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Sample records for program radiological survey

  1. Analytical program: 1975 Bikini radiological survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mount, M.E.; Robison, W.L.; Thompson, S.E.; Hamby, K.O.; Prindle, A.L.; Levy, H.B.

    1976-01-01

    The analytical program for samples of soil, vegetation, and animal tissue collected during the June 1975 field survey of Bikini and Eneu islands is described. The phases of this program are discussed in chronological order: initial processing of samples, gamma spectrometry, and wet chemistry. Included are discussions of quality control programs, reproducibility of measurements, and comparisons of gamma spectrometry with wet chemistry determinations of 241 Am. Wet chemistry results are used to examine differences in Pu:Am ratios and Pu-isotope ratios as a function of the type of sample and the location where samples were collected

  2. Application of computers in a Radiological Survey Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berven, B.A.; Blair, M.S.; Doane, R.W.; Little, C.A.; Perdue, P.T.

    1984-01-01

    A brief description of some of the applications of computers in a radiological survey program is presented. It has been our experience that computers and computer software have allowed our staff personnel to more productively use their time by using computers to perform the mechanical acquisition, analyses, and storage of data. It is hoped that other organizations may similarly profit from this experience. This effort will ultimately minimize errors and reduce program costs

  3. Procedures manual for the ORNL Radiological Survey Activities (RASA) Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myrick, T.E.; Berven, B.A.; Cottrell, W.D.; Goldsmith, W.A.; Haywood, F.F.

    1987-04-01

    The portion of the radiological survey program performed by ORNL is the subject of this Procedures Manual. The RASA group of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) at ORNL is responsible for the planning, conducting, and reporting of the results of radiological surveys at specified sites and associated vicinity properties. The results of these surveys are used by DOE in determining the need for and extent of remedial actions. Upon completion of the necessary remedial actions, the ORNL-RASA group or other OOS contractor may be called upon to verify the effectiveness of the remedial action. Information from these postremedial action surveys is included as part of the data base used by DOE in certifying a site for unrestricted use

  4. Procedures manual for the ORNL Radiological Survey Activities (RASA) Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myrick, T.E.; Berven, B.A.; Cottrell, W.D.; Goldsmith, W.A.; Haywood, F.F.

    1987-04-01

    The portion of the radiological survey program performed by ORNL is the subject of this Procedures Manual. The RASA group of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) at ORNL is responsible for the planning, conducting, and reporting of the results of radiological surveys at specified sites and associated vicinity properties. The results of these surveys are used by DOE in determining the need for and extent of remedial actions. Upon completion of the necessary remedial actions, the ORNL-RASA group or other OOS contractor may be called upon to verify the effectiveness of the remedial action. Information from these postremedial action surveys is included as part of the data base used by DOE in certifying a site for unrestricted use.

  5. Application of computers in a radiological survey program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berven, B.A.; Blair, M.S.; Doane, R.W.; Little, C.A.; Perdue, P.T.

    1984-01-01

    Computers have become increasingly important in data analysis and data management as well as assisting in report preparation in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Radiological Survey Activities (RASA) Program. The primary function of the RASA program is to collect, analyze, report, and manage data collected to characterize the radiological condition of potentially contaminated sites identified in the Department of Energy's (DOE) remedial action programs. Three different computer systems are routinely utilized in ORNL/RASA operations. Two of these systems are employed in specific functions. A Nuclear Data (ND) 682 is used to perform isotopic analysis of gamma spectroscopic data generated by high-purity germanium detectors for air, water and soil samples. The ND682 employs a 16,000-channel analyzer that is routinely used with four germanium spectrometers. Word processing and data management are accomplished using the INtext system implemented on a DEC PDP-11 computer. A group of personal computers are used to perform a diverse number of functions. These computer systems are Commodore Business Machines (CBM) Model 8032 with a dual floppy disk storage medium and line printers (with optional X-Y plotters). The CBM's are utilized for: (1) data analysis -- raw data from radiation detection instrumentation are stored and manipulated with customized computer programs; (2) data reduction -- raw data are converted into report-ready tables using customized programs; (3) data management -- radionuclide data on each air, water and soil sample are stored on diskettes along with location of archived samples; and (4) program management -- site surveys and report status are tracked by computer files as well as program budget information to provide contemporary information of program status

  6. Generic radiological characterization protocol for surveys conducted for DOE remedial action programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berven, B.A.; Cottrell, W.D.; Leggett, R.W.; Little, C.A.; Myrick, T.E.; Goldsmith, W.A.; Haywood, F.F.

    1986-05-01

    This report describes goals and methodology that can be used by radiological survey contractors in surveys at properties associated with the Department of Energy's remedial action programs. The description includes: (1) a general discussion of the history of the remedial action programs; (2) the types of surveys that may be employed by the Radiological Survey Activities (RASA) contractor; (3) generic survey methods that may be used during radiological surveys; and (4) a format for presenting information and data in a survey report. 9 refs

  7. Quality assurance program plan for the Radiological Survey Activities Program - Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, S.J.; Berven, B.A.; Little, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    The Radiological Survey Activities (RASA) program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is responsible for surveying designated sites in the vicinity of 24 inactive mill sites involved in the Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP). The purpose of these surveys is to provide a recommendation to DOE whether to include or exclude the site from UMTRAP based on whether the onsite residual radioactive material (if any) originated from the former mill sites, and radiation levels onsite are in excess of appropriate Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) criteria. This report describes the quality assurance program plan for the RASA program in conducting all activities related to the UMTRA project. All quality assurance provisions given by the DOE, DOE/UMTRA, and ORNL organizations are integrated into this plan. Specifically, this report identifies the policies and procedures followed in accomplishing the RASA/UMTRAP QA program, identifies those organizational units involved in the implementation of these procedures, and outlines the respective responsibilities of those groups

  8. Quality assurance program plan for the radiological survey activities program: Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, S.J.; Berven, B.A.; Little, C.A.

    1986-08-01

    The Radiological Survey Activities (RASA) program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is responsible for surveying designated sites in the vicinity of 24 inactive mill sites involved in the Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP). The purpose of these surveys is to provide a recommendation to DOE whether to include or exclude the site from UMTRAP based on whether the onsite residual radioactive material (if any) originated from the former mill sites, and radiation levels onsite are in excess of appropriate Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) criteria. This report describes the quality assurance program plan for the RASA program in conducting all activities related to the UMTRA project. All quality assurance provisions given by the DOE, DOE/UMTRA, and ORNL organizations are integrated into this plan. Specifically, this report identifies the policies and procedures followed in accomplishing the RASA/UMTRAP QA program, identifies those organizational units involved in the implementation of these procedures, and outlines the respective responsibilities of those groups

  9. AERIAL RADIOLOGICAL SURVEYS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proctor, A.E.

    1997-01-01

    Measuring terrestrial gamma radiation from airborne platforms has proved to be a useful method for characterizing radiation levels over large areas. Over 300 aerial radiological surveys have been carried out over the past 25 years including U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites, commercial nuclear power plants, Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program/Uranium Mine Tailing Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP/UMTRAP) sites, nuclear weapons test sites, contaminated industrial areas, and nuclear accident sites. This paper describes the aerial measurement technology currently in use by the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) for routine environmental surveys and emergency response activities. Equipment, data-collection and -analysis methods, and examples of survey results are described

  10. The Role of Artificial Intelligence in Diagnostic Radiology: A Survey at a Single Radiology Residency Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado-Mesa, Fernando; Alvarez, Edilberto; Arheart, Kris

    2018-02-21

    Advances in artificial intelligence applied to diagnostic radiology are predicted to have a major impact on this medical specialty. With the goal of establishing a baseline upon which to build educational activities on this topic, a survey was conducted among trainees and attending radiologists at a single residency program. An anonymous questionnaire was distributed. Comparisons of categorical data between groups (trainees and attending radiologists) were made using Pearson χ 2 analysis or an exact analysis when required. Comparisons were made using the Wilcoxon rank sum test when the data were not normally distributed. An α level of 0.05 was used. The overall response rate was 66% (69 of 104). Thirty-six percent of participants (n = 25) reported not having read a scientific medical article on the topic of artificial intelligence during the past 12 months. Twenty-nine percent of respondents (n = 12) reported using artificial intelligence tools during their daily work. Trainees were more likely to express doubts on whether they would have pursued diagnostic radiology as a career had they known of the potential impact artificial intelligence is predicted to have on the specialty (P = .0254) and were also more likely to plan to learn about the topic (P = .0401). Radiologists lack exposure to current scientific medical articles on artificial intelligence. Trainees are concerned by the implications artificial intelligence may have on their jobs and desire to learn about the topic. There is a need to develop educational resources to help radiologists assume an active role in guiding and facilitating the development and implementation of artificial intelligence tools in diagnostic radiology. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Radiological field survey problems and solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deming, E.J.; Boerner, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    Situations often arise during radiological field surveys which require the health physicist to improvise and/or make spot decisions. At times these situations can be humorous, but they can also present hazards more serious than normal radiological considerations. This presentation will depict various problematic situations encountered by Oak Ridge Associated Universities Radiological Site Assessment Program in the course of performing field environmental surveys. Detailing these potential hazards can alert other field survey groups to problems they may encounter

  12. Quality Assurance Program Plan for the radiological survey activities program --- Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knott, R.R.; Little, C.A.

    1991-08-01

    The Pollutant Assessments Group (PAG) at the Grand Junction Office (GJO), Colorado, of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is responsible for surveying designated sites in the vicinity of 24 inactive mill sites involved in the Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP). The purpose of these surveys is to provide a recommendation to DOE whether to include or exclude these sites from UMTRAP based on whether the on-site residual radioactive material (if any) originated from the former mill sites, and radiation levels on-site are in excess of appropriate Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) criteria. This report describes the Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) for the PAG in conducting all activities related to UMTRAP. All quality assurance provisions given by the DOE, DOE/UMTRA and ORNL organizations are integrated into this plan. Specifically, this report identifies the policies and procedures followed in accomplishing the PAG/UMTRA QA program, identifies those organizational units involved in the implementation of these procedures, and outlines the respective responsibilities of those groups. 11 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  13. ERC Radiological Glovebag Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nellesen, A.L.

    1997-07-01

    This document establishes the requirements and responsibilities for the standardized methods for installation, use, and dismantlement of glovebags within the Hanford Site Environmental Contractor Radiological Glovebag Program. This document addresses the following topics: Containment selection and fabrication, Glovebag fabrication, Containment installation and inspection, General glovebag containment work practices, Emergency situations, and Containment removal

  14. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program. Partial radiological survey of Shiprock vicinity property SH13 Shiprock, New Mexico, November 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.; Sholeen, C.M.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-05-01

    As part of a detailed radiological assessment of the vicinity properties at Shiprock, a comprehensive survey of the vicinity property designated as SH13 was initiated on November 19, 1982. At that time, a single residential structure existed in the northwest corner of the property. The lands surrounding the structure were extensively cluttered with junk. The initial assessment activities were limited to measurements within the residential structure of the ambient external penetrating radiation level at a 1-meter height and analyses of indoor air samples for airborne radioactivity. The external penetrating radiation exposure rate (12.3 μR/h) was less than the 20 μR/h above background limit specified in the EPA Standard (40 CFR 192.12[b][2]). As determined by the air samples, the short-term radon daughter concentration within the structure (0.36 mWL) did not exceed the 0.02 WL (or 20 mWL) limit for average annual concentration including background as specified in the EPA Standard. Further measurements required to completely determine the radiological status of this vicinity property, such as measurements of surface radiation both indoors and outdoors and collection and analyses of soil samples, were planned for the final phase of this assessment. However, that phase of the program was terminated before these measurements were accomplished. Thus, the extent of outdoor radiological contamination is presently unknown, and the evaluation of indoor contamination (if any) is incomplete

  15. The Northern Marshall Islands radiological survey: A quality control program for radiochemical and gamma spectroscopy analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kehl, S.R.; Mount, M.E.; Robison, W.L.

    1995-09-01

    From 1979 to 1989, approximately 25,000 Post Northern Marshall Islands Radiological Survey (PNMIRS) samples were collected, and over 71,400 radiochemical and gamma spectroscopy analyses were performed to establish the concentration of 90 Sr, 137 Cs, 241 Am, and plutonium isotopes in soil, vegetation, fish, and animals in the Northern Marshall Islands. While the Low Level Gamma Counting Facility (B379) in the Health and Ecological Assessment (HEA) division accounted for over 80% of all gamma spectroscopy analyses, approximately 4889 radiochemical and 5437 gamma spectroscopy analyses were performed on 4784 samples of soil, vegetation, terrestrial animal, and marine organisms by outside laboratories. Four laboratories were used by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to perform the radiochemical analyses: Thermo Analytical Norcal, Richmond, California (TMA); Nuclear Energy Services, North Carolina State University (NCSU); Laboratory of Radiation Ecology, University of Washington (LRE); and Health and Ecological Assessment (HEA) division, LLNL, Livermore, California. Additionally, LRE and NCSU were used to perform gamma spectroscopy analyses. The analytical precision and accuracy were monitored by including blind duplicates and natural matrix standards in each group of samples analyzed. On the basis of reported analytical values for duplicates and standards, 88% of the gamma and 87% of the radiochemical analyses in this survey were accepted. By laboratory, 93% of the radiochemical analyses by TMA; 88% of the gamma-ray spectrometry and 100% of the radiochemistry analyses by NCSU; 89% of the gamma spectroscopy and 87% of the radiochemistry analyses by LRE; and 90% of the radiochemistry analyses performed by HEA's radiochemistry department were accepted

  16. Program of environmental radiological monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-11-01

    This Regulation refers to the requirement of the Regulation CNEN-NN.3.01, 'Basic Act of Radiological Protection', as expressed in the section 5.14, related to the Program of Environmental Radiological Monitoring (PMRA)

  17. Radiological emergency preparedness (REP) program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwiatkowski, D.H.

    1995-01-01

    This talk focuses on the accomplishments of Radiological Emergency Preparedness Program. Major topics include the following: strengthening the partnership between FEMA, the States, and the Industry; the Standard Exercise Report Format (SERF); Multi-year performance partnership agreement (MYPPA); new REP Program guidance; comprehensive exercise program; federal radiological emergency response plan (FRERP); international interest; REP user fee; implementation EPA PAGs and Dose Limits; Contamination monitoring standard for portal monitors; guidance documents and training

  18. Northern Marshall Islands Radiological Survey: a quality-control program for a radiochemical analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jennings, C.D.; Mount, M.E.

    1983-08-01

    More than 16,000 radiochemical analyses were performed on about 5400 samples of soils, vegetation, animals, fish, invertebrates, and water to establish amounts of 90 Sr, 137 Cs, 241 Am, and plutonium isotopes in the Northern Marshall Islands. Three laboratories were contracted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to perform the radiochemical analyses: Environmental Analysis Laboratory (EAL), Richmond, California; Eberline Instrument Corporation (EIC), Albuquerque, New Mexico; and Laboratory of Radiation Ecology (LRE), University of Washington, Seattle, Washington. The analytical precision and accuracy were monitored by regularly including duplicate samples and natural matrix standards in each group of about 100 samples analyzed. Based on the duplicates and standards, over 83% of the radiochemical analyses in this survey were acceptable - 97% of the analyses by EAL, 45% of the analyses by EIC, and 98% of the analyses by LRE

  19. Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) Regions

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) created the Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) in the 1950s to make DOE resources and expertise available to organizations...

  20. Radiological protection Program of CDTN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    Radiological protection program of CDTN, its purposes and rules, responsabilities, physical control, monitoring, personnel radiation protection, radiation sources and radioactive wastes control, emergency and accidents and siting are described. (C.M.) [pt

  1. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites remedial action program post-remedial-action radiological survey of Kent Chemical Laboratory, the University of Chicago, Chicago, IL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

    1983-05-01

    A comprehensive radiological assessment of Kent Laboratory was conducted during September 1977, by the ANL Radiological Survey Group to determine if any radioactive contamination remained. The results of the assessment indicated the need for remedial action. Since 1977, the University has decontaminated this laboratory building, and in May 1983, the Department of Energy requested the ANL Radiological Survey Group to conduct a post-remedial-action survey. All the contaminated areas identified during the 1977 assessment were rechecked. Contamination remained in six of the rooms. Further decontamination of these areas was conducted by university personnel, and as a result, these areas are now free of contamination. However, a contaminated clay pipe in the attic remained. The clay pipe has since been removed and disposed of as solid radioactive waste. During the post-remedial-action survey, six soil samples were collected from excavation trenches dug in Rooms 1 and 2 as part of the University's remedial action efforts. Also, four sludge samples were taken from below the manhole covers in the basement of Kent Chemical Laboratory to assess the radiological condition of the sewer system. A radiological assessment of the sewer system had not been accomplished during the 1977 survey as per program direction. Radiochemical (fluorometric) and gamma-spectral analyses indicated that eight out of ten soil and sludge samples contained levels of radioactivity above expected background concentrations. The soil has since been further excavated. The building is now free of radioactive contamination in excess of background levels; however, the sewers do contain radioactive materials above background levels since contamination was found at appropriate access points. 6 references, 16 figures, 7 tables

  2. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program. Partial radiological survey of Shiprock vicinity property SH14 Shiprock, New Mexico, October-November 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.; Sholeen, C.M.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-06-01

    As part of a detailed radiological assessment of the vicinity properties at Shiprock, a comprehensive survey of the vicinity property designated as SH14 was initiated during October and November 1982. At the time of the survey, vicinity property SH14 consisted of about 20 acres of open lands to the northeast of, and directly across the San Juan River from, the upper tailings pile at Shiprock. The lands consisted of a sandy soil, sparsley covered with trees and other vegetation. The partial assessment activities included determination of surface radiation levels on about a 2-meter grid spacing through direct instrument surveys and analysis of a soil sample collected from the area. The partial radiological assessment indicated elevated levels of radioactivity at several general areas within the open lands. Radiochemical analyses of the soil sample collected from one of these areas indicated a radium concentration of 18 +- 2 pCi/g, which is in excess of the limit of 5 pCi/g above background, averaged over the first 15 cm of soil below the surface, as specified in the EPA Standard (40 CFR 192). Subsurface soil sampling was not conducted, and thus the vertical extent of the radiological contamination is not known. Further measurements required to completely determine and accurately report the radiological status of this vicinity property, including additional direct instrument surveys, collection and analyses of soil samples, and the establishment of a 200-ft grid system, were planned for the final phase of this assessment. However, that phase of the program was cancelled before these measurements were accomplished. The total extent of the radiological contamination of vicinity property SH14 is presently unknown. Nonetheless, since the surface soil contamination levels exceeded the limits specified in the EPA Standard, remedial action for this vicinity site should be considered

  3. Research Resources Survey: Radiology Junior Faculty Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Votaw, John R

    2015-07-01

    To assess resources available to junior faculty in US academic radiology departments for research mentorship and funding opportunities and to determine if certain resources are more common in successful programs. An anonymous survey covering scientific environment and research mentorship and was sent to vice-chairs of research of radiology departments. Results were evaluated to identify practices of research programs with respect to mentorship, resources, and opportunities. Academy of Radiology Research's 2012 National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants and awards list was used to determine if environment and practices correlate with funding. There was a 51% response rate. A greater fraction of clinical faculty gets promoted from assistant to associate professor than research faculty. Research faculty overall submits more funding applications. Most programs support start-up costs and K-awards. Over half of the departments have a vice-chair for faculty development, and most have formal mentorship programs. Faculty members are expected to teach, engage in service, publish, and apply for and get research funding within 3 years of hire. Top-tier programs as judged by NIH awards have a combination of MDs who devote >50% effort to research and PhD faculty. Key factors holding back both clinical and research junior faculty development were motivation, resources, and time, although programs reported high availability of resources and support at the department level. Better marketing of resources for junior faculty, effort devoted to mentoring clinical faculty in research, and explicit milestones/expectations for achievement could enhance junior faculty success, promote interest in the clinician–scientist career path for radiologists, and lead to greater research success.

  4. Uranium mill tailings remedial action program. Radiological survey of Shiprock vicinity property SH12, Shiprock, NM, October-November 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.; Sholeen, C.M.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-04-01

    A comprehensive survey of the vicinity property designated as SH12 was conducted on an intermittent basis from October 27 to November 22, 1982. At the time of the survey, several exhibition halls and concession stands; an auction yard; a race track and rodeo arena with associated stands, shutes, and corrals; and a hogan were located on the property. The surrounding environs were either sparsely covered with arid vegetation or covered with gravel. The assessment activities included determination of indoor and outdoor surface radiation levels, for both fixed and removable contamination, through direct instrument and smear (indoor only) surveys; measurement of ambient external penetrating radiation levels at 1-meter heights; and analyses of air, soil, and other material samples. The radiological assessment indicated elevated levels of radioactivity within only one of the structures. Background levels of radioactivity were indicated within all other structures. The assessment indicated elevated levels of radioactivity at the rodeo arena and nearby shutes and corrals, encompassing about 49,000 ft 2 of land. Radiochemical analysis of the soil sample collected from this general area indicated 23 +- 2 pCi/g for radium, which is in excess of the limit of 5 pCi/g above background, averaged over the first 15 cm of soil below the surface. Elevated levels of radioactivity were also found at the southern end of the west parking lot, encompassing about 7500 ft 2 of land, and at several areas in the southern section of the property, encompassing about 160,000 ft 2 of land. Radiochemical analyses of two of the soil samples collected from the southern section indicated radium concentrations of 43 +- 5 and 42 +- 5 pCi/g of soil, in excess of the limit of 5 pCi/g above background as specified in the EPA Standard. Subsurface soil sampling was not conducted, and thus the vertical extent of the radiological contamination is not known

  5. Uranium mill tailings remedial action program. Radiological survey of Shiprock vicinity property SH03, Shiprock, NM, July-November 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.; Sholeen, C.M.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-04-01

    A comprehensive survey of the vicinity property designated as SH03 was conducted on an intermittent basis from July 26 to November 11, 1982. At the time of the survey, three structures were located on the property - a residential trailer, the main structure, and an old gas pump housing. The lands surrounding the structures were either sparsely covered with arid vegetation or paved. The assessment activities included determination of indoor and outdoor surface radiation levels, for both fixed and removable contamination, through direct instrument and smear (indoor only) surveys; measurement of ambient external penetrating radiation levels at 1-meter heights; and analyses of air, soil, and other material samples. No evidence of radioactive contamination was found inside the trailer. However, the results of the radiological assessment did indicate the occurrence of elevated levels of gamma, surface alpha, and radon daughter radioactivity within the main structure. The short-term radon daughter measurements exceeded the limit of 0.02 Working Level for average annual concentration including background. The assessment also indicated elevated levels of radioactivity in the outdoor environs, encompassing about 32,000 ft 2 of the grounds adjacent to and surrounding the main structure on the east, south, and west sides. The contamination appeared to be due to the presence of unprocessed uranium ore. Analysis of surface soil samples collected from the environs indicated radium concentrations in excess of the limit of 5 pCi/g above background specified in the EPA Standard. Subsurface soil sampling was not conducted, and thus the vertical extent of the radiological contamination is not known. Since the surface soil contamination levels exceeded the limits specified in the EPA Standard, remedial action for this vicinity site should be considered

  6. Integrative teaching in Radiology. A survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dettmer, S.; Weidemann, J.; Wacker, F.; Fischer, V.

    2015-01-01

    To survey integrative teaching in radiology at German universities. A questionnaire about radiological education was sent electronically to all 37 chairpersons of university radiology departments in Germany. The questions included the course type, teaching methods, concept, perception, and advantages and disadvantages of integrative teaching. Statistical analysis was performed with nonparametric statistics and chi-square test. The survey was considered representative with a return rate of 68%. Integrative teaching is established at 4/5 of all departments. Integrative teaching is well accepted with an acceptance rate that is significantly higher in so-called 'Modellstudiengaengen' (model courses of study) (100%) compared to conventional courses of study (72%). The advantages of integrative teaching include linking of content (92%) and preparation for interdisciplinary work (76%). The disadvantages include high effort (75%) and time (67%) for organization. Furthermore, there is a risk that basic radiological facts and knowledge cannot be conveyed and that the visibility of radiology as an independent discipline is lost. Conventional radiological teaching has a similarly high acceptance (84%) compared to integrative courses (76%). Integrative teaching has a high acceptance among chairpersons in radiology in Germany despite the greater effort. A good interdisciplinary collaboration is essential for integrative teaching and at the same time this can be conveyed to the students. However, the visibility of radiology as a discipline and the possibility to cover basic radiological content must be ensured. Therefore, both conventional courses and integrative teaching seems reasonable, especially in cross-disciplinary subjects such as radiology.

  7. Radiological control technician: Training program management manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    This manual defines and describes the DOE Radiological Control Technician Core Training Program qualification and training process, material development requirements, standards and policies, and administration. The manual applies to Radiological Control Technician Training Programs at all DOE contractor sites

  8. Uranium mill tailings remedial action program. Radiological survey of Shiprock vicinity property SH01, Shiprock, NM, August-November 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.; Sholeen, C.M.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-04-01

    A comprehensive survey of the vicinity property designated as SH01 was conducted on an intermittent basis from August 23 to November 11, 1982. At the time of the survey, three structures were located on the property - two residential structures and a residential trailer. In addition to the three residences, the frame from a former truck scale was still on the property. The lands surrounding the structures and former truck scale were sparsely covered with vegetation. The assessment activities included determination of indoor and outdoor surface radiation levels through direct instrument surveys and analysis of air and soil samples. No evidence of radioactive contamination was found inside the structures, although elevated levels of radioactivity due to proximity to or shine from contaminated soils were indicated within all. The short-term radon daughter measurements did not exceed the limit of 0.02 Working Level for average annual concentration including background, as specified in the EPA Standard 40 CFR 192. The assessment indicated elevated levels of radioactivity in the outdoor environs, encompassing about 32,000 ft 2 (2900 m 2 ) of land surrounding, and north of, the former truck scale. Analysis of a surface soil sample collected from the environs indicated a radium concentration considerably in excess of the limit of 5 pCi/g above background specified in the EPA Standard. Subsurface soil sampling was not conducted, and thus the vertical extent of the radiological contamination is not known. Since the surface soil contamination level exceeded the limit specified in the EPA Standard, remedial action for this vicinity site should be considered

  9. Integrative teaching in radiology - a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmer, S; Weidemann, J; Fischer, V; Wacker, F K

    2015-04-01

    To survey integrative teaching in radiology at German universities. A questionnaire about radiological education was sent electronically to all 37 chairpersons of university radiology departments in Germany. The questions included the course type, teaching methods, concept, perception, and advantages and disadvantages of integrative teaching. Statistical analysis was performed with nonparametric statistics and chi-square test. The survey was considered representative with a return rate of 68 %. Integrative teaching is established at 4/5 of all departments. Integrative teaching is well accepted with an acceptance rate that is significantly higher in so-called "Modellstudiengängen" [model courses of study] (100 %) compared to conventional courses of study (72 %). The advantages of integrative teaching include linking of content (92 %) and preparation for interdisciplinary work (76 %). The disadvantages include high effort (75 %) and time (67 %) for organization. Furthermore, there is a risk that basic radiological facts and knowledge cannot be conveyed and that the visibility of radiology as an independent discipline is lost. Conventional radiological teaching has a similarly high acceptance (84 %) compared to integrative courses (76 %). Integrative teaching has a high acceptance among chairpersons in radiology in Germany despite the greater effort. A good interdisciplinary collaboration is essential for integrative teaching and at the same time this can be conveyed to the students. However, the visibility of radiology as a discipline and the possibility to cover basic radiological content must be ensured. Therefore, both conventional courses and integrative teaching seems reasonable, especially in cross-disciplinary subjects such as radiology. Both integrative teaching and conventional radiological teaching are highly accepted. The advantages include the linking of multidisciplinary content and the preparation for interdisciplinary cooperation

  10. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites remedial action program. Radiological survey of the Harshaw Chemical Company, Cleveland, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

    1984-04-01

    During the MED/AEC era, the Harshaw Chemical Company processed large quantities of normal uranium to produce both oxide and fluoride compounds. This work was done under contract to MED and its successor, AEC. Records indicated that at the time the AEC contract was terminated, the facility was decontaminated by Harshaw and released from AEC control in 1960. However, a search of AEC records indicated that documentation was insufficient to determine whether the decontamination work was adequate by current guidelines. Hence, a radiological assessment of the site ws initiated in 1976. The entire grounds and all buildings were surveyed using surface survey instruments to detect surface contamination and radiation detectors to determine general radiation levels. Extensive surface contamination was found throughout the site. While the major contamination was found in Plant C, significant levels of contamination also were found in 16 other buildings and at 32 exterior locations. The contaminating material seemed to be normal uranium exclusively. Air samples were taken at numerous indoor locations throughout the site, but no elevated levels of radon were detected. This was as expected since normal uranium has been separated from radium and hence radon levels are very low. Several soil samples were taken from around the site. Analyses of these samples indicated extensive soil contamination, as well as suspected contamination of the river bed in the vicinity of the plant outfall. Scheduled subsurface investigation of the site, as well as of the river bed and sewer system, have not been conducted. Levels of contamination at this site are significantly above guidelines for release of the site for unrestricted use. 57 figures, 7 tables

  11. Autonomous mobile robot for radiologic surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudar, A.M.; Wagner, D.G.; Teese, G.D.

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus is described for conducting radiologic surveys. The apparatus comprises in the main a robot capable of following a preprogrammed path through an area, a radiation monitor adapted to receive input from a radiation detector assembly, ultrasonic transducers for navigation and collision avoidance, and an on-board computer system including an integrator for interfacing the radiation monitor and the robot. Front and rear bumpers are attached to the robot by bumper mounts. The robot may be equipped with memory boards for the collection and storage of radiation survey information. The on-board computer system is connected to a remote host computer via a UHF radio link. The apparatus is powered by a rechargeable 24-volt DC battery, and is stored at a docking station when not in use and/or for recharging. A remote host computer contains a stored database defining paths between points in the area where the robot is to operate, including but not limited to the locations of walls, doors, stationary furniture and equipment, and sonic markers if used. When a program consisting of a series of paths is downloaded to the on-board computer system, the robot conducts a floor survey autonomously at any preselected rate. When the radiation monitor detects contamination, the robot resurveys the area at reduced speed and resumes its preprogrammed path if the contamination is not confirmed. If the contamination is confirmed, the robot stops and sounds an alarm. 5 figures

  12. Aerial radiological measuring system program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, J.F.; Boyns, P.K.

    1972-01-01

    The present ARMS aircraft has an effective survey time of four hours. Typical survey altitudes are 300 to 500 feet for terrain surveys and up to 20,000 feet for cloud tracks. A number of special airframe modifications have been made to accommodate the various sensor systems. The ARMS radiation measurement system consists of fourteen 4-inch diameter by 4-inch thick sodium iodide (NaI) detectors, a summing network for the detector signals, single and multichannel analyzers, analog computers, digital display and recording equipment, a doppler radar position computer, and strip chart recorders. Major subsystems include meteorology sensors, multispectral camera systems, and an infrared scanner for thermal mapping. Additional radiation detectors include an alpha spectrometer and a beta counter, used to count filter samples taken from a 150 cfm air sampler, which is a permanent part of the aircraft. A small lead shield houses a 1 / 2 -in. x 3-in. NaI crystal for beta and gamma counting of air filter samples. Several BF 3 neutron detectors are also available for neutron counting. The raw data from the gross gamma count and the gamma spectral measurements are permanently recorded on paper tape, and they must undergo reduction and analysis for final characterization of the radiological properties of the surveyed area. (U.S.)

  13. 200-UP-2 operable unit radiological surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendling, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes and documents the results of the radiological surveys conducted from August 17 through December 16, 1993 over a partial area of the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit, 200-W Area, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. In addition, this report explains the survey methodology of the Mobile Surface Contamination Monitor 11 (MSCM-II) and the Ultra Sonic Ranging And Data System (USRADS). The radiological survey of the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit was conducted by the Site Investigative Surveys/Environmental Restoration Health Physics Organization of the Westinghouse Hanford Company. The survey methodology for the majority of area was based on utilization of the MSCM-II or the USRADS for automated recording of the gross beta/gamma radiation levels at or near six (6) inches from the surface soil

  14. Emergencies in radiology: a survey of radiologist and radiology trainees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, Simon; Naidoo, Parmanand

    2014-01-01

    Emergencies in radiology are infrequent but potentially lethal. Australian and New Zealand radiologists are advised to undergo resuscitation training at least every three years; however, little is known about their experience and confidence in managing common emergencies relevant to their clinical practice. This paper describes the current experience and confidence of radiologists and radiology trainees in Australia and New Zealand in the management of common medical emergencies. A cross-sectional online survey of trainees and fellows of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiology collected data on training and learning preferences relating to resuscitation and life-support skills, access to emergency medical care, and knowledge, confidence and ability in managing a variety of medical emergencies. There were 602 responses to the survey (response rate 23.4%). The majority of respondents were interested in learning more about the management of contrast reactions, cardiac arrest, ischaemic chest pain and basic life support. Self-rated knowledge, confidence and ability were higher in respondents who had completed life-support training within the previous three years. In this group, however, more than 40% rated their ability at managing contrast reactions as poor or fair, while more than 60% rated their ability as poor or fair for management of cardiac arrest, basic life support, advanced life support and dosing of adrenaline. Preferred resuscitation training modalities included simulation, small-group tutorials and workshops. Self-reported level of skill and expertise in the management of potential emergencies in radiology is suboptimal among a large number of respondents. Consideration should be given to addressing this by improving access to specific training.

  15. Document: the radiological survey of the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerno, Linden; Leprieur, F.; Janssens, A.

    2002-01-01

    The document presents the radiological survey of the environment in France today with a comparison of the situation in Switzerland, Germany and Belgium. The evolution of the policy in this activity is also concerned. The laboratories and their monitoring equipment, the regulation and the social impacts are discussed. (A.L.B.)

  16. An Advanced Radiological Survey and Mapping System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCown, J.; Rogers, D.; Waggoner, Ch.

    2009-01-01

    A variety of radiological surveying systems have been described in the literature. This paper describes relative performances of a system that can employ a variety of radiological sensors including NaI, LiI, and LaBr 3 units of various sizes. The system includes navigation and data collection software that facilitates surveying without the use of survey grid-lines. Parameters presented to the operator via a graphical user interface (GUI) for monitoring system performance and navigation are described. Radiological spectra are logged along with position data from three differential GPS sensors to enhance position accuracy by taking into account the pitch and roll as the survey vehicle moves over uneven terrain. Accuracy of position data increases the potential for, and value of, data fusion with other survey data such as electromagnetic induction images. The survey system described has been developed around a zero turn radius lawn mower equipped with on-board generator/inverter for powering electronic and data communication equipment to maximize surveying effectiveness. Detection limits for U-238 will be discussed for the NaI (FIDLER, 75x75 mm, and 100x100x400 mm) and LaBr 3 (75x75 mm) detectors. These parameters will be reported for a variety of survey speeds (stationary, 1, 2, and 3 m/s), with and without the use of advanced signal processing to increase detection sensitivity. A background subtraction algorithm evaluating each spectrum for the presence of naturally occurring radiological materials will also be described for correcting each datum prior to mapping using Geosoft Oasis montaj. (authors)

  17. Implementation of a Radiological Safety Coach program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konzen, K.K. [Safe Sites of Colorado, Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site; Langsted, J.M. [M.H. Chew and Associates, Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-02-01

    The Safe Sites of Colorado Radiological Safety program has implemented a Safety Coach position, responsible for mentoring workers and line management by providing effective on-the-job radiological skills training and explanation of the rational for radiological safety requirements. This position is significantly different from a traditional classroom instructor or a facility health physicist, and provides workers with a level of radiological safety guidance not routinely provided by typical training programs. Implementation of this position presents a challenge in providing effective instruction, requiring rapport with the radiological worker not typically developed in the routine radiological training environment. The value of this unique training is discussed in perspective with cost-savings through better radiological control. Measures of success were developed to quantify program performance and providing a realistic picture of the benefits of providing one-on-one or small group training. This paper provides a description of the unique features of the program, measures of success for the program, a formula for implementing this program at other facilities, and a strong argument for the success (or failure) of the program in a time of increased radiological safety emphasis and reduced radiological safety budgets.

  18. Implementation of a Radiological Safety Coach program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konzen, K.K.

    1998-01-01

    The Safe Sites of Colorado Radiological Safety program has implemented a Safety Coach position, responsible for mentoring workers and line management by providing effective on-the-job radiological skills training and explanation of the rational for radiological safety requirements. This position is significantly different from a traditional classroom instructor or a facility health physicist, and provides workers with a level of radiological safety guidance not routinely provided by typical training programs. Implementation of this position presents a challenge in providing effective instruction, requiring rapport with the radiological worker not typically developed in the routine radiological training environment. The value of this unique training is discussed in perspective with cost-savings through better radiological control. Measures of success were developed to quantify program performance and providing a realistic picture of the benefits of providing one-on-one or small group training. This paper provides a description of the unique features of the program, measures of success for the program, a formula for implementing this program at other facilities, and a strong argument for the success (or failure) of the program in a time of increased radiological safety emphasis and reduced radiological safety budgets

  19. Questionnaire surveys of dentists on radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, A M; Brunton, P; Horner, K

    2012-05-01

    Survey by questionnaire is a widely used research method in dental radiology. A major concern in reviews of questionnaires is non-response. The objectives of this study were to review questionnaire studies in dental radiology with regard to potential survey errors and to develop recommendations to assist future researchers. A literature search with the software search package PubMed was used to obtain internet-based access to Medline through the website www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed. A search of the English language peer-reviewed literature was conducted of all published studies, with no restriction on date. The search strategy found articles with dates from 1983 to 2010. The medical subject heading terms used were "questionnaire", "dental radiology" and "dental radiography". The reference sections of articles retrieved by this method were hand-searched in order to identify further relevant papers. Reviews, commentaries and relevant studies from the wider literature were also included. 53 questionnaire studies were identified in the dental literature that concerned dental radiography and included a report of response rate. These were all published between 1983 and 2010. In total, 87 articles are referred to in this review, including the 53 dental radiology studies. Other cited articles include reviews, commentaries and examples of studies outside dental radiology where they are germane to the arguments presented. Non-response is only one of four broad areas of error to which questionnaire surveys are subject. This review considers coverage, sampling and measurement, as well as non-response. Recommendations are made to assist future research that uses questionnaire surveys.

  20. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites remedial action program. Radiological survey of the Middlesex Sampling Plant, Middlesex, New Jersey. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    The results of a radiological survey of the former Middlesex Sampling Plant, Middlesex, New Jersey, are presented in this report. The surveyed property served as a uranium ore sampling plant during the 1940's and early 1950's. It was released for unrestricted use in 1968 following a radiological survey by the Atomic Energy Commission and is now a reserve training center for the U.S. Marine Sixth Motor Transport Battalion. The present survey was undertaken to determine whether the existing radiological status of the property is consistent with current health guidelines and radiation protection practices. The radiological survey included measurement of residual alpha and beta-gamma contamination levels, radon and radon daughter concentrations in buildings, external gamma radiation levels on the site and on adjacent property, and radium concentrations in soil on the site and on adjacent property. Surface contamination levels exceeded U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) guidelines and 222 Rn concentration levels exceeded the non-occupational maximum permissible concentration MPC/sub a/ of 3 pCi/liter in some structures. These results indicate the possible need for extensive radon and radon daughter measurements in structures both onsite and offsite over periods as suggested by the U.S. Surgeon General

  1. Surveys & Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Employment and Payroll Survey of Business Owners Work from Home Our statistics highlight trends in household statistics from multiple surveys. Data Tools & Apps Main American FactFinder Census Business Builder My residential construction. Business Dynamics Statistics (BDS) Provides measures of openings and closings, job

  2. Mobile autonomous robot for radiological surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudar, A.M.; Wagner, D.G.; Teese, G.D.

    1992-01-01

    The robotics development group at the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) is developing a mobile autonomous robot that performs radiological surveys of potentially contaminated floors. The robot is called SIMON, which stands for Semi-Intelligent Mobile Observing Navigator. Certain areas of SRL are classified as radiologically controlled areas (RCAs). In an RCA, radioactive materials are frequently handled by workers, and thus, the potential for contamination is ever present. Current methods used for floor radiological surveying includes labor-intensive manual scanning or random smearing of certain floor locations. An autonomous robot such as SIMON performs the surveying task in a much more efficient manner and will track down contamination before it is contacted by humans. SIMON scans floors at a speed of 1 in./s and stops and alarms upon encountering contamination. Its environment is well defined, consisting of smooth building floors with wide corridors. The kind of contaminations that SIMON is capable of detecting are alpha and beta-gamma. The contamination levels of interest are low to moderate

  3. Radiological survey techniques for decontamination and dismantlement applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruesink, G.P.; Stempfley, D.H.; Pettit, P.J.; Warner, R.D.

    1997-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) is engaged in an aggressive Program to remove all above ground structures as part of the Fernald sites final remediation remedy. Through the complete removal of major facilities such as Plant 7, Plant 4, and Plant 1, the FEMP has developed radiological survey approaches that are effective for the different phases of the Decontamination and Dismantlement (D ampersand D) process. Some of the most pressing challenges facing the FEMP are implementing effective, low cost methods for the D ampersand D of former process buildings while minimizing environmental effects. One of the key components to ensure minimal impact on the environment is the collection of radiological contamination information during the D ampersand D process to facilitate the decision making process. Prior to the final demolition of any structure, radiological surveys of floors, walls, and ceilings must take place. These surveys must demonstrate that contamination levels am below 5000 dpm removable beta/gamma for non-porous surfaces and below 1000 dpm removable-beta/gamma for all porous surfaces. Technique which can perform these activities in a safe, effective, and cost efficient manner are greatly desired. The FEMP has investigated new approaches to address this need. These techniques include sampling approaches using standard baseline methodology as well as innovative approaches to accelerate final radiological clearance processes. To further improve upon this process, the FEMP has investigated several new technologies through the Fernald Plant 1 Large Scale Technology Demonstration Project. One of the most promising of these new technologies, Laser Induced Fluorescence, may significantly improve the radiological clearance survey process. This paper will present real world experiences in applying radiological control limits to D ampersand D projects as well as relate potential productivity and cost improvements with the

  4. Predecommissioning radiological survey of BR3 infrastructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantrel, E.

    2006-01-01

    The decommissioning of the BR3 (Belgian Reactor 3) approaches its final phase, in which the buildings infrastructures are being decontaminated targeting either the reuse or the conventional demolition after denuclearisation. In a PWR with a significant operation lifetime, such as the BR3, maintenance operations, failure and/or leakages, incidents occurring in the different circuits of the plant result in the contamination of the buildings infrastructures at various activity levels with contaminants penetrating/migrating up to several cm inside the material bulk structure. Moreover, the BR3 bioshield has been exposed to rather high neutron leakage fluxes during the reactor operation and is therefore activated. The different radiological situations faced require the implementation of different characterization methodologies based on the use of an adequate combination of measurement devices and/or sampling devices. The non-destructive assay of activation depth using the ISOCS (In Situ Object Counting System) and a specific spectra analysis protocol has been tested in 2004. The first results obtained were encouraging and the qualification program for activated material is running. We are now investigating the possibilities to extend the methodology to building materials contaminated in-depth with 137 Cs. The overall process of dismantling/denuclearization of the BR3 building infrastructure consists of: (1) a preliminary characterization and determination of the contamination or activation depth; (2) the determination of the decontamination method; (3) the effective decontamination and clean up; (4) a possible intermediate characterization followed by an additional decontamination step; and (5) the characterization for clearance. The more accurate the preliminary survey is performed the less additional control/decontamination cycles are needed to reach clearance levels. The pre-decommissioning characterization process includes a preliminary categorisation (see picture

  5. Radiological assistance program: Region I. Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musolino, S.V.; Kuehner, A.V.; Hull, A.P.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of the Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) is to make DOE resources available and provide emergency assistance to state and local agencies in order to control radiological hazards, protect the public health and safety, and minimize the loss of property. This plan is an integral part of a nationwide program of radiological assistance established by the US DOE, and is implemented on a regional basis. The Brookhaven Area Office (BHO) Radiological Assistance Program is applicable to DOE Region I, which consists of the New England States, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland and the District of Columbia. The BHO RAP-1 has been developed to: (a) ensure the availability of an effective radiological assistance capability to ensure the protection of persons and property; (b) provide guidelines to RAP-1 Team personnel for the evaluation of radiological incidents and implementation of corrective actions; (c) maintain liaison with other DOE installations, Federal, State and local organizations which may become involved in radiological assistance operations in Region I; and (d) encourage development of a local capability to cope with radiological incidents

  6. DOE Radiological Control Manual Core Training Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, H.L.; Maisler, J.

    1993-01-01

    Over the past year, the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Health (EH-40) has taken a leading role in the development of new standardized radiological control training programs for use throughout the DOE complex. The Department promulgated its Radiological Control (RadCon) Manual in June 1992. To ensure consistent application of the criteria presented in the RadCon Manual, standardized radiological control core training courses and training materials have been developed for implementation at all DOE facilities. In producing local training programs, standardized core courses are to be supplemented with site-specific lesson plans, viewgraphs, student handbooks, qualification standards, question banks, and wallet-sized training certificates. Training programs for General Employee Radiological Training, Radiological Worker I and II Training, and Radiological Control Technician Training have been disseminated. Also, training committees under the direction of the Office of Health (EH-40) have been established for the development of additional core training courses, development of examination banks, and the update of the existing core training courses. This paper discusses the current activities and future direction of the DOE radiological control core training program

  7. Doses from Hiroshima mass radiologic gastric surveys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoku, S; Sawada, S; Russell, W J [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)

    1980-05-01

    Doses to examinees from mass radiologic surveys of the stomach in Hiroshima Perfecture were estimated by surveying for the frequency of the examinations, and for the technical factors used in them, and by phantom dosimetry. The average surface, active bone marrow and male and female gonad doses per examination were 5.73 rad, 231 mrad, and 20.6 and 140 mrad, respectively. These data will be used in estimating doses from medical X-rays among atomic bomb survivors. By applying them to the Hiroshima population, the genetically significant, per caput mean marrow, and leukemia significant doses were 0.14,8.6 and 7.4 mrad, respectively. There was a benefit-to risk ratio of about 50 for mass gastric surveys performed in 1976. However, the calculated risk was greater than the benefit for examinees under 29 years of age because of the lower incidence of gastric cancer in those under 29 years.

  8. Emergency radiology in Canada: a national survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torreggiani, W.C.; Nicolaou, S.; Lyburn, I.D.; Harris, A.C.; Buckley, A.R.

    2002-01-01

    To document the existing radiology services available to emergency physicians in hospitals across Canada and to preview future trends and needs. Questionnaires (n = 130) regarding the type, availability and satisfaction with radiology services were distributed to radiologists and emergency physicians at 65 hospitals across Canada. Fifty-three (41%) questionnaires were returned, and 45 (35%) completed questionnaires from 35 hospitals were used for analysis (24 from radiologists and 21 from emergency physicians). Plain radiographs were available in all hospitals at all times. Ultrasonography, intravenous pyleograms and computed tomography (CT) were available in all departments during normal working hours; after hours, CT was unavailable in 1 hospital and ultrasonography was unavailable in 2. Focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) was routinely performed for blunt abdominal trauma in 6 centres, and 10 centres had teleradiology services. Regarding the quality of emergency service, 7 of 45 responded 'poor,' 4 'average,' 14 'good,' and 17 of 45 rated service 'excellent.' Interestingly, most radiologists answered 'good' or 'excellent,' and most of the 'poor' responses came from emergency physicians. Regarding staff coverage after 5 pm, 34 hospitals provided CT services, 20 had ultrasonography staff available, and there was radiology nursing coverage in 14 hospitals. Clinical details on requisitions were generally rated 'adequate' or 'poor.' Although most radiograph reports were available within 48 hours, some took longer. Hot-seat reporting was available in 11 centres. During normal working hours, radiologists were the first to read films in 5 of 35 hospitals. After hours, emergency physicians were the first to read films in all hospitals, but only 14 hospitals indicated they were 'formally' trained to do so. This survey documents the strengths and weaknesses of the radiology services available to emergency physicians. The perceptions of emergency physicians

  9. Survey of radiological safety in dental practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, J R [UKAEA Health and Safety Branch, London; Hudson, A P

    1977-01-01

    A pilot survey of radiological protection in dental practice in Great Britain has been requested by the Health and Safety Executive and is now in progress. The survey should provide more precise data on the use of X-ray equipment. There are approximately 13,000 dentists in Great Britain using X-ray apparatus, and some 600 of these have been selected, on a statistical basis, to be invited to make use of a postal survey over a six month period. The postal survey technique to be used has already been developed as a service following requests from individual dentists. The dentist receives a questionnaire and three initial films to test the timer, then two special cassettes incorporating film and filters. Film badges are worn over a 12 week period by the dentist and by any staff who assist in radiography. Follow-up visits to discuss the survey will be made to one in ten of the selected dentists. The results will give the individual dentists, without cost, assurance of the efficient functioning of their equipment, and advice, should any remedial measures be necessary. Concurrently, the resulting statistics will give an indication of how many, if any, practices fall short of the recommendations of the Code of Practice for the Protection of Persons against Ionizing Radiations arising from Medical and Dental Use. Further action in respect of the Health and Safety at Work Act will be determined in the light of the survey.

  10. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites, Remedial Action Program: radiological survey of the Hooker Chemical Company, Niagara Falls, New York. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Results of a radiological survey of a portion of the Hooker Chemical Company, Niagara Falls, New York, are presented. The survey was conducted over 5.5-acres in which uranium-bearing materials were handled in the early 1940's. The survey included direct measurements of alpha, beta-gamma, and external gamma radiation throughout the site, measurement of transferable alpha and beta contamination levels in the buildings, determination of uranium and radium concentrations in the soild on the site, measurement of radon and radon daughter concentrations in the buildings, and determination of radionuclide concentrations in surface water samples. The results of the survey indicate that radiation levels throughout the site are within pertinent guidelines for unrestricted release of the property

  11. Quarterly environmental radiological survey summary: First quarter 1995 100, 200, 300, and 600 Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, S.M.

    1995-04-01

    This report provides a summary of the radiological surveys performed in support of the operational environmental monitoring program at the Hanford Site. The surveys included in this program consist of inactive waste sites; outdoor radiological control areas; tank farm perimeters and associated diversion boxes, lift stations, and vent stations; perimeters of active or uncovered waste sites such as burial grounds, retention basins, ponds, process trenches, and ditches; and road and rail surfaces. This report provides a summary of the radiological surveys performed during the First Quarter of 1995. The status of corrective actions required from current and past reports are also discussed

  12. Human performance in radiological survey scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, W.S.; Abelquist, E.W.

    1998-03-01

    The probability of detecting residual contamination in the field using portable radiological survey instruments depends not only on the sensitivity of the instrumentation used in scanning, but also on the surveyor's performance. This report provides a basis for taking human performance into account in determining the minimum level of activity detectable by scanning. A theoretical framework was developed (based on signal detection theory) which allows influences on surveyors to be anticipated and understood, and supports a quantitative assessment of performance. The performance of surveyors under controlled yet realistic field conditions was examined to gain insight into the task and to develop means of quantifying performance. Then, their performance was assessed under laboratory conditions to quantify more precisely their ability to make the required discriminations. The information was used to characterize surveyors' performance in the scanning task and to provide a basis for predicting levels of radioactivity that are likely to be detectable under various conditions by surveyors using portable survey instruments

  13. Survey of radiologic practices among dental practitioners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goren, A.D.; Sciubba, J.J.; Friedman, R.; Malamud, H.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the factors that influence and contribute to patient exposure in radiologic procedures performed in the offices of 132 staff members within the dental department of a teaching hospital. A questionnaire was prepared in which data were requested on brands of film used, type of x-ray unit used, processing, and use of leaded apron, cervical shield, and film holder. Offices were also visited to evaluate performance of existing dental x-ray equipment. Both the Dental Radiographic Normalizing and Monitoring Device and the Dental Quality Control Test Tool were evaluated. The average exposure was equivalent to the class D film (220 mR), but only 13% of those surveyed used the faster class E film, which would reduce patient exposure in half. The survey indicates that dentists are not using the newer low-exposure class E film in their practices

  14. Human performance in radiological survey scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, W.S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Abelquist, E.W. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States)

    1998-03-01

    The probability of detecting residual contamination in the field using portable radiological survey instruments depends not only on the sensitivity of the instrumentation used in scanning, but also on the surveyor`s performance. This report provides a basis for taking human performance into account in determining the minimum level of activity detectable by scanning. A theoretical framework was developed (based on signal detection theory) which allows influences on surveyors to be anticipated and understood, and supports a quantitative assessment of performance. The performance of surveyors under controlled yet realistic field conditions was examined to gain insight into the task and to develop means of quantifying performance. Then, their performance was assessed under laboratory conditions to quantify more precisely their ability to make the required discriminations. The information was used to characterize surveyors` performance in the scanning task and to provide a basis for predicting levels of radioactivity that are likely to be detectable under various conditions by surveyors using portable survey instruments.

  15. A health survey of radiologic technologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boice, J.D. Jr.; Mandel, J.S.; Doody, M.M.; Yoder, R.C.; McGowan, R.

    1992-01-01

    A health survey of more than 143,000 radiologic technologists is described. The population was identified from the 1982 computerized files of the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists, which was established in 1926. Inactive members were traced to obtain current addresses or death notifications. More than 6000 technologists were reported to have died. For all registrants who were alive when located, a detailed 16-page questionnaire was sent, covering occupational histories, medical conditions, and other personal and lifestyle characteristics. Nonrespondents were contacted by telephone to complete an abbreviated questionnaire. More than 104,000 responses were obtained. Most technologists were female (76%), white (93%), and employed for an average of 12 years; 37% attended college, and approximately 50% never smoked cigarettes. Radiation exposure information was sought from employer records and commercial dosimetry companies. Technologists employed for the longest times had the highest estimated cumulative exposures, with approximately 9% with exposures greater than 5 cGy. There was a high correlation between cumulative occupational exposure and personal exposure to medical radiographs, related, in part, to the association of both factors with attained age. It is interesting that 10% of all technologists allowed others to practice taking radiographs on them during their training. Nearly 4% of the respondents reported having some type of cancer, mainly of the skin (1517), breast (665), and cervix (726). Prospective surveys will monitor cancer mortality rates through use of the National Death Index and cancer incidence through periodic mailings of questionnaires. This is the only occupational study of radiation employees who are primarily women and should provide new information on the possible risks associated with relatively low levels of exposure

  16. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites remedial action program. Radiological survey of the former Watertown arsenal property, Site 34 and Site 41, Watertown, Massachusetts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

    1983-10-01

    During the MED/AEC era, work involving radioactive materials was conducted at various sites within the arsenal complex. Building 34 housed a uranium machine shop, and a portion of Building 41 contained a foundry that was used for uranium work. Information provided by site personnel indicated that only depleted uranium was used in these buildings. Results of radiological analyses of contaminated material found at these sites indicated depleted uranium with uranium-236. Both buildings have been razed. The remnants still in place consist of the concrete floor slabs, access drives, and underground utility service trenches. This area is currently under the control of the Watertown Redevelopment Authority of Watertown, Massachusetts. During the period from June 25 through July 1, 1981, the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Occupational Health and Safety Division (OHS) Radiological Survey Group (RSG), conducted a radiological survey of Building Sites 34 and 41 at the direction of the US Department of Energy. Significant levels of contamination were found at 33 locations on the pad of Site 34 and in 5 out of 15 soild corings from the perimeter of the pad. No contamination was found on the pad of Site 41; however, two-thirds of this pad was covered with soil up to 4 ft thick. One of the 14 soil corings taken adjacent to the pad of Site 41 had elevated levels of uranium. Levels of contamination in excess of criteria, as identified in ANSI 13.12 and NRC Guidelines, were found at this site. The analyses of the samples from the sewer access points also revealed uranium and radium-226 anomalies. Therefore, according to NRC guidelines dated July 1982, it must be concluded that they are contaminated

  17. 618-11 Burial Ground USRADS radiological surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendling, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes and documents the results of the radiological surveys conducted from February 4 through February 10, 1993 over the 618-11 Burial Ground, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. In addition, this report explains the survey methodology using the Ultrasonic Ranging and Data System (USRADS). The 618-11 Burial Ground radiological survey field task consisted of two activities: characterization of the specific background conditions and the radiological survey of the area. The radiological survey of the 618-11 Burial Ground, along with the background study, were conducted by Site Investigative Surveys Environmental Restoration Health Physics Organization of the Westinghouse Hanford Company. The survey methodology was based on utilization of the Ultrasonic Ranging and Data System (USRADS) for automated recording of the gross gamma radiation levels at or near six (6) inches and at three (3) feet from the surface soil

  18. Comprehensive resurvey program to prevent radiological incidents at a national laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipton, W.V.; Hunckler, C.A.

    1978-01-01

    A comprehensive resurvey program in a general purpose research building at Argonne National Laboratory is being implemented. The program was designed to prevent radiological incidents by increasing the awareness of Health Physics personnel of radiological hazards, initiating corrective actions, and providing information for improving routine survey schedules, and for establishing manpower requirements. The following aspects of the program are described: scheduling, surveys, records, follow-up, and statistics

  19. Formerly utilized MED/AEC Sites Remedial Action Program. Radiological survey of the Pennsylvania Railroad Landfill Site, Burrell Township, Pennsylvnia. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-02-01

    A radiological survey was conducted at the Pennsylvania Railroad Landfill Site in Burrell Township, Pennsylvania. In 1956 and 1957, approximately 11,600 tons of radioactive material was dumped at this site and was apparently scattered over an area of loss than 10 acres. The survey included measurement of the following: external gamma radiation at 1 m above the surface and at the surface throughout the site; beta--gamma dose rates at 1 cm from the surface throughout the site; concentrations of 226 Ra and 238 U in surface and subsurface soil on the site; concentrations of 210 Pb, 226 Ra, 230 Th, and 238 U in subsurface water on the site and in surface water on and near the site; and the extent of atmospheric transport of 222 Rn and progeny from the site. The general location of the residues transported to the site, except possibly small, scattered quantities of materials, was determined from the survey. In some areas on the site, beta--gamma dose rates of 1 cm from the surface were above pertinent guidelines.Analyses of sediment from water samples taken from drainage areas near the site indicate that some radioactive material is being carried from the site by surface run-off. Results of this survey indicate that there is no significant atmospheric transport of 222 Rn from the site

  20. Northern Marshall Islands radiological survey: sampling and analysis summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Eagle, R.J.; Stuart, M.L.

    1981-07-23

    A radiological survey was conducted in the Northern Marshall Islands to document reamining external gamma exposures from nuclear tests conducted at Enewetak and Bikini Atolls. An additional program was later included to obtain terrestrial and marine samples for radiological dose assessment for current or potential atoll inhabitants. This report is the first of a series summarizing the results from the terrestrial and marine surveys. The sample collection and processing procedures and the general survey methodology are discussed; a summary of the collected samples and radionuclide analyses is presented. Over 5400 samples were collected from the 12 atolls and 2 islands and prepared for analysis including 3093 soil, 961 vegetation, 153 animal, 965 fish composite samples (average of 30 fish per sample), 101 clam, 50 lagoon water, 15 cistern water, 17 groundwater, and 85 lagoon sediment samples. A complete breakdown by sample type, atoll, and island is given here. The total number of analyses by radionuclide are 8840 for /sup 241/Am, 6569 for /sup 137/Cs, 4535 for /sup 239 +240/Pu, 4431 for /sup 90/Sr, 1146 for /sup 238/Pu, 269 for /sup 241/Pu, and 114 each for /sup 239/Pu and /sup 240/Pu. A complete breakdown by sample category, atoll or island, and radionuclide is also included.

  1. Northern Marshall Islands radiological survey: sampling and analysis summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Eagle, R.J.; Stuart, M.L.

    1981-01-01

    A radiological survey was conducted in the Northern Marshall Islands to document reamining external gamma exposures from nuclear tests conducted at Enewetak and Bikini Atolls. An additional program was later included to obtain terrestrial and marine samples for radiological dose assessment for current or potential atoll inhabitants. This report is the first of a series summarizing the results from the terrestrial and marine surveys. The sample collection and processing procedures and the general survey methodology are discussed; a summary of the collected samples and radionuclide analyses is presented. Over 5400 samples were collected from the 12 atolls and 2 islands and prepared for analysis including 3093 soil, 961 vegetation, 153 animal, 965 fish composite samples (average of 30 fish per sample), 101 clam, 50 lagoon water, 15 cistern water, 17 groundwater, and 85 lagoon sediment samples. A complete breakdown by sample type, atoll, and island is given here. The total number of analyses by radionuclide are 8840 for 241 Am, 6569 for 137 Cs, 4535 for 239+240 Pu, 4431 for 90 Sr, 1146 for 238 Pu, 269 for 241 Pu, and 114 each for 239 Pu and 240 Pu. A complete breakdown by sample category, atoll or island, and radionuclide is also included

  2. Uranium mill tailings remedial action program. Radiological survey of Shiprock vicinity property SH02 Shiprock, New Mexico, August-November 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.; Sholeen, C.M.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-04-01

    A comprehensive survey of the vicinity property designated as SH02 was conducted on an intermittent basis from August 3 to November 11, 1982. At the time of the survey, seven structures were located on the property - two residential trailers, one institutional building, two institutional trailers, a storage building, and a pump house. The lands surrounding the structures were either sparsely covered with vegetation or gravelled. The assessment activities included determination of indoor and outdoor surface radiation levels through direct instrument surveys; measurement of ambient external penetrating radiation levels at 1-meter heights; and analysis of air and soil samples. No evidence of radioactive contamination was found inside the structures; background levels of radioactivity were indicated within all seven. The short-term radon daughter measurements did not exceed the limit of 0.02 Working Level for average annual concentration including background, as specified in the EPA Standard 40 CFR 192. The assessment indicated elevated levels of radioactivity at one general area in the outdoor environs, encompassing about 1400 ft 2 (130 m 2 ) of land along the property's northern boundary. Analysis of a surface soil sample collected from this area indicated a radium concentration considerably in excess of the limit of 5 pCi/g above background specified in the EPA Standard. Subsurface soil sampling was not conducted, and thus the vertical extent of the radiological contamination is not known. Since the surface soil contamination level exceeded the limit specified in the EPA Standard, remedial action for this vicinity site should be considered

  3. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites remedial action program. Radiological survey of the Seaway Industrial Park, Tonawanda, New York. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leggett, R.W.; Cottrell, W.D.; Dickson, H.W.

    1978-05-01

    The results of a radiological survey of the Seaway Industrial Park, Tonawanda, New York, are presented in this report. The site is adjacent to the former Haist property, which was used to receive residues from uranium processing during the period 1944--46. In 1974 approximately 6000 yd 3 of this residue was transported to Seaway, where it was used as landfill. The survey was undertaken to determine radiation levels and the extent of radioactive materials on the Seaway property, as well as the extent of movement of radioactive residues by natural means such as surface run-off. The survey included measurement of: external gamma radiation on and near the site; beta-gamma radiation at the surface in the most contaminated areas; radium and uranium concentrations in the soil; concentrations of radium, uranium, and thorium in water samples collected from the drainage areas; and radium concentrations in mud samples taken from the drainage areas. The results indicate that the residues on the site do not pose any immediate health hazards. However, potential health hazards could result from some uses of the site. In particular, if buildings were to be built in certain areas on the site, significant concentrations of radon daughters could develop in these structures. 16 figs, 3 tables

  4. A mobile autonomous robot for radiological surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudar, A.M.; Wagner, D.G.; Teese, G.D.

    1992-01-01

    The Robotics Development Group at the Savannah River Site is developing an autonomous robot (SIMON) to perform radiological surveys of potentially contaminated floors. The robot scans floors at a speed of one-inch/second and stops, sounds an alarm, and flashes lights when contamination in a certain area is detected. The contamination of interest here is primarily alpha and beta-gamma. The robot, a Cybermotion K2A base, is radio controlled, uses dead reckoning to determine vehicle position, and docks with a charging station to replenish its batteries and calibrate its position. It uses an ultrasonic ranging system for collision avoidance. In addition, two safety bumpers located in the front and the back of the robot will stop the robots motion when they are depressed. Paths for the robot are preprogrammed and the robots motion can be monitored on a remote screen which shows a graphical map of the environment. The radiation instrument being used is an Eberline RM22A monitor. This monitor is microcomputer based with a serial I/0 interface for remote operation. Up to 30 detectors may be configured with the RM22A

  5. Quality assurance program in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yacovenco, Alejandro; Borges, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    Aiming to elaborate a methodology to optimize the performance of the Radiology Service of the Military Police Hospital, in Rio dee Janeiro, some goals were established: improvement of the attendance to patients; improvement of the qualification of technicians; achievement and maintenance of high degrees of quality in each step of the radiological process; improvement of the image quality; optimization of dose per examination and cost reduction. The procedure used to detect faults in the radiological process was the analysis of causes of film losses. Results show a 70% reduction in the film rejection rate. 74% of total identified faults were due to equipment, 11% to films, 10% to patients and 5% to developing. The reduction in the cost of developed film reached 75%. A training course given to the staff of the radiological service fully reached its goals, contributing, with the staff motivation, mostly to the success of the program. This success indicates that, with a serious persistent work, it is possible to offer to patients services within their expectations, even at a public hospital. Such programs should be supported by health authorities, not only due to their technical and economic needs but, mostly, due to their social implications. (author). 10 refs., 11 figs

  6. Annual evaluation of routine radiological survey/monitoring frequencies for the High Ranking Facilities Deactivating Project at Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    The Bethel Valley Watershed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has several Environmental Management (EM) facilities that are designated for deactivation and subsequent decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). The Surplus Facilities Program at ORNL provides surveillance and maintenance support for these facilities as deactivation objectives are completed to reduce the risks associated with radioactive material inventories, etc. The Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC Radiological Control (RADCON) Program has established requirements for radiological monitoring and surveying radiological conditions in these facilities. These requirements include an annual evaluation of routine radiation survey and monitoring frequencies. Radiological survey/monitoring frequencies were evaluated for two High Ranking Facilities Deactivation Project facilities, the Bulk Shielding Facility and Tower Shielding Facility. Considerable progress has been made toward accomplishing deactivation objectives, thus the routine radiological survey/monitoring frequencies are being reduced for 1999. This report identifies the survey/monitoring frequency adjustments and provides justification that the applicable RADCON Program requirements are also satisfied

  7. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites remedial action program: radiological survey of the former Simonds Saw and Steel Co., Lockport, New York. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-11-01

    Results of a radiological survey of the former Simonds Saw and Steel Company (current name of this facility is Guterl Special Steel Corporation), Lockport, New York, are presented in this report. During the period 1948 to 1956, this company handled large quantities of uranium metal and smaller quantities of thorium metal in rolling mill operations. The survey included measurement of residual alpha and beta-gamma radiation levels in the rolling mill building and forging shop; external gamma radiation in the same area; uranium, radium, and thorium in soil samples taken from beneath removable floor plates in the rolling mill area and from other parts of the site; radon and radon daughter concentrations in the rolling mill building; and contamination in drainage paths leading from the buildings and grounds. Elevated concentrations of uranium were found in soil samples taken from beneath the floor plates within 40 ft of the 16-inch rolling mill. Beta-gamma radiation levels were greater than 1 mrad/hr at the locations having the highest concentrations of uranium. External gamma radiation levels were above the background level in a few small isolated areas in the rolling mill building. The 16-inch rolling mill showed elevated alpha and beta contamination levels in several areas

  8. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program. Radiological survey of Shiprock vicinity property SH16, Shiprock, New Mexico, October-November 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.; Sholeen, C.M.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-05-01

    At the time of the survey, one residential structure was located on the property. The lands surrounding the structure were landscaped with lawn cover and other vegetation. The assessment activities included determination of indoor and outdoor surface radiation levels, for both fixed and removable contamination, through direct instrument and smear (indoor only) surveys; measurement of ambient external penetrating radiation levels at 1-meter heights; and analyses of air and soil samples. No evidence of radioactive contamination was found in the residential structure; background levels of radioactivity were indicated throughout. Radiation exposure rates were less than the 20 μR/h above background limit. Short-term radon daughter measurements did not exceed the 0.02 WL limit for average annual concentration including background. The assessment indicated elevated levels of radioactivity at several areas in the outside environs. Three localized areas, or discrete hot spots, were found within the backyard. A general area of elevated radioactivity was found at the back alleyway, encompassing about 1200 ft 2 . Radiochemical analyses of the soil sample collected from the backyard indicated a radium concentration of 14 +- 1 pCi/g, which is in excess of the limit of 5 pCi/g above background. Analyses of surface soil samples collected at the alleyway from nearly vicinity property sites also indicated radium concentrations in excess of the limit. Subsurface soil sampling was not conducted, and thus the vertical extent of the radiological contamination is not known. Remedial action for this vicinity site should be considered

  9. Urandium mill tailings remedial action program. Radiological survey of Shiprock vicinity property SH06, Shiprock, New Mexico, August-November 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.; Sholeen, C.M.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-05-01

    The radiological assessment conducted at the Shiprock vicinity property SH06 by the ANL Radiological Survey Group indicated background levels of radioactivity within the residential structure. Radiation exposure rates were less than the 20 μR/h above background limit specified in the EPA Standard (40 CFR 192.12[b][2]). Short-term radon daughter measurements did not exceed the 0.02 WL (or 20 mWL) limit for average annual concentration including background as specified in the EPA Standard (40 CFR 192.12[b][1]). The assessment indicated elevated levels of radioactivity at several areas in the outside environs. General areas of elevated radioactivity were found over almost the entire frontyard, encompassing about 1300 ft 2 (120 m 2 ), and at the west side of the residence, encompassing about 460 ft 2 (43 m 2 ). Radiochemical analysis of the soil sample collected from the frontyard near the residence indicated a radium concentration of 24 +- 2 pCi/g, which is in excess of the limit of 5 pCi/g above background, averaged over the first 15 cm of soil below the surface, as specified in Section 192.12(a)(1) of the EPA Standard. Elevated levels were also found at a 37-ft 2 (3.4-m 2 ) strip of land along the east property line, and in the backyard, at a small shack encompassing about 21 ft 2 (2.0 m 2 ) of land. From soil sample analyses and the history of the site, the contaminating material appears to be residual radioactive material under the provisions of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 in the form of radium-enhanced material (i.e., tailings). Since the surface soil contamination levels exceed the limits specified in the EPA Standard, remedial action for this vicinity site should be considered. 9 references, 4 figures, 5 tables

  10. Quarterly environmental radiological survey summary: Second Quarter 1995 100, 200, 300, and 600 Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    This report provides a summary of the radiological surveys performed in support of the operational environmental monitoring program at the Hanford Site. The Second Quarter 1995 survey results and the status of actions required from current and past reports are summarized

  11. Quarterly environmental radiological survey summary. Fourth quarter, 1995 100, 200, 300, and 600 Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, S.M.; Markes, B.M.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides a summary of the radiological surveys performed in support of the operational environmental monitoring program at the Hanford Site. The Fourth Quarter 1995 survey results and the status of actions required from current and past reports are described

  12. Radiological re-survey results at 130 West Central Avenue, Maywood, New Jersey (MJ029)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, M.E.; Johnson, C.A.

    1994-01-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from 1916 to 1959. During the early years of operation, MCW stored wastes and residues in low-lying areas west of the processing facilities and consequently some of the residuals containing radioactive materials migrated offsite to the surrounding area. Subsequently, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), designated for remedial action the old MCW property and several vicinity properties. Additionally, in 1984, the property at 130 West Central Ave., Maywood, New Jersey and properties in its vicinity were included as a decontamination research and development project under the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. In 1987 and 1988, at the request of DOE, ORNL conducted a radiological survey on this property. A second radiological survey by ORNL was conducted on this property in May, 1993 at the request of DOE after an ad hoc radiological survey, requested by a new property owner and conducted by Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI), identified some contamination not previously found by ORNL. The purpose of the survey was to determine if residuals from the old MCW were present on the property, and if so, if any radiological elements present were above guidelines. A certified civil survey was requisitioned by ORNL to determine actual property boundaries before beginning the radiological survey. The radiological re-survey included a surface gamma scan and the collection of a large number of soil samples for radionuclide analyses

  13. Formerly utilized MED/AEC Sites Remedial Action Program. Radiological survey of the former VITRO Rare Metals Plant, Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. Final report. [Plant to extract radium and uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-06-01

    This 18-acre site was used from 1911 to 1922 to extract radium from carnotite ore, from 1930 to 1942 to extract radium and uranium salts from onsite residues and carnotite ore, and from 1942 to 1957 to recover uranium from various ores and scrap materials. The radiological survey was conducted in two phases, Phase I included measurement of radon and radon daughter concentrations in onsite buildings; concentrations measured in this part of the survey were all above guideline levels. Phase II consisted of measurement of surface contamination levels on the site, external gamma radiation levels at 1 m above surfaces on and near the site, radionuclide concentrations in surface and subsurface soil and water on and near the site, and radon concentrations in air at offsite locations. The results of the second phase of the survey indicate that large quantities of the radioactive wastes generated during radium and uranium recovery operations still remain on the site. Radium-bearing wastes are present in soil beneath or adjacent to each of the buildings on the site and in the top few feet of soil over almost the entire site, with some areas being contaminated to a depth of 16 ft or more. Alpha contamination levels, beta--gamma dose rates, and external gamma radiation levels in some areas of the buildings and outdoors on the site are above current federal guidelines concerning the release of property for unrestricted use. Concentrations of /sup 226/Ra in water in holes drilled on the site are above the maximum permissible concentration (MPC/sub w/). Also, measurements made offsite show that contamination from the site has spread to nearby offsite locations, and that there is significant atmospheric transport of /sup 222/Rn from the site.

  14. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites Remedial Action Program. Radiological survey of the former Watertown Arsenal property GSA site Watertown, Massachusetts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

    1983-10-01

    The complete radiological survey of all the buildings located on the GSA site revealed no contamination. However, significant contamination was found on the site grounds. A total of approximately 6 m 2 of surface area exhibited elevated radiation levels. The area of contamination is centered around Section I (the burn area) and spreads out from this point. The contamination includes the subsurface, descending to the water table at the 6-ft level in some places. The contamination is primarily reprocessed depleted uranium. The ambient radiation level in the vicinity of the contamination as measured with a pressurized ionization chamber is significantly above background levels (up to 18 μR/h). As expected, no significant levels of radon contamination were found in any of the air samples. These levels of contamination of exceed the criteria as defined in ANSI 13.12 and the NRC Guidelines. The ambient radiation levels (up to 18 μR/h) are not in excess of criteria as defined in Appendix 6

  15. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites remedial action program. Radiological survey of Eckhart Hall, the University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, September 14, 1976-March 22, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Boggs Mayes, C.; Justus, A.L.

    1982-05-01

    A comprehensive radiological survey was conducted at the Eckhart Hall at the University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. General radiochemistry and/or physics research was performed at this facility during the MED/AEC era in the 1940s. The building is now used as laboratories, offices, and classrooms. Survey measurements included alpha and beta-gamma contamination determinations, both fixed and removable; beta-gamma exposure readings at contact and at 1 m (3 ft); estimates of radon-daughter concentrations in the air; and determination of concentrations of 137 Cs, the 232 Th decay chain, the 226 Ra decay chain, and uranium in the soil on the site. Thirteen spots of contamination were found to be fixed to or under existing surfaces and not readily available for transfer to other locations. Under current use conditions, the potential for radiation exposure to occupants of this building from these sources of contamination is remote. Concentrations of radon daughters in the air of the building were less than the limit of 0.01 Working Level (WL) above background. No long-lived radionuclides were detected in any air sample. Concentrations of radionuclides in soil samples collected around the facility indicated background levels. The presumed maximum potential internal radiation 50-year dose commitments from inhalation/ingestion of contamination remaining from MED/AEC activities were calculated to be less than 25% of the appropriate annual standards for an individual in an uncontrolled area. Remedial measures such as stabilization of the contamination in place would be applicable as a short-term measure. In order to reduce the risk in the event that building modifications take place in the future, health physics procedures and coverage are recommended. The long-term solution would involve decontamination by removal of the radioactive residues

  16. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program. Radiological survey of Shiprock vicinity property SH08, Shiprock, New Mexico, October-November 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.; Sholeen, C.M.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-05-01

    At the time of the survey, one residential structure was located on the property. The lands surrounding the structure were, for the most part, landscaped with lawn cover and other vegetation. The assessment activities included determination of indoor and outdoor surface radiation levels, for both fixed and removable contamination, through direct instrument and smear (indoor only) surveys; measurement of ambient external penetrating radiation levels at 1-meter heights; and analyses of air and soil samples. No evidence of radioactive contamination was found in the residential structure; background levels of radioactivity were indicated throughout. Radiation exposure rates were less than the 20 μR/h above background limit. Short-term radon daughter measurements did not exceed the 0.02 WL limit for average annual concentration including background. The assessment did indicate elevated levels of radioactivity at a few areas in the outside environs. A general area of elevated radioactivity was found at the west edge of the property, paralleling the roadway and encompassing an area of about 70 ft 2 ; and another general area of contamination was found in the backyard, encompassing about 960 ft 2 , and extending into the alleyway, encompassing a general area of about 1100 ft 2 there. Radiochemical analyses of the soil sample collected from the general area in the backyard indicated a radium concentration of 6.7 +- 0.7 pCi/g, which cannot be confidently interpreted to be below the limit of 5 pCi/g above background, averaged over the first 15 cm of soil below the surface. However, analyses of surface soil samples collected at the alleyway from nearby vicinity property sites indicated radium concentrations in excess of those limits. Subsurface soil sampling was not conducted, and thus the vertical extent of the radiological contamination is not known. Remedial action for this vicinity site should be considered

  17. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program. Radiological survey of Shiprock vicinity property SH15, Shiprock, New Mexico, October-November 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.; Sholeen, C.M.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-05-01

    At the time of the survey, one residential structure was located on the property. The lands surrounding the structure were landscaped with lawn cover and other vegetation. The lands in the unlandscaped east section contained a large garden plot and a dirt driveway leading to the back easement. The assessment activities included determination of indoor and outdoor surface radiation levels, for both fixed and removable contamination, through direct instrument and smear (indoor only) surveys; measurement of ambient external penetrating radiation levels at 1-meter heights; and analyses of air and soil samples. No evidence of radioactive contamination was found in the residential structure; background levels of radioactivity were indicated throughout. Radiation exposure rates were less than the 20 μR/h above background limit specified in the EPA Standard. Short-term radon daughter measurements did not exceed the 0.02 WL limit for average annual concentration including background as specified in the EPA Standard. The assessment indicated elevated levels of radioactivity in the outside environs. General areas of contamination were found in the backyard, along the back easement and encompassing about 1200 ft 2 of land area there, and extending into the unlandscaped east section, encompassing about 2400 ft 2 there. Several discrete hot spots or localized areas were found within these general areas. Radiochemical analysis of the soil samples collected from the areas indicated radium concentrations of 64 +- 6 and 82 +- 8 pCi/g, which are in excess of the limit of 5 pCi/g above background. Subsurface soil sampling was not conducted, and thus the vertical extent of the radiological contamination is now known. Remedial action for this vicinity site should be considered

  18. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites remedial action program. Radiological survey of the former Horizons, Inc., metal handling facility, Cleveland, Ohio. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leggett, R.W.; Cottrell, W.D.; Shinpaugh, W.H.; Doane, R.W.; Haywood, F.F.; Johnson, W.M.

    1979-02-01

    The results of a radiological survey of the former Horizons, Inc., metal handling facility in Cleveland, Ohio, are presented in this report. During the 1940's and early 1950's, two of the three buildings on this site (Buildings B and C) were used for the production of granular thorium metal. The survey included measurements related to the following: fixed and transferable alpha and beta-gamma contamination levels on the surfaces in Buildings B and C and on the roofs of these buildings; external gamma radiation levels at 1 m above the floors and grounds on and near the property; radionuclide concentrations in soil, water, and other materials collected from surfaces and drains inside Buildings B and C, from beneath the floor in Building C, and from outdoor locations on and near the site; and thoron ( 220 Rn) daughter concentrations in the air in Buildings B and C. Elevated concentrations of 232 Th, 228 Ra, 228 Th, and 230 Th were found in some samples. Alpha and beta-gamma contamination levels exceeded applicable guideline limits in some areas of Buildings B and C. External gamma radiation levels, approximately 10 times the average background level, were measured at isolated points in and near Building B. Thorium B ( 212 Pb) concentrations in air in Building B were near the Radioactivity Concentration Guide (RCG) level. Most of the elevated radiation levels were found indoors in areas presently used for storage. Outdoors on and near the site, significant radiation levels were found only near the east wall of Building B

  19. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program. Radiological survey of Shiprock vicinity property SH11, Shiprock, New Mexico, October-November 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.; Sholeen, C.M.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-05-01

    At the time of the survey, one residential structure used as a business office was located on the property. The lands surrounding the structure were, for the most part, landscaped with lawn cover and other vegetation. The assessment activities included determination of indoor and outdoor surface radiation levels, for both fixed and removable contamination, through direct instrument and smear (indoor only) surveys; measurement of ambient external penetrating radiation levels at 1-meter heights; and analyses of air and soil samples. No evidence of radioactive contamination was found in the residential structure; background levels of radioactivity were indicated throughout. Radiation exposure rates were less than the 20 μR/h above background limit. Short-term radon daughter measurements did not exceed the 0.02 WL limit for average annual concentration including background. The assessment did indicate elevated levels of radioactivity at a few areas in the outside environs. Two discrete hot spots or localized areas were found in the frontyard. A general area of elevated radioactivity was found at the back alleyway encompassing about 1100 ft 2 . Radiochemical analyses of the sample collected from one of the localized areas indicated the presence of natural uranium ore and a radium concentration of 165 +- 17 pCi/g, which is in excess of the limit of 5 pCi/g above background. Analyses of surface soil samples collected at the alleyway from nearby vicinity property sites also indicated radium concentrations in excess of the limits. Subsurface soil sampling was not conducted, and thus the vertical extent of the radiological contamination is not known. Remedial action for this vicinity site should be considered

  20. Nevada Test Site Area 25. Radiological survey and cleanup project, 1974-1983. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKnight, R.K.; Rosenberry, C.E.; Orcutt, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    This report describes radiological survey, decontamination and decommissioning of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Area 25 facilities and land areas incorporated in the Nuclear Rocket Development Station (NRDS). Buildings, facilities and support systems used after 1959 for nuclear reactor and engine testing were surveyed for the presence of radioactive contamination. The cleanup was part of the Surplus Facilities Management Program funded by the Department of Energy's Richland Operations Office. The radiological survey portion of the project encompassed portable instrument surveys and removable contamination surveys (swipe) for alpha and beta plus gamma radiation contamination of facilities, equipment and land areas. Soil sampling was also accomplished. The majority of Area 25 facilities and land areas have been returned to unrestricted use. Remaining radiologically contaminated areas are posted with warning signs and barricades. 12 figures

  1. Gamma radiological surveys of the Oak Ridge Reservation, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, 1990-1993, and overview of data processing and analysis by the Environmental Restoration Remote Sensing Program, Fiscal Year 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smyre, J.L.; Moll, B.W.; King, A.L.

    1996-06-01

    Three gamma radiological surveys have been conducted under auspices of the ER Remote Sensing Program: (1) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) (1992), (2) Clinch River (1992), and (3) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) (1993). In addition, the Remote Sensing Program has acquired the results of earlier surveys at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) (1990) and PORTS (1990). These radiological surveys provide data for characterization and long-term monitoring of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contamination areas since many of the radioactive materials processed or handled on the ORR, PGDP, and PORTS are direct gamma radiation emitters or have gamma emitting daughter radionuclides. High resolution airborne gamma radiation surveys require a helicopter outfitted with one or two detector pods, a computer-based data acquisition system, and an accurate navigational positioning system for relating collected data to ground location. Sensors measure the ground-level gamma energy spectrum in the 38 to 3,026 KeV range. Analysis can provide gamma emission strength in counts per second for either gross or total man-made gamma emissions. Gross count gamma radiation includes natural background radiation from terrestrial sources (radionuclides present in small amounts in the earth's soil and bedrock), from radon gas, and from cosmic rays from outer space as well as radiation from man-made radionuclides. Man-made count gamma data include only the portion of the gross count that can be directly attributed to gamma rays from man-made radionuclides. Interpretation of the gamma energy spectra can make possible the determination of which specific radioisotopes contribute to the observed man-made gamma radiation, either as direct or as indirect (i.e., daughter) gamma energy from specific radionuclides (e.g., cesium-137, cobalt-60, uranium-238)

  2. Short radiological emergency response training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.D.; Greenhouse, N.A.

    1977-01-01

    This paper presents an outline of a radiological emergency response training program conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory by the health physics and safety training staff. This course is given to groups from local, county, state, and federal agencies and industrial organizations. It is normally three days in length, although the structure is flexible to accommodate individual needs and prior training. An important feature of the course is an emergency exercise utilizing a short lived radionuclide to better simulate real accident conditions. Groups are encouraged to use their own instruments to gain better familiarity with their operating characteristics under field conditions. Immediately following the exercise, a critical review of the students' performance is conducted

  3. General Employee Radiological Training and Radiological Worker Training: Program management manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    This manual defines and describes the DOE General Employee Radiological Training (GERT) and Radiological Worker I and II (RW I and II) Training programs. It includes material development requirements, standards and policies, and program administration. This manual applies to General Employee Radiological Training and Radiological Worker Training at all DOE contractor sites. The training materials of both GERT and RW I and II training reflect the requirements identified in the DOE Radiological Control Manual and DOE Order 5480.11. The training programs represent the minimum requirement for the standardized core materials. Each contractor shall implement the program in its entirety and may augment the standardized core materials to increase the general employee and radiological worker level of competency

  4. Radiological Final Status Survey of the Hammond Depot, Hammond, Indiana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitkus, T.J.

    2008-01-01

    ORISE conducted extensive scoping, characterization, and final status surveys of land areas and structures at the DNSC's Hammond Depot located in Hammond, Indiana in multiple phases during 2005, 2006 and 2007. This report provides a detailed discussion of the radiological survey planning, survey implementation, remediation, and the results for these activities supporting the conclusion that radioactive contamination previously identified at the Hammond Depot (HD) has been reduced to levels such that the site may be released without radiological restrictions. The objective of the radiological final status survey (FSS) was to obtain the data necessary to demonstrate compliance with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-approved site-specific derived concentration guideline levels (DCGLs) for both structural surfaces and outdoor areas (ORISE 2006a and NRC 2007). The DCGLs were modeled such that any residual licensed material would not exceed the NRC's basic dose limit for license termination of 25 millirem per year (mrem/y)

  5. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites remedial action program: radiological survey of the Building Site 421, United States, Watertown Arsenel, Watertown, MA. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-02-01

    This report contains the results of surveys of the current radiological condition of the Building Site 421, United States Arsenal Watertown, Watertown, Massachusetts. Findings of this survey indicate there are four spots involving an area of less than 6000 cm/sup 2/ of identifiable low-level residual radioactivity on the concrete pad which is all that remains of Building Site 421. The largest spot is approximately 5000 cm/sup 2/. The other three spots are 100 cm/sup 2/ or less. The beta-gamma readings at these spots are 8.4 x 10/sup 2/ dis/min-100 cm/sup 2/, 2.2 x 10/sup 5/ dis/min-100 cm/sup 2/, 2.2 x 10/sup 5/ dis/min-100 cm/sup 2/ and 8.5 x 10/sup 4/ dis/min-100 cm/sup 2/. No alpha contamination was found at these locations. Gamma spectral analysis of a chip of contaminated concrete from one of the spots indicates that the contaminant is natural uranium. This contamination is fixed in the concrete and does not present an internal or external exposure hazard under present conditions. A hypothetical hazard analysis under a conservative set of assumed conditions indicates minimal internal hazard. The highest End Window contact reading was 0.09 mR/h. None of the other three spots indicated an elevated direct reading with the End Window Detector. Radon daughter concentrations were determined at three locations on the Building 421 pad. These were 0.00013 WL, 0.00011 WL and 0.00009 WL. According to the Surgeon General's Guidelines found in 10 CFR 712, radon daughter concentrations below 0.03 WL do not require remedial action in structures other than private dwellings and schools. Soil samples taken about the site indicate no elevated levels above the natural background levels in the soil. A gamma spectral analysis of a water sample obtained from the storm sewer line near the Building 421 pad indicates no elevated radioactivity in the sample. It was therefore felt that no contamination is present in this sewer.

  6. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites remedial action program: radiological survey of the Building Site 421, United States, Watertown Arsenel, Watertown, MA. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-02-01

    This report contains the results of surveys of the current radiological condition of the Building Site 421, United States Arsenal Watertown, Watertown, Massachusetts. Findings of this survey indicate there are four spots involving an area of less than 6000 cm 2 of identifiable low-level residual radioactivity on the concrete pad which is all that remains of Building Site 421. The largest spot is approximately 5000 cm 2 . The other three spots are 100 cm 2 or less. The beta-gamma readings at these spots are 8.4 x 10 2 dis/min-100 cm 2 , 2.2 x 10 5 dis/min-100 cm 2 , 2.2 x 10 5 dis/min-100 cm 2 and 8.5 x 10 4 dis/min-100 cm 2 . No alpha contamination was found at these locations. Gamma spectral analysis of a chip of contaminated concrete from one of the spots indicates that the contaminant is natural uranium. This contamination is fixed in the concrete and does not present an internal or external exposure hazard under present conditions. A hypothetical hazard analysis under a conservative set of assumed conditions indicates minimal internal hazard. The highest End Window contact reading was 0.09 mR/h. None of the other three spots indicated an elevated direct reading with the End Window Detector. Radon daughter concentrations were determined at three locations on the Building 421 pad. These were 0.00013 WL, 0.00011 WL and 0.00009 WL. According to the Surgeon General's Guidelines found in 10 CFR 712, radon daughter concentrations below 0.03 WL do not require remedial action in structures other than private dwellings and schools. Soil samples taken about the site indicate no elevated levels above the natural background levels in the soil. A gamma spectral analysis of a water sample obtained from the storm sewer line near the Building 421 pad indicates no elevated radioactivity in the sample. It was therefore felt that no contamination is present in this sewer

  7. Results of the radiological survey at 200 State Route 17 (MJ035), Maywood, New Jersey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Crutcher, J.W.; Carrier, R.F.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-02-01

    The property discussed in this report and properties in its vicinity contaminated with residues from the former Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) were included as a decontamination research and development project under the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. As part of this project, DOE is conducting radiological surveys in the vicinity of the site to identify properties contaminated with residues derived from the MCW. The principal radionuclide of concern is thorium-232. The radiological survey discussed in this report is part of that effort and was conducted, at the request of DOE, by members of the Measurement Applications and Development Group of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A radiological survey of the commercial property at 200 State Route 17, Maywood, New Jersey, was conducted during 1987. The survey and sampling of the ground surface and subsurface were carried out on September 2, 1987. 4 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  8. Results of the radiological survey at 136 West Central Avenue (MJ030), Maywood, New Jersey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Crutcher, J.W.; Carrier, R.F.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-02-01

    As a result of the Energy and Water Appropriations Act of Fiscal Year 1984, the property discussed in this report and properties in its vicinity contaminated with residues from the former Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) were included as a decontamination research and development project under the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. As part of this project, DOE is conducting radiological surveys in the vicinity of the site to identify properties contaminated with residues derived from the MCW. The principal radionuclide of concern is thorium-232. The radiological survey discussed in this report is part of that effort and was conducted, at the request of DOE by members of the Measurement Applications and Development Group of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A radiological survey of the private, residential property at 136 West Central Avenue, Maywood, New Jersey, was conducted during 1987. The survey and sampling of the ground surface and subsurface were carried out on April 29, 1987

  9. Radiological survey results at 1 Shady Lane, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ095)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Johnson, C.A.

    1995-07-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) conducted remedial action at the Stepan property in Maywood, New Jersey and several vicinity properties in Lodi, New Jersey as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). These properties are in the vicinity of the DOE-owned Maywood Interim Storage Site (MISS), adjacent to the former Maywood Chemical Works facility. The property at One Shady Lane, Lodi, New Jersey was not one of these vicinity properties but was surveyed by DOE at the request of the owner. At the request of DOE, a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey at this property. The purpose of the survey, conducted in November 1994, was to confirm whether remedial actions were to be performed on the property in order to be in compliance with the identified Guidelines. The radiological survey included surface gamma scans and gamma readings at 1 meter, and the collection of soil samples for radionuclide analysis. Results of the survey demonstrated that all radiological measurements on the property at One Shady Lane, Lodi, New Jersey, were comparable to background levels in the area, and well within the limits prescribed by DOE radiological guidelines. Based on the results of the radiological survey data, this property does not meet guidelines for inclusion under FUSRAP

  10. Quality assurance programs from laboratories offering radiological protection services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marrero Garcia, M.; Prendes Alonso, M.; Jova Sed, L.; Morales Monzon, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    The implementation of an adequate program for quality assurance in institutions servicing radiological protection programs will become an additional tool to achieve security targets included in that program. All scientific and technical services offered by CPHR employ quality assurance systems

  11. TENORM radiological survey of Utica and Marcellus Shale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ying, Leong; O’Connor, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Comprehensive on-site radiological survey of processed sludge drilled materials extracted from the oil and gas production activities in the Utica and Marcellus Shale in Ohio has been conducted with a shielded isotopic identifier incorporating an advanced patented algorithmic processor to measure low-activity levels in compliance with environmental standards. - highlights: • First on-site radiological survey of processed shale sludge from oil and gas fields. • Mobile spectroscopic radiation inspection system with shielding for low-activity measurements. • Quantification of Ra-226 and Ra-228 radionuclides contamination in soil samples

  12. Radiological Risk Assessment and Survey of Radioactive Contamination for Foodstuffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.R.; Lee, C.W.; Choi, K.S.

    2007-11-01

    After the Chernobyl nuclear accident in 1986, a radiological dose assessment and a survey of a radioactive contamination for foodstuffs have been investigated by many countries such as EU, Japan, USA. In the case of Japan which is similar to our country for the imported regions of foodstuffs, there were some instances of the excess for regulation on the maximum permitted levels of radioactive contamination among some imported foodstuffs. Concerns about the radioactive contamination of foodstuffs are increased because of the recently special situation (Nuclear test of North Korea). The purpose of this study is a radiological dose assessment and a survey of a radioactive contamination for foodstuffs in order to reduce the probability of intake of contaminated foodstuffs. Analytical results of the collected samples are below MDA. In this project, the model of radiological dose assessment via the food chain was also developed and radiological dose assessment was conducted based on surveys results of a radioactive contamination for foodstuffs in the Korean open markets since 2002. The results of radiological dose assessment are far below international reference level. It shows that public radiation exposure via food chain is well controlled within the international guide level. However, the radioactive contamination research of imported foodstuffs should be continuous considering the special situation(nuclear test of North Korea). These results are used to manage the radioactive contamination of the imported foodstuffs and also amend the regulation on the maximum permitted levels of radioactive contamination of foodstuffs

  13. Radiological survey results at 5 Porter Street, Beverly, Massachusetts (VB019)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Johnson, C.A.

    1992-07-01

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey at 5 Porter Street, Beverly, Massachusetts. The survey was performed in May 1991. The purpose of the survey was to determine if uranium from work performed under government contract at the former Ventron facility had migrated off-site to neighboring areas. The survey included a surface gamma scan and the collection of soil samples for radionuclide analyses. Results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations or radiation measurements in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Site Remedial Action Program guidelines

  14. Radiological survey results at Porter Street City Park, Beverly, Massachusetts (VB026)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Johnson, C.A.

    1992-08-01

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey at the Porter Street City Park, Beverly, Massachusetts. The survey was performed in May 1991. The purpose of the survey was to determine if uranium from work performed under government contract at the former Ventron facility had migrated off-site to neighboring areas. The survey included a surface gamma scan and the collection of soil samples for radionuclide analyses. Results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations or radiation measurements in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program guidelines

  15. Radiological survey results at 2 Porter Street, Beverly, Massachusetts (VB005)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Carrier, R.F.

    1992-08-01

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey at 2 Porter Street, Beverly, Massachusetts. The survey was performed in May 1991. The purpose of the survey was to determine if uranium dust from work performed under government contract at the former Ventron facility had migrated off-site to neighboring areas. The survey included a surface gamma scan and the collection of soil samples fore radionuclide analyses. Results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations or radiation measurements in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program guidelines

  16. Radiological survey results at 9 Porter Street, Beverly, Massachusetts (VB020)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Johnson, C.A.

    1992-07-01

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey at 9 Porter Street, Beverly, Massachusetts. The survey was performed in May 1991. The purpose of the survey was to determine if uranium from work performed under government contract at the former Ventron facility had migrated off-site to neighboring areas. The survey included a surface gamma scan and the collection of soil samples for radionuclide analyses. Results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations or radiation measurements in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program guidelines

  17. Dosimetric evaluation program for dental radiology practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregori, B.; Milat, J.; Fernandez, J.; Micinquevich, S.; Andrieu, J.

    1992-01-01

    The preliminary results of a program undertaken to estimate the doses to patients associated with dental radiology practices in Argentine, are presented. Information collected from the search demonstrated that the Dieck and coronal techniques are the most commonly used practices, while all the examinations are performed by using a circular collimator. For both practices, the dosimetric studies were carried out on a Rando Alderson phantom. All dose measurements were made using thermoluminescent detectors LiF and Ca 2 F. In addition, a mathematical model was developed by applying the Monte Carlo method to a MIRD-V phantom. Circular and rectangular collimators were used. Absorbed dose distribution on head and neck, as well as surface dose distribution, were estimated. The comparison of the performance of both collimators shows that the use of the rectangular one allows for a dose reduction of 80%. Besides, a good correlation between the physical and mathematical models applied was found. (author)

  18. Radiology curriculum for undergraduate medical studies—A consensus survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirsadraee, S.; Mankad, K.; McCoubrie, P.; Roberts, T.; Kessel, D.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To establish an expert consensus of what, when, and how the teaching of radiology should be incorporated into the core undergraduate medical curriculum. Methods and materials: This Delphi survey consisted of four iterative rounds, with feedback given at the start of each successive round in the form of the results of the previous round. The participants consisted of both radiologists and non-radiologists with significant interest and involvement in radiology and undergraduate/Foundation training. The study addressed the questions of how, where, when, and by whom radiology should be taught. Results: The number of responses in rounds 1–4 was 20, 23, 41, and 25 (25, 22, 31, and 61% response rate, respectively). There was good consensus amongst the responders on the following: radiology teaching must be delivered in conjunction with anatomy and clinical case-based teaching, if possible in the department of radiology on picture archiving and communication system (PACS) workstations, and the teaching should be delivered by a competent and credentialled individual. Case-based assessment was the most agreed method of assessment. The majority of the responders concurred that the curriculum should include general indications for commonly requested radiological investigations, consent and safety issues around radiological tests, and their basic interpretation. Conclusion: The consensus points reached by the present study not only serve as directive principles for developing a more comprehensive radiology curriculum, but also places emphasis on a broader range of knowledge required to promote the best use of a department of radiology by junior doctors in an attempt to improve patient experiences and care.

  19. Overview of the aerial radiological measuring system (ARMS) program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deal, L.J.; Doyle, J.F. III.

    1975-01-01

    Since 1960 EG and G, Inc. has developed and maintained for the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) a state-of-the-art radiation surveillance program called the Aerial Radiological Measuring System (ARMS). Radiological surveys covering more than 300,000 square miles have been performed. In addition to the radiation detector gear, the system includes an inertial navigation system, radar altimeter, meteorological probes, air sampler, air sample analyzer, multispectral cameras, aerial mapping camera and infrared scanner. The recently improved data acquisition system, REDAR, records all inputs digitally on magnetic tape and is readily mounted in fixed-wing aircraft or helicopters. The data analysis system, REDAC, is mounted in a mobile processing laboratory which accompanies the aircraft on surveys. Radiation isopleth maps, both for gross counts and selected isotopes, can be prepared in the field. Special computer software enables the ARMS to detect changes of less than 1.0 μR/hr in exposure rates between successive surveys of a given site

  20. Survey of diagnostic radiology in the Republic of Ireland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, J.D.; Howett, D.; Hone, C.; Mulholland, C.

    1988-03-01

    This survey examined a number of aspects of the practice of diagnostic radiology in Ireland. These included the frequency of examinations, the gonadal and active bone marrow doses to patients, the genetically significant dose, the standard of design of x-ray rooms and of performance of equipment, and an inventory of equipment currently in use (author)

  1. Aerial radiological survey of the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (Livermore, California)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tipton, W.J.

    1977-10-01

    An airborne radiological survey was conducted during August 1975 over several selected sites in the vicinity of Livermore, California. These sites included the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, Sandia Livermore Laboratories, LLL Site 300, the Livermore Municipal Golf Course, and the City of Livermore's sewage treatment plant. The radiation results were processed specifically for man-made gamma ray activity. All elevated man-made activity observed during the aerial survey was contained within the site boundaries of the three DOE facilities

  2. Training in radiological protection: Curricula and programming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1964-01-01

    An important activity of the International Atomic Energy Agency is the promotion of training in radiological protection. Through its organized training courses, its fellowship training programme and its field experts, the Agency has assisted many Member States to train an essential group of scientists in radiological protection. Many Member States are now developing their own national training programmes in radiological protection and this report has been prepared to provide the guidance that may be required in this development. In the report the various types of training which are encountered in a radiological protection programme are fully discussed, curricula are suggested and examples of established training courses are annexed

  3. Independent auto evaluation of an operative radiological protection program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medrano L, M.A.; Rodriguez C, C.C.; Linares R, D.; Zarate M, N.; Zempoalteca B, R.

    2006-01-01

    The program of operative radiological protection of a nuclear power plant consists of multiple procedures and associate tasks that have as purpose the radiological protection of the workers of the power station. It is for this reason that the constant evaluation of the one it programs it is an important tool in the identification of their weaknesses (and strengths), so they can be assisted appropriately. In this work the main elements of the program of independent auto evaluation of the program of operative radiological protection of the Laguna Verde Central that has been developed and implemented by the National Institute of Nuclear Research are described. (Author)

  4. Practical Implications for an Effective Radiology Residency Quality Improvement Program for Milestone Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leddy, Rebecca; Lewis, Madelene; Ackerman, Susan; Hill, Jeanne; Thacker, Paul; Matheus, Maria; Tipnis, Sameer; Gordon, Leonie

    2017-01-01

    Utilization of a radiology resident-specific quality improvement (QI) program and curriculum based on the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) milestones can enable a program's assessment of the systems-based practice component and prepare residents for QI implementation post graduation. This article outlines the development process, curriculum, QI committee formation, and resident QI project requirements of one institution's designated radiology resident QI program. A method of mapping the curriculum to the ACGME milestones and assessment of resident competence by postgraduate year level is provided. Sample projects, challenges to success, and lessons learned are also described. Survey data of current trainees and alumni about the program reveal that the majority of residents and alumni responders valued the QI curriculum and felt comfortable with principles and understanding of QI. The most highly valued aspect of the program was the utilization of a resident education committee. The majority of alumni responders felt the residency quality curriculum improved understanding of QI, assisted with preparation for the American Board of Radiology examination, and prepared them for QI in their careers. In addition to the survey results, outcomes of resident project completion and resident scholarly activity in QI are evidence of the success of this program. It is hoped that this description of our experiences with a radiology resident QI program, in accordance with the ACGME milestones, may facilitate the development of successful QI programs in other diagnostic radiology residencies. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites remedial action program. Radiological survey of the West Stands, New Chemistry Lab and Annex, and Ricketts Laboratory, the University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, August 31-September 2, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Mayes, C.B.; Justus, A.L.

    1982-05-01

    A radiological survey was conducted at the former locations of the West Stands, the New Chemistry Lab and Annex, and Ricketts Laboratory at the University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. General radiochemistry and/or physics research for the MED/AEC program was performed at these sites during the 1940s. The buildings have since been razed. The survey was undertaken to determine the presence of any radionuclides remaining from the MED/AEC operations that could have been spilled or released from the former structures. Environmental soil samples (corings) were collected from the areas where the West Stands, New Chemistry Lab and Annex, and Ricketts Laboratory once stood. The soil corings were taken at what appeared to be undisturbed locations near the sites of the three former facilities. Analyses of the soil corings included determination of the concentrations of 137 Cs, the 232 Th decay chain, the 226 Ra decay chain, and uranium in the soil. The levels of uranium and the 226 Ra decay chain found in the samples indicated that no concentrations above natural background levels were present. Slightly elevated levels of 60 Co were found in soil taken from the top 5 cm of the ground at two sampling sites, but this activity was presumed to have been traceable to induced activity from contaminated stainless steel that had been stored in the area during operations not related to MED/AEC activities. No increased radiation dose attributable to exposure to residual radioactivity from MED/AEC activities is expected

  6. Joint NRC/EPA Sewage Sludge Radiological Survey: Survey Design & Test Site Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report contains the results of a radiological survey of nine publicly POTWs around the country, which was commissioned by the Sewage Sludge Subcommittee, to determine whether and to what extent radionuclides concentrate in sewage treatment wastes.

  7. Radiological survey results at 914 Black Oak Ridge Road, Wayne, New Jersey (WJ005)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, R.E.; Johnson, C.A.

    1995-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) conducted remedial action during 1993 at several vicinity properties in the Wayne and Pequannock Townships in New Jersey as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). These properties are in the vicinity of the DOE-owned Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS), formerly the W.R. Grace facility. The property at 914 Black Oak Ridge Road, Wayne, New Jersey was not one of these vicinity properties; however the owner requested that his property be radiologically surveyed. At the request of DOE, a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological scoping survey of this property. The purpose of the survey, conducted in early November 1993, was to determine whether any radiological contamination might be present on the property. The radiological survey included surface gamma scans and gamma readings at one meter, and the collection of soil and/or debris samples for radionuclide analysis. Results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations or radiation measurements in excess of applicable DOE guidelines

  8. Interactive computer-based training program for radiological workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinoskey, P.A.; Camacho, P.I.; Wells, L.

    2000-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is redesigning its existing Computer-Based Training (CBT) programs for radiological workers. The redesign represents a major effort that is aimed at producing a single highly interactive and flexible CBT program. The new CBT program is designed to address a variety of radiological workers, including researchers, x-ray operators, and individuals working in tritium, uranium, plutonium, and accelerator facilities. The program addresses the diversity of backgrounds found at a national laboratory. The CBT program includes photographs, line drawings and illustrations, sound, video, and simulations, and it allows for easy insertion and replacement of text, graphics, sound, and video. The new design supports timely updates and customization for use at other University of California sites. The CBT program is divided into ten basic modules. Introduction and Lessons Learned, History and Uses, Fundamentals, Background Radiation, Biological Effects of Radiation, Characteristics of Radionuclides, Radiological Controls, Monitoring, Emergency Response, Responsibilities. Some of the main modules features as many as seven or eight submodules. For example, the module on Characteristics of Radionuclides features submodules on common radionuclides, tritium uranium, plutonium, x-ray machines, E-beam devices, radiographic devices, and accelerators. Required submodules are tailored to an individual's type of work and facility, and they are determined by the answers to an onscreen questionnaire given at the outset of training. Individuals can challenge most individual modules, but certain submodules will be mandatory based on the initial survey. For example, individuals working in the uranium facility will be required to complete the submodule on 'History and Uses of Uranium'. However, all other submodules under the main module, 'History and Uses', will be available if selected for preview. For each module, an opportunity is provided for further

  9. Region 8 radiological assistance program team response manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, D.E.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this manual is to provide guidance so that a request for radiological assistance is responded to in an effective and consistent manner. These procedures are specific to the trained and qualified members of the Region 8 Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) team. Procedures provide steps for responding to the request, notification and activation of the team members, position descriptions, and checklists

  10. Directory of personnel responsible for radiological health programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This is a directory of professional personnel who administer the radiological health program activities in state and local governmental agencies. Included in the directory is a listing of each state health officer or the head of the agency responsible for the radiological health program. The name, address, and telephone number of the radiological health personnel are listed, followed by the alternate contact who, in many instances, may be chief of a larger administrative unit of which the radiological health program is a subunit. The address for the program is also included if it differs from the official health department or agency. Generally, the titles of the personnel listed will indicate the administrative status of the radiological health program. The directory also includes a list of key professional personnel in the Bureau of Radiological Health, Radiation Operations Staff, Regional Radiological Health Representatives, Winchester Engineering and Analytical Center, Food and Drug Administration; Office of Radiation Programs, Regional Radiation Representatives, National Environmental Research Center, and Eastern Environmental Radiation Laboratory, Environmental Protection Agency; selected personnel in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; and selected personnel in the National Bureau of Standards

  11. Factors Influencing the Gender Breakdown of Academic Radiology Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, James C; Yoon, Sora C; Cater, Sarah Wallace; Grimm, Lars J

    2017-07-01

    To determine the gender distribution of radiology residency programs and identify associations with radiology departmental factors. The residency programs affiliated with the top 50 research medical school from US News and World Report were identified. The gender of all radiology residency graduates from each program from 2011 to 2015 were collected. Radiology departmental factors were collected: gender of chairperson, gender of program director, gender of faculty, geographic location, and city population of the residency program. The median percentage of female radiology faculty and residents were calculated and classified as above or below the median. Comparisons were made between residency programs and departmental factors via a Pearson χ 2 univariate test or logistic regression. There were 618 (27.9%) female and 1,598 (72.1%) male residents in our study, with a median female representation of 26.4% in each program. Programs with a female residency program director were significantly more likely to have an above-median percentage of female residents versus a male program director (68.4% versus 38.7%, P = .04). Programs in the Northeast (70.6%) and West (70.0%) had higher above-median female representation than the South (10.0%) and Midwest (38.5%, P < .01). There was no association with city population size (P = .40), gender of faculty (P = .40), residency size (P = .91), or faculty size (P = .15). Radiology residency programs with a female residency program director and those in the Northeast or West have a greater concentration of female residents. Residency programs that aim to increase female representation should investigate modifiable factors that can improve their recruitment practices. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Internet use in radiology: results of a nationwide survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorbeck, F; Zimmermann, C; Vorbeck-Meister, I; Kainberger, F; Imhof, H

    1999-08-01

    Purpose: To determine the number of radiologists who currently have Internet access, their use patterns on the Internet for Radiology purposes, the web sites they would recommend, and the potential site access to the Internet that they would like to see in the future. In addition, this study analyzed the best way to find nationwide radiological sites and their content. Materials and Methods: In a nationwide survey, 854 Austrian radiologist were asked to fill out and return a questionnaire about Internet access, current problems, current and future use, which web site they recommend, and about the use of e-mail. Next, the available nationwide radiological sites were searched with seven major search engines using 37 different keywords, as well as by category search, and by searching for links on the homepages of the radiological departments of all Universities of Austria. Then, the offered information of the founded pages was classified in categories. Results: Of the 210 (24.6%) radiologists who returned the questionnaire, 154 (73%) had Internet access. Time expenditure was considered the main problem using the Internet. The Internet was used for literature research by 69% of the radiologists with Internet access, for e-mail by 60%, and for congress information by 57%. In future, 43% would like to read electronic journals more often and 39% would like to use the web more intensively for scientific congresses. At the present time, we found 17 radiological web sites in Austria. The most promising way to find these sites was to use the search engines Alta Vista and Hotbot. Fifteen (88%) sites offered information for patients, seven (41%) for radiologists, five (29%) for students, and four (24%) for researchers. Summary: Many radiologists in Austria already have Internet access, although time expenditure was considered the main problem with Internet use. Survey responses showed a need for electronic journals. To our point of view, Universities and radiological societies

  13. Internet use in radiology: results of a nationwide survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorbeck, F.; Zimmermann, C.; Vorbeck-Meister, I.; Kainberger, F.; Imhof, H.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the number of radiologists who currently have Internet access, their use patterns on the Internet for Radiology purposes, the web sites they would recommend, and the potential site access to the Internet that they would like to see in the future. In addition, this study analyzed the best way to find nationwide radiological sites and their content. Materials and Methods: In a nationwide survey, 854 Austrian radiologist were asked to fill out and return a questionnaire about Internet access, current problems, current and future use, which web site they recommend, and about the use of e-mail. Next, the available nationwide radiological sites were searched with seven major search engines using 37 different keywords, as well as by category search, and by searching for links on the homepages of the radiological departments of all Universities of Austria. Then, the offered information of the founded pages was classified in categories. Results: Of the 210 (24.6%) radiologists who returned the questionnaire, 154 (73%) had Internet access. Time expenditure was considered the main problem using the Internet. The Internet was used for literature research by 69% of the radiologists with Internet access, for e-mail by 60%, and for congress information by 57%. In future, 43% would like to read electronic journals more often and 39% would like to use the web more intensively for scientific congresses. At the present time, we found 17 radiological web sites in Austria. The most promising way to find these sites was to use the search engines Alta Vista and Hotbot. Fifteen (88%) sites offered information for patients, seven (41%) for radiologists, five (29%) for students, and four (24%) for researchers. Summary: Many radiologists in Austria already have Internet access, although time expenditure was considered the main problem with Internet use. Survey responses showed a need for electronic journals. To our point of view, Universities and radiological societies

  14. Results of the radiological survey at the former Heppenstall Company site, 4620 Hatfield Street, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, W.D.; Crutcher, J.W.; Quillen, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    As part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, the US Department of Energy (DOE) is implementing a program to determine the radiological conditions at sites that were used to process radioactive materials under contract with the department's predecessor agencies. During 1955 the former Heppenstall Company site in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, was used by an Atomic Energy Commission contractor to process approximately 100,000 lbs of normal uranium metal. Because of insufficient records to document cleanup procedures and to verify the radiological condition of this site, DOE requested a survey. The radiological survey discussed in this report for the site of the former Heppenstall Company, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, was conducted by members of the Measurement Applications and Development Group of Oak Ridge National Laboratory in July of 1989. The survey included a surface gamma scan of the warehouse, collection of indoor soil and dust samples and one outdoor sample, and measurement of direct and transferable alpha and beta-gamma activity. Results of this radiological assessment indicate no detection of radiation levels or radionuclide concentrations above DOE guidelines. 7 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  15. An aerial radiological survey of the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, T.J.; Riedhauser, S.R.

    1999-01-01

    A team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory conducted an aerial radiological survey of the US Department of Energy's Nevada Test Site including three neighboring areas during August and September 1994. The survey team measured the terrestrial gamma radiation at the Nevada Test Site to determine the levels of natural and man-made radiation. This survey included the areas covered by previous surveys conducted from 1962 through 1993. The results of the aerial survey showed a terrestrial background exposure rate that varied from less than 6 microroentgens per hour (mR/h) to 50 mR/h plus a cosmic-ray contribution that varied from 4.5 mR/h at an elevation of 900 meters (3,000 feet) to 8.5 mR/h at 2,400 meters (8,000 feet). In addition to the principal gamma-emitting, naturally occurring isotopes (potassium-40, thallium-208, bismuth-214, and actinium-228), the man-made radioactive isotopes found in this survey were cobalt-60, cesium-137, europium-152, protactinium-234m an indicator of depleted uranium, and americium-241, which are due to human actions in the survey area. Individual, site-wide plots of gross terrestrial exposure rate, man-made exposure rate, and americium-241 activity (approximating the distribution of all transuranic material) are presented. In addition, expanded plots of individual areas exhibiting these man-made contaminations are given. A comparison is made between the data from this survey and previous aerial radiological surveys of the Nevada Test Site. Some previous ground-based measurements are discussed and related to the aerial data. In regions away from man-made activity, the exposure rates inferred from the gamma-ray measurements collected during this survey agreed very well with the exposure rates inferred from previous aerial surveys

  16. Results of the Radiological Survey at Conviber, Inc., 644 Garfield Street, Springdale, Pennsylvania (CVP001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Cottrell, W.D.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1991-10-01

    As part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), the US Department of Energy (DOE) is implementing a radiological survey program to determine the radiological conditions at sites that were used by the department's predecessor agencies. During the mid-1940s, and possibly continuing until 1951, the Conviber site in Springdale, Pennsylvania, was used to machine extruded uranium in support of government efforts. In 1980 a radiological scanning survey of this site was conducted by DOE and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staffs. Their report noted one anomaly: elevated radiation levels over a small area inside the building where uranium had been machined. Because much of the floor was inaccessible, for surveying and because of the lack of definitive records documenting use of this site, a comprehensive radiological assessment was recommended. The radiological survey discussed in this report for the site of Conviber, Inc., Springdale, Pennsylvania, was conducted by members of the Measurement Applications and Development Group of Oak Ridge National Laboratory in June of 1989. The survey included a surface gamma scan, collection of concrete and soil samples, and measurement of direct and removable alpha and beta-gamma contamination. One indoor location with a gamma measurement of 20 μR/h was found. In June of 1990 ORNL staff returned to investigate the location with elevated gamma. A hole was drilled through the concrete, gamma measurements were taken, and soil samples were obtained for analyses. In these eight indoor soil samples, concentrations of 238 U ranged from 90 to 20,000 pCi/g. However, under current site use, residual uranium covered by concrete does not pose a health risk

  17. Quality assurance program on diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yacovenco, Alejandro; Borges, Jose Carlos; Mota, Helvecio Correa

    1995-01-01

    Aiming to elaborate a methodology to optimize the performance of the Radiology Service of the Military Police Hospital, in Rio de Janeiro, some goals were established: improvement of the attendance to patients; improvement of the qualification of technicians; achievement and maintenance of high degrees of quality in each step of the radiological process; improvement of the image quality; optimization of dose per examination and cost reduction. (author). 8 refs., 3 figs

  18. Manual for conducting radiological surveys in support of license termination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, J.D.

    1992-06-01

    This document describes a process for conducting radiological surveys during decommissioning, to demonstrate that residual radioactive material satisfies criteria established by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for termination of a license. The Manual describes procedures for design and conduct of surveys in a manner which will provide a high degree of assurance that NRC guidelines and conditions have been satisfied. The Manual also describes methods for documenting the survey findings in a final report to the NRC. This Manual updates information contained in NUREG/CR-2082, Monitoring for Compliance with Decommissioning Termination Survey Criteria, (ORNL 1981). It incorporates statistical approaches to survey design and data interpretation used by the Environmental Protection Agency for evaluation of hazardous materials sites under Superfund (CERCLA). Quality assurance is emphasized throughout. (author)

  19. Radiological re-survey results at 146 West Central Avenue, Maywood, New Jersey (MJ034)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, M.E.; Johnson, C.A.

    1994-05-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from 1916 to 1959. During the early years of operation, MCW stored wastes and residues in low-lying areas west of the processing facilities and consequently some of the residuals containing radioactive materials migrated offsite to the surrounding area. Subsequently, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) designated for remedial action the old MCW property and several vicinity properties. Additionally, in 1984, the property at 146 West Central Ave., Maywood, New Jersey and properties in its vicinity were included as a decontamination research and development project under the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. In 1987 and 1988, at the request of DOE, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducted a radiological survey on this property. A report describing this survey was published in 1989. A second radiological survey by ORNL was conducted on this property in May 1993 at the request of DOE after an ad hoc radiological survey, requested by the property owner and conducted by Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI), identified some contamination not previously found by ORNL. The purpose of the second ORNL survey was to determine whether radioactive materials from the old MCW were present on the property, and if so, if radioactive materials present were above guidelines. A certified civil survey was requisitioned by ORNL to determine actual property boundaries before beginning the radiological re-survey. The re-survey included a surface gamma scan and the collection of a large number of soil samples for radionuclide analyses. Results of this survey demonstrated that although elevated residual thorium-232 contamination was present in a few isolated spots on the southern end of the backyard, it did not exceed DOE guidelines

  20. DOE Region 6 Radiological Assistance Program plan. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakubowski, F.M.

    1995-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has sponsored a Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) since the 1950's. The RAP is designed to make DOE resources available to other DOE facilities, state, tribal, local, private businesses, and individuals for the explicit purpose of assisting during radiological incidents. The DOE has an obligation, through the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, to provide resources through the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP, Nov. 1985) in the event of a radiological incident. Toward this end, the RAP program is implemented on a regional basis, and has planned for an incremental response capability with regional coordination between states and DOE response elements. This regional coordination is intended to foster a working relationship between DOE radiological assistance elements and those state, tribal, and local agencies responsible for first response to protect public health and safety

  1. Radiological decontamination, survey, and statistical release method for vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodwill, M.E.; Lively, J.W.; Morris, R.L.

    1996-06-01

    Earth-moving vehicles (e.g., dump trucks, belly dumps) commonly haul radiologically contaminated materials from a site being remediated to a disposal site. Traditionally, each vehicle must be surveyed before being released. The logistical difficulties of implementing the traditional approach on a large scale demand that an alternative be devised. A statistical method for assessing product quality from a continuous process was adapted to the vehicle decontamination process. This method produced a sampling scheme that automatically compensates and accommodates fluctuating batch sizes and changing conditions without the need to modify or rectify the sampling scheme in the field. Vehicles are randomly selected (sampled) upon completion of the decontamination process to be surveyed for residual radioactive surface contamination. The frequency of sampling is based on the expected number of vehicles passing through the decontamination process in a given period and the confidence level desired. This process has been successfully used for 1 year at the former uranium millsite in Monticello, Utah (a cleanup site regulated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act). The method forces improvement in the quality of the decontamination process and results in a lower likelihood that vehicles exceeding the surface contamination standards are offered for survey. Implementation of this statistical sampling method on Monticello projects has resulted in more efficient processing of vehicles through decontamination and radiological release, saved hundreds of hours of processing time, provided a high level of confidence that release limits are met, and improved the radiological cleanliness of vehicles leaving the controlled site

  2. Radiological survey results at 4400 Piehl Road, Ottawa Lake, Michigan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Johnson, C.A.

    1993-04-01

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey at 4400 Piehl Road in Ottawa Lake, Michigan. The survey was performed in September, 1992. The purpose of the survey was to determine if materials containing uranium from work performed under government contract at the former Baker Brothers facility in Toledo, Ohio had been transported off-site to this neighboring area. The radiological survey included surface gamma scans indoors and outdoors, alpha and beta scans inside the house and attached garage, beta-gamma scans of the hard surfaces outside, and the collection of soil, water, and dust samples for radionuclide analyses. Results of the survey demonstrated that the majority of the measurements on the property were within DOE guidelines. However, the presence of isolated spots of uranium contamination were found in two areas where materials were allegedly transported to the property from the former Baker Brothers site. Uranium uptake by persons on the property by ingestion is fairly unlikely, but inhalation is a possibility. Based on these findings, it is recommended that the residential property at 4400 Piehl Road in Ottawa Lake, Michigan be considered for inclusion under FUSRAP

  3. Survey method for radiological surveys of 300 FF-1 Operable Unit soil and materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greif, A.A.

    1997-06-01

    This technical basis document is to be used to survey soils at the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit during remediation of the site. Its purpose is to provide a basis for the survey methods to be employed by the Radiological Control Technician to determine if excavated areas require continued remediation in accordance with the Record of Decision for the operable unit

  4. Radiological survey of the former Kellex Research Facility, Jersey City, New Jersey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berven, B.A.; Dickson, H.W.; Goldsmith, W.A.; Johnson, W.M.; Cottrell, W.D.; Doane, R.W.; Haywood, F.F.; Ryan, M.T.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

    1982-02-01

    A radiological survey has been conducted at the site of the former Kellex Corporation Research Facility in Jersey City, New Jersey. Kellex played a major role in the Manhattan Project, particularly in the area of engineering research in gaseous diffusion for uranium enrichment. As a result of those operations and subsequent work with radioactive materials, this site was selected for a radiological survey by the Department of Energy (DOE) [then Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA)] in its program aimed at reviewing and documenting the radiological status of properties associated with early source material contracts. The survaty included measurement of external gamma radiation, beta-gamma surface dose rates, alpha and beta surface contamination, concentrations of selected radionuclides in surface and subsurface soil and water on the site, and background radiation in the northern part of New Jersey. The results of the radiological survey indicate radionuclide concentrations in the soil and water on the former Kellex property are within background levels, with the exception of nine isolated and well-defined areas on the site of the former Kellex Laboratory

  5. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program. Radiological survey of Shiprock vicinity property SH07, Shiprock, New Mexico, September-November 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.; Sholeen, C.M.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-05-01

    At the time of the survey, one residential structure was located on the property. The lands surrounding the structure were, for the most part, landscaped with lawn cover and other vegetation. The assessment activities included determination of indoor and outdoor surface radiation levels, for both fixed and removable contamination, through direct instrument and smear (indoor only) surveys; measurement of ambient external penetrating radiation levels at 1-meter heights; and analyses of air and soil samples. No evidence of radioactive contamination was found in the residential structure; background levels of radioactivity were indicated throughout. Radiation exposure rates were less than the 20 μR/h above background limit. Short-term radon daughter measurements did not exceed the 0.02 WL limit for average annual concentration including background. The assessment did indicate elevated levels of radioactivity at several areas in the outside environs. A general area of elevated radioactivity was found in the frontyard and alleyway, encompassing about 2300 ft 2 . Elevated levels were also found in the northwest corner of the property, encompassing about 320 ft 2 , and in the southeast corner, encompassing about 39 ft 2 . An area of elevated radioactivity was found at a backyard slab, constructed of decorative flagstone and encompassing about 160 ft 2 . Radiochemical analyses of the soil sample collected from the southeast corner indicated a radium concentration of 41 +- 5 pCi/g, which is in excess of the limit of 5 pCi/g above background. Analyses of a surface soil sample collected in the alley from an adjacent vicinity property site also indicated a radium concentration in excess of those limits. Subsurface soil sampling was not conducted. Remedial action for this vicinity site should be considered

  6. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program. Radiological survey of Shiprock vicinity property SH10, Shiprock, New Mexico, October-November 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.; Sholeen, C.M.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-05-01

    At the time of the survey, one residential structure was located on the property. The lands surrounding the structure were, for the most part, landscaped with lawn cover and other vegetation. The assessment activities included determination of indoor and outdoor surface radiation levels, for both fixed and removable contamination, through direct instrument and smear (indoor only) surveys; measurement of ambient external penetrating radiation levels at 1-meter heights; and analyses of air and soil samples. No evidence of radioactive contamination was found in the residential structure; background levels of radioactivity were indicated throughout. Radiation exposure rates were less than the 20 μR/h above background limit. Short-term radon daughter measurements did not exceed the 0.02 WL limit for average annual concentration including background. The assessment did indicate elevated levels of radioactivity at several areas in the outside environs. A general area was found along the east edge of the property, paralleling the roadway and encompassing about 24 ft 2 , and two discrete hot spots or localized areas were detected in the southeast corner of the property. Additionally, general areas were found near the southwest corner of the structure, encompassing about 6.8 ft 2 ; to the west of the structure, encompassing about 60 ft 2 ; and at the west edge of the property and alleyway, encompassing about 1400 ft 2 . Radiochemical analyses of the soil sample collected from this area indicated a radium concentration of 19 +- 2 pCi/g, which is in excess of the limit of 5 pCi/g above background. Subsurface soil sampling was not conducted. Remedial action for this vicinity site should be considered

  7. A survey of radiology reporting practices in veterinary teaching hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, W.M.

    1998-01-01

    Radiologists from 28 veterinary schools and one private teaching hospital responded to a survey questionnaire focused on diagnostic image reporting. Radiologists at 26 hospitals generated a hard copy report on essentially all imaging studies performed. At 25 hospitals, radiologists dictated and transcriptionists typed all or most reports; radiologists at two institutions typed all or some of their reports. At five hospitals, preliminary and/or final handwritten reports were generated. The range of reports generated per day was <10 to 40 per radiologist on duty. Seven respondents generated reports as films came from the processor and another 12 routinely generated reports the day the studies were completed. Clinician access to a processed report averaged 2 to 4 days after study was completed (reported range: several hours to 7 or more days). Fifteen responding radiologists personally mounted films from storage jackets for a majority of their reporting. Fourteen respondents generated reports from films mounted on motorized or stationary viewers. Nineteen respondents generated reports in a busy viewing area where they were frequently interrupted. Radiologists' impression of clinician and resident satisfaction regarding availability of radiology reports was that they were satisfied or very satisfied at 15 of the 29 hospitals. Five respondents reported that clinicians and residents were not concerned about availability of processed radiology reports. Thirteen radiologists were planning to change their reporting method within the next 2 years. The change most frequently sought (12 respondents) was to decrease turn-around time of reports. Ten radiologists indicated an interest in trying a voice recognition dictation system. The most common reasons given for not planning any changes in radiology reporting in the next 2 years were: limited number of radiologists (8) and 1 ''satisfied as is'' (7). Turn-around of radiology reports at these veterinary institutions averaged 2

  8. Radiological survey of Goiania by a mobile monitoring unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, M.C.F.

    1989-01-01

    After the initial response to the radiological accident in Goiania, a radiological survey throughout the city was performed using a mobile unit. This unit was equipped with two Geiger Muller detectors outsise the vehicle and one 4' x 4' NaI(Tl) detector connected to a dual recorder. All three detectors were placed 1 m above the ground. The survey system covers a wide range of exposure rate, since environmental levels up to 10 R h -1 . Eighty percent of the Goiania urban area was covered by this survey and except for some specific locations the contamination was restricted to the main foci surroundings ocurring in a non homogenous pattern. The highest value observed in the city after the main foci decontamination was of 0.7 mR h -1 in the 57 th street - where the source was opened. Results of the main foci and some other locations are apresented in the paper. The system designed to perform the survey in the city played a fundamental role during the decontamination process (author) [pt

  9. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program. Radiological survey of Shiprock vicinity property SH17, Shiprock, New Mexico, August and November 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.; Sholeen, C.M.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-05-01

    The assessment activities included determination of indoor surface radiation levels in two buildings through direct instrument surveys, measurement of ambient external penetrating radiation levels at 1-meter heights, and analysis of air samples. No evidence of radioactive contamination was found inside either building; the assessment indicated no elevated levels of radioactivity that could not be attributed to the structural materials used in the construction of the buildings. The levels of radiation that were detected from these sources were considered normal for the glazed-tile and cement-block materials encountered. Radiation exposure rates were less than the 20 μR/h above background limit specified in the EPA Standard. Short-term radon daughter measurements within the buildings did not exceed the 0.02 WL limit for average annual concentrations including background as specified in the EPA Standard. The assessment did not indicate the presence of residual radioactive material under the provisions of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978. Remedial action for this vicinity site should not be considered

  10. Results of the radiological survey at 266 East Spring Valley Avenue (MJ024), Hackensack, New Jersey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Crutcher, J.W.; Carrier, R.F.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-02-01

    As a result of the Energy and Water Appropriations Act of Fiscal Year 1984, the property discussed in this report and properties in its vicinity contaminated with residues from the former Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) were included as a decontamination research and development project under the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. As part of this project, DOE is conducting radiological surveys in the vicinity of the site to identify properties contaminated with residues derived from the MCW. The principal radionuclide of concern is thorium-232. The radiological survey discussed in this report is part of that effort and was conducted, at the request of DOE, by members of the Measurement Applications and Development Group of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A radiological survey of the private, residential property at 266 East Spring Valley Avenue, Hackensack, New Jersey, was conducted during 1987. The survey and sampling of the ground surface and subsurface were carried out on April 23, 1987. 4 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  11. Effective radiological safety program for electron linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swanson, W.P.

    1980-10-01

    An outline is presented of some of the main elements of an electron accelerator radiological safety program. The discussion includes types of accelerator facilities, types of radiations to be anticipated, activity induced in components, air and water, and production of toxic gases. Concepts of radiation shielding design are briefly discussed and organizational aspects are considered as an integral part of the overall safety program

  12. DOE Radiological Calibrations Intercomparison Program: Results of fiscal year 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, F.M.; McDonald, J.C.

    1988-06-01

    This report presents the FY 1987 results of the radiological calibrations intercomparison program. The intercomparison operation is discussed, and the equipment is described, particularly the instrument set, the beta source set, and relevant calculations. Solutions to problems and improvements in the program are suggested, and conclusions are then introduced. 9 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs

  13. Results of the radiological survey at the former ore storage site, Palmerton, Pennsylvania (PP001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, W.D.; Quillen, J.L.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1990-12-01

    As part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), the US Department of Energy (DOE) is implementing a radiological survey program to determine the radiological conditions at sites that were used by the department's predecessor agencies. The radiological survey discussed in this report for the former ore storage site in Palmerton, Pennsylvania, is part of the FUSRAP effort and was conducted at the request of DOE by members of the Measurement Applications and Development group of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in 1988. In 1953 and 1954 the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) established an ore stockpile on the property of the New Jersey Zinc Corporation in Palmerton, Pennsylvania. Approximately 57 truckloads of ore (about 360 tons) were stored at this site and remained there until 1973, when the AEC initiated a clean-up program. The 1988 ORNL radiological survey included a gamma scan at the ground surface, gamma measurements at discrete locations at the surface and at 1 m above the surface, gamma logging of 80 auger holes, and collection of 161 surface and subsurface soil samples. Of these 161 soil samples, 98% were below DOE guidelines for 226 Ra concentration in soil. Interpretation of the data suggests small, isolated spots of residual ore. The data indicate that it is highly unlikely that an individual living or working on this site could receive a radiation dose approaching the 100 mrem annual limit. However, it is suggested that DOE evaluate potential exposures at this site to ensure compliance with their policy that all exposures to radiation are reduced to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable. 4 refs., 88 figs., 4 tabs

  14. Comprehensive engineering and radiological survey of the Bochvar VNIINM site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazhanov, M.S.; Belousov, S.V.; Grishin, E.Zh.; Kotov, A.L.; Kuznetsov, A.Yu.; Savin, S.K.; Sukhanov, L.P.; Chernikov, M.A.; Utrobin, D.V.

    2012-01-01

    The comprehensive engineering and radiological survey (CERS) of Bochvar VNIINM war performed in 2010-2012. During the performance of the survey, radiometric measurements were taken to determine the total activity of α-emitting radionuclides in the air of work rooms, gas releases and in the environment, α- and β-emitting radionuclides in the air of work rooms, air releases from the site, waste waters, samples of snow, soil and vegetation, and in process oils. As a result of the work, experience was obtained in performing CERS of buildings and territory, standardized CERS programmes were developed, essential information was collected about radioactive contamination of both buildings and territory of the Bochvar VNIINM [ru

  15. [A survey of medical information education in radiological technology schools].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohba, Hisateru; Ogasawara, Katsuhiko; Hoshino, Shuhei; Hosoba, Minoru; Okuda, Yasuo; Konishi, Yasuhiko; Ikeda, Ryuji

    2010-08-20

    The purpose of this study was to clarify actual conditions and problems in medical information education and to propose the educational concept to be adopted in medical information. A questionnaire survey was carried out by the anonymous method in June 2008. The survey was intended for 40 radiological technology schools. The questionnaire items were as follows: (1) educational environment in medical information education, (2) content of a lecture in medical information, (3) problems in medical information education. The response rate was 55.0% (22 schools). Half of the responding schools had a laboratory on medical information. Seventeen schools had a medical information education facility, and out of them, approximately 50% had an educational medical information system. The main problems of the medical information education were as follows: (a) motivation of the students is low, (b) the educational coverage and level for medical information are uncertain, (c) there are not an appropriate textbook and educational guidance. In conclusion, these findings suggest that it is necessary to have a vision of medical information education in the education of radiological technologists.

  16. A survey of medical information education in radiological technology schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohba, Hisateru; Ogasawara, Katsuhiko; Hoshino, Shuhei; Hosoba, Minoru; Okuda, Yasuo; Konishi, Yasuhiko; Ikeda, Ryuji

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify actual conditions and problems in medical information education and to propose the educational concept to be adopted in medical information. A questionnaire survey was carried out by the anonymous method in June 2008. The survey was intended for 40 radiological technology schools. The questionnaire items were as follows: educational environment in medical information education, content of a lecture in medical information, problems in medical information education. The response rate was 55.0% (22 schools). Half of the responding schools had a laboratory on medical information. Seventeen schools had a medical information education facility, and out of them, approximately 50% had an educational medical information system. The main problems of the medical information education were as follows: motivation of the students is low, the educational coverage and level for medical information are uncertain, there are not an appropriate textbook and educational guidance. In conclusion, these findings suggest that it is necessary to have a vision of medical information education in the education of radiological technologists. (author)

  17. The Northern Marshall Islands radiological survey: Data and dose assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robison, W.L.; Noshkin, V.E.; Conrado, C.L.

    1997-01-01

    Fallout from atmospheric nuclear tests, especially from those conducted at the Pacific Proving Grounds between 1946 and 1958, contaminated areas of the Northern Marshall Islands. A radiological survey at some Northern Marshall Islands was conducted from September through November 1978 to evaluate the extent of residual radioactive contamination. The atolls included in the Northern Marshall Islands Radiological Survey (NMIRS) were Likiep, Ailuk, Utirik, Wotho, Ujelang, Taka, Rongelap, Rongerik, Bikar, Ailinginae, and Mejit and Jemo Islands. The original test sites, Bikini and Enewetak Atolls, were also visited on the survey. An aerial survey was conducted to determine the external gamma exposure rate. Terrestrial (soil, food crops, animals, and native vegetation), cistern and well water samples, and marine (sediment, seawater, fish and clams) samples were collected to evaluate radionuclide concentrations in the atoll environment. Samples were processed and analyzed for 137 Cs, 90 Sr, 239+240 Pu and 241 Am. The dose from the ingestion pathway was calculated using the radionuclide concentration data and a diet model for local food, marine, and water consumption. The ingestion pathway contributes 70% to 90% of the estimated dose. Approximately 95% of the dose is from 137 Cs accounts for about 10% to 30% of the dose. 239+240 Pu and 241 Am are the major contributors to dose via the inhalation pathway; however, inhalation accounts for only about 1% of the total estimated dose, based on surface soil levels and resuspension studies. All doses are computed for concentrations decay corrected to 1996. The maximum annual effective dose from manmade radionuclides at these atolls ranges from .02 mSv y -1 . The background dose in the Marshall Islands is estimated to be 2.4 mSv y -1 to 4.5 mSv y -1 . The 50-y integral dose ranges from 0.5 to 65 mSv. 35 refs., 2 figs., 9 tabs

  18. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigot, J.M.; Moreau, J.F.; Nahum, H.; Bellet, M.

    1990-01-01

    The 17th International Congress of Radiology was conducted in two separate scientific sessions, one for radiodiagnosis and one for radiation oncology. Topics covered are: Radiobiology -radioprotection; imaging and data processing; contrast media; MRI; nuclear medicine; radiology and disasters; radiology of tropical diseases; cardiovascular radiology; interventional radiology; imaging of trauma; imaging of chest, gastro-intestinal tract, breast and genito-urinary tract; imaging in gynecology;imaging in oncology; bone and joint radiology; head and neck-radiology; neuro-radiology. (H.W.). refs.; fig.; tabs

  19. Program of radiological monitoring environmental a nuclear facility in latency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blas, A. de; Riego, A.; Batalla, E.; Tapia, C.; Garcia, R.; Sanchez, J.; Toral, J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the Radiological Environmental Monitoring program of the Vandellos I nuclear power plant in the latency period. This facility was dismantled to level 2, as defined by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The program is an adaptation of the implanted one during the dismantling, taking into account the isotopes that may be present, as well as the main transfer routes. Along with the description of the program the results obtained in the latent period from 2005 until 2012 are presented.

  20. The American Board of Radiology Maintenance of Certification (MOC) Program in Radiologic Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Stephen R.; Hendee, William R.; Paliwal, Bhudatt R.

    2005-01-01

    Maintenance of Certification (MOC) recognizes that in addition to medical knowledge, several essential elements involved in delivering quality care must be developed and maintained throughout one's career. The MOC process is designed to facilitate and document the professional development of each diplomate of The American Board of Radiology (ABR) through its focus on the essential elements of quality care in Diagnostic Radiology and its subspecialties, and in the specialties of Radiation Oncology and Radiologic Physics. The initial elements of the ABR-MOC have been developed in accord with guidelines of The American Board of Medical Specialties. All diplomates with a ten-year, time-limited primary certificate in Diagnostic Radiologic Physics, Therapeutic Radiologic Physics, or Medical Nuclear Physics who wish to maintain certification must successfully complete the requirements of the appropriate ABR-MOC program for their specialty. Holders of multiple certificates must meet ABR-MOC requirements specific to the certificates held. Diplomates with lifelong certificates are not required to participate in the MOC, but are strongly encouraged to do so. MOC is based on documentation of individual participation in the four components of MOC: (1) professional standing, (2) lifelong learning and self-assessment, (3) cognitive expertise, and (4) performance in practice. Within these components, MOC addresses six competencies: medical knowledge, patient care, interpersonal and communication skills, professionalism, practice-based learning and improvement, and systems-based practice

  1. Results of the radiological survey at Essex Street and State Route 17 (MJ036), Maywood, New Jersey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Crutcher, J.W.; Carrier, R.F.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-02-01

    As a result of the Energy and Water Appropriations Act of Fiscal Year 1984, the property discussed in this report and properties in its vicinity contaminated with residues from the former Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) were included as a decontamination research and development project under the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. As part of this project, DOE is conducting radiological surveys in the vicinity of the site to identify properties contaminated with residues derived from the MCW. The principal radionuclide of concern is thorium-232. The radiological survey discussed in this report is part of that effort and was conducted, at the request of DOE, by members of the Measurement Applications and Development Group of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A radiological survey of the commercial property at Essex Street and State Route 17, Maywood, New Jersey, was conducted during 1987. 4 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  2. Radiological verification survey results at 14 Peck Ave., Pequannock, New Jersey (PJ001V)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, R.E.; Johnson, C.A.

    1995-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducted remedial action during 1993 at the Pompton Plains Railroad Spur and eight vicinity properties in the Wayne and Pequannock Townships in New Jersey as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). These properties are in the vicinity of the DOE-owned Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS), formerly the W. R. Grace facility. The property at 14 Peck Ave., Pequannock, New Jersey is one of these vicinity properties. At the request of DOE, a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted an independent radiological verification survey at this property. The purpose of the survey, conducted between September and December 1993, was to confirm the success of the remedial actions performed to remove any radioactive materials in excess of the identified guidelines. The verification survey included surface gamma scans and gamma readings at 1 meter, beta-gamma scans, and the collection of soil and debris samples for radionuclide analysis. Results of the survey demonstrated that all radiological measurements on the property at 14 Peck Ave. were within applicable DOE guidelines. Based on the results of the remedial action data and confirmed by the verification survey data, the portions of the site that had been remediated during this action successfully meet the DOE remedial action objectives

  3. Radiological verification survey results at 7 Peck Ave., Pequannock, New Jersey (PJ003V)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, R.E.; Johnson, C.A.

    1995-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) conducted remedial action during 1993 at the Pompton Plains Railroad Spur and eight vicinity properties in the Wayne and Pequannock Townships in New Jersey as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). These properties are in the vicinity of the DOE-owned Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS), formerly the W.R. Grace facility. The property at 7 Peck Ave., Pequannock, New Jersey is one of these vicinity properties. At the request of DOE, a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted an independent radiological verification survey at this property. The purpose of the survey, conducted between September and December 1993, was to confirm the success of the remedial actions performed to remove any radioactive materials in excess of the identified guidelines. The verification survey included surface gamma scans and gamma readings at 1 meter, beta-gamma scans, and the collection of soil samples for radionuclide analysis. Results of the survey demonstrated that all radiological measurements on the property at 7 Peck Ave. were within applicable DOE guidelines. Based on the results of the remedial action data and confirmed by the verification survey data, the portions of the site that had been remediated during this action successfully meet the DOE remedial action objectives

  4. Radiological verification survey results as 13 Peck Ave., Pequannock, New Jersey (PJ004V)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, R.E.; Johnson, C.A.

    1995-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) conducted remedial action during 1993 at the Pompton Plains Railroad Spur and eight vicinity properties in the Wayne and Pequannock Townships in New Jersey as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). These properties are in the vicinity of the DOE-owned Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS), formerly the W.R. Grace facility. The property at 13 Peck Ave., Pequannock, New Jersey is one of these vicinity properties. At the request of DOE, a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted an independent radiological verification survey at this property. The purpose of the survey, conducted between September and December 1993, was to confirm the success of the remedial actions performed to remove any radioactive materials in excess of the identified guidelines. The verification survey included surface gamma scans and gamma readings at 1 meter, beta-gamma scans, and the collection of soil and debris samples for radionuclide analysis. Results of the survey demonstrated that all radiological measurements on the property at 13 Peck Ave. were within applicable DOE guidelines. Based on the results of the remedial action data and confirmed by the verification survey data, the portions of the site that had been remediated during this action successfully meet the DOE remedial action objectives

  5. Radiological verification survey results at 898 Black Oak Ridge Rd., Wayne, New Jersey (WJ004V)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, R.E.; Johnson, C.A.

    1995-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) conducted remedial action during 1993 at the Pompton Plains Railroad Spur and eight vicinity properties in the Wayne and Pequannock Townships in New Jersey as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). These properties are in the vicinity of the DOE-owned Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS), formerly the W.R. Grace facility. The property at 898 Black Oak Ridge Road, Wayne, New Jersey is one of these vicinity properties. At the request of DOE, a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted an independent radiological verification survey at this property. The purpose of the survey, conducted between September and December 1993, was to confirm the success of the remedial actions performed to remove any radioactive materials in excess of the identified guidelines. The verification survey included surface gamma scans and gamma readings at one meter, beta-gamma scans, and the collection of soil and debris samples for radionuclide analysis. Results of the survey demonstrated that all radiological measurements on the property at 898 Black Oak Ridge Road were within applicable DOE guidelines. Based on the results of the remedial action data and confirmed by the verification survey data, the portions of the site that had been remediated during this action successfully meet the DOE remedial action objectives

  6. Radiological verification survey results at the Pompton Plains Railroad Spur, Pequannock, New Jersey (PJ008V)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, R.E.; Johnson, C.A.

    1995-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) conducted remedial action during 1993 at the Pompton Plains railroad spur and eight vicinity properties in the Wayne and Pequannock Townships in New Jersey as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). These properties are in the vicinity of the DOE-owned Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS), formerly the W.R. Grace facility. The property at the Pompton Plains Railroad Spur, Pequannock, New Jersey is one of these vicinity properties. At the request of DOE, a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted an independent radiological verification survey at this property. The purpose of the survey, conducted between September and December 1993, was to confirm the success of the remedial actions performed to remove any radioactive materials in excess of the identified guidelines. The verification survey included surface gamma scans and gamma readings at 1 meter, beta-gamma scans, and the collection of soil and debris samples for radionuclide analysis. Results of the survey demonstrated that all radiological measurements on the property at the Pompton Plains railroad spur were within applicable DOE guidelines. Based on the results of the remedial action data and confirmed by the verification survey data, the portions of the site that had been remediated during this action successfully meet the DOE remedial action objectives

  7. Radiological verification survey results at 3 Peck Ave., Pequannock, New Jersey (PJ002V)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, R.E.; Johnson, C.A.

    1995-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) conducted remedial action during 1993 at the Pompton Plains Railroad Spur and eight vicinity properties in the Wayne and Pequannock Townships in New Jersey as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). These properties are in the vicinity of the DOE-owned Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS), formerly the W.R. Grace facility. The property at 3 Peck Ave., Pequannock, New Jersey is one of these vicinity properties. At the request of DOE, a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted an independent radiological verification survey at this property. The purpose of the survey, conducted between September and December 1993, was to confirm the success of the remedial actions performed to remove any radioactive materials in excess of the identified guidelines. The verification survey included surface gamma scans and gamma readings at 1 meter, beta-gamma scans, and the collection of soil and debris samples for radionuclide analysis. Results of the survey demonstrated that all radiological measurements on the property at 3 Peck Ave. were within applicable DOE guidelines. Based on the results of the remedial action data and confirmed by the verification survey data, the portions of the site that had been remediated during this action successfully meet the DOE remedial action objectives

  8. Radiological verification survey results at 15 Peck Ave., Pequannock, New Jersey (PJ005V)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, R.E.; Johnson, C.A.

    1995-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) conducted remedial action during 1993 at the Pompton Plains Railroad Spur and eight vicinity properties in the Wayne and Pequannock Townships in New Jersey as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). These properties are in the vicinity of the DOE-owned Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS), formerly the W.R. Grace facility. The property at 15 Peck Ave., Pequannock, New Jersey is one of these vicinity properties. At the request of DOE, a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted an independent radiological verification survey at this property. The purpose of the survey, conducted between September and December 1993, was to confirm the success of the remedial actions performed to remove any radioactive materials in excess of the identified guidelines. The verification survey included surface gamma scans and gamma readings at 1 meter, beta-gamma scans, and the collection of soil and debris samples for radionuclide analysis. Results of the survey demonstrated that all radiological measurements on the property at 15 Peck Ave. were within applicable DOE guidelines. Based on the results of the remedial action data and confirmed by the verification survey data, the portions of the site that had been remediated during this action successfully meet the DOE remedial action objectives

  9. Radiological verification survey results at 17 Peck Ave., Pequannock, New Jersey (PJ006V)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, R.E.; Johnson, C.A.

    1995-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) conducted remedial action during 1993 at the Pompton Plains Railroad Spur and eight vicinity properties in the Wayne and Pequannock Townships in New Jersey as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). These properties are in the vicinity of the DOE-owned Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS), formerly the W.R. Grace facility. The property at 17 Peck Ave., Pequannock, New Jersey is one of these vicinity properties. At the request of DOE, a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted an independent radiological verification survey at this property. The purpose of the survey, conducted between September and December 1993, was to confirm the success of the remedial actions performed to remove any radioactive materials in excess of the identified guidelines. The verification survey included surface gamma scans and gamma readings at 1 meter, beta-gamma scans, and the collection of soil and debris samples for radionuclide analysis. Results of the survey demonstrated that all radiological measurements on the property at 17 Peck Ave. were within applicable DOE guidelines. Based on the results of the remedial action data and confirmed by the verification survey data, the portions of the site that had been remediated during this action successfully meet the DOE remedial action objectives

  10. Radiological survey of the Araks and Kura rivers (Azerbaijan)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umberto, Sansone; Chang, Kyu Kim; Gyula, Kis-Benedek; Renate, Schorn; Elizabeth, Zeiller

    2006-01-01

    Full text: In the frame of the IAEA Technical Cooperation project AZB/9/004 D evelopment of National Capabilities for Radionuclide Monitoring , aimed to establish in the Republic of Azerbaijan an independent National Nuclear Security and Radiation Safety Laboratory, a radiological survey was performed in the Araks and Kura Rivers (Azerbaijan). Sediment samples and where available aquatic plants were collected along these two rivers and their inflow and tributary rivers. Cs 137, U 238, U 234, Pu 239,Pu 240, Pu 238, Sr 90 and Am 241 activity concentrations were measured. The radionuclide levels measured were relatively low, and in most case below detection limit, as compared with those from other areas of the world which have been directly affected by effluents from nuclear installations or influenced by the Chernobyl accident. The results indicated that the radionuclides are of natural origin or attributable to the atmospheric fallout from nuclear weapons tests and in part also to the Chernobyl-derived deposition

  11. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites Remedial Action Program. Radiological survey of the St. Louis Airport Storage Site, St. Louis, Missouri. Final report. [U, Ra-bearing wastes stored in 1940-60's

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-09-01

    Results of two radiological surveys of the St. Louis-Lambert Airport property, formerly known as the Airport Storage Site, St. Louis, Missouri, are presented. Uranium- and radium-bearing waste materials were stored from the 1940's to the late 1960's in this area. The surveys included direct measurements of beta-gamma radiation; determination of uranium, actinium, and radium concentrations in soil samples and from bore holes; determination of radionuclide concentrations in groundwater and surface water; measurement of radon flux from the ground surface; and measurements of /sup 222/Rn in air near the site. Results indicate that some offsite drainage pathways are becoming contaminated, probably by runoff from the site; no migration of /sup 222/Rn from the site was observed.

  12. A reference standard-based quality assurance program for radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Patrick T; Johnson, C Daniel; Miranda, Rafael; Patel, Maitray D; Phillips, Carrie J

    2010-01-01

    The authors have developed a comprehensive radiology quality assurance (QA) program that evaluates radiology interpretations and procedures by comparing them with reference standards. Performance metrics are calculated and then compared with benchmarks or goals on the basis of published multicenter data and meta-analyses. Additional workload for physicians is kept to a minimum by having trained allied health staff members perform the comparisons of radiology reports with the reference standards. The performance metrics tracked by the QA program include the accuracy of CT colonography for detecting polyps, the false-negative rate for mammographic detection of breast cancer, the accuracy of CT angiography detection of coronary artery stenosis, the accuracy of meniscal tear detection on MRI, the accuracy of carotid artery stenosis detection on MR angiography, the accuracy of parathyroid adenoma detection by parathyroid scintigraphy, the success rate for obtaining cortical tissue on ultrasound-guided core biopsies of pelvic renal transplants, and the technical success rate for peripheral arterial angioplasty procedures. In contrast with peer-review programs, this reference standard-based QA program minimizes the possibilities of reviewer bias and erroneous second reviewer interpretations. The more objective assessment of performance afforded by the QA program will provide data that can easily be used for education and management conferences, research projects, and multicenter evaluations. Additionally, such performance data could be used by radiology departments to demonstrate their value over nonradiology competitors to referring clinicians, hospitals, patients, and third-party payers. Copyright 2010 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Quarterly environmental radiological survey summary: 100, 200, 300 and 600 Areas. Fourth quarter 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    This report provides a summary of the radiological surveys performed on waste disposal sites located at the Hanford Site. The Fourth Quarter 1994 survey results and the status of actions required from current and past reports are summarized

  14. The Northern Marshall Islands Radiological Survey: data and dose assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robison, W L; Noshkin, V E; Conrado, C L; Eagle, R J; Brunk, J L; Jokela, T A; Mount, M E; Phillips, W A; Stoker, A C; Stuart, M L; Wong, K M

    1997-07-01

    Fallout from atmospheric nuclear tests, especially from those conducted at the Pacific Proving Grounds between 1946 and 1958, contaminated areas of the Northern Marshall Islands. A radiological survey at some Northern Marshall Islands was conducted from September through November 1978 to evaluate the extent of residual radioactive contamination. The atolls included in the Northern Marshall Islands Radiological Survey (NMIRS) were Likiep, Ailuk, Utirik, Wotho, Ujelang, Taka, Rongelap, Rongerik, Bikar, Ailinginae, and Mejit and Jemo Islands. The original test sites, Bikini and Enewetak Atolls, were also visited on the survey. An aerial survey was conducted to determine the external gamma exposure rate. Terrestrial (soil, food crops, animals, and native vegetation), cistern and well water samples, and marine (sediment, seawater, fish and clams) samples were collected to evaluate radionuclide concentrations in the atoll environment. Samples were processed and analyzed for 137Cs, 90Sr, 239+240Pu and 241Am. The dose from the ingestion pathway was calculated using the radionuclide concentration data and a diet model for local food, marine, and water consumption. The ingestion pathway contributes 70% to 90% of the estimated dose. Approximately 95% of the dose is from 137Cs. 90Sr is the second most significant radionuclide via ingestion. External gamma exposure from 137Cs accounts for about 10% to 30% of the dose. 239+240Pu and 241Am are the major contributors to dose via the inhalation pathway; however, inhalation accounts for only about 1% of the total estimated dose, based on surface soil levels and resuspension studies. All doses are computed for concentrations decay corrected to 1996. The maximum annual effective dose from manmade radionuclides at these atolls ranges from .02 mSv y(-1) to 2.1 mSv y(-1). The background dose in the Marshall Islands is estimated to be 2.4 mSv y(-1). The combined dose from both background and bomb related radionuclides ranges from slightly

  15. Our Surveys & Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Employment and Payroll Survey of Business Owners Work from Home Our statistics highlight trends in household statistics from multiple surveys. Data Tools & Apps Main American FactFinder Census Business Builder My Classification Codes (i.e., NAICS) Economic Census Economic Indicators Economic Studies Industry Statistics

  16. Survey on medical information education for radiologic technologists working at hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Ryuji; Ogasawara, Katsuhiko; Okuda, Yasuo; Konishi, Yasuhiko; Ohoba, Hisateru; Hoshino, Shuhei; Hosoba, Minoru

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the importance of medical information for radiologic technologists has increased. The purpose of this questionnaire survey was to clarify the method of acquiring skill in medical information for radiologic technologists from the point of view of the managers of radiology departments. The questionnaire was sent to 260 hospitals that had introduced picture archiving and communication systems (PACSs) for the person responsible for medical information in the radiology department. The response rate was 35.4% (92 hospitals). The results of this survey clarified that few hospital have staff for medical information in the radiology department. Nevertheless, the excellent staff who have the skills to troubleshoot and develop systems are earnestly needed in radiology departments. To solve this problem, many technologists should understand the content, work load, and necessity of medical information. In addition, cooperation between radiologic technologist schools and hospitals is important in the field of medical information education. (author)

  17. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edholm, P.R.

    1990-01-01

    This is a report describing diagnostic techniques used in radiology. It describes the equipment necessary for, and the operation of a radiological department. Also is described the standard methods used in radiodiagnosis. (K.A.E.)

  18. Results of the radiological survey at 88 East Central Avenue, Maywood, New Jersey (MJ037)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-06-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 88 East Central Avenue Maywood, New Jersey (MJ037), was conducted during 1988. Results of the survey indicated radioactivity in the range of normal background for the northern New Jersey area. Radiological assessments of soil samples from the site demonstrate no radionuclide concentrations in excess of DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. 4 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  19. Results of the radiological survey at 90 Orchard Place Maywood, New Jersey (MJ023)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Carrier, R.F.

    1989-10-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 233 Th, derived from the MCW site. The surveys typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 90 Orchard Place, Maywood, New Jersey (MJ023), was conducted during 1987. While some radiological measurements taken at 90 Orchard Place were slightly greater than typical background levels encountered in the northern New Jersey area, no radionuclide concentrations nor radiation levels exceeded the applicable federal criteria. Based on the survey data it is recommended that this site be eliminated from consideration for inclusion in the DOE remedial action program. 5 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  20. Results of the radiological survey at 205 Main Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ075)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Carrier, R.F.; Floyd, L.M.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-08-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 205 Main Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ075), was conducted during 1987 and 1988. Results of the survey indicated radioactivity in the range of normal background for the northern New Jersey area. Radiological assessments of soil samples from the site demonstrate no radionuclide concentrations in excess of DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. 5 refs., 21 figs., 3 tabs

  1. Automation of the radiological survey process: USRADS ultrasonic ranging and data system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berven, B.A.; Blair, M.S.; Little, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    The Radiological Survey Activities (RASA) program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) serves as the Inclusion Survey Contractor (ISC) in the Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action project (UMTRAP). The ISC is to identify properties in the vicinity of 24 inactive uranium mill sites suspected of having 226 Ra-bearing uranium mill tailings by-product material originating from the processing of uranium ore contamination. Mobile gamma scanning was the primary method used to identify these properties. Once identified, the ISC conducts an inclusion survey. This survey performs sufficient radiological measurements to determine if uranium mill tailing contamination is present, and, if so, if it is in excess of relevant Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) criteria. Radon emanating from 226 Ra is the primary pathway of exposure to human occupants at these sites. EPA criteria focus on controlling 226 Ra concentration in soil. The concentration of 226 Ra in soil can be measured directly by soil sampling and subsequent gamma spectrographic analysis of the sample, or by direct measurement of the gamma exposure rate at the soil surface using portable instrumentation in the field. In both methods, the concentration of 226 Ra is inferred by examining the frequency of gamma emission of 214 Bi, a radioactive decay product in the 238 U decay chain

  2. Results of the radiological survey at 142 West Central Avenue, Maywood, New Jersey (MJ041)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-06-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 142 West Central Avenue, Maywood, New Jersey (MJ041), was conducted during 1988. Results of the survey indicated scattered radiation or ''shine'' from a storage pile, located off the property, containing residual radioactive material. Lead-shielded measurements showed radioactivity in the range of normal background for the northern New Jersey area. Radiological assessments of soil samples from the site demonstrate no radionuclide concentrations in excess of DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. 4 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs

  3. An aerial radiological survey of the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurer, R.J.

    1993-04-01

    An aerial radiological survey of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and surrounding area in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, was conducted during the period March 30 to April 14,1992. The purpose of the survey was to measure and document the terrestrial radiological environment of the Oak Ridge Reservation for use in environmental management programs and emergency response planning. The aerial survey was flown at an altitude of 150 feet (46 meters) along a series of parallel lines 250 feet (76 meters) apart and included X-10 (Oak Ridge National Laboratory), K-25 (former Gaseous Diffusion Plant), Y-12 (Weapons Production Plant), the Freels Bend Area and Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, the East Fork Poplar Creek (100-year floodplain extending from K-25 to Y-12), Elza Gate (former uranium ore storage site located in the city of Oak Ridge), Parcel A, the Clinch River (river banks extending from Melton Hill Dam to the city of Kingston), and the CSX Railroad Tracks (extending from Y-12 to the city of Oak Ridge). The survey encompassed approximately 55 square miles (1 41 square kilometers) of the Oak Ridge Reservation and surrounding area

  4. Interactive, Computer-Based Training Program for Radiological Workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinoskey, P.A.; Camacho, P.I.; Wells, L.

    2000-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is redesigning its Computer-Based Training (CBT) program for radiological workers. The redesign represents a major effort to produce a single, highly interactive and flexible CBT program that will meet the training needs of a wide range of radiological workers--from researchers and x-ray operators to individuals working in tritium, uranium, plutonium, and accelerator facilities. The new CBT program addresses the broad diversity of backgrounds found at a national laboratory. When a training audience is homogeneous in terms of education level and type of work performed, it is difficult to duplicate the effectiveness of a flexible, technically competent instructor who can tailor a course to the express needs and concerns of a course's participants. Unfortunately, such homogeneity is rare. At LLNL, they have a diverse workforce engaged in a wide range of radiological activities, from the fairly common to the quite exotic. As a result, the Laboratory must offer a wide variety of radiological worker courses. These include a general contamination-control course in addition to radioactive-material-handling courses for both low-level laboratory (i.e., bench-top) activities as well as high-level work in tritium, uranium, and plutonium facilities. They also offer training courses for employees who work with radiation-generating devices--x-ray, accelerator, and E-beam operators, for instance. However, even with the number and variety of courses the Laboratory offers, they are constrained by the diversity of backgrounds (i.e., knowledge and experience) of those to be trained. Moreover, time constraints often preclude in-depth coverage of site- and/or task-specific details. In response to this situation, several years ago LLNL began moving toward computer-based training for radiological workers. Today, that CBT effort includes a general radiological safety course developed by the Department of Energy's Hanford facility and a

  5. The Radiological Safety Analysis Computer Program (RSAC-5) user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenzel, D.R.

    1994-02-01

    The Radiological Safety Analysis Computer Program (RSAC-5) calculates the consequences of the release of radionuclides to the atmosphere. Using a personal computer, a user can generate a fission product inventory from either reactor operating history or nuclear criticalities. RSAC-5 models the effects of high-efficiency particulate air filters or other cleanup systems and calculates decay and ingrowth during transport through processes, facilities, and the environment. Doses are calculated through the inhalation, immersion, ground surface, and ingestion pathways. RSAC+, a menu-driven companion program to RSAC-5, assists users in creating and running RSAC-5 input files. This user's manual contains the mathematical models and operating instructions for RSAC-5 and RSAC+. Instructions, screens, and examples are provided to guide the user through the functions provided by RSAC-5 and RSAC+. These programs are designed for users who are familiar with radiological dose assessment methods

  6. Survey Method for Radiological Surveys of 300-FF-1 Operable Unit Soils and Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brehm, D.M.

    1998-06-01

    This technical basis is to be used to survey soils at the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit during remediation of the site. Its purpose is to provide a basis for the survey methods to be employed by radiological control technician (RCTs) to guide the excavation effort in accordance with the 300-FF-1 waste site Record of Decision (ROD). The ROD for the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit requires selective excavation, removal, and disposal of contaminated soil above 350 pCi/g total uranium activity. Soil above this level will be disposed of as radioactive waste. The remaining soil will remain onsite

  7. Results of the preliminary radiological survey at the former Diamond Magnesium Company site, Luckey, Ohio (DML001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1990-02-01

    As part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, the US Department of Energy (DOE) is implementing a radiological survey program to determine the radiological conditions at sites that were used by the department's predecessor agencies. One such site is the former Diamond Magnesium Company facility in Luckey, Ohio. The preliminary radiological survey discussed in this report was conducted at the request of DOE by members of the Measurement Applications and Development group of Oak Ridge National Laboratory in December 1988. The former Diamond Magnesium Company site in Luckey, Ohio, was used as a magnesium reduction plant during World War 2. It was closed in 1945 and reopened in 1949 as a beryllium production facility, operated by Brush Wellman for the US Atomic Energy Commission. The preliminary radiological survey included: a surface gamma scan of part of the property outdoors, collection of surface and subsurface soil samples, and collection of water samples. Laboratory analysis of soil samples showed concentrations of 226 Ra in excess of applicable DOE guidelines. A follow-up, detailed survey is recommended. 9 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs

  8. Survey Procedures Manual for the Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program (ESSAP). Revision 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program (ESSAP) of the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) conducts radiological survey activities under a contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) and for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). ORISE and its programs are operated by Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) through a contract with DOE. The purpose of this Procedures Manual is to provide a standardized set of procedures that document activities of the program in an auditable manner. These procedures are applicable to both DOE and NRC operations. Procedures presented in this manual are limited to those associated with site survey activities

  9. Radiologic safety program for ionizing radiation facilities in Parana, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, M.F.S.; Tilly Junior, J.G.

    1997-01-01

    A radiologic safety program for inspection, licensing and control of the use of ionizing radiation in medical, industrial and research facilities in Parana, Brazil is presented. The program includes stages such as: 1- division into implementation phases considering the activity development for each area; 2-use of the existing structure to implement and to improve services. The development of the program will permit to evaluate the improvement reached and to correct operational strategic. As a result, a quality enhancement at the services performed, a reduction for radiation dose exposure and a faster response for emergency situations will be expected

  10. Work plan for the radiological survey for the David Witherspoon, Incorporated, Landfill-1630 site, Knoxville, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-07-01

    This work plan establishes the methods and requirements for performing a radiological survey at the David Witherspoon, Incorporated, Landfill-1630 Site, Knoxville, Tennessee (DWI 1630 Site) in accordance with requirements under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). The radiological survey will identify the radiological contamination level of the equipment and debris stored at the DWI 1630 Site. The data generated from the survey activities will support the decisions for characterization of the equipment/debris and aid in subsequent disposition and waste handling. The survey activities to be performed under this work plan include an equipment radiological survey, a walkover survey, and an immunoassay testing for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). This work plan includes a quality assurance (QA)/quality control (QC) project plan, a health and safety (H ampersand S) plan, and a waste management plan

  11. Evaluation of radiological teaching programs in the Internet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitz, J.; Schubert, S.; Voelk, M.; Scheibl, K.; Paetzel, C.; Schreyer, A.; Djavidani, B.; Feuerbach, S.; Strotzer, M.

    2003-01-01

    Evaluation of web based training programs,which can be contacted from the homepages of radiological departments of German universities.Material and method From june 2000 to january 2002 the 75 web based training programs of 57 providers,which can be contacted from the web pages of the radiological departments of german universities were evaluated in a prospective study.A medical student experienced in using the world wide web examined each training program three times in an interval of six months using the following criteria: availability of the web sites,target group,kind of training program,contents and structure and the technical solution. 51 of the 57 the homepages were fully available at each visit. 64 of the 75 web based training programs which could be connected from these sites were available at all three visitis.One program was only partially available at one spot check. 8 of the 75 programs were designed for physicians and medically trained personal, 23 were made for medical students and 44 addressed both target groups (partially more than once mentioned).The number of the presented cases ranged between one single and 3700. In 31 of 75 training programs links to other teaching files were found.A complete presentation of cases was presented by 48 of the 75 web sites.5 of the 75 web sites offered physiological images for comparison. In 20 training programs the pathological changes were optically marked in the x-ray images.A logical and didactical structure was found in 24 teaching files, 14 gave the possibility to check the learning results.No provider made use of the possibility to pass credits to the students or physicians acount with regard to official training programs. Multimedia techniques were used in 15 training programs.43 sites used data reduced preview images (thumbnails).The latest update of the site is mentioned in 55 of the 75 web sites. 19 of 57 providers had either no possibility of contact or did not answer to an e-mail. From the homepages

  12. Environmental Radiological Impact of Nuclear Power. Monitoring and Control Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, L. M.

    2000-01-01

    Radioactive contamination of the environment and public exposure to ionizing radiation may result from releases from programmed or accidental operations in regulated activities, or they may be due to preexisting situations such as contamination caused by past accidents, radioactive rain caused by nuclear tests, or increased natural radioactivity resulting from human activities. In many cases, both the emission sources and the environment should be monitored to determine the risk to the population and verify to what extent the limits and conditions established by competent authorities are being observed. Monitoring can be divided into three categories: monitoring of the emission source, of the receiving medium and of members of the public; individual monitoring of the population is extremely rare and would only be considered when estimated doses substantially exceed the annual public dose limit. In practices likely to produce significant radioactive releases, as is the case of nuclear fuel cycle facilities, the limits and conditions for monitoring and controlling them and the requirements for environmental radiological monitoring are established in the licensing process. Programs implemented during normal operation of the facilities form the basis for monitoring in the event of accidents. in addition to environmental radiological monitoring associated with facilities, different countries have monitoring programs outside the facilities zones of influence, in order to ascertain the nationwide radiological fund and determine possible increases in this fund. In Spain, the facilities that generate radioactive waste have effluent storage, treatment and removal systems and radiological monitoring programs based on site and discharge characteristics. The environmental radiological monitoring system is composed of the network implemented by the owners in the nuclear fuel cycle facilities zones of influence, and by nationwide monitoring networks managed by the Consejo de

  13. Radiological survey of the Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, St. Louis, Missouri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldsmith, W.A.; Leggett, R.W.; Haywood, F.F.

    1981-12-01

    The results of a radiological survey of part of the Mallinckrodt Chemical Works (former Destrehan and Broadway Street plants), St. Louis, Missouri, are presented. During the period 1942 through 1957, this site was used for various projects involving the production of purified uranium from pitchblende concentrates. The survey included measurements of the following: residual alpha and beta-gamma contamination levels in the existing buildings that were used in the uranium projects; external gamma radiation levels at 1 m above the surface in these buildings and outdoors around these buildings; radon and radon daughter concentrations in the air in these buildings; uranium, radium, actinium, and thorium concentrations in surface and subsurface soil on the site; concentrations of radionuclides in water and sediment found in drains both inside and outside the buildings; and concentrations of radionuclides in ground and surface water on the site and in river water taken near the site. Alpha and beta-gamma contamination levels inside and outside some of the buildings were above limits set by current federal guidelines concerning the release of property for unrestricted use. Elevated external gamma radiation levels were measured at some outdoor locations and in some of the buildings. Licensable concentrations of uranium were found in soil at some places, and the concentration of uranium in a water sample taken from a core hole between Buildings 100 and 101 was in excess of limits set by current federal standards. Radon and radon daughter concentrations in three buildings were in excess of current federal guidelines for nonoccupational radiation exposure

  14. Radiological survey of the Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, St. Louis, Missouri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsmith, W A; Leggett, R W; Haywood, F F

    1981-12-01

    The results of a radiological survey of part of the Mallinckrodt Chemical Works (former Destrehan and Broadway Street plants), St. Louis, Missouri, are presented. During the period 1942 through 1957, this site was used for various projects involving the production of purified uranium from pitchblende concentrates. The survey included measurements of the following: residual alpha and beta-gamma contamination levels in the existing buildings that were used in the uranium projects; external gamma radiation levels at 1 m above the surface in these buildings and outdoors around these buildings; radon and radon daughter concentrations in the air in these buildings; uranium, radium, actinium, and thorium concentrations in surface and subsurface soil on the site; concentrations of radionuclides in water and sediment found in drains both inside and outside the buildings; and concentrations of radionuclides in ground and surface water on the site and in river water taken near the site. Alpha and beta-gamma contamination levels inside and outside some of the buildings were above limits set by current federal guidelines concerning the release of property for unrestricted use. Elevated external gamma radiation levels were measured at some outdoor locations and in some of the buildings. Licensable concentrations of uranium were found in soil at some places, and the concentration of uranium in a water sample taken from a core hole between Buildings 100 and 101 was in excess of limits set by current federal standards. Radon and radon daughter concentrations in three buildings were in excess of current federal guidelines for nonoccupational radiation exposure.

  15. Radiological Survey Results for the Niagara Mohawk Right-of-Way, Tonawanda, New York (TNY004)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie, S.P.; Uziel, M.S.

    1998-01-01

    At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey of a small portion of the Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation right-of-way in Tonawanda, New York. The purpose of the survey was to determine if radioactive residuals had migrated from or been redistributed onto the Niagara Mohawk right-of-way from the former Linde property to the west. The Linde Air Products Division of Union Carbide Corporation, Tonawanda New York, had used radioactive materials at that location for work performed under government contract from 1942 through 1948. The survey was performed in May 1996 in response to Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) requirements. These requirements dictate that the radiological status of certain vicinity properties shall be assessed and documented according to prescribed procedures prior to certification of the property for release for unrestricted use. Such release can only be granted if the property is found to be within current applicable authorized limits. The survey included a gamma scan of accessible areas and the collection and radionuclide analysis of soil samples from the portion of right-of-way located east of the former Linde plant site and north of the railway spur entrance gate. Results of the survey indicate that radioactive material probably originating from the Linde plant is located on the Niagara Mohawk right-of-way in the area surveyed. Surface gamma exposure rates were elevated above typical background levels. Four scattered surface soil samples exceeded DOE guideline values for 238 U, and 8 of 13 surface soil samples exceeded DOE guideline values for 226 Ra. The radionuclide distribution in these samples was similar to that found in materials resulting from former processing activities at the Linde site. It is recommended that the property be designated for remedial action by DOE

  16. Integrative teaching in Radiology. A survey; Integrative Lehre in der Radiologie. Eine Bestandsaufnahme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dettmer, S.; Weidemann, J.; Wacker, F. [Hannover Medical School, Hannover (Germany). Inst. for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Fischer, V. [Hannover Medical School, Hannover (Germany). Office for Medical Education

    2015-04-15

    To survey integrative teaching in radiology at German universities. A questionnaire about radiological education was sent electronically to all 37 chairpersons of university radiology departments in Germany. The questions included the course type, teaching methods, concept, perception, and advantages and disadvantages of integrative teaching. Statistical analysis was performed with nonparametric statistics and chi-square test. The survey was considered representative with a return rate of 68%. Integrative teaching is established at 4/5 of all departments. Integrative teaching is well accepted with an acceptance rate that is significantly higher in so-called 'Modellstudiengaengen' (model courses of study) (100%) compared to conventional courses of study (72%). The advantages of integrative teaching include linking of content (92%) and preparation for interdisciplinary work (76%). The disadvantages include high effort (75%) and time (67%) for organization. Furthermore, there is a risk that basic radiological facts and knowledge cannot be conveyed and that the visibility of radiology as an independent discipline is lost. Conventional radiological teaching has a similarly high acceptance (84%) compared to integrative courses (76%). Integrative teaching has a high acceptance among chairpersons in radiology in Germany despite the greater effort. A good interdisciplinary collaboration is essential for integrative teaching and at the same time this can be conveyed to the students. However, the visibility of radiology as a discipline and the possibility to cover basic radiological content must be ensured. Therefore, both conventional courses and integrative teaching seems reasonable, especially in cross-disciplinary subjects such as radiology.

  17. FFTF preoperational survey. Program report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twitty, B.L.; Bicehouse, H.J.

    1980-12-01

    The FFTF will become operational with criticality early in 1980. This facility is composed of the test reactor, fuel examination cells, expended fuel storage systems and fuel handling systems. The reactor and storage systems are sodium-cooled with the heat load dumped to the ambient air through heat exchangers. In order to assure that the operation of the FFTF has minimal impact on the environment, a monitoring program has been established. Prior to operation of a new facility, a preoperational environmental survey is required. It is the purpose of this report to briefly describe the environmental survey program and to provide the background data obtained during the preoperational phase of the survey program. Nine stations in the program of particular importance to FFTF are discussed in detail with results of monitoring given. No unexplained trends were noted

  18. Monitoring activities review of the Radiological Environmental Surveillance Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, P.D.

    1992-03-01

    The 1992 Monitoring Activities Review (MAR) is directed at the Radiological Environment Surveillance Program (RESP) activities at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) of Idaho Engineering Laboratory (INEL). MAR panelists studied RESP documents and discussed their concerns with Environmental Monitoring Unit (EMU) staff and other panel members. These concerns were subsequently consolidated into a collection of recommendations with supporting discussions. Recommendations focus on specific monitoring activities, as well as the overall program. The MAR report also contains pertinent comments that should not require further action

  19. A survey of radiologic practices in dental installations in Recife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, M.C.; Asfora, K.; Pinhereiro, J.T.; Khoury, H.J.; Hazing, C.A

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the operating conditions of the dental x-ray equipment installed in Recife, as well as, evaluate the radioprotection procedures at the dental clinics. The study consisted of: a) visual inspection of the x-ray unit, b) complete registration of the unit's characteristic, i.e. manufacturer, model, age, collimation type,FSD; c) measurement of the kVp, exposure time and surface dose, d) evaluation of the film processing conditions, and e) inspection of the radiation protection items available for the patient and personnel. The results showed that 42% of the inspected units presented fields diameters larger than the limits values than the limits values recommended by either national or international radiation protection organizations. The discrepancy between the present time and the ''true'' irradiation time was higher than 10% in 69% of the cases. The discrepancy between the present and the applied kilovoltage, on the other hand, was higher than 10% in 35% of the inspected units. The majority of the clinics do not have available either lead aprons or collars patients. Films are processed manually without using timers or thermometers. The test made to verify the adequacy of the film processing box showed that 75% of them had poor light filtration capability. In view of the result obtained, it is strongly recommended that a quality control program be implemented in dental radiologic clinics in Recife

  20. Radiological Assistance Program, DOE Region 6 response plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakubowski, F.M.

    1993-02-01

    This program plan meets all the requirements identified in DOE Order 5530.3, Radiological Assistance Program and supports those requirements leading to the establishment of a Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) as required by DOE 5530-5. Requests for radiological assistance may come from other DOE facilities, Federal or state agencies, tribal officials, or from any private corporation or individual. Many of the requests will be handled by a telephone call, a conference or a letter, teletype or memorandum. Other requests for assistance may involve radioactive material in serious accidents, fire, personal injuries, contamination or possible hazards to the general public. Some occurrences may require the dispatch of trained personnel equipped with radiation monitoring instruments and related equipment necessary to evaluate, control and neutralize the hazard. The primary responsibility for incidents involving radioactive material always remains with the party having custody of the radioactive materials. In addition, the DOE recognizes that the assistance provided shall not in any way preempt state, tribal, or local authority and/or responsibility on state or tribal properties. Toward this end, DOE assistance for non-DOE radioactive materials, is limited to technical assistance, advice, measurement and other resources as deemed necessary by the local authorities but excludes DOE interface with the public media. This is a function handled by the local or state Incident Commander

  1. ABR Core examination preparation: results of a survey of fourth-year radiology residents who took the 2013 examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Anup S; Grajo, Joseph R; Decker, Summer; Heitkamp, Darel E; DeStigter, Kristen K; Mezwa, Duane G; Deitte, Lori

    2015-01-01

    A survey was administered to fourth-year radiology residents after receiving their results from the first American Board of Radiology (ABR) Core examination in 2013. The purpose was to gather information regarding resources and study strategies to share with program directors and future resident classes. An online survey was distributed to examinees nationwide. The survey included free-response and multiple choice questions that covered examination results, perceived value of enumerated study resources, case-based and didactic teaching conferences, board reviews, study materials for noninterpretive skills, multidisciplinary conference attendance, and free-form comments. Two hundred sixty-six of 1186 residents who took the Core examination responded to the survey. Some resources demonstrated a significant difference in perceived value between residents who passed the examination and residents who failed, including internal board reviews (1.10, P multiple choice questions, audience response, and integration of clinical physics and patient safety topics compared to residents who failed. Radiology residents and residency programs have adapted their preparations for the ABR Core examination in a variety of ways. Certain practices and study tools, including daily conferences and internal board reviews, had greater perceived value by residents who passed the examination than by residents who failed. This survey provides insights that can be used to assess and modify current preparation strategies for the ABR Core examination. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Aerial radiological surveys of Steed Pond, Savannah River Site: Dates of surveys, 1984--1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzsche, A.E.; Jobst, J.E.

    1993-09-01

    From June 1984 to August 1985, three aerial radiological surveys were conducted over Steed Pond at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. In addition, Steed Pond was included in larger-area surveys of the Savannah River Site in subsequent years. The surveys were conducted by the Remote Sensing Laboratory of EG ampersand G Energy Measurements, Inc., Las Vegas, Nevada, for the US Department of Energy. Airborne measurements were obtained for both natural and man-made gamma radiation over Steed Pond and surrounding areas. The first survey was conducted when the pond was filled to normal capacity for the time of the year. On September 1, 1984, the Steed Pond dam spillway failed causing the pond to drain. The four subsequent surveys were conducted with the pond drained. The second survey and the third were conducted to study silt deposits exposed by the drop in water level after the spillway's opening. Steed Pond data from the February 1987 and April 1989 Savannah River Site surveys have been included to bring this study up to date

  3. The R+D radiological protection program in the European Communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mingot Buades, F.

    1993-01-01

    The R+D program a radiological protection for the year 1992 has lied basically on three areas: I .- Radiological exposure of man II .- Radiation effects on man (evaluation, prevention and treatment) III.- Risks and management of radiation exposure

  4. Comparison of radiology residency programs in ten countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willatt, J.M.G.; Mason, A.C.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to compare various aspects of radiology training schemes in ten countries. A questionnaire was sent to senior residents in the UK, USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Italy, Egypt, India, Malaysia and Greece. The questions concerned length of training, required pre-training experience, the organization of the training scheme, teaching, resources, stages at which residents can independently perform and report examinations, fellowships, and progression to jobs. A wide variety of training, ranging from highly scheduled programs with detailed aims and objectives, to self-learning occurs across the world. Examinations and assessments are also variable. There are lessons to be learned from varying practices; more exchanges of ideas should be encouraged. In view of the ''internationalization'' of radiology services and the variation in training styles an international qualification for quality assurance purposes may be desirable. (orig.)

  5. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites remedial action program. Radiological survey of Universal Cyclopes, Inc., Titusville, Plant (formerly Vulcan Crucible Steel Company, Aliquippa, Pennsylvania, May 2-8, 1978)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Mundis, R.L.; Mayes, C.B.

    1982-05-01

    A radiological survey was conducted at the Universal Cyclops, Inc. Titusville Plant (formerly Vulcan Crucible Steel Company), in Aliquippa, Pennsylvania, to determine the location and quantities of any radioactive materials remaining on the site as a result of MED/AEC activities in the late 1940s. This facility was used for rolling uranium billets during the MED/AEC era. The survey included measurements of alpha and beta-gamma contamination, both fixed and removable; beta-gamma exposure readings at contact and at 1 m (3 ft) above the floor or ground level; and measurements of the concentrations of radon daughters in air and concentrations of 137 Cs, the 232 Th decay chain, the 226 Ra decay chain, and uranium in the soil on the site. Fourteen spots of contamination exceeded the allowable limits for natural uranium. Under current use conditions, the potential for radiation exposure of occupants of the building from these sources of contamination is remote. Concentrations of radon daughters were below the 0.01 WL limit. Calculated radon concentrations based on the radon-daughter determinations ranged from 0.11 to 0.27 pCi/l. The concentration guide for 222 Rn in uncontrolled areas is 3 pCi/l. Analysis of soil samples from the site indicated elevated concentrations of uranium (15.1 +- 0.7 to 109.0 +- 5.5 pCi/g) at one sampling location near the building. There currently are no regulatory limits for uranium concentration in soil, but, a proposed guide value is pCi/g. After evaluation of results of the survey, it was concluded that although some areas of the Universal Cyclops facility are contaminated, these areas do not pose a significant risk to the present occupants of the building. Nonetheless, in a few cases the contamination does exceed accepted guidelines. Remedial measures are indicated to bring the contaminated areas within the guidelines

  6. Results of the radiological survey at 4 Branca Court, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ037)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Carrier, R.R.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-06-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 4 Branca Court, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ037), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. However, this property is apparently located directly over the old Lodi Brook streambed. This factor in combination with the elevated gamma logs of several auger holes is sufficient to recommend this site for inclusion in the DOE remedial action program. 5 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  7. An aerial radiological survey of the West Valley Demonstration Project and surrounding area, West Valley, New York

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, H.A.

    1991-09-01

    An aerial radiological survey of the West Valley Demonstration Project and the surrounding area was conducted from mid-August through early September 1984 by EG ampersand G Energy Measurements, Inc. for the United States Department of Energy. The radiological survey was part of the United States Department of Energy Comprehensive Integrated Remote Sensing (CIRS) program, which provides state-of-the-art remote sensing to support the needs of the various DOE facilities. The survey consisted of airborne measurements of both natural and man-made gamma radiation emanating from the terrestrial surface. These measurements allowed an estimate of the distribution of isotopic concentrations in the area surrounding the project site. Results are reported as isopleths superimposed on aerial photographs of the area. Gamma ray energy spectra are also presented for the net man-made radionuclides. 8 refs., 16 figs., 9 tabs

  8. Instructional Vignettes in Publication and Journalism Ethics in Radiology Research: Assessment via a Survey of Radiology Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Ginocchio, Luke A

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the potential usefulness of written instructional vignettes relating to publication and journalism ethics in radiology via a survey of radiology trainees. A literature review was conducted to guide the development of vignettes, each describing a scenario relating to an ethical issue in research and publication, with subsequent commentary on the underlying ethical issue and potential approaches to its handling. Radiology trainees at a single institution were surveyed regarding the vignettes' perceived usefulness. A total of 21 vignettes were prepared, addressing institutional review board and human subjects protection, authorship issues, usage of previous work, manuscript review, and other miscellaneous topics. Of the solicited trainees, 24.7% (16/65) completed the survey. On average among the vignettes, 94.0% of the participants found the vignette helpful; 19.9 received prior formal instruction on the issue during medical training; 40.0% received prior informal guidance from a research mentor; and 42.0% indicated that the issue had arisen in their own or a peer's prior research experience. The most common previously experienced specific issue was authorship order (93.8%). Free-text responses were largely favorable regarding the value of the vignettes, although also indicated numerous challenges in properly handling the ethical issues: impact of hierarchy, pressure to publish, internal politics, reluctance to conduct sensitive conversations with colleagues, and variability in journal and professional society policies. Radiology trainees overall found the vignettes helpful, addressing commonly encountered topics for which formal and informal guidance were otherwise lacking. The vignettes are publicly available through the Association of University Radiologists (AUR) website and may foster greater insights by investigators into ethical aspects of the publication and journalism process, thus contributing to higher quality

  9. Results of the radiological survey at 4 Hancock Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ060)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Carier, R.F.; Floyd, L.M.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-09-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 4 Hancock Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ060), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Gamma logging results found during this survey and during a previous survey conducted by Bechtel National, Incorporated, strongly indicated radionuclide concentrations in subsurface soil in excess of DOE remedial action criteria. This finding, coupled with the fact that adjacent properties have been found to be contaminated and that Lodi Brook apparently flows under the property, suggests that it be considered for inclusion in the DOE remedial action program. 5 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs

  10. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Medical Radiologic Technology (Radiography) (CIP: 51.0907--Medical Radiologic Technology). Postsecondary Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the radiologic technology program. Presented in the introductory section are a description of the program and suggested course sequence. Section I lists baseline competencies for the program,…

  11. Final report of the radiological release survey of Building 11 at the Grand Junction Office Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.K.; Corle, S.G.

    1997-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore concentrates and mill tailings during vanadium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District, and during sampling, assaying, pilot milling, storage, and brokerage activities conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJO Remedial Action Project (GJORAP) to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and underlying aquifer. WASTREN-Grand Junction is the site contractor for the facility and the remedial action contractor for GJORAP. Building 11 and the underlying soil were found not to be radiologically contaminated; therefore, the building can be released for unrestricted use. Placards have been placed at the building entrances indicating the completion of the radiological release survey and prohibiting the introduction of any radioactive materials within the building without written approvals from the GJO Facilities Operations Manager. This document was prepared in response to a DOE-GJO request for an individual final release report for each GJO building

  12. Final report of the radiological release survey of Building 54 at the Grand Junction Office Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.K.; Corle, S.G.

    1997-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore concentrates and mill tailings during vanadium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District, and during sampling, assaying, pilot milling, storage, and brokerage activities conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJO Remedial Action Project (GJORAP) to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and underlying aquifer. WASTREN-Grand Junction is the site contractor for the facility and the remedial action contractor for GJORAP. Building 54 and the underlying soil were found not to be radiologically contaminated, and can be released for unrestricted use. Placards have been placed at the building entrances indicating the completion of the radiological release survey and prohibiting the introduction of any radioactive materials within the building without written approvals from the GJO Facilities Operations Manager. This document was prepared in response to a DOE-GJO request for an individual release report for each GJO building

  13. Final report of the radiological release survey of Building 29 at the Grand Junction Office Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.K.; Corle, S.G.

    1997-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore concentrates and mill tailing during vanadium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District, and during sampling, assaying, pilot milling, storage, and brokerage activities conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJO Remedial Action Project (GJORAP) to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and underlying aquifer. WASTREN-Grand Junction is the site contractor for the facility and the remedial action contractor for GJORAP. Building 29 and the underlying soil were found not to be radiologically contaminated; therefore, the building can be released for unrestricted use. Placards have been placed at the building entrances indicating the completion of the radiological release survey and prohibiting the introduction of any radioactive materials within the building without written approvals from the GJO Facilities Operations Manager. This document was prepared in response to a DOE-GJO request for an individual final release report for each GJO building

  14. Final report of the radiological release survey of Building 19 at the Grand Junction Office Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.K.; Corle, S.G.

    1997-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore concentrates and mill tailings during vanadium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District, and during sampling, assaying, pilot milling, storage, and brokerage activities conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJO Remedial Action Project (GJORAP) to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and underlying aquifer. WASTREN-Grand Junction is the site contractor for the facility and the remedial action contractor for GJORAP. Building 19 and the underlying soil were found not to be radiologically contaminated; therefore, the building can be released for unrestricted use. Placards have been placed at the building entrances indicating the completion of the radiological release survey and prohibiting the introduction of any radioactive materials within the building without written approvals from the GJO Facilities Operations Manager. This document was prepared in response to a DOE-GJO request for an individual final release report for each GJO building

  15. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites remedial action program. Radiological survey of The George Herbert Jones Chemical Laboratory, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, June 13-17, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Mayes, C.B.; Justus, A.L.

    1982-05-01

    A comprehensive radiological survey was conducted at George Herbert Jones Chemical Laboratory at the University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. Radiochemistry for the MED/AEC project was performed in this building in the 1940s. The building is now used as laboratories, offices, and classrooms. The survey was undertaken to determine the location and quantities of any radioactive materials remaining from the MED/AEC operations. Forty-three spots of contamination possibly resulting from MED/AEC occupancy in 17 rooms exceeded the allowable limits as given in the ANSI Standard N13.12. Under current use conditions, the potential for radiation exposure to occupants of this building from these sources of contamination is remote. Concentrations of radon daughters in the air of the building, as measured with grab-sampling techniques, were below the limit of 0.01 WL above background as given in the Surgeon General's Guidelines. No long-lived radionuclides were detected in any air sample. Concentrations of radionuclides in soil samples from near the laboratory generally indicated background levels. In order to reduce the potential for radiation exposure, remedial measures such as stabilization of the contamination in place would be applicable as a short-term measure. In order to reduce the risk in the event that building modifications take place in the future, health physics procedures and coverage are recommended. The long-term solution would involve decontamination by removal of the radioactive residues from the 17 rooms or areas where contamination possibly resulting from MED/AEC activities was detected

  16. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykora, A.

    2006-01-01

    In this text-book basic knowledge about radiology, biomedical diagnostic methods (radiography, computer tomography), nuclear medicine and safety and radiation protection of personnel on the radiodiagnostic place of work are presented

  17. Administrative organization in diagnostic radiology residency program leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Grant R; Mullins, Mark E; Chen, Zhengjia; Meltzer, Carolyn C

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to document the current state of administrative structure in US diagnostic radiology (DR) residency program leadership. A secondary objective was to assess for correlation(s), if any, with DR residency programs that equipped positions such as assistant, associate, and emeritus program director (PD) with respect to residency size and region of the country. The Fellowship and Residency Electronic Interactive Database, as well as direct communication and programmatic Web site searches, were used to gather data regarding current US DR residency leadership. Data collected included the presence of additional leadership titles, including assistant PD, associate PD, and PD emeritus, and how many faculty members currently held each position. Programs were excluded if results could not be identified. Analysis of variance and t tests were used to estimate the correlations of the size of a residency with having additional or shared PD positions and the types of positions, respectively. Chi-square tests were used to assess for any regional differences. As of the time of this project, the Fellowship and Residency Electronic Interactive Database defined 186 US DR residency programs. A total of 173 programs (93%) were included in the analysis; the remainder were excluded because of unavailability of relevant data. Seventy-two percent (124 of 173) of programs had additional DR leadership positions. Of these, 30 programs (17%) had more than one such position. There were no significant differences in the sizes of the programs that used these additional positions (mean, 25 ± 12; range, 6-72) compared with those that did not (mean, 24 ± 12; range, 7-51). There were no significant differences between programs that had additional positions with respect to region of the country. The majority of US DR residency programs used some form of additional DR leadership position. In the majority of cases, this was in the form of an assistant or associate PD. Nearly one

  18. Analysis of a quality assurance program in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethlin, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    Retake analysis before and after introduction of a quality assurance program showed a 45% reduction of the retake rate. The most important changes concerning equipment and organizing of labour were: (1) More detailed inspection of development machines and X-ray generators, (2) new cassettes and intensifying screens, (3) reduction of the number of film formats used, (4) information and instruction of personnel. Cost reductions and profit from increased examination rate amounted to 4.5% of the overall operating costs of the radiologic department. (author)

  19. Learning on human resources management in the radiology residency program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Aparecido Ferreira de; Lederman, Henrique Manoel; Batista, Nildo Alves, E-mail: aparecidoliveira@ig.com.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina

    2014-03-15

    Objective: to investigate the process of learning on human resource management in the radiology residency program at Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, aiming at improving radiologists' education. Materials and methods: exploratory study with a quantitative and qualitative approach developed with the faculty staff, preceptors and residents of the program, utilizing a Likert questionnaire (46), taped interviews (18), and categorization based on thematic analysis. Results: According to 71% of the participants, residents have clarity about their role in the development of their activities, and 48% said that residents have no opportunity to learn how to manage their work in a multidisciplinary team. Conclusion: Isolation at medical records room, little interactivity between sectors with diversified and fixed activities, absence of a previous culture and lack of a training program on human resources management may interfere in the development of skills for the residents' practice. There is a need to review objectives of the medical residency in the field of radiology, incorporating, whenever possible, the commitment to the training of skills related to human resources management thus widening the scope of abilities of the future radiologists. (author)

  20. Learning on human resources management in the radiology residency program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Aparecido Ferreira de; Lederman, Henrique Manoel; Batista, Nildo Alves

    2014-01-01

    Objective: to investigate the process of learning on human resource management in the radiology residency program at Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, aiming at improving radiologists' education. Materials and methods: exploratory study with a quantitative and qualitative approach developed with the faculty staff, preceptors and residents of the program, utilizing a Likert questionnaire (46), taped interviews (18), and categorization based on thematic analysis. Results: According to 71% of the participants, residents have clarity about their role in the development of their activities, and 48% said that residents have no opportunity to learn how to manage their work in a multidisciplinary team. Conclusion: Isolation at medical records room, little interactivity between sectors with diversified and fixed activities, absence of a previous culture and lack of a training program on human resources management may interfere in the development of skills for the residents' practice. There is a need to review objectives of the medical residency in the field of radiology, incorporating, whenever possible, the commitment to the training of skills related to human resources management thus widening the scope of abilities of the future radiologists. (author)

  1. US DOE Radiological Assistance Program: personnel, equipment and resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hull, A.P.; Kuehner, A.V.; Phillips, L.F.

    1982-01-01

    The Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is intended to provide emergency advice and assistance in the event of radiological incidents. Each of DOE's eight Regional Coordinating Offices in the US provide a 24-hour reporting and response capability. Specifically, the Brookhaven Area Office (BHO) is responsible for DOE's Region I, which includes the 11 northeastern states of the US. Although an inventory of dedicated equipment is assigned to BHO-RAP, it draws upon the resources of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for trained personnel in health physics and for other specialized personnel in both the day to day operation of the program and in the on-the-scene response to an incident. The organization of the BHO-RAP program and its response procedures are described in detail. An inventory and brief description of the contents of a variety of emergency equipment kits and of additional state-of-the-art instruments is included. The BHO-RAP guidelines and requirements for field operations are also indicated, as are other DOE resources upon which it can draw

  2. Designing Surveys for Language Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, James Dean

    A discussion of survey methodology for investigating second language programs and instruction examines two methods: oral interviews and written questionnaires. Each method is defined, and variations are explored. For interviews, this includes individual, group, and telephone interviews. For questionnaires, this includes self-administered and…

  3. Quarterly environmental radiological survey summary - second quarter 1997 100, 200, 300, and 600 areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, S.M.; Marks, B.M.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides a summary of the radiological surveys performed in support of near-facility environmental monitoring at the Hanford Site. The Second Quarter 1997 survey results and the status of actions required are summarized below: All of the routine environmental radiological surveys scheduled during April, May, and June 1997, were performed as planned with the exception of UN-216-E-9. This site was not surveyed as stabilization activities were in progress. The sites scheduled for the Environmental Restorations Contractor (ERC) team were switched with those identified for the third quarter as there was a conflict with vegetation management activities

  4. Results of the independent radiological verification survey at 4400 Piehl Road, Ottawa Lake, Michigan (BTO002)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, M.E.; Brown, K.S.

    1996-04-01

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducted an independent radiological verification survey at Ottawa Lake, Michigan. The survey was performed in November and December of 1994. The purpose of the survey was to verify that the site was remediated to levels below the DOE guidelines for FUSRAP sites. Results of the independent radiological verification survey at Ottawa Lake, Michigan confirm that the residual uranium contamination at the site is below DOE FUSRAP guidelines for unrestricted use.

  5. Results of the radiological survey at 12 Frost Place, Albany, New York (AL178)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espegren, M.L.; Marley, J.L.

    1987-12-01

    A number of properties in the Albany/Colonie area have been identified as being potentially contaminated with uranium originating from the former National Lead Company's uranium forming plant in Colonie, New York. Radiological surveys were performed at 27 properties by members of the Radiological Survey Activities (RASA) group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period July 13-July 26, 1986. The property at 12 Frost Place in Albany, New York was the subject of a radiological investigation initiated July 22, 1986. The residential property consists of a two-story frame house located on a rectangular lot. An asphalt driveway connects the house to the street. The lot included in the radiological survey was /approximately/13 m wide by 29 m deep. 13 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs

  6. Results of the radiological survey at 30 Long Valley Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ045)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, W.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Francis, M.W.; Mynatt, J.O.

    1989-11-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 30 Long Valley Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ045), was conducted during 1985, 1986, and 1987. Some radionuclide measurements were greater than typical background levels in the northern New Jersey area. However, results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. 5 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Results of the radiological survey at 48 Schlosser Drive, Rochelle Park, New Jersey (RJ005)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Brown, K.S.

    1992-10-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956.MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from thisthorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy(DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Tb, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 48 Schlosser Drive, Rochelle Park, New Jersey (RJO05), was conducted on July 14, 1991. Results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions were not significantly different from normal background levels in the northern New Jersey area

  8. Results of the radiological survey at 6 Branca Court, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ041)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Carrier, R.F.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-06-01

    Maywood Chemical works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rate earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 6 Branca Court, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ041), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Act program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 6 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Results of the radiological survey at 19 Redstone Lane, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ056)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, W.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Francis, M.W.; Mynatt, J.O.

    1989-10-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 19 Redstone Lane, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ056), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions were not significantly different from normal background levels in the northern New Jersey area. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  10. Results of the radiological survey at 62 Trudy Drive, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ080)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-06-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 62 Trudy Drive, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ080), was conducted during 1988. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 5 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  11. Results of the radiological survey at 174 Essex Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ073)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Carrier, R.F.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-06-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 174 Essex Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ073), was conducted during 1987. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site

  12. Results of the radiological survey at 160 Essex Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ072)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Carrier, R.F.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-06-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 160 Essex Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ072), was conducted during 1987. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 4 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Results of the radiological survey at 99 Garibaldi Avenue, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ064)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-07-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 99 Garibaldi Avenue, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ064), was conducted during 1987. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 4 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs

  14. Results of the radiological survey at 2 Branca Court, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ036)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Carrier, R.F.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-06-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1961 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 2 Branca Court, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ036), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site

  15. Results of the radiological survey at 9 Hancock Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ028)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, W.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Francis, M.W.; Mynatt, J.O.

    1989-09-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 9 Hancock Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ028), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Some radionuclide measurements were greater than typical background levels in the northern New Jersey area. However, results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. 5 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Results of the radiological survey at 37 Schlosser Drive, Rochelle Park, New Jersey (RJ002)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Brown, K.S.

    1992-10-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 37 Schlosser Drive, Rochelle Park, New Jersey (RJ002), was conducted on July 14, 1991. Results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions were not significantly different from normal background levels in the northern New Jersey area

  17. Results of the radiological survey at 77 Sinninger Street, Maywood, New Jersey (MJ052)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Brown, K.S.

    1993-06-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 77 Sinninger Street, Maywood, New Jersey (MJ052), was conducted on December 17, 1992. Results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions were not significantly different from normal background levels in the northern New Jersey area

  18. Results of the radiological survey at 27 Schlosser Drive, Rochelle Park, New Jersey (RJ004)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Brown, K.S.

    1992-10-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Tb, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 27 Schlosser Drive, Rochelle Park, New Jersey (RJ004), was conducted on July 14, 1991. Results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions were not significantly different from normal background levels in the northern New Jersey area

  19. Results of the radiological survey at 112 Avenue E, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ082)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-06-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residue, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 112 Avenue E, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ082), was conducted during 1988. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 2 figs., 3 tabs

  20. Results of the radiological survey at 108 Avenue E, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ084)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-06-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 108 Avenue E, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ084), was conducted during 1988. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Results of the radiological survey at 106 Columbia Lane, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ063)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-07-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 106 Columbia Lane, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ063), was conducted during 1987. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 4 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  2. Results of the radiological survey at 32 Long Valley Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ046)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, W.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Francis, M.W.; Mynatt, J.O.

    1989-10-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 32 Long Valley Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ046), was conducted during 1985, 1986, and 1987. Some radionuclide measurements were greater than typical background levels in the northern New Jersey area. However, results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. 5 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  3. Results of the radiological survey at 17 Redstone Lane, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ030)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Carrier, R.F.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-06-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 17 Redstone Lane, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ030), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 4 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  4. Results of the radiological survey at 10 Long Valley Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ055)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Carrier, R.F.

    1989-11-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 10 Long Valley Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ055), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions were not significantly different from normal background levels in the northern New Jersey area. 4 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Results of the radiological survey at 79 Avenue B, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ091)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-06-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 79 Avenue B, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ091), was conducted during 1988. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Results of the radiological survey at 130 West Central Avenue, Maywood, New Jersey (MJ029)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Carrier, R.F.

    1989-10-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclides analyses. The survey of this site, 130 West Central Avenue, Maywood, New Jersey (MJ029), was conducted during 1987 and 1988. Some radionuclide measurements were greater than typical background levels in the northern New Jersey area. However, results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action program criteria. 4 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Results of the radiological survey at 12 Long Valley Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ054)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Carrier, R.F.

    1989-11-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extracting process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 12 Long Valley Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ054), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions were not significantly different from normal background levels in the northern New Jersey area

  8. Results of the radiological survey at 1 Branca Court, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ034)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Carrier, R.F.

    1989-10-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 1 Branca Court, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ034), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action program criteria. The radionuclide distributions were not significantly different from normal background levels in the northern New Jersey area. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Results of the radiological survey at 7 Redstone Lane, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ044)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, W.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Francis, M.W.; Mynatt, J.O.

    1989-10-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclides analyses. The survey of this site, 7 Redstone Lane, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ044), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Some radionuclide measurements were greater than typical background levels in the northern New Jersey area. However, results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. 5 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  10. Results of the radiological survey at 24 Long Valley Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ048)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, W.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Francis, M.W.; Mynatt, J.O.

    1989-08-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monozite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 24 Long Valley Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ048), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 4 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs

  11. Results of the radiological survey at 113 Avenue E, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ081)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-06-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 113 Avenue E, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ081), was conducted during 1988. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 5 refs, 2 figs., 3 tabs

  12. Results of the radiological survey at 28 Long Valley Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ047)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, W.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Francis, M.W.; Mynatt, J.O.

    1989-10-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 28 Long Valley Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ047), was conducted during 1985, 1986, 1987. Some radionuclide measurements were greater than typical background levels in the northern New Jersey area. However, results of the Survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. 5 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Results of the radiological survey at 10 Hancock Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ031)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Carrier, R.F.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-06-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling from radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 10 Hancock Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ031), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  14. Results of the radiological survey at 6 Hancock Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ033)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Carrier, R.F.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-06-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth, earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 6 Hancock Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ033), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site

  15. Results of the radiological survey at 7 Hancock Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ027)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, W.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Francis, M.W.; Mynatt, J.O.

    1989-09-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. AT the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 7 Hancock Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ027), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 5 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Results of the radiological survey at 31 Schlosser Drive, Rochelle Park, New Jersey (RJ003)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Brown, K.S.

    1992-10-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Tb, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 31 Schlosser Drive, Rochelle Park, New Jersey (RJ003), was conducted on July 14, 1991. Results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions were not significantly different from normal background levels in the northern New Jersey area

  17. Survey of UK radiology trainees in the aftermath of ‘Modernising Medical Careers’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mair Grant

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Following implementation of Modernising Medical Careers (MMC in the UK, potential radiology trainees must decide on their career and apply sooner than ever before. We aimed to determine whether current trainees were sufficiently informed to make an earlier career decision by comparing the early radiology experiences of Traditional and Foundation Trainees. Methods 344 radiology trainees were appointed through MMC in 2007/08. This cohort was surveyed online. Results Response rate was 174/344 (51%. Traditional Trainees made their career decision 2.6 years after graduation compared with 1.2 years for Foundation Trainees (57/167, 34%. Nearly half of responders (79/169, 47% experienced no formal radiology teaching as undergraduates. Most trainees regularly attended radiology meetings, spent time in a radiology department and/or performed radiology research. Many trainees received no career advice specific to radiology (69/163, 42% at any point prior to entering the specialty; this includes both formal and informal advice. Junior doctor experiences were more frequently cited as influencing career choice (98/164, 60%. An earlier career decision was associated with; undergraduate radiology projects (-0.72 years, p = 0.018, career advice (-0.63 years, p = 0.009 and regular attendance at radiology meetings (-0.65 years, p = 0.014. Conclusion Early experience of radiology enables trainees to make an earlier career decision, however current radiology trainees were not always afforded relevant experiences prior to entering training. Radiologists need to be more proactive in encouraging the next generation of trainees.

  18. Survey of UK radiology trainees in the aftermath of ‘Modernising Medical Careers’

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Following implementation of Modernising Medical Careers (MMC) in the UK, potential radiology trainees must decide on their career and apply sooner than ever before. We aimed to determine whether current trainees were sufficiently informed to make an earlier career decision by comparing the early radiology experiences of Traditional and Foundation Trainees. Methods 344 radiology trainees were appointed through MMC in 2007/08. This cohort was surveyed online. Results Response rate was 174/344 (51%). Traditional Trainees made their career decision 2.6 years after graduation compared with 1.2 years for Foundation Trainees (57/167, 34%). Nearly half of responders (79/169, 47%) experienced no formal radiology teaching as undergraduates. Most trainees regularly attended radiology meetings, spent time in a radiology department and/or performed radiology research. Many trainees received no career advice specific to radiology (69/163, 42%) at any point prior to entering the specialty; this includes both formal and informal advice. Junior doctor experiences were more frequently cited as influencing career choice (98/164, 60%). An earlier career decision was associated with; undergraduate radiology projects (-0.72 years, p = 0.018), career advice (-0.63 years, p = 0.009) and regular attendance at radiology meetings (-0.65 years, p = 0.014). Conclusion Early experience of radiology enables trainees to make an earlier career decision, however current radiology trainees were not always afforded relevant experiences prior to entering training. Radiologists need to be more proactive in encouraging the next generation of trainees. PMID:23031228

  19. Aerial radiological survey of the Savannah River floodplain. Date of survey: July-October 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyns, P.K.

    1984-12-01

    An aerial radiological survey of the Savannah River floodplain was conducted from late July through early October 1983 by EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc. for the United States Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Safety, and E.I. Du Pont de Nemours and Company, Inc., Savannah River Plant. The survey consisted of airborne measurements of both natural and man-made gamma radiation emanating from the terrestrial surface. These measurements allowed an estimate of the distribution of isotopic concentrations in the floodplain area. Results are reported as isopleths superimposed on maps and aerial photographs of the area. Gamma ray energy spectra are also presented for the net man-made radionuclides. The survey was designed to cover all the Savannah River floodplain (over 8000 flight line miles) from Augusta to Savannah, Georgia. Several areas of man-made activity were detected in the vicinity of the Savannah River Plant (SRP). The presence of 60 Co was not detected below the Lower Three Runs Creek area. The 137 Cs activity decreased rapidly below Lower Three Runs Creek; at a distance of 15 kilometers (9 miles) the annual dose due to 137 Cs was less than 10 millirem (mrem). Typical backgrounds in the survey areas were between 65 and 125 mrem per year. 4 references, 51 figures, 8 tables

  20. Joint CDRH (Center for Devices and Radiological Health) and state quality-assurance surveys in nuclear medicine: Phase 2 - radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, D.R.; Evans, C.D.

    1986-08-01

    The report discusses survey results on aspects of the quality assurance of radio-pharmaceuticals from 180 nuclear-medicine facilities in the United States. Data were collected from facilities in 8 states. Demographic information about nuclear-medicine operations and quality-assurance programs was gathered by state radiation-control-program personnel. The data collected from the survey show an incomplete acceptance of quality-assurance practices for radiopharmaceuticals. Most of the facilities in the survey indicated that, because an inferior radiopharmaceutical was prepared so infrequently, they did not believe it was cost-effective to perform extensive quality-assurance testing. The Center for Devices and Radiological Health hopes that the information from the survey will stimulate nuclear-medicine professionals and their organizations to encourage appropriate testing of all radiopharmaceuticals

  1. Relevant training issues for introduction of digital radiology: Results of a survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peer, S.; Faulkner, K.; Torbica, P.; Peer, R.; Busch, H. P.; Vetter, S.; Neofotistou, E.; Back, C.; Bosmans, H.; Vano, E.

    2005-01-01

    Council Directive 97/43/Euratom establishes the need for adequate training of radiology staff. The transition to digital radiology implies changes in various imaging aspects, which are not sufficiently covered by current institutional training programmes. This work aimed to assess how professionals, experienced in digital imaging, acquired their expertise and hence, what form institutional training should take. Within DIMOND III, a survey on training and resources was performed among radiology professionals. A lack of institutional education for digital radiology was found. In the transition to digital radiology, 30-35% train on the job and another 23-28% receive training from digital equipment vendors. A general agreement exists on the need for new quality criteria and strategies for dose management. Issues relevant for conventional/digital transition are only sparsely covered in EC training programmes. Based on these results, a set of training issues was produced, to be included in future European guidelines. (authors)

  2. Implementation of an occupational monitoring program in diagnostic radiology at the 'Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Sergio Ricardo de; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires; Azevedo, Ana Cecilia Pedrosa de

    2003-01-01

    An occupational monitoring program in diagnostic radiology was implemented at the Hospital Clementino Fraga Filho of the Rio de Janeiro Federal University (UFRJ), Brazil, in accordance with the Brazilian legislation. Previously, a survey of all personnel involved with ionizing radiation was performed. Many problems were observed: the great majority of the workers were not properly monitored; only three departments of the hospital kept an independent survey of the occupational doses; there was not a follow-up control of the high doses. With the implementation of the program, a new laboratory was chosen to read the dosemeters and this initiative resulted in reduction of the hospital costs. The inclusion of seven more departments in the program represented an increase of 60% in the number of monitored workers. The program also provided a system to control the high doses, especially in the Hemodynamics department, which presented the highest mean dose value (0.32 mSv/month). An area survey program was performed during different periods in places considered of high risk for the workers and for the public as well. At the same time, a software was used to build a database with the aim of controlling all personnel data. The implementation of the program provided all personnel involved a better knowledge of the risks associated with ionizing radiation and of radioprotection, and also awareness of the need of correct use of the personal dose monitors. (author)

  3. A national UK survey of radiology trainees special interest choices: what and why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvizi, Nassim; Bhuva, Shaheel

    2017-11-01

    A national survey was designed to better understand factors influencing special interest choices, future aspirations of UK radiology trainees and perceptions of breast radiology. A SurveyMonkey questionnaire was developed and distributed to all radiology trainees in the UK through the British Institute of Radiology, RCR Junior Radiologists Forum and by directly contacting UK training schemes as well as by social media between December 2015 and January 2016. From 21 training schemes across the UK, 232 responses were received. Over half entered radiology after foundation training and 62% were ST1-3; one-fifth of trainees intended to leave the NHS. The most popular special interests were musculoskeletal (18%), abdominal imaging (16%) and neuroradiology (13%). Gynaecological and oncological imaging proved to be the least popular. Strong personal interest, a successful rotation during training, a mix of imaging modalities, direct impact on patient care and job prospects were the most popular factors influencing career choice. Research and potential for private income were the least influential factors. Respondents detailed their perceptions of breast radiology, selecting an awareness of career prospects (41%) and a better trainee experience (36%) as factors that would increase their interest in pursuing it as a career. Understanding the factors that influence special interest choice is essential to addressing the alarming staffing shortfalls that will befall certain radiology special interests. Addressing trainee's preconceptions and improving the trainee experience are key to attracting trainees to breast radiology. Advances in knowledge: This is the first survey of its kind in the UK literature designed to evaluate special interest career choices and the factors that influence those among radiology trainees.

  4. Radiological survey of the former Baker Brothers, Inc. site, 2551--2555 Harleau Place, Toledo, Ohio (BTO001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.

    1992-03-01

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted investigative radiological surveys at the REMS, Inc., and the Doug Beet Company, 2551-2555 Harleau Place, Toledo, Ohio (BTO001) in 1988. The purpose of the surveys was to determine whether the property was contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 238 U, as a result of work contracted to the Manhattan Engineer District (MED). The survey included gamma scans; directly measured alpha, beta, and gamma radiation levels; transferable contamination levels; and soil, dust, debris, and air sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey and sampling covered accessible portions of the exterior ground surface, roof, and interiors of buildings. Results of the surveys demonstrated four general areas having radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria for 238 U outdoors and as surface contamination on shelves in one building

  5. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyers, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on disease processes originating within the alimentary tract, may extend through the extraperitoneal spaces, and abnormalities primarily arising within other extraperitoneal sites may significantly affect the bowel. Symptoms and signs may be obscure, delayed, or nonspecific, and the area is generally not accessible to auscultation, palpation, or percussion. Radiologic evaluation thus plays a critical role

  6. Radiological survey of landscapes in a scale 1 : 500 to 1 : 5000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganzha, D.D.; Nazarov, O.B.; Sploshnoj, B.M.

    2008-01-01

    The method of implementation of radiological survey, which includes providing a spatial basis, forming of a survey network, implementation of measuring of radiation and not radiation parameters of landscapes, is offered. The examples of application are resulted in the conditions of the Chernobyl exclusion on man-caused, urbanized and other functional landscapes

  7. An aerial radiological survey of L Lake and Steel Creek, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feimster, E.L.

    1992-11-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over a portion of the Savannah River Site along the Steel Creek Corridor during the period of July 16--31, 1986. Similar surveys of this area were performed in 1974, 1979, 1982, 1983, and 1985. This survey was flown with the same survey parameters and coverage as the 1985 survey to obtain measurements of both natural and man-made gamma radiation. These radiological measurements were used to determine if there had been any changes in concentration, spatial distribution, or estimated equivalent annual dose (mrem/yr) of the natural terrestrial background or man-made contaminants detected during the 1985 survey and earlier. The 1986 data are presented as isodose rate contour maps with overlays of corresponding 1985 survey data

  8. An aerial radiological survey of the Central Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feimster, E.L.

    1991-09-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over a 194-square- kilometer (75-square-mile) area encompassing the central portion of the Savannah River Site (SRS). The survey was flown during February 10--27, 1987. These radiological measurements were used as baseline data for the central area and for determining the extent of man-made radionuclide distribution. Previous SRS surveys included small portions of the area; the 1987 survey was covered during the site- wide survey conducted in 1979. Man-made radionuclides (including cobalt-60, cesium-137, protactinium-234m, and elevated levels of uranium-238 progeny) that were detected during the survey were typical of those produced by the reactor operations and material processing activities being conducted in the area. The natural terrestrial radiation levels were consistent with those measured during prior surveys of other SRS areas. 1 refs., 4 figs

  9. An aerial radiological survey of Areas 16 and 30, Nevada Test Site: Date of survey: June 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluitt, C.M.

    1986-10-01

    An aerial radiological survey of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) was conducted for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The survey period was from 1 June to 16 June 1983, during which airborne measurements were obtained over Areas 16 and 30. The data were used to generate exposure rate, cobalt-60, and cesium-137 spatial distribution maps. The aerial survey results are expressed as exposure rate, cesium-137, and cobalt-60 isopleth contours, superimposed on NTS maps. 12 refs., 16 figs

  10. Quality Measurements in Radiology: A Systematic Review of the Literature and Survey of Radiology Benefit Management Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Anand; Cinelli, Christina; Carrino, John A; Nagy, Paul; Coresh, Josef; Riese, Victoria G; Durand, Daniel J

    2015-11-01

    As the US health care system transitions toward value-based reimbursement, there is an increasing need for metrics to quantify health care quality. Within radiology, many quality metrics are in use, and still more have been proposed, but there have been limited attempts to systematically inventory these measures and classify them using a standard framework. The purpose of this study was to develop an exhaustive inventory of public and private sector imaging quality metrics classified according to the classic Donabedian framework (structure, process, and outcome). A systematic review was performed in which eligibility criteria included published articles (from 2000 onward) from multiple databases. Studies were double-read, with discrepancies resolved by consensus. For the radiology benefit management group (RBM) survey, the six known companies nationally were surveyed. Outcome measures were organized on the basis of standard categories (structure, process, and outcome) and reported using Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. The search strategy yielded 1,816 citations; review yielded 110 reports (29 included for final analysis). Three of six RBMs (50%) responded to the survey; the websites of the other RBMs were searched for additional metrics. Seventy-five unique metrics were reported: 35 structure (46%), 20 outcome (27%), and 20 process (27%) metrics. For RBMs, 35 metrics were reported: 27 structure (77%), 4 process (11%), and 4 outcome (11%) metrics. The most commonly cited structure, process, and outcome metrics included ACR accreditation (37%), ACR Appropriateness Criteria (85%), and peer review (95%), respectively. Imaging quality metrics are more likely to be structural (46%) than process (27%) or outcome (27%) based (P < .05). As national value-based reimbursement programs increasingly emphasize outcome-based metrics, radiologists must keep pace by developing the data infrastructure required to collect outcome

  11. Efficient radiologic reading environment by using an open-source macro program as connection software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Han

    2012-01-01

    The objectives are (1) to introduce an easy open-source macro program as connection software and (2) to illustrate the practical usages in radiologic reading environment by simulating the radiologic reading process. The simulation is a set of radiologic reading process to do a practical task in the radiologic reading room. The principal processes are: (1) to view radiologic images on the Picture Archiving and Communicating System (PACS), (2) to connect the HIS/EMR (Hospital Information System/Electronic Medical Record) system, (3) to make an automatic radiologic reporting system, and (4) to record and recall information of interesting cases. This simulation environment was designed by using open-source macro program as connection software. The simulation performed well on the Window-based PACS workstation. Radiologists practiced the steps of the simulation comfortably by utilizing the macro-powered radiologic environment. This macro program could automate several manual cumbersome steps in the radiologic reading process. This program successfully acts as connection software for the PACS software, EMR/HIS, spreadsheet, and other various input devices in the radiologic reading environment. A user-friendly efficient radiologic reading environment could be established by utilizing open-source macro program as connection software. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Efficient radiologic reading environment by using an open-source macro program as connection software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Han

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The objectives are (1) to introduce an easy open-source macro program as connection software and (2) to illustrate the practical usages in radiologic reading environment by simulating the radiologic reading process. Materials and methods: The simulation is a set of radiologic reading process to do a practical task in the radiologic reading room. The principal processes are: (1) to view radiologic images on the Picture Archiving and Communicating System (PACS), (2) to connect the HIS/EMR (Hospital Information System/Electronic Medical Record) system, (3) to make an automatic radiologic reporting system, and (4) to record and recall information of interesting cases. This simulation environment was designed by using open-source macro program as connection software. Results: The simulation performed well on the Window-based PACS workstation. Radiologists practiced the steps of the simulation comfortably by utilizing the macro-powered radiologic environment. This macro program could automate several manual cumbersome steps in the radiologic reading process. This program successfully acts as connection software for the PACS software, EMR/HIS, spreadsheet, and other various input devices in the radiologic reading environment. Conclusion: A user-friendly efficient radiologic reading environment could be established by utilizing open-source macro program as connection software.

  13. Electrical power line and pole removal radiological survey completion report: Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-02-01

    Each electric power pole and all wire, cross members, and attached hardware were radiologically surveyed and removed. The survey procedures did not conform in every respect with the planned procedures because the actual work differed from the removal plan. The survey showed that all contamination was fixed. Certain poles that were suspected of being contaminated with Th-230 were cut off one foot above ground level and left on site. Each truck load of materials was checked at the access point to ensure it met release criteria. Wood samples were taken from all the poles at Building 403 and 5% of all the rest and analyzed for U-238 and Th-232. Only U-238 was detected. 1903 bundles of wire (95,150 lin ft) were released, and 76 bundles (1520 lin ft) were found to be contaminated. 7163 lin ft of power pole material were released, and 1484 lin ft were contaminated. A comprehensive quality measure assurance/quality control program was applied to this work

  14. Results of the radiological survey at 72 Sidney Stret, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ067)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Carrier, R.F.; Floyd, L.M.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-09-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residues used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 72 Sidney Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ067), was conducted during 1987. Results indicated concentrations of 232 Th slightly in excess of the DOE remedial action criterion for subsurface soil. This finding, coupled with the fact that adjacent properties have been designated by DOE for remedial action, and that the old Lodi Brook streambed is apparently beneath the property, suggests that it be considered for inclusion in the DOE remedial action program. 4 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  15. Radiological diagnosis in AIDS - associated diseases: survey and differential diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rademaker, J.; Frahm, C.

    1997-01-01

    Acute manifestations of illnesses in patients with HIV-infection or AIDS will benefit from rapid diagnosis. Radiologic examinations provide substantial information to narrow the differential diagnosis. This article reviews clinically important HIV-associated diseases for the radiologist. The braod spectrum of possible manifestations is illustrated by the accompanying case reports that typify the complexity of diagnoses in this growing problem worldwide. (orig.) [de

  16. An Aerial Radiological Survey of the Nevada Test Site - Area 10 Corrective Action Unit 367

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyons, Craig

    2010-01-01

    A series of aerial radiological surveys were conducted over the Sedan, Uncle, and Ess ground zero areas in Area 10. The surveys were performed in November 2009 utilizing a large array of helicopter mounted sodium iodide detectors. The purpose of the survey was to update the previous radiological survey levels of the environment and surrounding areas of the ground zeros. Gross Counts, inferred exposure rates, man-made activity, and Americium-241 activity, as calculated from the aerial data are presented in the form of isopleth maps superimposed on imagery of the surveyed areas. In addition, spectral products are included that identify Cesium-137, Americium-241 and Cobalt-60 as the primary radionuclides present within the survey area.

  17. Usage of structured reporting in radiological practice: results from an Italian online survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faggioni, Lorenzo [University of Pisa, UO Radiodiagnostica 1, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Pisa (Italy); Coppola, Francesca [Sant' Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Malpighi Radiology Unit, Department of Diagnostic and Preventive Medicine, Bologna (Italy); Ferrari, Riccardo [Urgenza Emergenza, UOC Diagnostica per Immagini 1, Rome (Italy); Neri, Emanuele [Dipartimento di Ricerca Traslazionale, Universita di Pisa, Sezione Dipartimentale Radiodiagnostica 3, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Pisana, Pisa (Italy); Regge, Daniele [Universita di Torino, Dipartimento di Scienze Chirurgiche, Candiolo Cancer Institute - FPO, IRCCS, Candiolo (Italy)

    2017-05-15

    To assess the opinion on structured reporting (SR) and its usage by radiologist members of the Italian Society of Medical Radiology (SIRM) via an online survey. All members received an email invitation to join the survey as an initiative by the SIRM Imaging Informatics Chapter. The survey included 10 questions about demographic information, definition of radiological SR, its usage in everyday practice, perceived advantages and disadvantages over conventional reporting and overall opinion about SR. 1159 SIRM members participated in the survey. 40.3 % of respondents gave a correct definition of radiological SR, but as many as 56 % of them never used it at work. Compared with conventional reporting, the most appreciated advantages of SR were higher reproducibility (70.5 %), better interaction with referring clinicians (58.3 %) and the option to link metadata (36.7 %). Risk of excessive simplification (59.8 %), template rigidity (56.1 %) and poor user compliance (42.1 %) were the most significant disadvantages. Overall, most respondents (87.0 %) were in favour of the adoption of radiological SR. Most radiologists were interested in radiological SR and in favour of its adoption. However, concerns about semantic, technical and professional issues limited its diffusion in real working life, encouraging efforts towards improved SR standardisation and engineering. (orig.)

  18. Calculation of radiation exposure in diagnostic radiology. Method and surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duvauferrier, R.; Ramee, A.; Ezzeldin, K.; Guibert, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    A computerized method for evaluating the radiation exposure of the main target organs during various diagnostic radiologic procedures is described. This technique was used for educational purposes: study of exposure variations according to the technical modalities of a given procedure, and study of exposure variations according to various technical protocols (IVU, EGD barium study, etc.). This method was also used for studying exposure of patients during hospitalization in the Rennes Regional Hospital Center (France) in 1982, according to departments (urology, neurology, etc.). This method and results of these three studies are discussed [fr

  19. DOE radiological calibrations intercomparison program: Results of fiscal year 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, F.M.; Roberson, P.L.; McDonald, J.C.

    1987-05-01

    The Department of Energy Radiological Calibration Intercomparison Program was initiated in January 1986, under the research portion of the DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program. The program operates via the exchange of transfer standards, consisting of instrument sets and standard secondary beta sources. There are two instrument sets and the scheduled use has been staggered such that one set is available for use during each month. One set of secondary standard beta sources is available for use bimonthly. During the 1986 fiscal year, five laboratories used the instrument sets and three laboratories used the beta source set. Results were reported for all the measurements. The average and one standard deviation of the ratios of participant results to Pacific Northwest Laboratory calibration values were 1.12 +- 0.17 for gamma measurements. Those ratios for the gamma measurements varied from 0.98 to 3.06. The larger differences of results from measurements performed at two facilities were directly attributable to unfamiliarity with the intercomparison instruments. The average and one standard deviation of the ratios of participant results to PNL calibration values obtained using the secondary 90 Sr beta source was 1.02 +- 0.05, which is well within measurement uncertainties. The one participant who performed measurements using 147 Pm and 204 Tl sources obtained ratios of 0.68 and 1.11, respectively. No measurements were performed using neutron or x-ray sources

  20. Usage of structured reporting in radiological practice: results from an Italian online survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faggioni, Lorenzo; Coppola, Francesca; Ferrari, Riccardo; Neri, Emanuele; Regge, Daniele

    2017-05-01

    To assess the opinion on structured reporting (SR) and its usage by radiologist members of the Italian Society of Medical Radiology (SIRM) via an online survey. All members received an email invitation to join the survey as an initiative by the SIRM Imaging Informatics Chapter. The survey included 10 questions about demographic information, definition of radiological SR, its usage in everyday practice, perceived advantages and disadvantages over conventional reporting and overall opinion about SR. 1159 SIRM members participated in the survey. 40.3 % of respondents gave a correct definition of radiological SR, but as many as 56 % of them never used it at work. Compared with conventional reporting, the most appreciated advantages of SR were higher reproducibility (70.5 %), better interaction with referring clinicians (58.3 %) and the option to link metadata (36.7 %). Risk of excessive simplification (59.8 %), template rigidity (56.1 %) and poor user compliance (42.1 %) were the most significant disadvantages. Overall, most respondents (87.0 %) were in favour of the adoption of radiological SR. Most radiologists were interested in radiological SR and in favour of its adoption. However, concerns about semantic, technical and professional issues limited its diffusion in real working life, encouraging efforts towards improved SR standardisation and engineering. • Despite radiologists' awareness, radiological SR is little used in working practice. • Perceived SR advantages are reproducibility, better clinico-radiological interaction and link to metadata. • Perceived SR disadvantages are excessive simplification, template rigidity and poor user compliance. • Improved standardisation and engineering may be helpful to boost SR diffusion.

  1. Creating a comprehensive customer service program to help convey critical and acute results of radiology studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towbin, Alexander J; Hall, Seth; Moskovitz, Jay; Johnson, Neil D; Donnelly, Lane F

    2011-01-01

    Communication of acute or critical results between the radiology department and referring clinicians has been a deficiency of many radiology departments. The failure to perform or document these communications can lead to poor patient care, patient safety issues, medical-legal issues, and complaints from referring clinicians. To mitigate these factors, a communication and documentation tool was created and incorporated into our departmental customer service program. This article will describe the implementation of a comprehensive customer service program in a hospital-based radiology department. A comprehensive customer service program was created in the radiology department. Customer service representatives were hired to answer the telephone calls to the radiology reading rooms and to help convey radiology results. The radiologists, referring clinicians, and customer service representatives were then linked via a novel workflow management system. This workflow management system provided tools to help facilitate the communication needs of each group. The number of studies with results conveyed was recorded from the implementation of the workflow management system. Between the implementation of the workflow management system on August 1, 2005, and June 1, 2009, 116,844 radiology results were conveyed to the referring clinicians and documented in the system. This accounts for more than 14% of the 828,516 radiology cases performed in this time frame. We have been successful in creating a comprehensive customer service program to convey and document communication of radiology results. This program has been widely used by the ordering clinicians as well as radiologists since its inception.

  2. The role of radiologic technologist in radiation protection and quality assurance programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djurovic, B.; Spasci -Jokic, V.; Misovic, M.

    2001-01-01

    The most important sources of ionizing radiation for general public are medical sources. Good working protocols and radiological protections measurements provided significant reduction of patients and professional doses. Medical users of ionizing radiation are radiological technologists. The purpose of this paper is to point out to several facts and errors in radiation protection educational programs for radiological technologists. Medical College educational program covers main specific topics in radiation protection, but there are some omissions in training process. Radiological technologists must be actively involved in radiation protection. Following ethical standards they will reach higher standards than the law requires

  3. Gender and the radiology workforce: results of the 2014 ACR workforce survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluth, Edward I; Bansal, Swati; Macura, Katarzyna J; Fielding, Julia; Truong, Hang

    2015-02-01

    As part of the 2014 ACR Human Resources Commission Workforce Survey, an assessment of the gender of the U.S. radiologist workforce was undertaken. Radiologist gender in relation to type of practice, work location, leadership roles, and full- versus part-time employment have not previously been assessed by this survey. The survey was completed by group leaders in radiology identified through the Practice of Radiology Environment Database. The response rate to the survey was 22%, representing 35% of all practicing radiologists. The survey found that 78% of the radiology workforce is male, and 22% female. Among the men, 58% work in private practice, and 18% in the academic/university environment; among women, percentages were 43% and 31%, respectively. Of all physician leads, 85% are men, 15% women. Of the full-time radiologists, 15% of men are practice leaders compared with 11% of women. Fewer women than men are in private practice. More women than men practice in academic/university environments. Among part-time radiologists, there are more men than women, but significantly more women work part time than men. Women are in the minority among practice leaders. Copyright © 2015 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Results of the independent radiological verification survey of the lower Sheffield Brook floodplain, Wayne, New Jersey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yalcintas, M.G.; Carrier, R.F.

    1989-05-01

    Prior to 1971, the W.R. Grace Company processed and stored radioactive materials at Wayne, New Jersey, under license to the Atomic Energy Commission. Decontamination of structures and storage of waste materials on the property at the Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS) took place in 1974. Surveys by the State of New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and by Oak Ridge Associated Universities for the NRC in 1982 indicated that properties adjacent to the WISS contained surface contamination by radioactive residuals in amounts exceeding those acceptable under US Department of Energy (DOE) remedial action guidelines. At the request of DOE, remedial actions have been conducted by Bechtel National, Inc., to remove radioactive residuals from properties adjacent to the site. It is the policy of DOE to assign an independent verification contractor to ensure the effectiveness of remedial actions performed within the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This report describes the methods and results of those studies that were conducted by the Measurement Applications and Development Group of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the lower Sheffield Brook floodplain west of the WISS. Based upon post-remedial action and verification survey data, it was concluded that residual soil concentrations and gamma levels following excavation and backfilling of the area are within the limits prescribed by DOE radiological guidelines. 12 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs

  5. The Interventional Radiology (IR) Gender Gap: A Prospective Online Survey by the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wah, Tze Min; Belli, Anna Maria

    2018-05-22

    A prospective online survey was conducted by the Cardiovascular Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE) to evaluate the gender gap within interventional radiology (IR) and the barriers facing women in IR. A questionnaire ("Appendix") was devised by the authors and the CIRSE communication and publication team and sent electronically to 750 identifiable female members of CIRSE. Responses were collected from 7 August to 24 August 2017. The response rate was 19.9% (n = 149) with highest responses from UK (18%), Italy (11%), Germany (11%), Spain (7%), Netherlands (5%), France (5%), Sweden (4%), USA (4%). 91% of the respondents were between 31 and 46 years, 83% work full time, 62% spend > 50% of their working time in IR, and 67% practice in a university or tertiary referral institution. 85% were in the minority in their department. 52% had no leadership role in their department, but 67% expressed willingness to consider a leadership position. Their main concerns were work/family life balance, the risks of radiation exposure, the effect of pregnancy on training and practice and the male-dominated work environment. This survey highlights issues experienced by women in IR. Clear guidance on concerns regarding radiation exposure particularly during pregnancy is needed. Structured and supportive training is required for female IRs who may wish to train or work flexibly. The male-dominated environment is discouraging, and a scheme to promote female IRs would encourage women to take on senior leadership positions and attract more women into the specialty.

  6. Aerial radiological survey of the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and surrounding area, Princeton, New Jersey. Date of survey: August 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, P.A.

    1981-08-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted during August 1980 to radiometrically survey a 10.4 km 2 area centered on the future site of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) located near Princeton, New Jersey. All detected radionuclides were consistent with normal background emitters and no man-made gamma emitters were detected. Average aerial exposure rates normalized to one meter above the ground are presented in the form of an isopleth map

  7. Aerial radiological survey of the Argonne National Laboratory and surrounding area, Argonne, Illinois. Date of survey: May 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-12-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over the facilities of the Argonne National Laboratory in Argonne, Illinois, on 2 to 13 May 1977. The survey was flown at an altitude of 46 m by a helicopter containing 20 sodium iodide detectors. The line spacing was also 46 m. Enhanced gamma exposure rate levels, which could be attributed to Argonne operations, were observed at many locations

  8. Aerial radiological survey of the United States Department of Energy's Rocky Flats Plant, Golden, Colorado. Date of survey, August 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    An aerial radiological survey of the Rocky Flats Plant was conducted during August 1981. The survey consisted of an airborne measurement of both natural and man-made gamma radiation from the terrain surface in and around the Rocky Flats Plant. These measurements allowed an estimate of the distribution of isotope concentrations in the survey area. Results are reported as exposure rate, man-made, and 241 Am isopleths superimposed on photographs of the area. The survey covered a square area approximately 9.7 km on each side. Gamma ray energy spectra are also presented for the net man-made radionuclides

  9. Radiological survey of the covered and uncovered drilling mud depository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jónás, Jácint; Somlai, János; Csordás, Anita; Tóth-Bodrogi, Edit; Kovács, Tibor

    2018-08-01

    In petroleum engineering, the produced drilling mud sometimes contains elevated amounts of natural radioactivity. In this study, a remediated Hungarian drilling mud depository was investigated from a radiological perspective. The depository was monitored before and after a clay layer was applied as covering. In this study, the ambient dose equivalent rate H*(10) of the depository has been measured by a Scintillator Probe (6150AD-b Dose Rate Meter). Outdoor radon concentration, radon concentration in soil gas, and in situ field radon exhalation measurements were carried out using a pulse-type ionization chamber (AlphaGUARD radon monitor). Soil gas permeability (k) measurements were carried out using the permeameter (RADON-JOK) in situ device. Geogenic radon potentials were calculated. The radionuclide content of the drilling mud and cover layer sample has been determined with an HPGe gamma-spectrometer. The gamma dose rate was estimated from the measured radionuclide concentrations and the results were compared with the measured ambient dose equivalent rate. Based on the measured results before and after covering, the ambient dose equivalent rates were 76 (67-85) nSv/h before and 86 (83-89) nSv/h after covering, radon exhalation was 9 (6-12) mBq/m 2 s before and 14 (5-28) mBq/m 2 s after covering, the outdoor radon concentrations were 11 (9-16) before and 13 (10-22) Bq/m 3 after covering and the soil gas radon concentrations were 6 (3-8) before and 24 (14-40) kBq/m 3 after covering. Soil gas permeability measurements were 1E-11 (7E-12-1E-11) and 1E-12 (5E-13-1E-12) m 2 and the calculated geogenic radon potential values were 6 (3-8) and 12 (6-21) before and after the covering. The main radionuclide concentrations of the drilling mud were C U-238 12 (10-15) Bq/kg, C Ra-226 31 (18-40) Bq/kg, C Th-232 35 (33-39) Bq/kg and C K-40 502 (356-673) Bq/kg. The same radionuclide concentrations in the clay were C U-238 31 (29-34) Bq/kg, C Ra-226 45 (40-51) Bq/kg, C Th-232 58 (55

  10. Overview of environmental radiological monitoring program of Institute of Radiation Protection And Dosimetry - IRD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Sarah Barreto Oliveira de Christo; Peres, Sueli da Silva, E-mail: suelip@ird.gov.br, E-mail: sarah.barreto1@gmail.com [Instituto de Radioproteção e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Div. de Radioproteção

    2017-07-01

    As a branch of the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN), the Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (IRD) performs extensive activities in the fields of radiation protection, metrology, and dosimetry, as well as specific education, onto a wide operational scope that includes the technical support to national regulatory authorities in the licensing process for nationwide nuclear and radioactive facilities. IRD has several laboratories where are performed radiometric and radiochemical analyses and others radioactivity evaluation procedures in different types of samples obtained in the inspection activities, production of radioactivity metrological standards and reference material by National Laboratory of Metrology of Ionizing Radiation (LMNRI), besides others research activities. In this laboratories can be used sealed or unsealed radioactive sources and radiation-producing devices and are classified with radioactive installations in accordance to national regulations. This way, radioactive liquid effluents can be eventually produced and released into the environment in the course of such activities and an effluent monitoring program to control and reduce the releases to environment is carried out. Additionally, IRD maintains the Radioactive Waste Management Program and Environmental Radiological Monitoring Program (ERMP) in accordance to national regulations requirements. The primary focus of ERMP comprises the validation of the dose prognostics for the public members due to effluents discharge and the provision of consistent projections of the radiation levels at the monitoring sites. In this study, a long term ERMP data survey is discussed, spanning the last thirteen years of activities. On the basis of such discussions and prognostics, it could be observed that the radiological environmental radiological impact due to operation of IRD installations is negligible. (author)

  11. Overview of environmental radiological monitoring program of Institute of Radiation Protection And Dosimetry - IRD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Sarah Barreto Oliveira de Christo; Peres, Sueli da Silva

    2017-01-01

    As a branch of the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN), the Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (IRD) performs extensive activities in the fields of radiation protection, metrology, and dosimetry, as well as specific education, onto a wide operational scope that includes the technical support to national regulatory authorities in the licensing process for nationwide nuclear and radioactive facilities. IRD has several laboratories where are performed radiometric and radiochemical analyses and others radioactivity evaluation procedures in different types of samples obtained in the inspection activities, production of radioactivity metrological standards and reference material by National Laboratory of Metrology of Ionizing Radiation (LMNRI), besides others research activities. In this laboratories can be used sealed or unsealed radioactive sources and radiation-producing devices and are classified with radioactive installations in accordance to national regulations. This way, radioactive liquid effluents can be eventually produced and released into the environment in the course of such activities and an effluent monitoring program to control and reduce the releases to environment is carried out. Additionally, IRD maintains the Radioactive Waste Management Program and Environmental Radiological Monitoring Program (ERMP) in accordance to national regulations requirements. The primary focus of ERMP comprises the validation of the dose prognostics for the public members due to effluents discharge and the provision of consistent projections of the radiation levels at the monitoring sites. In this study, a long term ERMP data survey is discussed, spanning the last thirteen years of activities. On the basis of such discussions and prognostics, it could be observed that the radiological environmental radiological impact due to operation of IRD installations is negligible. (author)

  12. An aerial radiological survey of the White Oak Creek Floodplain, Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Date of survey: September-October 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzsche, A.E.

    1987-06-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over the White Oak Creek Floodplain of the Oak Ridge Reservation during the period 30 September through 3 October 1986. The survey was performed at the request of the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Oak Ridge Operations Office, by EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc. (EG and G/EM), a contractor of the DOE. The survey results will be utilized in support of the Remedial Action Program being conducted at the site by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., operator of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A flight line spacing of 37 meters (120 feet) and a survey altitude of 46 meters (150 feet) yielded the maximum data density and sensitivity achievable by the aerial system, which was greater than that achieved from prior surveys of the entire Oak Ridge Reservation. Isopleth maps of Cs-137, Co-60, Ti-208 implied concentrations, and exposure rates provided an estimate of the location and magnitude of the man-made activity. These maps, overlaid on a current photograph of the area, combine to yield a view of the radiological condition of the White Oak Creek Floodplain. 5 refs., 40 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Radiological survey of Ingalls Shipbuilding Division, Pascagoula, Mississippi, and environs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, T.W.; Windham, S.T.; Callis, R.S.; Phillips, C.R.

    1983-09-01

    This report presents results of the survey conducted by EERF personnel to assess environmental radioactivity remaining from operations of nuclear-powered vessels at Ingalls Shipyard, Pascagoula, Mississippi. Since Ingalls Shipyard will no longer build or service nuclear powered ships and has completed the decommissioning of the nuclear support facilities, an additional purpose of the survey was to determine if there is any remaining radioactivity from previous operations which could contribute to significant population exposure

  14. Aerial radiological survey of the Joseph M. Farley Nuclear Plant and surrounding area, Dothan, Alabama

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maguire, T.C.; Shipman, G.R.

    1982-03-01

    An aerial radiological survey was performed during the period 8 to 19 December 1979 over a 2000 square kilometer area centered on the two unit Joseph M. Farley Nuclear Plant near Dothan, Alabama. Radiological data were collected by flying north-south lines spaced 900 meters apart at an altitude of 150 meters above ground level. Processed data showed that all gamma rays detected within the survey area were those expected from naturally occurring radionuclides. Count rates obtained from the aerial platform were converted to exposure rates at 1 meter above the ground and are presented in the form of a radiation contour map. The observed exposure rates were between 4 and 12 microroentgens per hour (μR/h), with most of the area ranging between 4 and 10 μR/h. These values include an estimated cosmic ray contribution of 4.0 μR/h but do not include any contribution from airborne radionuclides, i.e., radon. Exposure rates obtained from ground measurements taken within the survey area were in close agreement with the aerial data. The data were also in close agreement with those obtained from a similar survey conducted during March 1977. Comparison of the results from both surveys indicated that no detectable change in the radiological characteristics of the survey area has occurred due to the operation of unit number 1 during the intervening period. The same equipment and procedures were utilized for both surveys

  15. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lissner, J.

    1985-01-01

    Diagnostic radiology is still the foremost of all innovative medical disciplines. This has many advantages but also some handicaps, e.g. the siting problem of medical equipment whose clinical potential is not fully known. This applies in particular to nuclear spin tomography, where the Laender governments and the Scientific Council seen to agree that all universities should have the appropriate equipment as soon as possible in order to intensify interdisciplinary research. Formerly, in the case of computerized tomography, there was less readiness. As a result, the siting of CT equipment is less organically structured. A special handicap of innovative fields is the problem of training and advanced training. The Chamber of Medicine and the Association of Doctors Participating in the Health Insurance Plan have issued regulations aimed at a better standardisation in this field. (orig.) [de

  16. An aerial radiological survey of the southwest drainage basin area of the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feimster, E.L.

    1994-04-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over a 106-square-mile area of the Savannah River Site (SRS), formerly the Savannah River Plant. The survey was conducted from August 24 through September 8, 1988, to collect baseline radiological data over the area. Both natural and man-made gamma emitting radionuclides were detected in the area. The detected man-made sources were confined to creeks, branches, and SRS facilities in the surveyed area and were a result of SRS operations. Naturally-occurring radiation levels were consistent with those levels detected in adjacent areas during previous surveys. The annual dose levels were within the range of levels found throughout the United States

  17. Quarterly environmental radiological survey summary: Third quarter 1994--100, 200, 300, and 600 Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, S.M.

    1994-11-01

    This report provides a summary of the radiological surveys performed on waste disposal sites located at the Hanford Site. The Third Quarter 1994 survey results and the status of actions required from current and past reports and are summarized below: (1) All the routine environmental radiological surveys scheduled during July, August, and September 1994 were completed except for the D Island vent riser area. The surveys for the 200-W railways, spurs, and sidings were completed during this period after being delayed by equipment problems during the second quarter. (2) No Compliance Assessment Reports (CARs) were issued for sites found out of compliance with standards identified in WHC-CM-7-5, Environmental Compliance. (3) Two Surveillance Compliance/Inspection Reports (SCIRs) were closed during the Third Quarter of 1994. (4) Eleven open SCIRs had not been resolved

  18. 1-99 W. Hubbard St, May 2018, Lindsay Light Radiological Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiological Survey of Right-of-Way Utility Excavation.The count rates in the excavation ranged from 2,100 cpm to 4,200 cpm.No count rates were found at any time that exceeded the instrument specific threshold limits of 7,366 and 6,415 cpm.

  19. Nuclear Engineering Academic Programs Survey, 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Science and Engineering Education, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education

    2004-01-01

    The survey includes degrees granted between September 1, 2002 and August 31, 2003. Thirty-three academic programs reported having nuclear engineering programs during the survey time period and all responded (100% response rate). Three of the programs included in last year's report were discontinued or out-of-scope in 2003. One new program has been added to the list. This year the survey data include U.S. citizenship, gender, and race/ethnicity by degree level

  20. The state of radiologic teaching practice in preclinical medical education: survey of American medical, osteopathic, and podiatric schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Zachary; Blackham, Kristine

    2015-04-01

    This study describes the state of preclinical radiology curricula in North American allopathic, osteopathic, and podiatric medical schools. An online survey of teaching methods, radiology topics, and future plans was developed. The Associations of American Medical Colleges, Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine, and Colleges of Podiatric Medicine listing for all US, Canadian, and Puerto Rican schools was used for contact information for directors of anatomy and/or radiology courses. Letters were sent via e-mail to 198 schools, with a link to the anonymous survey. Of 198 schools, 98 completed the survey (48%). Radiology curricula were integrated with other topics (91%), and taught by anatomists (42%) and radiologists (43%). The majority of time was spent on the topic of anatomy correlation (35%). Time spent teaching general radiology topics in the curriculum, such as physics (3%), modality differences (6%), radiation safety (2%), and contrast use (2%) was limited. Most schools had plans to implement an innovative teaching method in the near future (62%). The major challenges included limits on: time in the curriculum (73%); resources (32%); and radiology faculty participation (30%). A total of 82% reported that their curriculum did not model the suggestions made by the Alliance of Medical Student Educators in Radiology. This survey describes the current state of preclinical radiology teaching: curricula were nonstandard, integrated into other courses, and predominantly used for anatomy correlation. Other important contextual principles of the practice of radiology were seldom taught. Copyright © 2015 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A survey of nurse staffing levels in interventional radiology units throughout the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christie, A.; Robertson, I.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To supplement previous surveys analysing provision of interventional radiology (IR), in-hours (IH) and out-of-hours (OOH), by specifically surveying the level of nursing support provided. Materials and methods: A web-based questionnaire was distributed to all British Society of Interventional Radiology (BSIR) members. This addressed several aspects of radiology nursing support for IR procedures, both IH and OOH. Results: Sixty percent of respondents indicated that they have a formal OOH service. Of these, all have a dedicated nursing rota, with the vast majority operating with one nurse. IH, 77% of respondents always have a scrubbed nurse assistant, but this reduces to 40% OOH. IH, 4% never have a scrubbed radiology nurse assistant, which rises to 25% OOH. IH, 75% of respondents always have a radiology nurse dedicated to patient monitoring, but this reduces to 20% OOH. IH, 3% never have a radiology nurse dedicated to patient monitoring, which rises to 42% OOH. Conclusion: A significant disparity exists in the level of IR nursing support between IH and OOH. The majority of sites provide a single nurse with ad hoc additional support. This is potentially putting patients at increased risk. Radiology nurses are integral to the safe and sustainable provision of IR OOH services and a greater focus is required to ensure adequate and safe staffing levels for 24/7 IR services. - Highlights: • A significant disparity exists between the level of nursing support provided in-hours and OOH. • This applies to both the availability of a nurse to scrub and to monitor the patient. • Having a dedicated 24/7 nursing rota is mandatory to providing a deliverable OOH service.

  2. The current status of interventional radiology in Canada: results of a survey by the Canadian Interventional Radiology Association

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millward, S.F.; Holley, M.L. [Univ. of Western Ontario, London Health Sciences Centre, Dept. of Radiology, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2001-04-01

    To evaluate the current status of interventional radiology in Canada. A questionnaire was sent to 28 Canadian interventional radiologists (defined as a physician who performs any type of interventional procedure, including biopsies, but excluding interventional neuroradiology) practising in both tertiary and community hospitals in the major centres in all provinces except Prince Edward Island. Twenty-two (79%) of 28 surveys were completed and returned, providing data about 86 interventional radiologists (IRs). IRs were performing almost all of the following procedures at their institutions: inferior vena cava filter placement, venous angioplasty, dialysis fistula angioplasty, diagnostic and therapeutic pulmonary and bronchial artery procedures, diagnostic and therapeutic procedures of the lower extremity and renal arteries, percutaneous abscess and biliary drainage procedures, percutaneous nephrostomy, and fibroid embolization. A second group of procedures, performed by both IRs and non-radiologists in most institutions, included: all types of central venous catheter placements, pleural drainage, and gastrostomy tube placement. Procedures not being performed by anyone in a number of institutions included: dialysis graft thrombolysis, varicocele embolization, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts, palliative stenting of the gastrointestinal tract, fallopian tube recannalization, and liver and prostate tumour treatments. The factors most often limiting the respondents' ability to provide a comprehensive interventional service were the interventional radiology inventory budget and the availability of interventional radiology rooms; 50% of respondents indicated the number of available nurses, technologists and IRs was also an important limiting factor. IRs in Canada still play a major role in many of the most commonly performed procedures. However, limited availability of resources and personnel in many institutions may be hampering the ability of IRs to

  3. Career choices for radiology: national surveys of graduates of 1974-2002 from UK medical schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, G.; Lambert, T.W.; Goldacre, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To report on trends in career choices for radiology among UK medical graduates. Materials and methods: One and 3 years after graduation, and at longer time intervals thereafter, postal questionnaire surveys were sent to all doctors who graduated from UK medical schools in 1974, 1977, 1980, 1983, 1993, 1996, 1999, 2000 and 2002. Doctors were asked to specify their choice of long-term career and to identify factors influencing their choice. Employment details were also collected. Results were analysed using χ 2 statistics and binary logistic regression. Results: Seventy-four percent (24,621/33,412) and 73% (20,720/28,459) of doctors responded 1 and 3 years after graduation. Choices for radiology in year 1 increased significantly over time (1.7% of 1974 graduates to 3.2% of 2002 graduates; χ 2 test for trend = 15.3, p < 0.001). In particular, there has been a steady increase from the cohorts of 1993 onwards. Thirty-eight percent of those who chose radiology in year 1, and 80% who chose radiology in year 3, were still working in radiology 10 years after graduation. Hours and working conditions influenced long-term career choices more for radiology than for other careers. Conclusions: The proportion of UK trained junior doctors who want to become radiologists has increased in recent years. However, although medical school intake and the numbers making an early choice for radiology have risen, it is unclear whether sufficient UK graduates will be attracted to radiology to fulfil future service requirements from UK trained graduates alone

  4. Quarterly Environmental Radiological Survey Summary Third Quarter 1998, 100, 200, 300, and 600 Areas; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MCKINNEY, S.M.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides a summary of the radiological surveys performed in support of near-facility environmental monitoring at the Hanford Site. The Third Quarter 1998 survey results and the status of actions required are summarized: (1) All of the eighty-five environmental radiological surveys scheduled during July, August and September were performed as planned. Fifty-one of the surveys were conducted at Project Hanford Management Contractors (PHMC) sites and thirty-four at Environmental Restoration Contractor (ERC) sites. Contamination above background levels was found at seventeen of the PHMC waste sites and two of the ERC waste sites. Contamination levels as high and gt;1,000,000 disintegrations per minute (dpm) per 100 cm(sup 2) were reported. Of these contaminated surveys nine were in Underground Radioactive Material (URM) areas, three were in unposted areas and seven were in contamination areas. The contamination found within four of the URM and three of the CA areas was immediately cleaned up and no further action was required. The remaining five URM and two unposted sites were posted and along with the five CA sites will require remediation. Radiological Problem Reports (RPR's) were issued and the sites were turned over to the landlord for further action as required. (2) During the second quarter of 1998, 1.2 hectares (3.0 acres) were stabilized and radiologically down posted from Contamination Area (CA)/Soil Contamination (SC) to URM. (3) Four hectares (10 acres) located south and west of B-Plant were posted as a radiological buffer area as a result of a contamination spread. This off-normal occurrence is currently being investigated. (4) Four Surveillance Compliance Inspection Reports (SCIRs) remained open and had not been resolved. Tank Farms Operations has responsibility for the unresolved SCIRs

  5. Quarterly environmental radiological survey summary - first quarter 1997 100, 200, 300, and 600 areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mckinney, S.M.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides a summary of the radiological surveys performed in support of near-facility environmental monitoring at the Hanford Site. The First Quarter 1997 survey results and the status of actions required are summarized below: (1) All of the routine environmental radiological surveys scheduled during January, February, and March 1997, were performed as planned. (2) One hundred four environmental radiological surveys were performed during the first quarter 1997, twenty-nine at the active waste sites and seventy-five at the inactive waste sites. Contamination above background levels was found at eight of the active waste sites and seven of the inactive waste sites. Contamination levels as high as >1,000,000 disintegrations per minute (dpm) were reported. Of these contaminated surveys twelve were in Underground Radioactive Material (URM) areas and three were in contamination areas. The contamination found within ten of the URM areas was immediately cleaned up and no further action was required. In the remaining five sites the areas were posted and will require decontamination. Radiological Problem Reports (RPR's) were issued and the sites were turned over to the landlord for further action if required. (3) During the first quarter of 1997, 5.6 hectares (13.8 acres) were stabilized and radiologically down posted from Contamination Area (CA)/Soil Contamination (SC) to URM. (4) During the first quarter of 1997, the size of 216-A-25 Gable Mountain Pond was increased from 30.4 to 34.5 hectares (75.0 to 85.2 acres). This increase in size was due to the correction of the original boundary area by using the advanced technology of a global positioning system (GPS). An area, 1.6 hectares (4.0 acres), east of and adjacent to the 241-S/SX/SY tank farm complex was posted as a contamination/soil contamination area. (5) Five open Surveillance Compliance Inspection Reports (SCIRs) had not been resolved

  6. Radiology research in mainland China in the past 10 years: a survey of original articles published in Radiology and European Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Long Jiang; Wang, Yun Fei; Yang, Zhen Lu; Schoepf, U Joseph; Xu, Jiaqian; Lu, Guang Ming; Li, Enzhong

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the features and trends of Radiology research in Mainland China through bibliometric analysis of the original articles published in Radiology and European Radiology (ER) between 2006 and 2015. We reviewed the original articles published in Radiology and ER between 2006 and 2015. The following information was abstracted: imaging subspecialty, imaging technique(s) used, research type, sample size, study design, statistical analysis, study results, funding declarations, international collaborations, number of authors, department and province of the first author. All variables were examined longitudinally over time. Radiology research in Mainland China saw a substantial increase in original research articles published, especially in the last 5 years (P Radiology research, neuroradiology, vascular/interventional Radiology, and abdominal Radiology were the most productive fields; MR imaging was the most used modality, and a distinct geographic provenience was observed for articles published in Radiology and ER. Radiology research in Mainland China has seen substantial growth in the past 5 years with neuroradiology, vascular/interventional Radiology, and abdominal Radiology as the most productive fields. MR imaging is the most used modality. Article provenience shows a distinct geographical pattern. • Radiology research in Mainland China saw a substantial increase. • Neuroradiology, vascular/interventional Radiology, and abdominal Radiology are the most productive fields. • MRI is the most used modality in Mainland China's Radiology research. • Guangdong, Shanghai, and Beijing are the most productive provinces.

  7. Radiological protection survey results about radiodiagnosis protection practices in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jova S, L.; Morales M, J.A.; Quevedo, J.R.; Medina, J.R.; Naranjo, A.M.; Fornet, O.M.

    1996-01-01

    In order to identify radiation protection current situation in national X-ray diagnostic practice , the State (cuban) Supervision System for Radiation and Nuclear Safety carried out in 1992 a survey which was planned for projection of future regulatory activities in this field. Survey covers the most important aspects related to radiation protection of occupationally exposed workers, patients and general population. Surveyed sample included a total of 52 X-ray units, sited in 7 dental clinics, 2 polyclinics and 13 hospitals, from 7 provinces of the country. Results showed that the organization of radiation protection in terms of personnel specially designated to carry out surveillance and control activities and level of documentation is deficient. Survey evidenced the general lack of safety and quality culture among technologists and radiologists which is mainly reflected in non regular application of basic patient protection measures (shielding, collimation, use of proper filtration among others) and non regular execution of basic quality inspection of employed radiographic systems. (authors). 4 refs., 1 fig

  8. A national survey of occupational radiation exposure among diagnostic radiologic technologists in South Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeeyoung; Cha, Eun Shil; Jeong, Meeseon; Lee, Won Jin

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate representative occupational characteristics and radiation exposure for South Korean radiologic technologists. The authors conducted a national survey by stratified sampling of South Korean administrative districts and types of medical facilities. A total of 585 technologists were surveyed, and survey data were linked with dosimetry data from the National Dose Registry. A total of 73 % of radiologic technologists sampled were male, 62 % were younger than age 40 and 86.5 % began employment after 1990. The most frequent practices among radiologic technologists were diagnostic routine X-ray followed by computed tomography (CT) and portable X-ray. Male workers were more frequently involved in CT, portable X-ray and interventional radiology whereas female workers carried out most mammography procedures. The average annual effective dose was 2.3 mSv for male and 1.3 mSv for female workers. The dose was significantly higher for workers in the provinces and those who had recently started work. (authors)

  9. Results of the radiological survey at 14 Orford Street, Colonie, New York (AL182)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espegren, M.L.; Marley, J.L.; Carrier, R.F.

    1988-02-01

    A number of properties in the Albany/Colonie area have been identified as being potentially contaminated with uranium originating from the former National Lead Company's uranium forming plant in Colonie, New York. Radiological surveys were performed at 27 properties by members of the Radiological Survey Activities (RASA) group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period July 13--July 26, 1986. The property at 14 Orford Street in Colonie, New York (AL182) was the subject of a radiological investigation initiated July 23, 1986. The residential property consists of a two-story frame house located on a rectangular lot. An asphalt driveway connects the house to the street. A diagram of the property showing the approximate boundaries and the 5-m grid network established for measurements outside the house is shown. The lot included in the radiological survey was /approximately/15 m wide by 34 m deep. Front and rear views of the property are shown. 13 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs

  10. An aerial radiological survey of the Trinity Fallout Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzsche, A.E.

    1994-09-01

    An aerial gamma survey was conducted during May and June of 1992 to define the Trinity fallout field, which lies primarily in the White Sands Missile Range in the state of New Mexico. The field was mapped almost entirely from the gamma ray emissions of cesium-137 ( 137 Cs), a fission product. The field, as measured, extends from Trinity ground zero, over the Oscura Mountains, across the Chupadera Mesa, and thence past Cedarvale, New Mexico, a distance of more than 100 kilometers. An estimate of 137 Cs activity inventory is 100 Ci in an area covering 1,400 square kilometers. Another isotope, europium-152, is significant at ground zero. A 137 Cs concentration contour plot overlaid on a U.S. Geological Survey map indicates the location and intensity of the fallout field. A contour map of terrestrial exposure rate is presented in a similar fashion

  11. A method to automate the radiological survey process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berven, B.A.; Blair, M.S.

    1987-01-01

    This document describes the USRAD system, a hardware/software ranging and data transmission system, that provides real-time position data and combines it with other portable instrument measurements. Live display of position data and onsite data reduction, presentation, and formatting for reports and automatic transfer into databases are among the unusual attributes of USRADS. Approximately 25% of any survey-to-survey report process is dedicated to data recording and formatting, which is eliminated by USRADS. Cost savings are realized by the elimination of manual transcription of instrument readout in the field and clerical formatting of data in the office. Increased data reliability is realized by ensuring complete survey coverage of an area in the field, by elimination of mathematical errors in conversion of instrument readout to unit concentration, and by elimination of errors associated with transcribing data from the field into report format. The USRAD system can be adapted to measure other types of pollutants or physical/chemical/geological/biological conditions in which portable instrumentation exists. 2 refs., 2 figs

  12. 2016 Annual Inspection and Radiological Survey Results for the Piqua, Ohio, Decommissioned Reactor Site, July 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmerman, Brian [USDOE Office of Legacy Management, Washington, DC (United States); Miller, Michele [Navarro Research and Engineering, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-07-01

    This report presents the findings of the annual inspection and radiological survey of the Piqua, Ohio, Decommissioned Reactor Site (site). The decommissioned nuclear power demonstration facility was inspected and surveyed on April 15, 2016. The site, located on the east bank of the Great Miami River in Piqua, Ohio, was in fair physical condition. There is no requirement for a follow-up inspection, partly because City of Piqua (City) personnel participated in a March 2016 meeting to address reoccurring safety concerns. Radiological survey results from 104 locations revealed no removable contamination. One direct beta activity reading in a floor drain on the 56-foot level (1674 disintegrations per minute [dpm]/100 square centimeters [cm2]) exceeded the minimum detectable activity (MDA). Beta activity has been detected in the past at this floor drain. The reading was well below the action level of 5000 dpm/100 cm2.

  13. A national survey exploring UK trainees' perceptions, core training experience, and decisions to pursue advanced training in breast radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowes, S; Bydder, M; Sinnatamby, R

    2017-11-01

    To investigate UK radiology trainees' perceptions of breast radiology and the factors that influenced their decision whether or not to choose breast radiology as an area of special interest. An online survey was compiled and distributed to all UK specialty trainees in clinical radiology via the Royal College of Radiologists Junior Radiologists' Forum (JRF) regional representatives. There were 275 respondents, representing 22% of all UK radiology trainees. Responses were received from all regions. A significant factor identified in influencing whether or not trainees decide to pursue advanced training in breast radiology is the timing and quality of their initial core training experience. Specific positive aspects of breast radiology that were repeatedly identified included the high level of patient contact and frequent use of interventional procedures. Recurring negative aspects of breast radiology included isolation from general radiology and finding the subject matter boring. Breast radiology faces a significant workforce shortfall that is predicted to worsen in the coming years. There has never been a greater need to recruit specialty trainees into this field, and action is urgently needed to help ensure the sustainability of breast services and drive further improvements to patient care. The findings from this survey should be regarded as a challenge to all breast radiologists to engage with trainees from an early stage in their training and to enthuse them with the many positive aspects of a career in breast radiology. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Results of the radiological verification survey at the former Herring-Hall-Marvin Safe Company, 1550 Grand Boulevard, Hamilton Ohio (HO001V)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, M.E.; allred, J.F.; Johnson, C.A.

    1995-11-01

    During the period between the 1940s and early 1950s, the Herring-Hall-Marvin Safe Company, 1550 Grand Boulevard, Hamilton, Ohio, was one company under subcontract to the Manhattan Engineer District (MED), and the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), the lead agencies in the development of nuclear energy for defense-related projects. The US Department of Energy (DOE) conducted radiological surveys of these sites to evaluate current radiological conditions as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). In 1988, a radiological survey of the Herring-Hall-Marvin Safe Company facility was conducted, and after small fragments of uranium metal were removed, no beta or gamma radiation above background was detected and the building was dismissed from any additional DOE restrictions. In 1993, it was discovered that a portion of the actual machining work was conducted on the third floor of the facility, located in the southeastern comer of the building. At the request of DOE, this part of the facility was radiologically surveyed by an ORNL survey team to determine whether fixed surface contamination could be found that might exceed the DOE guidelines. Results of this radiological survey indicated 238 U contamination in excess of the DOE criteria for surface contamination, and the site was recommended for remediation. In February and March of 1995, a verification survey of the third floor of the former Herring-Hall-Marvin Safe Company facility by an ORNL survey team was performed in conjunction with decontamination operations conducted under the supervision of Bechtel National Incorporated. The verification survey included gamma scans at the surface and at one meter, alpha and beta-gamma scans for fixed contamination, and smears for transferable contamination

  15. Nuclear Engineering Academic Programs Survey, 2002 Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education

    2003-01-01

    The survey includes degrees granted between July 1, 2001 and June 30, 2002. Enrollment information refers to the fall term 2002. Thirty-five academic programs were in the survey universe and all responded (100% response rate). One of the 35 programs reported that it was discontinued after the 2001-2002 academic year. Also, two programs were discontinued after the previous academic year (2000-2001) and were not included in 2002 survey

  16. A report on the current status of grand rounds in radiology residency programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yablon, Corrie M; Wu, Jim S; Slanetz, Priscilla J; Eisenberg, Ronald L

    2011-12-01

    A national needs assessment of radiology program directors was performed to characterize grand rounds (GR) programs, assess the perceived educational value of GR programs, and determine the impact of the recent economic downturn on GR. A 28-question survey was developed querying the organizational logistics of GR programs, types of speakers, content of talks, honoraria, types of speakers invited, response to the economic downturn, types of speaker interaction with residents, and perceived educational value of GR. Questions were in multiple-choice, yes-or-no, and five-point Likert-type formats. The survey was distributed to the program directors of all radiology residencies within the United States. Fifty-seven of 163 programs responded, resulting in a response rate of 36%. Thirty-eight programs (67%) were university residencies and 10 (18%) were university affiliated. Eighty-two percent of university and 60% of university-affiliated residencies had their own GR programs, while only 14% of community and no military residencies held GR. GR were held weekly in 18% of programs, biweekly in 8%, monthly in 42%, bimonthly in 16%, and less frequently than every 2 months in 16%. All 38 programs hosting GR reported a broad spectrum of presentations, including talks on medical education (66%), clinical and evidence-based medicine (55%), professionalism (45%), ethics (45%), quality assurance (34%), global health (26%), and resident presentations (26%). All programs invited speakers from outside the institution, but there was variability with regard to the frequency of visits and whether invited speakers were from out of town. As a result of recent economic events, one radiology residency (3%) completely canceled its GR program. Others decreased the number of speakers from outside their cities (40%) or decreased the number of speakers from within their own cities (16%). Honoraria were paid to speakers by 95% of responding programs. Most program directors (79%) who had their own

  17. The current status of pediatric radiology in India: A conference-based survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Therakathu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Like most other developing countries, India has a large proportion of children among its population. However, the facilities for adequate treatment of this large population is inadequate. The development of pediatric radiology as a subspecialty is still at an infant stage in India. The goal of our study was to assess the awareness about the current status of pediatric radiology in India. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire was handed over to all attendees of a pediatric radiology conference to assess their opinion regarding the adequacy of pediatric training and practice in India. The questionnaire consisted of 10 multiple-choice and two descriptive questions. Descriptive statistical methods were used for analyzing the results. Results: Eighty-one out of 400 delegates responded to the questionnaire. Among these 81 respondents, 50 (61.7% felt that exposure to pediatric cases during postgraduate course was inadequate. Sixty-three out of 81 (77.7% respondents thought that specialized training is required for practicing pediatric radiology, and 79 respondents (97% felt that the number of such training programmes should increase. Forty-five out of 81 respondents (55.5% were interested in pursuing pediatric radiology as a career. Conclusion: According to the opinion of the respondents of our survey, pediatric radiology remains an underdeveloped speciality in India. Considering the proportion of the population in the pediatric age and the poor health indicators in this age group, elaborate measures, as suggested, need to be implemented to improve pediatric radiology training and the care of sick children in India.

  18. An aerial radiological survey of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and surrounding area, Batavia, Illinois

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzsche, A.E.

    1990-11-01

    An aerial radiological gamma survey was conducted over the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory during 1 through 6 June 1989. Flight lines at 150-foot altitude and 250-foot line spacings assured nearly 100% coverage. The terrestrial exposure at about 6 μR/h was nearly the same as that measured by the previous survey of this area (May 1977). Ten anomalous areas, mostly Na-22 and Mn-54, were detected within buildings and laboratories in the area. Although these locations have changed somewhat from the 1977 survey, the aerial data shows good agreement with the ground-based ion chamber and soil sample data. 7 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab

  19. Results of the radiological survey at Diebold Safe Company, 1550 Grand Boulevard, Hamilton, Ohio (HO001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.

    1990-02-01

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted investigative radiological surveys at Diebold Safe Company, 1550 Grand Boulevard, Hamilton, Ohio in 1988 and 1989. The purpose of the surveys was to determine whether the property was contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 238 U. The surveys included gamma scans; direct and transferable measurements of alpha, beta, and gamma radiation levels; and dust, debris, air, and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. 6 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs

  20. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites remedial action program: radiological survey of the Museum of Science and Industry, 57th Street and Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, Illinois. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-02-01

    From August 15, 1946 until July 15, 1953, ANL occupied part of the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago; some handling of radioactive materials took place. In a radiation survey taken of the areas in 1977, instrument and smear surveys were made, and air and soil samples were counted. Results indicate there is no identifiable residual radioactivity remaining from MED/AEC operations during the period 1946 through 1953

  1. Development of a Program on quality assurance in radiotherapy and radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tovar, Julio

    2000-01-01

    In this paper the development of a program of QA in radiotherapy and radiology is described. The objectives, resources, manpower and the cooperation between the IAEA and the Direccion General de Energia are outlined

  2. Aerial radiological and photographic survey of eleven atolls and two islands within the Northern Marshall Islands. Dates of surveys, July-November 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-06-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over eleven atolls and two islands within the northern Marshall Islands between September and November 1978. This survey was part of a comprehensive radiological survey, which included extensive terrestrial and marine sampling, to determine possible residual contamination which might remain as a result of the United States nuclear testing program conducted at Bikini Enewetak Atolls between 1946 and 1958. A similar survey was conducted at Enewetak Atoll in 1972. The present survey covered those atolls known to have received direct fallout from the Bravo event, conducted in March 1954 at Bikini Atoll. These included Bikini, Rongelap, Rongerik, Ailinginae, Bikar, Taka, and Utirik Atolls. In addition, several atolls and islands which might have been at the fringes of the Bravo fallout were also surveyed, including Likiep and Ailuk Atolls, Jemo and Mejit Islands, and Wotho Atoll. Ujelang Atoll, which lies approximately 200 km southwest of Enewetak, was also surveyed. Island-averaged terrestrial exposure rates in the range of 30 to 50 μR/h were observed over parts of Bikini Atoll, including Bikini Island, and over the northern part of Rongelap Atoll. Levels over southern Rongelap and over Rongerik Atoll ranged from 4 to 7 μR/h. Levels were somewhat lower at Ailinginae Atoll (approximately 2 μR/h) and at Utirik Atoll (approximately 0.7 μR/h). The variations observed were consistent with what might be expected from the fallout pattern of the Bravo event. Levels at Ailuk, Likiep, Wotho and Ujelang Atolls and at Mejit and Jemo Islands were consistent with 137 Cs activity, due to worldwide fallout, observed within the United States and at other locations in the central Pacific. These four atolls and the two islands, therefore, do not appear to have recieved any significant direct contamination from the Bravo event or the other tests conducted at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls

  3. The patient dose survey and dose reduction in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang Thanh Luong; Duong Van Vinh; Ha Ngoc Thach

    2000-01-01

    This paper presented the results of the patient dose survey in some hospitals in Hanoi from 1995 to 1997. The main investigated types of the X-ray examination were: Chest PA, LAT; Skull PA/AP, LAT; Lumbar spine AP, LAT; and Pelvis AP. The fluctuation of the entrance surface doses (ESD) was too large, even in the same type of X-ray examination and X-ray facility. It was found that the ratio of maximum and minimum ESD were ranged from 1.5 to 18. The mean values of ESD for chest and skull were higher than CEC recommended values, while the mean values of lumbar spine and pelvis were smaller than that of CEC recommended values. The result of dose intercomparison was also reported. Some methods of dose reduction were applied for improving the patient dose in X-ray departments such as a high kV technique, high sensitive screen-film combination. (author)

  4. Radiological survey following decontamination activities near the TA-45 site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunderson, T.; Buhl, T.; Romero, R.; Salazar, J.

    1983-07-01

    Three areas at the site of a former radioactive liquid waste treatment plant at Los Alamos National Laboratory were decontaminated during 1982 by Bechtel Corporation, with health physics support provided by Eberline Instrument Corporation, under the Department of Energy's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Before decontamination, there were above-background concentrations of gross alpha, gross beta, 238 Pu, 239 240 Pu, 241 Am, 90 Sr, and 137 Cs in the surface soils. These combined concentrations were above operational decontamination guidelines for surface soil contamination. After cleanup operations, radionuclide concentrations in surface soils at all three sites were within decontamination guidelines

  5. Development of interactive patient-based multimedia computer programs in veterinary orthopedic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraft, S.L.; Hoskinson, J.J.; Mussman, J.M.; Michaels, W.E.; Mclaughlin, R.; Gaughan, E.M.; Roush, J.K.

    1998-01-01

    Three computerized multimedia programs on large and small animal veterinary orthopedic radiology were developed and implemented for the radiology curriculum as an alternative to traditional film-based laboratory learning. Programs utilized ''hot words'' (colored text words that displayed an overlaid image label that highlighted lesions) and interactive quizzes which responded appropriately to selected answers. ''Hot words'' helped students develop confidence in accurate lesion detection and the interactive quizzes transformed learning from a passive to an active process. Multiple examples were provided for reinforcement and concepts were incorporated from other clinical disciplines for curriculum integration. Programs were written using a presentation software program, Toolbook for DOS based platform, and contained radiographic images made by laser-scanning digitization. Multiple students could simultaneously access the programs through a network server. These pilot programs were implemented successfully and computerized multimedia presentation proved to be well suited to teaching radiology. Development of the programs required attention to a number of hardware, software, time and cost factors

  6. Standarized radiological hazard analysis for a broad based operational safety program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadman, W.W. III; Andrews, L.L.

    1992-01-01

    The Radiological hazard Analysis (RHA) Manual provides a methodology and detailed guidance for systematic analysis of radiological hazards over a broad spectrum of program functions, housed in a wide variety of facilities. Radiological programs at LANL include: research and experimentation; routine materials operations; production; non-destructive examination or testing; isotope and machine produced radiations; chemistry; and metallurgy. The RHA permits uniform evaluation of hazard types over a range of several orders of magnitude of hazard severity. The results are used to estimate risk, evaluate types and level or resource allocations, identify deficiencies, and plan corrective actions for safe working environments. 2 refs

  7. Standardized radiological hazard analysis for a broad based operational safety program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadman, W. III; Andrews, L.

    1992-01-01

    The Radiological Hazard Analysis (RHA) Manual provides a methodology and detailed guidance for systematic analysis of radiological hazards over a broad spectrum of program functions, housed in a wide variety of facilities. Radiological programs at LANL include: research and experimentation routine materials operations; production; non-destructive examination or testing; isotope and machine produced radiations; chemistry; and metallurgy. The RHA permits uniform evaluation of hazard types over a range of several orders of magnitude of hazard severity. The results are used to estimate risk, evaluate types and level of resource allocations, identify deficiencies, and plan corrective actions for safe working environments. (author)

  8. An aerial radiological survey of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant and surrounding area, Paducah, Kentucky

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    An aerial radiological survey of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) and surrounding area in Paducah, Kentucky, was conducted during May 15--25, 1990. The purpose of the survey was to measure and document the terrestrial radiological environment at the PGDP and surrounding area for use in effective environmental management and emergency response planning. The aerial survey was flown at an altitude of 61 meters (200 feet) along a series of parallel lines 107 meters (350 feet) apart. The survey encompassed an area of 62 square kilometers (24 square miles), bordered on the north by the Ohio River. The results of the aerial survey are reported as inferred exposure rates at 1 meter above ground level in the form of a gamma radiation contour map. Typical background exposure rates were found to vary from 5 to 12 microroentgens per hour (μR/h). Protactinium-234m, a radioisotope indicative of uranium-238, was detected at several facilities at the PGDR. In support of the aerial survey, ground-based exposure rate and soil sample measurements were obtained at several sites within the survey perimeter. The results of the aerial and ground-based measurements were found to agree within ±15%

  9. Radiological survey of the former Shpack Landfill, Norton, Massachusetts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-05-01

    The distribution of contamination on the Shpack Landfill site is spotty and uneven, both horizontally and vertically. Although some hotspots exceed the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) criteria (see Appendix B), average concentrations of soil contamination are below the residual limits requiring remedial action. Removal of the hotspots only would generate approximately 390 m/sup 3/ (400 yd/sup 3/) of low-level radioactive waste. However, because of the relative physical and chemical stability of the radioactive contamination, such an effort could be deferred without harmful effect to individuals, the public or the natural environment. The site is also widely contaminated with chemical pollutants that might eventually require remedial action pursuant to several state and federal environmental statutes. The timing and nature of these possible environmental improvements could easily negate the need for a separate remedial action to clean up the radioactive contamination.

  10. Radiological survey of plants, animals, and soil in micronesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, V.A.

    1975-11-01

    In 1974 the Laboratory of Radiation Ecology began a program to determine the radionuclides found in foods, plants, animals, and soils of the Central Pacific. As part of this program the present study was undertaken to determine radionuclides found in the common foods and soils in areas of Micronesia other than those areas receiving local fallout from the test sites at Bikini or Enewetak atolls. Areas sampled in 1975 were Majuro Atoll in the Marshall Islands, Truk and Ponape in the Caroline Islands, Guam in the Marianas Islands, and Koror and Babelthaup in the Palau Islands. All samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides while some were also analyzed for 90 Sr of 239 240 Pu. Results of the analyses indicate that naturally occurring 40 K is the predominant radionuclide in the biological samples. Cesium-137 in amounts less than 1 pCi/g (dry) was the only fallout radionuclide detected in most of the biological samples. Soil samples usually contained 90 Sr, 137 Cs, 238 U, and 239 Pu, while soil from Truk, Palau, and Ponape also contained isotopes of radium and thorium. Soil from Guam also contained 210 Pb and 235 U in addition to the above radionuclides. Considering only the fallout radionuclides, the values for 90 Sr, 137 Cs, and 239 240 Pu in samples from Guam, Palau, Truk, Ponape, and Majuro are less than the values for these radionuclides in similar samples from atolls such as Utirik, Rongerik, and Ailinginae in the northern Marshall Islands, and are much less than values of these radionuclides in samples from Bikini and Rongelap atolls

  11. Radiology research in mainland China in the past 10 years: a survey of original articles published in Radiology and European Radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Long Jiang; Wang, Yun Fei; Yang, Zhen Lu; Lu, Guang Ming [Medical School of Nanjing University, Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Schoepf, U.J. [Medical School of Nanjing University, Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Xu, Jiaqian [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Li, Enzhong [National Natural Science Foundation of China, Department of Medical Science, Beijing (China)

    2017-10-15

    To evaluate the features and trends of Radiology research in Mainland China through bibliometric analysis of the original articles published in Radiology and European Radiology (ER) between 2006 and 2015. We reviewed the original articles published in Radiology and ER between 2006 and 2015. The following information was abstracted: imaging subspecialty, imaging technique(s) used, research type, sample size, study design, statistical analysis, study results, funding declarations, international collaborations, number of authors, department and province of the first author. All variables were examined longitudinally over time. Radiology research in Mainland China saw a substantial increase in original research articles published, especially in the last 5 years (P < 0.001). Within Mainland China's Radiology research, neuroradiology, vascular/interventional Radiology, and abdominal Radiology were the most productive fields; MR imaging was the most used modality, and a distinct geographic provenience was observed for articles published in Radiology and ER. Radiology research in Mainland China has seen substantial growth in the past 5 years with neuroradiology, vascular/interventional Radiology, and abdominal Radiology as the most productive fields. MR imaging is the most used modality. Article provenience shows a distinct geographical pattern. (orig.)

  12. Radiology research in mainland China in the past 10 years: a survey of original articles published in Radiology and European Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Long Jiang; Wang, Yun Fei; Yang, Zhen Lu; Lu, Guang Ming; Schoepf, U.J.; Xu, Jiaqian; Li, Enzhong

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the features and trends of Radiology research in Mainland China through bibliometric analysis of the original articles published in Radiology and European Radiology (ER) between 2006 and 2015. We reviewed the original articles published in Radiology and ER between 2006 and 2015. The following information was abstracted: imaging subspecialty, imaging technique(s) used, research type, sample size, study design, statistical analysis, study results, funding declarations, international collaborations, number of authors, department and province of the first author. All variables were examined longitudinally over time. Radiology research in Mainland China saw a substantial increase in original research articles published, especially in the last 5 years (P < 0.001). Within Mainland China's Radiology research, neuroradiology, vascular/interventional Radiology, and abdominal Radiology were the most productive fields; MR imaging was the most used modality, and a distinct geographic provenience was observed for articles published in Radiology and ER. Radiology research in Mainland China has seen substantial growth in the past 5 years with neuroradiology, vascular/interventional Radiology, and abdominal Radiology as the most productive fields. MR imaging is the most used modality. Article provenience shows a distinct geographical pattern. (orig.)

  13. Results of survey for assessing awareness level regarding radiological hazards of tobacco smoking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir, S. N. A.

    2009-01-01

    Human consumption of tobacco is as old as human history. However, injurious health effects due to tobacco smoking may not be evident to the public at large. This article presents results of a questionnaire based on a survey carried out in the metropolitan city of Lahore of Pakistan with an aim to understand the awareness level of the general population about the radiological hazards associated with tobacco smoking. Some 3600 participants from different educational backgrounds from all segments of the society participated in this survey. Analysis of the data collected concluded that the awareness level of the representative participants regarding the radiological hazards associated with tobacco smoking was alarmingly poor. These results suggest that a nationwide mass media campaign may be launched by the government authorities in Health and Environment departments to enlighten the general public in this respect to avoid tobacco-smoking-associated health risks. (authors)

  14. Radiological protection program in x-ray diagnostic facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melara F, N.E.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a basic document to initiate a discussion which will originate a Unified Protocol in Latin America and the Caribbean for radiological protection in the installations of medical radiology. The following principal elements are considered an inherent part of radiology protection: 1. Quality control of equipment. 2. Conditions in the dark room which coincide in the quality of the image. Levels of patient exposure and the processes for the quality control of the processors are not discussed, and it is limited to the installation of radiographic medical x-ray equipment, stationary and mobile. Each point to be put into effect is presented in a diagram, frequency and criteria for acceptance. A detailed explanation of each point along with a clear explanation of the recommended method for each follows in the same order in which they are presented in the diagram. Finally adequate forms for easily acquiring data are presented. (author)

  15. Northern Marshall Islands radiological survey: terrestrial food chain and total doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robison, W.L.; Mount, M.E.; Phillips, W.A.; Conrado, C.A.; Stuart, M.L.; Stoker, C.E.

    1982-01-01

    A radiological survey was conducted from September through November of 1978 to assess the concentrations of persistent manmade radionuclides in the terrestrial and marine environments of 11 atolls and 2 islands in the Northern Marshall Islands. The survey consisted mainly of an aerial radiological reconnaissance to map the external gamma-ray exposure rates over the islands of each atoll. The logistical support for the entire survey was designed to accommodate this operation. As a secondary phase of the survey, shore parties collected appropriate terrestrial and marine samples to assess the radiological dose from pertinent food chains to those individuals residing on the atolls, who may in the future reside on some of the presently uninhabited atolls, or who collect food from these atolls. Over 5000 terrestrial and marine samples were collected for radionuclide analysis from 76 different islands. Soils, vegetation, indigenous animals, and cistern water and groundwater were collected from the islands. Reef and pelagic fish, clams, lagoon water, and sediments were obtained from the lagoons. The concentration data for 90 Sr, 137 Cs, 238 Pu, 239 240 Pu, and 241 Am in terrestrial food crops, fowl, and animals collected at the atolls or islands are summarized. An assessment of the total dose from the major exposure pathways including external gamma, terrestrial food chain including food products and drinking water, marine food chain, and inhalation is provided. Radiological doses at each atoll or island are calculated from the average radionuclide concentrations in the terrestrial foods, marine foods, etc. assuming the average daily intake for each food item

  16. Aerial radiological survey of the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station and surrounding area, San Clemente, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilton, L.K.

    1980-12-01

    An airborne radiological survey of an 11 km 2 area surrounding the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station was made 9 to 17 January 1980. Count rates observed at 60 m altitude were converted to exposure rates at 1 m above the ground and are presented in the form of an isopleth map. Detected radioisotopes and their associated gamma ray exposure rates were consistent with that expected from normal background emitters, except directly over the plant

  17. Aerial radiological survey of the Industrial Reactor Laboratory and surrounding area Plainsboro, New Jersey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-12-01

    An airborne radiological survey of a 6 km 2 area centered over the Industrial Reactor Laboratory was made 25-27 July 1979. Detected radioisotopes and their associated gamma ray exposure rates were consistent with that expected from normal background emitters, except at two locations described in this report. Count rates observed at 46 m altitude were converted to exposure rates at 1 m above the ground and are presented in the form of an isopleth map

  18. Analysis and radiological assessment of survey results and samples from the beaches around Sellafield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, G.A.M.; Fry, F.A.

    1983-12-01

    After radioactive sea debris had been found on beaches near the BNFL, Sellafield, plant, NRPB was asked by the Department of the Environment to analyse some of the samples collected and to assess the radiological hazard to members of the public. A report is presented containing an analysis of survey reports for the period 19 November - 4 December 1983 and preliminary results of the analysis of all samples received, together with the Board's recommendations. (author)

  19. An Aerial Radiological Survey of the Yucca Mountain Project Proposed Land Withdrawal and Adjacent Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig Lyons, Thane Hendricks

    2006-01-01

    An aerial radiological survey of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) proposed land withdrawal was conducted from January to April 2006, and encompassed a total area of approximately 284 square miles (73,556 hectares). The aerial radiological survey was conducted to provide a sound technical basis and rigorous statistical approach for determining the potential presence of radiological contaminants in the Yucca Mountain proposed Land withdrawal area. The survey site included land areas currently managed by the Bureau of Land Management, the U.S. Air Force as part of the Nevada Test and Training Range or the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) as part of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The survey was flown at an approximate ground speed of 70 knots (36 meters per second), at a nominal altitude of 150 ft (46 m) above ground level, along a set of parallel flight lines spaced 250 ft (76 m) apart. The flight lines were oriented in a north-south trajectory. The survey was conducted by the DOE NNSA/NSO Remote Sensing Laboratory-Nellis, which is located in Las Vegas, Nevada. The aerial survey was conducted at the request of the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The primary contaminant of concern was identified by YMP personnel as cesium-137 ( 137 Cs). Due to the proposed land withdrawal area's proximity to the historical Nuclear Rocket Development Station (NRDS) facilities located on the NTS, the aerial survey system required sufficient sensitivity to discriminate between dispersed but elevated 137 Cs levels from those normally encountered from worldwide fallout. As part of that process, the survey also measured and mapped the exposure-rate levels that currently existed within the survey area. The inferred aerial exposure rates of the natural terrestrial background radiation varied from less than 3 to 22 microroentgens per hour. This range of exposure rates was primarily due to the surface

  20. An aerial radiological survey of the Ames Laboratory and surrounding area, Ames, Iowa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurer, R.J.

    1993-04-01

    An aerial radiological survey of the Ames Laboratory and surrounding area in Ames, Iowa, was conducted during the period July 15--25, 1991. The purpose of the survey was to measure and document the terrestrial radiological environment at the Ames Laboratory and the surrounding area for use in effective environmental management and emergency response planning. The aerial survey was flown at an altitude of 200 feet (61 meters) along a series of parallel lines 350 feet (107 meters) apart. The survey encompassed an area of 36 square miles (93 square kilometers) and included the city of Ames, Iowa, and the Iowa State University. The results are reported as exposure rates at 1 meter above ground level (inferred from the aerial data) in the form of a gamma radiation contour map. Typical background exposure rates were found to vary from 7 to 9 microroentgens per hour (μR/h). No anomalous radiation levels were detected at the Ames Laboratory. However, one anomalous radiation source was detected at an industrial storage yard in the city of Ames. In support of the aerial survey, ground-based exposure rate and soil sample measurements were obtained at several sites within the survey perimeter. The results of the aerial and ground-based measurements were found to agree within the expected uncertainty of ±15%

  1. An integrated system for conducting radiological surveys of contaminated sites - 16312

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCown, Jay P.; Rogers, Donna M.; Waggoner, Charles A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes an integrated detection system that has been developed to conduct radiological surveys of sites suspected of contamination of materials such as depleted uranium. This system utilizes cerium activated lanthanum bromide and thallium activated sodium iodide gamma detectors and can be easily adapted to include units for detecting neutrons. The detection system includes software controlling the collection of radiological spectra and GPS data. Two different platforms are described for conducting surveys, a modified zero turn radius (ZTR) mower and a three-wheeled cart that is manually pushed. The detection system software controlling data collection has components that facilitate completing a grid-less survey on user specified spacings. Another package confirms that all data quality activities (calibrations, etc.) are conducted prior to beginning the survey and also reviews data to identify areas that have been missed for which data quality falls below user designated parameters. Advanced digital signal processing algorithms are used to enhance the interpretation of spectra for conducting background subtractions and for mapping. Data from radiation detection instruments and GPS antennae are merged and made compatible with mapping using Geosoft Oasis montaj software. A summary of system performance during field-testing is included in the paper. This includes survey rate, detection limits, duty cycle, supporting ancillary equipment/material, and manpower requirements. The rate of false positives and false negatives is discussed with the benefits of surveys conducted using synergetic detection systems such as electromagnetic induction imaging. (authors)

  2. Results of the radiological survey at Two Mile Creek, Tonawanda, New York (TNY002)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, M.E.; Rodriguez, R.E.; Uziel, M.S.

    1997-08-01

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey at Two Mile Creek, Tonawanda, New York. The survey was performed in November 1991 and May 1996. The purpose of the survey was to determine if radioactive materials from work performed under government contract at the Linde Air Products Division of Union Carbide Corporation, Tonawanda, New York, had been transported into the creek. The survey included a surface gamma scan in accessible areas near the creek and the collection of soil, sediment, and core samples for radionuclide analyses. Survey results indicate that no significant material originating at the Linde plant is presently in the creek. Three of the 1991 soil sample locations on the creek bank and one near the lake contained slightly elevated concentrations of 238 U with radionuclide distributions similar to that found in materials resulting from former processing activities at the Linde site

  3. An aerial radiological survey of the Sandia National Laboratories and surrounding area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedhauser, S.R.

    1994-06-01

    A team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory conducted an aerial radiological survey of the area surrounding the Sandia National Laboratories and Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, New Mexico, during March and April 1993. The survey team measured the terrestrial gamma radiation at the site to determine the levels of natural and man-made radiation. This survey includes the areas covered by a previous survey in 1981. The results of the aerial survey show a background exposure rate which varies between 5 and 18 μR/h plus an approximate 6 μR/h contribution from cosmic rays. The major radioactive isotopes found in this survey were: potassium-40, thallium-208, bismuth-214, and actinium-228, which are all naturally-occurring isotopes, and cobalt-60, cesium-137, and excess amounts of thallium-208 and actinium-228, which are due to human actions in the survey area. In regions away from man-made activity, the exposure rates inferred from this survey's gamma ray measurements agree almost exactly with the exposure rates inferred from the 1981 survey. In addition to the aerial measurements, another survey team conducted in situ and soil sample radiation measurements at three sites within the survey perimeter. These ground-based measurements agree with the aerial measurements within ± 5%

  4. Women in the radiology profession: data from a 1995 national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deitch, C H; Sunshine, J H; Chan, W C; Shaffer, K A

    1998-02-01

    This report provides an in-depth picture of similarities and differences in the professional and practice characteristics of women and men who are radiologists in the United States, with specific attention to whether gender differences are less pronounced among younger radiologists. Data were taken from a national stratified random sample survey of radiologists. The response rate was 75%. The 1731 men and 294 women responding included diagnostic radiologists, radiation oncologists, and radiology-related nuclear medicine specialists. Seven percent of respondents who completed their radiology residency before 1970 were women, compared with 9% in 1970-1979, 19% in 1980-1989, and 27% in 1990-1995. Gender differences were smaller among posttraining radiologists younger than 40 years old than among those 40 years old or older for the following questions: when the respondent decided to specialize in radiology, whether the respondent is a subspecialist within diagnostic radiology, whether the respondent's practice is primarily academic, whether the practice is privately owned, and whether the respondent is a practice owner (partner, shareholder). Women who were residents and fellows more frequently indicated problems with unwanted sexual attention occurring in the past 2 years than did women who were not in training positions. However, posttraining women were more likely to have encountered discrimination in salary, hiring, or promotion at some time in their careers. Women's professional roles in radiology are changing slowly. A narrowing gender gap among younger radiologists on some professional and practice characteristics may indicate a further diminishing of gender differences in radiology in the future. It may also reflect greater gender equality at earlier rather than later stages of one's career.

  5. U.S. Department of Energy Region 6 Radiological Assistance Program response plan. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakubowski, F.M.

    1998-02-01

    Upon request, the DOE, through the Radiological Assistance Program (RAP), makes available and will provide radiological advice, monitoring, and assessment activities during radiological incidents where the release of radioactive materials is suspected or has occurred. Assistance will end when the need for such assistance is over, or if there are other resources available to adequately address the incident. The implementation of the RAP is usually accomplished through the recommendation of the DOE Regional Coordinating Office's (RCO) on duty Regional Response Coordinator (RRC) with the approval of the Regional Coordinating Office Director (RCOD). The DOE Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) is the designated RCO for DOE Region 6 RAP. The purpose of this document is: to describe the mechanism for responding to any organization or private citizen requesting assistance to radiological incidents; to coordinate radiological assistance among participating federal agencies, states, and tribes in DOE Region 6; and to describe the RAP Scaled Response concept of operations

  6. Aerial radiological survey of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho. Date of survey: June 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-02-01

    An aerial radiological survey of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) was conducted during June 1982 by EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc. for the United States Department of Energy (DOE). The survey consisted of airborne measurements of both natural and man-made gamma radiation from the terrain surface in and around the INEL site. These measurements allowed an estimate of the distribution of isotopic concentrations in the survey area. Results are reported as isopleths superimposed on maps and photographs of the area. Gamma ray energy spectra are also presented for the net man-made radionuclides. The survey was designed to cover all of the area within a 2 mile radius of any facility at the INEL. Several areas of man-made activity were detected. These areas are all known working or storage areas which are associated with normal operations at the INEL. 3 references, 48 figures, 5 tables

  7. An Aerial Radiological Survey of the Nevada Test Site - Areas 18 and 20 Corrective Action Unit 372

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyons, Craig

    2010-01-01

    A series of aerial radiological surveys were conducted over the Little Feller I and II ground zero areas in Area 18 and the Palanquin and Cabriolet ground zero areas in Area 20. The surveys were performed in October and November 2009 utilizing a large array of helicopter mounted sodium iodide detectors. The purpose of the survey was to update the previous radiological survey levels of the environment and surrounding areas of the ground zeros. Gross Counts, inferred exposure rates, man-made activity, and Americium-241 activity, as calculated from the aerial data are presented in the form of isopleth maps superimposed on imagery of the surveyed areas.

  8. Survey of the WHO-REMPAN network's capability for strengthening preparedness for radiological and nuclear emergencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumagai, A [Takashi Nagai Memorial International Hibakusha Medical Centre, Nagasaki Univ. Hospital, Nagasaki (Japan); Carr, Z [Dept. of Public Health and Environment, Health Security and Environment Cluster, World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland); Akira, O [Takashi Nagai Memorial International Hibakusha Medical Centre, Nagasaki Univ. Hospital, Nagasaki (Japan); Christie, D [Dept. of Public Health and Environment, Health Security and Environment Cluster, World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland); Yamashita, S [Takashi Nagai Memorial International Hibakusha Medical Centre, Nagasaki Univ. Hospital, Nagasaki (Japan); Fukushima Medical Univ. (Japan)

    2012-07-01

    This paper investigates the capacity of the World Health Organization (WHO)-REMPAN network in responding to radiological incidents and nuclear emergencies. A survey developed by the WHO Secretariat and Nagasaki Univ. was sent to all 40 WHO-REMPAN collaborating centres and liaison institutes in order to verify the current situation of the network, identify needs and collect suggestions for future improvements. Most of the responding institutions said they were satisfied with the current status of the network. However, several responses to the survey indicate that better internal communication is needed, as well as a position document to specify the roles, rights and responsibilities of the network members. (authors)

  9. Survey of the WHO-REMPAN network's capability for strengthening preparedness for radiological and nuclear emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagai, A.; Carr, Z.; Akira, O.; Christie, D.; Yamashita, S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the capacity of the World Health Organization (WHO)-REMPAN network in responding to radiological incidents and nuclear emergencies. A survey developed by the WHO Secretariat and Nagasaki Univ. was sent to all 40 WHO-REMPAN collaborating centres and liaison institutes in order to verify the current situation of the network, identify needs and collect suggestions for future improvements. Most of the responding institutions said they were satisfied with the current status of the network. However, several responses to the survey indicate that better internal communication is needed, as well as a position document to specify the roles, rights and responsibilities of the network members. (authors)

  10. Aerial radiological survey of the area surrounding the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-09-01

    An airborne radiological survey was conducted in July 1976. It was centered on the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Two areas were surveyed: one 35 km 2 and the other 16 km 2 . Using Nal(Tl) scintillation detectors, measurements were made of the terrestrial gamma radiation over the areas with a series of north-south flight lines. The processed data indicated that on-site radioactivity was due to nuclear matterials currently or previously handled, processed, or stored. Off-site activities were found to be due wholly to the naturally occurring 40 K, the 238 U chain, and thorium chain gamma emitters

  11. General programs of specialized education of radiological physicists in the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvorak, P.; Judas, L.; Richter, V.; Novak, L.

    2005-01-01

    Specialized Education of Czech radiological physicists in diagnostic radiology (DR), nuclear medicine (NM) or radiotherapy (RT) follows-up to regulated university master program. A form and content of Specialized Education which will be defined by General Programs must therefore reflect previous step. Graduates from Specialized Education will be fully competent clinical radiological physicists for DR, NM or RT according to their branch. Therefore, we strongly recommend that General Programs are made very carefully reflecting requirements of Specialized Education and current status of the field in the Czech Republic. Currently, CAMP works on its own version of General Program for each branch. CAMP is ready to collaborate closely with all other bodies included in preparation of General Programs and with the Czech Ministry of Health. (authors)

  12. Aerial Radiological Survey of Abandoned Uranium Mines (AUM) Map Service, Navajo Nation, 1994-1999, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This map service contains data from aerial radiological surveys of 41 potential uranium mining areas (1,144 square miles) within the Navajo Nation that were...

  13. An aerial radiological survey of the Oak Ridge Reservation and surrounding area, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurer, R.J.

    1989-09-01

    An aerial radiological survey of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and surrounding area in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, was conducted from September 12--29, 1989. The purpose of the survey was to measure and document the site's terrestrial radiological environment for use in effective environmental management and emergency response planning. The aerial survey was flown at an altitude of 91 meters (300 feet) along a series of parallel lines 152 meters (500 feet) apart. The survey encompassed an area of 440 square kilometers (170 square miles) as defined by the Tennessee Valley Authority Map S-16A of the entire Oak Ridge Reservation and adjacent area. The results of the aerial survey are reported as inferred exposure rates at 1 meter above ground level (AGL) in the form of a radiation contour map. Typical background exposure rates were found to vary from 5 to 14 microroentgens per hour (μR/h). The man-made radionuclides, cobalt-60, cesium-137, and protactinium-234m (a radioisotope indicative of depleted uranium), were detected at several facilities on the site. In support of the aerial survey, ground-based exposure rate and soil sample measurements were obtained at several locations within the survey boundary. In addition to the large scale aerial survey, two special flyovers were requested by the Department of Energy. The first request was to conduct a survey of a 1-mile x 2-mile area in south Knoxville, Tennessee. The area had been used previously to store contaminated scrap metals from operations at the Oak Ridge site. The second request was to fly several passes over a 5-mile length of railroad tracks leading from the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, north through the city of Oak Ridge. The railroad tracks had been previously used in the transport of cesium-137

  14. An aerial radiological survey of the Millstone Nuclear Power Station and surrounding area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vojtech, R.J.

    1994-03-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted during the period of September 10 to 18, 1990, over a 40-square-mile (104-square-kilometer) area surrounding the Millstone Nuclear Power Station (MNPS). The MNPS is located on the Long Island Sound shoreline, three kilometers south of Waterford, Connecticut. The purpose of the survey was to measure and document the terrestrial gamma ray environment of the plant and surrounding areas. A contour map showing radiation exposure rates at 1 meter above ground level was constructed from the aerial data and overlaid on an aerial photograph and a United States Geological Survey map of the area. The exposure rates within the survey region are quite uniform. The area is characterized by an exposure rate of 10-12 microroentgens per hour including an estimated cosmic ray contribution of 3.6 μR/h. This is typical of natural background. The only exception to the natural background readings is the Millstone station itself, which is characterized by an exposure rate consistent with the standard operation of the reactor units. Radionuclide assays of soil samples and pressurized-ion-chamber gamma ray measurements were obtained at five locations within the survey boundaries. These measurements were taken in support of, and are in agreement with, the aerial data. The radiological environment near the plant is consistent with normal plant operation

  15. An aerial radiological survey of the Millstone Nuclear Power Station and surrounding area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vojtech, R.J.

    1994-03-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted during the period of September 10 to 18, 1990, over a 40-square-mile (104-square-kilometer) area surrounding the Millstone Nuclear Power Station (MNPS). The MNPS is located on the Long Island Sound shoreline, three kilometers south of Waterford, Connecticut. The purpose of the survey was to measure and document the terrestrial gamma ray environment of the plant and surrounding areas. A contour map showing radiation exposure rates at 1 meter above ground level was constructed from the aerial data and overlaid on an aerial photograph and a United States Geological Survey map of the area. The exposure rates within the survey region are quite uniform. The area is characterized by an exposure rate of 10-12 microroentgens per hour including an estimated cosmic ray contribution of 3.6 {mu}R/h. This is typical of natural background. The only exception to the natural background readings is the Millstone station itself, which is characterized by an exposure rate consistent with the standard operation of the reactor units. Radionuclide assays of soil samples and pressurized-ion-chamber gamma ray measurements were obtained at five locations within the survey boundaries. These measurements were taken in support of, and are in agreement with, the aerial data. The radiological environment near the plant is consistent with normal plant operation.

  16. Aerial radiological survey of the Savannah River Plant and surrounding area, Aiken, South Carolina. Date of survey: June 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyns, P.K.; Smith, D.B.

    1982-07-01

    An aerial radiological survey of the Savannah River Plant (SRP) was conducted during June 1979 by EG and G Energy Measurements Group for the United States Department of Energy (DOE). The survey consisted of an airborne measurement of both natural and man-made gamma radiation from the terrain surface in and around the plant site. These measurements allowed a determination of the surface terrestrial spatial distribution of isotopic concentrations and equivalent gamma ray exposure rates from 60 Co and 137 Cs contaminants. The results are reported as exposure rate isopleths for the two isotopes and are superimposed on 1:48,000 scale maps of the area. Gamma ray energy spectra are also presented for the net man-made radioelements. This was the second survey of the entire Savannah River Plant site. The first survey was conducted in June 1974. A comparison of the surveys indicates a decrease in the exposure rates due to man-made isotopes. All areas of man-made activity were in the same location as indicated by the results of the first survey. It appears that no detectable new man-made activity has been released in the survey area since the 1974 survey

  17. Use of the analytical tree technique to develop a radiological protection program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domenech N, H.; Jova S, L.

    1996-01-01

    The results obtained by the Cuban Center for Radiological Protection and Hygiene by using an analytical tree technique to develop its general operational radiation protection program are presented. By the application of this method, some factors such as the organization of the radiation protection services, the provision of administrative requirements, the existing general laboratories requirements, the viability of resources and the current documentation was evaluated. Main components were considered such as: complete normative and regulatory documentation; automatic radiological protection data management; scope of 'on the-job'and radiological protection training for the personnel; previous radiological appraisal for the safety performance of the works and application of dose constrains for the personnel and the public. The detailed development of the program allowed to identify the basic aims to be achieved in its maintenance and improvement. (authors). 3 refs

  18. Results of the radiological survey at the Jessop Steel Company Site, 500 Green Street, Washington, Pennsylvania (JSP001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, W.D.; Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.

    1991-04-01

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted investigative radiological surveys at the Jessop Steel company, 500 Green Street, Washington, Pennsylvania (JSP001) in 1989. The purpose of the surveys was to determine whether the property was contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 238 U, as a result of work contracted to the Atomic Energy Commission. The survey included gamma scans; direct and transferable measurements of alpha and beta-gamma radiation levels; and soil dust, debris, grinding wheel, and air sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey and sampling covered portions of the exterior ground surface, the roof and gutter section above the saw shop and rolling mill area of building D, and the interiors of buildings A, B, C and D. Results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program guidelines for radium, thorium, and uranium. The radionuclide distributions were not significantly different from typical background levels in the Pennsylvania are. 7 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs

  19. Results of the radiological survey at the former Associate Aircraft Tool and Manufacturing Company site, Fairfield, Ohio (FOH001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, M.E.; Carrier, R.F.; Mathis, R.A.

    1993-03-01

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey of the former Associate Aircraft Tool and Manufacturing Company facility, Fairfield, Ohio. The survey was performed in July and September 1992. The purpose of the survey was to determine if the facility had become contaminated with residuals containing radioactive materials during the work performed under government contract from February to September, 1956. The survey included gamma scanning over a circumscribed area around and outside of the building, and gamma scanning over most accessible indoor floor surfaces as well as the collection of soil and other samples for radionuclide analyses. Roof trusses were beta-gamma scanned in locations where floor contamination was found. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in indoor and outdoor samples, and radiation measurements over floor and overhead surfaces, in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program guidelines. Elevated uranium concentrations outdoors were limited to several small, isolated spots. Radiation measurements exceeded guidelines indoors over numerous spots and areas inside the building, mainly in the areas that had been used in the early government work

  20. Results of the radiological survey of the Excelsior Steel Ball Company, Tonawanda, New York (TNY005)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie, S.P.; Brown, K.S.

    1998-07-01

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted two radiological surveys of property belonging to the Excelsior Steel Ball Company, which is surrounded on three sides by the former site of the Linde Uranium Refinery, Tonawanda, New York. The surveys were performed in September 1997 and February 1998. The purpose of the first survey was to determine if radioactive residuals were present from previous activities at the former Linde site. The Linde Air Products Division of Union Carbide Corporation, Tonawanda, New York, had used radioactive materials at that location for work performed under government contract from 1942 through 1948. The purpose of the second survey was to collect additional biased samples from an area of the site where biased sample results showed slightly elevated levels of thorium-232

  1. Final report of the radiological release survey of Building 30B at the Grand Junction Office Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krauland, P.A.; Corle, S.G.

    1997-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore concentrates and mill tailings during vanadium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District, and during sampling, assaying, pilot milling, storage, and brokerage activities conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJO Remedial Action Project (GJORAP) to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and underlying aquifer. WASTREN-Grand Junction is the site contractor for the facility and the remedial action contractor for GJORAP. Building 30B and the underlying soil were found not to be radiologically contaminated; therefore, the building can be released for unrestricted use. Placards have been placed at the building entrances indicating the completion of the radiological release survey and prohibiting the introduction of any radioactive materials within the building without written approvals from the GJO Facilities Operations Manager. This document was prepared in response to a DOE-GJO request for an individual final release report for each GJO building

  2. An aerial radiological survey of the Double Track Site and surrounding area, Central Nevada. Date of survey: December 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    An aerial radiological survey of the Double Track Site was conducted in December 1993. An interim report described survey procedures and presented terrestrial exposure rate and wide-area-averaged plutonium isopleth plots. This letter report presents additional plutonium plots and some rule-of-thumb calculations which should help the reader to properly interpret the data presented. Attached to this report are three isopleth plots produced from the Double Track data. No one processing method provides all the answers regarding a particular surveyed area. Where peak vales are most important, a figure created from the original unsmoothed data is the presentation of choice. A figure from smoothed data is superior for the detection of areas of widespread low-level contamination. A figure , also smoothed data, satisfied a particular early mission goal but is not as useful for cleanup operations as the other two. This last figure is presented for historical completeness only

  3. Results of the radiological survey at 1047 Central Avenue, Albany, New York (AL209)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, S.C.; Marley, J.L.

    1987-11-01

    A number of properties in the Albany/Colonie area have been identified as being potentially contaminated with uranium originating from the former National Lead Company's uranium forming plant in Colonie, New York. The property at 1047 Central Avenue in Albany, New York was the subject of a radiological investigation initiated August 26, 1986. The commercial property consists of a two-story frame building located on an irregular lot. An asphalt drive connects the property to the street. A diagram of the property showing the approximate boundaries and the 6-m grid network established for measurements outside the building is shown. The lot included in the radiological survey was /approximately/18 m wide by 60 m deep. Front and rear views of the property are shown. 13 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs

  4. Results of the radiological survey at 3 Crammond Street, Colonie, New York (AL135)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marley, J.L.

    1987-12-01

    A number of properties in the Albany/Colonie area have been identified as being potentially contaminated with uranium originating from the former National Lead Company's uranium forming plant in Colonie, New York. The property at 3 Crammond Street in Colonie, New York was subject of a radiological investigation initiated November 14, 1985. The property was a vacant, asphalt-paved lot. A diagram of the property showing the approximate boundaries and the 5-m grid network established for measurements is shown. The rectangular lot included in the radiological survey was /approximately/18.5 m wide by 33.7 m deep. A front view of the property is shown. 13 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs

  5. Results of the radiological survey at 7 Maplewood Avenue, Colonie, New York

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marley, J.L.

    1987-12-01

    A number of properties in the Albany/Colonie area have been identified as being potentially contaminated with uranium originating from the former National Lead Company's uranium forming plant in Colonie, New York. The property at 7 Maplewood Avenue in Colonie, New York, was the subject of a radiological investigation initiated May 8, 1986. The residential property consisted of a house and a garage located on a rectangular lot. An asphalt-paved driveway connected the garage with the street. A diagram of the property showing the approximate boundaries and the 4-m grid network established for measurements outside the house is shown. The lot included in the radiological survey was /approximately/12 m wide by 35.5 m deep. Front and rear views of the property are shown. 13 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs

  6. Results of the radiological survey at 23 Yardboro Avenue, Albany, New York (AL138)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marley, J.L.

    1987-12-01

    A number of properties in the Albany/Colonie area have been identified as being potentially contaminated with uranium originating from the former National Lead Company's uranium forming plant in Colonie, New York. The property at 23 Yardboro Avenue in Albany, New York (AL138) was the subject of a radiological investigation initiated May 7, 1986. The property was a residence with a one and one-half-story frame house located on a rectangular lot. An asphalt driveway or parking area is located at the east side of the house. An area of /approximately/10 m /times/ 14 m at the rear was inaccessible. A diagram of the property showing the approximate boundaries and the 3-m grid network established for measurements outside the house is shown. The lot included in the radiological survey was /approximately/14 m wide by 36 m deep. Front and rear views of the property are shown. 13 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs

  7. Results of the radiological survey at 1054 Central Avenue, Albany, New York (AL211)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, S.C.; Marley, J.L.

    1987-11-01

    A number of properties in the Albany/Colonie area have been identified as being potentially contaminated with uranium originating from the former National Lead Company's uranium forming plant in Colonie, New York. The property at 1054 Central Avenue in Albany, New York was the subject of a radiological investigation initiated August 27, 1986. The commercial property consists of a two-story frame and block building located on a rectangular lot. An asphalt drive connects the working areas to the street. A diagram of the property showing the approximate boundaries and the 5-m grid network established for measurements outside the building is shown. The lot included in the radiological survey was /approximately/13 m wide by 43 m deep. Front and side views of the property are shown. 13 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs

  8. Results of the radiological survey at 23 Lily Street, Albany, New York

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espegren, M.L.; Marley, J.L.; Carrier, R.F.

    1987-12-01

    A number of properties in the Albany/Colonie area have been identified as being potentially contaminated with uranium originating from the former National Lead Company's uranium forming plant in Colonie, New York. The property at 23 Lily Street in Albany, New York (AL174), was the subject of a radiological investigation initiated July 21, 1986. The residential property consists of a two-story frame house located on a rectangular lot. An asphalt driveway connects the house to the street. A diagram of the property showing the approximate boundaries and the 5-m grid network established for measurements outside the house is shown. The lot included in the radiological survey was /approximately/20 m wide by 30 m deep. Front and side views of the property are shown. 13 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs

  9. Results of the radiological survey at 21 Lily Street, Albany, New York

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espegren, M.L.; Marley, J.L.

    1987-12-01

    A number of properties in the Albany/Colonie area have been identified as being potentially contaminated with uranium originating from the former National Lead Company's uranium forming plant in Colonie, New York. The property at 21 Lily Street in Albany, New York (AL164) was the subject of a radiological investigation initiated July 16, 1986. The residential property consists of a two-story frame house located on a rectangular lot. A gravel drive is located on the lot. A diagram of the property showing the approximate boundaries and the 5-m grid network established for measurements outside the house is shown. The lot included in the radiological survey was /approximately/21 m wide by 26 m deep. Front and rear views of the property are shown. 13 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs

  10. Radiological survey support activities for the decommissioning of the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor Facility, Ames, Iowa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

    1984-09-01

    At the request of the Engineering Support Division of the US Department of Energy-Chicago Operations Office and in accordance with the programmatic overview/certification responsibilities of the Department of Energy Environmental and Safety Engineering Division, the Argonne National Laboratory Radiological Survey Group conducted a series of radiological measurements and tests at the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor located in Ames, Iowa. These measurements and tests were conducted during 1980 and 1981 while the reactor building was being decontaminated and decommissioned for the purpose of returning the building to general use. The results of these evaluations are included in this report. Although the surface contamination within the reactor building could presumably be reduced to negligible levels, the potential for airborne contamination from tritiated water vapor remains. This vapor emmanates from contamination within the concrete of the building and should be monitored until such time as it is reduced to background levels. 2 references, 8 figures, 6 tables.

  11. Results of the radiological survey at 15 Frost Place, Albany, New York

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espegren, M.L.; Marley, J.L.; Carrier, R.F.

    1987-12-01

    A number of properties in the Albany/Colonie area have been identified as being potentially contaminated with uranium originating from the former National Lead Company's uranium forming plant in Colonie, New York. The property at 15 Frost Place in Albany, New York, was the subject of a radiological investigation initiated July 22, 1986. The residential property consists of a two-story frame house with a separate garage located on a rectangular lot. An asphalt driveway connects the garage to the street. A diagram of the property showing the approximate boundaries and the 5-m grid network established for measurements outside the house is shown. The lot included in the radiological survey was /approximately/ 16 m wide by 33 m deep. Front and rear views of the property are shown. 13 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs

  12. Radiological characterization survey results for Gaskill Hall, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio (OXO015)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinhans, K.R.; Murray, M.E.; Carrier, R.F.

    1996-04-01

    Between October 1952 and February 1957, National Lead of Ohio (NLO), a primary contractor for the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), subcontracted certain uranium machining operations to Alba Craft Laboratory, Incorporated, located at 10-14 West Rose Avenue, Oxford, Ohio. In 1992, personnel from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) confirmed the presence of residual radioactive materials from the AEC-related operations in and around the facility in amounts exceeding the applicable Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines. Although the amount of uranium found on the property posed little health hazard if left undisturbed, the levels were sufficient to require remediation to bring radiological conditions into compliance with current guidelines, thus ensuring that the public and the environment are protected. Because it was suspected that uranium may have been used in the past in the immediate vicinity of Alba Craft in a Miami University building a team from ORNL, performed a radiological characterization survey of that structure in January 1994. The survey was conducted at the request of DOE as a precautionary measure to ensure that no radioactive residuals were present at levels exceeding guidelines. The survey included the determination of directly measured radiation levels and the collection of smear samples to detect possible removable alpha and beta-gamma activity levels, and comparison of these data to the guidelines. Results of the survey showed that all measurements were below the applicable guideline limits set by DOE

  13. Utilization of dashboard technology in academic radiology departments: results of a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansoori, Bahar; Novak, Ronald D; Sivit, Carlos J; Ros, Pablo R

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the most widely used financial, productivity, and accessibility metrics used by academic radiology departments (ARDs) in a dashboard format via a national survey. The results provide a guide to the selection of preferred or commonly used indicators to facilitate dashboard implementation and use. The study met the criteria for an exemption from institutional review board approval. A cross-sectional survey was conducted using a survey approved by the Society of Chairs of Academic Radiology Departments and sent to its members. The survey was designed to evaluate the adoption, access, and composition of dashboard technology in ARDs, particularly those related to measures of productivity and financial performance. The overall response rate was 42% (56 of 131 members). Sixty-two percent of responding ARDs currently use some form of dashboard technology, but 50% have used this technology for ≤2 years. Sixty-five percent of all ARDs use their dashboard information on a monthly basis. The two dashboard financial indicators most frequently used by ARDs are revenue and actual expenses. Similarly, the two productivity indicators used most widely are total examination volume and examination volume per modality. The two most important access indicators used are report turnaround time and backlog per unit time. Currently, fewer than two-thirds of the responding ARDs use dashboard technology, and one-half have used the technology for ≤2 years. Although some fiscal and productivity indices are more frequently used, there are a diverse number of factors used to measure productivity, finance, access, and other operational parameters in ARD dashboards. Thus, the information provided by each institutional dashboard may be significantly different from that in other ARDs. Copyright © 2013 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Aerial Radiological Surveys of the Las Vegas Strip and Adjacent Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, Thane; Reed, Michael

    2008-01-01

    As proficiency training for the Remote Sensing Laboratory's (RSL) Aerial Measuring System (AMS) radiological mapping mission, a survey team from RSL-Nellis conducted aerial radiological surveys of the Las Vegas Strip and adjacent areas on four separate occasions. The dates of the surveys were: December 11, 2006; December 26, 2007; December 31, 2007; and July 1, 2008. The AMS operation and appropriate law enforcement agencies selected the survey area as an appropriate urban location in which to exercise the AMS capability for mapping environmental radiation and searching for man-made radioactive sources. The surveys covered approximately 11 square miles. Each survey required a 2.5 hour-long flight, performed at an altitude of 300 ft above ground level (AGL), at a line spacing of 600 ft. Water line and test line flights were conducted over the Lake Mead and Government Wash areas in order to quantify the non-terrestrial background contributed by the aircraft, radon, and cosmic activity, and in order to determine the altitude-dependent air mass correction. The gamma data was collected by the AMS data acquisition system (REDAR V) using an array of twelve 2-inch x 4-inch x 16-inch sodium iodide (NaI) detectors flown on-board a twin-engine Bell 412 helicopter. One second gamma-energy spectral data were recorded continuously while in flight. This spectral data allows the system to distinguish between natural terrestrial background contributions and man-made radioisotope contributions. Spectral data can also be used to identify specific man-made radioactive isotopes. Data geo-locations were determined with a Real-Time Differential Global Positioning System (RDGPS). For the surveys occurring on December 26, 2007, and December 31, 2007, a neutron detection system was also flown. The neutron system consists of an array of eight moderated helium tubes, each cylindrical in nature measuring 6-feet in length with a diameter of 2-inches

  15. Aerial radiological survey of the Three Mile Island Station Nuclear Power Plant (Goldsboro, Pennsylvania). Date of survey: August 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzsche, A.E.

    1977-03-01

    An airborne radiological survey of an 2143 km 2 area surrounding the Three Mile Island Station was made during August 2 to August 4, 1976. Detected radioisotopes and their associated gamma ray exposure rates were consistent with that expected from the normal background emitters. Areal average exposure rates equivalent to one meter above the ground are presented in the form of an isopleth map. Geological data are presented in an isopleth map of rock and soil types; a brief description of the vegetation and terrain surrounding the site is also included

  16. Aerial radiological survey of US Department of Energy sites in Ames, Iowa. Date of survey: May 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-07-01

    An aerial radiological survey to measure terrestrial gamma radiation was carried out over five areas totaling 10 km 2 within the town of Ames, Iowa. Gamma ray data were measured over Ames Laboratory, several sections of downtown Ames, and the surrounding area. This was accomplished by flying parallel east-west lines 61 m apart. Processed data indicated that three areas showed increased activity levels of at least twice average background: the reactor, the waste treatment area, and a small area near the airport runway

  17. An Aerial Radiological Survey of Selected Areas of Area 18 - Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyons, Craig

    2009-01-01

    As part of the proficiency training for the Radiological Mapping mission of the Aerial Measuring System (AMS), a survey team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory-Nellis (RSL-Nellis) conducted an aerial radiological survey of selected areas of Area 18 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for the purpose of mapping man-made radiation deposited as a result of the Johnnie Boy and Little Feller I tests. The survey area centered over the Johnnie Boy ground zero but also included the ground zero and deposition area of the Little Feller I test, approximately 7,000 feet (2133 meters) southeast of the Johnnie Boy site. The survey was conducted in one flight. The completed survey covered a total of 4.0 square miles. The flight lines (with the turns) over the surveyed areas are presented in Figure 1. One 2.5-hour-long flight was performed at an altitude of 100 ft above ground level (AGL) with 200 foot flight-line spacing. A test-line flight was conducted near the Desert Rock Airstrip to ensure quality control of the data. The test line is not shown in Figure 1. However, Figure 1 does include the flight lines for a ''perimeter'' flight. The path traced by the helicopter flying over distinct roads within the survey area can be used to overlay the survey data on a base map or image. The flight survey lines were flown in an east-west orientation perpendicular to the deposition patterns for both sites. This technique provides better spatial resolution when contouring the data. The data were collected by the AMS data acquisition system (REDAR V) using an array of twelve 2-inch x 4-inch x 16-inch sodium iodide (NaI) detectors flown on-board a twin-engine Bell 412 helicopter. Data, in the form of gamma energy spectra, were collected every second over the course of the survey and were geo-referenced using a differential Global Positioning System. Spectral data allows the system to distinguish between ordinary fluctuations in natural background radiation levels and the signature produced by man

  18. Nevada Test Site Area 25, Radiological Survey and Cleanup Project, 1974-1983 (a revised final report). Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.G.

    1984-12-01

    This report describes the radiological survey, decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Area 25 facilities and land areas incorporated in the Nuclear Rocket Development Station (NRDS). Buildings, facilities and support systems used after 1959 for nuclear reactor and engine testing were surveyed for the presence of radioactive contamination. The radiological survey portion of the project encompassed portable instrument surveys and removable contamination surveys (swipe) for beta plus gamma and alpha radioactive contamination of facilities, equipment and land areas. Soil sampling was also accomplished. The majority of Area 25 facilities and land areas have been returned to unrestricted use. Remaining radiologically contaminated areas are posted with warning signs and barricades. 9 references, 23 figures

  19. A survey of research programs in radiation protection in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    A survey of research programs in Canada concerned with radiation protection was conducted in 1991-92 by the Joint Subcommittee on Regulatory Research (JSCRR) of the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) Advisory Committees on Radiological Protection and on Nuclear Safety. The purpose of this survey was to determine the current state of funding for this type of research in Canada. Funding for health-related radiation research in Canada is critical to establishing and maintaining a supply of trained professionals who can provide competent advice on health-related problems in radiation protection. The present report is an analysis of the information received in this survey. This survey concludes with the recommendation that the organization and definition of subprograms for the AECB Regulatory Research and Support Program should be completed as soon as possible. In this report the JSCRR should assist AECB staff in preparing a report in which priorities for research related to radiation protection are indicated. The sources of information noted at the end of the Discussion section of this report should be considered for this purpose. (author). 15 refs., 3 tabs.

  20. A survey of research programs in radiation protection in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    A survey of research programs in Canada concerned with radiation protection was conducted in 1991-92 by the Joint Subcommittee on Regulatory Research (JSCRR) of the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) Advisory Committees on Radiological Protection and on Nuclear Safety. The purpose of this survey was to determine the current state of funding for this type of research in Canada. Funding for health-related radiation research in Canada is critical to establishing and maintaining a supply of trained professionals who can provide competent advice on health-related problems in radiation protection. The present report is an analysis of the information received in this survey. This survey concludes with the recommendation that the organization and definition of subprograms for the AECB Regulatory Research and Support Program should be completed as soon as possible. In this report the JSCRR should assist AECB staff in preparing a report in which priorities for research related to radiation protection are indicated. The sources of information noted at the end of the Discussion section of this report should be considered for this purpose. (author). 15 refs., 3 tabs

  1. New around-the-clock radiology coverage system for the emergency department: a satisfaction survey among clinicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Young Hun; Jae, Hwan Jun; Shin, Cheong Il; Song, Su Jin; Cha, Won Cheol; Na, Dong Gyu

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the clinician satisfaction of a newly introduced around-the-clock radiology coverage system for the emergency department. Seventeen emergency physicians (8 board certified physicians, 9 residents) were invited to fill out a survey pertaining to the newly introduced radiology coverage system for the emergency department. The questionnaire included 10 questions covering three major topics. The first topic related to the around-the-clock radiology coverage by two full-time radiology residents. The second topic focused on the preliminary interpretations of radiology residents. The last topic included the interpretation assistance system by board-certified radiologists. The answers to each question were assessed using a scoring system of 1 to 5. The mean satisfaction score of the around-the-clock radiology coverage system by the two full-time radiology residents was 4.6 (range 3-5). The mean score for the preliminary interpretation system by the radiology residents was 4.8 (range 4-5). The score for the reliability of the preliminary versus the final interpretation was 4.1 (range 4-5). Lastly, the mean score for the interpretation assistance system by board-certified radiologists was 4.9 (range 4-5). The results of this study indicate a high satisfaction rating among clinicians' of the new around-the-clock radiology coverage system for the emergency department

  2. Results of the radiological survey at West Hunter Avenue Firehall, Maywood, New Jersey (MJ027)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.

    1990-03-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, West Hunter Avenue Firehall, Maywood, New Jersey (MJ027), was conducted during 1987. 4 refs., 3 tabs

  3. Results of the radiological survey at 14 Saint Ann Place, Rochelle Park, New Jersey (MJ032)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.

    1990-03-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 14 Saint Ann Place, Rochelle Park, New Jersey (MJ032), was conducted during 1987. 4 refs., 3 tabs

  4. An aerial radiological survey of the Double Track Site and surrounding area. Central Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, T.J.

    1995-07-01

    An aerial radiological survey of the Double Track Site was conducted in December 1993. An interim report was issued. That report described survey procedures and presented terrestrial exposure rate and wide-area-averaged plutonium isopleth plots. This letter report presents additional plutonium plots and some ''rule-of-thumb'' calculations which should help the reader to properly interpret the data presented. Attached to this report are three isopleth plots produced from the Double Track data. No one processing method provides all the answers regarding a particular surveyed area. Where peak values are most important, isopleth number-sign 1, created from the original unsmoothed data, is the presentation of choice. Isopleth number-sign 2, from smoothed data, is superior for the detection of areas of widespread low-level contamination. Isopleth number-sign 3, also smoothed data, satisfied a particular early mission goal but is not as useful for cleanup operations as the other two

  5. Results of the radiological survey at the National Community Bank, 113 Essex Street, Maywood, New Jersey (MJ021)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Cottrell, W.D.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-09-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, the National Community Bank, 113 Essex Street, Maywood, New Jersey (MJ021), was conducted during 1986. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 5 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  6. Results of the radiological survey at Kennedy Park, Money and Sidney Streets, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ062)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Cottrell, W.D.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-07-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, Kennedy Park, Money and Sidney Streets, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ062), was conducted during 1986 and 1987. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Results of the radiological survey at Interstate 80, North Right of Way at Lodi Brook, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ077)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-06-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and oil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, on the North Right of Way of Interstate 80 at Lodi Brook, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ077), was conducted during 1988. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 5 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  8. Results of the radiological survey at the Napp Chemical Company, 199 Main Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ076)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Carrier, R.F.

    1989-11-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, the Napp Chemical Company, 199 Main Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ076), was conducted during 1987. Results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions were not significantly different from normal background levels in the northern New Jersey area. 4 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Evaluation of Stress and a Stress-Reduction Program Among Radiologic Technologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reingold, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    To investigate stress levels and causes of stress among radiologic technologists and determine whether an intervention could reduce stress in a selected radiologic technologist population. Demographic characteristics and data on preintervention stress sources and levels were collected through Internet-based questionnaires. A 6-week, self-administered, mindfulness-based stress-reduction program was conducted as a pilot intervention with 42 radiologic technologists from the Veterans Administration Medical Center. Data also were collected postintervention. Identified sources of stress were compared with findings from previous studies. Some radiologic technologists experienced improvement in their perceptions of stress after the intervention. Sources of stress for radiologic technologists were similar to those shown in earlier research, including inconsistent management, poor management communication, conflicting demands, long work hours, excessive workloads, lack of work breaks, and time pressures. The mindfulness-based stress-reduction program is an example of an inexpensive method that could improve personal well-being, reduce work errors, improve relationships in the workplace, and increase job satisfaction. More research is needed to determine the best type of intervention for stress reduction in a larger radiologic technologist population.

  10. Radiological impact of the future CERN program (LEP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goebel, K.

    1982-01-01

    The author discusses the radiation problems which are the radiological influences of LEP which interest the majority of the members of the personnel. The first studies done in this domain are achieved, and the results are published this summer, among others the doses of radiation and of radioactivity and equally the concentration of hoxions gases on the exterior of the enclosure of future installations. The results are the object of discussions and are compared with the norms of radioprotection and with the actual situation in this region. (orig.)

  11. Radiological control aspects of the fabrication of the Light Water Breeder Reactor core (LWBR Development Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, B.G.

    1979-05-01

    A description is presented of the radiological control aspects of the fabrication of the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core. Included are the radiological control criteria applied for the design and use of fabrication facilities, the controls and limits imposed to minimize radiaion exposure to personnel, and an evaluation of the applied radiological program in meeting the program objectives. The goal of the LWBR program is to develop the technology to breed in light water reactors so that nuclear fuel may be used significantly more efficiently in these reactors. This technology is being developed by designing and fabricating a breeder reactor core, utilizing thoria (ThO 2 ) and binary thoria--urania (ThO 2 - 233 UO 2 ) fuel, to be operated in the existing pressurized water reactor plant owned by the Department of Energy at Shippingport, Pennsylvania

  12. Westinghouse corporate development of a decision software program for Radiological Evaluation Decision Input (REDI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, T.S.

    1995-01-01

    In December 1992, the Department of Energy (DOE) implemented the DOE Radiological Control Manual (RCM). Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company, Inc. (WINCO) submitted an implementation plan showing how compliance with the manual would be achieved. This implementation plan was approved by DOE in November 1992. Although WINCO had already been working under a similar Westinghouse RCM, the DOE RCM brought some new and challenging requirements. One such requirement was that of having procedure writers and job planners create the radiological input in work control procedures. Until this time, that information was being provided by radiological engineering or a radiation safety representative. As a result of this requirement, Westinghouse developed the Radiological Evaluation Decision Input (REDI) program

  13. Westinghouse corporate development of a decision software program for Radiological Evaluation Decision Input (REDI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, T.S. [Westinghosue Idaho Nuclear Co., Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-03-01

    In December 1992, the Department of Energy (DOE) implemented the DOE Radiological Control Manual (RCM). Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company, Inc. (WINCO) submitted an implementation plan showing how compliance with the manual would be achieved. This implementation plan was approved by DOE in November 1992. Although WINCO had already been working under a similar Westinghouse RCM, the DOE RCM brought some new and challenging requirements. One such requirement was that of having procedure writers and job planners create the radiological input in work control procedures. Until this time, that information was being provided by radiological engineering or a radiation safety representative. As a result of this requirement, Westinghouse developed the Radiological Evaluation Decision Input (REDI) program.

  14. An aerial radiological survey of the Saxton Nuclear Experimental Corporation facility and surrounding area, Saxton, Pennsylvania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoover, R.A.

    1991-10-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted during the period July 5 to 22, 1989, over an 83-square kilometer (32-square-mile) area surrounding the Saxton Nuclear Experimental Corporation (SNEC) facility which is owned by General Public Utilities and located near Saxton, Pennsylvania. The survey was conducted at a nominal altitude of 61 meters (200 feet) with line spacings of 91 meters (300 feet). A contour map of the terrestrial gamma exposure rate extrapolated to 1 meter above ground level (AGL) was prepared and overlaid on an aerial photograph and a set of United States Geological Survey (USGS) topographic maps of the area. The terrestrial exposure rates varied from about 9 to 11 microroentgens per hour (μR/h) over most of the survey area. The levels over the SNEC family did not differ from the exposure rates seen over the entire survey area. Cesium-137 (Cs-137) levels typical of worldwide fallout deposition were detected throughout the surveyed area. No other trends of Cs-137 were observed. Soil samples and pressurized ion chamber measurements were obtained at six locations within the survey boundaries to support the aerial data

  15. Distribution of radionuclides in surface seawater obtained by an aerial radiological survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inomata, Yayoi; Aoyama, Michio; Hirose, Katsumi; Sanada, Yukihisa; Torii, Tatsuo; Tsubono, Takaki; Tsumune, Daisuke; Yamada, Masatoshi

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the distribution in seawater of anthropogenic radionuclides from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP1) as preliminary attempt using a rapid aerial radiological survey performed by the U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration on 18 April 2011. We found strong correlations between in-situ activities of 131 I, 134 Cs, and 137 Cs measured in surface seawater samples and gamma-ray peak count rates determined by the aerial survey (correlation coefficients were 0.89 for 131 I, 0.96 for 134 Cs, and 0.92 for 137 Cs). The offshore area of high radionuclide activity extended south and southeast from the FNPP1. The maximum activities of 131 I, 134 Cs, and 137 Cs were 329, 650, and 599 Bq L -1 , respectively. The 131 I/ 137 Cs ratio in surface water of the high-activity area ranged from 0.6 to 0.7. Considering the radioactive decay of 131 I (half-life 8.02 d), we determined that the radionuclides in this area were directly released from FNPP1 to the ocean. We confirm that aerial radiological surveys can be effective for investigating the surface distribution of anthropogenic radionuclides in seawater. Our model reproduced the distribution pattern of radionuclides derived from the FNPP1, although results simulated by a regional ocean model were underestimated. (author)

  16. Radiological Control Technician: Phase 1, Site academic training study guides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    This volume is a study guide for training Radiological Control Technicians. Provided herein are support materials for learning radiological documentation, communication systems, counting errors and statistics, dosimetry, contamination control, airborne sampling program methods, respiratory protection, radiological source control, environmental monitoring, access control and work area setup, radiological work coverage, shipment and receipt for radioactive material, radiological incidents and emergencies, personnel decontamination, first aid, radiation survey instrumentation, contamination monitoring, air sampling, and counting room equipment

  17. Characteristics and trends of radiology research: a survey of original articles published in AJR and Radiology between 2001 and 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kyoung Ja; Yoon, Dae Young; Yun, Eun Joo; Seo, Young Lan; Baek, Sora; Gu, Dong Hyeon; Yoon, Soo Jeong; Han, Ari; Ku, You Jin; Kim, Sam Soo

    2012-09-01

    To determine the characteristics and trends of the original articles published in two major American radiology journals, AJR American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR) and Radiology, between 2001 and 2010. This was a retrospective bibliometric analysis that did not involve human subjects and was exempt from institutional review board approval. All 6542 original articles published in AJR and Radiology between 2001 and 2010 were evaluated. The following information was abstracted from each article: radiologic subspecialty, radiologic technique used, type of research, sample size, study design, statistical analysis, study outcome, declared funding, number of authors, affiliation of the first author, and country of the first author. In addition, all the variables examined were presented along with the trend over time. The most common subspecialty of study was abdominal (1219 of 6542, 18.6%), followed by vascular/interventional (804 of 6542, 12.3%). A total of 3744 (57.2%) original articles used magnetic resonance (MR) imaging or computed tomography (CT), 5495 (84.1%) were clinical research articles, 3060 (46.8%) had sample size of more than 50, 4087 (62.5%) were retrospective, 4714 (72.1%) performed statistical analysis, 6225 (95.2%) showed positive study outcome, 4784 (73.1%) were not funded, 3942 (60.3%) had four to seven authors, and 5731 (87.6%) were written by the primary author who was from a department of radiology or radiology-related specialties. The United States published 45.5% (2975 of 6542) of the articles, followed by Japan (n = 525, 8.0%), Germany (n = 485, 7.4%), and South Korea (n = 455, 7.0%). In the time trend analysis, the following variables showed a significantly positive trend: cardiac subspecialty, CT and MR imaging as the radiologic techniques, type of research as other (nonbasic, nonclinical), sample size of more than 50, four to seven as the number of authors, medicine-related department of the first author, and South Korea and Italy as

  18. Aerial radiological survey of the area surrounding the Edwin I. Hatch Nuclear Plant, Baxley, Georgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilton, L.K.

    1978-11-01

    An airborne radiological survey of a 2146 km 2 area surrounding the Edwin I. Hatch Nuclear Plant was made 28-31 March 1977. Detected radioisotopes, and their associated gamma ray exposure rates, were consistent with that expected from the normal background emitters. Count rates observed at 152 m altitude are converted to equivalent exposure rates at 1 m above the ground, and are presented in the form of an isopleth map. Exposure rates measured with small portable instruments and soil sample analysis showed agreement with the airborne data

  19. Radiological Assessment Survey of the Vance road Facility Source Vault Building Materials, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morton, J. R.

    2000-01-01

    From the 1950s, the Vance Road laboratory was the site of extensive nuclear medical research and involved the used of numerous radionuclides. These nuclides were stored in a source vault stored on the first floor of the facility. Nuclear medical research is no longer conducted in this facility, and the source vault was remediated in preparation for converting the area to office space and general use. The Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program (ESSAP) of ORISE performed a radiological assessment survey of the source vault and its associated miscellaneous building materials and laboratory equipment in preparation for the conversion to general use space

  20. Aerial radiological survey of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Station and surrounding area, Middletown, Pennsylvania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colton, D.P.

    1983-08-01

    An aerial radiological survey was performed over the area surrounding the Three Mile Island Nuclear Station during October 26 to 30, 1982. The survey covered an 82-square-kilometer area centered on the nuclear plant and encompassed the communities of Middletown, York Haven, Goldsboro and Royalton, Pennsylvania. The highest radiation exposure rates, up to a maximum of 200 microroentgens per hour (μR/h), were inferred from data measured directly over the TMI facilities. This detected radiation was due to the presence of cobalt-58, cobalt-60 and cesium-137, which was consistent with normal plant operations. Similar activity is routinely observed in aerial surveys over nuclear power plants which have been or are presently in an operational mode. For the remainder of the survey area, the inferred radiation exposure rates varied from 6 to 14 μR/h. The reported exposure rate values include an estimated cosmic ray contribution of 3.7 μR/h. Ground-based measurements, conducted during the time of the aerial survey, were compared to the aerial results. Pressurized ionization chamber readings and a group of soil samples were acquired at several locations within the survey area, along the river banks upstream and downstream of the survey area, and at the ground-based locations used for a previous aerial survey which was conducted in 1976. The exposure rate values obtained from these measurements were in agreement with the corresponding aerial data. With the exception of the activity observed within the TMI facilities, no evidence of any contamination which might have occurred as a result of past reactor operations or the 1979 TMI Unit 2 accident was detected from the aerial survey data. This was further supported by the results of the soil sample analyses and the comparison with the 1976 aerial survey data. 7 references, 12 figures, 4 tables

  1. Aerial radiological survey of the La Salle County Station and surrounding area, Seneca, Illinois. Date of survey: July 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobaugh, J.L.

    1982-06-01

    An aerial radiological survey was performed from 14 to 31 July 1981 over a 270-square-kilometer area centered on the La Salle County Station near Seneca, Illinois. The survey was conducted by EG and G for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. All gamma ray data were collected by flying lines spaced 152 meters (500 ft) apart at an altitude of 91 meters (300 ft) above ground level. Processed data showed that all gamma rays detected within the survey area were those expected from naturally occurring background emitters. Count rates obtained from the aerial platform were converted to exposure rates at 1 meter above the ground and are presented in the form of an isoradiation contour map. The observed exposure rates for the survey area were between 5 and 14 microroentgens per hour (μR/h), with most of the area ranging from 8 to 14 μR/h. The exposure rate obtained from soil samples taken from within the survey site displayed positive agreement with the aerial data

  2. Determining a pre-mining radiological baseline from historic airborne gamma surveys: A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollhöfer, Andreas; Beraldo, Annamarie; Pfitzner, Kirrilly; Esparon, Andrew; Doering, Che

    2014-01-01

    Knowing the baseline level of radioactivity in areas naturally enriched in radionuclides is important in the uranium mining context to assess radiation doses to humans and the environment both during and after mining. This information is particularly useful in rehabilitation planning and developing closure criteria for uranium mines as only radiation doses additional to the natural background are usually considered ‘controllable’ for radiation protection purposes. In this case study we have tested whether the method of contemporary groundtruthing of a historic airborne gamma survey could be used to determine the pre-mining radiological conditions at the Ranger mine in northern Australia. The airborne gamma survey was flown in 1976 before mining started and groundtruthed using ground gamma dose rate measurements made between 2007 and 2009 at an undisturbed area naturally enriched in uranium (Anomaly 2) located nearby the Ranger mine. Measurements of 226 Ra soil activity concentration and 222 Rn exhalation flux density at Anomaly 2 were made concurrent with the ground gamma dose rate measurements. Algorithms were developed to upscale the ground gamma data to the same spatial resolution as the historic airborne gamma survey data using a geographic information system, allowing comparison of the datasets. Linear correlation models were developed to estimate the pre-mining gamma dose rates, 226 Ra soil activity concentrations, and 222 Rn exhalation flux densities at selected areas in the greater Ranger region. The modelled levels agreed with measurements made at the Ranger Orebodies 1 and 3 before mining started, and at environmental sites in the region. The conclusion is that our approach can be used to determine baseline radiation levels, and provide a benchmark for rehabilitation of uranium mines or industrial sites where historical airborne gamma survey data are available and an undisturbed radiological analogue exists to groundtruth the data. - Highlights:

  3. An Aerial Radiological Survey of the City of North Las Vegas (Downtown) and the Motor Speedway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piotr Wasiolek

    2007-01-01

    As part of the proficiency training for the Radiological Mapping mission of the Aerial Measuring System (AMS), a survey team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory-Nellis (RSL-Nellis) conducted an aerial radiological survey on December 11-12, 2007, with the purpose of mapping natural radiation background and locating any man-made radioactive sources. The survey covered 19.4 square miles (9.2 square miles over the downtown area of the City of North Las Vegas and 10.2 square miles over the Las Vegas Motor Speedway [LVMS]). The flight lines over the surveyed areas are presented in Figures 1 and 2. A total of four 2.5-hour-long flights were performed at an altitude of 150 ft above ground level (AGL) with 300 ft of flight line spacing. Water line and test line flights were conducted over the Lake Mead and Government Wash areas to ensure quality control of the data. The data were collected by the AMS data acquisition system-REDAR V using an array of twelve 2-inch x 4-inch x 16-inch sodium iodide (NaI) detectors flown on-board a twin-engine Bell 412 helicopter. Data in the form of gamma energy spectra were collected continually (every second) over the course of the survey and were geo-referenced using a differential Global Positioning System. Collection of spectral data allows the system to distinguish between ordinary fluctuations in natural background radiation levels and the signature produced by man-made radioisotopes sources. Spectral data can also be used to identify specific radioactive isotopes. As a courtesy service with the approval of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office, RSL-Nellis is providing this summary to the office of the Mayor of City of North Las Vegas and LVMS security along with the gross counts-based exposure rate and man-made counts maps

  4. An Aerial Radiological Survey of the Las Vegas Strip and Adjacent Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thane Hendricks

    2008-01-01

    As proficiency training for the Radiological Mapping mission of the Aerial Measuring System (AMS), a survey team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory-Nellis (RSL-Nellis) conducted aerial radiological surveys of the Las Vegas Strip and adjacent areas on December 11, 2006, and December 26 and 31, 2007. The AMS operation and appropriate law enforcement agencies selected the area as an appropriate urban location to exercise AMS capability for mapping environmental radiation and searching for man-made radioactive sources. The surveys covered ∼11 square miles. Each survey required a 2.5-hour-long flight, performed at an altitude of 300 ft above ground level (AGL) at a line spacing of 600 ft. Water line and test line flights were conducted over the Lake Mead and Government Wash areas to determine the nonterrestrial background contributed by aircraft, radon, and cosmic activity, and to determine the altitude-dependent air mass correction. The data were collected by the AMS data acquisition system (REDAR V) using an array of twelve 2-inch x 4-inch x 16-inch sodium iodide (NaI) detectors flown on-board a twin-engine Bell 412 helicopter. Gamma energy spectral data were collected second-by-second over the survey area. This spectral data allows the system to distinguish between natural terrestrial background contributions and man-made radioisotope contributions. Spectral data can also be used to identify specific man-made radioactive isotopes. Data geo-locations were determined with a Real-Time Differential Global Positioning System (RDGPS)

  5. An automated radiological survey method for performing site remediation and decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handy, R.G.; Bolch, W.E.; Harder, G.F.; Tolaymat, T.M.

    1994-01-01

    A portable, computer-based method of performing environmental monitoring and assessment for site remediation and decommissioning has been developed. The integrated system has been developed to provide for survey time reductions and real-time data analysis. The technique utilizes a notebook 486 computer with the necessary hardware and software components that makes it possible to be used in an almost unlimited number of environmental monitoring and assessment scenarios. The results from a pilot, open-quotes hide-and-seekclose quotes gamma survey and an actual alpha decontamination survey were elucidated. It was found that a open-quotes hide-and-seekclose quotes survey could come up with timely and accurate conclusions about the position of the source. The use of the automated system in a Th-232 alpha survey resulted in a reduction in the standard time necessary to do a radiological survey. In addition, the ability to analyze the data on-site allowed for identification and location of areas which needed further decontamination. Finally, a discussion on possible future improvements and field conclusions was made

  6. An aerial radiological survey of the Enrico Fermi Atomic Power Plant and surrounding area, Newport, Michigan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    An aerial radiological survey was performed over the area surrounding the Enrico Fermi Atomic Power Plant during the period 27 to 30 May 1986. The survey covered a 64-square-kilometer (25-square-mile) area around the plant. The deteted radiation was due to the presence of varying concentrations of naturally-occurring radioactive materials. Radionuclides of the uranium and thorium decay chains and radioactive potassium were found. For the majority of the survey area, the inferred radiation exposure rate levels varied between 10 and 12 microroentgens per hour (μR/h). The reported exposure rate values included an estimated cosmic ray contribution of 3.7 μR/h. Ground-based measurements, conducted concurrently with the aerial survey, were compared to the inferred aerial results. Pressurized ionization chamber readings and a group of soil samples were acquired at five locations within the survey area. The exposure rate values obtained from these ground-based measurements were in good agreement with the corresponding inferred aerial values. No evidence was found of any radioactive contamination which might have occurred as a result of plant operations. This conclusion was supported by the results of the soil samples analyses and the comparison of the current survey data with those obtained in September 1970. 7 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  7. An Aerial Radiological Survey of Abandoned Uranium Mines in the Navajo Nation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, T.J.

    2001-01-01

    Aerial radiological surveys of forty-one geographical areas in the Navajo Nation were conducted during the period of October 1994 through October 1999. The surveys were conducted at the request of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 9 and were performed by personnel of the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) located in Las Vegas, Nevada, a facility of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office. The aerial survey and subsequent processing characterized the overall radioactivity levels and excess bismuth 214 activity (indicator of uranium ore deposits and/or uranium mines) within the surveyed areas. A total of 772,000 aerial gamma spectra and associated position parameters were obtained and analyzed during the multi-year operation. The survey determined that only 15 square miles (39 square kilometers) of the 1,144 square miles (2,963 square kilometers) surveyed (approximately 1.3 %) had excess bismuth indications above the minimum reportable activity, thus reducing the area requiring further investigation by a nominal factor of 76. Radiation contour data files, produced by RSL, were converted to Geographic Information System-compatible digital files and provided to EPA and EPA contractors for inclusion in numerous reports and graphics products

  8. An aerial radiological survey of the Savannah River Site TNX facility and surrounding area, Aiken, South Carolina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over a 3.8-square-kilometer (1.5-square-mile) area, centered on the Savannah River Site (SRS) TNX facility. The survey was flown on July 25, 1986, prior to the Steel Creek Corridor survey. Radiological measurements were used to determine the extent of man-made radionuclides in the TNX area. This survey area had been covered during previous site surveys of the Savannah River Floodplain. Higher than typical levels of thorium-232 daughters were detected in the survey area just west of the TNX facility. The natural terrestrial radiation levels were consistent with those measured during prior surveys of this and other SRS areas. 5 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Anesthesia Practice and Clinical Trends in Interventional Radiology: A European Survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haslam, Philip J.; Yap, Bernard; Mueller, Peter R.; Lee, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To determine current European practice in interventional radiology regarding nursing care, anesthesia, and clinical care trends.Methods: A survey was sent to 977 European interventional radiologists to assess the use of sedoanalgesia, nursing care, monitoring equipment, pre- and postprocedural care, and clinical trends in interventional radiology. Patterns of sedoanalgesia were recorded for both vascular and visceral interventional procedures. Responders rated their preferred level of sedoanalgesia for each procedure as follows: (a) awake/alert, (b) drowsy/arousable, (c) asleep/arousable, (d) deep sedation, and (e) general anesthesia. Sedoanalgesic drugs and patient care trends were also recorded. A comparison was performed with data derived from a similar survey of interventional practice in the United States.Results: Two hundred and forty-three of 977 radiologists responded (25%). The total number of procedures analyzed was 210,194. The majority (56%) of diagnostic and therapeutic vascular procedures were performed at the awake/alert level of sedation, 32% were performed at the drowsy/arousable level, and 12% at deeper levels of sedation. The majority of visceral interventional procedures were performed at the drowsy/arousable level of sedation (41%), 29% were performed at deeper levels of sedation, and 30% at the awake/alert level. In general, more sedoanalgesia is used in the United States. Eighty-three percent of respondents reported the use of a full-time radiology nurse, 67% used routine blood pressure/pulse oximetry monitoring, and 46% reported the presence of a dedicated recovery area. Forty-nine percent reported daily patient rounds, 30% had inpatient hospital beds, and 51% had day case beds.Conclusion: This survey shows clear differences in the use of sedation for vascular and visceral interventional procedures. Many, often complex, procedures are performed at the awake/alert level of sedation in Europe, whereas deeper levels of sedation are

  10. A survey of interventional radiology awareness among final-year medical students in a European country.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Leong, Sum

    2009-07-01

    Interventional radiology (IR) is a rapidly expanding specialty that is facing the challenges of turf wars and personnel shortages. Appropriate exposure of medical students to this field can be vital to recruitment of potential future trainees or referring physicians. The aim of this study was to determine the knowledge and views of final-year medical students in a single EU country regarding various aspects of IR. An electronic survey was sent via e-mail to all final-year medical students in a European country. The students were given a month to respond to the questionnaire. A total of 234 students of 675 (34.5%) replied to the survey. Of the respondents, 35% had previously completed an attachment to the radiology department. The majority of students (63%) thought their knowledge in radiology in general was poor. The percentage of students who correctly identified procedures performed by interventional radiologists was 69% for Hickman line insertion, 79% for fibroid embolization, and 67.5% for lower limb angioplasty. Sixty percent, 30%, and 47% thought that interventional radiologists perform cardiac angioplasties, perform arterial bypasses, and create AV fistulas, respectively. Forty-nine percent felt that interventional radiologists are surgically trained. Eighty-three percent of students were first made aware of angioplasty by a cardiologist. Thirty-one percent thought that interventional radiologists do ward rounds, 24% thought that interventional radiologists have admitting rights, and 26% felt that interventional radiologists run an outpatient practice. A significant number of students (76%) thought that the job prospects in IR are good or excellent but only 40.5% were willing to consider a career in IR. In conclusion, this study indicates that IR remains a nascent but attractive specialty to the majority of medical students. Further development of the existing informal undergraduate curriculum to address shortcomings will ensure that IR continues to attract

  11. A Survey of Interventional Radiology Awareness Among Final-Year Medical Students in a European Country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leong, Sum; Keeling, Aoife N.; Lee, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Interventional radiology (IR) is a rapidly expanding specialty that is facing the challenges of turf wars and personnel shortages. Appropriate exposure of medical students to this field can be vital to recruitment of potential future trainees or referring physicians. The aim of this study was to determine the knowledge and views of final-year medical students in a single EU country regarding various aspects of IR. An electronic survey was sent via e-mail to all final-year medical students in a European country. The students were given a month to respond to the questionnaire. A total of 234 students of 675 (34.5%) replied to the survey. Of the respondents, 35% had previously completed an attachment to the radiology department. The majority of students (63%) thought their knowledge in radiology in general was poor. The percentage of students who correctly identified procedures performed by interventional radiologists was 69% for Hickman line insertion, 79% for fibroid embolization, and 67.5% for lower limb angioplasty. Sixty percent, 30%, and 47% thought that interventional radiologists perform cardiac angioplasties, perform arterial bypasses, and create AV fistulas, respectively. Forty-nine percent felt that interventional radiologists are surgically trained. Eighty-three percent of students were first made aware of angioplasty by a cardiologist. Thirty-one percent thought that interventional radiologists do ward rounds, 24% thought that interventional radiologists have admitting rights, and 26% felt that interventional radiologists run an outpatient practice. A significant number of students (76%) thought that the job prospects in IR are good or excellent but only 40.5% were willing to consider a career in IR. In conclusion, this study indicates that IR remains a nascent but attractive specialty to the majority of medical students. Further development of the existing informal undergraduate curriculum to address shortcomings will ensure that IR continues to attract

  12. An aerial radiological survey of the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory and surrounding area, Waxahachie, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzsche, A.E.

    1993-02-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) site from July 22 through August 20,1991. Parallel lines were flown at intervals of 305 meters over a 1,036-square-kilometer (400-square-mile) area surrounding Waxahachie, Texas. The 70,000 terrestrial gamma energy spectra obtained were reduced to an exposure rate contour map overlaid on a United States Geological Survey (USGS) map of the area. The mean terrestrial exposure rate measured was 5.4 μR/h at 1 meter above ground level. Comparison to ground-based measurements shows good agreement. No anomalous or man-made isotopes were detected

  13. Radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Riverton, Wyoming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haywood, F.F.; Lorenzo, D.; Christian, D.J.; Chou, K.D.; Ellis, B.S.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

    1980-03-01

    Results of a radiological survey performed at the Riverton, Wyoming site in July 1976, are presented. The average external gamma exposure rate at 1 m over the tailings pile was 56 μR/hr. The corresponding rate for the former mill area was 97 μR/hr. Movement of tailings particles in a dry wash is evident; but it appears that, in general, the earth cover over the tailings pile has been effective in limiting both wind and water erosion of the tailings. The calculated concentration of 226 Ra as a function of depth in 15 augered holes is presented graphically. A survey of the Teton Division Lumber Company property in Riverton showed a maximum external gamma exposure rate of 270 μR/hr

  14. Aerial radiological survey of the Feed Materials Production Center and surrounding area, Fernald, Ohio. Date of survey: April 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-10-01

    An aerial radiological survey was performed over the area surrounding the Feed Materials Production Center, located near Fernald, Ohio, during the period April 24 to 27, 1985. The survey covered a 70-square-kilometer (27-square-mile) area centered on the plant. The highest exposure rates, in excess of 0.35 milliroentgens per hour (mR/h), were inferred from the data measured directly over the plant. This radiation was due to the presence of nuclides which were consistent with normal plant operations. For the remainder of the survey area, the inferred radiation exposure rates, varying from 6 to 12 microroentgens per hour (μR/h), were due to naturally-occurring potassium, uranium, thorium, and daughter products. The reported exposure rate values include an estimated cosmic ray contribution of 3.7μR/h. Ground-based measurements, conducted during the time of the aerial survey, were compared to the aerial results. Pressurized ionization chamber readings and a group of soil samples were acquired at several locations within the survey area. The exposure rate values obtained from these measurements were in agreement with the inferred aerial results. Soil sample results showed several areas just outside the site boundary with slightly elevated amounts of U-238. The levels, however, were well below the detection limit of the aerial system. The only off-site area that showed apparent above background activity in the aerial data was directly west of the storage silos. The symmetric shape of the contours, however, suggests that these elevated levels are due to ''shine'' from material stored on-site in the silos and not to actual off-site contamination. Detailed comparison of the 1985 aerial survey data with a previous survey conducted in 1976 showed no significant change in any area outside the plant boundary. 6 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs

  15. Aerial radiological survey of the creeks and tributaries near the Rancho Seco Nuclear Generation Station, Clay Station, California. Date of survey: December 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-06-01

    Radiological contamination due to man-made radionuclides was detected using hand-held instruments in the summer of 1984 in the creeks and tributaries near the Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Station at Clay Station, California. To help determine the extent of the contamination an aerial radiological survey centered over the creeks and tributaries and including the Rancho Seco facility was conducted during the period 3 to 15 December 1984. Radiological contaminants were detected along a 9-mile segment of the system of creeks in the area. These contaminants included cesium-134, cesium-137, and cobalt-60. Radiation measurements away from the contaminated areas were the same as those made during the aerial radiological survey conducted in 1980

  16. A radiological survey of the Eğrigöz granitoid, Western Anatolia/Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canbaz Öztürk, B; Yaprak, G; Çam, N F; Candan, O

    2015-06-01

    A radiological survey of the granitoid areas throughout Western Anatolia was conducted during 2007-14. As a part of this radiological survey, this article presents results obtained from Eğrigöz pluton, which lies in the northeastern region of Western Anatolia. In the investigated area, the activity measurements of the natural gamma-emitting radionuclides ((226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K) in the granitic rock samples and soils have been carried out by means of the NaI(Tl) gamma-ray spectrometry system. The activity concentrations of the relevant natural radionuclides in the granite samples appeared in the ranges as follows: (226)Ra, 28-95 Bq kg(-1); (232)Th, 50-122 Bq kg(-1) and (40)K, 782-1365 Bq kg(-1), while the typical ranges of the (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K activities in the soil samples were found to be 7-184, 11-174 and 149-1622 Bq kg(-1), respectively. Based on the available data, the radiation hazard parameters associated with the surveyed rocks/soils are calculated. The corresponding absorbed dose rates in air from all those radionuclides were always much lower than 200 nGy h(-1) and did not exceed the typical range of worldwide average values noted in the UNSCEAR (2000) report. Furthermore, the data are also used for the mapping of the surface soil activity of natural radionuclides and the corresponding gamma dose rates of the surveyed area. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Radiological surveys of properties in the Middlesex, New Jersey area. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leggett, R.W.; Haywood, F.F.; Cottrell, W.D.

    1981-03-01

    Results of the radiological surveys conducted at three properties in the Middlesex, New Jersey area as well as one additional location downstream from the Middlesex Sampling Plant (Willow Lake), are presented. The survey revealed that the yard around the church rectory on Harris Avenue is contaminated with a 226 Ra-bearing material, probably pitchblende ore from the former Middlesex Sampling Plant. The elevated 226 Ra concentrations around and, to a lesser extent, underneath the rectory are leading to elevated 222 Rn concentrations in air in the rectory and elevated alpha contamination levels (from radon daughters) on surfaces inside the rectory. External gamma radiation levels in the rectory yard are well above background levels, and beta-gamma dose rates at many points in the yard are above federal guidelines for the release of property for unrestricted use. The radiological survey of a parking lot at the Union Carbide plant in Bound Brook, New Jersey revealed that a nearly circular region of 50-ft diam in the lot showed above-background external gamma radiation levels. Two isolated spots within this region showed concentrations of uranium in soil above the licensable level stated in 10 CFR 40. Soil samples taken in the area of elevated gamma radiation levels generally showed nearly equal activities of 226 Ra and 238 U. The survey at the residences on William Street in Piscataway, revealed that the front yeard is generally contaminated from near the surface to a depth of 1.5 to 2.5 ft with 226 Ra-bearing material, possibly pitchblende ore. The remainder of the yard shows scattered contaminaion. External gamma radiation levels inside the house are above the background level near some outside walls

  18. Aerial radiological survey of the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station and surrounding area, Port Gibson, Mississippi. Date of survey: March 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballatore, L.A.; Hilton, L.K.

    1982-09-01

    An aerial radiological survey was performed from 11 to 20 March 1982 over a 260-square-kilometer area centered on the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station at Port Gibson, Mississippi (the station was not yet in operation at the time of the survey). All gamma ray data were collected by flying east-west lines spaced 152 meters apart at an altitude 91 meters above ground level. Processed data showed that all gamma rays detected within the survey area were those expected from naturally occurring terrestrial background emitters. Count rates obtained from the aerial platform were converted to exposure rates at 1 meter above the ground and are presented in the form of an isoradiation contour map. The observed exposure rates were between 5 and 13 microroentgens per hour (μR/h), with most of the area ranging from 9 to 10 μR/h. These values include an estimated cosmic ray contribution of 3.6 μR/h. The exposure rate obtained from soil samples and ionization chamber measurements taken from within the survey site displayed positive agreement with the aerial data

  19. Results of the radiological survey at the Town of Tonawanda Landfill, Tonawanda, New York (TNY001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, R.E.; Murray, M.E.; Uziel, M.S.

    1992-10-01

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey at the Town of Tonawanda Landfill, Tonawanda, New York. The survey was performed in September 1991. The purpose of the survey was to determine if radioactive materials from work performed under government contract at the Linde Air Products Division of Union Carbide Corporation, Tonawanda, New York, had been deposited in the landfill. The survey included a surface gamma scan and the collection of soil samples for radionuclide analyses. Results of the survey suggest that material originating at the Linde plant may have been deposited in the landfill. Soil samples S54 and B12 contained technologically enhanced levels of 238 U not unlike the product formerly produced by the Linde plant. In contrast, samples B4A, B5A and B7B, containing elevated concentrations of 226 Ra and 230 Th with much lower concentrations of 238 U, were similar to the residue or byproduct of the refinery operation conducted at the Linde plant. In 24 instances, soil samples from the Town of Tonawanda Landfill exceeded DOE guideline values for 238 U, 226 Ra, and/or 230 Th in surface or subsurface soil. Nine of these samples contained radionuclide concentrations more than 30 times the guideline value

  20. An aerial radiological survey of the Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station and surrounding area, Vernon, Vermont

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiman, R.; Bluitt, C.M.

    1993-10-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over the Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station in Vernon, Vermont, during the period August 7 through August 17, 1989. The survey was conducted at an altitude of 300 feet (91 meters) over a 65-square-mile (168-square-kilometer) area centered on the power station. The purpose of the survey was to document the terrestrial gamma radiation environment of the Vermont Yankee Power Station and surrounding area. The results of the aerial survey are reported as inferred gamma radiation exposure rates at 1 meter above ground level in the form of a contour map. Outside the plant boundary, exposure rates were found to vary between 6 and 10 microroentgens per hour (μR/h) and were attributed to naturally occurring uranium, thorium, and radioactive potassium gamma emitters. The aerial data were compared to ground-based open-quotes benchmarkclose quotes exposure rate measurements and radionuclide assays of soil samples obtained within the survey boundary. The ground-based measurements were found to be in good agreement with those inferred from the aerial measuring system

  1. An Aerial Radiological Survey of the Beaver Valley Power Station and the Surrounding Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colton, D.P.

    1999-01-01

    An aerial radiological survey of the Beaver Valley Power Station was conducted during September 18 to 21, 1998, and encompassed a 53.1-square-kilometer area. The survey was conducted by the U. S. Department of Energy's Remote Sensing Laboratory, located in Las Vegas, Nevada, and maintained and operated by Bechtel Nevada. The purpose of the survey was to measure and map the general exposure-rate levels that existed within the survey area and to define the areas of man-made radionuclide activity. The inferred exposure rates were generally uniform and typical of the natural background radiation, which varied from less than 5 to 12 microroentgens per hour. Enhanced exposure rates, not attributable to natural background, and activity from man-made radionuclides were detected over the power station. The detected man-made radionuclide activity was due to the presence of cobalt-60, which is a nuclear activation product, and cesium-137, which is a long-lived fission product. The detected man-made radionuclides were generally consistent with those expected from routine plant operations. Areas outside of the power station boundaries were found to be free of any detectable man-made radionuclides. A series of ground-based, pressurized ionization chamber exposure-rate measurements were acquired at four locations within the survey boundaries. The results of these measurements were compared and found to be within 5 to 30 percent of the corresponding 1998 inferred aerial exposure-rate data

  2. Aerial radiological survey of the US Department of Energy's Mound Facility, Miamisburg, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-03-01

    An aerial radiological survey to measure terrestrial gamma radiation was carried out by helicopter over an area centered on Mound Facility, a 180 acre area adjacent to the southern edge of the city of Miamisburg, Ohio. This survey was part of an effort to document background radiation levels around nuclear processing and handling facilities owned or contracted by the United States Department of Energy (DOE). Survey activities were conducted and performed by EG and G for the DOE. Wright-Patterson Air Force Base served as the survey base of operations. During the survey, gamma ray data were collected over a 12.3 km 2 area by flying an east-west grid of lines spaced 61 m apart, flying slowly over several selected areas, and hovering over several spots of interest. The processed data indicated that the on-site radioactivity was primarily due to radionuclides currently being handled or processed at the Facility, and that lesser activity could be attributed to previously handled or processed nuclear materials. Off-site data showed the radioactivity to be that only due to naturally occurring radionuclides

  3. An aerial radiological survey of the Yankee Rowe Nuclear Power Station and surrounding area, Rowe, Massachusetts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyns, P.K.; Bluitt, C.M.

    1993-09-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over the Yankee Rowe Nuclear Power Station in Rowe, Massachusetts, during the period August 17--24, 1989. The survey was conducted at an altitude of 300 feet (91 meters) over an 87-square-mile (225-square-kilometer) area centered on the power station. The purpose of the survey was to document the terrestrial gamma radiation environment of the Yankee Rowe Power Station and the surrounding area. The results of the aerial survey are reported as inferred gamma radiation exposure rates at 1 meter above ground level in the form of a contour map. Outside the plant boundary, exposure rates were found to vary between 6 and 10 microroentgens per hour (μR/h) and were attributed to naturally-occurring uranium, thorium, and radioactive potassium gamma emitters. The aerial data were compared to ground-based ''benchmark'' exposure rate measurements and radionuclide assays of soil samples obtained within the survey boundary. The ground-based measurements were found to be in good agreement with those inferred from the aerial measuring system

  4. Aerial radiological survey of the Shoreham Nuclear Power Station and surrounding area Brookhaven, New York

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-03-01

    An aerial radiological survey was performed over the area surrounding the Shoreham Nuclear Power Station during 5 to 9 June 1983. The survey, which covered an area of 338 square kilometers (131 square miles), also encompassed the entire Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) facility. The highest radiation exposure rate, over 1 milliroentgen per hour (mR/h), was inferred from data measured directly over the BNL facility. This detected activity was due to the presence of cobalt-58, cobalt-60 and cesium-137, which was consistent with normal BNL operations. With the exception of the BNL facility, the only detected man-made radioactivity was found near a cottage in Moriches, New York and was due to the presence of cobalt-60. For the remainder of the survey area, the inferred radiation exposure rates varied generally from 6 to 12 microroentgens per hour (μR/h). The reported exposure rate values include an estimated cosmic ray contribution of 3.7 μR/h. Ground-based measurements, conducted concurrently with the aerial survey, were compared to the inferred aerial results. Pressurized ionization chamber readings and a group of soil samples were acquired from five locations within the survey area. The exposure rate values obtained from these measurements were consistent with those inferred from the aerial results. 11 references, 12 figures, 3 tables

  5. Remote Sensing and Special Surveys Program annual report, January--December 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conder, S.R.; Doll, W.E.; Gabrielsen, C.A.; King, A.D.; Durfee, R.C.; Parr, P.D.

    1994-03-01

    The Remote Sensing and Special Surveys Program has been established to provide environmental characterization data, change data, and trend data to various Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ERWM) programs. The data are acquired through several different types of survey platforms. During the calendar year of 1993, a variety of surveys were conducted through the Remote Sensing and Special Surveys Program. The aerial surveys included geophysical, radiological, false color infrared (IR) photography, and natural color photography. Ground surveys were conducted to correlate data collected from the airborne platforms to data measured at ground level. Ground surveys were also conducted to determine the existence or absence of threatened and endangered plant species on the Oak Ridge Reservation. Some of the special surveys included laser induced fluorescence imaging, solar reflectance, and various remote sensing and ground control activities for the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) initiative. Data analysis, management, and storage are also conducted by the Remote Sensing and Special Surveys Program to achieve the highest level of data useability possible. The data acquired through these surveys have provided and will continue to provide much needed information to ERWM programs

  6. Model for the elaboration of program of environmental radiological monitoring reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-11-01

    This Regulation refers to the requirements of the Regulation CNEN-NN.3.01 'Basic Guidelines for Radiation Protection', expressed in the section 5.14, and its application related to the emission of reports of Environmental Radiological Monitoring Program to be submitted to CNEN evaluation

  7. Drive alive: teen seat belt survey program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkett, Katie M; Davidson, Steve; Cotton, Carol; Barlament, James; Loftin, Laurel; Stephens, James; Dunbar, Martin; Butterfield, Ryan

    2010-08-01

    To increase teen seat belt use among drivers at a rural high school by implementing the Drive Alive Pilot Program (DAPP), a theory-driven intervention built on highway safety best practices. The first component of the program was 20 observational teen seat belt surveys conducted by volunteer students in a high school parking lot over a 38-month period before and after the month-long intervention. The survey results were published in the newspaper. The second component was the use of incentives, such as gift cards, to promote teen seat belt use. The third component involved disincentives, such as increased police patrol and school policies. The fourth component was a programmatic intervention that focused on education and media coverage of the DAPP program. Eleven pre-intervention surveys and nine post-intervention surveys were conducted before and after the intervention. The pre- and post-intervention seat belt usage showed significant differences (p<0.0001). The average pre-intervention seat belt usage rate was 51.2%, while the average post-intervention rate was 74.5%. This represents a percentage point increase of 23.3 in seat belt use after the DAPP intervention. Based on seat belt observational surveys, the DAPP was effective in increasing seat belt use among rural high school teenagers. Utilizing a theory-based program that builds on existing best practices can increase the observed seat belt usage among rural high school students.

  8. Use of certification programs in the radiological protection of the patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucino, Sergio; Touzet, Rodolfo

    2008-01-01

    Full text: One of the main recommendations of the Congress of Malaga on Radiological Protection of the Patient is 'the qualification and training of the staff'. This goal cannot be reached in a country, in complete and systematic form, without the help of existing national programs who allow designing a program of continuous development of the professional capacities. This program must be able to adapt in permanent form to the needs of the Program of Radiological Protection of the Patient that change and evolve in constant form. In case of the Argentina it was adapted to these needs the 'National Program of Certification and Re-certification of medical professionals in Radiology and Radio-Diagnosis'. On the base of the existing program, general requirements were established for the radiological protection of the patient and in addition, special requirements for four specialties: a) General and pediatrics radiology; b) Computed tomography; c) Interventional radiology; d) Radiotherapy. The National Program of Certification was established in 1997 with a 'Top Permanent Council' formed by the National Minister of Health advised by a scientific council. It was also creates the 'National Council of Certification and professional Re-certification' integrated by the Minister of Education, the National Academy of Medicine, the Faculties of Medicine of the whole country, the medical Federations, the trade-union Associations and the Argentine Medical Association. The process of certification can be delegated to academic or university entities, medical colleges and medical chambers that have been recognized path and ethical conduct. The certification is voluntary but it becomes obligatory to be recognized as a specialist. The certification has duration of 5 years and is renewable on the basis of a system of credits that considers different elements of the developed activities and the written theoretical and practical evaluations. It is a transparent process where the ethical

  9. Aerial radiological survey of the Brookhaven National Laboratory and surrounding area, Upton, New York. Date of survey: June 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobaugh, J.L.

    1985-02-01

    An aerial radiological survey was performed from 11 to 13 June 1983, over approximately a 64-square-kilometer (25-square-mile) area surrounding the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). BNL is located in the center of Suffolk County, Long Island, New York. All gamma radiation data were collected by flying east-west lines spaced 76 meters (250 feet) apart at an altitude of 46 meters (150 feet) above ground level. Count rates obtained from the aerial platform were converted to exposure rates at 1 meter above the ground. The average background exposure rate in the survey area ranged from 5 to 10 microroentgens per hour (μR/h). The reported exposure rate values include an estimated cosmic ray contribution of 4.0 μR/h. Ground-based measurements made during the same time period were compared to the aerial survey results. Pressurized ion chamber readings and soil samples were taken from two locations within the aerial survey boundaries. Exposure rate values obtained from these measurement techniques were in agreement with those obtained from the aerial data. A total of 23 areas of man-made radioactivity were identified. The dominant isotopes found over these areas were cesium-137, sodium-22, manganese-54, and cobalt-60. A similar survey was conducted in May 1980. The 1983 survey results were similar to the 1980 results. Three areas of low level man-made activity were not reproduced by the 1983 data. Ten new areas were detected. The major difference occurred because of the increased sensitivity and spatial reduction brought on by lowering the altitude and decreasing the line spacing. 8 refs., 28 figs., 4 tabs

  10. An aerial radiological survey of the RMI facility and surrounding area, Ashtabula, Ohio: Date of survey, September 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-11-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over a 75-square-kilometer (30-square-mile) area surrounding the RMI facility in Ashtabula, Ohio, during the period between September 4 and 13, 1985. The survey was conducted at an altitude of 46 meters (150 ft). A second, more detailed survey was also performed over the RMI facility. This survey was conducted at an altitude of 30 meters (100 ft) and covered an area of about 2.6 square kilometers (1 sq mi) centered over the facility. Over most of the survey area, exposure rates varied from about 8 to 11 microentgens per hour (μR/h). Several areas of increased radioactivity were observed in addition to increased radioactivity over the RMI facility (exposure rates of up to 44 μR/h were detected). The increased radioactivity over the RMI facility was due to uranium; however, no evidence of uranium was found off site. A second site exhibiting increased radioactivity was located near a railroad siding. The anomalous radiation there was due primarily to elevated concentrations of radium. Ground samples from this location were found to contain 130,000 picocuries per gram (pCi/g) of radium-226. Two other regions of anomalous radiation were found on the shore of Lake Erie, near Pinney Dock. One of these sites contained elevated concentrations of potassium-40 (K-40). The spectrum from the second site indicated the source to be thorium. A fifth site was a facility located a few hundred meters east of the RMI plant. The spectrum from this site also indicated an increased amount of thorium. Finally, a sixth source was located in the eastern portion of the survey area. The spectrum from this site was found to be high in cesium-137 (Cs-137). 7 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Results of the radiological survey at 9 Redstone Lane, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ069)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Carrier, R.F.

    1989-07-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process waste and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monozite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Areas residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with teas and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigate radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 9 Redstone Lane, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ069), was conducted during 1987. Measurements at the private property located at 9 Redstone Lane indicate slightly elevated gamma exposure rates in association with cinder-like material observed in logging holes. These elevated levels result from naturally occurring radioactivity present in such substances as ashes and cinders. They are not related to the deposit of residues from processing operations at the MCW site. All other radiological findings conform to the guidelines established by the DOE for the Maywood, New Jersey, area remedial action plan. 4 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  12. Emerging Technologies and Techniques for Wide Area Radiological Survey and Remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutton, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zhao, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-03-24

    Technologies to survey and decontaminate wide-area contamination and process the subsequent radioactive waste have been developed and implemented following the Chernobyl nuclear power plant release and the breach of a radiological source resulting in contamination in Goiania, Brazil. These civilian examples of radioactive material releases provided some of the first examples of urban radiological remediation. Many emerging technologies have recently been developed and demonstrated in Japan following the release of radioactive cesium isotopes (Cs-134 and Cs-137) from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in 2011. Information on technologies reported by several Japanese government agencies, such as the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), the Ministry of the Environment (MOE) and the National Institute for Environmental Science (NIES), together with academic institutions and industry are summarized and compared to recently developed, deployed and available technologies in the United States. The technologies and techniques presented in this report may be deployed in response to a wide area contamination event in the United States. In some cases, additional research and testing is needed to adequately validate the technology effectiveness over wide areas. Survey techniques can be deployed on the ground or from the air, allowing a range of coverage rates and sensitivities. Survey technologies also include those useful in measuring decontamination progress and mapping contamination. Decontamination technologies and techniques range from non-destructive (e.g., high pressure washing) and minimally destructive (plowing), to fully destructive (surface removal or demolition). Waste minimization techniques can greatly impact the long-term environmental consequences and cost following remediation efforts. Recommendations on technical improvements to address technology gaps are presented together with observations on remediation in Japan.

  13. An aerial radiological survey of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant and surrounding area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampoll-Ramirez, G.

    1994-09-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted from August 10-16, 1993, over a 78-square-kilometer (30-square-mile) area of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant and surrounding area located near Portsmouth, Ohio. The survey was performed at a nominal altitude of 46 meters (150 feet) with a line spacing of 76 meters (250 feet). A contour map of the terrestrial gamma exposure rate extrapolated to 1 meter above ground level was prepared and overlaid on a set of United States Geological Survey topographic maps of the area and an aerial photograph of the plant. The terrestrial gamma exposure rates varied from about 7 to 14 microroentgens per hour at 1 meter above the ground. Protactinium-234m was observed at six sites within the boundaries of the plant. At a seventh site, only uranium-235 was observed. No other man-made, gamma ray-emitting radioactive material was present in a detectable quantity, either on or off the plant property. Soil sample and pressurized ion chamber measurements were obtained at four locations within the survey boundaries to support the aerial data. The results of the aerial and ground-based measurements were found to agree within ± 7.5%

  14. Results of the radiological survey at 110 E Hunter Avenue, Maywood, New Jersey (MJ022)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Carrier, R.F.; Floyd, L.M.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-09-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 110 E. Hunter Avenue, Maywood, New Jersey (MJ022), was conducted during 1987. Following the removal of a small chunk of material showing elevated gamma exposure rates, all radionuclide concentrations and measurements conformed to DOE remedial action criteria. The slightly elevated radionuclide concentrations found in other soil samples were the result of naturally enhances radioactivity characteristic of some environmental materials such as coal ash and were unrelated to operations at the MCW site. The survey data demonstrate that the property requires no further action on the part of DOE. 4 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  15. Results of radiological surveys of 20 borough-owned properties, Maywood, New Jersey (MJ050)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Carrier, R.F.

    1990-08-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of these 20 borough-owned properties Maywood, New Jersey, was conducted during 1987. Survey measurements indicate that none of the properties contained radioactive contamination. Slightly elevated gamma exposure rates in several areas were related to the presence of ashes or to natural materials used in the construction of buildings and asphalt surfaces. 4 refs., 1 figs., 1 tab

  16. Results of the radiological survey at 133 Maywood Avenue, Maywood, New Jersey (MJ025)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Carrier, R.F.; Floyd, L.M.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-10-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 133 Maywood Avenue, Maywood, New Jersey (MJ025), was conducted during 1987. The survey results demonstrate that all radionuclide concentrations and measurements conform to DOE remedial action criteria. All values are at or below typical background values found in northern New Jersey. 5 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  17. An aerial radiological survey of the Babcock and Wilcox Nuclear Facilities and surrounding area, Lynchburg, Virginia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guss, P.P.

    1993-04-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted from July 18 through July 25, 1988, over a 41-square-kilometer (16-square-mile) area surrounding the Babcock and Wilcox nuclear facilities located near Lynchburg, Virginia. The survey was conducted at a nominal altitude of 61 meters (200 feet) with line spacings of 91 meters (300 feet). A contour map of the terrestrial gamma exposure rate extrapolated to 1 meter above ground level (AGL) was prepared and overlaid on an aerial photograph. The terrestrial exposure rates varied from 8 to 12 microroentgens per hour (μR/h). A search of the data for man-made radiation sources revealed the presence of three areas of high count rates in the survey area. Spectra accumulated over the main plant showed the presence of cobalt-60 ( 60 Co) and cesium-137 ( 137 Cs). A second area near the main plant indicated the presence of uranium-235 ( 235 U). Protactinium-234m ( 234m Pa) and 60 Co Were detected over a building to the east of the main plant. Soil samples and pressurized ion chamber measurements were obtained at four locations within the survey boundaries in support of the aerial data

  18. Results of the radiological survey at 80 Industrial Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ061)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Carrier, R.F.; Floyd, L.M.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-07-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 80 Industrial Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ061), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of DOE remedial action criteria, primarily from the 232 Th decay chain, with some contamination from 226 Ra. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 5 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs

  19. Results of the radiological survey at 90 C Avenue, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ079)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-06-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted an investigative radiological survey during 1988 at 90 C Avenue, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ079), one of the properties in the vicinity of the MCW site. The survey included a gamma radiation scan of the surface and at one meter above the surface, as well as radionuclide sampling of surface and subsurface soil. The survey objective was to determine whether this site was contaminated with radioactive residues derived from MCW, principally 232 Th. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of DOE remedial action criteria, primarily from the 232 Th decay chain, with some contamination from 226 Ra. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 5 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  20. Results of the radiological survey at 14 Long Valley Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ070)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Carrier, R.F.

    1989-12-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 14 Long Valley Road, Lodi New Jersey (LJ070), was conducted during 1987. Survey measurements indicate that the property contained radioactive contamination primarily from the 232 Th decay chain. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from processing operations at the MCW. 5 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  1. An aerial radiological survey of the Fernald Environmental Management Project and surrounding area, Fernald, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phoenix, K.A.

    1997-04-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted from May 17--22, 1994, over a 36 square mile (93 square kilometer) area centered on the Fernald Environmental Management Project located in Fernald, Ohio. The purpose of the survey was to detect anomalous gamma radiation in the environment surrounding the plant. The survey was conducted at a nominal altitude of 150 feet (46 meters) with a line spacing of 250 feet (76 meters). A contour map of the terrestrial gamma exposure rate extrapolated to 1 meter (3.3 feet) above ground was prepared and overlaid on an aerial photograph of the area. Analysis of the data for man made sources showed five sites within the boundaries of the Fernald Environmental Management Project having elevated readings. The exposure rates outside the plant boundary were typical of naturally occurring background radiation. Soil samples and pressurized ion chamber measurements were obtained at four locations within the survey boundaries to supplement the aerial data. It was concluded that although the radionuclides identified in the high-exposure-rate areas are naturally occurring, the levels encountered are greatly enhanced due to industrial activities at the plant

  2. An aerial radiological survey of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant and surrounding area, Portsmouth, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted from July 11--20, 1990, over an 83-square-kilometer (32-square-mile) area surrounding the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant located near Portsmouth, Ohio. The survey was conducted at a nominal altitude of 91 meters (300 feet) with line spacings of 122 meters (400 feet). A contour map of the terrestrial gamma exposure rate extrapolated to 1 meter above ground level (AGL) was prepared and overlaid on an aerial photograph and a set of United States Geological Survey (USGS) topographic maps of the area. The terrestrial exposure rates varied from about 7 to 14 microroentgens per hour (μR/h) at 1 meter above the ground. Analysis of the data for man-made sources and for the uranium decay product, protactinium-234m ( 234m Pa), showed five sites within the boundaries of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant with elevated readings. Spectra obtained in the vicinity of the buildings at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant showed the presence of 234m Pa, a uranium-238 ( 238 U) decay product. In addition, spectral analysis of the data obtained over the processing plant facility showed gamma activity indicative of uranium-235 ( 234 U). No other man-made gamma ray emitting radioactive material was detected, either on or off the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant property. Soil samples and pressurized ion chamber measurements were obtained at five different locations within the survey boundlaries to support the aerial data

  3. Evaluation of educational programs: an affiliate survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerker, B

    1996-08-01

    The Planned Parenthood Federation of America (PPFA) conducted a survey in 1996 to investigate the use of educational program evaluation among its affiliates. Of the 153 surveys mailed out, 55 (36%) were returned. Evaluations of school-based educational programs were conducted consistently by 19% of respondents and occasionally by 72%; non-school-based programs were evaluated consistently by 31% of associations and occasionally by 64%. In both types of presentations, evaluations were likely to consist of pre- and post-testing, post-tests alone, or informal discussions with participants. The outcome variables most often measured were participant satisfaction with the presentation, knowledge gained, and behavioral change. 75% of educational directors recognized the value of evaluations for purposes such as program planning, providing a baseline, and procuring funding; 80% were interested in doing more evaluations. However, directors identified numerous obstacles to evaluation: insufficient time, lack of expertise or models, problems conducting meaningful impact evaluations, limited funds for this purpose, and fear that results would be disappointing. Despite its low response rate, this survey identified a need for PPFA's Education Department to promote program evaluation among its affiliates, provide staff training, and develop meaningful program impact measures.

  4. Aerial radiological survey of the Waterford Generating Station and surrounding area, Taft, Louisiana. Date of survey: March-April 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaffe, R.J.; Feimster, E.L.

    1984-02-01

    An aerial survey of the Waterford Generating Station near Taft, Louisiana was conducted during the period March 24 through April 7, 1982. The area encompassed a 256-square-kilometer (100-square-mile) area centered on the reactor facilities. Inferred exposure rates were due primarily to naturally occurring gamma-emitting radionuclides and cosmic ray activity (estimated at 3.7 μR/h). The exposure rates varied from 7 to 60 μR/h. Throughout most of the residential/industrial areas, the inferred exposure rate range was 7 to 12 μR/h. Marsh and water-covered areas were less than 7 μR/h. Two areas were encountered which had activity elevated above the typical background: (1) an industrial waste pond located 2 kilometers southeast of the site, and (2) a small area located 5 kilometers southeast of the site on the south bank of the Mississippi River. (A river barge was docked at this location during the survey.) Maximum inferred exposure rates over these areas were 60 and 16 μR/h, respectively. Spectral analysis revealed gamma-emitting radionuclides of the uranium decay chain as the primary contributors to this elevated activity. Ground-based measurements made in several areas were consistent with the aerial data. This was the first aerial radiological survey conducted over this area. 3 references, 9 figures, 3 tables

  5. Surface radiological free release program for the Battelle Columbus Laboratory Decommissioning Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, C.N.

    1995-01-01

    This paper was prepared for the Second Residual Radioactivity and Recycling Criteria Workshop and discusses decommissioning and decontamination activities at the Battelle Columbus Laboratories Decommissioning Project (BCLDP). The BCLDP is a joint effort between the Department of Energy (DOE) and Battelle Columbus Operations to decontaminate fifteen Battelle-owned buildings contaminated with DOE radioactive materials. The privately owned buildings located across the street from The Ohio State University campus became contaminated with natural uranium and thorium during nuclear research activities. BCLDP waste management is supported by an extensive radiological free-release program. Miscellaneous materials and building surfaces have been free-released from the BCLDP. The free-release program has substantially reduced radioactive waste volumes and supported waste minimization. Free release for unrestricted use has challenged regulators and NRC licensees since the development of early surface-release criteria. This paper discusses the surface radiological free-release program incorporated by the BCLDP and the historical development of the surface radiological free-release criteria. Concerns regarding radiological free-release criteria are also presented. (author)

  6. Independent auto evaluation of an operative radiological protection program; Autoevaluacion independiente de un programa de proteccion radiologica operativa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medrano L, M.A.; Rodriguez C, C.C.; Linares R, D.; Zarate M, N.; Zempoalteca B, R. [Gerencia Subsede Sureste Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: maam@nuclear.inin.mx

    2006-07-01

    The program of operative radiological protection of a nuclear power plant consists of multiple procedures and associate tasks that have as purpose the radiological protection of the workers of the power station. It is for this reason that the constant evaluation of the one it programs it is an important tool in the identification of their weaknesses (and strengths), so they can be assisted appropriately. In this work the main elements of the program of independent auto evaluation of the program of operative radiological protection of the Laguna Verde Central that has been developed and implemented by the National Institute of Nuclear Research are described. (Author)

  7. Results of the independent radiological verification survey at the former Bridgeport Brass Company Facility, Seymour, Connecticut (SSC001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Rice, D.E.; Allred, J.F.; Brown, K.S.

    1995-03-01

    At the request of the USDOE, a team from ORNL conducted an independent radiological verification survey at the former Bridgeport Brass Company Facility, Seymour, Connecticut, from September 1992 to March 1993. Purpose of the survey was to determine whether residual levels of radioactivity inside the Ruffert Building and selected adjacent areas were rmediated to levels below DOE guidelines for FUSRAP sites. The property was contaminated with radioactive residues of 238 U from uranium processing experiments conducted by Reactive Metals, Inc., from 1962 to 1964 for the Atomic Energy Commission. A previous radiological survey did not characterize the entire floor space because equipment which could not be moved at the time made it inaccessible for radiological surveys. During the remediation process, additional areas of elevated radioactivity were discovered under stationary equipment, which required additional remediation and further verification. Results of the independent radiological verification survey confirm that, with the exception of the drain system inside the building, residual uranium contamination has been remediated to levels below DOE guidelines for unrestricted release of property at FUSRAP sites inside and outside the Ruffert Building. However, certain sections of the drain system retain uranium contamination above DOE surface guideline levels. These sections of pipe are addressed in separate, referenced documentation

  8. Survey of international personnel radiation dosimetry programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swaja, R.E.

    1985-04-01

    In September of 1983, a mail survey was conducted to determine the status of external personnel gamma and neutron radiation dosimetry programs at international agencies. A total of 130 agencies participated in this study including military, regulatory, university, hospital, laboratory, and utility facilities. Information concerning basic dosimeter types, calibration sources, calibration phantoms, corrections to dosimeter responses, evaluating agencies, dose equivalent reporting conventions, ranges of typical or expected dose equivalents, and degree of satisfaction with existing systems was obtained for the gamma and neutron personnel monitoring programs at responding agencies. Results of this survey indicate that to provide the best possible occupational radiation monitoring programs and to improve dosimetry accuracy in performance studies, facility dosimetrists, regulatory and standards agencies, and research laboratories must act within their areas of responsibility to become familiar with their radiation monitoring systems, establish common reporting guidelines and performance standards, and provide opportunities for dosimetry testing and evaluation. 14 references, 10 tables

  9. Radiological protection guidelines for the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program and Remote Surplus Facilities Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, T.L.

    1984-01-01

    The need for a definitive basis for radiological guidelines and criteria for FUSRAP became apparent by 1981 and led ORO to sponsor a joint ANL/BNI/LANL/ORO effort under the chairmanship of Wayne Hansen (LANL) that resulted in a final FUSRAP radiological guidelines document in March 1983. A separate effort to develop guidelines for remedial action criteria for SFMP was in progress at PNL. The need to coordinate both efforts with impending revisions of DOE Radiological Protection Standards and impending new developments in EPA and NRC Radiological Protection Standards led to convening of the first DOE Workshop on Remedial Action Criteria in Gaithersburg, Maryland, in February 1984, followed by a second workshop in June 1984 at ANL. The major decisions were to base the criteria on dosimetry models and basic limits currently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection, to emphasize the development and use of site-specific rather than generic guidelines and criteria for residual radionuclide concentrations in the ground, and to prepare a manual to accompany the guidelines that would present procedures and tables for deriving site-specific soil guidelines and criteria for the remedial action programs. A joint ANL/LANL/ORNL/PNL effort to prepare a definitive set of guidelines and a manual has been initiated. The scope, status, and current plans for this effort, and some of the key issues, are presented. 10 references, 1 table

  10. Radiological protection guidelines for the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program and remote Surplus Facilities Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, T.L.

    1985-01-01

    The need for a definitive basis for radiological guidelines and criteria for FUSRAP became apparent by 1981 and led ORO to sponsor a joint ANL/BNI/LANL/ORO effort under the chairmanship of Wayne Hansen (LANL) that resulted in a final FUSRAP radiological guidelines document in March 1983. A separate effort to develop guidelines for remedial action criteria for SFMP was in progress at PNL. The need to coordinate both efforts with impending revisions of DOE Radiological Protection Standards and impending new developments in EPA and NRC Radiological Protection Standards led to convening of the first DOE Workshop on Remedial Action Criteria in Gaithersburg, Maryland, in February 1984, followed by a second workshop in June 1984 at ANL. The major decisions were to base the criteria on dosimetry models and basic limits currently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection, to emphasize the development and use of site-specific rather than generic guidelines and criteria for residual radionuclide concentrations in the ground, and to prepare a manual to accompany the guidelines that would present procedures and tables for deriving site-specific soil guidelines and criteria for the remedial action programs. A joint ANL/LANL/ORNL/PNL effort to prepare a definitive set of guidelines and a manual has been initiated. The scope, status, and current plans for this effort, and some of the key issues, are presented. 10 references, 1 table

  11. A survey of functional programming language principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    Research in the area of functional programming languages has intensified in the 8 years since John Backus' Turing Award Lecture on the topic was published. The purpose of this paper is to present a survey of the ideas of functional programming languages. The paper assumes the reader is comfortable with mathematics and has knowledge of the basic principles of traditional programming languages, but does not assume any prior knowledge of the ideas of functional languages. A simple functional language is defined and used to illustrate the basic ideas. Topics discussed include the reasons for developing functional languages, methods of expressing concurrency, the algebra of functional programming languages, program transformation techniques, and implementations of functional languages. Existing functional languages are also mentioned. The paper concludes with the author's opinions as to the future of functional languages. An annotated bibliography on the subject is also included.

  12. Radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Gunnison, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haywood, F.F.; Jacobs, D.G.; Hubbard, H.M. Jr.; Ellis, B.S.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

    1980-03-01

    The findings of a radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill site at Gunnison, Colorado, conducted in May 1976, are presented. Results of surface soil sample analyses and direct gamma radiation measurements indicate limited spread of tailings off the site. The only significant above background measurements off the site were obtained in an area previously covered by the tailings pile. There was little evidence of contamination of the surface or of unconfined groundwater in the vicinity of the tailings pile; however, the hydrologic conditions at the site indicate a potential for such contamination. The concentration of 226 Ra in all water samples except one from the tailings pile was well below the concentration guide for drinking water. The subsurface distribution of 226 Ra in 14 bore holes located on and around the tailings pile was calculated from gamma ray monitoring data obtained jointly with Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc

  13. Radiation Protection in Pediatric Radiology: Results of a Survey Among Dutch Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijwaard, Harmen; Valk, Doreth; de Waard-Schalkx, Ischa

    2016-10-01

    A survey about radiation protection in pediatric radiology was conducted among 22 general and seven children's hospitals in the Netherlands. Questions concerned, for example, child protocols used for CT, fluoroscopy and x-ray imaging, number of images and scans made, radiation doses and measures taken to reduce these, special tools used for children, and quality assurance issues. The answers received from 27 hospitals indicate that radiation protection practices differ considerably between general and children's hospitals but also between the respective general and children's hospitals. It is recommended that hospitals consult each other to come up with more uniform best practices. Few hospitals were able to supply doses that can be compared to the national Diagnostic Reference Levels (DRLs). The ones that could be compared exceeded the DRLs in one in five cases, which is more than was expected beforehand.

  14. Aerial radiological survey of the Brookhaven National Laboratory and surrounding area, May 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobaugh, J.L.; Steiner, P.A.

    1984-01-01

    An aerial radiological survey was performed from 15 to 18 May 1980 over approximately a 21-square-kilometer (8-square-mile) area surrounding the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). BNL is located in the center of Suffolk County, Long Island, New York. All gamma radiation data were collected by flying north-south lines spaced 91 meters (300 feet) apart at an altitude of 61 meters (200 feet) above ground level. A total of 17 anomalous areas were identified. The dominant isotopes found over these areas were cesium-137, manganese-54, and cobalt-60. All anomalies identified by the aerial measurements were correlated to site activities and storage facilities. 4 references, 18 figures, 1 table

  15. Radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at the Spook site, Converse County, Wyoming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haywood, F.F.; Christian, D.J.; Chou, K.D.; Ellis, B.S.; Lorenzo, D.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

    1980-05-01

    Results of a radiological survey performed at the Spook site in Converse County, Wyoming, in June 1976, are presented. The mill at this site was located a short distance from the open-pit mine where the ore was obtained and where part of the tailings was dumped into the mine. Several piles of overburden or low-grade ore in the vicinity were included in the measurements of above-ground gamma exposure rate. The average exposure rate over these piles varied from 14 μR/hr, the average background exposure rate for the area, to 140 μR/hr. The average exposure rate for the tailings and former mill area was 220 μR/hr. Movement of tailings particles down dry washes was evident. The calculated concentration of 226 Ra in ten holes as a function of depth is presented graphically

  16. Radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Tuba City, Arizona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haywood, F.F.; Jones, T.D.; Hubbard, H.M. Jr.; Ellis, B.S.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

    1980-01-01

    Results of a radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill site at Tuba City, Arizona, conducted in March 1976, are presented. Spread of tailings was detected in all directions by means of direct gamma measurements at 1 m above the ground and by determinations of the 226 Ra concentration in surface soil and sediment samples. In the direction toward which prevailing winds blow, the northeast, evidence of transportation of tailings was found at least 3.2 km from the tailings pile. Toward the north, south, and west, the spread was 300 to 400 m. Evidence of movement of tailings by water to offsite locations was also found. The concentration of 226 Ra in all water samples was well below the concentration guide for drinking water. The calculated subsoil distribution of 226 Ra in 14 holes, based on gamma monitoring data obtained by Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc., is presented graphically and compared with available analytical data

  17. Radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Rifle, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haywood, F.F.; Jacobs, D.J.; Ellis, B.S.; Hubbard, H.M. Jr.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

    1980-06-01

    Results of radiological surveys of two inactive uranium-mill sites near Rifle, Colorado, in May 1976 are presented. These sites are referred to as Old Rifle and New Rifle. The calculated 226 Ra inventory of the latter site is much higher than at the older mill location. Data on above-ground measurements of gamma exposure rates, surface and near-surface concentration of 226 Ra in soil and sediment samples, concentration of 226 Ra in water, calculated subsurface distribution of 226 Ra, and particulate radionuclide concentrations in air samples are given. The data serve to define the extent of contamination in the vicinity of the mill sites and their immediate surrounding areas with tailings particles. Results of these measurements were utilized as technical input for an engineering assessment of these two sites

  18. Radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Falls City, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haywood, F.F.; Christian, D.J.; Loy, E.T.; Lorenzo, D.; Ellis, B.S.

    1980-10-01

    Results of a radiological survey conducted at the Falls City, Texas, site in July 1976 are presented. There are seven partial to fully stabilized tailings piles, and an overburden pile from an open-pit mine. Above ground gamma-ray exposure rate measurements show moderate levels of contamination throughout the area with a maximum exposure rate of 500 μR/hr above tailings pile 2. The average exposure rate over the different areas varied from 14 μR/hr over the southwest end of tailings pile 7 to 207 μR/hr over the northeast end of the same pile. Analyses of surface soil and dry-wash sediment samples, as well as calculations of subsurface 226 Ra distribution, serve to define the spread of tailings around the area. Water erosion of the tailings is evident, but, because of abundant growth of vegetation on the tailings piles, wind erosion probably is not a major problem

  19. Aerial radiological survey of the area surrounding the St. Lucie Power Plant, Fort Pierce, Florida

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feimster, E.L.

    1979-06-01

    An airborne radiological survey of an 1100 km 2 area surrounding the St. Lucie Power Plant was conducted 1 to 8 March 1977. Detected radioisotopes and their associated gamma ray exposure rates were consistent with that expected from the normal background emitters. Count rates observed at 150 m altitude are converted to equivalent exposure rates at 1 m above the ground and are presented in the form of an isopleth map. Ground exposure rates measured with small portable instruments and soil sample analysis agreed with the airborne data. Geological data are presented in an isopleth map of rock and soil types. Also included is a brief description of the vegetation and terrain surrounding the site

  20. Radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Durango, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haywood, F.F.; Perdue, P.T.; Shinpaugh, W.H.; Ellis, B.S.; Chou, K.D.

    1980-03-01

    Results of a radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill site at Durango, Colorado, conducted in April 1976, in cooperation with a team from Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc., are presented together with descriptions of the instruments and techniques used to obtain the data. Direct above-ground gamma measurements and analysis of surface soil and sediment samples indicate movement of tailings from the piles toward Lightner Creek on the north and the Animas River on the east side of the piles. The concentration of 226 Ra in the former raffinate pond area is only slightly above the background level. Two structures in Durango were found to contain high concentrations of airborne radon daughters, where tailings are known to have been utilized in construction. Near-background concentrations of radon daughters were found in a well-ventilated building close to the tailings

  1. Aerial radiological survey of the Virgil C. Summer Nuclear Station and surrounding area, Jenkinsville, South Carolina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-07-01

    An aerial radiologic survey was performed from 9 to 16 March 1981 over a 280 square kilometer area centered on the Virgil C. Summer Nuclear Power Station near Jenkinsville, South Carolina. All gamma-photon data were collected by flying North-South lines spaced 230 meters apart at an altitude of 122 meters above ground level. Processed data showed that all gamma-photons detected within the survey area were those expected from naturally occurring terrestrial background emitters. Count rates obtained from the aerial platform were converted to exposure rates at 1 meter above the ground and are presented in the form of an isoradiation contour map. The observed exposure rates over the land areas were between 6 and 30 microroengtens per hour (μR/h) with most of the area ranging from 6 to 15 μR/h. These values include an estimated cosmic ray contribution of 4.0 μR/h. The exposure rate obtained from soil samples taken at the survey site displayed positive agreement with the aerial data

  2. Results of the radiological survey at Exit 4, Interstate 90, Albany, New York (AL212)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marley, J.L.; Carrier, R.F.

    1988-02-01

    A number of properties in the Albany/Colonie area have been identified as being potentially contaminated with uranium originating from the former National Lead Company's uranium forming plant in Colonie, New York. The property at Exit 4 between Yardboro Avenue and Interstate 90 in Albany, New York was the subject of a radiological investigation initiated April 27, 1987. The area of survey of the property of the State of New York was the north side of the right-of-way of Interstate 90 (I-90) at Exit 4 (the Slingerlands exit) from the fence along the south side of Yardboro Avenue to the berm of the west-bound lanes of I-90. The survey, starting at the I-90 bridge over Central Avenue continued west for approximately 570 m. The width of the area ranged from /approximately/10 m to 195 m. To perform the survey, a network of sectors forming a grid was established, beginning with a series of basing points measured at /approximately/23-m intervals at the fence along Yardboro Avenue. Sectors were set by projection of lines from the basing points, perpendicular to the fence, to the berm of I-90. Then parallel lines at 23-m intervals were set. 12 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs

  3. Results of the radiological survey at 70 State Highway 46, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ094)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-11-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 70 State Highway 46, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ094), was conducted during 1988. 4 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  4. Results of the radiological survey at 60 Orchard Place, Maywood, New Jersey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-11-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated waste were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes a direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 60 Orchard Place, Maywood, New Jersey (MJ048), was conducted during 1988. 4 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Results of the radiological survey at 15 John Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ087)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-12-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 15 John Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ087), was conducted during 1988. 5 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  6. Results of the radiological survey at 137 Maywood Avenue, Maywood, New Jersey (MJ026)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Carrier, R.F.

    1989-12-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 137 Maywood Avenue, Maywood, New Jersey (MJ026), was conducted during 1987. 6 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Results of the radiological survey at 3 Branca Court, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ038)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Carrier, R.F.

    1989-10-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 3 Branca Court, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ038), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  8. Results of the radiological survey at 112 Columbia Lane, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ068)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Carrier, R.F.

    1989-11-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 112 Columbia Lane, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ068), was conducted during 1987. 4 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Results of the radiological survey at 21 West Central Avenue, Maywood, New Jersey (MJ046)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-11-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 21 West Central Avenue, Maywood, New Jersey (MJ046), was conducted during 1988. 5 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  10. Aerial Mobile Radiation Survey Following Detonation of a Radiological Dispersal Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Laurel E; Fortin, Richard; Buckle, John L; Coyle, Maurice J; Van Brabant, Reid A; Harvey, Bradley J A; Seywerd, Henry C J; McCurdy, Martin W

    2016-05-01

    A series of experiments was conducted in 2012 at the Defence Research and Development Canada's Suffield Research Centre in Alberta, Canada, during which three radiological dispersal devices were detonated. The detonations released radioactive (140)La into the air, which was then carried by winds and detectable over distances of up to 2 km. The Nuclear Emergency Response group of Natural Resources Canada conducted airborne radiometric surveys shortly following the explosions to map the pattern of radioactivity deposited on the ground. The survey instrument suite was based on large volume NaI(Tl) scintillation gamma radiation detectors, which were situated in a basket mounted exterior to the helicopter and oriented end-to-end to maximize the sensitivity. A standard geophysical data treatment was used to subtract backgrounds and to correct the data to produce counts due to (140)La at the nominal altitude. Sensitivity conversion factors obtained from Monte Carlo simulations were then applied to express the measurements in terms of surface activity concentration in kBq m(-2). Integrated over the survey area, the results indicate that only 20 to 25% of the bomb's original inventory of radioactive material is deposited within a 1.5-km radius of ground zero. These results can be accommodated with a simple model for the RDD behavior and atmospheric dispersion.

  11. An aerial radiological survey of the Salmon Site and surrounding area, Lamar County, Mississippi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kernan, W.J.

    1994-05-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over the former Atomic Energy Commission Test Site at the Salmon Site and surrounding area between April 20 and May 1, 1992. The Salmon Site is located in Lamar County, Mississippi, approximately 20 miles southwest of Hattiesburg, Mississippi. The purpose of the survey was to measure and document the gamma-ray environment of the Salmon Site and adjacent lands. A contour map showing gamma radiation exposure rates at 1 meter above ground level was constructed from the aerial data and overlaid on a rectified aerial photograph of the area. The exposure rates within the area are between 5 and 8 μR/h. The reported exposure rates include a cosmic-ray contribution estimated to be 3.7 μR/h. Radionuclide assays of soil samples and in situ measurements, taken with a pressurized ion chamber and a high-purity germanium detector, were obtained at 4 locations within the survey boundaries. These measurements were taken in support of and are in agreement with the aerial data

  12. Results of the radiological survey at 83 Belle Avenue, Maywood, New Jersey (MJ047)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-11-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 83 Belle Avenue, Maywood, New Jersey (MJ047), was conducted during 1988. 5 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Results of the radiological survey at 17 John Street, Lodi, New Jersey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-12-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 17 John Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ088), was conducted during 1988. 5 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  14. Results of the radiological survey at 48 Long Valley Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ085)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-11-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 48 Long Valley Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ085), was conducted during 1988. 5 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  15. Results of the radiological survey at 105 Garibaldi Avenue, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ065)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Carrier, R.F.

    1989-11-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 105 Garibaldi Avenue, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ065), was conducted during 1987. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Results of the radiological survey at 104 Avenue E, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ086)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-12-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 104 Avenue E, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ086), was conducted during 1988. 5 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  17. Quality assurance program in diagnostic radiology; Programa de garantia de qualidade em radiologia diagnostica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yacovenco, Alejandro; Borges, J.C. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia; Lira, S.H. [Hospital Central da Policia Militar, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Radiologia; Mota, H.C. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1994-07-01

    Aiming to elaborate a methodology to optimize the performance of the Radiology Service of the Military Police Hospital, in Rio dee Janeiro, some goals were established: improvement of the attendance to patients; improvement of the qualification of technicians; achievement and maintenance of high degrees of quality in each step of the radiological process; improvement of the image quality; optimization of dose per examination and cost reduction. The procedure used to detect faults in the radiological process was the analysis of causes of film losses. Results show a 70% reduction in the film rejection rate. 74% of total identified faults were due to equipment, 11% to films, 10% to patients and 5% to developing. The reduction in the cost of developed film reached 75%. A training course given to the staff of the radiological service fully reached its goals, contributing, with the staff motivation, mostly to the success of the program. This success indicates that, with a serious persistent work, it is possible to offer to patients services within their expectations, even at a public hospital. Such programs should be supported by health authorities, not only due to their technical and economic needs but, mostly, due to their social implications. (author). 10 refs., 11 figs.

  18. Drive Alive: Teen Seat Belt Survey Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loftin, Laurel

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To increase teen seat belt use among drivers at a rural high school by implementing the Drive Alive Pilot Program (DAPP, a theory-driven intervention built on highway safety best practices.Methods: The first component of the program was 20 observational teen seat belt surveys conducted by volunteer students in a high school parking lot over a 38-month period before and after the month-long intervention. The survey results were published in the newspaper. The second component was the use of incentives, such as gift cards, to promote teen seat belt use. The third component involved disincentives, such as increased police patrol and school policies. The fourth component was a programmatic intervention that focused on education and media coverage of the DAPP program.Results: Eleven pre-intervention surveys and nine post-intervention surveys were conducted before and after the intervention. The pre- and post-intervention seat belt usage showed significant differences (p<0.0001. The average pre-intervention seat belt usage rate was 51.2%, while the average post-intervention rate was 74.5%. This represents a percentage point increase of 23.3 in seat belt use after the DAPP intervention.Conclusion: Based on seat belt observational surveys, the DAPP was effective in increasing seat belt use among rural high school teenagers. Utilizing a theory-based program that builds on existing best practices can increase the observed seat belt usage among rural high school students. [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(3: 280-283.

  19. Who will be the Radiologists of Tomorrow? A survey of radiology during the "Practical Year" in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmer, Sabine; Fischer, Volkhard; Paeßens, Carolin; Meyer, Simone; Wacker, Frank K; Rodt, Thomas

    2017-10-01

    Purpose  Aim of our study was to evaluate the motivation of medical students in their final year of medical school to choose radiology for further specialization by means of a Germany-wide survey. Materials and Methods  The survey was performed during the 2015/16 semester among German medical students in their four months radiology elective during the final year. Invitations for the study were distributed by the Student Secretariats of each university. The survey was web-based with EvaSys 7.0 software. Questions on radiology contents during medical studies and "practical year" were part of the survey. Plans for residency and possible advantages and disadvantages of radiology as medical specialty were inquired. Descriptive statistics and group comparisons were used as analysis methods. Results  89 students participated in the survey at the beginning and 60 students at the end of the practical year. Of these 39 students could be identified who answered both questionnaires. Most students were satisfied with their final year radiology elective (mean 1.8 on a range from 1 to 5). Nevertheless, they criticized mentoring during routine work (mean 2.1) and a lack of educational courses (mean 2.1). Most students (83 %) were uncertain about their residency choice at the beginning of their "practical year" and about one fifth changed their plans. From the students' point of view main advantages of radiology included contact with many other clinical disciplines (87 %) and the working conditions (68 %). The reduced patient contact (42 %), the large amount of work at a computer (43 %), and the dependency on referring physicians (42 %) were regarded as the main disadvantages. The students regarded the way radiology is taught during the studies as not practical enough. With regard to radiology the majority of students (63 %) felt poorly prepared for their future work. Conclusion  The "practical year" is important regarding the choice of future specialization

  20. An aerial radiological survey of Pocatello and Soda Springs, Idaho and surrounding area, June--July 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, H.A.

    1987-02-01

    Three aerial radiological surveys were conducted during the period 16 June through 15 July 1986 over the towns of Pocatello, Soda Springs, and Fort Hall, Idaho and the surrounding areas. The surveys were performed for the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) by the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL), utilizing the Aerial Measuring System (AMS). This work was completed in cooperation with a study by the EPA to conduct a dose assessment of human radiation exposure for industrial sources in Pocatello and Soda Springs, Idaho. The aerial surveys were performed to document the natural terrestrial radiological environment of the three localities and to map the spatial extent and degree of contamination due to phosphate milling operations. The results of these surveys will be used for planning ground-based measurements in addition to being incorporated into the dose assessment document. 4 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs

  1. Estimating radiological consequences using the Java programming language

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, J.; Hayward, M.; Harris, F.; Domel, R.

    1998-01-01

    At the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) a model is being developed to determine critical parameters affecting radioactive doses to humans following a release of radionuclides into the atmosphere. Java programming language was chosen because of the Graphical User Interface (GUI) capabilities and its portability across computer platforms, which were a requirement for the application, called RadCon. The mathematical models are applied over the 2D region, performing time varying calculations of dose to humans for each grid point, according to user selected options. The information combined includes: two dimensional time varying air and ground concentrations, transfer factors from soil to plant, plant to animal, plant to humans, plant interception factors to determine amount of radionuclide on plant surfaces, dosimetric data, such as dose conversion factors and user defined parameters, e.g. soil types, lifestyle, diet of animals and humans. Details of the software requirements, pathway parameters and implementation of RadCon are given

  2. Radiological Survey Results for Areas A1 North, A5A, A6, and B2 at the Molycorp Washington Remediation Project, Washington, Pennsylvania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    W.C. Adams

    2007-01-01

    Perform radiological surveys of the Molycorp Washington Remediation Project (MWRP) facility in Washington, Pennsylvania. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requested the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) to provide limited training pertaining to ORISE radiological soil scanning and sampling procedures to the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP) personnel. In addition, the NRC also requested that ORISE perform radiological surveys of the Molycorp Washington Remediation Project (MWRP) facility in Washington, Pennsylvania (Figure 1). ORISE has and will continue to interface with PADEP personnel in a joint effort to perform confirmatory radiological surveys, consisting of gamma scans and soil sampling, at the MWRP facility. PADEP personnel will continue to submit soil samples that they collect to ORISE for analyses. PADEP sample results, along with ORISE results, will be provided to the NRC and PADEP so that decisions regarding the radiological status of the surveyed areas can be determined. ORISE performed radiological surveys during the period of November 28 and 29, 2006. The survey unit (SU) available for ORISE radiological survey activities was Area A1 North. The MWRP final status survey (FSS) results for Area A1 North were reviewed prior to these survey activities. Prior to ORISE's survey activities, PADEP personnel had performed radiological surveys and collected soil samples from SU Areas A5A and A6. These samples were provided to ORISE for analyses while on site. After the ORISE radiological surveys, PADEP personnel collected soil samples from SU Areas A2 and B2 and these samples were shipped to ORISE for analyses in January 2007. Figure 2 depicts the MWRP Areas A through D; ORISE and PADEP personnel performed survey activities in portions of Areas A and B. For interlaboratory comparison analyses with MWRP's site contractor, Malcolm Pirnie (MP), ORISE requested soil samples from the Area A1 soil stockpiles

  3. Environmental and radiological remediation under Canada's global partnership program 2004-11 - 59185

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washer, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Following the '911' attack on the USA in 2001 the international community under Canada's G8 leadership established a $20 billion Global Partnership initiative in 2002 to collaboratively address threats to global security posed by the proliferation and potential terrorist use of Weapons and Materials of Mass Destruction (WMMD) and related materials and knowledge. This major international initiative addressed four priority areas: (1) Chemical Weapon Destruction (2) Nuclear powered submarine eliminations (3) Nuclear and radiological security; and (4) Employment for former weapon scientists. Additionally the initiative has addressed Biological Non- Proliferation. Canada's execution of all these program areas has resulted in substantial environmental benefits aside from the eradication and securing of WMMD. This paper reviews the environmental and radiological remediation achievements of the four primary Global Partnership program areas addressed under Canadian funding 2004 through 2011. (author)

  4. Aerial radiological survey of Areas 18 and 20 Nevada Test Site. Date of survey: October-November 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feimster, E.L.

    1985-11-01

    Radiological surveys were conducted over Areas 18 and 20 at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) during the period 10 October through 13 November 1980. Separate surveys of the two areas were conducted simultaneously using arrays of NaI(Tl) scintillation crystals mounted on Messerschmitt-Bolkow-Blohm BO-105 and Hughes H-500 helicopters. Exposure rate contour maps due to total terrestrial gamma ray activity were produced for both areas. The most frequently occurring range of exposure rates was 17 to 25 μR/h for both Areas 18 and 20; the total range varied from 12 to 2000 μR/h. These values include an estimated cosmic contribution of 6 μR/h. An isocount rate contour map showing the distribution of count rates measured in the spectral window sensitive to cesium-137 was produced to show the extent of man-made contaminants in Area 18. In a similar manner, an isocount rate contour map showing the distribution of count rates measured in a spectral window sensitive to cobalt-60 was used to show the extent of man-made contaminants in Area 20. The extent of man-made contamination from the effluents of the various events in both areas shows patterns indicative of the prevailing winds during and after the events. Except for the presence of low levels of cesium-137 activity in the eastern half of Area 18, all contaminants can be correlated with the effluents of the various events. In Area 18, cesium-137 activity appears to be spread over about 30 to 40 percent of the eastern half; it does not appear to be directly associated with the events in this area. The distribution and level of background radiation in the two areas are consistent with those measured during previous surveys

  5. Estimating radiological consequences using the Java programming language

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, J.; Hayward, M. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia). Information Management Div; Harris, F.; Domel, R. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia). Safety Div.

    1998-12-31

    At the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) a model is being developed to determine critical parameters affecting radioactive doses to humans following a release of radionuclides into the atmosphere. Java programming language was chosen because of the Graphical User Interface (GUI) capabilities and its portability across computer platforms, which were a requirement for the application, called RadCon. The mathematical models are applied over the 2D region, performing time varying calculations of dose to humans for each grid point, according to user selected options. The information combined includes: two dimensional time varying air and ground concentrations, transfer factors from soil to plant, plant to animal, plant to humans, plant interception factors to determine amount of radionuclide on plant surfaces, dosimetric data, such as dose conversion factors and user defined parameters, e.g. soil types, lifestyle, diet of animals and humans. Details of the software requirements, pathway parameters and implementation of RadCon are given 10 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  6. RIMS/sup tm/ - radiological information management system: software package EI-029-S86

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    RIMS/sup tm/ has been developed for health physics record keeping and reporting. It provides for the management needs relating to radiological information control at a nuclear facility. The program is comprised of the following modules: Personnel Radiological Information, Radiological Work Permit, Radiation Survey Records, Access Control, ALARA Reporting, and Respirator and Survey Instrument Inventory Modules.

  7. RIMS/sup tm/ - radiological information management system: software package EI-029-S86

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    RIMS/sup tm/ has been developed for health physics record keeping and reporting. It provides for the management needs relating to radiological information control at a nuclear facility. The program is comprised of the following modules: Personnel Radiological Information, Radiological Work Permit, Radiation Survey Records, Access Control, ALARA Reporting, and Respirator and Survey Instrument Inventory Modules

  8. Application gives the technique the analytic tree in the evaluation the effectiveness programs to radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Gonzalez, F.; Perez Velazquez, R.S.; Fornet Rodriguez, O.; Mustelier Hechevarria, A.; Miller Clemente, A.

    1998-01-01

    In the work we develop the IAEA recommendations in the application the analytic tree as instrument for the evaluation the effectiveness the occupational radiological protection programs. Is reflected like it has been assimilated and converted that technique in daily work istruments in the evaluation process the security conditions in the institutions that apply the nuclear techniques with a view to its autorization on the part of the regulatory organ

  9. NCRP Program Area Committee 3: Nuclear and Radiological Security and Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Tammy P; Buddemeier, Brooke

    2016-02-01

    Program Area Committee (PAC) 3 provides guidance and recommendations for response to nuclear and radiological incidents of both an accidental and deliberate nature. Leadership of PAC 3 was transitioned in March 2015, and the newly composed PAC has been working to delineate and then prioritize the landscape of possible activities for PAC 3. The major activity of PAC 3 during the past year was the establishment of Scientific Committee 3-1 to begin producing a report on Guidance for Emergency Responder Dosimetry.

  10. Results of the radiological survey at Route 17(S) and Becker Avenue, Rochelle Park, New Jersey (RJ001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Carrier, R.F.

    1989-11-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The surveys typically include direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this commercial property at Route 17(S) and Becker Avenue, Rochelle Park, New Jersey (RJ001), was conducted in 1986. Measurements taken at the commercial property located at Route 17(S) and Becker Avenue indicate slightly elevated gamma exposure rates in three areas of the parking lot. Although results of analysis of the asphalt disclosed radionuclide concentrations in excess of the applicable criterion, their presence is due to naturally radioactive substances in asphalt patching materials and is not associated with material from the MCW site. Therefore, it is recommended that this site be eliminated from consideration for inclusion in the DOE remedial action program. 5 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  11. Radiological survey results for the Peek Street site properties, Schenectady, New York

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Cottrell, W.D.; Carrier, R.F.

    1992-08-01

    The Peek Street Industrial Facility, located at 425 Peek Street, Schenectady, New York, was operated by the General Electric Company for the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) between 1947 and 1955. A variety of operations using radioactive materials were conducted at the site, but the main activities were to design an intermediate breeder reactor and to develop a chemical process for the recovery of uranium and plutonium from spent reactor fuel. Nonradioactive beryllium metal was machined on the site for breeder reactor application. The 4.5-acre site was decommissioned and released in October 1955. A radiological survey was conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory in November 1989. The survey included scan and grid point measurements of direct radiation levels outdoors on the five properties and inside the factory building, and radionuclide analysis of samples collected from each property. Radionuclide concentrations were determined in outdoor surface and subsurface soil samples from each property and in dust, debris, and structural materials from inside the factory building. Auger holes were logged to assess location and extent of possible subsurface residual soil radioactivity. Radionuclide concentrations were deter-mined in both indoor and outdoor water samples and in selected samples of vegetation. The presence of fixed and transferable surface residual radioactivity was investigated inside the factory building and on discarded materials outdoors on the property. High-volume air samples as well as additional selected indoor and outdoor soil samples were analyzed to determine levels of elemental beryllium

  12. Radiological survey activities: uranium mill tailings remedial action project procedures manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, C.A.; Berven, B.A.; Carter, T.E.

    1986-07-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) was assigned the responsibility for conducting remedial action at 24 sites, which are located in one eastern and nine western states. The DOE's responsibilities are being met through its Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Office (UMTRA-PO) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The purpose of this Procedures Manual is to provide a standardized set of procedures that document in an auditable manner the activities performed by the Radiological Survey Activities (RASA) group in the Dosimetry and Biophysical Transport Section (DABTS) of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), in its role as the Inclusion Survey Contractor (ISC). Members of the RASA group assigned to the UMTRA Project are headquartered in the ORNL/RASA office in Grand Junction, Colorado, and report to the ORNL/RASA Project Manager. The Procedures Manual ensures that the organizational, administrative, and technical activities of the RASA/UMTRA group conform properly to those of the ISC as described in the Vicinity Properties Management and Implementation Manual and the Summary Protocol. This manual also ensures that the techniques and procedures used by the RASA/UMTRA group and contractor personnel meet the requirements of applicable governmental, scientific, and industrial standards

  13. Web-based system for radiological protection programs: a repository for research, consultation and information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, Denise S.; Sordi, Gian Maria A.A., E-mail: gmsordi@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    In order to establish a Radiation Protection Plan or a Radiation Emergency Plan, Brazilian facilities should take into account all procedures based on national and international guidelines and recommendations. This information can be found in several documents published by different organizations over the past decades: the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN). Therefore, this project aims the informatization of the radiological protection programs in a single system in order to offer unified programs and inter-related information in Portuguese, providing Brazilian facilities a complete repository for research, consultation and information, combining computer technology and radiological protection in order to enhance the best benefits from information technology. This research work includes programs about: (1) Monitoring of Workplace (Monitoring for External Radiation, Monitoring for Surface Contamination, Monitoring for Air Contamination) and (2) Individual Monitoring (Monitoring of External Exposure and Monitoring of Internal Exposure, Monitoring for Skin and Clothing). WEB platform tools and functionalities were developed according to target public needs, regarding new possibilities of media, mobile access, and information sharing. The servers processing power added to the technology of relational databases allow to integrate information from different sources, enabling complex queries with reduced response time. Moreover, taking into account this is a pioneer project with the prospect of long-term use, the challenge involves the combination of multiple computer technologies that allows a robust, effective and flexible system, which can be easily adapted to future technological innovations. (author)

  14. Web-based system for radiological protection programs: a repository for research, consultation and information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, Denise S.; Sordi, Gian Maria A.A.

    2014-01-01

    In order to establish a Radiation Protection Plan or a Radiation Emergency Plan, Brazilian facilities should take into account all procedures based on national and international guidelines and recommendations. This information can be found in several documents published by different organizations over the past decades: the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN). Therefore, this project aims the informatization of the radiological protection programs in a single system in order to offer unified programs and inter-related information in Portuguese, providing Brazilian facilities a complete repository for research, consultation and information, combining computer technology and radiological protection in order to enhance the best benefits from information technology. This research work includes programs about: (1) Monitoring of Workplace (Monitoring for External Radiation, Monitoring for Surface Contamination, Monitoring for Air Contamination) and (2) Individual Monitoring (Monitoring of External Exposure and Monitoring of Internal Exposure, Monitoring for Skin and Clothing). WEB platform tools and functionalities were developed according to target public needs, regarding new possibilities of media, mobile access, and information sharing. The servers processing power added to the technology of relational databases allow to integrate information from different sources, enabling complex queries with reduced response time. Moreover, taking into account this is a pioneer project with the prospect of long-term use, the challenge involves the combination of multiple computer technologies that allows a robust, effective and flexible system, which can be easily adapted to future technological innovations. (author)

  15. Dosimetric studies of the eye lens using a new dosemeter – Surveys in interventional radiology departments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirchio, R.; Sánchez, H.; Domazet, W.

    2014-01-01

    During interventional radiology (IR) and cardiology (IC) procedures, medical staff can receive high doses to their eye lenses. The Retrospective Evaluation of Lens Injuries and Dose study organized in Argentina in 2010 found incipient opacity in 50% of IC physicians and 41% of IC technicians/nurses. These results, added to the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection, which lowered their former occupational equivalent dose limit for the lens, led us to assess the eye lens dose, Hp(3), during interventional procedures. To this end, a new dosemeter was designed and calibrated at the National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina to evaluate Hp(3). Personal dose equivalent (Hp(10)), and Hp(3) were assessed for 3 months in two IC and IR departments. An Alderson phantom was used to simulate monthly exposures of five occupational staff members. Hp(3) and Hp(10) were obtained monthly for 14 occupational staff members exposed to 121 IR and IC procedures. We concluded that the annual effective dose and Hp(3) were lower than 0.3 and 10 mSv, respectively and the average cumulative Hp(3) for working life was lower than 400 and 200 mSv for physicians and technicians/scrub nurse, respectively. An occupational annual dose constraint of 0.3 mSv was calculated. - Highlights: • An eye lens dosimeters was designed at the Personal Dosimetry Laboratory of CNEA. • A successful dosimetric survey in two interventional departments was done. • The annual effective dose and the annual eye lens dose are lower than the ICRP dose thresholds. • In order to reduce doses actions should be promoted to maximize radiation protection

  16. Aerial radiological survey of the Fermi National accelerator Laboratory and surrounding area, Batavia, Illinois. Data of survey: 12-14 May 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jobst, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over the facilities of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) near Batavia, Illinois on 12-14 May 1977. The survey was flown at an altitude of 91 m by a helicopter containing 20 sodium iodide detectors. The line spacing was also 91 m. Enhanced gamma exposure rate levels, which could be attributed to Fermilab operations, were observed at seven locations. One additional anomaly, not related to the Laboratory, was also discovered

  17. Radiological survey of the area surrounding the National Reactor Testing Station, Idaho Falls, Idaho. Date of survey: 1 and 2 February 1972

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    The Aerial Radiological Measuring System (ARMS) was used to survey the National Reactor Testing Station (NRTS) during February 1972. The purpose of the survey was primarily to identify the presence of Ru-106 and Rh-106 in a release from the Chemical Processing Plant at NRTS. Additionally, the gamma-ray terrestrial exposure rate levels were mapped and the distribution of any man-made isotopes was located and defined

  18. Evaluation of Radiology Teachers' Performance and Identification of the "Best Teachers" in a Residency Program: Mixed Methodology and Pilot Study of the MEDUC-RX32 Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huete, Álvaro; Julio, Rodrigo; Rojas, Viviana; Herrera, Cristián; Padilla, Oslando; Solís, Nancy; Pizarro, Margarita; Etcheberry, Lorena; Sarfatis, Alberto; Pérez, Gonzalo; Díaz, Luis A; Delfino, Alejandro; Muñoz, Estrella; Rivera, Horacio; Parra, Dimitri A; Bitran, Marcela; Riquelme, Arnoldo

    2016-07-01

    Radiology teachers are well trained in their specialty; however, when working in academic institutions, faculty development and promotion through the education pathway tends to be based on their teaching knowledge and skills. The aim of this study is to assess psychometric properties of the Medicina Universidad Católica-Radiology 32 items (MEDUC-RX32), an instrument designed to evaluate the performance of postgraduate radiology teachers and to identify the best teachers. Mixed methodology was used, including qualitative and quantitative phases. The psychometric properties of the MEDUC-RX32 survey were performed by factor analysis (validity), Cronbach alpha coefficient, and G coefficient (reliability). The residents assessed their teachers and simultaneously voted for the "best teacher," which was used as a gold standard for the receiver operating characteristic curves construction comparing their votes with the global score. A total of 28 residents answered 164 surveys. The global score was 6.23 ± 0.8 (scale from 1 to 7). The factor analysis showed six domains of the resident's perception: (1) tutorial teaching, feedback, and independent learning; (2) communication and teamwork; (3) learning objectives; (4) respectful behavior; (5) radiological report; and (6) teaching and care support. The tutor's strengths were related with respectful behavior and teamwork. The instrument is highly reliable with a Cronbach alpha of 0.937 and a G coefficient of 0.831 (with a minimum of 8 residents). The MEDUC-RX32 instrument has a sensitivity of 91.7% and specificity of 83.3% to identify tutors as best teachers with at least one vote with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.931 with a cutoff o