WorldWideScience

Sample records for program leap preschool

  1. Assessing sustainability of Lifestyle Education for Activity Program (LEAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, R P; Pate, R R; Dowda, M; Ward, D S; Epping, J N; Dishman, R K

    2012-04-01

    Sustained intervention effects are needed for positive health impacts in populations; however, few published examples illustrate methods for assessing sustainability in health promotion programs. This paper describes the methods for assessing sustainability of the Lifestyle Education for Activity Program (LEAP). LEAP was a comprehensive school-based intervention that targeted change in instructional practices and the school environment to promote physical activity (PA) in high school girls. Previous reports indicated that significantly more girls in the intervention compared with control schools reported engaging in vigorous PA, and positive long-term effects on vigorous PA also were observed for girls in schools that most fully implemented and maintained the intervention 3 years following the active intervention. In this paper, the seven steps used to assess sustainability in LEAP are presented; these steps provide a model for assessing sustainability in health promotion programs in other settings. Unique features of the LEAP sustainability model include assessing sustainability of changes in instructional practices and the environment, basing assessment on an essential element framework that defined complete and acceptable delivery at the beginning of the project, using multiple data sources to assess sustainability, and assessing implementation longitudinally.

  2. Encouraging School Enrollment and Attendance among Teenage Parents on Welfare: Early Impacts of Ohio's LEAP Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Robert G.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Presents interim findings from an impact analysis of Ohio's Learning, Earning, and Parenting (LEAP) Program. LEAP is a statewide program designed to encourage school attendance among pregnant and parenting teens on welfare. Suggests that LEAP has succeeded in its primary short-term goal of increasing the school enrollment and attendance of teen…

  3. Specifications of the equations for LEAP Model 22C. [Long-Term Energy Analysis Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, M.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Barish, J.

    1981-03-01

    This report describes the equations implemented in the Long-Term Energy Analysis Program (LEAP) Model 22C. The equilibrium equations of each of the processes contained in the LEAP Model 22C are specified, and the interrelations of the various equations are discussed. No attempt is made to derive the equations or to discuss their validity from an economic point of view.

  4. Four-Year Follow-Up of Children in the LEAP Randomized Trial: Some Planned and Accidental Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strain, Phillip S.

    2017-01-01

    This article reports on a 4-year follow-up study from the Learning Experiences and Alternative Program for Preschoolers and Their Parents (LEAP) randomized trial of early intervention for young children with autism. Overall, participants from LEAP classes were marginally superior to comparison class children on elementary school outcomes specific…

  5. Project LEAP: The Labor Education Achievement Program. A Program To Improve the Literacy Level and Productivity of the Workforce. Final Project Report. April 1, 1991-September 30, 1992.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metropolitan Baltimore Council of AFL-CIO Unions, MD.

    Maryland's Labor Education Achievement Program (LEAP) worked with a wide diversity of union workers in multiple industries and within numerous private companies and public agencies over a dispersed geographic area. Staff development included a workshop for local coordinators and a teacher inservice training session. LEAP provided…

  6. The leap year problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. van Deursen (Arie)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractA significant number of programs incorrectly treats the year 2000 as a non-leap year. We list 21 real life code fragments illustrating the large variety of ways that are used to determine whether a given year is a leap year or not. Some of these fragments are correct; others will fail in

  7. LEAP: A randomized-controlled trial of a lay-educator inpatient asthma education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Jessica L; Matlack, Kristen M; Simmons, Marsha D; Steinfeld, Jonathan; Laws, Margaret A; Dovey, Mark E; Cohen, Robyn T

    2015-06-29

    To evaluate the impact of LEAP, a volunteer-based, inpatient asthma education program for families of inner-city children with asthma. 711 children ages 2-17 years admitted with status asthmaticus were randomized to receive usual care or usual care plus a supplemental education intervention. Both groups completed a baseline interview. Trained volunteer lay educators conducted individualized bedside education with the intervention group. Primary outcome was attendance at a post-hospitalization follow-up visit 7-10 days after discharge. Secondary outcomes included parent-reported asthma management behaviors, symptoms, and self-efficacy scores from a one month follow-up interview. Post-hospitalization asthma clinic attendance was poor (38%), with no difference between groups. Families randomized to the intervention group were more likely to report use of a controller (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.3-4.2, peducation by trained lay volunteers was associated with improved asthma management behaviors. This novel volunteer-based program could have widespread implications as a sustainable model for asthma education. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. 34 CFR 303.148 - Transition to preschool programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Transition to preschool programs. 303.148 Section 303....148 Transition to preschool programs. Each application must include a description of the policies and... this part to preschool or other appropriate services, including— (a) A description of how the families...

  9. A Great LEAP Forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, John A.

    1998-01-01

    In 1996, a Winston-Salem principal closed a failing alternative school and developed a new program dedicated to helping at-risk kids succeed. The result was LEAP (Learning and Acceleration Program) Academy, a school that helps academically unstable middle-school students catch up to their peers by completing two years of academic course work in…

  10. 34 CFR 300.124 - Transition of children from the Part C program to preschool programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... preschool programs. 300.124 Section 300.124 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... Requirements § 300.124 Transition of children from the Part C program to preschool programs. The State must... programs assisted under Part C of the Act, and who will participate in preschool programs assisted under...

  11. Effectiveness of a Danish early year preschool program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bente; Holm, Anders; Bremberg, Sven

    2013-01-01

    A significant number of studies indicate that early year preschool programs lead to positive long-term effects. Systematic quality improvement of early year preschool may enhance these outcomes. The ASP Program was built on this principle. In this program preschool staff are supported...... in their efforts to critically reflect on current practices and to change these. A randomized controlled study was carried out in Denmark from September 2006 to May 2008. The study encompassed 2323 children in 59 preschools in two municipalities. Children were assessed using the Strength and Difficulties...

  12. The Lifestyle Engagement Activity Program (LEAP): Implementing Social and Recreational Activity into Case-Managed Home Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Lee-Fay; Baker, Jessica Rose; Harrison, Fleur; Jeon, Yun-Hee; Haertsch, Maggie; Camp, Cameron; Skropeta, Margaret

    2015-12-01

    The Lifestyle Engagement Activity Program (LEAP) incorporates social support and recreational activities into case-managed home care. This study's aim was to evaluate the effect of LEAP on engagement, mood, and behavior of home care clients, and on case managers and care workers. Quasi-experimental. Five Australian aged home care providers, including 2 specializing in care for ethnic minorities. Clients (n = 189) from 5 home care providers participated. The 12-month program had 3 components: (1) engaging support of management and staff; (2) a champion to drive practice change; (3) staff training. Case managers were trained to set meaningful social and/or recreational goals during care planning. Care workers were trained in good communication, to promote client independence and choice, and in techniques such as Montessori activities, reminiscence, music, physical activity, and humor. Data were collected 6 months before program commencement, at baseline, and 6 and 12 months. The Homecare Measure of Engagement Staff report and Client-Family interview were primary outcomes. Secondary outcomes were the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory; apathy, dysphoria, and agitation subscales of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory-Clinician Rating; the geriatric depression scale; UCLA loneliness scale; and home care satisfaction scale. Staff provided information on confidence in engaging clients and the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale. Twelve months after program commencement, clients showed a significant increase in self- or family-reported client engagement (b = 5.39, t[113.09] = 3.93, P engage clients (b = 0.52, t(21.33) = 2.80, P = .011, b = 0.29, t(198.69) = 2.58, P = .011, respectively). There were no significant changes in care worker-rated client engagement or client or family self-complete measures of depression or loneliness (P > .05). Client and family self-rated apathy increased over 12 months (b = 0.04, t(43.36) = 3.06, P = .004; b = 3.63, t(34.70) = 2.20, P = .035

  13. Mathematical foundations of LEAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oblow, E.M.

    1981-04-01

    As part of the ORNL energy model validation program an analysis was made of the mathematical structure of the LEAP energy modeling code. Emphasis was placed on understanding the equations which the code attempts to solve and the iterative numerical algorithm used to achieve a converged solution. The equations were found to be highly nonlinear, similar in form to those found in equilibrium boundary value problems. A combination of a standard nonlinear Gauss-Seidel approach and a modification of Newton's method was used as the basis of an iterative algorithm to find local solutions to the equilibrium equations. Several weaknesses in this approach are discussed, mainly those dealing with the computaton of relaxation coefficients in the Newton's method segment of the algorithm. The chief failing of the method as employed in LEAP is the use of a diagonal Jacobian matrix for Newton's method with an ad hoc scheme for calculating the diagonal matrix elements. Most problems encountered had large off-diagonal elements leading to a characteristic oscillatory break-down in convergence. It was concluded that the LEAP algorithm cannot be used to achieve convergence in an automated fashion for any general problem. In practice hand intervention is needed in most cases. Recommendations are made to approximate certain key elements of the Jacobian matrix to improve the general usefulness of the algorithm. Analytic expressions for the approximate elements are derived so as to facilitate implementation in LEAP. Other aspects of the numerical procedures are discussed, and recommendations for their improvement are also made.

  14. Programming with the KIBO Robotics Kit in Preschool Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkin, Mollie; Sullivan, Amanda; Bers, Marina Umaschi

    2016-01-01

    KIBO is a developmentally appropriate robotics kit for young children that is programmed using interlocking wooden blocks; no screens or keyboards are required. This study describes a pilot KIBO robotics curriculum at an urban public preschool in Rhode Island and presents data collected on children's knowledge of foundational programming concepts…

  15. A Sex Education Program in a Therapeutic Pre-School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Lucile M.; And Others

    Described is a sex education program for preschool children with emotional and learning problems in a therapeutic center. It is explained that the "Baby Week" method combines experimental and didactic learninq sequences geared to the developmental needs of this age group. The setting, planning, and organization of the program are discussed, and…

  16. Oral microflora in preschool children attending a fluoride varnish program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, Maria; Grindefjord, Margaret; Dahllöf, Göran

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To compare the oral microflora in preschool children attending a fluoride varnish program with a reference group receiving a standard oral health program without fluoride varnish applications. A second aim was to relate the microbial composition to the caries prevalence. METHODS: Five...... hundred seven 3-year-old children were enrolled from a cohort of 3403 preschool children taking part in a community based oral health project. Two hundred sixty-three of them had attended caries-preventive program with semi-annual applications of a fluoride varnish since the age of 1 year (test group......-annual fluoride varnish applications did not seem to significantly influence the oral microflora in preschool children. TRIAL REGISTRATION: www.controlled-trials.com (ISRCTN35086887) 20131216 'retrospectively registered'....

  17. The Operational Feasibility of the Leadership Evaluation and Analysis Program (LEAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-03-01

    organizational/management development COD) type programs presently being used in the Navy, Army, and Air Force (Forbes, 1976; Shaum , 1976; Hackman...Oldham, G. R. Development of the job diagnostic survey. Journal of Applied Psychology, 1975, 60(2), 159-170. Shaum , F. W. Organizational

  18. Social Skill Training in an Integrated Preschool Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglielmo, Hindi M.; Tryon, Georgiana Shick

    2001-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a commercially available social skills training program plus classroom reinforcement for use with preschoolers with developmental delays. Two groups of 19 participants each received either the combined treatment package or classroom reinforcement of target behaviors only. An additional 20 participants…

  19. Preschool Teachers' Use of Music in the Classroom: A Survey of Park District Preschool Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Rekha S.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how preschool teachers use music and identify the types of music activities available to children in their classrooms. Preschool teachers (N = 178) at park district programs throughout a large state in the American Midwest responded to an online questionnaire. Although teachers acknowledged using music…

  20. EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM FOR SUPPORTING MOTOR AND SOCIAL COMPETENCE OF PRESCHOOLERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzu ÖZYÜREK

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Satisfying the need of physical activity of children and promoting their social skills beginning from early childhood have importance by reason of providing a basis for following years. In this study, establishing process of the training program within the scope of “ Examination the Effects of Physical Education and Sports Activities to the Basic Psychomotor skills and Social Skills for Preschool Children ” named project supported by Karabuk University Coordinatorship of Scientific Research Projects has been mentioned. The training program has been intended to promote the motor and social competence of the children aged 48 months and older. In the study it has been given wide publicity to the stages of literature review, educational attainments and indicators fit for purpose, and taking an expert’s opinion. Commentary on practicing the training program integrated with preschool education program and their importances have been discussed.

  1. The inclusion of disadvantaged children in preschool programs: The children’s rights and social responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jager Jerneja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Participation of at least 95% of children between the ages of 4 and the mandatory school age in high-quality preschool programs represents an important contribution to the achievement of the Europe 2020 strategy. Slovenia is not far from achieving this objective; however, if we consider participation in preschool programs from the perspective of the entire population of preschool children and the realisation of children’s rights, we note that nearly a quarter of children - among them (at least in the wider European area the most disadvantaged - have not realised the right to education. We studied the awareness of the importance of ensuring access to preschool programs for all children on a representative sample of 106 Slovenian preschool principals by means of quantitative pedagogical research. The results show a high percentage of disadvantaged children in the preschool areas and in the preschools themselves; on the other hand, only a low percentage (only one-third of preschools collect data about disadvantaged children and implement preschool programs for them; only one-fifth of preschools implement preschool programs for disadvantaged children. In order to act responsibly and enable all children the right to education, we must start devoting greater attention to identifying and including disadvantaged children in preschool programs.

  2. The Effectiveness of an Additional Stretching Exercise Program in Improving Flexibility Level among Preschool Boys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wee Akina Sia Seng; Rengasamy, Shabeshan A/L; Raju, Subramaniam A/L

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the effectiveness of a two minutes' additional stretching exercise program in a 30 minutes games teaching lesson in improving the flexibility level of 6 year old preschool boys (M = 5.92, SD = 0.27) in a preschool in Malaysia. Fifty (50) preschool boys were selected for the study based on the intact sampling…

  3. Updating the Economic Impacts of the High/Scope Perry Preschool Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nores, Milagros; Belfield, Clive R.; Barnett, W. Steven; Schweinhart, Lawrence

    2005-01-01

    This article derives an updated cost-benefit ratio for the High/Scope Perry Preschool Program, an intensive preschool intervention delivered during the 1960s to at-risk children in Ypsilanti, Michigan. Because children were randomly assigned to the program or a control group, differences in outcomes are probably attributable to program status.…

  4. The Effects of Using Interactive Teaching Programs on Preschool Children's Literacy Development: Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahwaji, Nahla M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents findings of a case study that investigates the effects of using interactive teaching programs on literacy development for preschool children. The significant of this study comes from the lack of studies associated with using interactive teaching programs for preschool children in Saudi Arabia. Data are presented from analyzing…

  5. Pilot-Testing CATCH Early Childhood: A Preschool-Based Healthy Nutrition and Physical Activity Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shreela; Chuang, Ru-Jye; Hedberg, Ann Marie

    2011-01-01

    Background: The literature on theoretically-based programs targeting healthy nutrition and physical activity in preschools is scarce. Purpose: To pilot test CATCH Early Childhood (CEC), a preschool-based nutrition and physical activity program among children ages three to five in Head Start. Methods: The study was conducted in two Head Start…

  6. Perceptions of Parents of Young Children with and without Disabilities Attending Inclusive Preschool Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbert, Dana

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the characteristics of parents of children with and without disabilities whose young children attend an inclusive, early childhood education program that influence their perceptions of inclusion and inclusive preschool programs. Participants included parents of preschool children without disabilities (n=64) and parents…

  7. Leap Motion development essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Spiegelmock, Mischa

    2013-01-01

    This book is a fast-paced guide with practical examples that aims to help you understand and master the Leap Motion SDK.This book is for developers who are either involved in game development or who are looking to utilize Leap Motion technology in order to create brand new user interaction experiences to distinguish their products from the mass market. You should be comfortable with high-level languages and object-oriented development concepts in order to get the most out of this book.

  8. The Effect of a Music Program on Phonological Awareness in Preschoolers

    OpenAIRE

    Degé, Franziska; Schwarzer, Gudrun

    2011-01-01

    The present experiment investigated the effect of a music training program on phonological awareness in preschoolers. In particular, the effects of a music training program and a phonological skills training program on phonological awareness were compared. If language and music share basic processing mechanisms, the effect of both programs on enhancing phonological awareness should be similar. Forty-one preschoolers (22 boys) were randomly assigned to a phonological skills training program, a...

  9. The effect of music training program on phonological awareness in preschoolers

    OpenAIRE

    Franziska eDegé; Gudrun eSchwarzer

    2011-01-01

    The present experiment investigated the effect of a music training program on phonological awareness in preschoolers. In particular, the effects of a music training program and a phonological skills training program on phonological awareness were compared. If language and music share basic processing mechanisms, the effect of both programs on enhancing phonological awareness should be similar. Forty-one preschoolers (22 boys) were randomly assigned to a phonological skills training program, a...

  10. Economic foundations of LEAP Model 22C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, J.A.; Becker, M.; Trimble, J.L.

    1981-04-01

    The model for long-term energy projections, the DOE/EIA's Long Term Energy Analysis Program (LEAP), is discussed. This report identifies and presents an initial assessment of the major underlying economic assumptions of LEAP Model 22C, the version of LEAP used to prepare the 1978 Annual Report to Congress. The major economic assumptions of Model 22C discussed are: competitive markets; constant input proportions in production processes; constant returns to scale in production processes; unlimited supplies of capital and variable inputs at fixed prices; continuous (infinitely divisible) units of input; investment based on perfect foresight; technical change limited to exogenous forecasts; minimal regional differences (except for coal production); unlimited supplies of foreign oil at exogenously specified prices; very little government regulation; and, final demand quantities which are essentially exogenousy specified. The solution algorithm and the method of analysis are presented.

  11. Preschool Early Literacy Programs in Ontario Public Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelley Stagg Peterson

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on research examining how library staff in 10 Ontario libraries’ preschool literacy programs support three- and four-year-old children’s early literacy and school readiness as well as their parents’ and caregivers’ literacy interactions with their children. Multiple data sources included surveys of 82 parents/caregivers, observations of a sample of 65 of the 198 children at the sessions we visited, and interviews with10 library staff. Observations were analyzed for evidence of children’s development of print motivation, phonological awareness, vocabulary, narrative skills, and print awareness: early literacy skills and knowledge that have been shown to be reliably and significantly correlated with future reading success. Analysis of the observational and interview data showed that the programs have been very successful in fostering children’s readiness to participate in school activities and their motivation to read. Participating children learned new vocabulary, demonstrated an awareness of rhymes and sounds of language, and showed an understanding of books that were read by library staff: all early literacy behaviours that are foundational to later literacy development. The programs have also provided parents/caregivers with new ways to interact with children to engage them with books and with print at home. The development of children’s school readiness skills and parents’ awareness of how to support their children’s literacy are outcomes extending beyond library staff goals for their library programs and should be included in literature advertising the programs. Print awareness is an area of literacy development that library staff could encourage to a greater extent, however. Very few instances of such behaviour were observed, with most of the observations taking place in two of the preschool early literacy programs. Concomitantly, developing children’s print awareness is a recommended topic for

  12. Bringing Preschoolers and the Institutionalized Elderly Together: How One Program Works.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbert, Lois

    In developing an intergenerational program bringing together preschool children and elderly adults in a retirement home/geriatric center complex, preschool staff had to discard three misconceptions. It was initially supposed that the elderly would like to visit the nursery school. It was assumed that people in the retirement home have nothing to…

  13. Community-based physical activity as adjunctive smoking cessation treatment: Rationale, design, and baseline data for the Lifestyle Enhancement Program (LEAP) randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Weg, Mark W; Coday, Mace; Stockton, Michelle B; McClanahan, Barbara; Relyea, George; Read, Mary C; Wilson, Nancy; Connelly, Stephanie; Richey, Phyllis; Johnson, Karen C; Ward, Kenneth D

    2018-03-01

    Despite advances in behavioral and pharmacological treatment for tobacco use and dependence, quit rates remain suboptimal. Increasing physical activity has shown some promise as a strategy for improving cessation outcomes. However, initial efficacy studies focused on intensive, highly structured exercise programs that may not be applicable to the general population of smokers. We describe the rationale and study design and report baseline participant characteristics from the Lifestyle Enhancement Program (LEAP), a two-group, randomized controlled trial. Adult smokers who engaged in low levels of leisure time physical activity were randomly assigned to treatment conditions consisting of an individualized physical activity intervention delivered by health fitness instructors in community-based exercise facilities or an equal contact wellness control. All participants received standard cognitive behavioral smoking cessation counseling combined with nicotine replacement therapy. The primary outcomes are seven-day point prevalence abstinence at seven weeks, six- and 12 months. Secondary outcomes include self-reported physical activity, dietary intake, body mass index, waist circumference, percent body fat, and nicotine withdrawal symptoms. Participants consist of 392 sedentary smokers (mean [standard deviation] age = 44.6 [10.2] = years; 62% female; 31% African American). Results reported here provide information regarding experiences recruiting smokers willing to change multiple health behaviors including smoking and physical activity.

  14. LEAP: A Computer Course for Gifted Students. Manila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scruggs, Patricia; Johnson, Paul

    1985-01-01

    Learning Enrichment Activities Program (LEAP) is designed to offer intellectually challenging computer activities for gifted and talented children (grades 7-12) in Manila. Computer enrichment activities were designed according to an adaptation of the Enrichment Triad model. (CL)

  15. Evaluation of a preschool nutrition education program based on the theory of multiple intelligences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, K L

    2001-01-01

    This report describes the evaluation of a preschool nutrition education program based on the theory of multiple intelligences. Forty-six nutrition educators provided a series of 12 lessons to 6102 preschool-age children. The program was evaluated using a pretest/post-test design to assess differences in fruit and vegetable identification, healthy snack choices, willingness to taste foods, and eating behaviors. Subjects showed significant improvement in food identification and recognition, healthy snack identification, willingness to taste foods, and frequency of fruit, vegetable, meat, and dairy consumption. The evaluation indicates that the program was an effective approach for educating preschool children about nutrition.

  16. Assessing an Intergenerational Horticulture Therapy Program for Elderly Adults and Preschool Children

    OpenAIRE

    Predny, Mary Lorraine

    1999-01-01

    ASSESSING AN INTERGENERATIONAL HORTICULTURE THERAPY PROGRAM FOR ELDERLY ADULTS AND PRESCHOOL CHILDREN by Mary Lorraine Predny Dr. Diane Relf, Chair Horticulture Department ABSTRACT The goal of this research project was to determine if introducing intergenerational interactions would supplement or detract from the use of horticulture as a therapeutic tool when working with elderly adults and preschool children. The program was set up to compare ind...

  17. Great Leap into Famine

    OpenAIRE

    Ó Gráda, Cormac

    2011-01-01

    Frank Dikötter’s Mao's Great Famine: The History of China's Most Devastating Catastrophe, 1958-62 is the longest and most detailed study of the Great Leap Forward (GLF) famine to appear in English to date. Much of the story will be already familiar to western readers from works by Roderick McFarquhar (1983), Jasper Becker (1996), Ralph Thaxton (2008), and others, but Dikötter adds a lot that is new and valuable. For the past decade or so Chinese scholars have been publishing works based on pu...

  18. LEAP 1992: Conference summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dover, C.B.

    1992-12-01

    We present a summary of the many new results in antiproton ({bar p}) physics presented at the LEAP `92 conference, in the areas of meson spectroscopy, {bar N}N scattering, annihilation and spin observables, strangeness and charm production, {bar N} annihilation in nuclei, atomic physics with very low energy {bar p}`s, the exploration of fundamental symmetries and interactions with {bar p} (CP, T, CPT, gravitation), and the prospects for new {bar p} facilities at ultralow energies or energies above the LEAR regime ({ge} 2 GeV/c).

  19. LEAP 1992: Conference summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dover, C.B.

    1992-12-01

    We present a summary of the many new results in antiproton ([bar p]) physics presented at the LEAP '92 conference, in the areas of meson spectroscopy, [bar N]N scattering, annihilation and spin observables, strangeness and charm production, [bar N] annihilation in nuclei, atomic physics with very low energy [bar p]'s, the exploration of fundamental symmetries and interactions with [bar p] (CP, T, CPT, gravitation), and the prospects for new [bar p] facilities at ultralow energies or energies above the LEAR regime ([ge] 2 GeV/c).

  20. Preschool Gifted Education: Perceived Challenges Associated with Program Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettler, Todd; Oveross, Mattie E.; Salman, Rania C.

    2017-01-01

    This descriptive study investigated the challenges related to implementing gifted education services in preschool centers. Participants were 254 licensed preschool center directors in a southern state. Participants completed a researcher-created survey including both selected response items and constructed response items to examine the perceived…

  1. Autonomic and cardiovascular responses of preschool children to television programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröer, M; Howell, M

    1990-01-01

    This exploratory study examined the heart rates (HR) and skin temperatures (ST) of 18 preschool children while they viewed two clips of everyday children's television (TV) programming. The measurements were made in a day care setting, in a naturalistic environment designed to mimic the real world of children's TV viewing. The purpose of the study was to determine whether cardiovascular and autonomic arousal to TV programming might occur in some children. Since a large body of psychosocial literature addresses the affects of TV violence on children, HR and ST were examined during exposure to scenes from Mr. Roger's Neighborhood and G.I. Joe cartoons. The Mr. Roger's clip was slow, rhythmic, prosocial, and nonviolent, while the G.I. Joe clip was fast-paced, staccato, colorful, and full of verbal and action violence. The study found a significant effect of exposure to the cartoon violence on HR, with HR increasing. ST decreased, but not significantly, and there was a significant effect of time on the ST, due possibly to habituation. This finding has relevance to nursing assessment, intervention, and education of parents and children, since TV viewing is a pervasive cultural phenomenon. The possibility of excessive or inappropriate autonomic and cardiovascular responsiveness in some children to TV must be considered.

  2. Proactive identification of scalable program architectures: How to achieve a quantum-leap in time-to-market

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Lindschou; Mortensen, Niels Henrik

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the Architecture Framework for Product Family Master Plan. This framework supports the identification of a program architecture (the way cost competitive variance is provided for a full range of products) for a product program for product-based companies during the early stages...... of a product development project. The framework consists of three basic aspects: the market, product program, production and a time aspect-captured in the multi-level roadmap. One of the unique features is that these aspects are linked, allowing for an early clarification of critical issues through...

  3. Effects of an Educational Television Program on Preschoolers: Variability in Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baydar, Nazli; Kagitcibasi, Cigdem; Kuntay, Aylin C.; Goksen, Fatos

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the cognitive effects of an educational early childhood television program in Turkey that was designed to enhance basic cognitive skills and socio-emotional development of 5-year-old children. The program targeted children with low socioeconomic status who had limited access to formal preschool education. The program was…

  4. Operating experience with LEAP from the perspective of the computing applications analyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, W.E. III; Horwedel, J.E.; McAdoo, J.W.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Toney, B.C.

    1981-05-01

    The Long-Term Energy Analysis Program (LEAP), which was used for the energy price-quantity projections in the 1978 Annual Report to Congress (ARC '78) and used in an ORNL research program to develop and demonstrate a procedure for evaluating energy-economic modeling computer codes and the important results derived therefrom, is discussed. The LEAP system used in the ORNL research, the mechanics of executing LEAP, and the personnel skills required to execute the system are described. In addition, a LEAP sample problem, subroutine hierarchical flowcharts, and input tables for the ARC '78 energy-economic model are included. Results of a study to test the capability of the LEAP system used in the ORNL research to reproduce the ARC '78 results credited to LEAP are presented.

  5. Investigation of MONE Preschool Program for 36-72 Months Old Children (2006) According to Children Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batur Musaoglu, Ebru; Haktanir, Gelengul

    2012-01-01

    In Turkey, the preschoolers are being schooled under the guidelines of MONE (Ministry of National Education) Preschool Program for 36-72 Months Old Children (2006). The aim of this research is to investigate how children's rights are involved in this program. In this qualitative research based on document analysis, program book and Teacher Guide…

  6. Analysis of investigations and practice-related backgrounds of preschool educational program Head Start (USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.L. Kuzmishina

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to investigation of practice-related experience of preschool education abroad. It regards various aspects of preschool education and professional activities of educators in preschool educational settlements. The author analyzes the criteria of efficiency of preschool education as depending on duration of child education, preschoolers’ family backgrounds, peculiarities of family upbringing, professional quality of educators, professional and personal motivation of educators. The article touches upon the question of utilization of preschool educational programs for the purpose of diagnostics and intervention in case of child behavioral disorders. The article touches upon interrelations between child academic achievements, child self- regulation capacities and influence of parental close control on child self-dependence. Much attention is paid to the problem of social competence in present-day preschooler sand its development in preschool educational settlements. The conclusion, made in the article, states the importance of educator’s professional qualification and its influence on his/her professional efficiency and satisfaction.

  7. The effect of music training program on phonological awareness in preschoolers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska eDegé

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The present experiment investigated the effect of a music training program on phonological awareness in preschoolers. In particular, the effects of a music training program and a phonological skills training program on phonological awareness were compared. If language and music share basic processing mechanisms, the effect of both programs on enhancing phonological awareness should be similar. Forty-one preschoolers (22 boys were randomly assigned to a phonological skills training program, a music training program, and a control group that received sports training (from which no effect was expected. Preschoolers were trained for 10 minutes on a daily basis over a period of 20 weeks. In a pretest, no differences were found between the three groups in regard to age, gender, intelligence, socioeconomic status, and phonological awareness. Children in the phonological skills group and the music group showed significant increases in phonological awareness from pre- to post-test. The children in the sports training group did not show a significant increase from pre- to post-test. The enhancement of phonological awareness was basically driven by positive effects of the music program and the phonological skills program on phonological awareness for large phonological units. The data suggests that phonological awareness can be trained with a phonological skills training program as well as a music training program. These results can be interpreted as evidence of a shared sound category learning mechanism for language and music at preschool age.

  8. The effect of a music program on phonological awareness in preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degé, Franziska; Schwarzer, Gudrun

    2011-01-01

    The present experiment investigated the effect of a music program on phonological awareness in preschoolers. In particular, the effects of a music program and a phonological skills program on phonological awareness were compared. If language and music share basic processing mechanisms, the effect of both programs on enhancing phonological awareness should be similar. Forty-one preschoolers (22 boys) were randomly assigned to a phonological skills program, a music program, and a control group that received sports training (from which no effect was expected). Preschoolers were trained for 10 min on a daily basis over a period of 20 weeks. In a pretest, no differences were found between the three groups in regard to age, gender, intelligence, socioeconomic status, and phonological awareness. Children in the phonological skills group and the music group showed significant increases in phonological awareness from pre- to post-test. The children in the sports group did not show a significant increase from pre- to post-test. The enhancement of phonological awareness was basically driven by positive effects of the music program and the phonological skills program on phonological awareness for large phonological units. The data suggests that phonological awareness can be trained with a phonological skills program as well as a music program. These results can be interpreted as evidence of a shared sound category learning mechanism for language and music at preschool age.

  9. From "Hesitant" to "Environmental Leader": The Influence of a Professional Development Program on the Environmental Citizenship of Preschool Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spektor-Levy, Ornit; Abramovich, Anat

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the influence that the "Environmental Leadership Professional Development" program had on preschool teachers. The program's aim is to enhance environmental awareness, thus developing environmental citizenship and leadership. The program offered experiential and reflective learning, meetings with environmental…

  10. THE ROLE OF THE PREPARATORY PRESCHOOL PROGRAM FOR THE SCHOOL START OF THE CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Veličković

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to determine the contribution of the Preparatory Preschool Program (PPP coordination between Preschool and primary education process and analysis of all factors affecting the preliminary introduction of children for school through the implementation of the Preparatory Preschool Program.The survey was conducted in 6 Preschool institutions and 12 primary schools in the following towns: Bujanovac, Vranje, Vladičin Han, Leskovac and Niš; the sample consisting of 173 Preschool child care workers, 180 teachers and 32 professional associates with total number of 385 respondents.It is expected that the research results will initiate all people involved in children’s education from Preschool to primary elementary school education to act and work together in order to achieve a strategic and important aim - to prepare children for school effectively, i.e. to realize successfully the basic and very important prerequisite for easy adaptation of the children in the school environment.

  11. Validation of an age-modified caries risk assessment program (Cariogram) in preschool children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holgerson, Pernilla Lif; Twetman, Svante; Stecksèn-Blicks, Christina

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: (i) To validate caries risk profiles assessed with a computer program against actual caries development in preschool children, (ii) to study the possible impact of a preventive program on the risk profiles, and (iii) to compare the individual risk profiles longitudinally. MATERIAL...... of sugar. The majority of the children who changed category displayed a lowered risk at 7 years. The intervention program seemed to impair the predictive abilities of Cariogram. CONCLUSION: A modified Cariogram applied on preschool children was not particularly useful in identifying high caries risk...

  12. Evaluation of an Urban Farm-to-Preschool and Families Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Elena T; DiFulvio, Gloria T; Susi, Toni; Nelson-Peterman, Jerusha; Lowbridge-Sisley, Joan; Collins, Jessica

    2016-04-01

    Over the past 30 years, the rate of childhood obesity has risen dramatically. Despite recent declines in prevalence among preschool-aged children, child obesity is still a significant public health concern. Healthy People 2020 objectives include increasing fruit and vegetable consumption among children over 2 years of age and increasing the number of schools that offer access to fresh fruits and vegetables. To reach these objectives, farm-to-school programs are being implemented across the United States. The purpose of this evaluation was to: (a) identify factors that facilitate adoption of the Farm-to-Preschool and Families program in Springfield, MA, specifically; and (b) provide recommendations and guidelines for successful implementation of Farm-to-Preschool and Families programs generally. Using a combination of classroom observations of preschoolers, teacher and food service interviews, and administrator surveys, the findings suggest that having a strong programmatic infrastructure, administrative support, and external support from families is important to sustain a Farm-to-Preschool and Families program. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. Evaluation of the Preschool Life Skills Program in Head Start Classrooms: A Systematic Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Gregory P.; Fahmie, Tara A.; Heal, Nicole A.

    2014-01-01

    In an attempt to address risk factors associated with extensive nonfamilial child care, we implemented the preschool life skills (PLS) program (Hanley, Heal, Tiger, & Ingvarsson, 2007) in two community-based Head Start classrooms. A multiple baseline design across classrooms, repeated across skills, showed that the program resulted in a 5-fold…

  14. Sun Protection is Fun! A Skin Cancer Prevention Program for Preschools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripp, Mary K.; Herrmann, Nancy B.; Parcel, Guy S.; Chamberlin, Robert M.; Gritz, Ellen R.

    2000-01-01

    Describes the Sun Protection is Fun! skin cancer prevention program for preschool children that features intervention methods grounded in social cognitive theory and emphasizes symbolic modeling, vicarious learning, enactive mastery experiences, and persuasion. Program components include a curriculum and teacher's guide, videos, newsletters,…

  15. A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Parent Training and Emotion Socialization Program for Families of Hyperactive Preschool-Aged Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Sharonne D.; Harvey, Elizabeth A.; Roberts, Jasmin L.; Wichowski, Kayla; Lugo-Candelas, Claudia I.

    2013-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effectiveness of a parent training and emotion socialization program designed specifically for hyperactive preschoolers. Participants were 31 preschool-aged children whose parents were randomly assigned to a parent training (PT) or waitlist (WL) control group. PT parents took part in a 14-week parenting program that…

  16. Funding Preschool Programs for Children with Special Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenberg, Dolly F.

    1984-01-01

    Describes funding and communication strategies at six, nonprofit, nonsectarian, tuition-free preschools for mentally retarded and developmentally delayed children. Details marketing strategies; the role of multiple markets; the targeting of potential funders among local citizens, foundations, and corporations; and the creation of honorary…

  17. The Effectiveness of a Parent-Training Program for Promoting Cognitive Performance in Preschool Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elahe Vahidi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of a parent training program for promoting cognitive performance of young children through enriching the parent-child interactions among mothers of preschool-aged children in Mashhad, Iran. A total of 29 couples of mothers and their children were assigned to an experimental group (n = 16 couples and a control group (n = 13 couples. Mothers in the experimental group participated in 12 weekly sessions and were trained how to enrich their daily parent-child interactions as such. Children’s cognitive performance was assessed by three subscales of the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence (WPPSI. The results of the analysis of covariance (ANCOVA indicated a significant difference between the experimental and control group. The findings support the effectiveness of the parent training program for enhancing cognitive performance in preschoolers.

  18. Intergenerational Long-Term Effects of Preschool - Structural Estimates from a Discrete Dynamic Programming Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckman, James J; Raut, Lakshmi K

    2016-03-01

    This paper formulates a structural dynamic programming model of preschool investment choices of altruistic parents and then empirically estimates the structural parameters of the model using the NLSY79 data. The paper finds that preschool investment significantly boosts cognitive and non-cognitive skills, which enhance earnings and school outcomes. It also finds that a standard Mincer earnings function, by omitting measures of non-cognitive skills on the right-hand side, overestimates the rate of return to schooling. From the estimated equilibrium Markov process, the paper studies the nature of within generation earnings distribution, intergenerational earnings mobility, and schooling mobility. The paper finds that a tax-financed free preschool program for the children of poor socioeconomic status generates positive net gains to the society in terms of average earnings, higher intergenerational earnings mobility, and schooling mobility.

  19. Effects of a play program on creative thinking of preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garaigordobil, Maite; Berrueco, Laura

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a play program in the creative thinking of preschool children. The study used a repeated measures experimental pretest-posttest design with control groups. The sample included 86 participants aged 5 to 6 years (53 experimental and 33 control participants). Before and after administering the program, two evaluation instruments were applied: The Torrance Test of Creative Thinking (Torrance, 1990) and Behaviors and Traits of Creative Personality Scale (Garaigordobil & Berrueco, 2007). The program consisted of a weekly 75-minute play session throughout the school year. ANOVA results showed that the program significantly increased the verbal creativity (fluency, flexibility, originality), graphic creativity (elaboration, fluency, originality), and behaviors and traits of creative personality. In the pretest phase, there were no differences in the creativity of boys and girls, and the program stimulated a similar level of change in both sexes. The discussion focuses on the importance of implementing creative programs with preschool children.

  20. THE DESIGN FOR UTILIZING PROGRAMED INSTRUCTION FOR PRE-SCHOOL CHILDREN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LEE, BILLY EUGENE

    IN THIS LIMITED STUDY, THE AUTHOR, ASSUMING THAT LOW ABILITY PRESCHOOL CHILDREN FROM POOR FAMILIES HAVE THE MOST DIFFICULTY WITH PROGRAMED INSTRUCTION, USED CARTOONS TO TEST THREE LARGE PROJECT HEADSTART CLASSES (N-280) ON THREE FACTS AND ON EIGHT MORAL ATTITUDE ITEMS. TWICE THE PREFERRED ANSWERS WERE TAUGHT, AND THE CHILDREN RE-TESTED, BUT…

  1. Effects of an Indicated Prevention Program for Preschoolers: A Single-Subject Design Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    ?tefan, Catrinel A.; Miclea, Mircea

    2015-01-01

    This study intended to assess the effectiveness of a multifocused indicated prevention program implemented in a community setting. The study was conducted on three (n?=?3) preschool children with low levels of social-emotional competencies and high rates of externalizing problems. Using a multiple baseline design, observational data were gathered…

  2. [Effects of a maternal sexuality education program for mothers of preschoolers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun Mi; Kweon, Young-Ran

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate effects of a maternal sexuality education program for mothers of preschoolers. A quasi-experimental with non-equivalent control group pretest-posttest design was conducted. The participants were 55 mothers of preschoolers in G city (Experimental group=27, Control group=28). The experimental group received the maternal sexuality education, and the control group received the program after the experiment. Data were collected during October and November 2012 through self-administered questionnaires at two times: prior to the intervention and after the intervention. Data were analyzed using χ²-test, Fisher's exact test and t-test. After the intervention, mothers in the experimental group reported significant differences in knowledge of sex (t=3.74, psex (t=4.31, psexuality education (t=11.96, psexuality education program for mothers of preschoolers is effective in improving knowledge of sex, attitude toward sex, and parent-efficacy on child sexuality education. Therefore further study should be done with larger and varied participants to confirm the effects of sexuality education programs for mothers of preschoolers.

  3. Preschool Children's Development in Classic Montessori, Supplemented Montessori, and Conventional Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillard, Angeline S.

    2012-01-01

    Research on the outcomes of Montessori education is scarce and results are inconsistent. One possible reason for the inconsistency is variations in Montessori implementation fidelity. To test whether outcomes vary according to implementation fidelity, we examined preschool children enrolled in high fidelity classic Montessori programs, lower…

  4. The Child and Adult Care Food Program and the Nutrition of Preschoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenman, Sanders; Abner, Kristin S.; Kaestner, Robert; Gordon, Rachel A.

    2013-01-01

    Children spend a considerable amount of time in preschools and child care centers. As a result, these settings may have an influence on their diet, weight, and food security, and are potentially important contexts for interventions to address nutritional health. The Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) is one such intervention. No national…

  5. Old and Young Together: Effect of an Educational Program on Preschoolers' Attitudes Toward Older People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellmann-Jenkins, Mary; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Presents and discusses the results of an exploratory study seeking to determine the effects of an intervention program on aging on children's perceptions of elderly persons. It was found that classroom interaction with older people and exposure to media with accurate information about aging positively changes preschoolers' attitudes toward aging.…

  6. A Joint Interactive Storybook Intervention Program for Preschool and Kindergarten Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaknin-Nusbaum, Vered; Nevo, Einat

    2017-01-01

    The effectiveness of a joint interactive storybook reading program delivered by class teachers to develop literacy skills is examined in Hebrew-speaking preschool and kindergarten children. Post-intervention, both groups achieved significantly higher gains in language and print concept skills than age-matched comparison groups that did not have…

  7. Mainstreaming a Blind Child--Problems Perceived in a Preschool Day Care Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Pearl E.; Wolfgang, Charles

    1984-01-01

    Aims to (1) identify and define problems faced by preschool day care personnel as they attempted to mainstream one totally blind child into their program and (2) rank problems according to the degree of concern involved adults felt about the problems. (RH)

  8. Integration оf Foreign Educational Technologies іn the Content of Program of Pre-School Education in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadiia Frolenkova

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Reveals the integration and implementation of foreign educational technologies in the content of educational programs of preschool education in Ukraine. The emphasis on the implementation of programs for the ideas of Waldorf education, Montessori programs, “SelfEsteem”, “Step by Step”, “Education for sustainable development for children of pre-school age”. It is proved that the integration of foreign educational technologies in the process of optimizing the scientific and methodological support preschool education content Ukraine simulated based priority, primarily oriented humanistic, pedagogical ideas and technologies.Key words: educational technologies, integration, educational program, content of preschool education, children of pre-school age.

  9. EDITORIAL: Quanta and leaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Ken

    2000-11-01

    oscillating light `waves' had to be quantized as well. Several articles in this issue of Physics Education celebrate the first year of the quantum, 1900. I am grateful and beholden to Board Member and co-editor Gren Ireson for his contacts and nomination of the various contributors. It does seem strange, however, a full century after its discovery full of its amazing success that the essential quantum nature of practically everything is still kept hidden from school students, in the UK at least. Let's see what happens in the coming century. Now for another quantum leap. This is the last issue of Physics Education that I shall have the honour of editing. In fact, I shall leap into historical obscurity as the very last honorary editor. Great efforts by your Editorial Board - over a fair number of years! - have resulted in a radical reorganizing of both the journal and the way it is produced. It's been an interesting five years, a time of falling numbers but quite radical innovations in post-16 physics education. IoPP and the IoP are working together to revitalize what may have been seen by many as a staid if respectable and authoritative publication. We shall keep the authority and even respectability but hope to liven things up a bit. The new editor is Kerry Parker of Sheffield College. She will take on a stronger role than I and my predecessors have had, and will be working at IoPP in Bristol two days a week. There are many obvious advantages in this, and I look forward to seeing the new design and approach that will start with the January 2000 issue. So, it's goodbye from me - and also from the unsung heroine of Physics Education for even longer. Managing Editor Dr Jill Membrey has been doing the really hard work at Bristol for many years, but is now moving on to other things at IoPP. I am extremely grateful for the highly professional care and support she has provided for myself and the Editorial Board over the years. The new Managing Editor is Andrea Pomroy, who arrives at

  10. Open pre-schools at integrated health services - A program theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agneta Abrahamsson

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Family centres in Sweden are integrated services that reach all prospective parents and parents with children up to their sixth year, because of the co-location of the health service with the social service and the open pre-school. The personnel on the multi-professional site work together to meet the needs of the target group. The article explores a program theory focused on the open pre-schools at family centres.Method: A multi-case design is used and the sample consists of open pre-schools at six family centres. The hypothesis is based on previous research and evaluation data. It guides the data collection which is collected and analysed stepwise. Both parents and personnel are interviewed individually and in groups at each centre.Findings: The hypothesis was expanded to a program theory. The compliance of the professionals was the most significant element that explained why the open access service facilitated positive parenting. The professionals act in a compliant manner to meet the needs of the children and parents as well as in creating good conditions for social networking and learning amongst the parents. Conclusion: The compliance of the professionals in this program theory of open pre-schools at family centres can be a standard in integrated and open access services, whereas the organisation form can vary. The best way of increasing the number of integrative services is to support and encourage professionals that prefer to work in a compliant manner.

  11. Open pre-schools at integrated health services - A program theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agneta Abrahamsson

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Family centres in Sweden are integrated services that reach all prospective parents and parents with children up to their sixth year, because of the co-location of the health service with the social service and the open pre-school. The personnel on the multi-professional site work together to meet the needs of the target group. The article explores a program theory focused on the open pre-schools at family centres. Method: A multi-case design is used and the sample consists of open pre-schools at six family centres. The hypothesis is based on previous research and evaluation data. It guides the data collection which is collected and analysed stepwise. Both parents and personnel are interviewed individually and in groups at each centre. Findings: The hypothesis was expanded to a program theory. The compliance of the professionals was the most significant element that explained why the open access service facilitated positive parenting. The professionals act in a compliant manner to meet the needs of the children and parents as well as in creating good conditions for social networking and learning amongst the parents. Conclusion: The compliance of the professionals in this program theory of open pre-schools at family centres can be a standard in integrated and open access services, whereas the organisation form can vary. The best way of increasing the number of integrative services is to support and encourage professionals that prefer to work in a compliant manner.

  12. Munch and Move: evaluation of a preschool healthy eating and movement skill program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farrell Louise

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early childhood services have been identified as a key setting for promoting healthy eating and physical activity as a means of preventing overweight and obesity. However, there is limited evidence on effective nutrition and physical activity programs in this setting. The purpose of this study was to evaluate Munch and Move, a low-intensity, state-wide, professional development program designed to support early childhood professionals to promote healthy eating and physical activity among children in their care. Methods The evaluation involved 15 intervention and 14 control preschools (n = 430; mean age 4.4 years in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia and was based on a randomised-control design with pre and post evaluation of children's lunchbox contents, fundamental movement skills (FMS, preschool policies and practices and staff attitudes, knowledge and confidence related to physical activity, healthy eating and recreational screen time. Results At follow up, FMS scores for locomotor, object control and total FMS score significantly improved by 3.4, 2.1 and 5.5 points more (respectively in the intervention group compared with the control group (P Conclusion The findings suggest that a low intensity preschool healthy weight intervention program can improve certain weight related behaviours. The findings also suggest that change to food policies are difficult to initiate mid-year and potentially a longer implementation period may be required to determine the efficacy of food policies to influence the contents of preschoolers lunchboxes.

  13. Cost-effective early childhood development programs from preschool to third grade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Arthur J; Temple, Judy A

    2008-01-01

    Although findings on the positive effects of early childhood development programs have been widely disseminated, less attention has been given to program impacts across the entire period of early childhood. This review summarizes evidence on the effects and cost-effectiveness of programs and services from ages 3 to 9. The major focus is preschool programs for 3- and 4-year-olds, full-day kindergarten, school-age programs including reduced class sizes, and preschool-to-third-grade interventions. Participation in preschool programs was found to have relatively large and enduring effects on school achievement and child well-being. High-quality programs for children at risk produce strong economic returns ranging from about $4 per dollar invested to over $10 per dollar invested. Relative to half-day kindergarten, the positive effects of full-day kindergarten have been found to be relatively small and generally do not last for more than a year. Although no formal economic analyses have been conducted, the economic return per dollar invested would be expected to be close to zero. Among early-school-age programs, preschool plus school-age interventions (PK-3) for children at risk are linked to higher levels of school performance into adolescence. The Child-Parent Center PK-3 Program shows a return of $6 to $9 per dollar invested. Class-size reductions show evidence of positive effects, with economic returns of roughly $3 per dollar invested. The causal mechanisms of long-term effects are discussed. Key principles to promote intervention effectiveness are offered.

  14. Leap-Frogging Newton's Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasturiarachi, A. Bathi

    2002-01-01

    Using Newton's method as an intermediate step, we introduce an iterative method that approximates numerically the solution of f(x) = 0. The method is essentially a leap-frog Newton's method. The order of convergence of the proposed method at a simple root is cubic and the computational efficiency in general is less, but close to that of Newton's…

  15. Refractive Errors and Amblyopia in the UCLA Preschool Vision Program; First Year Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendler, Karen; Mehravaran, Shiva; Lu, Xiang; Brown, Stuart I; Mondino, Bartly J; Coleman, Anne L

    2016-12-01

    To report the outcomes of full ophthalmic examination for preschool children in LA County who failed screening with the Retinomax Autorefractor. Retrospective, cross-sectional study. Between August 2012 and May 2013, the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) preschool vision program screened 11 260 preschool children aged 3-5 years in Los Angeles County using the Retinomax Autorefractor only. Of those, 1007 children who failed the screening were examined by an ophthalmologist on the UCLA Mobile Eye Clinic. Data from the eye examination were recorded for all children. Amblyopia was defined as unilateral if there was ≥2 line interocular difference in the best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and as bilateral if BCVA was amblyopia was found in 9% of those examined, or 0.8% of the original population. Of the amblyopic subjects, 77% were unilateral. Screening of preschoolers with the Retinomax led to diagnosis and early treatment of uncorrected refractive errors and amblyopia. By treating children early, amblyopia may be prevented, quality of life improved, and academic achievements enhanced. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Improving leaping ability in elite rhythmic gymnasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, M R; Tremain, L; Christiansen, J; Beitzel, J

    1998-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to improve the leaping ability of athletes in rhythmic gymnastics, a high leap demanding sport, using a controlled course of jump training. Six elite athletes underwent a course of leap training including pool training and Pilates' Method of Body Conditioning using spring controlled resistance to muscular exertion. Baseline data was obtained on a force plate that measured reaction time, leap height, and explosive power on each athlete before initiating training. After 1 month of training, leap height improved 16.2%, ground reaction time improved 50%, and explosive power improved 220%. With continued maintenance training, no decrease in effect was noted; however, no significant improvement occurred after the first month of training. At 1 yr with discontinuation of the leaping protocol but continued training within the sport, the initial gains were likewise maintained. No injuries occurred during participation in the leaping protocol. Elite rhythmic gymnasts can safely improve their leaping ability significantly through an intense course of jump training. Continued training with the leaping protocol does not appear to further enhance the benefit; however, the gains appear to be maintained at 4 months and 1 yr post training with or without additional training with the leaping protocol.

  17. The Impact of Art Education Program on the Social Skills of Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, Elçin

    2017-01-01

    The current study was carried out to determine the effect of art education program on the social skills of preschool children at the age of 61-72 months attending to a kindergarten. The working group of the research was made up of 51 children in total, as experiment group (n: 26) and control group (n: 25). An experiment design with a pre/post-test…

  18. Evaluation of a Classwide Teaching Program for Developing Preschool Life Skills

    OpenAIRE

    Hanley, Gregory P; Heal, Nicole A; Tiger, Jeffrey H; Ingvarsson, Einar T.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, nonmaternal center-based child care has been linked to problem behavior in young children (National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 2003). In response, a comprehensive program to promote prosocial skills was evaluated in a classroom of 16 children between the ages of 3 and 5 years. Classroom observations were conducted during evocative situations to determine the likelihood of problem behavior (noncompliance, vocal or motor disruptions, aggression) and preschool lif...

  19. Program and Teacher Characteristics Predicting the Implementation of Banking Time with Preschoolers Who Display Disruptive Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williford, Amanda P; Wolcott, Catherine Sanger; Whittaker, Jessica Vick; Locasale-Crouch, Jennifer

    2015-11-01

    This study examined the relationship among baseline program and teacher characteristics and subsequent implementation of Banking Time. Banking Time is a dyadic intervention intended to improve a teacher's interaction quality with a specific child. Banking Time implementation was examined in the current study using a sample of 59 teachers and preschool children displaying disruptive behaviors in the classroom (~three children per classroom). Predictors included preschool program type, teacher demographic characteristics (personal and professional), and teacher beliefs (self-efficacy, authoritarian beliefs, and negative attributions about child disruptive behavior). Multiple measures and methods (i.e., teacher report, consultant report, independent observations) were used to assess implementation. We created three implementation composite measures (dosage, quality, and generalized practice) that had high internal consistencies within each composite but were only modestly associated with one another, suggesting unique constructs of implementation. We found that type of preschool program was associated with dosage and quality. Aspects of teacher demographics related to all three implementation composites. Teacher beliefs predicted dosage and generalized practice. Results suggest that the factors that predict the implementation of Banking Time vary as a function of the type of implementation being assessed.

  20. Interactive programs with preschool children bring smiles and conversation to older adults: time-sampling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Kumiko; Kobayashi, Minako

    2013-10-18

    Keeping older adults healthy and active is an emerging challenge of an aging society. Despite the importance of personal relationships to their health and well-being, changes in family structure have resulted in a lower frequency of intergenerational interactions. Limited studies have been conducted to compare different interaction style of intergenerational interaction. The present study aimed to compare the changes in visual attention, facial expression, engagement/behaviour, and intergenerational conversation in older adults brought about by a performance-based intergenerational (IG) program and a social-oriented IG program to determine a desirable interaction style for older adults. The subjects of this study were 25 older adults who participated in intergenerational programs with preschool children aged 5 to 6 years at an adult day care centre in Tokyo. We used time sampling to perform a structured observation study. The 25 older participants of intergenerational programs were divided into two groups based on their interaction style: performance-based IG program (children sing songs and dance) and social-oriented IG program (older adults and children play games together). Based on the 5-minute video observation, we compared changes in visual attention, facial expression, engagement/behaviour, and intergenerational conversation between the performance-based and social-oriented IG programs. Constructive behaviour and intergenerational conversation were significantly higher in the social-oriented IG programming group than the performance-based IG programming group (pprogramming group than the performance-based IG programming (pprogramming group than the social-oriented IG programming group (pIntergenerational programs with preschool children brought smiles and conversation to older adults. The social-oriented IG program allowed older adults to play more roles than the performance-based IG program. The intergenerational programs provide opportunities to fulfil

  1. Evaluation of a Sleep Education Program for Low-Income Preschool Children and Their Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Katherine E.; Miller, Alison L.; Bonuck, Karen; Lumeng, Julie C.; Chervin, Ronald D.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate a novel sleep education program for low-income preschool children and their families. Design: Randomized trial of an educational intervention. Setting: Community-based. Participants: Head Start preschool families (n = 152) in greater Lansing and Detroit, Michigan. Interventions: Classrooms or Head Start sites were randomized to an intervention group (prompt intervention) versus a control group (delayed intervention). Parents attended a one-time, 45-min sleep education program and preschoolers received 2 w (320 total min) of classroom sleep curriculum. Measurements: Parent knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy, and beliefs were assessed as the primary outcomes just before the 45-min sleep intervention, immediately postintervention, and approximately 1 mo postintervention. Parents reported their child's bedtimes and wake times on 7-day sleep diaries at baseline and at 1-mo follow-up. Average weeknight sleep durations and bedtimes served as secondary outcomes. Results: Linear mixed models showed a time × treatment effect for parents' knowledge, attitudes, and self-efficacy (each P sleep duration at 1-mo follow-up by 30 min (11.0 ± 0.9 h vs. 10.5 ± 1.0 hours at baseline) compared to controls (10.4 ± 0.9 h versus 10.5 ± 0.9 h at baseline) (P = 0.04 for difference between groups). Children did not show statistically significant improvements in bedtime. Conclusions: Educational interventions in early childhood can have an effect on parents' sleep knowledge, attitudes, and self-efficacy, and on children's sleep behavior. However, repeated exposure to the new information may be important for parents as well as their children. Citation: Wilson KE, Miller AL, Bonuck K, Lumeng JC, Chervin RD. Evaluation of a sleep education program for low-income preschool children and their families. SLEEP 2014;37(6):1117-1125. PMID:24882907

  2. The capabilities and constraints of the LEAP (Long-range Energy Alternatives Planning System) for development of energy matrix; As potencialidades e restricoes do LEAP (Long-range Energy Alternatives Planning System) para o desenvolvimento de matriz energetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Afonso Henriques Moreira [MS Consultoria Ltda, Itajuba, MG (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Itajuba (UNIFEI), MG (Brazil); Cruz, Ricardo Alexandre Passos da; Magalhaes, Ricardo Nogueira [IX Consultoria e Representacoes Ltda, Itajuba, MG (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    This paper seeks to introduce and discuss the main features of the LEAP model preparing energy matrixes, in the medium and long term energy planning context. These characteristics are analyzed and compared to other known simulation models used worldwide, checking potentialities and existing barriers of using the LEAP program (author)

  3. Evaluation of a sleep education program for low-income preschool children and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Katherine E; Miller, Alison L; Bonuck, Karen; Lumeng, Julie C; Chervin, Ronald D

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate a novel sleep education program for low-income preschool children and their families. Randomized trial of an educational intervention. Community-based. Head Start preschool families (n = 152) in greater Lansing and Detroit, Michigan. Classrooms or Head Start sites were randomized to an intervention group (prompt intervention) versus a control group (delayed intervention). Parents attended a one-time, 45-min sleep education program and preschoolers received 2 w (320 total min) of classroom sleep curriculum. Parent knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy, and beliefs were assessed as the primary outcomes just before the 45-min sleep intervention, immediately postintervention, and approximately 1 mo postintervention. Parents reported their child's bedtimes and wake times on 7-day sleep diaries at baseline and at 1-mo follow-up. Average weeknight sleep durations and bedtimes served as secondary outcomes. Linear mixed models showed a time × treatment effect for parents' knowledge, attitudes, and self-efficacy (each P Educational interventions in early childhood can have an effect on parents' sleep knowledge, attitudes, and self-efficacy, and on children's sleep behavior. However, repeated exposure to the new information may be important for parents as well as their children.

  4. An Earthquake Education Program with Parent Participation for Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulay, Hulya

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of the earthquake education program which was prepared for 5 to 6 year old children and to draw attention to the importance of parent participation. The earthquake education program was applied to 93 children and 31 parents in the province of Denizli situated in the first degree seismic zone…

  5. Hybrid chernoff tau-leap

    KAUST Repository

    Moraes, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Markovian pure jump processes model a wide range of phenomena, including chemical reactions at the molecular level, dynamics of wireless communication networks, and the spread of epidemic diseases in small populations. There exist algorithms such as Gillespie\\'s stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA) and Anderson\\'s modified next reaction method (MNRM) that simulate a single path with the exact distribution of the process, but this can be time consuming when many reactions take place during a short time interval. Gillespie\\'s approximated tau-leap method, on the other hand, can be used to reduce computational time, but it may lead to nonphysical values due to a positive one-step exit probability, and it also introduces a time discretization error. Here, we present a novel hybrid algorithm for simulating individual paths which adaptively switches between the SSA and the tau-leap method. The switching strategy is based on a comparison of the expected interarrival time of the SSA and an adaptive time step derived from a Chernoff-type bound for the one-step exit probability. Because this bound is nonasymptotic, we do not need to make any distributional approximation for the tau-leap increments. This hybrid method allows us (i) to control the global exit probability of any simulated path and (ii) to obtain accurate and computable estimates of the expected value of any smooth observable of the process with minimal computational work. We present numerical examples that illustrate the performance of the proposed method. © 2014 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  6. Analyzing Viewer Reactions to a Preschool Television Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, George Lee

    1972-01-01

    This report describes a technique which can be used to provide both formative and summative evaluation of television programs designed to promote educational development in 3-, 4-, and 5-year-old children. (Author)

  7. Preschool Social-Emotional Skills Training: A Controlled Pilot Test of the Making Choices and Strong Families Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, Natalie W.; Fraser, Mark W.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to pilot test a multicomponent program designed to prevent aggressive behavior in preschool children. The first program component was comprised of social-emotional skills training. It focused on improving the social information processing and emotional-regulation skills of children. The second component was…

  8. Assessing Preschools Using the Eco-Schools Program in Terms of Educating for Sustainable Development in Early Childhood Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Aysel; Guler Yildiz, Tulin

    2017-01-01

    This study assesses the practices and environmental properties of preschools implementing the Eco-Schools program, targeting education for sustainable development (ESD) in terms of the program's environmental, sociocultural, and economic pillars. Qualitative and quantitative methods were used. The sample group, determined through criterion…

  9. A Longitudinal Study of Handwriting Skills in Pre-Schoolers: The Acquisition of Syllable Oriented Programming Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler Vilageliu, Olga; Kandel, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown the relevance of the syllable as a programming unit in handwriting production, both in adults and elementary school children. This longitudinal study focuses on the acquisition of writing skills in a group of preschoolers. It examines how and when the syllable structure of the word starts regulating motor programming in…

  10. The High/Scope Perry Preschool Program: Cost-Benefit Analysis Using Data from the Age-40 Followup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfield, Clive R.; Nores, Milagros; Barnett, Steve; Schweinhart, Lawrence

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an updated cost-benefit analysis of the High/Scope Perry preschool Program, using data on individuals aged 40. Children were randomly assigned to a treatment or control group. Program costs are compared against treatment impacts on educational resources, earnings, criminal activity, and welfare receipt. Net present values are…

  11. Combining child social skills training with a parent early intervention program for inhibited preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Elizabeth X; Rapee, Ronald M; Coplan, Robert J

    2017-10-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the efficacy of early intervention for anxiety in preschoolers through parent-education. The current study evaluated a six-session early intervention program for preschoolers at high risk of anxiety disorders in which a standard educational program for parents was supplemented by direct training of social skills to the children. Seventy-two children aged 3-5 years were selected based on high behavioural inhibition levels and concurrently having a parent with high emotional distress. Families were randomly assigned to either the intervention group, which consisted of six parent-education group sessions and six child social skills training sessions, or waitlist. After six months, families on waitlist were offered treatment consisting of parent-education only. Relative to waitlist, children in the combined condition showed significantly fewer clinician-rated anxiety disorders and diagnostic severity and maternal (but not paternal) reported anxiety symptoms and life interference at six months. Mothers also reported less overprotection. These gains were maintained at 12-month follow-up. Parent only education following waitlist produced similar improvements among children. Quasi-experimental comparison between combined and parent-only interventions indicated greater reductions from combined intervention according to clinician reports, but no significant differences on maternal reports. Results suggest that this brief early intervention program for preschoolers with both parent and child components significantly reduces risk and disorder in vulnerable children. The inclusion of a child component might have the potential to increase effects over parent-only intervention. However, future support for this conclusion through long-term, randomised controlled trials is needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. When Does Preschool Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Weiland, Christina; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2016-01-01

    We have many reasons to invest in preschool programs, including persistent gaps in school readiness between children from poorer and wealthier families, large increases in maternal employment over the past several decades, and the rapid brain development that preschool-age children experience. But what do we know about preschool education's…

  13. Lines and Spaces: James Dickey's "The Leap."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Sandra Cowan

    1992-01-01

    Describes a teacher's experience in presenting her students with James Dickey's poem "The Leap." Focuses on the primary visual images of the poem, the space where memory lives, the space where contemplation thrives, and the space where emotions dwell. (PRA)

  14. Parents' Selection Factors when Choosing Preschool Programs for Their Children with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn-Applegate, Katherine; Pentimonti, Jill; Justice, Laura M.

    2011-01-01

    Parents, including parents of children with disabilities, are often challenged to find preschools that meet their families' various needs and desires. Research on preschool quality is prevalent, but these studies rarely consider how parents perceive quality. This descriptive study asked what parents value most when choosing a preschool for their…

  15. Gifted Education in Preschool: Perceived Barriers and Benefits of Program Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettler, Todd; Oveross, Mattie E.; Bishop, James C.

    2017-01-01

    Substantial evidence supports the benefits of quality preschool education for children of all levels and backgrounds. However, early childhood gifted education services rarely exist in preschool centers. This study included 263 preschool centers representing geographic diversity in a southern state in the United States. Narrative data were…

  16. China in space the great leap forward

    CERN Document Server

    Harvey, Brian

    2013-01-01

    The 21st century has seen the emergence, after the Soviet Union and the United States, of the third great space superpower: China. Here, in China in Space - The Great Leap Forward, Brian Harvey takes a contemporary look at the new Chinese space program. China has already launched its first space station, Tiangong; has sent its first spacecraft to the Moon, the Chang e; and has plans to send spaceships to Mars and further afield. China's annual launch rate has already overtaken those of both Europe and the United States. Huge new production plants and launch centers are under construction, to build and launch the new family of Long March 5, 6, and 7 rockets. In Roadmap 2050, the Academy of Sciences indicates that China intends to be the leading spacefaring nation by mid-century, with bases on the Moon and Mars. This book gives an informed, fully up-to-date commentary on all aspects of the Chinese space program, including its history, development, technology, missions, and the personalities involved. It lists a...

  17. Characteristics of Children with Prenatal Drug Exposure Being Served in Preschool Special Education Programs in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Shirley; Erwin, Elizabeth J.

    1994-01-01

    Comparison of 29 children prenatally exposed to drugs and 20 children without such exposure in preschool special education programs in New York City found the groups differed in mood, attachment, aggression, attention, movement level, organization and level of play, language usage, anger, and unoccupied behavior. Great variability was found in the…

  18. The Effects of Action and Violence in Television Programs on the Social Behavior and Imaginative Play of Preschool Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huston-Stein, Aletha; And Others

    The independent contributions of action and violence in television programs to children's attention and social behavior were investigated. Pairs of preschool children were assigned to one of four television conditions (1) high action-high violence, (2) high action-low violence, (3) low action-low violence, or (4) no television. Action was defined…

  19. Pow! Boom! Kablam! Effects of Viewing Superhero Programs on Aggressive, Prosocial, and Defending Behaviors in Preschool Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Sarah M; Stockdale, Laura; Linder, Jennifer Ruh; Nelson, David A; Collier, Kevin M; Essig, Lee W

    2017-11-01

    Many schools and parents try to motivate children to become defenders of victimized peers. Defending behavior is common in the media (particularly in superhero programs); however, no study has examined the effect of media on defending behavior. The aim of the study was to examine longitudinal associations between superhero engagement and a variety of aggressive, prosocial, and defending behaviors in preschool children. Participants consisted of 240 preschoolers (49% male) and their parents who reported on child media use and outcomes at 2 different time points. Preschooler's engagement with superheroes was related to increased physical and relational aggression 1 year later. Engagement with superheroes was not related to prosocial or defending behaviors. Implications of the results are discussed.

  20. Listening and speaking ability of Thai deaf children in preschool aural rehabilitation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lertsukprasert, Krisna; Kasemkosin, Nittaya; Cheewareungroj, Wichit; Kasemsuwan, Lalida

    2010-04-01

    An auditory-oral approach can help deaf children achieve success in oral communication. Many studies confirm that deaf children with access to sound through high-powered and appropriate hearing aids at the youngest age possible have the capability to acquire communication skills similar to their hearingpeers. Evaluate the listening and speaking progress made by 27 Thai hearing-impaired children who attended a preschool aural rehabilitation program, which was established at Audiology and Speech clinic. After hearing aids fitting, deaf children were enrolled to the preschool aural rehabilitation program after receiving their parents consent. Hearing impaired children were divided into groups of 4-6 children with approximately the same level of performance. The listening and speaking performance at the initial period were recorded. Each group participated in the 3-hour-program once a week, included auditory training, conversation (maternal reflexive method), and speech stimulation. The improvements and problems of each child were recorded at the end of session. Listening and speaking performance evaluation were recorded at six months intervals. There were 12 boys and 15 girls. The average hearing loss in the better ear was 104 dBHL, range from 83-117 dBHL, SD = 8.33. The mean age of enrollment was 2 years and 10 months. The majority gradually developed listening skills and speaking ability. There was no relationship between age of enrollment and the listening and speaking ability (p > 0.05). However, listening skills had positive relationship with length of speech (r = 0.685), number of spoken vocabulary (r = 0.665), and speech character (r = 0.598); p children to participate in hearing society.

  1. The effects of perceptual motor development programs on balance and quickness at preschool children aged between 4 and 6

    OpenAIRE

    Ertan Tüfekçioğlu; İnci Banu Ayça

    2008-01-01

    Preschool is the term that allows the most positive and permanent contributions to movements skills to be realized. This term includes the development stages that may shape whole life. It is known that, apporpriate education programs in sensitive age terms accelerate development at children. Therefore, the effects of perceptual motor development programs on balance and qucikness will be examined in this study.Pre-test Post-test control group model is carried out  in this study. 62 children, c...

  2. Desarrollo del simulador del instrumento Theremin empleando un Leap Motion

    OpenAIRE

    SANCHO I MARTÍNEZ, JOAN

    2015-01-01

    [ES] El objetivo del proyecto consiste en crear un programa que simula el uso del instrumento musical Theremin y que requiere el uso del dispositivo Leap Motion. La base del programa se ha hecho con ejemplos básicos de otras aplicaciones con librerías de sonido, reconocimiento de gestos y de diseño gráfico. Se ha empleado el lenguaje de programación C++ para desarrollarlo. [EN] The project goal is to create a program that simulate the use of the musical instrument Theremin a...

  3. Paths of Effects from Preschool to Adult Well-Being: A Confirmatory Analysis of the Child-Parent Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Arthur J.; Ou, Suh-Ruu

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the contribution of five hypotheses to the estimated effects of preschool in the Child-Parent Centers on occupational prestige, felony arrest, and depressive symptoms in adulthood in the Chicago Longitudinal Study. An alternative-intervention, quasi-experimental design included over 1,400 low-income participants (93% of whom were black) who attended preschool for 1–2 years or the usual early educational intervention and were traced to age 24. LISREL analysis of five hypotheses (cognitive advantage, family support, school support, motivational advantage, and social adjustment) indicated that while each individually accounted for part of the estimated direct effect of preschool on adult well-being, the best-fitting model across outcomes included indicators of all five hypotheses. The full model completely accounted for the direct effect of preschool on occupational prestige and official felony arrest, and 79% on depression symptoms. Key mediators included cognitive skills at school entry, school quality in the elementary grades, juvenile arrest, and school completion. The identified processes may help establish, strengthen, and sustain effects in other programs and settings. PMID:21410923

  4. An oral health promotion program for an urban minority population of preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Rosamund L; Wong, Tracy

    2003-10-01

    The objective of this project was to design, implement and evaluate an oral health promotion program for inner-city Vietnamese preschool children in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. The project comprised of four general phases: information-gathering, project planning, project implementation, and project evaluation. The information-gathering phase of the project demonstrated extensive tooth decay in young children, bottle use during the day and during sleep-time long past recommended weaning age, and a belief of many parents that primary teeth were not important. Based on this information, the project planning committee designed a program that featured one-to-one counseling supported by community-wide activities. A Vietnamese lay health counselor provided counseling to mothers with telephone follow-up that coincided with scheduled infant immunization visits to a twice-monthly Child Health Clinic for Vietnamese families. At all the follow-up assessment clinics scheduled over the 7-year duration of this continuing project, mothers who had had more than one counseling visit reported significantly less use of sleep-time and daytime bottles for their children, and their children demonstrated significantly reduced prevalence of caries compared to similarly aged children at baseline. One-to-one counseling with regular follow-up provided by a lay person of similar background and culture to the participants is an effective way to facilitate adoption of healthy behaviors and to improve oral health of children.

  5. Using social impact borrowing to expand preschool through third grade programs in urban public schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, Judy A; Reynolds, Arthur J

    Budget constraints and difficulty raising taxes limit school districts from expanding education programming even when research shows that additional expenditures would generate economic benefits that are greater than costs. Recently, coalitions of private investors, philanthropists, education practitioners, and government finance analysts have emerged to create opportunities to expand education services that promise high rates of social net benefits without raising taxes or reducing other expenditures. These collaborators have a strong interest in obtaining careful estimates of educational program effectiveness. We describe the use of social-impact borrowing to increase access to the Child-Parent Center preschool-through-third-grade intervention for at-risk students in the Chicago Public School District. The partners include the city, school district, investors, nonprofit organizations, and a university. The key to the feasibility of social-impact borrowing is the ability to document that early intervention can reduce the need for later special-education services. With the help of private investors and nonprofit organizations, it is possible for public school districts to finance services with funds from private sources and use future cost savings to repay this debt. We discuss how social-impact borrowing is being used in Chicago and in Salt Lake County as the nation's first two instances of using pay-for-performance social-impact borrowing to support early education.

  6. Enriching preschool classrooms and home visits with evidence-based programming: sustained benefits for low-income children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierman, Karen L; Heinrichs, Brenda S; Welsh, Janet A; Nix, Robert L; Gest, Scott D

    2017-02-01

    Growing up in poverty undermines healthy development, producing disparities in the cognitive and social-emotional skills that support early learning and mental health. Preschool and home-visiting interventions for low-income children have the potential to build early cognitive and social-emotional skills, reducing the disparities in school readiness that perpetuate the cycle of poverty. However, longitudinal research suggests that the gains low-income children make during preschool interventions often fade at school entry and disappear by early elementary school. In an effort to improve the benefits for low-income children, the REDI program enriched Head Start preschool classrooms (study one) and home visits (study two) with evidence-based programming, documenting positive intervention effects in two randomized trials. In this study, REDI participants were followed longitudinally, to evaluate the sustained impact of the classroom and home-visiting enrichments 3 years later, when children were in second grade. The combined sample included 556 children (55% European American, 25% African American, 19% Latino; 49% male): 288 children received the classroom intervention, 105 children received the classroom intervention plus the home-visiting intervention, and 173 children received usual practice Head Start. The classroom intervention led to sustained benefits in social-emotional skills, improving second grade classroom participation, student-teacher relationships, social competence, and peer relations. The coordinated home-visiting intervention produced additional benefits in child mental health (perceived social competence and peer relations) and cognitive skills (reading skills, academic performance). Significant effects ranged from 25% to 48% of a standard deviation, representing important effects of small to moderate magnitude relative to usual practice Head Start. Preschool classroom and home-visiting programs for low-income children can be improved with the use

  7. The Leap from Patterns to Formulas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beigie, Darin

    2011-01-01

    Initial exposure to algebraic thinking involves the critical leap from working with numbers to thinking with variables. The transition to thinking mathematically using variables has many layers, and for all students an abstraction that is clear in one setting may be opaque in another. Geometric counting and the resulting algebraic patterns provide…

  8. Leaping Shampoo and the Stable Kaye Effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versluis, Michel; Blom, C.; van der Meer, Roger M.; van der Weele, J.P.; Lohse, Detlef

    2006-01-01

    The 'Leaping Shampoo' video reveals the underlying physical mechanisms of the so-called Kaye effect. The spectacular effect is a classic textbook example to illustrate the rich dynamics of complex fluids and was first described by A. Kaye in a 1963 Nature paper, however, no published discussion or

  9. The Origins of Science Thales' Leap

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 4. The Origins of Science Thales' Leap. Gangan Prathap. Reflections Volume 1 Issue 4 April 1996 pp 67-73. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/001/04/0067-0073. Author Affiliations.

  10. The Educational Experiment of the Great Leap Forward, 1958-1959: Its Inherent Contradictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Julia

    1979-01-01

    The educational programs of the Great Leap Forward (GLF) represented the first organized attempt by the Chinese government to restructure and align the educational system with the national economy. The educational policies of the GLF ultimately foundered because of patterned inertia within the educational system.(Author)

  11. Classroom Effects of a Hybrid Universal and Indicated Prevention Program for Preschool Children: A Comparative Analysis Based on Social and Emotional Competence Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, Catrinel Alice; Miclea, Mircea

    2012-01-01

    Research Findings: The current study's main aim was to implement a multifocused, community-based intervention for preventing conduct problems in preschool children. Our assumption was that the same intervention program could be delivered concomitantly as a universal prevention program for all children as well as an indicated prevention program for…

  12. [Comparative analysis of the efficacy of a playful-narrative program to teach mathematics at pre-school level].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil Llario, M D; Vicent Catalá, Consuelo

    2009-02-01

    Comparative analysis of the efficacy of a playful-narrative program to teach mathematics at pre-school level. In this paper, the effectiveness of a programme comprising several components that are meant to consolidate mathematical concepts and abilities at the pre-school level is analyzed. The instructional methodology of this programme is compared to other methodologies. One-hundred 5-6 year-old children made up the sample that was distributed in the following conditions: (1) traditional methodology; (2) methodology with perceptual and manipulative components, and (3) methodology with language and playful components. Mathematical competence was assessed with the Mathematical Criterial Pre-school Test and the subtest of quantitative-numeric concepts of BADyG. Participants were evaluated before and after the academic course during which they followed one of these methodologies. The results show that the programme with language and playful components is more effective than the traditional methodology (p<.000) and also more effective than the perceptual and manipulative methodology (p<.000). Implications of the results for instructional practices are analyzed.

  13. 32 CFR Appendix B to Part 80 - Procedures for Special Educational Programs (Including Related Services) for Preschool Children...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (Including Related Services) for Preschool Children and Children With Disabilities (3-21 years Inclusive) B... Related Services) for Preschool Children and Children With Disabilities (3-21 years Inclusive) A... of a parent of each preschool child or child, evaluate all preschool children or children who are...

  14. Time scales, their users, and leap seconds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidelmann, P. Kenneth; Seago, John H.

    2011-08-01

    Numerous time scales exist to address specific user requirements. Accurate dynamical time scales (barycentric, geocentric and terrestrial) have been developed based on the theory of relativity. A family of time scales has been developed based on the rotation of the Earth that includes Universal Time (specifically UT1), which serves as the traditional astronomical basis of civil time. International Atomic Time (TAI) is also maintained as a fundamental time scale based on the output of atomic frequency standards. Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) is an atomic scale for worldwide civil timekeeping, referenced to TAI, but with epoch adjustments via so-called leap seconds to remain within one second of UT1. A review of the development of the time scales, the status of the leap-second issue, and user considerations and perspectives are discussed. A description of some more recent applications for time usage is included.

  15. Multilevel hybrid Chernoff tau-leap

    KAUST Repository

    Moraes, Alvaro

    2015-04-08

    In this work, we extend the hybrid Chernoff tau-leap method to the multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) setting. Inspired by the work of Anderson and Higham on the tau-leap MLMC method with uniform time steps, we develop a novel algorithm that is able to couple two hybrid Chernoff tau-leap paths at different levels. Using dual-weighted residual expansion techniques, we also develop a new way to estimate the variance of the difference of two consecutive levels and the bias. This is crucial because the computational work required to stabilize the coefficient of variation of the sample estimators of both quantities is often unaffordable for the deepest levels of the MLMC hierarchy. Our method bounds the global computational error to be below a prescribed tolerance, TOL, within a given confidence level. This is achieved with nearly optimal computational work. Indeed, the computational complexity of our method is of order O(TOL−2), the same as with an exact method, but with a smaller constant. Our numerical examples show substantial gains with respect to the previous single-level approach and the Stochastic Simulation Algorithm.

  16. Cost-analysis of an oral health outreach program for preschool children in a low socioeconomic multicultural area in Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wennhall, Inger; Norlund, Anders; Matsson, Lars

    2010-01-01

    of materials, rental facilities and equipment based on accounting data. The cost for fillings was extracted from a specified per diem list. Overhead costs were assumed to correspond to 50% of salaries and all costs were calculated as net present value per participating child in the program and expressed...... in Euro. The results revealed an estimated total cost of 310 Euro per included child (net present value) in the 3-year program. Half of the costs were attributed to the first year of the program and the costs of manpower constituted 45% of the total costs. When the total cost was reduced with the cost......The aim was to calculate the total and the net costs per child included in a 3-year caries preventive program for preschool children and to make estimates of expected lowest and highest costs in a sensitivity analysis. The direct costs for prevention and dental care were applied retrospectively...

  17. Views of Teachers, Parents, and Counselors toward the Preschool Version of First Step to Success Early Intervention Program (FSS-PSV) in Preventing Antisocial Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çolak, Aysun; Tomris, Gözde; Diken, Ibrahim H.; Arikan, Arzu; Aksoy, Funda; Çelik, Seçil

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to describe the views of teachers, parents, and FSS-PSV counselors on the Preschool Version of First Step to Success Early Intervention Program (FSS-PSV) in preventing antisocial behaviors; in addition, the implementation process and contributions from the program will also be outlined. The study was conducted in six different…

  18. The Impact of a Two-Year School Breakfast Program for Preschool-Aged Children on Their Nutrient Intake and Pre-Academic Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worobey, John; Worobey, Harriet S.

    1999-01-01

    Two studies examined nutritional differences between home breakfasts and breakfasts served at preschool following School Breakfast Program guidelines and evaluated nutritional impact of program participation on 4-year olds' preacademic performance. Results indicated that breakfast intake was altered under school breakfast conditions. Performance…

  19. The Application of Leap Motion in Astronaut Virtual Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qingchao, Xie; Jiangang, Chao

    2017-03-01

    With the development of computer vision, virtual reality has been applied in astronaut virtual training. As an advanced optic equipment to track hand, Leap Motion can provide precise and fluid tracking of hands. Leap Motion is suitable to be used as gesture input device in astronaut virtual training. This paper built an astronaut virtual training based Leap Motion, and established the mathematics model of hands occlusion. At last the ability of Leap Motion to handle occlusion was analysed. A virtual assembly simulation platform was developed for astronaut training, and occlusion gesture would influence the recognition process. The experimental result can guide astronaut virtual training.

  20. Interim report on nodel evaluation methodology and the evaluation of LEAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Barish, J.; Bjornstad, D.

    1980-04-01

    This report describes progress made at ORNL toward development and demonstration of a methodology for evaluating energy-economic modeling codes and important results derived from these codes. To bolster traditional evaluation methods with more-quantitative procedures of interest to the Energy Information Administration, ORNL is applying sensitivity theory as part of a comprehensive effort to quantify the importance of various data and model parameters to the key results that are of interest. The Long-Term Energy Analysis Program (LEAP) was chosen as the initial focus for the research. LEAP is an energy-economy model which resides in the Long-Term Energy Analysis Division (LTEAD) of the Integrative Analysis Group in the Office of Applied Analysis, EIA. LTEAD developed Model 22C of LEAP for two reasons: (1) to prepare projections through the year 2020, which were needed for the 1978 EIA Annual Report to Congress and (2) to develop a base for analyses of specific options for Federal action. LEAP Model 22C and its uses are described to provide the background for this interim description of the model evaluation effort at ORNL. 19 figures, 10 tables.

  1. Evaluation of a Classwide Teaching Program for Developing Preschool Life Skills

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hanley, Gregory P; Heal, Nicole A; Tiger, Jeffrey H; Ingvarsson, Einar T

    2007-01-01

    ..., and friendship skills. These four categories of preschool life skills, which included two to four related skills, were selected for classwide teaching because they were either identified by educators as important for early school success, have often been taught following functional assessments of more severe problem behavior, or both. Skills we...

  2. "Can I Play With You?" Peer Culture in Inclusive Preschool Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfberg, Pamela J.; Zercher, Craig; Lieber, Joan; Capell, Karen; Matias, Sonya; Hanson, Marci; Odom, Samuel L.

    1999-01-01

    A study explored the peer cultures of 10 children with significant disabilities in six inclusive preschools and found that the children expressed the desire to participate in peer culture through a range of social-communicative and symbolic behaviors, and experienced inclusion by coordinating social activity and establishing reciprocal…

  3. Efficacy of family-based weight control program for pre-school children in primary care

    Science.gov (United States)

    OBJECTIVE: To test the efficacy of an innovative family-based intervention for overweight pre-school children and overweight parents conducted in the primary care setting. METHODS: 96 children with BMI >85th percentile and an overweight parent were randomized to Intervention or Information Control...

  4. Examining the Sustainability of an Evidence-Based Preschool Curriculum: The REDI Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford DeRousie, Rebecca M.; Bierman, Karen L.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which an evidence-based preschool curriculum (Head Start REDI) was sustained by 20 teachers during the year following a randomized controlled efficacy trial, when teachers were no longer required by the research project to implement the curriculum. Two quantitative measures of sustainability (teacher ratings, REDI…

  5. Preschool Intervention Programs: Investing in the Future of Young Children, Families and Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindjord, Denise

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how preschool helps children develop pre-mathematics, social, and language skills as well as confidence. Claims low-income children have the greatest need for high-quality early care to overcome the disadvantages of poverty, and argues that high-quality child care prevents later costs for special education, welfare, or job training…

  6. No Teachers Left Behind: An Exploration of Preschool Teacher Preparation Programs in Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Ellen J.

    2012-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of early childhood education for young children, states are planning and implementing initiatives to assure greater access to high-quality, elementary-school based preschool. In the field of early childhood education the leading professional organizations, such as the National Association for the Education of Young…

  7. Evaluating an Integrated Nutrition and Parenting Education Program for Preschoolers and Their Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, YaeBin

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of the study described in this article was to test the effectiveness of Little Books and Little Cooks, a 7-week integrated nutrition and parenting education intervention designed to improve eating habits of families, strengthen relationships between parents and their children, and improve preschoolers' cooking skills. Participant…

  8. The Great Leap Forward: Anatomy of a Central Planning Disaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Yang, Dennis Tao

    2005-01-01

    The Great Leap Forward disaster, characterized by a collapse in grain production and a widespread famine in China between 1959 and 1961, is found attributable to a systemic failure in central planning. Wishfully expecting a great leap in agricultural productivity from collectivization, the Chinese government accelerated its aggressive…

  9. Measurement of characteristic leap interval between chest and falsetto registers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miller, DG; Svec, JG; Schutte, HK

    A markedly smaller time constant distinguishes a chest-falsetto leap from the more usual execution of a sung interval by muscular adjustments in the length and tension of the vocal folds. The features of such a chest-falsetto leap are examined in detail with respect to F-0, peak-to-peak amplitude of

  10. Investing in Our Future: The Evidence Base on Preschool Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Weiland, Christina; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; Burchinal, Margaret R.; Espinosa, Linda M.; Gormley, William T.; Ludwig, Jens; Magnuson, Katherine A.; Phillips, Deborah; Zaslow, Martha J.

    2013-01-01

    The expansion of publicly-funded preschool education is currently the focus of a prominent debate. At present, 42% of 4-year-olds attend publicly funded preschool (28% attend public prekindergarten programs, 11% Head Start, and 3% special education preschool programs). A vigorous debate about the merits of preschool education is underway, although…

  11. Increasing Access to Preschool: Recommendations for Reducing Barriers to Providing Full-day, Full-year Programs. Policy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kate

    2008-01-01

    More than ever before, Californians recognize that preschool provides young children with a strong start in school and life. Research confirms that effective preschool not only prepares children for kindergarten, but benefits them in the long-term. Despite the benefits, only 48% of 3- and 4-year-old children attend preschool in California. While…

  12. Examining the Sustainability of an Evidence-Based Preschool Curriculum: The REDI Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford DeRousie, Rebecca M.; Bierman, Karen L.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which an evidence-based preschool curriculum (Head Start REDI) was sustained by 20 teachers during the year following a randomized controlled efficacy trial, when teachers were no longer required by the research project to implement the curriculum. Two quantitative measures of sustainability (teacher ratings, REDI coach ratings) and a qualitative measure (teacher interview) were collected and compared. Sustainability varied by the specific curriculum component, with higher rates of sustainability for the social-emotional component (Preschool PATHS) than for the language and literacy components. Estimates of sustainability were affected by the method of measurement, with REDI coach ratings and qualitative teacher interviews more closely aligned than teacher ratings. Responses from qualitative interviews identified the main factors that teachers thought affected sustainability. Teacher responses suggest that efforts to promote sustainability are best targeted at reducing barriers, such as competing demands, rather than simply highlighting the benefits of the new curriculum. PMID:22408287

  13. Teachers' education, classroom quality, and young children's academic skills: results from seven studies of preschool programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Early, Diane M; Maxwell, Kelly L; Burchinal, Margaret; Alva, Soumya; Bender, Randall H; Bryant, Donna; Cai, Karen; Clifford, Richard M; Ebanks, Caroline; Griffin, James A; Henry, Gary T; Howes, Carollee; Iriondo-Perez, Jeniffer; Jeon, Hyun-Joo; Mashburn, Andrew J; Peisner-Feinberg, Ellen; Pianta, Robert C; Vandergrift, Nathan; Zill, Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    In an effort to provide high-quality preschool education, policymakers are increasingly requiring public preschool teachers to have at least a Bachelor's degree, preferably in early childhood education. Seven major studies of early care and education were used to predict classroom quality and children's academic outcomes from the educational attainment and major of teachers of 4-year-olds. The findings indicate largely null or contradictory associations, indicating that policies focused solely on increasing teachers' education will not suffice for improving classroom quality or maximizing children's academic gains. Instead, raising the effectiveness of early childhood education likely will require a broad range of professional development activities and supports targeted toward teachers' interactions with children.

  14. 'Our story': Support program for parents of children with disabilities: Example of good practice in preschool institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihić Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Raising a child with a developmental disability can be a serious challenge for parents, which leads to increased parenting stress and has multiple impacts on family well-being. Even though there is a well recognized need for support for parents of children with disabilities, our country lacks the systematized support programs and their evaluations. Program 'Our Story' aims to educate parents about the key processes that lead to accepting the child's condition and recognizing an appropriate care model for a child with disabilities. The program is based on attachment theory and the importance of resolution to diagnosis- emotional and cognitive acceptance of the child's health condition and its implications. It is a structured program, consisting of six thematic meetings with a group of parents. The group counseling is led by two professionals who have previously undergone a 32-hour program for the implementation of training. This paper presents the experiences from two preschool institutions, in which the program was implemented and evaluated. Also it discusses the importance and possibilities of implementing a support program for parents of children with disability in the context of early education system.

  15. The Push for Public Preschool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessoff, Alan

    2010-01-01

    From selecting appropriate curricula and teachers to providing classrooms with bathrooms easily accessible to 4-year-olds, public preschool programs present challenges to districts that run the programs, which are designed to prepare children to get off to a good start when they enter kindergarten. While a wide range of private preschool programs…

  16. Improving preschooler conduct adaptation by using a social learning program based on motion games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsuzsa Szilárda

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Being aware of the changes which occur under the influence of environmental conditions, education, culture and social roles upon the child is indispensable with a view to build up a conduct adapted to the social environment. For any preschooler child, entering kindergarten is an important social event and getting adapted to the new situation is not easy. Broadening the relational framework with objects, other individuals, with one’s own self, results in disciplining preschooler conducts and increasing the number of socially desirable conducts. Relying upon the above statements, this study is aimed at working out a social learning programme made up of motion games involving socialization/cooperation elements intended for inducing amelioration in terms of the child’s conduct during the process of adaptation to the kindergarten environment. The experiment was conducted using a sample of “little group” preschoolers (children 3-4 years of age. As research methods, the following have been used: studying the reference literature, the method of pedagogical observation, the method of experiment and the method of playing. Further to the practical application of the programme worked out with a view to enhance the adaptation conduct in the said subjects, the experimental group proved to have undergone a significant positive evolution and each subject showed improvements considering the conduct of adaptation to kindergarten conditions, as highlighted by the change i.e. higher values in terms of the individual scores achieved at the final test. Preschool education is meant to provide all possible ways and means to enable any child’s integration into groups of children of a peer age, to develop sociability in children and to create favorable conditions for building out inter-children networks.

  17. Exploring the outcomes of a novel computer-assisted treatment program targeting expressive-grammar deficits in preschoolers with SLI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Karla N; Warr-Leeper, Genese; Thomas-Stonell, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    The impact of a newly designed computer-assisted treatment (C-AT) program, My Sentence Builder, for the remediation of expressive-grammar deficits in children with specific language impairment (SLI) was explored. This program was specifically designed with features to directly address expressive-grammar difficulties, thought to be associated with hypothesized deficits in verbal working memory (VWM). Thirty-four preschoolers with deficits in expressive-grammar morphology participated. Using the randomization procedure of consecutive sampling, participants were recruited. Twenty-two participants were consecutively assigned to one of two treatment groups, C-AT or non C-AT (nC-AT). The nC-AT utilized conventional language stimulation procedures containing features which have been traditionally used to address expressive-grammar deficits. A group of equivalent children awaiting treatment and chosen from the same sample of children as the treatment participants served as a control group. Blind assessments of outcomes were completed pre-, post-, and 3-months post-treatment in a formal and informal context. C-AT and nC-AT participants significantly outperformed controls pre-to-post to 3-months post-treatment in both assessment contexts. No significant differences in treatment gains were found between C-AT and nC-AT. Results suggested that treatments designed to directly address expressive-grammar deficits were better than no treatment for preschool SLI. Further, use of a C-AT program may be another feasible treatment method for this disorder population. As a result of this activity, the reader will recognize that: (1) expressive-grammar treatment is better than no treatment for immediate and continued language growth, (2) use of a C-AT program containing specific features designed to directly address expressive-grammar deficits is another viable, but not necessarily a better treatment option for the remediation of expressive-grammar deficits in preschool children with SLI

  18. Social Emotional Learning in a Guatemalan Preschool Sample: Does Socioeconomic Status Moderate the Effects of a School-Based Prevention Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinton, Amanda B.; Edstrom, Leihua; Mildon, Heather A.; Davila, Lesliann

    2015-01-01

    Researchers evaluated the effectiveness of a universal social skills program and compared social emotional knowledge on individual skills interviews with 100 Guatemalan preschool children from resource rich (N?=?47) and resource poor (N?=?53) backgrounds. Participant ages ranged from 3- to 6-years-old. SEL was evaluated prior and subsequent to…

  19. Implementing a Family Centered Program for Physically Impaired/Developmentally Delayed Preschool Children To Bridge the Therapeutic Gap between School and Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluger, Karen P.

    This practicum addresses the problem of limited interaction between physical therapists and families of developmentally delayed/physically impaired preschool-age children. A program was developed in which the physical therapist was videotaped handling and exercising a child, while explaining the purpose of the movements and instructing the parent…

  20. Effects of a Computer-Based Early Reading Program on the Early Reading and Oral Language Skills of At-Risk Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffstetter, Mary; King, James R.; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.; Schneider, Jenifer J.; Powell-Smith, Kelly A.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a computer-based early reading program (Headsprout Early Reading) on the oral language and early reading skills of at-risk preschool children. In a pretest-posttest control group design, 62 children were randomly assigned to receive supplemental instruction with Headsprout Early Reading (experimental group) or…

  1. Actions and Achievements of Self-Regulated Learning in Personal Environments. Research on Students Participating in the Graduate Program in Preschool Education at the University of Granada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves-Barboza, Eduardo; Trujillo-Torres, Juan Manuel; López-Núñez, Juan Antonio; Sola-Martínez, Tomás

    2017-01-01

    This paper is intended to study the self-regulated learning (SRL) process in personal learning environments (PLEs) among students participating in the Graduate Program for Preschool Education at the University of Granada (Spain). The study is focused on self-regulatory actions carried out by students, and on their self-regulated learning…

  2. THE EFFECTS OF A HIGHLY STRUCTURED PRESCHOOL PROGRAM ON THE MEASURED INTELLIGENCE OF CULTURALLY DISADVANTAGED FOUR-YEAR-OLD CHILDREN. INTERIM REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    HODGINS, AUDREY; KARNES, MERLE B.

    TWENTY-SEVEN DISADVANTAGED 4-YEAR-OLDS PARTICIPATED IN A STRUCTURED PRESCHOOL PROGRAM WHICH STRESSED LANGUAGE AND COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT. THE CHILDREN WERE PLACED IN EITHER A MORNING OR AN AFTERNOON CLASS. THESE CLASSES WERE SUBDIVIDED INTO 3 ABILITY GROUPS, EACH WITH ITS OWN TEACHER WHO STAYED WITH HER CHILDREN. CONTENT AREA MATERIALS USED IN…

  3. Increasing access to dental care for medicaid preschool children: the Access to Baby and Child Dentistry (ABCD) program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grembowski, D; Milgrom, P M

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Washington State's Access to Baby and Child Dent stry (ABCD) Program, first implemented in Spokane County in 1995, offers extended dental benefits to participating Medicaid-enrolled children and higher fees for certified providers. This study aimed to determine the program's effect on children's dental utilization and dental fear, and on parent satisfaction and knowledge. METHODS: The study used a posttest-only comparison group design. Trained interviewers conducted telephone interviews with 465 parents of chi dren ages 13 to 36 months (49% ABCD, 51% Medicaid-enrolled children not in ABCD). One year later, 282 of 465 parents completed a follow-up survey. Utilization and expenditures were calculated from Medicaid claims. RESULTS: Forty-three percent of children in the ABCD Program visited a dentist in the follow-up year, compared with 12% of Medicaid-enrolled children not in the ABCD Program. An ABCD child was 5.3 times as likely to have had at least one dental visit as a child not in the program. ABCD children were 4 to 13 times as likely to have used specific dental services. Parents of ABCD children were more likely to report having ever tried to make a dental appointment, less likely to report that their children were fearful of the dentist, and were more satisfied, compared to parents of non-ABCD children. CONCLUSION: The authors conclude that the ABCD Program was effective in increasing access for preschool children enrolled in Medicaid, reducing dental fear, and increasing parent satisfaction. PMID:11236017

  4. The infant behavioral assessment and intervention program in very low birth weight infants; outcome on executive functioning, behaviour and cognition at preschool age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkerk, Gijs; Jeukens-Visser, Martine; Houtzager, Bregje; Koldewijn, Karen; van Wassenaer, Aleid; Nollet, Frans; Kok, Joke

    2012-08-01

    The Infant Behavioral Assessment and Intervention Program (IBAIP©) improved motor function at 24 months, and mental and behavioural development in high risk subgroups of very low birth weight (VLBW) infants. To determine IBAIP's effects on executive functioning, behaviour and cognition at preschool age. Follow-up of a randomised controlled trial (RCT). At 44 months corrected age, all 176 VLBW infants were invited for follow-up. Forty-one term born children were assessed for comparison. Visual Attention Task (VAT), Gift delay, Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test III-NL (PPVT), Visual motor integration tests and Miller assessment for preschoolers. Parents completed Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function-Preschool (BRIEF-P) and Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). At preschool age, 76 (88%) children of the intervention group and 75 (83%) children of the control group participated. There were no significant differences between the intervention and the control group. However, positive interaction effects between intervention and infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia, infants born at gestational agecognition. However, the most vulnerable children had a clinical relevant profit from IBAIP. VLBW children performed worse than the term born children. This study is a follow-up at preschool age of the multi-centre RCT of IBAIP versus usual care in VLBW infants. The RCT was performed in Amsterdam, The Netherlands (IBAIP). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Multilevel Drift-Implicit Tau-Leap

    KAUST Repository

    Ben Hammouda, Chiheb

    2016-01-06

    The dynamics of biochemical reactive systems with small copy numbers of one or more reactant molecules is dominated by stochastic effects. For those systems, discrete state-space and stochastic simulation approaches were proved to be more relevant than continuous state-space and deterministic ones. In systems characterized by having simultaneously fast and slowtimescales, the existing discrete space-state stochastic path simulation methods such as the stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA) and the explicit tauleap method can be very slow. Implicit approximations were developed in the literature to improve numerical stability and provide efficient simulation algorithms for those systems. In this work, we propose an efficient Multilevel Monte Carlo method in the spirit of the work by Anderson and Higham (2012) that uses drift-implicit tau-leap approximations at levels where the explicit tauleap method is not applicable due to numerical stability issues. We present numerical examples that illustrate the performance of the proposed method.

  6. Leap Model 22C results versus EIA 1979 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, M.

    1981-03-01

    A comparison study of LEAP Model 22C predicted results for years 1975 and 1980 versus the compiled real data of EIA 1979 report for years 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, and 1979 has been performed. It is concluded that most of the quantities predicted by LEAP Model 22C for 1975 and 1980 are in reasonable agreement (within about 2%) with EIA 1979 as well as with EIA 1978 data. Many differences between LEAP Model 22C predicted results and EIA 1979 real data for years 1975 and 1980 are also discussed.

  7. Defining Nature-Based Preschools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larimore, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Nature-based early childhood education. Nature-based preschool. Nature preschool. Forest kindergarten. Nature kindergarten. Waldkindergarten. Forest school. These are a few of the program terms currently being discussed among early childhood environmental education professionals in the United States. Why is there so much discussion about the names…

  8. Features of Complex Program of Physical Rehabilitation of Scoliosis in Preschool Children in a Polyclinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.R. Uska

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the efficiency of complex methods of physical rehabilitation in children with scoliosis in a polyclinic. The study involved 174 preschool children with I degree scoliosis. The plan of treatment and remediation activities included: all-day compliance with orthopedic regimen, daily therapeutic exercises (special symmetrical, asymmetrical and detorsion exercises, therapeutic massage with elements of acupressure, therapeutic swimming, muscle electrostimulation, medical choreography, corrective exercises after day sleep (gaming exercises in the initial prone position in order to prepare the muscles for active and effective work in the upright stance. The complex of rehabilitation measures made it possible to normalize the functionality of the spine in 24.1 % of children, to improve posture in 42.6 % of patients and to stabilize the scoliotic process in 28.7 % of patients.

  9. Adjoint sensitivity theory and its application to LEAP Model 22C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Barish, J.; Drischler, J.D.; Horwedel, J.E.; Lucius, J.L.; McAdoo, J.W.

    1981-06-01

    Adjoint sensitivity theory can be used to determine the sensitivity of results of interest to each of the data elements that enter into the calculations. In this paper adjoint sensitivity theory is discussed, and its applicability to a large energy-economics model is demonstrated by applying it to a specific calculation carried out with the Long-Term Energy Analysis Program (LEAP). Numerical results for dR/dx, where R is the result of interest and x is any one of the data elements, are presented for all x for which dR/dx is appreciable and for several definitions of R. In a number of cases the accuracy of the dR/dx obtained by adjoint methods has been verified by direct calculations and these comparisons are also presented. The application of the theory as presented requires extensive development work in that a large amount of analytic differentiation must be carried out and a substantial effort is needed to evaluate these derivatives. In the course of the work, a method was developed that would allow all of the required derivatives to be obtained numerically using LEAP and this method is presented and discussed. This numerical method is applicable only to codes with the very special modular structure of LEAP.

  10. Input parameters for LEAP and analysis of the Model 22C data base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, L.; Goldstein, M.

    1981-05-01

    The input data for the Long-Term Energy Analysis Program (LEAP) employed by EIA for projections of long-term energy supply and demand in the US were studied and additional documentation provided. Particular emphasis has been placed on the LEAP Model 22C input data base, which was used in obtaining the output projections which appear in the 1978 Annual Report to Congress. Definitions, units, associated model parameters, and translation equations are given in detail. Many parameters were set to null values in Model 22C so as to turn off certain complexities in LEAP; these parameters are listed in Appendix B along with parameters having constant values across all activities. The values of the parameters for each activity are tabulated along with the source upon which each parameter is based - and appropriate comments provided, where available. The structure of the data base is briefly outlined and an attempt made to categorize the parameters according to the methods employed for estimating the numerical values. Due to incomplete documentation and/or lack of specific parameter definitions, few of the input values could be traced and uniquely interpreted using the information provided in the primary and secondary sources. Input parameter choices were noted which led to output projections which are somewhat suspect. Other data problems encountered are summarized. Some of the input data were corrected and a revised base case was constructed. The output projections for this revised case are compared with the Model 22C output for the year 2020, for the Transportation Sector. LEAP could be a very useful tool, especially so in the study of emerging technologies over long-time frames.

  11. cuTauLeaping: a GPU-powered tau-leaping stochastic simulator for massive parallel analyses of biological systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco S Nobile

    Full Text Available Tau-leaping is a stochastic simulation algorithm that efficiently reconstructs the temporal evolution of biological systems, modeled according to the stochastic formulation of chemical kinetics. The analysis of dynamical properties of these systems in physiological and perturbed conditions usually requires the execution of a large number of simulations, leading to high computational costs. Since each simulation can be executed independently from the others, a massive parallelization of tau-leaping can bring to relevant reductions of the overall running time. The emerging field of General Purpose Graphic Processing Units (GPGPU provides power-efficient high-performance computing at a relatively low cost. In this work we introduce cuTauLeaping, a stochastic simulator of biological systems that makes use of GPGPU computing to execute multiple parallel tau-leaping simulations, by fully exploiting the Nvidia's Fermi GPU architecture. We show how a considerable computational speedup is achieved on GPU by partitioning the execution of tau-leaping into multiple separated phases, and we describe how to avoid some implementation pitfalls related to the scarcity of memory resources on the GPU streaming multiprocessors. Our results show that cuTauLeaping largely outperforms the CPU-based tau-leaping implementation when the number of parallel simulations increases, with a break-even directly depending on the size of the biological system and on the complexity of its emergent dynamics. In particular, cuTauLeaping is exploited to investigate the probability distribution of bistable states in the Schlögl model, and to carry out a bidimensional parameter sweep analysis to study the oscillatory regimes in the Ras/cAMP/PKA pathway in S. cerevisiae.

  12. cuTauLeaping: a GPU-powered tau-leaping stochastic simulator for massive parallel analyses of biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobile, Marco S; Cazzaniga, Paolo; Besozzi, Daniela; Pescini, Dario; Mauri, Giancarlo

    2014-01-01

    Tau-leaping is a stochastic simulation algorithm that efficiently reconstructs the temporal evolution of biological systems, modeled according to the stochastic formulation of chemical kinetics. The analysis of dynamical properties of these systems in physiological and perturbed conditions usually requires the execution of a large number of simulations, leading to high computational costs. Since each simulation can be executed independently from the others, a massive parallelization of tau-leaping can bring to relevant reductions of the overall running time. The emerging field of General Purpose Graphic Processing Units (GPGPU) provides power-efficient high-performance computing at a relatively low cost. In this work we introduce cuTauLeaping, a stochastic simulator of biological systems that makes use of GPGPU computing to execute multiple parallel tau-leaping simulations, by fully exploiting the Nvidia's Fermi GPU architecture. We show how a considerable computational speedup is achieved on GPU by partitioning the execution of tau-leaping into multiple separated phases, and we describe how to avoid some implementation pitfalls related to the scarcity of memory resources on the GPU streaming multiprocessors. Our results show that cuTauLeaping largely outperforms the CPU-based tau-leaping implementation when the number of parallel simulations increases, with a break-even directly depending on the size of the biological system and on the complexity of its emergent dynamics. In particular, cuTauLeaping is exploited to investigate the probability distribution of bistable states in the Schlögl model, and to carry out a bidimensional parameter sweep analysis to study the oscillatory regimes in the Ras/cAMP/PKA pathway in S. cerevisiae.

  13. Language Development of the Preschool Children: The Effects of an Audio-Visual Intervention Program in Delhi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roul, Sushanta Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Preschool may not be a place where formal education is imparted but yes, it definitely is a place where children have their first taste of independence. Preschool education is the provision of education for children before the commencement of statutory education usually between the ages of 2 and 5. Thus the purposes of the study were: to study the…

  14. A LEAP Forward for Quantitative Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.L. Vacher

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The Association of American College and Universities’ Learning Education and America’s Promise (LEAP initiative has identified quantitative literacy (QL as one of its Essential Learning Outcomes and classified it amongst five other Intellectual and Practical Skills such as inquiry and analysis, critical and creative thinking, and written and oral communication. This brings to mind a spreadsheet in which these transdisciplinary intellectual and practical skills are rows and academic disciplines are columns. With the view that the learning outcome QL is a row crossing mathematics and other disciplinary columns, this editorial considers how the papers in this and previous issues of Numeracy distribute into the imaginary spreadsheet. The analysis shows that papers in Numeracy have been expanding from the journal’s cell of origin, where QL crosses mathematics, as well as growing in number. The editorial closes by asking about the uniformity of principles of QL from one cell to another in the row, and whether there are levels of QL within the row as a whole. A sidebar notes that downloads are passing the 15,000 mark and the monthly rate now is about 2/3 higher than it was six months ago.

  15. Raising a Fit Preschooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... October 2014 More on this topic for: Parents Music and Your Preschooler Is Your Preschooler Too Active? Sleep and Your Preschooler Games for Preschoolers Motivating Preschoolers to Be Active Should Your Preschooler Play Sports? Safe Exploring for Preschoolers Your Child's Weight Kids ...

  16. An Intergenerational Summer Program Involving Persons with Dementia and Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigliotti, Christina; Morris, Matt; Smock, Sara; Jarrott, Shannon E.; Graham, Bonnie

    2005-01-01

    We implemented an intergenerational (IG) summer program at a colocated site for 2 consecutive summers to maximize continuity and enhance sustainability. We incorporated multiple methods to represent the views of key program stakeholders, including staff and administrators, parents who attended the program, and facilitators reports of the…

  17. "Growing Better Beginnings": An Evaluation of a Family Literacy Program for Pre-Schoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barratt-Pugh, Caroline; Maloney, Carmel

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the implementation and outcomes of "Growing Better Beginnings": a family literacy program for four and five year olds. The program builds on "Better Beginnings: Birth to Three" launched in 2005. Parents, teachers and librarians were surveyed and interviewed to ascertain their perceptions of the program.…

  18. Contemporary trends of preschool education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulić Radivoje I.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is a common fact for the most systems of preschool education that they are all formed under the influence of pedagogical ideas of Comenius, Locke, Rousseau and in a certain way Pestalozzi as a founder of special programs and activities in that area. Although being integrated in the school system, preschool education is not obligatory in the most European countries, not even today. There is a lack of total financial support of the state for the programs of preschool education in such conditions, and that enables the private sector to use that kind of situation and become an alternative in its organization. The novelty is that there are more and more independent preschool institutions which are funded by different organizations, as well as the fact that the institutions of preschool education function as elementary schools in some countries. Generally speaking, there are three types of program in most institutions of preschool education: academic, intellectual and programs of the parents' efficiency that is mostly conditioned by the type of a preschool institution. .

  19. Multinomial tau-leaping method for stochastic kinetic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, Michel F.; Resat, Haluk

    2007-02-01

    We introduce the multinomial tau-leaping (MτL) method for general reaction networks with multichannel reactant dependencies. The MτL method is an extension of the binomial tau-leaping method where efficiency is improved in several ways. First, τ-leaping steps are determined simply and efficiently using a priori information and Poisson distribution-based estimates of expectation values for reaction numbers over a tentative τ-leaping step. Second, networks are partitioned into closed groups of reactions and corresponding reactants in which no group reactant set is found in any other group. Third, product formation is factored into upper-bound estimation of the number of times a particular reaction occurs. Together, these features allow larger time steps where the numbers of reactions occurring simultaneously in a multichannel manner are estimated accurately using a multinomial distribution. Furthermore, we develop a simple procedure that places a specific upper bound on the total reaction number to ensure non-negativity of species populations over a single multiple-reaction step. Using two disparate test case problems involving cellular processes—epidermal growth factor receptor signaling and a lactose operon model—we show that the τ-leaping based methods such as the MτL algorithm can significantly reduce the number of simulation steps thus increasing the numerical efficiency over the exact stochastic simulation algorithm by orders of magnitude.

  20. Quantifying stochastic effects in biochemical reaction networks using partitioned leaping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Leonard A; Piccirilli, Aaron M; Majusiak, Emily R; Clancy, Paulette

    2009-05-01

    "Leaping" methods show great promise for significantly accelerating stochastic simulations of complex biochemical reaction networks. However, few practical applications of leaping have appeared in the literature to date. Here, we address this issue using the "partitioned leaping algorithm" (PLA) [L. A. Harris and P. Clancy, J. Chem. Phys. 125, 144107 (2006)], a recently introduced multiscale leaping approach. We use the PLA to investigate stochastic effects in two model biochemical reaction networks. The networks that we consider are simple enough so as to be accessible to our intuition but sufficiently complex so as to be generally representative of real biological systems. We demonstrate how the PLA allows us to quantify subtle effects of stochasticity in these systems that would be difficult to ascertain otherwise as well as not-so-subtle behaviors that would strain commonly used "exact" stochastic methods. We also illustrate bottlenecks that can hinder the approach and exemplify and discuss possible strategies for overcoming them. Overall, our aim is to aid and motivate future applications of leaping by providing stark illustrations of the benefits of the method while at the same time elucidating obstacles that are often encountered in practice.

  1. Mastering of musical rhythm by pre-school age children with speech disorders with the help of dance-correction program trainings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.B. Petrenko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It is known that regular listening to specially selected music develops children’s cognitive abilities. Musical influence optimizes many important functions of brain: increases mental workability; accelerates processing of information; improves short term memory. Besides, sensitivity of visual and hearing analyzers strengthens, as well as regulation of arbitrary movements; indicators of verbal and non verbal intellect improve. Purpose: to determine peculiarities of musical rhythm’s mastering by pre-school age children with speech disorders with the help of dance-correction program trainings. Material: the categories of the tested children: children of age - 4-5 and 5-6 years with speech disorders and healthy pre-school age children. Children of 4-5 years’ age composed: main group (n=12, control group (n=16; group of healthy children (n=24. For assessment of verbal thinking and rhythm-motor (or dance abilities we used complex of tests of constantly increasing difficulty. Results: we found that under influence of dance-correcting exercises activation of rhythm-motor abilities and development of cognitive functions happened in children. We also found main functional peculiarities of musical rhythm’s mastering by pre-school age children. It was determined that by the end of pedagogic experiment, main groups of children approached to groups of healthy peers by all tested characteristics. Conclusions: it is recommended to include correcting components (fit ball - dance gymnastic, tales-therapy, logo-rhythm trainings, and game fitness in trainings by choreographic program.

  2. The effects of Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies Preschool Program on teacher-children relationships and children's social competence in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilir Seyhan, Gamze; Ocak Karabay, Sakire; Arda Tuncdemir, Tugce B; Greenberg, Mark T; Domitrovich, Celene

    2017-05-02

    This quasi-experimental study examined the effects of the Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies (PATHS) Preschool Program on the outcomes of children's social-emotional competence, perceived relationships between teacher and children and teachers' ability to create a positive classroom atmosphere. Two hundred and eighty five children (48-72 months) and teachers in Izmir participated in the intervention, and 280 children (48-72 months) and teachers participated as comparison group. Intervention teachers implemented PATHS in their classrooms. For data triangulation, multiple sources of data were collected in the study. Classrooms were observed using two different scales. Teacher rated students using another two different scales. Children were assessed with an interview to evaluate their perceptions of relationships. Intervention group teachers reported greater improvement of children's social-emotional skills, interpersonal relationship skills and emotion regulation. Furthermore, when observed intervention group children showed higher levels of pro-social behaviour, increased levels of compliance, better problem solving skills and more positive feelings. Intervention group children also described their relationships with their teachers as significantly more positively. Finally, intervention group teachers perceived more dependency in their relationships with children. © 2017 International Union of Psychological Science.

  3. Hip-Hop to Health Jr., an obesity prevention program for minority preschool children: baseline characteristics of participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolley, Melinda R; Fitzgibbon, Marian L; Dyer, Alan; Van Horn, Linda; KauferChristoffel, Katherine; Schiffer, Linda

    2003-03-01

    The prevalence of obesity in the United States is a significant public health problem. Many obesity-related risk factors are more prevalent in minority populations. Given the recalcitrant nature of weight loss interventions for adults, prevention of overweight and obesity has become a high priority. The present study reports baseline data from an obesity prevention intervention developed for minority preschool children. Hip-Hop to Health Jr. is a 5-year randomized controlled intervention that targets 3- to 5-year-old minority children enrolled in 24 Head Start programs. Our primary aim is to test the effect of the intervention on change in body mass index. Data were collected on sociodemographic, anthropometric, behavioral, and cognitive variables for the children and parents at baseline. Participants included 416 black children, 337 black parents, 362 Latino children, and 309 Latino parents. Using body mass index for age and sex > or = the 95th percentile as the definition of overweight, 15% of the black children and 28% of the Latino children were overweight. More than 75% of the parents were either overweight or obese. The development of interventions to effectively prevent or control obesity early in life is crucial. These data highlight the escalating problem of weight control in minority populations.

  4. Development and evaluation of a basic physical and sports activity program for preschool children in nursery schools in iran: an interventional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordi, Ramin; Nourian, Ruhollah; Ghayour, Mahboubeh; Kordi, Mahboubeh; Younesian, Ali

    2012-09-01

    The objectives of this study were a) to develop a physical activity program for nursery schools, and b) to evaluate the effects of this program on fundamental movement skills of preschool age children in Iran. In this quasi-experimental study 147 children from five nursery schools in five different cities in Iran were enrolled. A physical activity program was developed for nursery children. Trained nursery physical activity instructors conducted the program for 10 weeks for all subjects. The levels of gross motor development of all subjects were measured before intervention and after 10 weeks physical activity program employing the Test of Gross Motor Development-edition 2 (TGMD-2). The participants in this study had a mean (SD) age of 4.95 (0.83) years. At the end of the study, scores of subjects at all components of TGMD-2 (including locomotor, object control, sum of standard scores and gross motor quotient) were significantly improved compared to the baseline scores (P120) and after 10 weeks intervention this rate was increased to 49.7% of all subjects. It seems that the developed physical activity program conducted by trained nursery physical activity instructors could be an effective and practical way of increasing levels of fundamental movement skills of preschool children in Iran.

  5. The Impact of the Multi-sensory Program Alfabeto on the Development of Literacy Skills of Third Stage Pre-school Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Staa, Betina; Reis, Loureni; Scandola, Matilde Conceição Lescano

    Here we present the results of the pilot-project undertaken in ten Pre-Schools with third stage (5 year-old) children who used ALFABETO Multi-sensory Program. The study shows that the project rendered meaningful results as to the development of writing hypotheses among the children who had access to the program. We also observed the opinions of the teachers involved in the project, who mentioned that ALFABETO motivated students to develop their reading, writing and oral skills, and promoted socialization and interaction among students.

  6. The influence of the program of prophylaxis of flat foot on the biomechanics characteristics of foot of children of pre-school age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bychuk I.O.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In the article is defined linear and angular biomechanics descriptions of children's foot of senior preschool age. It is analysed the dynamics and increase of the explored indexes during realization of the program of prophylaxis of flat foot in the teaching process. In experiment took part teachers and instructors of physical culture; control and experimental group consist of 20 children at the age of 5-6 years old. Efficiency of the offered program of prophylaxis of flat foot is proved.

  7. Cultural Adaptation of a Preventive Program for Ultra-Orthodox Preschool Boys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilboa, Yafit

    2016-01-01

    Cultural factors significantly influence the effectiveness of pediatric screening that enables the prevention of developmental disturbances. The formulation of intervention programs must match the needs of the child, his or her family, and educators. Recognizing the importance of creating an intervention program accessible to the culture of the…

  8. FOCUS: Essential Elements of Quality for State-Funded Preschool Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    New Mexico Public Education Department, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The "FOCUS: Essential Elements of Quality, New Mexico's Tiered Quality Rating and Improvement System (TQRIS)," provides early childhood program personnel with the criteria, tools, and resources they need to improve the quality of their program. These quality improvements focus on children's growth, development, and learning--so that each…

  9. Energy Leap (Energiesprong). Long-term Plan. Update 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-12-15

    The Dutch government considers the transition process to be necessary and stimulates investments in energy innovations in the built environment. This innovation effort is the programme 'Energy Leap' (Energiesprong), which is being carried out by the Steering Group Experimental Housing (SEV) on behalf of the Dutch Ministry of the Interior and Kingdom Relations (BZK). The programme is derived from the Innovation Agenda for Energy in the Built Environment. The SEV 'Energy Leap' programme aims to make a substantial contribution to the conditions under which the energy transition can be achieved effectively. In this basic plan, it is explained how the market can arrive at this, and which activities will be supported, set up and/or implemented by Energy Leap.

  10. LEAP - A Large Area GRB Polarimeter for the ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Mark L.; Baring, Matthew G.; Bloser, Peter F.; Briggs, Michael Stephen; Connaughton, Valerie; Dwyer, Joseph; Gaskin, Jessica; Grove, J. Eric; Gunji, Shuichi; Hartmann, Dieter; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Hill, Joanne E.; Kippen, R. Marc; Kishimoto, Shunji; Kishimoto, Yuji; Krizmanic, John F.; Lundman, Christoffer; Mattingly, David; McBreen, Sheila; Meegan, Charles A.; Mihara, Tatehiro; Nakamori, Takeshi; Pearce, Mark; Phlips, Bernard; Preece, Robert D.; Produit, Nicolas; Ryan, James M.; Ryde, Felix; Sakamoto, Takanori; Strickman, Mark Samuel; Sturner, Steven J.; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Toma, Kenji; Vestrand, W. Thomas; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; yatsu, Yoichi; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Zhang, Bing

    2017-08-01

    The LargE Area burst Polarimeter (LEAP) is a mission concept for a wide FOV Compton scatter polarimeter instrument that would be mounted as an external payload on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2022. It has recently been proposed as an astrophysics Mission of Opportunity (MoO), with the primary objective of measuring polarization of the prompt emission of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). It will achieve its science objectives with a simple mission design that features a single instrument based entirely on well-established, flight-proven scintillator-photomultiplier tube (PMT) technologies. LEAP will provide GRB polarization measurements from 30-500 keV and GRB spectroscopy from 5 keV up to 5 MeV, and will self-sufficiently provide the source localization that is required for analysis of the polarization data. The instrument consists of 9 independent polarimeter modules and associated electronics. Each module is a 12 x 12 array of independent plastic and CsI(Tl) scintillator elements, each with individual PMT readout, to identify and measure Compton scatter events. It will provide coverage of GRB spectra over a range that includes most values of Ep. With a total geometric scintillator area of 5000 cm2, LEAP will provide a total effective area for polarization (double scatter) events of ~500 cm2. LEAP will trigger on >200 GRBs within its FOV during a two-year mission. At least 120 GRBs will have sufficient counts to enable localization with an error of 50%, as suggested by published results, LEAP will provide definitive polarization measurements on ~100 GRBs. These data will allow LEAP to differentiate between the intrinsic and geometric classes of GRB models and further distinguish between two geometric models at the 95% confidence level. Detailed time-resolved and/or energy-resolved studies will be conducted for the brightest GRBs.

  11. 45.2 THE EFFECTIVENESS OF PARENT TRAINING AS A TREATMENT FOR PRESCHOOL ATTENTION-DEFICIT/HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER: A MULTI-CENTER RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL OF THE NEW FOREST PARENTING PROGRAM IN EVERYDAY CLINICAL PRACTICE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Anne-Mette

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Parent training is recommended as first-line treatment for ADHD in preschool children. The New Forest Parenting Programme (NFPP) is an evidence-based parenting program developed specifically to target preschool ADHD. This talk will present fresh results from a multicenter trial designed...... consisted of eight individually delivered parenting sessions where the child attended three of the sessions. Outcomes were examined at three time points as follows: T1, baseline; T2, week 12, postintervention; and T3, 6-month follow-up. Children (N = 165; ages 3–7 years) with a clinical diagnosis of ADHD...... ADHD-Rating Scale (Preschool ADHD-RS) by T2. Secondary outcome measures included the following: effects on this measure at T3; T2 and T3 measures of teacher-reported preschool ADHD-RS scores; parent- and teacher-rated scores on the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire; direct observation of ADHD...

  12. Buckle up safely: a cluster randomised trial to evaluate the effectiveness of a pre-school based program to increase appropriate use of child restraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunter Kate

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Road traffic crashes for car occupants are a leading cause of death and serious injury in children from high and middle income countries globally. Correct use of appropriate child restraints can significantly reduce death and serious injury but there is a need for well powered trials to examine effectiveness of programs to increase optimal child restraint practices. The aim of this trial is to examine the effectiveness of a comprehensive intervention to increase the use of appropriate child restraints, and decrease incorrect use of child restraints in pre-school aged children traveling in cars. Methods and Design A cluster randomised controlled trial will be conducted, involving 28 pre-school or childcare centres in low income areas of Sydney, Australia, over one calendar year. The intervention is an educational program involving an in-service for centre staff, distribution of educational materials to parents, a parent workshop demonstrating restraint use, subsidised restraints for parents in need, and vouchers for a free restraint checking service. Blinded assessors will observe restraint use at all centres at the end of the calendar year. Data will be analysed on an intention-to-treat basis; the primary analysis will compare the proportion of each of the two outcome measures (use of appropriate restraints, and incorrect use of restraints at each centre between intervention and control groups. Detailed process evaluation will be conducted, including examination of implementation and utilisation of various elements of the program by both centres and families. Discussion This assessor blinded cluster randomised trial is powered to provide credible evidence about the efficacy of an education and distribution program in a pre-school setting to increase appropriate use, and decrease incorrect use of child restraints. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12609000612213.

  13. Widening the Gap: The Potential Impact of Eliminating the Colorado Preschool Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colorado Children's Campaign, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Colorado has seen a growing gap in the achievement of poor and low-income students compared to their more affluent peers. A widening achievement gap has short- and long-term implications for children, as well as the state. Research suggests that high-quality early childhood programs are an effective way to reduce or even eliminate achievement…

  14. Enriched Home Environment Program for Preschool Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Divya; Szymanski, Monika; Schranz, Caren

    2015-01-01

    This study discusses the impact of the Enriched Home Environment Program (EHEP) on participation in home activities among two children with ASD using case study methodology. EHEP involves occupational therapists to collaborate with families of children with ASD to educate them about the impact of factors that influence child's participation within…

  15. Competencies Required in Education Research and Teaching Systematization according to Students from the Preschool, Primary and Secondary Education Programs of the University of Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Alberto Segura-Castillo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present the results of two online forums carried out with the participation of 42 students of the Licenciaturas  in Preschool Education, Primary Education and Secondary Education of the University of Costa Rica. The main purpose of the forums was to determine the insights of the participant students about the competencies they have achieved in the field of education research, and which have been the essential tools for them to systematize their own teaching practices. The discussion forums were part of the course FD5091 Métodos de Investigación Educativa [Education Research Methods] of the School of Teacher Education, delivered from March-April 2010.  Of the sample, 60 percent were students of the Preschool teaching program, 35 percent were from the Primary Education teaching program and 5 percent were from the Secondary Education teaching program in the fields of Science, Mathematics and Social Studies. According to the insights and beliefs showed by the participants –both, the future teachers and the profession practitioners–, there are no opportunities for research or systematization of their own teaching mediation, in the current work situation. (1 Translator’s Note: In Costa Rica, the “Licenciatura” is a one-year post-Bachelor study program, usually including thesis. “Primary Education” refers to students from the 1st to 6th grades, and “Secondary Education” refers to students from the 7th to 11th grades.

  16. Evaluation of the Preschool Situational Self-Regulation Toolkit (PRSIST) Program for Supporting children's early self-regulation development: study protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Steven J; Vasseleu, Elena; Neilsen-Hewett, Cathrine; Cliff, Ken

    2018-01-24

    For children with low self-regulation in the preschool years, the likelihood of poorer intellectual, health, wealth and anti-social outcomes in adulthood is overwhelming. Yet this knowledge has not yielded a framework for understanding self-regulatory change, nor generated particularly successful methods for enacting this change. Reconciling insights from cross-disciplinary theory, research and practice, this study seeks to implement a newly developed program of low-cost and routine practices and activities for supporting early self-regulatory development within preschool contexts and to evaluate its effect on children's self-regulation, executive function and school readiness; and educator perceived knowledge, attitudes and self-efficacy related to self-regulation. The Early Start to Self-Regulation study is a cluster randomized, controlled trial for evaluating benefits of the Preschool Situational Self-Regulation Toolkit (PRSIST) program, when implemented by early childhood educators, compared with routine practice. The PRSIST program combines professional learning, adult practices, child activities and connections to the home to support children's self-regulation development. Fifty preschool centers in New South Wales, Australia, will be selected to ensure a range of characteristics, namely: National Quality Standards (NQS) ratings, geographic location and socioeconomic status. After collection of baseline child and educator data, participating centers will then be randomly allocated to one of two groups, stratified by NQS rating: (1) an intervention group (25 centers) that will implement the PRSIST program; or (2) a control group (25 centers) that will continue to engage in practice as usual. Primary outcomes at the child level will be two measures of self-regulation: Head-Toes-Knees-Shoulders task and the PRSIST observational assessment. Secondary outcomes at the child level will be adult-reported measures of child self-regulation, executive function and

  17. A statewide assessment of lead screening histories of preschool children enrolled in a Medicaid managed care program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivier, P M; Hogan, J W; Simon, P; Leddy, T; Dansereau, L M; Alario, A J

    2001-08-01

    Despite the prominence of lead poisoning as a public health problem, recent Government Accounting Office reports indicate that only one fifth of children who are covered by Medicaid have been screened for lead poisoning. The purpose of this study was to examine the lead screening histories of children who were enrolled in a statewide, Medicaid managed care plan to determine the relative impact of the type of primary care provider site and family sociodemographic characteristics on the likelihood of being screened. The study also examined the prevalence of and risk factors for lead poisoning of children who had been screened. A random sample of 2000 preschool-age children was chosen from those who were enrolled continuously in the statewide, expanded, Medicaid managed care program for a 1-year period and between the ages of 19 and 35 months at the end of that year. Sociodemographic characteristics and lists of primary care providers were obtained from administrative data sets. Medical record audits at primary care provider sites were performed to obtain the lead screening histories of the children, including test dates and results. Data on 1988 children were used for study analyses, and 80% of these children had at least 1 documented blood lead level. Children whose primary care provider was an office-based physician were less likely to be screened as compared with patients of health centers, hospital-based clinics, and staff model health maintenance organizations (68%, 86%, 89%, and 91% respectively). Variation in screening rates persisted in a multivariate analysis controlling for family sociodemographic characteristics and practice level variation. Of the 1587 children who had a documented blood lead test, 467 children (29%) had a blood lead level of >/=10 mg/dL on at least 1 test. Blood lead screening rates in Rhode Island's Medicaid managed care program are dramatically higher than national estimates for children who are enrolled in Medicaid. Potential

  18. Lower Extremity Biomechanical Demands During Saut de Chat Leaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Danielle N; Kulig, Kornelia

    2016-12-01

    In dance, high demands are placed on the lower extremity joints during jumping tasks. The purpose of this study was to compare biomechanical demands placed on the lower extremity joints during the takeoff and landing phases of saut de chat leaps. Thirty healthy, experienced dancers with 20.8±4.9 yrs of dance training performed 5 saut de chat leaps. A three-dimensional motion analysis system and force plates were used to collect kinematic and kinetic data. Ground reaction force (GRF) peaks and impulse and sagittal plane kinematics and kinetics of the hip, knee, ankle, and metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joints were calculated for the takeoff and landing phases of each leap. Saut de chat takeoffs demonstrated greater braking GRF impulse (pchat leaps place significant demands on a dancer's body. Takeoff involves greater demands on the more distal joints and requires more braking forces, while the landing phase involves greater demands on the more proximal joints of the lower extremity and requires the dancer to absorb more vertical force. These demands, combined with extensive repetition of movements during training, may contribute to the high number of chronic injuries seen in dance.

  19. Preschooler development

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as roofs, attic windows, and steep staircases). Have strict rules for the preschooler about areas that are ... have appropriate role models of both sexes. Single parents should make sure the child has the chance ...

  20. Eligiendo un Programa: Guia para los padres de infantes y pre-escolares con incapacidades visuales (Selecting a Program: A Guide for Parents of Infants & Preschoolers with Visual Impairments).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Deborah; McCann, Mary Ellen

    Translated into Spanish, this booklet is intended for parents of infants and preschoolers with visual impairments or blindness. The guide focuses on the parent's role in selecting an appropriate program and helping the child make a positive transition into the program. The first section looks at feelings about transitions and positive steps…

  1. Facilitating Development in Preschoolers with Down's Syndrome in Hong Kong: A Controlled Evaluation Study of the Effects of Centre-Based Intervention and Regular Preschool Attendance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Nirmala

    1997-01-01

    Six Hong Kong preschoolers with Down syndrome who attended a center-based educational intervention program were assessed and matched on age, mental age (MA), and IQ. Three of the preschoolers also attended regular preschools two days per week. After a year, the children who also had attended regular preschool had higher MA and IQ. (Author/CR)

  2. Effect of the Children’s Health Activity Motor Program on Motor Skills and Self-Regulation in Head Start Preschoolers: An Efficacy Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Leah E.; Palmer, Kara K.; Bub, Kristen L.

    2016-01-01

    Self-regulatory skills are broadly defined as the ability to manage emotions, focus attention, and inhibit some behaviors while activating others in accordance with social expectations and are an established indicator of academic success. Growing evidence links motor skills and physical activity to self-regulation. This study examined the efficacy of a motor skills intervention (i.e., the Children’s Health Activity Motor Program, CHAMP) that is theoretically grounded in Achievement Goal Theory on motor skill performance and self-regulation in Head Start preschoolers. A sample of 113 Head Start preschoolers (Mage = 51.91 ± 6.5 months; 49.5% males) were randomly assigned to a treatment (n = 68) or control (n = 45) program. CHAMP participants engaged in 15, 40-min sessions of a mastery climate intervention that focused on the development of motor skills over 5 weeks while control participants engaged in their normal outdoor recess period. The Delay of Gratification Snack Task was used to measure self-regulation and the Test of Gross Motor Development-2nd Edition was used to assess motor skills. All measures were assessed prior to and following the intervention. Linear mixed models were fit for both self-regulation and motor skills. Results revealed a significant time × treatment interaction (p gratification in preschool age children and significantly improved motor skills while participating in outdoor recess was not effective. CHAMP could help contribute to children’s learning-related skills and physical development and subsequently to their academic success. PMID:27660751

  3. The Development of Social-Emotional Competence in Preschool-Aged Children: An Introduction to the Fun FRIENDS Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahl, Kristine M.; Barrett, Paula M.

    2007-01-01

    The development of social-emotional competence is of key importance during early childhood, particularly during the preschool years. We too often believe that early childhood education should focus on the promotion of academic skills to increase intelligence and, therefore, neglect the importance of social and emotional learning. Children who are…

  4. Enriching Preschool Classrooms and Home Visits with Evidence-Based Programming: Sustained Benefits for Low-Income Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierman, Karen L.; Heinrichs, Brenda S.; Welsh, Janet A.; Nix, Robert L.; Gest, Scott D.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Growing up in poverty undermines healthy development, producing disparities in the cognitive and social-emotional skills that support early learning and mental health. Preschool and home-visiting interventions for low-income children have the potential to build early cognitive and social-emotional skills, reducing the disparities in…

  5. Parental Involvement in Preschool Education: Asset or Liability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveridge, Robert L.; Carapella, Ruth

    This paper reports factors influencing developmental growth of disadvantaged 3- to 5-year-old preschool children in a Title I program at Euclid School, St. Louis, Missouri. A Preschool Academy was designed to serve 45 preschool pupils in an area served by two neighboring elementary schools. Pupils were divided into three groups and each group…

  6. Effect of the Children's Health Activity Motor Program on Motor Skills and Self-Regulation in Head Start Preschoolers: An Efficacy Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Leah E; Palmer, Kara K; Bub, Kristen L

    2016-01-01

    Self-regulatory skills are broadly defined as the ability to manage emotions, focus attention, and inhibit some behaviors while activating others in accordance with social expectations and are an established indicator of academic success. Growing evidence links motor skills and physical activity to self-regulation. This study examined the efficacy of a motor skills intervention (i.e., the Children's Health Activity Motor Program, CHAMP) that is theoretically grounded in Achievement Goal Theory on motor skill performance and self-regulation in Head Start preschoolers. A sample of 113 Head Start preschoolers (Mage = 51.91 ± 6.5 months; 49.5% males) were randomly assigned to a treatment (n = 68) or control (n = 45) program. CHAMP participants engaged in 15, 40-min sessions of a mastery climate intervention that focused on the development of motor skills over 5 weeks while control participants engaged in their normal outdoor recess period. The Delay of Gratification Snack Task was used to measure self-regulation and the Test of Gross Motor Development-2nd Edition was used to assess motor skills. All measures were assessed prior to and following the intervention. Linear mixed models were fit for both self-regulation and motor skills. Results revealed a significant time × treatment interaction (p physical development and subsequently to their academic success.

  7. Physical Activity in Different Preschool Settings: An Exploratory Study

    OpenAIRE

    Katrin Röttger; Elke Grimminger; Friederike Kreuser; Lorenz Assländer; Albert Gollhofer; Ulrike Korsten-Reck

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Physical activity (PA) in preschoolers is vital to protect against obesity but is influenced by different early-life factors. The present study investigated the impact of different preschool programs and selected family factors on preschoolers' PA in different countries in an explorative way. Methods. The PA of 114 children (age = 5.3 ± 0.65 years) attending different preschool settings in four cities of the trinational Upper Rhine region (Freiburg, Landau/Germany, Basel/Switzer...

  8. "Why Do We Celebrate …?" Filling Traditions with Meaning in an Ethnically Diverse Swedish Preschool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puskás, Tünde; Andersson, Anita

    2017-01-01

    The Swedish preschool is an important socializing agent because the great majority of children aged, from 1 to 5 years, are enrolled in an early childhood education program. This paper explores how preschool teachers and children, in an ethnically diverse preschool, negotiate the meaning of cultural traditions celebrated in Swedish preschools.…

  9. The Effect of a Handwashing Intervention on Preschool Educator Beliefs, Attitudes, Knowledge and Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, L.; Zucker, D.; Brody, D.; Engelhard, D.; Manor, O.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the effect of a preschool hygiene intervention program on psychosocial measures of educators regarding handwashing and communicable pediatric disease. A cluster-randomized trial, with randomization at the level of the preschool, was run in 40 Jerusalem preschool classrooms. Eighty preschool educators participated. The program…

  10. Time2bHealthy - An online childhood obesity prevention program for preschool-aged children: A randomised controlled trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammersley, Megan L; Jones, Rachel A; Okely, Anthony D

    2017-10-01

    The use of parent-focused internet-based programs for the prevention and treatment of childhood obesity has shown promise but there is an acknowledged gap in parent-focused interventions which target the early childhood stage. The aim of this study is to determine the efficacy of Time2bHealthy - an online healthy lifestyle program for parents of preschool-aged children. The program will be evaluated using a two-arm, parallel, randomised controlled design. The 11-week program is underpinned by Social Cognitive Theory and consists of interactive modules on healthy eating, physical activity, screen-time and sleep. The intervention also involves elements of social media, where participants share discuss ideas and experiences and they can interact and obtain information with experts. Time2bHealthy is being compared to a comparison condition. Outcomes include change in BMI (primary outcome), dietary intake, physical activity, sleep, child feeding, parental role-modelling and parent self-efficacy. Process evaluation data, such as adherence and engagement with the online forums, will also be collected. Time2bHealthy is the first randomised controlled trial to our knowledge to assess the efficacy of an online parent-focussed healthy lifestyle program for preschool-aged children in changing body mass index. Early childhood is a crucial time for establishing healthy lifestyle behaviours and parents play an important role. This study therefore fills an important gap in the literature. If found to be efficacious, Time2bHealthy has potential for broad-reach access and translation into primary health care services. The study is registered with the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (12616000119493). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Preschoolers' Choice: Tofu or Potato Chips?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Linda

    2004-01-01

    Statistics show a growing need for American children to develop healthy nutrition habits and make physical activity a routine part of their day. This article discusses the importance of knowledge about lessons on healthy lifestyles in preschool population to check obesity. By targeting preschoolers, the New York City obesity-prevention program and…

  12. Leap Motion Device Used to Control a Real Anthropomorphic Gripper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionel Staretu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents for the first time the use of the Leap Motion device to control an anthropomorphic gripper with five fingers. First, a description of the Leap Motion device is presented, highlighting its main functional characteristics, followed by testing of its use for capturing the movements of a human hand's fingers in different configurations. Next, the HandCommander soft module and the Interface Controller application are described. The HandCommander is a software module created to facilitate interaction between a human hand and the GraspIT virtual environment, and the Interface Controller application is required to send motion data to the virtual environment and to test the communication protocol. For the test, a prototype of an anthropomorphic gripper with five fingers was made, including a proper hardware system of command and control, which is briefly presented in this paper. Following the creation of the prototype, the command system performance test was conducted under real conditions, evaluating the recognition efficiency of the objects to be gripped and the efficiency of the command and control strategies for the gripping process. The gripping test is exemplified by the gripping of an object, such as a screw spanner. It was found that the command system, both in terms of capturing human hand gestures with the Leap Motion device and effective object gripping, is operational. Suggestive figures are presented as examples.

  13. The Kaye effect revisited: High speed imaging of leaping shampoo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versluis, Michel; Blom, Cock; van der Meer, Devaraj; van der Weele, Ko; Lohse, Detlef

    2003-11-01

    When a visco-elastic fluid such as shampoo or shower gel is poured onto a flat surface the fluid piles up forming a heap on which rather irregular combinations of fluid buckling, coiling and folding are observed. Under specific conditions a string of fluid leaps from the heap and forms a steady jet fed by the incoming stream. Momentum transfer of the incoming jet, combined with the shear-thinning properties of the fluid, lead to a spoon-like dimple in the highly viscous fluid pool in which the jet recoils. The jet can be stable for several seconds. This effect is known as the Kaye effect. In order to reveal its mechanism we analyzed leaping shampoo through high-speed imaging. We studied the jet formation, jet stability and jet disruption mechanisms. We measured the velocity of both the incoming and recoiled jet, which was found to be thicker and slower. By inclining the surface on which the fluid was poured we observed jets leaping at upto five times.

  14. Health-improving training of preschoolers' with respiratory diseases parents as an integral part of rehabilitation programs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Areshina Ju.B.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The necessity of health-improving training of preschoolers' with respiratory diseases parents is reasoned. The reasoning is held theoretically and practically. The list of lecture topics for this contingent of parents is created. It contains plans of lectures, designed for covers a hospital and a post- hospital periods of physical rehabilitation. In experiment took part 42 families of children aged 4-6 years old.

  15. Oral health education program among pre-school children: an application of health-promoting schools approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirzad, Mahboube; Taghdisi, Mohammad Hossein; Dehdari, Tahereh; Abolghasemi, Jamileh

    2016-01-01

    Preschool children have a limit ability to take care of their teeth. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of an intervention based on Albanian's Health Promoting Schools Model (Albanian's HPSM) on the oral health behaviors among a group of Iranian female preschool (5-6 years old) children. In this quasi-experimental study, 120 children in seventh district of Tehran, Iran were randomly recruited and assigned to either the intervention or the control groups. A scale was designed and validated to assess the oral health behaviors among the children and knowledge,attitude, self-efficacy beliefs, perceived barriers and oral health behaviors among the parents and the schoolteachers. An expert panel approved the content validity of the scale (CVR = 0.89,CVI = 0.90). The reliability was also approved applying intraclass correlation coefficient (range,0.83-0.92) and Cronbach alpha (range, 0.83-0.96). Based on the preliminary data, a 6-week intervention was designed and conducted to the intervention group. One month following the intervention, both groups were followed-up. The data were analyzed using covariance and paired t tests. Following the intervention, significant differences were found in the oral health behaviors of the children in the intervention group (P schools (HPSs) approach was useful in improving the oral hygiene behaviors among the preschool children.

  16. John Tracy Clinic: Programa de Ensenanza por Correspondencia para Los Padres de Ninos Sordo-Ciegos de Edad Preescolar (John Tracy Clinic Correspondence Learning Program for Parents of Preschool Deaf-Blind Children).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thielman, Virginia B.; And Others

    Written in Spanish, the document contains a correspondence learning program for parents of deaf blind preschoolers. An introductory section gives preliminary instructions, an introduction to sign language, and a list of resources for deaf blind children. Twelve lessons follow with information on: the parent's role in teaching the child, visual…

  17. Lightweight Exoatmospheric Projectile (LEAP) Test Program. Environment Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-01

    mourning doves (Zenaida macroura), sage sparrows (Amphispiza belli), side blotched lizards (Uta stansburiana) and antelope ground squirrels...In washes or flats (3000-5000 ft); flowers June ILee’s pincushion cactus (E),E E Rocky slopes of lime -stone mountains ~QgyptVutha sned !la (4000-6000

  18. The Leadership Evaluation and Analysis Program (LEAP). Economic Feasibility Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-07-01

    Iv y war uded t o imIIp I e ni t anid t it r- t hetr dove 1 ep t heI FEA P’ Wh i 1 te ne sy t e111, t i COI t Ve i 1. led t’enem I - ana 111 s Is was...i - t I ilt, rs .The dLi tl awot, Me ana V. ed t" 101101iat tl des5 ’ *i pt ioens et 1-EAV app I i ca t i ens , p ired i I V i0 eteuane ntem and’ the...AIMD Intermediate 3-M data feedback report. San Dieqo, Ca.: February 1979. Freud , S. Collected papers. New York: Basic Books, 1959. (Originally

  19. Lightweight Exoatmospheric Projectile (LEAP) Test Program. Supplemental Environmental Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-01

    flight. lae 1s9tfed 1-3 I Supp4,meii EmvromeW A&.sessmr EvP I I Fuel Storage I Fueling Area 5103 Payload Assembly Bldg 5065S Launch Pad5105 Oxidizer...Shop (G- 16), and Altitude Testing (C- 2A.Test activities will require 10 additional employees ; however, no new structures or modifications/expansions...since 1984 for their association with important World War II engagements in 1944. These properties are known as the Kwajalein Island Battlefield

  20. Investing in Preschool Programs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Greg J. Duncan; Katherine Magnuson

    2013-01-01

    ... capital investment in young children, particu- greatest potential value is as a human capital investment in young children, particularly children from economically disadvantaged families (Heckman 2006). After all, larly children from economically disadvantaged families (Heckman 2006). After all, both human and animal studies highlight the critical...

  1. Para Candidatos en Programas de Centros de Cuidado y Educacion Infantil con Ninos de Edad Pre-escolar: Asociado en Desarrollo Infantil Sistema de Evaluacion y Normas de Competencia CDA (Preschool Caregivers in Center-Based Programs: The Child Development Associate Assessment System and Competency Standards).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council for Early Childhood Professional Recognition, Washington, DC.

    This Spanish-language booklet outlines the requirements of the Child Development Associate (CDA) credential for preschool teachers or caregivers who work in center-based preschool day care programs. Part 1 provides an overview of the CDA credentialing system and the various options, settings, standards, and stages of the CDA assessment system.…

  2. Effect of the Children’s Health Activity Motor Program on Motor Skills and Self-Regulation in Head Start Preschoolers: An Efficacy Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah Elizabeth Robinson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Self-regulatory skills are broadly defined as the ability to manage emotions, focus attention, and inhibit some behaviors while activating others in accordance with social expectations and are an established indicator of academic success. Growing evidence links motor skills and physical activity to self-regulation. This study examined the efficacy of a motor skills intervention (i.e., the Children’s Health Activity Motor Program, CHAMP that is theoretically grounded in Achievement Goal Theory on motor skill performance and self-regulation in Head Start preschoolers. A sample of 113 Head Start preschoolers (Mage = 51.91 + 6.5 months; 49.5% males were randomly assigned to a treatment (n = 68 or control (n = 45 program. CHAMP participants engaged in 15, 40-minute sessions of a mastery climate intervention that focused on the development of motor skills over 5 weeks while control participants engaged in their normal outdoor recess period. The Delay of Gratification Snack Task was used to measure self-regulation and the Test of Gross Motor Development - 2nd Edition was used to assess motor skills. All measures were assessed prior to and following the intervention. Linear mixed models were fit for both self-regulation and motor skills. Results revealed a significant time*treatment interaction (p < .001. In regards to motor skills, post hoc comparisons found that all children improved their motor skills (p < .05, but the CHAMP group improved significantly more than the control group (p < .001. Children in CHAMP maintained their self-regulation scores across time while children in the control group scored significantly lower than the CHAMP group at the posttest (p < .05. CHAMP is a mastery climate movement program that may be an approach to enhance skills associated with healthy development in children (i.e., motor skills and self-regulation. This efficacy trial provided evidence that CHAMP helped maintain delay of gratification in preschool age

  3. A Pilot Study of a 6-Week Parenting Program for Mothers of Pre-school Children Attending Family Health Centers in Karachi, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmin Khowaja

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Recently, parenting programs to address behavioural and emotional problems associated with child maltreatment in developing countries have received much attention. There is a paucity of literature on effective parent education interventions in the local context of Pakistan. This study aimed to assess the feasibility of offering a 6-week parenting program for mothers of pre-school children attending family health centres (FHCs in Karachi, the largest metropolitan city of Pakistan. Methods A pilot quasi-experimental trial was conducted. Two FHCs were selected, one as the intervention and the second as the control. A total of 57 mothers of pre-school children (n = 30 intervention; n = 27 control participated in this study. Mothers in the intervention group received SOS Help for parents module, while mothers in the control group received information about routine childcare. A parenting scale (PS was administered before the program was implemented and repeated 2 weeks after the program was completed in both groups. Statistical analysis was performed to compare participants’ attributes. Descriptive analysis was conducted to compare pre- and post-test mean scores along with standard deviation for parenting subscales in the intervention and control groups. Results A total of 50 mothers (n = 25 intervention; n = 25 control completed the 6-week program. Attrition was observed as 5/30 (17% in the intervention arm and 2/27 (2% in the control arm. Mothers commonly reported the burden of daily domestic and social responsibilities as the main reason for dropping out. Furthermore, the majority of participants in the control group recommended increasing the duration of weekly sessions from 1 to 1.5 hours, thereby decreasing the program period from 6 to 4 weeks. Mothers in intervention group reported substantial improvement in parenting skills as indicated by mean difference in their pre- and post-test scores for laxness and over

  4. The effects of the Triple P-Positive Parenting Program on preschool children with co-occurring disruptive behavior and attentional/hyperactive difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bor, William; Sanders, Matthew R; Markie-Dadds, Carol

    2002-12-01

    Two variants of a behavioral family intervention (BFI) program known as Triple P were compared using 87 preschoolers with co-occurring disruptive behavior and attentional/hyperactive difficulties. Families were randomly allocated to enhanced BFI (EBFI), standard BFI (SBFI), or a waitlist (WL) control group. At postintervention both BFI programs were associated with significantly lower levels of parent-reported child behavior problems, lower levels of dysfunctional parenting, and greater parental competence than the WL condition. The EBFI condition was also associated with significantly less observed child negative behavior in comparison to the WL. The gains achieved at postintervention were maintained at 1-year follow-up. Contrary to predictions, the enhanced program was not shown to be superior to the standard program using any of the outcome measures at either postintervention or follow-up. Each of the programs produced significant reductions in children's co-occurring disruptive behavior and attentional/hyperactive difficulties with 80% of the children showing clinically reliable improvement in observed negative behavior from preintervention to follow-up.

  5. L.E.A.P. AS A CONTRIBUTION TO LOCAL ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT IN THE REPUBLIC OF MOLDOVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petru COCÎRŢĂ

    2010-04-01

    . Developments complex specialized programs of LEAP. 5. Elaboration of implementationand monitoring mechanisms of LEAPs. The conclusions emphasize the need to continue these practises in other localities of the Republic of Moldova.

  6. Reducing visual deficits caused by refractive errors in school and preschool children: results of a pilot school program in the Andean region of Apurimac, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre-Arteaga, Sergio; Gil-González, Diana; Enciso, Olga; Phelan, Aoife; García-Muñoz, Angel; Kohler, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Refractive error is defined as the inability of the eye to bring parallel rays of light into focus on the retina, resulting in nearsightedness (myopia), farsightedness (Hyperopia) or astigmatism. Uncorrected refractive error in children is associated with increased morbidity and reduced educational opportunities. Vision screening (VS) is a method for identifying children with visual impairment or eye conditions likely to lead to visual impairment. To analyze the utility of vision screening conducted by teachers and to contribute to a better estimation of the prevalence of childhood refractive errors in Apurimac, Peru. Design : A pilot vision screening program in preschool (Group I) and elementary school children (Group II) was conducted with the participation of 26 trained teachers. Children whose visual acuity wassustainability and improvements in education and quality of life resulting from childhood vision screening require further research.

  7. Who Goes to Preschool and Why Does It Matter? Preschool Policy Brief. Issue 15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, W. Steven; Yarosz, Donald J.

    2007-01-01

    In a world shaped by global competition, preschool education programs play an increasingly vital role in child development and school readiness. There is growing awareness that early learning's impacts persist across children's life spans, affecting educational achievement, adult earning and even crime and delinquency. Preschool education is…

  8. Trust as a Leap of Hope for Transaction Value

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Peter Ping

    2015-01-01

    trustor’s propensity to trust as well as above and beyond trustor confident expectation of trustee’s trustworthiness (either due to trustee’s trait-like characters or due to institutional assurance). In this sense, trust should be reframed as a leap of hope to enhance transaction value by taking advantage...... of vulnerability. This is because the most laudable potential contribution from trust research to other domains of social research may lie in the reframing of high vulnerability from a risk to be avoided to an opportunity to be created and captured. The critical implications of this reframing to advance future...

  9. The EU-AIMS Longitudinal European Autism Project (LEAP) : Clinical characterisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charman, Tony; Loth, Eva; Tillmann, Julian; Crawley, Daisy; Wooldridge, Caroline; Goyard, David; Ahmad, Jumana; Auyeung, Bonnie; Ambrosino, Sara|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413586561; Banaschewski, Tobias; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Baumeister, Sarah; Beckmann, Christian; Bölte, Sven; Bourgeron, Thomas; Bours, Carsten; Brammer, Michael; Brandeis, Daniel; Brogna, Claudia; De Bruijn, Yvette; Chakrabarti, Bhismadev; Cornelissen, Ineke; Acqua, Flavio Dell; Dumas, Guillaume; Durston, Sarah|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/243083912; Ecker, Christine; Faulkner, Jessica; Frouin, Vincent; Garcés, Pilar; Ham, Lindsay; Hayward, Hannah; Hipp, Joerg; Holt, Rosemary J.; Isaksson, Johan; Johnson, Mark H.; Jones, Emily J.H.; Kundu, Prantik; Lai, Meng Chuan; D'Ardhuy, Xavier Liogier; Lombardo, Michael V.; Lythgoe, David J; Mandl, René|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304814172; Mason, Luke; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Moessnang, Carolin; Mueller, Nico; O'Dwyer, Laurence; Oldehinkel, Marianne; Oranje, Bob|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/217177409; Pandina, Gahan; Persico, Antonio M.; Ruggeri, Barbara; Ruigrok, Amber N V; Sabet, Jessica; Sacco, Roberto; Cáceres, Antonia San Jóse; Simonoff, Emily; Toro, Roberto; Tost, Heike; Waldman, Jack; Williams, Steve C.R.; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Spooren, Will; Murphy, Declan G M; Buitelaar, Jan K.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The EU-AIMS Longitudinal European Autism Project (LEAP) is to date the largest multi-centre, multi-disciplinary observational study on biomarkers for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The current paper describes the clinical characteristics of the LEAP cohort and examines age, sex and IQ

  10. Evaluering av Leap Motion kontrollern för visualisering av musik

    OpenAIRE

    Uvman, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    An experiment was carried out, attempting to ascertain whether the Leap Motion Controller can be a useful input device for dynamically controlling graphic visualizations, e.g. by artists who use video and interactive visual arts to enhance music performances. The Leap Motion Controller was found to be too unreliable to be used as the primary controller in a professional visual arts performance.

  11. Problems of computerization in the brunch of preschool education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Podolyaka А.Е.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of computer technologies was probed in preschool education. 27 pedagogical workers of child's preschool establishments took part in research. The differentiated approach is rotined in the selection of facilities of physical education of children of preschool age. The basic requirements are selected to the computer programs. Found out disparity between enhanceable demand on the computer programs and their introduction in an educational educate process. Multilevel classification and sequence is set in the selection of mobile games.

  12. Why Preschoolers Need Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pica, Rae

    2011-01-01

    NAEYC, the National Association for Sport and Physical Education, and the US Department of Health and Human Services all recommend that preschool programs offer physical education. There are many reasons why. First, young children form healthy habits early in life. Before entering elementary school they learn to brush their teeth, bathe…

  13. The Role of Mosque in Education of Preschool Children (Study of Some Educational Books for Preschool Children and Mosque)

    OpenAIRE

    Notosrijoedono, R.A Anggraeni

    2011-01-01

    The existence of mosque is inseparable from the aspect of community education. Mosque can give various contributions, one of them in educating preschool children surrounding the mosque. Mosque comprises of various facilities of room and veranda can be used for various kinds of programs, one of them is education program for preschool students. Education for-preschool children initially is conducted in one of rooms or veranda of mosque, if it is organized kindly can develop and has its own buil...

  14. Multilevel hybrid split-step implicit tau-leap

    KAUST Repository

    Ben Hammouda, Chiheb

    2016-06-17

    In biochemically reactive systems with small copy numbers of one or more reactant molecules, the dynamics is dominated by stochastic effects. To approximate those systems, discrete state-space and stochastic simulation approaches have been shown to be more relevant than continuous state-space and deterministic ones. In systems characterized by having simultaneously fast and slow timescales, existing discrete space-state stochastic path simulation methods, such as the stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA) and the explicit tau-leap (explicit-TL) method, can be very slow. Implicit approximations have been developed to improve numerical stability and provide efficient simulation algorithms for those systems. Here, we propose an efficient Multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) method in the spirit of the work by Anderson and Higham (SIAM Multiscal Model. Simul. 10(1), 2012). This method uses split-step implicit tau-leap (SSI-TL) at levels where the explicit-TL method is not applicable due to numerical stability issues. We present numerical examples that illustrate the performance of the proposed method. © 2016 Springer Science+Business Media New York

  15. Reducing visual deficits caused by refractive errors in school and preschool children: results of a pilot school program in the Andean region of Apurimac, Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Latorre-Arteaga

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Refractive error is defined as the inability of the eye to bring parallel rays of light into focus on the retina, resulting in nearsightedness (myopia, farsightedness (Hyperopia or astigmatism. Uncorrected refractive error in children is associated with increased morbidity and reduced educational opportunities. Vision screening (VS is a method for identifying children with visual impairment or eye conditions likely to lead to visual impairment. Objective: To analyze the utility of vision screening conducted by teachers and to contribute to a better estimation of the prevalence of childhood refractive errors in Apurimac, Peru. Design: A pilot vision screening program in preschool (Group I and elementary school children (Group II was conducted with the participation of 26 trained teachers. Children whose visual acuity was<6/9 [20/30] (Group I and≤6/9 (Group II in one or both eyes, measured with the Snellen Tumbling E chart at 6 m, were referred for a comprehensive eye exam. Specificity and positive predictive value to detect refractive error were calculated against clinical examination. Program assessment with participants was conducted to evaluate outcomes and procedures. Results: A total sample of 364 children aged 3–11 were screened; 45 children were examined at Centro Oftalmológico Monseñor Enrique Pelach (COMEP Eye Hospital. Prevalence of refractive error was 6.2% (Group I and 6.9% (Group II; specificity of teacher vision screening was 95.8% and 93.0%, while positive predictive value was 59.1% and 47.8% for each group, respectively. Aspects highlighted to improve the program included extending training, increasing parental involvement, and helping referred children to attend the hospital. Conclusion: Prevalence of refractive error in children is significant in the region. Vision screening performed by trained teachers is a valid intervention for early detection of refractive error, including screening of preschool children

  16. Preparedness of educators to implement modern information technologies in their work with preschool children

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Velickovic, Sonja; Stosic, Lazar

    2016-01-01

    ... (Preschool Preparatory Program) from the point of view of digitalization and informatization of the society The authors are in favour of the implementation of modern educational technology in the process of educating preschool...

  17. A Smartphone App for Families With Preschool-Aged Children in a Public Nutrition Program: Prototype Development and Beta-Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Pamela; Emerson, Janice S; Quirk, Meghan E; Canedo, Juan R; Jones, Jessica L; Vylegzhanina, Violetta; Schmidt, Douglas C; Mulvaney, Shelagh A; Beech, Bettina M; Briley, Chiquita; Harris, Calvin; Husaini, Baqar A

    2017-08-02

    The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) in the United States provides free supplemental food and nutrition education to low-income mothers and children under age 5 years. Childhood obesity prevalence is higher among preschool children in the WIC program compared to other children, and WIC improves dietary quality among low-income children. The Children Eating Well (CHEW) smartphone app was developed in English and Spanish for WIC-participating families with preschool-aged children as a home-based intervention to reinforce WIC nutrition education and help prevent childhood obesity. This paper describes the development and beta-testing of the CHEW smartphone app. The objective of beta-testing was to test the CHEW app prototype with target users, focusing on usage, usability, and perceived barriers and benefits of the app. The goals of the CHEW app were to make the WIC shopping experience easier, maximize WIC benefit redemption, and improve parent snack feeding practices. The CHEW app prototype consisted of WIC Shopping Tools, including a barcode scanner and calculator tools for the cash value voucher for purchasing fruits and vegetables, and nutrition education focused on healthy snacks and beverages, including a Yummy Snack Gallery and Healthy Snacking Tips. Mothers of 63 black and Hispanic WIC-participating children ages 2 to 4 years tested the CHEW app prototype for 3 months and completed follow-up interviews. Study participants testing the app for 3 months used the app on average once a week for approximately 4 and a half minutes per session, although substantial variation was observed. Usage of specific features averaged at 1 to 2 times per month for shopping-related activities and 2 to 4 times per month for the snack gallery. Mothers classified as users rated the app's WIC Shopping Tools relatively high on usability and benefits, although variation in scores and qualitative feedback highlighted several barriers that

  18. A Smartphone App for Families With Preschool-Aged Children in a Public Nutrition Program: Prototype Development and Beta-Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Janice S; Quirk, Meghan E; Canedo, Juan R; Jones, Jessica L; Vylegzhanina, Violetta; Schmidt, Douglas C; Mulvaney, Shelagh A; Beech, Bettina M; Briley, Chiquita; Harris, Calvin; Husaini, Baqar A

    2017-01-01

    Background The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) in the United States provides free supplemental food and nutrition education to low-income mothers and children under age 5 years. Childhood obesity prevalence is higher among preschool children in the WIC program compared to other children, and WIC improves dietary quality among low-income children. The Children Eating Well (CHEW) smartphone app was developed in English and Spanish for WIC-participating families with preschool-aged children as a home-based intervention to reinforce WIC nutrition education and help prevent childhood obesity. Objective This paper describes the development and beta-testing of the CHEW smartphone app. The objective of beta-testing was to test the CHEW app prototype with target users, focusing on usage, usability, and perceived barriers and benefits of the app. Methods The goals of the CHEW app were to make the WIC shopping experience easier, maximize WIC benefit redemption, and improve parent snack feeding practices. The CHEW app prototype consisted of WIC Shopping Tools, including a barcode scanner and calculator tools for the cash value voucher for purchasing fruits and vegetables, and nutrition education focused on healthy snacks and beverages, including a Yummy Snack Gallery and Healthy Snacking Tips. Mothers of 63 black and Hispanic WIC-participating children ages 2 to 4 years tested the CHEW app prototype for 3 months and completed follow-up interviews. Results Study participants testing the app for 3 months used the app on average once a week for approximately 4 and a half minutes per session, although substantial variation was observed. Usage of specific features averaged at 1 to 2 times per month for shopping-related activities and 2 to 4 times per month for the snack gallery. Mothers classified as users rated the app’s WIC Shopping Tools relatively high on usability and benefits, although variation in scores and qualitative

  19. Research-Based Options for Education Policymaking: Preschool Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathis, William

    2012-01-01

    Publicly supported, high-quality preschool education is among the most successful and well-documented of education reforms. There is near-universal agreement that high-quality preschool programs more than pay for themselves in economic and social benefits. Program quality is absolutely critical. While no one factor can be considered determinative,…

  20. Buckle up safely (shoalhaven): a process and impact evaluation of a pragmatic, multifaceted preschool-based pilot program to increase correct use of age-appropriate child restraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Kate; Keay, Lisa; Clapham, Kathleen; Lyford, Marilyn; Brown, Julie; Bilston, Lynne; Simpson, Judy M; Stevenson, Mark; Ivers, Rebecca Q

    2014-01-01

    To conduct a process and impact evaluation of a multifaceted education-based pilot program targeting correct use of age-appropriate restraints in a regional setting with a high proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families. The program was delivered in 2010 in 3 early learning centers where 31 percent of the children were of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander descent. Each component of the program was assessed for message consistency and uptake. To measure program effectiveness, participating children were matched 1:1 by age, language spoken at home, and annual household income with 71 children from the control arm of a contemporaneous trial. The outcome measure in the control and program centers (a 4-category ordinal scale of restraint use) was compared using ordinal logistic regression accounting for age of the parent. Process evaluation found that though program components were delivered with a consistency of message, uptake was affected by turnover of all staff at one center and by parents experiencing difficulty in paying for subsidized restraints at each of the centers. Impact evaluation found that children from the centers receiving the program had nearly twice the odds of being in a better restraint category than children matched from the control group (adjusted odds ratio [ORadj] = 2.06, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09-3.90). This was a pragmatic study reflecting the real-life issues of implementing a program in preschools where 57 percent of families had a low income and turnover of staff was high. Despite these issues, impact evaluation showed that the integrated educational program showed promise in increasing correct use of age-appropriate restraints. The findings from this pilot study support the use of an integrated educational program that includes access to subsidized restraints to promote best practice child restraint use among communities that include a high proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families in New

  1. Impact of requiring influenza vaccination for children in licensed child care or preschool programs--Connecticut, 2012-13 influenza season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadler, James L; Yousey-Hindes, Kimberly; Kudish, Kathy; Kennedy, Erin D; Sacco, Vincent; Cartter, Matthew L

    2014-03-07

    Preschool-aged children are at increased risk for severe influenza-related illness and complications. Congregate child care settings facilitate influenza transmission among susceptible children. To protect against influenza transmission in these settings, in September 2010, Connecticut became the second U.S. state (after New Jersey) to implement regulations requiring that all children aged 6-59 months receive at least 1 dose of influenza vaccine each year to attend a licensed child care program. To evaluate the impact of this regulation on vaccination levels and influenza-associated hospitalizations during the 2012-13 influenza season, vaccination data from U.S. and Connecticut surveys and the Emerging Infections Program (EIP) were analyzed. After the regulation took effect, vaccination rates among Connecticut children aged 6-59 months increased from 67.8% during the 2009-10 influenza season to 84.1% during the 2012-13 season. During the 2012-13 influenza season, among all 11 EIP surveillance sites, Connecticut had the greatest percentage decrease (12%) in the influenza-associated hospitalization rate from 2007-08 among children aged ≤4 years. Additionally, the ratio of the influenza-associated hospitalization rates among children aged ≤4 years to the overall population rate (0.53) was lower than for any other EIP site. Requiring vaccination for child care admission might have helped to increase vaccination rates in Connecticut and reduced serious morbidity from influenza.

  2. Does Pre-School Education Matter? Understanding the Lived Experiences of Parents and Their Perceptions of Preschool Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manigo, Catrina; Allison, Rinyka

    2017-01-01

    According to the United States Department of Education, approximately 4,172,347 four-year-olds are eligible to attend publicly funded preschool programs. Of this number, only 1,709,607 of those eligible are enrolled in a publicly funded preschool program (U.S. Department of Education, 2014). Because of a lack of quantitative and qualitative data…

  3. The interaction of the antimicrobial peptide cLEAP-2 and the bacterial membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townes, Claire L; Michailidis, Georgios; Hall, Judith

    2009-09-25

    Chicken Liver Expressed Antimicrobial Peptide-2 (cLEAP-2) is known to have killing activities against Salmonella spp., but the mechanism by which killing occurs remains to be elucidated. The ability of cLEAP-2 to disrupt the outer membrane of several Salmonella spp. was assessed using the fluorescent probe N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine (NPN). A rapid dose-dependent permeabilization of the outer membranes of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium phoP, and S. enterica serovar Typhimurium SL1344 was observed although no significant permeabilisation of the S. enteriditis membrane was detected. These data suggested that the ability of the mature cLEAP-2 peptide to permeabilise the Salmonella outer membrane is important in mediating its killing activities. The ability of the peptide to kill Gram-positive bacteria, specifically Streptococcus spp. and Staphylococcus spp. was also investigated using recombinant peptide and a time-kill assay. Of the strains analysed the Streptococcus pyogenes M1 strain appeared the most resistant to LEAP-2 killing although S. pyogenes mutants deficient in Sortase and M1 activities showed increased sensitivity to the mature peptide. This suggested the involvement of specific Streptococcus cell wall proteins including M1 in the resistance of the bacteria to cLEAP-2 killing. cLEAP-2 showed no significant toxicity towards mammalian erythrocytes indicating selectivity for bacterial over eukaryote cell membranes. These data provide further support for mature cLEAP-2 functioning in protecting the chicken against microbial attack.

  4. Preexercise static stretching effect on leaping performance in elite rhythmic gymnasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cagno, Alessandra; Baldari, Carlo; Battaglia, Claudia; Gallotta, Maria Chiara; Videira, Miguel; Piazza, Marina; Guidetti, Laura

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the acute effects of static stretching (SS) on technical leaps performance in rhythmic gymnastics. Thirty-eight gymnasts (age 14.13 +/- 3.2 years), competing at the international and national levels, performed vertical jumps (squat jump, countermovement jump, hopping test [HT]) and technical leaps (split leap with leg stretched [SL], split leap with ring [RG], split leap with back bend of the trunk [BBT]) assessed in 2 different conditions: after SS and after their usual typical warm-up (TWU) as control conditions. Jumps and leaps flight time (FT) and ground contact time (GCT) parameters were evaluated by OptoJump. Leap performance was simultaneously evaluated by scores awarded by judges. For each dependent variable, the effect of warm-up condition (TWU and SS) was examined by a paired-sample t-test. A multiple regression analysis determined the amount of variance in judges' scores from the FT and GCT variables. Results revealed that vertical jumps FT was not affected by SS warm-up. Ground contact time of HT significantly increased after SS warm-up (p rhythmic gymnastics judges' evaluation.

  5. Protocol for the Locomotor Experience Applied Post-stroke (LEAPS trial: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Samuel S

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Locomotor training using body weight support and a treadmill as a therapeutic modality for rehabilitation of walking post-stroke is being rapidly adopted into clinical practice. There is an urgent need for a well-designed trial to determine the effectiveness of this intervention. The objective of the Locomotor Experience Applied Post-Stroke (LEAPS trial is to determine if there is a difference in the proportion of participants who recover walking ability at one year post-stroke when randomized to a specialized locomotor training program (LTP, conducted at 2- or 6-months post-stroke, or those randomized to a home based non-specific, low intensity exercise intervention (HEP provided 2 months post-stroke. We will determine if the timing of LTP delivery affects gait speed at 1 year and whether initial impairment severity interacts with the timing of LTP. The effect of number of treatment sessions will be determined by changes in gait speed taken pre-treatment and post-12, -24, and -36 sessions. Methods/Design We will recruit 400 adults with moderate or severe walking limitations within 30 days of stroke onset. At two months post stroke, participants are stratified by locomotor impairment severity as determined by overground walking speed and randomly assigned to one of three groups: (a LTP-Early; (b LTP-Late or (c Home Exercise Program -Early. The LTP program includes body weight support on a treadmill and overground training. The LTP and HEP interventions are delivered for 36 sessions over 12 weeks. Primary outcome measure include successful walking recovery defined as the achievement of a 0.4 m/s gait speed or greater by persons with initial severe gait impairment or the achievement of a 0.8 m/s gait speed or greater by persons with initial moderate gait impairment. LEAPS is powered to detect a 20% difference in the proportion of participants achieving successful locomotor recovery between the LTP groups and the HEP group, and

  6. Leaping shampoo glides on a lubricating air layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.; Li, E. Q.; Marston, J. O.; Bonito, A.; Thoroddsen, S. T.

    2013-06-01

    When a stream of shampoo is fed onto a pool in one's hand, a jet can leap sideways or rebound from the liquid surface in an intriguing phenomenon known as the Kaye effect. Earlier studies have debated whether non-Newtonian effects are the underlying cause of this phenomenon, making the jet glide on top of a shear-thinning liquid layer, or whether an entrained air layer is responsible. Herein we show unambiguously that the jet slides on a lubricating air layer. We identify this layer by looking through the pool liquid and observing its rupture into fine bubbles. The resulting microbubble sizes suggest this air layer is of submicron thickness. This thickness estimate is also supported by the tangential deceleration of the jet during the rebounding.

  7. Leaping shampoo glides on a lubricating air layer

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, S.

    2013-06-10

    When a stream of shampoo is fed onto a pool in one\\'s hand, a jet can leap sideways or rebound from the liquid surface in an intriguing phenomenon known as the Kaye effect. Earlier studies have debated whether non-Newtonian effects are the underlying cause of this phenomenon, making the jet glide on top of a shear-thinning liquid layer, or whether an entrained air layer is responsible. Herein we show unambiguously that the jet slides on a lubricating air layer. We identify this layer by looking through the pool liquid and observing its rupture into fine bubbles. The resulting microbubble sizes suggest this air layer is of submicron thickness. This thickness estimate is also supported by the tangential deceleration of the jet during the rebounding.

  8. The Traditional in Contemporary Curricula of Preschool Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kopas-Vukašinović Emina

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary curricula of preschool education are the result of the improvement of pedagogical and didactic theories. They imply a technical plan with which it is possible to achieve measurable objectives of preschool education. The curriculum is also defined as a tool for quality and equal education for all. It represents a reflection of the time, society and culture in which it exists, but also a model for future society and education. Thus an important research question arises as to what extent we recognize traditional ideas about learning and the development of a preschool child in contemporary preschool programs. Are traditional ideas about educating young children unjustly neglected or do we recognize them in contemporary pedagogical theory even today, at the same time forgetting about the past and declaring them innovations? This paper deals with the starting points for the development of a curriculum. The goal of the research was to determine to what extent can the starting points for the development of preschool children, which have existed in the first preschool programs in Serbia in the late 19th century, be recognized in contemporary preschool programs. A descriptive method was applied as well as a procedure for content analysis of program documents. Research results confirm that the elements of the first preschool programs, which remain relevant until today, can be recognized in contemporary preschool programs. They are related to target orientations, principles and functions of preschool education. However, these ideas are defined as contemporary tendencies, and the fact that they existed in preschool programs that were developed a long time ago is unjustly ignored.

  9. Psychosocial outcomes of Lunch is in the Bag, a parent program for packing healthful lunches for preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweitzer, Sara J; Briley, Margaret E; Roberts-Gray, Cindy; Hoelscher, Deanna M; Harrist, Ronald B; Staskel, Deanna M; Almansour, Fawaz D

    2011-01-01

    This pilot study evaluated effects of Lunch is in the Bag on behavioral constructs and their predictive relationship to lunch-packing behaviors of parents of young children. Six child care centers were pair-matched and randomly assigned to intervention (n = 3) and comparison (n = 3) groups. Parent/child dyads participated. Constructs of knowledge, outcome expectations, perceived control, subjective norms, and intentions were measured by a pre/post questionnaire. Hierarchical linear regression was used, and P < .05 was considered significant. There were significant increases in knowledge (P = .01); outcome expectations for whole grains (P < .001); and subjective norms for fruit (P = .002), vegetables (P = .046), and whole grains (P = .02). Perceived control, outcome expectations, and intentions significantly predicted packing vegetables and knowledge predicted whole grains. Lunch is in the Bag is a feasible intervention to improve the lunch-packing behaviors of parents of preschool-aged children. Copyright © 2011 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Accelerating the Gillespie τ-Leaping Method Using Graphics Processing Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarov, Ivan; D’Souza, Roshan M.; Tapia, Jose-Juan

    2012-01-01

    The Gillespie τ-Leaping Method is an approximate algorithm that is faster than the exact Direct Method (DM) due to the progression of the simulation with larger time steps. However, the procedure to compute the time leap τ is quite expensive. In this paper, we explore the acceleration of the τ-Leaping Method using Graphics Processing Unit (GPUs) for ultra-large networks ( reaction channels). We have developed data structures and algorithms that take advantage of the unique hardware architecture and available libraries. Our results show that we obtain a performance gain of over 60x when compared with the best conventional implementations. PMID:22715366

  11. Mental health consultations in the preschool daycare center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, M S

    2001-01-01

    This article explores some of the challenges to children's emotional and social development inherent in the all-day childcare programs for children aged 3 to 5 years. The psychoanalytically oriented child development community has offered ongoing assistance, information, and support to teachers, parents, and children in preschools and preschool daycare sites in a number of communities across the country. The process and results of a long-term preschool daycare consultation are presented.

  12. [Association between socioeconomic status and oral hygiene among preschoolers enrolled in the IMSS preventive dental program in Campeche].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Solís, Carlo Eduardo; Segovia-Villanueva, América; Estrella-Rodríguez, Ramón; Maupomé, Gerardo; Avila-Burgos, Leticia; Pérez-Nuñez, Ricardo

    2006-01-01

    Determine the association between socioeconomic status and oral hygiene in the primary dentition of preschool children. We undertook a cross-sectional study of 1,303 children attending 10 schools in Campeche, Mexico. Every child was clinically examined in a portable dental chair by one of four examiners. We used a questionnaire addressed to the mothers to collect data on socioeconomic and socio demographic variables--including attitudinal variables dealing with the perceived importance of oral health. Oral hygiene was assessed appraising the frequency of tooth brushing and the presence of dental plaque. Data analysis included non-parametric tests using STATA 8.2. Mean age was 4.36 +/- 0.79 years and 48.3% of children were girls. Of the study population, 17.8% (n = 232) were classified as having inadequate oral hygiene, 50.9% (n = 663) having moderate oral hygiene, and 31.3% (n = 408) having adequate oral hygiene. Children who were rated more frequently as having inadequate hygiene (p < 0.05) had mothers with a negative attitude toward oral health, were users only of public medical insurance (as opposed to users of private services), and had not used dental services in the year prior to the study. Finally, we observed a decrease in the adequacy of oral hygiene associated with a decrease in socioeconomic status. Our findings showed that oral hygiene was closely associated with socioeconomic status. This implies that if a reduction of oral health inequalities is to be achieved, the strategies and resources targeting these goals must take into account the existing differences between population groups with more or fewer social disadvantages.

  13. A year-long caregiver training program improves cognition in preschool Ugandan children with human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Michael J; Bangirana, Paul; Nakasujja, Noeline; Page, Connie F; Shohet, Cilly; Givon, Deborah; Bass, Judith K; Opoka, Robert O; Klein, Pnina S

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate mediational intervention for sensitizing caregivers (MISC). MISC biweekly caregiver training significantly enhanced child development compared with biweekly training on health and nutrition (active control) and to evaluate whether MISC training improved the emotional well-being of the caregivers compared with controls. Sixty of 120 rural Ugandan preschool child/caregiver dyads with HIV were assigned by randomized clusters to biweekly MISC training, alternating between home and clinic for 1 year. Control dyads received a health and nutrition curriculum. Children were evaluated at baseline, 6 months, and 1 year with the Mullen Early Learning Scales and the Color-Object Association Test for memory. Caldwell Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment and videotaped child/caregiver MISC interactions also were evaluated. Caregivers were evaluated for depression and anxiety with the Hopkins Symptoms Checklist. Between-group repeated-measures ANCOVA comparisons were made with age, sex, CD4 levels, viral load, material socioeconomic status, physical development, and highly active anti-retroviral therapy treatment status as covariates. The children given MISC had significantly greater gains compared with controls on the Mullen Visual Reception scale (visual-spatial memory) and on Color-Object Association Test memory. MISC caregivers significantly improved on Caldwell Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment scale and total frequency of MISC videotaped interactions. MISC caregivers also were less depressed. Mortality was less for children given MISC compared with controls during the training year. MISC was effective in teaching Ugandan caregivers to enhance their children's cognitive development through practical and sustainable techniques applied during daily interactions in the home. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Leap and strike kinetics of an acoustically 'hunting' barn owl (Tyto alba).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usherwood, James R; Sparkes, Emily L; Weller, Renate

    2014-09-01

    Barn owls are effective hunters of small rodents. One hunting technique is a leap from the ground followed by a brief flight and a plummeting 'strike' onto an acoustically targeted - and potentially entirely hidden - prey. We used forceplate measurements to derive kinetics of the leap and strike. Leaping performance was similar to reported values for guinea fowl. This is likely achieved despite the owl's considerably smaller size because of its relatively long legs and use of wing upstroke. Strikes appear deliberately forceful: impulses could have been spread over larger periods during greater deflections of the centre of mass, as observed in leaping and an alighting landing measurement. The strike, despite forces around 150 times that of a mouse body weight, is not thought to be crucial to the kill; rather, forceful strikes may function primarily to enable rapid penetration of leaf litter or snow cover, allowing grasping of hidden prey. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. Leap and strike kinetics of an acoustically ‘hunting’ barn owl (Tyto alba)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usherwood, James R.; Sparkes, Emily L.; Weller, Renate

    2014-01-01

    Barn owls are effective hunters of small rodents. One hunting technique is a leap from the ground followed by a brief flight and a plummeting ‘strike’ onto an acoustically targeted – and potentially entirely hidden – prey. We used forceplate measurements to derive kinetics of the leap and strike. Leaping performance was similar to reported values for guinea fowl. This is likely achieved despite the owl's considerably smaller size because of its relatively long legs and use of wing upstroke. Strikes appear deliberately forceful: impulses could have been spread over larger periods during greater deflections of the centre of mass, as observed in leaping and an alighting landing measurement. The strike, despite forces around 150 times that of a mouse body weight, is not thought to be crucial to the kill; rather, forceful strikes may function primarily to enable rapid penetration of leaf litter or snow cover, allowing grasping of hidden prey. PMID:24948629

  16. Initial Experiments with the Leap Motion as a User Interface in Robotic Endonasal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travaglini, T A; Swaney, P J; Weaver, Kyle D; Webster, R J

    The Leap Motion controller is a low-cost, optically-based hand tracking system that has recently been introduced on the consumer market. Prior studies have investigated its precision and accuracy, toward evaluating its usefulness as a surgical robot master interface. Yet due to the diversity of potential slave robots and surgical procedures, as well as the dynamic nature of surgery, it is challenging to make general conclusions from published accuracy and precision data. Thus, our goal in this paper is to explore the use of the Leap in the specific scenario of endonasal pituitary surgery. We use it to control a concentric tube continuum robot in a phantom study, and compare user performance using the Leap to previously published results using the Phantom Omni. We find that the users were able to achieve nearly identical average resection percentage and overall surgical duration with the Leap.

  17. The Promise of Pre-K: Expanding Quality Preschool in Cincinnati. Education/Childcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Quality preschool improves children's educational outcomes into the elementary grades, and good programs with wraparound childcare anchor family financial stability by enabling parents to work. Yet, too few Cincinnati children have access to a good preschool or any preschool at all. A levy on this November's ballot seeks to change that by adding a…

  18. The Promise of Pre-K. Expanding Quality Preschool in Cincinnati. Education/Childcare. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Quality preschool improves children's educational outcomes into the elementary grades, and good programs with wraparound childcare anchor family financial stability by enabling parents to work. Yet, too few Cincinnati children have access to a good preschool or any preschool at all. A levy on this November's ballot seeks to change that by adding a…

  19. The EU-AIMS Longitudinal European Autism Project (LEAP): clinical characterisation.

    OpenAIRE

    Charman, Tony; Loth, Eva; Tillmann, Julian; Crawley, Daisy; Wooldridge, Caroline; Goyard, David; Ahmad, Jumana; Auyeung, Bonnie; Ambrosino, Sara; Banaschewski, Tobias; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Baumeister, Sarah; Beckmann, Christian; Bölte, Sven; Bourgeron, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background The EU-AIMS Longitudinal European Autism Project (LEAP) is to date the largest multi-centre, multi-disciplinary observational study on biomarkers for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The current paper describes the clinical characteristics of the LEAP cohort and examines age, sex and IQ differences in ASD core symptoms and common co-occurring psychiatric symptoms. A companion paper describes the overall design and expe...

  20. Leap Motion + Kinect: An optical 3D multi-sensor solution for HCI

    OpenAIRE

    Bakli, Gaute

    2013-01-01

    Microsoft's Kinect is a well researched and established optical 3D sensor in a wide range of HCI\\footnote{Human - Computer Interface} applications. However, to fully utilize modern HCI environments , the requirement for accuracy and range are increasing. While Kinect's current technology delivers sufficient range, it does not deliver adequate accuracy.\\\\ Leap Motion is a new consumer grade optical 3D sensor with declared sub-milimeter accuracy within a small range. Can Leap Motion complime...

  1. The Source of Child Care Center Preschool Learning and Program Standards: Implications for Potential Early Learning Challenge Fund Grantees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Debra J.; Sansanelli, Rachel A.

    2010-01-01

    The proposed federal Early Learning Challenge Fund (ELCF) aims to improve the quality of early care and education programs by promoting the integration of more stringent program and early learning standards than are typically found in child care centers. ELCF grantees also must outline their plans for professional development and technical…

  2. Experimental Impacts of a Teacher Professional Development Program in Chile on Preschool Classroom Quality and Child Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Leyva, Diana; Snow, Catherine E.; Treviño, Ernesto; Barata, M. Clara; Weiland, Christina; Gomez, Celia J.; Moreno, Lorenzo; Rolla, Andrea; D'Sa, Nikhit; Arbour, Mary Catherine

    2015-01-01

    We assessed impacts on classroom quality and on 5 child language and behavioral outcomes of a 2-year teacher professional-development program for publicly funded prekindergarten and kindergarten in Chile. This cluster-randomized trial included 64 schools (child N = 1,876). The program incorporated workshops and in-classroom coaching. We found…

  3. Two-Year Impact of a Mindfulness-Based Program on Preschoolers' Self-Regulation and Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thierry, Karen L.; Bryant, Heather L.; Nobles, Sandra Speegle; Norris, Karen S.

    2016-01-01

    Research Findings: Students experienced a mindfulness program designed to enhance their self-regulation in prekindergarten and kindergarten. At the end of the 1st year of the program, these students showed improvements in teacher-reported executive function skills, specifically related to working memory and planning and organizing, whereas…

  4. Preschool literacy and second language learners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lars

    Preschool literacy and second language learners Lars Holm In order to understand literacy and language in education it is no longer enough to direct research attention to schools and universities. In the Nordic countries, preschools have become important arenas for numerous political initiatives...... (programs and concepts) intended to improve pre-school children’s literacy and language skills. Seen in a knowledge-society perspective the development might be characterized as an expansion of a life-long-learning evidence-based strategy into early childhood. The importance of development of early...... in the literacy events they meet in their day-care centers and kindergartens? Examining these social practices in pre-schools might illuminate the interplay between language and literacy and the learning processes of second language learners and contribute to the discussion about the need for re...

  5. Pengenalan Isyarat Tangan Menggunakan Leap Motion Controller untuk Pertunjukan Boneka Tangan Virtual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iskandar Dzulkarnain

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Leap Motion Controller memiliki keterbatasan dalam menangkap gerak isyarat tangan. Keterbatasan tersebut menyebabkan gerakan tangan model boneka virtual tidak seakurat gerakan tangan pelakon. Selain itu, konfigurasi bone model dimensi tiga untuk Leap Motion Controller berbeda dengan konfigurasi bone dimensi tiga pada umumnya. Oleh karena itu, dilakukan pengenalan isyarat tangan menggunakan Leap Motion Controller untuk pertunjukan boneka tangan virtual. Pengenalan isyarat tangan tersebut dilakukan dengan memetakan hasil penjejakan tangan dari Leap Motion Controller ke dalam model prefab tangan Leap SDK. Setelah berhasil dipetakan, konfigurasi bone dari model prefab tangan Leap SDK diadaptasi ke dalam model boneka tangan virtual. Adaptasi tersebut dilakukan dengan mengatur posisi dan orientasi bone pada model dimensi tiga boneka tangan. Setelah posisi dan orientasi bone yang sesuai ditemukan, model dimensi tiga boneka tangan diuji menirukan gerakan boneka tangan asli. Pengujian boneka tangan virtual pada sembarang orang dilakukan untuk mengetahui tingkat kesinkronan gerak mulut atas dan mulut bawah boneka tangan virtual. Dari pengujian sembarang orang, didapatkan hasil 50% setuju dan 5,6% sangat setuju gerak mulut atas sinkron dengan gerak tangan. Sedangkan untuk gerak mulut bawah sinkron dengan gerak tangan didapatkan 16,7% setuju dan 11,1% sangat setuju.

  6. A Comparison of the Cognitive Development of 3-6 Year-Old Children Who Receive Family-Supported Preschool Education, Institutional Education and No Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zembat, Rengin; Kuday, Fatma Servet

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to examine the effects of Family Supported Preschool Education programs on the development of preschool children. By measuring the effects of family-supported preschool education on cognitive development, this study helps support alternative methods of making preschool education more widespread. The study uses the experimental…

  7. Mathematics and Science Learning Opportunities in Preschool Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piasta, Shayne B.; Pelatti, Christina Yeager; Miller, Heather Lynnine

    2014-01-01

    Research Findings: The present study observed and coded instruction in 65 preschool classrooms to examine (a) overall amounts and (b) types of mathematics and science learning opportunities experienced by preschool children as well as (c) the extent to which these opportunities were associated with classroom and program characteristics. Results…

  8. Nature Preschools and Forest Kindergartens: The Handbook for Outdoor Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, David

    2016-01-01

    "Nature Preschools and Forest Kindergartens" is the latest from environmental education expert David Sobel. Joined by a variety of colleagues to share their experiences and steps for creating a successful forest kindergarten program, "Nature Preschools and Forest Kindergartens" walks you through the European roots of the…

  9. Occupational Therapy in Preschools: A Synthesis of Current Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasmin, Emmanuelle; Gauthier, Anne; Julien, Marjorie; Hui, Caroline

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents a synthesis of current knowledge about occupational therapy in preschools (for 3-6 year olds) in order to provide a better understanding of this field of practice and to guide the implementation or programming of this service. In the literature, occupational therapy in preschools has been documented mainly in the USA. Results…

  10. Priming the Pump: Implementing Response to Intervention in Preschool

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, Donna; Schmertzing, Lorraine; Schmertzing, Richard

    2012-01-01

    This instrumental case study used qualitative methods and grounded theory to examine the implementation of Response to Intervention (RtI) in a rural preschool program. Ten of the preschool staff and eight parents were involved. Other data sources included continuous field notes, memos maintained by the researcher, classroom observations, and…

  11. Self-perceptions and social–emotional classroom engagement following structured physical activity among preschoolers: A feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spyridoula Vazou

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: This study demonstrates the feasibility of providing structured PA program to preschoolers. Moreover, these initial findings suggest that purposely designed, structured PA may help advance the social–emotional engagement and perceived competence of preschool children.

  12. The Effects of an Emotional Education Program on the Emotional Skills of Six-Year-Old Children Attending Preschool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltali, Neslihan Durmosoglu; Deniz, M. Engin

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the effects of an Emotional Education Program, which is based on the PATHS (Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategy) developed by Domitrovich, Greenberg, Cortes and Kusche, on six year old children's emotional skills (identification of emotions, understanding emotions and expression of emotions). In this study,…

  13. Evaluation of the Color Me Healthy Program in Influencing Nutrition and Physical Activity in Mississippi Preschool Child Care Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huye, Holly F.; Bankston, Sarah; Speed, Donna; Molaison, Elaine F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this research was to determine the level of implementation and perceived value in creating knowledge and behavior change from the Color Me Healthy (CMH) training program in child care centers, family day carehomes, or Head Start facilities throughout Mississippi. Methods: A two-phase survey was used to initially…

  14. The Mommy and Me Play Program: a pilot play intervention for low-income, African American preschool families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Linnie Green

    2015-01-01

    In this study the author examined the effects of a dyadic, mother-paired play intervention-The Mommy and Me Play Program-an innovative intervention program designed using a live-action modeling technique in which mothers serve as "natural helpers" to each other. By identifying natural strengths in mothers and employing opportunities for scaffolded learning, this intervention aimed to enhance mother-child play interactions and children's social and emotional competence. Fifty mother-child dyads from a single, low-income, African American, urban community were assessed in this study on measures of mother-child play interactions and children's social and emotional competency. Results from this pilot were not statistically significant, but provide important information regarding future research with this intervention program. These preliminary findings indicated that mothers with fewer play skills pre-intervention demonstrated improvement in their play skills post-intervention beyond other intervention participants; and children of those same mothers showed the greatest decrease in angry and aggressive behaviors in the classroom when compared to other participating children from pre- to post-intervention. Implications for research and practice in community-based, intervention work with low-income, ethnic-minority families are discussed.

  15. Pedagogy, policy and preschool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornerup, Ida; Schrøder, Vibeke

    The aim of this study is to conduct a discourse analysis on how global, national and local policy documents influence preschool teacher education and the practical pedagogical work in preschools. The study is part of a larger Nordic research study (Gjems, Vatne, Schrøder and Kornerup). Previous...... studies of preschool teacher education (Vatne, Gjems 2014) shows that professional knowledge vary according to the consolidation act of education and that there seems to be connections between both global and national policy and the educational field (Kornerup, 2011). The discourse analysis...... of the implementation of the learning curriculum in Danish preschools. This focus has affected both preschools and education. During this century, the preschool teacher education has been revised three times....

  16. Drift-Implicit Multi-Level Monte Carlo Tau-Leap Methods for Stochastic Reaction Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Ben Hammouda, Chiheb

    2015-05-12

    In biochemical systems, stochastic e↵ects can be caused by the presence of small numbers of certain reactant molecules. In this setting, discrete state-space and stochastic simulation approaches were proved to be more relevant than continuous state-space and deterministic ones. These stochastic models constitute the theory of stochastic reaction networks (SRNs). Furthermore, in some cases, the dynamics of fast and slow time scales can be well separated and this is characterized by what is called sti↵ness. For such problems, the existing discrete space-state stochastic path simulation methods, such as the stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA) and the explicit tau-leap method, can be very slow. Therefore, implicit tau-leap approxima- tions were developed to improve the numerical stability and provide more e cient simulation algorithms for these systems. One of the interesting tasks for SRNs is to approximate the expected values of some observables of the process at a certain fixed time T. This is can be achieved using Monte Carlo (MC) techniques. However, in a recent work, Anderson and Higham in 2013, proposed a more computationally e cient method which combines multi-level Monte Carlo (MLMC) technique with explicit tau-leap schemes. In this MSc thesis, we propose new fast stochastic algorithm, particularly designed 5 to address sti↵ systems, for approximating the expected values of some observables of SRNs. In fact, we take advantage of the idea of MLMC techniques and drift-implicit tau-leap approximation to construct a drift-implicit MLMC tau-leap estimator. In addition to accurately estimating the expected values of a given observable of SRNs at a final time T , our proposed estimator ensures the numerical stability with a lower cost than the MLMC explicit tau-leap algorithm, for systems including simultane- ously fast and slow species. The key contribution of our work is the coupling of two drift-implicit tau-leap paths, which is the basic brick for

  17. 3-D analysis of semiconductor dopant distributions in a patterned structure using LEAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, J.S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, P.O. Box 116130, 525 Engineering Builing, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)], E-mail: jsm200@ufl.edu; Jones, K.S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, P.O. Box 116130, 525 Engineering Builing, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Kennel, H.; Corcoran, S. [Intel Corporation, Hillsboro, OR (United States)

    2008-05-15

    This work presents the first 3-D analysis of lateral dopant diffusion in a patterned structure using a pulsed laser-assisted local electrode atom probe (LEAP). A structure similar to a device channel was created for this work by performing a 3 keV, 1x10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} As{sup +} implant on a poly-Si line patterned wafer with 70 nm line width and 200 nm line pitch. The wafer was subsequently annealed at 950 deg. C for 1 s. LEAP samples were made using a site-selective in-situ focused ion beam (FIB) process. The results from LEAP analysis were then compared with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and Florida object-oriented process simulator (FLOOPS) results. Good structural agreement was found between the LEAP and HRTEM results. Several 1-D As concentration profiles extracted from the LEAP data were also found to be in good agreement with FLOOPS process simulation results. These profiles also represent for the first time that results from a 3-D process simulator have been able to be confirmed experimentally using a single sample.

  18. An analysis of the immunization status of preschool children enrolled in a statewide Medicaid managed care program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivier, P M; Alario, A J; Peter, G; Leddy, T; Simon, P; Mor, V

    2001-11-01

    To measure immunization coverage rates for children enrolled in a statewide Medicaid managed care program and determine the impact of sociodemographic characteristics and the type of primary care provider site on immunization coverage. A random sample of 2000 was chosen from children between the ages of 19 and 35 months who had been continuously enrolled in the Medicaid managed care program for 1 year. Sociodemographic data and a list of primary care providers for the study children were obtained from administrative databases. Immunization histories were determined by medical record review. Vaccine-specific immunization rates for diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis, polio, Haemophilus influenzae type b, hepatitis B, and measles-mumps-rubella ranged from 87% to 94%, with an overall coverage rate of 75%. Overall immunization status varied by primary care provider site as follows: office-based, 72%; community health center, 75%; hospital-based clinic, 79%; and staff model health maintenance organization, 85% (chi(2) test, P =.008). Immunization rates compare favorably with national rates for this low-income group. Sociodemographic characteristics were not important predictors of underimmunization, but rates did vary by the type of primary care provider site.

  19. The Effectiveness of Parent Training as a Treatment for Preschool Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled, Multicenter Trial of the New Forest Parenting Program in Everyday Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, David; Frydenberg, Morten; Rask, Charlotte U; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; Thomsen, Per H

    2016-01-01

    Background Parent training is recommended as the first-line treatment for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in preschool children. The New Forest Parenting Programme (NFPP) is an evidence-based parenting program developed specifically to target preschool ADHD. Objective The objective of this trial is to investigate whether the NFPP can be effectively delivered for children referred through official community pathways in everyday clinical practice. Methods A multicenter randomized controlled parallel arm trial design is employed. There are two treatment arms, NFPP and treatment as usual. NFPP consists of eight individually delivered parenting sessions, where the child attends during three of the sessions. Outcomes are examined at three time points (T1, T2, T3): T1 (baseline), T2 (week 12, post intervention), and T3 (6 month follow/up). 140 children between the ages of 3-7, with a clinical diagnosis of ADHD, informed by the Development and Well Being Assessment, and recruited from three child and adolescent psychiatry departments in Denmark will take part. Randomization is on a 1:1 basis, stratified for age and gender. Results The primary endpoint is change in ADHD symptoms as measured by the Preschool ADHD-Rating Scale (ADHD-RS) by T2. Secondary outcome measures include: effects on this measure at T3 and T2 and T3 measures of teacher reported Preschool ADHD-RS scores, parent and teacher rated scores on the Strength & Difficulties Questionnaire, direct observation of ADHD behaviors during Child’s Solo Play, observation of parent-child interaction, parent sense of competence, and family stress. Results will be reported using the standards set out in the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials Statement for Randomized Controlled Trials of nonpharmacological treatments. Conclusions The trial will provide evidence as to whether NFPP is a more effective treatment for preschool ADHD than the treatment usually offered in everyday clinical practice. Trial

  20. Children's Representations of Cultural Scripts in Play: Facilitating Transition from Home to Preschool in an Intercultural Early Learning Program for Refugee Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirova, Anna

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on the role of play as a cultural activity in refugee children's transition from home to preschool. The "culture-free" view of play as a means for development of a "universal" child was challenged and an alternative view presented of play as a culturally leading activity in the development of a culturally situated child based…

  1. A Selective Intervention Program for Inhibited Preschool-Aged Children of Parents with an Anxiety Disorder: Effects on Current Anxiety Disorders and Temperament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Susan J.; Rapee, Ronald M.; Edwards, Susan L.

    2009-01-01

    The efficacy of early intervention for preschool-aged children at risk of anxiety disorders is investigated. Brief early intervention delivered through parents can reduce anxiety and associated risk and may alter the developmental trajectory of anxiety in some young children.

  2. Foundations of Science Literacy: Efficacy of a Preschool Professional Development Program in Science on Classroom Instruction, Teachers' Pedagogical Content Knowledge, and Children's Observations and Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gropen, Jess; Kook, Janna F.; Hoisington, Cindy; Clark-Chiarelli, Nancy

    2017-01-01

    Young children are able to benefit from early science teaching but many preschool teachers have not had opportunities to deepen their own understanding of science or to develop their pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) in relation to specific science topics and concepts. This study presents the results of efficacy research on Foundations of…

  3. No Preschooler Left behind: Preschool Policies in the NCLB World

    Science.gov (United States)

    DellaMattera, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Current preschool learning guidelines, created in response to NCLB requirements, focus on three areas of human development in an effort to ensure that preschoolers are ready for kindergarten. This study examined four New England states' preschool learning guidelines, looking at how each detailed its support for preschoolers' development. The…

  4. Swedish Preschool Teachers' Ideas of the Ideal Preschool Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramling Samuelsson, Ingrid; Williams, Pia; Sheridan, Sonja; Hellman, Annette

    2016-01-01

    In Sweden, preschool has been noted as being of a high quality compared to many other countries. However, dramatic changes in the preschool sector are taking place. A recent law states that it is a child's right to get a preschool place within a few months. As a consequence, the number of children in preschool has increased, which could influence…

  5. The Overweight Preschool Retarded Child Can and Should Lose Weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Robert; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes a weight reduction and control program for obese retarded preschool children involving parent leaders and incorporating social and tangible rewards. Discusses techniques children practice daily for a total of 15 weeks. (RH)

  6. Existence and uniqueness of solutions from the LEAP equilibrium energy-economy model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oblow, E.M.

    1982-10-01

    A study was made of the existence and uniqueness of solutions to the long-range, energy-economy model LEAP. The code is a large scale, long-range (50 year) equilibrium model of energy supply and demand in the US economy used for government and industrial forecasting. The study focused on the two features which distinguish LEAP from other equilibrium models - the treatment of product allocation and basic conversion of materials into an energy end product. Both allocation and conversion processes are modeled in a behavioral fashion which differs from classical economic paradigms. The results of the study indicate that while LEAP contains desirable behavioral features, these same features can give rise to non-uniqueness in the solution of allocation and conversion process equations. Conditions under which existence and uniqueness of solutions might not occur are developed in detail and their impact in practical applications are discussed.

  7. Leaping ability and body composition in rhythmic gymnasts for talent identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cagno, A; Baldari, C; Battaglia, C; Brasili, P; Merni, F; Piazza, M; Toselli, S; Ventrella, A R; Guidetti, L

    2008-09-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate leaping ability and morphological characteristics in rhythmic gymnastics, in order to verify which parameters are useful indicators for the talent identification. Twenty-five national gymnasts of international level (age 14.7+/-2.2 years) underwent three testing sessions: anthropometric measurements, vertical jumps (counter movement jump and hopping test), and three technical split leaps with stretched legs (SL), with ring (RG) and with back bend of the trunk (BBT). Elite had significantly different values (P gymnasts (0.34+/-0.05 vs 0.27+/-0.04 m; P rhythmic gymnastics. Level of muscle compliance (stiffness) evaluated by hopping test is a good parameter for athletes selection and for monitoring leaps training.

  8. The significance of land-atmosphere interactions in the Earth system-iLEAPS achievements and perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suni, T.; Guenther, A.; Hansson, H.C.; Kulmala, M.; Andreae, M.O.; Arneth, A.; Artaxo, P.; Blyth, E.; Brus, M.; Ganzeveld, L.; Kabat, P.; de. Noblet-Ducoudré, N.; Reichstein, M.; Reissell, A.; Rosenfeld, D.; Seneviratne, S.

    2015-01-01

    The integrated land ecosystem-atmosphere processes study (iLEAPS) is an international research project focussing on the fundamental processes that link land-atmosphere exchange, climate, the water cycle, and tropospheric chemistry. The project, iLEAPS, was established 2004 within the

  9. Estimation of the Level of Cognitive Development of a Preschool Child Using the System of Situations with Mathematical Contents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorev, Pavel M.; Bichurina, Svetlana Y.; Yakupova, Rufiya M.; Khairova, Irina V.

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive development of personality can be considered as one of the key directions of preschool education presented in the world practice, where preschool programs are educational ones, and preschool education is the first level of the general education. Thereby the purpose of the research is to create a model of reliable estimation of cognitive…

  10. Long-Haired Girl, Short-Haired Boy: Imagery Use in Preschoolers' Stereotypes About Sex Differences in Emotionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnbaum, Dana W.

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence and the relative salience of imagery and contextual cues in the mediation of preschoolers' emotional stereotypes. Fourteen male and 14 female preschoolers enrolled in a university summer preschool program were presented with six hypothetical emotional situations in story form -- 2 each for…

  11. Writing Workshop in Preschool

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Kelly A.

    2012-01-01

    Preschoolers may be novices in the area of writing but, as this article highlights, they are indeed writers. In a year-long ethnography of preschoolers during structured writing time the teacher/researcher explored how students adapted to a writing workshop format. Students participated in daily journal writing and sharing, and weekly conference…

  12. Lessons from implementing mass drug administration for soil transmitted helminths among pre-school aged children during school based deworming program at the Kenyan coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemary M. Musuva

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 2012 London declaration which committed to “sustaining, expanding and extending drug access programmes to ensure the necessary supply of drugs and other interventions to help control soil-transmitted helminths (STH by 2020” has seen many countries in Africa roll out mass drug administration (MDA especially among school age children. In Kenya, however, during the National school-based deworming exercise, pre-school aged children (PSAC have to access treatment at primary schools as the pre-school teachers are not trained to carry out deworming. With studies being conducted on the effectiveness of MDAs, the experiences of key education stakeholders which could improve the programme by giving best practices, and challenges experienced have not been documented. Methods This was a cross-sectional qualitative study using Focus group discussions (FGDs and Key informant interviews (KIIs. It was conducted in 4 sub-counties with high STH prevalence at the Kenyan coast (Matuga, Malindi, Lunga Lunga and Msambweni to understand best practices for implementing MDA among PSAC.FGDs categorized by gender were conducted among local community members, whereas KIIs involved pre-school teachers, primary school teachers, community health extension workers (CHEWs and opinion leaders. Participants were purposefully selected with the saturation model determining the number of interviews and focus groups. Voice data collected was transcribed verbatim then coded and analyzed using ATLAS.Ti version 6. Results Majority of the primary school teachers and CHEWs reported that they were satisfied with the method of mobilization used and the training tools. This was however not echoed by the pre-school teachers, parents and chiefs who complained of being left out of the process. Best practices mentioned included timely drug delivery, support from pre-school teachers, and management of side effects. Overcrowding during the drug administration day

  13. Programa Embu Enxergando Melhor: uma proposta de atenção integral à saúde ocular em pré-escolares Embu Seeing Better: a complete eye health program proposal for preschool children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cecília S. Lapa

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: A visão desempenha um papel preponderante no desenvolvimento global da criança. A detecção e o tratamento precoce de problemas visuais são fundamentais para impedir a instalação de seqüelas sensório-motoras irreversíveis. Este estudo visou descrever um programa de atenção integral à saúde ocular de crianças, constituído por ações educativas, de prevenção, de assistência e de reabilitação. MÉTODOS: Estudo descritivo transversal, no qual se utilizaram dados do treinamento dos professores, da triagem visual realizada na escola e do exame oftalmológico e ortóptico de 23.374 crianças, de cinco a sete anos de idade, matriculadas na rede municipal de educação infantil do município do Embu, no período de 1994 a 2002. RESULTADOS: Foram capacitados 600 professores e testados 22.118 (95% pré-escolares. Destes, 4.553 (21% precisavam de exame oftalmológico e, deles, 3.016 (66% compareceram à consulta. Dos examinados, 1.389 (46% receberam prescrição óptica, 477 (16%, foram encaminhadas para tratamento ortóptico e 1.601 (53% receberam alta. CONCLUSÕES: A triagem visual é uma prática eficiente para promover a saúde ocular de pré-escolares, na qual o professor é o elemento chave. Para o êxito destas ações, é fundamental estruturar práticas educativas e de promoção da saúde ocular destinadas às crianças, às famílias e à sociedade.OBJECTIVE: Early detection and prompt treatment of ocular disorders in children are important to avoid lifelong visual impairment. This study aimed to describe a comprehensive eye health care program for preschool children. METHODS: A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out focusing eye health conditions of 23,374 children, between five and seven years old, of the public preschool system of Embu, a municipality of Sao Paulo, Brazil, from 1994 to 2002. Data were obtained from preschool vision screening programs performed by teachers and from ocular assessments of

  14. Emotion Regulation in Sexually Abused Preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langevin, Rachel; Cossette, Louise; Hébert, Martine

    2016-02-01

    Emotion regulation is closely related to mental health in children and adults. Low emotion regulation competencies have been found in school-aged sexually abused girls. The aim of the present study was to investigate emotion regulation competencies in sexually abused preschool girls and boys using a multi-informant approach. Emotion regulation was assessed in 62 sexually abused and 65 non-abused preschoolers using the Emotion Regulation Checklist and the MacArthur Story Stem Battery. Both parents and educators reported lower emotion regulation competencies in sexually abused preschoolers, especially boys, than in non-abused children. The narrative task completed by the children also revealed lower emotion regulation competencies in sexually abused boys. These findings could have an important impact on intervention programs offered to these at-risk children.

  15. Preschool Interpersonal Relationships Predict Kindergarten Achievement: Mediated by Gains in Emotion Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Marcela M.; Domitrovich, Celene E.; Bierman, Karen L.

    2016-01-01

    Using longitudinal data, this study tested a model in which preschool interpersonal relationships promoted kindergarten achievement in a pathway mediated by growth in emotion knowledge. The sample included 164 children attending Head Start (14% Hispanic-American, 30% African-American, 56% Caucasian; 56% girls). Preschool interpersonal relationships were indexed by student-teacher relationship closeness and positive peer interactions. Two measures of emotion knowledge (identifying emotions in photographs, recognizing emotions in stories) were assessed at the start and end of the preschool year. Structural equation models revealed that positive interpersonal relationships (with teachers and peers) predicted gains in emotion knowledge (identification, recognition) during the preschool year. Positive interpersonal relationships in preschool also predicted kindergarten achievement (controlling for initial preschool achievement); however, this association was mediated by gains in emotion knowledge during the preschool year. Implications are discussed for school readiness programs serving economically-disadvantaged children. PMID:27630379

  16. Preschool Interpersonal Relationships Predict Kindergarten Achievement: Mediated by Gains in Emotion Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Marcela M; Domitrovich, Celene E; Bierman, Karen L

    2015-01-01

    Using longitudinal data, this study tested a model in which preschool interpersonal relationships promoted kindergarten achievement in a pathway mediated by growth in emotion knowledge. The sample included 164 children attending Head Start (14% Hispanic-American, 30% African-American, 56% Caucasian; 56% girls). Preschool interpersonal relationships were indexed by student-teacher relationship closeness and positive peer interactions. Two measures of emotion knowledge (identifying emotions in photographs, recognizing emotions in stories) were assessed at the start and end of the preschool year. Structural equation models revealed that positive interpersonal relationships (with teachers and peers) predicted gains in emotion knowledge (identification, recognition) during the preschool year. Positive interpersonal relationships in preschool also predicted kindergarten achievement (controlling for initial preschool achievement); however, this association was mediated by gains in emotion knowledge during the preschool year. Implications are discussed for school readiness programs serving economically-disadvantaged children.

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Xylella fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa Strain Stag?s Leap

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, J.; Wu, F.; Zheng, Z.; Deng, X.; Burbank, L. P.; Stenger, D. C.

    2016-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa causes Pierce?s disease of grapevine. Presented here is the draft genome sequence of the Stag?s Leap strain, previously used in pathogenicity/virulence assays to evaluate grapevine germplasm bearing Pierce?s disease resistance and a phenotypic assessment of knockout mutants to determine gene function.

  18. Draft genome sequence of Xylella fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa strain Stag’s Leap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xylella fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa causes Pierce’s disease of grapevine. Presented here is the draft genome sequence of the Stag’s Leap strain, previously used in pathogenicity/virulence assays to evaluate grapevine germplasm bearing Pierce’s disease....

  19. Plateaus, Dips, and Leaps: Where to Look for Inventions and Discoveries During Skilled Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Wayne D; Lindstedt, John K

    2017-09-01

    The framework of plateaus, dips, and leaps shines light on periods when individuals may be inventing new methods of skilled performance. We begin with a review of the role performance plateaus have played in (a) experimental psychology, (b) human-computer interaction, and (c) cognitive science. We then reanalyze two classic studies of individual performance to show plateaus and dips which resulted in performance leaps. For a third study, we show how the statistical methods of Changepoint Analysis plus a few simple heuristics may direct our focus to periods of performance change for individuals. For the researcher, dips become the marker of exploration where performance suffers as new methods are invented and tested. Leaps mark the implementation of a successful new method and an incremental jump above the path plotted by smooth and steady log-log performance increments. The methods developed during these dips and leaps are the key to surpassing one's teachers and acquiring extreme expertise. Copyright © 2016 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  20. Plateaus, Dips, and Leaps: Where to Look for Inventions and Discoveries during Skilled Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Wayne D.; Lindstedt, John K.

    2017-01-01

    The framework of "plateaus, dips, and leaps" shines light on periods when individuals may be inventing new methods of skilled performance. We begin with a review of the role "performance plateaus" have played in (a) experimental psychology, (b) human-computer interaction, and (c) cognitive science. We then reanalyze two classic…

  1. Project LEAP: Learning English-for-Academic-Purposes. Training Manual Year Three.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Marguerite Ann, Ed.

    Project LEAP (Learning English-for-Academic-Purposes) is a three-year faculty development and supplemental instruction partnership to improve the academic literacy skills of native-born, immigrant, and international language minority students. This manual is the third set of faculty development materials produced by the project, presenting…

  2. A Preschool with Promise: How One District Provides Early Education for All

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubin, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    This article features a school district in Perth Amboy, New Jersey, that has created a full-day preschool program that helps prepare all children socially and academically for school. For students ages 3 and 4 in Perth Amboy, the two ideas--learning and fun--are one and the same. Through the district's full-day preschool program, teachers…

  3. The Promise of Preschool: Why We Need Early Education for All

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, W. Steven; Frede, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    It's fairly well known that high-quality preschool programs can have life-altering impacts on disadvantaged children, including reductions in school dropout and crime, and increased earnings. Not as well known is that terrific preschool programs have important academic and social benefits for middle-class children too. Decades of research indicate…

  4. A longitudinal study of the role of children's altruism and forgiveness in the relation between parental aggressive discipline and anxiety of preschoolers in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Sylvia Y C L; Gu, Minmin; Cheung, Andy P S

    2017-03-01

    Using data collected over a 1-year period on a stratified random sample of 368 parents with children studying in nurseries (mean age=3.97years), this study assessed the predictive effects of parental corporal punishment, parental psychological aggression, preschoolers' altruism, and preschoolers' forgiveness on preschoolers' anxiety symptoms in Hong Kong, China. Results of hierarchical regression analyses showed that parental psychological aggression, preschoolers' altruism and preschoolers' forgiveness at Time 1 significantly predicted preschoolers' anxiety at Time 2, when controlling for the initial level of preschoolers' anxiety and important demographic variables that co-vary with preschoolers' anxiety. Moreover, preschoolers' altruism moderated the predictive effect of parental psychological aggression on preschoolers' anxiety symptoms. The study has several significant contributions. First, the study supports the predictive effect of parental aggressive discipline on preschoolers' anxiety. Second, we provide evidence that preschoolers' altruism and forgiveness negatively predict preschoolers' anxiety symptoms. Third, preschoolers' altruism and forgiveness are shown to protect them against parental psychological aggression. A dual-focus approach to intervention and prevention is proposed to reduce aggressive discipline by parents as well as to enhance altruism and forgiveness in children. Parent training programs could be provided to teach parents positive discipline strategies. Home-based or school-based interventions could be designed for preschool children to foster and enhance their altruism and forgiveness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. La Educacion Preescolar en Cuba [Preschool Education in Cuba].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childhood Education, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Describes the "Educate Your Child" program, a Cuban family-based program supported by UNICEF and designed to enhance the total development of children from birth until the start of formal schooling for the 80 percent of Cuban children who do not attend the Children's Circle preschool program. Highlights the importance of the regional…

  6. Promoting social and emotional competencies among young children in Croatia with preschool PATHS

    OpenAIRE

    Mihic, Josipa; Novak, Miranda; Basic, Josipa; Nix, Robert L.; Centre for Resilience & Socio-Emotional Health

    2016-01-01

    Preschool PATHS (Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies) is an evidence-based universal prevention program focused on promoting children’s social and emotional competencies and reducing the likelihood of behaviour problems and negative relationships with peers and teachers. This paper examines changes in the social and emotional competencies of the first children to participate in Preschool PATHS in Croatia. This study included 164 children, ages 3-6, in 12 preschool classro...

  7. Preschooler test or procedure preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preparing preschoolers for test/procedure; Test/procedure preparation - preschooler ... Preparing children for medical tests can reduce their anxiety. It can also make them less likely to cry and resist the procedure. Research shows that ...

  8. Does famine influence sex ratio at birth? Evidence from the 1959-1961 Great Leap Forward Famine in China

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shige Song

    2012-01-01

    ... sample survey in 1982. The study identified an abrupt decline in sex ratio at birth between April 1960, over a year after the Great Leap Forward Famine began, and October 1963, approximately 2 years after the famine ended...

  9. Influence of Teachers' Personal Health Behaviors on Operationalizing Obesity Prevention Policy in Head Start Preschools: A Project of the Children's Healthy Living Program (CHL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel, Monica Kazlausky; Nigg, Claudio R; Fialkowski, Marie K; Braun, Kathryn L; Li, Fenfang; Novotny, Rachel

    2016-05-01

    To quantify the Head Start (HS) teacher mediating and moderating influence on the effect of a wellness policy intervention. Intervention trial within a larger randomized community trial. HS preschools in Hawaii. Twenty-three HS classrooms located within 2 previously randomized communities. Seven-month multi-component intervention with policy changes to food served and service style, initiatives for employee wellness, classroom activities for preschoolers promoting physical activity (PA) and healthy eating, and training and technical assistance. The Environment and Policy Assessment and Observation (EPAO) classroom scores and teacher questionnaires assessing on knowledge, beliefs, priorities, and misconceptions around child nutrition and changes in personal health behaviors and status were the main outcome measures. Paired t tests and linear regression analysis tested the intervention effects on the classroom and mediating and moderating effects of the teacher variables on the classroom environment. General linear model test showed greater intervention effect on the EPAO score where teachers reported higher than average improvements in their own health status and behaviors (estimate [SE] = -2.47 (0.78), P < .05). Strategies to improve teacher health status and behaviors included in a multi-component policy intervention aimed at child obesity prevention may produce a greater effect on classroom environments. Copyright © 2016 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Great Leap Forward Means More Contact with the West.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needham, Joseph

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the implications of the new Chinese policy of increased contacts with the West, the reform of higher education, and the embarking on a program for the development of science and technology. (GA)

  11. Tool path planning of hole-making operations in ejector plate of injection mould using modified shuffled frog leaping algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amol M. Dalavi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Optimization of hole-making operations in manufacturing industry plays a vital role. Tool travel and tool switch planning are the two major issues in hole-making operations. Many industrial applications such as moulds, dies, engine block, automotive parts etc. requires machining of large number of holes. Large number of machining operations like drilling, enlargement or tapping/reaming are required to achieve the final size of individual hole, which gives rise to number of possible sequences to complete hole-making operations on the part depending upon the location of hole and tool sequence to be followed. It is necessary to find the optimal sequence of operations which minimizes the total processing cost of hole-making operations. In this work, therefore an attempt is made to reduce the total processing cost of hole-making operations by applying relatively new optimization algorithms known as shuffled frog leaping algorithm and proposed modified shuffled frog leaping algorithm for the determination of optimal sequence of hole-making operations. An industrial application example of ejector plate of injection mould is considered in this work to demonstrate the proposed approach. The obtained results by the shuffled frog leaping algorithm and proposed modified shuffled frog leaping algorithm are compared with each other. It is seen from the obtained results that the results of proposed modified shuffled frog leaping algorithm are superior to those obtained using shuffled frog leaping algorithm.

  12. Evaluation of the mathematical and economic basis for conversion processes in the LEAP energy-economy model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oblow, E.M.

    1982-10-01

    An evaluation was made of the mathematical and economic basis for conversion processes in the LEAP energy-economy model. Conversion processes are the main modeling subunit in LEAP used to represent energy conversion industries and are supposedly based on the classical economic theory of the firm. The study arose out of questions about uniqueness and existence of LEAP solutions and their relation to classical equilibrium economic theory. An analysis of classical theory and LEAP model equations was made to determine their exact relationship. The conclusions drawn from this analysis were that LEAP theory is not consistent with the classical theory of the firm. Specifically, the capacity factor formalism used by LEAP does not support a classical interpretation in terms of a technological production function for energy conversion processes. The economic implications of this inconsistency are suboptimal process operation and short term negative profits in years where plant operation should be terminated. A new capacity factor formalism, which retains the behavioral features of the original model, is proposed to resolve these discrepancies.

  13. Modified shuffled frog leaping algorithm optimized control for air-breathing hypersonic flight vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingbing Liang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the flight control problem of air-breathing hypersonic vehicles and proposes a novel intelligent algorithm optimized control method. To achieve the climbing, cruising and descending flight control of the air-breathing hypersonic vehicle, an engineering-oriented flight control system based on a Proportional Integral Derivative (PID method is designed for the hypersonic vehicle, which including the height loop, the pitch angle loop and the velocity loop. Moreover, as a variant of nature-inspired algorithm, modified shuffled frog leaping algorithm is presented to optimize the flight control parameters and is characterized by better exploration and exploitation than the standard shuffled frog leaping algorithm. A nonlinear model of air-breathing hypersonic vehicle is used to verify the dynamic characteristics achieved by the intelligent flight control system. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed swarm intelligence optimized PID controllers are effective in achieving better flight trajectory and velocity control performance than the traditional controllers.

  14. Python Leap Second Management and Implementation of Precise Barycentric Correction (barycorrpy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanodia, Shubham; Wright, Jason

    2018-01-01

    We announce barycorrpy (BCPy) , a Python implementation to calculate precise barycentric corrections well below the 1 cm/s level, following the algorithm of Wright and Eastman (2014). This level of precision is required in the search for 1 Earth mass planets in the Habitable Zones of Sun-like stars by the Radial Velocity (RV) method, where the maximum semi-amplitude is about 9 cm/s. We have developed BCPy to be used in the pipeline for the next generation Doppler Spectrometers - Habitable-zone Planet Finder (HPF) and NEID. In this work, we also develop an automated leap second management routine to improve upon the one available in Astropy. It checks for and downloads a new leap second file before converting from the UT time scale to TDB.

  15. Towards automatic global error control: Computable weak error expansion for the tau-leap method

    KAUST Repository

    Karlsson, Peer Jesper

    2011-01-01

    This work develops novel error expansions with computable leading order terms for the global weak error in the tau-leap discretization of pure jump processes arising in kinetic Monte Carlo models. Accurate computable a posteriori error approximations are the basis for adaptive algorithms, a fundamental tool for numerical simulation of both deterministic and stochastic dynamical systems. These pure jump processes are simulated either by the tau-leap method, or by exact simulation, also referred to as dynamic Monte Carlo, the Gillespie Algorithm or the Stochastic Simulation Slgorithm. Two types of estimates are presented: an a priori estimate for the relative error that gives a comparison between the work for the two methods depending on the propensity regime, and an a posteriori estimate with computable leading order term. © de Gruyter 2011.

  16. DESIGN REVIEW OF CAD MODELS USING A NUI LEAP MOTION SENSOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GÎRBACIA Florin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural User Interfaces (NUI is a relatively new area of research that aims to develop humancomputer interfaces, natural and intuitive, using voice commands, hand movements and gesture recognition, similar to communication between people which also implies body language and gestures. In this paper is presented a natural designed workspace which acquires the user's motion using a Leap Motion sensor and visualizes the CAD models using a CAVE-like 3D visualisation system. The user can modify complex CAD models using bimanual gesture commands in a 3D virtual environment. The developed bimanual gestures for rotate, pan, zoom and explode are presented. From the conducted experiments is established that Leap Motion NUI sensor provides an intuitive tool for design review of CAD models, performed even by users with no experience in CAD systems and virtual environments.

  17. SPECIFICS OF SELECTION OF THE CONTENT OF 5-7 YEAR OLD CHILDREN’S EMOIONAL DEVELOPMENT IN THE CONDITIONS OF CONTEMPORARY PRESCHOOL EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION (by the example of the program «Emotional Masterpieces»)

    OpenAIRE

    Irina Nikolaevna Rozova

    2015-01-01

    The paper considers the problem of emotional development of preschool children in the content of preschool education. Based on the analysis of modern approaches to definition of the content of preschool education, the author highlights the priorities. They are focused on personal development, self-realization and self-development of the child in the activities, formation of individual perception of the world, education of emotional and value-based attitude towards the environment, formation o...

  18. SparseLeap: Efficient Empty Space Skipping for Large-Scale Volume Rendering

    KAUST Repository

    Hadwiger, Markus

    2017-08-28

    Recent advances in data acquisition produce volume data of very high resolution and large size, such as terabyte-sized microscopy volumes. These data often contain many fine and intricate structures, which pose huge challenges for volume rendering, and make it particularly important to efficiently skip empty space. This paper addresses two major challenges: (1) The complexity of large volumes containing fine structures often leads to highly fragmented space subdivisions that make empty regions hard to skip efficiently. (2) The classification of space into empty and non-empty regions changes frequently, because the user or the evaluation of an interactive query activate a different set of objects, which makes it unfeasible to pre-compute a well-adapted space subdivision. We describe the novel SparseLeap method for efficient empty space skipping in very large volumes, even around fine structures. The main performance characteristic of SparseLeap is that it moves the major cost of empty space skipping out of the ray-casting stage. We achieve this via a hybrid strategy that balances the computational load between determining empty ray segments in a rasterization (object-order) stage, and sampling non-empty volume data in the ray-casting (image-order) stage. Before ray-casting, we exploit the fast hardware rasterization of GPUs to create a ray segment list for each pixel, which identifies non-empty regions along the ray. The ray-casting stage then leaps over empty space without hierarchy traversal. Ray segment lists are created by rasterizing a set of fine-grained, view-independent bounding boxes. Frame coherence is exploited by re-using the same bounding boxes unless the set of active objects changes. We show that SparseLeap scales better to large, sparse data than standard octree empty space skipping.

  19. SparseLeap: Efficient Empty Space Skipping for Large-Scale Volume Rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadwiger, Markus; Al-Awami, Ali K; Beyer, Johanna; Agus, Marco; Pfister, Hanspeter

    2018-01-01

    Recent advances in data acquisition produce volume data of very high resolution and large size, such as terabyte-sized microscopy volumes. These data often contain many fine and intricate structures, which pose huge challenges for volume rendering, and make it particularly important to efficiently skip empty space. This paper addresses two major challenges: (1) The complexity of large volumes containing fine structures often leads to highly fragmented space subdivisions that make empty regions hard to skip efficiently. (2) The classification of space into empty and non-empty regions changes frequently, because the user or the evaluation of an interactive query activate a different set of objects, which makes it unfeasible to pre-compute a well-adapted space subdivision. We describe the novel SparseLeap method for efficient empty space skipping in very large volumes, even around fine structures. The main performance characteristic of SparseLeap is that it moves the major cost of empty space skipping out of the ray-casting stage. We achieve this via a hybrid strategy that balances the computational load between determining empty ray segments in a rasterization (object-order) stage, and sampling non-empty volume data in the ray-casting (image-order) stage. Before ray-casting, we exploit the fast hardware rasterization of GPUs to create a ray segment list for each pixel, which identifies non-empty regions along the ray. The ray-casting stage then leaps over empty space without hierarchy traversal. Ray segment lists are created by rasterizing a set of fine-grained, view-independent bounding boxes. Frame coherence is exploited by re-using the same bounding boxes unless the set of active objects changes. We show that SparseLeap scales better to large, sparse data than standard octree empty space skipping.

  20. Acoustical evaluation of preschool classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wonyoung; Hodgson, Murray

    2003-10-01

    An investigation was made of the acoustical environments in the Berwick Preschool, Vancouver, in response to complaints by the teachers. Reverberation times (RT), background noise levels (BNL), and in-class sound levels (Leq) were measured for acoustical evaluation in the classrooms. With respect to the measured RT and BNL, none of the classrooms in the preschool were acceptable according to the criteria relevant to this study. A questionnaire was administered to the teachers to assess their subjective responses to the acoustical and nonacoustical environments of the classrooms. Teachers agreed that the nonacoustical environments in the classrooms were fair, but that the acoustical environments had problems. Eight different classroom configurations were simulated to improve the acoustical environments, using the CATT room acoustical simulation program. When the surface absorption was increased, both the RT and speech levels decreased. RASTI was dependent on the volumes of the classrooms when the background noise levels were high; however, it depended on the total absorption of the classrooms when the background noise levels were low. Ceiling heights are critical as well. It is recommended that decreasing the volume of the classrooms is effective. Sound absorptive materials should be added to the walls or ceiling.

  1. Efficient Grid-based Clustering Algorithm with Leaping Search and Merge Neighbors Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Wen, Peng; Zhu, Erzhou

    2017-09-01

    The increasing data size makes the research of clustering algorithm still an important topic in data mining. As one of the fastest algorithms, the grid clustering algorithm now still suffers from low precision problem. And the efficiency of the algorithm also needed improvement. In order to cope with these problems, this paper proposes an efficient grid-based clustering algorithm by using leaping search and Merge Neighborhood (LSMN). In the algorithm, the LSMN first divides the data space into a finite number of grids and determines the validity of the grid according to the threshold. Then, leaping search mechanism is used to find valid grids of the grid by retrieving all the odd columns and odd rows. Finally, if the number of valid grids is greater than the invalid grid, the invalid grids are merged together. In the algorithm, the time cost is reduced and the accuracy is improved by leaping search and re-judgment of the invalid grid mechanisms respectively. The experimental results have shown that the proposed algorithm exhibits relatively better performance when compared with some popularly used algorithms.

  2. Mathematics and Science Learning Opportunities in Preschool Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piasta, Shayne B.; Pelatti, Christina Yeager; Miller, Heather Lynnine

    2014-01-01

    Research findings The present study observed and coded instruction in 65 preschool classrooms to examine (a) overall amounts and (b) types of mathematics and science learning opportunities experienced by preschool children as well as (c) the extent to which these opportunities were associated with classroom and program characteristics. Results indicated that children were afforded an average of 24 and 26 minutes of mathematics and science learning opportunities, respectively, corresponding to spending approximately 25% of total instructional time in each domain. Considerable variability existed, however, in the amounts and types of mathematics and science opportunities provided to children in their classrooms; to some extent, this variability was associated with teachers’ years of experience, teachers’ levels of education, and the socioeconomic status of children served in the program. Practice/policy Although results suggest greater integration of mathematics and science in preschool classrooms than previously established, there was considerable diversity in the amounts and types of learning opportunities provided in preschool classrooms. Affording mathematics and science experiences to all preschool children, as outlined in professional and state standards, may require additional professional development aimed at increasing preschool teachers’ understanding and implementation of learning opportunities in these two domains in their classrooms. PMID:25489205

  3. Preschool Teachers use of ICTs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masoumi, Davoud

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the ways in which information and communication technologies (ICT) are integrated in three preschools in south-western Sweden. The case study involved observations of and interviews with preschool teachers. The findings support claims that ICT can enhance preschool...... practices by providing a variety of complementary opportunities to enrich and transform existing curricula. The study shows that in the studied preschools ICTs have been appropriated in distinctive ways: as an object to enrich existing practices; as a cultural mediator; as a way to entertain young children...... to the complexities that surround engagement with any innovation in preschool settings, and the adoption of new technologies in particular....

  4. Estimativa do consumo de energia e de macronutrientes no domicílio e na escola em pré-escolares Estimation of energy and macronutrient intake at home and in the kindergarten programs in preschool children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Rombaldi Bernardi

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estimar o consumo de energia e de macronutrientes no domicílio e na escola em tempo integral em crianças de 2 a 6 anos e pesquisar diferenças no consumo entre as crianças de escolas públicas e particulares. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal realizado com 362 pré-escolares em Caxias do Sul (RS. O estado nutricional foi avaliado pela razão peso para estatura. O consumo na escola foi avaliado por meio do método de pesagem direta individual dos alimentos consumidos pelas crianças e, no domicílio, por meio do método de registro alimentar realizado pelos pais ou responsáveis. Para as análises estatísticas utilizou-se o teste U de Mann-Whitney (p OBJECTIVE: To estimate the energy and macronutrient intake at home and at all-day in the kindergarten programs in children aged 2 to 6 and to investigate differences in consumption and intake between children at public and private kindergartens. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study of 362 preschool children from Caxias do Sul, Brazil. Nutritional status was assessed in terms of weight to height ratios. Foods consumed in the kindergarten were evaluated by weighing the actual foods eaten by the children and home intakes were calculated from a food diary kept by parents or guardians. Statistical analyses were performed using the Mann-Whitney U test (p < 0.05. RESULTS: It was found that 28 children (7.7% were overweight, 92 (25.4% were at risk of becoming overweight and seven (1.9% were classified as having wasting. Analysis of 24-hour nutritional intake demonstrated that 51.3% of the energy, 60.3% of the lipids and 51.6% of the proteins consumed by children were eaten at home, despite the children spending the whole day in the kindergarten programs. Preschool children at kindergartens ate greater quantities of energy (p = 0.001, carbohydrates (p < 0.001, and lipids (p = 0.04 than did children at public kindergartens, but their total daily intakes were similar, irrespective of which type of

  5. Montessori Preschool Elevates and Equalizes Child Outcomes: A Longitudinal Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeline S. Lillard

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Quality preschool programs that develop the whole child through age-appropriate socioemotional and cognitive skill-building hold promise for significantly improving child outcomes. However, preschool programs tend to either be teacher-led and didactic, or else to lack academic content. One preschool model that involves both child-directed, freely chosen activity and academic content is Montessori. Here we report a longitudinal study that took advantage of randomized lottery-based admission to two public Montessori magnet schools in a high-poverty American city. The final sample included 141 children, 70 in Montessori and 71 in other schools, most of whom were tested 4 times over 3 years, from the first semester to the end of preschool (ages 3–6, on a variety of cognitive and socio-emotional measures. Montessori preschool elevated children’s outcomes in several ways. Although not different at the first test point, over time the Montessori children fared better on measures of academic achievement, social understanding, and mastery orientation, and they also reported relatively more liking of scholastic tasks. They also scored higher on executive function when they were 4. In addition to elevating overall performance on these measures, Montessori preschool also equalized outcomes among subgroups that typically have unequal outcomes. First, the difference in academic achievement between lower income Montessori and higher income conventionally schooled children was smaller at each time point, and was not (statistically speaking significantly different at the end of the study. Second, defying the typical finding that executive function predicts academic achievement, in Montessori classrooms children with lower executive function scored as well on academic achievement as those with higher executive function. This suggests that Montessori preschool has potential to elevate and equalize important outcomes, and a larger study of public Montessori

  6. Montessori Preschool Elevates and Equalizes Child Outcomes: A Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillard, Angeline S; Heise, Megan J; Richey, Eve M; Tong, Xin; Hart, Alyssa; Bray, Paige M

    2017-01-01

    Quality preschool programs that develop the whole child through age-appropriate socioemotional and cognitive skill-building hold promise for significantly improving child outcomes. However, preschool programs tend to either be teacher-led and didactic, or else to lack academic content. One preschool model that involves both child-directed, freely chosen activity and academic content is Montessori. Here we report a longitudinal study that took advantage of randomized lottery-based admission to two public Montessori magnet schools in a high-poverty American city. The final sample included 141 children, 70 in Montessori and 71 in other schools, most of whom were tested 4 times over 3 years, from the first semester to the end of preschool (ages 3-6), on a variety of cognitive and socio-emotional measures. Montessori preschool elevated children's outcomes in several ways. Although not different at the first test point, over time the Montessori children fared better on measures of academic achievement, social understanding, and mastery orientation, and they also reported relatively more liking of scholastic tasks. They also scored higher on executive function when they were 4. In addition to elevating overall performance on these measures, Montessori preschool also equalized outcomes among subgroups that typically have unequal outcomes. First, the difference in academic achievement between lower income Montessori and higher income conventionally schooled children was smaller at each time point, and was not (statistically speaking) significantly different at the end of the study. Second, defying the typical finding that executive function predicts academic achievement, in Montessori classrooms children with lower executive function scored as well on academic achievement as those with higher executive function. This suggests that Montessori preschool has potential to elevate and equalize important outcomes, and a larger study of public Montessori preschools is warranted.

  7. HomeStyles, A Web-Based Childhood Obesity Prevention Program for Families With Preschool Children: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd-Bredbenner, Carol; Martin-Biggers, Jennifer; Koenings, Mallory; Quick, Virginia; Hongu, Nobuko; Worobey, John

    2017-04-25

    The home environment is where young children spend most of their time, and is critically important to supporting behaviors that promote health and prevent obesity. However, the home environment and lifestyle patterns remain understudied, and few interventions have investigated parent-led makeovers designed to create home environments that are supportive of optimal child health and healthy child weights. The aim of the HomeStyles randomized controlled trial (RCT) is to determine whether the Web-based HomeStyles intervention enables and motivates parents to shape the weight-related aspects of their home environments and lifestyle behavioral practices (diet, exercise, and sleep) to be more supportive of their preschool children's optimal health and weight. A rigorous RCT utilizing an experimental group and an attention control group, receiving a bona fide contemporaneous treatment equal in nonspecific treatment effects and differing only in subject matter content, will test the effect of HomeStyles on a diverse sample of families with preschool children. This intervention is based on social cognitive theory and uses a social ecological framework, and will assess: intrapersonal characteristics (dietary intake, physical activity level, and sleep) of parents and children; family interpersonal or social characteristics related to diet, physical activity, media use, and parental values and self-efficacy for obesity-preventive practices; and home environment food availability, physical activity space and supports in and near the home, and media availability and controls in the home. Enrollment for this study has been completed and statistical data analyses are currently underway. This paper describes the HomeStyles intervention with regards to: rationale, the intervention's logic model, sample eligibility criteria and recruitment, experimental group and attention control intervention content, study design, instruments, data management, and planned analyses.

  8. The laboratory environmental algae pond simulator (LEAPS) photobioreactor: Validation using outdoor pond cultures of Chlorella sorokiniana and Nannochloropsis salina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huesemann, M.; Williams, P.; Edmundson, S.; Chen, P.; Kruk, R.; Cullinan, V.; Crowe, B.; Lundquist, T.

    2017-09-01

    A bench-scale photobioreactor system, termed Laboratory Environmental Algae Pond Simulator (LEAPS), was designed and constructed to simulate outdoor pond cultivation for a wide range of geographical locations and seasons. The LEAPS consists of six well-mixed glass column photobioreactors sparged with CO2-enriched air to maintain a set-point pH, illuminated from above by a programmable multicolor LED lighting (0 to 2,500 µmol/m2-sec), and submerged in a temperature controlled water-bath (-2 °C to >60 °C). Measured incident light intensities and water temperatures deviated from the respective light and temperature set-points on average only 2.3% and 0.9%, demonstrating accurate simulation of light and temperature conditions measured in outdoor ponds. In order to determine whether microalgae strains cultured in the LEAPS exhibit the same linear phase biomass productivity as in outdoor ponds, Chlorella sorokiniana and Nannochloropsis salina were cultured in the LEAPS bioreactors using light and temperature scripts measured previously in the respective outdoor pond studies. For Chlorella sorokiniana, the summer season biomass productivity in the LEAPS was 6.6% and 11.3% lower than in the respective outdoor ponds in Rimrock, Arizona, and Delhi, California; however, these differences were not statistically significant. For Nannochloropsis salina, the winter season biomass productivity in the LEAPS was statistically significantly higher (15.2%) during the 27 day experimental period than in the respective outdoor ponds in Tucson, Arizona. However, when considering only the first 14 days, the LEAPS biomass productivity was only 9.2% higher than in the outdoor ponds, a difference shown to be not statistically significant. Potential reasons for the positive or negative divergence in LEAPS performance, relative to outdoor ponds, are discussed. To demonstrate the utility of the LEAPS in predicting productivity, two other strains – Scenedesmus obliquus and Stichococcus minor

  9. Beyond Behavioral Modification: Benefits of Socio-Emotional/Self-Regulation Training for Preschoolers with Behavior Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziano, Paulo A.; Hart, Katie

    2016-01-01

    The current study evaluated the initial efficacy of three intervention programs aimed at improving school readiness in preschool children with externalizing behavior problems (EBP). Participants for this study included 45 preschool children (76% boys; M[subscript age] = 5.16 years; 84% Hispanic/Latino background) with at-risk or clinically…

  10. Using the Quality of Literacy Implementation Checklist to Improve Preschool Literacy Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beecher, Constance C.; Abbott, Mary I.; Petersen, Sarah; Greenwood, Charles R.

    2017-01-01

    Despite much progress in improving the quality of preschool programs, there is still an uneven quality of instruction in early childhood settings. Providing support and professional development (PD) for teachers that is practical, systematic and sustainable is one potential avenue to increase classroom quality in preschool, including quality of…

  11. Preschool Units EMIS Staff Report. EMIS Staff ECE Units 2005. Report Documentation. Version 1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio Department of Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of Preschool Units EMIS Staff Report is twofold. First, it helps School Districts and Educational Service Centers (ESC) ensure accuracy and validity of preschool staff, student and program data submitted to the Ohio Department of Education (ODE) through the Education Management Information System (EMIS). From this report, school…

  12. Arts Enrichment and Preschool Emotions for Low-Income Children at Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Eleanor D.; Sax, Kacey L.

    2013-01-01

    No studies to date examine the impact of arts-integrated preschool programming on the emotional functioning of low-income children at risk for school problems. The present study examines observed emotion expression and teacher-rated emotion regulation for low-income children attending Settlement Music School's Kaleidoscope Preschool Arts…

  13. Prevention of Problem Behavior by Teaching Functional Communication and Self-Control Skills to Preschoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luczynski, Kevin C.; Hanley, Gregory P.

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of the preschool life skills program (PLS; Hanley, Heal, Tiger, & Ingvarsson, 2007) on the acquisition and maintenance of functional communication and self-control skills, as well as its effect on problem behavior, of small groups of preschoolers at risk for school failure. Six children were taught to request teacher…

  14. Preparedness of Educators to Implement Modern Information Technologies in Their Work with Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velickovic, Sonja; Stošic, Lazar

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the issue of the preparedness of educators to realize the contents of the PPP (Preschool Preparatory Program) from the point of view of digitalization and informatization of the society. The authors are in favour of the implementation of modern educational technology in the process of educating preschool children with the aim…

  15. "A Big Door Opened for Us": Parents' Perceptions of Comprehensive Preschool

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMulder, Elizabeth K.; Stribling, Stacia M.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative research study was designed to explore the perceptions of parents with low income regarding the effects of involvement in a comprehensive preschool program on their children's development and on the families' quality of life. A purposeful sample of parents who became actively involved in the preschool community was interviewed…

  16. he problem of physical rehabilitation for breach properties of foot preschool age children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozlov Y.V.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Scientific and methodical literature about preschoolers flat were analyzed in the article. Special means of physical rehabilitation are discussed in. Results of the study of literary sources suggest the need to develop and implement new physical rehabilitation programs in preschools. The greatest effect is expected when based on the foundation of certain numerical showings of biogeometrical sideview of bearing and videotechnology.

  17. Teaching and Learning about Play, Language, and Literacy with Preschool Educators in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Linda

    1999-01-01

    Compares preschool/kindergarten education in Malaysia and the United Kingdom, including curriculum and teacher training. Describes the Malaysian national preschool curriculum guidelines as using play as a vehicle for learning while incorporating a more formal reading and writing readiness program. Describes experiences in a teaching course for…

  18. THE DYNAMIC LEAP AND BALANCE TEST (DLBT): A TEST-RETEST RELIABILITY STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffri, Abbis H; Newman, Thomas M; Smith, Brent I; John Miller, Sayers

    2017-08-01

    There is a need for new clinical assessment tools to test dynamic balance during typical functional movements. Common methods for assessing dynamic balance, such as the Star Excursion Balance Test, which requires controlled movement of body segments over an unchanged base of support, may not be an adequate measure for testing typical functional movements that involve controlled movement of body segments along with a change in base of support. The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of the Dynamic Leap and Balance Test (DLBT) by assessing its test-retest reliability. It was hypothesized that there would be no statistically significant differences between testing days in time taken to complete the test. Reliability study. Thirty healthy college aged individuals participated in this study. Participants performed a series of leaps in a prescribed sequence, unique to the DLBT test. Time required by the participants to complete the 20-leap task was the dependent variable. Subjects leaped back and forth from peripheral to central targets alternating weight bearing from one leg to the other. Participants landed on the central target with the tested limb and were required to stabilize for two seconds before leaping to the next target. Stability was based upon qualitative measures similar to Balance Error Scoring System. Each assessment was comprised of three trials and performed on two days with a separation of at least six days. Two-way mixed ANOVA was used to analyze the differences in time to complete the sequence between the three trial averages of the two testing sessions. Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC3,1) was used to establish between session test-retest reliability of the test trial averages. Significance was set a priori at p ≤ 0.05. No significant differences (p > 0.05) were detected between the two testing sessions. The ICC was 0.93 with a 95% confidence interval from 0.84 to 0.96. This test is a cost-effective, easy to

  19. Real-World Literacy Activity in Pre-School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jim; Purcell-Gates, Victoria; Lenters, Kimberly; McTavish, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we share real-world literacy activities that we designed and implemented in two early literacy classes for preschoolers from two inner-city neighbourhoods that were part of an intergenerational family literacy program, Literacy for Life (LFL). The program was informed by research that shows that young children in high literate…

  20. The Characteristics and Origins of the Academic Preschool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyson, Marion C.

    1991-01-01

    Examined academic preschools and relationships between classroom practices and teachers' beliefs about early education. Discussed observational instruments for identifying formal academic programs. Programs whose staff espoused beliefs in teacher-directed, formal academic learning were rated as significantly more academically focused than were…

  1. The effect of a movement-to-music video program on the objectively measured sedentary time and physical activity of preschool-aged children and their mothers: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuominen, Pipsa P A; Husu, Pauliina; Raitanen, Jani; Kujala, Urho M; Luoto, Riitta M

    2017-01-01

    Regular physical activity (PA) and the avoidance of prolonged sitting are essential for children's healthy growth, and for the physical and mental wellbeing of both children and adults. In the context of exercise, music may promote behavioral change through increased exercise adherence and participation. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a movement-to-music video program could reduce sedentary behavior (SB) and increase PA in mother-child pairs in the home environment. A randomized controlled trial was conducted in the Pirkanmaa region, Finland, in 2014-2016. The participants consisted of 228 mother-child pairs (child age 5-7 years). The primary outcomes of interest were tri-axial accelerometer-derived SB and PA, which were measured in weeks one (baseline), two, and eight in both the intervention and control groups. Further, the mothers and children in the intervention group used a movement-to-music video program from the beginning of week two to the end of week eight. Secondary outcomes included self-reported screen time. The statistical methods employed comprised an intention-to-treat and linear mixed effects model design. No statistically significant differences between groups were found in primary or secondary outcomes. Among the children in the control group, light PA decreased significantly over time and screen time increased from 89 (standard deviation, SD 37) to 99 (SD 41) min/d. Among mothers and children in the intervention group, no statistical differences were found. In supplementary analysis, the children who stayed at home instead of attending daycare/preschool had on average 25 (95% confidence interval, CI 19-30) min/d more sedentary time and 11 (95% CI 8-14) min/d less moderate-to-vigorous PA than those who were at daycare/preschool. The higher body mass index of mothers was related with 5 (95% CI 2-7) min/d more sedentary time and 1 (95% CI 0-2) min/d less moderate-to-vigorous PA. The movement-to-music video program did not change

  2. The effect of a movement-to-music video program on the objectively measured sedentary time and physical activity of preschool-aged children and their mothers: A randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pipsa P A Tuominen

    Full Text Available Regular physical activity (PA and the avoidance of prolonged sitting are essential for children's healthy growth, and for the physical and mental wellbeing of both children and adults. In the context of exercise, music may promote behavioral change through increased exercise adherence and participation. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a movement-to-music video program could reduce sedentary behavior (SB and increase PA in mother-child pairs in the home environment. A randomized controlled trial was conducted in the Pirkanmaa region, Finland, in 2014-2016. The participants consisted of 228 mother-child pairs (child age 5-7 years. The primary outcomes of interest were tri-axial accelerometer-derived SB and PA, which were measured in weeks one (baseline, two, and eight in both the intervention and control groups. Further, the mothers and children in the intervention group used a movement-to-music video program from the beginning of week two to the end of week eight. Secondary outcomes included self-reported screen time. The statistical methods employed comprised an intention-to-treat and linear mixed effects model design. No statistically significant differences between groups were found in primary or secondary outcomes. Among the children in the control group, light PA decreased significantly over time and screen time increased from 89 (standard deviation, SD 37 to 99 (SD 41 min/d. Among mothers and children in the intervention group, no statistical differences were found. In supplementary analysis, the children who stayed at home instead of attending daycare/preschool had on average 25 (95% confidence interval, CI 19-30 min/d more sedentary time and 11 (95% CI 8-14 min/d less moderate-to-vigorous PA than those who were at daycare/preschool. The higher body mass index of mothers was related with 5 (95% CI 2-7 min/d more sedentary time and 1 (95% CI 0-2 min/d less moderate-to-vigorous PA. The movement-to-music video program did

  3. The protection effect of LEAP-2 on the mudskipper (Boleophthalmus pectinirostris) against Edwardsiella tarda infection is associated with its immunomodulatory activity on monocytes/macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Chen, Qiang; Lu, Xin-Jiang; Chen, Jiong

    2016-12-01

    Liver-expressed antimicrobial peptide 2 (LEAP-2) is a cationic peptide that plays an important role in the host's innate immune system. However, the mechanism by which LEAP-2 modulates/regulates the host defense against pathogens remains largely unknown. In this study, we identified a cDNA sequence encoding LEAP-2 homolog (BpLEAP-2) in the mudskipper, Boleophthalmus pectinirostris. Sequence analysis revealed that BpLEAP-2 belonged to the fish LEAP-2A cluster and that it was closely related to ayu LEAP-2. BpLEAP-2 mRNA was detected in a wide range of tissues, with the highest level of transcripts found in the liver. Upon infection with Edwardsiella tarda, BpLEAP-2 mRNA expression was significantly increased in the liver, kidney, spleen, and gill, but decreased in the intestine. Chemically synthesized BpLEAP-2 mature peptide did not exhibit antibacterial activity against E. tarda in vitro. Intraperitoneal injection of BpLEAP-2 (1.0 or 10.0 μg/g) resulted in significantly improved survival rate and reduced tissue bacterial load in E. tarda-infected mudskippers. In E. tarda-infected fish, BpLEAP-2 (0.1, 1.0, or 10.0 μg/g) eliminated E. tarda-induced tissue mRNA expression of BpTNF-α and BpIL-1β. In monocytes/macrophages (MO/MФ), BpLEAP-2 (1.0 or 10.0 μg/ml) induced chemotaxis, enhanced respiratory burst, and inhibited E. tarda-induced mRNA expression of BpTNF-α and BpIL-1β. At a concentration of 10.0 μg/ml, BpLEAP-2 also significantly enhanced the bacterial killing efficiency of MO/MФ. No significant effect was seen in the phagocytic activity of MO/MФ upon treatment with BpLEAP-2. Our study provides evidence, for the first time, that LEAP-2 exhibited immunomodulatory effects on immune cells, and protected the host from pathogenic infections independent of direct bacterial killing function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Title I Preschool Program in the Wake County Public School System (WCPSS): Short- and Long-Term Outcomes. Eye on Evaluation. E&R Report No.11.16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baenen, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    The longitudinal study of the 2005-06 preschool in Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) found short-term gains during the preschool year, but limited impact by kindergarten and no average impact by the end of 3rd grade on achievement, retention rates, special education placements, or attendance. Small sample sizes limit conclusions that can be…

  5. What do children learn at Swedish Preschools?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lindström, Lisbeth

    2013-01-01

    ...’ perception of what children enrolled in preschools learn and how they learn it; and second, to highlight and illuminate what abilities preschool teachers perceive that children can develop during their stay at preschool...

  6. Assessment of Attention in Preschoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahone, E.M.; Schneider, H.E.

    2012-01-01

    In the past two decades, there has been an increased interest in the assessment and treatment of preschool children presenting with concerns about attention problems. This article reviews the research and clinical literature involving assessment of attention and related skills in the preschool years. While inattention among preschoolers is common, symptoms alone do not necessarily indicate a disorder, and most often represent a normal variation in typical preschool child development. Thus, accurate identification of “disordered” attention in preschoolers can be challenging, and development of appropriate, norm-referenced tests of attention for preschoolers is also difficult. The current review suggests that comprehensive assessment of attention and related functions in the preschool child should include thorough review of the child’s history, planned observations, and formal psychometric testing. The three primary methods of psychometric assessment that have been used to characterize attentional functioning in preschool children include performance-based tests, structured caregiver interviews, and rating scales (parent, teacher, and clinician). Among performance-based methods for measurement of attention in the preschool years, tests have been developed to assess sustained attention, selective (focused) attention, span of attention (encoding/manipulation), and (top-down) controlled attention—including freedom from distractibility and set shifting. Many of these tests remain experimental in nature, and review of published methods yields relatively few commercially available, nationally normed tests of attention for preschoolers, and an overall dearth of reliability and validity studies on the available measures. PMID:23090646

  7. Reliability and validity of the test of gross motor development-II in Korean preschool children: applying AHP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chung-Il; Han, Dong-Wook; Park, Il-Hyeok

    2014-04-01

    The Test of Gross Motor Development-II (TGMD-II) is a frequently used assessment tool for measuring motor ability. The purpose of this study is to investigate the reliability and validity of TGMD-II's weighting scores (by comparing pre-weighted TGMD-II scores with post ones) as well as examine applicability of the TGMD-II on Korean preschool children. A total of 121 Korean children (three kindergartens) participated in this study. There were 65 preschoolers who were 5-years-old (37 boys and 28 girls) and 56 preschoolers who were 6-years-old (34 boys and 22 girls). For internal consistency, reliability, and construct validity, only one researcher evaluated all of the children using the TGMD-II in the following areas: running; galloping; sliding; hopping; leaping; horizontal jumping; overhand throwing; underhand rolling; striking a stationary ball; stationary dribbling; kicking; and catching. For concurrent validity, the evaluator measured physical fitness (strength, flexibility, power, agility, endurance, and balance). The key findings were as follows: first, the reliability coefficient and the validity coefficient between pre-weighted and post-weighted TGMD-II scores were quite similar. Second, the research showed adequate reliability and validity of the TGMD-II for Korean preschool children. The TGMD-II is a proper instrument to test Korean children's motor development. Yet, applying relative weighting on the TGMD-II should be a point of consideration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Trans-Friendly Preschool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykstra, Laurel A.

    2005-01-01

    Transgender kids and kids from trans families attend preschool and kindergarten. For the safety, comfort, and optimum learning of these students, trans-positive early childhood education environments are necessary. Through simple changes to existing curricula and equipment, teachers, parents, and administrators can create a trans-positive setting…

  9. Preschool Children's School Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekdogan, Serpil; Akgül, Esra

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine preschool teachers' perspectives about children's school readiness. Qualitative and quantitative research methods were used in the study as a mixed method research. Data, in the quantitative aspects of the research, were collected through the use of "School Readiness Form" developed by Boz (2004)…

  10. Child Development: Preschool Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiam, Heng Keng, Ed.

    This book reports some of the results of an extensive study of the physical, cognitive, language, social, and emotional development of Malaysian children. Chapter 1 of the book describes the demographics of the sample. Subjects were 3,099 preschool children in the state of Selangor and the federal district of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Data is…

  11. Educational Psychotherapy of Preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Myron; Ronald, Doris

    Educational psychotherapy for preschool children and its functioning are described in detail. Also described is the process of training teachers to do this work. The educational psychotherapy process attempts to operate at the interface between education and psychotherapy. The components of catharsis, recall, sharpening and correcting of…

  12. Preschool teacher's role in helping preschoolers develop healthy eating habits

    OpenAIRE

    Pellis, Mateja

    2016-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the preschool teacher's role in helping preschoolers develop healthy eating habits. An attempt was made to determine her or his attitude toward the principle of choice and diversity, the principle of equal opportunities and recognizing diversity among children, as well as the principle of multiculturalism. The theoretical sections deal with the criteria of healthy nutrition in the preschool period and the forming of eating habits in early childhood – these manifest ...

  13. Evaluation of a portable markerless finger position capture device: accuracy of the Leap Motion controller in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, James Y; Lulic, Tea; Gonzalez, Dave A; Tran, Johnathan; Dickerson, Clark R; Roy, Eric A

    2015-05-01

    Although motion analysis is frequently employed in upper limb motor assessment (e.g. visually-guided reaching), they are resource-intensive and limited to laboratory settings. This study evaluated the reliability and accuracy of a new markerless motion capture device, the Leap Motion controller, to measure finger position. Testing conditions that influence reliability and agreement between the Leap and a research-grade motion capture system were examined. Nine healthy young adults pointed to 15 targets on a computer screen under two conditions: (1) touching the target (touch) and (2) 4 cm away from the target (no-touch). Leap data was compared to an Optotrak marker attached to the index finger. Across all trials, root mean square (RMS) error of the Leap system was 17.30  ±  9.56 mm (mean ± SD), sampled at 65.47  ±  21.53 Hz. The % viable trials and mean sampling rate were significantly lower in the touch condition (44% versus 64%, p motion capture systems, the Leap Motion controller is sufficiently reliable for measuring motor performance in pointing tasks that do not require high positional accuracy (e.g. reaction time, Fitt's, trails, bimanual coordination).

  14. Factors of the active listening of preschool children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purić Daliborka S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Active listening is a communication skill which is crucial for the development of cooperative relationships in the group, culture of friendship and fellowship, it is also important for the development of literacy skills and talent for speaking. Furthermore, it contributes to the improvement of the level of knowledge, skills and school achievement, as well as to the development of self-confidence of children. Developing of active listening is an important task in the activities with children of preschool age. In this paper, the author, wanting to determine the importance of the factors of active listening of preschool children, examines how preschool teachers (N = 198: (a evaluate the importance of certain elements of active listening that relate to the speaker and the listener, and (b estimate their role in the process of developing active listening skills of preschool children as an essential element of successful interpersonal communication. Results of the survey show that preschool teachers attach greater importance to the factors of active listening related to the listener (attention, listening skill, interest in the subject, than to the factors related to the speaker (motivation for listening, quality of the narrative. More than two-thirds of surveyed preschool teachers (172 or 86.9% define its impact on the stimulation of active listening of children as significant. Work experience and professional qualifications as independent variables significantly influence the attitudes of preschool teachers about the importance of their impact in stimulating active listening. Preschool teacher is a key element of the training of preschool children in the area of the basic communication skills of active listening. In this sense, the results of our survey show that in the context of academic study programs for education of preschool teachers special attention is given to the communication skills and to their role in the development of active listening

  15. A Program Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jale Aldemir

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to discover the transformation preschool teacher candidates go through in their perceptions about teacher and teaching during their teacher education program. The participants of the study were 35 senior students enrolled in the preschool teacher education program at a university located in the Eastern Anatolian Region of Turkey. A qualitative survey instrument was conducted to examine the preservice teachers’ perceptions. The data collected from the survey were analyzed by adopting a constant comparative coding method. The study revealed a change in the participants’ perceptions about preschool education before and after they enrolled in the program. The hardest parts of teaching in preschool were the need of high level of energy, patience, and skills to manage the classroom while the most pleasurable sides were having fun, play opportunities, and the positive impact teachers make on children. The qualities of an ideal preschool program listed by the participants involved curriculum, physical environment, and social-emotional atmosphere while the themes regarding the ideal preschool teacher were revolved around the personal qualities, professional attitude, and professional knowledge and skills. Hence, the findings of this qualitative study can only be generalized in the context the study was conducted; however, the study could have important implications for preschool teacher education in Turkey and in other countries, and help the international readers perceive preschool teacher education from a different perspective.

  16. An Improved Shuffled Frog-Leaping Algorithm for Flexible Job Shop Scheduling Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kong Lu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The flexible job shop scheduling problem is a well-known combinatorial optimization problem. This paper proposes an improved shuffled frog-leaping algorithm to solve the flexible job shop scheduling problem. The algorithm possesses an adjustment sequence to design the strategy of local searching and an extremal optimization in information exchange. The computational result shows that the proposed algorithm has a powerful search capability in solving the flexible job shop scheduling problem compared with other heuristic algorithms, such as the genetic algorithm, tabu search and ant colony optimization. Moreover, the results also show that the improved strategies could improve the performance of the algorithm effectively.

  17. Towards a Transnational History of Great Leaps Forward in Pastoral Central Eurasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niccolò Pianciola

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article places the great famine in Kazakhstan (1931-33 in the context of policies implemented by the Stalinist and Maoist governments towards Central Eurasian pastoral populations. After highlighting the factors that caused the famine in Ukraine, the article focuses on the specificities of the famine among the Kazakhs, and its regional distribution within Kazakhstan. It then analyses the role that the same factors could have played in other mainly pastoral regions, both during the 1930s (Kyrgyz ASSR, Outer Mongolia, and during Mao's Great Leap Forward (Inner Mongolia, Tibet, Qinghai, Xinjiang. The article compares the different cases and investigates their transnational connections.

  18. Natural user interface based on gestures recognition using Leap Motion sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Sousa

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Natural User Interface (NUI is a term used for human-computer interfaces where the interface is invisible or becomes invisible after successive user-immersion levels, it is typically based on the human nature or human natural elements. Currently several three-dimensional (3D sensors and system can be used to interpret specific human gestures, enabling a completely hands-free control of electronic devices, manipulating objects in a virtual world or interacting with augmented reality applications. This paper presents a set of methods to recognize 3D gestures, and some human-computer interfaces applications using a Leap Motion sensor

  19. Maternal stress and psychological status and sleep in minority preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Barbara A; Redeker, Nancy S

    2015-01-01

    Minority women living in inner city environments may be at more risk for psychological distress. Maternal stress, anxiety, depression, and psychological trauma can influence the preschool child's behavior and may have a negative impact on the preschool child's sleep patterns. The purpose of the study was to: (a) examine objective and subjective preschool children sleep patterns and (b) explore the relationship between objective and subjective sleep patterns in preschool children and maternal psychological status. A cross-sectional observational design was used. Descriptive analyses and correlations were conducted to examine the data. Twenty-one minority women were recruited from the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children Program. Preschool children wore wrist actigraphs, and their sleep efficiency, time in bed, and sleep periods were analyzed. Mothers completed measures on depression, anxiety, stress, and psychological trauma. Mothers' self-report of their children's sleep habits indicated at risk scores for sleep problems. Life stress in the mothers was statistically significant and negatively related to preschool child's sleep duration. Mild to severe symptoms of depression and mild anxiety were reported and criteria for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder were found in 12 of the 21 mothers. The results of the study indicate that parent education on sleep and the minority preschool child should be part of community interventions and screening preschool parents for psychological distress should be considered with referrals for support services. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. A randomized controlled trial of preschool-based joint attention intervention for children with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaale, Anett; Smith, Lars; Sponheim, Eili

    2012-01-01

    Deficits in joint attention (JA) and joint engagement (JE) represent a core problem in young children with autism as these affect language and social development. Studies of parent-mediated and specialist-mediated JA-intervention suggest that such intervention may be effective. However, there is little knowledge about the success of the intervention when done in preschools. Assess the effects of a preschool-based JA-intervention. 61 children (48 males) with autistic disorder (29-60 months) were randomized to either 8 weeks of JA-intervention, in addition to their preschool programs (n = 34), or to preschool programs only (n = 27). The intervention was done by preschool teachers with weekly supervision by trained counselors from Child and Adolescent Mental Health Clinics (CAMHC). Changes in JA and JE were measured by blinded independent testers using Early Social Communication Scale (ESCS) and video taped preschool teacher-child and mother-child play at baseline and post-intervention. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00378157. Intention-to-treat analysis showed significant difference between the intervention and the control group, with the intervention group yielding more JA initiation during interaction with the preschool teachers. The effect generalized to significantly longer duration of JE with the mothers. This is the first randomized study to show positive and generalized effects of preschool-based JA-intervention. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry © 2011 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  1. Effect of a health education program in the oral health profile of preschool children: an experience in the public network of Porto Alegre, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Stürmer Badalott

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To estimate the effect of health promotion activities developed in a child education school, on the children’s oral health profile, relating oral manifestations to social, sanitary and feeding factors. Methods: Interventional, longitudinal and describing quantitative work, accomplished with 41 preschool children from four to six years old, living in the area assisted by a Family Health Team (Equipe de Saúde da Família-ESF in the city of Porto Alegre-RS. Diagnosis of dental caries and gingivitis was carried out through oral clinical examination at the beginning and at the end of the study. The dietary pattern was obtained by applying a questionnaire and the social-sanitary aspects of the families, from the records of File A in the Basic Health Care Information System (Sistema de Informação da Atenção Básica-SIAB. Results: Caries disease was diagnosed in 58.5% of the children, whose dmft index (total sum of decayed, extracted and filled teeth was 2.43. There was a decrease in the number of decayed teeth and an increase in extracted and filled teeth. The rates of visible plaque and gums bleeding got better. The social-sanitary aspects were standardized in the community, being not representative. The group presenting the highest dmft values followed a diet containing sugars, with viscous consistence and an intake frequency of four or more times a day. Conclusion: The activities of health promotion developed in the school partially changed the children’s oral conditions. There was a positive correlation between consistency, composition and frequency of diet and the presence of caries disease; on the other hand, there was no significant relation between social-sanitary conditions and the presence of oral diseases

  2. Effect of a health education program in the oral health profile of preschool children: an experience in the public network of Porto Alegre, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Stürmer Badalotti

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To estimate the effect of health promotion activities developed in a child education school, on the children’s oral health profile, relating oral manifestations to social, sanitary and feeding factors. Methods: Interventional, longitudinal and describing quantitative work, accomplished with 41 preschool children from four to six years old, living in the area assisted by a Family Health Team (Equipe de Saúde da Família-ESF in the city of Porto Alegre-RS. Diagnosis of dental caries and gingivitis was carried out through oral clinical examination at the beginning and at the end of the study. The dietary pattern was obtained by applying a questionnaire and the social-sanitary aspects of the families, from the records of File A in the Basic Health Care Information System (Sistema de Informação da Atenção Básica-SIAB. Results: Caries disease was diagnosed in 58.5% of the children, whose dmft index (total sum of decayed, extracted and filled teeth was 2.43. There was a decrease in the number of decayed teeth and an increase in extracted and filled teeth. The rates of visible plaque and gums bleeding got better. The social-sanitary aspects were standardized in the community, being not representative. The group presenting the highest dmft values followed a diet containing sugars, with viscous consistence and an intake frequency of four or more times a day. Conclusion: The activities of health promotion developed in the school partially changed the children’s oral conditions. There was a positive correlation between consistency, composition and frequency of diet and the presence of caries disease; on the other hand, therewas no significant relation between social sanitary conditions and the presence of oral diseases.

  3. Immediate and delayed effects of invented writing intervention in preschool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofslundsengen, Hilde; Hagtvet, Bente Eriksen; Gustafsson, Jan-Eric

    This study examined the effects of a 10 week invented writing program with five-year-old preschoolers (mean age 5.7 years) on their immediate post intervention literacy skills and also the facilitative effects of the intervention on the subsequent learning to read during the first 6 months of schooling. The study included 105 children (54 girls) from 12 preschools in Norway. The preschools were randomly assigned to the experimental group with the invented writing program, or the control group with the ordinary program offered to preschoolers. The classroom-based programs (40 sessions) were conducted by the children's regular teachers. The children's emergent literacy skills were evaluated using a pre-test, a post-test and a follow-up test 6 months later, and the data were analyzed using latent autoregressive models. The results showed that the invented writing group performed significantly better than the control group on the post-test for the measures of phoneme awareness ( d  = .54), spelling ( d  = .65) and word reading ( d  = .36). Additionally, indirect effects were observed on the delayed follow-up tests on phoneme awareness ( d  = .45), spelling ( d  = .48) and word reading ( d  = .26). In conclusion, we argue that invented writing appeared to smooth the progress of emergent literacy skills in preschool, including the subsequent reading development in school. Contextualized in a semi-consistent orthography and a preschool tradition that does not encourage the learning of written language skills, the findings add to our knowledge of how children learn to write and read.

  4. Preschool Teachers' Emotional Socialization Responses to 4-6 Year-Old Turkish Preschoolers' Emotional Expressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Sukran

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to investigate preschool teachers' emotion socialization responses to Turkish preschoolers' emotional expressions based on children's age and gender. The participants in the current study were 12 preschool full time teachers from 4 preschool and 288 preschoolers ranging in age from 4 to 6 years in Aksaray. In…

  5. Preschool Movement Education in Turkey: Perceptions of Preschool Administrators and Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevimli-Celik, Serap; Kirazci, Sadettin; Ince, Mustafa Levent

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions of preschool administrators and parents about preschool movement education and movement practices in preschools. Participants were 8 preschool administrators and 21 parents from 8 randomly selected private preschools in one of the municipalities in Ankara, Turkey. Semi-structured interviews,…

  6. Child Sexual Abuse at Preschools--A Research Review of a Complex Issue for Preschool Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, Helena; Eidevald, Christian; Westberg-Broström, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this research review is to synthesize research published between 2000 and 2015 regarding child sexual abuse, preschool and preschool teachers. The review identifies themes relevant for the preschool teacher profession: child sexual abuse at preschools, suspicions and consequences for the preschool sector, preventing techniques and…

  7. "Kinder En Ingles." English for the Spanish-speaking Pre-schooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, John S.

    1970-01-01

    Their producer describes a series of instructional programs shown on commercial television in Amarillo, Texas that are designed to help Spanish speaking preschoolers learn enough English to prepare them for public school. (LS)

  8. Features diagnostics gifted preschoolers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadiia Lazarovych

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Authors of the article analyze the problem of development of mathematical speech fromthe side of P. Galperin intellectual actions formation theory. The role of first and secondsignal systems in child’s learning of mathematical definitions is being validated and specialtraits learning of mathematical terms and definitions by children of early and preschool age isbeing comprehended: figure, quantity, scope, form, etc. Based on step-by-step theory ofintellectual actions, publication authors explain their own approach to provision of activemathematical speech development; by the example of integrated didactic module special traitsof comprehension by children of senior preschool age of logical operations, word terms, word’constructions are being commented; games and game exercises of logic-mathematicaldirectivity.Key words: intellectual actions formation steps, first and second signal systems,preschooler’s mathematical speech , mathematical development, integrated didactic module.

  9. Preschool Teachers' Perspectives on Planning and Documentation in Preschool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvestad, Torgeir; Sheridan, Sonja

    2015-01-01

    This article is based on a research project focusing on Norwegian teachers' planning and documentation of children's learning in preschool. Norwegian preschools follow a national curriculum and teachers are obliged to document both professional practice and learning outcomes. The aim of the article is to investigate teachers' experiences of…

  10. Shuffled Frog Leaping Algorithm for Preemptive Project Scheduling Problems with Resource Vacations Based on Patterson Set

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Han

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a shuffled frog leaping algorithm (SFLA for the single-mode resource-constrained project scheduling problem where activities can be divided into equant units and interrupted during processing. Each activity consumes 0–3 types of resources which are renewable and temporarily not available due to resource vacations in each period. The presence of scarce resources and precedence relations between activities makes project scheduling a difficult and important task in project management. A recent popular metaheuristic shuffled frog leaping algorithm, which is enlightened by the predatory habit of frog group in a small pond, is adopted to investigate the project makespan improvement on Patterson benchmark sets which is composed of different small and medium size projects. Computational results demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of SFLA in reducing project makespan and minimizing activity splitting number within an average CPU runtime, 0.521 second. This paper exposes all the scheduling sequences for each project and shows that of the 23 best known solutions have been improved.

  11. Leaping frogs (Anura: Ranixalidae of the Western Ghats of India: An integrated taxonomic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelesh Dahanukar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Leaping frogs of the family Ranixalidae are endemic to the Western Ghats of India and are currently placed in a single genus, Indirana.  Based on specimens collected from their entire range and a comprehensive study of type material defining all known species, we propose a revised taxonomy for the leaping frogs using an integrative approach including an analysis of the mitochondrial 16S rRNA and nuclear rhodopsin genes, as well as multivariate morphometrics. Both genetic and morphological analyses suggest that the genus Indirana is paraphyletic and a distinct monophyletic group, Walkerana gen. nov is described herein.  The new genus is separated from Indirana sensu stricto by an apomorphic character state of reduced webbing, with one phalange free on the first and second toe (vs. no free phalanges, two phalanges free on the third and fifth toe (vs. one free phalange, and three phalanges free on the fourth toe (vs. 2–2½ phalanges free.  This review includes (i identification of lectotypes and redescription of three species of the genus Walkerana; (ii identification of lectotypes for Indirana beddomii and I. semipalmata and their redescription; (iii redescription of I. brachytarsus and I. gundia; and (iv descriptions of four new species, namely, I. duboisi and I. tysoni from north of the Palghat gap, and I. yadera and I. sarojamma from south of the Palghat gap; and (iv a key to the genera and species in the family Ranixalidae. 

  12. An improved shuffled frog leaping algorithm based evolutionary framework for currency exchange rate prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Rajashree

    2017-11-01

    Forecasting purchasing power of one currency with respect to another currency is always an interesting topic in the field of financial time series prediction. Despite the existence of several traditional and computational models for currency exchange rate forecasting, there is always a need for developing simpler and more efficient model, which will produce better prediction capability. In this paper, an evolutionary framework is proposed by using an improved shuffled frog leaping (ISFL) algorithm with a computationally efficient functional link artificial neural network (CEFLANN) for prediction of currency exchange rate. The model is validated by observing the monthly prediction measures obtained for three currency exchange data sets such as USD/CAD, USD/CHF, and USD/JPY accumulated within same period of time. The model performance is also compared with two other evolutionary learning techniques such as Shuffled frog leaping algorithm and Particle Swarm optimization algorithm. Practical analysis of results suggest that, the proposed model developed using the ISFL algorithm with CEFLANN network is a promising predictor model for currency exchange rate prediction compared to other models included in the study.

  13. The Characters of Leap Years in Qing Calendars (1644-1911)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dalong

    In Qing Dynasty (1644-1911) three different calendars had been put into use which titles are Xiyang Xinfa Lishu (Treatise on Astronomy and Calendrical Science according to the New Method in West 1645-1666) Yuzhi Lixiang Kaocheng (Compendium of Calendrical Science and Astronomy compiled by Imperial Order 1725-1742) and Yuzhi Lixiang Kaocheng Houbian (Sequel Compendium of Calendrical Science and Astronomy compiled by Imperial Order 1742-1911). The characters of leap years in the three calendars are different for the last one which is selected the year of 1723 as it epoch and named as Guimao Yuan Li. This calendar is based on the 33-year pattern of leap years (there is a rather exact accord between days and years over this interval with eight days being intercalated per 33 years) and is slightly different from the former two calendars. Therefore the calendars of Qing Dynasty complied by Western Jesuits and Chinese astronomers can be regarded as the remarkable achievements in the history of calendar in the world.

  14. Effect of Family Supported Pre-Reading Training Program Given to Children in Preschool Education Period on Reading Success in Primary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyuktaskapu, Sema

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the effect of Family Supported Pre-Reading Program developed for 6 year olds attending nursery school on children's reading success in the future was examined. In order to fulfill this aim, reading skills of 25 primary school first-grade pupils who participated Family Supported Pre-Reading Program were compared with another 25…

  15. Quality in preschool in a cultural context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh-Müller, Grethe; Ringsmose, Charlotte

    What is educational quality i preschools? How can it be evaluated/measured. How can educational quality be developped in everyday life in preschools?......What is educational quality i preschools? How can it be evaluated/measured. How can educational quality be developped in everyday life in preschools?...

  16. Motivations and Barriers in Promoting Preschool Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küçükturan, A. Güler; Akbaba Altun, Sadegül

    2017-01-01

    This study is designed to explore the reasons for sending and not sending preschool age children to preschools at an early age by exploring the motivations for and barriers towards promoting preschool education in Turkey. It aimed to determine various stakeholders' perceptions, attitudes, and knowledge related to preschool education in order to…

  17. What Do Children Learn at Swedish Preschools?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, Lisbeth

    2013-01-01

    The purposes of this research are, first, to make visible, examine, and illuminate preschool teachers' perception of what children enrolled in preschools learn and how they learn it; and second, to highlight and illuminate what abilities preschool teachers perceive that children can develop during their stay at preschools. As a theoretical…

  18. Risk and protective factors for mental health problems in preschool-aged children: cross-sectional results of the BELLA preschool study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlodarczyk, Olga; Pawils, Silke; Metzner, Franka; Kriston, Levente; Klasen, Fionna; Ravens-Sieberer, Ulrike

    2017-01-01

    Mental health problems (MHPs) in preschoolers are precursors of mental disorders which have shown to be associated with suffering, functional impairment, exposure to stigma and discrimination, as well as enhanced risk of premature death. A better understanding of factors associated with MHPs in preschoolers can facilitate early identification of children at risk and inform prevention programs. This cross-sectional study investigated the association of risk and protective factors with MHPs within a German representative community sample. MHPs were assessed in a sample of 391 preschoolers aged 3-6 years using the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). The effects of parental MHPs, children's temperament, parental socioeconomic status (SES), social support and perceived self-competence on MHPs were assessed using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses that controlled for sociodemographic characteristics. Overall, 18.2% of preschoolers were classified as 'borderline or abnormal' on the total difficulties score of the SDQ. Bivariate analyses showed that parental MHPs, children's difficult temperament, and parental low SES increased the likelihood, whereas high perceived parental competence decreased the likelihood of preschool MHPs. In the multivariate analyses, only difficult child temperament remained significantly associated with preschool MHPs when other variables were controlled. The results underline the importance of children's difficult temperamental characteristics as a risk factor for mental health in preschoolers and suggest that these may also be an appropriate target for prevention of preschool MHPs. More research on specific aspects of preschool children's temperament, the socioeconomic environment and longitudinal studies on the effects of these in the development of preschool MHPs is needed.

  19. Systematic Quality Work in Preschool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Sonja; Williams, Pia; Sandberg, Anette

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the meaning that Swedish preschool teachers ascribe to systematic quality work. In Sweden, all preschools are required to work systematically with quality issues. This involves several interdependent steps that follow each other in a specific order. Although the concept of systematic quality work might…

  20. Effects of a Physical Activity Intervention in Preschool Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Kristina; Kriemler, Susi; Lehmacher, Walter; Ruf, Katharina C; Graf, Christine; Hebestreit, Helge

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate a multicomponent, child-appropriate preschool intervention program led by preschool teachers to enhance physical activity (PA) and motor skill performance (MS) in 4- and 5-yr-old children. Evaluation involved 709 children (mean age, 4.7 ± 0.6 yr; 49.5% girls) from 41 preschools (intervention group, n = 21; control group, n = 20) in the rural and urban surroundings of two German cities. Children in the intervention group received a daily PA intervention lasting 30 min and PA homework over one academic year, which was designed by professionals but led by preschool teachers. The intervention included educational components for parents and teachers. Primary outcomes were MS (composite MS score) and objectively measured moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) by accelerometry. Measurements were performed at baseline, midintervention, and postintervention as well as 2-4 months after the end of intervention. Intervention effects were analyzed by repeated measurement analysis adjusted for group, sex, age, baseline outcomes, urban/rural location of the preschool, and cluster (preschool). Compared with controls, children in the intervention group showed positive effects in MS at postintervention (estimate effect, 0.625 z-score points; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.276-0.975; P = 0.001) and at follow-up (estimate effect, 0.590 z-score points; 95% CI, 0.109-1.011; P = 0.007) and an increase in MVPA from baseline to postintervention by 0.5% of total wearing time (95% CI, 0.002%-1.01%; P = 0.049) at borderline significance. There was no benefit on MVPA for the intervention group between baseline and follow-up. A child-appropriate, multidimensional PA intervention could sustainably improve MS but not PA. Findings suggest that a change in health-related behaviors is difficult. Future research should implement participatory intervention components in preschool setting and better integrate the families of the children.

  1. 34 CFR 104.38 - Preschool and adult education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Preschool and adult education. 104.38 Section 104.38 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE FOR CIVIL RIGHTS, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL...

  2. Identifying and Addressing Challenges to Research in University Laboratory Preschools

    Science.gov (United States)

    File, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Research Findings: This essay offers a review of challenges that university laboratory preschools face in providing a site for research that fits with other components of the program mission. An argument is made to consider paradigm shifts in research questions and methods that move away from traditions within the fields that study children's…

  3. The Food Friends: Encouraging Preschoolers to Try New Foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellows, Laura; Anderson, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    In response to concerns about children's eating behaviors, the Colorado Nutrition Network developed and tested Food Friends--Making New Foods Fun for Kids. The program was designed as a 12-week social marketing campaign aimed at encouraging preschool-age children to try new foods, such as Ugli Fruit, couscous, and daikon radish. Tasting novel…

  4. Story Based Activities Enhance Literacy Skills in Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, Elçin; Bolay, Hayrunnisa

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the impact of story-based activities on literacy skills in pre-school children. The efficacy of story-based activities program were tested by literacy skills survey test. Results showed that, the scores of overall literacy skills and all subsets skills in the study group (n = 45) were statistically significantly higher than the…

  5. Investing in High Quality Preschool: Lessons from an Urban Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorman, Rebekah L.; Anthony, Elizabeth; Osborne-Fears, Billie; Fischer, Robert L.

    2017-01-01

    Large numbers of children of low income families in the United States arrive at kindergarten already far behind their more affluent peers on measures of school readiness. In the absence of any federal preschool policy and amidst alarm about this growing divide, universal prekindergarten (UPK) programs have been launched around the United States,…

  6. Longitudinal Outcomes for Preschool Dual Language Learners Receiving Writing Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matera, Carola

    2011-01-01

    This article analyzed data from a randomized, longitudinal study (Matera & Gerber, 2008) to measure the effectiveness of a writing intervention that provided clearly defined opportunities for Spanish-speaking preschool children in a Head Start program to develop their writing abilities in English. Results from this study indicate that children…

  7. Evaluation of a Social Marketing Campaign Targeting Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Susan L.; Bellows, Laura; Beckstrom, Leslie; Anderson, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the effectiveness of a pilot social marketing program to increase preschoolers' willingness to try new foods. Methods: Four Head Start centers participated (2 experimental, 2 control) in a study using a quasi-experimental design. Experimental sites received a 12-week intervention developed using social marketing…

  8. The Leadership Evaluation and Analysis Program (LEAP). Contemporary Marine Corps Leadership Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-08-01

    trained and treated as the best. All grunts resent the fact that we always seem to get the short end of the stick. It’s depressing when base and office...anything with them in the first place? I feel they should be home with Mama . I also think it’s bad when a Marine requests leave and is turned down for...and patriotic force into a force that I wouldn’t rest the defense of the nation on. It has a cancer that must be cut out or the entire bodywill rotl

  9. Final Report of the Lower Extremity Assessment Program (LEAP 99-2). Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-08-01

    affected by current footwear . The Wellco OB demonstrated a trend of marginal improvement in protection against the smallest mine tested (M- 14). This...milliseconds with a possible trend towards slower subsequent decay of the measured load with the blast attenuating footwear . Disruption of the combat...that currently available landmine protective footwear does not prevent severe injury. This footwear potentially reduces injury severity against some

  10. Development and evaluation of a basic physical and sports activity program for preschool children in nursery schools in iran: an interventional study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kordi, Ramin; Nourian, Ruhollah; Ghayour, Mahboubeh; Kordi, Mahboubeh; Younesian, Ali

    2012-01-01

    .... The levels of gross motor development of all subjects were measured before intervention and after 10 weeks physical activity program employing the Test of Gross Motor Development-edition 2 (TGMD-2...

  11. THE IMPACT OF EDUCATION REFORM ON PRESCHOOL GROUP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iuliana GAVREA MAZUR

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to identify the results that children have after the appliance of the new art.23 al. (1 lit. b of the national education law. According to this the preschool class is part of the primary education. The quantitative research method used the collected data from the school Inspectorate and also from the official documents. These demonstrates that schoolars that have ben enrolled after the reform in education from 2012 and have followed the program of the preschool class have accomodated much easier to the requests of the new environment. This corresponds to the children in such age and offers a schoolar athmosphere.

  12. Quasi-Experimental Study: Head Start Preschoolers' Cognitive Development as Assessed by the Learning Accomplishment Profile--Diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Jeanne M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Preschoolers' cognitive abilities were assessed each year as part of the Head Start Program requirements. The Head Start PK-4 Center evaluated preschoolers' cognition by administering the Learning Accomplishment Profile-Diagnostic (LAP-D), as a pretest and posttest measure. The LAP-D study used archival data collected from the 2009-2010…

  13. Attention and Perseverance Behaviors of PreSchool Children Enrolled in Suzuki Violin Lessons and Other Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Laurie

    1992-01-01

    Reports on a study of attention span and persevering behaviors of preschool children. Finds the Suzuki Method of violin instruction is associated with longer attention spans and more persevering behaviors than creative movement instruction or other preschool programs. Concludes that teachers prefer the Suzuki Method's approach to other forms of…

  14. Two-Year Study of Northwest Regional Center's Summer Sessions for Preschool, Rubella, Deaf-Blind Children. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkovich, Paul

    The report describes the Summer Sessions for Preschool, Rubella, Deaf-Blind Children conducted in 1970 and 1971 by the Northwest Regional Center for Deaf-Blind Children in Vancouver, Washington. The summer programs were primarily designed to evaluate preschool deaf-blind children in a learning and living situation. The report is intended not only…

  15. Together! A Newsletter for Parents and Preschoolers = Juntos! Una circular para los Padres y los Pre-Escolares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucson Public Library, AZ.

    Designed for parents of preschoolers, this monthly bilingual (English/Spanish) newsletter contains information on local library programs, games and activities to play at home, reading readiness, and recommended books for preschoolers. A feature on disabled children includes a description of the library's special needs collection and a letter to…

  16. The Role of the School-based Speech-Language Pathologist Serving Preschool Children with Dysphagia: A Personal Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurjan, Randy Moskowitz

    2000-01-01

    This article discusses the role of speech-language pathologists in serving preschool children with dysphagia. Current approaches to feeding and swallowing intervention, etiologies and programs, transdisciplinary teaming, developmental and feeding evaluation, and types of service delivery models (home-based and center-based) for preschool children…

  17. The Poverty of Preschool Promises: Saving Children and Money with the Early Education Tax Credit. Policy Analysis. No. 641

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Adam B.

    2009-01-01

    The political momentum behind state-level preschool programs is tremendous, but existing proposals are often flawed and expensive. Preschool can provide small but statistically significant short-term gains for low-income children; however, these gains usually fade quickly in later grades. There is little evidence to support the belief that…

  18. Enrofloxacin and Probiotic Lactobacilli Influence PepT1 and LEAP-2 mRNA Expression in Poultry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavlova, Ivelina; Milanova, Aneliya; Danova, Svetla; Fink-Gremmels, Johanna|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/119949997

    2016-01-01

    Expression of peptide transporter 1 (PepT1) and liver-expressed antimicrobial peptide 2 (LEAP-2) in chickens can be influenced by food deprivation, pathological conditions and drug administration. Effect of three putative probiotic Lactobacillus strains and enrofloxacin on the expression of PepT1

  19. Underwater sonar image detection: A combination of non-local spatial information and quantum-inspired shuffled frog leaping algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingmei; Liu, Shu; Liu, Zhipeng

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a combination of non-local spatial information and quantum-inspired shuffled frog leaping algorithm to detect underwater objects in sonar images. Specifically, for the first time, the problem of inappropriate filtering degree parameter which commonly occurs in non-local spatial information and seriously affects the denoising performance in sonar images, was solved with the method utilizing a novel filtering degree parameter. Then, a quantum-inspired shuffled frog leaping algorithm based on new search mechanism (QSFLA-NSM) is proposed to precisely and quickly detect sonar images. Each frog individual is directly encoded by real numbers, which can greatly simplify the evolution process of the quantum-inspired shuffled frog leaping algorithm (QSFLA). Meanwhile, a fitness function combining intra-class difference with inter-class difference is adopted to evaluate frog positions more accurately. On this basis, recurring to an analysis of the quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO) and the shuffled frog leaping algorithm (SFLA), a new search mechanism is developed to improve the searching ability and detection accuracy. At the same time, the time complexity is further reduced. Finally, the results of comparative experiments using the original sonar images, the UCI data sets and the benchmark functions demonstrate the effectiveness and adaptability of the proposed method.

  20. Underwater sonar image detection: A combination of non-local spatial information and quantum-inspired shuffled frog leaping algorithm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingmei Wang

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a combination of non-local spatial information and quantum-inspired shuffled frog leaping algorithm to detect underwater objects in sonar images. Specifically, for the first time, the problem of inappropriate filtering degree parameter which commonly occurs in non-local spatial information and seriously affects the denoising performance in sonar images, was solved with the method utilizing a novel filtering degree parameter. Then, a quantum-inspired shuffled frog leaping algorithm based on new search mechanism (QSFLA-NSM is proposed to precisely and quickly detect sonar images. Each frog individual is directly encoded by real numbers, which can greatly simplify the evolution process of the quantum-inspired shuffled frog leaping algorithm (QSFLA. Meanwhile, a fitness function combining intra-class difference with inter-class difference is adopted to evaluate frog positions more accurately. On this basis, recurring to an analysis of the quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO and the shuffled frog leaping algorithm (SFLA, a new search mechanism is developed to improve the searching ability and detection accuracy. At the same time, the time complexity is further reduced. Finally, the results of comparative experiments using the original sonar images, the UCI data sets and the benchmark functions demonstrate the effectiveness and adaptability of the proposed method.

  1. An Effective Hybrid Cuckoo Search Algorithm with Improved Shuffled Frog Leaping Algorithm for 0-1 Knapsack Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhong Feng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An effective hybrid cuckoo search algorithm (CS with improved shuffled frog-leaping algorithm (ISFLA is put forward for solving 0-1 knapsack problem. First of all, with the framework of SFLA, an improved frog-leap operator is designed with the effect of the global optimal information on the frog leaping and information exchange between frog individuals combined with genetic mutation with a small probability. Subsequently, in order to improve the convergence speed and enhance the exploitation ability, a novel CS model is proposed with considering the specific advantages of Lévy flights and frog-leap operator. Furthermore, the greedy transform method is used to repair the infeasible solution and optimize the feasible solution. Finally, numerical simulations are carried out on six different types of 0-1 knapsack instances, and the comparative results have shown the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm and its ability to achieve good quality solutions, which outperforms the binary cuckoo search, the binary differential evolution, and the genetic algorithm.

  2. Preschool-aged children's television viewing in child care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christakis, Dimitri A; Garrison, Michelle M

    2009-12-01

    The goal was to quantify television viewing in day care settings and to investigate the characteristics of programs that predict viewing. A telephone survey of licensed child care programs in Michigan, Washington, Florida, and Massachusetts was performed. The frequency and quantity of television viewing for infants, toddlers, and preschool-aged children were assessed. With the exception of infants, children in home-based child care programs were exposed to significantly more television on an average day than were children in center-based programs (infants: 0.2 vs 0 hours; toddlers: 1.6 vs 0.1 hours; preschool-aged children: 2.4 vs 0.4 hours). In a regression analysis of daily television time for preschool-aged children in child care, center-based programs were found to have an average of 1.84 fewer hours of television each day, controlling for the other covariates. Significant effect modification was found, in that the impact of home-based versus center-based child care programs differed somewhat depending on educational levels for staff members; having a 2- or 4-year college degree was associated with 1.41 fewer hours of television per day in home-based programs, but no impact of staff education on television use was observed in center-based programs. For many children, previous estimates of screen time significantly underestimated actual amounts. Pediatricians should council parents to minimize screen time in child care settings.

  3. Working memory and early numeracy training in preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passolunghi, Maria Chiara; Costa, Hiwet Mariam

    2016-01-01

    Many factors influence children's performance in mathematical achievement, including both domain-specific and domain-general factors. This study aimed to verify and compare the effects of two types of training on early numerical skills. One type of training focused on the enhancement of working memory, a domain-general precursor, while the other focused on the enhancement of early numeracy, a domain-specific precursor. The participants were 48 five-year-old preschool children. Both the working memory and early numeracy training programs were implemented for 5 weeks. The results showed that the early numeracy intervention specifically improved early numeracy abilities in preschool children, whereas working memory intervention improved not only working memory abilities but also early numeracy abilities. These findings stress the importance of performing activities designed to train working memory abilities, in addition to activities aimed to enhance more specific skills, in the early prevention of learning difficulties during preschool years.

  4. Optimal inverse magnetorheological damper modeling using shuffled frog-leaping algorithm–based adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiufang Lin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Magnetorheological dampers have become prominent semi-active control devices for vibration mitigation of structures which are subjected to severe loads. However, the damping force cannot be controlled directly due to the inherent nonlinear characteristics of the magnetorheological dampers. Therefore, for fully exploiting the capabilities of the magnetorheological dampers, one of the challenging aspects is to develop an accurate inverse model which can appropriately predict the input voltage to control the damping force. In this article, a hybrid modeling strategy combining shuffled frog-leaping algorithm and adaptive-network-based fuzzy inference system is proposed to model the inverse dynamic characteristics of the magnetorheological dampers for improving the modeling accuracy. The shuffled frog-leaping algorithm is employed to optimize the premise parameters of the adaptive-network-based fuzzy inference system while the consequent parameters are tuned by a least square estimation method, here known as shuffled frog-leaping algorithm-based adaptive-network-based fuzzy inference system approach. To evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed approach, the inverse modeling results based on the shuffled frog-leaping algorithm-based adaptive-network-based fuzzy inference system approach are compared with those based on the adaptive-network-based fuzzy inference system and genetic algorithm–based adaptive-network-based fuzzy inference system approaches. Analysis of variance test is carried out to statistically compare the performance of the proposed methods and the results demonstrate that the shuffled frog-leaping algorithm-based adaptive-network-based fuzzy inference system strategy outperforms the other two methods in terms of modeling (training accuracy and checking accuracy.

  5. An Experimental Program to Provide In-Home Vocational Training in Preschool and Day Care Work for Unskilled Disadvantaged Mothers and Child-Caring Adults. A Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West Chester State Coll., PA.

    On the basis of interviews with mothers and baby-sitters of children enrolled in the Early Learning Programs of the Pennsylvania Research in Infant Development and Education Project in the West Chester, Pennsylvania, area, 12 low-income labor force nonparticipants identified as potential entrants into the job market were chosen to participate in…

  6. The Rhythm of Language: Fostering Oral and Listening Skills in Singapore Pre-School Children through an Integrated Music and Language Arts Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Linda; Chong, Sylvia

    1998-01-01

    Examined the effectiveness of a year-long integrated language and music program (the Expressive Language and Music Project) to enhance Singaporean kindergartners' English oral-language competency. Found that the natural communicative setting and creative use of resources and activities based on the Orff and Kodaly approaches facilitated language…

  7. Promoting Social and Emotional Competencies among Young Children in Croatia with Preschool PATHS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josipa Mihic

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Preschool PATHS (Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies is an evidence-based universal prevention program focused on promoting children’s social and emotional competencies and reducing the likelihood of behaviour problems and negative relationships with peers and teachers. This paper examines changes in the social and emotional competencies of the first children to participate in Preschool PATHS in Croatia. This study included 164 children, ages 3-6, in 12 preschool classrooms in three cities across Croatia, who participated in the classroom-based Preschool PATHS curriculum. At the beginning and end of the preschool year, teachers completed wellvalidated and reliable assessments of social and emotional competencies on each child. Hierarchical linear models revealed statistically significant and substantial improvements in prosocial behaviour, emotion regulation, emotion symptoms, peer problems, relational aggression, conduct problems, and hyperactive-impulsive behaviour. Study findings reveal significant changes in children’s social and emotional competencies during preschool. This time may present a unique opportunity to buttress children’s skills and improve long-term school success through the implementation of a rigorous empiricallyvalidated prevention program such as Preschool PATHS.

  8. Physical activity, sedentary behaviour and energy balance in the preschool child: opportunities for early obesity prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, John J

    2008-08-01

    Prevalence of obesity in preschool children has increased dramatically in recent years. The preschool years (age 3-6 years) have been regarded as critical for the programming of energy balance, via the concept of early 'adiposity rebound'. Children who undergo early adiposity rebound are at increased risk of later obesity. Recent evidence suggests that associations between timing of adiposity rebound and later obesity may not reflect programming, but might denote that 'obesogenic' growth trajectories are often established by the preschool period. Studies of objectively-measured physical activity and sedentary behaviour in preschool children show that levels of physical activity are typically low and sedentary behaviour high. The review of evidence presented here is supportive of the hypothesis that physical activity is protective against obesity in the preschool period, and that sedentary behaviour, particularly television viewing, is obesogenic. Definitive evidence on dose-response relationships between physical activity, sedentary behaviour and obesity remain unclear. Dose-response evidence could be obtained fairly readily by intervention and longitudinal observational studies that use accelerometry in preschool children. The generalisability of much of the evidence base is limited and there is a need for research on the influence of physical activity and sedentary behaviour in the preschool years in the aetiology of obesity in the developing world.

  9. Long-Term Effects of Famine on Chronic Diseases: Evidence from China's Great Leap Forward Famine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xue Feng; Liu, Gordon G; Fan, Maoyong

    2017-07-01

    We evaluate the long-term effects of famine on chronic diseases using China's Great Leap Forward Famine as a natural experiment. Using a unique health survey, we explore the heterogeneity of famine intensity across regions and find strong evidence supporting both the adverse effect and the selection effect. The two offsetting effects co-exist and their magnitudes vary in different age cohorts at the onset of famine. The selection effect is dominant among the prenatal/infant famine-exposed cohort, while the adverse effect appears dominant among the childhood/puberty famine-exposed cohort. The net famine effects are more salient in rural residents and non-migrants subsamples. Gender differences are also found, and are sensitive to smoking and drinking behaviors. Our conclusion is robust to various specifications. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Improved delay-leaping simulation algorithm for biochemical reaction systems with delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Na; Zhuang, Gang; Da, Liang; Wang, Yifei

    2012-04-14

    In biochemical reaction systems dominated by delays, the simulation speed of the stochastic simulation algorithm depends on the size of the wait queue. As a result, it is important to control the size of the wait queue to improve the efficiency of the simulation. An improved accelerated delay stochastic simulation algorithm for biochemical reaction systems with delays, termed the improved delay-leaping algorithm, is proposed in this paper. The update method for the wait queue is effective in reducing the size of the queue as well as shortening the storage and access time, thereby accelerating the simulation speed. Numerical simulation on two examples indicates that this method not only obtains a more significant efficiency compared with the existing methods, but also can be widely applied in biochemical reaction systems with delays.

  11. An adaptive tau-leaping method for stochastic simulations of reaction-diffusion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padgett, Jill M. A.; Ilie, Silvana

    2016-03-01

    Stochastic modelling is critical for studying many biochemical processes in a cell, in particular when some reacting species have low population numbers. For many such cellular processes the spatial distribution of the molecular species plays a key role. The evolution of spatially heterogeneous biochemical systems with some species in low amounts is accurately described by the mesoscopic model of the Reaction-Diffusion Master Equation. The Inhomogeneous Stochastic Simulation Algorithm provides an exact strategy to numerically solve this model, but it is computationally very expensive on realistic applications. We propose a novel adaptive time-stepping scheme for the tau-leaping method for approximating the solution of the Reaction-Diffusion Master Equation. This technique combines effective strategies for variable time-stepping with path preservation to reduce the computational cost, while maintaining the desired accuracy. The numerical tests on various examples arising in applications show the improved efficiency achieved by the new adaptive method.

  12. Age and growth of leaping grey mullet (Liza saliens (Risso, 1810 in Minorca (Balearic Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Cardona

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available A population of leaping grey mullet (Liza saliens (Risso, 1810 was studied in order to measure seasonal and annual growth rates. The annual growth rates were similar to those reported for other populations from the central Western Mediterranean and intermediate between those living in northern and southern areas. As usual, the growth rate of adult males was slower than that of females. Males reached adulthood in their third summer. Females of the same age showed a moderate gonadal development, but did not ripen until the next summer. Mullets of all ages gained weight only when the water temperature was higher than 20°C. However adults and immature fish showed reduced growth in mid-summer, when that of the juveniles peaked. This difference is not a consequence of the reproductive cost, because the growth rate of immatures was greatly reduced although they did not spawn.

  13. The grand leap of the whale up the Niagara Falls: converting philosophical conclusions into policy prescriptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Søren

    2015-04-01

    This article analyzes a neat conjuring trick employed in bioethics, that is, the immediate conversion of a philosophical conclusion into a policy prescription, and compares it to the "grand leap of the whale up the Niagara Falls" mentioned by Benjamin Franklin. It is shown that there is no simple and easy way to achieve the conversion, by considering arguments falling under four headings: (1) reasonable disagreement about values and theories, (2) general jurisprudential arguments, (3) the differences between policymaking and philosophy, and (4) the messy world of implementation. The particular issue used to illustrate the difficulties in moving from philosophical conclusion to policy description is infanticide of healthy infants, but the analysis is general, and the conclusion that the immediate move to policy is illegitimate is quite general.

  14. Scenario planning to leap-frog the Sustainable Development Goals: An adaptation pathways approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.R.A. Butler

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Few studies have examined how to mainstream future climate change uncertainty into decision-making for poverty alleviation in developing countries. With potentially drastic climate change emerging later this century, there is an imperative to develop planning tools which can enable vulnerable rural communities to proactively build adaptive capacity and ‘leap-frog’ the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs. Using an example from Indonesia, we present a novel participatory approach to achieve this. We applied scenario planning to operationalise four adaptation pathways principles: (1 consideration of climate change as a component of multi-scale social-ecological systems; (2 recognition of stakeholders’ competing values, goals and knowledge through co-learning; (3 coordination of responses across multiple decision-making levels; and (4 identification of strategies which are ‘no regrets’, incremental (tackling proximate drivers of community vulnerability and transformative (tackling systemic drivers. Workshops with stakeholders from different administrative levels identified drivers of change, an aspirational vision and explorative scenarios for livelihoods in 2090, and utilised normative back-casting to design no regrets adaptation strategies needed to achieve the vision. The resulting ‘tapestry’ of strategies were predominantly incremental, and targeted conventional development needs. Few directly addressed current or possible future climate change impacts. A minority was transformative, and higher level stakeholders identified proportionately more transformative strategies than local level stakeholders. Whilst the vast majority of strategies were no regrets, some were potentially mal-adaptive, particularly for coastal areas and infrastructure. There were few examples of transformative innovations that could generate a step-change in linked human and environmental outcomes, hence leap-frogging the SDGs. We conclude that whilst

  15. Effect of a child care center-based obesity prevention program on body mass index and nutrition practices among preschool-aged children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natale, Ruby A; Lopez-Mitnik, Gabriela; Uhlhorn, Susan B; Asfour, Lila; Messiah, Sarah E

    2014-09-01

    This study examined the effect of an early childhood obesity prevention program on changes in Body Mass Index (BMI) z-score and nutrition practices. Eight child care centers were randomly assigned to an intervention or attention control arm. Participants were a multiethnic sample of children aged 2 to 5 years old (N = 307). Intervention centers received healthy menu changes and family-based education focused on increased physical activity and fresh produce intake, decreased intake of simple carbohydrate snacks, and decreased screen time. Control centers received an attention control program. Height, weight, and nutrition data were collected at baseline and at 3, 6, and 12 months. Analysis examined height, weight, and BMI z-score change by intervention condition (at baseline and at 3, 6, and 12 months). Pearson correlation analysis examined relationships among BMI z-scores and home activities and nutrition patterns in the intervention group. Child BMI z-score was significantly negatively correlated with the number of home activities completed at 6-month post intervention among intervention participants. Similarly, intervention children consumed less junk food, ate more fresh fruits and vegetables, drank less juice, and drank more 1% milk compared to children at control sites at 6 months post baseline. Ninety-seven percent of those children who were normal weight at baseline were still normal weight 12 months later. Findings support child care centers as a promising setting to implement childhood obesity prevention programs in this age group. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  16. Addressing the Needs of Preschool Children in the Context of Disasters and Terrorism: Assessment, Prevention, and Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolmer, Leo; Hamiel, Daniel; Pardo-Aviv, Lee; Laor, Nathaniel

    2017-07-01

    The goal of this paper is to review the research literature regarding the needs of preschoolers in the context of disasters and terrorism with the aim of understanding the existing methods for assessment, prevention, and intervention to provide recommendations and point out required research and development. We differentiate between screening tools that provide initial evaluation and assessment tools for diagnosing preschooler children's pathology and review possible interventions that address the preschool child's needs before, during, and after the incident itself. We also emphasize the lack of dissemination and research of prevention programs and mass interventions for preschoolers. Programs for community mass prevention and intervention for preschoolers should be developed and evaluated and interventions should be adapted for individual and group delivery. Moreover, the increase in the number of children refugees requires cultural adaptations of assessment measures and interventions.

  17. Quality of Distance Education in Turkey: Preschool Teacher Training Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Gultekin

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Distance education is used for teacher training at different levels and fields in Turkey. Launched in the 2000-2001 academic year and still applied by Anadolu University, the Pre-School Teacher Training Program is one of those programs offered by distance education. This study aims to evaluate Anadolu University’s Preschool Teacher Training Program in Turkey by obtaining student opinions. A total of 1,026 senior students enrolled in the Preschool Education major at the Open Education Faculty of Anadolu University participated in the survey. A questionnaire to determine the opinions of students on the program was used as a means of data collection. Means (X and standard deviations (SD were employed to analyze the survey data. The results showed that although the teacher candidates study at a good level, they do not have a good record of watching the television programs. The results also revealed that the opinions of teacher candidates about the textbooks, television programs, teaching practices, and academic assistance services are positive.

  18. Obesity in Infants to Preschoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Preschoolers Infographic How to Make a Healthy Home Dietary Recommendations for Healthy Children Top 10 Tips to Help Children Develop Healthy Habits Fruit and Veggie Toolkit for Kids Healthy Foods ...

  19. Woodworking for Preschool Handicapped Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulla-Branz, John

    1984-01-01

    Woodworking experiences based on a task analysis approach can be motivating instructional experiences for preschool handicapped children. The article presents sequentially ordered hammering and sawing skills adaptations for specific disability groups. (CL)

  20. Learning in Preschool: Teachers' Talk about Their Work with Documentation in Swedish Preschools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfgren, Håkan

    2017-01-01

    This article investigates preschool teachers' professionalism and professional strategies in relation to narratives about learning in preschool. These are expressed through the teachers' talk about documentation. A policy on increased systematic documentation in preschools has been introduced in Sweden. Preschool teachers were interviewed about…

  1. Organising and Leading Systematic Quality Work in the Preschool -- Preschool Managers' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Håkansson, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Preschool managers' responsibility for and leadership of systematic quality work has come to the fore in connection with changes made to the Swedish preschool curriculum. The aim of this study is to contribute to the understanding of preschool managers' leadership and management of the systematic quality work in Swedish preschools with reference…

  2. Objectively measured sedentary behavior in preschool children: comparison between Montessori and traditional preschools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Wonwoo; Blair, Steven N; Pate, Russell R

    2013-01-03

    This study aimed to compare the levels of objectively-measured sedentary behavior in children attending Montessori preschools with those attending traditional preschools. The participants in this study were preschool children aged 4 years old who were enrolled in Montessori and traditional preschools. The preschool children wore ActiGraph accelerometers. Accelerometers were initialized using 15-second intervals and sedentary behavior was defined as Montessori preschools, after adjusting for selected potential correlates of preschoolers' sedentary behavior. Children attending Montessori preschools spent less time in sedentary behavior than those attending traditional preschools during the in-school (44.4. min/hr vs. 47.1 min/hr, P = 0.03), after-school (42.8. min/hr vs. 44.7 min/hr, P = 0.04), and total-day (43.7 min/hr vs. 45.5 min/hr, P = 0. 009) periods. School type (Montessori or traditional), preschool setting (private or public), socio-demographic factors (age, gender, and socioeconomic status) were found to be significant predictors of preschoolers' sedentary behavior. Levels of objectively-measured sedentary behavior were significantly lower among children attending Montessori preschools compared to children attending traditional preschools. Future research should examine the specific characteristics of Montessori preschools that predict the lower levels of sedentary behavior among children attending these preschools compared to children attending traditional preschools.

  3. Pedagogical documentation: Preschool teachers’ perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović-Breneselović Dragana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Educational policy shapes the positions of all stakeholders and their mutual relations in the system of preschool education through its attitude towards documentation. The attitude towards the function of pedagogical documentation in preschool education programmes reflects certain views on children, learning and nature of the programmes. Although contemporary approaches to preschool education emphasise the issue of documentation, this problem is dealt with partially and technically in our country. The aim of our research was to explore preschool teachers’ perspective on documentation by investigating the current situation and teachers’ preferences related to documentation type, as well as to study the purpose, meaning and process of documentation. The research was conducted on the sample of 300 preschool teachers. The descriptive method, interviewing and scaling techniques were used. Research data suggest that the field of documentation is marked by contradictions in perceiving the meaning and function of documentation, as well as by discrepancy and lack of integration at the level of conceptions, practice and educational policy. Changing the current situation in the field of documentation is not a technical matter of elaboration of certain types and forms of documentation; it demands explication of the purpose and function of documentation in keeping with the conception of preschool education programmes and a systemic approach to changes originating from the given conception. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 179060: Modeli procenjivanja i strategije unapređivanja kvaliteta obrazovanja u Srbiji

  4. Science in the Eyes of Preschool Children: Findings from an Innovative Research Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubosarsky, Mia D.

    How do young children view science? Do these views reflect cultural stereotypes? When do these views develop? These fundamental questions in the field of science education have rarely been studied with the population of preschool children. One main reason is the lack of an appropriate research instrument that addresses preschool children's developmental competencies. Extensive body of research has pointed at the significance of early childhood experiences in developing positive attitudes and interests toward learning in general and the learning of science in particular. Theoretical and empirical research suggests that stereotypical views of science may be replaced by authentic views following inquiry science experience. However, no preschool science intervention program could be designed without a reliable instrument that provides baseline information about preschool children's current views of science. The current study presents preschool children's views of science as gathered from a pioneering research tool. This tool, in the form of a computer "game," does not require reading, writing, or expressive language skills and is operated by the children. The program engages children in several simple tasks involving picture recognition and yes/no answers in order to reveal their views about science. The study was conducted with 120 preschool children in two phases and found that by the age of 4 years, participants possess an emergent concept of science. Gender and school differences were detected. Findings from this interdisciplinary study will contribute to the fields of early childhood, science education, learning technologies, program evaluation, and early childhood curriculum development.

  5. Literature review on the preschool pedestrian

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-10-01

    The purpose of this literature review was to describe (1) the factors leading to typical preschool pedestrian accidents, (2) the developmental characteristics of the preschool child that affect his/her behavior in traffic, (3) social factors that may...

  6. Computerized sociometric assessment for preschool children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endedijk, Hinke M.; Cillessen, Antonius H. N.

    2015-01-01

    In preschool classes, sociometric peer ratings are used to measure children's peer relationships. The current study examined a computerized version of preschool sociometric ratings. The psychometric properties were compared of computerized sociometric ratings and traditional peer ratings for

  7. Literature review on the preschool pedestrian

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review was to describe (1) the factors leading to typical preschool pedestrian accidents, (2) the developmental characteristics of the preschool child that affect his/her behavior in traffic, (3) social factors that may...

  8. Correlates of preschool children's physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkley, Trina; Salmon, Jo; Okely, Anthony D; Hesketh, Kylie; Crawford, David

    2012-08-01

    Physical activity is important for children's health, and identifying factors associated with their physical activity is important for future interventions and public health programs. This study sought to identify multidimensional correlates of preschool children's physical activity. The social-ecological model (SEM) was used to identify constructs potentially associated with preschool children's physical activity. Data were collected from 1004 preschool children, aged 3-5 years, and parents in 2008-2009, and analyzed in 2010-2011. Physical activity was measured over 8 days using ActiGraph accelerometers. Parents completed a comprehensive survey. Generalized linear modeling was used to assess associations between potential correlates and percentage of time spent in physical activity. Correlates of physical activity were found across all the domains of the SEM and varied between boys and girls and week and weekend days. Age was the only consistent correlate, with children spending approximately 10% less time in physical activity for each advancing year of age. Some modifiable correlates that were related to more than one physical activity outcome were rules restricting rough games inside and usual daily sleep time for boys. For girls, a preference to play inside/draw/do crafts rather than be active, and child constraints, was associated with more than one of the physical activity outcomes. A novel finding in this study is the counterintuitive association between parental rules restricting rough games inside and boys' higher physical activity participation levels. Potential strategies for promoting children's physical activity should seek to influence children's preference for physical activity and parent rules. Gender-specific strategies also may be warranted. Copyright © 2012 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A note on the leap-frog scheme in two and three dimensions. [finite difference method for partial differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abarbanel, S.; Gottlieb, D.

    1976-01-01

    The paper considers the leap-frog finite-difference method (Kreiss and Oliger, 1973) for systems of partial differential equations of the form du/dt = dF/dx + dG/dy + dH/dz, where d denotes partial derivative, u is a q-component vector and a function of x, y, z, and t, and the vectors F, G, and H are functions of u only. The original leap-frog algorithm is shown to admit a modification that improves on the stability conditions for two and three dimensions by factors of 2 and 2.8, respectively, thereby permitting larger time steps. The scheme for three dimensions is considered optimal in the sense that it combines simple averaging and large time steps.

  10. The Arts in Turkish Preschool Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acer, Dilek

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important factors determining a nation's level of development in the modern world is preschool education. When preschool education is perceived as an entity that affects every aspect of childhood development, this fact is undeniable. Several aspects of preschool education, including art education, play a significant role in a…

  11. Educational Vouchers for Universal Pre-Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Henry M.; Schwartz, Heather L.

    2007-01-01

    This article considers two issues regarding preschool education. First, it provides a brief set of arguments for government funding of universal, pre-school education. Second, it explores the applicability of a voucher plan using a regulated market approach for the funding of universal, pre-school education. Four criteria are used to assess the…

  12. Preschoolers Use Speakers' Preferences to Learn Words

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saylor, Megan M.; Sabbagh, Mark A.; Fortuna, Alexandra; Troseth, Georgene

    2009-01-01

    In two studies, we investigated preschoolers' ability to use others' preferences to learn names for things. Two studies demonstrated that preschool children make smart use of others' preferences. In the first study, preschool children only used information about others' preferences when they were clearly linked to referential intentions. The…

  13. [A new human machine interface in neurosurgery: The Leap Motion(®). Technical note regarding a new touchless interface].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Tommaso, L; Aubry, S; Godard, J; Katranji, H; Pauchot, J

    2016-06-01

    Currently, cross-sectional imaging viewing is used in routine practice whereas the surgical procedure requires physical contact with an interface (mouse or touch-sensitive screen). This type of contact results in a risk of lack of aseptic control and causes loss of time. The recent appearance of devices such as the Leap Motion(®) (Leap Motion society, San Francisco, USA) a sensor which enables to interact with the computer without any physical contact is of major interest in the field of surgery. However, its configuration and ergonomics produce key challenges in order to adapt to the practitioner's requirements, the imaging software as well as the surgical environment. This article aims to suggest an easy configuration of the Leap Motion(®) in neurosurgery on a PC for an optimized utilization with Carestream(®) Vue PACS v11.3.4 (Carestream Health, Inc., Rochester, USA) using a plug-in (to download at: https://drive.google.com/?usp=chrome_app#folders/0B_F4eBeBQc3ybElEeEhqME5DQkU) and a video tutorial (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yVPTgxg-SIk). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Long-term energy security in a national scale using LEAP. Application to de-carbonization scenarios in Andorra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travesset-Baro, Oriol; Jover, Eric; Rosas-Casals, Marti

    2016-04-01

    This paper analyses the long-term energy security in a national scale using Long-range Energy Alternatives Planning System (LEAP) modelling tool. It builds the LEAP Andorra model, which forecasts energy demand and supply for the Principality of Andorra by 2050. It has a general bottom-up structure, where energy demand is driven by the technological composition of the sectors of the economy. The technological model is combined with a top-down econometric model to take into account macroeconomic trends. The model presented in this paper provides an initial estimate of energy demand in Andorra segregated into all sectors (residential, transport, secondary, tertiary and public administration) and charts a baseline scenario based on historical trends. Additional scenarios representing different policy strategies are built to explore the country's potential energy savings and the feasibility to achieve the Intended Nationally Determined Contribution (INDC) submitted in April 2015 to UN. In this climatic agreement Andorra intends to reduce net greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) by 37% as compared to a business-as-usual scenario by 2030. In addition, current and future energy security is analysed in this paper under baseline and de-carbonization scenarios. Energy security issues are assessed in LEAP with an integrated vision, going beyond the classic perspective of security of supply, and being closer to the sustainability's integrative vision. Results of scenarios show the benefits of climate policies in terms of national energy security and the difficulties for Andorra to achieving the de-carbonization target by 2030.

  15. Can preschool improve child health outcomes? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Onise, Katina; Lynch, John W; Sawyer, Michael G; McDermott, Robyn A

    2010-05-01

    Early childhood development interventions (ECDIs) have the potential to bring about wide ranging human capital benefits for children through to adulthood. Less is known, however, about the potential for such interventions to improve population health. The aim of this study was to examine the evidence for child health effects of centre-based preschool intervention programs for healthy 4 year olds, beyond the preschool years. Medline, Embase, ERIC, Psych Info, Sociological Abstracts, the Cochrane Library, C2-SPECTR and the Head Start database were searched using terms relating to preschool and health from 1980 to July 2008, limited to English language publications. Reference lists and the journal Child Development were hand searched for eligible articles missed by the electronic search. There were 37 eligible studies identified. The reviewed studies examined a range of interventions from centre-based preschool alone, to interventions also including parenting programs and/or health services. The study populations were mostly sampled from populations at risk of school failure (76%). Only eight of the 37 studies had a strong methodological rating, 15 were evaluated as at moderate potential risk of bias and 14 as at high potential risk of bias. The review found generally null effects of preschool interventions across a range of health outcomes, however there was some evidence for obesity reduction, greater social competence, improved mental health and crime prevention. We conclude that the great potential for early childhood interventions to improve population health across a range of health outcomes, as anticipated by policy makers worldwide, currently rests on a rather flimsy evidence base. Given the potential and the increasingly large public investment in these interventions, it is imperative that population health researchers, practitioners and policy makers worldwide collaborate to advance this research agenda. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Executive functions in preschool children with cerebral palsy--Assessment and early intervention--A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Kristian; Liverød, Janne Risholm; Lerdal, Bjørn; Vestrheim, Ida E; Skranes, Jon

    2016-01-01

    To assess the level of executive functioning among preschool children with cerebral palsy (CP) and evaluate effects of the Program Intensified habilitation (PIH). In this non-randomized, prospective study, 15 preschool children with CP, and their parents attended the PIH for a 1-year period. Executive functions were evaluated using the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive functions-Preschool version (BRIEF-P), filled out by parents and preschool teachers. Before PIH, scores of executive function difficulties were close to the general population mean. After PIH, fathers and preschool teachers reported reduced levels of executive difficulties on, respectively, the Emergent Metacognition Index and the Flexibility Index on the BRIEF-P. Mothers reported no changes. The children in our sample showed age-appropriate levels of executive functions before attending PIH. Some aspects of executive skills difficulties were reduced after PIH. Using BRIEF-P contributed to the differentiation of cognitive strengths and weaknesses among the children.

  17. Screening for pre-school and school-age hearing problems: European Consensus Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarżyński, Henryk; Piotrowska, Anna

    2012-01-01

    To formulate consensus statement and policies on structured hearing screening programs in pre-school and school-age children in Europe. This consensus will be brought before the European Union's Member States as a working and effective program with recommendations for adoption. A distinguished panel of experts discussed hearing screening of pre-school and school-age children during the 10th Congress of European Federation of Audiology Societies (EFAS), held in Warsaw, Poland, on June 22, 2011. The panel included experts in audiology, otolaryngology, communication disorders, speech language pathology, education and biomedical engineering. Consensus was reached on thirteen points. Key elements of the consensus, as described herein, are: (1) defining the role of pre-school and school screening programs in the identification and treatment of hearing problems; (2) identifying the target population; (3) recognizing the need for a quality control system in screening programs. The European Consensus Statement on Hearing Screening of Pre-school and School-age Children will encourage the appropriate authorities of the various countries involved to initiate hearing screening programs of pre-school and school-age children. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Feasibility of First Step to Success with Preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Andy J; Small, Jason; Feil, Edward; Seeley, John; Walker, Hill; Golly, Annemieke

    2013-07-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine feasibility of the preschool version of the First Step to Success (FSS) intervention. Toward this end, the following four research questions were addressed: (1) To what extent was the intervention implemented with integrity? (2) To what extent do teachers and parents perceive the intervention to be socially valid? (3) To what extent were teachers and parents satisfied with the intervention? and (4) To what extent was the intervention effective in reducing problem behavior and improving social skills? Twelve students participated in the study. Treatment integrity, social validity, and satisfaction results were analyzed at the aggregate level, and a reliable change index was calculated at the case level for primary outcome measures to assess the potential efficacy of the intervention. Fidelity data suggest the preschool version of the intervention can be implemented with acceptable integrity by coaches and teachers in preschool settings. Social validity outcomes suggest parents' perceptions of the program's goals, procedures, and outcomes were extremely favorable, and social validity from the teacher perspective was acceptable. The results provide initial evidence that participating in the preschool version of the FSS intervention improves children's social skills and decreases problem behavior.

  19. Locomotion and Grasping impairment in preschoolers with autism spectrum disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Fulceri

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate expressiveness of motor impairment in autism spectrum disorder (ASD and its correlation with developmental and clinical features of ASD. Method: Thirty-five male preschoolers with ASD completed the Peabody Developmental Motor Scales-2 (PDMS-2; Folio and Fewell, 2000 and underwent a multidisciplinary assessment including medical examination, standardized assessment of cognitive abilities, administration of Autism_Diagnostic_Observation_Schedule (ADOS and a parent interview about adaptive skills. Results: Results revealed a substantial impairment in locomotion and grasping skills. Both fine and gross motor skills were significantly correlated with non verbal IQ and adaptive behaviours (p<0.01 but not with chronological age or ADOS scores. Children with weaker motor skills have greater cognitive and adaptive behaviours deficits. Conclusions: Motor development in ASD can be detected at preschool age and locomotion and grasping skills are substantially the most impaired area. These findings support the need to assess motor skills in preschoolers with ASD in addition to other developmental skill areas. Along with the increasingly acknowledged importance of motor skills for subsequent social, cognitive, and communicative development our findings support the need to consider motor intervention as a key area in therapeutic program to improve outcome in preschoolers with ASD.

  20. Low Birth Weight, Preschool Education, and School Remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, Judy A.; Reynolds, Arthur J.; Arteaga, Irma

    2016-01-01

    Studies have documented a strong relationship between low birth weight status and adverse child outcomes such as poor school performance and need for special education services. Following a cohort of over 1,300 low-income and predominately African American children in the Chicago Longitudinal Study we investigated whether birth weight and family socio-economic risk measured at the time of the child’s birth predicts placement into special education classes or grade retention in elementary school. Contrary to previous research, we found that low birth weight (education placement. Rather, these children (especially boys) were more likely to be retained in grade as an alternative approach to addressing poor school performance. Family socio-economic risk at birth was a significant predictor of the need for remedial services. We also assessed whether a high-quality preschool program offered at ages 3 and 4 can reduce the negative effects of low family SES and birth weight on the need for special education and grade retention. Preschool participation in the Child-Parent Centers was found to reduce the likelihood of school remediation. The effects of preschool were greater for children from families with higher levels of socio-economic disadvantage. The beneficial effects of preschool on special education placement were also larger for boys than girls. PMID:27667851

  1. Early preschool environments and gender: Effects of gender pedagogy in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shutts, Kristin; Kenward, Ben; Falk, Helena; Ivegran, Anna; Fawcett, Christine

    2017-10-01

    To test how early social environments affect children's consideration of gender, 3- to 6-year-old children (N=80) enrolled in gender-neutral or typical preschool programs in the central district of a large Swedish city completed measures designed to assess their gender-based social preferences, stereotypes, and automatic encoding. Compared with children in typical preschools, a greater proportion of children in the gender-neutral school were interested in playing with unfamiliar other-gender children. In addition, children attending the gender-neutral preschool scored lower on a gender stereotyping measure than children attending typical preschools. Children at the gender-neutral school, however, were not less likely to automatically encode others' gender. The findings suggest that gender-neutral pedagogy has moderate effects on how children think and feel about people of different genders but might not affect children's tendency to spontaneously notice gender. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A systematic review of body dissatisfaction and sociocultural messages related to the body among preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatangelo, Gemma; McCabe, Marita; Mellor, David; Mealey, Alex

    2016-09-01

    This systematic review examines body dissatisfaction and the influence of sociocultural messages related to body image among preschool children. The review was conducted according to the PRISMA guidelines and 16 studies were included in the final analysis. Findings suggest that children under the age of 6 years old experience body dissatisfaction, however, the proportion of children who are dissatisfied varied from around 20% to 70%, depending on the method of assessment. The literature was divided on whether preschool aged girls experience more body dissatisfaction than boys. Parental influence appears to be an important factor in the development of preschool children's body dissatisfaction and attitudes. However, more research is needed to understand the influences of children's peers and the media. The need for more sensitive measures of body dissatisfaction and prevention programs for preschool children is discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Developing Healthy Food Preferences in Preschool Children Through Taste Exposure, Sensory Learning, and Nutrition Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekitsing, Chandani; Hetherington, Marion M; Blundell-Birtill, Pam

    2018-02-14

    The present review was undertaken in order to summarize and evaluate recent research investigating taste exposure, sensory learning, and nutrition education interventions for promoting vegetable intake in preschool children. Overall, taste exposure interventions yielded the best outcomes for increasing vegetable intake in early childhood. Evidence from sensory learning strategies such as visual exposure and experiential learning also show some success. While nutrition education remains the most common approach used in preschool settings, additional elements are needed to strengthen the educational program for increasing vegetable intake. There is a substantial gap in the evidence base to promote vegetable intake in food fussy children. The present review reveals the relative importance of different intervention strategies for promoting vegetable intake. To strengthen intervention effects for improving vegetable intake in preschool children, future research could consider integrating taste exposure and sensory learning strategies with nutrition education within the preschool curriculum.

  4. Formative research and strategic development of a physical activity component to a social marketing campaign for obesity prevention in preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellows, Laura; Anderson, Jennifer; Gould, Susan Martin; Auld, Garry

    2008-06-01

    The prevalence of overweight in childhood, including preschoolers, continues to rise. While efforts focusing on school-aged children are encouraging, obesity prevention programs to address nutrition and physical activity in the child care center are lacking. Food Friends is a successfully evaluated nutrition program aimed at enhancing preschoolers' food choices, the addition of a physical activity program would improve the programs overall efforts to establish healthful habits early in life. This study describes the formative research conducted with secondary influencers of preschoolers-teachers and parents-for the development of a physical activity program. Key informant interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with preschool teachers and parents, respectively, to examine current physical activity practices, as well as attitudes, opinions, and desired wants and needs for physical activity materials. Findings illustrate that teachers provided physical activity; however, most did not use a structured program. Teachers identified time, space and equipment as barriers to providing activity in their classroom. Focus group findings identified activities of preschoolers', parents' perceptions of the adequacy of activity levels, and items to help parents engage their children in more physical activity. Barriers were also identified by parents and included time, safety, inclement weather, and lack of knowledge and self-efficacy. Findings from this formative research were used to develop a marketing strategy to guide the development of a physical activity component, Food Friends Get Movin' with Mighty Moves , as part of a larger social marketing campaign aimed to decrease the risk for obesity in low-income preschoolers.

  5. Energy demand and vehicle emissions stimate in Aburra Valley from 2000 to 2010 using LEAP model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Victoria Toro-Gómez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo presenta un análisis retrospectivo de la demanda de energía y las emisiones atmosféricas generadas por el parque automotor del Valle de Aburrá, región que tiene a Medellín como municipio cen tral. El estudio fue desarrollado usando el modelo LEAP y se llevó a cabo para el periodo comprendido entre los años 2000 y 2010, con el objetivo de generar informaci ón para la definición de est rategias que contribuyan a disminuir la contaminaci ón atmosférica en la región. Los resultados mostraron que a pesar del crecimiento ace lerado del parque automotor, la demand a de energía y emisiones de CO 2 crecieron lentamente, mientras las emisiones de contaminantes criterio decrecieron durante la última década. Además, se encontró que los camiones hicieron una importante contribución a las emisiones de CO, NO X , SO X y PM2.5, mientras las emisiones de VOC de las motos 2T representaron una proporción considerable de las emisiones totales de dicho contaminante.

  6. Exploring direct 3D interaction for full horizontal parallax light field displays using leap motion controller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikarla, Vamsi Kiran; Sodnik, Jaka; Szolgay, Peter; Jakus, Grega

    2015-04-14

    This paper reports on the design and evaluation of direct 3D gesture interaction with a full horizontal parallax light field display. A light field display defines a visual scene using directional light beams emitted from multiple light sources as if they are emitted from scene points. Each scene point is rendered individually resulting in more realistic and accurate 3D visualization compared to other 3D displaying technologies. We propose an interaction setup combining the visualization of objects within the Field Of View (FOV) of a light field display and their selection through freehand gesture tracked by the Leap Motion Controller. The accuracy and usefulness of the proposed interaction setup was also evaluated in a user study with test subjects. The results of the study revealed high user preference for free hand interaction with light field display as well as relatively low cognitive demand of this technique. Further, our results also revealed some limitations and adjustments of the proposed setup to be addressed in future work.

  7. Dynamic Gesture Recognition based on LeapMotion and HMM-CART Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qixiang; Deng, Fang

    2017-10-01

    This paper focuses on improving the recognition accuracy of dynamic gesture learning, and proposes dynamic gesture track recognition strategy based on HMM-CART model structure. It integrates the modeling ability of the HMM (Hidden-Markov-Model) for time series data and the interpretability of CART (Classification-And-Regression-Tree) for its ability of fast classification and regression, and use it for dynamic gesture recognition. Time series data of movement gestures collected by LeapMotion sensor will be first divided into four channels: finger shape, palm normal vector, palm ball radius and palm displacement vector, and then HMM in HMM Layer will be built for each channel, finally the likelihood probability of model calculated for each sub-sequence of observation should be classified as the input of the CART model in CART Layer to identify the gesture. Experiments show that the accuracy of dynamic gesture recognition method using HMM-CART model is higher than that of traditional single channel HMM.

  8. Nonlinear Rayleigh wave inversion based on the shuffled frog-leaping algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Cheng-Yu; Wang, Yan-Yan; Wu, Dun-Shi; Qin, Xiao-Jun

    2017-12-01

    At present, near-surface shear wave velocities are mainly calculated through Rayleigh wave dispersion-curve inversions in engineering surface investigations, but the required calculations pose a highly nonlinear global optimization problem. In order to alleviate the risk of falling into a local optimal solution, this paper introduces a new global optimization method, the shuffle frog-leaping algorithm (SFLA), into the Rayleigh wave dispersion-curve inversion process. SFLA is a swarm-intelligence-based algorithm that simulates a group of frogs searching for food. It uses a few parameters, achieves rapid convergence, and is capability of effective global searching. In order to test the reliability and calculation performance of SFLA, noise-free and noisy synthetic datasets were inverted. We conducted a comparative analysis with other established algorithms using the noise-free dataset, and then tested the ability of SFLA to cope with data noise. Finally, we inverted a real-world example to examine the applicability of SFLA. Results from both synthetic and field data demonstrated the effectiveness of SFLA in the interpretation of Rayleigh wave dispersion curves. We found that SFLA is superior to the established methods in terms of both reliability and computational efficiency, so it offers great potential to improve our ability to solve geophysical inversion problems.

  9. Design and evaluation of an augmented reality simulator using leap motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Trinette; de Ribaupierre, Sandrine; Eagleson, Roy

    2017-10-01

    Advances in virtual and augmented reality (AR) are having an impact on the medical field in areas such as surgical simulation. Improvements to surgical simulation will provide students and residents with additional training and evaluation methods. This is particularly important for procedures such as the endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV), which residents perform regularly. Simulators such as NeuroTouch, have been designed to aid in training associated with this procedure. The authors have designed an affordable and easily accessible ETV simulator, and compare it with the existing NeuroTouch for its usability and training effectiveness. This simulator was developed using Unity, Vuforia and the leap motion (LM) for an AR environment. The participants, 16 novices and two expert neurosurgeons, were asked to complete 40 targeting tasks. Participants used the NeuroTouch tool or a virtual hand controlled by the LM to select the position and orientation for these tasks. The length of time to complete each task was recorded and the trajectory log files were used to calculate performance. The resulting data from the novices' and experts' speed and accuracy are compared, and they discuss the objective performance of training in terms of the speed and accuracy of targeting accuracy for each system.

  10. Malnutrition, sex ratio, and selection: a study based on the great leap forward famine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shige

    2014-12-01

    This study tests the evolutionary hypothesis that maternal nutritional condition can influence offspring sex ratio at birth in humans. Using the 1959-1961 Chinese Great Leap Forward famine as a natural experiment, this study combines two large-scale national data sources and difference-in-differences method to identify the effect of famine-induced acute malnutrition on sex ratio at birth. The results show a significant famine-induced decrease in the proportion of male births in the 1958, 1961, and 1964 in the urban population but not in the rural population. Given that both the urban and rural populations suffered from the famine-induced malnutrition, and that the rural population experienced a drastic famine-induced mortality increase and fertility reduction, these results suggest the presence of a short-term famine effect, a long-term famine effect, and a selection effect. The timing of the estimated famine effects suggests that famine influences sex ratio at birth by differential implantation and differential fetal loss by fetal sex.

  11. Leaping shampoo glides on a 500-nm-thick lubricating air layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Erqiang; Lee, Sanghyun; Marston, Jeremy; Bonito, Andrea; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur

    2013-11-01

    When a stream of shampoo is fed onto a pool in one's hand, a jet can leap sideways or rebound from the liquid surface in an intriguing phenomenon known as the Kaye effect. Earlier studies have debated whether non-Newtonian effects are the underlying cause of this phenomenon, making the jet glide on top of a shear-thinning liquid layer, or whether an entrained air layer is responsible. Herein we show unambiguously that the jet slides on a lubricating air layer [Lee et al., Phys. Rev. E 87, 061001 (2013)]. We identify this layer by looking through the pool liquid and observing its rupture into fine micro-bubbles. The resulting micro-bubble sizes suggest that the thickness of this air layer is around 500 nm. This thickness estimate is also supported by the tangential deceleration of the jet during the rebounding, with the shear stress within the thin air layer sufficient for the observed deceleration. Particle tracking within the jet shows uniform velocity, with no pronounced shear, which would be required for shear-thinning effects. The role of the surfactant may primarily be to stabilize the air film.

  12. Exploring Direct 3D Interaction for Full Horizontal Parallax Light Field Displays Using Leap Motion Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vamsi Kiran Adhikarla

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the design and evaluation of direct 3D gesture interaction with a full horizontal parallax light field display. A light field display defines a visual scene using directional light beams emitted from multiple light sources as if they are emitted from scene points. Each scene point is rendered individually resulting in more realistic and accurate 3D visualization compared to other 3D displaying technologies. We propose an interaction setup combining the visualization of objects within the Field Of View (FOV of a light field display and their selection through freehand gesture tracked by the Leap Motion Controller. The accuracy and usefulness of the proposed interaction setup was also evaluated in a user study with test subjects. The results of the study revealed high user preference for free hand interaction with light field display as well as relatively low cognitive demand of this technique. Further, our results also revealed some limitations and adjustments of the proposed setup to be addressed in future work.

  13. Indirana salelkari, a new species of leaping frog (Anura: Ranixalidae from Western Ghats of Goa, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil Modak

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Indirana salelkari, a new species of leaping frog, is described from Netravali, Goa, India.  The species can be distinguished from its congeners by a combination of morphological characters, viz., head longer than wide, narrow and deep buccal cavity, vomerine teeth large and acutely placed close to each other, oval choanae, distinct canthus rostralis, first finger longer than or equal to second, presence of double outer palmer tubercles, elongated inner metatarsal tubercle, moderate webbing, discs of fingers and toes with crescentic deep marginal grooves restricted only to the anterior side of the discs, dorsal skin with glandular folds but without warts, ventral skin granular with some mottling on throat and, palms and soles dark brown.  Indirana salelkari differs from its sister taxa, I. chiravasi, in the placement and structure of vomerine teeth and choanae.  The new species is genetically distinct from I. chiravasi, with a genetic distance of 3.8% for the 16S rRNA gene.  We also provide phylogentic placement of Indirana salelkari based on mitochondrial 12S and 16S ribosomal genes and nuclear rhodopsin gene along with molecular clock analysis, which further confirms its genetic distinctness from other related taxa.  

  14. Indirana chiravasi, a new species of Leaping Frog (Anura: Ranixalidae from Western Ghats of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.D. Padhye

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Indirana chiravasi, a new species of leaping frog is described from the northern Western Ghats around Amboli, Sindhudurg District, Maharashtra, India. It differs from all its congeners based on a combination of characters including presence of median single internal vocal sac, head longer than wide, distinct canthus rostralis, tympanum 2/3rd to 3/4th the diameter of eye, vomerine teeth in two oblique series at the posterior border of choanae, long midventral lingual papilla, first finger longer than or equal to second, presence of double outer palmer tubercle, thin and elongated inner metatarsal tubercle, absence of outer metatarsal tubercle, webbing moderate, dorsal skin with glandular folds but without warts, ventral skin smooth without mottling and palms and soles dark brown. Molecular analysis based on mitochondrial 12S and 16S genes and nuclear rhodopsin and rag1 genes suggests that the species is genetically distinct from other species for which genetic data is available. Preliminary observations on the development of the species are also provided. We also provide genetic data and images for Indirana gundia collected from the type locality.

  15. THE RELATIONSHIP OF THE EDUCATIONAL STAFF TOWARDS CHILDREN WITH DEVE LOPMENTAL DISORDERS-AN IMPORTANT FACTOR FOR THEIR QUALITY TREATMENT IN THE PRE-SCHOOL INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snezana MATOVSKA

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction· The purpose for the integration in the preschool institution· The need for the integration in the preschool institution· The results of the integration in the preschool institutionPersonal experience from the integration in the preschool institution· The relationship of the educational and upbringing staff towards the child· The relationship of the child towards the preschool institution· (the relationship towards the other children and the relationship towards the staff Proposal and suggestions for solving the present situation· The completion of legislative and its carrying out in practice· The creation of space and staff possibilities for active integration of the children with developmental disorders in the preschool institutions· The preparation of didactic material and the devices for carrying out the working program.

  16. Preschool life skills: Recent advancements and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmie, Tara A; Luczynski, Kevin C

    2018-01-08

    Over the past decade, researchers have replicated and extended research on the preschool life skills (PLS) program developed by Hanley, Heal, Tiger, and Ingvarsson (2007). This review summarizes recent research with respect to maximizing skill acquisition, improving generality, evaluating feasibility and acceptability, and testing predictions of the initial PLS study. For each area, we suggest directions for future research. © 2018 Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  17. Computer as a didactic toy: Computers' use in preschool education

    OpenAIRE

    Arsović, Branka

    2011-01-01

    ICT technology is used to facilitate teaching and learning in the preschool educational program. Although some pedagogues and psychologists have expressed concern about the usefulness of computer usage at this children age, numerous studies point out the positive effects of the use of IT on the children's cognitive aspects, as well as on children's social and emotional development. Appropriate educational software can enhance the development of children's symbolic thinking. Children can also ...

  18. 45.2 THE EFFECTIVENESS OF PARENT TRAINING AS A TREATMENT FOR PRESCHOOL ATTENTION-DEFICIT/HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER: A MULTI-CENTER RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL OF THE NEW FOREST PARENTING PROGRAM IN EVERYDAY CLINICAL PRACTICE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Anne-Mette

    2016-01-01

    to investigate whether the NFPP can be delivered effectively for children who are referred through official community pathways in everyday clinical practice. Methods A multicenter randomized controlled parallel arm trial design was incorporated. There were two treatment arms, NFPP and treatment as usual. NFPP......, informed by the Development and Well-Being Assessment (DAWBA), were recruited from three child and adolescent psychiatry departments in Denmark. Randomization was on a 1:1 basis and stratified for age and gender. Results The primary endpoint showed a change in ADHD symptoms as measured by the Preschool...... behaviors during child’s solo play; observation of parent–child interaction; parent sense of competence; and family stress. Conclusions This trial will provide evidence on whether NFPP is a more effective treatment for preschool ADHD than the treatment usually offered in everyday clinical practice....

  19. Wishful thinking in preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Stéphane; Clément, Fabrice; Mercier, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    The current experiment sought to demonstrate the presence of wishful thinking--when wishes influence beliefs--in young children. A sample of 77 preschoolers needed to predict, eight times in a row, which of two plastic eggs, one containing one toy and the other containing three toys, would be drawn by a blinded experimenter. On the four trials in which the children could not keep the content of the egg drawn, they were equally likely to predict that either egg would be drawn. By contrast, on the four trials in which the children got to keep the content of the egg, they were more likely to predict that the egg with three toys would be drawn. Any effort the children exerted would be the same across conditions, so that this demonstration of wishful thinking cannot be accounted for by an effort heuristic. One group of children--a subgroup of the 5-year-olds--did not engage in wishful thinking. Children from this subgroup instead used the representativeness heuristic to guide their answers. This result suggests that having an explicit representation of the outcome inhibits children from engaging in wishful thinking in the same way as explicit representations constrain the operation of motivated reasoning in adults. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Gendering in one Icelandic preschool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudrun Alda Hardardottir

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to shed light on gendering in preschool. It analyzes the opinions and beliefs of preschool teachers with regard to boys and girls in one Icelandic preschool, and how gender performative acts are manifested in the preschool’s children. The preschool, which was observed for one school year, comprised 60 children, aged 18 months to five years, and 20 employees, of which eight were qualified teachers. The research material is analyzed in terms of Judith Butler’s gender constructivism. Butler contends that gender is constituted by, and is a product of, society, and that the individual’s empowerment is therefore limited in relation to society, with individuals typically seeking to identify themselves with the dominant norms concerning gender. The main conclusions suggest that “gendering” is prominent within the preschool. There is a strong tendency among the preschool teachers to classify the children into categories of boys/masculine and girls/feminine, and specific norms direct the children into the dominant feminine and masculine categories, thus maintaining and reinforcing their gender stereotypes. The children used symbols such as colors, locations and types of play as means to instantiate the “girling” and the “boying”. These findings are consistent with previous Nordic research and indicate a prevailing essentialist perspective towards both girls and boys. The originality of the research, however, lies in focusing on children’s gender from the individual’s perspective and how the individual child generally enacts gender performatively within the confines of society’s norms.

  1. Learning about Activity and Understanding Nutrition for Child Health (LAUNCH): Rationale, design, and implementation of a randomized clinical trial of a family-based pediatric weight management program for preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Lori J; Filigno, Stephanie Spear; Bolling, Christopher; Ratcliff, Megan B; Kichler, Jessica C; Robson, Shannon L; Simon, Stacey L; McCullough, Mary Beth; Clifford, Lisa M; Stough, Cathleen O; Zion, Cynthia; Ittenbach, Richard F

    2017-01-01

    Obesity affects nearly 2 million preschool age children in the United States and is not abating. However, research on interventions for already obese preschoolers is limited. To address this significant gap in the literature, we developed an intervention targeting obesity reduction in 2 to 5year olds, Learning about Activity and Understanding Nutrition for Child Health (LAUNCH). This paper describes the rationale, design, participant enrollment, and implementation of a 3-arm randomized, parallel-group clinical trial comparing LAUNCH to a motivational-interviewing intervention (MI) and standard care (STC), respectively. Whereas LAUNCH was designed as a skills based intervention, MI focused on addressing the guardian's motivation to make changes in diet and activity and providing tools to do so at the guardian's level of readiness to implement changes. Child body mass index z-score was the primary outcome, assessed at pretreatment, posttreatment (Month 6), and 6 and 12month follow-ups (Months 12 and 18). Mechanisms of weight change (e.g., dietary intake, physical activity) and environmental factors associated with weight (e.g., foods available in the home, caregiver diet) were also assessed. This study is unique because it is one of the few randomized controlled trials to examine a developmentally informed, clinic and home skills based behavioral family intervention for preschoolers who are already obese. Being obese during the preschool years increases the likelihood of remaining obese as an adult and is associated with serious health conditions; if this intervention is successful, it has the potential to change the health trajectories for young children with obesity. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. "Banana Starts with Yellow": Curricular Implications of Preschoolers Missing a Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvester, Ruth; Kragler, Sherry

    2013-01-01

    Despite significant investments over the past decade in the expansion and improvement of preschool programs, too many children, particularly poor children, enter kindergarten behind their peers. Because it is critical that voluntary pre-kindergarten (VPK) classrooms offer educational programs that both address the needs and developmental levels of…

  3. Serendipitous findings from a pilot project on preparation of health preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, P L

    1984-01-01

    Thirty-four healthy preschoolers were pretested and posttested as part of a pilot project on preparation programming. Variables associated with their knowledge about medical equipment were identified. The results of this small pilot project are used to present suggestions for future research evaluating the effects of preparation programs for health young children.

  4. Impact of Preschool Education on the Academic Achievement of Low Socio-Economic Status Elementary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Gary L.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if attending a four-year-old preschool program had an impact on the academic achievement of elementary age students. With limited funding and the demands of No Child Left Behind legislation, schools are constantly evaluating the effectiveness and cost of ongoing programming. In addition, educational…

  5. Two Instructional Films on Pre-School Deaf Children. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegenthaler, Bruce M.; Greenhill, Leslie P.

    A project produced two instructional films on preschool deaf children. Both were black and white sound films about 30 minutes long. Evaluation followed completion of the active phase of film making. Designed to aid in professional education and program development, the two films presented principles of parent-child programs and demonstrated…

  6. Review of the studies on nutrition in Polish preschool children. Part 2. Meals prepared at preschool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkiel-Pawłowska, Sylwia; Chalcarz, Wojciech

    This article is the second part of the review of the studies on nutrition in Polish preschool children. In the first part, studies on preschool menus assessment were presented and summarised, whereas this article reviews the studies on the assessment of foods and meals prepared at preschool. The aim of this review was to present and summarise the results of the studies on the assessment of meals prepared for children at preschool based on the reports from the preschool food storeroom, the studies on chemical analysis of sample meals served at preschools and the studies on comparison of the results of chemical analysis to the results obtained by calculations obtained from computer programmes. The results of the studies on the assessment of meals prepared for children at preschool using various methods confirm most of the findings from the studies on the assessment of preschool menus. It is necessary to carry out more studies on energy and nutrient content assessment of preschool meals determined by chemical analysis of sample meals in order to provide more accurate information about the real nutritional value of meals served to children at preschool. It is essential to update the Polish food composition tables to enable more precise calculations of nutritional value of the meals planned for children at preschools which will improve the possibility of adjusting preschool meals to the real needs of both 3-year-old and 4-6-year-old children during their stay at preschool.

  7. Objectively measured sedentary behavior in preschool children: comparison between Montessori and traditional preschools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byun Wonwoo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aimed to compare the levels of objectively-measured sedentary behavior in children attending Montessori preschools with those attending traditional preschools. Methods The participants in this study were preschool children aged 4 years old who were enrolled in Montessori and traditional preschools. The preschool children wore ActiGraph accelerometers. Accelerometers were initialized using 15-second intervals and sedentary behavior was defined as Results Children attending Montessori preschools spent less time in sedentary behavior than those attending traditional preschools during the in-school (44.4. min/hr vs. 47.1 min/hr, P = 0.03, after-school (42.8. min/hr vs. 44.7 min/hr, P = 0.04, and total-day (43.7 min/hr vs. 45.5 min/hr, P = 0. 009 periods. School type (Montessori or traditional, preschool setting (private or public, socio-demographic factors (age, gender, and socioeconomic status were found to be significant predictors of preschoolers’ sedentary behavior. Conclusions Levels of objectively-measured sedentary behavior were significantly lower among children attending Montessori preschools compared to children attending traditional preschools. Future research should examine the specific characteristics of Montessori preschools that predict the lower levels of sedentary behavior among children attending these preschools compared to children attending traditional preschools.

  8. Preschool teachers’ reasoning about interactive whiteboard embedded in Swedish preschools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Bourbour

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to investigate the ways in which teachers enact the interactive whiteboard (IWB in Swedish preschools in relation to preschool children’s mathematical learning. Data collected from interviews with four preschool teachers have provided the opportunity to consider the potential of IWB to facilitate a creative approach to young children’s mathematic education. The findings suggest that IWB use in preschool is mostly viewed as “Space for children to involve in problem-solving situations”, “Supporting collaborative learning and mutual negotiation”, “Goal-oriented mathematics learning facilitated by IWB” and “Retaining children’s interest in learning activities”. This study also highlights the importance of teachers’ technological knowledge and skills in mediating the interaction and facilitating the use of IWB in preschool pedagogical practices. Normal 0 21 false false false SV JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Normal tabell"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:"Cambria","serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}

  9. An improved leaping detector for flow analysis applied to iron speciation in drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Sérgio R. B.; Araújo, Mário C. U.; Honorato, Ricardo S.; Zagatto, Elias A. G.; Lima, José F. C.; Lapa, Rui A. S.

    2000-01-01

    A low inner volume (ca. 64 ml) probe was built up in an injector-commutator in order to behave as a photometric leaping detector in flow analysis. It comprises a bicolour light-emitting diode (BLED), as a source of pulsed radiation in the red and green visible region, and two phototransistors as transducers. Sample injection, detector relocation, analytical signal recording, data treatment and definition of the spectral working range were computer-controlled. The feasibility of the system was initially demonstrated in the flow-injection speciation of iron, and the overall standard deviation of results was estimated as ± 1.6 and ± 1.4% for 1.6–4.0 mg l−1 Fe(II) or total iron after eightfold processing of synthetic samples. The system was further applied to drug analysis: the mean deviations of results for typical samples were estimated as ± 5.2 and ± 3.3%, and the relative standard deviation as ± 1.6 and ± 1.3% for Fe(II) and total iron, respectively. Results were compared with those obtained by a conventional spectrophotometric procedure and no statistic differences at the 95% confidence level were found. In relation to an earlier system with multi-site detection, the proposed system is more stable, presenting low drift with a relative standard deviation of 0.026% and 0.039% for measurements (n=120 during 4 h of observation) with green and red emission. It is also faster with a sampling rate of 133 h−1 and carryover problems are not found. The possibility of compensating the Schlieren noise by dual-wavelength spectrophotometry is discussed. PMID:18924860

  10. Field studies at the Apache Leap Research Site in support of alternative conceptual models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodhouse, E.G.; Davidson, G.R.; Theis, C. [eds.] [and others

    1997-08-01

    This is a final technical report for a project of the U.S Nuclear Regulatory Commission (sponsored contract NRC-04-090-51) with the University of Arizona. The contract was an optional extension that was initiated on July 21, 1994 and that expired on May 31, 1995. The project manager was Thomas J. Nicholson, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. The objectives of this contract were to examine hypotheses and conceptual models concerning unsaturated flow and transport through fractured rock, and to design and execute confirmatory field and laboratory experiments to test these hypotheses and conceptual models at the Apache Leap Research Site near Superior, Arizona. The results discussed here are products of specific tasks that address a broad spectrum of issues related to flow and transport through fractures. Each chapter in this final report summarizes research related to a specific set of objectives and can be read and interpreted as a separate entity. The tasks include detection and characterization of historical rapid fluid flow through fractured rock and the relationship to perched water systems using environmental isotopic tracers of {sup 3}H and {sup 14}C, fluid- and rock-derived {sup 2343}U/{sup 238}U measurements, and geophysical data. The water balance in a small watershed at the ALRS demonstrates the methods of acounting for ET, and estimating the quantity of water available for infiltration through fracture networks. Grain density measurements were made for core-sized samples using a newly designed gas pycnometer. The distribution and magnitude of air permeability measurements have been measured in a three-dimensional setting; the subsequent geostatistical analysis is presented. Electronic versions of the data presented here are available from authors; more detailed discussions and analyses are available in technical publications referenced herein, or soon to appear in the professional literature.

  11. Validation of the Leap Motion Controller using markered motion capture technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeragliuolo, Anna H; Hill, N Jeremy; Disla, Luis; Putrino, David

    2016-06-14

    The Leap Motion Controller (LMC) is a low-cost, markerless motion capture device that tracks hand, wrist and forearm position. Integration of this technology into healthcare applications has begun to occur rapidly, making validation of the LMC׳s data output an important research goal. Here, we perform a detailed evaluation of the kinematic data output from the LMC, and validate this output against gold-standard, markered motion capture technology. We instructed subjects to perform three clinically-relevant wrist (flexion/extension, radial/ulnar deviation) and forearm (pronation/supination) movements. The movements were simultaneously tracked using both the LMC and a marker-based motion capture system from Motion Analysis Corporation (MAC). Adjusting for known inconsistencies in the LMC sampling frequency, we compared simultaneously acquired LMC and MAC data by performing Pearson׳s correlation (r) and root mean square error (RMSE). Wrist flexion/extension and radial/ulnar deviation showed good overall agreement (r=0.95; RMSE=11.6°, and r=0.92; RMSE=12.4°, respectively) with the MAC system. However, when tracking forearm pronation/supination, there were serious inconsistencies in reported joint angles (r=0.79; RMSE=38.4°). Hand posture significantly influenced the quality of wrist deviation (P<0.005) and forearm supination/pronation (P<0.001), but not wrist flexion/extension (P=0.29). We conclude that the LMC is capable of providing data that are clinically meaningful for wrist flexion/extension, and perhaps wrist deviation. It cannot yet return clinically meaningful data for measuring forearm pronation/supination. Future studies should continue to validate the LMC as updated versions of their software are developed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Scaling-up the medical workforce in Timor-Leste: challenges of a great leap forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Jorge; Dussault, Gilles; Buchan, James; Ferrinho, Paulo

    2013-11-01

    The health services system of Timor-Leste (T-L) will, by 2015, add 800 physicians, most of them trained in Cuba, to the 233 employed by the national health system in 2010-2011. The need for more physicians is not in discussion: poor health indicators, low coverage and utilization of services, and poor quality of services are well documented in T-L. However, the choice of this scaling-up, with a relatively narrow focus on the medical workforce, needs to be assessed for its relevance to the health profile of the country, for its comprehensiveness in terms of other complementary measures needed to make it effective. This article discusses the potential effects of the rapid scaling-up of the medical workforce, and the organizational capacity needed to monitor the process and eventually mitigate any deleterious consequences. The analysis is based on a review of documentation collected on site (T-L) and on interviews with key-informants conducted in 2011. We stress that any workforce scaling-up is not simply a matter of increasing numbers of professionals, but should combine improved training, distribution, working conditions, management and motivation, as a means towards better performing health services' systems. This is a major challenge in a context of limited organizational and managerial capacity, underdeveloped information systems, limited training and research capacity, and dependency on foreign aid and technical assistance. Potential risks are associated with funding the additional costs of recruiting more personnel, associated expenditures on infrastructure, equipment and consumables, the impact on current staff mix, and the expected increased demand for services. We conclude that failing to manage effectively the forthcoming "great leap forward" will have long term effects: formal policies and plans for the balanced development of the health workforce, as well as strengthened institutions are urgently needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Preschool Needle Pain Responding: Establishing 'Normal'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waxman, Jordana A; DiLorenzo, Miranda G; Pillai Riddell, Rebecca R; Flora, David B; Greenberg, Saul; Garfield, Hartley

    2017-06-01

    The current study sets forth to provide descriptive data for preschool vaccination pain responding as well as examine longitudinal relationships over early childhood. Growth mixture modeling was first used to describe stable subgroups of preschoolers on the basis of their pain response patterns over 2-minutes post-needle. Secondly, a parallel-process growth curve model was used to assess the stability of acute pain responding from 12 months of age to preschool age. Specifically, we examined whether preschool pain-related distress or regulation could be predicted from 12-month acute pain responding. Preschool participants were part of a Canadian longitudinal cohort (The Opportunities to Understand Childhood Hurt [OUCH] cohort; N = 302). Growth mixture modeling analyses discerned 3 distinct groups of preschoolers, with an important minority not regulating to low-no pain by 2 minutes post-needle. There were no significant associations between 12-month and preschool pain responding. These results highlight the steep trajectory of development between these different stages of early childhood and the variability of pain responding at the preschool vaccination. This study provides descriptive data for preschool vaccination pain responding as well as examines longitudinal relationships over early childhood. Demonstrating significantly different pain patterns from infancy, 25% of preschoolers are displaying suboptimal regulation trajectories. This considerable minority poses a significant concern because of the established trajectory of phobia onset in middle childhood. Copyright © 2017 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Mozart Effect in Preschool Children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Ken

    2006-01-01

    In 1993, Rauscher et al. reported a temporary increase in spatial-temporal ability after listening to Mozart's music. This led to numerous replication and extension studies with mixed findings in the past decade. This study investigated the "Mozart effect" in preschool children. Forty-one boys and girls, aged three to five, attempted a series of…

  15. Controlling Relationships in Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Jose Manuel; Braza, Francisco; Carreras, Rosario

    2004-01-01

    In order to facilitate the comprehension of social structure in preschool children, our research has two foci: first, to define controlling behaviours (nonaggressive group organisation) and to determine their organisational principles, and second, to analyse the relation of the controlling behaviours with aggressive behaviours. Through direct…

  16. Reducing Poverty through Preschool Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Greg J.; Ludwig, Jens; Magnuson, Katherine A.

    2007-01-01

    Greg Duncan, Jens Ludwig, and Katherine Magnuson explain how providing high-quality care to disadvantaged preschool children can help reduce poverty. In early childhood, they note, children's cognitive and socioemotional skills develop rapidly and are sensitive to "inputs" from parents, home learning environments, child care settings, and the…

  17. Developing preschool children social aptitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Teresa Brás

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The kindergarten teachers must be aware of the importance of the acquisition of social skills for children, with a view to appropriate adaptation and overcoming the various challenges that will have those throughout existence. This article is the presentation of a research work within the pre-school educational context, in the field of ʻSocial and Personal Educationʼ which may lead to improved social skills within the group of children. In order to accomplish this, after the teaching training with the pre-school class which focussed on the acquisition of social competence, an assessment of the modified social skills within the class was carried out. These activities were included in the preschool lesson planning during the ʻSupervised Teaching Practiceʼ. They were developed based on childrenʼs daily life situations, focussing mainly on using games in the learning contexts. The aim of these games was to motivate and involve the children in order to enhance their balanced social development. The results obtained suggest that the introduction of this type of learning activities may be an asset in Pre-school Education because they develop both childrenʼs social skills and social competence. Moreover, this type of learning activities may also lead to changes in childrenʼs social interaction with both adults and their peers which may favour pro social behaviour.

  18. Inclusion in Malaysian Integrated Preschools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukumaran, Sailajah; Loveridge, Judith; Green, Vanessa A.

    2015-01-01

    Inclusive education has been introduced through a number of policy developments in Malaysia over the last 10 years but there is little research investigating the extent and nature of inclusive education for preschoolers with special educational needs (SEN). This study surveyed both regular and special education teachers in Malaysian integrated…

  19. Preschool teachers' perception and use of hearing assistive technology in educational settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Lauri H; Poole, Bridget; Muñoz, Karen

    2013-07-01

    This study explored how often sound-field amplification and personal frequency-modulated (FM) systems are used in preschool classrooms, teacher perceptions of advantages and disadvantages of using hearing assistive technology, and teacher recommendations for hearing assistive technology use. The study used a cross-sectional survey design. Participants were professionals who provided services to preschool-age children who are deaf or hard of hearing in public or private schools. A total of 306 surveys were sent to 162 deaf education programs throughout the United States; 99 surveys were returned (32%). Simple statistics were used to describe the quantitative survey results; content analysis was completed on open-ended survey comments. Surveys were received from teachers working at listening and spoken language preschool programs (65%) and at bilingual-bicultural and total communication preschool programs (35%). Most respondents perceived that hearing assistive technology improved students' academic performance, speech and language development, behavior, and attention in the classroom. The majority of respondents also reported that they definitely would or probably would recommend a sound-field system (77%) or personal FM system (71%) to other educators. Hearing assistive technology is frequently used in preschool classrooms of children who are deaf or hard of hearing, with generally positive teacher perceptions of the benefits of using such technology.

  20. Preschool teacher's view on learning in preschool in Sweden and Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broström professor m.so., Stig; Frøkjær, Thorleif; Johansson, Inge

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine how preschool teachers in Sweden and Denmark perceive children’s learning in preschool. The study aimed to answer the following questions: What is ‘learning’? How do children learn? What are the best conditions for children’s learning? What is the role...... similarities between how Danish and Swedish preschool teachers think of learning and participation. This supports earlier assumption about the coherence of Nordic preschool beliefs which unites education and care....

  1. Wind-powered wheel locomotion, initiated by leaping somersaults, in larvae of the southeastern beach tiger beetle (Cicindela dorsalis media.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Harvey

    Full Text Available Rapid movement is challenging for elongate, soft-bodied animals with short or no legs. Leaping is known for only a few animals with this "worm-like" morphology. Wheel locomotion, in which the animal's entire body rolls forward along a central axis, has been reported for only a handful of animals worldwide. Here we present the first documented case of wind-powered wheel locomotion, in larvae of the coastal tiger beetle Cicindela dorsalis media. When removed from their shallow burrows, larvae easily can be induced to enter a behavioral sequence that starts with leaping; while airborne, larvae loop their body into a rotating wheel and usually either "hit the ground rolling" or leap again. The direction larvae wheel is closely related to the direction in which winds are blowing; thus, all our larvae wheeled up-slope, as winds at our study site consistently blew from sea to land. Stronger winds increased both the proportion of larvae wheeling, and the distance traveled, exceeding 60 m in some cases. In addition, the proportion of larvae that wheel and the distance traveled by wheeling larvae are significantly greater on smooth sandy beaches than on beach surfaces made rough and irregular by pedestrian, equestrian, and vehicular traffic. Like other coastal species of tiger beetles, C. dorsalis media has suffered major declines in recent years that are clearly correlated with increased human impacts. The present study suggests that the negative effects of beach traffic may be indirect, preventing larvae from escaping from predators using wheel locomotion by disrupting the flat, hard surface necessary for efficient wheeling.

  2. Footwear suitability in Turkish preschool-aged children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurt, Yasin; Sener, Gul; Yakut, Yavuz

    2014-06-01

    Unsuitable footwear worn in childhood may cause some foot problems by interfering normal development of foot. To compare footwear suitability rate of indoor and outdoor footwear at all points in preschool children and investigate factors which could affect footwear suitability. A cross-sectional survey study. A total of 1000 healthy preschool children (4-6 years old) participated in this study. Indoor and outdoor footwear of children were evaluated through Turkish version of Footwear Assessment Score. Effect of factors like age, sex, number of siblings, educational and occupational situation of parents, and behavior of school management about selecting footwear was investigated. Children got better footwear score for outdoor than indoor ones (p footwear score for both indoor and outdoor ones than girls (p footwear score was found in favor of children who were going to schools that gave guidance about selecting footwear for both indoor and outdoor in comparison to children going to other schools (p footwear for their children. Performing education programs and investigation of their effect with comprehensive follow-up studies in future is essential. This study reflects footwear habits of Turkish preschool children and factors affecting this issue. Results may give way to education programs about suitable footwear worn in childhood for healthy foot development. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2013.

  3. An Improved Fireworks Algorithm Based on Grouping Strategy of the Shuffled Frog Leaping Algorithm to Solve Function Optimization Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Feng Sun

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The fireworks algorithm (FA is a new parallel diffuse optimization algorithm to simulate the fireworks explosion phenomenon, which realizes the balance between global exploration and local searching by means of adjusting the explosion mode of fireworks bombs. By introducing the grouping strategy of the shuffled frog leaping algorithm (SFLA, an improved FA-SFLA hybrid algorithm is put forward, which can effectively make the FA jump out of the local optimum and accelerate the global search ability. The simulation results show that the hybrid algorithm greatly improves the accuracy and convergence velocity for solving the function optimization problems.

  4. A New Method Based On Modified Shuffled Frog Leaping Algorithm In Order To Solve Nonlinear Large Scale Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliasghar Baziar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In order to handle large scale problems this study has used shuffled frog leaping algorithm. This algorithm is an optimization method based on natural memetics that uses a new two-phase modification to it to have a better search in the problem space. The suggested algorithm is evaluated by comparing to some well known algorithms using several benchmark optimization problems. The simulation results have clearly shown the superiority of this algorithm over other well-known methods in the area.

  5. Improving preschoolers' mathematics achievement with tablets: a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schacter, John; Jo, Booil

    2017-09-01

    With a randomized field experiment of 433 preschoolers, we tested a tablet mathematics program designed to increase young children's mathematics learning. Intervention students played Math Shelf, a comprehensive iPad preschool and year 1 mathematics app, while comparison children received research-based hands-on mathematics instruction delivered by their classroom teachers. After 22 weeks, there was a large and statistically significant effect on mathematics achievement for Math Shelf students (Cohen's d = .94). Moderator analyses demonstrated an even larger effect for low achieving children (Cohen's d = 1.27). These results suggest that early education teachers can improve their students' mathematics outcomes by integrating experimentally proven tablet software into their daily routines.

  6. Emotional Competence and Emotion Socialization in Preschoolers: The Viewpoint of Preschool Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiliç, Sükran

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research is to thoroughly investigate preschool teachers' opinions about emotional competence and emotion socialization. The study group was comprised of 20 preschool teachers working in preschools in the city-center of Aksaray. A semi-structured interview form prepared by the researcher was used as the data collection tool. Data…

  7. Assessing Preschool Children's Pretend Play: Preliminary Validation of the Affect in Play Scale-Preschool Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaugars, Astrida Seja; Russ, Sandra W.

    2009-01-01

    Research Findings: A description of the development and preliminary validation of the Affect in Play Scale-Preschool version (APS-P) is presented by demonstrating associations among preschool children's play, creativity, and daily behavior using multiple methodologies. Thirty-three preschool-age children completed a standardized 5-minute play task…

  8. Cooperation between Parents and Preschool Institutions through Different Concepts of Preschool Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercnik, Sanja; Devjak, Tatjana

    2017-01-01

    This paper analyses the importance, role, and methods of cooperation between parents and preschool institutions through the different concepts of preschool education and different educational approaches and formal frameworks. Through educational approaches, the authors analyse how cooperation affects the implementation of preschool education in…

  9. Student Preschool Teachers' Experiences of Science and Its Role in Preschool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thulin, Susanne; Redfors, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    This article reports on student preschool teachers' views of science and its role in preschool. Three cohorts of students have been given a written questionnaire with open-ended questions before and after a one-semester course including science (specifically Chemistry and Physics) in a 3.5-year preschool teacher programme in Sweden. The science…

  10. An Examination of Parents' and Preschool Workers' Perspectives on Bullying in Preschool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, David Lansing; Kovac, Velibor Bobo

    2016-01-01

    Parents (n = 141) and preschool workers (n = 81) completed a survey regarding their perspectives towards: (a) the existence of bullying in preschool, (b) interpretations of bullying, (c) the roles of bullies and victims, and (d) gender differences. Findings suggest that both groups largely believe that bullying occurs in preschool. Excluding…

  11. Process Mediates Structure: The Relation between Preschool Teacher Education and Preschool Teachers' Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blömeke, Sigrid; Jenßen, Lars; Grassmann, Marianne; Dunekacke, Simone; Wedekind, Hartmut

    2017-01-01

    Data about processes and outcomes of preschool teacher education is scarce. This paper examines the opportunities to learn (OTL) of prospective preschool teachers (N = 1,851) at different types and stages of preschool teacher education and their relation to general pedagogical knowledge (GPK), mathematics pedagogical content knowledge (MPCK), and…

  12. Preschool Teachers' Views on Competence in the Context of Home and Preschool Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuorinen, Tuula; Sandberg, Anette; Sheridan, Sonja; Williams, Pia

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to analyse and discuss preschool teachers' views regarding competence within their profession in the context of home and preschool collaboration. The question addressed is as follows: In what situations do preschool teachers perceive that their competence becomes visible for parents? The results, based on interviews…

  13. A theoretical framework for analysing preschool teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaiklin, Seth

    2014-01-01

    This article introduces a theoretical framework for analysing preschool teaching as a historically-grounded societal practice. The aim is to present a unified framework that can be used to analyse and compare both historical and contemporary examples of preschool teaching practice within and across...... national traditions. The framework has two main components, an analysis of preschool teaching as a practice, formed in relation to societal needs, and an analysis of the categorical relations which necessarily must be addressed in preschool teaching activity. The framework is introduced and illustrated...... through the analysis of one of the earliest recorded examples of preschool education (initiated by J. F. Oberlin in northeastern France in 1767). The general idea of societal need is elaborated as a way of analysing practices, and a general analytic schema is presented for characterising preschool...

  14. Affordances of Ditches for Children in Preschool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerstrup, Inger Elisabeth; Møller, Maja Steen

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to expand understanding of the affordances provided by ditches in a Danish preschool context. Affordances are defined as the meaningful action possibilities of the environment. At a forest preschool, a group of 21 children aged approximately 3to 6.5 years accompanied by two to three...... offered varied and changing action possibilities for the preschool children. The paper discusses the possible incorporation of this largely unrecognized design element by planners and managers of green spaces and playgrounds for children in preschool....

  15. Speech production of preschoolers with cleft palate

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hardin-Jones, Mary A; Jones, David L

    2005-01-01

    The present investigation was conducted to examine the prevalence of preschoolers with cleft palate who require speech therapy, demonstrate significant nasalization of speech, and produce compensatory articulations...

  16. Physical activity in children attending preschools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, Line Groenholt; Kristensen, Peter Lund; Korsholm, Lars; Froberg, Karsten

    2013-11-01

    To identify correlates of objectively measured moderate and vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in children during preschool attendance. This cross-sectional study included data from 426 apparently healthy Danish children (49.5% boys), 5 to 6 years of age enrolled in 42 randomly selected preschools. The percentage of time spent in MVPA (≥ 574 counts/15 second) during preschool attendance was measured using ActiGraph accelerometers over 4.3 preschool days in May and June in 2009. Thirty-seven potential correlates across the child, preschool staff, and preschool environment domains were tested for associations with MVPA. The final multivariate model identified 9 significant correlates of MVPA. Preterm birth, vegetation on the playground, and rainy days were negatively associated with MVPA, whereas child motor coordination, location of preschool building on the playground, gender (boys), percentage afternoon hours, and size of indoor area per child were positively associated with MVPA. The direction of the significant association with the parental mean education level was unclear. We identified a number of new modifiable correlates of MVPA during preschool attendance. The positive association with size of indoor area per child and location of the preschool building on the playground seem important correlates to be targeted in future studies.

  17. Cookie or fruit? Relative reinforcing value of snack foods among preschoolers with overweight/obesity compared to healthy weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Mary Beth; Guilkey, Hayley; Stark, Lori

    2017-04-01

    The reinforcing value of food is an important determinant of food intake. Research has yet to examine the relative reinforcing value (RRV) of snack foods in young children with overweight and obesity (OW/OB). The current study compared the RRV of high-energy dense foods (cookies) to low-energy dense foods (fruits) between preschoolers with OW/OB and healthy weight (HW). RRV of cookies and fruits in preschoolers with OW/OB (n = 30; Mage = 4.4 ± 0.84; 60% male) and HW (n = 30; Mage = 4.5 ± 0.85; 70% male) was assessed with a developmentally-tailored computer program which used a progressive fixed ratio reward schedule. The results showed that the RRV of cookies was significantly higher for preschoolers with OW/OB compared to HW while the RRV of fruits was significantly higher for preschoolers with HW compared to OW/OB. These results suggest that cookies are more reinforcing for preschoolers with OW/OB and less reinforcing for preschoolers with HW. Finding ways to reduce the reinforcing value of high-energy dense snack foods and identify alternatives that are as reinforcing for preschoolers is a challenge for weight control treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. An Analysis of the Precision and Reliability of the Leap Motion Sensor and Its Suitability for Static and Dynamic Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jože Guna

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of an evaluation of the performance of the Leap Motion Controller with the aid of a professional, high-precision, fast motion tracking system. A set of static and dynamic measurements was performed with different numbers of tracking objects and configurations. For the static measurements, a plastic arm model simulating a human arm was used. A set of 37 reference locations was selected to cover the controller’s sensory space. For the dynamic measurements, a special V-shaped tool, consisting of two tracking objects maintaining a constant distance between them, was created to simulate two human fingers. In the static scenario, the standard deviation was less than 0.5 mm. The linear correlation revealed a significant increase in the standard deviation when moving away from the controller. The results of the dynamic scenario revealed the inconsistent performance of the controller, with a significant drop in accuracy for samples taken more than 250 mm above the controller’s surface. The Leap Motion Controller undoubtedly represents a revolutionary input device for gesture-based human-computer interaction; however, due to its rather limited sensory space and inconsistent sampling frequency, in its current configuration it cannot currently be used as a professional tracking system.

  19. Possible applications of the LEAP motion controller for more interactive simulated experiments in augmented or virtual reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, Peter; Vauderwange, Oliver; Mandal, Avikarsha; Javahiraly, Nicolas; Curticapean, Dan

    2016-09-01

    Practical exercises are a crucial part of many curricula. Even simple exercises can improve the understanding of the underlying subject. Most experimental setups require special hardware. To carry out e. g. a lens experiments the students need access to an optical bench, various lenses, light sources, apertures and a screen. In our previous publication we demonstrated the use of augmented reality visualization techniques in order to let the students prepare with a simulated experimental setup. Within the context of our intended blended learning concept we want to utilize augmented or virtual reality techniques for stationary laboratory exercises. Unlike applications running on mobile devices, stationary setups can be extended more easily with additional interfaces and thus allow for more complex interactions and simulations in virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR). The most significant difference is the possibility to allow interactions beyond touching a screen. The LEAP Motion controller is a small inexpensive device that allows for the tracking of the user's hands and fingers in three dimensions. It is conceivable to allow the user to interact with the simulation's virtual elements by the user's very hand position, movement and gesture. In this paper we evaluate possible applications of the LEAP Motion controller for simulated experiments in augmented and virtual reality. We pay particular attention to the devices strengths and weaknesses and want to point out useful and less useful application scenarios.

  20. Cooperation between Parents and Preschool Institutions through Different Concepts of Preschool Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Berčnik

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the importance, role, and methods of cooperation between parents and preschool institutions through the different concepts of preschool education and different educational approaches and formal frameworks. Through educational approaches, the authors analyse how cooperation affects the implementation of preschool education in alternative educational approaches, such as the Waldorf, Montessori, and Reggio Emilia approaches, and Slovenian public preschool institutions. They envisage that different educational approaches in preschool education perceive the importance and role of cooperation with parents differently and conclude that there are various models of cooperation, which can be demonstrated through a theoretical analysis of the aforementioned alternative preschool approaches. In their view, partnership promotes a shared commitment to the quality realisation of educational goals; it also develops understanding and an ethos of openness in the relationship between all actors in the process of care and education of preschool children.

  1. Review of the studies on nutrition in Polish preschool children. Part 1. Preschool menus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkiel, Sylwia; Chalcarz, Wojciech

    The last review of the literature on nutrition in Polish children covered the years 1980-1995. From that time living conditions in Poland have changed due to political and economic changes. Attitudes toward eating and healthy life-style have also changed. Therefore, it is necessary to summarise current knowledge about what Polish preschool children eat. The aim of this article was to present the areas of research on nutrition in Polish preschool children based on the review of the literature, and to present and summarise the results of the studies on the assessment of preschool menus. The review of the literature showed two main areas of research on nutrition in Polish preschool children: the assessment of meals planned and served to children at preschools, and the assessment of food behaviour and daily food and nutrient intake in preschool children. Studies on energy and nutrient content of preschool menus should be carried out regularly in order to improve nutrition of children during their stay at preschool and vegetarian menus should be studied to fill the gap in the literature. The methodology of assessing preschool meals should be the same in order to provide the possibility to compare both the results and the conclusions. Preschool menus should be adjusted to the needs of 3-year-old children and 4-6-year-old children separately. The nation-wide education programme for preschool staff should be worked out and implemented in order to teach the preschool staff about the current nutrition recommendations for children, as well as the nutritional needs of 3-year-old children and 4-6-year-old children. preschool children, nutrition, preschool menus, energy content, nutrient content.

  2. [Fluoride urinary excretion in Mexico City's preschool children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez-López, María Lilia Adriana; Hernández-Guerrero, Juan Carlos; Jiménez-Farfán, Dolores; Molina-Frechero, Nelly; Murrieta-Pruneda, Francisco; López-Jiménez, Georgina

    2008-01-01

    The assessment of urinary fluoride excretion during dental developing stage has been reported for different countries with community fluoride programs. Also, one of the factors that could influence on retention and excretion of fluoride is the deficient nutrition so the aim of this study was to determine fluoride urinary excretion by a group of preschool children with and without malnutrition. Urinary samples from 24 hours were collected from 60 preschool children selected by convenience from Iztapalapa area of Mexico City, 30 with malnutrition and 30 with standard nutritrional status by weight for age. The samples were analyzed by fluoride especific electrode. Orion 720A. The average concentration of fluoride in urine from preschool children with and without malnutrition were 0.89 +/- 0.4 mg/L and 0.80 +/- 0.3 mg/L, respectively. The mean of 24 hours total fluoride excreted were 367 +/- 150 microg/24 hrs. in malnutrition children and 355 +/- 169 microg/24 hrs. for those with standard nutritional status. There were no differences statistically significant between groups. The urinary fluoride excretion for children with and without malnutrition were in the optimal range of fluoridation for the prevention of caries decay. Malnutrition was no associated with changes on fluoride orine concentration and excretion rates.

  3. Terapia baseada em realidade virtual usando o leap motion controller para reabilitação do membro superior após acidente vascular cerebral = Virtual reality therapy using the leap motion controller for post-stroke upper limb rehabilitation Virtual reality therapy using the Leap Motion Controller for post-stroke upper limb rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soares, Nayron Medeiros

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Avaliar a aplicabilidade de um sensor de movimento, baseado em realidade virtual, para promover a reabilitação do membro superior após um acidente vascular cerebral. RELATO DOS CASOS: Três pacientes após acidente vascular cerebral realizaram um treino para reabilitação do membro superior com realidade virtual usando a tecnologia Leap Motion Controller e o jogo Playground 3D®, durante três dias consecutivos. No primeiro e no terceiro dia, foram avaliados com os testes Caixa e Blocos, Coordenação Óculo-Manual de Melo e Estimulação Magnética Transcraniana. No último dia, foram aplicadas Fichas de Avaliação da Experiência do paciente. Após o treinamento proposto, observou-se diminuição do limiar motor em ambos os hemisférios cerebrais e melhores desempenhos nos testes que avaliaram a habilidade manual e óculo-manual. A terapia proposta foi bem recebida pelos pacientes testados. CONCLUSÕES: Não foram observados efeitos adversos e os resultados mostram-se promissores e precisos no treinamento realizado com realidade virtual usando a tecnologia Leap Motion Controller e o jogo Playground 3D®. O treinamento proporcionou uma participação ativa dos pacientes na reabilitação das sequelas de extremidade superior após um acidente vascular cerebral

  4. Functional programming in JavaScript

    CERN Document Server

    Mantyla, Dan

    2015-01-01

    If you are a JavaScript developer interested in learning functional programming, looking for the quantum leap towards mastering the JavaScript language, or just want to become a better programmer in general, then this book is ideal for you. It is aimed at programmers involved in developing reactive frontend apps, server-side apps that wrangle with reliability and concurrency, and everything in between.

  5. 45 CFR 605.38 - Preschool and adult education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Preschool and adult education. 605.38 Section 605... Preschool, Elementary, and Secondary Education § 605.38 Preschool and adult education. A recipient to which this subpart applies that provides preschool education or day care or adult education may not, on the...

  6. Teaching Islam: A Look Inside an Islamic Preschool in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borhan, Lihanna

    2004-01-01

    Although required to use the National Preschool Curriculum for the five- to six-year-old age group, preschools in Malaysia can add to this curriculum to suit their individual purposes. Thus, preschools with religious emphasis are common in Malaysia. Parents send their children to the religiously affiliated preschools in the hope of inculcating…

  7. Bilingual Preschools. Volume I: Learning and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersten, Kristin, Ed.; Rohde, Andreas, Ed.; Schelletter, Christina, Ed.; Steinlen, Anja K., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    Drawing on data from eleven preschools in four European countries (Germany, Belgium, Sweden, and the UK), this edited volume explores the progress of preschool children learning English over a period of two years. In the first volume, children's lexical and grammatical comprehension, the quality of L2 input, the effect of immersion on L1…

  8. Sustaining Preschoolers' Engagement during Interactive Writing Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Anna H.

    2016-01-01

    Interactive writing is a developmentally appropriate activity used to enhance children's literacy development in the preschool setting. This article describes the unique needs of preschoolers as emerging writers, including their developing fine motor skills, early literacy skills, and social skills related to group writing. Strategies are provided…

  9. Assessing the Development of Preschoolers' Mathematical Patterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchelmore, Michael C.; Papic, Marina M.; Mulligan, Joanne T.

    2011-01-01

    The development of patterning strategies during the year prior to formal schooling was studied in 53 children from 2 similar preschools. One preschool implemented a 6-month intervention focusing on repeating and spatial patterns. Children from the intervention group demonstrated greater understanding of unit of repeat and spatial structuring, and…

  10. Correlates of adiposity among Latino preschool children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childhood obesity is at record high levels in the US and disproportionately affects Latino children; however, studies examining Latino preschool children's obesity-related risk factors are sparse. This study determined correlates of Latino preschoolers' (ages 3-5 years) adiposity to inform future ob...

  11. The Importance of Music in Preschool Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlin, Anna; Gustavsson, Hans-Olof

    2015-01-01

    At a few universities in Sweden students can chose a preschool teacher education programme with a music profile. At one of these universities, a study was undertaken that aimed to explore student teachers' understanding of self as musician, their future professional role as a preschool teacher and how the education equips for that. Sixteen…

  12. Looking for Theory in Preschool Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Christine

    2012-01-01

    This paper sets out to examine the place of theory in preschool education, considering the theories to which practitioners and providers have access and which provide a rationale for everyday practices and shape the experiences of young children. The paper reflects the circumstances of preschool provision, practices and thinking in the UK in…

  13. Grapheme-Phoneme Acquisition of Deaf Preschoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beal-Alvarez, Jennifer S.; Lederberg, Amy R.; Easterbrooks, Susan R.

    2012-01-01

    We examined acquisition of grapheme-phoneme correspondences by 4 deaf and hard-of-hearing preschoolers using instruction from a curriculum designed specifically for this population supplemented by Visual Phonics. Learning was documented through a multiple baseline across content design as well as descriptive analyses. Preschoolers who used sign…

  14. "It's as If…" Preschoolers Encountering Contemporary Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissanen, Mari-Jatta

    2017-01-01

    This article reports a study on an encounter between preschoolers and contemporary photography. The article has two aims: first, it elucidates preschoolers' meaning-making when viewing photographs, and second, it investigates the possible benefits of using contemporary photography as a forum for prompting children's aesthetic agency in early…

  15. ADHD in Preschool: Approaches and Teacher Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ajay; Squires, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Due to the prevalence of ADHD, there is a need for early intervention at the preschool level to improve children's chance of academic success in later years. Yet few preschool teachers are trained to meet the challenges children with ADHD present. This paper gives a rationale and curriculum for teacher training in ADHD, with an emphasis on Social…

  16. The Ecological Education of Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaeva, S. N.

    2008-01-01

    The system of ecological education of preschool children includes multiple interconnected blocks that cover all aspects of the ecological pedagogical process in a preschool institution: the content of the ecological education, the ways it is conducted (methods and technologies), and the organization and management of the process.

  17. Creative Inspiration for Preschoolers from Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rönkkö, Marja-Leena; Aerila, Juli-Anna; Grönman, Satu

    2016-01-01

    This research explores the learning outcomes of preschool children produced through visits to an historic house museum environment. The new Finnish preschool curriculum identifies the importance of arts-based approaches for children and that these approaches should be closely aligned to experiential and holistic education. The aim of the research…

  18. Is Something Better than Nothing? An Evaluation of Early Childhood Programs in Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Nirmala; Sun, Jin; Pearson, Veronica; Pearson, Emma; Liu, Hongyun; Constas, Mark A.; Engle, Patrice L.

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the relative effectiveness of home-based, community-based, and state-run early childhood programs across Cambodia. A total of 880 five-year-olds (55% girls) from 6 rural provinces in Cambodia attending State Preschools, Community Preschools, Home-Based Programs, or no programs were assessed twice using the Cambodian…

  19. Características cognitivas, emocionales y conductuales de niños preescolares del programa buen comienzo en el noroccidente de medellín (cognitive, emotional, and behavioral characteristics of preschoolers of the good start program in the northwestern area in medellin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Andrés Montoya Arenas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN: En el presente artículo derivado de investigación, se describen las características cognitivas, emocionales y conductuales de una muestra de 20 niños preescolares, que oscilan entren los 3 y 5 años de edad, de estrato socioeconómico bajo y que han sido beneficiados del programa estratégico de la Alcaldía de Medellín (Colombia, perteneciente a la Secretaría de Educación, denominado Buen Comienzo. El programa Buen Comienzo tiene como propósito la promoción del desarrollo integral, diverso e incluyente de niñas y niñas, desde en una perspectiva interdisciplinaria del ciclo vital, protección de los derechos y articulación interinstitucional. ABSTRACT: In this current article, derived from a piece of research, the cognitive, emotional, and behavioral characteristics, of a sample of 20 preschoolers, are described and whose ages range between 3 and 5 years. They belong to a low socio-economic level and they have benefited from the strategic program at the Mayor’s Office in Medellin (Colombia, belonging to the Secretariat of Education program called the Good Start. Such a program aims the promotion of comprehensive, diverse, and inclusive development of children, from an interdisciplinary perspective of the life cycle, the protection of rights and the inter-institutional coordination.

  20. Promoting Social and Emotional Competencies among Young Children in Croatia with Preschool PATHS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihic, Josipa; Novak, Miranda; Basic, Josipa; Nix, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    Preschool PATHS (Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies) is an evidence-based universal prevention program focused on promoting children's social and emotional competencies and reducing the likelihood of behaviour problems and negative relationships with peers and teachers. This paper examines changes in the social and emotional competencies of…