WorldWideScience

Sample records for program leadership network

  1. Network Leadership: An Emerging Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Christopher W.

    2012-01-01

    Network leadership is an emerging approach that can have an impact on change in education and in society. According to Merriam-Webster (2011), a network is "an interconnected or interrelated chain, group, or system." Intentional interconnectedness is what separates network leadership from other leadership theories. Network leadership has the…

  2. Leadership Networking Connect, Collaborate, Create

    CERN Document Server

    (CCL), Center for Creative Leadership; Baldwin, David

    2011-01-01

    Networking is essential to effective leadership in today's organizations. Leaders who are skilled networkers have access to people, information, and resources to help solve problems and create opportunities. Leaders who neglect their networks are missing out on a critical component of their role as leaders. This book will help leaders take a new view of networking and provide insight into how to enhance their networks and become effective at leadership networking.

  3. A network approach to leadership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewis, Jenny; Ricard, Lykke Margot

    Leaders’ ego-networks within an organization are pivotal as focal points that point to other organizational factors such as innovation capacity and leadership effectiveness. The aim of the paper is to provide a framework for exploring leaders’ ego-networks within the boundary of an organization. We...... a survey of senior administrators and politicians from Copenhagen municipality, we examine strategic information networks. Whole network analysis is used first to identify important individuals on the basis of centrality measures. The ego-networks of these individuals are then analysed to examine...

  4. Technical Leadership Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-13

    the traditional tenets of leadership and management , systems thinking, understanding SOS issues, and thinking and acting holistically. Our research...international element 2.0 Enterprise Leadership and Management UNCLASSIFIED Contract Number: H98230-08-D-0171 DO 002. TO002, RT 004 Report No...mechanisms for leadership of the overall technical effort, for systems engineering, for requirements, management , and for systems integration. o Develop

  5. Technical Leadership Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-30

    will be focused on their view of the pros / cons of the ‘how’ they are going about their assigned task as opposed to ‘what’ they are proposing. As...Leadership Style (Y) M4.0 Simula on 1- Leadership Value Proposi on (Y) Some hidden (secret) mo va ons for roles in scenarios/vigne es Develop SWOT

  6. Developing Principal Instructional Leadership through Collaborative Networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cone, Mariah Bahar

    2010-01-01

    This study examines what occurs when principals of urban schools meet together to learn and improve their instructional leadership in collaborative principal networks designed to support, sustain, and provide ongoing principal capacity building. Principal leadership is considered second only to teaching in its ability to improve schools, yet few…

  7. Leadership Training Program for Shared Leadership Based on Super Leadership at Cheo-Eum Korean Presbyterian Church: A Study of Christian Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Houng Jin

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation was to launch a leadership training program for shared leadership based on "super leadership." The constructs of the study were designed to study Bible leaders in shared leadership, leadership paradigm and types, transformational leadership, and, super leadership and shared leadership theory that are all…

  8. Leadership Under Challenge: Information Technology R&D in a Competitive World. An Assessment of the Federal Networking and Information Technology R&D Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marburger, John H; Kvamme, E. F; Scalise, George; Reed, Daniel A

    2007-01-01

    ...).That leadership is essential to U.S. economic prosperity, security, and quality of life. This report presents a formal assessment of the Federal Networking and Information Technology R&D (NITRD...

  9. Leadership for All: An Internal Medicine Residency Leadership Development Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jared M; Wininger, David A; Martin, Bryan

    2016-10-01

    Developing effective leadership skills in physicians is critical for safe patient care. Few residency-based models of leadership training exist. We evaluated residents' readiness to engage in leadership training, feasibility of implementing training for all residents, and residents' acceptance of training. In its fourth year, the Leadership Development Program (LDP) consists of twelve 90-minute modules (eg, Team Decision Making and Bias, Leadership Styles, Authentic Leadership) targeting all categorical postgraduate year (PGY) 1 residents. Modules are taught during regularly scheduled educational time. Focus group surveys and discussions, as well as annual surveys of PGY-1s assessed residents' readiness to engage in training. LDP feasibility was assessed by considering sustainability of program structures and faculty retention, and resident acceptance of training was assessed by measuring attendance, with the attendance goal of 8 of 12 modules. Residents thought leadership training would be valuable if content remained applicable to daily work, and PGY-1 residents expressed high levels of interest in training. The LDP is part of the core educational programming for PGY-1 residents. Except for 2 modules, faculty presenters have remained consistent. During academic year 2014-2015, 45% (13 of 29) of categorical residents participated in at least 8 of 12 modules, and 72% (21 of 29) participated in at least 7 of 12. To date, 125 categorical residents have participated in training. Residents appeared ready to engage in leadership training, and the LDP was feasible to implement. The attendance goal was not met, but attendance was sufficient to justify program continuation.

  10. Outdoor Leadership Skills: A Program Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shooter, Wynn; Sibthorp, Jim; Paisley, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Successful hiring, training, and pairing or grouping of staff requires administrators to consider the relationship between their programs' goals and the specific outdoor leadership skills of individual leaders. Authors have divided outdoor leadership skills into a three-category structure, and models of outdoor leadership have focused on skills…

  11. Impact of a student leadership development program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnut, Renae; Tran-Johnson, Jennifer

    2013-12-16

    To assess the effectiveness of the Student Leadership Development Series (SLDS), an academic-year--long, co-curricular approach to developing leadership skills in pharmacy students. Participants met once per month for activities and a college-wide guest speaker session. Students also completed monthly forms regarding what they had learned, participated in poster presentations, and created a personal leadership platform. One hundred twenty-three students participated in the program between 2008 and 2013. On monthly evaluation forms and a summative evaluation, students indicated that the program helped them feel prepared for leadership opportunities and increased their desire to pursue leadership. They valued interacting with pharmacy leaders from the community and learning how they could distinguish themselves as leaders. The SLDS provided pharmacy students with an opportunity to explore personal leadership styles and develop broader understanding of leadership, and increased their desire to pursue leadership positions in the future.

  12. Idea Management: Perspectives from Leadership, Learning, and Network Theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Deichmann (Dirk)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractIn this dissertation, we focus on how leadership styles, individual learning behaviors, and social network structures drive or inhibit organizational members to repeatedly generate and develop innovative ideas. Taking the idea management programs of three multinational companies as the

  13. Designing a leadership development program for surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Gregory A; Pradarelli, Jason C; Lemak, Christy Harris; Mulholland, Michael W; Dimick, Justin B

    2016-01-01

    Although numerous leadership development programs (LDPs) exist in health care, no programs have been specifically designed to meet the needs of surgeons. This study aimed to elicit practicing surgeons' motivations and desired goals for leadership training to design an evidence-based LDP in surgery. At a large academic health center, we conducted semistructured interviews with 24 surgical faculty members who voluntarily applied and were selected for participation in a newly created LDP. Transcriptions of the interviews were analyzed using analyst triangulation and thematic coding to extract major themes regarding surgeons' motivations and perceived needs for leadership knowledge and skills. Themes from interview responses were then used to design the program curriculum specifically to meet the leadership needs of surgical faculty. Three major themes emerged regarding surgeons' motivations for seeking leadership training: (1) Recognizing key gaps in their formal preparation for leadership roles; (2) Exhibiting an appetite for personal self-improvement; and (3) Seeking leadership guidance for career advancement. Participants' interviews revealed four specific domains of knowledge and skills that they indicated as desired takeaways from a LDP: (1) leadership and communication; (2) team building; (3) business acumen/finance; and (4) greater understanding of the health care context. Interviews with surgical faculty members identified gaps in prior leadership training and demonstrated concrete motivations and specific goals for participating in a formal leadership program. A LDP that is specifically tailored to address the needs of surgical faculty may benefit surgeons at a personal and institutional level. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Antagonistic neural networks underlying differentiated leadership roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyatzis, Richard E.; Rochford, Kylie; Jack, Anthony I.

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of two distinct leadership roles, the task leader and the socio-emotional leader, has been documented in the leadership literature since the 1950s. Recent research in neuroscience suggests that the division between task-oriented and socio-emotional-oriented roles derives from a fundamental feature of our neurobiology: an antagonistic relationship between two large-scale cortical networks – the task-positive network (TPN) and the default mode network (DMN). Neural activity in TPN tends to inhibit activity in the DMN, and vice versa. The TPN is important for problem solving, focusing of attention, making decisions, and control of action. The DMN plays a central role in emotional self-awareness, social cognition, and ethical decision making. It is also strongly linked to creativity and openness to new ideas. Because activation of the TPN tends to suppress activity in the DMN, an over-emphasis on task-oriented leadership may prove deleterious to social and emotional aspects of leadership. Similarly, an overemphasis on the DMN would result in difficulty focusing attention, making decisions, and solving known problems. In this paper, we will review major streams of theory and research on leadership roles in the context of recent findings from neuroscience and psychology. We conclude by suggesting that emerging research challenges the assumption that role differentiation is both natural and necessary, in particular when openness to new ideas, people, emotions, and ethical concerns are important to success. PMID:24624074

  15. Antagonistic Neural Networks Underlying Differentiated Leadership Roles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Eleftherios Boyatzis

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of two distinct leadership roles, the task leader and the socio-emotional leader, has been documented in the leadership literature since the 1950’s. Recent research in neuroscience suggests that the division between task oriented and socio-emotional oriented roles derives from a fundamental feature of our neurobiology: an antagonistic relationship between two large-scale cortical networks -- the Task Positive Network (TPN and the Default Mode Network (DMN. Neural activity in TPN tends to inhibit activity in the DMN, and vice versa. The TPN is important for problem solving, focusing of attention, making decisions, and control of action. The DMN plays a central role in emotional self-awareness, social cognition, and ethical decision making. It is also strongly linked to creativity and openness to new ideas. Because activation of the TPN tends to suppress activity in the DMN, an over-emphasis on task oriented leadership may prove deleterious to social and emotional aspects of leadership. Similarly, an overemphasis on the DMN would result in difficulty focusing attention, making decisions and solving known problems. In this paper, we will review major streams of theory and research on leadership roles in the context of recent findings from neuroscience and psychology. We conclude by suggesting that emerging research challenges the assumption that role differentiation is both natural and necessary, in particular when openness to new ideas, people, emotions, and ethical concerns are important to success.

  16. Antagonistic neural networks underlying differentiated leadership roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyatzis, Richard E; Rochford, Kylie; Jack, Anthony I

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of two distinct leadership roles, the task leader and the socio-emotional leader, has been documented in the leadership literature since the 1950s. Recent research in neuroscience suggests that the division between task-oriented and socio-emotional-oriented roles derives from a fundamental feature of our neurobiology: an antagonistic relationship between two large-scale cortical networks - the task-positive network (TPN) and the default mode network (DMN). Neural activity in TPN tends to inhibit activity in the DMN, and vice versa. The TPN is important for problem solving, focusing of attention, making decisions, and control of action. The DMN plays a central role in emotional self-awareness, social cognition, and ethical decision making. It is also strongly linked to creativity and openness to new ideas. Because activation of the TPN tends to suppress activity in the DMN, an over-emphasis on task-oriented leadership may prove deleterious to social and emotional aspects of leadership. Similarly, an overemphasis on the DMN would result in difficulty focusing attention, making decisions, and solving known problems. In this paper, we will review major streams of theory and research on leadership roles in the context of recent findings from neuroscience and psychology. We conclude by suggesting that emerging research challenges the assumption that role differentiation is both natural and necessary, in particular when openness to new ideas, people, emotions, and ethical concerns are important to success.

  17. Veterinary Technician Program Director Leadership Style and Program Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renda-Francis, Lori A.

    2012-01-01

    Program directors of American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) accredited veterinary technician programs may have little or no training in leadership. The need for program directors of AVMA-accredited veterinary technician programs to understand how leadership traits may have an impact on student success is often overlooked. The purpose of…

  18. Developing Program Management Leadership for Acquisition Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-30

    mêçÅÉÉÇáåÖë= çÑ=íÜÉ= bfdeqe=^kkr^i=^`nrfpfqflk== obpb^o`e=pvjmlpfrj== qeropa^v=pbppflkp== slirjb ff Developing Program Management Leadership for...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Developing Program Management Leadership for Acquisition Reform 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...Developing Program  Management   Leadership   for Acquisition Reform    The 8th Annual Acquisition Research Symposium Panel #20: Investing in People

  19. Higher Education Leadership Graduate Program Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Sydney, Jr.; Chambers, Crystal Renée; Newton, Rochelle

    2016-01-01

    Graduate programs in higher education administration and leadership have sought to equip students with the knowledge, skills, and competencies for higher education leadership; that is, to prepare globally minded leaders who can navigate the internal and external demands of, and for, higher education. With the use of the Lattuca and Stark model of…

  20. Leadership Preparation in an Education Doctorate Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryerson, Dean

    2011-01-01

    This was a study of an education doctorate program at a small, private college. It examined the following nine components: theory of leadership for school improvement; candidate recruitment and selection based on leadership; coherent curriculum; use of active learning strategies; knowledgeable faculty; high quality internships; social and…

  1. Leadership Program for Promoting Policies Linking the Environment ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Leadership Program for Promoting Policies Linking the Environment and Health in Africa. It is obvious that in many African countries, no linkages are being made between health policy and environment policy. In 2005, the global network Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) francophone ...

  2. Effects of participation in the Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine (ELAM) program on women faculty's perceived leadership capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDade, Sharon A; Richman, Rosalyn C; Jackson, Gregg B; Morahan, Page S

    2004-04-01

    This study measured the impact of participation by women academics in the Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine (ELAM) program as part of a robust evaluation agenda. The design is a classic pre/post, within-group, self-report study. The survey elicits self-perception about leadership in ten constructs: knowledge of leadership, management, and organizational theory; environmental scanning; financial management; communication; networking and coalition building; conflict management; general leadership; assessment of strengths and weaknesses; acceptance of leadership demands; and career advancement sophistication. The post surveys inquire additionally about perceived program usefulness. Data were collected from 79 participants (1997-98, 1998-99, and 2000-01 classes). Response rates were nearly 100% (pre) and 69% to 76% (post). Statistically significant increases (p leadership capabilities were identified across all ten leadership constructs. Gains were large in knowledge of leadership and organizational theory, environmental scanning, financial management, and general leadership. Gains in career building knowledge were large to moderate. More modest were gains in communication, networking, and conflict management. There were significant correlations between each leadership construct and perceived usefulness of the program. Significant improvements were reported on all leadership constructs, even when participants viewed themselves as already skilled. While it cannot be concluded that participation in ELAM directly and solely caused all improvements, it seems unlikely that midcareer women faculty would improve on all ten constructs in 11 months after program completion by natural maturation alone. Future research will investigate whether the changes are due to ELAM or other factors, and assess whether participants show more rapid advancement into leadership than comparable women not participating in ELAM.

  3. An Examination of the Relationships between Leadership Development Approaches, Networking Ability, and Social Capital Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbaugh, Bradley; Kaufman, Eric K.

    2017-01-01

    Participants in leadership development programs take part in multiple developmental experiences that can influence the composition of their social network and enhance social capital. However, further investment in such practices may be limited because little is known about the relationship between leadership development approaches, networking…

  4. Inclusive Leadership Development: Drawing From Pedagogies of Women's and General Leadership Development Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Keimei; Cavanagh, Kevin V.; van Esch, Chantal; Bilimoria, Diana; Brown, Cara

    2016-01-01

    Trends in extant literature suggest that more relational and identity-based leadership approaches are necessary for leadership that can harness the benefits of the diverse and globalized workforces of today and the future. In this study, we compared general leadership development programs (GLDPs) and women's leadership development programs (WLDPs)…

  5. Enhancing leadership and relationships by implementing a peer mentoring program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafni Lachter, Liat R; Ruland, Judith P

    2018-03-30

    Peer-mentoring is often described as effective means to promote professional and leadership skills, yet evidence on practical models of such programs for occupational therapy students are sparse. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of a peer-mentoring program designed for graduate occupational therapy students. Forty-seven second-year student volunteers were randomly assigned to individually mentor first-year students in a year-long program. Students met biweekly virtually or in person to provide mentorship on everyday student issues, according to mentees' needs. Faculty-led group activities prior and during the peer-mentoring program took place to facilitate the mentorship relationships. Program effectiveness was measured using the Multi-factor Leadership Questionnaire (Avolio & Bass, MLQ: Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire, 2004) and an open-ended feedback survey. Results of multi-variate MANOVA for repeated measures indicating significant enhancement in several leadership skills (F(12,46) = 4.0, P = 0.001, η 2  = 0.579). Qualitative data from feedback surveys indicated that an opportunity to help; forming relationships; and structure as enabler were perceived as important participation outcomes. Students expressed high satisfaction and perceived value from their peer-mentoring experience. As we seek ways to promote our profession and the leadership of its members, it is recommended to consider student peer-mentoring to empower them to practice and advance essential career skills from the initial stages of professional development. Evidence found in this study demonstrates that peer-mentoring programs can promote leadership development and establishment of networks in an occupational therapy emerging professional community, at a low cost. The peer-mentoring blueprint and lessons learned are presented with hopes to inspire others to implement peer-mentoring programs in their settings. © 2018 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  6. Creating Leaders through the Teacher Learning and Leadership Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Kyle

    2015-01-01

    Leadership is a skill that can be learned through professional development, mentoring, and leadership development programs. In Ontario, the Teacher Learning and Leadership Program (TLLP) helps educators develop their leadership skills through a Ministry of Education--funded project that addresses student learning needs in their classrooms. This…

  7. Organizational and market factors associated with leadership development programs in hospitals: a national study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Thompson, Jon M

    2012-01-01

    Effective leadership in hospitals is widely recognized as the key to organizational performance. Clinical, financial, and operational performance is increasingly being linked to the leadership practices of hospital managers. Moreover, effective leadership has been described as a means to achieve competitive advantage. Recent environmental forces, including reimbursement changes and increased competition, have prompted many hospitals to focus on building leadership competencies to successfully address these challenges. Using the resource dependence theory as our conceptual framework, we present results from a national study of hospitals examining the association of organizational and market factors with the provision of leadership development program activities, including the presence of a leadership development program, a diversity plan, a program for succession planning, and career development resources. The data are taken from the American Hospital Association's (AHA) 2008 Survey of Hospitals, the Area Resource File, and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. The results of multilevel logistic regressions of each leadership development program activity on organizational and market factors indicate that hospital size, system and network affiliation, and accreditation are significantly and positively associated with all leadership development program activities. The market factors significantly associated with all leadership development activities include a positive odds ratio for metropolitan statistical area location and a negative odds ratio for the percentage of the hospital's service area population that is female and minority. For-profit hospitals are less likely to provide leadership development program activities. Additional findings are presented, and the implications for hospital management are discussed.

  8. Program for developing leadership in pharmacy residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Patrick D

    2012-07-15

    An innovative, structured approach to incorporating leadership development activities into pharmacy residency training is described. The American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) has called for increased efforts to make leadership development an integral component of the training of pharmacy students and new practitioners. In 2007, The Nebraska Medical Center (TNMC) took action to systematize leadership training in its pharmacy residency programs by launching a new Leadership Development Series. Throughout the residency year, trainees at TNMC participate in a variety of activities: (1) focused group discussions of selected articles on leadership concepts written by noted leaders of the past and present, (2) a two-day offsite retreat featuring trust-building exercises and physical challenges, (3) a self-assessment designed to help residents identify and use their untapped personal strengths, (4) training on the effective application of different styles of communication and conflict resolution, and (5) education on the history and evolution of health-system pharmacy, including a review and discussion of lectures by recipients of ASHP's Harvey A. K. Whitney Award. Feedback from residents who have completed the series has been positive, with many residents indicating that it has stimulated their professional growth and helped prepared them for leadership roles. A structured Leadership Development Series exposes pharmacy residents to various leadership philosophies and principles and, through the study of Harvey A. K. Whitney Award lectures, to the thoughts of past and present pharmacy leaders. Residents develop an increased self-awareness through a resident fall retreat, a StrengthsFinder assessment, and communication and conflict-mode assessment tools.

  9. How Might Better Network Theories Support School Leadership Research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadfield, Mark; Jopling, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This article explores how recent research in education has applied different aspects of "network" theory to the study of school leadership. Constructs from different network theories are often used because of their perceived potential to clarify two perennial issues in leadership research. The first is the relative importance of formal and…

  10. The Mentoring Experience: Leadership Development Program Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamm, Kevan W.; Sapp, Rochelle; Lamm, Alexa J.

    2017-01-01

    Using a semi-structured interview approach, ten mentors from a leadership development program focused on building leaders in Colleges of Agriculture and Life Sciences across the nation provided insights regarding their mentoring method, process, and experiences. Mentors interviewed agreed the mentoring process was beneficial for themselves as well…

  11. Transformational Leadership in a High School Choral Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Owen Brian

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine a high school choral program to discover how the leadership behaviors of the teacher contributed to the success of the program. The teacher's leadership behaviors were examined through the framework of Transformational Leadership. Criteria for the selection of this program included a recent performance at a…

  12. 20 CFR 638.520 - Student government and leadership programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Student government and leadership programs... Student government and leadership programs. The center operator shall establish an elected student government and student leadership program in accordance with procedures established by the Job Corps Director. ...

  13. Developing Leadership for Increasing Complexity: A Review of Online Graduate Leadership Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winton, Steven L.; Palmer, Sarah; Hughes, Patrick J.

    2018-01-01

    Leadership education must evolve to keep pace with the growing recognition that effective leadership happens in a complex environment and is as much a systemic variable as a personal one. As part of a program review process, a graduate leadership program at a private Midwestern university conducted a qualitative review of 18 online graduate…

  14. Effectiveness of the AAOS Leadership Fellows Program for Orthopaedic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Charles S; Tabrizi, Shervin; Kramer, Jeffrey; Yule, Arthur C; Ahn, Brian S

    2010-11-17

    Effective physician leadership is critical to the future success of healthcare organizations. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) Leadership Fellows Program is a one-year program designed to train young orthopaedic surgeons to become future leaders in orthopaedics. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of the AAOS Leadership Fellows Program on the leadership skills and achievements of its participants. Graduates of the Leadership Fellows Program were compared with a control group of previous applicants who were not accepted to the program (applicants) in a retrospective cohort comparison study. A subjective survey of leadership skills was used to assess the confidence of the two cohorts in eight areas of leadership. In addition, an updated curriculum vitae from each of sixty leadership fellows from the classes of 2003 through 2009 and from each of forty-seven applicants was retrospectively reviewed for evidence of leadership. The updated curriculum vitae of the leadership fellows was evaluated for leadership activity attained prior to and following participation in the program, while the updated curriculum vitae of applicants was evaluated for leadership activity attained prior to and following the last year of application to the program. Curricula vitae were assessed for demonstration of national leadership, academic rank, hospital administrative rank, and research experience. On the leadership survey, the graduates of the Leadership Fellows Program scored higher than the applicants in seven of eight categories. The review of the curricula vitae demonstrated that, prior to the Leadership Fellows Program, the leadership fellows were more likely than the applicants to have an academic practice and hold an academic rank. The difference between the two cohorts in administrative rank and leadership of national committees was not significant. Following the program, the leadership fellows were more likely to chair national committees (p

  15. Social network approaches to leadership: an integrative conceptual review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Dorothy R; DeChurch, Leslie A; Braun, Michael T; Contractor, Noshir S

    2015-05-01

    Contemporary definitions of leadership advance a view of the phenomenon as relational, situated in specific social contexts, involving patterned emergent processes, and encompassing both formal and informal influence. Paralleling these views is a growing interest in leveraging social network approaches to study leadership. Social network approaches provide a set of theories and methods with which to articulate and investigate, with greater precision and rigor, the wide variety of relational perspectives implied by contemporary leadership theories. Our goal is to advance this domain through an integrative conceptual review. We begin by answering the question of why-Why adopt a network approach to study leadership? Then, we offer a framework for organizing prior research. Our review reveals 3 areas of research, which we term: (a) leadership in networks, (b) leadership as networks, and (c) leadership in and as networks. By clarifying the conceptual underpinnings, key findings, and themes within each area, this review serves as a foundation for future inquiry that capitalizes on, and programmatically builds upon, the insights of prior work. Our final contribution is to advance an agenda for future research that harnesses the confluent ideas at the intersection of leadership in and as networks. Leadership in and as networks represents a paradigm shift in leadership research-from an emphasis on the static traits and behaviors of formal leaders whose actions are contingent upon situational constraints, toward an emphasis on the complex and patterned relational processes that interact with the embedding social context to jointly constitute leadership emergence and effectiveness. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  16. A Leadership Education and Development Program for Clinical Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Joyce J; Modic, Mary Beth; Van Dyk, Jennifer; Hancock, K Kelly

    2016-11-01

    The Leadership Education and Development (LEAD) Program was designed to transform care at the bedside by empowering clinical nurses as leaders. The heart of LEAD was enhancing communication skills of clinical nurses with clinical colleagues and, most importantly, patients and families. Key concepts of leadership/management were included: personal awareness, personal leadership skills/abilities, leading change, leading others individually and in teams, enhancing the patient/provider experience, and the leadership role in outcomes management. A quantitative, longitudinal, survey design was used with 2 cohorts. The program consisted of six 4-hour sessions for 3 to 6 months. Leadership practices were measured before program implementation, at the end of the program, and 3 months after program completion. There were significant increases in leadership practices sustained 3 months after program completion. A range of other outcome measures was included. There is a need for additional leadership development programs for clinical nurses.

  17. A network analysis of leadership theory : the infancy of integration.

    OpenAIRE

    Meuser, J. D.; Gardner, W. L.; Dinh, J. E.; Hu, J.; Liden, R. C.; Lord, R. G.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the status of leadership theory integration by reviewing 14 years of published research (2000 through 2013) in 10 top journals (864 articles). The authors of these articles examined 49 leadership approaches/theories, and in 293 articles, 3 or more of these leadership approaches were included in their investigations. Focusing on these articles that reflected relatively extensive integration, we applied an inductive approach and used graphic network analysis as a guide for drawi...

  18. Leadership Development Program Final Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Teresa C.

    2016-01-01

    TOSC is NASA's prime contractor tasked to successfully assemble, test, and launch the EM1 spacecraft. TOSC success is highly dependent on design products from the other NASA Programs manufacturing and delivering the flight hardware; Space Launch System(SLS) and Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle(MPCV). Design products directly feed into TOSC's: Procedures, Personnel training, Hardware assembly, Software development, Integrated vehicle test and checkout, Launch. TOSC senior management recognized a significant schedule risk as these products are still being developed by the other two (2) programs; SVE and ACE positions were created.

  19. An examination of the relationship between athlete leadership and cohesion using social network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughead, Todd M; Fransen, Katrien; Van Puyenbroeck, Stef; Hoffmann, Matt D; De Cuyper, Bert; Vanbeselaere, Norbert; Boen, Filip

    2016-11-01

    Two studies investigated the structure of different athlete leadership networks and its relationship to cohesion using social network analysis. In Study 1, we examined the relationship between a general leadership quality network and task and social cohesion as measured by the Group Environment Questionnaire (GEQ). In Study 2, we investigated the leadership networks for four different athlete leadership roles (task, motivational, social and external) and their association with task and social cohesion networks. In Study 1, the results demonstrated that the general leadership quality network was positively related to task and social cohesion. The results from Study 2 indicated positive correlations between the four leadership networks and task and social cohesion networks. Further, the motivational leadership network emerged as the strongest predictor of the task cohesion network, while the social leadership network was the strongest predictor of the social cohesion network. The results complement a growing body of research indicating that athlete leadership has a positive association with cohesion.

  20. Faculty perceptions of occupational therapy program directors' leadership styles and outcomes of leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snodgrass, Jeff; Shachar, Mickey

    2008-01-01

    This research study investigated the relationship between faculty perceptions of occupational therapy program directors' leadership styles and outcomes of leadership and the effects of moderating demographic and institutional characteristics. Data for this study were collected utilizing the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire Form 5X and the self-designed Demographic and Institution Questionnaire. The study working sample included 184 graduate occupational therapy faculty members from 98 (65%) of all accredited academic occupational therapy programs in the United States for the 2005-06 academic year. Major findings from the study indicate that, in general, transformational leadership had a significant (p leadership outcomes whereas transactional leadership had a significant (p leadership attribute (although belonging to the transactional leadership construct) was found to be a positive predictor of leadership outcomes. Demographic and institutional characteristics did not have a significant (p > 0.01) influence on perceived leadership styles and leadership outcomes. The results of this research show that the most effective occupational therapy leaders in academia have been found to be those who adopt and utilize a full range of leadership styles that combine both transformational and transactional contingent reward leadership styles and suggest common effectiveness for other allied health fields.

  1. Social Justice Leadership as Praxis: Developing Capacities through Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman, Gail

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to propose a conceptual framework for social justice leadership as praxis and to explore the implications of this framework for leadership preparation programs. Conceptual Argument: The conceptual framework for social justice leadership is grounded in a review of literature and organized around three central…

  2. Mindsets of Leadership Education Undergraduates: An Approach to Program Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Sarah P.; Odom, Summer F.

    2015-01-01

    Students (N = 313) in undergraduate leadership degree programs at Texas A&M University were surveyed to determine their leadership mindset using hierarchical and systemic thinking preferences. Significant differences in thinking were found between gender and academic classification. Male leadership students scored greater in hierarchical…

  3. Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-04-07

    USAWC STRATEGY RESEARCH PROJECT LEADERSHIP by LIEUTENANT COLONEL RONALD D. JOHNSON United States Army Colonel David R. Brooks Project Advisor The...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Leadership Unclassified 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Johnson, Ronald D. ; Author... Leadership FORMAT: Strategy Research Project DATE: 07 April 2003 PAGES: 28 CLASSIFICATION: Unclassified This SRP shows that values and ethics are essential

  4. Building Regional Networking Capacity through Leadership Development: The Case of Leadership Northwest Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltsberger, Beverly; Majee, Wilson

    2012-01-01

    Through a case study analysis of a regional leadership development program, this article describes the impact on individual and group leadership skills and how the skills are employed to benefit individual communities and the region as a whole. Data were obtained through surveys. Through cooperation and collaboration between and among leadership…

  5. Leadership development at university: Comparing student leaders with different levels of involvement in a leadership education program

    OpenAIRE

    Vogt, Krista Lee

    2007-01-01

    This study examined how students’ leadership behaviours are related to both their personal leadership experience and their involvement in a leadership education program. The context of the study was the University of Guelph’s Certificate in Leadership program. The Student Leadership Practices Inventory (LPI) was administered to 33 student leaders who did not participate in the Leadership Certificate and 14 students who were at various levels of completion of the Certificate. No significant di...

  6. Leadership in Dental Hygiene Degree Completion Programs: A Pilot Study Comparing Stand-Alone Leadership Courses and Leadership-Infused Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michelle L; Gurenlian, JoAnn R; Freudenthal, Jacqueline J; Farnsworth, Tracy J

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to define the extent to which leadership and leadership skills are taught in dental hygiene degree completion programs by comparing stand-alone leadership courses/hybrid programs with programs that infuse leadership skills throughout the curricula. The study involved a mixed-methods approach using qualitative and quantitative data. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with program directors and faculty members who teach a stand-alone leadership course, a hybrid program, or leadership-infused courses in these programs. A quantitative comparison of course syllabi determined differences in the extent of leadership content and experiences between stand-alone leadership courses and leadership-infused curricula. Of the 53 U.S. dental hygiene programs that offer degree completion programs, 49 met the inclusion criteria, and 19 programs provided course syllabi. Of the program directors and faculty members who teach a stand-alone leadership course or leadership-infused curriculum, 16 participated in the interview portion of the study. The results suggested that competencies related to leadership were not clearly defined or measurable in current teaching. Reported barriers to incorporating a stand-alone leadership course included overcrowded curricula, limited qualified faculty, and lack of resources. The findings of this study provide a synopsis of leadership content and gaps in leadership education for degree completion programs. Suggested changes included defining a need for leadership competencies and providing additional resources to educators such as courses provided by the American Dental Education Association and the American Dental Hygienists' Association.

  7. Examining the Role of Multicultural Competence in Leadership Program Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Amy B.

    2015-01-01

    Research examining the multicultural competence of leadership educators across a variety of institutions demonstrated variance based on leadership program structure, program elements, and the ways in which diversity was addressed in the program. The Multicultural Competence in Student Affairs-Preliminary 2 (MCSA-P2) scale was used to measure…

  8. Enhancing Agency through Leadership Development Programs for Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, Lindsey; O'Meara, KerryAnn

    2018-01-01

    The ADVANCE Leadership Fellows Program at the University of Maryland is a yearlong professional development program for faculty aspiring to or recently engaged in leadership roles. Data shows an increase in participants' sense of agency to become academic leaders following the program. We use a comprehensive data set, including program…

  9. The Frequency of Assistant Principal Coursework in Educational Leadership Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which the assistant principalship is addressed in educational leadership program curricula through coursework in state-approved programs operating in a southern state in the United States. A survey was administered to Educational Leadership program directors, and gaps were found between what…

  10. Navigating the Leadership Landscape: Creating an Inventory to Identify Leadership Education Programs for Health Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gertler, Matthew; Verma, Sarita; Tassone, Maria; Seltzer, Jane; Careau, Emmanuelle

    2015-01-01

    As health systems become increasingly complex, there is growing emphasis on collaborative leadership education for health system change. The Canadian Interprofessional Health Leadership Collaborative conducted research on this phenomenon through a scoping and systematic review of the health leadership literature, key informant interviews and an inventory of health leadership programs in Canada. The inventory is unique, accounting for educational programming missed by traditional scholarly literature reviews. A major finding is that different health professions have access to health leadership education in different stages of their careers. This pioneering inventory suggests that needs may differ between health professions but also that there is a growing demand for multiple types of programs for specific targeted audiences, and a strategic need for collaborative leadership education in healthcare.

  11. Leadership Book Club: An Innovative Strategy to Incorporate Leadership Development Into Pharmacy Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Alyssa; Dervay, Katelyn

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: To describe an innovative strategy for incorporating leadership training and development across multiple postgraduate year 2 (PGY2) pharmacy residency programs at a single institution. Background: Tampa General Hospital has 7 pharmacy residency positions: 4 postgraduate year 1 (PGY1) residents and a single resident for each of the 3 PGY2 programs (critical care, emergency medicine, and solid organ transplant). Administrative topics are incorporated across the PGY1 and PGY2 residency programs, with each PGY2 program having additional administrative topics specific to their specialty area. Summary: What began as an elective administrative topic discussion for the PGY2 emergency medicine resident has evolved over time into a longitudinal leadership book club. The leadership book club is utilized to meet the residency goals and objectives related to leadership development for all 3 PGY2 programs. Each year a single book is identified through the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) Leadership Academy book list or by participant suggestion. The book is then divided into 4 sections with corresponding hour-long discussions that occur quarterly throughout the residency year. The residency program directors (RPDs) and co-RPDs lead the initial discussion, and each PGY2 resident leads 1 of the subsequent 3 discussions. Based on resident feedback, the leadership book club is an innovative and effective strategy to incorporate leadership training and development into residency training. Conclusion: It is imperative to foster the development of leadership skills in pharmacy residency programs to prevent a future leadership gap in health system pharmacy. Leadership book club is a unique strategy to incorporate leadership training longitudinally across multiple PGY2 residency programs at a single institution.

  12. Learning Python network programming

    CERN Document Server

    Sarker, M O Faruque

    2015-01-01

    If you're a Python developer or a system administrator with Python experience and you're looking to take your first steps in network programming, then this book is for you. Basic knowledge of Python is assumed.

  13. Promoting Effective Program Leadership in Psychology: A Benchmarking Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halonen, Jane S.

    2013-01-01

    Although scholars have scrutinized many aspects of academic life in psychology, the topic of leadership for psychology programs has remained elusive. This article describes the importance of high-quality leadership in the development of thriving psychology programs. The author offers a strategy for evaluating leaders to help provide developmental…

  14. Leadership Training Program for Medical Staff in Belgium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, Neree; Brabanders, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Today healthcare is facing many challenges in a volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous environment. There is a need to develop strong leaders who can cope with these challenges. This article describes the process of a leadership training program for healthcare professionals in Belgium (named "Clinical Leadership Program" or…

  15. Investigation of a Leadership Development Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-08-04

    Hall. Yukl, G. A. (1989b). Managerial leadership : A review of theory and research. Journal of Management , 15(2), 251-289. Yukl, G. A. (1994...by leadership training. A quantitative approach was taken, using Sashkin’s Visionary Leadership Theory (VLT) to study the effects of a certificated...34full range" of leadership and management styles. (Tech. Rep. No. 1040). Alexandria, VA: U. S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral Sciences

  16. IUPUI's Leadership in Dynamic Organizations Program: Translating Leadership into Application for Staff and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Daniel; Bedford, Marilyn; Hundley, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Traditional leadership development programs for higher education staff are challenged to blend theory with a real-world context that is meaningful to participants' work. Standard student leadership curriculum is strong on theory, but often thin on providing this real-world context. Both HR training departments and academic units charged with…

  17. Examining the Influence of Campus Leadership Programs at a Catholic University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Rich; Meents-DeCaigny, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    This study uses the socially responsible leadership and leadership efficacy scales in the Multi-Institutional Study of Leadership (MSL) to examine leadership programs at one Catholic campus, and their influence on socially responsible leadership and leadership efficacy. Examining students that identified as involved in 14 campus leadership…

  18. Return on investment in healthcare leadership development programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyaraman, Maya M; Qadar, Sheikh Muhammad Zeeshan; Wierzbowski, Aleksandra; Farshidfar, Farnaz; Lys, Justin; Dickson, Graham; Grimes, Kelly; Phillips, Leah A; Mitchell, Jonathan I; Van Aerde, John; Johnson, Dave; Krupka, Frank; Zarychanski, Ryan; Abou-Setta, Ahmed M

    2018-02-05

    Purpose Strong leadership has been shown to foster change, including loyalty, improved performance and decreased error rates, but there is a dearth of evidence on effectiveness of leadership development programs. To ensure a return on the huge investments made, evidence-based approaches are needed to assess the impact of leadership on health-care establishments. As a part of a pan-Canadian initiative to design an effective evaluative instrument, the purpose of this paper was to identify and summarize evidence on health-care outcomes/return on investment (ROI) indicators and metrics associated with leadership quality, leadership development programs and existing evaluative instruments. Design/methodology/approach The authors performed a scoping review using the Arksey and O'Malley framework, searching eight databases from 2006 through June 2016. Findings Of 11,868 citations screened, the authors included 223 studies reporting on health-care outcomes/ROI indicators and metrics associated with leadership quality (73 studies), leadership development programs (138 studies) and existing evaluative instruments (12 studies). The extracted ROI indicators and metrics have been summarized in detail. Originality/value This review provides a snapshot in time of the current evidence on ROI indicators and metrics associated with leadership. Summarized ROI indicators and metrics can be used to design an effective evaluative instrument to assess the impact of leadership on health-care organizations.

  19. Dental Students', Alumni, and Dentists' Perspectives on Leadership: Impact of the Scholars Program in Dental Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemchick, Audrey L; Delgado, Jessica; Taichman, Russell S; Inglehart, Marita R

    2017-01-01

    In 2006, the Scholars Program in Dental Leadership (SPDL) was created at the University of Michigan School of Dentistry with the aim of preparing dental students to take on leadership roles in their profession and communities. The aims of this quantitative study were to investigate how SPDL alumni and current participants evaluated this program; to assess whether SPDL alumni evaluated their leadership-related educational experiences, leadership perceptions, and attitudes towards leadership activities in dentistry more positively than did non-SPDL dental students and general dentists; and to explore if leadership-related educational/clinical experiences were correlated with these constructs. Participants were 218 of 431 dental students across all four years (response rate 51%), 32 of whom were participants in the SPDL; 32 of 53 SPDL alumni (response rate 60%); and 595 of 3,000 general dentists invited to participate (response rate 20%). Both current and past SPDL participants evaluated the program on average positively (3.75 and 3.92, respectively, on a five-point scale). Non-SPDL students and alumni evaluated leadership-related educational experiences more positively than did the dentists (3.65/3.61 vs. 2.49; pleadership differed as well. Students and alumni evaluated being recognized (4.40/4.60 vs. 4.20; ppractice efficiency (4.61/4.53 vs. 4.36; pleadership-related constructs. These results showed that the SPDL positively affected alumni perceptions of leadership indicators and attitudes.

  20. An ethical leadership program for nursing unit managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Sang Hee; Park, Mihyun; Choi, Kyungok; Kim, Mi Kyoung

    2018-03-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the effect of an ethical leadership program (ELP) on ethical leadership, organizational citizenship behavior (OCB), and job outcomes of nursing unit managers (UMs) and to examine changes in staff nurses' perception about UMs' EL, OCB, job outcomes, and ethical work environments (EWEs) post-ELP. A quasi-experimental (pre- and post-test design) study conducted six-month intervention (ELP) using self-reported UM survey (n=44), and staff nurses (n=158) were randomly extracted by two steps. The Korean version of Ethical Leadership at Work for UMs' self-ethical leadership, the Ethical Leadership Scale for staff nurses' perceived ethical leadership, a 19-item OCB scale, and six dimensions of the medium-sized Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire II for job outcomes and EWEs were administered at baseline and post-intervention. UMs' ethical leadership scores differed significantly over time in people orientation (p=0.041) and concern for ethical leadership sustainability (p=0.002) adjusting for UM experience duration and nursing unit type. Total mean and level of power-sharing of ethical leadership among UMs with leadership, OCB, job outcomes, and EWEs, significant improvement over time appeared only in EWEs' work influence level (p=0.007). This study provides useful information for clinical ELP development and examining the program's effect on leadership skills and followers' outcomes. Program facilitation relies on practical training methods, participant motivation, and assessment outcome designs by controlling clinical confounding factors. Findings have implications as an attempt for intervention to promote competencies related to ethical leadership of nursing unit managers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Linking Experiences and Outcomes within a Postsecondary Leadership Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strawn, Kellie; McKim, Aaron J.; Velez, Jonathan J.

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the leadership development outcomes associated with specific experiences in a one-year, intensive leadership development program at a large northwest research university. Students highlighted three programmatic experiences for their effectiveness: (a) faculty mentoring, (b) participation in a weekly seminar, and (c)…

  2. Transformational Leadership in the Planning of a Doctoral Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Bobby J.; Slater, Charles L.

    2000-01-01

    The process of developing a doctoral program at the University of the Incarnate Word demonstrates the use of both transformational leadership (empowerment, advocacy, reconciliation) and transactional leadership (power brokering, making legitimate decisions). The contemporary environment needs multiple leaders who exercise different types of…

  3. The Role of Leadership in Navy Program Offices. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-05-01

    PROGRAM MANAGEMENT COURSE- SSTUDENT STUDY PROGRAM Fort Beivoir, Virginia, 22060 THE ROLE OF LEADERSHIP IN NAVY PROGRAM OFFICES STUDY REPORT PMC 73-1...jLa I1 • 1. Men at the Top. Osborne kLliott 1 2. "Understanding Leadership ". W. 0. H. Prentice, HBR Sep- Oct 1966 j 3. "A Theory of Human Motivation...Drucker, IMI reprint 9. Technical Management Institute Thifnkpiece, " Leadership " 1 • 0. "The Effective Manager ". Peter Drucker, LMI r~print 11. Sur-ival In

  4. Women's Leadership Development Training for [Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelinsky, Lia R.; Anderson, James C., II

    2016-01-01

    Hoyt and Kennedy (2008) asserted that women deal with messages related to appearance, behavior, and leadership identity that promote a loss of voice starting at a young age. More specifically, these societal messages and expectations convey constructs of effective leadership that are often associated with men (Eagly & Carli, 2003; Eagly &…

  5. Academy of Program/Project & Engineering Leadership Annual Publications

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Academy of Program/Project & Engineering Leadership's Annual Report highlights the Academy's efforts to serve the NASA workforce's needs in adapting to the...

  6. Twisted network programming essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Fettig, Abe

    2005-01-01

    Twisted Network Programming Essentials from O'Reilly is a task-oriented look at this new open source, Python-based technology. The book begins with recommendations for various plug-ins and add-ons to enhance the basic package as installed. It then details Twisted's collection simple network protocols, and helper utilities. The book also includes projects that let you try out the Twisted framework for yourself. For example, you'll find examples of using Twisted to build web services applications using the REST architecture, using XML-RPC, and using SOAP. Written for developers who want to s

  7. Characterization of leadership styles by analyzing social networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Saravia Vergara

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The study presents an analysis of networks to characterize the leadership styles in an institution volunteer, complementary or alternative to classic questionnaires to measure leadership. The study raises test questions to identify friendly relations and prominent leaders in the leadership dimensions of transformational, transactional and passive / avoidant and analyzes, for each of them, the metrics of the network structure as a whole and the role each individual actor. The study exploratory level, based on the opinion of 9 members of a specific project, allowed to show the benefits of network analysis applied to the subject of leadership: (i identified that the climate of "respect and trust", "enthusiasm" and "concern for the welfare of the people" dominate the organization; and (ii the individual role of each leader was identified. Three leaders who are considered as the best friends and care about the welfare of others were identified, but one of them stands for broadcasting "greater respect and trust" and is "an example to follow"; while the other two leaders stand out as being more "enthusiastic and optimistic" and "promote innovation and creativity," among other findings.

  8. Implementing Health-Promoting Leadership in Municipal Organizations: Managers’ Experiences with a Leadership Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Larsson

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze how line and middle managers experience and describe barriers and enablers in the implementation of a health-promoting leadership program in municipal organizations. A qualitative case study design was applied to examine the leadership program in a case involving implementation of an organizational health intervention. Data were mainly collected using semi-structured interviews with line and middle managers participating in the leadership program. Interviews with senior managers, notes from meetings/workshops, and written action plans were used as complementary data. The interview data were analyzed using a thematic analysis, and the complementary data using a summative content analysis. The findings show that the interviewed line and middle managers experienced this leadership program as a new approach in leadership training because it is based primarily on employee participation. Involvement and commitment of the employees was considered a crucial enabler in the implementation of the leadership program. Other enablers identified include action plans with specific goals, earlier experiences of organizational change, and integration of the program content into regular routines and structures. The line and middle managers described several barriers in the implementation process, and they described various organizational conditions, such as high workload, lack of senior management support, politically initiated projects, and organizational change, as challenges that limited the opportunities to be drivers of change. Taken together, these barriers interfered with the leadership program and its implementation. The study contributes to the understanding of how organizational-level health interventions are implemented in public sector workplaces.

  9. Indicators of opinion leadership in customer networks : self-reports and degree centrality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Risselada, Hans; Verhoef, Pieter; Bijmolt, Tammo

    In this paper, we assess two alternative indicators of opinion leadership, self-reported opinion leadership and degree centrality, on the same dataset. We also investigate the interaction effect of these two indicators and the social network environment on opinion leadership. We use social network

  10. Science Teacher Leadership: Learning from a Three-Year Leadership Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luft, Julie A.; Dubois, Shannon L.; Kaufmann, Janey; Plank, Larry

    2016-01-01

    Teachers are professional learners and leaders. They seek to understand how their students learn, and they participate in programs that provide new instructional skills, curricular materials, and ways to become involved in their community. This study follows a science teacher leadership program over a three-year period of time. There were…

  11. Leadership and business education in orthopaedic residency training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiesau, Carter D; Heim, Kathryn A; Parekh, Selene G

    2011-01-01

    Leadership and business challenges have become increasingly present in the practice of medicine. Orthopaedic residency programs are at the forefront of educating and preparing orthopaedic surgeons. This study attempts to quantify the number of orthopaedic residency programs in the United States that include leadership or business topics in resident education program and to determine which topics are being taught and rate the importance of various leadership characteristics and business topics. A survey was sent to all orthopaedic department chairpersons and residency program directors in the United States via e-mail. The survey responses were collected using a survey collection website. The respondents rated the importance of leadership training for residents as somewhat important. The quality of character, integrity, and honesty received the highest average rating among 19 different qualities of good leaders in orthopaedics. The inclusion of business training in resident education was also rated as somewhat important. The topic of billing and coding received the highest average rating among 14 different orthopaedically relevant business topics. A variety of topics beyond the scope of clinical practice must be included in orthopaedic residency educational curricula. The decreased participation of newly trained orthopaedic surgeons in leadership positions and national and state orthopaedic organizations is concerning for the future of orthopaedic surgery. Increased inclusion of leadership and business training in resident education is important to better prepare trainees for the future.

  12. Program Leadership from a Nordic Perspective - Program Leaders' Power to Influence Their Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Högfeldt, Anna-Karin; Strömberg, Emma; Jerbrant, Anna

    2013-01-01

    research demonstrated that program leaders have quite different positions, strategies and methods when it comes to monitoring and developing their programs. In this paper, a deeper investigation is carried out of the (im-) possibilities to make real influence on the study courses that constitutes...... the respective Engineering study programs. Eight program leaders from the five N5T universities have been interviewed, and the analysis of these studies, has culminated in a model for the analysis of program leadership for Engineering education development....

  13. Internal Leadership Challenges of Network Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Michael P.; Stone-Johnson, Corrie

    2010-01-01

    While networking is becoming an increasingly popular school improvement strategy with high levels of success, there is little research that shows the challenges school leaders face as they enter into these new relationships. This article supplements current literature by providing documentation and analysis of some internal leadership…

  14. Leadership development programs for physicians: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frich, Jan C; Brewster, Amanda L; Cherlin, Emily J; Bradley, Elizabeth H

    2015-05-01

    Physician leadership development programs typically aim to strengthen physicians' leadership competencies and improve organizational performance. We conducted a systematic review of medical literature on physician leadership development programs in order to characterize the setting, educational content, teaching methods, and learning outcomes achieved. Articles were identified through a search in Ovid MEDLINE from 1950 through November 2013. We included articles that described programs designed to expose physicians to leadership concepts, outlined teaching methods, and reported evaluation outcomes. A thematic analysis was conducted using a structured data entry form with categories for setting/target group, educational content, format, type of evaluation and outcomes. We identified 45 studies that met eligibility criteria, of which 35 reported on programs exclusively targeting physicians. The majority of programs focused on skills training and technical and conceptual knowledge, while fewer programs focused on personal growth and awareness. Half of the studies used pre/post intervention designs, and four studies used a comparison group. Positive outcomes were reported in all studies, although the majority of studies relied on learner satisfaction scores and self-assessed knowledge or behavioral change. Only six studies documented favorable organizational outcomes, such as improvement in quality indicators for disease management. The leadership programs examined in these studies were characterized by the use of multiple learning methods, including lectures, seminars, group work, and action learning projects in multidisciplinary teams. Physician leadership development programs are associated with increased self-assessed knowledge and expertise; however, few studies have examined outcomes at a system level. Our synthesis of the literature suggests important gaps, including a lack of programs that integrate non-physician and physician professionals, limited use of more

  15. The Nursing Leadership Institute program evaluation: a critique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Havaei F

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Farinaz Havaei, Maura MacPhee School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada Abstract: A theory-driven program evaluation was conducted for a nursing leadership program, as a collaborative project between university faculty, the nurses' union, the provincial Ministry of Health, and its chief nursing officers. A collaborative logic model process was used to engage stakeholders, and mixed methods approaches were used to answer evaluation questions. Despite demonstrated, successful outcomes, the leadership program was not supported with continued funding. This paper examines what happened during the evaluation process: What factors failed to sustain this program? Keywords: leadership development, theory-driven evaluation, mixed methods, collaborative logic modeling

  16. Program Leadership from a Nordic Perspective - Managing Education Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Högfeldt, Anna-Karin; Cornell, Ann; Cronhjort, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we focus on university educational development issues by investigating the program leadership at five Nordic technical universities. Specifically, the paper compares definitions, views and experiences of education leadership in the Nordic Five Tech (N5T) universities. The paper does...... this by, first, reviewing the definitions of roles and responsibilities for program directors at each university, and second, by presenting results from a survey carried out in March 2012 among program directors at the N5T universities. Based on this data, we analyze how program directors experience...... their role, their possibilities to lead, and their opportunities of learning to lead. How is time for reflection and development as leaders handled at the different universities? The paper goes on to consider what impact the mandate of the leadership role has on the possibilities for developing educational...

  17. Clinical program leadership: skill requirements for contemporary leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spallina, Joseph M

    2002-01-01

    With knowledge of these leadership requirements and a shrinking base of experienced managers, healthcare organizations and professional societies have little choice in their approach to prepare for the leadership development challenges of the future. Organizations will focus leadership development, training, and continuing management education on integrating business tools and skills into clinical program management. The management requirements for clinical programs will continue to grow in complexity and the number of qualified managers will continue to diminish, New approaches to solving this shortage will evolve. Professional, forprofit companies, healthcare provider organizations, and academic programs will develop clinical program management training tracks. Organizations that create solutions to this management imperative will maintain their competitive edge in the challenging times that will greet the industry in the future.

  18. Leadership networks in Catholic parishes: implications for implementation research in health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrón, Rosalyn; Leyva, Bryan; Allen, Jennifer; Ospino, Hosffman; Tom, Laura; Rustan, Sarah

    2014-12-01

    Through two case studies of Catholic parishes in Massachusetts, this study explores the implications of leader-centered versus distributed leadership in Catholic parishes for the implementation of evidence-based health interventions. The two parishes involved in the study differ from each other in several ways. In the first, parishioners are less engaged in leadership activities at the decision-making level in the parish. A small group of lay volunteers work with the parish priest and other ordained leaders on parish activities. In the second parish, a large and active lay volunteer leadership have forged an organizational structure that allows more independence from the pastor's direct oversight. In this parish, lay volunteer leaders are the prime drivers of organizational programs and events. In 2012-2013, three types of networks were assessed at each parish: discussion, collaboration, and outside-of-parish ties. The contrasts between each parish include differences in density of collaboration, in frequency of discussion, and network centrality of the respective parish priests. We further identified key actors in the network structures at each parish. We discuss the implications of these findings for understanding organizational capacity in the context of health program implementation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Implementation of a Structured Nursing Leadership Development Program for Succession Planning in a Health System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramseur, Priscilla; Fuchs, Mary Ann; Edwards, Pamela; Humphreys, Janice

    2018-01-01

    Preparing future nursing leaders to be successful is important because many current leaders will retire in large numbers in the future. A structured nursing leadership development program utilizing the Essentials of Nurse Manager Orientation online program provided future nursing leaders with content aligned with nursing leadership competencies. Paired with assigned mentors and monthly leadership sessions, the participants increased their perception of leadership competence.

  20. Effective Software Engineering Leadership for Development Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagle West, Marsha

    2010-01-01

    Software is a critical component of systems ranging from simple consumer appliances to complex health, nuclear, and flight control systems. The development of quality, reliable, and effective software solutions requires the incorporation of effective software engineering processes and leadership. Processes, approaches, and methodologies for…

  1. Climate leadership program: Building Africa's resilience through ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Activities include training, research, testing of climate solutions in local communities, and coaching and mentorship in the area of policy development and advocacy. Emphasis will be placed on building leadership capacity among women. This is a collaborative effort between the University of Nairobi and the Institute of ...

  2. Building Successful Multicultural Special Education Programs through Innovative Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obiakor, Festus E.; Beachum, Floyd D.; Williams, Darrell; McCray, Carlos R.

    2006-01-01

    With increased debates over various aspects of special education, it has become apparent that multicultural leadership is needed to prepare school administrators and teachers to design effective special education programs. In this article, the authors discuss several aspects of administering successful programs for multicultural students. To be…

  3. Accreditation in the Professions: Implications for Educational Leadership Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlakis, Alexandra; Kelley, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    Program accreditation is a process based on a set of professional expectations and standards meant to signal competency and credibility. Although accreditation has played an important role in shaping educational leadership preparation programs, recent revisions to accreditation processes and standards have highlighted attention to the purposes,…

  4. A Leadership Model for University Geology Department Teacher Inservice Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Daniel S.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Provides geology departments and science educators with a leadership model for developing earth science inservice programs. Model emphasizes cooperation/coordination among departments, science educators, and curriculum specialists at local/intermediate/state levels. Includes rationale for inservice programs and geology department involvement in…

  5. Development and evaluation of a leadership program for veterinary students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, D A; Klingborg, D J

    2001-01-01

    Leadership skills are important for many facets of professional life, but no known leadership training programs exist in North American veterinary schools. It was the purpose of this project to develop, deliver, and evaluate a leadership program for first-year veterinary students. Leadership attributes emphasized in the course included effective communication, openness to learning from others, self-awareness, commitment beyond self-interest, motivation, decision making, understanding issue complexity, and team building. The five-day course was delivered to 21 new veterinary students randomly selected just prior to their first-year orientation in the fall of 2000. Participants ranked themselves higher than non-participants in a post-course evaluation on their ability to be effective leaders. Participants reported an increase in self-confidence and a clearer understanding of their leadership roles. Participants also noted new support systems among co-participants and expressed a new ability to consider complex issues more broadly. Most reported that they frequently used enhanced skills in giving and receiving feedback and team building. Other leadership tools identified as valuable included negotiation, group dynamics, a structured approach to problem solving, time management, and an awareness of personal learning style preferences as a means to improve communication.

  6. Executive Leadership in School Improvement Networks: A Conceptual Framework and Agenda for Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peurach, Donald J.; Gumus, Emine

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to improve understanding of executive leadership in school improvement networks: for example, networks supported by comprehensive school reform providers, charter management organizations, and education management organizations. In this analysis, we review the literature on networks and executive leadership. We draw…

  7. Administrative organization in diagnostic radiology residency program leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Grant R; Mullins, Mark E; Chen, Zhengjia; Meltzer, Carolyn C

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to document the current state of administrative structure in US diagnostic radiology (DR) residency program leadership. A secondary objective was to assess for correlation(s), if any, with DR residency programs that equipped positions such as assistant, associate, and emeritus program director (PD) with respect to residency size and region of the country. The Fellowship and Residency Electronic Interactive Database, as well as direct communication and programmatic Web site searches, were used to gather data regarding current US DR residency leadership. Data collected included the presence of additional leadership titles, including assistant PD, associate PD, and PD emeritus, and how many faculty members currently held each position. Programs were excluded if results could not be identified. Analysis of variance and t tests were used to estimate the correlations of the size of a residency with having additional or shared PD positions and the types of positions, respectively. Chi-square tests were used to assess for any regional differences. As of the time of this project, the Fellowship and Residency Electronic Interactive Database defined 186 US DR residency programs. A total of 173 programs (93%) were included in the analysis; the remainder were excluded because of unavailability of relevant data. Seventy-two percent (124 of 173) of programs had additional DR leadership positions. Of these, 30 programs (17%) had more than one such position. There were no significant differences in the sizes of the programs that used these additional positions (mean, 25 ± 12; range, 6-72) compared with those that did not (mean, 24 ± 12; range, 7-51). There were no significant differences between programs that had additional positions with respect to region of the country. The majority of US DR residency programs used some form of additional DR leadership position. In the majority of cases, this was in the form of an assistant or associate PD. Nearly one

  8. Evaluating a physician leadership development program - a mixed methods approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Throgmorton, Cheryl; Mitchell, Trey; Morley, Tom; Snyder, Marijo

    2016-05-16

    Purpose - With the extent of change in healthcare today, organizations need strong physician leaders. To compensate for the lack of physician leadership education, many organizations are sending physicians to external leadership programs or developing in-house leadership programs targeted specifically to physicians. The purpose of this paper is to outline the evaluation strategy and outcomes of the inaugural year of a Physician Leadership Academy (PLA) developed and implemented at a Michigan-based regional healthcare system. Design/methodology/approach - The authors applied the theoretical framework of Kirkpatrick's four levels of evaluation and used surveys, observations, activity tracking, and interviews to evaluate the program outcomes. The authors applied grounded theory techniques to the interview data. Findings - The program met targeted outcomes across all four levels of evaluation. Interview themes focused on the significance of increasing self-awareness, building relationships, applying new skills, and building confidence. Research limitations/implications - While only one example, this study illustrates the importance of developing the evaluation strategy as part of the program design. Qualitative research methods, often lacking from learning evaluation design, uncover rich themes of impact. The study supports how a PLA program can enhance physician learning, engagement, and relationship building throughout and after the program. Physician leaders' partnership with organization development and learning professionals yield results with impact to individuals, groups, and the organization. Originality/value - Few studies provide an in-depth review of evaluation methods and outcomes of physician leadership development programs. Healthcare organizations seeking to develop similar in-house programs may benefit applying the evaluation strategy outlined in this study.

  9. Analysis of Evidence Supporting the Educational Leadership Constituent Council 2011 Educational Leadership Program Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Pamela D.; Anderson, Erin; Reynolds, Amy L.; Mawhinney, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    This document analysis provides a summary of the research from high-impact journals published between 2008 and 2013 with the explicit purpose of determining the extent to which the current empirical evidence supports the individual 2011 Educational Leadership Constituent Council Program Standards and their elements. We found that the standards are…

  10. Implementing and Investigating Distributed Leadership in a National University Network--SaMnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Manjula D.; Rifkin, Will; Tzioumis, Vicky; Hill, Matthew; Johnson, Elizabeth; Varsavsky, Cristina; Jones, Susan; Beames, Stephanie; Crampton, Andrea; Zadnik, Marjan; Pyke, Simon

    2017-01-01

    The literature suggests that collaborative approaches to leadership, such as distributed leadership, are essential for supporting educational innovators in leading change in teaching in universities. This paper briefly describes the array of activities, processes and resources to support distributed leadership in the implementation of a network,…

  11. Shared Leadership and Team Creativity: A Social Network Analysis in Engineering Design Teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiong Wu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This research explores the relationship between shared leadership and creativity in engineering design teams. To do this, a social network perspective was adopted using four measures to assess key elements of shared leadership networks. These are (a network density, (b centralization, (c efficiency and (d strength. Data was collected from a sample of 22 engineering design teams who adopt a shared leadership approach. Our results support previous findings that the density of a shared leadership network is positively related to team creativity. In contrast, we learned that centralization exerts a negative influence on it. Moreover, while we found that there is no evidence to support a positive correlation between efficiency and team creativity, we demonstrate an inverted U-shaped relationship between strength and team creativity in a shared leadership network. These findings are important because they add to the academic debate in the shared leadership area and provide valuable insights for managers.

  12. Program Helps Simulate Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, James; Mcintire, Gary

    1993-01-01

    Neural Network Environment on Transputer System (NNETS) computer program provides users high degree of flexibility in creating and manipulating wide variety of neural-network topologies at processing speeds not found in conventional computing environments. Supports back-propagation and back-propagation-related algorithms. Back-propagation algorithm used is implementation of Rumelhart's generalized delta rule. NNETS developed on INMOS Transputer(R). Predefines back-propagation network, Jordan network, and reinforcement network to assist users in learning and defining own networks. Also enables users to configure other neural-network paradigms from NNETS basic architecture. Small portion of software written in OCCAM(R) language.

  13. The Top 30 Rising Stars Program: an inter-organizational approach to leadership succession planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilworth, Katie; Lankshear, Sara; Cava, Maureen; Aldred, Jacqueline; Hawkes, Nancy; Lefebre, Nancy; Price, Jennifer; Lawler, Valerie

    2011-01-01

    An effective leadership development program is an organizational investment that advances individual performance while strengthening organizational capabilities. The Top 30 Rising Stars Program is a leadership succession program designed to enable leadership capacity building within and across organizations. Key components of the program include formal learning, stretch opportunities, and mentorship. Evaluation results reveal high participant satisfaction and an increase in reported self-confidence in their ability to assume a formal leadership position.

  14. A Summer Leadership Development Program for Chemical Engineering Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Annie E.; Evans, Greg J.; Reeve, Doug

    2012-01-01

    The Engineering Leaders of Tomorrow Program (LOT) is a comprehensive curricular, co-curricular, extra-curricular leadership development initiative for engineering students. LOT envisions: "an engineering education that is a life-long foundation for transformational leaders and outstanding citizens." Academic courses, co-curricular certificate…

  15. Quality Special Education Programs: The Role of Transformational Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinton, Demi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to determine whether or not a relationship existed between principals who demonstrate transformational leadership traits and six different quality practices in their special education program. Effective principals must know and understand special education laws, practices, and current issues, but evidence…

  16. Administrator Preparation for Multicultural Leadership: Inside Four Nationally Accredited Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Mary; Enomoto, Ernestine K.

    2004-01-01

    As accrediting associations and ISLLC Standards for School Leaders attest, school leaders have a critical role to insure equitable educational opportunities for diverse students. But how are they being prepared for multicultural leadership in administrator preparation programs? This qualitative study examined and contrasted four different…

  17. Using a Hybrid Approach for a Leadership Cohort Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Maxine A.

    2013-01-01

    Because information technology continues to change rapidly, Extension is challenged with learning and using technology appropriately. We assert Extension cannot shy away from the challenges but must embrace technology because audiences and external forces demand it. A hybrid, or blended, format of a leadership cohort program was offered to public…

  18. Teacher Leadership Program Readiness Surveys. Toolkit/Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finster, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Federal initiatives, such as the Teacher Incentive Fund (TIF), encourage school districts to develop teacher leadership (TL) roles and use funds to provide incentives for teachers to fill them. Before starting a teacher leader program, school districts should assess whether their current conditions are favorable to implementing teacher leader…

  19. The development, implementation, and assessment of an innovative faculty mentoring leadership program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsen, Lawrence C; Borus, Jonathan F; Nadelson, Carol C; Seely, Ellen W; Haas, Audrey; Fuhlbrigge, Anne L

    2012-12-01

    Effective mentoring is an important component of academic success. Few programs exist to both improve the effectiveness of established mentors and cultivate a multispecialty mentoring community. In 2008, in response to a faculty survey on mentoring, leaders at Brigham and Women's Hospital developed the Faculty Mentoring Leadership Program as a peer learning experience for midcareer and senior faculty physician and scientist mentors to enhance their skills and leadership in mentoring and create a supportive community of mentors. A planning group representing key administrative, educational, clinical, and research mentorship constituencies designed the nine-month course.Participants met monthly for an hour and a half during lunchtime. Two cofacilitators engaged the diverse group of 16 participants in interactive discussions about cases based on the participants' experiences. While the cofacilitators discussed with the participants the dyadic mentor-mentee relationship, they specifically emphasized the value of engaging multiple mentors and establishing mentoring networks. In response to postsession and postcourse (both immediately and after six months) self-assessments, participants reported substantive gains in their mentoring confidence and effectiveness, experienced a renewed sense of enthusiasm for mentoring, and took initial steps to build a diverse network of mentoring relationships.In this article, the authors describe the rationale, design, implementation, assessment, and ongoing impact of this innovative faculty mentoring leadership program. They also share lessons learned for other institutions that are contemplating developing a similar faculty mentoring program.

  20. 77 FR 26537 - Notice of Commissioners and Staff Attendance at FERC Leadership Development Program Graduation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-04

    ... Attendance at FERC Leadership Development Program Graduation/Induction Ceremony The Federal Energy Regulatory... may attend the following event: FERC Leadership Development Program Graduation/Induction Ceremony: 888... and welcome 17 employees selected for the 2012 Leadership Development Program and graduate 15...

  1. 76 FR 5799 - Notice of Commissioners and Staff Attendance at FERC Leadership Development Program Induction...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-02

    ... Attendance at FERC Leadership Development Program Induction Ceremony January 26, 2011. The Federal Energy... Commission staff may attend the following event: FERC Leadership Development Program Induction Ceremony: 888... welcome 16 employees selected for the 2011 Leadership Development Program. Kimberly D. Bose, Secretary...

  2. Developing the leadership skills of new graduates to influence practice environments: a novice nurse leadership program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyess, Susan; Sherman, Rose

    2011-01-01

    The authors of the recently published Institute of Medicine on the Future of Nursing report emphasized the importance of preparing nurses to lead change to advance health care in the United States. Other scholars linked practice environments to safe quality care. In order for nurses to fully actualize this role in practice environments, they need to possess leadership skills sets that identify and respond to challenges faced. New nurses are no exception. This article presents a program with a 5-year track record that is designed to support transition and enhance the skill sets of leadership for new nurses in their first year of practice. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation measurements at baseline and postprogram provided data for evaluation of the first 4 cohorts in the program. Evaluative outcomes presented indicate that new nurses gained leadership and translational research skills that contributed to their ability to influence practice environments. Nonetheless, practice environments continue to need improvement and ongoing leadership from all levels of nursing must be upheld.

  3. Developing nurse leaders: a program enhancing staff nurse leadership skills and professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Pauline J

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to determine whether participation in the Nursing Leadership Perspectives Program (NLPP) at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, produced a change in leadership skills, increased professional activities, leadership promotion, and retention rates of participants. The NLPP is an educational program designed to enhance leadership skills and promote professionalism of registered nurses. The 6-month program provides participants with theoretical knowledge, core competencies, and opportunities to practice application of leadership skills. Outcome metrics were collected from registered nurses who completed the program (n = 15). Data analysis included descriptive and nonparametric methods. Participants reported statistically significant changes in their leadership skills after participation in the program (P = .007) on the Leadership Practices Inventory. Changes in professional behavior were also statistically significant as rated by the Nursing Activity Scale (P = .001). Participants demonstrated a change in leadership skills and professional behavior following the program.

  4. Leaders Growing Leaders: Designing a Tier-Based Leadership Program for Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torbeck, Laura; Rozycki, Grace; Dunnington, Gary

    2018-02-07

    Leadership has emerged as a crucial component of professional development for physicians in academic medicine. Most leadership skills can be learned and therefore best practices of delivering leadership development are in high demand. For practicing surgeons, specific strategies to teach leadership have been lacking. The purpose of this paper is to describe the structure of a tier-based leadership development program called Leaders Growing Leaders, to identify the major curricular components to each tier including measures and outcomes, and to share lessons learned for those who may want to begin a similar leadership development program. Copyright © 2018 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Linear Programming and Network Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Bazaraa, Mokhtar S; Sherali, Hanif D

    2011-01-01

    The authoritative guide to modeling and solving complex problems with linear programming-extensively revised, expanded, and updated The only book to treat both linear programming techniques and network flows under one cover, Linear Programming and Network Flows, Fourth Edition has been completely updated with the latest developments on the topic. This new edition continues to successfully emphasize modeling concepts, the design and analysis of algorithms, and implementation strategies for problems in a variety of fields, including industrial engineering, management science, operations research

  6. Network speech systems technology program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, C. J.

    1981-09-01

    This report documents work performed during FY 1981 on the DCA-sponsored Network Speech Systems Technology Program. The two areas of work reported are: (1) communication system studies in support of the evolving Defense Switched Network (DSN) and (2) design and implementation of satellite/terrestrial interfaces for the Experimental Integrated Switched Network (EISN). The system studies focus on the development and evaluation of economical and endurable network routing procedures. Satellite/terrestrial interface development includes circuit-switched and packet-switched connections to the experimental wideband satellite network. Efforts in planning and coordination of EISN experiments are reported in detail in a separate EISN Experiment Plan.

  7. Are Water-Related Leadership Development Programs Designed to Be Effective? An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbach, Mark E.; Floress, Kristin; Kaufman, Eric K.

    2015-01-01

    Water resource professionals and others involved in managing water resources face increasingly complex challenges. Effective leadership development programs are needed to produce water leaders who can address these challenges. Leadership programs must be designed not simply to increase participants' environmental and leadership knowledge but to…

  8. Evaluating a leadership program: a comparative, longitudinal study to assess the impact of the Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine (ELAM) Program for Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannels, Sharon A; Yamagata, Hisashi; McDade, Sharon A; Chuang, Yu-Chuan; Gleason, Katharine A; McLaughlin, Jean M; Richman, Rosalyn C; Morahan, Page S

    2008-05-01

    The Hedwig van Ameringen Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine (ELAM) program provides an external yearlong development program for senior women faculty in U.S. and Canadian medical schools. This study aims to determine the extent to which program participants, compared with women from two comparison groups, aspire to leadership, demonstrate mastery of leadership competencies, and attain leadership positions. A pre-/posttest methodology and longitudinal structure were used to evaluate the impact of ELAM participation. Participants from two ELAM cohorts were compared with women who applied but were not accepted into the ELAM program (NON) and women from the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) Faculty Roster. The AAMC group was a baseline for midcareer faculty; the NON group allowed comparison for leadership aspiration. Baseline data were collected in 2002, with follow-up data collected in 2006. Sixteen leadership indicators were considered: administrative leadership attainment (four indicators), full professor academic rank (one), leadership competencies and readiness (eight), and leadership aspirations and education (three). For 15 of the indicators, ELAM participants scored higher than AAMC and NON groups, and for one indicator they scored higher than only the AAMC group (aspiration to leadership outside academic health centers). The differences were statistically significant for 12 indicators and were distributed across the categories. These included seven of the leadership competencies, three of the administrative leadership attainment indicators, and two of the leadership aspirations and education indicators. These findings support the hypothesis that the ELAM program has a beneficial impact on ELAM fellows in terms of leadership behaviors and career progression.

  9. Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholars program leadership training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jacquelyn C; McBride, Angela Barron; Etcher, LuAnn; Deming, Katie

    The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholars program was created to address the nursing shortage via development of the next generation of national leaders in academic nursing. The leadership training combined development at the scholar's home institution with in-person didactic and interactive sessions with notable leaders in nursing and other disciplines. A curriculum matrix, organized by six domains, was evaluated quantitatively and qualitatively. What set this program apart is that it immersed junior faculty in concerted leadership development with regard to all aspects of the faculty role so that teaching interactively, making use of the latest in information technology, giving testimony before a policy-making group, participating in strategic planning, and figuring out how to reduce the budget without jeopardizing quality were all envisioned as part of the faculty role. The domains covered by this program could easily be used as the framework to plan other leadership-development programs for the next generation of academic leaders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Defense Leadership and Management Program (DLAMP)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ramp, S

    1997-01-01

    This Directive, under Chapters 23, 33, 41, and 71 of title 5, United States Code, establishes policy and assigns responsibilities for a program of civilian leader training, education, and development...

  11. South Asian Water (SAWA) Leadership Program on Climate Change ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    South Asian Water (SAWA) Leadership Program on Climate Change. Selon le cinquième rapport du Groupe d'experts intergouvernemental sur l'évolution du climat, les principaux risques en Asie du Sud seraient une augmentation du débordement des rivières, des inondations côtières et des inondations en milieu urbain ...

  12. Nurse manager residency program: an innovative leadership succession plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Amy; Wagner, Jennifer; Martin, Christina; Grant, Brandy; Maule, Katrina; Resh, Kimberly; King, Lisa; Eaton, Holly; Fetter, Katrina; King, Stacey L; Thompson, Elizabeth J

    2014-01-01

    To ensure succession planning within the ranks of nurse managers meet current and projected nursing management needs and organizational goals, we developed and implemented a nurse manager residency program at our hospital. By identifying, supporting, and mentoring clinical experts who express a desire and display an aptitude for nursing leadership, we are graduating individuals who can transition to a nurse manager position with greater ease and competence.

  13. Harnessing health information to foster disadvantaged teens' community engagement, leadership skills, and career plans: a qualitative evaluation of the Teen Health Leadership Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keselman, Alla; Ahmed, Einas A; Williamson, Deborah C; Kelly, Janice E; Dutcher, Gale A

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes a qualitative evaluation of a small-scale program aiming to improve health information literacy, leadership skills, and interest in health careers among high school students in a low-income, primarily minority community. Graduates participated in semi-structured interviews, transcripts of which were coded with a combination of objectives-driven and data-driven categories. The program had a positive impact on the participants' health information competency, leadership skills, academic orientation, and interest in health careers. Program enablers included a supportive network of adults, novel experiences, and strong mentorship. The study suggests that health information can provide a powerful context for enabling disadvantaged students' community engagement and academic success.

  14. The evaluation of a clinical development unit leadership preparation program by focus group interviews - part 2: negative aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Jennifer; Parsons, Myra

    2002-10-01

    In Western Sydney, Australia, in 1996, the Area Health Service and the University of Western Sydney entered a strategic alliance to develop a nursing research culture in the health services. One of the strategies implemented to achieve this was the establishment of a network of research-receptive environments known as Clinical Development Units (CDUs). In terms of research receptivity, evidence at the time suggested that it could only be developed in units where the leadership style is democratic and participatory. In terms of CDUs, evidence suggested that their successful development depended critically on the effective management of CDU leadership stressors. In light of this, it was agreed to conduct a CDU leadership preparation program in Western Sydney. The program aimed to furnish CDU leaders with the participatory leadership skills required to develop and manage their units. It was expected that the acquisition of such leadership skills would serve to minimize the leadership stessors they could expect to experience. This is the second of two papers which report course evaluation data. The first focused on the more positive evaluation data; this paper focuses on the negative evaluation data and outlines how the current program has been modified in light of these data. In addition, it discusses two themes which emerged during data analysis. These were nurses' apparent mutual lack of trust and their pressing needs to be recognized as valuable and merit-worthy.

  15. Strengthening community leadership: evaluation findings from the california healthy cities and communities program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegler, Michelle C; Norton, Barbara L; Aronson, Robert E

    2008-04-01

    Collaborative approaches to community health improvement such as healthy cities and communities have the potential to strengthen community capacity through leadership development. The healthy cities and communities process orients existing local leadership to new community problem-solving strategies and draws out leadership abilities among residents not previously engaged in civic life. In an evaluation of the California Healthy Cities and Communities (CHCC) Program, leadership development was one of several outcomes assessed at the civic-participation level of the social ecology. Data collection methods included focus groups and surveys, semistructured interviews with coordinators and community leaders, and review of program documents. Findings suggest that the CHCC program enhanced capacity by expanding new leadership opportunities through coalition participation, program implementation, and civic leadership roles related to spin-off organizations and broader collaborative structures. Communities in rural regions were particularly successful in achieving significant leadership outcomes.

  16. Peer Education in Student Leadership Programs: Responding to Co-Curricular Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, Paige

    2011-01-01

    Leadership development is an outcome of colleges and universities today stressed both in and out of the classroom. Additionally, leadership is often included in institutional missions, with emphasis on students developing as responsible citizens or leaders. The use of peer educators is standard in many student leadership development programs. In…

  17. An Exploratory Study of the Impact of College Student Leadership Programs upon the Construct of Mindfulness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Rich

    2012-01-01

    Mindfulness is a key skill that produces the greater psychological awareness identified by most leadership scholars as being essential to effective leadership. This study conducted an exploratory assessment of the effectiveness of mindfulness-based cocurricular collegiate leadership programs through pre- and post-participation application of the…

  18. Leadership Role Identity Construction in Women's Leadership Development Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brue, Krystal L.; Brue, Shawn A.

    2018-01-01

    This article analyzes women's only leadership development training to determine how leadership roles are conceptualized and implemented, how women independently and collectively construct new leadership role identities, and how leadership identities are retained post training. Themes of nested validation, accepting the belonging narrative,…

  19. Influence of a Hospital-Based, Internal Leadership Development Program on Leadership Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch-Carre, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    A search on Amazon revealed more than 6,000 books related to leadership development. The Business Source database has more than 700 articles with the word leadership in the title, published between 2005 and 2015. This suggests that leadership is a topic in which many are interested. Clearly, leadership makes a difference in an organization's…

  20. Team leadership: network differences in women's and men's instrumental and expressive relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, C; Grusky, O; Podus, D; Young, A

    1999-01-01

    Recent studies have emphasised differences in leadership styles between women and men. Women have an "interactive" leadership style while men are more "directive" and "authoritative." Social network analysis is used to examine differences in eight mental health case management teams, half formally supervised by women and half by men. The techniques used are graphical displays and measures of centrality. Results show male leaders as the most central team member for both instrumental and expressive relations. Female leaders, however, do not adhere to a single leadership style. Team centralisation also differs with gender composition of teams influencing leadership differences.

  1. NET-2 Network Analysis Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malmberg, A.F.

    1974-01-01

    The NET-2 Network Analysis Program is a general purpose digital computer program which solves the nonlinear time domain response and the linearized small signal frequency domain response of an arbitrary network of interconnected components. NET-2 is capable of handling a variety of components and has been applied to problems in several engineering fields, including electronic circuit design and analysis, missile flight simulation, control systems, heat flow, fluid flow, mechanical systems, structural dynamics, digital logic, communications network design, solid state device physics, fluidic systems, and nuclear vulnerability due to blast, thermal, gamma radiation, neutron damage, and EMP effects. Network components may be selected from a repertoire of built-in models or they may be constructed by the user through appropriate combinations of mathematical, empirical, and topological functions. Higher-level components may be defined by subnetworks composed of any combination of user-defined components and built-in models. The program provides a modeling capability to represent and intermix system components on many levels, e.g., from hole and electron spatial charge distributions in solid state devices through discrete and integrated electronic components to functional system blocks. NET-2 is capable of simultaneous computation in both the time and frequency domain, and has statistical and optimization capability. Network topology may be controlled as a function of the network solution. (U.S.)

  2. Team sponsors in community-based health leadership programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Tracy Enright; Dinkin, Donna R; Champion, Heather

    2017-05-02

    Purpose The purpose of this article is to share the lessons learned about the role of team sponsors in action-learning teams as part of community-based health leadership development programs. Design/methodology/approach This case study uses program survey results from fellow participants, action learning coaches and team sponsors to understand the value of sponsors to the teams, the roles they most often filled and the challenges they faced as team sponsors. Findings The extent to which the sponsors were perceived as having contributed to the work of the action learning teams varied greatly from team to team. Most sponsors agreed that they were well informed about their role. The roles sponsors most frequently played were to provide the teams with input and support, serve as a liaison to the community and serve as a sounding board, motivator and cheerleader. The most common challenges or barriers team sponsors faced in this role were keeping engaged in the process, adjusting to the role and feeling disconnected from the program. Practical implications This work provides insights for program developers and community foundations who are interested in building the capacity for health leadership by linking community sponsors with emerging leaders engaged in an action learning experience. Originality/value This work begins to fill a gap in the literature. The role of team sponsors has been studied for single organization work teams but there is a void of understanding about the role of sponsors with multi-organizational teams working to improve health while also learning about leadership.

  3. Levers supporting program evaluation culture and capacity in Romanian public administration: The role of leadership

    OpenAIRE

    Cristina Mora; Raluca Antonie

    2012-01-01

    Program evaluation culture and capacity is at the very beginning of its development in Romania. In this article we highlight one of the fundamental, but not always obvious, connections that support sustainable evaluation culture and capacity building and development: the link between leadership and program evaluation. If properly used, program evaluation results can be a strong instrument in leadership, just as leadership can fundamentally encourage the development of evaluation culture and c...

  4. Seeking Clarity in New Jersey for Leadership Preparation Program Design: Confusion, Fragility, and Unintended Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolittle, Gini

    2013-01-01

    In 2004, the New Jersey Department of Education issued a mandate to the 17 leadership preparation program providers to revise their leadership preparation programs after completing a critical friends review. This case study explores the challenges, programmatic, and political experiences of one preparation program as state support dwindled.…

  5. Florida's Mandated Educational Leadership Program Redesign: The William Cecil Golden Touch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountford, Meredith; Acker-Hocevar, Michele A.

    2013-01-01

    In 2007, educational leadership programs in Florida were notified by Florida's Department of Education of a law requiring all programs to align with new legislation, State Rule 6A-5.081. Previously, most state-approved preparation programs were based on Florida's Leadership Preparation Standards, a version of the 1996 Interstate School Leadership…

  6. Leadership Training in an MBA Program Using Peer-Led Team Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Gregory; Frye, Robin; Mantena, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    Leadership training is an important part of any MBA program, but is often difficult to provide in an effective way. Over the last three years, we implemented a program of Peer-Led Team Learning in two core courses of our MBA curriculum, which we believe provides a good solution. The program combines leadership training with practical hands-on…

  7. Advice networks in teams: the role of transformational leadership and members' core self-evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Peterson, Suzanne J

    2011-09-01

    This article examines the team-level factors promoting advice exchange networks in teams. Drawing upon theory and research on transformational leadership, team diversity, and social networks, we hypothesized that transformational leadership positively influences advice network density in teams and that advice network density serves as a mediating mechanism linking transformational leadership to team performance. We further hypothesized a 3-way interaction in which members' mean core self-evaluation (CSE) and diversity in CSE jointly moderate the transformational leadership-advice network density relationship, such that the relationship is positive and stronger for teams with low diversity in CSE and high mean CSE. In addition, we expected that advice network centralization attenuates the positive influence of network density on team performance. Results based on multisource data from 79 business unit management teams showed support for these hypotheses. The results highlight the pivotal role played by transformational leadership and team members' CSEs in enhancing team social networks and, ultimately, team effectiveness. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved

  8. Developing an Interdisciplinary, Team-Based Quality Improvement Leadership Training Program for Clinicians: The Partners Clinical Process Improvement Leadership Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Sandhya K; Carballo, Victoria; Cummings, Brian M; Millham, Frederick; Jacobson, Joseph O

    Although there has been tremendous progress in quality improvement (QI) education for students and trainees in recent years, much less has been published regarding the training of active clinicians in QI. The Partners Clinical Process Improvement Leadership Program (CPIP) is a 6-day experiential program. Interdisciplinary teams complete a QI project framed by didactic sessions, interactive exercises, case-based problem sessions, and a final presentation. A total of 239 teams composed of 516 individuals have graduated CPIP. On completion, participant satisfaction scores average 4.52 (scale 1-5) and self-reported understanding of QI concepts improved. At 6 months after graduation, 66% of survey respondents reported sustained QI activity. Three opportunities to improve the program have been identified: (1) increasing faculty participation through online and tiered course offerings, (2) integrating the faculty-focused program with the trainee curriculum, and (3) developing a postgraduate curriculum to address the challenges of sustained improvement.

  9. Building Leadership Capacity in the Involving Network State

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Dorthe; Tangkjær, Christian

    2013-01-01

    New partnerships, cross-organisational collaborations and co-creation, digitalisation, involvement of citizens, public design and innovation stand out as new and emerging solutions in welfare delivery. However, New Public Management (NPM) seems to represent a historical repertoire of perspectives...... communities in order to conduct the needed leadership capabilities and incorporate the impact of leadership education in a multi-contextual public sector. We argue that critical reflexivity needs to be a pivotal point in leadership programmes....

  10. Leadership

    OpenAIRE

    Eagly, A. H.; Antonakis, J.

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, we review leadership research, with special attention to the questions that psychologists have addressed. Our presentation emphasizes that the phenomena of leadership can be predicted by a wide range of situational, social, and individual differences factors. Although not organized into a single, coherent theory, these bodies of knowledge are sufficiently related that we are able to piece together a moderately cohesive picture of leadership. This emergent understanding derive...

  11. Servant Leadership: Guiding Extension Programs in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astroth, Kirk A.; Goodwin, Jeff; Hodnett, Frank

    2011-01-01

    A new set of leadership skills is required for Extension administrators for the 21st century. Past models and theories are reviewed and discussed. The old "power" model of leadership is no longer relevant. A relatively new model called "Servant Leadership" is reviewed and explained. Seven key practices of servant leadership are outlined, and the…

  12. The development and achievement of a healthy cities network in Taiwan: sharing leadership and partnership building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Susan C; Kuo, Hsien-Wen

    2016-03-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) Healthy Cities (HC) projects are the best known of the settings-based approaches to health promotion. They engage local governments in health development through a process of political commitment, institutional change, capacity-building, partnership-based planning and innovative projects. Many cities have promoted HC projects in Taiwan since 2002. In 2008, the Taiwan Alliance for Healthy Cities (TAHC) was launched to assist local governments in effectively establishing, operating and promoting HC projects. In this article, we share our experiences of establishing a platform and network to promote the HC program in Taiwan. Based on individual city profiles and governance in Taiwan, the TAHC developed a well-organized framework and model to encourage strong leadership in local governments and to promote participation and engagement in their communities. In the last 6 years, leaders from Taiwan's local governments in HC networks have integrated the HC concepts into their governance models, actively engaging and combining various resources with practical expertise and private sectors. The network of health in Taiwan allows each city to develop its unique perspective on the HC projects. Using this method, not only local government meets its needs, but also increases governance efficiency and effectiveness, resulting in the promotion of its citizens' overall sustainable urban health development. This HC network in Taiwan has partnerships with government and non-governmental organizations (NGOs), with academic support and citizen involvement, a dynamic data collection system and demonstrated leadership in the sharing of information in the Asian region. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. Organisational adaptation in an activist network: social networks, leadership, and change in al-Muhajiroun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Michael; Horgan, John; Horne, Cale; Vining, Peter; Carley, Kathleen M; Bigrigg, Michael W; Bloom, Mia; Braddock, Kurt

    2013-09-01

    Social networks are said to facilitate learning and adaptation by providing the connections through which network nodes (or agents) share information and experience. Yet, our understanding of how this process unfolds in real-world networks remains underdeveloped. This paper explores this gap through a case study of al-Muhajiroun, an activist network that continues to call for the establishment of an Islamic state in Britain despite being formally outlawed by British authorities. Drawing on organisation theory and social network analysis, we formulate three hypotheses regarding the learning capacity and social network properties of al-Muhajiroun (AM) and its successor groups. We then test these hypotheses using mixed methods. Our methods combine quantitative analysis of three agent-based networks in AM measured for structural properties that facilitate learning, including connectedness, betweenness centrality and eigenvector centrality, with qualitative analysis of interviews with AM activists focusing organisational adaptation and learning. The results of these analyses confirm that al-Muhajiroun activists respond to government pressure by changing their operations, including creating new platforms under different names and adjusting leadership roles among movement veterans to accommodate their spiritual leader's unwelcome exodus to Lebanon. Simple as they are effective, these adaptations have allowed al-Muhajiroun and its successor groups to continue their activism in an increasingly hostile environment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  14. Program Director Participation in a Leadership and Management Skills Fellowship and Characteristics of Program Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carek, Peter J; Mims, Lisa D; Conry, Colleen M; Maxwell, Lisa; Greenwood, Vicki; Pugno, Perry A

    2015-01-01

    The association between a residency program director completing a leadership and management skills fellowship and characteristics of quality and innovation of his/her residency program has not been studied. Therefore, the aim of this study is to examine the association between a residency program director's completion of a specific fellowship addressing these skills (National Institute for Program Director Development or NIPDD) and characteristics of quality and innovation of the program they direct. Using information from the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP), National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) and FREIDA® program characteristics were obtained. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the data. The relationship between programs with a NIPDD graduate as director and program quality measures and indicators of innovation was analyzed using both chi square and logistic regression. Initial analyses showed significant associations between the NIPDD graduate status of a program director and regional location, mean years of program director tenure, and the program's 5-year aggregate ABFM board pass rate from 2007--2011. After grouping the programs into tertiles, the regression model showed significant positive associations with programs offering international experiences and being a NIPDD graduate. Program director participation in a fellowship addressing leadership and management skills (ie, NIPDD) was found to be associated with higher pass rates of new graduates on a Board certification examination and predictive of programs being in the upper tertile of programs in terms of Board pass rates.

  15. Commentary: Recommendations and remaining questions for health care leadership training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, James K

    2013-01-01

    Effective leadership is critical for optimizing cost, access, and quality in health care. Creating a pipeline of effective health care leaders requires developing leadership competencies that differ from the usual criteria of clinical and scientific excellence by which physicians have traditionally been promoted to leadership positions. Specific competencies that differentiate effective leaders from average leaders, especially emotional intelligence and its component abilities, are essential for effective leadership.Adopting a long-standing practice from successful corporations, some health care institutions, medical societies, and business schools now offer leadership programs that address these differentiating leadership competencies. The author draws on experience with such programs through the Cleveland Clinic Academy to provide recommendations for health care leadership training and to identify unanswered questions about such programs.The author recommends that such training should be broadly available to all health care leadership communities (i.e., nurses, administrators, and physicians). A progressive curriculum, starting with foundational concepts and extending to coaching and feedback opportunities through experiential learning, recognizes the challenge of becoming an effective leader and the long time line needed to do so. Linking leadership courses to continuing medical education and to graduate credit opportunities is appealing to participants. Other recommendations focus on the importance of current leaders' involvement in nominating emerging leaders for participation, embedding leadership development discussions in faculty's professional reviews, and blending discussion of frameworks and theory with practical, experiential lessons. The author identifies questions about the benefits of formal health care leadership training that remain to be answered.

  16. Implementation and evaluation of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine leadership program for women faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Rachel B; González-Fernández, Marlís; Bodurtha, Joann; Skarupski, Kimberly A; Fivush, Barbara

    2015-05-01

    Women continue to be underrepresented in top leadership roles in academic medicine. Leadership training programs for women are designed to enhance women's leadership skills and confidence and increase overall leadership diversity. The authors present a description and evaluation of a longitudinal, cohort-based, experiential leadership program for women faculty at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. We compared pre- and post-program self-assessed ratings of 11 leadership skills and specific negotiation behaviors from 3 cohorts of leadership program participants (n=134) from 2010 to 2013. Women reported significant improvements in skills across 11 domains with the exceptions of 2 domains, Public Speaking and Working in Teams, both of which received high scores in the pre-program assessment. The greatest improvement in rankings occurred within the domain of negotiation skills. Although women reported an increase in their negotiation skills, we were not able to demonstrate an increase in the number of times that women negotiated for salary, space, or promotion following participation in the program. The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine Leadership Program for Women Faculty has demonstrable value for the professional development of participants and addresses institutional strategies to enhance leadership diversity and the advancement of women.

  17. International Mentoring Programs: Leadership Opportunities to Enhance Worldwide Pharmacy Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubaka, Chukwuemeka; Brechtelsbauer, Erich; Goff, Debra A

    2017-07-01

    Health-system and community pharmacy practice in the United States is experiencing transformational change; however, this transformation is lagging in the international arena. As a result, efforts are being made to provide support and education to the international pharmacy leaders and practitioners. This article describes one effort, the Mandela Washington Fellows Program, and suggests areas where pharmacy leaders can be involved to help advance the practice of pharmacy on an international level. The Mandela Washington Fellows Program for young Africa leaders consists of a US-Africa pharmacy-mentoring program identified ranging from educational opportunities to collaboration for implementation of patient care programs. The specifics of the mentoring program include daily meetings, clinic and ward rounds, round table discussions with mentors, and visits to various hospital care systems. Lessons were learned and strategies for sustaining the program are discussed. These types of programs represent leadership opportunities that may not be apparent to most pharmacy directors, but expanding their view to helping international pharmacists expand their practice only strengthens the professional goal of providing patient-centered pharmacy services.

  18. Influences of Leadership Program Participation on Students' Capacities for Socially Responsible Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugan, John P.; Bohle, Christopher W.; Gebhardt, Matt; Hofert, Meghan; Wilk, Emily; Cooney, Matthew A.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined differential effects of various types of individual leadership experiences (e.g., retreats, academic minors) on college students' capacities for socially responsible leadership using data from 8,961 seniors representing 99 colleges and universities. Participation in individual leadership experiences explained a significant,…

  19. Developing an Organizational Leadership Graduate Program: A "CHAT" about Leadership Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Patrick J.; Panzo, Donna

    2015-01-01

    Much of recent research on leadership education focuses on the application of a particular assignment or project to develop an individual's leadership. Other research has examined leadership development from different educational levels such as graduate, undergraduate, and even K-12. The following paper is an idea brief surrounding a newly created…

  20. Perceived Leadership Life Skills Developed through Participation at the Arkansas FFA Leadership Conference: A Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Chelsey Ann; Cox, Casandra Kay; Burris, Scott; Dykes, Mollie

    2015-01-01

    Youth leadership life skills are the "development of life skills necessary to perform leadership functions in real life" (Miller, 1976, p.2). A model developed by Kapostasy indicates life skills should be taught through FFA [formerly Future Farmers of America] (Staller, 2001). Thus, it is important to evaluate youth leadership life…

  1. Effects of a Leadership Development Program on Gifted and Non-Gifted Students' Leadership Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogurlu, Üzeyir; Serap, Emir

    2014-01-01

    Problem Statement: The presence of leaders who will lead societies to success is an important gain for a society. In the present time, leadership development has become a strategic requirement. Although there is a common agreement on the need for leadership education, there are few studies on the education process of leadership and the efficacy of…

  2. Campus Involvement as a Predictor for Durable Leadership Development in Conjunction with Leadership Program Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosch, David M.; Stephens, Clinton M.

    2017-01-01

    Postsecondary educators have long been faced with the challenge of developing the leadership capacity of their students. This research investigated the following research question: To what degree do formal opportunities for involvement predict durable growth in leadership capacity in students who participate in a formal leadership development…

  3. Designing a physician leadership development program based on effective models of physician education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Joseph; Fassiotto, Magali; Ku, Manwai Candy; Mammo, Dagem; Valantine, Hannah

    2017-02-02

    Because of modern challenges in quality, safety, patient centeredness, and cost, health care is evolving to adopt leadership practices of highly effective organizations. Traditional physician training includes little focus on developing leadership skills, which necessitates further training to achieve the potential of collaborative management. The aim of this study was to design a leadership program using established models for continuing medical education and to assess its impact on participants' knowledge, skills, attitudes, and performance. The program, delivered over 9 months, addressed leadership topics and was designed around a framework based on how physicians learn new clinical skills, using multiple experiential learning methods, including a leadership active learning project. The program was evaluated using Kirkpatrick's assessment levels: reaction to the program, learning, changes in behavior, and results. Four cohorts are evaluated (2008-2011). Reaction: The program was rated highly by participants (mean = 4.5 of 5). Learning: Significant improvements were reported in knowledge, skills, and attitudes surrounding leadership competencies. Behavior: The majority (80%-100%) of participants reported plans to use learned leadership skills in their work. Improved team leadership behaviors were shown by increased engagement of project team members. All participants completed a team project during the program, adding value to the institution. Results support the hypothesis that learning approaches known to be effective for other types of physician education are successful when applied to leadership development training. Across all four assessment levels, the program was effective in improving leadership competencies essential to meeting the complex needs of the changing health care system. Developing in-house programs that fit the framework established for continuing medical education can increase physician leadership competencies and add value to health care

  4. Leadership

    OpenAIRE

    anonymous

    2001-01-01

    Leadership in a community of 30,000 offers lessons to all of us on vision, responsibility and character. See how the leaders of Garden City, Kansas deal with challenges that many communities face. This issue also provides information about leadership and Community Affairs resources.

  5. The Art of Athlete Leadership: Identifying High-Quality Athlete Leadership at the Individual and Team Level Through Social Network Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransen, Katrien; Van Puyenbroeck, Stef; Loughead, Todd M; Vanbeselaere, Norbert; De Cuyper, Bert; Vande Broek, Gert; Boen, Filip

    2015-06-01

    This research aimed to introduce social network analysis as a novel technique in sports teams to identify the attributes of high-quality athlete leadership, both at the individual and at the team level. Study 1 included 25 sports teams (N = 308 athletes) and focused on athletes' general leadership quality. Study 2 comprised 21 sports teams (N = 267 athletes) and focused on athletes' specific leadership quality as a task, motivational, social, and external leader. The extent to which athletes felt connected with their leader proved to be most predictive for athletes' perceptions of that leader's quality on each leadership role. Also at the team level, teams with higher athlete leadership quality were more strongly connected. We conclude that social network analysis constitutes a valuable tool to provide more insight in the attributes of high-quality leadership both at the individual and at the team level.

  6. Emerging Youth Leaders in an After-School Civic Leadership Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monkman, Karen; Proweller, Amira

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study examines the notion of youth leadership in an after-school program focused on teaching leadership skills and instilling habits of civic engagement within a long-term support program that prioritizes college readiness for low-income minority students. Through activities designed to help youth discover their passions, envision…

  7. Assistant Principals' Perceptions Regarding the Role and the Effectiveness of an Educational Leadership Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Gary B.; Gurley, D. Keith; Fifolt, Matthew; Collins, Loucrecia; McNeese, Rose

    2016-01-01

    In this study, faculty members of an educational leadership program, situated in a large urban university in the southeastern region of the United States, utilized focus group research to determine the perceptions of K-12 assistant principals regarding the effectiveness of an educational leadership program, and to provide recommendations for…

  8. Experiences and Outcomes of a Women's Leadership Development Program: A Phenomenological Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brue, Krystal L.; Brue, Shawn A.

    2016-01-01

    Women's leadership training programs provide organizations opportunities to value women leaders as organizational resources. This qualitative research utilized phenomenological methodology to examine lived experiences of seven alumni of a women's-only leadership program. We conducted semi-structured interviews to clarify what learning elements…

  9. Exploring the Causal Impact of the McREL Balanced Leadership Program on Leadership, Principal Efficacy, Instructional Climate, Educator Turnover, and Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Robin; Goddard, Roger; Kim, Minjung; Miller, Robert; Goddard, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    This study uses a randomized design to assess the impact of the Balanced Leadership program on principal leadership, instructional climate, principal efficacy, staff turnover, and student achievement in a sample of rural northern Michigan schools. Participating principals report feeling more efficacious, using more effective leadership practices,…

  10. Transformational leadership and group interaction as climate antecedents: a social network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohar, Dov; Tenne-Gazit, Orly

    2008-07-01

    In order to test the social mechanisms through which organizational climate emerges, this article introduces a model that combines transformational leadership and social interaction as antecedents of climate strength (i.e., the degree of within-unit agreement about climate perceptions). Despite their longstanding status as primary variables, both antecedents have received limited empirical research. The sample consisted of 45 platoons of infantry soldiers from 5 different brigades, using safety climate as the exemplar. Results indicate a partially mediated model between transformational leadership and climate strength, with density of group communication network as the mediating variable. In addition, the results showed independent effects for group centralization of the communication and friendship networks, which exerted incremental effects on climate strength over transformational leadership. Whereas centralization of the communication network was found to be negatively related to climate strength, centralization of the friendship network was positively related to it. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

  11. Together Everyone Achieves More: Leadership Networks and Interagency Relationships of the Judge Advocate Generals Corps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-22

    leadership networks may be formal or informal in nature, but share the trait that all of the nodes of the network create products or perform services...Employment and Reemployment Rights Act (“USERRA”), voting rights by enforcing the Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting Act of 1986

  12. Plans & Policies for Technology in Education: A Compendium. A Technology Leadership Network Special Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National School Boards Association, Alexandria, VA. Inst. for the Transfer of Technology to Education.

    This document shows how education leaders nationwide--many of them part of the National School Boards Association's 345-district Technology Leadership Network--have addressed technology-related policy issues such as copyright, purchasing, network/Internet use, and ethics as well as technology planning topics including staff development, classroom…

  13. Network-Based Leadership Development: A Guiding Framework and Resources for Management Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen-Lester, Kristin L.; Woehler, Meredith L.; Willburn, Phil

    2016-01-01

    Management education and leadership development has traditionally focused on improving human capital (i.e., knowledge, skills, and abilities). Social capital, networks, and networking skills have received less attention. When this content has been incorporated into learning and development experiences, it has often been more ad hoc and has…

  14. Program Design Considerations for Leadership Training for Dental and Dental Hygiene Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taichman, Russell S.; Parkinson, Joseph W.; Nelson, Bonnie A.; Nordquist, Barbara; Ferguson-Young, Daphne C.; Thompson, Joseph F.

    2012-01-01

    Since leadership is an essential part of the oral health professions, oral health educators can play an essential role in establishing a culture of leadership and in mentoring students to prepare them for future leadership roles within the profession. However, leadership training for oral health professionals is a relatively new concept and is frequently not found within dental and dental hygiene curricula. The purpose of this article is to propose several models for leadership training that are specific to the oral health professions. The authors hope that providing an overview of leadership programs in academic dental institutions will encourage all U.S. and Canadian dental schools to begin developing a culture that promotes leadership development. PMID:22319084

  15. Interorganizational networks: fundamental to the Accreditation Canada program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jonathan I; Nicklin, Wendy; MacDonald, Bernadette

    2014-01-01

    Within the Canadian healthcare system, the term population-accountable health network defines the use of collective resources to optimize the health of a population through integrated interventions. The leadership of these networks has also been identified as a critical factor, highlighting the need for creative management of resources in determining effective, balanced sets of interventions. In this article, using specific principles embedded in the Accreditation Canada program, the benefits of a network approach are highlighted, including knowledge sharing, improving the consistency of practice through standards, and a broader systems-and-population view of healthcare delivery across the continuum of care. The implications for Canadian health leaders to leverage the benefits of interorganizational networks are discussed.

  16. An Assessment of the Leadership Education and Development Program at the United States Naval Academy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zaleski, Patrick

    2003-01-01

    ...) Program was established in 1997. This program allows Navy and Marine Corps officers to receive a Master of Science in Leadership and Human Resource Development from the Naval Postgraduate School...

  17. Redefining leadership education in graduate public health programs: prioritization, focus, and guiding principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachance, Jennifer A; Oxendine, Jeffrey S

    2015-03-01

    Public health program graduates need leadership skills to be effective in the complex, changing public health environment. We propose a new paradigm for schools of public health in which technical and leadership skills have equal priority as core competencies for graduate students. Leadership education should focus on the foundational skills necessary to effect change independent of formal authority, with activities offered at varying levels of intensity to engage different students. Leadership development initiatives should be practice based, process focused, interdisciplinary, diversity based, adaptive, experimental, innovative, and empowering, and they should encourage authenticity. Leadership training in graduate programs will help lay the groundwork for public health professionals to have an immediate impact in the workforce and to prioritize continuous leadership development throughout their careers.

  18. Redefining Leadership Education in Graduate Public Health Programs: Prioritization, Focus, and Guiding Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxendine, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Public health program graduates need leadership skills to be effective in the complex, changing public health environment. We propose a new paradigm for schools of public health in which technical and leadership skills have equal priority as core competencies for graduate students. Leadership education should focus on the foundational skills necessary to effect change independent of formal authority, with activities offered at varying levels of intensity to engage different students. Leadership development initiatives should be practice based, process focused, interdisciplinary, diversity based, adaptive, experimental, innovative, and empowering, and they should encourage authenticity. Leadership training in graduate programs will help lay the groundwork for public health professionals to have an immediate impact in the workforce and to prioritize continuous leadership development throughout their careers. PMID:25706021

  19. Using Contemporary Leadership Skills in Medication Safety Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertig, John B; Hultgren, Kyle E; Weber, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    The discipline of studying medication errors and implementing medication safety programs in hospitals dates to the 1970s. These initial programs to prevent errors focused only on pharmacy operation changes - and not the broad medication use system. In the late 1990s, research showed that faulty systems, and not faulty people, are responsible for errors and require a multidisciplinary approach. The 2013 ASHP Statement on the Role of the Medication Safety Leader recommended that medication safety leaders be integrated team members rather than a single point of contact. Successful medication safety programs must employ a new approach - one that embraces the skills of all health care team members and positions many leaders to improve safety. This approach requires a new set of leadership skills based on contemporary management principles, including followership, team-building, tracking and assessing progress, storytelling and communication, and cultivating innovation, all of which promote transformational change. The application of these skills in developing or changing a medication safety program is reviewed in this article.

  20. An Empirical Study of the Change Project as Both Teaching Tool and Outcome of an Educational Leadership Development Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jean A.; Schleisman, Jane; Kistler, Susan

    The Bush Foundation's leadership-development programs are an important source of inservice leadership training in Minnesota. The extent to which these programs influence pre-collegiate education is explored. The paper draws on a longitudinal study that asked two basic questions: what are the long-term effects of the Bush Leadership Programs on…

  1. 34 CFR 403.70 - How must funds be used under the State Programs and State Leadership Activities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... State Leadership Activities? 403.70 Section 403.70 Education Regulations of the Offices of the... the Basic Programs? State Programs and State Leadership Activities § 403.70 How must funds be used under the State Programs and State Leadership Activities? A State shall use funds reserved under section...

  2. Early Careerist Interest and Participation in Health Care Leadership Development Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jon M; Temple, April

    2015-01-01

    Health care organizations are increasingly embracing leadership development programs. These programs include a variety of specific activities, such as formally structured leadership development, as well as mentoring, personal development and coaching, 360-degree feedback, and job enlargement, in order to increase the leadership skills of managers and high-potential staff. However, there is a lack of information on how early careerists in health care management view these programs and the degree to which they participate. This article reports on a study undertaken to determine how early careerists working in health care organizations view leadership development programs and their participation in such programs offered by their employers. Study findings are based on a survey of 126 early careerists who are graduates of an undergraduate health services administration program. We found varying levels of interest and participation in specific leadership development activities. In addition, we found that respondents with graduate degrees and those with higher compensation were more likely to participate in selected leadership development program activities. Implications of study findings for health care organizations and early careerists in the offering of, and participation in, leadership development programs are discussed.

  3. Advancing nursing leadership: a model for program implementation and measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omoike, Osei; Stratton, Karen M; Brooks, Beth A; Ohlson, Susan; Storfjell, Judy Lloyd

    2011-01-01

    Despite the abundant literature documenting the need for nurse management education and career development, only recently have professional standards been targeted for this group. Competency standards for nurse leaders repeatedly identify systems-level concepts including finance and budget, communication skills, strategic management, human resources management, change management, and computer technology skills. However, educational initiatives to meet these standards are still at the early stages and most nurse leaders continue to acquire knowledge and experience through "on-the-job" training. This article will illustrate the need for partnerships and collaboration between academia and hospitals to advance nursing leadership to the next century. In addition, a tool to measure the impact of a graduate certificate program in nursing administration on nurse leader competencies is presented. Overall, the certificate program has been successful in multiple ways; it has "graduated" almost 80 nurse leaders, improved participant competence in their role at the systems level, as well as providing an impetus for completion of a graduate degree post program.

  4. Leadership Programming: Exploring a Path to Faculty Engagement in Transformational Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamm, Kevan W.; Sapp, L. Rochelle; Lamm, Alexa J.

    2016-01-01

    Transformational leadership has served as a model for positive, individual-focused leadership, based on its emphasis on motivation and higher levels of organizational performance. Change is a constant for faculty that become leaders within the Land Grant University System. Changes to governance and accountability of institutions and threats to…

  5. Leadership and Ethics: A Pragmatic Exploration among Candidates in a Doctoral Leadership Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Jennifer Marie

    2011-01-01

    The study of leadership and ethics, in the context of ethical behavior, is an area of concern, yet interest in an ever changing multicultural society of social norms and values. The magnitude of success has been and can be attributed to thriving and flourishing leadership exhibited by those parties involved. However, the behaviors exhibited by…

  6. Student Leadership Distribution: Effects of a Student-Led Leadership Program on School Climate and Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Jeff; Yager, Stuart; Yager, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on the understandings educators developed from two schools concerning how distributed leadership involving a select group of students affected the climate and community of their schools. Findings suggest that student-led leadership roles within the school community have an impact on creating a positive school-wide climate; a…

  7. A leadership program in an undergraduate nursing course in Western Australia: building leaders in our midst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Joyce M; Cope, Vicki C; Harris, Maureen

    2010-04-01

    This paper discusses a leadership program implemented in the School of Nursing at Edith Cowan University to develop leadership in fourth semester nursing students enrolled in a three year undergraduate nursing degree to prepare them for the dynamic 'changing world' environment of healthcare. Students were invited to apply to undertake the program in extracurricular time. Nineteen students applied to the program and ten were chosen to participate in the program. The numbers were limited to ten to equal selected industry leader mentors. The leadership program is based on the belief that leadership is a function of knowing oneself, having a vision that is well communicated, building trust among colleagues, and taking effective action to realize one's own potential. It is asserted that within the complexity of health care it is vital that nurses enter the clinical setting with leadership capabilities because graduate nurses must take the lead to act autonomously, make decisions at the point of service, and develop a professional vision that fits with organizational and professional goals Thus, the more practice students have with leadership skills, the more prepared they will be to enter the workforce. The program consists of three components: leadership knowledge, leadership skills and leadership-in-action. The leadership program focuses on the student-participant's ability to be self reflective on personal leadership qualities, critically appraise, and work within a team as well as to take responsibility for ensuring the achievement of team goals as leader. The program is practical and is reliant on the involvement of leader mentors who hold positions of leadership with the health industry in Western Australia. Students completed a pre and post program questionnaire related to abilities and skills in leadership. This paper discusses pre and post evaluation data against program outcomes. The findings demonstrate that participants of the program increased their ability

  8. Residency Programs and Clinical Leadership Skills Among New Saudi Graduate Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dossary, Reem Nassar; Kitsantas, Panagiota; Maddox, P J

    2016-01-01

    Nurse residency programs have been adopted by health care organizations to assist new graduate nurses with daily challenges such as intense working environments, increasing patient acuity, and complex technologies. Overall, nurse residency programs are proven beneficial in helping nurses transition from the student role to independent practitioners and bedside leaders. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of residency programs on leadership skills of new Saudi graduate nurses who completed a residency program compared to new Saudi graduate nurses who did not participate in residency programs. The study design was cross-sectional involving a convenience sample (n = 98) of new graduate nurses from three hospitals in Saudi Arabia. The Clinical Leadership Survey was used to measure the new graduate nurses' clinical leadership skills based on whether they completed a residency program or not. Descriptive statistics, correlation, and multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to examine leadership skills in this sample of new Saudi graduate nurses. A significant difference was found between residents and nonresidents in their leadership skills (t = 10.48, P = .000). Specifically, residents were significantly more likely to show higher levels of leadership skills compared to their counterparts. Attending a residency program was associated with a significant increase in clinical leadership skills. The findings of this study indicate that there is a need to implement more residency programs in hospitals of Saudi Arabia. It is imperative that nurse managers and policy makers in Saudi Arabia consider these findings to improve nurses' leadership skills, which will in turn improve patient care. Further research should examine how residency programs influence new graduate nurses' transition from student to practitioner with regard to clinical leadership skills in Saudi Arabia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Business without the Math: Competing Discourses and the Struggle to Develop an Undergraduate Leadership Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, Patricia Genoe; McGowan, Rosemary A.; Gerhardt, Kris; Diallo, Lamine; Saeed, Akbar

    2013-01-01

    Despite widespread acknowledgement of the importance of leadership education, undergraduate leadership degree programs in Canada are limited and, in some cases, struggling for survival. This case study examines the ways in which competing discourses of careerism, postsecondary corporatization, liberal arts education, and business education impact…

  10. Development and implementation of the Saskatchewan Leadership Program: Leading for healthcare transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutwiri, Betty; Witt, Christine; Denysek, Christina; Halferdahl, Susan; McLeod, Katherine M

    2016-01-01

    The Saskatchewan Leadership Program (SLP) was developed based on the LEADS framework and aligned with Lean management to build leadership renewal and sustainability conducive to transformational change in the Saskatchewan health system. This article describes the development, implementation, and evaluation of the SLP, including experiences and lessons learned. © 2015 The Canadian College of Health Leaders.

  11. Measuring the Impacts of a Volunteer-Based Community Development Program in Developing Volunteers' Leadership Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Amy; Singletary, Loretta; Hill, George

    2012-01-01

    This article summarizes the results of an evaluation of the impacts of a community development program to develop leadership skills in its adult volunteers. The evaluation featured 20 questions about leadership skills learned as a result of volunteer experiences. Data analysis strategies beyond a simple means ranking resulted in evidence…

  12. Infusing Gender and Diversity Issues into Educational Leadership Programs: Transformational Learning and Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Michelle; Mountford, Meredith; Skrla, Linda

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to consider the impact of incorporating a set of readings focused on issues of gender, diversity, leadership, and feminist thought into the curriculum of a statewide educational leadership doctoral program. Design/methodology/approach: Based data from open-ended surveys, semi-structured interviews, and…

  13. The 12 Steps of Addiction Recovery Programs as an Influence on Leadership Development: A Personal Narrative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    My participation in a 12-step addiction program based on the principles and traditions of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) has been critical for my leadership development. As I worked to refrain from addictive behaviors and practiced 12-step principles, I experienced a shift from individualistic, self-centered leadership towards a servant leader…

  14. The Role of Servant Leadership in Faculty Development Programs: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Eric James

    2012-01-01

    The following note is that a review of existing literature pertaining to servant leadership and faculty development. Specifically, this work discussed delivering servant leadership to online faculty through the utilization of a faculty development program. The idea for this literature review stemmed from the author asking how an online academic…

  15. A Fresh Look at Graduate Programs in Teacher Leadership in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Jack; Petta, Katherine; Porter, Christina

    2012-01-01

    Teacher leadership has been studied in the United States for 30 years, but less is known about American graduate programs that purport to prepare teacher leaders. Furthermore, the federal No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 prompted a closer look at teacher effectiveness, which then shifted the definition of teacher leadership and caused some…

  16. Is Transformational Leadership Effective in a System Program Office

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-01

    Management , 31: 12-16 (March-April 1988). 12. Fiedler, Fred E. A Theory of Leadership Effectiveness. New York: McGraw Hill, Inc., 1967. 13. Fulghum, David... management and leadership . It was my hope to profit personally from this research by becoming a better leader and manager in the future. I am indebted...centers around the situational theory of lec;Iership, which suggests that the most effective style of leadership depends on the individual situation the

  17. Perceived Impact of a Longitudinal Leadership Program for All Pharmacy Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane R. Mort

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe a longitudinal leadership program involving all students and report the perceived impact. Design: The program included a first year Leadership Interview, a third year Report of Leadership, and a fourth year Professional Business Meeting Attendance. Activities involved guided reflection. Assessment: Students (n=138 indicated the activities helped them recognize the importance of leadership and their leadership potential (e.g., 72.5% and 62.3% of students due to meeting attendance, respectively. Students participated in leadership activities that they would not have pursued otherwise, either in response to the activity (27.7% due to interview or as a requirement of the activity (51.1% for leadership report. Students reported developing specific leadership skills through the activities. Most students planned to be involved in a district/regional (72.5%, state (84.1%, and national (51.4% meeting in the five years following graduation. Conclusion: Students reported a positive impact on leadership perceptions and participation. The report is a preliminary step in the development and assessment of a longitudinal curricular initiative involving all pharmacy students.   Type: Case Study

  18. A leadership development program for surgeons: First-year participant evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradarelli, Jason C; Jaffe, Gregory A; Lemak, Christy Harris; Mulholland, Michael W; Dimick, Justin B

    2016-08-01

    In a dynamic health care system, strong leadership has never been more important for surgeons. Little is known about how to design and conduct effectively a leadership program specifically for surgeons. We sought to evaluate critically a Leadership Development Program for practicing surgeons by exploring how the program's strengths and weaknesses affected the surgeons' development as physician-leaders. At a large academic institution, we conducted semistructured interviews with 21 surgical faculty members who applied voluntarily, were selected, and completed a newly created Leadership Development Program in December 2012. Interview transcripts underwent qualitative descriptive analysis with thematic coding based on grounded theory. Themes were extracted regarding surgeons' evaluations of the program on their development as physician-leaders. After completing the program, surgeons reported personal improvements in the following 4 areas: self-empowerment to lead, self-awareness, team-building skills, and knowledge in business and leadership. Surgeons felt "more confident about stepping up as a leader" and more aware of "how others view me and my interactions." They described a stronger grasp on "giving feedback" as well as a better understanding of "business/organizational issues." Overall, surgeon-participants reported positive impacts of the program on their day-to-day work activities and general career perspective as well as on their long-term career development plans. Surgeons also recommended areas where the program could potentially be improved. These interviews detailed self-reported improvements in leadership knowledge and capabilities for practicing surgeons who completed a Leadership Development Program. A curriculum designed specifically for surgeons may enable future programs to equip surgeons better for important leadership roles in a complex health care environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Creating a New Approach to Principal Leadership: The National Institute of School Leadership has Borrowed from the Leadership Practices of Other Professions to Build an Innovative Program for Principals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Robert C.

    2005-01-01

    The author describes a principal training program resulting from a study that found disconnects between education leadership programs and what principals need to know and be able to do to guide improved instruction. The National Institute for School Leadership program focuses on practicing principals but also has applications for aspiring…

  20. The 12 Steps of Addiction Recovery Programs as an influence on leadership development: a personal narrative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedman Mitchell

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available My participation in a 12-step addiction program based on the principles and traditions of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA has been critical for my leadership development. As I worked to refrain from addictive behaviors and practiced 12-step principles, I experienced a shift from individualistic, self-centered leadership towards a servant leader orientation. I thus consider the 12-step recovery process, which commenced in 2001, a leadership formative experience (LFE as it had the greatest influence on my subsequent development. My experience of thinking about and rethinking my life in reference to leadership and followership lends itself to a personal inquiry. It draws on work on the12 steps; self-assessments and personal journal entries; and memory of life events. I aim to contribute to the leadership development literature by exploring the influence of participation in a 12-step recovery program and posing it as an LFE, subjects that have received little attention.

  1. Foregrounding the Role of Relationships in Reform: A Social Network Perspective on Leadership and Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Yi-Hwa; Daly, Alan J.; Brown, Chris; del Fresno, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The role of relationships in the process of leadership and change is central, yet the social aspect of the work of reform is often background in favor of more technical approaches to improvement. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to argue that social network theory and analysis provides a useful theory and set of tools to unpack the…

  2. Project Leadership Lived Experiences with Web-Based Social Networking: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scroggins, Charles W.

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the lived experiences of project leaders adopting and using Web-2.0 social networking collaboration applications for their project leadership activities. The experiences of 20 project leaders in a Fortune 500 aerospace and defense enterprise in the northeastern United States of America were explored using a qualitative…

  3. Academy of Program/Project & Engineering Leadership: NASA's Path to Project Management Excellence

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA's Path to Project Management Excellence eBook. Leadership plays a critical role in the success of today’s programs and projects. In an increasingly global and...

  4. Academy of Program/Project & Engineering Leadership Orbital Debris Management and Risk Mitigation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA Academy of Program/Project & Engineering Leadership (APPEL) is excited to announce the public release of Orbital Debris Management and Risk Mitigation,...

  5. Empowering primary care workers to improve health services: results from Mozambique's leadership and management development program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Cary

    2008-07-23

    This article is the third article in the Human Resources for Health journal's feature on the theme of leadership and management in public health. The series of six articles has been contributed by Management Sciences for Health (MSH) and will be published article-by-article over the next few weeks. The third article presents a successful application in Mozambique of a leadership development program created by Management Sciences for Health (MSH). Through this program, managers from 40 countries have learned to work in teams to identify their priority challenges and act to implement effective responses. From 2003 to 2004, 11 health units in Nampula Province, participated in a leadership and management development program called the Challenges Program. This was following an assessment which found that the quality of health services was poor, and senior officials determined that the underlying cause was the lack of human resource capacity in leadership and management in a rapidly decentralizing health care system. The program was funded by the US Agency for International Development (USAID) and implemented in partnership between the Mozambican Ministry of Health (MOH) Provincial Directorate in Nampula and Management Sciences for Health (MSH). The Challenges Program used simple management and leadership tools to assist the health units and their communities to address health service challenges. An evaluation of the program in 2005 showed that 10 of 11 health centers improved health services over the year of the program. The Challenges Program used several strategies that contributed to successful outcomes. It integrated leadership strengthening into the day-to-day challenges that staff were facing in the health units. The second success factor in the Challenges Program was the creation of participatory teams. After the program, people no longer waited passively to be trained but instead proactively requested training in needed areas. MOH workers in Nampula reported

  6. The Development and Validation of a Transformational Leadership Survey for Substance Use Treatment Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Jennifer R.; Knight, Danica K.; Broome, Kirk M.; Flynn, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    Directors in substance use treatment programs are increasingly required to respond to external economic and socio-political pressures. Leadership practices that promote innovation can help offset these challenges. Using focus groups, factor analysis, and validation instruments, the current study developed and established psychometrics for the Survey of Transformational Leadership. In 2008, clinical directors were evaluated on leadership practices by 214 counselors within 57 programs in four U.S. regions. Nine themes emerged: integrity, sensible risk, demonstrates innovation, encourages innovation, inspirational motivation, supports others, develops others, delegates tasks, and expects excellence. Study implications, limitations and suggested future directions are discussed. Funding from NIDA. PMID:20509734

  7. An Intentional Approach to Achieving Learning Outcomes during a Youth Leadership Residential Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Green

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The High Desert Leadership Retreat (HDLR is an annual four-day youth conference which incorporates positive youth development practices to build life skills and increase youth leadership capacity. There are numerous examples in youth development literature of program models and associated outcomes. However, few studies have articulated which aspects of a conference contribute to the achievement of learning outcomes. By utilizing proven program evaluation methods, the achievement of learning outcomes was measured during both formal and informal conference sessions.

  8. The Development, Implementation, and Assessment of an Innovative Faculty Mentoring Leadership Program

    OpenAIRE

    Tsen, Lawrence C.; Borus, Jonathan F.; Nadelson, Carol C.; Seely, Ellen W.; Haas, Audrey; Fuhlbrigge, Anne L.

    2012-01-01

    Effective mentoring is an important component of academic success. Few programs exist to both improve the effectiveness of established mentors and cultivate a multi-specialty mentoring community. In 2008, in response to a faculty survey on mentoring, leaders at Brigham and Women’s Hospital developed the Faculty Mentoring Leadership Program (FMLP) as a peer-learning experience for mid-career and senior faculty physician and scientist mentors to enhance their skills and leadership in mentoring ...

  9. Promoting Inclusive Holistic Graduate Admissions in Educational Leadership Preparation Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christa Boske

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Aspiring and practicing school leaders often identify graduate degrees as playing a significant role in achieving educational access and engaging in building, district-wide, regional, state, and national decision-making regarding practice and policy impacting marginalized populations in K–12 U.S. schools. The rationale behind initiating discourse on graduate student involvement grows out of current policy and reform initiatives requiring increased accountability for improved student performance, especially for children from predetermined “subgroups” due to race, class, native language, and ability (i.e., emotional, social, cognitive, and physical. The call for more deliberate involvement in understanding graduate admissions also arises in regard to student attrition and retention concerns. Faculty often play an under-examined role as gatekeepers throughout the admissions process. The way in which they understand graduate requirements, holistic evaluation, and merit affords opportunities to positively address significant implications for racial equity and diversity in graduate education. To understand faculty reliance upon graduate admissions criteria that undermine espoused university strategic plans, college-level diversity goals, and programmatic decision-making, four professors across the U.S. explore graduate admissions processes and the significance of implementing holistic admissions criteria. We present a holistic graduate admissions conceptual model for school leadership preparation programs to consider when increasing equity and access for minoritized candidates.

  10. Leading the Teacher Team - Balancing Between Formal and Informal Power in Program Leadership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Högfeldt, Anna-Karin; Malmi, Lauri; Kinnunen, Päivi

    2018-01-01

    to work and collaborate for the same target. This calls for strategic and long-term thinking of engineering education development. Institutions should support the development of both formal structures as well as informal leadership skills among their program directors, but never fall for the temptation......This continuous research within Nordic engineering institutions targets the contexts and possibilities for leadership among engineering education program directors. The IFP-model, developed based on analysis of interviews with program leaders in these institutions, visualizes the program director......’s informal and formal power. The model is presented as a tool for starting a shared discussion on the complexities of the leadership of engineering program development. The authors liken program development to hunting in teams. Each individual expert in the program is needed, and all experts will need...

  11. THE ROLE OF SERVANT LEADERSHIP IN FACULTY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS: A Review of The Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric James RUSSELL

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The following note is that a review of existing literature pertaining to servant leadership and faculty development. Specifically, this work discussed delivering servant leadership to online faculty through the utilization of a faculty development program. The idea for this literature review stemmed from the author asking how an online academic administrator could utilize the practice of servant leadership in order to improve the overall online academic experience. The intent of the review involved discovering, through a review of the literature, a way of opening up a dialogue that can possibly drive future research studies regarding the practice of servant leadership to improve of the overall online academic teaching experience. In this work, the author conducted a literature review that identified strengths in both faculty development as well as practicing servant leadership within the online education modality. The literature identified the issue of faculty isolation as challenge for academic administrators and offered up faculty development as a possible solution to overcoming it. The findings of the work showed a benefit to bringing servant leadership practices into faculty development programs in order to improve the overall online teaching environment. The work generates future empirical research ideas regarding building community, the use of servant leadership, and faculty development programs.

  12. Developing a Physician Management & Leadership Program (PMLP) in Newfoundland and Labrador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddalena, Victor; Fleet, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to document the process the province of Newfoundland and Labrador used to develop an innovative Physician Management and Leadership Program (PMLP). The PMLP is a collaborative initiative among Memorial University (Faculty of Medicine and Faculty of Business), the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador, and the Regional Health Authorities. As challenges facing health-care systems become more complex there is a growing need for management and leadership training for physicians. Memorial University Faculty of Medicine and the Gardiner Centre in the Faculty of Business in partnership with Regional Health Authorities and the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador identified the need for a leadership and management education program for physician leaders. A provincial needs assessment of physician leaders was conducted to identify educational needs to fill this identified gap. A Steering Committee was formed to guide the design and implementation and monitor delivery of the 10 module Physician Management and Leadership Program (PMLP). Designing management and leadership education programs to serve physicians who practice in a large, predominately rural geographic area can be challenging and requires efficient use of available resources and technology. While there are many physician management and leadership programs available in Canada and abroad, the PMLP was designed to meet the specific educational needs of physician leaders in Newfoundland and Labrador.

  13. Building leadership capacity to drive sustainable water management: the evaluation of a customised program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A C

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a customised, six-month, leadership development program (LDP) that was designed for emerging leaders in the Australian water industry who were promoting sustainable urban water management (SUWM). It also presents results from an evaluation of the program's benefits, costs and overall 'return on investment' (ROI). The program was designed to help build emergent leadership capacity in the water industry, given strong evidence that this form of leadership plays an important role in advancing SUWM. It involved '360-degree feedback' processes, training, individual leadership development plans, and coaching sessions. Its design was informed by a review of the literature, and its content was informed by local empirical research involving effective SUWM leaders. The evaluation used a seven-tier assessment framework that examined different dimensions of the program's performance using source and methodological triangulation. The results indicate that such LDPs can produce a range of positive outcomes, such as promoting desired leadership behaviours and generating a positive ROI estimate. Specifically, the program's estimated ROI was approximately 190% after only one year. The primary conclusion is that evidence-based LDPs which are highly customised for specific types of leaders in the water industry represent a promising type of intervention to build forms of leadership capacity which are needed to successfully promote SUWM.

  14. Leadership of healthcare commissioning networks in England: a mixed-methods study on clinical commissioning groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariadis, Markos; Oborn, Eivor; Barrett, Michael; Zollinger-Read, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the relational challenges for general practitioner (GP) leaders setting up new network-centric commissioning organisations in the recent health policy reform in England, we use innovation network theory to identify key network leadership practices that facilitate healthcare innovation. Design Mixed-method, multisite and case study research. Setting Six clinical commissioning groups and local clusters in the East of England area, covering in total 208 GPs and 1 662 000 population. Methods Semistructured interviews with 56 lead GPs, practice managers and staff from the local health authorities (primary care trusts, PCT) as well as various healthcare professionals; 21 observations of clinical commissioning group (CCG) board and executive meetings; electronic survey of 58 CCG board members (these included GPs, practice managers, PCT employees, nurses and patient representatives) and subsequent social network analysis. Main outcome measures Collaborative relationships between CCG board members and stakeholders from their healthcare network; clarifying the role of GPs as network leaders; strengths and areas for development of CCGs. Results Drawing upon innovation network theory provides unique insights of the CCG leaders’ activities in establishing best practices and introducing new clinical pathways. In this context we identified three network leadership roles: managing knowledge flows, managing network coherence and managing network stability. Knowledge sharing and effective collaboration among GPs enable network stability and the alignment of CCG objectives with those of the wider health system (network coherence). Even though activities varied between commissioning groups, collaborative initiatives were common. However, there was significant variation among CCGs around the level of engagement with providers, patients and local authorities. Locality (sub) groups played an important role because they linked commissioning decisions with

  15. Cultivating Leadership, Pedagogy and Programming for CSPAP and Healthy, Active Lifestyles at the University of Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goc Karp, Grace; Brown, Helen; Scruggs, Philip W.; Berei, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    This article highlights processes for infusing comprehensive school physical activity programming (CSPAP) into the physical education teacher education (PETE) program at the University of Idaho (UI). The PETE program uses a modified leadership framework to target learning outcomes and activities pertinent to CSPAP. Student CSPAP knowledge and…

  16. Thinking Management and Leadership within Colleges and Schools Somewhat Differently: A Practice-Based, Actor-Network Theory Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulcahy, Dianne; Perillo, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the significance of materiality for management and leadership in education using resources provided by actor-network theory (ANT). Espousing the idea that human interactions are mediated by material objects and that these objects participate in the production of practices, ANT affords thinking management and leadership in a…

  17. Neural-Network Object-Recognition Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spirkovska, L.; Reid, M. B.

    1993-01-01

    HONTIOR computer program implements third-order neural network exhibiting invariance under translation, change of scale, and in-plane rotation. Invariance incorporated directly into architecture of network. Only one view of each object needed to train network for two-dimensional-translation-invariant recognition of object. Also used for three-dimensional-transformation-invariant recognition by training network on only set of out-of-plane rotated views. Written in C language.

  18. Identifying and Living Leadership in the Lives of Prekindergarten through 4th-Grade Girls: The Story of One Intentional Leadership Identity Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Darlyne; Hufford, Mariandl M. C.; Emmerson, Melissa S.; Eckert, Sarah Anne

    2017-01-01

    Cultivating leadership identity early in a child's development is crucial. This article examines the development of an intentional leadership identity development program for young girls. Using participatory action research (PAR), faculty and students from a college school of social work and administrators and teachers from a suburban…

  19. A structural model of treatment program and individual counselor leadership in innovation transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joe, George W; Becan, Jennifer E; Knight, Danica K; Flynn, Patrick M

    2017-03-23

    A number of program-level and counselor-level factors are known to impact the adoption of treatment innovations. While program leadership is considered a primary factor, the importance of leadership among clinical staff to innovation transfer is less known. Objectives included explore (1) the influence of two leadership roles, program director and individual counselor, on recent training activity and (2) the relationship of counselor attributes on training endorsement. The sample included 301 clinical staff in 49 treatment programs. A structural equation model was evaluated for key hypothesized relationships between exogenous and endogenous variables related to the two leadership roles. The importance of organizational leadership, climate, and counselor attributes (particularly counseling innovation interest and influence) to recent training activity was supported. In a subset of 68 counselors who attended a developer-led training on a new intervention, it was found that training endorsement was higher among those with high innovation interest and influence. The findings suggest that each leadership level impacts the organization in different ways, yet both can promote or impede technology transfer.

  20. The effectiveness of a leadership development program on self-awareness in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitello-Cicciu, Joan M; Weatherford, Barbara; Gemme, Donna; Glass, Bonnell; Seymour-Route, Paulette

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the changes in behaviors as reported by nursing leaders following participation in a leadership development program (LDP). There is a scarcity of research examining changes in leadership behaviors following LDP participation. A growing body of literature links critical behaviors and traits to outcomes among nurse managers and executives. Literature supports that leadership behaviors can be learned in educational programs if the environment is right and if the talent and capacity are present. Focus groups and online responses were guided by a structured interview protocol to elicit responses from the participants of the behavioral changes that have occurred in them as a result of their participation in an LDP. Seven themes describing leadership behaviors were identified. These self-reported behaviors were present 5 to 9 months after completion of the LDP.

  1. Designing a tool for curriculum leadership development in postgraduate programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Avizhgan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Leadership in the area of curriculum development is increasingly important as we look for ways to improve our programmes and practices. In curriculum studies, leadership has received little attention. Considering the lack of an evaluation tool with objective criteria in postgraduate curriculum leadership process, this study aimed to design a specific tool and determine the validity and reliability of the tool. Method: This study is a methodological research.  At first, domains and items of the tool were determined through expert interviews and literature review. Then, using Delphi technique, 54 important criteria were developed. A panel of experts was used to confirm content and face validity. Reliability was determined by a descriptive study in which 30 faculties from two of Isfahan universities and was estimated by internal consistency. The data were analyzed by SPSS software, using Pearson Correlation Coefficient and reliability analysis. Results: At first, considering the definition of curriculum leadership determined the domains and items of the tool and they were developed primary tool. Expert’s faculties’ views were used in deferent stages of development and psychometry. The tool internal consistency with Cronbach's alpha coefficient times was 96.5. This was determined for each domain separately. Conclution: Applying this instrument can improve the effectiveness of curriculum leadership. Identifying the characteristics of successful and effective leaders, and utilizing this knowledge in developing and implementing curriculum might help us to have better respond to the changing needs of our students, teachers and schools of tomorrow.

  2. The role of leadership in the synchronization of directed complex networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheshbolouki, Aida; Zarei, Mina; Sarbazi-Azad, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Synchronization is a phenomenon that occurs in systems of interacting units, and is widespread in nature, society and technology. Recent studies have enlightened us regarding the interplay between synchronization dynamics and interaction structure. However, most of these studies neglect that real-world networks may actually be directed and disconnected. Here, we study the synchronization of directed networks with multiple leaders using the Kuramoto model. We found that in networks with high driving strength, the steady-state frequency of each node is determined by the linear combination of leaders’ natural frequencies, with structural coefficients that can be calculated using the eigenvectors of a network Laplacian matrix corresponding to zero eigenvalues. The steady-state frequencies of the nodes following multiple leaders are not fixed and have sharp peaks between consecutive time instances where leaders meet each other in the phase circle. The results suggest a new way of understanding how leadership style influences the synchronization dynamics of directed networks. (paper)

  3. The Price of Selfish Stackelberg Leadership in a Network Game

    OpenAIRE

    Goldberg, P. W.; Polpinit, P.

    2007-01-01

    We study a class of games in which a finite number of agents each controls a quantity of flow to be routed through a network, and are able to split their own flow between multiple paths through the network. Recent work on this model has contrasted the social cost of Nash equilibria with the best possible social cost. Here we show that additional costs are incurred in situations where a selfish ``leader'' agent allocates his flow, and then commits to that choice so that other agents are compel...

  4. A Second Year Evaluation of the ESEA Title III Urban Leadership Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frerichs, Allen H.

    The Urban Leadership Program, funded under Title III of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, was carried out among sixth graders at the Albert Einstein School in Chicago, Illinois. The primary purpose of the program was to develop skills and competence to prepare participants for survival and success in a large urban environment. A…

  5. The Perceived Importance of Youth Educator's Confidence in Delivering Leadership Development Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumbaugh, Laura; Cater, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    A successful component of programs designed to deliver youth leadership develop programs are youth educators who understand the importance of utilizing research-based information and seeking professional development opportunities. The purpose of this study was to determine youth educator's perceived confidence in leading youth leadership…

  6. Teaching MBA Students Teamwork and Team Leadership Skills: An Empirical Evaluation of a Classroom Educational Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, Charles J.; Strupeck, David; Griffin, Andrea; Szostek, Jana; Rominger, Anna S.

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive educational program for teaching behavioral teamwork and team leadership skills was rigorously evaluated with 148 MBA students enrolled at an urban regional campus of a Midwestern public university. Major program components included (1) videotaped student teams in leaderless group discussion (LGD) exercises at the course beginning…

  7. Evaluating Extension Based Leadership Development Programs in the Southern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamm, Kevan W.; Carter, Hannah S.; Lamm, Alexa J.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to evaluate and accurately articulate the outcomes associated with leadership development programs is critical to their continued financial and administrative support. With calls for outcome-based accountability, the need for rigorous evaluation is particularly relevant for those programs administered through the Cooperative Extension…

  8. Implementing a Project-Based Learning Model in a Pre-Service Leadership Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albritton, Shelly; Stacks, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes two instructors' efforts to more authentically engage students in a preservice leadership program's course called Program Planning and Evaluation by using a project-based learning approach. Markham, Larmer, and Ravitz (2003) describe project-based learning (PjBL) as "a systematic teaching method that engages students in…

  9. Design and Intervention of an Educational-Leadership Program: Student Voice and Agency, Expectations and Internationalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Plessis, Anna Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores the lived experiences of a diverse student cohort enrolled in a master's degree educational-leadership program. The program's global focus was on the quality of teacher education, prospective teachers' workplace preparedness and leaders in the workforce in higher education. Internationalization, real-life experiences and…

  10. MBA in Education Leadership: A Model for Developing an Interdisciplinary Principal Preparation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rachel A.; Somers, John

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a model for developing an interdisciplinary principal preparation program, an MBA in Education Leadership, which integrates best practices in both education and business within an educational context. The paper addresses gaps that exist in many traditional principal preparation programs and provides an alternative model, which…

  11. The Impact of Personal and Program Characteristics on the Placement of School Leadership Preparation Program Graduates in School Leader Positions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Edward J.; Hollingworth, Liz; An, Brian P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of personal and program characteristics on the placement of graduates of principal preparation programs in assistant principal, principal, and school leadership positions. Research Design: This study relies on Texas principal production data from 1993 through 2007 matched to employment…

  12. Nonlinear programming with feedforward neural networks.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reifman, J.

    1999-06-02

    We provide a practical and effective method for solving constrained optimization problems by successively training a multilayer feedforward neural network in a coupled neural-network/objective-function representation. Nonlinear programming problems are easily mapped into this representation which has a simpler and more transparent method of solution than optimization performed with Hopfield-like networks and poses very mild requirements on the functions appearing in the problem. Simulation results are illustrated and compared with an off-the-shelf optimization tool.

  13. Research Courses in Education Leadership Programs: Relevance in an Era of Accountability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca M. Bustamante

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Master’s degree research course offerings of 72 university education leadership programs were examined to explore how relevant the courses were to the inquiry needs of practicing school leaders. Research course titles and descriptions were analyzed using content analysis. Findings revealed considerable variation in research course requirements, course titles, and course descriptions. Analysis of course descriptions indicated minimal emphasis on the research skills required for school improvement. Results also suggested a lack of consensus on the importance of developing research skills for school leaders across university education leadership programs. Implications for education leadership preparation programs are discussed with an emphasis on the need for further studies on the research skills required by practicing school leaders.

  14. Strategies for fostering basic psychological needs support in high quality youth leadership programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, Corliss; Harlow, Meghan; Kendellen, Kelsey

    2017-04-01

    Youth leadership programming has become an increasingly common context to foster basic psychological needs and promote youth development. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore strategies involved in fostering youth needs support within six leadership programs. Two leaders and 30 youth participated in semi-structured interviews to better understand the strategies used to foster needs support. Findings revealed that leaders were able to foster a sense of relatedness among youth through building trusting adult-youth relationships and nurturing an inclusive environment. Maximizing choice and negotiating youth voice helped to foster youth's autonomy. Finally, creating a task-oriented climate and providing intentional opportunities for skill-building helped to foster youth's competence. Findings suggest that training for leaders is critical in understanding what, and how strategies should be employed to help foster youth needs support in leadership programming. Limitations and future directions are outlined. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Leadership, excellence, creativity and innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Coulson-Thomas, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Raises questions about the meaning, purpose and practice of contemporary leadership in relation to excellence, creativity and innovation, covering leadership qualities, the context and requirements of leadership, leadership at different stages of development, creativity and innovation, CEOs and top down leadership, entrepreneurship and shared leadership, leading the network organisation, shared and collective leadership, the role and contribution of boards, key questions for boards, leadershi...

  16. Empowering primary care workers to improve health services: results from Mozambique's leadership and management development program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perry Cary

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This article is the third article in the Human Resources for Health journal's feature on the theme of leadership and management in public health. The series of six articles has been contributed by Management Sciences for Health (MSH and will be published article-by-article over the next few weeks. The third article presents a successful application in Mozambique of a leadership development program created by Management Sciences for Health (MSH. Through this program, managers from 40 countries have learned to work in teams to identify their priority challenges and act to implement effective responses. From 2003 to 2004, 11 health units in Nampula Province, participated in a leadership and management development program called the Challenges Program. This was following an assessment which found that the quality of health services was poor, and senior officials determined that the underlying cause was the lack of human resource capacity in leadership and management in a rapidly decentralizing health care system. The program was funded by the US Agency for International Development (USAID and implemented in partnership between the Mozambican Ministry of Health (MOH Provincial Directorate in Nampula and Management Sciences for Health (MSH. The Challenges Program used simple management and leadership tools to assist the health units and their communities to address health service challenges. An evaluation of the program in 2005 showed that 10 of 11 health centers improved health services over the year of the program. The Challenges Program used several strategies that contributed to successful outcomes. It integrated leadership strengthening into the day-to-day challenges that staff were facing in the health units. The second success factor in the Challenges Program was the creation of participatory teams. After the program, people no longer waited passively to be trained but instead proactively requested training in needed areas. MOH workers

  17. Horses and At-Risk Youth: An Equine Facilitated Learning Program Focusing on Authentic Leadership Skill Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany L. Adams-Pope

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Interesting and innovative youth development programs are important to further youth education. Programs focused on developing leadership skills in youth, specifically at-risk youth, are important when thinking of the future of our communities. The primary purpose of the study was to determine the impact of an equine facilitated, authentic leadership program on at-risk youth. Youth participated in a three-day equine facilitated learning program based on authentic leadership with focus groups conducted three days before and three days after the program. In this article, we describe the development and methodology of the program and specific implications for practice.

  18. The building of the kitchen table : In search of an alternative model for in-company leadership development programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sigaloff, C.L.; Nabben, E.H. (Iselien); Bergsma, E.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an alternative model of a leadership-development program. Design/methodology/approach: A leadership-development program based on a "closure-type description" instead of an "input-type description" (Varela) was designed and executed for an organization. The

  19. Dynamics of a Successful Planned Giving Program Utilizing Shared Leadership at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Robin Lynn Brunty

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dynamics of a successful planned giving program utilizing shared leadership at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). This information will assist the leadership in determining if and how a successful planned giving program can be established for HBCUs. It is possible for planned gifts…

  20. Computer program for compressible flow network analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilton, M. E.; Murtaugh, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    Program solves problem of an arbitrarily connected one dimensional compressible flow network with pumping in the channels and momentum balancing at flow junctions. Program includes pressure drop calculations for impingement flow and flow through pin fin arrangements, as currently found in many air cooled turbine bucket and vane cooling configurations.

  1. Management and Fragmentation of a Network Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kenneth Mølbjerg

    This paper contains an analysis of the role of identity in interorganizational collaboration. The case is a network program that involved three parties: eight companies, one consulting institution and a research institution. The purpose of the network program was to develop and test concepts...... and methods within organizational learning and it was supported by the Danish government. The three parties had different roles in the program. The eight companies all participated as experiments for organizational learning. Consultants from the consulting institution acted as consultants on the eight...

  2. Changes in leadership styles as a function of a four-day leadership training institute for nurse managers: a perspective on continuing education program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, M S

    1996-01-01

    This study measured changes in knowledge acquisition and application of the Hersey and Blanchard model of leadership styles and leadership style adaptability among 144 registered nurses who participated in a four-day management institute. A pre- and post-institute administration of the LEAD-Self instrument was conducted. Although the findings demonstrated a significant change in the participants' leadership styles, the data revealed that outcomes were not as positive as had been assumed based on participants' self-reports. The discussion of findings reveals the complexity and the necessity of measuring learning outcomes for continuing education program improvement.

  3. The Cambia Sojourns Scholars Leadership Program: Conversations with Emerging Leaders in Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Oliver, Dulce M; Bernacki, Rachelle; Cooper, Zara; Grudzen, Corita; Izumi, Seiko; Lafond, Deborah; Lam, Daniel; LeBlanc, Thomas W; Tjia, Jennifer; Walter, Jennifer

    2017-08-01

    There is a pressing workforce shortage and leadership scarcity in palliative care to adequately meet the demands of individuals with serious illness and their families. To address this gap, the Cambia Health Foundation launched its Sojourns Scholars Leadership Program in 2014, an initiative designed to identify, cultivate, and advance the next generation of palliative care leaders. This report intends to summarize the second cohort of Sojourns Scholars' projects and their reflection on their leadership needs. This report summarizes the second cohort of sojourns scholars' project and their reflection on leadership needs. After providing a written reflection on their own projects, the second cohort participated in a group interview (fireside chat) to elicit their perspectives on barriers and facilitators in providing palliative care, issues facing leadership in palliative care in the United States, and lessons from personal and professional growth as leaders in palliative care. They analyzed the transcript of the group interview using qualitative content analysis methodology. Three themes emerged from descriptions of the scholars' project experience: challenges in palliative care practice, leadership strategies in palliative care, and three lessons learned to be a leader were identified. Challenges included perceptions of palliative care, payment and policy, and workforce development. Educating and collaborating with other clinicians and influencing policy change are important strategies used to advance palliative care. Time management, leading team effort, and inspiring others are important skills that promote effectiveness as a leader. Emerging leaders have a unique view of conceptualizing contemporary palliative care and shaping the future. Providing comprehensive, coordinated care that is high quality, patient and family centered, and readily available depends on strong leadership in palliative care. The Cambia Scholars Program represents a unique opportunity.

  4. Negative Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Negative Leadership by Colonel David M. Oberlander United States Army United States Army War...SUBTITLE Negative Leadership 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Colonel David M...Dr. Richard C. Bullis Department of Command Leadership , and Management 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING

  5. Integration of leadership training into a problem/case-based learning program for first- and second-year medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginzburg, Samara B; Deutsch, Susan; Bellissimo, Jaclyn; Elkowitz, David E; Stern, Joel Nh; Lucito, Robert

    2018-01-01

    The evolution of health care systems in response to societal and financial pressures has changed care delivery models, which presents new challenges for physicians. Leadership training is increasingly being recognized as an essential component of medical education training to prepare physicians to meet these needs. Unfortunately, most medical schools do not include leadership training. It has been suggested that a longitudinal and integrated approach to leadership training should be sought. We hypothesized that integration of leadership training into our hybrid problem-based learning (PBL)/case-based learning (CBL) program, Patient-Centered Explorations in Active Reasoning, Learning and Synthesis (PEARLS), would be an effective way for medical students to develop leadership skills without the addition of curricular time. We designed a unique leadership program in PEARLS in which 98 medical students participated during each of their six courses throughout the first 2 years of school. A program director and trained faculty facilitators educated students and coached them on leadership development throughout this time. Students were assessed by their facilitator at the end of every course on development of leadership skills related to teamwork, meaningful self-assessment, process improvement, and thinking outside the box. Students consistently improved their performance from the first to the final course in all four leadership parameters evaluated. The skills that demonstrated the greatest change were those pertaining to thinking outside the box and process improvement. Incorporation of a longitudinal and integrated approach to leadership training into an existing PBL/CBL program is an effective way for medical students to improve their leadership skills without the addition of curricular time. These results offer a new, time-efficient option for leadership development in schools with existing PBL/CBL programs.

  6. Advanced network programming principles and techniques : network application programming with Java

    CERN Document Server

    Ciubotaru, Bogdan

    2013-01-01

    Answering the need for an accessible overview of the field, this text/reference presents a manageable introduction to both the theoretical and practical aspects of computer networks and network programming. Clearly structured and easy to follow, the book describes cutting-edge developments in network architectures, communication protocols, and programming techniques and models, supported by code examples for hands-on practice with creating network-based applications. Features: presents detailed coverage of network architectures; gently introduces the reader to the basic ideas underpinning comp

  7. Career Advancement, Career Enhancement, and Personal Growth of Pepperdine University's Educational Leadership Academy Graduate Program Alumni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Ruth I.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was two-fold: (a) to explore and describe the perceived impact of Pepperdine University's Educational Leadership Academy (ELA) on 2003-2006 ELA graduates' career advancement, career enhancement, and personal growth; and (b) to obtain ELA graduates' suggestions for ELA program improvement to better prepare…

  8. Global Leadership Model for Health Professions Education--A Case Study of the FAIMER Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladhani, Zahra; Shah, Henal; Wells, Ray; Friedman, Stacey; Bezuidenhout, Juanita; van Heerden, Ben; Campos, Henry; Morahan, Page S.

    2015-01-01

    The health workforce of the 21st century has enormous challenges; health professionals need to be both experts in their field and equipped with leadership and managerial skills. These skills are not part of the regular curriculum, so specific programs bridging this gap are required. Since 2001, FAIMER®, with eight centers across the globe, has…

  9. An Evaluative Study of an ICT Module for a School Leadership and Management Preparation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musgrave, Sarietjie; De Wet, Corene

    2017-01-01

    This study reports on findings of an evaluative study on the effectiveness of an information and communication technology (ICT) module that forms part of the Advanced Certificate in Education: School Leadership and Management program. The study was carried out among distance education (DE) students from the University of the Free State enrolled…

  10. Communicating across the Curriculum in an Undergraduate Business Program: Management 100--Leadership and Communication in Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuleja, Elizabeth A.; Greenhalgh, Anne M.

    2008-01-01

    Educating undergraduate business students in the 21st century requires more than addressing the quantitative side of business; rather, it calls for including the more qualitative "soft skills," such as speaking and writing. This article examines the design, delivery, and effectiveness of an undergraduate program dedicated to leadership,…

  11. Towards a Marketing Communication Recruitment Plan for the Rowan University Educational Leadership Doctoral Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanyi, Titus Kamau

    2009-01-01

    Doctoral studies are at the apex of the education system. Attracting, recruiting, enrolling, and graduating the best suited students in doctoral education is, therefore, critical in ensuring the highest academic standards and service to society. Focusing on Rowan University's Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) in Educational Leadership program, this…

  12. The Political Sense of Urgency for Educational Leadership Preparation Programs to Show Impact Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, Valerie; Asadoorian, Malcolm O., III

    2014-01-01

    Higher education today is confronted with increasing marketization and aggressive regulation of the public sector. In an attempt to address these challenging issues, public universities are undergoing unprecedented change, particularly Colleges of Education. Redesigning educational leadership preparation programs, working in partnership with local…

  13. Youth Leadership Development: Perceptions and Preferences of Urban Students Enrolled in a Comprehensive Agriculture Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, James C., II; Kim, Eunyoung

    2009-01-01

    This descriptive study explores the perceptions of and preferences for leadership development by students enrolled in a comprehensive urban agriculture program. A total of 284 students from the Chicago High School for Agricultural Sciences participated in the study. The results of the study showed that the average respondent was involved in a…

  14. Creating Professional Learning Communities in a Traditional Educational Leadership Preparation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolittle, Gini; Stanwood, H. Mark; Simmerman, Herb

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors examine the prerequisites for leadership preparation programs with regard to implementing and institutionalizing professional learning communities as an instructional strategy. First, the authors posit that as faculty they must examine and reflect on their own teaching practices and how they influence their reciprocal…

  15. Evaluation of the Science, Technology, and Engineering Leadership Program, Year Two

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolanin, Natalie L.; Wade, Julie H.

    2013-01-01

    The Office of Shared Accountability (OSA) conducted an evaluation of the implementation of the second year (2011-2012) of the Science, Technology, and Engineering Leadership Program (STELP) in Montgomery County (Maryland) Public Schools (MCPS). Funding for STELP, including the evaluation study, is provided by a grant from the Howard Hughes Medical…

  16. Evaluation of the Science, Technology, and Engineering Leadership Program, Year Three

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolanin, Natalie; Wade, Julie

    2014-01-01

    The Office of Shared Accountability conducted an evaluation of the implementation of the third and final year (2012-2013) of the "Science, Technology, and Engineering Leadership Program" (STELP) in Montgomery County (Maryland) Public Schools (MCPS). Funding for STELP, including the evaluation study, is provided by a grant from the Howard…

  17. Understanding Effective Program Improvement Schools through a Distributed Leadership Task Context Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gipson, Frances Marie

    2012-01-01

    Federal, state, and local agencies face challenges organizing resources that create the conditions necessary to create, sustain, and replicate effective high performing schools. Knowing that leadership does impact achievement outcomes and that school districts tackle growing numbers of sanctioned Program Improvement schools, a distributed…

  18. A Comparative Study of Leadership Preparation Programs in Gama (Brazil) and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges-Gatewood, Mara Rubia Fonseca; McNeal, Larry

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the relationship, if any, between leadership preparation programs types and how well school administrators are prepared to set a widely shared vision, develop a school culture, effectively manage school operations and resources, collaborate with faculty and community members, act with integrity and…

  19. Self-Leadership Change Project: The Continuation of an Ongoing Experiential Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, James I.; Kern, Dave; Tewari, Jitendra; Jones, Kenneth E.; Beemraj, Eshwar Prasad; Ettigi, Chaitra Ashok

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The self-leadership change project (SLCP) is an ongoing program for senior level students at a regional university designed to provide hands-on experience in building self-management skills, which is considered a pre-requisite by many leaders and scholars (e.g. Drucker, 1996; Schaetti et al., 2008). The paper aims to discuss this issue.…

  20. Perceived Value of University-Based Continuing Education Leadership Development Programs for Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Geri L.; Major, Claire H.

    2014-01-01

    This quantitative study, which involved development of a Value Creation Survey, examined the perceived value of leadership development programs (LDPs) provided by continuing higher education for administrators in colleges and universities. Participants were administrators at Association for Continuing Higher Education (ACHE) member institutions.…

  1. Use of Immersive Simulations to Enhance Graduate Student Learning: Implications for Educational Leadership Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelkel, Robert H.; Johnson, Christie W.; Gilbert, Kristen A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present how one university incorporates immersive simulations through platforms which employ avatars to enhance graduate student understanding and learning in educational leadership programs. While using simulations and immersive virtual environments continues to grow, the literature suggests limited evidence of…

  2. The Roles of Site-Based Mentors in Educational Leadership Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowser, Audrey; Hux, Annette; McBride, Jackie; Nichols, Cindy; Nichols, Joe

    2014-01-01

    This study focused on whether the roles of site based mentors in an educational leadership program were successfully completed. Three hundred eleven internship candidates' portfolios were reviewed to determine whether mentors essentially performed the tasks of collaboration, supervision, and evaluation of their protegees portfolios. A bibliography…

  3. "Con todo mi corazón": Mentoring Latinas in Educational Leadership Doctoral Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Mariela A.

    2016-01-01

    Personal narrative essays were used to analyze the experiences of four Latina doctoral students who completed their first year in an educational leadership doctoral program in a Hispanic-Serving Institution (HSI) in the southwestern U.S. Four themes emerged from their "testimonios" 1) "Con todo el corazón"; 2) "Somos como…

  4. iPrincipals: Innovative Themes, Strategies, and Recommendations of Ten Online University Educational Leadership Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, Teri A.; Loose, William V.

    2015-01-01

    This report, the second in a series, provides comparative empirical data on current state and national university trends around the thematic strategies and constructs ten fully online Educational Leadership programs engage within their innovative designs. Our 2014 iPrincipals report provided information on how one California University…

  5. The Effectiveness of an Embedded Approach to Practicum Experiences in Educational Leadership: Program Candidates' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Mary; Chan, Tak Cheung; Jiang, Binbin

    2013-01-01

    This study examined how effective an embedded practicum experience in an educational leadership program in a Southeastern University is in serving the purpose of preparing educational leaders to meet future challenges. Findings of this study confirm practicum areas that met the educational demands and highlight areas that need improvement to…

  6. Factors That Influence Student Selection of Educational Leadership Master's Programs at Regional Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winn, Pam; Leach, Lesley F.; Erwin, Susan; Benedict, Liza

    2014-01-01

    Graduate enrollment numbers in Educational Leadership programs have dwindled at many public higher education institutions. At the same time, for-profit institutions and institutions with private marketing partnerships have experienced increasingly greater enrollments. Many public institutions are reevaluating their marketing and recruiting…

  7. A Faculty Development Program for Change and Growth. [and] Leadership Institute for Continuing Professional Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Daniel W.; Queeney, Donna S.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the Nebraska University Program for Renewal of Faculty is to foster systematic, planned change benefiting the individual and the institution. Penn State and Harvard Universities initiated the Leadership Institute for Continuing Professional Education to enable participants to discuss issues common to professional continuing…

  8. Research Courses in Education Leadership Programs: Relevance in an Era of Accountability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Rebecca M.; Combs, Julie P.

    2011-01-01

    Master's degree research course offerings of 72 university education leadership programs were examined to explore how relevant the courses were to the inquiry needs of practicing school leaders. Research course titles and descriptions were analyzed using content analysis. Findings revealed considerable variation in research course requirements,…

  9. A Case Study of Undergraduate Women in a Leadership Development Program at a Coeducational Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haight, Lori P.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this interpretive case study was to explore the collegiate experiences of undergraduate women participating in a cohort women's-only leadership development program at a coeducational institution. Using a framework based on Kurt Lewin's psycho-social model of behavior being the function of a person interacting with the environment…

  10. Structuring Serendipity: Mentoring as a Component of Leadership Development Programs in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonebright, Denise A.

    2014-01-01

    The need to develop a pool of well-qualified future leaders is a key concern for human resource development scholars and practitioners in higher education. Research indicates that formal leadership development programs are most effective when they are based on experiential models. Mentoring is one experiential component that can enhance such…

  11. Lights, Camera, Action: Advancing Learning, Research, and Program Evaluation through Video Production in Educational Leadership Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, Jennifer; Militello, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    This article analyzes specific uses of digital video production in the field of educational leadership preparation, advancing a three-part framework that includes the use of video in (a) teaching and learning, (b) research methods, and (c) program evaluation and service to the profession. The first category within the framework examines videos…

  12. Creating and Implementing an Offshore Graduate Program: A Case Study of Leadership and Development of the Global Executive MBA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Marisa L.

    2013-01-01

    This study applies the literature on leadership framing to the globalization of higher education to understand the development of the Global Executive MBA program at a large university. The purpose of the study was to provide administrators, educators and university leaders an understanding as to how to respond to globalization and, secondly, to…

  13. LEADERSHIP NETWORK BLAKE, MOUTON AND MCCANSE: CASE STUDY - LEADERSHIP STYLES AND DIMENSIONS IN ONE OF THE LOCAL SELF-GOVERNMENTS IN SERBIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srdjan Nikezic

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Leadership style represents the way in which a leader succeedes to direct and coordinate the behavior and actions of employees in order to achieve their goals. Leadership is a process of motivating of employees to work on achieving of goals promoted by the leader. It is a way of establishing the appropriate relationship between the leader and his associates and other employees. Using the model of Leadership Network Blake, Mouton and McCanse aspect of the application one of the five leadership styles is accompanied by two dimensions of local government. In two dimensions the respondents were orientating towards one of two choices: employee care and concern for the task. In this paper, on the basis of concrete research, based on the established hypotheses leadership style was determined that maches to the actual situation in local government. The investigation was taken in municipality located in central Serbia, which represents dominant sample for the research in this territorial socio-economic community.

  14. Advancing Systems Engineering Excellence: The Marshall Systems Engineering Leadership Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Philip; Whitfield, Susan

    2011-01-01

    As NASA undertakes increasingly complex projects, the need for expert systems engineers and leaders in systems engineering is becoming more pronounced. As a result of this issue, the Agency has undertaken an initiative to develop more systems engineering leaders through its Systems Engineering Leadership Development Program; however, the NASA Office of the Chief Engineer has also called on the field Centers to develop mechanisms to strengthen their expertise in systems engineering locally. In response to this call, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has developed a comprehensive development program for aspiring systems engineers and systems engineering leaders. This presentation will summarize the two-level program, which consists of a combination of training courses and on-the-job, developmental training assignments at the Center to help develop stronger expertise in systems engineering and technical leadership. In addition, it will focus on the success the program has had in its pilot year. The program hosted a formal kickoff event for Level I on October 13, 2009. The first class includes 42 participants from across MSFC and Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF). A formal call for Level II is forthcoming. With the new Agency focus on research and development of new technologies, having a strong pool of well-trained systems engineers is becoming increasingly more critical. Programs such as the Marshall Systems Engineering Leadership Development Program, as well as those developed at other Centers, help ensure that there is an upcoming generation of trained systems engineers and systems engineering leaders to meet future design challenges.

  15. Report on Networking and Programming Languages 2017

    KAUST Repository

    Bjorner, Nikolaj

    2017-10-26

    The third workshop on Networking and Programming Lan-guages, NetPL 2017, was held in conjunction with SIG-COMM 2017. The workshop series attracts invited speakers from academia and industry and a selection of contributed abstracts for short presentations. NetPL brings together re-searchers from the networking community and researchers from the programming languages and verification communities. The workshop series is a timely forum for exciting trends, technological and scientific advances in the intersection of these communities. We describe some of the high-lights from the invited talks through the lens of three trends: Advances in network machine architectures, network programming abstractions, and network verification. NetPL included five invited speakers, four from academia, and one from industry. The program contained six contributed talks out of eight submitted for presentation. The workshop organizers reviewed the abstracts for quality and scope. A total of 42 registrations were received and the attendance occupied the lecture room to the brink. Slides and abstracts from all talks are available from the workshop home page.1 Videos of the presentations are available in the NetPL YouTube channel.2.

  16. Report on Networking and Programming Languages 2017

    KAUST Repository

    Bjorner, Nikolaj; Canini, Marco; Sultana, Nik

    2017-01-01

    The third workshop on Networking and Programming Lan-guages, NetPL 2017, was held in conjunction with SIG-COMM 2017. The workshop series attracts invited speakers from academia and industry and a selection of contributed abstracts for short presentations. NetPL brings together re-searchers from the networking community and researchers from the programming languages and verification communities. The workshop series is a timely forum for exciting trends, technological and scientific advances in the intersection of these communities. We describe some of the high-lights from the invited talks through the lens of three trends: Advances in network machine architectures, network programming abstractions, and network verification. NetPL included five invited speakers, four from academia, and one from industry. The program contained six contributed talks out of eight submitted for presentation. The workshop organizers reviewed the abstracts for quality and scope. A total of 42 registrations were received and the attendance occupied the lecture room to the brink. Slides and abstracts from all talks are available from the workshop home page.1 Videos of the presentations are available in the NetPL YouTube channel.2.

  17. The Relationship Among Principal Preparation Programs, Professional Development, and Instructional Leadership Efficacy  

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas III, Harry R.

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a qualitative analysis of principals' perceptions of the relationship among principal preparation programs, professional development and instructional leadership confidence in one urban school division in Virginia. Levine (2005) argued that the principal has a salient effect on the instructional programs within schools, and the preparation and professional development of the principal affects the degree to which they maintain and improve instruction. To examine principal p...

  18. Building capacity for HIV/AIDS program leadership and management in Uganda through mentored Fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matovu, Joseph K B; Wanyenze, Rhoda K; Mawemuko, Susan; Wamuyu-Maina, Gakenia; Bazeyo, William; Olico-Okui; Serwadda, David

    2011-02-24

    Around the world, health professionals and program managers are leading and managing public and private health organizations with little or no formal management and leadership training and experience. To describe an innovative 2-year, long-term apprenticeship Fellowship training program implemented by Makerere University School of Public Health (MakSPH) to strengthen capacity for leadership and management of HIV/AIDS programs in Uganda. IMPLEMENTATION PROCESS: The program, which began in 2002, is a 2-year, full-time, non-degree Fellowship. It is open to Ugandan nationals with postgraduate training in health-related disciplines. Enrolled Fellows are attached to host institutions implementing HIV/AIDS programs and placed under the supervision of host institution and academic mentors. Fellows spend 75% of their apprenticeship at the host institutions while the remaining 25% is dedicated to didactic short courses conducted at MakSPH to enhance their knowledge base. Overall, 77 Fellows have been enrolled since 2002. Of the 57 Fellows who were admitted between 2002 and 2008, 94.7% (54) completed the Fellowship successfully and 50 (92.3%) are employed in senior leadership and management positions in Uganda and internationally. Eighty-eight percent of those employed (44/54) work in institutions registered in Uganda, indicating a high level of in-country retention. Nineteen of the 20 Fellows who were admitted between 2009 and 2010 are still undergoing training. A total of 67 institutions have hosted Fellows since 2002. The host institutions have benefited through staff training and technical expertise from the Fellows as well as through grant support to Fellows to develop and implement innovative pilot projects. The success of the program hinges on support from mentors, stakeholder involvement, and the hands-on approach employed in training. The Fellowship Program offers a unique opportunity for hands-on training in HIV/AIDS program leadership and management for both

  19. Building capacity for HIV/AIDS program leadership and management in Uganda through mentored Fellowships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph K.B. Matovu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Around the world, health professionals and program managers are leading and managing public and private health organizations with little or no formal management and leadership training and experience. Objective: To describe an innovative 2-year, long-term apprenticeship Fellowship training program implemented by Makerere University School of Public Health (MakSPH to strengthen capacity for leadership and management of HIV/AIDS programs in Uganda. Implementation process: The program, which began in 2002, is a 2-year, full-time, non-degree Fellowship. It is open to Ugandan nationals with postgraduate training in health-related disciplines. Enrolled Fellows are attached to host institutions implementing HIV/AIDS programs and placed under the supervision of host institution and academic mentors. Fellows spend 75% of their apprenticeship at the host institutions while the remaining 25% is dedicated to didactic short courses conducted at MakSPH to enhance their knowledge base. Achievements: Overall, 77 Fellows have been enrolled since 2002. Of the 57 Fellows who were admitted between 2002 and 2008, 94.7% (54 completed the Fellowship successfully and 50 (92.3% are employed in senior leadership and management positions in Uganda and internationally. Eighty-eight percent of those employed (44/54 work in institutions registered in Uganda, indicating a high level of in-country retention. Nineteen of the 20 Fellows who were admitted between 2009 and 2010 are still undergoing training. A total of 67 institutions have hosted Fellows since 2002. The host institutions have benefited through staff training and technical expertise from the Fellows as well as through grant support to Fellows to develop and implement innovative pilot projects. The success of the program hinges on support from mentors, stakeholder involvement, and the hands-on approach employed in training. Conclusion: The Fellowship Program offers a unique opportunity for hands

  20. Maximizing Program Delivery in Extension: Lessons from Leadership for Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, Kevin M.; Schmidt, Janet L.

    1995-01-01

    Reviews advantages and disadvantages of four extension delivery methods: partnerships, master volunteer programs, information centers, and regional programs. Concluded that the key is matching individual, community, and emerging needs with the right method. (SK)

  1. Promoting academic excellence through leadership development at the University of Washington: the Teaching Scholars Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, Lynne; Ambrozy, Donna; Pinsky, Linda E

    2006-11-01

    The University of Washington Teaching Scholars Program (TSP) was established in 1995 to prepare faculty for local and national leadership and promote academic excellence by fostering a community of educational leaders to innovate, enliven, and enrich the environment for teaching and learning at the University of Washington (UW). Faculty in the Department of Medical Education and Biomedical Informatics designed and continue to implement the program. Qualified individuals from the UW Health Sciences Professional Schools and foreign scholars who are studying at the UW are eligible to apply for acceptance into the program. To date, 109 faculty and fellows have participated in the program, the majority of whom have been physicians. The program is committed to interprofessional education and seeks to diversify its participants. The curriculum is developed collaboratively with each cohort and comprises topics central to medical education and an emergent set of topics related to the specific interests and teaching responsibilities of the participating scholars. Core sessions cover the history of health professions education, learning theories, educational research methods, assessment, curriculum development, instructional methods, professionalism, and leadership. To graduate, scholars must complete a scholarly project in curriculum development, faculty development, or educational research; demonstrate progress towards construction of a teaching portfolio; and participate regularly and actively in program sessions. The TSP has developed and nurtured an active cadre of supportive colleagues who are transforming educational practice, elevating the status of teaching, and increasing the recognition of teachers. Graduates fill key teaching and leadership positions at the UW and in national and international professional organizations.

  2. Selecting Candidates for Key Leadership Positions in Program Executive Offices Ground Combat Systems and Combat Service and Combat Service Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-14

    start or continue a profitable growth pattern and boost morale and motivation, a poor decision may bring the company to the brink of financial...HON Frank Kendall issued a memorandum titled “Key Leadership Positions and Qualification Criteria” (Kendall, 2013). This memorandum provides a...Chief Developmental Tester • Program Lead, Business Financial Manager SELECTING CANDIDATES FOR KEY LEADERSHIP POSITIONS 4

  3. Content Analysis of the Practicum Course in the Master of Science in Educational Leadership/Administration Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Scott W.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, I explored the overall efficacy of the Master of Science in Educational Leadership/ Administration (MSEL/A) program at Florida State University (FSU), by taking a closer look at the introductory course, Practicum in Educational Leadership (the Practicum), as well as the final assessment, the student e-portfolio. The MSEL/A at FSU is…

  4. Healthy Native Community Fellowship: An Indigenous Leadership Program to Enhance Community Wellness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Rae

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The Healthy Native Communities Fellowship (HNCF is a grassroots evidence-based mentorship and leadership program that develops the skills and community-building capacities of leaders and community teams to improve health status through several intermediate social and cultural mechanisms: (a strengthening social participation (also known as social capital or cohesion; (b strengthening cultural connectedness and revitalization of cultural identity; and (c advocating for health-enhancing policies, practices, and programs that strengthen systems of prevention and care, as well as address the structural social determinants of health. This leadership program uses a community-based participatory research (CBPR approach and participatory evaluation to investigate how the work of local American Indian and Alaska Native leaders (fellows and their community coalitions contributes to individual, family, and community level health outcomes.

  5. ["The Talpiot medical leadership program"--advancing the brightest young physicians and researchers to fill future leadership roles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Yehuda; Kinori, Michael; Zimlichman, Eyal; Rosinger, Avivit; Shalev, Guzu; Talmi, Rachel; Noy, Shlomo; Rotstein, Zeev

    2015-02-01

    The modern medical world is dynamic and boundless. There is a need for the medical training system currently existing in Israel to undergo a thorough conceptual change in order to strive for excellence and innovation on the one hand and to prevent the "brain drain" from Israel on the other. To report on the "Talpiot" program at the "Sheba Medical Center", which identifies, promotes and prepares the most talented young doctors to fill key positions in the fields of medicine and health in Israel. This study is based on a project with the same name in the Israeli Defense Forces (IDF). It promotes an elite group of physicians and researchers at the medical center and includes the provision of scholarships, personal guidance and customized educational opportunities for its members. Conversely, every member in the program is committed to complete five years of training followed by another five years as a senior physician or a researcher at the medical center. Since 2002, there have been six cycles of "Talpionaires". The current 46 members of the program fill key leadership roles in the medical center and are considered leaders in their field. Among the program's alumni are managers of institutes, units and research institutes. This group is responsible for the publication of hundreds of scientific papers studies and dozens of patents in medical technology. Some of them have progressed academically far beyond their peers. Excellence programs are an integral part of any institution which considers itself a leader, both in medicine and beyond. The exciting and visionary "Talpiot" program is Sheba's contribution to the quality of the medical system in the country of Israel in the long run. Promoting young doctors and researchers to become leaders in the Israeli medical system is an integral part of national interests.

  6. Distributed and collaborative: Experiences of local leadership of a first-year experience program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo McKenzie

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Local level leadership of the first year experience (FYE is critical for engaging academic and professional staff in working collaboratively on a whole of institution focus on student transition and success. This paper describes ways in which local informal leadership is experienced at faculty level in an institutional FYE program, based on interviews with faculty coordinators and small grant recipients. Initial analysis using the distributed leadership tenets described by Jones, Hadgraft, Harvey, Lefoe, and Ryland (2014 revealed features that enabled success, such as collaborative communities, as well as faculty differences influenced by the strength of the external mandate for change in the FYE. More fine-grained analysis indicated further themes in engaging others, enabling and enacting the FYE program that fostered internal mandates for change: gaining buy-in; being opportunistic; making use of evidence of success and recognition; along with the need for collegial support for coordinators and self-perceptions of leadership being about making connections, collaboration, trust and expertise.

  7. Creation of a scholars program in dental leadership (SPDL) for dental and dental hygiene students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taichman, Russell S; Green, Thomas G; Polverini, Peter J

    2009-10-01

    There is a great need for leaders in the dental profession. As technological advances make our world smaller and our lives faster and more complex, we as a profession face challenges and opportunities that are evolving. Many of the changes in the scope and mode of practice will require new and different approaches. Meeting these challenges will require changes in how we as dental professionals do business; interact with our patients, other stakeholders, and health care providers; and educate our future colleagues. The purposeful incorporation of leadership education into dental and dental hygiene curricula represents an important departure from existing paradigms-but will help prepare our students to address these challenges. This article provides an overview of the development of a Scholars Program in Dental Leadership (SPDL) at the University of Michigan School of Dentistry. Our aim for the program is to create a learning environment that fosters leadership development, so that students are prepared and motivated to assume leadership positions in the profession and their communities.

  8. Leadership: Making Things Happen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisk, Dorothy A.

    This monograph presents activities and guidelines for developing leadership training programs for gifted and talented students. Three theories of leadership are discussed: trait theory which assumes that one is either born with leadership talent or one does not have it; leadership style theory in which the patterns of leadership are categorized as…

  9. Boost.Asio C++ network programming

    CERN Document Server

    Torjo, John

    2013-01-01

    What you want is an easy level of abstraction, which is just what this book provides in conjunction with Boost.Asio. Switching to Boost.Asio is just a few extra #include directives away, with the help of this practical and engaging guide.This book is great for developers that need to do network programming, who don't want to delve into the complicated issues of a raw networking API. You should be familiar with core Boost concepts, such as smart pointers and shared_from_this, resource classes (noncopyable), functors and boost::bind, boost mutexes, and the boost date/time library. Readers should

  10. Leadership styles and occupational stress among college athletic directors: the moderating effect of program goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryska, Todd A

    2002-03-01

    The interaction between an individual's abilities and the perceived demands of the workplace appears to make a unique contribution to job-related stress above and beyond that of dispositional or situational factors alone (R. S. Lazarus, 1990). In the present study, the author evaluated this contention among 245 male intercollegiate athletic directors by assessing the combined influence of leadership style and program goals on occupational stress. Regression analyses revealed the presence of both significant main effects and interaction effects of leadership style and program goals in the prediction of emotional exhaustion, daily job stress, and personal accomplishment. Findings are discussed in terms of person-environment fit theory (J. R. P. French, R. D. Caplan, & R. V. Harrison, 1982) and the notion of perceived control within the occupational setting.

  11. The Networked Principal: Examining Principals' Social Relationships and Transformational Leadership in School and District Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moolenaar, Nienke M.; Sleegers, Peter J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: While in everyday practice, school leaders are often involved in social relationships with a variety of stakeholders both within and outside their own schools, studies on school leaders' networks often focus either on networks within or outside schools. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the extent to which principals occupy…

  12. Advancing women and closing the leadership gap: the Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine (ELAM) program experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, R C; Morahan, P S; Cohen, D W; McDade, S A

    2001-04-01

    Women are persistently underrepresented in the higher levels of academic administration despite the fact that they have been entering the medical profession in increasing numbers for at least 20 years and now make up a large proportion of the medical student body and fill a similar proportion of entry level positions in medical schools. Although there are no easy remedies for gender inequities in medical schools, strategies have been proposed and implemented both within academic institutions and more broadly to achieve and sustain the advancement of women faculty to senior level positions. Substantial, sustained efforts to increase programs and activities addressing the major obstacles to advancement of women must be put in place so that the contributions of women can be fully realized and their skills fittingly applied in meeting the medical education and healthcare needs of all people in the 21st century.

  13. A study of science leadership and science standards in exemplary standards-based science programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Wendy Renae

    The purpose for conducting this qualitative study was to explore best practices of exemplary standards-based science programs and instructional leadership practices in a charter high school and in a traditional high school. The focus of this study included how twelve participants aligned practices to National Science Education Standards to describe their science programs and science instructional practices. This study used a multi-site case study qualitative design. Data were obtained through a review of literature, interviews, observations, review of educational documents, and researcher's notes collected in a field log. The methodology used was a multi-site case study because of the potential, through cross analysis, for providing greater explanation of the findings in the study (Merriam, 1988). This study discovered six characteristics about the two high school's science programs that enhance the literature found in the National Science Education Standards; (a) Culture of expectations for learning-In exemplary science programs teachers are familiar with a wide range of curricula. They have the ability to examine critically and select activities to use with their students to promote the understanding of science; (b) Culture of varied experiences-In exemplary science programs students are provided different paths to learning, which help students, take in information and make sense of concepts and skills that are set forth by the standards; (c) Culture of continuous feedback-In exemplary science programs teachers and students work together to engage students in ongoing assessments of their work and that of others as prescribed in the standards; (d) Culture of Observations-In exemplary science programs students, teachers, and principals reflect on classroom instructional practices; teachers receive ongoing evaluations about their teaching and apply feedback towards improving practices as outlined in the standards; (e) Culture of continuous learning-In exemplary

  14. A Study of Army Civilian Entry Level and Mid-Level Program Management Leadership Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-08

    and mid-grade level positions is an important responsibility for senior leaders. Mentoring and coaching entry level and mid-grade level...Program Management Leadership Development Craig J. Maurice Defense Acquisition University Senior Service College Fellowship 2015-2016 Huntsville...requirements for the Army’s Senior Service College Fellowship (SSCF) under the direction of SSCF Director, Mr. John Daniels and Research Advisor, Mr. Van

  15. Research Courses in Education Leadership Programs: Relevance in an Era of Accountability

    OpenAIRE

    Rebecca M. Bustamante; Julie P. Combs

    2011-01-01

    Master’s degree research course offerings of 72 university education leadership programs were examined to explore how relevant the courses were to the inquiry needs of practicing school leaders. Research course titles and descriptions were analyzed using content analysis. Findings revealed considerable variation in research course requirements, course titles, and course descriptions. Analysis of course descriptions indicated minimal emphasis on the research skills required for school improvem...

  16. Reflections on the contributions of self-advocates to an interdisciplinary leadership development program for graduate students in health affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Angela; Zuver, Deborah; Kermon, McCafferty; Fernandez, Claudia; Margolis, Lewis H

    2018-04-01

    To advance equity and to enhance leadership skills, self-advocates with intellectual/developmental disabilities are now part of the cohort of trainees in the University of North Carolina LEND, which means that they fully participate in the Interdisciplinary Leadership Development Program, a collaboration among programs in public health, social work, and LEND, which meets monthly. Given this important new participation by self-advocates, this study analyzes the reflections of graduate students on the contributions of self-advocates to their leadership training. At the conclusion of the program each year, graduate students respond to a questionnaire about how self-advocates influenced the content and interactions/discussions of the monthly workshops and are asked to provide specific examples to explain their perceptions. The 12 MCH leadership competencies were used to guide the coding of the comments for this qualitative, directed content analysis. Forty-six of 58 students (79.3%) from two consecutive cohorts responded for this cross-sectional study. Interactions with self-advocates prompted comments on 8 of the 12 leadership competencies, including interdisciplinary team building (29% of the comments); developing others through teaching and mentoring (22%); and self-reflection (18%). The inclusion of self-advocates throughout an interdisciplinary leadership development program for graduate students in health affairs can strengthen MCH leadership competencies for all participants as they enter an increasingly interdisciplinary workforce. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Perspectives of female medical faculty in Ethiopia on a leadership fellowship program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvach, Elizabeth; Yesehak, Bethlehem; Abebaw, Hiwot; Conniff, James; Busse, Heidi; Haq, Cynthia

    2017-09-01

    This study aims to evaluate a leadership fellowship program through perspectives of Ethiopian women medical faculty participants. An intensive two-week leadership development fellowship was designed for women faculty from Ethiopian medical schools and conducted from 2011-2015 at the University of Wisconsin-School of Medicine and Public Health in Madison, Wisconsin. Nine Ethiopian women working in early- or mid-level academic positions were selected. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with the fellows. Transcripts were reviewed through qualitative analysis to assess the perceived impact of the training on their careers. Three male academic leaders were interviewed to solicit feedback on the program. Eight of 9 fellows were interviewed. Themes describing the benefits of the fellowship included: increased awareness of gender inequities; enhanced motivation for career advancement; increased personal confidence; and improved leadership skills. Fellows provided suggestions for future training and scaling up efforts to promote gender equity. Male leaders described the benefits of men promoting gender equity within academic health centers. This paper provides evidence that targeted brief training programs can enhance women's motivation and skills to become effective leaders in academic medicine in Ethiopia. Promoting gender equity in academic medicine is an important strategy to address health workforce shortages and to provide professional role models for female students in the health professions.

  18. Principals' Conceptions of Instructional Leadership and Their Informal Social Networks: An Exploration of the Mechanisms of the Mesolevel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, Jessica G.

    2016-01-01

    First-year principals encounter multiple messages about what it means to be instructional leaders; this may matter for how they enact instructional leadership. This cross-case qualitative study uses a qualitative approach of social network analysis to uncover the mechanisms through which first-year principals encountered particular beliefs about…

  19. The Mount Sinai international enhancement of social work leadership program: The past and the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Elisa; Green, Karen; Whitwam, Louisa; Epstein, Irwin; Bernstein, Susan

    2018-07-01

    Developed in 1988, the Mount Sinai International Enhancement of Social Work Leadership Program brings 4-6 social workers from several countries each year to the Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, where they meet with leaders from the hospital, community based organizations and graduate schools of social work, to enhance their leadership ability, strengthen management and research skills, and build upon global social work relationships. This article reviews the results of a survey conducted in 2016 to assess whether the visiting scholars met established learning objectives of the Program. Survey outcomes, presented in quantitative and qualitative terms, show positive results, and the scholars reported that the Program was extremely beneficial. The Program is viewed through the lens of two select adult learning theories: Social Learning Theory, which incorporates collaboration and learning from others, and Transformative Learning Theory, which is comprised of self-reflection and individualized learning. The inclusion of these theories in the implementation of the Program will be discussed. An analysis of the survey's outcomes, through pre- and post-Program participation and learning, facilitates assessment of potential programmatic adjustments to help evaluate long-term viability of the Program and potential duplication by other academic medical centers.

  20. Can Professional Development Improve School Leadership? Results from a Randomized Control Trial Assessing the Impact of McREL's Balanced Leadership Program on Principals in Rural Michigan Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert James; Goddard, Roger D.; Kim, Minjung; Jacob, Robin; Goddard, Yvonne; Schroeder, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This multiyear experimental study was designed to examine (1) the causal impact of McREL International's Balanced Leadership® Professional Development (BLPD) program on school principals' learning, beliefs, and behaviors and (2) whether there were differences in the types of outcomes the professional development influenced. Outcomes…

  1. Everything Rises and Falls on Leadership: An Assessment of Undergraduate Leadership Development Programs at the University of Arkansas--Fayetteville

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Louis Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Today's students are the leaders of tomorrow, and their ability to lead in the 21st century will be critical to the sustainability of life, and the nation's ability to prosper will depend on the quality of leadership demonstrated at all levels of society. Student leadership development in institutions of higher education has never been more vital…

  2. Software-Programmed Optical Networking with Integrated NFV Service Provisioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehmeri, Victor; Wang, Xi; Basu, Shrutarshi

    2017-01-01

    We showcase demonstrations of “program & compile” styled optical networking as well as open platforms & standards based NFV service provisioning using a proof-of-concept implementation of the Software-Programmed Networking Operating System (SPN OS).......We showcase demonstrations of “program & compile” styled optical networking as well as open platforms & standards based NFV service provisioning using a proof-of-concept implementation of the Software-Programmed Networking Operating System (SPN OS)....

  3. Testing knowledge sharing effectiveness: trust, motivation, leadership style, workplace spirituality and social network embedded model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Muhammad Sabbir

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this inquiry is to investigate the relationships among the antecedents of knowledge sharing effectiveness under the position of non-academic staff of higher learning institutions through an empirical test of a conceptual model consisting of trust, extrinsic and intrinsic motivation, leadership style, workplace spirituality and online social network. This study used the respondents from the non-academic staff of higher learning institutions in Malaysia (n = 200, utilizing a self-administered survey questionnaire. The structural equation modeling approach was used to test the proposed hypotheses. The outcomes indicate that all the antecedents play a substantial function in knowledge sharing effectiveness. In addition, perceived risk plays a mediating role between trust and knowledge sharing effectiveness. On the other hand, this research also proved the communication skill also plays a mediating role between leadership style and knowledge sharing effectiveness. This study contributes to pioneering empirical findings on knowledge sharing literature under the scope of the non-academic staff perspective.

  4. Executive Energy Leadership Academy | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Executive Energy Leadership Academy Executive Energy Leadership Academy NREL's Executive Energy Leadership Academy is a nationally renowned program that provides non-technical business, governmental, and foreground. Leadership Program The Leadership Program is designed for community and industry leaders with an

  5. Lean and leadership practices: development of an initial realist program theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodridge, Donna; Westhorp, Gill; Rotter, Thomas; Dobson, Roy; Bath, Brenna

    2015-09-07

    Lean as a management system has been increasingly adopted in health care settings in an effort to enhance quality, capacity and safety, while simultaneously containing or reducing costs. The Ministry of Health in the province of Saskatchewan, Canada has made a multi-million dollar investment in Lean initiatives to create "better health, better value, better care, and better teams", affording a unique opportunity to advance our understanding of the way in which Lean philosophy, principles and tools work in health care. In order to address the questions, "What changes in leadership practices are associated with the implementation of Lean?" and "When leadership practices change, how do the changed practices contribute to subsequent outcomes?", we used a qualitative, multi-stage approach to work towards developing an initial realist program theory. We describe the implications of realist assumptions for evaluation of this Lean initiative. Formal theories including Normalization Process Theory, Theories of Double Loop and Organization Leaning and the Theory of Cognitive Dissonance help understand this initial rough program theory. Data collection included: key informant consultation; a stakeholder workshop; documentary review; 26 audiotaped and transcribed interviews with health region personnel; and team discussions. A set of seven initial hypotheses regarding the manner in which Lean changes leadership practices were developed from our data. We hypothesized that Lean, as implemented in this particular setting, changes leadership practices in the following ways. Lean: a) aligns the aims and objectives of health regions; b) authorizes attention and resources to quality improvement and change management c) provides an integrated set of tools for particular tasks; d) changes leaders' attitudes or beliefs about appropriate leadership and management styles and behaviors; e) demands increased levels of expertise, accountability and commitment from leaders; f) measures and

  6. Impacting Binational Health through Leadership Development: A Program Evaluation of the Leaders across Borders Program, 2010–2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar A. Contreras

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundWorkforce and leadership development is imperative for the advancement of public health along the U.S./Mexico border. The Leaders across borders (LaB program aims to train the public health and health-care workforce of the border region. The LaB is a 6-month intensive leadership development program, which offers training in various areas of public health. Program curriculum topics include: leadership, border health epidemiology, health diplomacy, border public policies, and conflict resolution.MethodsThis article describes the LaB program evaluation outcomes across four LaB cohort graduates between 2010 and 2014. LaB graduates received an invitation to participate via email in an online questionnaire. Eighty-five percent (n = 34 of evaluation participants indicated an improvement in the level of binationality since participating in the LaB program. Identified themes in the evaluation results included increased binational collaborations and partnerships across multidisciplinary organizations that work towards improving the health status of border communities. Approximately 93% (n = 37 of the LaB samples were interested in participating in future binational projects while 80% (n = 32 indicated interest in the proposal of other binational initiatives. Participants expressed feelings of gratitude from employers who supported their participation and successful completion of LaB.DiscussionPrograms such as LaB are important in providing professional development and education to a health-care workforce along the U.S./Mexico border that is dedicated to positively impacting the health outcomes of vulnerable populations residing in this region.

  7. A Community-Based Leadership Development Program for First Nations Women: Revaluing and Honoring Women’s Strengths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Amanda Maranzan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Over 400 First Nation women participated in leadership development workshops developed by First Nation women for First Nation women. We collected survey data and conducted focus groups and interviews with workshop participants to identify outcomes and determine barriers and resources to women in leadership. Outcomes of the workshop included increased perception of women as leaders, increased personal capacity, and encouragement to seek opportunities for formal and informal leadership positions. Family and home responsibility, community pressure, and lack of support were identified as barriers faced by women in leadership or considering leadership positions. This program represents an effort to empower women to participate in social, cultural, and political life within their communities and obtain equitable political representation.

  8. Mapping U.S. government tobacco control leadership: networked for success?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leischow, Scott J; Luke, Douglas A; Mueller, Nancy; Harris, Jenine K; Ponder, Paris; Marcus, Stephen; Clark, Pamela I

    2010-09-01

    In order to better understand how tobacco control efforts are coordinated across agencies of the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), we assessed tobacco control-related communication between tobacco control leaders across DHHS. Cross-sectional surveys were collected from individuals representing 11 DHHS agencies, and social network analyses were used to assess linkages and map agencies' tobacco control communication. Individuals within the Office of the Secretary and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) were most central to the network, and those of highest rank were most likely to be central to the network (F = 4.03, p = .024). The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Food and Drug Administration, Health Resources and Services Administration, and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration had no or almost no contact with other agencies. There was considerable between-agency contact variability, and the CDC was the most central agency. Tobacco control communication across DHHS agencies was present but extremely variable. This inconsistency may compromise the ability of the DHHS to address tobacco use, a critical public health problem, in a coordinated and efficient fashion. In light of the new leadership at DHHS, this analysis describes a systems approach that can be reimplemented as a means of understanding and improving communication and collaboration to improve public health.

  9. Organizational Change Management For Health Equity: Perspectives From The Disparities Leadership Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt, Joseph R; Tan-McGrory, Aswita; Kenst, Karey S; Phan, Thuy Hoai; Lopez, Lenny

    2017-06-01

    Leaders of health care organizations need to be prepared to improve quality and achieve equity in today's health care environment characterized by a focus on achieving value and addressing disparities in a diverse population. To help address this need, the Disparities Solutions Center at Massachusetts General Hospital launched the Disparities Leadership Program in 2007. The leadership program is an ongoing, year-long, executive education initiative that trains leaders from hospitals, health plans, and health centers to improve quality and eliminate racial and ethnic disparities in health care. Feedback from participating organizations demonstrates that health care leaders seem to possess knowledge about what disparities are and about what should be done to eliminate them. Data collection, performance measurement, and multifaceted interventions remain the tools of the trade. However, the barriers to success are lack of leadership buy-in, organizational prioritization, energy, and execution, which can be addressed through organizational change management strategies. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  10. Network interdiction and stochastic integer programming

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    On March 15, 2002 we held a workshop on network interdiction and the more general problem of stochastic mixed integer programming at the University of California, Davis. Jesús De Loera and I co-chaired the event, which included presentations of on-going research and discussion. At the workshop, we decided to produce a volume of timely work on the topics. This volume is the result. Each chapter represents state-of-the-art research and all of them were refereed by leading investigators in the respective fields. Problems - sociated with protecting and attacking computer, transportation, and social networks gain importance as the world becomes more dep- dent on interconnected systems. Optimization models that address the stochastic nature of these problems are an important part of the research agenda. This work relies on recent efforts to provide methods for - dressing stochastic mixed integer programs. The book is organized with interdiction papers first and the stochastic programming papers in the second part....

  11. Discourses of knowledge across global networks: What can be learnt about knowledge leadership from the ATLAS collaboration?

    CERN Document Server

    Mabey, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Writing on knowledge management (KM) and leadership studies tends to take place in parallel; both fields are prolific yet they rarely inform each other. A KM view tends to take a positional view of leaders and a functionalist view of firms: so it regards those with the ascription or status of leaders as pivotal, and knowledge as a commodity to be leveraged with the help of leaders to improve firm performance. But as the global reach of organizations in the knowledge-based economy become more stretched, as their operations become more networked and as their workforces become more mobile, the task of deploying and deriving value from knowledge becomes ever more challenging and calls for a qualitatively different approach which is termed knowledge leadership. In contrast to the instrumentalist approach of KM we offer some alternative discourses of knowledge and explore the implications of these for knowledge leadership. We then use interpretive discourse to examine the way knowledge activists enact and experienc...

  12. Training for Leadership Roles in Academic Medicine: Opportunities for Psychologists in the AAMC LEAD Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPaglia, Donna; Thompson, Britta; Hafler, Janet; Chauvin, Sheila

    2017-06-01

    Psychologists' roles within academic medicine have expanded well beyond research and scholarship. They are active as providers of patient care, medical education, and clinical supervision. Although the number of psychologists in academic health centers continues to grow, they represent a small portion of total medical school faculties. However, with the movement toward collaborative care models, emphasis on interprofessional teams, and increased emphasis on psychological science topics in medical curricula, psychologists are well-positioned to make further contributions. Another path through which psychologists can further increase their contributions and value within academic health centers is to aspire to leadership roles. This article describes the first author's reflections on her experiences in a two-year, cohort-based, educational leadership development certificate program in academic medicine. The cohort was comprised largely of physicians and basic scientists, and a small number of non-physician participants of which the first author was the only clinical psychologist. The insights gained from this experience provide recommendations for psychologists interested in leadership opportunities in academic medicine.

  13. The impact of a supportive leadership program in a policing organisation from the participants' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Juanita; Maclean, Rowena; Biggs, Herbert

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the implementation of an organisational level intervention, focussing on Supportive Leadership (SL), in an Australian police organisation from the perspective of supervisors and managers. The impact of the intervention was explored using a qualitative methodology using semi-structured telephone interviews with 44 participants who had attended the Supportive Leadership Workshop, designed to improve awareness of good management practices. Data was subjected to thematic analysis using a social constructivist theoretical orientation. Findings showed that SL as a concept was generally accepted by a majority of participants and that they had integrated a number of SL strategies into their work practices. The participants also identified the importance of senior personnel role-modelling SL and the negative impact of non-role modelling. RESEARCH LIMITATIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: The major limitation of the study was the non-random sample of voluntary participants. However, the nature of conducting applied studies in police organisations is inherently difficult due to confidentiality and their paramilitary nature. This study highlights the need for future studies in police leadership and occupational stress that directly explore issues from the perspective of the supervisors and managers. Interventions such as SL need support and role modelling from senior management to enhance their credibility. ORIGINAL VALUE: This paper reports on an applied intervention that received major support and funding within a police organisation. It is of value to other organizations considering similar interventions because it highlights issues that could be addressed to further enhance the program.

  14. Logic integer programming models for signaling networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haus, Utz-Uwe; Niermann, Kathrin; Truemper, Klaus; Weismantel, Robert

    2009-05-01

    We propose a static and a dynamic approach to model biological signaling networks, and show how each can be used to answer relevant biological questions. For this, we use the two different mathematical tools of Propositional Logic and Integer Programming. The power of discrete mathematics for handling qualitative as well as quantitative data has so far not been exploited in molecular biology, which is mostly driven by experimental research, relying on first-order or statistical models. The arising logic statements and integer programs are analyzed and can be solved with standard software. For a restricted class of problems the logic models reduce to a polynomial-time solvable satisfiability algorithm. Additionally, a more dynamic model enables enumeration of possible time resolutions in poly-logarithmic time. Computational experiments are included.

  15. Genetic Network Programming with Reconstructed Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fengming; Mabu, Shingo; Wang, Lutao; Eto, Shinji; Hirasawa, Kotaro

    A lot of research on evolutionary computation has been done and some significant classical methods such as Genetic Algorithm (GA), Genetic Programming (GP), Evolutionary Programming (EP), and Evolution Strategies (ES) have been studied. Recently, a new approach named Genetic Network Programming (GNP) has been proposed. GNP can evolve itself and find the optimal solution. It is based on the idea of Genetic Algorithm and uses the data structure of directed graphs. Many papers have demonstrated that GNP can deal with complex problems in the dynamic environments very efficiently and effectively. As a result, recently, GNP is getting more and more attentions and is used in many different areas such as data mining, extracting trading rules of stock markets, elevator supervised control systems, etc., and GNP has obtained some outstanding results. Focusing on the GNP's distinguished expression ability of the graph structure, this paper proposes a method named Genetic Network Programming with Reconstructed Individuals (GNP-RI). The aim of GNP-RI is to balance the exploitation and exploration of GNP, that is, to strengthen the exploitation ability by using the exploited information extensively during the evolution process of GNP and finally obtain better performances than that of GNP. In the proposed method, the worse individuals are reconstructed and enhanced by the elite information before undergoing genetic operations (mutation and crossover). The enhancement of worse individuals mimics the maturing phenomenon in nature, where bad individuals can become smarter after receiving a good education. In this paper, GNP-RI is applied to the tile-world problem which is an excellent bench mark for evaluating the proposed architecture. The performance of GNP-RI is compared with that of the conventional GNP. The simulation results show some advantages of GNP-RI demonstrating its superiority over the conventional GNPs.

  16. Students as facilitators in a teacher training program: motivation for leadership roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Annette; van Diggele, Christie; Mellis, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Although students often partake in peer-teaching activities during medical school, they are rarely provided with formal training in teaching. We have previously described our teacher training (TT) program for medical students. The TT program is delivered face-to-face across two sessions. In order to alleviate academic teaching load required to run the course, and at the same time provide our final-year students with practical opportunities to develop their leadership skills, we engaged five senior students as co-facilitators alongside academic staff. By developing an understanding of our students' motivation to participate as facilitators, we may be able to promote an interest within leadership in teaching among other students. Our study sought to examine students' motivation to take part as facilitators in the TT program. Data were collected through a focus group session with the five student facilitators. Self-determination theory, which poses that there are three elements key to intrinsic motivation, including autonomy, competence, and relatedness, was used as a conceptual lens to identify and code recurrent themes in the data. Elements that motivated students to assist in facilitation included an opportunity to review and build on their knowledge and skills in teaching practices; the recognition and acknowledgement received from school staff and fellow students; the opportunity to develop these relationships; and a desire to increase their peer-teaching responsibilities. By actively involving our students in leadership practices, we were able to not only engage the students, but also develop our student community and contribute to the promotion of a culture of excellence in teaching within the hospital.

  17. Implementation of a Cognitive Skills Training Program in ROTC: The Leadership Enrichment Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-03-01

    IMPLEMENTATION ..................... B-i C. LEP BRIDGING MANUAL . ............... ..... C-I D. ROTC INSTRUCTORS TRAINED IN IE ............... D-1 E. BASIC...cognitive ability. The importance of thinking ability is em- phasized throughout the leadership field manual , FM-22-100, particularly in the sections...haplamtation * Qonfeaumos Calls, * Gonctmetr Site Visits * instrutor 4-5/85 questionnaires Got Feeback an * Conference Camll * Ref ruskur Session 2/85 Frolow

  18. Quantitative Research Methods Training in Education Leadership and Administration Preparation Programs as Disciplined Inquiry for Building School Improvement Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Alex J.

    2017-01-01

    The quantitative research methods course is a staple of graduate programs in education leadership and administration. Historically, these courses serve to train aspiring district and school leaders in fundamental statistical research topics. This article argues for programs to focus as well in these courses on helping aspiring leaders develop…

  19. Fellowship Program in Health System Improvement: A novel approach integrating leadership development and patient-centred health system transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippon, Donald J; Montesanti, Stephanie; Stafinski, Tania

    2018-03-01

    This article highlights a novel approach to professional development, integrating leadership, development and patient-centred health system transformation in the new Fellowship Program in Health System Improvement offered by the School of Public Health at the University of Alberta. Early assessment of the program is also provided.

  20. Developing a Survey to Determine Student Perceptions of Readiness at the Beginning of an Educational Leadership Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Michael D.; Gratto, John

    2015-01-01

    In this study, researchers developed a survey to determine student perceptions of readiness prior to entering an educational leadership program. The researchers analyzed and established the reliability and validity of the survey created to understand student readiness as they enter the program. The information garnered from this survey will help…

  1. Assessing change in perceived community leadership readiness in the Obesity Prevention and Lifestyle program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostadinov, Iordan; Daniel, Mark; Jones, Michelle; Cargo, Margaret

    2016-02-01

    Issue addressed The context of community-based childhood obesity prevention programs can influence the effects of these intervention programs. Leadership readiness for community mobilisation for childhood obesity prevention is one such contextual factor. This study assessed perceived community leadership readiness (PCLR) at two time points in a state-wide, multisite community-based childhood obesity prevention program. Methods PCLR was assessed across 168 suburbs of 20 intervention communities participating in South Australia's Obesity Prevention and Lifestyle (OPAL) program. Using a validated online PCLR tool, four key respondents from each community rated each suburb within their respective community on a nine-point scale for baseline and 2015. Average PCLR and change scores were calculated using the general linear model with suburbs nested in communities. Relationships between demographic variables and change in PCLR were evaluated using multiple regression. Ease of survey use was also assessed. Results Average PCLR increased between baseline (3.51, s.d.=0.82) and 2015 (5.23, s.d.=0.89). PCLR rose in 18 of 20 intervention communities. PCLR was inversely associated with suburb population size (r 2 =0.03, P=0.03, β=-0.25) and positively associated with intervention duration (r 2 change=0.08, P=0.00, β=0.29). Only 8% of survey respondents considered the online assessment tool difficult to use. Conclusions PCLR increased over the course of the OPAL intervention. PCLR varied between and within communities. Online assessment of PCLR has utility for multisite program evaluations. So what? Use of a novel, resource-efficient online tool to measure the key contextual factors of PCLR has enabled a better understanding of the success and generalisability of the OPAL program.

  2. Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring (CALM) Program Network, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The CALM network includes 168 active sites in both hemispheres with 15 participating countries. This network represents the only coordinated and standardized program...

  3. Program Spotlight: National Outreach Network's Community Health Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Outreach Network of Community Health Educators located at Community Network Program Centers, Partnerships to Advance Cancer Health Equity, and NCI-designated cancer centers help patients and their families receive survivorship support.

  4. Transforming LEND leadership training curriculum through the maternal and child health leadership competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Betsy P; Couse, Leslie J; Sonnenmeier, Rae M; Kurtz, Alan; Russell, Susan M; Antal, Peter

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe how the Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Leadership Competencies (v 3.0) were used to examine and improve an MCH Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities (LEND) training curriculum for New Hampshire and Maine. Over 15 % of the nation's children experience neurodevelopmental disabilities or special health care needs and estimates suggest 1 in every 68 children is diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder. Across the Unites States critical shortages of qualified MCH professionals exist, particularly in poor and rural areas. A continued investment in training interdisciplinary leaders is critical. The MCH Leadership Competencies provide an effective foundation for leadership training through identification of requisite knowledge, skills, and dispositions required of MCH leaders. This paper describes a three-step process, which began in 2010 and included utilizing the MCH Leadership Competencies as a tool to reflect on, develop, and evaluate the NH LEND leadership curriculum. Curriculum development was further supported through participation in a multi-state learning collaborative. Through a series of intentional decisions, the curriculum design of NH LEND utilized the competencies and evidence-based principles of instruction to engage trainees in the development of specific MCH content knowledge and leadership skills. The LEND network specifically, and MCH leadership programs more broadly, may benefit from the intentional use of the MCH competencies to assist in curriculum development and program evaluation, and as a means to support trainees in identifying specific leadership goals and evaluating their leadership skill development.

  5. Incorporating the life course model into MCH nutrition leadership education and training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haughton, Betsy; Eppig, Kristen; Looney, Shannon M; Cunningham-Sabo, Leslie; Spear, Bonnie A; Spence, Marsha; Stang, Jamie S

    2013-01-01

    Life course perspective, social determinants of health, and health equity have been combined into one comprehensive model, the life course model (LCM), for strategic planning by US Health Resources and Services Administration's Maternal and Child Health Bureau. The purpose of this project was to describe a faculty development process; identify strategies for incorporation of the LCM into nutrition leadership education and training at the graduate and professional levels; and suggest broader implications for training, research, and practice. Nineteen representatives from 6 MCHB-funded nutrition leadership education and training programs and 10 federal partners participated in a one-day session that began with an overview of the models and concluded with guided small group discussions on how to incorporate them into maternal and child health (MCH) leadership training using obesity as an example. Written notes from group discussions were compiled and coded emergently. Content analysis determined the most salient themes about incorporating the models into training. Four major LCM-related themes emerged, three of which were about training: (1) incorporation by training grants through LCM-framed coursework and experiences for trainees, and similarly framed continuing education and skills development for professionals; (2) incorporation through collaboration with other training programs and state and community partners, and through advocacy; and (3) incorporation by others at the federal and local levels through policy, political, and prevention efforts. The fourth theme focused on anticipated challenges of incorporating the model in training. Multiple methods for incorporating the LCM into MCH training and practice are warranted. Challenges to incorporating include the need for research and related policy development.

  6. MD/MBA programs in the United States: evidence of a change in health care leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, David B; Chandler, Maria; Forman, Howard P

    2003-03-01

    Managerial sciences are playing an increasingly prominent role in the organization and delivery of health care. Despite popular media reports that a rising number of physicians are acquiring a background in this discipline through MD/MBA (medical and master of business administration) programs, no recent study has verified this. This study measured changes in the number and nature of the affiliations between management and medicine in the form of MD/MBA programs in the United States. Surveys of admission officers of 125 U.S. allopathic medical schools and of the overseers of each joint MD/MBA degree program were administered in May-October 2001. Main outcome measures included program growth, curriculum and degree requirements, application and admission requirements, and program leadership and organization. The number of MD/MBA programs grew from six to 33 between 1993 and 2001, and 17 more medical schools were considering establishing the joint-degree program. Ten, 15, and 20 programs produced 27, 42, and 61 graduates in 1999, 2000, and 2001, respectively, and over 100 students were expected to graduate per year when all 33 programs matured. Program structures and oversight indicate a spectrum of philosophies regarding the appropriate level of integration of the two degrees. MD/MBA programs apparently attempt to complement medical education with management education rather than the converse. The growth in the numbers of MD/MBA programs and participants indicates rising cooperation between medical and business schools and increasing interest in management education early in the careers of graduating physicians.

  7. Building capacity for change: evaluation of an organisation-wide leadership development program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Tim; Shoobridge, Jodie; Harvey, Gill; Carter, Libby; Kitson, Alison

    2018-05-23

    Objective. This study evaluated Leading 4 Change, a change leadership development program designed to support healthcare middle managers through a period of significant organisational change and enhance workplace resilience. Methods. A mixed methods evaluation was conducted within the program's framework of a quality improvement activity. Quantitative measures were participant responses (n=160) to online questionnaires, which were compared before and after the program, using an uncontrolled pre-post study design. Four questionnaires were used: Resilience @ Work, General Self-Efficacy, the 11-item Learning Organization Survey and organisational climate. Differences between the pre- and post-program periods were compared using linear mixed-effects models, incorporating repeated measures between 'pre' and 'post' periods. Qualitative data were obtained by interviewing four participants on three occasions during the program, and through text responses provided by participants during a presentation session after the program finished. Both interview data and textual data were subjected to thematic analysis. Results. Integration of data from quantitative and qualitative analyses generated three main findings: (1) participants were satisfied and engaged with the program, which met their learning objectives; (2) the program led to increased workplace resilience, in particular the ability to manage stress and self-efficacy for individuals; and (3) organisational learning perceptions were unchanged. Conclusion. Although conducted during a period of intense internal and external pressure, Leading 4 Change led to demonstrable effects. It effectively engaged middle managers across a health system. However, there was no evidence that the effect of the program extended beyond individual participants to their perceptions of their work environment as a learning organisation. What is known about the topic? Although much has been written about change management and change leadership

  8. A Qualitative Program Evaluation of a Structured Leadership Mentoring Program at a Large Aerospace Corporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teller, Romney P.

    2011-01-01

    The researcher utilized a qualitative approach to conduct a program evaluation of the organization where he is employed. The study intended to serve as a program evaluation for the structured in-house mentoring program at a large aerospace corporation (A-Corp). This program evaluation clarified areas in which the current mentoring program is…

  9. NWTS waste package program plan. Volume II. Program logic networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-10-01

    This document describes the work planned for developing the technology to design, test and produce packages used for the long-term isolation of nuclear waste in deep geologic repositories. Waste forms considered include spent fuel and high-level waste. The testing and selection effort for barrier materials for radionuclide containment is described. The NWTS waste package program is a design-driven effort; waste package conceptual designs are used as input for preliminary designs, which are upgraded to a final design as materials and testing data become available. Performance assessment models are developed and validated. Milestones and a detailed schedule are given for the waste package development effort. Program logic networks defining work flow, interfaces among the NWTS Projects, and interrelationships of specific activities are presented. Detailed work elements are provided for the Waste Package Program Plan subtasks - design and development, waste form, barrier materials, and performance evaluation - for salt and basalt, host rocks for which the state of waste package knowledge and the corresponding data base are advanced

  10. Deep Space Network Radiometric Remote Sensing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Steven J.

    1994-01-01

    Planetary spacecraft are viewed through a troposphere that absorbs and delays radio signals propagating through it. Tropospheric water, in the form of vapor, cloud liquid, and precipitation, emits radio noise which limits satellite telemetry communication link performance. Even at X-band, rain storms have severely affected several satellite experiments including a planetary encounter. The problem will worsen with DSN implementation of Ka-band because communication link budgets will be dominated by tropospheric conditions. Troposphere-induced propagation delays currently limit VLBI accuracy and are significant sources of error for Doppler tracking. Additionally, the success of radio science programs such as satellite gravity wave experiments and atmospheric occultation experiments depends on minimizing the effect of water vapor-induced propagation delays. In order to overcome limitations imposed by the troposphere, the Deep Space Network has supported a program of radiometric remote sensing. Currently, water vapor radiometers (WVRs) and microwave temperature profilers (MTPs) support many aspects of the Deep Space Network operations and research and development programs. Their capability to sense atmospheric water, microwave sky brightness, and atmospheric temperature is critical to development of Ka-band telemetry systems, communication link models, VLBI, satellite gravity wave experiments, and radio science missions. During 1993, WVRs provided data for propagation model development, supported planetary missions, and demonstrated advanced tracking capability. Collection of atmospheric statistics is necessary to model and predict performance of Ka-band telemetry links, antenna arrays, and radio science experiments. Since the spectrum of weather variations has power at very long time scales, atmospheric measurements have been requested for periods ranging from one year to a decade at each DSN site. The resulting database would provide reliable statistics on daily

  11. Reduction of admit wait times: the effect of a leadership-based program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Pankaj B; Combs, Mary A; Vinson, David R

    2014-03-01

    Prolonged admit wait times in the emergency department (ED) for patients who require hospitalization lead to increased boarding time in the ED, a significant cause of ED congestion. This is associated with decreased quality of care, higher morbidity and mortality, decreased patient satisfaction, increased costs for care, ambulance diversion, higher numbers of patients who leave without being seen (LWBS), and delayed care with longer lengths of stay (LOS) for other ED patients. The objective was to assess the effect of a leadership-based program to expedite hospital admissions from the ED. This before-and-after observational study was undertaken from 2006 through 2011 at one community hospital ED. A team of ED and hospital leaders implemented a program to reduce admit wait times, using a computerized hospital-wide tracking system to monitor inpatient and ED bed status. The team collaboratively and consistently moved ED patients to their inpatient beds within an established goal of 60 minutes after an admission decision was reached. Top leadership actively intervened in real time by contacting staff whenever delays occurred to expedite immediate solutions to achieve the 60-minute goal. The primary outcome measures were the percentage of ED patients who were admitted to inpatient beds within 60 minutes from the time the beds were requested and ED boarding time. LOS, patient satisfaction, LWBS rate, and ambulance diversion hours were also measured. After ED census, hospital admission rates, and ED bed capacity were controlled for using a multivariable linear regression analysis, the admit wait time reduction program contributed to an increase in patients being admitted to the hospital within 60 minutes by 16 percentage points (95% confidence intervals [CI] = 10 to 22 points; p leadership-based program to reduce admit wait times and boarding times was associated with a significant increase in the percentage of patients admitted to the hospital within 60 minutes and a

  12. The Afya Bora Fellowship: An Innovative Program Focused on Creating an Interprofessional Network of Leaders in Global Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Wendy M; Farquhar, Carey; Mashalla, Yohana

    2017-09-01

    Most current health professions education programs are focused on the development of clinical skills. As a result, they may not address the complex and interconnected nature of global health. Trainees require relevant clinical, programmatic, and leadership skills to meet the challenges of practicing in an increasingly globalized environment. To develop health care leaders within sub-Saharan Africa, the Afya Bora Consortium developed a one-year fellowship for medical doctors and nurses. Fellows from nine institutions in the United States and sub-Saharan Africa participate in 12 learning modules focused on leadership development and program management. Classroom-based training is augmented with an experiential apprenticeship component. Since 2011, 100 fellows have graduated from the program. During their apprenticeships, fellows developed projects beneficial to their development and to host organizations. The program has developed fellows' skills in leadership, lent expertise to local organizations, and built knowledge in local contexts. Most fellows have returned to their countries of origin, thus building local capacity. U.S.-based fellows examine global health challenges from regional perspectives and learn from sub-Saharan African experts and peers. The Consortium provides ongoing support to alumni through career development awards and alumni network engagement with current and past fellow cohorts. The Consortium expanded from its initial network of five countries to six and continues to seek opportunities for geographical and institutional expansion.

  13. Development and evaluation of a leadership training program for public health emergency response: results from a Chinese study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Yihua

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since the 9/11 attack and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS, the development of qualified and able public health leaders has become a new urgency in building the infrastructure needed to address public health emergencies. Although previous studies have reported that the training of individual leaders is an important approach, the systemic and scientific training model need further improvement and development. The purpose of this study was to develop, deliver, and evaluate a participatory leadership training program for emergency response. Methods Forty-one public health leaders (N = 41 from five provinces completed the entire emergency preparedness training program in China. The program was evaluated by anonymous questionnaires and semi-structured interviews held prior to training, immediately post-training and 12-month after training (Follow-up. Results The emergency preparedness training resulted in positive shifts in knowledge, self-assessment of skills for public health leaders. More than ninety-five percent of participants reported that the training model was scientific and feasible. Moreover, the response of participants in the program to the avian influenza outbreak, as well as the planned evaluations for this leadership training program, further demonstrated both the successful approaches and methods and the positive impact of this integrated leadership training initiative. Conclusion The emergency preparedness training program met its aims and objectives satisfactorily, and improved the emergency capability of public health leaders. This suggests that the leadership training model was effective and feasible in improving the emergency preparedness capability.

  14. Exploring the use of grounded theory as a methodological approach to examine the 'black box' of network leadership in the national quality forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoflund, A Bryce

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes how grounded theory was used to investigate the "black box" of network leadership in the creation of the National Quality Forum. Scholars are beginning to recognize the importance of network organizations and are in the embryonic stages of collecting and analyzing data about network leadership processes. Grounded theory, with its focus on deriving theory from empirical data, offers researchers a distinctive way of studying little-known phenomena and is therefore well suited to exploring network leadership processes. Specifically, this paper provides an overview of grounded theory, a discussion of the appropriateness of grounded theory to investigating network phenomena, a description of how the research was conducted, and a discussion of the limitations and lessons learned from using this approach.

  15. An Evaluation Study of an Executive Master of Business Administration (EMBA) Program in an Urban City: Examining the Transfer of Knowledge and Leadership Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hye Lim

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of the Executive Master of Business Administration (EMBA) degree program in terms of transfer of knowledge and leadership practices. Based on a review of literature related to adult learning theories, EMBA programs, the importance of evaluation practices, and leadership practices, this study was designed to…

  16. Book Review ~ Preparing your Campus for a Networked Future: Educuase Leadership Strategy No. 1. Editor: Mark A. Luker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reviewed by Erin Keough

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available This book is part of a series on leadership strategies “designed to help university and college presidents and other top leaders in higher education understand and prepare for the impact of advanced networking on the institutions” (p.xv. It is interesting to review following what some have termed the “nuclear winter” in telecommunications industry, a book related to the networked future that was written, or at least conceived, in 1999, when enthusiasm for how electronic networks would change the world was at its peak. Although these authors, like many of us, might wish to temper the predictions made about the speed at which advanced networking would “break the access, performance and cost barriers that have in the past presented an insurmountable obstacle to the new vision of education”(p.1, much of the information and policy advice in the book has withstood the test of a short but turbulent time.

  17. Occupying the Principal Position: Examining Relationships between Transformational Leadership, Social Network Position, and Schools' Innovative Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moolenaar, Nienke M.; Daly, Alan J.; Sleegers, Peter J. C.

    2010-01-01

    Throughout the world, educational policy makers, practitioners, and scholars have acknowledged the importance of principal leadership in the generation and implementation of innovations. In many studies, transformational leadership has emerged as a promising approach in response to increasing demands to develop and implement innovations in…

  18. Career paths of alumni of the Cornell Leadership Program for veterinary students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, D R; McGregor, D D; Grohn, Y T

    The Cornell Leadership Program at Cornell University, usa, aims to assist talented veterinary students to embark on careers in research, academia, government agencies or industry. Over 400 students have participated since the Program began in 1990 and their subsequent careers have been followed. In this study, five sources of data were analysed: application documents of the participants; audio recordings of interviews with each participant from 2000 to 2007; annual tracking records of alumni after graduating with a veterinary degree; spontaneous comments from alumni about how the Program influenced their career plans; and a list of published scientific papers by alumni. Analysis revealed that about 50 per cent of veterinary graduates were establishing themselves in careers envisaged by the Program, although many of them experienced conflicts between a vocational commitment to clinical practice and a desire to solve problems through research. Many alumni asserted that the Program had influenced their career plans, but they had difficulty in accepting that rigorous scientific training was more important in acquiring research skills than working directly on a veterinary research problem. One career of great appeal to alumni was that of veterinary translational science, in which disease mechanisms are defined through fundamental research. It is concluded from the data that there are three challenging concepts for recently qualified veterinarians aiming to advance the knowledge of animal disease: research careers are satisfying and rewarding for veterinarians; a deep understanding of the chosen field of research is needed; and a high standard of scientific training is required to become an effective veterinary scientist.

  19. Texas High School Principals' First Year Experiences and Perceptions Relating to the Leadership of Career and Technical Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nix, Toby Lee

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions and experiences of three Texas high school principals regarding their first-year of leadership involving Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs. A narrative non-fiction methodology was used to present the participants' stories and perceptions of their lived experiences. The three…

  20. A Cultural Approach to Understanding Professional Experiences of Foreign-Born Faculty in U.S. Educational Leadership Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrabrova, Iryna; Sanzo, Karen L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the professional experiences of foreign-born faculty members serving in U.S. educational leadership preparation programs, utilizing a cultural approach to discern their lived experiences related to professional life. Cultural values were explored as reflected in professional life experiences. The…

  1. Levels of Leadership: Effects of District and School Leaders on the Quality of School Programs of Family and Community Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Joyce L.; Galindo, Claudia L.; Sheldon, Steven B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study tests key constructs of sociocultural and organizational learning theories with quantitative methods to better understand the nature and impact of district and school leadership and actions on the quality of programs of family and community involvement. Research Design: Survey data from a "nested" sample of 24 districts and 407…

  2. An Examination of Mental Health Content in Course Work and Field Experiences in Connecticut Educational Leadership Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Dorothy P.

    2017-01-01

    This exploratory mixed method convergent parallel study examined Connecticut Educational leadership preparation programs for the existence of mental health content to learn the extent to which pre-service school leaders are prepared for addressing student mental health. Interviews were conducted with school mental health experts and Connecticut…

  3. The Double Bind for Women: Exploring the Gendered Nature of Turnaround Leadership in a Principal Preparation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Jennie Miles; Burton, Laura J.

    2016-01-01

    In this study of nine participants in a turnaround principal preparation program, Jennie Miles Weiner and Laura J. Burton explore how gender role identity shaped participants' views of effective principal leadership and their place within it. The authors find that although female and male participants initially framed effective leadership…

  4. Social network analysis of public health programs to measure partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoen, Martin W; Moreland-Russell, Sarah; Prewitt, Kim; Carothers, Bobbi J

    2014-12-01

    In order to prevent chronic diseases, community-based programs are encouraged to take an ecological approach to public health promotion and involve many diverse partners. Little is known about measuring partnership in implementing public health strategies. We collected data from 23 Missouri communities in early 2012 that received funding from three separate programs to prevent obesity and/or reduce tobacco use. While all of these funding programs encourage partnership, only the Social Innovation for Missouri (SIM) program included a focus on building community capacity and enhancing collaboration. Social network analysis techniques were used to understand contact and collaboration networks in community organizations. Measurements of average degree, density, degree centralization, and betweenness centralization were calculated for each network. Because of the various sizes of the networks, we conducted comparative analyses with and without adjustment for network size. SIM programs had increased measurements of average degree for partner collaboration and larger networks. When controlling for network size, SIM groups had higher measures of network density and lower measures of degree centralization and betweenness centralization. SIM collaboration networks were more dense and less centralized, indicating increased partnership. The methods described in this paper can be used to compare partnership in community networks of various sizes. Further research is necessary to define causal mechanisms of partnership development and their relationship to public health outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Leadership development programs for health care middle managers: An exploration of the top management team member perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whaley, Alan; Gillis, William E

    Hospitals throughout the United States establish leadership and management programs for their middle managers. Despite their pervasiveness and an increased emphasis on physician leadership, there is limited research regarding the development programs designed for clinical and nonclinical health care middle managers. Using two theoretical lenses, signaling and institutional theory, this exploratory study investigates mid-sized hospital development programs from the perspective of top management team (TMT) members. Our objective is to find out what types of programs hospitals have, how they are developed, and how they are evaluated. We conducted semistructured interviews with 13 TMT members in six purposefully selected hospitals and matched these interviews with program curricula. Careful coding of the data allowed us not only to show our data in a meaningful visual representation but also to show the progression of the data from raw form to aggregate themes in the qualitative research process. We identified four types of development programs used in the selected hospitals: (a) ongoing series, (b) curriculum-based, (c) management orientation, and (d) mentoring. Challenges existed in aligning the need for the program with program content. Communication occurred both through direct messaging regarding policies and procedures and through hidden signals. TMT members referenced other programs for guidance but were not always clear about what it is they wanted the programs to accomplish. Finally, there was limited program outcome measurement. Our small sample indicates that specific, structured, and comprehensive programs perform best. The better programs were always trying to improve but that most needed better accountability of tracking outcomes. In setting up a program, a collaborative approach among TMT members to establish what the needs are and how to measure outcomes worked well. Successful programs also tied in their leadership development with overall employee

  6. A DOCTORAL PROGRAM FOR THE WORLD: GLOBAL TERTIARY EDUCATION AND LEADERSHIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jace Hargis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to share the findings of a highly generalizable investigative feasibility project, whose goal is to enhance the teaching ability of current higher education faculty members. The mission of the project was to introduce a new doctoral degree on Global Education and Leadership (GEL geared toward a ubiquitous, broad approach to assist faculty members in their pursuit of improved teaching and learning. The methods used were to perform an online search identifying 18 different institutions, whose mission focused on both student-centered learning, as well as pursued an active scholarship of teaching and learning agenda; contact 52 key personnel for a visit to share our program; travel to each of eight countries to share the vision of the program in five weeks; and finally to collate results and examine trends and identify host institutions, accreditation steps and start dates. The major result of this experience was the unanimous agreement on the universal unsystematic process of providing tertiary faculty members with the essential andragogical methods to efficiently and effectively become exemplar teachers. Due to the overwhelming uniformity in affirmative response to the program, the key conclusion is to move forward with the doctoral program aggressively.

  7. Teachers’ Perceptions of Inclusion in a Pilot Inclusive Education Program: Implications for Instructional Leadership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary Y. Mngo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The opinions of general education secondary school teachers in seven select schools involved in a pilot inclusive education program in the Northwest Region of Cameroon were sought. The findings reveal that most teachers in Cameroon still prefer separate special education institutions to inclusive ones. These conclusions contradict earlier research which showed that resistance to integrated classrooms was emanating from beliefs and customs. Teachers with some training on teaching students with disabilities and more experienced and highly educated teachers were more supportive of inclusive education indicating that resistance to the practice is linked to inadequate or complete lack of teachers’ preparedness. Younger, less experienced teachers with no training in special education indicated less enthusiasm regarding the benefits of inclusion, their ability to manage integrated classrooms, and teach students with disabilities. The implication of these findings for future research, institutional support systems, institutional policies, and overall instructional leadership is discussed in this article.

  8. AN EVALUATIVE STUDY OF AN ICT MODULE FOR A SCHOOL LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT PREPARATION PROGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarietjie MUSGRAVE

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study reports on findings of an evaluative study on the effectiveness of an information and communication technology (ICT module that forms part of the Advanced Certificate in Education: School Leadership and Management program. The study was carried out among distance education (DE students from the University of the Free State enrolled for above mentioned module. Two ICT audit surveys were used to gather data. This study used two modes of evaluation: Jung and Latchem’s (2007 quality indicators for DE and comparison. The findings highlight ready access to ICT, technical support, appropriate guidance and support by knowledgeable, innovative and committed facilitators and the creation of a sense of community as imperatives for teaching education leaders ICT skills and knowledge.

  9. Using Transcendental Phenomenology to Explore the “Ripple Effect” in a Leadership Mentoring Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tammy Moerer-Urdahl

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Several approaches exist for organizing and analyzing data in a phenomenological qualitative study. Transcendental phenomenology, based on principles identified by Husserl (1931 and translated into a qualitative method by Moustakas (1994, holds promise as a viable procedure for phenomenological research. However, to best understand the approach to transcendental phenomenology, the procedures need to be illustrated by a qualitative study that employs this approach. This article first discusses the procedures for organizing and analyzing data according to Moustakas (1994. Then it illustrates each step in the data analysis procedure of transcendental phenomenology using a study of reinvestment or the “ripple effect” for nine individuals who have participated in a youth leadership mentoring program from the 1970s to the present. Transcendental phenomenology works well for this study as this methodology provides logical, systematic, and coherent design elements that lead to an essential description of the experience.

  10. Case study of physician leaders in quality and patient safety, and the development of a physician leadership network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Chris; Yousefi, Vandad; Wallington, Tamara; Ginzburg, Amir

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing recognition of the need for physician leadership in quality and patient safety, and emerging evidence that physician leadership contributes to improved care. Hospitals are beginning to establish physician leader positions; however, there is little guidance on how to define these roles and the strategies physician leaders can use toward improving care. This case study examines the roles of four physician leaders, describes their contribution to the design and implementation of hospital quality and patient safety agendas and discusses the creation of a physician network to support these activities. The positions were established between July 2006 and April 2009. All are corporate roles with varying reporting and accountability structures. The physician leads are involved in strategic planning, identifying and leading quality and safety initiatives, physician engagement and culture change. All have significantly contributed to the implementation of hospital improvement activities and are seen as influential among their peers as resources and mentors for local project success. Despite their accomplishments, these physician leads have been challenged by ambiguous role descriptions and difficulty identifying effective improvement strategies. As such, an expanding physician network was created with the goal of sharing approaches and tools and creating new strategies. Physician leaders are an important factor in the improvement of safety and quality within hospitals. This case study provides a template for the creation of such positions and highlights the importance of networking as an effective strategy for improving local care and advancing professional development of physician leaders in quality and patient safety.

  11. Toward a joint health and disease management program. Toronto hospitals partner to provide system leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macleod, Anne Marie; Gollish, Jeffrey; Kennedy, Deborah; McGlasson, Rhona; Waddell, James

    2009-01-01

    The Joint Health and Disease Management Program in the Toronto Central Local Health Integration Network (TC LHIN) is envisioned as a comprehensive model of care for patients with hip and knee arthritis. It includes access to assessment services, education, self-management programs and other treatment programs, including specialist care as needed. As the first phase of this program, the hospitals in TC LHIN implemented a Hip and Knee Replacement Program to focus on improving access and quality of care, coordinating services and measuring wait times for patients waiting for hip or knee replacement surgery. The program involves healthcare providers, consumers and constituent hospitals within TC LHIN. The approach used for this program involved a definition of governance structure, broad stakeholder engagement to design program elements and plans for implementation and communication to ensure sustainability. The program and approach were designed to provide a model that is transferrable in its elements or its entirety to other patient populations and programs. Success has been achieved in creating a single wait list, developing technology to support referral management and wait time reporting, contributing to significant reductions in waits for timely assessment and treatment, building human resource capacity and improving patient and referring physician satisfaction with coordination of care.

  12. The Role of Leadership Support for Health Promotion in Employee Wellness Program Participation, Perceived Job Stress, and Health Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoert, Jennifer; Herd, Ann M; Hambrick, Marion

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore the relationship between leadership support for health promotion and job stress, wellness program participation, and health behaviors. A cross-sectional survey design was used. Four worksites with a range of wellness programs were selected for this study. Participants in this study were employees (n = 618) at 4 organizations (bank, private university, wholesale supplier, and public university) in the southeastern United States, each offering an employee wellness program. Response rates in each organization ranged from 3% to 34%. Leadership support for health promotion was measured with the Leading by Example instrument. Employee participation in wellness activities, job stress, and health behaviors were measured with multi-item scales. Correlation/regression analysis and descriptive statistics were used to analyze the relationships among the scaled variables. Employees reporting higher levels of leadership support for health promotion also reported higher levels of wellness activity participation, lower job stress, and greater levels of health behavior ( P = .001). To ascertain the amount of variance in health behaviors accounted for by the other variables in the study, a hierarchical regression analysis revealed a statistically significant model (model F 7,523 = 27.28; P = .001), with leadership support for health promotion (β = .19, t = 4.39, P = .001), wellness activity participation (β = .28, t = 6.95, P stress (β = -.27, t = -6.75, P ≤ .001) found to be significant predictors of health behaviors in the model. Exploratory regression analyses by organization revealed the focal variables as significant model predictors for only the 2 larger organizations with well-established wellness programs. Results from the study suggest that employees' perceptions of organizational leadership support for health promotion are related to their participation in wellness activities, perceived job stress levels, and health behaviors.

  13. Social Network Analysis of the Farabi Exchange Program: Student Mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugurlu, Zeynep

    2016-01-01

    Problem Statement: Exchange programs offer communication channels created through student and instructor exchanges; a flow of information takes place through these channels. The Farabi Exchange Program (FEP) is a student and instructor exchange program between institutions of higher education. Through the use of social network analysis and…

  14. Pilot study of a training program to enhance transformational leadership in Spinal Cord Injury Peer Mentors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin Ginis, Kathleen A; Shaw, Robert B; Stork, Matthew J; Battalova, Alfiya; McBride, Christopher B

    2018-01-01

    Experimental, pragmatic design. (1) To determine the effects of a transformational leadership (TFL) training program on spinal cord injury (SCI) peer mentors and their mentees; (2) To document characteristics of mentorship within a community-based SCI peer mentor program. In total 23 SCI peer mentors (70% male; M age = 47.4 ± 12.1) were randomly allocated to an Experimental or Control condition. Experimental condition mentors received a half-day TFL workshop and bi-weekly emailed information on using TFL in SCI peer mentorship. Sixteen SCI mentees (50% male; M age = 49.1 ± 12.9) enrolled in the study and 9 completed measures of self-efficacy and their mentors' use of TFL and supportiveness at 3 and 6-months. Mentors completed monthly reports of mentorship activities. Community-based peer mentorship program in British Columbia, Canada. There were no between-groups differences in mentee self-efficacy, mentor use of TFL or mentor supportiveness. In the Experimental condition only, total mentorship time and sessions were positively correlated with mentors' use of TFL and supportiveness. Mentorship occurred in-person, by phone, text, and email and mentors discussed an average of 11 topics. The intervention did not increase SCI peer mentors' use of TFL relative to a Control condition. Nevertheless, there may be merit in coaching SCI peer mentors to use TFL given the positive correlations between mentorship time and sessions, TFL use, and perceived supportiveness of the mentor. Although inherently challenging, research involving community-based SCI peer mentorship programs provides opportunities for scientists and community organizations to extend knowledge of peer mentorship beyond the context of hospital-based programs. Research supported by a SSHRC Partnership Development Grant.

  15. Leading the Way to America's Future: A Monograph about the Launch and Implementation of the Kellogg MSI Leadership Fellows Program, 2002-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Institute for Higher Education Policy, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The basic objective of the Kellogg MSI Leadership Fellows Program is to develop a new cadre of skilled leaders who understand the unique and important context of leadership for Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs). These institutions have taken on responsibility for educating large numbers of students of color. A college or university is…

  16. Health leadership education programs, best practices, and impact on learners' knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors and system change: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Careau E

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Emmanuelle Careau,1 Gjin Biba,1 Rosemary Brander,2 Janice P Van Dijk,2 Sarita Verma,3 Margo Paterson,2 Maria Tassone31Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Rehabilitation and Social Integration, Université Laval, Québec, QC, 2Office of Interprofessional Education and Practice, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, 3Centre for Interprofessional Education, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, CanadaBackground: A review of the literature was undertaken by the Canadian Interprofessional Health Leadership Collaborative to investigate the content and competencies of health education programs that teach collaborative leadership and to inform the development of an international collaborative leadership curriculum.Methods: A PubMed and Google Scholar search identified the frequency of key leadership education program terms and was adjusted for six major databases. From the 2,119 references, 250 were selected in a double-blinded manner. A descriptive statistical analysis was performed to determine the patterns, types, learners, models, and competencies addressed. Cross-tabulation and analysis of correlation identified best practices and impacts on learners' knowledge, skills, attitudes/behaviors, and on health system change.Results: Four types of leadership models were formally identified, ie, traditional leadership, transformational leadership, clinical leadership, and collaborative leadership. The most identified competencies were interprofessional communication, knowledge on how to work in teams and across disciplines, and financial knowledge. The least addressed topics were social accountability and community engagement. Only 6.8% of the articles reviewed assessed the effectiveness of their program based on patient-centered outcomes and 3.6% on system change.Conclusion: This literature review focused on 250 health leadership education programs reported in peer-reviewed journals to address important questions about the competencies, best practices

  17. A pharmacy course on leadership and leading change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Todd D; Traynor, Andrew P; Janke, Kristin K

    2009-04-07

    To develop and implement a course that develops pharmacy students' leadership skills and encourages them to become leaders within the profession. A leadership course series was offered to pharmacy students on 2 campuses. The series incorporated didactic, experiential, and self-directed learning activities, and focused on developing core leadership skills, self-awareness, and awareness of the process for leading change. Students reported increased knowledge and confidence in their ability to initiate and lead efforts for change. The learning activities students' valued most were the StrengthsFinder assessment (67% of students rated "very useful") and a Leadership Networking Partners (LNP) program (83% of students rated "very useful"). Teaching leadership skills poses a significant challenge in curriculum development and requires multifaceted course design elements that resonate with students and engage the practice community. Addressing these requirements results in a high level of student engagement and a desire to continue the development of leadership skills.

  18. Computer Networking Laboratory for Undergraduate Computer Technology Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Naghedolfeizi, Masoud

    2000-01-01

    ...) To improve the quality of education in the existing courses related to computer networks and data communications as well as other computer science courses such programming languages and computer...

  19. The commercial vehicle information systems and networks program, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    The Commercial Vehicle Information Systems and Networks (CVISN) grant program supports the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administrations (FMCSAs) safety mission by providing grant funds to States to: : Improve safety and productivity of moto...

  20. The Commercial Vehicle Information Systems and Network program, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    The Commercial Vehicle Information Systems and : Networks (CVISN) program supports that safety : mission by providing grant funds to States for: : Improving safety and productivity of motor : carriers, commercial motor vehicles : (CMVs), and thei...

  1. Optimal traffic control in highway transportation networks using linear programming

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yanning; Canepa, Edward S.; Claudel, Christian G.

    2014-01-01

    of the Hamilton-Jacobi PDE, the problem of controlling the state of the system on a network link in a finite horizon can be posed as a Linear Program. Assuming all intersections in the network are controllable, we show that the optimization approach can

  2. Leadership in Search of Public Value

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Dorthe

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This chapter takes its point of departure in the vision of educating public leaders and managers with the ability to create public value in a networked governance structure. The purpose of the chapter is to revise this vision by unpacking the notion of public value in contemporary...... governance and discuss the implications for public leadership and for public leadership and management programs. Design/methodology/approach: The chapter explores the notion of public value as a conceptual framework for emergent forms of networked governance. Drawing on insights from sociology of law...... and governmentality studies, a set of key tensions inherent in the public value discourse are identified as the diagnostic impetus to consider the somewhat excessive leadership figure put forward in the literature. The chapter shows that the discourse of networked governance and public value thinking is rather...

  3. Interprofessional academic health center leadership development: the case of the University of Alabama at Birmingham's Healthcare Leadership Academy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Grant T; Duncan, W Jack; Knowles, Kathy L; Nelson, Kathleen; Rogers, David A; Kennedy, Karen N

    2014-05-01

    The study describes the genesis of the University of Alabama at Birmingham's Healthcare Leadership Academy (HLA), highlights the HLA's outcomes, discloses how the HLA has changed, and delineates future directions for academic health center (AHC) interprofessional leadership training. While interprofessional training is recognized as an important component of the professional education for health professionals, AHCs have not focused on interprofessional leadership training to prepare future AHC leaders. As professional bureaucracies, AHCs require leadership distributed across different professions; these leaders not only should be technical experts, but also skilled at interprofessional teamwork and collaborative governance. The HLA is examined using the case method, which is supplemented with a descriptive analysis of program evaluation data and outcomes. The HLA has created a networked community of AHC leaders; the HLA's interprofessional team projects foster innovative problem solving. Interprofessional leadership training expands individuals' networks and has multiple organizational benefits. © 2014.

  4. Leadership Strategies for Department Chairs and Program Directors: A Case Study Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, Robert W.; Haden, N. Karl; Taylor, Robert L.; Thomas, D. Denee

    2002-01-01

    Reviews leadership challenges and management concepts in academic dentistry as they were applied in a case-based faculty development workshop, in order to provide a foundation for three cases that follow in subsequent articles. The workshop was structured to address leadership challenges relating to managing people, mission management, conflict…

  5. The Impacts of a National Internship Program on Interns' Perceived Leadership, Critical Thinking, and Communication Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Dennis W.; Birdsong, Victoria; Fuhrman, Nicholas; Borron, Abigail

    2017-01-01

    At perhaps all levels of education, strong leadership skills are often equated with the ability to engage in critical thinking, and effective oral and written communication. The purpose of this study was to identify the self-perceived expansion of animal health interns' leadership, critical thinking and communication competencies using the…

  6. Development of Program to Enhance Team Building Leadership Skills of Primary School Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sairam, Boonchauy; Sirisuthi, Chaiyuth; Wisetrinthong, Kanjana

    2017-01-01

    Team building leadership skills are important to understandings of how the primary school administrators might work towards creating more effective teamwork in the school. This research aimed 1) to study the components of team building leadership skills needed for primary school administrators, 2) to examine the current states and desirable…

  7. Servant Leadership: Faculty and Student Perceptions among Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU) Nursing Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffman, Tammie J.

    2017-01-01

    Servant leadership characteristics and caring converged in exploration of faculty and students of private, Christian nursing schools. Faculty assessed their servant leadership behaviors while students disclosed their perceptions of faculty as caring persons. Students evaluated faculty positively on a six-point Likert scale (mean 5.26).…

  8. Assessing Opinions in Community Leadership Networks to Address Health Inequalities: A Case Study from Project IMPACT

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, M. P.; Ramanadhan, S.; Viswanath, K.

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates a novel approach that those engaged in promoting social change in health can use to analyze community power, mobilize it and enhance community capacity to reduce health inequalities. We used community reconnaissance methods to select and interview 33 participants from six leadership sectors in "Milltown", the New…

  9. Leadership training and delivery prospects of team leaders in Communication Network Support Services Limited, Ilorin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulahi G. Olatunji

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Training and development of staff has been one of the key focuses of every human resources department of any formal work organisation. This is as a result of the realisation that training is an important determinant of people’s behaviour as well as their general delivery ability at work. In realisation of this, intellectuals and researchers in industrial relations generally have put vested interest in the phenomena of training and work delivery ability. However, despite the enormous volume of literatures available in this regard, very few among them have specifically examined the importance of leadership training as a possible determinant of work delivery. Thus, this study is an attempt to cover this gap. In order to achieve this objective, survey design was used as the research design for the study. A questionnaire was used to elicit information from the respondents, while simple random sampling technique was used to select the study sample. Frequency distribution and percentage were used as descriptive tools, while chi-square was used as an inferential statistical tool in the study. The study found out that leadership training has a significant relationship with the identified work delivery elements measured in the study. The study concluded that leadership training has a significant effect on delivery ability of team leaders and thus recommended that leadership training should be given utmost priority in work organisations so that work delivery prospects of the employees could be realised.

  10. Making a Difference: Two Case Studies Describing the Impact of a Capstone Leadership Education Experience Provided through a National Youth Leadership Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, Manda; Stedman, Nicole L. P.; Elbert, Chanda; Rutherford, Tracy

    2009-01-01

    Many youth leadership organizations exist today and provide a variety of leadership experiences. One such organization provides a week long leadership experience to high school students with its primary purpose being to guide students through a process of identifying a community need and developing a plan to address that need. This article reports…

  11. Informing Leadership Education by Connecting Curricular Experiences and Leadership Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKim, Aaron J.; Velez, Jonathan J.

    2017-01-01

    Linking specific learning experiences to leadership development has the potential to enhance leadership education. In this study, we sought to link student growth in 13 leadership areas to specific learning experiences within a leadership development program. We measured development within the 13 areas by comparing the perceived needs of students…

  12. ANALYSIS OF THE RELATIONSHIP OF THE TRAINING PROGRAM (DIKLATPIM TO INCREASE THE QUALITY OF LEADERSHIP (LEADERSHIP OF CIVIL SERVANTS IN THE OFFICE OF THE LOCAL GOVERNMENT DISTRICT OF AGAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Amaluis

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The principal functions of human resources management, there is a function evaluation. Program training as one strategy for human resource development that requires function evaluation to determine the effectiveness of a training Program. On the Organization of the public sector, the implementation of a training Program is set based on the Government Regulation No. 101 in 2000. Training programs for civil servants aims to improve the ability of lead as well as performance improvements. In this study, the intended training program is a level III leadership Training. This research aims to quantify relationships training programme to improve the quality of leadership. Respondents consisted of 96 people level III Leadership Training Program evaluation method using the method of Kirkpatrick & Kirkpatrick. Analysis of the correlation used is simple by looking at the significance of the values between variables. Based on the research results obtained that the only training Program correlates on taraf was strong but not significantly to improve the quality of leadership. From this research can be disimpulan that the organizers of the training program is considered necessary to conduct a training needs Analysis in depth, so knowable Competency Gapsetiap potential participants and prepare a suitable training method to improve the Gap.

  13. New graduate nurse transition programs and clinical leadership skills in novice RNs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Kathy B; Richards, Kathy C; Barnett, Scott D

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine predictors of clinical leadership skill (CLS) for RNs with 24 months of clinical experience or less. New graduate nurse transition programs (NGNTPs) have been proposed as a strategy to increase CLS. CLS is associated with positive patient outcomes. Method used was hierarchical regression modeling to evaluate predictors of CLS among individual characteristics of RNs and characteristics of NGNTPs. Perceived overall quality of an NGNTP was the strongest predictor of CLS (R = 0.041, P < .01). Clinical experience and NGNTP characteristics accounted for 6.9% of the variance in CLS and 12.6% of the variance among RNs with assigned mentors (P < .01). RNs participating in NGNTPs for more than 24 weeks were 21 times more likely to remain employed within the organization when compared with NGNTPs of 12 weeks or less, a significant cost-benefit to the organization. Although perceived overall quality of a NGNTP was the strongest predictor of CLS, much of the variance in CLS remains unexplained.

  14. Responding to the Affordable Care Act: a leadership opportunity for social workers in employee assistance programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frauenholtz, Susan

    2014-08-01

    Until recently, estimates indicated that more than half of Americans obtain health insurance through their employers. Yet the employer-based system leaves many vulnerable populations, such as low-wage and part-time workers, without coverage. The changes authorized by the Affordable Care Act (2010), and in particular the Health Insurance Marketplace (also known as health insurance exchanges), which became operational in 2014, are projected to have a substantial impact on the provision of employer-based health care coverage. Because health insurance is so intricately woven with employment, social workers in employee assistance programs (EAPs) are positioned to assume an active leadership role in guiding and developing the needed changes to employer-based health care that will occur as the result of health care reform. This article describes the key features and functions of the Health Insurance Marketplace and proposes an innovative role for EAP social workers in implementing the exchanges within their respective workplaces and communities. How EAP social workers can act as educators, advocates, and brokers of the exchanges, and the challenges they may face in their new roles, are discussed, and the next steps EAP social workers can take to prepare for health reform-related workplace changes are delineated.

  15. Interchange. Program Improvement Products Identified through Networking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This catalog lists exemplary field-based program improvement products identified by the Dissemination and Utilization Products and Services Program (D&U) at the National Center for Research in Vocational Education. It is designed to increase awareness of these products among vocational educators and to provide information about them that…

  16. MAILROOM- A LOCAL AREA NETWORK ELECTRONIC MAIL PROGRAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, M. J.

    1994-01-01

    The Mailroom program is a Local Area Network (LAN) electronic mail program. It allows LAN users to electronically exchange notes, letters, reminders, or any sort of communication via their computer. The Mailroom program links all LAN users into a communication circle where messages can be created, sent, copied, printed, downloaded, uploaded, and deleted through a series of menu-driven screens. Mailroom includes a feature which allows users to determine if a message they have sent has been read by the receiver. Each user must be separately installed and removed from Mailroom as they join or leave the network. Mailroom comes with a program that accomplishes this with minimum of effort on the part of the Network Administrator/Manager. There is also a program that allows the Network Administrator/Manager to install Mailroom on each user's workstation so that on execution of Mailroom the user's station may be identified and the configurations settings activated. It will create its own configuration and data/supporting files during the setup and installation process. The Mailroom program is written in Microsoft QuickBasic. It was developed to run on networked IBM XT/ATs or compatibles and requires that all participating workstations share a common drive. It has been implemented under DOS 3.2 and has a memory requirement of 71K. Mailroom was developed in 1988.

  17. Collaborating internationally on physician leadership development: why now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ming-Ka; de Camps Meschino, Diane; Dath, Deepak; Busari, Jamiu; Bohnen, Jordan David; Samson, Lindy Michelle; Matlow, Anne; Sánchez-Mendiola, Melchor

    2016-07-04

    Purpose This paper aims to highlight the importance of leadership development for all physicians within a competency-based medical education (CBME) framework. It describes the importance of timely international collaboration as a key strategy in promoting physician leadership development. Design/methodology/approach The paper explores published and Grey literature around physician leadership development and proposes that international collaboration will meet the expanding call for development of leadership competencies in postgraduate medical learners. Two grounding frameworks were used: complexity science supports adding physician leadership training to the current momentum of CBME adoption, and relational cultural theory supports the engagement of diverse stakeholders in multiple jurisdictions around the world to ensure inclusivity in leadership education development. Findings An international collaborative identified key insights regarding the need to frame physician leadership education within a competency-based model. Practical implications International collaboration can be a vehicle for developing a globally relevant, generalizable physician leadership curriculum. This model can be expanded to encourage innovation, scholarship and program evaluation. Originality/value A competency-based leadership development curriculum is being designed by an international collaborative. The curriculum is based on established leadership and education frameworks. The international collaboration model provides opportunities for ongoing sharing, networking and diversification.

  18. Designing Camera Networks by Convex Quadratic Programming

    KAUST Repository

    Ghanem, Bernard; Wonka, Peter; Cao, Yuanhao

    2015-01-01

    be formulated mathematically as a convex binary quadratic program (BQP) under linear constraints. Moreover, we propose an optimization strategy with a favorable trade-off between speed and solution quality. Our solution

  19. Learning oncogenetic networks by reducing to mixed integer linear programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahrabi Farahani, Hossein; Lagergren, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Cancer can be a result of accumulation of different types of genetic mutations such as copy number aberrations. The data from tumors are cross-sectional and do not contain the temporal order of the genetic events. Finding the order in which the genetic events have occurred and progression pathways are of vital importance in understanding the disease. In order to model cancer progression, we propose Progression Networks, a special case of Bayesian networks, that are tailored to model disease progression. Progression networks have similarities with Conjunctive Bayesian Networks (CBNs) [1],a variation of Bayesian networks also proposed for modeling disease progression. We also describe a learning algorithm for learning Bayesian networks in general and progression networks in particular. We reduce the hard problem of learning the Bayesian and progression networks to Mixed Integer Linear Programming (MILP). MILP is a Non-deterministic Polynomial-time complete (NP-complete) problem for which very good heuristics exists. We tested our algorithm on synthetic and real cytogenetic data from renal cell carcinoma. We also compared our learned progression networks with the networks proposed in earlier publications. The software is available on the website https://bitbucket.org/farahani/diprog.

  20. Self-reported leadership styles of deans of baccalaureate and higher degree nursing programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broome, Marion E

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade there has been a lack of attention in the discipline paid to developing strong academic leaders. It is widely acknowledged that the role of the dean has shifted dramatically over the past two decades, with an increasing emphasis on interaction with and accountability to external constituencies at the university, community, and national levels. The overall purpose of this study was to investigate the self-reported leadership styles, behaviors, and experiences of deans of schools of nursing in the United States. The Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ) was sent to 655 deans who were members of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing; 344 returned completed surveys for a return rate of 52.5%. Scores on the transformational scale (n = 321; 20 items) ranged from 2.75 to 4.0, with a mean of 3.79; transactional scores ranged from 1.3 to 4.0, with a mean of 3.3 and mode of 3.5. The passive leadership component was lowest, with a range of 0 to 3.75, mean of 1.1, and mode of 1.0. The highest scores for each dean were then examined and compared across the three components. Seventy-seven percent of the deans' highest scores fell on the transformational, 21% on the transactional, and 2% on the passive-avoidant scale. There were no significant differences in the most commonly reported leadership behaviors by gender, ethnicity, or terminal degree. Deans of nursing, compared with over 3,000 other leaders who have completed the MLQ, ranked in the 80th percentile for self-reported transformative behaviors and outcomes effectiveness. The findings from this sample, who were predominantly female, are congruent with previous research on women leaders. Recommendations for future research leadership development programs are presented. © 2013.

  1. A Framework for Understanding Collective Leadership: The Selective Utilization of Leader and Team Expertise within Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    characteristics (e.g., team stability, autonomy , enabling interactions) that will 22    influence collective leadership and performance. Taken...composition, the team’s autonomy , role integration, and preparation for team activities (Mumford & Hunter, 2005; Spreitzer, Cohen & Ledford, 1999; Uhl...tasks as interdependent was influenced by their belief in the value of teamwork, self-efficacy for teamwork, and collectivist feelings. Thus, the way

  2. Leadership in Groups: Social Networks and Perceptions of Formal and Informal Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    anguish . Using SPSS v. 12.0. Melbourne, Australia: Wiley and Sons. Cohen, P. A. (1981). Student ratings of instruction and student achievement: A...level of analysis. Level one data was analyzed using the SPSS ® statistical package for Windows™ (version 13.0). The informal leader side of the...expressive-instrumental leadership model consists of both group and individual level data. Again, SPSS ® was used to analyze the level one data

  3. A mathematical programming approach for sequential clustering of dynamic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Jonathan C.; Bennett, Laura; Papageorgiou, Lazaros G.; Tsoka, Sophia

    2016-02-01

    A common analysis performed on dynamic networks is community structure detection, a challenging problem that aims to track the temporal evolution of network modules. An emerging area in this field is evolutionary clustering, where the community structure of a network snapshot is identified by taking into account both its current state as well as previous time points. Based on this concept, we have developed a mixed integer non-linear programming (MINLP) model, SeqMod, that sequentially clusters each snapshot of a dynamic network. The modularity metric is used to determine the quality of community structure of the current snapshot and the historical cost is accounted for by optimising the number of node pairs co-clustered at the previous time point that remain so in the current snapshot partition. Our method is tested on social networks of interactions among high school students, college students and members of the Brazilian Congress. We show that, for an adequate parameter setting, our algorithm detects the classes that these students belong more accurately than partitioning each time step individually or by partitioning the aggregated snapshots. Our method also detects drastic discontinuities in interaction patterns across network snapshots. Finally, we present comparative results with similar community detection methods for time-dependent networks from the literature. Overall, we illustrate the applicability of mathematical programming as a flexible, adaptable and systematic approach for these community detection problems. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Temporal Network Theory and Applications", edited by Petter Holme.

  4. Ohio 4-H Agents' and Volunteer Leaders' Perceptions of the Volunteer Leadership Development Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwarteng, Joseph A.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    This study found that six areas of volunteer leadership development are important to volunteers and 4-H agents. The areas are (1) recruiting, (2) training, (3) motivation, (4) recognition, (5) retention, and (6) supervision. (JOW)

  5. Deliberate Integration of Student Leadership Development in Doctor of Pharmacy Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Michael H.; Bzowyckyj, Andrew S.; Fuentes, David G.; Rosenberg, Ettie; DiCenzo, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The CAPE 2013 Outcomes answered the call for increased student leadership development (SLD) by identifying leadership as a desired curricular goal. To meet this outcome, colleges and schools of pharmacy are advised to first identify a set of SLD competencies aligned with their institution’s mission and goals and then organize these competencies into a SLD framework/model. Student leadership development should be integrated vertically and horizontally within the curriculum in a deliberate and longitudinal manner. It should include all student pharmacists, begin at the point of admission, and extend beyond extracurricular activities. The school’s assessment plan should be aligned with the identified SLD competencies so student learning related to leadership is assessed. To accomplish these recommendations, a positive environment for SLD should be cultivated within the school, including administrative backing and resources, as well as support among the broader faculty for integrating SLD into the curriculum. PMID:26941428

  6. Deliberate Integration of Student Leadership Development in Doctor of Pharmacy Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, Kristin K; Nelson, Michael H; Bzowyckyj, Andrew S; Fuentes, David G; Rosenberg, Ettie; DiCenzo, Robert

    2016-02-25

    The CAPE 2013 Outcomes answered the call for increased student leadership development (SLD) by identifying leadership as a desired curricular goal. To meet this outcome, colleges and schools of pharmacy are advised to first identify a set of SLD competencies aligned with their institution's mission and goals and then organize these competencies into a SLD framework/model. Student leadership development should be integrated vertically and horizontally within the curriculum in a deliberate and longitudinal manner. It should include all student pharmacists, begin at the point of admission, and extend beyond extracurricular activities. The school's assessment plan should be aligned with the identified SLD competencies so student learning related to leadership is assessed. To accomplish these recommendations, a positive environment for SLD should be cultivated within the school, including administrative backing and resources, as well as support among the broader faculty for integrating SLD into the curriculum.

  7. What is leadership?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingborg, Donald J; Moore, Dale A; Varea-Hammond, Sonya

    2006-01-01

    The demand for more effective leadership is heard throughout the health professions. Modern concepts of leadership differ from the traditional definition of a charismatic individual leader. Historically, leadership has been vested in positions, while today leadership is seen as a role one moves continuously into and out of, depending on the circumstance. Leadership ideas have evolved so that newer characteristics of leaders include being a team builder; possessing creative and strategic thinking skills; demonstrating honesty and integrity; and having the ability to motivate others to action. This article discusses some of the history of leadership, current thoughts on attributes of effective leaders, and the differences and similarities between leaders and managers; identifies selected teachable leadership tools; and describes various styles and purposes of existing leadership programs.

  8. SEWER NETWORK DISCHARGE OPTIMIZATION USING THE DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viorel MINZU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It is necessary to adopt an optimal control that allows an efficient usage of the existing sewer networks, in order to avoid the building of new retention facilities. The main objective of the control action is to minimize the overflow volume of a sewer network. This paper proposes a method to apply a solution obtained by discrete dynamic programming through a realistic closed loop system.

  9. Latin American Knowledge Networking Program on Gender ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This project aims to strengthen the capacity of Latin American researchers, academics, policymakers and practitioners to mainstream gender in macroeconomic policies and programs. The project will consist of three elements: a self-study module that introduces participants to gender-aware approaches to macroeconomics ...

  10. The impact of residency programs on new nurse graduates' clinical decision-making and leadership skills: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AL-Dossary, Reem; Kitsantas, Panagiota; Maddox, P J

    2014-06-01

    Health care institutions have adapted residency programs to help new graduate nurses to become fully competent and transition from a student nurse to an independent practicing nurse and a bedside leader. The study's aim is to review the literature on the impact of residency programs on new graduate nurses' clinical decision-making and leadership skills. An electronic search was conducted between 1980 and 2013 using databases of the scientific literature in Medline, PubMed, Cochrane EPOC, Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature database guide (CINAHL), and PsychInfo using a range of keywords. Information gathered was evaluated for relevance. Thirteen studies that met the inclusion criteria were used in this systematic review. In several studies considered in this review, residency programs were developed to improve new graduates skills and promote their transition into the nursing workforce. In fact, the transition programs reduced turnover in that first year of practice and promoted professional growth of the new graduate such as hand-on nursing skills, clinical decision-making and leadership skills, satisfaction, and retention. There is a need for effective residency programs that are designed to prepare new graduate nurses in providing safe, competent and effective patient care. © 2013.

  11. A Recurrent Neural Network for Nonlinear Fractional Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan-Ju Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel recurrent time continuous neural network model which performs nonlinear fractional optimization subject to interval constraints on each of the optimization variables. The network is proved to be complete in the sense that the set of optima of the objective function to be minimized with interval constraints coincides with the set of equilibria of the neural network. It is also shown that the network is primal and globally convergent in the sense that its trajectory cannot escape from the feasible region and will converge to an exact optimal solution for any initial point being chosen in the feasible interval region. Simulation results are given to demonstrate further the global convergence and good performance of the proposing neural network for nonlinear fractional programming problems with interval constraints.

  12. Optimal traffic control in highway transportation networks using linear programming

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yanning

    2014-06-01

    This article presents a framework for the optimal control of boundary flows on transportation networks. The state of the system is modeled by a first order scalar conservation law (Lighthill-Whitham-Richards PDE). Based on an equivalent formulation of the Hamilton-Jacobi PDE, the problem of controlling the state of the system on a network link in a finite horizon can be posed as a Linear Program. Assuming all intersections in the network are controllable, we show that the optimization approach can be extended to an arbitrary transportation network, preserving linear constraints. Unlike previously investigated transportation network control schemes, this framework leverages the intrinsic properties of the Halmilton-Jacobi equation, and does not require any discretization or boolean variables on the link. Hence this framework is very computational efficient and provides the globally optimal solution. The feasibility of this framework is illustrated by an on-ramp metering control example.

  13. Geographic mobility advances careers: study of the Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine (ELAM) program for women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Marsha R; Morahan, Page S; Dannels, Sharon A; McDade, Sharon A

    2013-11-01

    To explore whether geographic mobility is associated with career advancement of women in U.S. medical schools who are entering mid- to executive-level positions. Using an existing dataset of 351 participants in academic medicine who attended the Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine (ELAM) Program for Women (1996-2005) (adjusted to 345 participants in some analyses because data on initial faculty rank were missing), the authors conducted a quantitative study in 2009 to determine whether geographic mobility was associated with administrative promotion for those who relocated geographically (from employer while attending ELAM to employer at last job of record). Twenty-four percent of women (83/345) relocated geographically (movers) after attending ELAM. Moving had a positive association with career advancement (P = .001); odds for promotion were 168% higher for movers than for stayers [odds ratio Exp(β) = 2.684]. Movers attained higher administrative positions (P = .003), and more movers (60%) were promoted at the most recent job compared with stayers (40%) (P = .0001). Few movers changed city size; 70% already resided in large or urban cities where most medical schools are located. Age was not a barrier to mobility. Career advancement was not related to research reputation (National Institutes of Health grant award ranking) of participants' schools (either at time of attending ELAM or post-ELAM). Similar to findings outside academic medicine, 24% of women classified as geographic "movers" among midcareer faculty in medical schools attained career advantages. Psychosocial and socioeconomic factors underlying women's relocation decisions require additional study.

  14. AN APPLICATION FOR EFFICIENT TELECOMMUNICATION NETWORKS PROVISIONING USING LINEAR PROGRAMMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Augusta Soares Machado

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a practical proposition for the application of the Linear Programming quantitative method in order to assist planning and control of customer circuit delivery activities in telecommunications companies working with the corporative market. Based upon data provided for by a telecom company operating in Brazil, the Linear Programming method was employed for one of the classical problems of determining the optimum mix of production quantities for a set of five products of that company: Private Telephone Network, Internet Network, Intranet Network, Low Speed Data Network, and High Speed Data Network, in face of several limitations of the productive resources, seeking to maximize the company’s monthly revenue. By fitting the production data available into a primary model, observation was made as to what number of monthly activations for each product would be mostly optimized in order to achieve maximum revenues in the company. The final delivery of a complete network was not observed but the delivery of the circuits that make it up, and this was a limiting factor for the study herein, which, however, brings an innovative proposition for the planning of private telecommunications network provisioning.

  15. Human and Organizational Risk Modeling: Critical Personnel and Leadership in Network Organizations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schreiber, Craig

    2006-01-01

    Network organizations offer learning, adaptive and resilient capabilities that are particularly useful in high velocity environments as these capabilities allow the organization to effectively respond to change...

  16. Deepening system leadership : teachers leading from below

    OpenAIRE

    Boylan, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The increasing importance of educational collaborations and networks that blur organizational boundaries requires conceptual developments in leadership theory. One approach to both theorizing and promoting such phenomena is through the idea of system leadership. Three different meanings of the term are identified: interschool leadership; a systemic leadership orientation and identity; and leadership of the school system as a whole. Previous descriptions of system leadership, and policy initia...

  17. A program for verification of phylogenetic network models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawan, Andreas D M; Lu, Bingxin; Zhang, Louxin

    2016-09-01

    Genetic material is transferred in a non-reproductive manner across species more frequently than commonly thought, particularly in the bacteria kingdom. On one hand, extant genomes are thus more properly considered as a fusion product of both reproductive and non-reproductive genetic transfers. This has motivated researchers to adopt phylogenetic networks to study genome evolution. On the other hand, a gene's evolution is usually tree-like and has been studied for over half a century. Accordingly, the relationships between phylogenetic trees and networks are the basis for the reconstruction and verification of phylogenetic networks. One important problem in verifying a network model is determining whether or not certain existing phylogenetic trees are displayed in a phylogenetic network. This problem is formally called the tree containment problem. It is NP-complete even for binary phylogenetic networks. We design an exponential time but efficient method for determining whether or not a phylogenetic tree is displayed in an arbitrary phylogenetic network. It is developed on the basis of the so-called reticulation-visible property of phylogenetic networks. A C-program is available for download on http://www.math.nus.edu.sg/∼matzlx/tcp_package matzlx@nus.edu.sg Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. The European Nucelar Engineering Network Program (ENEN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villa, M.; Boeck, H.; Hajek, M.

    2002-01-01

    As of 2002 there are 439 Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) and 264 Research Reactors (RR) in operation world-wide, out of these countries, 11 countries in Europe account for 145 NPP and 18 countries in Europe for 37 RR. A large fraction of both the NPP and the RR are over 30 years old. The same age problem exists also among the qualified nuclear staff. Most of the nuclear staff joined those facilities in the 60-ties and 70-ties and are now approaching retirement age. Due to this fact a large amount of experience and competence will be lost in the next decade [1]. Therefore it is of utmost importance to improve and harmonize the nuclear educational system among European countries. Having this target in mind an EU project, the European Nuclear Engineering Network (ENEN), was submitted by 17 countries to the European Union. The proposal was accepted and the two year project started officially on January 1's't 2002. In this paper a survey on the history and the structure of ENEN is given, the targets and timetables of the individual 10 Work Packages are discussed and the results up to September 2002 are presented.(author)

  19. The European Nucelar Engineering Network Program (ENEN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villa, M; Boeck, H; Hajek, M [Atominstitut der Oesterreichischen Universitaeten, Vienna (Austria)

    2002-07-01

    As of 2002 there are 439 Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) and 264 Research Reactors (RR) in operation world-wide, out of these countries, 11 countries in Europe account for 145 NPP and 18 countries in Europe for 37 RR. A large fraction of both the NPP and the RR are over 30 years old. The same age problem exists also among the qualified nuclear staff. Most of the nuclear staff joined those facilities in the 60-ties and 70-ties and are now approaching retirement age. Due to this fact a large amount of experience and competence will be lost in the next decade [1]. Therefore it is of utmost importance to improve and harmonize the nuclear educational system among European countries. Having this target in mind an EU project, the European Nuclear Engineering Network (ENEN), was submitted by 17 countries to the European Union. The proposal was accepted and the two year project started officially on January 1's't 2002. In this paper a survey on the history and the structure of ENEN is given, the targets and timetables of the individual 10 Work Packages are discussed and the results up to September 2002 are presented.(author)

  20. An Improved Dynamic Programming Decomposition Approach for Network Revenue Management

    OpenAIRE

    Dan Zhang

    2011-01-01

    We consider a nonlinear nonseparable functional approximation to the value function of a dynamic programming formulation for the network revenue management (RM) problem with customer choice. We propose a simultaneous dynamic programming approach to solve the resulting problem, which is a nonlinear optimization problem with nonlinear constraints. We show that our approximation leads to a tighter upper bound on optimal expected revenue than some known bounds in the literature. Our approach can ...

  1. Evaluation of thermal network correction program using test temperature data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimoto, T.; Fink, L. C.

    1972-01-01

    An evaluation process to determine the accuracy of a computer program for thermal network correction is discussed. The evaluation is required since factors such as inaccuracies of temperatures, insufficient number of temperature points over a specified time period, lack of one-to-one correlation between temperature sensor and nodal locations, and incomplete temperature measurements are not present in the computer-generated information. The mathematical models used in the evaluation are those that describe a physical system composed of both a conventional and a heat pipe platform. A description of the models used, the results of the evaluation of the thermal network correction, and input instructions for the thermal network correction program are presented.

  2. Social Networking Tools to Facilitate Cross-Program Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Paul; Howard, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Students working on a highly collaborative project used social networking technology for community building activities as well as basic project-related communication. Requiring students to work on cross-program projects gives them real-world experience working in diverse, geographically dispersed groups. An application used at Appalachian State…

  3. The Network Form of Implementing Educational Programs: Differences and Typology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolev, Alexandr Borisovich

    2016-01-01

    The article describes peculiarities of implementation and major differences in network educational programs, currently introduced in Russia. It presents a general typology of models and forms for implementing interaction between educational institutions of Russia, including teacher institutes and federal universities, as well as a typology of…

  4. Workshop: Western hemisphere network of bird banding programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celis-Murillo, A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To promote collaboration among banding programs in the Americas. Introduction: Bird banding and marking provide indispensable tools for ornithological research, management, and conservation of migratory birds on migratory routes, breeding and non-breeding grounds. Many countries and organizations in Latin America and the Caribbean are in the process of developing or have expressed interest in developing national banding schemes and databases to support their research and management programs. Coordination of developing and existing banding programs is essential for effective data management, reporting, archiving and security, and most importantly, for gaining a fuller understanding of migratory bird conservation issues and how the banding data can help. Currently, there is a well established bird-banding program in the U.S.A. and Canada, and programs in other countries are being developed as well. Ornithologists in many Latin American countries and the Caribbean are interested in using banding and marking in their research programs. Many in the ornithological community are interested in establishing banding schemes and some countries have recently initiated independent banding programs. With the number of long term collaborative and international initiatives increasing, the time is ripe to discuss and explore opportunities for international collaboration, coordination, and administration of bird banding programs in the Western Hemisphere. We propose the second ?Western Hemisphere Network of Bird Banding Programs? workshop, in association with the SCSCB, to be an essential step in the progress to strengthen international partnerships and support migratory bird conservation in the Americas and beyond. This will be the second multi-national meeting to promote collaboration among banding programs in the Americas (the first meeting was held in October 8-9, 2006 in La Mancha, Veracruz, Mexico). The Second ?Western Hemisphere Network of Bird Banding Programs

  5. Diffusion of innovation: a social network and organizational learning approach to governance of a districtwide leadership team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hwa Liou

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available District and school leaders play particularly important roles in leading districtwide improvement, as they are increasingly held accountable for bringing about change and improvement for educational innovation and excellence.  While conventional districtwide governance places much of its focus on technical and administrative matters such as policy development, supervision, and monitoring progress. This technical focus often overlooks the fundamental aspect that drives the progress of improvement—the social infrastructure shaped by interpersonal relationship. Responding to recent scholarships that calls for a networked approach to governance, this study examined the change effort of a districtwide leadership team over three points in time drawing on social network theory and analysis focused on district governance.  Specifically, we focused on the type of interpersonal relationship in which leaders engaged with each other in sharing and exchanging innovative ideas as these efforts may support better governance. Additionally, we explored organizational learning as a way to examine climate in support of districtwide innovative efforts during change process. Our findings from leaders indicated increased innovative behaviors and perceived climate on organizational learning over time. The findings suggested that leaders increased connections around risk taking, regardless of their work level over time. This increased connectedness around innovation was coupled with an increase in leaders’ perception of the district’s learning climate, suggesting a cohesive approach to governance and improvement.

  6. Neural network for solving convex quadratic bilevel programming problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xing; Li, Chuandong; Huang, Tingwen; Li, Chaojie

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, using the idea of successive approximation, we propose a neural network to solve convex quadratic bilevel programming problems (CQBPPs), which is modeled by a nonautonomous differential inclusion. Different from the existing neural network for CQBPP, the model has the least number of state variables and simple structure. Based on the theory of nonsmooth analysis, differential inclusions and Lyapunov-like method, the limit equilibrium points sequence of the proposed neural networks can approximately converge to an optimal solution of CQBPP under certain conditions. Finally, simulation results on two numerical examples and the portfolio selection problem show the effectiveness and performance of the proposed neural network. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Designing Camera Networks by Convex Quadratic Programming

    KAUST Repository

    Ghanem, Bernard

    2015-05-04

    ​In this paper, we study the problem of automatic camera placement for computer graphics and computer vision applications. We extend the problem formulations of previous work by proposing a novel way to incorporate visibility constraints and camera-to-camera relationships. For example, the placement solution can be encouraged to have cameras that image the same important locations from different viewing directions, which can enable reconstruction and surveillance tasks to perform better. We show that the general camera placement problem can be formulated mathematically as a convex binary quadratic program (BQP) under linear constraints. Moreover, we propose an optimization strategy with a favorable trade-off between speed and solution quality. Our solution is almost as fast as a greedy treatment of the problem, but the quality is significantly higher, so much so that it is comparable to exact solutions that take orders of magnitude more computation time. Because it is computationally attractive, our method also allows users to explore the space of solutions for variations in input parameters. To evaluate its effectiveness, we show a range of 3D results on real-world floorplans (garage, hotel, mall, and airport). ​

  8. Subtractive Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larwin, K. H.; Thomas, Eugene M.; Larwin, David A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a new term and concept to the leadership discourse: Subtractive Leadership. As an extension of the distributive leadership model, the notion of subtractive leadership refers to a leadership style that detracts from organizational culture and productivity. Subtractive leadership fails to embrace and balance the characteristics…

  9. Changes in Emotional-Social Intelligence, Caring, Leadership and Moral Judgment during Health Science Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larin, Helene; Benson, Gerry; Wessel, Jean; Martin, Lynn; Ploeg, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    In addition to having academic knowledge and clinical skills, health professionals need to be caring, ethical practitioners able to understand the emotional concerns of their patients and to effect change. The purpose of this study was to determine whether emotional-social intelligence, caring, leadership and moral judgment of health science…

  10. Effectiveness of a Leadership Development Program That Incorporates Social and Emotional Intelligence for Aspiring School Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Núñez, María Trinidad; Patti, Janet; Holzer, Allison

    2015-01-01

    Focus on social and emotional intelligence competencies to improve effective leadership has become commonplace in the corporate arena and is now considered by many a prerequisite to successful job performance and outcomes (Antonakis, Ashkanasy, & Dasborough, 2009; Grant, Curtayne, & Burton, 2009; Spence & Grant, 2007; Kampa-Kokesch…

  11. Preparation for Full Time Employment: A Capstone Experience for Students in Leadership Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Gregory T.; Cannon, Karen J.; Stedman, Nicole L.; Telg, Ricky W.

    2011-01-01

    This practice paper describes the development and implementation of a senior capstone course for communication and leadership development for undergraduate students. The resulting course is a unique combination of experiential skill development and career preparation. The success of this course provides students with an important and meaningful…

  12. The Perceived Value of University-Based, Continuing Education Leadership Development Programs for Administrators in Higher Education: An Intangibles Model of Value Creation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Geraldine Louise

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the perceived value of leadership development programs (LDPs) provided by continuing education for administrators in colleges and universities. Included in this study were questions about the perceived value of non-credit, credit, and blended (credit and non-credit) programs at the individual, institutional, and higher…

  13. Assessing the Impact of a Program Designed to Develop Sustainability Leadership amongst Staff Members in Higher Education Institutes: A Case Study from a Community of Practice Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkaher, Iris; Avissar, Ilana

    2018-01-01

    This study focuses on the impact of a sustainability leadership development program (SLDP) designed to develop staff members as leaders who encourage sustainability practices within institutions of higher education (IHE). Using the framework of community of practice (CoP), we explored the program's contribution by interviewing 16 staff members who…

  14. The impact of the organizational transfer climate on the use of teacher leadership competences developed in a post-initial Master's program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoek, M.; Volman, M.

    2014-01-01

    The transfer of learning outcomes of Master's programs for teachers is not self-evident. In this study, 18 teachers who recently graduated and their supervisors were interviewed on the transfer of leadership competences developed during their Master's program and on how the organizational transfer

  15. Program for Analyzing Flows in a Complex Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Alok Kumar

    2006-01-01

    Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP) version 4 is a general-purpose computer program for analyzing steady-state and transient flows in a complex fluid network. The program is capable of modeling compressibility, fluid transients (e.g., water hammers), phase changes, mixtures of chemical species, and such externally applied body forces as gravitational and centrifugal ones. A graphical user interface enables the user to interactively develop a simulation of a fluid network consisting of nodes and branches. The user can also run the simulation and view the results in the interface. The system of equations for conservation of mass, energy, chemical species, and momentum is solved numerically by a combination of the Newton-Raphson and successive-substitution methods.

  16. DCS-Neural-Network Program for Aircraft Control and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Charles C.

    2006-01-01

    A computer program implements a dynamic-cell-structure (DCS) artificial neural network that can perform such tasks as learning selected aerodynamic characteristics of an airplane from wind-tunnel test data and computing real-time stability and control derivatives of the airplane for use in feedback linearized control. A DCS neural network is one of several types of neural networks that can incorporate additional nodes in order to rapidly learn increasingly complex relationships between inputs and outputs. In the DCS neural network implemented by the present program, the insertion of nodes is based on accumulated error. A competitive Hebbian learning rule (a supervised-learning rule in which connection weights are adjusted to minimize differences between actual and desired outputs for training examples) is used. A Kohonen-style learning rule (derived from a relatively simple training algorithm, implements a Delaunay triangulation layout of neurons) is used to adjust node positions during training. Neighborhood topology determines which nodes are used to estimate new values. The network learns, starting with two nodes, and adds new nodes sequentially in locations chosen to maximize reductions in global error. At any given time during learning, the error becomes homogeneously distributed over all nodes.

  17. Linear programming based on neural networks for radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xingen Wu; Limin Luo

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a neural network model for linear programming that is designed to optimize radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP). This kind of neural network can be easily implemented by using a kind of 'neural' electronic system in order to obtain an optimization solution in real time. We first give an introduction to the RTP problem and construct a non-constraint objective function for the neural network model. We adopt a gradient algorithm to minimize the objective function and design the structure of the neural network for RTP. Compared to traditional linear programming methods, this neural network model can reduce the time needed for convergence, the size of problems (i.e., the number of variables to be searched) and the number of extra slack and surplus variables needed. We obtained a set of optimized beam weights that result in a better dose distribution as compared to that obtained using the simplex algorithm under the same initial condition. The example presented in this paper shows that this model is feasible in three-dimensional RTP. (author)

  18. A Study of Officer's use of Leadership Skills Learned in the Navy's Intermediate Officer Leadership Course

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Conroy, William

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Navy's present-day leadership training program, referred to as the Leadership Continuum, provides for leadership training for all enlisted personnel and officers at initial entry into the naval...

  19. Global health leadership training in resource-limited settings: a collaborative approach by academic institutions and local health care programs in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanjako, Damalie; Namagala, Elizabeth; Semeere, Aggrey; Kigozi, Joanitor; Sempa, Joseph; Ddamulira, John Bosco; Katamba, Achilles; Biraro, Sam; Naikoba, Sarah; Mashalla, Yohana; Farquhar, Carey; Sewankambo, Nelson

    2015-11-18

    Due to a limited health workforce, many health care providers in Africa must take on health leadership roles with minimal formal training in leadership. Hence, the need to equip health care providers with practical skills required to lead high-impact health care programs. In Uganda, the Afya Bora Global Health Leadership Fellowship is implemented through the Makerere University College of Health Sciences (MakCHS) and her partner institutions. Lessons learned from the program, presented in this paper, may guide development of in-service training opportunities to enhance leadership skills of health workers in resource-limited settings. The Afya Bora Consortium, a consortium of four African and four U.S. academic institutions, offers 1-year global health leadership-training opportunities for nurses and doctors. Applications are received and vetted internationally by members of the consortium institutions in Botswana, Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, and the USA. Fellows have 3 months of didactic modules and 9 months of mentored field attachment with 80% time dedicated to fellowship activities. Fellows' projects and experiences, documented during weekly mentor-fellow meetings and monthly mentoring team meetings, were compiled and analyzed manually using pre-determined themes to assess the effect of the program on fellows' daily leadership opportunities. Between January 2011 and January 2015, 15 Ugandan fellows (nine doctors and six nurses) participated in the program. Each fellow received 8 weeks of didactic modules held at one of the African partner institutions and three online modules to enhance fellows' foundation in leadership, communication, monitoring and evaluation, health informatics, research methodology, grant writing, implementation science, and responsible conduct of research. In addition, fellows embarked on innovative projects that covered a wide spectrum of global health challenges including critical analysis of policy formulation and review processes

  20. Primary School Teachers and Outdoor Education: Varying Levels of Teacher Leadership in Informal Networks of Peers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovardas, Tasos

    2016-01-01

    The study concentrated on an area in Greece with a multiplicity of sites for outdoor education. Informal networks of teachers were detected through a snowball technique and data were collected by means of a questionnaire and semi-structured interviews. A typology was first enriched to account for teacher interaction. This typology was then…

  1. The Portals 4.0 network programming interface.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, Brian W.; Brightwell, Ronald Brian; Pedretti, Kevin; Wheeler, Kyle Bruce; Hemmert, Karl Scott; Riesen, Rolf E.; Underwood, Keith Douglas; Maccabe, Arthur Bernard; Hudson, Trammell B.

    2012-11-01

    This report presents a specification for the Portals 4.0 network programming interface. Portals 4.0 is intended to allow scalable, high-performance network communication between nodes of a parallel computing system. Portals 4.0 is well suited to massively parallel processing and embedded systems. Portals 4.0 represents an adaption of the data movement layer developed for massively parallel processing platforms, such as the 4500-node Intel TeraFLOPS machine. Sandias Cplant cluster project motivated the development of Version 3.0, which was later extended to Version 3.3 as part of the Cray Red Storm machine and XT line. Version 4.0 is targeted to the next generation of machines employing advanced network interface architectures that support enhanced offload capabilities.

  2. The portals 4.0.1 network programming interface.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, Brian W.; Brightwell, Ronald Brian; Pedretti, Kevin; Wheeler, Kyle Bruce; Hemmert, Karl Scott; Riesen, Rolf E.; Underwood, Keith Douglas; Maccabe, Arthur Bernard; Hudson, Trammell B.

    2013-04-01

    This report presents a specification for the Portals 4.0 network programming interface. Portals 4.0 is intended to allow scalable, high-performance network communication between nodes of a parallel computing system. Portals 4.0 is well suited to massively parallel processing and embedded systems. Portals 4.0 represents an adaption of the data movement layer developed for massively parallel processing platforms, such as the 4500-node Intel TeraFLOPS machine. Sandias Cplant cluster project motivated the development of Version 3.0, which was later extended to Version 3.3 as part of the Cray Red Storm machine and XT line. Version 4.0 is targeted to the next generation of machines employing advanced network interface architectures that support enhanced offload capabilities. 3

  3. A Programming Language Approach to Safety in Home Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Kjeld Høyer; Schougaard, Kari Rye; Schultz, Ulrik Pagh

    , even in a worst-case scenario where an unauthorized user gains remote control of the facilities. We address this safety issue at the programming language level by restricting the operations that can be performed on devices according to the physical location of the user initiating the request......-based restrictions on operations. This model has been implemented in a middleware for home AV devices written in Java, using infrared communication and a FireWire network to implement location awareness....

  4. A Programming Language Approach to Safety in Home Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Kjeld Høyer; Schougaard, Kari Sofie Fogh; Schultz, Ulrik Pagh

    2003-01-01

    , even in a worst-case scenario where an unauthorized user gains remote control of the facilities. We address this safety issue at the programming language level by restricting the operations that can be performed on devices according to the physical location of the user initiating the request......-based restrictions on operations. This model has been implemented in a middleware for home AV devices written in Java, using infrared communication and a FireWire network to implement location awareness....

  5. Program For Local-Area-Network Electronic Mail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    MailRoom is computer program for local-area network (LAN) electronic mail. Enables users of LAN to exchange electronically notes, letters, reminders, or any sort of communication via their computers. Links all users of LAN into communication circle in which messages created, sent, copied, printed, downloaded, uploaded, and deleted through series of menu-driven screens. Includes feature that enables users to determine whether messages sent have been read by receivers. Written in Microsoft QuickBasic.

  6. Network trending; leadership, followership and neutrality among companies: A random matrix approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobarhan, N. S. Safavi; Saeedi, A.; Roodposhti, F. Rahnamay; Jafari, G. R.

    2016-11-01

    In this article, we analyze the cross-correlation between returns of different stocks to answer the following important questions. The first one is: If there exists collective behavior in a financial market, how could we detect it? And the second question is: Is there a particular company among the companies of a market as the leader of the collective behavior? Or is there no specified leadership governing the system similar to some complex systems? We use the method of random matrix theory to answer the mentioned questions. Cross-correlation matrix of index returns of four different markets is analyzed. The participation ratio quantity related to each matrices' eigenvectors and the eigenvalue spectrum is calculated. We introduce shuffled-matrix created of cross correlation matrix in such a way that the elements of the later one are displaced randomly. Comparing the participation ratio quantities obtained from a correlation matrix of a market and its related shuffled-one, on the bulk distribution region of the eigenvalues, we detect a meaningful deviation between the mentioned quantities indicating the collective behavior of the companies forming the market. By calculating the relative deviation of participation ratios, we obtain a measure to compare the markets according to their collective behavior. Answering the second question, we show there are three groups of companies: The first group having higher impact on the market trend called leaders, the second group is followers and the third one is the companies who have not a considerable role in the trend. The results can be utilized in portfolio construction.

  7. Leadership, leadership, wherefore art thou leadership?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Charlie G

    2004-06-01

    Leadership is an elusive concept. Although no one best definition exists, some common characteristics, such as charisma and influence, tend to dominate most discussions on leadership qualities and traits. This article presents an overview of the findings of and pitfalls in research on leadership, in its varied and multifaceted contexts. It explores both personal and contextual attributes of leadership.

  8. Human and Organizational Risk Modeling: Critical Personnel and Leadership in Network Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    outcome measure. This technique uses a square matrix as input into the QAP procedure. The square matrix was built by using the same column vector...communication network was already a square matrix . 6.2.2. Intermittent Availability – Results and Discussion The results and discussion starts with...Stressor Stressor Stressor IA SA IA SA IA SA TX x x .00 Org. BCG x x TX x x .25 Org. BCG x x TX x x .50

  9. Opinion leadership in parliamentary Twitter networks: A matter of layers of interaction?

    OpenAIRE

    Borge Bravo, Rosa; Esteve del Valle, Marc

    2017-01-01

    This article seeks to test whether Twitter is contributing to the appearance of new opinion leaders or empowering already visible political leaders. The study is based on a data set spanning from January 1, 2013 to March 31, 2014 that covers all relationships (4,516), retweets (6,045) and mentions (19,507) of Catalan parliamentarians. The data sustains that having a parliamentarian position increases the probability of being an opinion leader of the following–follower and mention networks, bu...

  10. Leadership Epistemology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogenschneider, Bret N.

    2016-01-01

    The study of leadership is characterized by an expanding set of definitions of the term leadership. Some scholars even set out to know leadership by the identification of traits or behaviors of good leaders. However, the scientific study of leadership requires the identification of a causal theory of leadership. The scientific belief in causation…

  11. Attitude toward Visionary Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesourd, Sandra J.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Formulates descriptive research findings into a utilitarian tool for principal leadership development programs. An instrument measuring attitude toward a (visionary) leadership ideal was developed, administered, and analyzed. Previous research findings were summarized. Results showed that the instrument would help assess individual acceptance of…

  12. A landscape analysis of leadership training in postgraduate medical education training programs at the University of Ottawa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlon Danilewitz

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: While there is strong recognition of the importance of training future physician leaders, the nature and design of PGME leadership training is highly variable. These data can be used to potentially inform future PGME leadership training curricula.

  13. Leadership and management influences the outcome of wildlife reintroduction programs: findings from the Sea Eagle Recovery Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra E. Sutton

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Wildlife reintroductions and translocations are statistically unlikely to succeed. Nevertheless, they remain a critical part of conservation because they are the only way to actively restore a species into a habitat from which it has been extirpated. Past efforts to improve these practices have attributed the low success rate to failures in the biological knowledge (e.g., ignorance of social behavior, poor release site selection, or to the inherent challenges of reinstating a species into an area where threats have already driven it to local extinction. Such research presumes that the only way to improve reintroduction outcomes is through improved biological knowledge. This emphasis on biological solutions may have caused researchers to overlook the potential influence of other factors on reintroduction outcomes. I employed a grounded theory approach to study the leadership and management of a successful reintroduction program (the Sea Eagle Recovery Project in Scotland, UK and identify four critical managerial elements that I theorize may have contributed to the successful outcome of this 50-year reintroduction. These elements are: 1. Leadership & Management: Small, dedicated team of accessible experts who provide strong political and scientific advocacy (“champions” for the project. 2. Hierarchy & Autonomy: Hierarchical management structure that nevertheless permits high individual autonomy. 3. Goals & Evaluation: Formalized goal-setting and regular, critical evaluation of the project’s progress toward those goals. 4. Adaptive Public Relations: Adaptive outreach campaigns that are open, transparent, inclusive (esp. linguistically, and culturally relevant.

  14. Leadership and management influences the outcome of wildlife reintroduction programs: findings from the Sea Eagle Recovery Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Alexandra E

    2015-01-01

    Wildlife reintroductions and translocations are statistically unlikely to succeed. Nevertheless, they remain a critical part of conservation because they are the only way to actively restore a species into a habitat from which it has been extirpated. Past efforts to improve these practices have attributed the low success rate to failures in the biological knowledge (e.g., ignorance of social behavior, poor release site selection), or to the inherent challenges of reinstating a species into an area where threats have already driven it to local extinction. Such research presumes that the only way to improve reintroduction outcomes is through improved biological knowledge. This emphasis on biological solutions may have caused researchers to overlook the potential influence of other factors on reintroduction outcomes. I employed a grounded theory approach to study the leadership and management of a successful reintroduction program (the Sea Eagle Recovery Project in Scotland, UK) and identify four critical managerial elements that I theorize may have contributed to the successful outcome of this 50-year reintroduction. These elements are: 1. Leadership & Management: Small, dedicated team of accessible experts who provide strong political and scientific advocacy ("champions") for the project. 2. Hierarchy & Autonomy: Hierarchical management structure that nevertheless permits high individual autonomy. 3. Goals & Evaluation: Formalized goal-setting and regular, critical evaluation of the project's progress toward those goals. 4. Adaptive Public Relations: Adaptive outreach campaigns that are open, transparent, inclusive (esp. linguistically), and culturally relevant.

  15. Mathematical programs with complementarity constraints in traffic and telecommunications networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralph, Daniel

    2008-06-13

    Given a suitably parametrized family of equilibrium models and a higher level criterion by which to measure an equilibrium state, mathematical programs with equilibrium constraints (MPECs) provide a framework for improving or optimizing the equilibrium state. An example is toll design in traffic networks, which attempts to reduce total travel time by choosing which arcs to toll and what toll levels to impose. Here, a Wardrop equilibrium describes the traffic response to each toll design. Communication networks also have a deep literature on equilibrium flows that suggest some MPECs. We focus on mathematical programs with complementarity constraints (MPCCs), a subclass of MPECs for which the lower level equilibrium system can be formulated as a complementarity problem and therefore, importantly, as a nonlinear program (NLP). Although MPECs and MPCCs are typically non-convex, which is a consequence of the upper level objective clashing with the users' objectives in the lower level equilibrium program, the last decade of research has paved the way for finding local solutions of MPCCs via standard NLP techniques.

  16. Teambuilding and leadership training in an internal medicine residency training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, James K; Rose, Mark; Lee, Rita; Dolgan, Colleen; Hoogwerf, Byron J

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe and evaluate the impact of a 1-day retreat focused on developing leadership skills and teambuilding among postgraduate year 1 residents in an internal medicine residency. A group of organizers, including members of the staff, the chief medical residents, administrative individuals in the residency office, and an internal organizational development consultant convened to organize an off-site retreat with activities that would provide experiential learning regarding teamwork and leadership, including a "reef survival exercise" and table discussions regarding the characteristics of ideal leaders. In addition, several energizing activities and recreational free time was provided to enhance the interaction and teamwork dimensions of the retreat. To evaluate the impact of the retreat, attendees completed baseline and follow-up questionnaires regarding their experience of the retreat. Attendees universally regarded the retreat as having value for them. Comparison of baseline to postretreat responses indicated that attendees felt that the retreat enhanced their abilities to be better physicians, resident supervisors, and leaders. Follow-up responses indicated significant increases in attendees' agreement that good leaders challenge the process, make decisions based on shared visions, allow others to act, recognize individual contributions, and serve as good role models. Results on the survival exercise indicated a high frequency with which team-based decisions surpassed individual members' decisions, highlighting the importance and value of teamwork to attendees. Our main findings were that: participants universally found this 1-day retreat beneficial in helping to develop teamwork and leadership skills and the experiential learning aspects of the retreat were more especially highly rated and highlighted the advantages of teamwork. In the context that this 1-day retreat was deemed useful by faculty and residents alike, further

  17. Teambuilding and Leadership Training in an Internal Medicine Residency Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, James K; Rose, Mark; Lee, Rita; Dolgan, Colleen; Hoogwerf, Byron J

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this report is to describe and evaluate the impact of a 1-day retreat focused on developing leadership skills and teambuilding among postgraduate year 1 residents in an internal medicine residency. METHOD A group of organizers, including members of the staff, the chief medical residents, administrative individuals in the residency office, and an internal organizational development consultant convened to organize an off-site retreat with activities that would provide experiential learning regarding teamwork and leadership, including a “reef survival exercise” and table discussions regarding the characteristics of ideal leaders. In addition, several energizing activities and recreational free time was provided to enhance the interaction and teamwork dimensions of the retreat. To evaluate the impact of the retreat, attendees completed baseline and follow-up questionnaires regarding their experience of the retreat. RESULTS Attendees universally regarded the retreat as having value for them. Comparison of baseline to postretreat responses indicated that attendees felt that the retreat enhanced their abilities to be better physicians, resident supervisors, and leaders. Follow-up responses indicated significant increases in attendees’ agreement that good leaders challenge the process, make decisions based on shared visions, allow others to act, recognize individual contributions, and serve as good role models. Results on the survival exercise indicated a high frequency with which team-based decisions surpassed individual members’ decisions, highlighting the importance and value of teamwork to attendees. CONCLUSIONS Our main findings were that: participants universally found this 1-day retreat beneficial in helping to develop teamwork and leadership skills and the experiential learning aspects of the retreat were more especially highly rated and highlighted the advantages of teamwork. In the context that this 1-day retreat was deemed useful

  18. Transportation Security Leadership: The Right Stuff

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Burke, Karen

    2008-01-01

    .... transportation systems from terrorist threats. With the growing complexity and global nature of the terrorist networks, it requires leadership that is collaborative, integrative, and able to take a holistic leadership approach...

  19. Leadership development in dental education: report on the ADEA Leadership Institute, 2000-08.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haden, N Karl; Ranney, Richard R; Weinstein, George; Breeding, Larry C; Bresch, Jack E; Valachovic, Richard W

    2010-03-01

    This report describes participants' assessment of their experiences in the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) Leadership Institute program. The ADEA Leadership Institute is designed for mid-career faculty members who desire to attain administrative roles within their own or other institutions or enhance their effectiveness in these roles. This year-long program, conducted in four phases, is ADEA's flagship career enhancement program and provides dental educators with perspectives about oral health policy and legislation, organization and financing of higher education, the dental school's role within the parent institution, financial management, legal issues, recruiting faculty, and opportunities to acquire and practice skills associated with effective leadership. ADEA Leadership Institute Fellows also explore team-building, personality preferences, leadership styles, emotional intelligence, stress management, work-life balance, strategies for leading change, and giving and receiving feedback, as well as engaging in self- and peer assessment throughout the year. Each year up to twenty-one fellows are selected to participate in the institute in a competitive application process. In 2009, 149 fellows who participated in the institute from 2000 to 2008 were invited to take part in a survey to establish their profiles and academic leadership roles, determine their perceptions of the benefits from the institute curriculum, and elicit their suggestions for improvement. The survey response rate was 73 percent (n=109). Ninety-nine percent of respondents gave an overall positive assessment of their experiences. The most beneficial experiences, according to respondents, included networking with the program participants, advisors, and instructors (78 percent); self-discovery through self-assessments and evaluations (44 percent); and a 360 degree feedback process to provide additional reflection about areas for improvement (17 percent). Least beneficial experiences

  20. Situational Leadership

    OpenAIRE

    Süttö, Marián

    2016-01-01

    This thesis is focused on field of leadership, particularly situational leadership model by Hersey and Blanchard. Thesis is mostly theoretical framework aimed to offer the possibility for reader to get overview in leadership issues. Theoretical framework of the thesis is focused on leadership definition, the most important leadership theories in the past, and especially to situational leadership approach. The focus of this thesis is to get detailed insight in this model and therefore offer in...

  1. Leadership Epistemology

    OpenAIRE

    Bogenschneider, B

    2016-01-01

    The study of leadership is characterized by an expanding set of definitions of the term leadership. Some scholars even set out to know leadership by the identification of traits or behaviors of good leaders. However, the scientific study of leadership requires the identification of a causal theory of leadership. The scientific belief in causation as the common epistemology is the necessary link between the various disciplines interested in leadership (e.g., organizational psychology, statisti...

  2. The Role of Educational Leadership on Participation in the Costa Rican National Program of Science and Technology Fairs at Escuela Abraham Lincoln in the Coastal Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the role that Costa Rican educational leaders play in implementing the National Program of Science and Technology Fairs (Programa Nacional de Ferias de Ciencia y Tecnologia [PRONAFECYT]) initiative. The study provides an examination of leadership practices, instructional strategies, and professional…

  3. The Effect of Leadership Courses and Programs on University Undergraduates' Self-Efficacy in Two Mid-Sized Christian Universities in West Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majkowski, Jasmine Meg

    2017-01-01

    The globalization and diversification within the world led universities to try to address the problem with improved future leaders. Universities offer leadership classes and programs to prepare tomorrow's leaders to adapt to the ever-changing landscape the world now offers. This study built on the theoretical framework of Albert Bandura's…

  4. Building interfirm leadership: a relational identity perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Hao, Bin; Feng, Yanan; Ye, Jiangfeng

    2017-01-01

    While leadership has been recognized as an approach to facilitating network orchestration, little is known about the mechanism through which a hub firm enhances interfirm leadership. Grounded on the theory of social identity and network orchestration, we develop a framework of the enhancement of interfirm leadership, proposing that the tendency of building leadership rests on the hub firm’s ability to shape the partners’ relational identity. We identify three types of role-adoption that indic...

  5. The Portals 4.1 Network Programming Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, Brian; Brightwell, Ronald B.; Grant, Ryan; Hemmert, Karl Scott; Pedretti, Kevin; Wheeler, Kyle; Underwood, Keith D; Riesen, Rolf; Maccabe, Arthur B.; Hudson, Trammel

    2017-04-01

    This report presents a specification for the Portals 4 networ k programming interface. Portals 4 is intended to allow scalable, high-performance network communication betwee n nodes of a parallel computing system. Portals 4 is well suited to massively parallel processing and embedded syste ms. Portals 4 represents an adaption of the data movement layer developed for massively parallel processing platfor ms, such as the 4500-node Intel TeraFLOPS machine. Sandia's Cplant cluster project motivated the development of Version 3.0, which was later extended to Version 3.3 as part of the Cray Red Storm machine and XT line. Version 4 is tar geted to the next generation of machines employing advanced network interface architectures that support enh anced offload capabilities.

  6. Working toward Transformational Leadership in Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Kathleen E.

    1996-01-01

    Argues that, before colleges and universities can develop leaders, they must develop a coherent vision of what leadership is. Uses a historian's concept of transformational leadership to explore the various dimensions of leadership, such as its moral dimension. Outlines reasons for instituting and transforming leadership development programs. (RJM)

  7. Leadership in adolescent health: developing the next generation of maternal child health leaders through mentorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood, Emily A; Trent, Maria; Gordon, Catherine M; Goncalves, Adrianne; Resnick, Michael; Fortenberry, J Dennis; Boyer, Cherrie B; Richardson, Laura; Emans, S Jean

    2015-02-01

    Leadership development is a core value of Maternal Child Health Bureau training programs. Mentorship, an MCH Leadership Competency, has been shown to positively affect career advancement and research productivity. Improving mentorship opportunities for junior faculty and trainees may increase pursuit of careers in areas such as adolescent health research and facilitate the development of new leaders in the field. Using a framework of Developmental Networks, a group of MCH Leadership Education in Adolescent Health training program faculty developed a pilot mentoring program offered at the Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine Annual Meeting (2011-2013). The program matched ten interdisciplinary adolescent health fellows and junior faculty with senior mentors at other institutions with expertise in the mentee's content area of study in 2011. Participants were surveyed over 2 years. Respondents indicated they were "very satisfied" with their mentor match, and all agreed or strongly agreed that the mentoring process in the session was helpful, and that the mentoring relationships resulted in several ongoing collaborations and expanded their Developmental Networks. These results demonstrate that MCH programs can apply innovative strategies to disseminate the MCH Leadership Competencies to groups beyond MCH-funded training programs through programs at scientific meetings. Such innovations may enhance the structure of mentoring, further the development of new leaders in the field, and expand developmental networks to provide support for MCH professionals transitioning to leadership roles.

  8. Effective Leadership and Management of an ACS Injury Prevention Program: Current Opinions and Perspectives From Where the Rubber Meets the Road.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Elizabeth S; Bryant, Elizabeth A

    The American College of Surgeons (ACS) mandates that each verified trauma center must have an injury prevention coordinator (IPC); however, Chapter 18 in the Resources for Optimal Care of the Injured Patient (2014) provides minimal information on how to effectively lead or manage an injury prevention (IP) program. This opinion article addresses 3 fundamental components of an effective IP program: (1) construction of an innovative vision of IP programming using current technology; (2) intentional investment and involvement; and (3) stakeholder leadership, engagement, and sustainability. This article also provides leadership and management methods from other professions both within and outside of the health care field that can be translated into sustainable IP program planning, implementation, and longevity.

  9. "They Were Really Looking for a Male Leader for the Building": Gender, Identity and Leadership Development in a Principal Preparation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Laura J; Weiner, Jennie M

    2016-01-01

    This study utilized a comparative case study analysis to investigate how gender influenced the experiences of participants in a leadership development program (principal preparation program) designed to lead public K-12 schools identified as requiring turnaround. We closely focused on two participants, a man and a woman, and compared the ways each participant made meaning of his/her experiences as developing leaders in the program. Although both participants conceptualized effective leadership in similar communally-oriented ways, the way they came to construct their identities as leaders varied greatly. These differences were largely influenced by different and, what appeared to be, gendered feedback occurring during the program and when participants entered the job market.

  10. They were really looking for a male leader for the building: Gender, identity and leadership development in a principal preparation program.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura J Burton

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study utilized a comparative case study analysis to investigate how gender influenced the experiences of participants in a leadership development program (principal preparation program designed to lead public K-12 schools identified as requiring turnaround. We closely focused on two participants, a man and a woman, and compared the ways each participant made meaning of his/her experiences as developing leaders in the program. Although both participants conceptualized effective leadership in similar communally-oriented ways, the way they came to construct their identities as leaders varied greatly. These differences were largely influenced by different and, what appeared to be, gendered feedback occurring during the program and when participants entered the job market.

  11. “They Were Really Looking for a Male Leader for the Building”: Gender, Identity and Leadership Development in a Principal Preparation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Laura J.; Weiner, Jennie M.

    2016-01-01

    This study utilized a comparative case study analysis to investigate how gender influenced the experiences of participants in a leadership development program (principal preparation program) designed to lead public K-12 schools identified as requiring turnaround. We closely focused on two participants, a man and a woman, and compared the ways each participant made meaning of his/her experiences as developing leaders in the program. Although both participants conceptualized effective leadership in similar communally-oriented ways, the way they came to construct their identities as leaders varied greatly. These differences were largely influenced by different and, what appeared to be, gendered feedback occurring during the program and when participants entered the job market. PMID:26909054

  12. Surfacing the Iceberg of Leadership: A New Taxonomy of Leadership Concepts and Theories

    OpenAIRE

    Kaufman, EK; Cletzer, DA

    2017-01-01

    Leadership scholars have long sought to impose order on the numerous theories in leadership literature. While mid-level theories abound, no taxonomy exists to provide hierarchy and a mechanism for explaining how theories interrelate. This poster offers a new taxonomy for organizing leadership theories and concepts based on the metaphor of an iceberg. It invites leadership scholars to vet their own leadership courses and undergraduate leadership programs to determine the depth to which they ex...

  13. Navy definitions of leadership and LMET/NAVLEAD competency clusters compared to selected leadership theories

    OpenAIRE

    Al Harbi, Toraiheeb

    1995-01-01

    This study examines the leadership training model used in the US Navy and investigates the way the Navy looks at and defines leadership in general. The emphasis is placed on leadership training for commissioned officers. The objective is dual; first, to make explicit the Navy's concept and definition of leadership, and second, to examine and analyze the leadership training program LMET/NAVLEAD content, as designed by McBer. Then, both the Navy definition of leadership and ...

  14. The effectiveness of an aged care specific leadership and management program on workforce, work environment, and care quality outcomes: design of a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Yun-Hee; Simpson, Judy M; Chenoweth, Lynn; Cunich, Michelle; Kendig, Hal

    2013-10-25

    A plethora of observational evidence exists concerning the impact of management and leadership on workforce, work environment, and care quality. Yet, no randomised controlled trial has been conducted to test the effectiveness of leadership and management interventions in aged care. An innovative aged care clinical leadership program (Clinical Leadership in Aged Care--CLiAC) was developed to improve managers' leadership capacities to support the delivery of quality care in Australia. This paper describes the study design of the cluster randomised controlled trial testing the effectiveness of the program. Twenty-four residential and community aged care sites were recruited as managers at each site agreed in writing to participate in the study and ensure that leaders allocated to the control arm would not be offered the intervention program. Sites undergoing major managerial or structural changes were excluded. The 24 sites were randomly allocated to receive the CLiAC program (intervention) or usual care (control), stratified by type (residential vs. community, six each for each arm). Treatment allocation was masked to assessors and staff of all participating sites. The objective is to establish the effectiveness of the CLiAC program in improving work environment, workforce retention, as well as care safety and quality, when compared to usual care. The primary outcomes are measures of work environment, care quality and safety, and staff turnover rates. Secondary outcomes include manager leadership capacity, staff absenteeism, intention to leave, stress levels, and job satisfaction. Differences between intervention and control groups will be analysed by researchers blinded to treatment allocation using linear regression of individual results adjusted for stratification and clustering by site (primary analysis), and additionally for baseline values and potential confounders (secondary analysis). Outcomes measured at the site level will be compared by cluster

  15. The effectiveness of an aged care specific leadership and management program on workforce, work environment, and care quality outcomes: design of a cluster randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background A plethora of observational evidence exists concerning the impact of management and leadership on workforce, work environment, and care quality. Yet, no randomised controlled trial has been conducted to test the effectiveness of leadership and management interventions in aged care. An innovative aged care clinical leadership program (Clinical Leadership in Aged Care − CLiAC) was developed to improve managers’ leadership capacities to support the delivery of quality care in Australia. This paper describes the study design of the cluster randomised controlled trial testing the effectiveness of the program. Methods Twenty-four residential and community aged care sites were recruited as managers at each site agreed in writing to participate in the study and ensure that leaders allocated to the control arm would not be offered the intervention program. Sites undergoing major managerial or structural changes were excluded. The 24 sites were randomly allocated to receive the CLiAC program (intervention) or usual care (control), stratified by type (residential vs. community, six each for each arm). Treatment allocation was masked to assessors and staff of all participating sites. The objective is to establish the effectiveness of the CLiAC program in improving work environment, workforce retention, as well as care safety and quality, when compared to usual care. The primary outcomes are measures of work environment, care quality and safety, and staff turnover rates. Secondary outcomes include manager leadership capacity, staff absenteeism, intention to leave, stress levels, and job satisfaction. Differences between intervention and control groups will be analysed by researchers blinded to treatment allocation using linear regression of individual results adjusted for stratification and clustering by site (primary analysis), and additionally for baseline values and potential confounders (secondary analysis). Outcomes measured at the site level will be

  16. Leader-follower consensus and synchronization in numerosity-constrained networks with dynamic leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Subhradeep; Abaid, Nicole

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we study leader-follower consensus and synchronization protocols over a stochastically switching network. The agents representing the followers can communicate with any other agent, whereas the agents serving as leaders are restricted to interact only with the other leaders. The model incorporates the phenomenon of numerosity, which limits the perceptual capacity of the agents while allowing for shuffling with whom each individual interacts at each time step. We derive closed form expressions for necessary and sufficient conditions for consensus, the rate of convergence to consensus, and conditions for stochastic synchronization in terms of the asymptotic convergence factor. We provide simulation results to validate the theoretical findings and to illustrate the dependence of this factor on system parameters. The closed form results enable us to study the factors affecting the feasibility of consensus. We show that agents' traits can be chosen for an engineered system to maximize the convergence speed and that protocol speed is enhanced as the proportion of the leaders increases in certain cases. These results may find application in the design and control of an engineered leader-follower system, where consensus or synchronization at the fastest possible rate is desired.

  17. Inferring animal social networks and leadership: applications for passive monitoring arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacoby, David M P; Papastamatiou, Yannis P; Freeman, Robin

    2016-11-01

    Analyses of animal social networks have frequently benefited from techniques derived from other disciplines. Recently, machine learning algorithms have been adopted to infer social associations from time-series data gathered using remote, telemetry systems situated at provisioning sites. We adapt and modify existing inference methods to reveal the underlying social structure of wide-ranging marine predators moving through spatial arrays of passive acoustic receivers. From six months of tracking data for grey reef sharks (Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos) at Palmyra atoll in the Pacific Ocean, we demonstrate that some individuals emerge as leaders within the population and that this behavioural coordination is predicted by both sex and the duration of co-occurrences between conspecifics. In doing so, we provide the first evidence of long-term, spatially extensive social processes in wild sharks. To achieve these results, we interrogate simulated and real tracking data with the explicit purpose of drawing attention to the key considerations in the use and interpretation of inference methods and their impact on resultant social structure. We provide a modified translation of the GMMEvents method for R, including new analyses quantifying the directionality and duration of social events with the aim of encouraging the careful use of these methods more widely in less tractable social animal systems but where passive telemetry is already widespread. © 2016 The Authors.

  18. Leader-follower consensus and synchronization in numerosity-constrained networks with dynamic leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Subhradeep; Abaid, Nicole

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we study leader-follower consensus and synchronization protocols over a stochastically switching network. The agents representing the followers can communicate with any other agent, whereas the agents serving as leaders are restricted to interact only with the other leaders. The model incorporates the phenomenon of numerosity, which limits the perceptual capacity of the agents while allowing for shuffling with whom each individual interacts at each time step. We derive closed form expressions for necessary and sufficient conditions for consensus, the rate of convergence to consensus, and conditions for stochastic synchronization in terms of the asymptotic convergence factor. We provide simulation results to validate the theoretical findings and to illustrate the dependence of this factor on system parameters. The closed form results enable us to study the factors affecting the feasibility of consensus. We show that agents' traits can be chosen for an engineered system to maximize the convergence speed and that protocol speed is enhanced as the proportion of the leaders increases in certain cases. These results may find application in the design and control of an engineered leader-follower system, where consensus or synchronization at the fastest possible rate is desired.

  19. A recurrent neural network for solving bilevel linear programming problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xing; Li, Chuandong; Huang, Tingwen; Li, Chaojie; Huang, Junjian

    2014-04-01

    In this brief, based on the method of penalty functions, a recurrent neural network (NN) modeled by means of a differential inclusion is proposed for solving the bilevel linear programming problem (BLPP). Compared with the existing NNs for BLPP, the model has the least number of state variables and simple structure. Using nonsmooth analysis, the theory of differential inclusions, and Lyapunov-like method, the equilibrium point sequence of the proposed NNs can approximately converge to an optimal solution of BLPP under certain conditions. Finally, the numerical simulations of a supply chain distribution model have shown excellent performance of the proposed recurrent NNs.

  20. Journeys to School Leadership: How Action Learning Identified What Participants Valued in a Year-Long Australian Leadership Development Program Centered on Principles of Good Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulla, Norman; Degenhardt, Leoni

    2016-01-01

    The need to identify and suitably prepare teachers to undertake school leadership roles especially as principals is now well documented in the literature. Similarly documented is the general concern about the lack of suitable applicants willing to consider the role. This study raised the question of what might be learnt when a…

  1. A Korean Space Situational Awareness Program : OWL Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J.; Choi, Y.; Jo, J.; Moon, H.; Im, H.; Park, J.

    2012-09-01

    We are going to present a brief introduction to the OWL (Optical Wide-field patroL) network, one of Korean space situational awareness facilities. Primary objectives of the OWL network are 1) to obtain orbital information of Korean domestic LEOs using optical method, 2) to monitor GEO-belt over territory of Korea, and 3) to alleviate collisional risks posed to Korean satellites from space debris. For these purposes, we are planning to build a global network of telescopes which consists of five small wide-field telescopes and one 2m class telescope. The network of small telescopes will be dedicated mainly to the observation of domestic LEOs, but many slots will be open to other scientific programs such as GRB follow-up observations. Main targets of 2m telescope not only include artificial objects such as GEO debris and LEO debris with low inclination and high eccentricity, but also natural objects such as near Earth asteroids. We expect to monitor space objects down to 10cm in size in GEO using the 2m telescope system. Main research topics include size distribution and evolution of space debris. We also expect to utilize this facility for physical characterization and population study of near Earth asteroids. The aperture size of the small telescope system is 0.5m with Rechey-Cretian configuration and its field of view is 1.75 deg x 1.75 deg. It is equipped with 4K CCD with 9um pixel size, and its plate scale is 1.3 arcsec/pixel. A chopper wheel is employed to maximize astrometric solutions in a single CCD frame, and a de-rotator is used to compensate field rotation of the alt-az type mount. We have designed a compact end unit in which three rotating parts (chopper wheel, filter wheel, de-rotator) and a CCD camera are integrated, and dedicated telescope/site control boards for the OWL network. The design of 2m class telescope is still under discussion yet is expected to be fixed in the first half of 2013 at the latest. The OWL network will be operated in a fully

  2. Exploring Self-Efficacy in Education Leadership Programs: What Makes the Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versland, Tena M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite attention given to principal preparation program reform, little research exists explaining how candidates develop self-efficacy or how preparation programs contribute to self-efficacy development. Researchers used a mixed-methods study to examine principals' perceptions of program effectiveness, determine underlying constructs related to…

  3. Sensitivity analysis of linear programming problem through a recurrent neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Raja

    2017-11-01

    In this paper we study the recurrent neural network for solving linear programming problems. To achieve optimality in accuracy and also in computational effort, an algorithm is presented. We investigate the sensitivity analysis of linear programming problem through the neural network. A detailed example is also presented to demonstrate the performance of the recurrent neural network.

  4. Design and evaluation of simulation scenarios for a program introducing patient safety, teamwork, safety leadership, and simulation to healthcare leaders and managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Jeffrey B; Singer, Sara J; Hayes, Jennifer; Sales, Michael; Vogt, Jay W; Raemer, Daniel; Meyer, Gregg S

    2011-08-01

    We developed a training program to introduce managers and informal leaders of healthcare organizations to key concepts of teamwork, safety leadership, and simulation to motivate them to act as leaders to improve safety within their sphere of influence. This report describes the simulation scenario and debriefing that are core elements of that program. Twelve teams of clinician and nonclinician managers were selected from a larger set of volunteers to participate in a 1-day, multielement training program. Two simulation exercises were developed: one for teams of nonclinicians and the other for clinicians or mixed groups. The scenarios represented two different clinical situations, each designed to engage participants in discussions of their safety leadership and teamwork issues immediately after the experience. In the scenarios for nonclinicians, participants conducted an anesthetic induction and then managed an ethical situation. The scenario for clinicians simulated a consulting visit to an emergency room that evolved into a problem-solving challenge. Participants in this scenario had a limited time to prepare advice for hospital leadership on how to improve observed safety and cultural deficiencies. Debriefings after both types of scenarios were conducted using principles of "debriefing with good judgment." We assessed the relevance and impact of the program by analyzing participant reactions to the simulation through transcript data and facilitator observations as well as a postcourse questionnaire. The teams generally reported positive perceptions of the relevance and quality of the simulation with varying types and degrees of impact on their leadership and teamwork behaviors. These kinds of clinical simulation exercises can be used to teach healthcare leaders and managers safety leadership and teamwork skills and behaviors.

  5. Discovery of Boolean metabolic networks: integer linear programming based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yushan; Jiang, Hao; Ching, Wai-Ki; Cheng, Xiaoqing

    2018-04-11

    Traditional drug discovery methods focused on the efficacy of drugs rather than their toxicity. However, toxicity and/or lack of efficacy are produced when unintended targets are affected in metabolic networks. Thus, identification of biological targets which can be manipulated to produce the desired effect with minimum side-effects has become an important and challenging topic. Efficient computational methods are required to identify the drug targets while incurring minimal side-effects. In this paper, we propose a graph-based computational damage model that summarizes the impact of enzymes on compounds in metabolic networks. An efficient method based on Integer Linear Programming formalism is then developed to identify the optimal enzyme-combination so as to minimize the side-effects. The identified target enzymes for known successful drugs are then verified by comparing the results with those in the existing literature. Side-effects reduction plays a crucial role in the study of drug development. A graph-based computational damage model is proposed and the theoretical analysis states the captured problem is NP-completeness. The proposed approaches can therefore contribute to the discovery of drug targets. Our developed software is available at " http://hkumath.hku.hk/~wkc/APBC2018-metabolic-network.zip ".

  6. Reverse engineering GTPase programming languages with reconstituted signaling networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Scott M

    2016-07-02

    The Ras superfamily GTPases represent one of the most prolific signaling currencies used in Eukaryotes. With these remarkable molecules, evolution has built GTPase networks that control diverse cellular processes such as growth, morphology, motility and trafficking. (1-4) Our knowledge of the individual players that underlie the function of these networks is deep; decades of biochemical and structural data has provided a mechanistic understanding of the molecules that turn GTPases ON and OFF, as well as how those GTPase states signal by controlling the assembly of downstream effectors. However, we know less about how these different activities work together as a system to specify complex dynamic signaling outcomes. Decoding this molecular "programming language" would help us understand how different species and cell types have used the same GTPase machinery in different ways to accomplish different tasks, and would also provide new insights as to how mutations to these networks can cause disease. We recently developed a bead-based microscopy assay to watch reconstituted H-Ras signaling systems at work under arbitrary configurations of regulators and effectors. (5) Here we highlight key observations and insights from this study and propose extensions to our method to further study this and other GTPase signaling systems.

  7. Responsible Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone-Johnson, Corrie

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: At a time when school leadership takes on great import, we must ask how leadership can move beyond a focus on individual- and school-level changes to collective leadership that relies on the strength of relationships between schools and the communities in which they reside to foster and sustain change. Such leadership is termed…

  8. Leadership, Governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    : Environmental Documents, Reports LANL Home Calendar Search Contacts About » Leadership, Governance Leadership national security and energy challenges. Leadership, Governance Ethics, Accountability Los Alamos National . Director's Office terry wallace in leadership, governance Director Terry C. Wallace, Jr. Terry C. Wallace, Jr

  9. Educational Leadership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moos, Lejf

    2003-01-01

    Educational leadership is different from other kinds of leadership, e.g. in leading production or service enterprises or public service institutions ? because educational leaders cannot choose their leadership style. I shall argue that educational leadership must be seen from the perspective...

  10. Programs for control of an analog-signal switching network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Ottavio, T.; Enriquez, R.; Katz, R.; Skelly, J.

    1989-01-01

    A suite of programs has been developed to control the network of analog-signal switching multiplexers in the AGS complex. The software is driven by a relational database which describes the architecture of the multiplexer tree and the set of available analog signals. Signals are routed through a three-layer multiplexer tree, to be made available at four consoles each with three 4-trace oscilloscopes. A menu-structured operator interface program is available at each console, to accept requests to route any available analog signal to any of that console's 12 oscilloscope traces. A common routing-server program provides automatic routing-server program provides automatic routing of requested signals through the layers of multiplexers, maintaining a reservation database to denote free and in-use trunks. Expansion of the analog signal system is easily accommodated in software by adding new signals, trunks, multiplexers, or consoles to the database. Programmatic control of the triggering signals for each of the oscilloscopes is also provided. 3 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  11. A network-based Macintosh serial host interface program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wight, J.

    1991-03-01

    A program has been written for the Apple Macintosh to replace conventional host RS232 terminals with customizable user interfaces. Serial port NuBus cards in the Macintosh allow many simultaneous sessions to be maintained. A powerful system is attained by connecting multiple Macintoshes on a network, each running this program. Each is then able to share incoming data from any of its serial ports with any other Macintosh, as well as accept data from any other Macintosh for output to any of its serial ports. The program has been used to eliminate multiple host terminals, modernize the user interface, and to centralize operation of a complex control system. Minimal changes to host software have been required. By making extensive use of Macintosh resources, the same executable code serves in a variety of roles. An object oriented C language with a class library made the development straightforward and easy to modify. This program is used to control a 2 MW neutral beam system on the DIII-D magnetic fusion tokamak. 7 figs

  12. Uncovering changes in university teachers' professional networks during an instructional development program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Waes, Sara; Van den Bossche, Piet; Moolenaar, Nienke M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304352802; Stes, Ann; Van Petegem, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This study examined (1) the extent to which university teachers' networks changed while they participated in an instructional development program, (2) which mechanisms supported or constrained network change, and (3) the extent to which value was created through networks. Longitudinal social network

  13. Leadership Innovations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-01

    leadership " and " leadership in innovation." 3 THEORY , AS AN INSTRUMENT OF ANALYSIS FOR INNOVATION IN LEADERSHIP There are many...attributes of a leader.𔃺 Attempts to define leadership usually contrast it with "followship", management ," or sometimes - with ’beadship."’" These...plausible theory . - . . . -. - -- Nevertheless, some authors consider, and I agree, that there is no true leadership theory because existing

  14. Effective leadership

    OpenAIRE

    Vávrová, Zuzana

    2010-01-01

    In my bachelor thesis I describe problems of effective leadership in organization in relation with organization's objectives filling. I focus here on main principles of leadership process. I characterize process of leadership and personality of leader, who is active executor of this process in organization. The effective leadership is here evaluated mainly from organization theory point of view and in relation with requirements to management, especially its relation with leadership and its de...

  15. Leadership training in a family medicine residency program: Cross-sectional quantitative survey to inform curriculum development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Erin; Moore, Ainsley; Schabort, Inge

    2017-03-01

    To assess the current status of leadership training as perceived by family medicine residents to inform the development of a formal leadership curriculum. Cross-sectional quantitative survey. Department of Family Medicine at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont, in December 2013. A total of 152 first- and second-year family medicine residents. Family medicine residents' attitudes toward leadership, perceived level of training in various leadership domains, and identified opportunities for leadership training. Overall, 80% (152 of 190) of residents completed the survey. On a Likert scale (1 = strongly disagree, 4 = neutral, 7 = strongly agree), residents rated the importance of physician leadership in the clinical setting as high (6.23 of 7), whereas agreement with the statement "I am a leader" received the lowest rating (5.28 of 7). At least 50% of residents desired more training in the leadership domains of personal mastery, mentorship and coaching, conflict resolution, teaching, effective teamwork, administration, ideals of a healthy workplace, coalitions, and system transformation. At least 50% of residents identified behavioural sciences seminars, a lecture and workshop series, and a retreat as opportunities to expand leadership training. The concept of family physicians as leaders resonated highly with residents. Residents desired more personal and system-level leadership training. They also identified ways that leadership training could be expanded in the current curriculum and developed in other areas. The information gained from this survey might facilitate leadership development among residents through application of its results in a formal leadership curriculum. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  16. A Community-Based Leadership Development Program for First Nations Women: Revaluing and Honoring Women’s Strengths

    OpenAIRE

    K. Amanda Maranzan; Alice Sabourin; Christine Simard-Chicago

    2013-01-01

    Over 400 First Nation women participated in leadership development workshops developed by First Nation women for First Nation women. We collected survey data and conducted focus groups and interviews with workshop participants to identify outcomes and determine barriers and resources to women in leadership. Outcomes of the workshop included increased perception of women as leaders, increased personal capacity, and encouragement to seek opportunities for formal and informal leadership position...

  17. Leading to Transgress: Critical Considerations for Transforming Leadership Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteen, Laura; Guthrie, Kathy L; Jones, Tamara Bertrand

    2016-12-01

    The culturally relevant leadership learning (CRLL) model is explored through the lens of theory and practice. This creates critical questions to guide leadership educators in the ongoing process of transforming leadership programs. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  18. The Mental Health Leadership and Advocacy Program (mhLAP): a pioneering response to the neglect of mental health in Anglophone West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulmalik, Jibril; Fadahunsi, Woye; Kola, Lola; Nwefoh, Emeka; Minas, Harry; Eaton, Julian; Gureje, Oye

    2014-01-27

    Developing countries in Africa and other regions share a similar profile of insufficient human resources for mental health, poor funding, a high unmet need for services and a low official prioritisation of mental health. This situation is worsened by misconceptions about the causes of mental disorders, stigma and discrimination that frequently result in harmful practices against persons with mental illness. Previous explorations of the required response to these challenges have identified the need for strong leadership and consistent advocacy as potential drivers of the desired change. The Mental Health Leadership and Advocacy Program (mhLAP) is a project that aims to provide and enhance the acquisition of skills in mental health leadership, service development, advocacy and policy planning and to build partnerships for action. Launched in 2010 to serve the Anglophone countries of The Gambia, Ghana, Liberia, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, this paper describes the components of the program, the experience gained since its initiation, and the achievements made during the three years of its implementation. These achievements include: 1) the annual training in mental health leadership and advocacy which has graduated 96 participants from 9 different African countries and 2) the establishment of a broad coalition of service user groups, non-governmental organizations, media practitioners and mental health professionals in each participating country to implement concerted mental health advocacy efforts that are focused on country-specific priorities.

  19. Medical school deans' perceptions of organizational climate: useful indicators for advancement of women faculty and evaluation of a leadership program's impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannels, Sharon; McLaughlin, Jean; Gleason, Katharine A; McDade, Sharon A; Richman, Rosalyn; Morahan, Page S

    2009-01-01

    The authors surveyed U.S. and Canadian medical school deans regarding organizational climate for faculty, policies affecting faculty, processes deans use for developing faculty leadership, and the impact of the Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine (ELAM) Program for Women. The usable response rate was 58% (n = 83/142). Deans perceived gender equity in organizational climate as neutral, improving, or attained on most items and deficient on four. Only three family-friendly policies/benefits were available at more than 68% of medical schools; several policies specifically designed to increase gender equity were available at fewer than 14%. Women deans reported significantly more frequent use than men (P = .032) of practices used to develop faculty leadership. Deans' impressions regarding the impact of ELAM alumnae on their schools was positive (M = 5.62 out of 7), with those having more fellows reporting greater benefit (P = .01). The deans felt the ELAM program had a very positive influence on its alumnae (M = 6.27) and increased their eligibility for promotion (M = 5.7). This study provides a unique window into the perceptions of medical school deans, important policy leaders at their institutions. Their opinion adds to previous studies of organizational climate focused on faculty perceptions. Deans perceive the organizational climate for women to be improving, but they believe that certain interventions are still needed. Women deans seem more proactive in their use of practices to develop leadership. Finally, deans provide an important third-party judgment for program evaluation of the ELAM leadership intervention, reporting a positive impact on its alumnae and their schools.

  20. Leadership Training in Otolaryngology Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, John P; Fried, Marvin P; Smith, Richard V; Hsueh, Wayne; Choi, Karen

    2017-06-01

    Although residency training offers numerous leadership opportunities, most residents are not exposed to scripted leadership instruction. To explore one program's attitudes about leadership training, a group of otolaryngology faculty (n = 14) and residents (n = 17) was polled about their attitudes. In terms of self-perception, more faculty (10 of 14, 71.4%) than residents (9 of 17, 52.9%; P = .461) considered themselves good leaders. The majority of faculty and residents (27 of 31) thought that adults could be taught leadership ability. Given attitudes about leadership ability and the potential for improvement through instruction, consideration should be given to including such training in otolaryngology residency.

  1. Leadership for Effective Schools: Guidelines for the Development of an Inclusion Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Donald L.; Karr-Kidwell, PJ

    This paper offers a literature review of materials concerning inclusion of students with disabilities, and reports on the 3-year development of an inclusion program at one elementary school in Texas. The literature review is organized into sections which address legislative initiatives and law, special education programs with mainstreaming, the…

  2. Support program to the development of the leadership for senior chiefs of shift in CNAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alava Reyes, M. J.; Melo Aguilera, A.

    2012-01-01

    Action program aimed at strengthening significant aspects associated with the shift supervisor in the control room. By the difficulty of joint actions of the collective, was used a methodology of personal coaching staff. The combined program of observations and Cabinet sessions lasted for six months.

  3. Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial of An Aged Care Specific Leadership and Management Program to Improve Work Environment, Staff Turnover, and Care Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Yun-Hee; Simpson, Judy M; Li, Zhicheng; Cunich, Michelle M; Thomas, Tamsin H; Chenoweth, Lynn; Kendig, Hal L

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a leadership and management program in aged care. Double-blind cluster randomized controlled trial. Twelve residential and community-aged care sites in Australia. All care staff employed for 6 months or longer at the aged care sites were invited to participate in the surveys at 3 time points: baseline (time 1), 9 months from baseline (time 2), and 9 months after completion of time 2 (time 3) from 2011 to 2013. At each time point, at least 500 care staff completed a survey. At baseline (N = 503) the largest age group was 45 to 54 years (37%), and the majority of care staff were born in Australia (70%), spoke English (94%), and had at least completed secondary education (57%). A 12-month Clinical Leadership in Aged Care (CLiAC) program for middle managers, which aimed to further develop their leadership and management skills in creating positive workplace relationships and in enabling person-centered, evidence-based care. The primary outcomes were care staff ratings of the work environment, care quality and safety, and staff turnover rates. Secondary outcomes were care staff's intention to leave their employer and profession, workplace stress, job satisfaction, and cost-effectiveness of implementing the program. Absenteeism was excluded due to difficulty in obtaining reliable data. Managers' self-rated knowledge and skills in leadership and management are not included in this article, which focuses on care staff perceptions only. At 6 months after its completion, the CLiAC program was effective in improving care staff's perception of management support [mean difference 0.61, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.04-1.18; P = .04]. Compared with the control sites, care staff at the intervention sites perceived their managers' leadership styles as more transformational (mean difference 0.30, 95% CI 0.09-0.51; P = .005), transactional (mean difference 0.22, 95% CI 0.05-0.39; P = .01), and less passive avoidant (mean difference 0.30, 95% CI 0

  4. Using Social Network Analysis as a Method to Assess and Strengthen Participation in Health Promotion Programs in Vulnerable Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindhede, Anette Lykke; Aagaard-Hansen, Jens

    2017-03-01

    This article provides an example of the application of social network analysis method to assess community participation thereby strengthening planning and implementation of health promotion programming. Community health promotion often takes the form of services that reach out to or are located within communities. The concept of community reflects the idea that people's behavior and well-being are influenced by interaction with others, and here, health promotion requires participation and local leadership to facilitate transmission and uptake of interventions for the overall community to achieve social change. However, considerable uncertainty exists over exact levels of participation in these interventions. The article draws on a mixed methods research within a community development project in a vulnerable neighborhood of a town in Denmark. It presents a detailed analysis of the way in which social network analysis can be used as a tool to display participation and nonparticipation in community development and health promotion activities, to help identify capacities and assets, mobilize resources, and finally to evaluate the achievements. The article concludes that identification of interpersonal ties among people who know one another well as well as more tenuous relationships in networks can be used by community development workers to foster greater cohesion and cooperation within an area.

  5. The transportation management division institutional program: Networking and problem solving

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGinnis, K.A.; Peterson, J.M.

    1989-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has several programs related to transportation. While these programs may have differing missions and legislative authority, the required activities are frequently similar. To ensure a DOE-wide perspective in developing transportation policies and procedures, a DOE Transportation Institutional Task Force (Task Force) has been formed, which is the primary focus of this paper. The Task Force, composed of representatives from each of the major DOE transportation programs, meets periodically to exchange experiences and insights on institutional issues related to Departmental shipping. The primary purpose of the group is to identify opportunities for productive interactions with the transportation community, including interested and affected members of the public. This paper will also focus sharply on the networking of DOE with the State, Tribal, and local officials in fostering better understanding and in solving problems. An example of such activity is the DOE's cooperative agreement with the Energy Task Force of the Urban Consortium. A major effort is to encourage cooperative action in identifying, addressing, and resolving issues that could impede the transportation of radioactive materials

  6. A student leadership model for promoting educational programs in organ donation and transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reville, P; Zhao, C; Perez, T; Nowacki, A S; Phillips, D; Bowen, G; Starling, N; Pflaum, B; Strickland, R; Fung, J; Askar, M

    2013-05-01

    The global organ shortage is the strongest factor for the increase in transplant wait time and deaths on waitlists. Here we describe a model for involving high school students in education research around organ donation and transplantation and capitalize on the strength of a pre-existing educational program offered by the local organ procurement organization (OPO). While training in education research at Cleveland Clinic, a high school student embarked on a collaborative project with the local OPO. The project involved evaluating three educational programs, selecting the most appropriate program for administration at her school, coordinating with the student's school administration and teachers, administering an assessment tool for the effectiveness of the program, and analyzing the results. The local OPO program that was selected for implementation consisted of a video presentation entitled "Share your life, share your decision" prepared by the United States Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), lectures by invited speakers and an educational assessment (pre- and post-education). The assessment survey included 3 multiple choice and 7 true/false questions. Compared to the over 2500 programs administered in the last 5 years by the local OPO, this program had a higher volume of participation (n = 353 compared to an average of 150 students/day). Students correctly classified transplantation status of more organ and tissues post-education (P education (P ≤ .002 for all). This experience included for the first time a formal assessment of the program which will be utilized to address targeted areas for specific improvements. This student collaborative model of involving students in organ donation and transplantation related education research has the potential to promote and maximize the effectiveness of educational programs targeting their peers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. SERVANT LEADERSHIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manalullaili Manalullaili

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available "Servant leadership" is one form of leadership style that is based sincerity and provide help without thought of personal gain or reward to be gained. Servant leadership is different with transformational leadership and transactional leadership. Because this type of leadership is a combination of environmental assessment related to good behaviour "akhlakul karimah". Greenleef are researchers who agree that this leadership style is very "up to date" and can apply to any form of organization, including educational organizations. This paper will explain what it is "servant leadership", the characteristics of which can be categorized as "servant leadership", advantages and disadvantages, and how to apply them into educational organizations, for example: UIN Raden Fatah Palembang

  8. A novel recurrent neural network with finite-time convergence for linear programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingshan; Cao, Jinde; Chen, Guanrong

    2010-11-01

    In this letter, a novel recurrent neural network based on the gradient method is proposed for solving linear programming problems. Finite-time convergence of the proposed neural network is proved by using the Lyapunov method. Compared with the existing neural networks for linear programming, the proposed neural network is globally convergent to exact optimal solutions in finite time, which is remarkable and rare in the literature of neural networks for optimization. Some numerical examples are given to show the effectiveness and excellent performance of the new recurrent neural network.

  9. Organizational leadership, health risk screening, individually tailored programs, and supportive workplace culture might reduce presenteeism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Steultjens; E. Baker; N. Aas; W. Randi

    2012-01-01

    To determine if Workplace Health Promotion programs (WHPs) are effective in improving presenteeism. The secondary objective was to identify characteristics of successful programmes and potential risk factors for presenteeism. The Cochrane Library, Medline and other electronic databases were searched

  10. 75 FR 6007 - Office of Innovation and Improvement; Overview Information; School Leadership Grant Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-05

    ... 60 months. III. Eligibility Information 1. Eligible Applicants: High-need LEAs; consortia of high... School Libraries program, these same data apply to the ESEA definition of a high-need LEA used for...

  11. Evaluating the Value-Added Impact of Outdoor Management Training for Leadership Development in an MBA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kass, Darrin; Grandzol, Christian

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the benefits of Outdoor Management Training for the leadership development of students enrolled in an MBA-level Organizational Behavior course. Students enrolled in one of two experiential courses. Both were identical, except one included an intensive outdoor training component called Leadership on the Edge. The…

  12. The Role of Parental Leadership in Academic Performance: A Case of Pupils in the Free Primary Education Program in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellon, Emmanuel O.; Ngware, Moses Waithanji; Admassu, Kassahun

    2017-01-01

    The study examines the combined effects of key elements in parental leadership on academic performance. In the wake of inadequate learning resources, parental leadership becomes an indispensable learning input for children's academic performance. The discourse utilized data collected from 2005 to 2010 in a longitudinal study involving 1,549…

  13. (abstract) Deep Space Network Radiometric Remote Sensing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Steven J.

    1994-01-01

    Planetary spacecraft are viewed through a troposphere that absorbs and delays radio signals propagating through it. Tropospheric water, in the form of vapor, cloud liquid,and precipitation , emits radio noise which limits satellite telemetry communication link performance. Even at X-band, rain storms have severely affected several satellite experiments including a planetary encounter. The problem will worsen with DSN implementation of Ka-band becausecommunication link budgets will be dominated by tropospheric conditions. Troposphere-induced propagation delays currently limit VLBI accuracy and are significant sources of error for Doppler tracking. Additionally, the success of radio science programs such as satellite gravity wave experiments and atmospheric occultation experiments depends on minimizing the effect of watervapor-induced prop agation delays. In order to overcome limitations imposed by the troposphere, the Deep Space Network has supported a program of radiometric remote sensing. Currently, water vapor radiometers (WVRs) and microwave temperature profilers (MTPs) support many aspects of the Deep Space Network operations and research and development programs. Their capability to sense atmospheric water, microwave sky brightness, and atmospheric temperature is critical to development of Ka-band telemetry systems, communication link models, VLBI, satellite gravity waveexperiments, and r adio science missions. During 1993, WVRs provided data for propagation mode development, supp orted planetary missions, and demonstrated advanced tracking capability. Collection of atmospheric statistics is necessary to model and predict performance of Ka-band telemetry links, antenna arrays, and radio science experiments. Since the spectrum of weather variations has power at very long time scales, atmospheric measurements have been requested for periods ranging from one year to a decade at each DSN site. The resulting database would provide reliable statistics on daily

  14. FLOWNET: A Computer Program for Calculating Secondary Flow Conditions in a Network of Turbomachinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    The program requires the network parameters, the flow component parameters, the reservoir conditions, and the gas properties as input. It will then calculate all unknown pressures and the mass flow rate in each flow component in the network. The program can treat networks containing up to fifty flow components and twenty-five unknown network pressures. The types of flow components that can be treated are face seals, narrow slots, and pipes. The program is written in both structured FORTRAN (SFTRAN) and FORTRAN 4. The program must be run in an interactive (conversational) mode.

  15. Deepening System Leadership: Teachers Leading from Below

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boylan, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The increasing importance of educational collaborations and networks that blur organizational boundaries requires conceptual developments in leadership theory. One approach to both theorizing and promoting such phenomena is through the idea of system leadership. Three different meanings of the term are identified: interschool leadership; a…

  16. Leadership Enhancement of Rural Women. | Patwardhan | Gender ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study aimed at developing a training program for enhancement of women leadership and executing and evaluating its effect. The Enhancement of Women Leadership Program (EWLP) was developed, which consists of five broad dimensions as Nurturing Intelligence, Self Development, Developing Leadership Skills, ...

  17. The University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health Doctor of Public Health program: an innovative approach to doctoral-level practice leadership development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenihan, Patrick; Welter, Christina; Brandt-Rauf, Paul; Neuberger, Babette; Pinsker, Eve; Petros, Michael; Risley, Kristine

    2015-03-01

    The University of Illinois at Chicago, School of Public Health, Doctor of Public Health degree is designed to build leadership skills and an ability to contribute to the evidence base of practice. The competency-based, distance-format, doctoral-level program for midcareer professionals features an action learning approach in which students apply leadership principles from the virtual classroom to real-world problems at their work sites. Students demonstrate mastery of the competencies and readiness to advance to the dissertation stage through completing a portfolio by using a process of systematic reflection. The practice-oriented dissertation demonstrates the ability to contribute to the evidence base of public health practice in an area of emphasis. Preliminary evaluation data indicate that the program is meeting its intended purposes.

  18. The safety leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, Howard; Faulkner, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the authors present a careful consideration about the role of leadership, the fundamental element for the success of Behavior-Based Safety (B-BS) programs within companies. Lees and Faulkner have been training, coaching and writing about Behavior-Based Safety for the last ten years. Considerable data has been gathered during this process and the paramount factor in its success is leadership. An effective leader can create many spectacular successes. The success stories are all predicated on good leadership, without that a good product, great processes and quality people are all wasted and often find themselves on the rocks of frustration.

  19. [Implementation of the program of "Collaborative Development of Advanced Practical Education to Train Pharmacists in Leadership" under the joint operation of the pharmaceutical departments in fourteen national universities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Kazumasa; Tamura, Satoru; Kobayashi, Motomasa

    2012-01-01

    "Collaborative Development of Advanced Practical Education Program to Train Pharmacists with Leadership" applied jointly by the pharmaceutical departments of fourteen national universities was selected to receive the special expenditure support of Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology for fiscal year 2010 under "the Training of Highly Skillful Professionals and Improvement of the Quality of the Function of Professional Education". This project is to promote the collaborative development of the educational program which will make it possible to further advance and substantiate the education of pharmacists in the six year course of the pharmaceutical department for the ultimate purpose to introduce pharmacists with leadership who can play an active role and fill in a leadership position in a wide range of responsibilities into the society which, more and more, has come to expect pharmacy to take the initiative in acting against health hazards caused by infections, foods and environmental pollution as well as to meet the diversification of healthcare. To be more specific, this project is to try and evaluate the following programs repeatedly based on the plan-do-check-act (PDCA) cycle: 1) Practical medical and pharmaceutical education program; 2) Program concerning research on long term themes and advanced education; 3) Program concerning training and education of SPs (standardized patients or simulated patients) and PBL (problem-based learning) tutorial education; and 4) Program concerning the method of evaluation of education. Through this repeated trial and evaluation, this project ultimately seeks to construct a highly effective practical educational program which integrates each university's achievements and educational attempts rich in originality.

  20. Leadership = Communication? The Relations of Leaders' Communication Styles with Leadership Styles, Knowledge Sharing and Leadership Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Reinout E; Bakker-Pieper, Angelique; Oostenveld, Wyneke

    2010-09-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relations between leaders' communication styles and charismatic leadership, human-oriented leadership (leader's consideration), task-oriented leadership (leader's initiating structure), and leadership outcomes. METHODOLOGY: A survey was conducted among 279 employees of a governmental organization. The following six main communication styles were operationalized: verbal aggressiveness, expressiveness, preciseness, assuredness, supportiveness, and argumentativeness. Regression analyses were employed to test three main hypotheses. FINDINGS: In line with expectations, the study showed that charismatic and human-oriented leadership are mainly communicative, while task-oriented leadership is significantly less communicative. The communication styles were strongly and differentially related to knowledge sharing behaviors, perceived leader performance, satisfaction with the leader, and subordinate's team commitment. Multiple regression analyses showed that the leadership styles mediated the relations between the communication styles and leadership outcomes. However, leader's preciseness explained variance in perceived leader performance and satisfaction with the leader above and beyond the leadership style variables. IMPLICATIONS: This study offers potentially invaluable input for leadership training programs by showing the importance of leader's supportiveness, assuredness, and preciseness when communicating with subordinates. ORIGINALITY/VALUE: Although one of the core elements of leadership is interpersonal communication, this study is one of the first to use a comprehensive communication styles instrument in the study of leadership.

  1. Leadership Skill Development of Teen Leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleon, Scott; Rinehart, Susan

    1998-01-01

    Teen participants in the Ohio 4-H Teen Community Leadership College (n=64) perceived their leadership skills to be much higher after the program. They appeared to need improvement in initiative, assertiveness, and objectivity. (SK)

  2. A Case Study for Executive Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Phyllis J.

    1975-01-01

    A newly appointed woman dean discusses the value of a management development program involving a process of self-analysis and self-determination of leadership style and effectiveness (the University of Illinois "Executive Leadership Seminar"). (JT)

  3. Assembling networks of microbial genomes using linear programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Catherine; Beiko, Robert G

    2010-11-20

    Microbial genomes exhibit complex sets of genetic affinities due to lateral genetic transfer. Assessing the relative contributions of parent-to-offspring inheritance and gene sharing is a vital step in understanding the evolutionary origins and modern-day function of an organism, but recovering and showing these relationships is a challenging problem. We have developed a new approach that uses linear programming to find between-genome relationships, by treating tables of genetic affinities (here, represented by transformed BLAST e-values) as an optimization problem. Validation trials on simulated data demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach in recovering and representing vertical and lateral relationships among genomes. Application of the technique to a set comprising Aquifex aeolicus and 75 other thermophiles showed an important role for large genomes as 'hubs' in the gene sharing network, and suggested that genes are preferentially shared between organisms with similar optimal growth temperatures. We were also able to discover distinct and common genetic contributors to each sequenced representative of genus Pseudomonas. The linear programming approach we have developed can serve as an effective inference tool in its own right, and can be an efficient first step in a more-intensive phylogenomic analysis.

  4. Values, vision, proposals and networks: using ideas in leadership for human development : The approach of Mahbub ul Haq

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.R. Gasper (Des)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractLeadership is a matter that social scientists often are ambivalent about, but is important in knife-edge' situations and when people choose direction within wide-open possibilities. "Good leaders" need contexts that stimulate and discipline them, good "followers"/ collaborators, and

  5. Teaching Group Processes through Multiple Group Leadership Opportunities in a Masters Level Counselor Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, Marc B.; Winters, Ryan C.; Esters, Irvin E.

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing an experiential component in group work training is a prominent feature in Counselor Education programs. Although numerous models have been proposed, the vast majority offer limited explanations of incorporating the number of hours of group participation and observation recommended by the Professional Standards for the Training of Group…

  6. Developing Competence: A Qualitative Inquiry of College Student Leadership in University Outdoor Orientation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starbuck, J. David.

    2013-01-01

    Forty-nine formal research studies have been conducted on participants of college outdoor orientation programs. Although many variables have been examined for the incoming students, only one study has focused on the impact on the student leaders. The goal of this study was to understand how student leaders in outdoor orientation programs…

  7. Special Education Doctoral Programs: A 10-Year Comparison of the Suppliers of Leadership Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Deborah Deutsch; Montrosse, Bianca Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    The first article in this special issue is about the doctoral programs, the suppliers of new doctoral graduates in special education. It focuses on one component of a larger effort, the Special Education Faculty Needs Assessment (SEFNA) project, which investigated many aspects of the supply of new doctoral graduates as well as the demand for new…

  8. Improving Leadership Preparation Programs through a School, University, and Professional Organization Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peel, Henry A.; Wallace, Corinna

    Beginning educational administrators often find that they are unprepared to deal with the realities of school administration. This paper describes how the Halifax County, North Carolina, school system worked with a national organization and an area university to develop a plan to improve its administrator-preparation program. In 1992 the school…

  9. Leadership and adolescent girls: a qualitative study of leadership development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, Michael A; Kennedy, Cara L

    2008-12-01

    This research investigated youth leadership experiences of adolescent girls who participated in a comprehensive feminist-based leadership program. This qualitative study utilized a grounded theory approach to understand changes that occurred in 10 female adolescent participants. The words of the participants revealed that initially they viewed leadership in traditional terms and were hesitant to identify themselves as leaders or to see themselves included within their concepts of leadership. Following the program their view of leadership expanded and diversified in a manner that allowed for inclusion of themselves within it. They spoke with greater strength and confidence and felt better positioned and inspired to act as leaders. Participants identified having examples of women leaders, adopting multiple concepts of leadership, and participating in an environment of mutual respect and trust as factors that contributed to their expanded conceptualization.

  10. Understanding Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    leadership theories and connect these age old theories to what the Army believes is needed in the 21st century Army leader. The...effective leader. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Trait Theory , Behavior Theory , Situation Theory , Transformational Leadership , Leader, Manager 16. SECURITY...TERMS: Trait Theory , Behavior Theory , Situation Theory , Transformational Leadership , Leader, Manager CLASSIFICATION: Unclassified The purpose

  11. Trans* Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourian, T J; Simmons, Symone L

    2017-06-01

    Focusing on emerging literature on trans* and gender-nonconforming students and their leadership, this chapter outlines the ways trans* students are engaged in leadership in educational institutions and outside of them and discusses implications for staff and faculty regarding how to support and engage these students and their leadership. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  12. Our leadership in science and technology as provided by the national space program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, W. E.

    1972-01-01

    The contributions of science and technology to the success of the United States as a world leader are discussed. Specific instances of the manner in which science advances and new technologies resulting from space research have contributed to a higher standard of living are presented. It is concluded that the benefits of the space program are not reflected only in the material advancements, but that intangible results have also been achieved in greater incentives to improve the present culture.

  13. Leadership training in Endocrinology fellowship A survey of program directors and recent graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-16

    Program Directors and Recent Graduates presented at/ published to SAMHS and Universities Research Forum (SURF) 2017, San Antonio, TX 16 June 2017 m...Research Division may pay for your basic journal publishing charges (to include costs for tables and black and white photos). We cannot pay for...efforts. LINDA STEEL-GOODWIN, Col, USAF, BSC Director , Clinical Investigations & Research Support Warrior Medics - Mission Ready - Patient Focused

  14. Linear Programming Approaches for Power Savings in Software-defined Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moghaddam, F.A.; Grosso, P.

    2016-01-01

    Software-defined networks have been proposed as a viable solution to decrease the power consumption of the networking component in data center networks. Still the question remains on which scheduling algorithms are most suited to achieve this goal. We propose 4 different linear programming

  15. Connecting Leadership and Learning: Do Versatile Learners Make Connective Leaders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jill L.

    2016-01-01

    Recent failures in leadership, suggest that creating better-quality leadership development programs is critical. In moving from theory to practice, this paper examined the relationship between learning style and leadership style which may enable us to move away from one-size-fits-all leadership development programs. Utilizing Kolb's Experiential…

  16. PROPOSAL FOR NEURAL-LINGUISTIC PROGRAMMING (N.L.P. INTHE ADMINISTRATIVE DEVELOPMENT OF LEADERSHIP SPORTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil Samira

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Neural-linguistic programming is an organised method to know the human self construction and dealing with it in fixed means and styles so as to decesisively affect the processes of perception, thinking, imaging, ideas,feeling and also in behavior, skills and the human body and mental performance (1 Neural-linguistic programming has a private nature because it is a group of mechanisms and practicaltechniques far from likeliness, so it enters in the circle of application and employment of the human abilities and possibilities. (9 Al Fiky (2001 points out that neural linguistic programming created the favourable environment to help individuals to get rid of their diseased fears and controlling in their negative reactions and thus improving communication with themselves and with others. He shows it took its way into the human life fields because itsways and strategies are used in the sectors of health, education, marketing and administration(2. The modern administration embarks on the human element that represents the most valuable elementsof administration and is the most effective on the productivity and with the increasing the effect of the human element in the efficacy of the administrative organizations, the need increased to consider the management of the human resources as an independent function of administrative functions that cancers the human element and onwhose efficiency, abilities, experience and zeal for work, the administration efficacy depends.

  17. A Novel Linear Programming Formulation of Maximum Lifetime Routing Problem in Wireless Sensor Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cetin, Bilge Kartal; Prasad, Neeli R.; Prasad, Ramjee

    2011-01-01

    In wireless sensor networks, one of the key challenge is to achieve minimum energy consumption in order to maximize network lifetime. In fact, lifetime depends on many parameters: the topology of the sensor network, the data aggregation regime in the network, the channel access schemes, the routing...... protocols, and the energy model for transmission. In this paper, we tackle the routing challenge for maximum lifetime of the sensor network. We introduce a novel linear programming approach to the maximum lifetime routing problem. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first mathematical programming...

  18. Emergence of Leadership in Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdyan, Armen E; Galstyan, Aram

    2016-01-01

    We study a neuro-inspired model that mimics a discussion (or information dissemination) process in a network of agents. During their interaction, agents redistribute activity and network weights, resulting in emergence of leader(s). The model is able to reproduce the basic scenarios of leadership known in nature and society: laissez-faire (irregular activity, weak leadership, sizable inter-follower interaction, autonomous sub-leaders); participative or democratic (strong leadership, but with feedback from followers); and autocratic (no feedback, one-way influence). Several pertinent aspects of these scenarios are found as well-e.g., hidden leadership (a hidden clique of agents driving the official autocratic leader), and successive leadership (two leaders influence followers by turns). We study how these scenarios emerge from inter-agent dynamics and how they depend on behavior rules of agents-in particular, on their inertia against state changes.

  19. Emergence of Leadership in Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdyan, Armen E.; Galstyan, Aram

    2016-01-01

    We study a neuro-inspired model that mimics a discussion (or information dissemination) process in a network of agents. During their interaction, agents redistribute activity and network weights, resulting in emergence of leader(s). The model is able to reproduce the basic scenarios of leadership known in nature and society: laissez-faire (irregular activity, weak leadership, sizable inter-follower interaction, autonomous sub-leaders); participative or democratic (strong leadership, but with feedback from followers); and autocratic (no feedback, one-way influence). Several pertinent aspects of these scenarios are found as well—e.g., hidden leadership (a hidden clique of agents driving the official autocratic leader), and successive leadership (two leaders influence followers by turns). We study how these scenarios emerge from inter-agent dynamics and how they depend on behavior rules of agents—in particular, on their inertia against state changes. PMID:27532484

  20. Network model and short circuit program for the Kennedy Space Center electric power distribution system

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    Assumptions made and techniques used in modeling the power network to the 480 volt level are discussed. Basic computational techniques used in the short circuit program are described along with a flow diagram of the program and operational procedures. Procedures for incorporating network changes are included in this user's manual.