WorldWideScience

Sample records for program key components

  1. Developing a Blueprint for Successful Private Partnership Programs in Small Fusion Centers: Key Program Components and Smart Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    provide comprehensive training on the subjects mentioned above, and also host “train-the-trainer” programs to teach FLO program participants and...actually teach . The program is mobile and is presented in schools and other civic venues, and it focuses on terrorism prevention, resiliency, and home...validated the often-quoted idiom , “The devil is in the details.” Law enforcement executives attempting to establish a private sector outreach program

  2. Planning of a Student Peer Program as a Key Component of a Campus Suicide Prevention Project: Utilizing NAPP Programmatic Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozny, Darren A.; Porter, Julia Y.; Watson, Joshua C.

    2008-01-01

    Campus students are most likely to confide with other students (Brownson, 2007). Thus, the student peer program's rationale is that it is a vital component of our campus suicide prevention project's purpose to early identify at-risk students, engage at-risk students, and utilize appropriate helping interventions (may include referral to the…

  3. Component-oriented programming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, J; Szyperski, C; Weck, W; Buschmann, F; Buchmann, AP; Cilia, MA

    2003-01-01

    This report covers the eighth Workshop on Component-Oriented Programming (WCOP). WCOP has been affiliated with ECOOP since its inception in 1996. The report summarizes the contributions made by authors of accepted position papers as well as those made by all attendees of the workshop sessions.

  4. Childhood Immunization: A Key Component of Early Childhood Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messonnier, Nancy

    2017-01-01

    Physical health is a key component of early childhood development and school readiness. By keeping children healthy and decreasing the chances of disease outbreaks, immunizations help early childhood programs create a safe environment for children. While overall vaccination rates are high nationally for most vaccines routinely recommended for…

  5. Key components of financial-analysis education for clinical nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Ji Young; Noh, Wonjung

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we identified key components of financial-analysis education for clinical nurses. We used a literature review, focus group discussions, and a content validity index survey to develop key components of financial-analysis education. First, a wide range of references were reviewed, and 55 financial-analysis education components were gathered. Second, two focus group discussions were performed; the participants were 11 nurses who had worked for more than 3 years in a hospital, and nine components were agreed upon. Third, 12 professionals, including professors, nurse executive, nurse managers, and an accountant, participated in the content validity index. Finally, six key components of financial-analysis education were selected. These key components were as follows: understanding the need for financial analysis, introduction to financial analysis, reading and implementing balance sheets, reading and implementing income statements, understanding the concepts of financial ratios, and interpretation and practice of financial ratio analysis. The results of this study will be used to develop an education program to increase financial-management competency among clinical nurses. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. A key component of the Globe arrives

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The first component of the Palais de l'Equilibre arrived at CERN last week. Renamed the Globe of Innovation, this elegant wooden sphere will be inaugurated in October 2004. The convoy transporting the first component of the Palais de l'Equilibre, the keystone of the famous wooden globe, arrived at CERN on the night of 28th August in the middle of a violent storm and dramatic flashes of lightning. Erected in Neuchâtel last year for the EXPO.02 exhibition, the Palais de l'Equilibre was a gift to the Laboratory from the Swiss Confederation (see Bulletin 25/2003). The gift of the structure and 4 million Swiss francs, together with help from the Swiss army for the reassembly work, received the final approval of the Swiss Federal Council on 20th August 2003. Renamed the Globe of Innovation, the 27-metre-high sphere measuring 40 metres in diameter will house the Laboratory's new exhibition centre in 2005. The keystone, known as the "central vertex", is a crown measuring 6.5 m in diameter and 4.5 m high, located a...

  7. Lidars: a key component of urban biodefense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayor, Shane D; Benda, Paul; Murata, Christina E; Danzig, Richard J

    2008-03-01

    A biological aerosol attack in a city could infect tens of thousands of people. In the absence of announcements by the attacker or detection by present point detection systems, victims would be unaware of their exposure prior to developing symptoms. Since infections are most effectively countered before the onset of symptoms, detection technologies that provide early awareness of an attack should be given high priority. Current biological point detection (BPD) systems collect environmental air samples and then analyze them in laboratories so as to permit detection within 12-36 hours of an attack. Improvements in the pipeline may reduce this lag time to as little as a few hours. However, BPD systems have inherent weaknesses when used to detect and respond to an aerosol attack. The likelihood of a limited number of BPD systems intercepting an aerosol plume in a vast attack space may be low. Moreover, BPD systems do not provide critical information needed for response, such as the source location, precise time, and geographic reach of an attack. The missing information would invaluably guide prophylaxis distribution, identification of contaminated areas, and criminal apprehension. This article describes how lidars used for real-time observation of aerosol plumes could complement BPD systems by providing fine-scale spatial and temporal information. A lidar system also could be used to corroborate positive BPD system results, to improve reaction to positive results, and/or to provide an independent basis for low-regret protective steps. Lidar systems can resolve key biodefense challenges, and this article describes three compatible concepts of operations. Leveraging lessons from a lidar system now operating at the Pentagon, a test of an expanded lidar network would provide immediate protection for key Washington, DC, assets, demonstrate the synergy of BPD systems and lidars, and provide a test bed for research to improve lidar's shortcomings.

  8. TASQC Quantum Key Transfer Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-11-04

    Securely transferring timing information in the electrical grid is a critical component of securing the nation's infrastructure from cyber attacks. One solution to this problem is to use quantum information to securely transfer the timing information across sites. This software provides such an infrastructure using a standard Java webserver that pulls the quantum information from associated hardware.

  9. Security of quantum key distribution with multiphoton components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hua-Lei; Fu, Yao; Mao, Yingqiu; Chen, Zeng-Bing

    2016-07-01

    Most qubit-based quantum key distribution (QKD) protocols extract the secure key merely from single-photon component of the attenuated lasers. However, with the Scarani-Acin-Ribordy-Gisin 2004 (SARG04) QKD protocol, the unconditionally secure key can be extracted from the two-photon component by modifying the classical post-processing procedure in the BB84 protocol. Employing the merits of SARG04 QKD protocol and six-state preparation, one can extract secure key from the components of single photon up to four photons. In this paper, we provide the exact relations between the secure key rate and the bit error rate in a six-state SARG04 protocol with single-photon, two-photon, three-photon, and four-photon sources. By restricting the mutual information between the phase error and bit error, we obtain a higher secure bit error rate threshold of the multiphoton components than previous works. Besides, we compare the performances of the six-state SARG04 with other prepare-and-measure QKD protocols using decoy states.

  10. CoC Awards by Program Component

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — CoC Awards by Program Component reports provide snapshots of award data broken down by eligible program component types for the year selected. The reports, which can...

  11. Development of commercial hybrid electric vehicle with native key components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Bakhmutov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The perspectives of development of medium weight cargo vehicles with hybrid powertrain including Russian native key components are considered in this article. Series-parallel scheme of HEV is more relevant owing to limitations of series and parallel schemes. An example of this technology is described. This technical solution has good facilities for variation of HEV and AWD type. The authors have patented it. In addition, another main issue is to choose the types of key components with good correlation for parameters of ICE, electric motors, batteries, and inverter. Using mathematical model of the vehicle a selection and correlation of technical characteristics were carried out to meet ecological and economical requirements. After computing calculation two control strategies were accepted. The first strategy contributes to good fuel consumption, while the other one is aimed at ecology. Researchers use test benches to confirm the results of calculation, and this one was built by the authors applying native components. The result of experiment on the test bench is the growth of fuel consumption of the medium weight cargo vehicle by 25% and compliance with ecological class Euro-4.

  12. Key components of an effective mentoring relationship: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eller, Lucille Sanzero; Lev, Elise L; Feurer, Amy

    2014-05-01

    Despite the recognized importance of mentoring, little is known about specific mentoring behaviors that result in positive outcomes. To identify key components of an effective mentoring relationship identified by protégés-mentor dyads in an academic setting. In this qualitative study, purposive sampling resulted in geographic diversity and representation of a range of academic disciplines. Participants were from 12 universities in three regions of the U.S. (South, n=5; Northeast, n=4; Midwest, n=2) and Puerto Rico (n=1). Academic disciplines included natural sciences (51%), nursing/health sciences (31%), engineering (8%), and technology (1%). Twelve workshops using the Technology of Participation method were held with 117 mentor-protégé dyads. Consensus was reached regarding the key components of an effective mentoring relationship. Conventional content analysis, in which coding categories were informed by the literature and derived directly from the data, was employed. Eight themes described key components of an effective mentoring relationship: (1) open communication and accessibility; (2) goals and challenges; (3) passion and inspiration; (4) caring personal relationship; (5) mutual respect and trust; (6) exchange of knowledge; (7) independence and collaboration; and (8) role modeling. Described within each theme are specific mentor-protégé behaviors and interactions, identified needs of both protégé and mentor in the relationship, and desirable personal qualities of mentor and protégé. Findings can inform a dialog between existing nurse mentor-protégé dyads as well as student nurses and faculty members considering a mentoring relationship. Nurse educators can evaluate and modify their mentoring behaviors as needed, thereby strengthening the mentor-protégé relationship to ensure positive outcomes of the learning process. © 2013.

  13. Electric vehicle recycling 2020: Key component power electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulach, Winfried; Schüler, Doris; Sellin, Guido; Elwert, Tobias; Schmid, Dieter; Goldmann, Daniel; Buchert, Matthias; Kammer, Ulrich

    2018-03-01

    Electromobility will play a key role in order to reach the specified ambitious greenhouse gas reduction targets in the German transport sector of 42% between 1990 and 2030. Subsequently, a significant rise in the sale of electric vehicles (EVs) is to be anticipated in future. The amount of EVs to be recycled will rise correspondingly after a delay. This includes the recyclable power electronics modules which are incorporated in every EV as an important component for energy management. Current recycling methods using car shredders and subsequent post shredder technologies show high recycling rates for the bulk metals but are still associated with high losses of precious and strategic metals such as gold, silver, platinum, palladium and tantalum. For this reason, the project 'Electric vehicle recycling 2020 - key component power electronics' developed an optimised recycling route for recycling power electronics modules from EVs which is also practicable in series production and can be implemented using standardised technology. This 'WEEE recycling route' involves the disassembly of the power electronics from the vehicle and a subsequent recycling in an electronic end-of-life equipment recycling plant. The developed recycling process is economical under the current conditions and raw material prices, even though it involves considerably higher costs than recycling using the car shredder. The life cycle assessment shows basically good results, both for the traditional car shredder route and the developed WEEE recycling route: the latter provides additional benefits from some higher recovery rates and corresponding credits.

  14. Anomaly Monitoring Method for Key Components of Satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Peng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presented a fault diagnosis method for key components of satellite, called Anomaly Monitoring Method (AMM, which is made up of state estimation based on Multivariate State Estimation Techniques (MSET and anomaly detection based on Sequential Probability Ratio Test (SPRT. On the basis of analysis failure of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs, we divided the failure of LIBs into internal failure, external failure, and thermal runaway and selected electrolyte resistance (Re and the charge transfer resistance (Rct as the key parameters of state estimation. Then, through the actual in-orbit telemetry data of the key parameters of LIBs, we obtained the actual residual value (RX and healthy residual value (RL of LIBs based on the state estimation of MSET, and then, through the residual values (RX and RL of LIBs, we detected the anomaly states based on the anomaly detection of SPRT. Lastly, we conducted an example of AMM for LIBs, and, according to the results of AMM, we validated the feasibility and effectiveness of AMM by comparing it with the results of threshold detective method (TDM.

  15. 5 keys to business analytics program success

    CERN Document Server

    Boyer, John; Green, Brian; Harris, Tracy; Van De Vanter, Kay

    2012-01-01

    With business analytics is becoming increasingly strategic to all types of organizations and with many companies struggling to create a meaningful impact with this emerging technology, this work-based on the combined experience of 10 organizations that display excellence and expertise on the subject-shares the best practices, discusses the management aspects and sociology that drives success, and uncovers the five key aspects behind the success of some of the top business analytics programs in the industry. Readers will learn about numerous topics, including how to create and manage a changing

  16. Key Components of a Successful Earth Science Subsetter Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, L.; Baskin, W. E.; Piatko, P.; Kusterer, J.; Rinsland, P.; Perez, J.

    2011-12-01

    At the October 2010 A-Train Symposium the Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) science team released a new CALIPSO Search and Subset Application that received a very enthusiastic response from atmospheric scientists. The template of this subsetter application architecture is being applied to the distribution of Level 2 Satellite data granules from Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) SSF swath datasets and Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) datasets. Science data users utilize these new tools to rapidly locate, subset, and order specific dataset parameters tailored to their requirements. This presentation focuses on the implementation of key components of this subsetter architecture and explores the challenges that ASDC's development team encountered while adapting the following framework components to each of these datasets in a fairly short time: Interactive user interface that is tightly integrated with a PostgrSQL-PostGIS metadata database specifically tailored for the science product data granules to be subsetted. Scalable workflow framework for scheduling potentially thousands of subset processes across a configurable number of cluster processing nodes. Efficient subset application with high speed access to archived data granules. Metadata mining application capable of directly mining the desired metadata directly from the archived data granules.

  17. 49 CFR 228.203 - Program components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Program components. (a) System security. The integrity of the program and database must be protected by a security system that utilizes an employee identification number and password, or a comparable method, to... Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION...

  18. A Linguistic Model in Component Oriented Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crăciunean, Daniel Cristian; Crăciunean, Vasile

    2016-12-01

    It is a fact that the component-oriented programming, well organized, can bring a large increase in efficiency in the development of large software systems. This paper proposes a model for building software systems by assembling components that can operate independently of each other. The model is based on a computing environment that runs parallel and distributed applications. This paper introduces concepts as: abstract aggregation scheme and aggregation application. Basically, an aggregation application is an application that is obtained by combining corresponding components. In our model an aggregation application is a word in a language.

  19. Key issues in the design of pay for performance programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eijkenaar, Frank

    2013-02-01

    Pay for performance (P4P) is increasingly being used to stimulate healthcare providers to improve their performance. However, evidence on P4P effectiveness remains inconclusive. Flaws in program design may have contributed to this limited success. Based on a synthesis of relevant theoretical and empirical literature, this paper discusses key issues in P4P-program design. The analysis reveals that designing a fair and effective program is a complex undertaking. The following tentative conclusions are made: (1) performance is ideally defined broadly, provided that the set of measures remains comprehensible, (2) concerns that P4P encourages "selection" and "teaching to the test" should not be dismissed, (3) sophisticated risk adjustment is important, especially in outcome and resource use measures, (4) involving providers in program design is vital, (5) on balance, group incentives are preferred over individual incentives, (6) whether to use rewards or penalties is context-dependent, (7) payouts should be frequent and low-powered, (8) absolute targets are generally preferred over relative targets, (9) multiple targets are preferred over single targets, and (10) P4P should be a permanent component of provider compensation and is ideally "decoupled" form base payments. However, the design of P4P programs should be tailored to the specific setting of implementation, and empirical research is needed to confirm the conclusions.

  20. Component-Oriented Programming (WCOP 2004)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, J.; Szyperski, C.; Weck, W.; Malenfant, J; Ostvold, BM

    2004-01-01

    This report covers the ninth Workshop on Component-Oriented Programming (WCOP). WCOP has been affiliated with ECOOP since its inception in 1996. The report summarizes the contributions made by authors of accepted position papers as well as those made by all attendees of the workshop sessions.

  1. Water management as a key component of integrated weed management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Zanin

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Water management within the cropping system is a key factor for an integrated weed management. Soil moisture affects seed persistence and seed dormancy, thus influencing their germination, the establishment of seedlings as well as the competition at adult stage and the number, vitality and dormancy of the new seeds produced by the weeds. The interactions among water availability and competition are very complex and still not fully understood. A research effort in this sector should the be very relevant for the development of new approaches of weed management, such as “Ecological weed management”, aiming to reduce weed density and competitiveness and, in the medium term, to prevent undesired modifications of the weed flora.

  2. Smart as a Key Component of the Sustainable City Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Zelinka

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Smart City Initiatives are aiming on creation of a sustainable model for cities with the aim to improve quality of life of their citizens. A smart city represents an interdisciplinary field requiring high level of cooperation among experts from different fields and a contribution of the latest technologies in order to achieve the best results in the city's key areas. Such approach requires an effective cooperation across many fields, from technical or economic through legislation to social areas. Success of the smart city concept is not thinkable without an effective engagement of the end users, i.e. citizens of the smart cities. The traditional systems engineering methodologies fail and new approaches are urgently needed. A new Hybrid-Agile Methodology (HAM is introduced and its advantages with respect to smart city projects are discussed. However, application of methodologies cannot be successful without principal changes in how are all engaged parties thinking.

  3. WRKY transcription factors: key components in abscisic acid signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, Deena L; Tripathi, Prateek; Rabara, Roel C; Lin, Jun; Ringler, Patricia; Boken, Ashley K; Langum, Tanner J; Smidt, Lucas; Boomsma, Darius D; Emme, Nicholas J; Chen, Xianfeng; Finer, John J; Shen, Qingxi J; Rushton, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors (TFs) are key regulators of many plant processes, including the responses to biotic and abiotic stresses, senescence, seed dormancy and seed germination. For over 15 years, limited evidence has been available suggesting that WRKY TFs may play roles in regulating plant responses to the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA), notably some WRKY TFs are ABA-inducible repressors of seed germination. However, the roles of WRKY TFs in other aspects of ABA signalling, and the mechanisms involved, have remained unclear. Recent significant progress in ABA research has now placed specific WRKY TFs firmly in ABA-responsive signalling pathways, where they act at multiple levels. In Arabidopsis, WRKY TFs appear to act downstream of at least two ABA receptors: the cytoplasmic PYR/PYL/RCAR-protein phosphatase 2C-ABA complex and the chloroplast envelope-located ABAR-ABA complex. In vivo and in vitro promoter-binding studies show that the target genes for WRKY TFs that are involved in ABA signalling include well-known ABA-responsive genes such as ABF2, ABF4, ABI4, ABI5, MYB2, DREB1a, DREB2a and RAB18. Additional well-characterized stress-inducible genes such as RD29A and COR47 are also found in signalling pathways downstream of WRKY TFs. These new insights also reveal that some WRKY TFs are positive regulators of ABA-mediated stomatal closure and hence drought responses. Conversely, many WRKY TFs are negative regulators of seed germination, and controlling seed germination appears a common function of a subset of WRKY TFs in flowering plants. Taken together, these new data demonstrate that WRKY TFs are key nodes in ABA-responsive signalling networks. © 2011 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal © 2011 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Transcriptome analysis elucidates key developmental components of bryozoan lophophore development

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Yue Him

    2014-10-10

    The most recent phylogenomic study suggested that Bryozoa (Ectoprocta), Brachiopoda, and Phoronida are monophyletic, implying that the lophophore of bryozoans, phoronids and brachiopods is a synapomorphy. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of the lophophore development of the Lophophorata clade can therefore provide us a new insight into the formation of the diverse morphological traits in metazoans. In the present study, we profiled the transcriptome of the Bryozoan (Ectoproct) Bugula neritina during the swimming larval stage (SW) and the early (4 h) and late (24 h) metamorphic stages using the Illumina HiSeq2000 platform. Various genes that function in development, the immune response and neurogenesis showed differential expression levels during metamorphosis. In situ hybridization of 23 genes that participate in the Wnt, BMP, Notch, and Hedgehog signaling pathways revealed their regulatory roles in the development of the lophophore and the ancestrula digestive tract. Our findings support the hypothesis that developmental precursors of the lophophore and the ancestrula digestive tract are pre-patterned by the differential expression of key developmental genes according to their fate. This study provides a foundation to better understand the developmental divergence and/or convergence among developmental precursors of the lophophore of bryozoans, branchiopods and phoronids.

  5. National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing. Program summary report, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing focused on manufacturing research and development for flat panel displays, advanced lithography, microelectronics, and optoelectronics. This report provides an overview of the program, summaries of the technical projects, and key program accomplishments.

  6. Ocean gliders as key component within the AORAC-SA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, C.; Hernandez Brito, J.; Castro, A.; Rueda, M. J.; Llinas, O.

    2016-02-01

    The Atlantic Ocean Research Alliance Coordination and Support Action (AORAC-SA) is designed to provide scientific, technical and logistical support to the EU in developing and implementing transAtlantic Marine Research Cooperation between the European Union, the United States of America and Canada. The Coordination and Support Action (CSA) is carried out within the framework of the Atlantic Ocean Research Alliance (AORA) as outlined in the Galway Statement on Atlantic Ocean Cooperation (May 2013). The CSA will be responsible for the organization of expert and stakeholder meetings, workshops and conferences required by the AORA and related to identified research priorities support actions and other initiatives as they arise, taking into account related Horizon 2020 supported transAtlantic projects and on-going national and EU collaborative projects. The AORAC-SA support and governance structure comprises a Secretariat and Management Team, guided by a high-level Operational Board, representative of the major European Marine Research Programming and Funding Organizations as well as those of the USA and Canada. As example of this research cooperative framework, ocean gliders have become nowadays a common, innovative and sustainable ocean-observations tool for the Atlantic basin, linking research groups, govermental institutions and private companies from both sides in terms of technical developments, transatlantic missions in partnership, training forums, etc. aiming to develop common practices and protocols for a better ocean resources management and understanding. Within this context, the Oceanic Platform of the Canary Islands (PLOCAN), as AORAC-SA partner, is working on specific actions like ocean glider observations programs (endurance line) by AtlantOS project (www.atlantos-h2020.eu), related new technical developments by NeXOS FP-7 project (www.nexosproject.eu) and a yearly International Glider School forum hosting (www.gliderschool.eu).

  7. NOMPC is likely a key component of Drosophila mechanotransduction channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jiaxin; Wang, Qingxiu; Wang, Zuoren

    2013-07-01

    Mechanotransduction is the basis of several sensory modalities, including touch, hearing, proprioception and gravity sensation. Despite its importance to sensory processing and behavior, the molecular mechanisms underlying mechanotransduction remain to be fully understood. In particular, the identity of the ion channels serving mechanotransduction is still unknown in many species. Drosophila melanogaster nompC (no mechanoreceptor potential C) has been shown to be essential for mechanotransduction in flies, yet there is no direct evidence demonstrating that NOMPC is indeed a mechanotransducing ion channel in Drosophila. To dissect the functional roles of NOMPC in mechanotransduction, we found that NOMPC-dependent transient adapting mechanoreceptor current (MRC) in the external bristle sensory organ was also chloride dependent. However, this chloride-dependent current was not necessary for spike generation. Furthermore, ectopic expression of wild-type NOMPC conferred mechanosensitivity on the interneurons in the antennal lobe (AL) and cation-mediated inward mechanocurrent was recorded, while a point mutation in the putative selective filter region of NOMPC failed to produce the mechanocurrent in the AL interneurons. These functional studies imply that NOMPC is likely to be a crucial component of mechanotransducers that accounts for mechanotransductions in mechanosensory neurons of Drosophila. © 2013 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Physical and Chemical Analytical Analysis: A key component of Bioforensics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velsko, S P

    2005-02-15

    The anthrax letters event of 2001 has raised our awareness of the potential importance of non-biological measurements on samples of biological agents used in a terrorism incident. Such measurements include a variety of mass spectral, spectroscopic, and other instrumental techniques that are part of the current armamentarium of the modern materials analysis or analytical chemistry laboratory. They can provide morphological, trace element, isotopic, and other molecular ''fingerprints'' of the agent that may be key pieces of evidence, supplementing that obtained from genetic analysis or other biological properties. The generation and interpretation of such data represents a new domain of forensic science, closely aligned with other areas of ''microbial forensics''. This paper describes some major elements of the R&D agenda that will define this sub-field in the immediate future and provide the foundations for a coherent national capability. Data from chemical and physical analysis of BW materials can be useful to an investigation of a bio-terror event in two ways. First, it can be used to compare evidence samples collected at different locations where such incidents have occurred (e.g. between the powders in the New York and Washington letters in the Amerithrax investigation) or between the attack samples and those seized during the investigation of sites where it is suspected the material was manufactured (if such samples exist). Matching of sample properties can help establish the relatedness of disparate incidents, and mis-matches might exclude certain scenarios, or signify a more complex etiology of the events under investigation. Chemical and morphological analysis for sample matching has a long history in forensics, and is likely to be acceptable in principle in court, assuming that match criteria are well defined and derived from known limits of precision of the measurement techniques in question. Thus, apart from certain

  9. PCOM: A Microcomputer Program that Performs a Principal Components Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Stephen

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes a microcomputer program that extracts principal components from a correlation matrix and rotates them to a varimax solution. Eigenvalues, variances associated with each component, unrotated component loadings, and varimax rotated loadings are output by the program. (Author)

  10. Human reliability program: Components and effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baley-Downes, S.

    1986-01-01

    The term ''Human Reliability Program'' (HRP) is defined as a series of selective controls which are implemented and integrated to identify the ''insider threat'' from current and prospective employees who are dishonest, disloyal and unreliable. The HRP, although not a prediction of human behaviour, is an excellent tool for decision making and should compliment security and improve employee quality. The HRP consists of several component applications such as management evaluation; appropriate background investigative requirements; occupational health examination and laboratory testing; drug/alcohol screening; psychological testing and interviews; polygraph examination; job related aberrant behaviour recognition; on-going education and training; document control; drug/alcohol rehabilitation; periodic HRP audit; and implementation of an onsite central clearing house. The components and effects of HRP are discussed in further detail in this paper.

  11. Schooling feeding versus scholarship program : which one is key to ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Schooling feeding versus scholarship program : which one is key to help children learn reading, writing and simple calculation skills?; final draft report. Pheakdey Em; Pheakdey Pheap. URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10625/54705. Date: 2013-10 ...

  12. Curated Collections for Educators: Five Key Papers about Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Brent; Gottlieb, Michael; Boysen-Osborn, Megan; King, Andrew; Quinn, Antonia; Krzyzaniak, Sara; Pineda, Nicolas; Yarris, Lalena M; Chan, Teresa

    2017-05-04

    The evaluation of educational programs has become an expected part of medical education. At some point, all medical educators will need to critically evaluate the programs that they deliver. However, the evaluation of educational programs requires a very different skillset than teaching. In this article, we aim to identify and summarize key papers that would be helpful for faculty members interested in exploring program evaluation. In November of 2016, the 2015-2016 Academic life in emergency medicine (ALiEM) Faculty Incubator program highlighted key papers in a discussion of program evaluation. This list of papers was augmented with suggestions by guest experts and by an open call on Twitter. This resulted in a list of 30 papers on program evaluation. Our authorship group then engaged in a process akin to a Delphi study to build consensus on the most important papers about program evaluation for medical education faculty. We present our group's top five most highly rated papers on program evaluation. We also summarize these papers with respect to their relevance to junior medical education faculty members and faculty developers. Program evaluation is challenging. The described papers will be informative for junior faculty members as they aim to design literature-informed evaluations for their educational programs.

  13. National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing. Program summary report, Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing focused on manufacturing research and development for flat panel displays, advanced lithography, microelectronics, and optoelectronics. This report provides an overview of the program, program history, summaries of the technical projects, and key program accomplishments.

  14. Demand for programs for key populations in Africa from countries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Owen Ryan, John Macom, and Michelle Moses-Eisenstein

    2012-11-28

    Nov 28, 2012 ... grams for key populations in Africa, since neither donor reports specifically on these populations. This analysis sought to address that knowledge gap in an effort to better understand country demand for programs for MSM, IDU, and FSW. Methods. Data were gathered from all publicly available documents ...

  15. Habitat Restoration as a Key Conservation Lever for Woodland Caribou: A review of restoration programs and key learnings from Alberta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Bentham

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Recovery Strategy for the Woodland Caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou, Boreal Population in Canada (EC, 2012, identifies coordinated actions to reclaim woodland caribou habitat as a key step to meeting current and future caribou population objectives. Actions include restoring industrial landscape features such as roads, seismic lines, pipelines, cut-lines, and cleared areas in an effort to reduce landscape fragmentation and the changes in caribou population dynamics associated with changing predator-prey dynamics in highly fragmented landscapes. Reliance on habitat restoration as a recovery action within the federal recovery strategy is high, considering all Alberta populations have less than 65% undisturbed habitat, which is identified in the recovery strategy as a threshold providing a 60% chance that a local population will be self-sustaining. Alberta’s Provincial Woodland Caribou Policy also identifies habitat restoration as a critical component of long-term caribou habitat management. We review and discuss the history of caribou habitat restoration programs in Alberta and present outcomes and highlights of a caribou habitat restoration workshop attended by over 80 representatives from oil and gas, forestry, provincial and federal regulators, academia and consulting who have worked on restoration programs. Restoration initiatives in Alberta began in 2001 and have generally focused on construction methods, revegetation treatments, access control programs, and limiting plant species favourable to alternate prey. Specific treatments include tree planting initiatives, coarse woody debris management along linear features, and efforts for multi-company and multi-stakeholder coordinated habitat restoration on caribou range. Lessons learned from these programs have been incorporated into large scale habitat restoration projects near Grande Prairie, Cold Lake, and Fort McMurray. A key outcome of our review is the opportunity to provide a

  16. 75 FR 7045 - Key Gas Components, Inc., Marion, NC; Notice of Negative Determination Regarding Application for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-16

    ... Employment and Training Administration Key Gas Components, Inc., Marion, NC; Notice of Negative Determination Regarding Application for Reconsideration By application dated January 8, 2010, a petitioner requested... of facts or of the law justified reconsideration of the decision. The negative determination of the...

  17. Fermilab and Berkeley Lab Collaborate with Meyer Tool on Key Component for European Particle Accelerator

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Officials of the U.S. Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory announced yesterday the completion of a key component of the U.S. contribution to the Large Hadron Collider, a particle accelerator under construction at CERN, in Geneva, Switzerland

  18. The Effects of an Intensive Tutor Training Component in a Peer Tutoring Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, Susan D.; McNeil, Mary E.

    1987-01-01

    An intensive 10-day peer tutor training component is described as a key element in the success of a peer tutoring program in mathematics for 21 low-achieving second graders. Results suggest the program's effectiveness in increasing the speed and accuracy of responses on written speed tests of addition facts. (Author/JW)

  19. Higher-Order Components for Grid Programming

    CERN Document Server

    Dünnweber, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Higher-Order Components were developed within the CoreGRID European Network of Excellence and have become an optional extension of the popular Globus middleware. This book provides the reader with hands-on experience, describing a collection of example applications from various fields of science and engineering, including biology and physics.

  20. Elliptic Curved Component Macro-Programming and Its Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhibo; Hu, Junchen; Li, Kaiqiang; Zhang, Shiyu; Liu, Aiju

    2017-10-01

    Most conventional numerical control systems do not have the function of noncircular curve interpolation instruction. Manual programming is extremely challenging, automatic programming by computer-aided manufacturing software is highly sophisticated, and processing parameters cannot be easily modified. Therefore, macro-programs, which possess powerful parametric programming, are applied for the processing of noncircular curved components. The values of arguments were determined using transfer and loop statements (IF and WHILE), and elliptic curved macro-programs were achieved using normal and parameter equations in this study. The elliptic curved components were fitted using micro-sized segments or arcs. The numerical control machining tests verified the validity and viability of the macro-programs, and elliptic curved components were processed. The results indicated that the elliptic curved components processed using macro-programs met the design requirements.

  1. Reserve Component Programs, Fiscal Year 1987.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    required to meet current construction and maintenance needs and to reduce large backlogs in all reserve components. Duft In the last decade...Infantry Battalions 47 2 49 Armored Battalions 43 2 45 Petroleum, Oil, and Lubricant Companies 0 45 45 Combat Divisions 36 0 36 Medium Helicopter...facilities. High endurance cutters, medium endurance cutters, and Since 1980, the number of women patrol boats are considered combat serving in the Selected

  2. Product costing program for wood component manufacturers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrienn Andersch; Urs Buehlmann; Jeff Palmer; Janice K Wiedenbeck; Steve. Lawser

    2013-01-01

    Accurate and timely product costing information is critically important for companies in planning the optimal utilization of company resources. While an overestimation of product costs can lead to loss of potential business and market share, underestimation of product costs can result in financial losses to the company. This article introduces a product costing program...

  3. Psychological distress as a key component of psychosocial functioning in community-dwelling older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnittger, Rebecca I B; Walsh, Cathal D; Casey, Anne-Marie; Wherton, Joseph P; McHugh, Joanna E; Lawlor, Brian A

    2012-01-01

    To explore the key components representative of measures of psychosocial functioning with a focus on identifying the constituents of psychological distress in an Irish sample of community-dwelling older adults and to examine the relationship between these components and health outcomes such as frailty. Cross-sectional observational study at the Technology Research for Independent Living (TRIL) Clinic, a comprehensive geriatric assessment facility in St. James's Hospital, Dublin. In this study, 579 participants were given eight primary assessments (Centre for Epidemiological Studies of Depression, Geriatric Adverse Life Events Scale, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, De Jong-Gierveld Scale, Practitioner Assessment of Network Type, Eysenck Personality Inventory, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Lubben Social Network Scale) and a broad range of health and demographic secondary assessments. Principal factor analysis identified the core components relating to psychosocial functioning. Following this, the regression factors of these components were correlated with health outcomes. The first of three components identified accounted for 9.08% of the variance and related to a core internal component of psychological distress. The two other components related to external and physiological functioning, specifically social support networks and sleep. Spearman's Rho correlations indicated significant associations of walking speed, age, Berg Balance Scale and living alone with all three components. Additionally, the core component of psychological distress significantly correlated with the Fried Frailty Index, illness co-morbidity, ADL, IADL and nutrition. These results characterise the variation in psychosocial functioning in older adults and identifies psychological distress as a core facet of psychosocial functioning which has associations with frailty.

  4. Developing physician-leaders: key competencies and available programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, James K

    2008-01-01

    Because effective leadership is critical to organizational success, frontrunner organizations cultivate leaders for bench depth and pipeline development. The many challenges in healthcare today create a special need for great leadership. This paper reviews the leadership competencies needed by physician-leaders and current experience with developing physician-leaders in healthcare institution-sponsored programs. On the basis of this review, six key leadership competency domains are proposed: 1. technical skills and knowledge (regarding operational, financial, and information systems, human resources, and strategic planning), 2. industry knowledge (e.g., regarding clinical processes, regulation, and healthcare trends), 3. problem-solving skills, 4. emotional intelligence, 5. communication, and 6. a commitment to lifelong learning. Review of current experience indicates that, in addition to leadership training through degree and certificate-granting programs (e.g., by universities and/or official medical societies), healthcare institutions themselves are developing intramural programs to cultivate physician-leaders. Greater attention is needed to assessing the impact and effectiveness of such programs in developing leaders and benefiting organizational outcomes.

  5. AIS as key component in modern vessel traffic management and information systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamers, W. [DaimlerChrysler Aerospace AG (DASA), Ulm (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    The objective of this paper is to provide information in respect to universal shipborne identification system (UAIS) as main sensor in various vessel traffic applications. The presented paper will give general information concerning AIS functionality and the standardisation process. Based on experience from recent projects and various IALA working group activities, a typical future VTMIS architectures is also presented being based on AIS as key sensor. The required key performance of AIS associated with the HW components will be described. The results from European technology study Indris are presented and discussed. Finally, a summary and conclusion from the presented material will complete the technical paper. The elaboration of this presentation has been carried out as a joint task between Mr. Andre van Berg, MDS Suedafrika und Mr. Walter Lamers, DASA Ulm. (orig.)

  6. Research on Modeling Method of Power System Key Components for E-REV

    OpenAIRE

    Niu Jigao; Shi Xiaoli; Xu Chunhua; Li Chenxu

    2017-01-01

    Aiming at the modeling problem of power system key components for an Extended-Range Electric Vehicle (E-REV), the co-simulation platform based on AVL-Cruise and Matlab/Simulink software is introduced, and the modeling methods of E-REV engine, driving motor and battery are studies by the method of mixing the theoretical modeling with the experimental modeling. Off-line simulation results with chosen driving cycles indicate that the proposed vehicle model has better simulation precision and can...

  7. National Nanotechnology Initiative Investments by Agency and Program Component Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Science and Technology Policy, Executive Office of the President — Data represents National Nanotechnology Initiative investments by agency and program component area (PCA) from FY 2001 through FY 2010 (requested). While this data...

  8. Intron retention as a component of regulated gene expression programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Aishwarya G; Smith, Christopher W J

    2017-09-01

    Intron retention has long been an exemplar of regulated splicing with case studies of individual events serving as models that provided key mechanistic insights into the process of splicing control. In organisms such as plants and budding yeast, intron retention is well understood as a major mechanism of gene expression regulation. In contrast, in mammalian systems, the extent and functional significance of intron retention have, until recently, remained greatly underappreciated. Technical challenges to the global detection and quantitation of transcripts with retained introns have often led to intron retention being overlooked or dismissed as "noise". Now, however, with the wealth of information available from high-throughput deep sequencing, combined with focused computational and statistical analyses, we are able to distinguish clear intron retention patterns in various physiological and pathological contexts. Several recent studies have demonstrated intron retention as a central component of gene expression programs during normal development as well as in response to stress and disease. Furthermore, these studies revealed various ways in which intron retention regulates protein isoform production, RNA stability and translation efficiency, and rapid induction of expression via post-transcriptional splicing of retained introns. In this review, we highlight critical findings from these transcriptomic studies and discuss commonalties in the patterns prevalent in intron retention networks at the functional and regulatory levels.

  9. Modelling Creativity: Identifying Key Components through a Corpus-Based Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordanous, Anna; Keller, Bill

    2016-01-01

    Creativity is a complex, multi-faceted concept encompassing a variety of related aspects, abilities, properties and behaviours. If we wish to study creativity scientifically, then a tractable and well-articulated model of creativity is required. Such a model would be of great value to researchers investigating the nature of creativity and in particular, those concerned with the evaluation of creative practice. This paper describes a unique approach to developing a suitable model of how creative behaviour emerges that is based on the words people use to describe the concept. Using techniques from the field of statistical natural language processing, we identify a collection of fourteen key components of creativity through an analysis of a corpus of academic papers on the topic. Words are identified which appear significantly often in connection with discussions of the concept. Using a measure of lexical similarity to help cluster these words, a number of distinct themes emerge, which collectively contribute to a comprehensive and multi-perspective model of creativity. The components provide an ontology of creativity: a set of building blocks which can be used to model creative practice in a variety of domains. The components have been employed in two case studies to evaluate the creativity of computational systems and have proven useful in articulating achievements of this work and directions for further research.

  10. Rivers and Floodplains as Key Components of Global Terrestrial Water Storage Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getirana, Augusto; Kumar, Sujay; Girotto, Manuela; Rodell, Matthew

    2017-10-01

    This study quantifies the contribution of rivers and floodplains to terrestrial water storage (TWS) variability. We use state-of-the-art models to simulate land surface processes and river dynamics and to separate TWS into its main components. Based on a proposed impact index, we show that surface water storage (SWS) contributes 8% of TWS variability globally, but that contribution differs widely among climate zones. Changes in SWS are a principal component of TWS variability in the tropics, where major rivers flow over arid regions and at high latitudes. SWS accounts for 22-27% of TWS variability in both the Amazon and Nile Basins. Changes in SWS are negligible in the Western U.S., Northern Africa, Middle East, and central Asia. Based on comparisons with Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment-based TWS, we conclude that accounting for SWS improves simulated TWS in most of South America, Africa, and Southern Asia, confirming that SWS is a key component of TWS variability.

  11. Sensitivity analysis of key components in large-scale hydroeconomic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medellin-Azuara, J.; Connell, C. R.; Lund, J. R.; Howitt, R. E.

    2008-12-01

    This paper explores the likely impact of different estimation methods in key components of hydro-economic models such as hydrology and economic costs or benefits, using the CALVIN hydro-economic optimization for water supply in California. In perform our analysis using two climate scenarios: historical and warm-dry. The components compared were perturbed hydrology using six versus eighteen basins, highly-elastic urban water demands, and different valuation of agricultural water scarcity. Results indicate that large scale hydroeconomic hydro-economic models are often rather robust to a variety of estimation methods of ancillary models and components. Increasing the level of detail in the hydrologic representation of this system might not greatly affect overall estimates of climate and its effects and adaptations for California's water supply. More price responsive urban water demands will have a limited role in allocating water optimally among competing uses. Different estimation methods for the economic value of water and scarcity in agriculture may influence economically optimal water allocation; however land conversion patterns may have a stronger influence in this allocation. Overall optimization results of large-scale hydro-economic models remain useful for a wide range of assumptions in eliciting promising water management alternatives.

  12. Establishing key components of yoga interventions for musculoskeletal conditions: a Delphi survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Lesley; Stebbings, Simon; Sherman, Karen J; Cherkin, Daniel; Baxter, G David

    2014-06-18

    Evidence suggests yoga is a safe and effective intervention for the management of physical and psychosocial symptoms associated with musculoskeletal conditions. However, heterogeneity in the components and reporting of clinical yoga trials impedes both the generalization of study results and the replication of study protocols. The aim of this Delphi survey was to address these issues of heterogeneity, by developing a list of recommendations of key components for the design and reporting of yoga interventions for musculoskeletal conditions. Recognised experts involved in the design, conduct, and teaching of yoga for musculoskeletal conditions were identified from a systematic review, and invited to contribute to the Delphi survey. Forty-one of the 58 experts contacted, representing six countries, agreed to participate. A three-round Delphi was conducted via electronic surveys. Round 1 presented an open-ended question, allowing panellists to individually identify components they considered key to the design and reporting of yoga interventions for musculoskeletal conditions. Thematic analysis of Round 1 identified items for quantitative rating in Round 2; items not reaching consensus were forwarded to Round 3 for re-rating. Thirty-six panellists (36/41; 88%) completed the three rounds of the Delphi survey. Panellists provided 348 comments to the Round 1 question. These comments were reduced to 49 items, grouped under five themes, for rating in subsequent rounds. A priori group consensus of ≥80% was reached on 28 items related to five themes concerning defining the yoga intervention, types of yoga practices to include in an intervention, delivery of the yoga protocol, domains of outcome measures, and reporting of yoga interventions for musculoskeletal conditions. Additionally, a priori consensus of ≥50% was reached on five items relating to minimum values for intervention parameters. Expert consensus has provided a non-prescriptive reference list for the design and

  13. Establishing key components of yoga interventions for musculoskeletal conditions: a Delphi survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests yoga is a safe and effective intervention for the management of physical and psychosocial symptoms associated with musculoskeletal conditions. However, heterogeneity in the components and reporting of clinical yoga trials impedes both the generalization of study results and the replication of study protocols. The aim of this Delphi survey was to address these issues of heterogeneity, by developing a list of recommendations of key components for the design and reporting of yoga interventions for musculoskeletal conditions. Methods Recognised experts involved in the design, conduct, and teaching of yoga for musculoskeletal conditions were identified from a systematic review, and invited to contribute to the Delphi survey. Forty-one of the 58 experts contacted, representing six countries, agreed to participate. A three-round Delphi was conducted via electronic surveys. Round 1 presented an open-ended question, allowing panellists to individually identify components they considered key to the design and reporting of yoga interventions for musculoskeletal conditions. Thematic analysis of Round 1 identified items for quantitative rating in Round 2; items not reaching consensus were forwarded to Round 3 for re-rating. Results Thirty-six panellists (36/41; 88%) completed the three rounds of the Delphi survey. Panellists provided 348 comments to the Round 1 question. These comments were reduced to 49 items, grouped under five themes, for rating in subsequent rounds. A priori group consensus of ≥80% was reached on 28 items related to five themes concerning defining the yoga intervention, types of yoga practices to include in an intervention, delivery of the yoga protocol, domains of outcome measures, and reporting of yoga interventions for musculoskeletal conditions. Additionally, a priori consensus of ≥50% was reached on five items relating to minimum values for intervention parameters. Conclusions Expert consensus has provided a non

  14. Benchmarking Non Public Hospitals in Puerto Rico: A Key Component in the Financial Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arisbel Ramos Martin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Benchmarking is considered a key component of the organizational performance measurement system. This study examines a sample of 53 profit and nonprofit hospitals registered in the American Hospital Directory, through four financial dimensions: liquidity, efficiency, profitability and capital structure. The purpose of the study is to validate whether the financial industry benchmark differs or not from a group of 17 selected financial ratios of profit and nonprofit hospitals, to determine if their financial performance is efficient or inefficient in the Puerto Rico health care system. The findings from the research show that 53% or more of the 17 selected financial ratios, compared globally, suggest being efficient in both types of hospitals. This means that these financial ratios were greater than or equal to the industry benchmark.

  15. Pricing in health care organizations. A key component of the marketing mix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, D

    1989-01-01

    Pricing is one of the key components of a successful marketing mix. Pricing objectives, strategies, and tactics cannot stand alone, however. To be effective, price must work in harmony with other marketing and management activities. Despite its importance, use of pricing as a management tool is limited in health care compared to other industries. Many factors contribute to this situation, including the structure of the health-care exchange process, limited consumer knowledge, and a limited ability to measure costs. I will provide an overview of pricing information, both within and outside health care. Specifically, we will explore the definition of pricing, nonmonetary pricing, price elasticity, classical pricing theory, and the role of pricing in a health-care setting.

  16. Tuning I/O Subsystem: A Key Component in RDBMS Performance Tuning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitesh Kumar SHARMA

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In a computer system, the fastest storage component is the CPU cache, followed by the system memory. I/O to disk is thousands of times slower than an access to memory. This fact is the key for why you try to make effective use of memory whenever possible and defer I/Os whenever you can. The majority of the user response time is actually spent waiting for a disk I/O to occur. By making good use of caches in memory and reducing I/O overhead, you can optimize performance. The goal is to retrieve data from memory whenever you can and to use the CPU for other activities whenever you have to wait for I/Os. This paper examines ways to optimize the performance of the system by taking advantage of caching and effective use of the system's CPUs.

  17. The contribution of simulation training in enhancing key components of laparoscopic competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loukas, Constantinos; Nikiteas, Nikolaos; Kanakis, Meletios; Georgiou, Evangelos

    2011-06-01

    This study aims to investigate how basic training contributes to the performance of complex laparoscopic tasks performed in a virtual reality (VR) environment. An assessment methodology is proposed based on quantitative error analysis of key components of laparoscopic competence. Twenty-five inexperienced surgeons were trained on four basic tasks. The effect of training was assessed on three independent scenarios (two procedural: adhesiolysis and bowel suturing, and a laparoscopic cholecystectomy [LC]). Several error parameters were post hoc analyzed to yield a quantitative performance index for two fundamental skills: proficiency and safety. Time and instrument path length were also measured and compared. Correlation analysis was performed to study how these indices correlate one another. Significant learning curves were demonstrated during training. For adhesiolysis, all four indices improved significantly (P training (P training, especially for proficiency. This study finds it possible to assess key competence skills based on the quantitative analysis of various parameters generated by a VR simulator. The improvement in basic training is transferred to more complex tasks. The proposed methodology is useful for structured evaluation of laparoscopic performance demonstrating fundamental elements of surgical competence.

  18. Selection of Key Component Vendor from the Aspects of Capability, Productivity, and Reliability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent F. Yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In a technology-driven industry, the appropriate vendors/suppliers can effectively contribute to cobusiness development profits. Key component vendors help dynamically drive solution design firms to achieve strong performances, especially when an integrated circuit (IC component that has technical know-how specifications dominates an electronic solution design. This paper presents a systematic framework to examine the decision process for the selection of wireless fidelity (Wi-Fi IC vendor alternatives from the business ecosystem aspect in order to review the importance of buyer-supplier synergistic effects. We implement the fuzzy analytic hierarchy process technique which incorporates a vendor’s capability, productivity, and reliability characteristics into a hierarchical structure and deploys decision experts’ judgments along with vague data analysis to solve a real-world problem faced by a leading company specialized in the research and design of wireless networking solutions. The findings indicate the Taiwanese local vendor is the top priority for alternatives selection, and the results contribute significant values to the design firm’s operation management.

  19. Statistical Framework for Planning a Component Shelf Life Program.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowder, Stephen V. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-02-01

    This document outlines a statistical framework for establishing a shelf-life program for components whose performance is measured by the value of a continuous variable such as voltage or function time. The approach applies to both single measurement devices and repeated measurement devices, although additional process control charts may be useful in the case of repeated measurements. The approach is to choose a sample size that protects the margin associated with a particular variable over the life of the component. Deviations from expected performance of the measured variable are detected prior to the complete loss of margin. This ensures the reliability of the component over its lifetime.

  20. Nonribosomal peptides, key biocontrol components for Pseudomonas fluorescens In5, isolated from a Greenlandic suppressive soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelsen, Charlotte F; Watrous, Jeramie; Glaring, Mikkel A; Kersten, Roland; Koyama, Nobuhiro; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Stougaard, Peter

    2015-03-17

    Potatoes are cultivated in southwest Greenland without the use of pesticides and with limited crop rotation. Despite the fact that plant-pathogenic fungi are present, no severe-disease outbreaks have yet been observed. In this report, we document that a potato soil at Inneruulalik in southern Greenland is suppressive against Rhizoctonia solani Ag3 and uncover the suppressive antifungal mechanism of a highly potent biocontrol bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens In5, isolated from the suppressive potato soil. A combination of molecular genetics, genomics, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) revealed an antifungal genomic island in P. fluorescens In5 encoding two nonribosomal peptides, nunamycin and nunapeptin, which are key components for the biocontrol activity by strain In5 in vitro and in soil microcosm experiments. Furthermore, complex microbial behaviors were highlighted. Whereas nunamycin was demonstrated to inhibit the mycelial growth of R. solani Ag3, but not that of Pythium aphanidermatum, nunapeptin instead inhibited P. aphanidermatum but not R. solani Ag3. Moreover, the synthesis of nunamycin by P. fluorescens In5 was inhibited in the presence of P. aphanidermatum. Further characterization of the two peptides revealed nunamycin to be a monochlorinated 9-amino-acid cyclic lipopeptide with similarity to members of the syringomycin group, whereas nunapeptin was a 22-amino-acid cyclic lipopeptide with similarity to corpeptin and syringopeptin. Crop rotation and systematic pest management are used to only a limited extent in Greenlandic potato farming. Nonetheless, although plant-pathogenic fungi are present in the soil, the farmers do not experience major plant disease outbreaks. Here, we show that a Greenlandic potato soil is suppressive against Rhizoctonia solani, and we unravel the key biocontrol components for Pseudomonas fluorescens In5, one of the potent biocontrol bacteria

  1. A classification of components of workplace disability management programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gensby, Ulrik; Labriola, Merete; Irvin, Emma

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This paper presents results from a Campbell systematic review on the nature and effectiveness of workplace disability management programs (WPDM) promoting return to work (RTW), as implemented and practiced by employers. A classification of WPDM program components, based on the review...... were conducted in pairs of reviewers. Studies were clustered around various dimensions of the design and context of programs. Results: 16,932 records were identified by the initial search. 599 papers were assessed for relevance. Thirteen studies met inclusion criteria. Twelve peer reviewed articles...

  2. Capacity building in water demand management as a key component for attaining millennium development goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumbo, Bekithemba; Forster, Laura; Arntzen, Jaap

    Successful water demand management (WDM) implementation as a component of integrated water resource management (IWRM) can play a significant role in the alleviation of poverty through more efficient use of available water resources. The urban population in Southern African cities is characterised by so-called ‘water poor’ communities who typically expend a high percentage of their household income on poor quality water. Usually they have no access to an affordable alternative source. Although WDM as a component of IWRM is not a panacea for poverty, it can help alleviate poverty by facilitating water services management by municipal water supply agencies (MWSAs) in the region. WDM is a key strategy for achieving the millennium development goals (MDGs) and, as such, should be given due attention in the preparation of national IWRM and water efficiency plans. Various studies in the Southern African region have indicated that capacity building is necessary for nations to develop IWRM and water-use efficiency plans to meet the targets set out in the MDGs. WDM education and training of water professionals and end-users is particularly important in developing countries, which are resource and information-access poor. In response to these findings, The World Conservation Union (IUCN) and its consulting partners, the Training and Instructional Design Academy of South Africa (TIDASA), and Centre for Applied Research (CAR) designed, developed and presented a pilot WDM Guideline Training Module for MWSAs as part of Phase II of IUCN’s Southern Africa regional WDM project. Pilot training was conducted in July 2004 in Lusaka, Zambia for a group of 36 participants involved in municipal water supply from nine Southern African countries. This paper looks at the links between building the capacity of professionals, operational staff and other role-players in the municipal water supply chain to implement WDM as part of broader IWRM strategies, and the subsequent potential for

  3. MrpL35, a mitospecific component of mitoribosomes, plays a key role in cytochromecoxidase assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Box, Jodie M; Kaur, Jasvinder; Stuart, Rosemary A

    2017-11-15

    Mitoribosomes perform the synthesis of the core components of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system encoded by the mitochondrial genome. We provide evidence that MrpL35 (mL38), a mitospecific component of the yeast mitoribosomal central protuberance, assembles into a subcomplex with MrpL7 (uL5), Mrp7 (bL27), and MrpL36 (bL31) and mitospecific proteins MrpL17 (mL46) and MrpL28 (mL40). We isolated respiratory defective mrpL35 mutant yeast strains, which do not display an overall inhibition in mitochondrial protein synthesis but rather have a problem in cytochrome c oxidase complex (COX) assembly. Our findings indicate that MrpL35, with its partner Mrp7, play a key role in coordinating the synthesis of the Cox1 subunit with its assembly into the COX enzyme and in a manner that involves the Cox14 and Coa3 proteins. We propose that MrpL35 and Mrp7 are regulatory subunits of the mitoribosome acting to coordinate protein synthesis and OXPHOS assembly events and thus the bioenergetic capacity of the mitochondria. © 2017 Box et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  4. Parent Education: Key to Successful Alternative Education Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buroker, Charles D.

    1993-01-01

    Examines the relationship between parental involvement and alternative education programs and reports results of a highly successful parent education program (Active Parenting) in Lima, Ohio. This video-based discussion program evinced high participant satisfaction, specifically encouraged 15 positive parenting behaviors, and discouraged some…

  5. Strengthening Teacher Education Program: Keys to Develop through Teacher Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Tecnam Yoon

    2014-01-01

    Teacher performance assessment is a part of a global trend based on teacher education program. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the American Teacher Performance Assessment (TPA) program, to identify some of the features in creating a system for pre-service teachers in developing countries, and to suggest an ideal TPA model for strengthening the teacher education program.

  6. NASALIFE - Component Fatigue and Creep Life Prediction Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Mital, Subodh K.

    2014-01-01

    NASALIFE is a life prediction program for propulsion system components made of ceramic matrix composites (CMC) under cyclic thermo-mechanical loading and creep rupture conditions. Although the primary focus was for CMC components, the underlying methodologies are equally applicable to other material systems as well. The program references empirical data for low cycle fatigue (LCF), creep rupture, and static material properties as part of the life prediction process. Multiaxial stresses are accommodated by Von Mises based methods and a Walker model is used to address mean stress effects. Varying loads are reduced by the Rainflow counting method or a peak counting type method. Lastly, damage due to cyclic loading and creep is combined with Minor's Rule to determine damage due to cyclic loading, damage due to creep, and the total damage per mission and the number of potential missions the component can provide before failure.

  7. Successful Bullying Prevention Programs: Influence of Research Design, Implementation Features, and Program Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryanna Hahn Fox

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Bullying prevention programs have been shown to be generally effective in reducing bullying and victimization. However, the effects are relatively small in randomized experiments and greater in quasi-experimental and age-cohort designs. Programs that are more intensive and of longer duration (for both children and teachers are more effective, as are programs containing more components. Several program components are associated with large effect sizes, including parent training or meetings and teacher training. These results should inform the design and evaluation of anti-bullying programs in the future, and a system ofaccreditation of effective programs.

  8. An Analysis of Digital Inclusion Projects: Three Crucial Factors and Four Key Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Smith

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an in-depth analysis into two case studies aimed at addressing the digital divide in two developing countries. A detailed description is provided for each case study along with an analysis of how successful the two projects were at addressing the digital divide in Siyabuswa, South Africa and Ennis, Ireland. The two case studies were both community-based ICT projects in rural areas of their respective countries. However, citizens in Siyabuswa had to continuously work hard to obtain new resources for a central hub which serviced the entire community, while citizens in Ennis were awarded a grant with an abundance of ICT technology including an Internet connection in every home. A conceptual framework for analyzing the success of digital inclusion projects was developed through a comprehensive literature review. This paper will identify the three factors (value, sustainability, and scalability and four key components (digital equity, excellence, opportunity, and empowerment that make up the framework, analyze each of the two case studies based on the framework, and explore future implications for addressing gaps in ICT access through the implementation of digital inclusion projects.

  9. Component of Caramel Food Coloring, THI, Causes Lymphopenia Indirectly via a Key Metabolic Intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtoyo, Mamoru; Machinaga, Nobuo; Inoue, Ryotaku; Hagihara, Katsunobu; Yuita, Hiroshi; Tamura, Masakazu; Hashimoto, Ryuji; Chiba, Jun; Muro, Fumihito; Watanabe, Jun; Kobayashi, Yoshimasa; Abe, Koji; Kita, Yasuo; Nagasaki, Miyuki; Shimozato, Takaichi

    2016-05-19

    Caramel color is widely used in the food industry, and its many variations are generally considered to be safe. It has been known for a long time that THI (2-acetyl-4-(tetrahydroxybutyl)imidazole), a component of caramel color III, causes lymphopenia in animals through sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) lyase (S1PL) inhibition. However, this mechanism of action has not been fully validated because THI does not inhibit S1PL in vitro. To reconcile this situation, we examined molecular details of THI mechanism of action using "smaller" THI derivatives. We identified a bioactive derivative, A6770, which has the same lymphopenic effect as THI via S1PL inhibition. In the case of A6770 we observe this effect both in vitro and in vivo, and demonstrate that A6770 is phosphorylated and inhibits S1PL in the same way as 4-deoxypyridoxine. In addition, A6770 was detected in rat plasma following oral administration of THI, suggesting that A6770 is a key metabolic intermediate of THI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Coordination between veterinary services and other relevant authorities: a key component of good public governance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellemain, V

    2012-08-01

    Coordination between Veterinary Services and other relevant authorities is a key component of good public governance, especially for effective action and optimal management of available resources. The importance of good coordination is reflected in the World Organisation for Animal Health'Tool forthe Evaluation of Performance of Veterinary Services', which includes a critical competency on coordination. Many partners from technical, administrative and legal fields are involved. The degree of formalisation of coordination tends to depend on a country's level of organisation and development. Contingency plans against avian influenza led to breakthroughs in many countries in the mid-2000s. While interpersonal relationships remain vital, not everything should hinge on them. Organisation and management are critical to operational efficiency. The distribution of responsibilities needs to be defined clearly, avoiding duplication and areas of conflict. Lead authorities should be designated according to subject (Veterinary Services in animal health areas) and endowed with the necessary legitimacy. Lead authorities will be responsible for coordinating the drafting and updating of the relevant documents: agreements between authorities, contingency plans, standard operating procedures, etc.

  11. Evaluating Key Watershed Components of Low Flow Regimes in New England Streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Alisa C; Gold, Arthur J; Pelletier, Marguerite C

    2016-05-01

    Water resource managers seeking to optimize stream ecosystem services and abstractions of water from watersheds need an understanding of the importance of land use, physical and climatic characteristics, and hydrography on different low flow components of stream hydrographs. Within 33 USGS gaged watersheds of southern New England, we assessed relationships between watershed variables and a set of low flow parameters by using an information-theoretical approach. The key variables identified by the Akaike Information Criteria (AIC) weighting factors as generating positive relationships with low flow events included percent stratified drift, mean elevation, drainage area, and mean August precipitation. The extent of wetlands in the watershed was negatively related to low flow magnitudes. Of the various land use variables, the percentage of developed land was found to have the highest importance and a negative relationship on low flow magnitudes, but was less important than wetlands and physical and climatic features. Our results suggest that management practices aimed to sustain low flows in fluvial systems can benefit from attention to specific watershed features. We draw attention to the finding that streams located in watersheds with high proportions of wetlands may require more stringent approaches to withdrawals to sustain fluvial ecosystems during drought periods, particularly in watersheds with extensive development and limited deposits of stratified drift. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  12. Understanding science teacher enhancement programs: Essential components and a model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, Samuel Albert

    Researchers and practioners alike recognize that "the national goal that every child in the United States has access to high-quality school education in science and mathematics cannot be realized without the availability of effective professional development of teachers" (Hewson, 1997, p. 16). Further, there is a plethora of reports calling for the improvement of professional development efforts (Guskey & Huberman, 1995; Kyle, 1995; Loucks-Horsley, Hewson, Love, & Stiles, 1997). In this study I analyze a successful 3-year teacher enhancement program, one form of professional development, to: (1) identify essential components of an effective teacher enhancement program; and (2) create a model to identify and articulate the critical issues in designing, implementing, and evaluating teacher enhancement programs. Five primary sources of information were converted into data: (1) exit questionnaires, (2) exit surveys, (3) exit interview transcripts, (4) focus group transcripts, and (5) other artifacts. Additionally, a focus group was used to conduct member checks. Data were analyzed in an iterative process which led to the development of the list of essential components. The Components are categorized by three organizers: Structure (e.g., science research experience, a mediator throughout the program), Context (e.g., intensity, collaboration), and Participant Interpretation (e.g., perceived to be "safe" to examine personal beliefs and practices, actively engaged). The model is based on: (1) a 4-year study of a successful teacher enhancement program; (2) an analysis of professional development efforts reported in the literature; and (3) reflective discussions with implementors, evaluators, and participants of professional development programs. The model consists of three perspectives, cognitive, symbolic interaction, and organizational, representing different viewpoints from which to consider issues relevant to the success of a teacher enhancement program. These

  13. School lunch program in India: background, objectives and components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chutani, Alka Mohan

    2012-01-01

    The School Lunch Program in India (SLP) is the largest food and nutrition assistance program feeding millions of children every day. This paper provides a review of the background information on the SLP in India earlier known as national program for nutrition support to primary education (NP-NSPE) and later as mid day meal scheme, including historical trends and objectives and components/characteristics of the scheme. It also addresses steps being taken to meet challenges being faced by the administrators of the program in monitoring and evaluation of the program. This program was initially started in 1960 in few states to overcome the complex problems malnutrition and illiteracy. Mid Day Meal Scheme is the popular name for school meal program. In 2001, as per the supreme court orders, it became mandatory to give a mid day meal to all primary and later extended to upper primary school children studying in the government and government aided schools. This scheme benefitted 140 million children in government assisted schools across India in 2008, strengthening child nutrition and literacy. In a country with a large percent of illiterate population with a high percent of children unable to read or write; governmental and non-governmental organizations have reported that mid day meal scheme has consistently increased enrollment in schools in India. One of the main goals of school lunch program is to promote the health and well-being of the Nation's children.

  14. 2015 Key Water Power Program and National Laboratory Accomplishments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Water Power Program is committed to developing and deploying a portfolio of innovative technologies and market solutions for clean, domestic power generation from water resources across the United States.

  15. Keys to success: Ten case studies of effective weatherization programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.A.; Berry, L.G.; Kolb, J.O.; White, D.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kinney, L.F.; Wilson, T. [Synertech Systems Corp., Syracuse, NY (United States)

    1993-11-01

    In 1990, DOE initiated a nationwide evaluation of its Weatherization Program, with assistance from Oak Ridge National Laboratory and an advisory group of 40 weatherization professionals, program managers, and researchers. The evaluation is comprised of three impact studies covering the Program`s major market segments: Single-family homes, mobile homes, and dwellings in small (2 to 4-unit) multifamily buildings (the Single-Family Study), Single-family homes heated primarily with fuel oil (the Fuel-Oil Study), and Dwellings in buildings with five or more units (the Multifamily Study). The Single-Family Study, the subject of this report, is a critical part of this coordinated evaluation effort. Its focus on single-family dwellings, mobile homes, and dwellings in small multifamily buildings covers 83% of the income-eligible population and 96% of the dwellings weatherized during Program Year 1989. The first phase of the Single-Family Study involved the analysis of a massive data base of information collected from 368 local weatherization agencies and 543 electric and gas utilities. This analysis resulted in energy-saving and cost-effectiveness estimates for the Weatherization Program and the identification of a set of ten high-performing agencies located throughout the country. The second phase, which is the subject of this report, involves a ``process`` evaluation of these ten high performers, aimed at identifying those weatherization practices that explain their documented success.

  16. U.S. Military Stop Loss Program: Key Questions and Answers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-28

    CRS Report for Congress Prepared for Members and Committees of Congress U.S. Military Stop Loss Program: Key Questions and Answers...TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2009 to 00-00-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE U.S. Military Stop Loss Program: Key Questions and Answers 5a. CONTRACT...Military Stop Loss Program: Key Questions and Answers Congressional Research Service Summary Stop Loss is a frequently misunderstood DOD force

  17. Java decaffeinated: experiences building a programming language from components

    OpenAIRE

    Dobson, Simon; Farragher, Linda

    2000-01-01

    non-peer-reviewed Most modern programming languages are complex and feature rich. Whilst this is (sometimes) an advantage for industrial-strength applications, it complicates both language teaching and language research. We describe our experiences in the design of a reduced sub-set of the Java language and its implementation using the Vanilla language development framework. We argue that Vanilla???s component-based approach allows the language???s feature set to be varied quickly and simp...

  18. Components of Program for Analysis of Spectra and Their Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Taufer

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The spectral analysis of aqueous solutions of multi-component mixtures is used for identification and distinguishing of individual componentsin the mixture and subsequent determination of protonation constants and absorptivities of differently protonated particles in the solution in steadystate (Meloun and Havel 1985, (Leggett 1985. Apart from that also determined are the distribution diagrams, i.e. concentration proportions ofthe individual components at different pH values. The spectra are measured with various concentrations of the basic components (one or severalpolyvalent weak acids or bases and various pH values within the chosen range of wavelengths. The obtained absorbance response area has to beanalyzed by non-linear regression using specialized algorithms. These algorithms have to meet certain requirements concerning the possibility ofcalculations and the level of outputs. A typical example is the SQUAD(84 program, which was gradually modified and extended, see, e.g., (Melounet al. 1986, (Meloun et al. 2012.

  19. 2015 Key Wind Program and National Laboratory Accomplishments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

    2015-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Program is committed to helping the nation secure cost-competitive sources of renewable energy through the development and deployment of innovative wind power technologies. By investing in improvements to wind plant design, technology development, and operation as well as developing tools to identify the highest quality wind resources, the Wind Program serves as a leader in making wind energy technologies more competitive with traditional sources of energy and a larger part of our nation’s renewable energy portfolio.

  20. The data collection component of the Hanford Meteorology Monitoring Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glantz, C.S.; Islam, M.M.

    1988-09-01

    An intensive program of meteorological monitoring is in place at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site. The Hanford Meteorology Monitoring Program involves the measurement, observation, and storage of various meteorological data; continuous monitoring of regional weather conditions by a staff of professional meteorologists; and around-the-clock forecasting of weather conditions for the Hanford Site. The objective of this report is to document the data collection component of the program. In this report, each meteorological monitoring site is discussed in detail. Each site's location and instrumentation are described and photographs are presented. The methods for processing and communicating data to the Hanford Meteorology Station are also discussed. Finally, the procedures followed to maintain and calibrate these instruments are presented. 2 refs., 83 figs., 15 tabs.

  1. A Component-Oriented Programming for Embedded Mobile Robot Software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayang N. A. Jawawi

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Applying software reuse to many Embedded Real-Time (ERT systems poses significant challenges to industrial software processes due to the resource-constrained and real-time requirements of the systems. Autonomous Mobile Robot (AMR system is a class of ERT systems, hence, inherits the challenge of applying software reuse in general ERT systems. Furthermore, software reuse in AMR systems is challenged by the diversities in terms of robot physical size and shape, environmental interaction and implementation platform. Thus, it is envisioned that component-based software engineering will be the suitable way to promote software reuse in AMR systems with consideration to general requirements to be self-contained, platform-independent and real-time predictable. A framework for component-oriented programming for AMR software development using PECOS component model is proposed in this paper. The main features of this framework are: (1 use graphical representation for components definition and composition; (2 target C language for optimal code generation with resource-constrained micro-controller; and (3 minimal requirement for run-time support. Real-time implementation indicates that, the PECOS component model together with the proposed framework is suitable for resource constrained embedded AMR systems software development.

  2. A Component-Oriented Programming for Embedded Mobile Robot Software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safaai Deris

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Applying software reuse to many Embedded Real-Time (ERT systems poses significant challenges to industrial software processes due to the resource-constrained and real-time requirements of the systems. Autonomous Mobile Robot (AMR system is a class of ERT systems, hence, inherits the challenge of applying software reuse in general ERT systems. Furthermore, software reuse in AMR systems is challenged by the diversities in terms of robot physical size and shape, environmental interaction and implementation platform. Thus, it is envisioned that component-based software engineering will be the suitable way to promote software reuse in AMR systems with consideration to general requirements to be self-contained, platform-independent and real-time predictable. A framework for component-oriented programming for AMR software development using PECOS component model is proposed in this paper. The main features of this framework are: (1 use graphical representation for components definition and composition; (2 target C language for optimal code generation with resource-constrained micro-controller; and (3 minimal requirement for run-time support. Real-time implementation indicates that, the PECOS component model together with the proposed framework is suitable for resource constrained embedded AMR systems software development.

  3. Dinitrogen emissions as an overlooked key component of the N balance of montane grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zistl-Schlingmann, Marcus; Feng, Jinchao; Kiese, Ralf; Stephan, Ruth; Dannenmann, Michael

    2017-04-01

    . Ammonia losses amounted to only 13-18%, N2O losses to 1-3 % and NO losses to 1% of applied manure-N. In the context of the ecosystem total N budget, our results show that N2 losses are a so far overlooked key component of the N balance in montane grasslands. Understanding controls of N2 loss is therefore an indispensable prerequisite for the development of grassland management strategies targeted to improve N use efficiency.

  4. Demand for programs for key populations in Africa from countries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While several major donors have undertaken efforts to prioritize these groups, it remains unclear which African countries are actively seeking donor support for these programs. For this analysis, we reviewed publicly available proposal and budget documentation from the US PEPFAR for fiscal years 2007 through 2010 and ...

  5. Key Resources for Community College Student Success Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carales, Vincent D.; Garcia, Crystal E.; Mardock-Uman, Naomi

    2016-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of organizations and other entities focused on assisting community college staff, faculty, and administrators in developing and promoting student success outcomes. We provide a listing of relevant web resources related to programming and conclude with a summary of suggested readings.

  6. Key Challenges to Collegiate Music Education Programs in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Patrick M.

    2012-01-01

    Higher education is the linchpin of music education in North America. It is primarily in collegiate institutions that music teachers are educated throughout the life cycles of their careers. This begins with preservice programs, typically at the baccalaureate level, and continues with in-service professional development and graduate degree…

  7. Essential components of a successful doctoral program in nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Ven, Anne L; Shann, Mary H; Sridhar, Srinivas

    2015-01-01

    The Nanomedicine program at Northeastern University provides a unique interdisciplinary graduate education that combines experiential research, didactic learning, networking, and outreach. Students are taught how to apply nanoscience and nanotechnology to problems in medicine, translate basic research to the development of marketable products, negotiate ethical and social issues related to nanomedicine, and develop a strong sense of community involvement within a global perspective. Since 2006, the program has recruited 50 doctoral students from ten traditional science, technology, and engineering disciplines to participate in the 2-year specialization program. Each trainee received mentoring from two or more individuals, including faculty members outside the student's home department and faculty members at other academic institutions, and/or clinicians. Both students and faculty members reported a significant increase in interdisciplinary scholarly activities, including publications, presentations, and funded research proposals, as a direct result of the program. Nearly 90% of students graduating with a specialization in nanomedicine have continued on to careers in the health care sector. Currently, 43% of graduates are performing research or developing products that directly involve nanomedicine. This article identifies some key elements of the Nanomedicine program, describes how they were implemented, and reports on the metrics of success.

  8. Essential components of a successful doctoral program in nanomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Ven, Anne L; Shann, Mary H; Sridhar, Srinivas

    2015-01-01

    The Nanomedicine program at Northeastern University provides a unique interdisciplinary graduate education that combines experiential research, didactic learning, networking, and outreach. Students are taught how to apply nanoscience and nanotechnology to problems in medicine, translate basic research to the development of marketable products, negotiate ethical and social issues related to nanomedicine, and develop a strong sense of community involvement within a global perspective. Since 2006, the program has recruited 50 doctoral students from ten traditional science, technology, and engineering disciplines to participate in the 2-year specialization program. Each trainee received mentoring from two or more individuals, including faculty members outside the student’s home department and faculty members at other academic institutions, and/or clinicians. Both students and faculty members reported a significant increase in interdisciplinary scholarly activities, including publications, presentations, and funded research proposals, as a direct result of the program. Nearly 90% of students graduating with a specialization in nanomedicine have continued on to careers in the health care sector. Currently, 43% of graduates are performing research or developing products that directly involve nanomedicine. This article identifies some key elements of the Nanomedicine program, describes how they were implemented, and reports on the metrics of success. PMID:25565801

  9. Reverse engineering: a key component of systems biology to unravel global abiotic stress cross-talk

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Friedel, Swetlana; Usadel, Björn; von Wirén, Nicolaus; Sreenivasulu, Nese

    2012-01-01

    .... In this review article, we discuss the recent advances of reverse engineering approaches that led to seminal discoveries of key candidate regulatory genes involved in cross-talk of abiotic stress...

  10. Self-tracking and persuasive ecoaching in healthy lifestyle interventions: work-in-progress scoping review of key components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisette van Gemert-Pijnen; Dr. Martijn de Groot; Aniek Lentferink; Dr. Hilbrand Oldenhuis; Dr. Hugo Velthuijsen; Olga Kulyk; Dr. Louis Polstra; Hermie Hermens

    2016-01-01

    The combination of self-tracking and persuasive eCoaching in healthy lifestyle interventions is a promising approach. The objective of this study is to map the key components of existing healthy lifestyle interventions combining self-tracking and persuasive eCoaching using the scoping

  11. Two novel cyclic peptides are key components of the antimicrobial activity of the Greenlandic isolate Pseudomonas sp. In5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hennessy, Rosanna Catherine; Phippen, Christopher; Nielsen, Kristian F.

    suppressive soil, Pseudomonas sp. In5 is therefore a promising potential biocontrol agent with potent activity against plant pathogens. Studies to date have shown nunamycin and nunapeptin as key components underpinning this antimicrobial activity. Current research is focussed on unravelling the regulation...

  12. Key components of external facilitation in an acute stroke quality improvement collaborative in the Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidassie, Balmatee; Williams, Linda S; Woodward-Hagg, Heather; Matthias, Marianne S; Damush, Teresa M

    2015-05-14

    Facilitation is a key component for successful implementation in several implementation frameworks; however, there is a paucity of research specifying this component. As part of a stroke quality improvement intervention in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), facilitation plus data feedback was compared to data feedback alone in 11 VA medical facilities. The objective of this study was to elucidate upon the facilitation components of the stroke quality improvement. We conducted a secondary evaluation of external facilitation using semi-structured interviews. Five facilitators and two program directors were interviewed. Qualitative analysis was performed on transcribed interviews to gain an understanding of the role and activities of external facilitators during the on-site and telephone facilitation. Quantitative frequencies were calculated from the self-reported time spent in facilitation tasks by facilitators. The external facilitators saw their role as empowering the clinical teams to take ownership of the process changes at the clinical sites to improve their performance quality. To fulfill this role, they reported engaging in a number of core tasks during telephone and on-site visits including: assessing the context in which the teams were currently operating, guiding the clinical teams through their planned changes and use of process improvement tools, identifying resources and making referrals, holding teams accountable for plan implementation with on-site visits, and providing support and encouragement to the teams. Time spent in facilitation activities changed across time from guiding change (early) to supporting efforts made by the clinical teams (later). Facilitation activity transitioned to more monitoring, problem solving, and intentional work to hand over the clinical improvement process to the site teams with the coach's role being increasingly that of a more distant consultant. Overall, this study demonstrated that external facilitation is not

  13. Identifying key components for an effective case report poster: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Lisa L; Paranjape, Anuradha; Estrada, Carlos

    2009-03-01

    Residents demonstrate scholarly activity by presenting posters at academic meetings. Although recommendations from national organizations are available, evidence identifying which components are most important is not. To develop and test an evaluation tool to measure the quality of case report posters and identify the specific components most in need of improvement. Faculty evaluators reviewed case report posters and provided on-site feedback to presenters at poster sessions of four annual academic general internal medicine meetings. A newly developed ten-item evaluation form measured poster quality for specific components of content, discussion, and format (5-point Likert scale, 1 = lowest, 5 = highest). Evaluation tool performance, including Cronbach alpha and inter-rater reliability, overall poster scores, differences across meetings and evaluators and specific components of the posters most in need of improvement. Forty-five evaluators from 20 medical institutions reviewed 347 posters. Cronbach's alpha of the evaluation form was 0.84 and inter-rater reliability, Spearman's rho 0.49 (p vs, 4.0, P < 0.001). We found no difference in faculty scores. The following areas were identified as most needing improvement: clearly state learning objectives, tie conclusions to learning objectives, and use appropriate amount of words. Our evaluation tool provides empirical data to guide trainees as they prepare posters for presentation which may improve poster quality and enhance their scholarly productivity.

  14. NASA/General Electric Engine Component Improvement Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, A. J.; Lennard, D. J.; Ziemianski, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    The Engine Component Improvement (ECI) Program has been initiated in connection with projects designed to reduce the impact of the world-wide energy crisis in the area of aviation. The two parts of the ECI program have the overall objective to identify and quantify the sources and causes of CF6 engine performance deterioration, and to reduce the fuel consumption of CF6 engines through the development and the incorporation of various performance improvement concepts. The CF6 high-bypass turbofan engine was selected as a basis for this effort, since it is expected to be a significant fuel user in commercial revenue service for the next 15 to 20 years. The first part of the ECI program represents the initial step in an effort to achieve a goal of five percent reduction in fuel usage for CF6 engines in the 1979-82 time period. The first performance improvement concept selected is an improved efficiency fan blade. Other improvements are related to a short core exhaust system and an improved high pressure turbine.

  15. Design and Fabrication Technique of the Key Components for Very High Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Jin; Song, Ki Nam; Kim, Yong Wan

    2006-12-15

    The gas outlet temperature of Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) may be beyond the capability of conventional metallic materials. The requirement of the gas outlet temperature of 950 .deg. C will result in operating temperatures for metallic core components that will approach very high temperature on some cases. The materials that are capable of withstanding this temperature should be prepared, or nonmetallic materials will be required for limited components. The Ni-base alloys such as Alloy 617, Hastelloy X, XR, Incoloy 800H, and Haynes 230 are being investigated to apply them on components operated in high temperature. Currently available national and international codes and procedures are needed reviewed to design the components for HTGR/VHTR. Seven codes and procedures, including five ASME Codes and Code cases, one French code (RCC-MR), and on British Procedure (R5) were reviewed. The scope of the code and code cases needs to be expanded to include the materials with allowable temperatures of 950 .deg. C and higher. The selection of compact heat exchangers technology depends on the operating conditions such as pressure, flow rates, temperature, but also on other parameters such as fouling, corrosion, compactness, weight, maintenance and reliability. Welding, brazing, and diffusion bonding are considered proper joining processes for the heat exchanger operating in the high temperature and high pressure conditions without leakage. Because VHTRs require high temperature operations, various controlled materials, thick vessels, dissimilar metal joints, and precise controls of microstructure in weldment, the more advanced joining processes are needed than PWRs. The improved solid joining techniques are considered for the IHX fabrication. The weldability for Alloy 617 and Haynes 230 using GTAW and SMAW processes was investigated by CEA.

  16. Peroxynitrous acid induces structural and functional modifications to basement membranes and its key component, laminin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Degendorfer, Georg; Chuang, Christine Y.; Hammer, Astrid

    2015-01-01

    Basement membranes (BM) are specialized extracellular matrices underlying endothelial cells in the artery wall. Laminin, the most abundant BM glycoprotein, is a structural and biologically active component. Peroxynitrous acid (ONOOH), a potent oxidizing and nitrating agent, is formed in vivo...... and functional changes. These modifications, and resulting compromised cell-matrix interactions, may contribute to endothelial cell dysfunction, a weakening of the structure of atherosclerotic lesions, and an increased propensity to rupture....

  17. Oleic acid is a key cytotoxic component of HAMLET-like complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permyakov, Sergei E; Knyazeva, Ekaterina L; Khasanova, Leysan M; Fadeev, Roman S; Zhadan, Andrei P; Roche-Hakansson, Hazeline; Håkansson, Anders P; Akatov, Vladimir S; Permyakov, Eugene A

    2012-01-01

    HAMLET is a complex of α-lactalbumin (α-LA) with oleic acid (OA) that selectively kills tumor cells and Streptococcus pneumoniae. To assess the contribution of the proteinaceous component to cytotoxicity of HAMLET, OA complexes with proteins structurally and functionally distinct from α-LA were prepared. Similar to HAMLET, the OA complexes with bovine β-lactoglobulin (bLG) and pike parvalbumin (pPA) (bLG-OA-45 and pPA-OA-45, respectively) induced S. pneumoniae D39 cell death. The activation mechanisms of S. pneumoniae death for these complexes were analogous to those for HAMLET, and the cytotoxicity of the complexes increased with OA content in the preparations. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration for HEp-2 cells linearly decreased with rise in OA content in the preparations, and OA concentration in the preparations causing HEp-2 cell death was close to the cytotoxicity of OA alone. Hence, the cytotoxic action of these complexes against HEp-2 cells is induced mostly by OA. Thermal stabilization of bLG upon association with OA implies that cytotoxicity of bLG-OA-45 complex cannot be ascribed to molten globule-like conformation of the protein component. Overall, the proteinaceous component of HAMLET-like complexes studied is not a prerequisite for their activity; the cytotoxicity of these complexes is mostly due to the action of OA.

  18. The nuclear data, A key component for reactor studies, Overview of AREVA NP needs and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Ravaux Simon; Demy Pierre-Marie; Rechatin Clément

    2016-01-01

    The quality of the nuclear data is essential for AREVA NP. Indeed, many AREVA NP activities such as reactor design, safety studies or reactor instrumentation use them as input data. So, the nuclear data can be considered as a key element for AREVA NP. REVA NP’s contribution in the improvement of the nuclear data consists in a joint effort with the CEA. It means a financing and a sharing of information which can give an orientation to the future research axis. The aim of this article is to pre...

  19. Protostars in Orion: New results from the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey Key Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Babar; Fischer, W.; Megeath, T.; Tobin, J.; Poteet, C.; Hartmann, L.; Watson, D.; Manoj, P.; Allen, L.; Stutz, A.; Krause, O.; Henning, T.; Stanke, T.; Bergin, E.; Calvet, N.; Maret, S.; Furlan, E.; Neufeld, D.; Osorio, M.; Wilson, T.

    2011-01-01

    We present new far-IR photometry results on 131 proto-stars from the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS). HOPS is a 200-hour Herschel key program that will systematically survey 286 protostars encompassing a wide range of source luminosities, evolutionary phases, and environments in a single molecular cloud in the 60-210 micron window where we will sample the peak of the thermal emission from the protostellar envelope. We will focus on PACS imaging at 70 and 160 um taken as part of the imaging component of the HOPS program. From these data we extract 70 and 160 um photometry which are then combined with existing ground-based and HST near-IR imaging, IRAC and MIPS 3-24 um photometry and IRS 5-35 um spectra to create 1.6-160 um SEDs. These SEDS are integrated to find the bolometric luminosities and compared to the results of radiative transfer models (Whitney et al. 2003, ApJ, 591, 1049) to constrain the envelope morphologies, envelope densities, and infall rates. Our initial results (Fischer et al. 2010, A&A, 518, L122) on only protostars 4 stars showed a range of evolutionary states for the protostars. In this contribution, we extend our sample to 131 protostars -- the first large survey of its kind in the far-IR. We will examine the distribution of luminosities and SED properties as a function of environment. We will also present preliminary fits to radiative transfer models of the protostars.

  20. Reverse Engineering: A Key Component of Systems Biology to Unravel Global Abiotic Stress Cross-Talk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedel, Swetlana; Usadel, Björn; von Wirén, Nicolaus; Sreenivasulu, Nese

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the global abiotic stress response is an important stepping stone for the development of universal stress tolerance in plants in the era of climate change. Although co-occurrence of several stress factors (abiotic and biotic) in nature is found to be frequent, current attempts are poor to understand the complex physiological processes impacting plant growth under combinatory factors. In this review article, we discuss the recent advances of reverse engineering approaches that led to seminal discoveries of key candidate regulatory genes involved in cross-talk of abiotic stress responses and summarized the available tools of reverse engineering and its relevant application. Among the universally induced regulators involved in various abiotic stress responses, we highlight the importance of (i) abscisic acid (ABA) and jasmonic acid (JA) hormonal cross-talks and (ii) the central role of WRKY transcription factors (TF), potentially mediating both abiotic and biotic stress responses. Such interactome networks help not only to derive hypotheses but also play a vital role in identifying key regulatory targets and interconnected hormonal responses. To explore the full potential of gene network inference in the area of abiotic stress tolerance, we need to validate hypotheses by implementing time-dependent gene expression data from genetically engineered plants with modulated expression of target genes. We further propose to combine information on gene-by-gene interactions with data from physical interaction platforms such as protein–protein or TF-gene networks. PMID:23293646

  1. Reverse engineering: A key component of systems biology to unravel global abiotic stress cross-talk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swetlana eFriedel

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the global abiotic stress response is an important stepping stone for the development of universal stress tolerance in plants in the era of climate change. Although co-occurrence of several stress factors (abiotic and biotic in nature is found to be frequent, current attempts are poor to understand the complex physiological processes impacting plant growth under combinatory factors. In this review article, we discuss the recent advances of reverse engineering approaches that led to seminal discoveries of key candidate regulatory genes involved in cross-talk of abiotic stress responses and summarised the available tools of reverse-engineering and its relevant application. Among the universally induced regulators involved in various abiotic stress responses, we highlight the importance of (i abscisic acid (ABA and jasmonic acid (JA hormonal cross-talks and (ii the central role of WRKY transcription factors, potentially mediating both abiotic and biotic stress responses. Such interactome networks help not only to derive hypotheses but also play a vital role in identifying key regulatory targets and interconnected hormonal responses. To explore the full potential of gene network inference in the area of abiotic stress tolerance, we need to validate hypotheses by implementing time-dependent gene expression data from genetically engineered plants with modulated expression of target genes. We further propose to combine information on gene-by-gene interactions with data from physical interaction platforms such as protein-protein or transcription factor (TF-gene networks.

  2. Advanced diesel engine component development program, tasks 4-14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushal, Tony S.; Weber, Karen E.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes the Advanced Diesel Engine Component Development (ADECD) Program to develop and demonstrate critical technology needed to advance the heavy-duty low heat rejection engine concept. Major development activities reported are the design, analysis, and fabrication of monolithic ceramic components; vapor phase and solid film lubrication; electrohydraulic valve actuation; and high pressure common rail injection. An advanced single cylinder test bed was fabricated as a laboratory tool in studying these advanced technologies. This test bed simulates the reciprocator for a system having no cooling system, turbo compounding, Rankine bottoming cycle, common rail injection, and variable valve actuation to achieve fuel consumption of 160 g/kW-hr (.26 lb/hp-hr). The advanced concepts were successfully integrated into the test engine. All ceramic components met their functional and reliability requirements. The firedeck, cast-in-place ports, valves, valve guides, piston cap, and piston ring were made from silicon nitride. Breakthroughs required to implement a 'ceramic' engine included the fabrication of air-gap cylinder heads, elimination of compression gaskets, machining of ceramic valve seats within the ceramic firedeck, fabrication of cast-in-place ceramic port liners, implementation of vapor phase lubrication, and elimination of the engine coolant system. Silicon nitride valves were successfully developed to meet several production abuse test requirements and incorporated into the test bed with a ceramic valve guide and solid film lubrication. The ADECD cylinder head features ceramic port shields to increase insulation and exhaust energy recovery. The combustion chamber includes a ceramic firedeck and piston cap. The tribological challenge posed by top ring reversal temperatures of 550 C was met through the development of vapor phase lubrication using tricresyl phosphate at the ring-liner interface. A solenoid-controlled, variable valve actuation system

  3. The nuclear data, A key component for reactor studies, Overview of AREVA NP needs and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravaux Simon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The quality of the nuclear data is essential for AREVA NP. Indeed, many AREVA NP activities such as reactor design, safety studies or reactor instrumentation use them as input data. So, the nuclear data can be considered as a key element for AREVA NP. REVA NP’s contribution in the improvement of the nuclear data consists in a joint effort with the CEA. It means a financing and a sharing of information which can give an orientation to the future research axis. The aim of this article is to present the industrial point of view from AREVA NP on the research on nuclear data. Several examples of collaborations with the CEA which have resulted in an improvement of the nuclear data are presented.

  4. The nuclear data, A key component for reactor studies, Overview of AREVA NP needs and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravaux, Simon; Demy, Pierre-Marie; Rechatin, Clément

    2016-03-01

    The quality of the nuclear data is essential for AREVA NP. Indeed, many AREVA NP activities such as reactor design, safety studies or reactor instrumentation use them as input data. So, the nuclear data can be considered as a key element for AREVA NP. REVA NP's contribution in the improvement of the nuclear data consists in a joint effort with the CEA. It means a financing and a sharing of information which can give an orientation to the future research axis. The aim of this article is to present the industrial point of view from AREVA NP on the research on nuclear data. Several examples of collaborations with the CEA which have resulted in an improvement of the nuclear data are presented.

  5. Key components of effective collaborative goal setting in the chronic care encounter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigi, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Collaborative goal setting in patient-provider communication with chronic patients is the phase in which--after collecting the data regarding the patient's health--it is necessary to make a decision regarding the best therapy and behaviors the patient should adopt until the next encounter. Although it is considered a pivotal phase of shared decision making, there remain a few open questions regarding its components and its efficacy: What are the factors that improve or impede agreement on treatment goals and strategies?; What are the 'success conditions' of collaborative goal setting?; How can physicians effectively help patients make their preferences explicit and then co-construct with them informed preferences to help them reach their therapeutic goals? Using the theoretical framework of dialogue types, an approach developed in the field of Argumentation Theory, it will be possible to formulate hypotheses on the success conditions' and effects on patient commitment of collaborative goal setting.

  6. Periostin Is a Key Niche Component for Wound Metastasis of Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Keitaro; Sugihara, Eiji; Ohta, Shoichiro; Izuhara, Kenji; Funakoshi, Takeru; Amagai, Masayuki; Saya, Hideyuki

    2015-01-01

    Tissue injury promotes metastasis of several human cancers, although factors associated with wound healing that attract circulating tumor cells have remained unknown. Here, we examined the primary and metastatic lesions that appeared 1 month after trauma in a patient with acral lentiginous melanoma. The levels of mRNA for periostin (POSTN), type 1 collagen, and fibronectin were significantly increased in the metastatic lesion relative to the primary lesion. The increase of these extracellular matrix proteins at the wound site was reproduced in a mouse model of wound healing, with the upregulation of Postn mRNA persisting the longest. POSTN was expressed in the region surrounding melanoma cell nests in metastatic lesions of both wounded mice and the patient. POSTN attenuated the cell adhesion and promoted the migration of melanoma cells without affecting their proliferation in vitro. In the mouse model, the wound site as well as subcutaneously injected osteoblasts that secrete large amounts of POSTN invited the metastasis of remotely-transplanted melanoma cells on the sites. Osteoblasts with suppression of POSTN by shRNA showed a greatly reduced ability to promote such metastasis. Our results suggest that POSTN is a key factor in promoting melanoma cell metastasis to wound sites by providing a premetastatic niche.

  7. Periostin Is a Key Niche Component for Wound Metastasis of Melanoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keitaro Fukuda

    Full Text Available Tissue injury promotes metastasis of several human cancers, although factors associated with wound healing that attract circulating tumor cells have remained unknown. Here, we examined the primary and metastatic lesions that appeared 1 month after trauma in a patient with acral lentiginous melanoma. The levels of mRNA for periostin (POSTN, type 1 collagen, and fibronectin were significantly increased in the metastatic lesion relative to the primary lesion. The increase of these extracellular matrix proteins at the wound site was reproduced in a mouse model of wound healing, with the upregulation of Postn mRNA persisting the longest. POSTN was expressed in the region surrounding melanoma cell nests in metastatic lesions of both wounded mice and the patient. POSTN attenuated the cell adhesion and promoted the migration of melanoma cells without affecting their proliferation in vitro. In the mouse model, the wound site as well as subcutaneously injected osteoblasts that secrete large amounts of POSTN invited the metastasis of remotely-transplanted melanoma cells on the sites. Osteoblasts with suppression of POSTN by shRNA showed a greatly reduced ability to promote such metastasis. Our results suggest that POSTN is a key factor in promoting melanoma cell metastasis to wound sites by providing a premetastatic niche.

  8. Recruitment and Selection of Staff - Key Components for the Reform of the Romanian Police

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria-Liliana-Amelia Purda-Nicoară (Netotea-Suciu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Human resource management is a complex and dynamic process, whose components interrelate and reinforce one another, constantly evolving due to internal influences or because of external pressures. This is a cyclical process, and its "beginning" is represented by the recruitment and selection of staff. In the present context, when the labor market has changed so dramatically, and the demands of the employers are also ever more complex, these activities prove to be essential for the further development and success of any organization. This happens because recruitment and selection of the most suitable people result in obtaining employees who possess multiple skills and qualifications, and who are able to readily obtain high performance, an enhancement of their motivations, building a strong and lasting team, and thus ensure excellent results for the company and the ability to adapt to the present day continuous changes. Therefore, professionally addressing the Romanian Police staff recruitment and selection is absolutely necessary. If the recruitment activities will point out the most suitable people, with potential for development in the organization, a quality selection activity may be the guarantee of identifying the candidates who have the knowledge, skills and abilities needed to transform the potential capabilities into professionalism. Only organizations that will know how to build multidisciplinary, competent and motivated teams will be ready to face new challenges.

  9. Peroxynitrous acid induces structural and functional modifications to basement membranes and its key component, laminin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degendorfer, Georg; Chuang, Christine Y; Hammer, Astrid; Malle, Ernst; Davies, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Basement membranes (BM) are specialized extracellular matrices underlying endothelial cells in the artery wall. Laminin, the most abundant BM glycoprotein, is a structural and biologically active component. Peroxynitrous acid (ONOOH), a potent oxidizing and nitrating agent, is formed in vivo at sites of inflammation from superoxide and nitric oxide radicals. Considerable data supports ONOOH formation in human atherosclerotic lesions, and an involvement of this oxidant in atherosclerosis development and lesion rupture. These effects may be mediated, at least in part, via extracellular matrix damage. In this study we demonstrate co-localization of 3-nitrotyrosine (a product of tyrosine damage by ONOOH) and laminin in human atherosclerotic lesions. ONOOH-induced damage to BM was characterized for isolated murine BM, and purified murine laminin-111. Exposure of laminin-111 to ONOOH resulted in dose-dependent loss of protein tyrosine and tryptophan residues, and formation of 3-nitrotyrosine, 6-nitrotryptophan and the cross-linked material di-tyrosine, as detected by amino acid analysis and Western blotting. These changes were accompanied by protein aggregation and fragmentation as detected by SDS-PAGE. Endothelial cell adhesion to isolated laminin-111 exposed to 10 μM or higher levels of ONOOH was significantly decreased (~25%) compared to untreated controls. These data indicate that laminin is oxidized by equimolar or greater concentrations of ONOOH, with this resulting in structural and functional changes. These modifications, and resulting compromised cell-matrix interactions, may contribute to endothelial cell dysfunction, a weakening of the structure of atherosclerotic lesions, and an increased propensity to rupture. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Key Resources for Creating Online Nutrition Education for Those Participating in Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stosich, Marie C.; LeBlanc, Heidi; Kudin, Janette S.; Christofferson, Debra

    2016-01-01

    Internet-based nutrition education is becoming an important tool in serving the rural, low-income community, yet the task of creating such programming can be daunting. The authors describe the key resources used in developing an Internet-based nutrition education program for those participating in Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program…

  11. International Experience with Key Program Elements of IndustrialEnergy Efficiency or Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Target-SettingPrograms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Kramer, Klaas Jan

    2008-02-02

    Target-setting agreements, also known as voluntary ornegotiated agreements, have been used by a number of governments as amechanism for promoting energy efficiency within the industrial sector. Arecent survey of such target-setting agreement programs identified 23energy efficiency or GHG emissions reduction voluntary agreement programsin 18 countries. International best practice related to target-settingagreement programs calls for establishment of a coordinated set ofpolicies that provide strong economic incentives as well as technical andfinancial support to participating industries. The key program elementsof a target-setting program are the target-setting process,identification of energy-saving technologies and measures usingenergy-energy efficiency guidebooks and benchmarking as well as byconducting energy-efficiency audits, development of an energy-savingsaction plan, development and implementation of energy managementprotocols, development of incentives and supporting policies, monitoringprogress toward targets, and program evaluation. This report firstprovides a description of three key target-setting agreement programs andthen describes international experience with the key program elementsthat comprise such programs using information from the three keytarget-setting programs as well as from other international programsrelated to industrial energy efficiency or GHG emissionsreductions.

  12. Direct transcriptional activation of BT genes by NLP transcription factors is a key component of the nitrate response in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takeo; Maekawa, Shugo; Konishi, Mineko; Yoshioka, Nozomi; Sasaki, Yuki; Maeda, Haruna; Ishida, Tetsuya; Kato, Yuki; Yamaguchi, Junji; Yanagisawa, Shuichi

    2017-01-29

    Nitrate modulates growth and development, functioning as a nutrient signal in plants. Although many changes in physiological processes in response to nitrate have been well characterized as nitrate responses, the molecular mechanisms underlying the nitrate response are not yet fully understood. Here, we show that NLP transcription factors, which are key regulators of the nitrate response, directly activate the nitrate-inducible expression of BT1 and BT2 encoding putative scaffold proteins with a plant-specific domain structure in Arabidopsis. Interestingly, the 35S promoter-driven expression of BT2 partially rescued growth inhibition caused by reductions in NLP activity in Arabidopsis. Furthermore, simultaneous disruption of BT1 and BT2 affected nitrate-dependent lateral root development. These results suggest that direct activation of BT1 and BT2 by NLP transcriptional activators is a key component of the molecular mechanism underlying the nitrate response in Arabidopsis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Prediction of Key Cytoskeleton Components Involved in Glomerular Diseases Based on a Protein-Protein Interaction Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Fangrui; Tan, Aidi; Ju, Wenjun; Li, Xuejuan; Li, Shao; Ding, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of the physiological morphologies of different types of cells and tissues is essential for the normal functioning of each system in the human body. Dynamic variations in cell and tissue morphologies depend on accurate adjustments of the cytoskeletal system. The cytoskeletal system in the glomerulus plays a key role in the normal process of kidney filtration. To enhance the understanding of the possible roles of the cytoskeleton in glomerular diseases, we constructed the Glomerular Cytoskeleton Network (GCNet), which shows the protein-protein interaction network in the glomerulus, and identified several possible key cytoskeletal components involved in glomerular diseases. In this study, genes/proteins annotated to the cytoskeleton were detected by Gene Ontology analysis, and glomerulus-enriched genes were selected from nine available glomerular expression datasets. Then, the GCNet was generated by combining these two sets of information. To predict the possible key cytoskeleton components in glomerular diseases, we then examined the common regulation of the genes in GCNet in the context of five glomerular diseases based on their transcriptomic data. As a result, twenty-one cytoskeleton components as potential candidate were highlighted for consistently down- or up-regulating in all five glomerular diseases. And then, these candidates were examined in relation to existing known glomerular diseases and genes to determine their possible functions and interactions. In addition, the mRNA levels of these candidates were also validated in a puromycin aminonucleoside(PAN) induced rat nephropathy model and were also matched with existing Diabetic Nephropathy (DN) transcriptomic data. As a result, there are 15 of 21 candidates in PAN induced nephropathy model were consistent with our predication and also 12 of 21 candidates were matched with differentially expressed genes in the DN transcriptomic data. By providing a novel interaction network and prediction, GCNet

  14. Identification of key ancestors of modern germplasm in a breeding program of maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technow, F; Schrag, T A; Schipprack, W; Melchinger, A E

    2014-12-01

    Probabilities of gene origin computed from the genomic kinships matrix can accurately identify key ancestors of modern germplasms Identifying the key ancestors of modern plant breeding populations can provide valuable insights into the history of a breeding program and provide reference genomes for next generation whole genome sequencing. In an animal breeding context, a method was developed that employs probabilities of gene origin, computed from the pedigree-based additive kinship matrix, for identifying key ancestors. Because reliable and complete pedigree information is often not available in plant breeding, we replaced the additive kinship matrix with the genomic kinship matrix. As a proof-of-concept, we applied this approach to simulated data sets with known ancestries. The relative contribution of the ancestral lines to later generations could be determined with high accuracy, with and without selection. Our method was subsequently used for identifying the key ancestors of the modern Dent germplasm of the public maize breeding program of the University of Hohenheim. We found that the modern germplasm can be traced back to six or seven key ancestors, with one or two of them having a disproportionately large contribution. These results largely corroborated conjectures based on early records of the breeding program. We conclude that probabilities of gene origin computed from the genomic kinships matrix can be used for identifying key ancestors in breeding programs and estimating the proportion of genes contributed by them.

  15. Impact of a community-based diabetes self-management program on key metabolic parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson C

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Characterize the impact of a pharmacist-led diabetes self-management program on three key metabolic parameters: glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP among employee health program participants. Methods: A self-insured company in the Kansas City metropolitan area began offering a pharmacist-led diabetes self-management program to eligible company employees and their dependents in 2008. A retrospective pre-post analysis was conducted to determine if the program affected key metabolic parameters in participants by determining mean change after one year of participation. Results: Among 183 program participants, 65 participants met inclusion criteria. All three key metabolic parameters were significantly reduced from baseline to one year of program participation: HbA1c decreased from 8.1% to 7.3% (p=0.007; LDL-C decreased from 108.3 mg/dL to 96.4 mg/dL (p=0.009; and MAP decreased from 96.1 to 92.3 mm Hg (p=0.005. Conclusions: The pharmacist-led diabetes self-management program demonstrated significant reductions in HbA1c, LDL-C, and MAP from baseline to one year of program participation. Improvements were statistically significant and clinically relevant for each parameter. Previous studies indicate these reductions may cause reduced overall healthcare costs.

  16. Growing-up just like everyone else: key components of a successful pediatric HIV disclosure intervention in Namibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Laura; Beima-Sofie, Kristin; Hamunime, Ndapewa; Shepard, Mark; Ferris, Larissa; Ingo, Paulina; John-Stewart, Grace; O'Malley, Gabrielle

    2015-06-01

    To facilitate replication and adaptation of pediatric HIV disclosure interventions, we identified key components of a child-friendly cartoon book used to guide Namibian caregivers and healthcare workers (HCWs) through a gradual, structured disclosure process. Qualitative interviews were conducted with caregivers and HCWs from four high-volume pediatric HIV clinics in Namibia. Semi-structured in-depth interviews with 35 HCWs and 64 caregivers of HIV+ children aged 7-15 were analyzed using constant comparative and modified grounded theory analysis. Major barriers to disclosure were compared to accounts of intervention success, and themes related to key components were identified. The disclosure book overcomes barriers to disclosure by reducing caregiver resistance, increasing HIV and disclosure knowledge, and providing a gradual, structured framework for disclosure. The delayed mention of HIV-specific terminology overcomes caregiver fears associated with HIV stigma, thus encouraging earlier uptake of disclosure initiation. Caregivers value the book's focus on staying healthy, keeping the body strong, and having a future 'like other kids', thus capitalizing on evidence of the positive benefits of resilience and hopefulness rather than the negative consequences of HIV. The book's concepts and images resonate with children who readily adopt the language of 'body soldiers' and 'bad guys' in describing how important it is for them to take their medicine. Discussion cues ease communication between HCWs, caregivers, and pediatric patients. Given the urgent need for available pediatric HIV disclosure interventions, easily implementable tools like the Namibian disclosure book should be evaluated for utility in similar settings.

  17. Recent Progress on the Key Materials and Components for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells in Vehicle Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Wang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Fuel cells are the most clean and efficient power source for vehicles. In particular, proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs are the most promising candidate for automobile applications due to their rapid start-up and low-temperature operation. Through extensive global research efforts in the latest decade, the performance of PEMFCs, including energy efficiency, volumetric and mass power density, and low temperature startup ability, have achieved significant breakthroughs. In 2014, fuel cell powered vehicles were introduced into the market by several prominent vehicle companies. However, the low durability and high cost of PEMFC systems are still the main obstacles for large-scale industrialization of this technology. The key materials and components used in PEMFCs greatly affect their durability and cost. In this review, the technical progress of key materials and components for PEMFCs has been summarized and critically discussed, including topics such as the membrane, catalyst layer, gas diffusion layer, and bipolar plate. The development of high-durability processing technologies is also introduced. Finally, this review is concluded with personal perspectives on the future research directions of this area.

  18. Recommendations for strengthening the infrared technology component of any condition monitoring program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Jack R., Jr.; Young, R. K.

    1999-03-01

    place the condition monitoring program in perspective); (11) Use of procedures for Predictive, Condition Monitoring and maintenance in general (To get consistent results); (12) Developing a scheme for predictive, condition monitoring personnel qualification and certification (To provide a career path and incentive to advance skill level and value to the company); (13) Analyst Assignment to Technologies and Related Duties (To make intelligent use of the skills of individuals assigned); (14) Condition Monitoring Analyst Selection Criteria (Key attributes for success are mentioned.); (15) Design and Modification to Support Monitoring (For old and new machinery to facilitate data acquisition); (16) Establishment of a Museum of Components and Samples Pulled from Service for Cause (For orientation and awareness training of operators and managers and exchange of information between analysts); (17) Goals (To promote a proactive program approach for machinery condition improvement).

  19. Overexpressing key component genes of the secretion pathway for enhanced secretion of an Aspergillus niger glucose oxidase in Trichoderma reesei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yilan; Sun, Xianhua; Xue, Xianli; Luo, Huiying; Yao, Bin; Xie, Xiangming; Su, Xiaoyun

    2017-11-01

    Vast interest exists in developing T. reesei for production of heterologous proteins. Although rich genomic and transcriptomic information has been uncovered for the T. reesei secretion pathway, little is known about whether engineering its key components could enhance expression of a heterologous gene. In this study, snc1, a v-SNARE gene, was first selected for overexpression in T. reesei. In engineered T. reesei with additional copies of snc1, the Aspergillus niger glucose oxidase (AnGOD) was produced to a significantly higher level (2.2-fold of the parental strain). hac1 and bip1, two more component genes in the secretion pathway, were further tested for overexpression and found to be also beneficial for AnGOD secretion. The overexpression of one component gene more or less affected the expression of the other two genes, suggesting a complex regulating mechanism. Our study demonstrates the potential of engineering the secretion pathway for enhancing heterologous gene production in T. reesei. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Canada's National Core Library Statistics Program: First Steps in Developing Key Performance Indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Alvin M.

    Canada's National Core Library Statistics Program is designed to capture several key indicators of the broad impact on Canadian society of library services provided by the public, academic, and special library sectors. These impacts can be broadly organized into cultural and economic. Current indicators of cultural impact are question answering…

  1. Golden Key Program. Common Education for Visually Impaired Children in Western China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bailun

    This paper describes a new program in the Western provinces of China (Guangxi, Guizhou, Yunnan, Gansu, Ningxia, Qinghai, Xinjiang, Tibet, and Inner Mongolia) that is designed to integrate 20,000 children with low-vision into general education classrooms. The Golden Key Research Center of Education for Visually Impaired has been working with the…

  2. Conflict Resolution Education: A Component of Peer Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorga, Mary G.; Oliver, Marvarene

    2006-01-01

    Conflict resolution programs are one part of peer programs offered in schools to enhance the development of life skills of students. This article addresses the need for and role of conflict resolution education in the schools. It then describes several approaches to conflict resolution education. A review of outcome research concerning conflict…

  3. The humoral pattern recognition molecule PTX3 is a key component of innate immunity against urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaillon, Sébastien; Moalli, Federica; Ragnarsdottir, Bryndis; Bonavita, Eduardo; Puthia, Manoj; Riva, Federica; Barbati, Elisa; Nebuloni, Manuela; Cvetko Krajinovic, Lidija; Markotic, Alemka; Valentino, Sonia; Doni, Andrea; Tartari, Silvia; Graziani, Giorgio; Montanelli, Alessandro; Delneste, Yves; Svanborg, Catharina; Garlanda, Cecilia; Mantovani, Alberto

    2014-04-17

    Immunity in the urinary tract has distinct and poorly understood pathophysiological characteristics and urinary tract infections (UTIs) are important causes of morbidity and mortality. We investigated the role of the soluble pattern recognition molecule pentraxin 3 (PTX3), a key component of the humoral arm of innate immunity, in UTIs. PTX3-deficient mice showed defective control of UTIs and exacerbated inflammation. Expression of PTX3 was induced in uroepithelial cells by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) in a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)- and MyD88-dependent manner. PTX3 enhanced UPEC phagocytosis and phagosome maturation by neutrophils. PTX3 was detected in urine of UTI patients and amounts correlated with disease severity. In cohorts of UTI-prone patients, PTX3 gene polymorphisms correlated with susceptibility to acute pyelonephritis and cystitis. These results suggest that PTX3 is an essential component of innate resistance against UTIs. Thus, the cellular and humoral arms of innate immunity exert complementary functions in mediating resistance against UTIs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluating the role of key learning theories in ECHO: a telehealth educational program for primary care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socolovsky, Carmela; Masi, Christopher; Hamlish, Tamara; Aduana, Glen; Arora, Sanjeev; Bakris, George; Johnson, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    ECHO (Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes) is a telehealth educational program that uses videoconference technology to train community-based primary care providers (PCP's) on the management of complex, chronic diseases. The main components of ECHO are didactics, case presentations, and case-based learning. ECHO was developed using the key principles of Social Cognitive Theory, Situated Learning Theory, and Community of Practice Theory. In a prior study, we implemented an ECHO curriculum to improve management of resistant hypertension. The goals of the current study were to determine the extent to which the learning theories served as the foundation of the ECHO curriculum and identify opportunities to more effectively incorporate key principles of these theories into the ECHO program. We conducted semi-structured interviews with the nine clinicians who participated in the pilot curriculum. A community-based PCP assisted with question development, analysis, and manuscript preparation. We analyzed the interview transcripts using Directed Content Analysis. Transcript analysis supported the contention that ECHO is based upon Social Cognitive Theory, Situated Learning Theory, and Community of Practice Theory. Comments from study participants highlighted benefits of each theory's principles. Conversely, they also suggested we could improve our implementation of ECHO by adhering more closely to specific learning theory strategies. Our results indicate that ECHO indeed reflects the key tenants of Social Cognitive Theory, Situated Learning Theory, and Community of Practice Theory. Several aspects of our ECHO curriculum can be improved by more complete application of these learning theories.

  5. Adolescent women as a key target population for community nutrition education programs in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Amy; Februhartanty, Judhiastuty; Worsley, Anthony

    2017-05-01

    Adolescence is a critical life-stage that sets the foundation for health in adulthood. Adolescent women are a unique population and should be targeted as such for nutrition promotion activities. Using Indonesia as a case study, this qualitative study aimed to identify existing nutrition promotion programs aimed at adolescent girls, how best to target this population and effective recommendations to inform nutrition education program design for this important group. Semi-structured interviews and questionnaires were conducted with ten key informants working in public health in Indonesia. Interview transcripts were analysed and coded to identify key themes. No existing nutrition education programs targeting adolescent women in Indonesia were identified. Several strategies apply to nutrition programs for adolescent girls: 1) nutrition promotion messages that are relevant to the lifestyles and interests of adolescent women; 2) technology-based interventions show promise, however, they need to be appropriately targeted to sub-groups; 3) school remains an important setting; and 4) early marriage is an important issue affecting nutritional status and engagement of adolescent girls. The informants recommended that: 1) more research is needed about the underlying motivations for behaviour change among adolescent women and ways to effectively implement the identified engagement strategies; 2) adolescent girls should be included in program design to improve its suitability and uptake; and 3) government budget and policy support is crucial to success. Adolescent women are an important population group and more research is required to identify the optimal forms of engagement to improve nutrition programs for them.

  6. Component Composability Issues in Object-Oriented Programming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aksit, Mehmet; Tekinerdogan, B.

    1997-01-01

    Building software from reusable components is considered important in reducing development costs. Object-oriented languages such as C++, Smalltalk and Java, however, are not capable of expressing certain aspects of applications in a composable way. Software engineers may experience difficulties in

  7. Component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibor Tot

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A unique case of metaplastic breast carcinoma with an epithelial component showing tumoral necrosis and neuroectodermal stromal component is described. The tumor grew rapidly and measured 9 cm at the time of diagnosis. No lymph node metastases were present. The disease progressed rapidly and the patient died two years after the diagnosis from a hemorrhage caused by brain metastases. The morphology and phenotype of the tumor are described in detail and the differential diagnostic options are discussed.

  8. Keys to the House: Unlocking Residential Savings With Program Models for Home Energy Upgrades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grevatt, Jim [Energy Futures Group (United States); Hoffman, Ian [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hoffmeyer, Dale [US Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    2017-07-05

    After more than 40 years of effort, energy efficiency program administrators and associated contractors still find it challenging to penetrate the home retrofit market, especially at levels commensurate with state and federal goals for energy savings and emissions reductions. Residential retrofit programs further have not coalesced around a reliably successful model. They still vary in design, implementation and performance, and they remain among the more difficult and costly options for acquiring savings in the residential sector. If programs are to contribute fully to meeting resource and policy objectives, administrators need to understand what program elements are key to acquiring residential savings as cost effectively as possible. To that end, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored a comprehensive review and analysis of home energy upgrade programs with proven track records, focusing on those with robustly verified savings and constituting good examples for replication. The study team reviewed evaluations for the period 2010 to 2014 for 134 programs that are funded by customers of investor-owned utilities. All are programs that promote multi-measure retrofits or major system upgrades. We paid particular attention to useful design and implementation features, costs, and savings for nearly 30 programs with rigorous evaluations of performance. This meta-analysis describes program models and implementation strategies for (1) direct install retrofits; (2) heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) replacement and early retirement; and (3) comprehensive, whole-home retrofits. We analyze costs and impacts of these program models, in terms of both energy savings and emissions avoided. These program models can be useful guides as states consider expanding their strategies for acquiring energy savings as a resource and for emissions reductions. We also discuss the challenges of using evaluations to create program models that can be confidently applied in

  9. Modified Delphi Consensus to Suggest Key Elements of Stepping On Falls Prevention Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Jane E; Clemson, Lindy; Schlotthauer, Amy; Mack, Karin A; Shea, Terry; Gobel, Vicki; Cech, Sandy

    2017-01-01

    Falls among older adults result in substantial morbidity and mortality. Community-based programs have been shown to decrease the rate of falls. In 2007, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention funded a research study to determine how to successfully disseminate the evidence-based fall prevention program (Stepping On) in the community setting. As the first step for this study, a panel of subject matter experts was convened to suggest which parts of the Stepping On fall prevention program were considered key elements, which could not be modified by implementers. Older adult fall prevention experts from the US, Canada, and Australia participated in a modified Delphi technique process to suggest key program elements of Stepping On. Forty-four experts were invited to ensure that the panel of experts would consist of equal numbers of physical therapists, occupational therapists, geriatricians, exercise scientists, and public health researchers. Consensus was determined by percent of agreement among panelists. A Rasch analysis of item fit was conducted to explore the degree of diversity and/or homogeneity of responses across our panelists. The Rasch analysis of the 19 panelists using fit statistics shows there was a reasonable and sufficient range of diverse perspectives (Infit MnSQ 1.01, Z score -0.1, Outfit MnSQ 0.96, Z score -0.2 with a separation of 4.89). Consensus was achieved that these elements were key: 17 of 18 adult learning elements, 11 of 22 programming, 12 of 15 exercise, 7 of 8 upgrading exercises, 2 of 4 peer co-leader's role, and all of the home visits, booster sessions, group leader's role, and background and training of group leader elements. The top five key elements were: (1) use plain language, (2) develop trust, (3) engage people in what is meaningful and contextual for them, (4) train participants for cues in self-monitoring quality of exercises, and (5) group leader learns about exercises and understands how to progress them. The Delphi

  10. Implementation of the Australian HPV vaccination program for adult women: qualitative key informant interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leask, Julie; Jackson, Cath; Trevena, Lyndal; McCaffery, Kirsten; Brotherton, Julia

    2009-09-04

    This study sought to evaluate the early implementation of Australia's national HPV vaccination program for adult women aged 18-26 years. We conducted qualitative in-depth interviews with 24 program managers and primary care providers in key roles of implementation across the country. While participants had generally positive beliefs about the vaccine, some questioned the cost-effectiveness for women aged 18-26 years. A short timeframe for implementing a unique and complex program raised particular challenges including ensuring providers and consumers received timely access to information. Media attention helped and hindered implementation. Existing primary care systems and close coordination between players helped overcome these issues. Although challenging, delivery of HPV vaccination to adult women is achievable and the Australian experience provides useful information for countries commencing HPV vaccination programs in this population.

  11. State of art and key problems of OOP for FE programming in engineering analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Heng; Zhou, Yunyun

    2013-03-01

    Object-oriented programming (OOP) has been the most important development method, especially for huge and complicated program systems, since OOP can overcome structural complexity of code, strong coupling among modules and poor maintenance shortcomings in traditional structural programming. Since B.W.R.Forde applied OOP to Finite Element (FE) firstly in 1990, the research in this field has not been stopped. Scholars have taken many positive and useful attempts on study of OOP in FE programming from different aspects. The state of the art of OOP in FE and current development has been reviewed, and the key problems in the OOP FEM fields thus are pointed out, thus prospects of OOP in FE code design are put forward.

  12. Public Health Preparedness Funding: Key Programs and Trends From 2001 to 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Crystal R; Watson, Matthew; Sell, Tara Kirk

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate trends in funding over the past 16 years for key federal public health preparedness and response programs at the US Department of Health and Human Services, to improve understanding of federal funding history in this area, and to provide context for future resource allocation decisions for public health preparedness. In this 2017 analysis, we examined the funding history of key federal programs critical to public health preparedness by reviewing program budget data collected for our annual examination of federal funding for biodefense and health security programs since fiscal year (FY) 2001. State and local preparedness at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention initially received $940 million in FY2002 and resulted in significant preparedness gains, but funding levels have since decreased by 31%. Similarly, the Hospital Preparedness Program within the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response was funded at a high of $515 million in FY2003, but funding was reduced by 50%. Investments in medical countermeasure development and stockpiling remained relatively stable. The United States has made significant progress in preparing for disasters and advancing public health infrastructure. To enable continued advancement, federal funding commitments must be sustained.

  13. Stakeholders perspectives on the key components of community-based interventions coordinating care in dementia: a qualitative systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backhouse, Amy; Richards, David A; McCabe, Rose; Watkins, Ross; Dickens, Chris

    2017-11-22

    Interventions aiming to coordinate services for the community-based dementia population vary in components, organisation and implementation. In this review we aimed to investigate the views of stakeholders on the key components of community-based interventions coordinating care in dementia. We searched four databases from inception to June 2015; Medline, The Cochrane Library, EMBASE and PsycINFO, this was aided by a search of four grey literature databases, and backward and forward citation tracking of included papers. Title and abstract screening was followed by a full text screen by two independent reviewers, and quality was assessed using the CASP appraisal tool. We then conducted thematic synthesis on extracted data. A total of seven papers from five independent studies were included in the review, and encompassed the views of over 100 participants from three countries. Through thematic synthesis we identified 32 initial codes that were grouped into 5 second-order themes: (1) case manager had four associated codes and described preferences for the case manager personal and professional attributes, including a sound knowledge in dementia and availability of local services; (2) communication had five associated codes and emphasized the importance stakeholders placed on multichannel communication with service users, as well as between multidisciplinary teams and across organisations; (3) intervention had 11 associated codes which focused primarily on the practicalities of implementation such as the contact type and frequency between case managers and service users, and the importance of case manager training and service evaluation; (4) resources had five associated codes which outlined stakeholder views on the required resources for coordinating interventions and potential overlap with existing resources, as well as arising issues when available resources do not meet those required for successful implementation; and (5) support had seven associated codes that

  14. Key components of the eight classes of type IV secretion systems involved in bacterial conjugation or protein secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglielmini, Julien; Néron, Bertrand; Abby, Sophie S; Garcillán-Barcia, María Pilar; de la Cruz, Fernando; Rocha, Eduardo P C

    2014-05-01

    Conjugation of DNA through a type IV secretion system (T4SS) drives horizontal gene transfer. Yet little is known on the diversity of these nanomachines. We previously found that T4SS can be divided in eight classes based on the phylogeny of the only ubiquitous protein of T4SS (VirB4). Here, we use an ab initio approach to identify protein families systematically and specifically associated with VirB4 in each class. We built profiles for these proteins and used them to scan 2262 genomes for the presence of T4SS. Our analysis led to the identification of thousands of occurrences of 116 protein families for a total of 1623 T4SS. Importantly, we could identify almost always in our profiles the essential genes of well-studied T4SS. This allowed us to build a database with the largest number of T4SS described to date. Using profile-profile alignments, we reveal many new cases of homology between components of distant classes of T4SS. We mapped these similarities on the T4SS phylogenetic tree and thus obtained the patterns of acquisition and loss of these protein families in the history of T4SS. The identification of the key VirB4-associated proteins paves the way toward experimental analysis of poorly characterized T4SS classes. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  15. Essential Components of Educational Programs on Biomedical Writing, Editing, and Publishing

    OpenAIRE

    Barroga, Edward; Vardaman, Maya

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of educational programs on biomedical writing, editing, and publishing is to nurture ethical skills among local and international researchers and editors from diverse professional backgrounds. The mechanics, essential components, and target outcomes of these programs are described in this article. The mechanics covers the objectives, design, benefits, duration, participants and qualifications, program formats, administrative issues, and mentorship. The essential componen...

  16. Constructing a Cross-Domain Resource Inventory: Key Components and Results of the EarthCube CINERGI Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaslavsky, I.; Richard, S. M.; Malik, T.; Hsu, L.; Gupta, A.; Grethe, J. S.; Valentine, D. W., Jr.; Lehnert, K. A.; Bermudez, L. E.; Ozyurt, I. B.; Whitenack, T.; Schachne, A.; Giliarini, A.

    2015-12-01

    While many geoscience-related repositories and data discovery portals exist, finding information about available resources remains a pervasive problem, especially when searching across multiple domains and catalogs. Inconsistent and incomplete metadata descriptions, disparate access protocols and semantic differences across domains, and troves of unstructured or poorly structured information which is hard to discover and use are major hindrances toward discovery, while metadata compilation and curation remain manual and time-consuming. We report on methodology, main results and lessons learned from an ongoing effort to develop a geoscience-wide catalog of information resources, with consistent metadata descriptions, traceable provenance, and automated metadata enhancement. Developing such a catalog is the central goal of CINERGI (Community Inventory of EarthCube Resources for Geoscience Interoperability), an EarthCube building block project (earthcube.org/group/cinergi). The key novel technical contributions of the projects include: a) development of a metadata enhancement pipeline and a set of document enhancers to automatically improve various aspects of metadata descriptions, including keyword assignment and definition of spatial extents; b) Community Resource Viewers: online applications for crowdsourcing community resource registry development, curation and search, and channeling metadata to the unified CINERGI inventory, c) metadata provenance, validation and annotation services, d) user interfaces for advanced resource discovery; and e) geoscience-wide ontology and machine learning to support automated semantic tagging and faceted search across domains. We demonstrate these CINERGI components in three types of user scenarios: (1) improving existing metadata descriptions maintained by government and academic data facilities, (2) supporting work of several EarthCube Research Coordination Network projects in assembling information resources for their domains

  17. A natural language processing program effectively extracts key pathologic findings from radical prostatectomy reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Brian J; Merchant, Madhur; Zheng, Chengyi; Thomas, Anil A; Contreras, Richard; Jacobsen, Steven J; Chien, Gary W

    2014-12-01

    Natural language processing (NLP) software programs have been widely developed to transform complex free text into simplified organized data. Potential applications in the field of medicine include automated report summaries, physician alerts, patient repositories, electronic medical record (EMR) billing, and quality metric reports. Despite these prospects and the recent widespread adoption of EMR, NLP has been relatively underutilized. The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of an internally developed NLP program in extracting select pathologic findings from radical prostatectomy specimen reports in the EMR. An NLP program was generated by a software engineer to extract key variables from prostatectomy reports in the EMR within our healthcare system, which included the TNM stage, Gleason grade, presence of a tertiary Gleason pattern, histologic subtype, size of dominant tumor nodule, seminal vesicle invasion (SVI), perineural invasion (PNI), angiolymphatic invasion (ALI), extracapsular extension (ECE), and surgical margin status (SMS). The program was validated by comparing NLP results to a gold standard compiled by two blinded manual reviewers for 100 random pathology reports. NLP demonstrated 100% accuracy for identifying the Gleason grade, presence of a tertiary Gleason pattern, SVI, ALI, and ECE. It also demonstrated near-perfect accuracy for extracting histologic subtype (99.0%), PNI (98.9%), TNM stage (98.0%), SMS (97.0%), and dominant tumor size (95.7%). The overall accuracy of NLP was 98.7%. NLP generated a result in report. This novel program demonstrated high accuracy and efficiency identifying key pathologic details from the prostatectomy report within an EMR system. NLP has the potential to assist urologists by summarizing and highlighting relevant information from verbose pathology reports. It may also facilitate future urologic research through the rapid and automated creation of large databases.

  18. Components of effective randomized controlled trials of hydrotherapy programs for fibromyalgia syndrome: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Perraton

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Luke Perraton, Zuzana Machotka, Saravana KumarInternational Centre for Allied Health Evidence, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, AustraliaAim: Previous systematic reviews have found hydrotherapy to be an effective management strategy for fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS. The aim of this systematic review was to summarize the components of hydrotherapy programs used in randomized controlled trials.Method: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials was conducted. Only trials that have reported significant FMS-related outcomes were included. Data relating to the components of hydrotherapy programs (exercise type, duration, frequency and intensity, environmental factors, and service delivery were analyzed.Results: Eleven randomized controlled trials were included in this review. Overall, the quality of trials was good. Aerobic exercise featured in all 11 trials and the majority of hydrotherapy programs included either a strengthening or flexibility component. Great variability was noted in both the environmental components of hydrotherapy programs and service delivery.Conclusions: Aerobic exercise, warm up and cool-down periods and relaxation exercises are common features of hydrotherapy programs that report significant FMS-related outcomes. Treatment duration of 60 minutes, frequency of three sessions per week and an intensity equivalent to 60%–80% maximum heart rate were the most commonly reported exercise components. Exercise appears to be the most important component of an effective hydrotherapy program for FMS, particularly when considering mental health-related outcomes.Keywords: hydrotherapy, fibromyalgia syndrome, exercise, effective, components

  19. Clean Diesel Engine Component Improvement Program Diesel Truck Thermoelectric Generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsner, N. B. [Hi-Z Technology, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States); Bass, J. C. [Hi-Z Technology, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States); Ghamaty, S. [Hi-Z Technology, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States); Krommenhoek, D. [Hi-Z Technology, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States); Kushch, A. [Hi-Z Technology, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States); Snowden, D. [Hi-Z Technology, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States); Marchetti, S. [Hi-Z Technology, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

    2005-03-16

    Hi-Z Technology, Inc. (Hi-Z) is currently developing four different auxiliary generator designs that are used to convert a portion (5 to 20%) of the waste heat from vehicle engines exhaust directly to electricity. The four designs range from 200 Watts to 10 kW. The furthest along is the 1 kW Diesel Truck Thermoelectric Generator (DTTEG) for heavy duty Class 8 Diesel trucks, which, under this program, has been subjected to 543,000 equivalent miles of bouncing and jarring on PACCAR's test track. Test experience on an earlier version of the DTTEG on the same track showed the need for design modifications incorporated in DTTEG Mod 2, such as a heavy duty shock mounting system and reinforcement of the electrical leads mounting system, the thermocouple mounting system and the thermoelectric module restraints. The conclusion of the 543,000 mile test also pointed the way for an upgrading to heavy duty hose or flex connections for the internal coolant connections for the TEG, and consideration of a separate lower temperature cooling loop with its own radiator. Fuel savings of up to $750 per year and a three to five year payback are believed to be possible with the 5 % efficiency modules. The economics are expected to improve considerably to approach a two year payback when the 5 kW to 10 kW generators make it to the market in a few years with a higher efficiency (20%) thermoelectric module system called Quantum Wells, which are currently under development by Hi-Z. Ultimately, as automation takes over to reduce material and labor costs in the high volume production of QW modules, a one year payback for the 5 kW to10 kW generator appears possible. This was one of the stated goals at the beginning of the project. At some future point in time, with the DTTEG becoming standard equipment on all trucks and automobiles, fuel savings from the 25% conversion of exhaust heat to useable electricity nationwide equates to a 10% reduction in the 12 to 15 million barrels per day of

  20. The effects of exercise program on burnout and metabolic syndrome components in banking and insurance workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Han Hui; Yeh, Ching Ying; Su, Chien Tien; Chen, Chiou Jong; Peng, Shu Mei; Chen, Ruey Yu

    2013-01-01

    To explore the effectiveness of exercise program for banking and insurance workers and clarify the association between exercise, burnout, and metabolic syndrome components. In the process of the study, a practicable worksite exercise program was developed for bank and insurance enterprises. A three-month (12-wk) exercise course was conducted, and its benefits evaluated. Levels of burnout and metabolic syndrome components were analyzed after exercise intervention. After intervention, the indicators of burnout and metabolic syndrome components were significantly improved in both low and high intensity groups, and the improvement were expressed in reduction of waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, person burnout and work-related burnout. A dose-response of burnouts and metabolic syndrome components with exercise intensity are shown (psyndrome components were independently associated with burnout and exercise intensity in the crude model. After adjustment for potential confounders, waist circumference and systolic blood pressure differences showed significant associations with exercise intensity (pburnouts and metabolic syndrome components.

  1. Components of effective randomized controlled trials of hydrotherapy programs for fibromyalgia syndrome: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perraton, Luke; Machotka, Zuzana; Kumar, Saravana

    2009-01-01

    Aim Previous systematic reviews have found hydrotherapy to be an effective management strategy for fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). The aim of this systematic review was to summarize the components of hydrotherapy programs used in randomized controlled trials. Method A systematic review of randomized controlled trials was conducted. Only trials that have reported significant FMS-related outcomes were included. Data relating to the components of hydrotherapy programs (exercise type, duration, frequency and intensity, environmental factors, and service delivery) were analyzed. Results Eleven randomized controlled trials were included in this review. Overall, the quality of trials was good. Aerobic exercise featured in all 11 trials and the majority of hydrotherapy programs included either a strengthening or flexibility component. Great variability was noted in both the environmental components of hydrotherapy programs and service delivery. Conclusions Aerobic exercise, warm up and cool-down periods and relaxation exercises are common features of hydrotherapy programs that report significant FMS-related outcomes. Treatment duration of 60 minutes, frequency of three sessions per week and an intensity equivalent to 60%–80% maximum heart rate were the most commonly reported exercise components. Exercise appears to be the most important component of an effective hydrotherapy program for FMS, particularly when considering mental health-related outcomes. PMID:21197303

  2. Components of effective randomized controlled trials of hydrotherapy programs for fibromyalgia syndrome: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perraton, Luke; Machotka, Zuzana; Kumar, Saravana

    2009-11-30

    Previous systematic reviews have found hydrotherapy to be an effective management strategy for fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). The aim of this systematic review was to summarize the components of hydrotherapy programs used in randomized controlled trials. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials was conducted. Only trials that have reported significant FMS-related outcomes were included. Data relating to the components of hydrotherapy programs (exercise type, duration, frequency and intensity, environmental factors, and service delivery) were analyzed. Eleven randomized controlled trials were included in this review. Overall, the quality of trials was good. Aerobic exercise featured in all 11 trials and the majority of hydrotherapy programs included either a strengthening or flexibility component. Great variability was noted in both the environmental components of hydrotherapy programs and service delivery. Aerobic exercise, warm up and cool-down periods and relaxation exercises are common features of hydrotherapy programs that report significant FMS-related outcomes. Treatment duration of 60 minutes, frequency of three sessions per week and an intensity equivalent to 60%-80% maximum heart rate were the most commonly reported exercise components. Exercise appears to be the most important component of an effective hydrotherapy program for FMS, particularly when considering mental health-related outcomes.

  3. The Arabidopsis Mediator Complex Subunit16 Is a Key Component of Basal Resistance against the Necrotrophic Fungal Pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenggang; Yao, Jin; Du, Xuezhu; Zhang, Yanping; Sun, Yijun; Rollins, Jeffrey A; Mou, Zhonglin

    2015-09-01

    Although Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is a devastating necrotrophic fungal plant pathogen in agriculture, the virulence mechanisms utilized by S. sclerotiorum and the host defense mechanisms against this pathogen have not been fully understood. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Mediator complex subunit MED16 is a key component of basal resistance against S. sclerotiorum. Mutants of MED16 are markedly more susceptible to S. sclerotiorum than mutants of 13 other Mediator subunits, and med16 has a much stronger effect on S. sclerotiorum-induced transcriptome changes compared with med8, a mutation not altering susceptibility to S. sclerotiorum. Interestingly, med16 is also more susceptible to S. sclerotiorum than coronatine-insensitive1-1 (coi1-1), which is the most susceptible mutant reported so far. Although the jasmonic acid (JA)/ethylene (ET) defense pathway marker gene PLANT DEFENSIN1.2 (PDF1.2) cannot be induced in either med16 or coi1-1, basal transcript levels of PDF1.2 in med16 are significantly lower than in coi1-1. Furthermore, ET-induced suppression of JA-activated wound responses is compromised in med16, suggesting a role for MED16 in JA-ET cross talk. Additionally, MED16 is required for the recruitment of RNA polymerase II to PDF1.2 and OCTADECANOID-RESPONSIVE ARABIDOPSIS ETHYLENE/ETHYLENE-RESPONSIVE FACTOR59 (ORA59), two target genes of both JA/ET-mediated and the transcription factor WRKY33-activated defense pathways. Finally, MED16 is physically associated with WRKY33 in yeast and in planta, and WRKY33-activated transcription of PDF1.2 and ORA59 as well as resistance to S. sclerotiorum depends on MED16. Taken together, these results indicate that MED16 regulates resistance to S. sclerotiorum by governing both JA/ET-mediated and WRKY33-activated defense signaling in Arabidopsis. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Viral Hepatitis Strategic Information to Achieve Elimination by 2030: Key Elements for HIV Program Managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low-Beer, Daniel; Bergeri, Isabel; Hess, Sarah; Garcia-Calleja, Jesus Maria; Hayashi, Chika; Mozalevskis, Antons; Rinder Stengaard, Annemarie; Sabin, Keith; Harmanci, Hande; Bulterys, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Evidence documenting the global burden of disease from viral hepatitis was essential for the World Health Assembly to endorse the first Global Health Sector Strategy (GHSS) on viral hepatitis in May 2016. The GHSS on viral hepatitis proposes to eliminate viral hepatitis as a public health threat by 2030. The GHSS on viral hepatitis is in line with targets for HIV infection and tuberculosis as part of the Sustainable Development Goals. As coordination between hepatitis and HIV programs aims to optimize the use of resources, guidance is also needed to align the strategic information components of the 2 programs. The World Health Organization monitoring and evaluation framework for viral hepatitis B and C follows an approach similar to the one of HIV, including components on the following: (1) context (prevalence of infection), (2) input, (3) output and outcome, including the cascade of prevention and treatment, and (4) impact (incidence and mortality). Data systems that are needed to inform this framework include (1) surveillance for acute hepatitis, chronic infections, and sequelae and (2) program data documenting prevention and treatment, which for the latter includes a database of patients. Overall, the commonalities between HIV and hepatitis at the strategic, policy, technical, and implementation levels justify coordination, strategic linkage, or integration, depending on the type of HIV and viral hepatitis epidemics. Strategic information is a critical area of this alignment under the principle of what gets measured gets done. It is facilitated because the monitoring and evaluation frameworks for HIV and viral hepatitis were constructed using a similar approach. However, for areas where elimination of viral hepatitis requires data that cannot be collected through the HIV program, collaborations are needed with immunization, communicable disease control, tuberculosis, and hepatology centers to ensure collection of information for the remaining indicators. PMID

  5. Key Components in eHealth Interventions Combining Self-Tracking and Persuasive eCoaching to Promote a Healthier Lifestyle: A Scoping Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldenhuis, Hilbrand KE; de Groot, Martijn; Polstra, Louis; Velthuijsen, Hugo; van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia EWC

    2017-01-01

    Background The combination of self-tracking and persuasive eCoaching in automated interventions is a new and promising approach for healthy lifestyle management. Objective The aim of this study was to identify key components of self-tracking and persuasive eCoaching in automated healthy lifestyle interventions that contribute to their effectiveness on health outcomes, usability, and adherence. A secondary aim was to identify the way in which these key components should be designed to contribute to improved health outcomes, usability, and adherence. Methods The scoping review methodology proposed by Arskey and O’Malley was applied. Scopus, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and PubMed were searched for publications dated from January 1, 2013 to January 31, 2016 that included (1) self-tracking, (2) persuasive eCoaching, and (3) healthy lifestyle intervention. Results The search resulted in 32 publications, 17 of which provided results regarding the effect on health outcomes, 27 of which provided results regarding usability, and 13 of which provided results regarding adherence. Among the 32 publications, 27 described an intervention. The most commonly applied persuasive eCoaching components in the described interventions were personalization (n=24), suggestion (n=19), goal-setting (n=17), simulation (n=17), and reminders (n=15). As for self-tracking components, most interventions utilized an accelerometer to measure steps (n=11). Furthermore, the medium through which the user could access the intervention was usually a mobile phone (n=10). The following key components and their specific design seem to influence both health outcomes and usability in a positive way: reduction by setting short-term goals to eventually reach long-term goals, personalization of goals, praise messages, reminders to input self-tracking data into the technology, use of validity-tested devices, integration of self-tracking and persuasive eCoaching, and provision of face-to-face instructions during

  6. Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model (NUREG-0711)Revision 3: Update Methodology and Key Revisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OHara J. M.; Higgins, J.; Fleger, S.

    2012-07-22

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews the human factors engineering (HFE) programs of applicants for nuclear power plant construction permits, operating licenses, standard design certifications, and combined operating licenses. The purpose of these safety reviews is to help ensure that personnel performance and reliability are appropriately supported. Detailed design review procedures and guidance for the evaluations is provided in three key documents: the Standard Review Plan (NUREG-0800), the HFE Program Review Model (NUREG-0711), and the Human-System Interface Design Review Guidelines (NUREG-0700). These documents were last revised in 2007, 2004 and 2002, respectively. The NRC is committed to the periodic update and improvement of the guidance to ensure that it remains a state-of-the-art design evaluation tool. To this end, the NRC is updating its guidance to stay current with recent research on human performance, advances in HFE methods and tools, and new technology being employed in plant and control room design. NUREG-0711 is the first document to be addressed. We present the methodology used to update NUREG-0711 and summarize the main changes made. Finally, we discuss the current status of the update program and the future plans.

  7. Self-tracking and Persuasive eCoaching in Healthy Lifestyle Interventions : Work-in-progress Scoping Review of Key Components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lentferink, Aniek Joset; Oldenhuis, Hilbrand; Kulyk, Olga Anatoliyivna; de Groot, Martijn; Polstra, Louis; Velthuijsen, Hugo; Hermens, Hermanus J.; van Gemert-Pijnen, Lisette

    2016-01-01

    The combination of self-tracking and persuasive eCoaching in healthy lifestyle interventions is a promising approach. The objective of this study is to map the key components of existing healthy lifestyle interventions combining self-tracking and persuasive eCoaching using the scoping review

  8. Embedded protostars in the dust, ice, and gas in time (DIGIT) Herschel key program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Joel D.; Evans II, Neal J.; Jørgensen, Jes Kristian

    2013-01-01

    We present 50-210 um spectral scans of 30 Class 0/I protostellar sources, obtained with Herschel-PACS, and 0.5-1000 um SEDs, as part of the Dust, Ice, and Gas in Time (DIGIT) Key Program. Some sources exhibit up to 75 H2O lines ranging in excitation energy from 100-2000 K, 12 transitions of OH......, but not with the time-averaged outflow rate derived from low-J CO maps. [C II] emission is in general not local to the source. The sample Lbol increased by 1.25 (1.06) and Tbol decreased to 0.96 (0.96) of mean (median) values with the inclusion of the Herschel data. Most CO rotational diagrams are characterized by two...

  9. Essential Components of Educational Programs on Biomedical Writing, Editing, and Publishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroga, Edward; Vardaman, Maya

    2015-10-01

    The primary objective of educational programs on biomedical writing, editing, and publishing is to nurture ethical skills among local and international researchers and editors from diverse professional backgrounds. The mechanics, essential components, and target outcomes of these programs are described in this article. The mechanics covers the objectives, design, benefits, duration, participants and qualifications, program formats, administrative issues, and mentorship. The essential components consist of three core schedules: Schedule I Basic aspects of biomedical writing, editing, and communications; Schedule II Essential skills in biomedical writing, editing, and publishing; and Schedule III Interactive lectures on relevant topics. The target outcomes of the programs comprise knowledge acquisition, skills development, paper write-up, and journal publication. These programs add to the prestige and academic standing of the host institutions.

  10. Developing Your Evaluation Plans: A Critical Component of Public Health Program Infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavinghouze, S Rene; Snyder, Kimberly

    A program's infrastructure is often cited as critical to public health success. The Component Model of Infrastructure (CMI) identifies evaluation as essential under the core component of engaged data. An evaluation plan is a written document that describes how to monitor and evaluate a program, as well as how to use evaluation results for program improvement and decision making. The evaluation plan clarifies how to describe what the program did, how it worked, and why outcomes matter. We use the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) "Framework for Program Evaluation in Public Health" as a guide for developing an evaluation plan. Just as using a roadmap facilitates progress on a long journey, a well-written evaluation plan can clarify the direction your evaluation takes and facilitate achievement of the evaluation's objectives.

  11. Components of Successful Staple Food Fortification Programs: Lessons From Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martorell, Reynaldo; de Romaña, Daniel López

    2017-09-01

    There are few effectiveness evaluations of food fortification programs, and little is known about what makes programs successful. We examined 3 food fortification programs in Latin America to identify common features that might explain their success and to draw lessons for program design and implementation everywhere: The vitamin A fortification of sugar in Guatemala with impact on vitamin A status of the population, the fortification of a basket of foods with iron and other micronutrients in Costa Rica with impact on iron status and anemia in women and children, and the fortification of wheat flour with folic acid in Chile, which reduced the incidence of neural tube defects. We identified pertinent literature about these preselected programs and asked regional experts for any additional information. We also conducted structured interviews of key informants to provide historical and contextual information. Institutional research capacity and champions of fortification are features of successful programs in Latin America. We also found that private/public partnerships (industry, government, academia, and civil society) might be key for sustainability. To achieve impact, program managers need to use fortification vehicles that are consumed by the nutritionally vulnerable and to add bioavailable fortificants at adequate content levels in order to fill dietary gaps and reduce micronutrient deficiencies. Adequate monitoring and quality control are essential. For future programs, we recommend that the evaluation be specified up-front, including a baseline/end line and data collection along the program impact pathway to inform needed improvements and to strengthen causal inferences.

  12. Is our residency program successful? Structuring an outcomes assessment system as a component of program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torbeck, Laura; Canal, David F; Choi, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    In an attempt to better define the success of our residency program with regard to resident development, we committed to develop an ongoing assessment of residency performance and devised an outcomes assessment system. We describe the process and structure that we used to construct an outcomes assessment system. We discuss the process we used to discern whether or not our program is successful as well as offer tips on what data to collect and track should other residency programs decide to devise a similar outcomes assessment database. Taking time to "step back" to take inventory of a residency program and ensure year over year and at the end of training residents have developed and matured as planned is an educationally sound practice. Structuring an outcomes assessment system like the one that we discuss here can aid program directors with this important task. Copyright © 2014 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Remodelling of lace plant leaves: antioxidants and ROS are key regulators of programmed cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauphinee, Adrian N; Fletcher, Jacob I; Denbigh, Georgia L; Lacroix, Christian R; Gunawardena, Arunika H L A N

    2017-07-01

    Antioxidants and reactive oxygen species are integral for programmed cell death signaling during perforation formation in the lace plant ( Aponogeton madagascariensis ). The lace plant is an excellent model system for studying developmentally regulated programmed cell death (PCD). During early lace plant leaf development, PCD systematically deletes cells resulting in a perforated leaf morphology that is unique in planta. A distinct feature in young lace plant leaves is an abundance of anthocyanins, which have antioxidant properties. The first sign of PCD induction is the loss of anthocyanin pigmentation in cells that are targeted for destruction, which results in a visible gradient of cell death. The cellular dynamics and time course of lace plant PCD are well documented; however, the signals involved in the pathway remain elusive. This study investigates the roles of antioxidants and ROS in developmental PCD signaling during lace plant perforation formation. The involvement of antioxidants and ROS in the pathway was determined using a variety of techniques including pharmacological whole plant experimentation, long-term live cell imaging, the 2,2'-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid anti-radical activity assay, and western blot analysis. Results indicate that antioxidants and ROS are key regulators of PCD during the remodelling of lace plant leaves.

  14. Key Stakeholdersí Attitudes towards Teacher Education Programs in TEFL: A Case Study of Farhangian University in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami, Javad; Qurbanzada, Isa

    2016-01-01

    Recently, teacher training courses have attracted the researchers' special attention, while teacher education programs have not received as much attention. The present study investigated the attitudes key stakeholders in a teacher education program (i.e., student teachers, in-service teachers, and teacher educators) hold toward the appropriateness…

  15. A Decade of Evolution in the Practice Teaching Component Of a Canadian Teacher Education Program: What Drove Change, What Insights Were Gleaned, And What Challenges Lie Ahead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona Benson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the many and diverse factors that have driven changes to the field-based component of a program of teacher education in a large Canadian university over the past 10 years. We look at key contexts of influence to any work in program change; that of internal and external bodies at the institutional level, the operational or program delivery level, feedback from stakeholders in teacher education, and lastly, the research and scholarship in teacher education that provides a framework for innovation and improvement. A significant inclusion in this paper is the perspective on the support at ground level that is required, but rarely acknowledged, to move any change initiatives forward. We present models that capture a decade of change to 4 undergraduate field experiences and 2 graduate level internships that comprise the field component of our teacher education program. We share key indicators of success resulting from these changes, highlight important insights gleaned, and point to pressing challenges that we face as we look to future program evolution that will carry us into the next decade. While this work reflects one single field-based component of a teacher education program in Canada, we trust that useful parallels can be drawn by the reader as they contemplate or are in the process of addressing and moving through similar orbits of change and evolution within their own programs.

  16. Constituents of Cypriol Oil (Cyperus scariosus R.Br.): N-Containing Molecules and Key Aroma Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clery, Robin A; Cason, Julie R L; Zelenay, Veronika

    2016-06-08

    Cypriol oil, the essential oil from Cyperus scariosus R.Br., has been investigated to reveal minor nitrogen-containing molecules and minor components responsible for the odor. A total of 21 nitrogenous components are reported, of which epi-guaipyridine (32 mg/kg), guaia-9,11-dienpyridine (9 mg/kg), and cananodine (10 mg/kg) were the most abundant. A new ketone, cyperen-8-one, with a significant woody, ambery odor could also be isolated and identified along with a novel lactone, cyperolactone, and an alcohol. Rotundone was found to have the highest odor-activity value of the measured compounds and, together with the other ketones, contributes to the woody-amber character of cypriol oil.

  17. Key issues in decomposing fMRI during naturalistic and continuous music experience with independent component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Fengyu; Puoliväli, Tuomas; Alluri, Vinoo; Sipola, Tuomo; Burunat, Iballa; Toiviainen, Petri; Nandi, Asoke K; Brattico, Elvira; Ristaniemi, Tapani

    2014-02-15

    Independent component analysis (ICA) has been often used to decompose fMRI data mostly for the resting-state, block and event-related designs due to its outstanding advantage. For fMRI data during free-listening experiences, only a few exploratory studies applied ICA. For processing the fMRI data elicited by 512-s modern tango, a FFT based band-pass filter was used to further pre-process the fMRI data to remove sources of no interest and noise. Then, a fast model order selection method was applied to estimate the number of sources. Next, both individual ICA and group ICA were performed. Subsequently, ICA components whose temporal courses were significantly correlated with musical features were selected. Finally, for individual ICA, common components across majority of participants were found by diffusion map and spectral clustering. The extracted spatial maps (by the new ICA approach) common across most participants evidenced slightly right-lateralized activity within and surrounding the auditory cortices. Meanwhile, they were found associated with the musical features. Compared with the conventional ICA approach, more participants were found to have the common spatial maps extracted by the new ICA approach. Conventional model order selection methods underestimated the true number of sources in the conventionally pre-processed fMRI data for the individual ICA. Pre-processing the fMRI data by using a reasonable band-pass digital filter can greatly benefit the following model order selection and ICA with fMRI data by naturalistic paradigms. Diffusion map and spectral clustering are straightforward tools to find common ICA spatial maps. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Optimizing Key Parameters of Ground Delay Program with Uncertain Airport Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jixin Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Ground Delay Program (GDP relies heavily on the capacity of the subject airport, which, due to its uncertainty, adds to the difficulty and suboptimality of GDP operation. This paper proposes a framework for the joint optimization of GDP key parameters including file time, end time, and distance. These parameters are articulated and incorporated in a GDP model, based on which an optimization problem is proposed and solved under uncertain airport capacity. Unlike existing literature, this paper explicitly calculates the optimal GDP file time, which could significantly reduce the delay times as shown in our numerical study. We also propose a joint GDP end-time-and-distance model solved with genetic algorithm. The optimization problem takes into account the GDP operational efficiency, airline and flight equity, and Air Traffic Control (ATC risks. A simulation study with real-world data is undertaken to demonstrate the advantage of the proposed framework. It is shown that, in comparison with the current GDP in operation, the proposed solution reduces the total delay time, unnecessary ground delay, and unnecessary ground delay flights by 14.7%, 50.8%, and 48.3%, respectively. The proposed GDP strategy has the potential to effectively reduce the overall delay while maintaining the ATC safety risk within an acceptable level.

  19. Key Issues for Navigation and Time Dissemination in NASA's Space Exploration Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, R. A.; Brodsky, B.; Oria, A. J.; Connolly, J. W.; Sands, O. S.; Welch, B. W.; Ely T.; Orr, R.; Schuchman, L.

    2006-01-01

    The renewed emphasis on robotic and human missions within NASA's space exploration program warrants a detailed consideration of how the positions of objects in space will be determined and tracked, whether they be spacecraft, human explorers, robots, surface vehicles, or science instrumentation. The Navigation Team within the NASA Space Communications Architecture Working Group (SCAWG) has addressed several key technical issues in this area and the principle findings are reported here. For navigation in the vicinity of the Moon, a variety of satellite constellations have been investigated that provide global or regional surface position determination and timely services analogous to those offered by GPS at Earth. In the vicinity of Mars, there are options for satellite constellations not available at the Moon due to the gravitational perturbations from Earth, such as two satellites in an aerostationary orbit. Alternate methods of radiometric navigation as considered, including one- and two-way signals, as well as autonomous navigation. The use of a software radio capable of receiving all available signal sources, such as GPS, pseudolites, and communication channels, is discussed. Methods of time transfer and dissemination are also considered in this paper.

  20. The Effect of Self-Recording and Social Reinforcement Components of Parent Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csapo, Marg

    1979-01-01

    Evaluates the effectiveness of two components of parent training programs: (1) parents recording their own ignoring and rewarding behavior, and (2) verbal social reinforcement from peers and the consultant. Subjects were 40 parents of children (seven to nine years) with behavior problems. (MP)

  1. The Use of Workforce Assessment as a Component of Career and Technical Education Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Kenneth R.; Schleif, Nicole L.; Bowen, Mauvalyn M.

    2011-01-01

    This research project examined the extent to which Career and Technical Education (CTE)-related programs use workforce needs assessment as a component of their evaluation activities. An employer perspective was used to develop a conceptual framework drawing on strategic human resource management theory. The extent and methods utilized for…

  2. Tabulations of Responses from the 2000 Survey of Reserve Component Personnel: Volume 3. Benefits and Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-08-01

    or Working in a Family Business : By Reserve Component......................................................................................1618...in a Family Business : By Paygrade and Gender....................................................................................1619 104e.3 Spouse’s...Employment Status -- Managing or Working in a Family Business : By Reserve Program and Ever Deployed

  3. Key informants' perspectives on development of family medicine training programs in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gossa W

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Weyinshet Gossa,1,2 Dawit Wondimagegn,3 Demeke Mekonnen,4 Wondwossen Eshetu,5 Zerihun Abebe,6 Michael D Fetters2 1Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; 2Department of Family Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; 3Department of Psychiatry, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, 4Department of Pediatrics, Jimma University, Jimma, 5Federal Ministry of Health, 6St Paul's Hospital Millennium Medical College, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Abstract: As a very low-income country, Ethiopia faces significant development challenges, though there is great aspiration to dramatically improve health care in the country. Family medicine has recently been recognized through national policy as one potential contributor in addressing Ethiopia's health care challenges. Family medicine is a new specialty in Ethiopia emerging in the context of family medicine development in Sub-Saharan Africa. The Addis Ababa University family medicine residency program started in 2013 and is the first and the only family medicine program in the country as of March 2016. Stakeholders on the ground feel that family medicine is off to a good start and have great enthusiasm and optimism for its success. While the Ministry of Health has a vision for the development of family medicine and a plan for rapid upscaling of family medicine across the country, significant challenges remain. Continuing discussion about the potential roles of family medicine specialists in Ethiopia and policy-level strategic planning to place family medicine at the core of primary health care delivery in the country is needed. In addition, the health care-tier system needs to be restructured to include the family medicine specialists along with appropriately equipped health care facilities for training and practice. Key stakeholders are optimistic that family medicine expansion can be successful in Ethiopia through a coordinated effort by

  4. Just-in-Time Adaptive Interventions (JITAIs) in Mobile Health: Key Components and Design Principles for Ongoing Health Behavior Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahum-Shani, Inbal; Smith, Shawna N; Spring, Bonnie J; Collins, Linda M; Witkiewitz, Katie; Tewari, Ambuj; Murphy, Susan A

    2016-09-23

    The just-in-time adaptive intervention (JITAI) is an intervention design aiming to provide the right type/amount of support, at the right time, by adapting to an individual's changing internal and contextual state. The availability of increasingly powerful mobile and sensing technologies underpins the use of JITAIs to support health behavior, as in such a setting an individual's state can change rapidly, unexpectedly, and in his/her natural environment. Despite the increasing use and appeal of JITAIs, a major gap exists between the growing technological capabilities for delivering JITAIs and research on the development and evaluation of these interventions. Many JITAIs have been developed with minimal use of empirical evidence, theory, or accepted treatment guidelines. Here, we take an essential first step towards bridging this gap. Building on health behavior theories and the extant literature on JITAIs, we clarify the scientific motivation for JITAIs, define their fundamental components, and highlight design principles related to these components. Examples of JITAIs from various domains of health behavior research are used for illustration. As we enter a new era of technological capacity for delivering JITAIs, it is critical that researchers develop sophisticated and nuanced health behavior theories capable of guiding the construction of such interventions. Particular attention has to be given to better understanding the implications of providing timely and ecologically sound support for intervention adherence and retention.

  5. Millennial and Non-Millennial Agriculture Teachers' Current and Ideal Emphasis on the Three Components of the Agricultural Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoulders, Catherine W.; Toland, Hannah

    2017-01-01

    Classroom and laboratory instruction, FFA, and SAE have long represented the complete agricultural education program via the three-component model. While the model depicts three circles of equal size to represent these components, the focus and level of emphasis of each component within the agriculture program is the decision of the agriculture…

  6. The French human biomonitoring program: First lessons from the perinatal component and future needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereumeaux, Clémentine; Fillol, Clémence; Charles, Marie-Aline; Denys, Sébastien

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents a progress report of the French human biomonitoring (HBM) program established in 2010. This program has been designed to provide a national representative estimation of the French population's exposure to various environmental chemicals and to study the determinants of exposure. This program currently consists in two surveys: a perinatal component related to a selection of 4145 pregnant women who have been enrolled in the Elfe cohort (the French Longitudinal Study since Childhood) in 2011, and a general population survey related to adults aged 18-74 years and children as from 6 years (Esteban). The aim of this manuscript is to present highlights of the French human biomonitoring program with particular focus on the prioritization of biomarkers to be analyzed in the program and the selection of biomarkers applied to both program components. The Delphi method was used to establish a consensual list of prioritized biomarkers in 2011. First results of the perinatal component of the French HBM program have shown that the biomarkers prioritized were relevant, as almost all pregnant women were exposed to them. However, for some biomarkers, levels' decreases have been observed which may partly be explained by measures taken to prohibit some of these chemicals (e.g. atrazine) and by industrial processes evolutions leading to the substitution of others (e.g. bisphenol A, di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate/DEHP, dialkyl phosphates). Therefore, the list of biomarkers to be monitored in the French HBM program has been implemented to include some substitutes of biomarkers prioritized in the first instance (e.g. bisphenol S, F). Finally, this method combines rigor and flexibility and helped us to build a prioritized list that will be shared and supported by many if not all actors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Delivering heart failure disease management in 3 tertiary care centers: key clinical components and venues of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Monica R; Whellan, David J; Peterson, Eric D; Nohria, Anju; Hasselblad, Vic; Xue, Zhenyi; Bowers, Margaret T; O'Connor, Christopher M; Califf, Robert M; Stevenson, Lynne W

    2008-04-01

    Little data exist to assist to help those organizing and managing heart failure (HF) disease management (DM) programs. We aimed to describe the intensity of outpatient HF care (clinic visits and telephone calls) and medical and nonpharmacological interventions in the outpatient setting. This was a prospective substudy of 130 patients enrolled in STARBRITE in HFDM programs at 3 centers. Follow-up occurred 10, 30, 60, 90, and 120 days after discharge. The number of clinic visits and calls made by HF cardiologists, nurse practitioners, and nurses were prospectively tracked. The results were reported as medians and interquartile ranges. There were a total of 581 calls with 4 (2, 6) per patient and 467 clinic visits with 3 (2, 5) per patient. Time spent per patient was 8.9 (6, 10.6) minutes per call and 23.8 (20, 28.3) minutes per clinic visit. Nurses and nurse practitioners spent 113 hours delivering care on the phone, and physicians and nurse practitioners spent 187.6 hours in clinic. Issues addressed during calls included HF education (341 times [52.6%]) and fluid overload (87 times [41.8%]). Medical interventions included adjustments to loop diuretics (calls 101 times, clinic 156 times); beta-blockers (calls 18 times, clinic 126 times); vasodilators (calls 8 times, clinic 55 times). More than a third of clinician time was spent on calls, during which >50% of patient contacts and HF education and >39% of diuretic adjustments occurred. Administrators and public and private insurers need to recognize the amount of medical care delivered over the telephone and should consider reimbursement for these activities.

  8. A Comprehensive Study of Key Electric Vehicle (EV Components, Technologies, Challenges, Impacts, and Future Direction of Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuad Un-Noor

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Electric vehicles (EV, including Battery Electric Vehicle (BEV, Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV, Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV, Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle (FCEV, are becoming more commonplace in the transportation sector in recent times. As the present trend suggests, this mode of transport is likely to replace internal combustion engine (ICE vehicles in the near future. Each of the main EV components has a number of technologies that are currently in use or can become prominent in the future. EVs can cause significant impacts on the environment, power system, and other related sectors. The present power system could face huge instabilities with enough EV penetration, but with proper management and coordination, EVs can be turned into a major contributor to the successful implementation of the smart grid concept. There are possibilities of immense environmental benefits as well, as the EVs can extensively reduce the greenhouse gas emissions produced by the transportation sector. However, there are some major obstacles for EVs to overcome before totally replacing ICE vehicles. This paper is focused on reviewing all the useful data available on EV configurations, battery energy sources, electrical machines, charging techniques, optimization techniques, impacts, trends, and possible directions of future developments. Its objective is to provide an overall picture of the current EV technology and ways of future development to assist in future researches in this sector.

  9. The D3 F-box protein is a key component in host strigolactone responses essential for arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Satoko; Kameoka, Hiromu; Tempo, Misaki; Akiyama, Kohki; Umehara, Mikihisa; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro; Hayashi, Hideo; Kyozuka, Junko; Shirasu, Ken

    2012-12-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) represents an ancient endosymbiosis between plant roots and Glomeromycota fungi. Strigolactones (SLs), plant-derived terpenoid lactones, activate hyphal branching of AM fungi before physical contact. Lack of SL biosynthesis results in lower colonization of AM fungi. The F-box protein, DWARF3 (D3), and the hydrolase family protein DWARF14 (D14) are crucial for SL responses in rice. Here we conducted AM fungal colonization assays with the SL-insensitive d3 and d14 mutants. The d3 mutant exhibited strong defects in AM fungal colonization, whereas the d14 mutant showed higher AM fungal colonization. As D14 has a homologous protein, D14-LIKE, we generated D14-LIKE knockdown lines by RNA interference in the wildtype and d14 background. D14 and D14-LIKE double knockdown lines exhibited similar colonization rates as those of the d14-1 mutant. D3 is crucial for establishing AM symbiosis in rice, whereas D14 and D14-LIKE are not. Our results suggest distinct roles for these SL-related components in AM symbiosis. © 2012 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  10. Photometry of Transneptunian Objects for the Herschel Key Program `TNOs are Cool'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehnhardt, H.; Schulz, D.; Protopapa, S.; Götz, C.

    2014-11-01

    Photometric measurements of 33 transneptunian objects (TNOs) and Centaurs from the target list of the Herschel Key program `TNOs are cool' are presented. Broadband filter observations of 5 Plutinos, 14 classical disk objects (CDOs), 5 scattered disk objects (SDOs), 5 detached disk objects (DDOs) and 4 Centaurs are used to determine absolute magnitudes, broadband colours and spectral gradients in the visible wavelength range. The diameters of the objects estimated with assumed average albedo values fall in the typical range for the various dynamical populations. Deviations between our and published measurements of the photometric brightnesses for three objects indicate larger lightcurve amplitudes (0.4-0.8 mag) due to non-spherical shape and/or albedo. A statistical analysis of photometric population properties using our data and those of the MBOSS2 database by Hainaut et al. (A&A 546:A115, 2012) supports the results and conclusion of this group of authors, namely it shows that dynamically cold CDOs are disjunct for their visible colours from the other TNO populations and Centaurs. Six objects (2002 GV31, 2003 AZ84, 2003 MW12, 2003 OP32, 2003 UZ117, 2005 RM43) with neutral to bluish spectral gradients were found, of which 2002 GV31 shows the smallest spectral slope among the dynamically cold CDOs known so far. Three very red objects (2002 KY14, 2004 GV9, 2007 OR10) with spectral gradients above 40 %/100 nm were found of which 2007 OR10 is by far the reddest DDO measured so far.

  11. Functional analysis of a zebrafish myd88 mutant identifies key transcriptional components of the innate immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiel van der Vaart

    2013-05-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs are an important class of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs that recognize microbial and danger signals. Their downstream signaling upon ligand binding is vital for initiation of the innate immune response. In human and mammalian models, myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MYD88 is known for its central role as an adaptor molecule in interleukin 1 receptor (IL-1R and TLR signaling. The zebrafish is increasingly used as a complementary model system for disease research and drug screening. Here, we describe a zebrafish line with a truncated version of MyD88 as the first zebrafish mutant for a TLR signaling component. We show that this immune-compromised mutant has a lower survival rate under standard rearing conditions and is more susceptible to challenge with the acute bacterial pathogens Edwardsiella tarda and Salmonella typhimurium. Microarray and quantitative PCR analysis revealed that expression of genes for transcription factors central to innate immunity (including NF-ĸB and AP-1 and the pro-inflammatory cytokine Il1b, is dependent on MyD88 signaling during these bacterial infections. Nevertheless, expression of immune genes independent of MyD88 in the myd88 mutant line was sufficient to limit growth of an attenuated S. typhimurium strain. In the case of infection with the chronic bacterial pathogen Mycobacterium marinum, we show that MyD88 signaling has an important protective role during early pathogenesis. During mycobacterial infection, the myd88 mutant shows accelerated formation of granuloma-like aggregates and increased bacterial burden, with associated lower induction of genes central to innate immunity. This zebrafish myd88 mutant will be a valuable tool for further study of the role of IL1R and TLR signaling in the innate immunity processes underlying infectious diseases, inflammatory disorders and cancer.

  12. Structural Characterisation of FabG from Yersinia pestis, a Key Component of Bacterial Fatty Acid Synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey D Nanson

    Full Text Available Ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein reductases (FabG are ubiquitously expressed enzymes that catalyse the reduction of acyl carrier protein (ACP linked thioesters within the bacterial type II fatty acid synthesis (FASII pathway. The products of these enzymes, saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, are essential components of the bacterial cell envelope. The FASII reductase enoyl-ACP reductase (FabI has been the focus of numerous drug discovery efforts, some of which have led to clinical trials, yet few studies have focused on FabG. Like FabI, FabG appears to be essential for survival in many bacteria, similarly indicating the potential of this enzyme as a drug target. FabG enzymes are members of the short-chain alcohol dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR family, and like other SDRs, exhibit highly conserved secondary and tertiary structures, and contain a number of conserved sequence motifs. Here we describe the crystal structures of FabG from Yersinia pestis (YpFabG, the causative agent of bubonic, pneumonic, and septicaemic plague, and three human pandemics. Y. pestis remains endemic in many parts of North America, South America, Southeast Asia, and Africa, and a threat to human health. YpFabG shares a high degree of structural similarity with bacterial homologues, and the ketoreductase domain of the mammalian fatty acid synthase from both Homo sapiens and Sus scrofa. Structural characterisation of YpFabG, and comparison with other bacterial FabGs and the mammalian fatty acid synthase, provides a strong platform for virtual screening of potential inhibitors, rational drug design, and the development of new antimicrobial agents to combat Y. pestis infections.

  13. Establishing key components of yoga interventions for reducing depression and anxiety, and improving well-being: a Delphi method study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Manincor, Michael; Bensoussan, Alan; Smith, Caroline; Fahey, Paul; Bourchier, Suzanne

    2015-03-26

    Previous research suggests benefits of yoga in reducing depression and anxiety. However, common concerns in reviews of the research include lack of detail, rationale and consistency of approach of interventions used. Issues related to heterogeneity include amount, types and delivery of yoga interventions. This study aims to document consensus-based recommendations for consistency of yoga interventions for reducing depression and anxiety. The Delphi method was used to establish consensus from experienced yoga teachers. Thirty-three eligible teachers were invited to participate, from four different countries. Two rounds of an online survey were sent to participants. The first round sought initial views. The second round sought consensus on a summary of those views. Survey questions related to frequency and duration (dosage) of the yoga, approaches and techniques to be included or avoided, and training and experience for yoga teachers. Twenty-four teachers agreed to participate. Eighteen completed the second round (n = 18). General consensus (>75% of participants in agreement) was achieved on parameters of practice (dosage): an average of 30 to 40 minutes, to be done 5 times per week, over a period of 6 weeks. Numerous recommendations for yoga techniques to include or avoid were collected in the first round. The second round produced a consensus statement on those recommendations. Breath regulation and postures were considered very important or essential for people with depression; and relaxation, breath regulation and meditation being very important or essential for people with anxiety. Other recommended components also achieved consensus. There was also general consensus that it is very important or essential for teachers to have a minimum of 500 training hours over 2 years, at least 2 years teaching experience, training in developing personalised yoga practices, training in yoga for mental health, and professional supervision or mentoring. The Delphi process has

  14. Longitudinal integration of cultural components into a physician assistant program's clinical year may improve cultural competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrke, Barbara; De Oliveira, Kathleen; Scheel, Matthew H; Beck, Barbra; Hopp, Jane

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the efficacy of longitudinal integration of cultural components into the clinical year of a 2-year master of science in physician assistant studies (MSPAS) program. Students submitted cultural reflection papers, gave a medical case/cultural presentation, and participated in cultural awareness discussion groups throughout the clinical year. Students completed the same cultural awareness survey at the conclusion of their clinical year that they had completed at benchmarked intervals during their didactic year. Additionally, cultural competency was assessed during the students' summative objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) using a combination of the program's objectives and established professional standards. Qualitative data suggested that students recognized the importance of cultural competency in providing quality patient care and recognized that remaining culturally competent is an ongoing process. Linear trend analyses revealed significant positive relationships between survey response scores and time in the program. The OSCE's cultural assessment scores indicated cultural competency in broad, general categories, but scores declined as cultural categories narrowed and became more detailed. Continued integration of cultural awareness training and assessment throughout the clinical year of a physician assistant (PA) program may have a positive impact on improving cultural competency. PA programs seeking to improve cultural competency in their students should consider continued integration of cultural components throughout the clinical year.

  15. Medicaid: A Primer - Key Information on the Nation's Health Coverage Program for Low-Income People

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the program has been an important locus of innovation and improvement in health care delivery and payment. ... enabled the program to evolve and facilitated state innovation. What is Medicaid? Medicaid is the nation’s publicly ...

  16. Key Features of Management of Technology (MoT) Undergraduate Program in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsuddin, Alina; Abdullah, Nor Hazana; Wahab, Eta

    2011-01-01

    Management of Technology (MoT) Education is growing both in numbers and importance. There are more than 200 universities in the world that are offering MoT programs. However, these universities have taken different approaches with respect to the names and designs of the programs. In Malaysia, some of the programs are known as Technology…

  17. Interviewing Key Informants: Strategic Planning for a Global Public Health Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kun, Karen E.; Kassim, Anisa; Howze, Elizabeth; MacDonald, Goldie

    2013-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Sustainable Management Development Program (SMDP) partners with low- and middle-resource countries to develop management capacity so that effective global public health programs can be implemented and better health outcomes can be achieved. The program's impact however, was variable. Hence, there…

  18. Components of effective randomized controlled trials of hydrotherapy programs for fibromyalgia syndrome: A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Perraton, Luke; Machotka, Zuzana; Kumar, Saravana

    2009-01-01

    Luke Perraton, Zuzana Machotka, Saravana KumarInternational Centre for Allied Health Evidence, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, AustraliaAim: Previous systematic reviews have found hydrotherapy to be an effective management strategy for fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). The aim of this systematic review was to summarize the components of hydrotherapy programs used in randomized controlled trials.Method: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials was conducted. Onl...

  19. Review of the Eighth Year of the Partial Immersion Program at Key Elementary School, Arlington, Virginia, 1993-94.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barfield, Susan C.; Rhodes, Nancy C.

    The partial immersion program at Key Elementary School (Arlington, Virginia), where half the day is taught in English and half in Spanish, continued to be successful in its eighth year. Reasons for success include: dedication and in-depth understanding of immersion philosophy among principal, coordinator, teachers, and staff; innovations in both…

  20. Water in Star-forming Regions with the Herschel Space Observatory (WISH) : I. Overview of Key Program and First Results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dishoeck, E. F.; Kristensen, L. E.; Benz, A. O.; Bergin, E. A.; Caselli, P.; Cernicharo, J.; Herpin, F.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Johnstone, D.; Liseau, R.; Nisini, B.; Shipman, R.; Tafalla, M.; van der Tak, F.; Wyrowski, F.; Aikawa, Y.; Bachiller, R.; Baudry, A.; Benedettini, M.; Bjerkeli, P.; Blake, G. A.; Bontemps, S.; Braine, J.; Brinch, C.; Bruderer, S.; Chavarria, L.; Codella, C.; Daniel, F.; de Graauw, Th.; Deul, E.; di Giorgio, A. M.; Dominik, C.; Doty, S. D.; Dubernet, M. L.; Encrenaz, P.; Feuchtgruber, H.; Fich, M.; Frieswijk, W.; Fuente, A.; Giannini, T.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Helmich, F. P.; Herczeg, G. J.; Jacq, T.; Jorgensen, J. K.; Karska, A.; Kaufman, M. J.; Keto, E.; Larsson, B.; Lefloch, B.; Lis, D.; Marseille, M.; McCoey, C.; Melnick, G.; Neufeld, D.; Olberg, M.; Pagani, L.; Panic, O.; Parise, B.; Pearson, J. C.; Plume, R.; Risacher, C.; Salter, D.; Santiago-Garcia, J.; Saraceno, P.; Staeuber, P.; van Kempen, T. A.; Visser, R.; Viti, S.; Walmsley, M.; Wampfler, S. F.; Yildiz, U. A.

    Water In Star-forming regions with Herschel (WISH) is a key program on the Herschel Space Observatory designed to probe the physical and chemical structures of young stellar objects using water and related molecules and to follow the water abundance from collapsing clouds to planet-forming disks.

  1. Material testing facilities and programs for plasma-facing component testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsmeier, Ch.; Unterberg, B.; Coenen, J. W.; Doerner, R. P.; Greuner, H.; Kreter, A.; Linke, J.; Maier, H.

    2017-09-01

    Component development for operation in a large-scale fusion device requires thorough testing and qualification for the intended operational conditions. In particular environments are necessary which are comparable to the real operation conditions, allowing at the same time for in situ/in vacuo diagnostics and flexible operation, even beyond design limits during the testing. Various electron and neutral particle devices provide the capabilities for high heat load tests, suited for material samples and components from lab-scale dimensions up to full-size parts, containing toxic materials like beryllium, and being activated by neutron irradiation. To simulate the conditions specific to a fusion plasma both at the first wall and in the divertor of fusion devices, linear plasma devices allow for a test of erosion and hydrogen isotope recycling behavior under well-defined and controlled conditions. Finally, the complex conditions in a fusion device (including the effects caused by magnetic fields) are exploited for component and material tests by exposing test mock-ups or material samples to a fusion plasma by manipulator systems. They allow for easy exchange of test pieces in a tokamak or stellarator device, without opening the vessel. Such a chain of test devices and qualification procedures is required for the development of plasma-facing components which then can be successfully operated in future fusion power devices. The various available as well as newly planned devices and test stands, together with their specific capabilities, are presented in this manuscript. Results from experimental programs on test facilities illustrate their significance for the qualification of plasma-facing materials and components. An extended set of references provides access to the current status of material and component testing capabilities in the international fusion programs.

  2. The I.A.G./A.I.G. SEDIBUD (Sediment Budgets in Cold Environments) Program (2005 - 2017): Key activities and outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beylich, Achim A.

    2017-04-01

    Amplified climate change and ecological sensitivity of high-latitude and high-altitude cold climate environments has been highlighted as a key global environmental issue. Projected climate change in largely undisturbed cold regions is expected to alter melt-season duration and intensity, along with the number of extreme rainfall events, total annual precipitation and the balance between snowfall and rainfall. Similarly, changes to the thermal balance are expected to reduce the extent of permafrost and seasonal ground frost and increase active-layer depths. These combined effects will undoubtedly change Earth surface environments in cold regions and will alter the fluxes of sediments, solutes and nutrients. However, the absence of quantitative data and coordinated analysis to understand the sensitivity of the Earth surface environment are acute in cold regions. Contemporary cold climate environments generally provide the opportunity to identify solute and sedimentary systems where anthropogenic impacts are still less important than the effects of climate change. Accordingly, it is still possible to develop a library of baseline fluvial yields and sedimentary budgets before the natural environment is completely transformed. The SEDIBUD (Sediment Budgets in Cold Environments) Program, building on the European Science Foundation (ESF) Network SEDIFLUX (Sedimentary Source-to-Sink Fluxes in Cold Environments, since 2004) was formed in 2005 as a new Program (Working Group) of the International Association of Geomorphologists (I.A.G./A.I.G.) to address this still existing key knowledge gap. SEDIBUD (2005-2017) has currently about 400 members worldwide and the Steering Committee of this international program is composed of eleven scientists from ten different countries. The central research question of this global program is to: Assess and model the contemporary sedimentary fluxes in cold climates, with emphasis on both particulate and dissolved components. Research carried

  3. Low-cost manufacturing of the point focus concentrating module and its key component, the Fresnel lens. Final subcontract report, 31 January 1991--6 May 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saifee, T.; Konnerth, A. III [Solar Kinetics, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)

    1991-11-01

    Solar Kinetics, Inc. (SKI) has been developing point-focus concentrating PV modules since 1986. SKI is currently in position to manufacture between 200 to 600 kilowatts annually of the current design by a combination of manual and semi-automated methods. This report reviews the current status of module manufacture and specifies the required approach to achieve a high-volume manufacturing capability and low cost. The approach taken will include process development concurrent with module design for automated manufacturing. The current effort reviews the major manufacturing costs and identifies components and processes whose improvements would produce the greatest effect on manufacturability and cost reduction. The Fresnel lens is one such key component. Investigating specific alternative manufacturing methods and sources has substantially reduced the lens costs and has exceeded the DOE cost-reduction goals. 15 refs.

  4. 77 FR 37060 - Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources (CIKR) Asset Protection Technical Assistance Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-20

    ... information provided. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources (CIKR) Asset..., Office of Infrastructure Protection, Infrastructure Information Collection Division. Title: Critical...] [FR Doc No: 2012-15014] DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY [Docket No. DHS-2012-0002] Critical...

  5. Key Elements of Academic Programs Management Management of Postgraduate Virtual Courses at Universidad EAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Benavides Gallego

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Rev.esc.adm.neg The main focus of this research study is the management of postgraduate academic programs offered at Univerdsidad EAN in virtual learning. The management processes applied to all types of organizations involve educational institutions. In such institutions, one of the principal actions of their management is to adminístrate academic programs, even though the focus of this study is postgraduate courses, specially the particular issues found in specialization courses and master degree programs base don virtual methodolgy, in which particular features and differences are described concerning the management of the academic programs offered having a face to face methodology.

  6. TITAN: a computer program for accident occurrence frequency analyses by component Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomura, Yasushi [Department of Fuel Cycle Safety Research, Nuclear Safety Research Center, Tokai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Tamaki, Hitoshi [Department of Safety Research Technical Support, Tokai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Kanai, Shigeru [Fuji Research Institute Corporation, Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-04-01

    In a plant system consisting of complex equipments and components for a reprocessing facility, there might be grace time between an initiating event and a resultant serious accident, allowing operating personnel to take remedial actions, thus, terminating the ongoing accident sequence. A component Monte Carlo simulation computer program TITAN has been developed to analyze such a complex reliability model including the grace time without any difficulty to obtain an accident occurrence frequency. Firstly, basic methods for the component Monte Carlo simulation is introduced to obtain an accident occurrence frequency, and then, the basic performance such as precision, convergence, and parallelization of calculation, is shown through calculation of a prototype accident sequence model. As an example to illustrate applicability to a real scale plant model, a red oil explosion in a German reprocessing plant model is simulated to show that TITAN can give an accident occurrence frequency with relatively good accuracy. Moreover, results of uncertainty analyses by TITAN are rendered to show another performance, and a proposal is made for introducing of a new input-data format to adapt the component Monte Carlo simulation. The present paper describes the calculational method, performance, applicability to a real scale, and new proposal for the TITAN code. In the Appendixes, a conventional analytical method is shown to avoid complex and laborious calculation to obtain a strict solution of accident occurrence frequency, compared with Monte Carlo method. The user's manual and the list/structure of program are also contained in the Appendixes to facilitate TITAN computer program usage. (author)

  7. Implementing Writing Assessment in a Degree Completion Program: Key Issues and Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, Jeff E.; Allred, Ellen R.; Hunt, Rob

    2010-01-01

    This article details the advantages and challenges of implementing writing assessment in a degree completion program; it describes the steps involved in the writing assessment process. Study results demonstrate that graduates from a degree completion program generally have adequate writing skills; nevertheless, many could improve their…

  8. Computer Programs in Marine Science: Key to Oceanographic Records Documentation No. 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firestone, Mary A.

    Presented are abstracts of 700 computer programs in marine science. The programs listed are categorized under a wide range of headings which include physical oceanography, chemistry, coastal and estuarine processes, biology, pollution, air-sea interaction and heat budget, navigation and charting, curve fitting, and applied mathematics. The…

  9. A Solid Foundation: Key Capacities of Construction Pre-Apprenticeship Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmer, Matt; Blair, Amy; Gerber, Allison

    2012-01-01

    This publication shares research from site visits conducted to construction pre-apprenticeship programs in Baltimore, Hartford, Milwaukee and Portland (OR). Findings from the site visits, which included interviews and focus groups with pre-apprenticeship program staff, public officials, philanthropic leaders, construction industry leaders and…

  10. NASALife-Component Fatigue and Creep Life Prediction Program and Illustrative Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Mital, Subodh K.; Gyekenyesi, John Z.

    2005-01-01

    NASALife is a life prediction program for propulsion system components made of ceramic matrix composites (CMC) under cyclic thermo-mechanical loading and creep rupture conditions. Although, the primary focus was for CMC components the underlying methodologies are equally applicable to other material systems as well. The program references data for low cycle fatigue (LCF), creep rupture, and static material properties as part of the life prediction process. Multiaxial stresses are accommodated by Von Mises based methods and a Walker model is used to address mean stress effects. Varying loads are reduced by the Rainflow counting method. Lastly, damage due to cyclic loading (Miner s rule) and creep are combined to determine the total damage per mission and the number of missions the component can survive before failure are calculated. Illustration of code usage is provided through example problem of a CMC turbine stator vane made of melt-infiltrated, silicon carbide fiber-reinforced, silicon carbide matrix composite (MI SiC/SiC)

  11. Coastal Mapping Program Project FL1305: CEDAR KEY TO CLEARWATER, FL.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The objective of the Coastal Mapping Program is to provide surveying and mapping information of our nation's coastline. This shoreline mapping effort also supports...

  12. Integrating organizational development skills with community organization practice: the key to successful national health care programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunatilake, S; Forouzesh, M R

    1989-01-01

    The article describes the developmental stages of a health care project from the inception as a demonstration project until its establishment as a large scale national program. The skills and competencies required of a project administrator during the demonstration stage are more related to the practice of community organization. However, in expanding a demonstration project to a large scale national program, these administrators are confronted with a multitude of bureaucratic and organizational constraints. The skills and competencies required of a program manager at this stage are best grouped under the field of organizational development. The failure of many large programs can be traced to the lack of organizational development skills among those involved in managing them. The implications for organizational development training within the curriculum of instruction in health education are also discussed.

  13. Key Informants' Perceptions on the Implementation of a National Program for Improving Nutritional Status of Children in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghodsi, Delaram; Omidvar, Nasrin; Rashidian, Arash; Raghfar, Hossein; Eini-Zinab, Hassan; Ebrahimi, Marziyeh

    2016-01-01

    Childhood malnutrition is a major public health issue. Multidisciplinary approach for Improvement of Nutritional Status of Children in Iran was implemented in order to reduce malnutrition among children. This study aimed to evaluate the implementation aspect of the program and to explore key informants' perceptions and experience regarding the factors affected its implementation. Data were collected through the review of secondary data and semistructured interviews at national, province, and local levels. Four layers of key informants were selected purposefully for interviewing, including policymakers, senior nutrition officers, head of Hygiene, Remedy and Insurance Affairs in Imam Khomeini Relief Foundation, and community health workers. Qualitative content analysis was carried out based on Supporting the Use of Research Evidence framework and Tailored Implementation for Chronic Diseases' checklist to interpret the viewpoints of the study participants. Results showed that the program had successes in improving mother's knowledge on health, nutrition, and child care through health system and increased families' access to food, but there were some aspects that affected program's implementation. Some of these factors are the lack of clarity in the program's protocol and indicators, human shortage and inadequate financial resources, poor facilities, inattention to staff motivation, insufficient commitment among different sections, poor communication and supervision among different executive sections, and program protocols designing regardless of practical condition. Based on the results, top-down approach in policymaking and inadequate financial and human resources were responsible for most of the challenges encountered in the implementation.

  14. A component analysis of an alcohol and drug program: employee education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLatchie, B H; Grey, P M; Johns, Y; Lomp, K G

    1981-07-01

    The present study represents an attempt to evaluate a specific component of an alcohol and drug program, employee education. Two groups of employees at a moderate-size manufacturing plant in Southern Ontario were surveyed as to their alcohol knowledge prior to, and following, an educational seminar. A group of 161 hourly rate employees and a group of 61 front-line supervisors, department heads, shop stewards and union bargaining committee members participated in the study. It was found that educational seminars of relatively brief duration are an effective means of increasing employees' alcohol knowledge and awareness, their familiarity with a company's alcohol and drug policy, and the likelihood of their using established company programs for substance abuse.

  15. Advanced Diesel Engine Component Development Program, final report - tasks 4-14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaushal, T.S.; Weber, K.E.

    1994-11-01

    The Advanced Diesel Engine Component Development (ADECD) Program is a multi-year, multi-phase effort to develop and demonstrate the critical technology needed to advance the heavy-duty low heat rejection (LHR) engine concept for the long-haul, heavy-duty truck market. The ADECD Program has been partitioned into two phases. The first phase, Phase 1, was completed in 1986, resulting in definition of the Advanced Diesel Reference Engine (ADRE)III. The second phase, Phase 11/111, examines the feasibility of the ADRE concepts for application to the on-highway diesel engine. Phase 11/111 is currently underway. This project is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies. The work has been performed by the Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) under Contract DEN3-329 with the NASA Lewis Research Center, who provide project management and technical direction.

  16. Writing-skills Intervention Programming and its being a Component of Response to Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael William Dunn

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available For a struggling writer, step-by-step instruction can be a helpful means to manage organizing and producing elaborate text. This mixed-methods project offered four struggling writers a mnemonic strategy called Ask, Reflect, Text (ART in 45-minute sessions over 22 days. The second- and fourth-grade students attended a public school in the US Pacific Northwest. As a parallel component to the project, the students’ teachers and intervention specialist met with the author for 4 one-hour sessions to discuss: 1 the children’s intervention programming and progress, and 2 the paradigm of response to intervention (RTI and their thoughts about its feasibility in classrooms. The end-of-project assessment data demonstrated that the children made progress with writing skills, but the teachers and intervention specialist felt that support personnel would be needed to manage RTI-type intervention programming in general education classrooms.

  17. Algorithms and programs of dynamic mixture estimation unified approach to different types of components

    CERN Document Server

    Nagy, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a general theoretical background for constructing the recursive Bayesian estimation algorithms for mixture models. It collects the recursive algorithms for estimating dynamic mixtures of various distributions and brings them in the unified form, providing a scheme for constructing the estimation algorithm for a mixture of components modeled by distributions with reproducible statistics. It offers the recursive estimation of dynamic mixtures, which are free of iterative processes and close to analytical solutions as much as possible. In addition, these methods can be used online and simultaneously perform learning, which improves their efficiency during estimation. The book includes detailed program codes for solving the presented theoretical tasks. Codes are implemented in the open source platform for engineering computations. The program codes given serve to illustrate the theory and demonstrate the work of the included algorithms.

  18. Effect of a focused and directed continuing education program on prehospital skill maintenance in key resuscitation areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lorenzo, Robert A; Abbott, Cynthia A

    2007-10-01

    US Army Medics (formerly MOS 91B) received training similar to EMT-B level but were not required to be certified. Medics additionally received training in such skills as intravenous (i.v.) line insertion and fluid resuscitation. Continuing education, although encouraged, was not required. The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a focused and directed psychomotor skills continuing education program in maintaining skills performance over a 6-month period in four key resuscitation areas. The education effect was the focus of the analysis. The study population was a convenience sample of medics with 1-4 years experience assigned to field units at Ft. Hood, TX. Subjects received a pretest evaluation of skills performance in four key areas using standard NREMT skill sheets. Scores on skill evaluations represent the percentage of steps correctly performed. After pretest evaluations, subjects were required to complete a comprehensive and focused continuing education program that emphasized skill practice. After the 6-month pretest, a post-test was conducted. Pre- and post-test scores for each student were matched. A one-tailed Student's t-test was used to compare results before and after the intervention, with statistical significance set at p skills of i.v. insertion, airway management, patient assessment, and bleeding control was 79 +/- 11, 73 +/- 14, 44 +/- 22, and 57 +/- 13, respectively. The post-test performance for these same skills increased (p education program that emphasizes skill practice in key resuscitation areas can improve skills performance.

  19. Residential immersive life skills programs for youth with disabilities: service providers' perceptions of experiential benefits and key program features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Gillian; McPherson, Amy; Kingsnorth, Shauna; Stewart, Debra; Glencross-Eimantas, Tanya; Gorter, Jan Willem; Jones-Galley, Kimberlea; Morrison, Andrea; Isihi, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    The objective was to determine service providers' perceptions of the experiential benefits of residential immersive life skills (RILS) programs for youth with disabilities, along with important program features. Thirty-seven service providers from three RILS programs took part in qualitative interviews. Themes were derived using a phenomenological approach. There were perceived benefits for youth, and also for parents and service providers. Study themes concerned the process of youth empowerment, life-changing experiences for youth and parents, and changed service provider views affecting practice. Youth changes were attributed to the residential group format and afforded opportunities, which included being away from home, navigating public transportation, directing attendant services, and sharing intense learning and social experiences with peers. Youth were seen to experience important personal changes in life skills, self-confidence, self-understandings, and self-advocacy. Perceived benefits for parents included realizations concerning their child's abilities and new hope for the future. Service providers indicated changes in their knowledge, perspectives, and approach to practice. The findings suggest that life skills programs should be intentionally designed to provide challenging experiential opportunities that motivate youth to engage in new life directions by providing new insights, self-realizations, and positive yet realistic views of the future. Service providers indicated the importance of challenging, real-world experiential opportunities that provide youth with disabilities with new insights, self-realizations, and positive yet realistic views of the future. Important experiential opportunities for youth included being away from home, navigating public transportation, directing attendant care, and sharing intense learning and social experiences with peers. The findings provide preliminary qualitative evidence that life skills programs should be

  20. Key Concepts in an Educational Program Conceptos claves en un programa educativo Conceitos chave em um programa educativo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ARANGO MARTÍNEZ CATHERINE

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available

    The results of the review are hereby presented on literature regarding assertive communication concepts, feelings and visions of nursing as a reciprocal and a simultaneous support for an educational program based on intervention with adolescents to promote responsible procreation. The present literature review took Ebsco-Host and Scielo as databases.

    Conclusion: Assertive communication is a learned social skill, which needs to be strengthened in as much as programs of sexual and reproductive health are concerned. Affection is a motivator for transmission and acquisition of knowledge in sexual and in reproductive education matters; the vision of reciprocity allows for interaction between the adolescent and the nurse and is a necessary component for mutual construction of self - care in this area, and the vision of simultaneity integrates the context as a key element in addressing the issue within a educational program.

    Se presentan los resultados de la revisión de literatura sobre los conceptos comunicación asertiva, afecto y las visiones de enfermería de reciprocidad y simultaneidad como sustento base de un programa educativo de intervención con adolescentes para promover la responsabilidad procreativa. La revisión bibliográfica sistemática tomó como bases de datos Ebsco-Host y Scielo.

    Conclusiones: la comunicación asertiva es una habilidad social aprendida, que es necesario fortalecer en los programas de salud sexual y reproductiva; el afecto es un elemento motivador para la transmisión y apropiación de conocimientos en educación sexual y reproductiva; la visión de reciprocidad orienta la interacción entre el (la adolescente y la (el enfermera (o componente necesario para una construcción mutua del autocuidado en este ámbito, y la visión de simultaneidad integra el contexto como elemento

  1. Conceptos claves en un programa educativo Conceitos chave em um programa educativo Key Concepts in an Educational Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MYRIAM PATRICIA PARDO TORRES

    2010-10-01

    are hereby presented on literature regarding assertive communication concepts, feelings and visions of nursing as a reciprocal and a simultaneous support for an educational program based on intervention with adolescents to promote responsible procreation. The present literature review took Ebsco-Host and Scielo as databases. Conclusion: Assertive communication is a learned social skill, which needs to be strengthened in as much as programs of sexual and reproductive health are concerned. Affection is a motivator for transmission and acquisition of knowledge in sexual and in reproductive education matters; the vision of reciprocity allows for interaction between the adolescent and the nurse and is a necessary component for mutual construction of self - care in this area, and the vision of simultaneity integrates the context as a key element in addressing the issue within a educational program.

  2. The key roles of four Experimental Forests in the LTSP International Research Program [Chapter 23

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert F. Powers; David H. Alban; Robert Denner; John D. Elioff; Gary O. Fiddler; Deborah Page-Dumroese; Felix Ponder; Allan E. Tiarks; Peter E. Avers; Richard G. Cline; Nelson S. Loftus

    2014-01-01

    Four Experimental Forests were pivotal in piloting the long-term soil productivity (LTSP) cooperative research program - one of the most successful and extensive collaborative science efforts yet undertaken by the USDA Forest Service. Launched on the Palustris, Challenge, Marcell, and Priest River Experimental Forests, LTSP traces to a seminal discussion during a field...

  3. Elementary School-Located Influenza Vaccine Programs: Key Stakeholder Experiences from Initiation to Continuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Valerie; Rousculp, Matthew D.; Price, Mark; Coles, Theresa; Therrien, Michelle; Griffin, Jane; Hollis, Kelly; Toback, Seth

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the initiation and logistics, funding, perceived barriers and benefits, and disruption of school activities by school-located influenza vaccination (SLIV) programs conducted during the 2008-2009 influenza season. Seventy-two interviews using a structured protocol were conducted with 26 teachers, 16 school administrators, and 30…

  4. An Innovative Continuing Nursing Education Program Targeting Key Geriatric Conditions for Hospitalized Older People in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Lily Dongxia; Shen, Jun; Wu, Haifeng; Ding, Fu; He, Xizhen; Zhu, Yueping

    2013-01-01

    A lack of knowledge in registered nurses about geriatric conditions is one of the major factors that contribute to these conditions being overlooked in hospitalized older people. In China, an innovative geriatric continuing nursing education program aimed at developing registered nurses' understanding of the complex care needs of hospitalized…

  5. Who am I? Key influences on the formation of academic identity within a faculty development program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieff, Susan; Baker, Lindsay; Mori, Brenda; Egan-Lee, Eileen; Chin, Kevin; Reeves, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Professional identity encompasses how individuals understand themselves, interpret experiences, present themselves, wish to be perceived, and are recognized by the broader professional community. For health professional and health science educators, their 'academic' professional identity is situated within their academic community and plays an integral role in their well being and productivity. This study aims to explore factors that contribute to the formation and growth of academic identity (AI) within the context of a longitudinal faculty development program. Using a qualitative case study approach, data from three cohorts of a 2-year faculty development program were explored and analyzed for emerging issues and themes related to AI. Factors salient to the formation of AI were grouped into three major domains: personal (cognitive and emotional factors unique to each individual); relational (connections and interactions with others); and contextual (the program itself and external work environments). Faculty development initiatives not only aim to develop knowledge, skills, and attitudes, but also contribute to the formation of academic identities in a number of different ways. Facilitating the growth of AI has the potential to increase faculty motivation, satisfaction, and productivity. Faculty developers need to be mindful of factors within the personal, relational, and contextual domains when considering issues of program design and implementation.

  6. Structured-Exercise-Program (SEP): An Effective Training Approach to Key Healthcare Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miazi, Mosharaf H.; Hossain, Taleb; Tiroyakgosi, C.

    2014-01-01

    Structured exercise program is an effective approach to technology dependent resource limited healthcare area for professional training. The result of a recently conducted data analysis revealed this. The aim of the study is to know the effectiveness of the applied approach that was designed to observe the level of adherence to newly adopted…

  7. An Integrative Approach for Mapping Differentially Expressed Genes and Network Components Using Novel Parameters to Elucidate Key Regulatory Genes in Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Manika; Gupta, Rajinder; Moussa, Ahmed; Singh, Tiratha Raj

    2015-01-01

    For examining the intricate biological processes concerned with colorectal cancer (CRC), a systems biology approach integrating several biological components and other influencing factors is essential to understand. We performed a comprehensive system level analysis for CRC which assisted in unravelling crucial network components and many regulatory elements through a coordinated view. Using this integrative approach, the perceptive of complexity hidden in a biological phenomenon is extensively simplified. The microarray analyses facilitated differential expression of 631 significant genes employed in the progression of disease and supplied interesting associated up and down regulated genes like jun, fos and mapk1. The transcriptional regulation of these genes was deliberated widely by examining transcription factors such as hnf4, nr2f1, znf219 and dr1 which directly influence the expression. Further, interactions of these genes/proteins were evaluated and crucial network motifs were detected to associate with the pathophysiology of CRC. The available standard statistical parameters such as z-score, p-value and significance profile were explored for the identification of key signatures from CRC pathway whereas a few novel parameters representing over-represented structures were also designed in the study. The applied approach revealed 5 key genes i.e. kras, araf, pik3r5, ralgds and akt3 via our novel designed parameters illustrating high statistical significance. These novel parameters can assist in scrutinizing candidate markers for diseases having known biological pathways. Further, investigating and targeting these proposed genes for experimental validations, instead being spellbound by the complicated pathway will certainly endow valuable insight in a well-timed systematic understanding of CRC.

  8. An Integrative Approach for Mapping Differentially Expressed Genes and Network Components Using Novel Parameters to Elucidate Key Regulatory Genes in Colorectal Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manika Sehgal

    Full Text Available For examining the intricate biological processes concerned with colorectal cancer (CRC, a systems biology approach integrating several biological components and other influencing factors is essential to understand. We performed a comprehensive system level analysis for CRC which assisted in unravelling crucial network components and many regulatory elements through a coordinated view. Using this integrative approach, the perceptive of complexity hidden in a biological phenomenon is extensively simplified. The microarray analyses facilitated differential expression of 631 significant genes employed in the progression of disease and supplied interesting associated up and down regulated genes like jun, fos and mapk1. The transcriptional regulation of these genes was deliberated widely by examining transcription factors such as hnf4, nr2f1, znf219 and dr1 which directly influence the expression. Further, interactions of these genes/proteins were evaluated and crucial network motifs were detected to associate with the pathophysiology of CRC. The available standard statistical parameters such as z-score, p-value and significance profile were explored for the identification of key signatures from CRC pathway whereas a few novel parameters representing over-represented structures were also designed in the study. The applied approach revealed 5 key genes i.e. kras, araf, pik3r5, ralgds and akt3 via our novel designed parameters illustrating high statistical significance. These novel parameters can assist in scrutinizing candidate markers for diseases having known biological pathways. Further, investigating and targeting these proposed genes for experimental validations, instead being spellbound by the complicated pathway will certainly endow valuable insight in a well-timed systematic understanding of CRC.

  9. Keeping community health workers in Uganda motivated: key challenges, facilitators, and preferred program inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunie, Aurélie; Wamala-Mucheri, Patricia; Otterness, Conrad; Akol, Angela; Chen, Mario; Bufumbo, Leonard; Weaver, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In the face of global health worker shortages, community health workers (CHWs) are an important health care delivery strategy for underserved populations. In Uganda, community-based programs often use volunteer CHWs to extend services, including family planning, in rural areas. This study examined factors related to CHW motivation and level of activity in 3 family planning programs in Uganda. Methods: Data were collected between July and August 2011, and sources comprised 183 surveys with active CHWs, in-depth interviews (IDIs) with 43 active CHWs and 5 former CHWs, and service statistics records. Surveys included a discrete choice experiment (DCE) to elicit CHW preferences for selected program inputs. Results: Service statistics indicated an average of 56 visits with family planning clients per surveyed CHW over the 3-month period prior to data collection. In the survey, new skills and knowledge, perceived impact on the community, and enhanced status were the main positive aspects of the job reported by CHWs; the main challenges related to transportation. Multivariate analyses identified 2 correlates of CHWs being highly vs. less active (in terms of number of client visits): experiencing problems with supplies and not collaborating with peers. DCE results showed that provision of a package including a T-shirt, badge, and bicycle was the program input CHWs preferred, followed by a mobile phone (without airtime). IDI data reinforced and supplemented these quantitative findings. Social prestige, social responsibility, and aspirations for other opportunities were important motivators, while main challenges related to transportation and commodity stockouts. CHWs had complex motivations for wanting better compensation, including offsetting time and transportation costs, providing for their families, and feeling appreciated for their efforts. Conclusion: Volunteer CHW programs in Uganda and elsewhere need to carefully consider appropriate combinations of

  10. Keeping community health workers in Uganda motivated: key challenges, facilitators, and preferred program inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunie, Aurélie; Wamala-Mucheri, Patricia; Otterness, Conrad; Akol, Angela; Chen, Mario; Bufumbo, Leonard; Weaver, Mark

    2014-02-01

    In the face of global health worker shortages, community health workers (CHWs) are an important health care delivery strategy for underserved populations. In Uganda, community-based programs often use volunteer CHWs to extend services, including family planning, in rural areas. This study examined factors related to CHW motivation and level of activity in 3 family planning programs in Uganda. Data were collected between July and August 2011, and sources comprised 183 surveys with active CHWs, in-depth interviews (IDIs) with 43 active CHWs and 5 former CHWs, and service statistics records. Surveys included a discrete choice experiment (DCE) to elicit CHW preferences for selected program inputs. Service statistics indicated an average of 56 visits with family planning clients per surveyed CHW over the 3-month period prior to data collection. In the survey, new skills and knowledge, perceived impact on the community, and enhanced status were the main positive aspects of the job reported by CHWs; the main challenges related to transportation. Multivariate analyses identified 2 correlates of CHWs being highly vs. less active (in terms of number of client visits): experiencing problems with supplies and not collaborating with peers. DCE results showed that provision of a package including a T-shirt, badge, and bicycle was the program input CHWs preferred, followed by a mobile phone (without airtime). IDI data reinforced and supplemented these quantitative findings. Social prestige, social responsibility, and aspirations for other opportunities were important motivators, while main challenges related to transportation and commodity stockouts. CHWs had complex motivations for wanting better compensation, including offsetting time and transportation costs, providing for their families, and feeling appreciated for their efforts. Volunteer CHW programs in Uganda and elsewhere need to carefully consider appropriate combinations of financial and nonfinancial inputs for optimal

  11. Providing Feedback, Orientation and Opportunities for Reflection as Key Elements for Successful Mentoring Programs: Reviewing a Program for Future Business Education Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Riebenbauer

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The introduction to teaching is critical for novice teachers. Near the end of their master’s program, students of Business Education and Development in Austria spend one semester at an assigned school. They are introduced to teaching, while being assisted by peer students, mentoring teachers, and a companion course. Mentors receive special training and preparation in advance, thus contributing to a high quality mentoring program. The program is organized threefold: (1 providing feedback, (2 opportunities for reflection and (3 career orientation. The purpose of this paper is to assess key elements of successful mentoring programs and to question which competences of mentors contribute most to the success of those programs. Between 2012 and 2015, 188 persons (student teachers and their mentors responded to an online survey at the end of their mentoring program. Additionally, data from a study (1,245 questionnaires regarding the student teachers’ perception of their own competence was utilized, allowing for a comparison of student teacher confidence in their abilities before and after the mentoring program. The present results provide insight into the key elements of successful mentoring programs; both from a student teacher’s and mentor’s perspective. During the semester, students showed an increase regarding their self-perception of their professional competences. It was found that students and mentoring teachers valued feedback after each lesson more than feedback in regular meetings. Opportunities for reflection (e.g. exchange with peer students, learning diaries were considered helpful. The mentoring program helped students to decide whether to become a teacher or not.

  12. International Solar-Terrestrial Program Key Parameter Visualization Tool Data: USA_NASA_DDF_ISTP_IM_KP_0206

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocuna, M. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Baker, D. N.; Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Mish, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science Program (GGS) is designed to improve greatly the understanding of the flow of energy, mass and momentum in the solar-terrestrial environment with particular emphasis on "Geospace". The Global Geospace Science Program is the US contribution to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. This CD-ROM issue describes the WIND and POLAR spacecraft, the scientific experiments carried onboard, the Theoretical and Ground Based investigations which constitute the US Global Geospace Science Program and the ISTP Data Systems which support the data acquisition and analysis effort. The International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) Key Parameter Visualization Tool (KPVT), provided on the CD-ROM, was developed at the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF). The KPVT is a generic software package for visualizing the key parameter data produced from all ISTP missions, interactively and simultaneously. The tool is designed to facilitate correlative displays of ISTP data from multiple spacecraft and instruments, and thus the selection of candidate events and data quality control. The software, written in IDL, includes a graphical/widget user interface, and runs on many platforms, including various UNIX workstations, Alpha/Open VMS, Macintosh (680x0 and PowerPC), and PC/Windows NT, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95.

  13. International Solar-Terrestrial Program Key Parameter Visualization Tool Data: USA_NASA_DDF_ISTP_KP_0223

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocuna, M. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Baker, D. N.; Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Mish, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science Program (GGS) is designed to improve greatly the understanding of the flow of energy, mass and momentum in the solar-terrestrial environment with particular emphasis on "Geospace". The Global Geospace Science Program is the US contribution to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. This CD-ROM issue describes the WIND and POLAR spacecraft, the scientific experiments carried onboard, the Theoretical and Ground Based investigations which constitute the US Global Geospace Science Program and the ISTP Data Systems which support the data acquisition and analysis effort. The International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) Key Parameter Visualization Tool (KPVT), provided on the CD-ROM, was developed at the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF). The KPVT is a generic software package for visualizing the key parameter data produced from all ISTP missions, interactively and simultaneously. The tool is designed to facilitate correlative displays of ISTP data from multiple spacecraft and instruments, and thus the selection of candidate events and data quality control. The software, written in IDL, includes a graphical/widget user interface, and runs on many platforms, including various UNIX workstations, Alpha/Open VMS, Macintosh (680x0 and PowerPC), and PC/Windows NT, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95.

  14. International Solar-Terrestrial Program Key Parameter Visualization Tool Data: USA_NASA_DDF_ISTP_IM_KP_0204

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocuna, M. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Baker, D. N.; Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Mish, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science Program (GGS) is designed to improve greatly the understanding of the flow of energy, mass and momentum in the solar-terrestrial environment with particular emphasis on "Geospace". The Global Geospace Science Program is the US contribution to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. This CD-ROM issue describes the WIND and POLAR spacecraft, the scientific experiments carried onboard, the Theoretical and Ground Based investigations which constitute the US Global Geospace Science Program and the ISTP Data Systems which support the data acquisition and analysis effort. The International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) Key Parameter Visualization Tool (KPVT), provided on the CD-ROM, was developed at the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF). The KPVT is a generic software package for visualizing the key parameter data produced from all ISTP missions, interactively and simultaneously. The tool is designed to facilitate correlative displays of ISTP data from multiple spacecraft and instruments, and thus the selection of candidate events and data quality control. The software, written in IDL, includes a graphical/widget user interface, and runs on many platforms, including various UNIX workstations, Alpha/Open VMS, Macintosh (680x0 and PowerPC), and PC/Windows NT, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95.

  15. International Solar-Terrestrial Program Key Parameter Visualization Tool Data: USA_NASA_DDF_ISTP_KP_0227

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocuna, M. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Baker, D. N.; Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Mish, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science Program (GGS) is designed to improve greatly the understanding of the flow of energy, mass and momentum in the solar-terrestrial environment with particular emphasis on "Geospace". The Global Geospace Science Program is the US contribution to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. This CD-ROM issue describes the WIND and POLAR spacecraft, the scientific experiments carried onboard, the Theoretical and Ground Based investigations which constitute the US Global Geospace Science Program and the ISTP Data Systems which support the data acquisition and analysis effort. The International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) Key Parameter Visualization Tool (KPVT), provided on the CD-ROM, was developed at the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF). The KPVT is a generic software package for visualizing the key parameter data produced from all ISTP missions, interactively and simultaneously. The tool is designed to facilitate correlative displays of ISTP data from multiple spacecraft and instruments, and thus the selection of candidate events and data quality control. The software, written in IDL, includes a graphical/widget user interface, and runs on many platforms, including various UNIX workstations, Alpha/Open VMS, Macintosh (680x0 and PowerPC), and PC/Windows NT, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95.

  16. International Solar-Terrestrial Program Key Parameter Visualization Tool Data: USA_NASA_DDF_ISTP_KP_0255

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocuna, M. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Baker, D. N.; Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Mish, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science Program (GGS) is designed to improve greatly the understanding of the flow of energy, mass and momentum in the solar-terrestrial environment with particular emphasis on "Geospace". The Global Geospace Science Program is the US contribution to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. This CD-ROM issue describes the WIND and POLAR spacecraft, the scientific experiments carried onboard, the Theoretical and Ground Based investigations which constitute the US Global Geospace Science Program and the ISTP Data Systems which support the data acquisition and analysis effort. The International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) Key Parameter Visualization Tool (KPVT), provided on the CD-ROM, was developed at the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF). The KPVT is a generic software package for visualizing the key parameter data produced from all ISTP missions, interactively and simultaneously. The tool is designed to facilitate correlative displays of ISTP data from multiple spacecraft and instruments, and thus the selection of candidate events and data quality control. The software, written in IDL, includes a graphical/widget user interface, and runs on many platforms, including various UNIX workstations, Alpha/Open VMS, Macintosh (680x0 and PowerPC), and PC/Windows NT, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95.

  17. International Solar-Terrestrial Program Key Parameter Visualization Tool Data: USA_NASA_DDF_ISTP_KP_0226

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocuna, M. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Baker, D. N.; Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Mish, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science Program (GGS) is designed to improve greatly the understanding of the flow of energy, mass and momentum in the solar-terrestrial environment with particular emphasis on "Geospace". The Global Geospace Science Program is the US contribution to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. This CD-ROM issue describes the WIND and POLAR spacecraft, the scientific experiments carried onboard, the Theoretical and Ground Based investigations which constitute the US Global Geospace Science Program and the ISTP Data Systems which support the data acquisition and analysis effort. The International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) Key Parameter Visualization Tool (KPVT), provided on the CD-ROM, was developed at the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF). The KPVT is a generic software package for visualizing the key parameter data produced from all ISTP missions, interactively and simultaneously. The tool is designed to facilitate correlative displays of ISTP data from multiple spacecraft and instruments, and thus the selection of candidate events and data quality control. The software, written in IDL, includes a graphical/widget user interface, and runs on many platforms, including various UNIX workstations, Alpha/Open VMS, Macintosh (680x0 and PowerPC), and PC/Windows NT, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95.

  18. International Solar-Terrestrial Program Key Parameter Visualization Tool Data: USA_NASA_DDF_ISTP_IM_KP_0215

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocuna, M. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Baker, D. N.; Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Mish, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science Program (GGS) is designed to improve greatly the understanding of the flow of energy, mass and momentum in the solar-terrestrial environment with particular emphasis on "Geospace". The Global Geospace Science Program is the US contribution to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. This CD-ROM issue describes the WIND and POLAR spacecraft, the scientific experiments carried onboard, the Theoretical and Ground Based investigations which constitute the US Global Geospace Science Program and the ISTP Data Systems which support the data acquisition and analysis effort. The International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) Key Parameter Visualization Tool (KPVT), provided on the CD-ROM, was developed at the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF). The KPVT is a generic software package for visualizing the key parameter data produced from all ISTP missions, interactively and simultaneously. The tool is designed to facilitate correlative displays of ISTP data from multiple spacecraft and instruments, and thus the selection of candidate events and data quality control. The software, written in IDL, includes a graphical/widget user interface, and runs on many platforms, including various UNIX workstations, Alpha/Open VMS, Macintosh (680x0 and PowerPC), and PC/Windows NT, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95.

  19. International Solar-Terrestrial Program Key Parameter Visualization Tool Data: USA_NASA_DDF_ISTP_IM_KP_0207

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocuna, M. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Baker, D. N.; Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Mish, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science Program (GGS) is designed to improve greatly the understanding of the flow of energy, mass and momentum in the solar-terrestrial environment with particular emphasis on "Geospace". The Global Geospace Science Program is the US contribution to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. This CD-ROM issue describes the WIND and POLAR spacecraft, the scientific experiments carried onboard, the Theoretical and Ground Based investigations which constitute the US Global Geospace Science Program and the ISTP Data Systems which support the data acquisition and analysis effort. The International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) Key Parameter Visualization Tool (KPVT), provided on the CD-ROM, was developed at the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF). The KPVT is a generic software package for visualizing the key parameter data produced from all ISTP missions, interactively and simultaneously. The tool is designed to facilitate correlative displays of ISTP data from multiple spacecraft and instruments, and thus the selection of candidate events and data quality control. The software, written in IDL, includes a graphical/widget user interface, and runs on many platforms, including various UNIX workstations, Alpha/Open VMS, Macintosh (680x0 and PowerPC), and PC/Windows NT, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95.

  20. International Solar-Terrestrial Program Key Parameter Visualization Tool Data: USA_NASA_DDF_ISTP_IM_KP_0214

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocuna, M. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Baker, D. N.; Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Mish, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science Program (GGS) is designed to improve greatly the understanding of the flow of energy, mass and momentum in the solar-terrestrial environment with particular emphasis on "Geospace". The Global Geospace Science Program is the US contribution to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. This CD-ROM issue describes the WIND and POLAR spacecraft, the scientific experiments carried onboard, the Theoretical and Ground Based investigations which constitute the US Global Geospace Science Program and the ISTP Data Systems which support the data acquisition and analysis effort. The International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) Key Parameter Visualization Tool (KPVT), provided on the CD-ROM, was developed at the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF). The KPVT is a generic software package for visualizing the key parameter data produced from all ISTP missions, interactively and simultaneously. The tool is designed to facilitate correlative displays of ISTP data from multiple spacecraft and instruments, and thus the selection of candidate events and data quality control. The software, written in IDL, includes a graphical/widget user interface, and runs on many platforms, including various UNIX workstations, Alpha/Open VMS, Macintosh (680x0 and PowerPC), and PC/Windows NT, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95.

  1. International Solar-Terrestrial Program Key Parameter Visualization Tool Data: USA_NASA_DDF_ISTP_IM_KP_0209

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocuna, M. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Baker, D. N.; Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Mish, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science Program (GGS) is designed to improve greatly the understanding of the flow of energy, mass and momentum in the solar-terrestrial environment with particular emphasis on "Geospace". The Global Geospace Science Program is the US contribution to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. This CD-ROM issue describes the WIND and POLAR spacecraft, the scientific experiments carried onboard, the Theoretical and Ground Based investigations which constitute the US Global Geospace Science Program and the ISTP Data Systems which support the data acquisition and analysis effort. The International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) Key Parameter Visualization Tool (KPVT), provided on the CD-ROM, was developed at the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF). The KPVT is a generic software package for visualizing the key parameter data produced from all ISTP missions, interactively and simultaneously. The tool is designed to facilitate correlative displays of ISTP data from multiple spacecraft and instruments, and thus the selection of candidate events and data quality control. The software, written in IDL, includes a graphical/widget user interface, and runs on many platforms, including various UNIX workstations, Alpha/Open VMS, Macintosh (680x0 and PowerPC), and PC/Windows NT, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95.

  2. International Solar-Terrestrial Program Key Parameter Visualization Tool Data: USA_NASA_DDF_ISTP_IM_KP_0212

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocuna, M. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Baker, D. N.; Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Mish, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science Program (GGS) is designed to improve greatly the understanding of the flow of energy, mass and momentum in the solar-terrestrial environment with particular emphasis on "Geospace". The Global Geospace Science Program is the US contribution to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. This CD-ROM issue describes the WIND and POLAR spacecraft, the scientific experiments carried onboard, the Theoretical and Ground Based investigations which constitute the US Global Geospace Science Program and the ISTP Data Systems which support the data acquisition and analysis effort. The International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) Key Parameter Visualization Tool (KPVT), provided on the CD-ROM, was developed at the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF). The KPVT is a generic software package for visualizing the key parameter data produced from all ISTP missions, interactively and simultaneously. The tool is designed to facilitate correlative displays of ISTP data from multiple spacecraft and instruments, and thus the selection of candidate events and data quality control. The software, written in IDL, includes a graphical/widget user interface, and runs on many platforms, including various UNIX workstations, Alpha/Open VMS, Macintosh (680x0 and PowerPC), and PC/Windows NT, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95.

  3. International Solar-Terrestrial Program Key Parameter Visualization Tool Data: USA_NASA_DDF_ISTP_KP_0231

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocuna, M. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Baker, D. N.; Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Mish, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science Program (GGS) is designed to improve greatly the understanding of the flow of energy, mass and momentum in the solar-terrestrial environment with particular emphasis on "Geospace". The Global Geospace Science Program is the US contribution to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. This CD-ROM issue describes the WIND and POLAR spacecraft, the scientific experiments carried onboard, the Theoretical and Ground Based investigations which constitute the US Global Geospace Science Program and the ISTP Data Systems which support the data acquisition and analysis effort. The International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) Key Parameter Visualization Tool (KPVT), provided on the CD-ROM, was developed at the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF). The KPVT is a generic software package for visualizing the key parameter data produced from all ISTP missions, interactively and simultaneously. The tool is designed to facilitate correlative displays of ISTP data from multiple spacecraft and instruments, and thus the selection of candidate events and data quality control. The software, written in IDL, includes a graphical/widget user interface, and runs on many platforms, including various UNIX workstations, Alpha/Open VMS, Macintosh (680x0 and PowerPC), and PC/Windows NT, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95.

  4. International Solar-Terrestrial Program Key Parameter Visualization Tool Data: USA_NASA_DDF_ISTP_KP_0222

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocuna, M. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Baker, D. N.; Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Mish, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science Program (GGS) is designed to improve greatly the understanding of the flow of energy, mass and momentum in the solar-terrestrial environment with particular emphasis on "Geospace". The Global Geospace Science Program is the US contribution to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. This CD-ROM issue describes the WIND and POLAR spacecraft, the scientific experiments carried onboard, the Theoretical and Ground Based investigations which constitute the US Global Geospace Science Program and the ISTP Data Systems which support the data acquisition and analysis effort. The International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) Key Parameter Visualization Tool (KPVT), provided on the CD-ROM, was developed at the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF). The KPVT is a generic software package for visualizing the key parameter data produced from all ISTP missions, interactively and simultaneously. The tool is designed to facilitate correlative displays of ISTP data from multiple spacecraft and instruments, and thus the selection of candidate events and data quality control. The software, written in IDL, includes a graphical/widget user interface, and runs on many platforms, including various UNIX workstations, Alpha/Open VMS, Macintosh (680x0 and PowerPC), and PC/Windows NT, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95.

  5. International Solar-Terrestrial Program Key Parameter Visualization Tool Data: USA_NASA_DDF_ISTP_IM_KP_0201

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocuna, M. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Baker, D. N.; Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Mish, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science Program (GGS) is designed to improve greatly the understanding of the flow of energy, mass and momentum in the solar-terrestrial environment with particular emphasis on "Geospace". The Global Geospace Science Program is the US contribution to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. This CD-ROM issue describes the WIND and POLAR spacecraft, the scientific experiments carried onboard, the Theoretical and Ground Based investigations which constitute the US Global Geospace Science Program and the ISTP Data Systems which support the data acquisition and analysis effort. The International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) Key Parameter Visualization Tool (KPVT), provided on the CD-ROM, was developed at the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF). The KPVT is a generic software package for visualizing the key parameter data produced from all ISTP missions, interactively and simultaneously. The tool is designed to facilitate correlative displays of ISTP data from multiple spacecraft and instruments, and thus the selection of candidate events and data quality control. The software, written in IDL, includes a graphical/widget user interface, and runs on many platforms, including various UNIX workstations, Alpha/Open VMS, Macintosh (680x0 and PowerPC), and PC/Windows NT, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95.

  6. International Solar-Terrestrial Program Key Parameter Visualization Tool Data: USA_NASA_DDF_ISTP_KP_0215

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocuna, M. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Baker, D. N.; Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Mish, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science Program (GGS) is designed to improve greatly the understanding of the flow of energy, mass and momentum in the solar-terrestrial environment with particular emphasis on "Geospace". The Global Geospace Science Program is the US contribution to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. This CD-ROM issue describes the WIND and POLAR spacecraft, the scientific experiments carried onboard, the Theoretical and Ground Based investigations which constitute the US Global Geospace Science Program and the ISTP Data Systems which support the data acquisition and analysis effort. The International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) Key Parameter Visualization Tool (KPVT), provided on the CD-ROM, was developed at the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF). The KPVT is a generic software package for visualizing the key parameter data produced from all ISTP missions, interactively and simultaneously. The tool is designed to facilitate correlative displays of ISTP data from multiple spacecraft and instruments, and thus the selection of candidate events and data quality control. The software, written in IDL, includes a graphical/widget user interface, and runs on many platforms, including various UNIX workstations, Alpha/Open VMS, Macintosh (680x0 and PowerPC), and PC/Windows NT, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95.

  7. International Solar-Terrestrial Program Key Parameter Visualization Tool Data: USA_NASA_DDF_ISTP_KP_0253

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocuna, M. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Baker, D. N.; Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Mish, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science Program (GGS) is designed to improve greatly the understanding of the flow of energy, mass and momentum in the solar-terrestrial environment with particular emphasis on "Geospace". The Global Geospace Science Program is the US contribution to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. This CD-ROM issue describes the WIND and POLAR spacecraft, the scientific experiments carried onboard, the Theoretical and Ground Based investigations which constitute the US Global Geospace Science Program and the ISTP Data Systems which support the data acquisition and analysis effort. The International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) Key Parameter Visualization Tool (KPVT), provided on the CD-ROM, was developed at the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF). The KPVT is a generic software package for visualizing the key parameter data produced from all ISTP missions, interactively and simultaneously. The tool is designed to facilitate correlative displays of ISTP data from multiple spacecraft and instruments, and thus the selection of candidate events and data quality control. The software, written in IDL, includes a graphical/widget user interface, and runs on many platforms, including various UNIX workstations, Alpha/Open VMS, Macintosh (680x0 and PowerPC), and PC/Windows NT, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95.

  8. International Solar-Terrestrial Program Key Parameter Visualization Tool Data: USA_NASA_DDF_ISTP_IM_KP_0208

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocuna, M. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Baker, D. N.; Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Mish, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science Program (GGS) is designed to improve greatly the understanding of the flow of energy, mass and momentum in the solar-terrestrial environment with particular emphasis on "Geospace". The Global Geospace Science Program is the US contribution to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. This CD-ROM issue describes the WIND and POLAR spacecraft, the scientific experiments carried onboard, the Theoretical and Ground Based investigations which constitute the US Global Geospace Science Program and the ISTP Data Systems which support the data acquisition and analysis effort. The International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) Key Parameter Visualization Tool (KPVT), provided on the CD-ROM, was developed at the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF). The KPVT is a generic software package for visualizing the key parameter data produced from all ISTP missions, interactively and simultaneously. The tool is designed to facilitate correlative displays of ISTP data from multiple spacecraft and instruments, and thus the selection of candidate events and data quality control. The software, written in IDL, includes a graphical/widget user interface, and runs on many platforms, including various UNIX workstations, Alpha/Open VMS, Macintosh (680x0 and PowerPC), and PC/Windows NT, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95.

  9. International Solar-Terrestrial Program Key Parameter Visualization Tool Data: USA_NASA_DDF_ISTP_IM_KP_0217

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocuna, M. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Baker, D. N.; Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Mish, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science Program (GGS) is designed to improve greatly the understanding of the flow of energy, mass and momentum in the solar-terrestrial environment with particular emphasis on "Geospace". The Global Geospace Science Program is the US contribution to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. This CD-ROM issue describes the WIND and POLAR spacecraft, the scientific experiments carried onboard, the Theoretical and Ground Based investigations which constitute the US Global Geospace Science Program and the ISTP Data Systems which support the data acquisition and analysis effort. The International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) Key Parameter Visualization Tool (KPVT), provided on the CD-ROM, was developed at the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF). The KPVT is a generic software package for visualizing the key parameter data produced from all ISTP missions, interactively and simultaneously. The tool is designed to facilitate correlative displays of ISTP data from multiple spacecraft and instruments, and thus the selection of candidate events and data quality control. The software, written in IDL, includes a graphical/widget user interface, and runs on many platforms, including various UNIX workstations, Alpha/Open VMS, Macintosh (680x0 and PowerPC), and PC/Windows NT, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95.

  10. International Solar-Terrestrial Program Key Parameter Visualization Tool Data: USA_NASA_DDF_ISTP_IM_KP_0210

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocuna, M. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Baker, D. N.; Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Mish, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science Program (GGS) is designed to improve greatly the understanding of the flow of energy, mass and momentum in the solar-terrestrial environment with particular emphasis on "Geospace". The Global Geospace Science Program is the US contribution to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. This CD-ROM issue describes the WIND and POLAR spacecraft, the scientific experiments carried onboard, the Theoretical and Ground Based investigations which constitute the US Global Geospace Science Program and the ISTP Data Systems which support the data acquisition and analysis effort. The International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) Key Parameter Visualization Tool (KPVT), provided on the CD-ROM, was developed at the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF). The KPVT is a generic software package for visualizing the key parameter data produced from all ISTP missions, interactively and simultaneously. The tool is designed to facilitate correlative displays of ISTP data from multiple spacecraft and instruments, and thus the selection of candidate events and data quality control. The software, written in IDL, includes a graphical/widget user interface, and runs on many platforms, including various UNIX workstations, Alpha/Open VMS, Macintosh (680x0 and PowerPC), and PC/Windows NT, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95.

  11. International Solar-Terrestrial Program Key Parameter Visualization Tool Data: USA_NASA_DDF_ISTP_KP_0219

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocuna, M. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Baker, D. N.; Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Mish, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science Program (GGS) is designed to improve greatly the understanding of the flow of energy, mass and momentum in the solar-terrestrial environment with particular emphasis on "Geospace". The Global Geospace Science Program is the US contribution to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. This CD-ROM issue describes the WIND and POLAR spacecraft, the scientific experiments carried onboard, the Theoretical and Ground Based investigations which constitute the US Global Geospace Science Program and the ISTP Data Systems which support the data acquisition and analysis effort. The International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) Key Parameter Visualization Tool (KPVT), provided on the CD-ROM, was developed at the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF). The KPVT is a generic software package for visualizing the key parameter data produced from all ISTP missions, interactively and simultaneously. The tool is designed to facilitate correlative displays of ISTP data from multiple spacecraft and instruments, and thus the selection of candidate events and data quality control. The software, written in IDL, includes a graphical/widget user interface, and runs on many platforms, including various UNIX workstations, Alpha/Open VMS, Macintosh (680x0 and PowerPC), and PC/Windows NT, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95.

  12. International Solar-Terrestrial Program Key Parameter Visualization Tool Data: USA_NASA_DDF_ISTP_KP_0221

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocuna, M. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Baker, D. N.; Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Mish, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science Program (GGS) is designed to improve greatly the understanding of the flow of energy, mass and momentum in the solar-terrestrial environment with particular emphasis on "Geospace". The Global Geospace Science Program is the US contribution to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. This CD-ROM issue describes the WIND and POLAR spacecraft, the scientific experiments carried onboard, the Theoretical and Ground Based investigations which constitute the US Global Geospace Science Program and the ISTP Data Systems which support the data acquisition and analysis effort. The International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) Key Parameter Visualization Tool (KPVT), provided on the CD-ROM, was developed at the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF). The KPVT is a generic software package for visualizing the key parameter data produced from all ISTP missions, interactively and simultaneously. The tool is designed to facilitate correlative displays of ISTP data from multiple spacecraft and instruments, and thus the selection of candidate events and data quality control. The software, written in IDL, includes a graphical/widget user interface, and runs on many platforms, including various UNIX workstations, Alpha/Open VMS, Macintosh (680x0 and PowerPC), and PC/Windows NT, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95.

  13. International Solar-Terrestrial Program Key Parameter Visualization Tool Data: USA_NASA_DDF_ISTP_KP_0209

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocuna, M. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Baker, D. N.; Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Mish, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science Program (GGS) is designed to improve greatly the understanding of the flow of energy, mass and momentum in the solar-terrestrial environment with particular emphasis on "Geospace". The Global Geospace Science Program is the US contribution to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. This CD-ROM issue describes the WIND and POLAR spacecraft, the scientific experiments carried onboard, the Theoretical and Ground Based investigations which constitute the US Global Geospace Science Program and the ISTP Data Systems which support the data acquisition and analysis effort. The International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) Key Parameter Visualization Tool (KPVT), provided on the CD-ROM, was developed at the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF). The KPVT is a generic software package for visualizing the key parameter data produced from all ISTP missions, interactively and simultaneously. The tool is designed to facilitate correlative displays of ISTP data from multiple spacecraft and instruments, and thus the selection of candidate events and data quality control. The software, written in IDL, includes a graphical/widget user interface, and runs on many platforms, including various UNIX workstations, Alpha/Open VMS, Macintosh (680x0 and PowerPC), and PC/Windows NT, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95.

  14. International Solar-Terrestrial Program Key Parameter Visualization Tool Data: USA_NASA_DDF_ISTP_KP_0220

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocuna, M. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Baker, D. N.; Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Mish, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science Program (GGS) is designed to improve greatly the understanding of the flow of energy, mass and momentum in the solar-terrestrial environment with particular emphasis on "Geospace". The Global Geospace Science Program is the US contribution to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. This CD-ROM issue describes the WIND and POLAR spacecraft, the scientific experiments carried onboard, the Theoretical and Ground Based investigations which constitute the US Global Geospace Science Program and the ISTP Data Systems which support the data acquisition and analysis effort. The International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) Key Parameter Visualization Tool (KPVT), provided on the CD-ROM, was developed at the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF). The KPVT is a generic software package for visualizing the key parameter data produced from all ISTP missions, interactively and simultaneously. The tool is designed to facilitate correlative displays of ISTP data from multiple spacecraft and instruments, and thus the selection of candidate events and data quality control. The software, written in IDL, includes a graphical/widget user interface, and runs on many platforms, including various UNIX workstations, Alpha/Open VMS, Macintosh (680x0 and PowerPC), and PC/Windows NT, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95.

  15. International Solar-Terrestrial Program Key Parameter Visualization Tool Data: USA_NASA_DDF_ISTP_KP_0217

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocuna, M. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Baker, D. N.; Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Mish, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science Program (GGS) is designed to improve greatly the understanding of the flow of energy, mass and momentum in the solar-terrestrial environment with particular emphasis on "Geospace". The Global Geospace Science Program is the US contribution to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. This CD-ROM issue describes the WIND and POLAR spacecraft, the scientific experiments carried onboard, the Theoretical and Ground Based investigations which constitute the US Global Geospace Science Program and the ISTP Data Systems which support the data acquisition and analysis effort. The International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) Key Parameter Visualization Tool (KPVT), provided on the CD-ROM, was developed at the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF). The KPVT is a generic software package for visualizing the key parameter data produced from all ISTP missions, interactively and simultaneously. The tool is designed to facilitate correlative displays of ISTP data from multiple spacecraft and instruments, and thus the selection of candidate events and data quality control. The software, written in IDL, includes a graphical/widget user interface, and runs on many platforms, including various UNIX workstations, Alpha/Open VMS, Macintosh (680x0 and PowerPC), and PC/Windows NT, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95.

  16. International Solar-Terrestrial Program Key Parameter Visualization Tool Data: USA_NASA_DDF_ISTP_KP_0224

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocuna, M. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Baker, D. N.; Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Mish, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science Program (GGS) is designed to improve greatly the understanding of the flow of energy, mass and momentum in the solar-terrestrial environment with particular emphasis on "Geospace". The Global Geospace Science Program is the US contribution to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. This CD-ROM issue describes the WIND and POLAR spacecraft, the scientific experiments carried onboard, the Theoretical and Ground Based investigations which constitute the US Global Geospace Science Program and the ISTP Data Systems which support the data acquisition and analysis effort. The International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) Key Parameter Visualization Tool (KPVT), provided on the CD-ROM, was developed at the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF). The KPVT is a generic software package for visualizing the key parameter data produced from all ISTP missions, interactively and simultaneously. The tool is designed to facilitate correlative displays of ISTP data from multiple spacecraft and instruments, and thus the selection of candidate events and data quality control. The software, written in IDL, includes a graphical/widget user interface, and runs on many platforms, including various UNIX workstations, Alpha/Open VMS, Macintosh (680x0 and PowerPC), and PC/Windows NT, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95.

  17. International Solar-Terrestrial Program Key Parameter Visualization Tool Data: USA_NASA_DDF_ISTP_IM_KP_0216

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocuna, M. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Baker, D. N.; Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Mish, W. H.; Lytle, John

    2001-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science Program (GGS) is designed to improve greatly the understanding of the flow of energy, mass and momentum in the solar-terrestrial environment with particular emphasis on "Geospace". The Global Geospace Science Program is the US contribution to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. This CD-ROM issue describes the WIND and POLAR spacecraft, the scientific experiments carried onboard, the Theoretical and Ground Based investigations which constitute the US Global Geospace Science Program and the ISTP Data Systems which support the data acquisition and analysis effort. The International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) Key Parameter Visualization Tool (KPVT), provided on the CD-ROM, was developed at the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF). The KPVT is a generic software package for visualizing the key parameter data produced from all ISTP missions, interactively and simultaneously. The tool is designed to facilitate correlative displays of ISTP data from multiple spacecraft and instruments, and thus the selection of candidate events and data quality control. The software, written in IDL, includes a graphical/widget user interface, and runs on many platforms, including various UNIX workstations, Alpha/Open VMS, Macintosh (680x0 and PowerPC), and PC/Windows NT, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95.

  18. International Solar-Terrestrial Program Key Parameter Visualization Tool Data: USA_NASA_DDF_ISTP_IM_KP_0205

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocuna, M. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Baker, D. N.; Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Mish, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science Program (GGS) is designed to improve greatly the understanding of the flow of energy, mass and momentum in the solar-terrestrial environment with particular emphasis on "Geospace". The Global Geospace Science Program is the US contribution to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. This CD-ROM issue describes the WIND and POLAR spacecraft, the scientific experiments carried onboard, the Theoretical and Ground Based investigations which constitute the US Global Geospace Science Program and the ISTP Data Systems which support the data acquisition and analysis effort. The International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) Key Parameter Visualization Tool (KPVT), provided on the CD-ROM, was developed at the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF). The KPVT is a generic software package for visualizing the key parameter data produced from all ISTP missions, interactively and simultaneously. The tool is designed to facilitate correlative displays of ISTP data from multiple spacecraft and instruments, and thus the selection of candidate events and data quality control. The software, written in IDL, includes a graphical/widget user interface, and runs on many platforms, including various UNIX workstations, Alpha/Open VMS, Macintosh (680x0 and PowerPC), and PC/Windows NT, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95.

  19. International Solar-Terrestrial Program Key Parameter Visualization Tool Data: USA_NASA_DDF_ISTP_KP_0228

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocuna, M. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Baker, D. N.; Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Mish, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science Program (GGS) is designed to improve greatly the understanding of the flow of energy, mass and momentum in the solar-terrestrial environment with particular emphasis on "Geospace". The Global Geospace Science Program is the US contribution to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. This CD-ROM issue describes the WIND and POLAR spacecraft, the scientific experiments carried onboard, the Theoretical and Ground Based investigations which constitute the US Global Geospace Science Program and the ISTP Data Systems which support the data acquisition and analysis effort. The International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) Key Parameter Visualization Tool (KPVT), provided on the CD-ROM, was developed at the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF). The KPVT is a generic software package for visualizing the key parameter data produced from all ISTP missions, interactively and simultaneously. The tool is designed to facilitate correlative displays of ISTP data from multiple spacecraft and instruments, and thus the selection of candidate events and data quality control. The software, written in IDL, includes a graphical/widget user interface, and runs on many platforms, including various UNIX workstations, Alpha/Open VMS, Macintosh (680x0 and PowerPC), and PC/Windows NT, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95.

  20. International Solar-Terrestrial Program Key Parameter Visualization Tool Data: USA_NASA_DDF_ISTP_KP_0213

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocuna, M. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Baker, D. N.; Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Mish, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science Program (GGS) is designed to improve greatly the understanding of the flow of energy, mass and momentum in the solar-terrestrial environment with particular emphasis on "Geospace". The Global Geospace Science Program is the US contribution to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. This CD-ROM issue describes the WIND and POLAR spacecraft, the scientific experiments carried onboard, the Theoretical and Ground Based investigations which constitute the US Global Geospace Science Program and the ISTP Data Systems which support the data acquisition and analysis effort. The International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) Key Parameter Visualization Tool (KPVT), provided on the CD-ROM, was developed at the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF). The KPVT is a generic software package for visualizing the key parameter data produced from all ISTP missions, interactively and simultaneously. The tool is designed to facilitate correlative displays of ISTP data from multiple spacecraft and instruments, and thus the selection of candidate events and data quality control. The software, written in IDL, includes a graphical/widget user interface, and runs on many platforms, including various UNIX workstations, Alpha/Open VMS, Macintosh (680x0 and PowerPC), and PC/Windows NT, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95.

  1. International Solar-Terrestrial Program Key Parameter Visualization Tool Data: USA_NASA_DDF_ISTP_IM_KP_0221

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocuna, M. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Baker, D. N.; Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Mish, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science Program (GGS) is designed to improve greatly the understanding of the flow of energy, mass and momentum in the solar-terrestrial environment with particular emphasis on "Geospace". The Global Geospace Science Program is the US contribution to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. This CD-ROM issue describes the WIND and POLAR spacecraft, the scientific experiments carried onboard, the Theoretical and Ground Based investigations which constitute the US Global Geospace Science Program and the ISTP Data Systems which support the data acquisition and analysis effort. The International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) Key Parameter Visualization Tool (KPVT), provided on the CD-ROM, was developed at the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF). The KPVT is a generic software package for visualizing the key parameter data produced from all ISTP missions, interactively and simultaneously. The tool is designed to facilitate correlative displays of ISTP data from multiple spacecraft and instruments, and thus the selection of candidate events and data quality control. The software, written in IDL, includes a graphical/widget user interface, and runs on many platforms, including various UNIX workstations, Alpha/Open VMS, Macintosh (680x0 and PowerPC), and PC/Windows NT, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95.

  2. International Solar-Terrestrial Program Key Parameter Visualization Tool Data: USA_NASA_DDF_ISTP_IM_KP_0213

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocuna, M. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Baker, D. N.; Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Mish, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science Program (GGS) is designed to improve greatly the understanding of the flow of energy, mass and momentum in the solar-terrestrial environment with particular emphasis on "Geospace". The Global Geospace Science Program is the US contribution to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. This CD-ROM issue describes the WIND and POLAR spacecraft, the scientific experiments carried onboard, the Theoretical and Ground Based investigations which constitute the US Global Geospace Science Program and the ISTP Data Systems which support the data acquisition and analysis effort. The International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) Key Parameter Visualization Tool (KPVT), provided on the CD-ROM, was developed at the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF). The KPVT is a generic software package for visualizing the key parameter data produced from all ISTP missions, interactively and simultaneously. The tool is designed to facilitate correlative displays of ISTP data from multiple spacecraft and instruments, and thus the selection of candidate events and data quality control. The software, written in IDL, includes a graphical/widget user interface, and runs on many platforms, including various UNIX workstations, Alpha/Open VMS, Macintosh (680x0 and PowerPC), and PC/Windows NT, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95.

  3. International Solar-Terrestrial Program Key Parameter Visualization Tool Data: USA_NASA_DDF_ISTP_KP_0212

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocuna, M. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Baker, D. N.; Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Mish, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science Program (GGS) is designed to improve greatly the understanding of the flow of energy, mass and momentum in the solar-terrestrial environment with particular emphasis on "Geospace". The Global Geospace Science Program is the US contribution to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. This CD-ROM issue describes the WIND and POLAR spacecraft, the scientific experiments carried onboard, the Theoretical and Ground Based investigations which constitute the US Global Geospace Science Program and the ISTP Data Systems which support the data acquisition and analysis effort. The International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) Key Parameter Visualization Tool (KPVT), provided on the CD-ROM, was developed at the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF). The KPVT is a generic software package for visualizing the key parameter data produced from all ISTP missions, interactively and simultaneously. The tool is designed to facilitate correlative displays of ISTP data from multiple spacecraft and instruments, and thus the selection of candidate events and data quality control. The software, written in IDL, includes a graphical/widget user interface, and runs on many platforms, including various UNIX workstations, Alpha/Open VMS, Macintosh (680x0 and PowerPC), and PC/Windows NT, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95.

  4. International Solar-Terrestrial Program Key Parameter Visualization Tool Data: USA_NASA_DDF_ISTP_KP_0225

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocuna, M. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Baker, D. N.; Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Mish, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science Program (GGS) is designed to improve greatly the understanding of the flow of energy, mass and momentum in the solar-terrestrial environment with particular emphasis on "Geospace". The Global Geospace Science Program is the US contribution to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. This CD-ROM issue describes the WIND and POLAR spacecraft, the scientific experiments carried onboard, the Theoretical and Ground Based investigations which constitute the US Global Geospace Science Program and the ISTP Data Systems which support the data acquisition and analysis effort. The International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) Key Parameter Visualization Tool (KPVT), provided on the CD-ROM, was developed at the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF). The KPVT is a generic software package for visualizing the key parameter data produced from all ISTP missions, interactively and simultaneously. The tool is designed to facilitate correlative displays of ISTP data from multiple spacecraft and instruments, and thus the selection of candidate events and data quality control. The software, written in IDL, includes a graphical/widget user interface, and runs on many platforms, including various UNIX workstations, Alpha/Open VMS, Macintosh (680x0 and PowerPC), and PC/Windows NT, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95.

  5. International Solar-Terrestrial Program Key Parameter Visualization Tool Data: USA_NASA_DDF_ISTP_KP_0216

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocuna, M. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Baker, D. N.; Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Mish, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science Program (GGS) is designed to improve greatly the understanding of the flow of energy, mass and momentum in the solar-terrestrial environment with particular emphasis on "Geospace". The Global Geospace Science Program is the US contribution to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. This CD-ROM issue describes the WIND and POLAR spacecraft, the scientific experiments carried onboard, the Theoretical and Ground Based investigations which constitute the US Global Geospace Science Program and the ISTP Data Systems which support the data acquisition and analysis effort. The International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) Key Parameter Visualization Tool (KPVT), provided on the CD-ROM, was developed at the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF). The KPVT is a generic software package for visualizing the key parameter data produced from all ISTP missions, interactively and simultaneously. The tool is designed to facilitate correlative displays of ISTP data from multiple spacecraft and instruments, and thus the selection of candidate events and data quality control. The software, written in IDL, includes a graphical/widget user interface, and runs on many platforms, including various UNIX workstations, Alpha/Open VMS, Macintosh (680x0 and PowerPC), and PC/Windows NT, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95.

  6. International Solar-Terrestrial Program Key Parameter Visualization Tool Data: USA_NASA_DDF_ISTP_KP_0211

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocuna, M. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Baker, D. N.; Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Mish, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science Program (GGS) is designed to improve greatly the understanding of the flow of energy, mass and momentum in the solar-terrestrial environment with particular emphasis on "Geospace". The Global Geospace Science Program is the US contribution to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. This CD-ROM issue describes the WIND and POLAR spacecraft, the scientific experiments carried onboard, the Theoretical and Ground Based investigations which constitute the US Global Geospace Science Program and the ISTP Data Systems which support the data acquisition and analysis effort. The International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) Key Parameter Visualization Tool (KPVT), provided on the CD-ROM, was developed at the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF). The KPVT is a generic software package for visualizing the key parameter data produced from all ISTP missions, interactively and simultaneously. The tool is designed to facilitate correlative displays of ISTP data from multiple spacecraft and instruments, and thus the selection of candidate events and data quality control. The software, written in IDL, includes a graphical/widget user interface, and runs on many platforms, including various UNIX workstations, Alpha/Open VMS, Macintosh (680x0 and PowerPC), and PC/Windows NT, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95.

  7. International Solar-Terrestrial Program Key Parameter Visualization Tool Data: USA_NASA_DDF_ISTP_KP_0210

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocuna, M. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Baker, D. N.; Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Mish, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science Program (GGS) is designed to improve greatly the understanding of the flow of energy, mass and momentum in the solar-terrestrial environment with particular emphasis on "Geospace". The Global Geospace Science Program is the US contribution to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. This CD-ROM issue describes the WIND and POLAR spacecraft, the scientific experiments carried onboard, the Theoretical and Ground Based investigations which constitute the US Global Geospace Science Program and the ISTP Data Systems which support the data acquisition and analysis effort. The International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) Key Parameter Visualization Tool (KPVT), provided on the CD-ROM, was developed at the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF). The KPVT is a generic software package for visualizing the key parameter data produced from all ISTP missions, interactively and simultaneously. The tool is designed to facilitate correlative displays of ISTP data from multiple spacecraft and instruments, and thus the selection of candidate events and data quality control. The software, written in IDL, includes a graphical/widget user interface, and runs on many platforms, including various UNIX workstations, Alpha/Open VMS, Macintosh (680x0 and PowerPC), and PC/Windows NT, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95.

  8. International Solar-Terrestrial Program Key Parameter Visualization Tool Data: USA_NASA_DDF_ISTP_KP_0230

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocuna, M. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Baker, D. N.; Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Mish, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science Program (GGS) is designed to improve greatly the understanding of the flow of energy, mass and momentum in the solar-terrestrial environment with particular emphasis on "Geospace". The Global Geospace Science Program is the US contribution to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. This CD-ROM issue describes the WIND and POLAR spacecraft, the scientific experiments carried onboard, the Theoretical and Ground Based investigations which constitute the US Global Geospace Science Program and the ISTP Data Systems which support the data acquisition and analysis effort. The International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) Key Parameter Visualization Tool (KPVT), provided on the CD-ROM, was developed at the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF). The KPVT is a generic software package for visualizing the key parameter data produced from all ISTP missions, interactively and simultaneously. The tool is designed to facilitate correlative displays of ISTP data from multiple spacecraft and instruments, and thus the selection of candidate events and data quality control. The software, written in IDL, includes a graphical/widget user interface, and runs on many platforms, including various UNIX workstations, Alpha/Open VMS, Macintosh (680x0 and PowerPC), and PC/Windows NT, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95.

  9. International Solar-Terrestrial Program Key Parameter Visualization Tool Data: USA_NASA_DDF_ISTP_KP_0214

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocuna, M. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Baker, D. N.; Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Mish, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science Program (GGS) is designed to improve greatly the understanding of the flow of energy, mass and momentum in the solar-terrestrial environment with particular emphasis on "Geospace". The Global Geospace Science Program is the US contribution to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. This CD-ROM issue describes the WIND and POLAR spacecraft, the scientific experiments carried onboard, the Theoretical and Ground Based investigations which constitute the US Global Geospace Science Program and the ISTP Data Systems which support the data acquisition and analysis effort. The International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) Key Parameter Visualization Tool (KPVT), provided on the CD-ROM, was developed at the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF). The KPVT is a generic software package for visualizing the key parameter data produced from all ISTP missions, interactively and simultaneously. The tool is designed to facilitate correlative displays of ISTP data from multiple spacecraft and instruments, and thus the selection of candidate events and data quality control. The software, written in IDL, includes a graphical/widget user interface, and runs on many platforms, including various UNIX workstations, Alpha/Open VMS, Macintosh (680x0 and PowerPC), and PC/Windows NT, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95.

  10. International Solar-Terrestrial Program Key Parameter Visualization Tool Data: USA_NASA_DDF_ISTP_IM_KP_0202

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocuna, M. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Baker, D. N.; Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Mish, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science Program (GGS) is designed to improve greatly the understanding of the flow of energy, mass and momentum in the solar-terrestrial environment with particular emphasis on "Geospace". The Global Geospace Science Program is the US contribution to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. This CD-ROM issue describes the WIND and POLAR spacecraft, the scientific experiments carried onboard, the Theoretical and Ground Based investigations which constitute the US Global Geospace Science Program and the ISTP Data Systems which support the data acquisition and analysis effort. The International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) Key Parameter Visualization Tool (KPVT), provided on the CD-ROM, was developed at the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF). The KPVT is a generic software package for visualizing the key parameter data produced from all ISTP missions, interactively and simultaneously. The tool is designed to facilitate correlative displays of ISTP data from multiple spacecraft and instruments, and thus the selection of candidate events and data quality control. The software, written in IDL, includes a graphical/widget user interface, and runs on many platforms, including various UNIX workstations, Alpha/Open VMS, Macintosh (680x0 and PowerPC), and PC/Windows NT, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95.

  11. International Solar-Terrestrial Program Key Parameter Visualization Tool Data: USA_NASA_DDF_ISTP_KP_0218

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocuna, M. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Baker, D. N.; Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Mish, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science Program (GGS) is designed to improve greatly the understanding of the flow of energy, mass and momentum in the solar-terrestrial environment with particular emphasis on "Geospace". The Global Geospace Science Program is the US contribution to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. This CD-ROM issue describes the WIND and POLAR spacecraft, the scientific experiments carried onboard, the Theoretical and Ground Based investigations which constitute the US Global Geospace Science Program and the ISTP Data Systems which support the data acquisition and analysis effort. The International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) Key Parameter Visualization Tool (KPVT), provided on the CD-ROM, was developed at the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF). The KPVT is a generic software package for visualizing the key parameter data produced from all ISTP missions, interactively and simultaneously. The tool is designed to facilitate correlative displays of ISTP data from multiple spacecraft and instruments, and thus the selection of candidate events and data quality control. The software, written in IDL, includes a graphical/widget user interface, and runs on many platforms, including various UNIX workstations, Alpha/Open VMS, Macintosh (680x0 and PowerPC), and PC/Windows NT, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95.

  12. International Solar-Terrestrial Program Key Parameter Visualization Tool Data: USA_NASA_DDF_ISTP_IM_KP_0203

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocuna, M. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Baker, D. N.; Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Mish, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science Program (GGS) is designed to improve greatly the understanding of the flow of energy, mass and momentum in the solar-terrestrial environment with particular emphasis on "Geospace". The Global Geospace Science Program is the US contribution to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. This CD-ROM issue describes the WIND and POLAR spacecraft, the scientific experiments carried onboard, the Theoretical and Ground Based investigations which constitute the US Global Geospace Science Program and the ISTP Data Systems which support the data acquisition and analysis effort. The International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) Key Parameter Visualization Tool (KPVT), provided on the CD-ROM, was developed at the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF). The KPVT is a generic software package for visualizing the key parameter data produced from all ISTP missions, interactively and simultaneously. The tool is designed to facilitate correlative displays of ISTP data from multiple spacecraft and instruments, and thus the selection of candidate events and data quality control. The software, written in IDL, includes a graphical/widget user interface, and runs on many platforms, including various UNIX workstations, Alpha/Open VMS, Macintosh (680x0 and PowerPC), and PC/Windows NT, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95.

  13. International Solar-Terrestrial Program Key Parameter Visualization Tool Data: USA_NASA_DDF_ISTP_KP_0229

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocuna, M. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Baker, D. N.; Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Mish, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science Program (GGS) is designed to improve greatly the understanding of the flow of energy, mass and momentum in the solar-terrestrial environment with particular emphasis on "Geospace". The Global Geospace Science Program is the US contribution to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. This CD-ROM issue describes the WIND and POLAR spacecraft, the scientific experiments carried onboard, the Theoretical and Ground Based investigations which constitute the US Global Geospace Science Program and the ISTP Data Systems which support the data acquisition and analysis effort. The International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) Key Parameter Visualization Tool (KPVT), provided on the CD-ROM, was developed at the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF). The KPVT is a generic software package for visualizing the key parameter data produced from all ISTP missions, interactively and simultaneously. The tool is designed to facilitate correlative displays of ISTP data from multiple spacecraft and instruments, and thus the selection of candidate events and data quality control. The software, written in IDL, includes a graphical/widget user interface, and runs on many platforms, including various UNIX workstations, Alpha/Open VMS, Macintosh (680x0 and PowerPC), and PC/Windows NT, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95.

  14. Office Civilian Waste Management Transportation Institutional Program Update on Collaborative Efforts with Key Stakeholders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Saris; P. Austin; J.J. Offner

    2004-12-29

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) created the Office of National Transportation in 2003 recognizing the need to revitalize and accelerate development of the transportation system. The Department has made a commitment to work through a collaborative planning process before developing specific policies and procedures and making transportation decisions. OCRWM has begun to build the institutional framework to support development of this transportation system. Interactions with stakeholders have been initiated. The authors describe the key stakeholders, identified issues, regional and national planning activities, and mechanisms for interaction.

  15. Volatile components and key odorants of fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill.) and thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.) oil extracts obtained by simultaneous distillation-extraction and supercritical fluid extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Maroto, M Consuelo; Díaz-Maroto Hidalgo, Ignacio Javier; Sánchez-Palomo, Eva; Pérez-Coello, M Soledad

    2005-06-29

    Volatile oil extracts of fennel seeds (Foeniculum vulgare Mill.) and thyme leaves (Thymus vulgaris L.) were obtained by simultaneous distillation-extraction (SDE) and supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In general, fennel oil extracted by SDE and SFE showed similar compositions, with trans-anethole, estragole, and fenchone as the main components. In contrast, thymol and p-cymene, the most abundant compounds in thyme leaves, showed big differences, with generally higher amounts of monoterpenes obtained by SDE. However, in this case, the differences between the extracts were higher. Key odorants of fennel seeds determined by gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) showed similar patterns when applying SDE and SFE. trans-Anethole (anise, licorice), estragole (anise, licorice, sweet), fenchone (mint, camphor, warm), and 1-octen-3-ol (mushroom) were the most intense odor compounds detected in fennel extracts. Thymol and carvacrol, with oregano, thyme, and spicy notes, were identified as key compounds contributing to the aroma of thyme leaves.

  16. [Impact of distillage recycling on the glycolysis key enzymes, stress response metabolites and intracelluler components of the self-flocculating yeast].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zi, Lihan; Zhang, Chunming; Ren, Jiangang; Yuan, Wenjie; Chen, Lijie

    2010-07-01

    This research aimed to study the effect of distillage recycling on ethanol fermentation, the key glycolytic enzymes and cell composition of the self-flocculating yeast. With the self-flocculating yeast SPSC01 and medium composed of 220 g/L glucose, 8 g/L yeast extract and 6 g/L peptone, continuous ethanol fermentation was carried out at the dilution rate of 0.04 h(-1) with a 1.5 L tank bioreactor. Fermentation broth was collected every 3 days, and ethanol and other volatile byproducts were removed by distillation, but the stillage with high boiling byproducts was recycled to prepare the medium instead of fresh water. The system was run for 20 days, during which ethanol and biomass concentrations in the effluent decreased continuously, indicating the significant inhibition of the high boiling byproducts accumulated within the system. Thus, the activities of the key enzymes of the glycolytic pathway: hexokinase, 6-phosphofructose kinase, and pyruvate kinase were analyzed, and it was observed that all of them were inhibited. Furthermore, the biosynthesis of the stress response metabolites glycerol and trehalose was investigated, and it was found that glycerol production that can protect yeast cells against osmotic pressure stress was enhanced, but trehalose biosynthesis that can protect yeast cells against ethanol inhibition was not improved, correspondingly. And in the meantime, the biosynthesis of the major intracellular components proteins and hydrocarbons was adjusted, correspondingly.

  17. Investigating the key factors in designing a communication skills program for medical students: A qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdi Hazavehei, Seyyed M.; Moonaghi, Hossein Karimi; Moeini, Babak; Moghimbeigi, Abbas; Emadzadeh, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Medical students have a serious need to acquire communication skills with others. In many medical schools, special curriculums are developed to improve such skills. Effective training of communication skills requires expert curriculum design. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences and views of experts and stakeholders in order to design a suitable training program in communication skills for medical students. Methods The content analysis approach was used in this qualitative study. Forty-three participants were selected from the faculty, nurses, physicians, residents, and medical students at Mashhad University of Medical Sciences using purposive sampling. The data were collected through focus group discussions and semi-structured interviews. To ensure the accuracy of the data, the criteria of credibility, transferability, dependability, and conformability were met. The data were analyzed by MAXQDA software using the Graneheim & Lundman model. Results The findings of this study consisted of two main themes, i.e., “The vast nature of the present communication skills training” and “administrative requirements of the training program regarding communication skills.” The first theme included the educational needs of students, the problems associated with training people to have good communication skills, the importance of good communication skills in performing professional duties, communication skills and job requirements, the learning environment of communication skills, and the status of existing training programs for communication skills. Strategies and suitable methods for teaching communication skills and methods of evaluating the students in this regard also were obtained. Conclusion The findings of this study were the elements required to design a proper and local model to teach communication skills to medical students through analyzing the concepts of effective communication. The results of this study can be useful for medical

  18. Investigating the key factors in designing a communication skills program for medical students: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdi Hazavehei, Seyyed M; Karimi Moonaghi, Hossein; Moeini, Babak; Moghimbeigi, Abbas; Emadzadeh, Ali

    2015-11-01

    Medical students have a serious need to acquire communication skills with others. In many medical schools, special curriculums are developed to improve such skills. Effective training of communication skills requires expert curriculum design. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences and views of experts and stakeholders in order to design a suitable training program in communication skills for medical students. The content analysis approach was used in this qualitative study. Forty-three participants were selected from the faculty, nurses, physicians, residents, and medical students at Mashhad University of Medical Sciences using purposive sampling. The data were collected through focus group discussions and semi-structured interviews. To ensure the accuracy of the data, the criteria of credibility, transferability, dependability, and conformability were met. The data were analyzed by MAXQDA software using the Graneheim & Lundman model. The findings of this study consisted of two main themes, i.e., "The vast nature of the present communication skills training" and "administrative requirements of the training program regarding communication skills." The first theme included the educational needs of students, the problems associated with training people to have good communication skills, the importance of good communication skills in performing professional duties, communication skills and job requirements, the learning environment of communication skills, and the status of existing training programs for communication skills. Strategies and suitable methods for teaching communication skills and methods of evaluating the students in this regard also were obtained. The findings of this study were the elements required to design a proper and local model to teach communication skills to medical students through analyzing the concepts of effective communication. The results of this study can be useful for medical faculties in designing a proper program for

  19. Identifying effective components of alcohol abuse prevention programs: effects of fear appeals, message style, and source expertise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stainback, R D; Rogers, R W

    1983-04-01

    Despite the importance of alcohol abuse prevention programs, the effectiveness of many components of these programs has not been demonstrated empirically. An experiment tested the efficacy of three components of many prevention programs: fear appeals, one- versus two-sided message style, and the expertise of the source. The persuasive impact of this information was examined on 113 ninth-grade students' intentions to abstain from drinking alcohol while they are teenagers. The results reveal that fear appeals are successful in strengthening students' intentions to refrain from drinking. Implications are discussed for implementing these principles and for designing future investigations of alcohol abuse prevention programs.

  20. Advance Planning, Programming and Production Control as key Activities Now the Environmental Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Cardoso de Oliveira Neto

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This work addresses the evolution of Planning, Programming and Control of Production (PPCP as essential activities of the company towards the insertion of environmental education. The approach is based on an exploratory research and a critical bibliographic revision. Two main objectives were established: i a new way of production organization, by considering cleaner production from company utilities to production capacity, technology and outsourcing and ii infrastructure changes related to market attendance and environmental education dissemination. Needs that arise can be grouped as follows: utilities adequacy, cleaner technologies and ecochains implementation; instruction and dissemination of environmental education; and necessity of the adoption of new paradigms.

  1. The case for including reach as a key element of program theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montague, Steve; Porteous, Nancy L

    2013-02-01

    This paper suggests that there is a need to build reach in the logic models and results frameworks of public health initiatives. A lack of explicit thinking about reach in logic models can lead to problems such as narrow/constricted understanding of impacts chain, favoring of 'narrow and efficient' initiatives over 'wide and engaging' initiatives and biased thinking against equity considerations. An alternative approach described in this paper that explicitly considers reach demonstrates that an explicit description of reach in program theory and results logic depictions can improve equity in health and social systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The polyadenylation factor subunit CLEAVAGE AND POLYADENYLATION SPECIFICITY FACTOR30: A key factor of programmed cell death and a regulator of immunity in arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Bruggeman, Quentin

    2014-04-04

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is essential for several aspects of plant life, including development and stress responses. Indeed, incompatible plant-pathogen interactions are well known to induce the hypersensitive response, a localized cell death. Mutational analyses have identified several key PCD components, and we recently identified the mips1 mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), which is deficient for the key enzyme catalyzing the limiting step of myoinositol synthesis. One of the most striking features of mips1 is the light-dependent formation of lesions on leaves due to salicylic acid (SA)-dependent PCD, revealing roles for myoinositol or inositol derivatives in the regulation of PCD. Here, we identified a regulator of plant PCD by screening for mutants that display transcriptomic profiles opposing that of the mips1 mutant. Our screen identified the oxt6 mutant, which has been described previously as being tolerant to oxidative stress. In the oxt6 mutant, a transfer DNA is inserted in the CLEAVAGE AND POLYADENYLATION SPECIFICITY FACTOR30 (CPSF30) gene, which encodes a polyadenylation factor subunit homolog. We show that CPSF30 is required for lesion formation in mips1 via SA-dependent signaling, that the prodeath function of CPSF30 is not mediated by changes in the glutathione status, and that CPSF30 activity is required for Pseudomonas syringae resistance. We also show that the oxt6 mutation suppresses cell death in other lesion-mimic mutants, including lesion-simulating disease1, mitogen-activated protein kinase4, constitutive expressor of pathogenesis-related genes5, and catalase2, suggesting that CPSF30 and, thus, the control of messenger RNA 3′ end processing, through the regulation of SA production, is a key component of plant immune responses. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  3. 34 CFR 694.10 - What are the requirements for awards under the program's scholarship component under section 404E...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...'s scholarship component under section 404E of the HEA? 694.10 Section 694.10 Education Regulations... What are the requirements for awards under the program's scholarship component under section 404E of the HEA? (a) Amount of scholarship. (1) Except as provided in paragraph (a)(2) of this section, the...

  4. Proposal to negotiate extensions to four collaboration agreements for the design of key components of the beam-delivery and linac systems for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) for a duration of two years

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    Proposal to negotiate extensions to four collaboration agreements for the design of key components of the beam-delivery and linac systems for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) for a duration of two years

  5. Prokaryotic homologs of Argonaute proteins are predicted to function as key components of a novel system of defense against mobile genetic elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Oost John

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In eukaryotes, RNA interference (RNAi is a major mechanism of defense against viruses and transposable elements as well of regulating translation of endogenous mRNAs. The RNAi systems recognize the target RNA molecules via small guide RNAs that are completely or partially complementary to a region of the target. Key components of the RNAi systems are proteins of the Argonaute-PIWI family some of which function as slicers, the nucleases that cleave the target RNA that is base-paired to a guide RNA. Numerous prokaryotes possess the CRISPR-associated system (CASS of defense against phages and plasmids that is, in part, mechanistically analogous but not homologous to eukaryotic RNAi systems. Many prokaryotes also encode homologs of Argonaute-PIWI proteins but their functions remain unknown. Results We present a detailed analysis of Argonaute-PIWI protein sequences and the genomic neighborhoods of the respective genes in prokaryotes. Whereas eukaryotic Ago/PIWI proteins always contain PAZ (oligonucleotide binding and PIWI (active or inactivated nuclease domains, the prokaryotic Argonaute homologs (pAgos fall into two major groups in which the PAZ domain is either present or absent. The monophyly of each group is supported by a phylogenetic analysis of the conserved PIWI-domains. Almost all pAgos that lack a PAZ domain appear to be inactivated, and the respective genes are associated with a variety of predicted nucleases in putative operons. An additional, uncharacterized domain that is fused to various nucleases appears to be a unique signature of operons encoding the short (lacking PAZ pAgo form. By contrast, almost all PAZ-domain containing pAgos are predicted to be active nucleases. Some proteins of this group (e.g., that from Aquifex aeolicus have been experimentally shown to possess nuclease activity, and are not typically associated with genes for other (putative nucleases. Given these observations, the apparent extensive

  6. DIGIT, GASPS, DEBRIS and DUNES: four HERSCHEL Open Time Key Programs to survey the dust cycle in circumstellar disks

    OpenAIRE

    Augereau, J. -C.; Absil, Olivier; Bouvier, J.; Duchêne, G.; Lestrade, J.-F.; Maret, S.; Martin-Zaïdi, C.; Ménard, F.; Morbidelli, A; Olofsson, J.; Pantin, E.; Pinte, C.; Thébault, P.

    2008-01-01

    Four accepted HERSCHEL open time key programs, DIGIT, GASPS, DEBRIS and DUNES, will study the evolution of the dust grains in circumstellar disks around young and Main Sequence stars. There is a strong implication of the french community in these four projects which represent a total of 930 hours (>38 days) of her\\ observing time. The DIGIT and GASPS projects will focus on the first stages of planet formation, while the DEBRIS and DUNES projects will search for extra-solar Kuiper Belt analogs...

  7. Successful biological control of tropical soda apple (Solanales: Solanaceae) in Florida: A review of key program components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tropical soda apple (Solanum viarum Dunal) is a small shrub native to South America that is invasive in pastures and conservation areas across Florida. Dense patches of tropical soda apple not only reduce cattle stocking rates and limit their movement, but also serve as reservoirs for pests of solan...

  8. Reconstructed cell fate–regulatory programs in stem cells reveal hierarchies and key factors of neurogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Parra, Marco-Antonio; Malysheva, Valeriya; Mohamed Saleem, Mohamed Ashick; Lieb, Michele; Godel, Aurelie; Gronemeyer, Hinrich

    2016-01-01

    Cell lineages, which shape the body architecture and specify cell functions, derive from the integration of a plethora of cell intrinsic and extrinsic signals. These signals trigger a multiplicity of decisions at several levels to modulate the activity of dynamic gene regulatory networks (GRNs), which ensure both general and cell-specific functions within a given lineage, thereby establishing cell fates. Significant knowledge about these events and the involved key drivers comes from homogeneous cell differentiation models. Even a single chemical trigger, such as the morphogen all-trans retinoic acid (RA), can induce the complex network of gene-regulatory decisions that matures a stem/precursor cell to a particular step within a given lineage. Here we have dissected the GRNs involved in the RA-induced neuronal or endodermal cell fate specification by integrating dynamic RXRA binding, chromatin accessibility, epigenetic promoter epigenetic status, and the transcriptional activity inferred from RNA polymerase II mapping and transcription profiling. Our data reveal how RA induces a network of transcription factors (TFs), which direct the temporal organization of cognate GRNs, thereby driving neuronal/endodermal cell fate specification. Modeling signal transduction propagation using the reconstructed GRNs indicated critical TFs for neuronal cell fate specification, which were confirmed by CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing. Overall, this study demonstrates that a systems view of cell fate specification combined with computational signal transduction models provides the necessary insight in cellular plasticity for cell fate engineering. The present integrated approach can be used to monitor the in vitro capacity of (engineered) cells/tissues to establish cell lineages for regenerative medicine. PMID:27650846

  9. Research program Integrity of Components (FKS). A substantial contribution to component safety; Forschungsvorhaben Komponentensicherheit (FKS). Ein wesentlicher Beitrag zur Komponentensicherheit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kussmaul, K.; Roos, E.; Foehl, J.

    1998-11-01

    The main objectives pursued are: (a) verify the quality of reactor pressure vessels in existing LWR-type reactors, and (b) quantify the safety margin using both specified and non-specified materials and welds. On the basis of knowledge obtained through earlier programmes, the research project was to examine in particular deviations from the specified materials properties, for more exact quantification of the safety margin before RPV failure. There are three major factors influencing the component performance until failure, which are aggregate material fatigue, flaws, loading conditions, and the research work was to focus on the materials properties. An item of main interest was to assess the impact of long service life on the materials properties, assuming particularly unfavourable boundary conditions for materials properties and operational loads. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Die Hauptziele des Forschungsvorhabens Komponentensicherheit waren (a) die Qualitaet bestehender Reaktordruckbehaelter von Leichtwasserreaktoren zu verifizieren, und (b) den Sicherheitsabstand zu quantifizieren unter Verwendung von Werkstoffen und Schweissverbindungen, die innerhalb und ausserhalb der Spezifikation liegen. Gestuetzt auf Erkenntnisse aus frueheren Programmen sollten zur quantitativen Erfassung des Sicherheitsabstandes gegen Versagen des RDB`s insbesondere auch Abweichungen vom spezifikationsgemaessen Werkstoffzustand betrachtet werden. Von den drei Haupteinflussgroessen Werkstoffzustand, Fehlerzustand, Beanspruchungszustand, die das Versagensverhalten bestimmen, lag der Schwerpunkt des FKS auf der Untersuchung des Werkstoffeinflusses. Insbesondere sollte geprueft werden, wie sich der Langzeitbetrieb auf die Aenderung der Werkstoffeigenschaften auswirkt, wenn besonders unguenstige Randbedingungen von Werkstoffzustand und Betriebsbedingungen zugrunde gelegt werden. (orig./MM)

  10. Unpacking the key components of a programme to improve the timeliness of hip-fracture care: a mixed-methods case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzocato, Pamela; Unbeck, Maria; Elg, Mattias; Sköldenberg, Olof Gustaf; Thor, Johan

    2015-11-09

    Delay to surgery for patients with hip fracture is associated with higher incidence of post-operative complications, prolonged recovery and length of stay, and increased mortality. Therefore, many health care organisations launch improvement programmes to reduce the wait for surgery. The heterogeneous application of similar methods, and the multifaceted nature of the interventions, constrain the understanding of which method works, when, and how. In complex acute care settings, another concern is how changes for one patient group influence the care for other groups. We therefore set out to analyse how multiple components of hip-fracture improvement efforts aimed to reduce the time to surgery influenced that time both for hip-fracture patients and for other acute surgical orthopaedic inpatients. This study is an observational mixed-methods single case study of improvement efforts at a Swedish acute care hospital, which triangulates control chart analysis of process performance data over a five year period with interview, document, and non-participant observation data. The improvement efforts led to an increase in the monthly percentage of hip-fracture patients operated within 24 h of admission from an average of 47% to 83%, with performance predictably ranging between 67% and 98% if the process continues unchanged. Meanwhile, no significant changes in lead time to surgery for other acute surgical orthopaedic inpatients were observed. Interview data indicated that multiple intervention components contributed to making the process more reliable. The triangulation of qualitative and quantitative data, however, indicated that key changes that improved performance were the creation of a process improvement team and having an experienced clinician coordinate demand and supply of surgical services daily and enhance pre-operative patient preparation. Timeliness of surgery for patients with hip fracture in a complex hospital setting can be substantially improved without

  11. Targeted sequencing for high-resolution evolutionary analyses following genome duplication in salmonid fish: Proof of concept for key components of the insulin-like growth factor axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappin, Fiona M; Shaw, Rebecca L; Macqueen, Daniel J

    2016-12-01

    High-throughput sequencing has revolutionised comparative and evolutionary genome biology. It has now become relatively commonplace to generate multiple genomes and/or transcriptomes to characterize the evolution of large taxonomic groups of interest. Nevertheless, such efforts may be unsuited to some research questions or remain beyond the scope of some research groups. Here we show that targeted high-throughput sequencing offers a viable alternative to study genome evolution across a vertebrate family of great scientific interest. Specifically, we exploited sequence capture and Illumina sequencing to characterize the evolution of key components from the insulin-like growth (IGF) signalling axis of salmonid fish at unprecedented phylogenetic resolution. The IGF axis represents a central governor of vertebrate growth and its core components were expanded by whole genome duplication in the salmonid ancestor ~95Ma. Using RNA baits synthesised to genes encoding the complete family of IGF binding proteins (IGFBP) and an IGF hormone (IGF2), we captured, sequenced and assembled orthologous and paralogous exons from species representing all ten salmonid genera. This approach generated 299 novel sequences, most as complete or near-complete protein-coding sequences. Phylogenetic analyses confirmed congruent evolutionary histories for all nineteen recognized salmonid IGFBP family members and identified novel salmonid-specific IGF2 paralogues. Moreover, we reconstructed the evolution of duplicated IGF axis paralogues across a replete salmonid phylogeny, revealing complex historic selection regimes - both ancestral to salmonids and lineage-restricted - that frequently involved asymmetric paralogue divergence under positive and/or relaxed purifying selection. Our findings add to an emerging literature highlighting diverse applications for targeted sequencing in comparative-evolutionary genomics. We also set out a viable approach to obtain large sets of nuclear genes for any

  12. DIGIT, GASPS, DEBRIS and DUNES: four HERSCHEL Open Time Key Programs to survey the dust cycle in circumstellar disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augereau, J.-C.; Absil, O.; Bouvier, J.; Duchêne, G.; Lestrade, J.-F.; Maret, S.; Martin-Zaïdi, C.; Ménard, F.; Morbidelli, A.; Olofsson, J.; Pantin, E.; Pinte, C.; Thébault, P.

    2008-11-01

    Four accepted HERSCHEL open time key programs, DIGIT, GASPS, DEBRIS and DUNES, will study the evolution of the dust grains in circumstellar disks around young and Main Sequence stars. There is a strong implication of the french community in these four projects which represent a total of 930 hours (>38 days) of her\\ observing time. The DIGIT and GASPS projects will focus on the first stages of planet formation, while the DEBRIS and DUNES projects will search for extra-solar Kuiper Belt analogs around nearby Main Sequence stars. In this paper, we give an overview of the scientific goals of the four projects and of the numerical tools that we will be providing to the teams to model and interpret the her\\ observations from these programs.

  13. Video teleconferencing in the compounding laboratory component of a dual-campus doctor of pharmacy program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Jennifer L; Shrewsbury, Robert P

    2011-11-10

    To design, implement, and assess the effectiveness of using a live video teleconferencing system to connect the main campus and a satellite campus during laboratory compounding exercises in a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) program. A new laboratory facility with identical equipment and supplies to the main campus was built at the satellite campus and teleconferencing equipment was set up. Students on both campuses prepared 20 compounded formulations over a 5-course pharmaceutical care laboratory sequence. Live video teleconferencing was used for students to ask questions and for the lead faculty instructor to observe the students' technique. Faculty and staff members and teaching assistants facilitated the laboratory sessions on both campuses. The performance of students on assayed products at the main campus was compared with that of students at the satellite campus to ensure program integrity with the compounding laboratory component. The use of video teleconferencing for teaching compounding was successful and no difference in overall student pass rates was seen. The few observed differences in student performance between the 2 campuses were believed to be a result of variations in instructor communication with distant students. Video teleconferencing can be used successfully to deliver curriculum in laboratory compounding to pharmacy students.

  14. Incentive-Based Conservation Programs in Developing Countries: A Review of Some Key Issues and Suggestions for Improvements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiteri, Arian; Nepalz, Sanjay K.

    2006-01-01

    Biodiversity conservation in developing countries has been a challenge because of the combination of rising human populations, rapid technological advances, severe social hardships, and extreme poverty. To address the social, economic, and ecological limitations of people-free parks and reserves, incentives have been incorporated into conservation programs in the hopes of making conservation meaningful to local people. However, such incentive-based programs have been implemented with little consideration for their ability to fulfill promises of greater protection of biodiversity. Evaluations of incentive-based conservation programs indicate that the approach continually falls short of the rhetoric. This article provides an overview of the problems associated with incentive-based conservation approaches in developing countries. It argues that existing incentive-based programs (IBPs) have yet to realize that benefits vary greatly at different “community” scales and that a holistic conceptualization of a community is essential to incorporate the complexities of a heterogeneous community when designing and implementing the IBPs. The spatial complexities involved in correctly identifying the beneficiaries in a community and the short-term focus of IBPs are two major challenges for sustaining conservation efforts. The article suggests improvements in three key areas: accurate identification of “target” beneficiaries, greater inclusion of marginal communities, and efforts to enhance community aptitudes.

  15. Key Nutrients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federal Extension Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    Lessons written to help trainer agents prepare aides for work with families in the Food and Nutrition Program are presented in this booklet. The key nutrients discussed in the 10 lessons are protein, carbohydrates, fat, calcium, iron, iodine, and Vitamins A, B, C, and D. the format of each lesson is as follows: Purpose, Presentation, Application…

  16. Specialized core stability exercise: a neglected component of anterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Dong-liang; Li, Jing-long; Zhai, Hua; Wang, Hui-fang; Meng, Han; Wang, Yu-bin

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of anterior cruciate ligament injury has continued to increase over the last two decades. This injury is associated with abnormal gait patterns and osteoarthritis of the knee. In order to accelerate recovery, the introduction of core stability exercises into the rehabilitation program is proposed. The theory underlying the use of core stability exercise relates to the neuroplasticity that follows anterior cruciate ligament injury. Neuroplasticity in lumbar, thoracic, cervical and brain regions diminish activation in the contralateral thalamus, postparietal cortex, SM1, basal ganglia-external globus pallidus, SII, cingulated motor area, premotor cortex, and in the ipsilateral cerebellum and SM1 and increase activation in pre-SMA, SIIp, and pITG, indicating modifications of the CNS. In addition, the neuroplasticity can regulate the movement of trunk muscles, for example, sternocleidomastoid and lower trapezius muscles. Core stability also demonstrates a negative correlation with the incidence of anterior cruciate ligament injury. Therefore, we propose that core stability exercises may improve the rehabilitation of anterior cruciate ligament injuries by increasing core motor control. Specialized core stability exercises aimed at rectifying biomechanical problems associated with gait and core stability may play a key role in the management of anterior cruciate ligament injury.

  17. AN ANALYSIS OF SOME ASPECTS OF COMPONENT-BASED PROGRAMMING FOR SELECTING APPROPRIATE CATEGORICAL STRUCTURES AS THEIR MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William STEINGARTNER

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Formal methods and formal models are important tools in software engineering. Formal methods provide unambiguous meaning of programs written in some language or constructed from modules. Moreover, they provide the basic mathematical techniques necessary for those who are working with theoretical background in computer science. Categories are interesting mathematical structures which have become important for constructing the models of programs and program systems. In this paper we formulate an introductory analysis of some aspects of component-based programming for selecting appropriate categorical structures as their models.

  18. The Arabidopsis Mediator Complex Subunit16 Is a Key Component of Basal Resistance against the Necrotrophic Fungal Pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenggang; Yao, Jin; Du, Xuezhu; Zhang, Yanping; Sun, Yijun; Rollins, Jeffrey A.; Mou, Zhonglin

    2015-01-01

    Although Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is a devastating necrotrophic fungal plant pathogen in agriculture, the virulence mechanisms utilized by S. sclerotiorum and the host defense mechanisms against this pathogen have not been fully understood. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Mediator complex subunit MED16 is a key component of basal resistance against S. sclerotiorum. Mutants of MED16 are markedly more susceptible to S. sclerotiorum than mutants of 13 other Mediator subunits, and med16 has a much stronger effect on S. sclerotiorum-induced transcriptome changes compared with med8, a mutation not altering susceptibility to S. sclerotiorum. Interestingly, med16 is also more susceptible to S. sclerotiorum than coronatine-insensitive1-1 (coi1-1), which is the most susceptible mutant reported so far. Although the jasmonic acid (JA)/ethylene (ET) defense pathway marker gene PLANT DEFENSIN1.2 (PDF1.2) cannot be induced in either med16 or coi1-1, basal transcript levels of PDF1.2 in med16 are significantly lower than in coi1-1. Furthermore, ET-induced suppression of JA-activated wound responses is compromised in med16, suggesting a role for MED16 in JA-ET cross talk. Additionally, MED16 is required for the recruitment of RNA polymerase II to PDF1.2 and OCTADECANOID-RESPONSIVE ARABIDOPSIS ETHYLENE/ETHYLENE-RESPONSIVE FACTOR59 (ORA59), two target genes of both JA/ET-mediated and the transcription factor WRKY33-activated defense pathways. Finally, MED16 is physically associated with WRKY33 in yeast and in planta, and WRKY33-activated transcription of PDF1.2 and ORA59 as well as resistance to S. sclerotiorum depends on MED16. Taken together, these results indicate that MED16 regulates resistance to S. sclerotiorum by governing both JA/ET-mediated and WRKY33-activated defense signaling in Arabidopsis. PMID:26143252

  19. TRAIL-Based High Throughput Screening Reveals a Link between TRAIL-Mediated Apoptosis and Glutathione Reductase, a Key Component of Oxidative Stress Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitri Rozanov

    Full Text Available A high throughput screen for compounds that induce TRAIL-mediated apoptosis identified ML100 as an active chemical probe, which potentiated TRAIL activity in prostate carcinoma PPC-1 and melanoma MDA-MB-435 cells. Follow-up in silico modeling and profiling in cell-based assays allowed us to identify NSC130362, pharmacophore analog of ML100 that induced 65-95% cytotoxicity in cancer cells and did not affect the viability of human primary hepatocytes. In agreement with the activation of the apoptotic pathway, both ML100 and NSC130362 synergistically with TRAIL induced caspase-3/7 activity in MDA-MB-435 cells. Subsequent affinity chromatography and inhibition studies convincingly demonstrated that glutathione reductase (GSR, a key component of the oxidative stress response, is a target of NSC130362. In accordance with the role of GSR in the TRAIL pathway, GSR gene silencing potentiated TRAIL activity in MDA-MB-435 cells but not in human hepatocytes. Inhibition of GSR activity resulted in the induction of oxidative stress, as was evidenced by an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS and peroxidation of mitochondrial membrane after NSC130362 treatment in MDA-MB-435 cells but not in human hepatocytes. The antioxidant reduced glutathione (GSH fully protected MDA-MB-435 cells from cell lysis induced by NSC130362 and TRAIL, thereby further confirming the interplay between GSR and TRAIL. As a consequence of activation of oxidative stress, combined treatment of different oxidative stress inducers and NSC130362 promoted cell death in a variety of cancer cells but not in hepatocytes in cell-based assays and in in vivo, in a mouse tumor xenograft model.

  20. Key components of a service model providing early childhood support for women attending opioid treatment clinics: an Australian state health service review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Susan R; Schmied, Virginia; Nicholls, Daniel; Dahlen, Hannah

    2012-09-01

    To report the findings of a service review--specifically the strategy to provide early childhood services 'on site' at opioid treatment clinics to address access difficulties. Child and family health nurses are skilled in the assessment and support of families during early childhood. However, women with a history of substance abuse are often cautious when engaging with universal and other health services, with the result that the infant may miss recommended developmental screening and early referral to improve health outcomes. In 2006, an internal review was undertaken of the integration of early childhood and parenting services at opioid treatment clinics in a large Area Health Service of New South Wales, Australia. A qualitative study design, using semi-structured interview questions was used. Data were collected via six focus groups (4-15 participants in each group) and individual interview of child and family health nurses, nurse unit managers and clinical staff (n=58). Three key components of a model for providing early childhood support in collaboration with opioid treatment services were identified. First, the importance of building a trusting relationship between the woman and the child and family health nurses, second, maintaining continuity of care and a multidisciplinary/multiagency approach, and finally the importance of staff education, support and professional development. The provision of early childhood and parenting services on site, as part of a multidisciplinary 'one stop shop' approach to service delivery was a clear recommendation of the review. Reduction of access difficulties to specialised early childhood support is of benefit to clients, community health services attempting to provide a service to this difficult to reach population and to drug and alcohol services seeking to provide a high level of holistic care for clients. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Legislation on violence against women: overview of key components Legislación sobre la violencia contra la mujer: panorama de los elementos fundamentales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaby Ortiz-Barreda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine if legislation on violence against women (VAW worldwide contains key components recommended by the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO and the United Nations (UN to help strengthen VAW prevention and provide better integrated victim protection, support, and care. A systematic search for VAW legislation using international legal databases and other electronic sources plus data from previous research identified 124 countries/territories with some type of VAW legislation. Full legal texts were found for legislation from 104 countries/territories. Those available in English, Portuguese, and Spanish were downloaded and compiled and the selection criteria applied (use of any of the common terms related to VAW, including intimate partner violence (IPV, and reference to at least two of six sectors (education, health, judicial system, mass media, police, and social services with regard to VAW interventions (protection, support, and care. A final sample from 80 countries/territories was selected and analyzed for the presence of key components recommended by PAHO and the UN (reference to the term "violence against women" in the title; definitions of different types of VAW; identification of women as beneficiaries; and promotion of (reference to the participation of multiple sectors in VAW interventions. Few countries/territories specifically identified women as the beneficiaries of their VAW legislation, including those that labeled their legislation "domestic violence" law ( n = 51, of which only two explicitly mentioned women as complainants/survivors. Only 28 countries/territories defined the main forms of VAW (economic, physical, psychological, and sexual in their VAW legislation. Most highlighted the role of the judicial system, followed by that of social services and the police. Only 28 mentioned the health sector. Despite considerable efforts worldwide to strengthen VAW legislation, most VAW laws do not incorporate

  2. NINE KEY FUNCTIONS FOR A HUMAN SUBJECTS PROTECTION PROGRAM FOR COMMUNITY-ENGAGED RESEARCH: POINTS TO CONSIDER1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Lainie Friedman; Loup, Allan; Nelson, Robert M.; Botkin, Jeffrey R.; Kost, Rhonda; Smith, George R.; Gehlert, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    The Ethical Conduct of Community-engaged research (CEnR), of which the Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) model is the partnership model most widely discussed in the CEnR literature and is the primary model we draw upon in this discussion, requires an integrated and comprehensive human subjects protection (HSP) program that addresses the additional concerns salient to CEnR where members of a community are both research partners and participants. As delineated in the federal regulations, the backbone of a HSP program is the fulfillment of nine functions: (1) minimize risks; (2) reasonable benefit-risk ratio; (3) fair subject selection; (4) adequate monitoring; (5) informed consent; (6) privacy and confidentiality; (7) conflicts of interest; (8) address vulnerabilities; and (9) HSP training. The federal regulations, however, do not consider the risks and harms that may occur to groups, and these risks have not traditionally been included in the benefit: risk analysis nor have they been incorporated into an HSP framework. We explore additional HSP issues raised by CEnR within these nine ethical functions. Various entities exist that can provide HSP—the investigator, the Institutional Review Board, the Conflict of Interest Committee, the Research Ethics Consultation program, the Research Subject Advocacy program, the Data and Safety Monitoring Plan, and the Community Advisory Board. Protection is best achieved if these entities are coordinated to ensure that no gaps exist, to minimize unnecessary redundancy, and to provide checks and balances between the different entities of HSP and the nine functions that they must realize. The document is structured to provide a “points-to-consider” roadmap for HSP entities to help them adequately address the nine key functions necessary to provide adequate protection of individuals and communities in CEnR. PMID:20235862

  3. BTSA Program Directors' Perceptions on the Relationship between Components of Mentor Assessment and Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maricich, Patricia Sheehan

    2014-01-01

    California's Beginning Teacher Support and Assessment program (BTSA) is a high stakes induction program; a new teacher's completion of a BTSA induction program leads to the California clear credential. The cornerstone of the BTSA induction program is the mentor, also known as a support provider. Mentors provide a variety of services to new…

  4. Federal High Performance Computing and Communications Program. The Department of Energy Component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Office of Energy Research.

    This report, profusely illustrated with color photographs and other graphics, elaborates on the Department of Energy (DOE) research program in High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC). The DOE is one of seven agency programs within the Federal Research and Development Program working on HPCC. The DOE HPCC program emphasizes research in…

  5. Improving the Effectiveness of the Bio-slurry Extension Component of National Biodigester Program in Cambodia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, M. F.

    2009-10-15

    This report deals with the escalating challenge Cambodia faces in its agricultural sector for providing sufficient feeding to an increasing population, while also having improper soil management. Based on field visits, interviews, regular meetings, training workshops, and joint analysis it was revealed that farmers used both organic (bio-slurry) and inorganic fertilisers but were unaware of the balance needed and required doses of fertiliser. Further, it appeared that farmers have limited access to improve crop management practices, specifically to fertiliser management. In a response to the problem, the current weaknesses, and further scope of improvement of present organisational setup of slurry extension component of NBP and subsidy system have been analysed in depth. Extensive recommendations are offered on an organisational setup level (e.g. strengthen the linkage between Provincial Biogas Program Office-PBPO and Cambodian Centre for Study and Development in Agriculture-CEDAC by involving CEDAC in the planning process), subsidy (e.g. provide subsidy to attract farmers for construction of standard compost hut, boundaries and shade), planning (e.g. bottom up planning approach is suggested where a seasonal planning meeting should be organized at province by the project director involving CEDAC provincial coordinator), development of training materials (e.g. a national consultant should be hired for developing a training manual on bio-slurry systems), training (e.g. strengthen user training by increasing its number, frequency, topics), farmers participatory action research (e.g. the participatory approach should be replaced by a demonstration one), monitoring and reporting (e.g. monitoring system should be established as desk and field monitoring)

  6. NPRL2 sensitizes human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cells to cisplatin treatment by regulating key components in the DNA repair pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gitanjali Jayachandran

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available NPRL2, one of the tumor suppressor genes residing in a 120-kb homozygous deletion region of human chromosome band 3p21.3, has a high degree of amino acid sequence homology with the nitrogen permease regulator 2 (NPR2 yeast gene, and mutations of NPRL2 in yeast cells are associated with resistance to cisplatin-mediated cell killing. Previously, we showed that restoration of NPRL2 in NPRL2-negative and cisplatin-resistant cells resensitize lung cancer cells to cisplatin treatment in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we show that sensitization of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cells to cisplatin by NPRL2 is accomplished through the regulation of key components in the DNA-damage checkpoint pathway. NPRL2 can phosphorylate ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM kinase activated by cisplatin and promote downstream gamma-H2AX formation in vitro and in vivo, which occurs during apoptosis concurrently with the initial appearance of high-molecular-weight DNA fragments. Moreover, this combination treatment results in higher Chk1 and Chk2 kinase activity than does treatment with cisplatin alone and can activate Chk2 in pleural metastases tumor xenograft in mice. Activated Chk1 and Chk2 increase the expression of cell cycle checkpoint proteins, including Cdc25A and Cdc25C, leading to higher levels of G2/M arrest in tumor cells treated with NPRL2 and cisplatin than in tumor cells treated with cisplatin only. Our results therefore suggest that ectopic expression of NPRL2 activates the DNA damage checkpoint pathway in cisplatin-resistant and NPRL2-negative cells; hence, the combination of NPRL2 and cisplatin can resensitize cisplatin nonresponders to cisplatin treatment through the activation of the DNA damage checkpoint pathway, leading to cell arrest in the G2/M phase and induction of apoptosis. The direct implication of this study is that combination treatment with NPRL2 and cisplatin may overcome cisplatin resistance and enhance therapeutic efficacy.

  7. NPRL2 Sensitizes Human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) Cells to Cisplatin Treatment by Regulating Key Components in the DNA Repair Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bingbing; Roth, Jack A.; Ji, Lin

    2010-01-01

    NPRL2, one of the tumor suppressor genes residing in a 120-kb homozygous deletion region of human chromosome band 3p21.3, has a high degree of amino acid sequence homology with the nitrogen permease regulator 2 (NPR2) yeast gene, and mutations of NPRL2 in yeast cells are associated with resistance to cisplatin-mediated cell killing. Previously, we showed that restoration of NPRL2 in NPRL2-negative and cisplatin-resistant cells resensitize lung cancer cells to cisplatin treatment in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we show that sensitization of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells to cisplatin by NPRL2 is accomplished through the regulation of key components in the DNA-damage checkpoint pathway. NPRL2 can phosphorylate ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase activated by cisplatin and promote downstream γ-H2AX formation in vitro and in vivo, which occurs during apoptosis concurrently with the initial appearance of high-molecular-weight DNA fragments. Moreover, this combination treatment results in higher Chk1 and Chk2 kinase activity than does treatment with cisplatin alone and can activate Chk2 in pleural metastases tumor xenograft in mice. Activated Chk1 and Chk2 increase the expression of cell cycle checkpoint proteins, including Cdc25A and Cdc25C, leading to higher levels of G2/M arrest in tumor cells treated with NPRL2 and cisplatin than in tumor cells treated with cisplatin only. Our results therefore suggest that ectopic expression of NPRL2 activates the DNA damage checkpoint pathway in cisplatin-resistant and NPRL2-negative cells; hence, the combination of NPRL2 and cisplatin can resensitize cisplatin nonresponders to cisplatin treatment through the activation of the DNA damage checkpoint pathway, leading to cell arrest in the G2/M phase and induction of apoptosis. The direct implication of this study is that combination treatment with NPRL2 and cisplatin may overcome cisplatin resistance and enhance therapeutic efficacy. PMID:20700484

  8. Pilot monitoring program: geologic input for the hillslope component (includes a discussion of Caspar Creek geology and geomorphology)

    Science.gov (United States)

    T. E. Spittler

    1995-01-01

    The California Department of Conservation, Division of Mines and Geology (DMG) is submitting this report and accompanying maps to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CDF) to fulfill Interagency Agreement number 8CA38400, Pilot Monitoring Program -- Geologic Input for the Hillslope Component. Under this agreement, DMG has assisted CDF in the...

  9. Set up for Success: An Examination of the Ronald E. McNair Postbaccalaureate Achievement Program's Mentoring Component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyre, Dwuena Cene

    2011-01-01

    Often, individuals are set up to fail. However, effective mentoring can set individuals up to succeed. This nonexperimental cross-sectional, predictive study examines the Ronald E. McNair Postbaccalaureate Achievement Program's mentoring component. Specific focus is placed on faculty mentor competency and its impact on McNair student intent to…

  10. [THE FUNCTIONAL CONSTITUENT OF A BIOLOGICAL COMPONENT IN PROGRAMS FOR TRAINING SPECIALISTS IN THE AREA OF PARASITOLOGY FOR ACCREDITATION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovgalev, A S; Astanina, S Yu; Andreeva, N D

    2015-01-01

    The paper considers the functional aspects of a biological component in programs for training specialists in the area of Parasitology for accreditation within the current enactments, including those on modernization of public health and additional professional education. The working program of the module "Fundamental Disciplines" has been used as an example to outline approaches to molding a medical parasitologist's capacity and readiness to solve professional tasks on the basis of knowledge of fundamental disciplines: biology, immunology, and medical geography. Education fundamentalization is shown to suggest more unsupervised work of a learner in the teaching process. The fundamental constituent of a biological component of the 'programs for training learners in the specialty of Parasitology for accreditation is shown in the interaction of all sections of this area with special and allied subjects.

  11. Meeting the needs of parents around the time of diagnosis of disability among their children: evaluation of a novel program for information, support, and liaison by key workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahi, Jugnoo S; Manaras, Irene; Tuomainen, Helena; Hundt, Gillian Lewando

    2004-10-01

    Key worker programs for families of children with disabilities, to promote information provision, emotional support, and liaisons among different agencies, have long been advocated but not extensively implemented. We report the impact on the experiences of parents and the practices of health care professionals of a novel, hospital-based, key worker service (Community Link Team [CLT]), implemented in the pediatric ophthalmology department of Great Ormond Street Hospital (London, United Kingdom). The CLT included 2 members, 1 of whom was present during the first outpatient assessment by the consultant ophthalmologist of any child newly diagnosed as visually impaired (corrected acuity of 6/18 or worse in the better eye) and accompanied the family during other assessments performed during that visit. A dedicated room was used by the CLT members to spend time with each family after completion of the clinical assessments. The CLT members reiterated and/or clarified clinical information already provided, specifically advised the families about visual stimulation programs and the benefits and purpose of visual impairment certification, and provided information about educational and social services. The same CLT member met the family at subsequent visits to the department and acted as the first point of contact for parents. Parents of children newly diagnosed with visual impairment and/or ophthalmic disorders at Great Ormond Street Hospital participated in a 2-stage study to assess their needs, their views about the processes of care, and their overall satisfaction. The study included a questionnaire survey with 2 standard instruments, ie, the Measure of Processes of Care, specifically developed and used to assess parents' views of the degree to which health services for a range of childhood disorders are family-centered, and the short form of the Client Satisfaction Questionnaire, used to assess overall parental satisfaction or dissatisfaction with services in the

  12. 40 CFR 1033.645 - Non-OEM component certification program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... test data are available from other sources, such as testing performed by a railroad. (e) Components... otherwise not be remanufactured under a certificate of conformity. (iii) A copy of the maintenance instructions for engines using your component. You may reference the other certificate holder's maintenance...

  13. Water in Star-forming Regions with the Herschel Space Observatory (WISH). I. Overview of Key Program and First Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dishoeck, E. F.; Kristensen, L. E.; Benz, A. O.; Bergin, E. A.; Caselli, P.; Cernicharo, J.; Herpin, F.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Johnstone, D.; Liseau, R.; Nisini, B.; Shipman, R.; Tafalla, M.; van der Tak, F.; Wyrowski, F.; Aikawa, Y.; Bachiller, R.; Baudry, A.; Benedettini, M.; Bjerkeli, P.; Blake, G. A.; Bontemps, S.; Braine, J.; Brinch, C.; Bruderer, S.; Chavarría, L.; Codella, C.; Daniel, F.; de Graauw, Th.; Deul, E.; di Giorgio, A. M.; Dominik, C.; Doty, S. D.; Dubernet, M. L.; Encrenaz, P.; Feuchtgruber, H.; Fich, M.; Frieswijk, W.; Fuente, A.; Giannini, T.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Helmich, F. P.; Herczeg, G. J.; Jacq, T.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Karska, A.; Kaufman, M. J.; Keto, E.; Larsson, B.; Lefloch, B.; Lis, D.; Marseille, M.; McCoey, C.; Melnick, G.; Neufeld, D.; Olberg, M.; Pagani, L.; Panić, O.; Parise, B.; Pearson, J. C.; Plume, R.; Risacher, C.; Salter, D.; Santiago-García, J.; Saraceno, P.; Stäuber, P.; van Kempen, T. A.; Visser, R.; Viti, S.; Walmsley, M.; Wampfler, S. F.; Yıldız, U. A.

    2011-02-01

    Water In Star-forming regions with Herschel (WISH) is a key program on the Herschel Space Observatory designed to probe the physical and chemical structures of young stellar objects using water and related molecules and to follow the water abundance from collapsing clouds to planet-forming disks. About 80 sources are targeted, covering a wide range of luminosities—from low (105 L⊙)—and a wide range of evolutionary stages—from cold prestellar cores to warm protostellar envelopes and outflows to disks around young stars. Both the HIFI and PACS instruments are used to observe a variety of lines of H2O, H218O and chemically related species at the source position and in small maps around the protostars and selected outflow positions. In addition, high-frequency lines of CO, 13CO, and C18O are obtained with Herschel and are complemented by ground-based observations of dust continuum, HDO, CO and its isotopologs, and other molecules to ensure a self-consistent data set for analysis. An overview of the scientific motivation and observational strategy of the program is given, together with the modeling approach and analysis tools that have been developed. Initial science results are presented. These include a lack of water in cold gas at abundances that are lower than most predictions, strong water emission from shocks in protostellar environments, the importance of UV radiation in heating the gas along outflow walls across the full range of luminosities, and surprisingly widespread detection of the chemically related hydrides OH+ and H2O+ in outflows and foreground gas. Quantitative estimates of the energy budget indicate that H2O is generally not the dominant coolant in the warm dense gas associated with protostars. Very deep limits on the cold gaseous water reservoir in the outer regions of protoplanetary disks are obtained that have profound implications for our understanding of grain growth and mixing in disks.

  14. Solving Component Structural Dynamic Failures Due to Extremely High Frequency Structural Response on the Space Shuttle Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frady, Greg; Nesman, Thomas; Zoladz, Thomas; Szabo, Roland

    2010-01-01

    For many years, the capabilities to determine the root-cause failure of component failures have been limited to the analytical tools and the state of the art data acquisition systems. With this limited capability, many anomalies have been resolved by adding material to the design to increase robustness without the ability to determine if the design solution was satisfactory until after a series of expensive test programs were complete. The risk of failure and multiple design, test, and redesign cycles were high. During the Space Shuttle Program, many crack investigations in high energy density turbomachines, like the SSME turbopumps and high energy flows in the main propulsion system, have led to the discovery of numerous root-cause failures and anomalies due to the coexistences of acoustic forcing functions, structural natural modes, and a high energy excitation, such as an edge tone or shedding flow, leading the technical community to understand many of the primary contributors to extremely high frequency high cycle fatique fluid-structure interaction anomalies. These contributors have been identified using advanced analysis tools and verified using component and system tests during component ground tests, systems tests, and flight. The structural dynamics and fluid dynamics communities have developed a special sensitivity to the fluid-structure interaction problems and have been able to adjust and solve these problems in a time effective manner to meet budget and schedule deadlines of operational vehicle programs, such as the Space Shuttle Program over the years.

  15. Capturing how age-friendly communities foster positive health, social participation and health equity: a study protocol of key components and processes that promote population health in aging Canadians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levasseur, Mélanie; Dubois, Marie-France; Généreux, Mélissa; Menec, Verena; Raina, Parminder; Roy, Mathieu; Gabaude, Catherine; Couturier, Yves; St-Pierre, Catherine

    2017-05-25

    To address the challenges of the global aging population, the World Health Organization promoted age-friendly communities as a way to foster the development of active aging community initiatives. Accordingly, key components (i.e., policies, services and structures related to the communities' physical and social environments) should be designed to be age-friendly and help all aging adults to live safely, enjoy good health and stay involved in their communities. Although age-friendly communities are believed to be a promising way to help aging Canadians lead healthy and active lives, little is known about which key components best foster positive health, social participation and health equity, and their underlying mechanisms. This study aims to better understand which and how key components of age-friendly communities best foster positive health, social participation and health equity in aging Canadians. Specifically, the research objectives are to: 1) Describe and compare age-friendly key components of communities across Canada 2) Identify key components best associated with positive health, social participation and health equity of aging adults 3) Explore how these key components foster positive health, social participation and health equity METHODS: A mixed-method sequential explanatory design will be used. The quantitative part will involve a survey of Canadian communities and secondary analysis of cross-sectional data from the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging (CLSA). The survey will include an age-friendly questionnaire targeting key components in seven domains: physical environment, housing options, social environment, opportunities for participation, community supports and healthcare services, transportation options, communication and information. The CLSA is a large, national prospective study representative of the Canadian aging population designed to examine health transitions and trajectories of adults as they age. In the qualitative part, a multiple

  16. The Complexity of Poverty: A Missing Component of Educational Leadership Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyman, Linda L.; Villani, Christine J.

    2002-01-01

    Reviews research on poverty in the United States, the effects of poverty on children and learning, attitudes of Americans toward causes of poverty, and status of social justice in educational leadership programs. Survey of educational leadership programs finds little instructional attention given to the complexity of poverty. Recommends the…

  17. SPSS and SAS programs for determining the number of components using parallel analysis and velicer's MAP test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, B P

    2000-08-01

    Popular statistical software packages do not have the proper procedures for determining the number of components in factor and principal components analyses. Parallel analysis and Velicer's minimum average partial (MAP) test are validated procedures, recommended widely by statisticians. However, many researchers continue to use alternative, simpler, but flawed procedures, such as the eigenvalues-greater-than-one rule. Use of the proper procedures might be increased if these procedures could be conducted within familiar software environments. This paper describes brief and efficient programs for using SPSS and SAS to conduct parallel analyses and the MAP test.

  18. An asynchronous learning approach for the instructional component of a dual-campus pharmacy resident teaching program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Gina Daubney; Baia, Patricia; Canning, Jacquelyn E; Strang, Aimee F

    2015-03-25

    To describe the shift to an asynchronous online approach for pedagogy instruction within a pharmacy resident teaching program offered by a dual-campus college. The pedagogy instruction component of the teaching program (Part I) was redesigned with a focus on the content, delivery, and coordination of the learning environment. Asynchronous online learning replaced distance technology or lecture capture. Using a pedagogical content knowledge framework, residents participated in self-paced online learning using faculty recordings, readings, and discussion board activities. A learning management system was used to assess achievement of learning objectives and participation prior to progressing to the teaching experiences component of the teaching program (Part II). Evaluation of resident pedagogical knowledge development and participation in Part I of the teaching program was achieved through the learning management system. Participant surveys and written reflections showed general satisfaction with the online learning environment. Future considerations include addition of a live orientation session and increased faculty presence in the online learning environment. An online approach framed by educational theory can be an effective way to provide pedagogy instruction within a teaching program.

  19. Nunamycin and Nunapeptin: Two novel cyclic peptides are key components of the antimicrobial activity of the Greenlandic isolate Pseudomonas fluorescens In5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hennessy, Rosanna Catherine; Phippen, Christopher; Nielsen, Kristian F.

    suppressive soil, P. fluorescens In5 is therefore a promising potential biocontrol agent with potent activity against plant pathogens. Studies to date have shown nunamycin and nunapeptin as key compounds underpinning this antimicrobial activity. A combination of molecular genetic strain manipulations and omic...

  20. Program information architecture/document hierarchy. [Information Management Systems, it's components and rationale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, T.W.

    1991-09-01

    The Nuclear Waste Management System (NWMS) Management Systems Improvement Strategy (MSIS) (DOE 1990) requires that the information within the computer program and information management system be ordered into a precedence hierarchy for consistency. Therefore, the US Department of Energy (DOE). Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) requested Westinghouse Hanford Company to develop a plan for NWMS program information which the MSIS calls a document hierarchy. This report provides the results of that effort and describes the management system as a program information architecture.'' 3 refs., 3 figs.

  1. The HERschel Inventory of the Agents of Galaxy Evolution in the Magellanic Clouds, a HERschel Open Time Key Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meixner, Margaret; Panuzzo, P.; Roman-Duval, J.; Engelbracht, C.; Babler, B.; Seale, J.; Hony, S.; Montiel, E.; Sauvage, M.; Gordon, K.; hide

    2013-01-01

    We present an overview or the HERschel Inventory of The Agents of Galaxy Evolution (HERITAGE) in the Magellanic Clouds project, which is a Herschel Space Observatory open time key program. We mapped the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) at 100, 160, 250, 350, and 500 micron with the Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) and Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) instruments on board Herschel using the SPIRE/PACS parallel mode. The overriding science goal of HERITAGE is to study the life cycle of matter as traced by dust in the LMC and SMC. The far-infrared and submillimeter emission is an effective tracer of the interstellar medium (ISM) dust, the most deeply embedded young stellar objects (YSOs), and the dust ejected by the most massive stars. We describe in detail the data processing, particularly for the PACS data, which required some custom steps because of the large angular extent of a single observational unit and overall the large amount of data to be processed as an ensemble. We report total global fluxes for LMC and SMC and demonstrate their agreement with measurements by prior missions. The HERITAGE maps of the LMC and SMC are dominated by the ISM dust emission and bear most resemblance to the tracers of ISM gas rather than the stellar content of the galaxies. We describe the point source extraction processing and the critetia used to establish a catalog for each waveband for the HERITAGE program. The 250 micron band is the most sensitive and the source catalogs for this band have approx. 25,000 objects for the LMC and approx. 5500 objects for the SMC. These data enable studies of ISM dust properties, submillimeter excess dust emission, dust-to-gas ratio, Class 0 YSO candidates, dusty massive evolved stars, supemova remnants (including SN1987A), H II regions, and dust evolution in the LMC and SMC. All images and catalogs are delivered to the Herschel Science Center as part of the conummity support

  2. THE HERSCHEL INVENTORY OF THE AGENTS OF GALAXY EVOLUTION IN THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS, A HERSCHEL OPEN TIME KEY PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meixner, M.; Roman-Duval, J.; Seale, J.; Gordon, K.; Beck, T.; Boyer, M. L. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Panuzzo, P.; Hony, S.; Sauvage, M.; Okumura, K.; Chanial, P. [CEA, Laboratoire AIM, Irfu/SAp, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Engelbracht, C.; Montiel, E.; Misselt, K. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Babler, B. [Department of Astronomy, 475 North Charter Street, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Bernard, J.-P. [CNRS, IRAP, 9 Av. Colonel Roche, BP 44346, F-31028 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Bolatto, A. [Department of Astronomy, Laboratory for Millimeter-Wave Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States); Bot, C. [Universite de Strasbourg, Observatoire Astronomique de Strasbourg, 11, Rue de l' Universite, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Carlson, L. R. [Sterrewacht Leiden, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Clayton, G. C., E-mail: meixner@stsci.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 233-A Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4001 (United States); and others

    2013-09-15

    We present an overview of the HERschel Inventory of The Agents of Galaxy Evolution (HERITAGE) in the Magellanic Clouds project, which is a Herschel Space Observatory open time key program. We mapped the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) at 100, 160, 250, 350, and 500 {mu}m with the Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) and Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) instruments on board Herschel using the SPIRE/PACS parallel mode. The overriding science goal of HERITAGE is to study the life cycle of matter as traced by dust in the LMC and SMC. The far-infrared and submillimeter emission is an effective tracer of the interstellar medium (ISM) dust, the most deeply embedded young stellar objects (YSOs), and the dust ejected by the most massive stars. We describe in detail the data processing, particularly for the PACS data, which required some custom steps because of the large angular extent of a single observational unit and overall the large amount of data to be processed as an ensemble. We report total global fluxes for the LMC and SMC and demonstrate their agreement with measurements by prior missions. The HERITAGE maps of the LMC and SMC are dominated by the ISM dust emission and bear most resemblance to the tracers of ISM gas rather than the stellar content of the galaxies. We describe the point source extraction processing and the criteria used to establish a catalog for each waveband for the HERITAGE program. The 250 {mu}m band is the most sensitive and the source catalogs for this band have {approx}25,000 objects for the LMC and {approx}5500 objects for the SMC. These data enable studies of ISM dust properties, submillimeter excess dust emission, dust-to-gas ratio, Class 0 YSO candidates, dusty massive evolved stars, supernova remnants (including SN1987A), H II regions, and dust evolution in the LMC and SMC. All images and catalogs are delivered to the Herschel Science Center as part of the community support

  3. Workshop Report: International Workshop to Explore Synergies between Nuclear and Renewable Energy Sources as a Key Component in Developing Pathways to Decarbonization of the Energy Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Boardman, Richard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ruth, Mark [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lyons, Peter B. [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States)

    2016-08-01

    An international workshop was organized in June 2016 to explore synergies between nuclear and renewable energy sources. Synergies crossing electricity, transportation, and industrial sectors were the focus of the workshop, recognizing that deep decarbonization will require efforts that go far beyond the electricity sector alone. This report summarizes the key points made within each presentation and highlights outcomes that were arrived at in the discussions.

  4. Reserve Component Programs, Fiscal Year 1993. Report of the Reserve Forces Policy Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    active in promoting designed to fully integrate parents in a cultural awareness. prevention strategy. Counterdrug Operations The National Guard also...and roundout brigades and their parent professional military education to Reserve divisions. BOLD SHIFT also focused on component officers. The Army...Men.n AMRlt Wing. •Asfrlsk IMlctN Army Reserve spas puts doe for FY92 Is for on.hW yar due to k owmwilon of cosumer hin payment. Souros: Th Rmncao

  5. The WalkSafe Program: developing and evaluating the educational component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotz, Gillian; de Marcilla, Anamarie Garces; Lutfi, Khaleeq; Kennedy, Amy; Castellon, Pedro; Duncan, Robert

    2009-03-01

    Miami-Dade County, FL, has one of the highest numbers of pediatric pedestrian injuries in the country. To respond to this problem, WalkSafe an elementary school-based pedestrian injury prevention program was created. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the 3-day WalkSafe educational curriculum in a high-risk district. Sixteen elementary schools were identified and enrolled in the study. Children (n = 10,621) in grades K-5 participated in the WalkSafe program in October 2006. Four of the 16 schools were randomly selected to receive pre-, post-, and 3-month posteducational testing of pedestrian safety knowledge. Teachers (n = 462) were asked to complete teacher surveys to gain feedback about the program. A total of 2,987 tests were collected during the three different testing times. Grades were combined to form groups (K-1), (2-3), and (4-5). Significant differences were observed (p value 0.05). There were 154 (30%) of the teacher surveys returned. The 3-day WalkSafe educational curriculum implemented in a high-risk district was shown to increase the pedestrian safety knowledge of elementary school age children. From recommendations made by teachers and multiple agencies, the modified 3-day program was approved to implement on a yearly basis in all public elementary schools in Miami-Dade County. Further studies will investigate the transfer of knowledge gain to behavioral change among elementary school-aged children.

  6. “Historical” component in common and professional competences of students of political science program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shestov Nikolay Igorevich

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article the author analyzes structure and pithy contradictions in common and special competences of students of political science programs in the sphere of historical knowledge, which are provided with national third-generation standards. Also in this article the abilities of improvement of these competences are proved.

  7. An Analysis of the Reading Mastery Program: Effective Components and Research Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schieffer, Cheryl; Marchand-Martella, Nancy E.; Martella, Ronald C.; Simonsen, Flint L.; Waldron-Soler, Kathleen M.

    2002-01-01

    Provides an analysis of the Reading Mastery program that includes an overview of the need to teach reading. Examines how Reading Mastery aligns with the focal areas of oral language, decoding, and comprehension. Details a comprehensive research review of 25 published studies and two large-scale research reviews. Finds use of the Reading Mastery…

  8. 1981 Kuwait Summer Students Training Program, Secondary Component. An Evaluation Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halasa, Ofelia

    An eight-week summer science program was designed to create and encourage interest in science among outstanding secondary school students from different geographic areas of Kuwait. Opportunities were provided for students to: (1) engage in hands-on science activities; (2) work in laboratories in one of three research areas (chemistry;…

  9. A fast mathematical programming procedure for simultaneous fitting of assembly components into cryoEM density maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shihua; Vasishtan, Daven; Xu, Min; Topf, Maya; Alber, Frank

    2010-06-15

    Single-particle cryo electron microscopy (cryoEM) typically produces density maps of macromolecular assemblies at intermediate to low resolution (approximately 5-30 A). By fitting high-resolution structures of assembly components into these maps, pseudo-atomic models can be obtained. Optimizing the quality-of-fit of all components simultaneously is challenging due to the large search space that makes the exhaustive search over all possible component configurations computationally unfeasible. We developed an efficient mathematical programming algorithm that simultaneously fits all component structures into an assembly density map. The fitting is formulated as a point set matching problem involving several point sets that represent component and assembly densities at a reduced complexity level. In contrast to other point matching algorithms, our algorithm is able to match multiple point sets simultaneously and not only based on their geometrical equivalence, but also based on the similarity of the density in the immediate point neighborhood. In addition, we present an efficient refinement method based on the Iterative Closest Point registration algorithm. The integer quadratic programming method generates an assembly configuration in a few seconds. This efficiency allows the generation of an ensemble of candidate solutions that can be assessed by an independent scoring function. We benchmarked the method using simulated density maps of 11 protein assemblies at 20 A, and an experimental cryoEM map at 23.5 A resolution. Our method was able to generate assembly structures with root-mean-square errors Matlab code package. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics Online.

  10. An Analysis of Responses to the BSEP (Basic Skills Education Program) Questionnaire for Commanders and Key NCOs at Army Posts in Germany and Panama

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Representative 19. KEY wORDS (Ceoninu. en reveree side it necesar7 ad identify by block nu. ber) Education * Basic Skills Literacy Evaluation 2& ABiT’AC C...experiences with, soldiers who had graduated from the Basic Skil Education Program (BSEP). They reported that soldiers are permitted to attend BSEP as a

  11. Elucidating the altered transcriptional programs in breast cancer using independent component analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew E Teschendorff

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The quantity of mRNA transcripts in a cell is determined by a complex interplay of cooperative and counteracting biological processes. Independent Component Analysis (ICA is one of a few number of unsupervised algorithms that have been applied to microarray gene expression data in an attempt to understand phenotype differences in terms of changes in the activation/inhibition patterns of biological pathways. While the ICA model has been shown to outperform other linear representations of the data such as Principal Components Analysis (PCA, a validation using explicit pathway and regulatory element information has not yet been performed. We apply a range of popular ICA algorithms to six of the largest microarray cancer datasets and use pathway-knowledge and regulatory-element databases for validation. We show that ICA outperforms PCA and clustering-based methods in that ICA components map closer to known cancer-related pathways, regulatory modules, and cancer phenotypes. Furthermore, we identify cancer signalling and oncogenic pathways and regulatory modules that play a prominent role in breast cancer and relate the differential activation patterns of these to breast cancer phenotypes. Importantly, we find novel associations linking immune response and epithelial-mesenchymal transition pathways with estrogen receptor status and histological grade, respectively. In addition, we find associations linking the activity levels of biological pathways and transcription factors (NF1 and NFAT with clinical outcome in breast cancer. ICA provides a framework for a more biologically relevant interpretation of genomewide transcriptomic data. Adopting ICA as the analysis tool of choice will help understand the phenotype-pathway relationship and thus help elucidate the molecular taxonomy of heterogeneous cancers and of other complex genetic diseases.

  12. A case study of translating ACGME practice-based learning and improvement requirements into reality: systems quality improvement projects as the key component to a comprehensive curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomolo, A M; Lawrence, R H; Aron, D C

    2009-10-01

    In 2002, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) introduced a new requirement: residents must demonstrate competency in Practice-Based Learning and Improvement (PBLI). Training in this domain is still not consistently integrated into programmes, with few, if any, adequately going beyond knowledge of basic content and addressing all components of the requirement. To summarise the implementation of a PBLI curriculum designed to address all components of the requirement and to evaluate the impact on the practice system. A case-study approach was used for identifying and evaluating the steps for delivering the curriculum, along with the Model for Improvement's successive Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) cycles (July 2004-May 2006). Notes from curriculum development meetings, notes and presentation slides made by teams about their projects, resident curriculum exit evaluations curriculum and interviews. Residents reported high levels of comfort by applying PBLI-related knowledge and skills and that the curriculum improved their ability to do various PBLI tasks. The involvement of multiple stakeholders increased. Twelve of the 15 teams' suggestions with practical systems-relevant outcomes were implemented and sustained beyond residents' project periods. While using the traditional PDSA cycles was helpful, there were limitations. A PBLI curriculum that is centred around practice-based quality improvement projects can fulfil the objectives of this ACGME competency while accomplishing sustained outcomes in quality improvement. A comprehensive curriculum is an investment but offers organisational rewards. We propose a more realistic and informative representation of rapid PDSA cycle changes.

  13. Stanol esters as a component of maximal dietary therapy in the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundy, Scott M

    2005-07-04

    Use of plant stanols/sterols in forms that are sufficiently bioavailable for therapeutic effect should be a key element of maximal dietary therapy. This principle was recognized by National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) and has been amply confirmed by experimental studies in humans. Since the introduction of statins, dietary therapy for control of elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels has received less attention. The time has come, however, to reassert the importance of maximal dietary therapy as a cost-effective means for treatment of elevated LDL concentrations and for lifetime prevention of coronary heart disease.

  14. Effect of a muscular resistance training program to improve physical fitness components in older females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio Gonzalezjurado

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to estimate the effect of resistance training program in the fitness of untrained older women. Fourteen women in Chile (65,86 ± 6.55 kg, 1.55 ± 0.06 m, 67.71 ± 5.31 years old underwent a program of strength training for 6 weeks, performing Back Test (BT , Leg Press (PS, Bench Press (BP and Knee Extension (ER at 3 sessions per week, recording measurements before and after the period of training on maximal dynamic strength (FDM estimated indirectly by the mass displaced in a maximal repetitions test on those exercises and maximal oxygen consumption (VO2máx estimated by the UKK test. The results show significant differences between the pre-and post-test values (mean ± SD of estimated VO2max (11.02 ± 7.26 and 15.57 ± 5.17 ml kg-1 min-1, P <0.05 and FDM estimated the pre-and post-tests (mean ± SD in LS: 43.09 ± 6.19 and 51.27 ± 9.07 N (p <0.01, PB: 21,12 ± 5.77 and 29.08 ± 7.47 kg (p <0.001, ER: 18.60 ± 5.07 and 21.99 ± 5.21 kg (p <0.05 and PS: 18,60 ± 5.07 and 21.99 ± 5.21 kg (p <0.05. We conclude that the proposed training program improves the FDM in this sample of older adults.

  15. Components of US Associate Degree Nursing Programs and Their Relationship to the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses Graduate Pass Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Caroline A.

    2011-01-01

    The nursing shortage has accelerated the need for nursing programs to discover program components related to success on the NCLEX-RN. As the demand for nurses is growing, nursing programs have been called upon to help find solutions to the problem. This study attempted to contribute to the resolution of the shortage and provide nursing educators…

  16. Social assistance and labor market programs in Latin America : methodology and key findings from the social protection database

    OpenAIRE

    Kostenbaum, Silvana; Grosh, Margaret; Oliveri, Maria Laura; Rodriguez-Alas, Claudia; Cerutti, Paula; Strokova, Victoria; Fruttero, Anna

    2014-01-01

    How much do countries spend on social protection? Do social protection programs cover all poor people? And, how well are they targeted? It is notoriously hard to find comprehensive cross-country data on social protection programs which can help answer such questions and allow to benchmark social protection systems. The World Bank s Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) Social Protection Datab...

  17. A Pilot Study of an Adaptive, Idiographic, and Multi-Component Attention Bias Modification Program for Social Anxiety Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Nader; Kuckertz, Jennie M; Strege, Marlene V

    2016-10-01

    An attentional bias toward threat may be one mechanism underlying clinical anxiety. Attention bias modification (ABM) aims to reduce symptoms of anxiety disorders by directly modifying this deficit. However, existing ABM training programs have not consistently modified attentional bias and may not reflect optimal learning needs of participants (i.e., lack of explicit instruction, training goal unclear to participants, lack of feedback, non-adaptive, inability to differentiate or target different components of attentional bias). In the current study, we introduce a new adaptive ABM program (AABM) and test its feasibility in individuals with social anxiety disorder. We report task characteristics and preliminary evidence that this task consistently modifies attentional bias and that changes in attentional bias (but not number of trials) correlate with the level of symptom reduction. These results suggest that AABM may be a targeted method for the next generation of studies examining the utility of attention training.

  18. APLICACIONES EDUCATIVAS DE LA TEORÍA VYGOTSKIANA. EL PROGRAMA (“KEY TO LEARNING” APPLICATIONS OF VYGOTSKY’S THEORY TO EDUCATION. THE “KEY TO LEARNING” PROGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moisés Esteban Guitart

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Resumen:En ciencias de la educación, las últimas décadas han estado marcadas por un interés en las ideas de Lev S. Vygotski. De hecho, a partir de esas ideas se han propuesto varias aplicaciones educativas. Una de ellas es el “Key to learning”. El artículo propone una visión general de este programa educativo desarrollado a partir de algunos trabajos e ideas de autores rusos contemporáneos. Primero, desarrollamos algunas ideas en torno a la noción de zona de desarrollo próximo (ZpD. Después, sugerimos la teoría de las habilidades de aprendizaje. En este sentido, el objetivo principal de “Key to learning” es mejorar las habilidades de aprendizaje cognitivas, comunicativas y directivas de niños de entre 3 a 7 años de edad. Para este propósito son creadas 12 unidades curriculares que componen el programa. Para concluir se enfatiza la creación de zonas de desarrollo próximo estructuradas como parte de un sistema de enseñanza y aprendizaje que vincula la actividad, la asistencia y la agencia.Abstract: The last decades have been marked in educational sciences by an upsurge of interest in Lev S. Vygotsky´s ideas. Indeed, different applications of Vygotsky’s theory to education have been suggested. One of them is the “key to learning” program. This paper proposes an overview of this educational program developed from the work and ideas of several contemporary Russian scholars. First, we develop some ideas on zone of proximal development. After that, we suggest the learning skills theory. In that sense, the main objective of “Key to learning” is to improve the cognitive, communicative, and directive learning skills of children between 3 and 7 years of age. For this purpose are created 12 curriculum units composing the program. We conclude emphasizing the creation of structured zones of proximal development as a part of a teaching-learning learning system, which links activity, assistance and agency.

  19. Expression patterns of key Sonic Hedgehog signaling pathway components in the developing and adult mouse midbrain and in the MN9D cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerstein, Melanie; Chleilat, Enaam; Khakipoor, Shokoufeh; Michailidis, Konstantinos; Ophoven, Christian; Roussa, Eleni

    2017-11-01

    The temporal dynamic expression of Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) and signaling during early midbrain dopaminergic (mDA) neuron development is one of the key players in establishing mDA progenitor diversity. However, whether SHH signaling is also required during later developmental stages and in mature mDA neurons is less understood. We study the expression of SHH receptors Ptch1 and Gas1 (growth arrest-specific 1) and of the transcription factors Gli1, Gli2 and Gli3 in mouse midbrain during embryonic development [embryonic day (E) 12.5 onwards)], in newborn and adult mice using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Moreover, we examine the expression and regulation of dopaminergic neuronal progenitor markers, midbrain dopaminergic neuronal markers and markers of the SHH signaling pathway in undifferentiated and butyric acid-treated (differentiated) MN9D cells in the presence or absence of exogenous SHH in vitro by RT-PCR, immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry. Gli1 was expressed in the lateral mesencephalic domains, whereas Gli2 and Gli3 were expressed dorsolaterally and complemented by ventrolateral expression of Ptch1. Co-localization with tyrosine hydroxylase could not be observed. GAS1 was exclusively expressed in the dorsal mesencephalon at E11.5 and co-localized with Ki67. In contrast, MN9D cells expressed all the genes investigated and treatment of the cells with butyric acid significantly upregulated their expression. The results suggest that SHH is only indirectly involved in the differentiation and survival of mDA neurons and that the MN9D cell line is a valuable model for investigating early development but not the differentiation and survival of mDA neurons.

  20. Key Components of Different Plant Defense Pathways Are Dispensable for Powdery Mildew Resistance of the Arabidopsis mlo2 mlo6 mlo12 Triple Mutant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Kuhn

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Loss of function mutations of particular plant MILDEW RESISTANCE LOCUS O (MLO genes confer durable and broad-spectrum penetration resistance against powdery mildew fungi. Here, we combined genetic, transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses to explore the defense mechanisms in the fully resistant Arabidopsis thaliana mlo2 mlo6 mlo12 triple mutant. We found that this genotype unexpectedly overcomes the requirement for indolic antimicrobials and defense-related secretion, which are critical for incomplete resistance of mlo2 single mutants. Comparative microarray-based transcriptome analysis of mlo2 mlo6 mlo12 mutants and wild type plants upon Golovinomyces orontii inoculation revealed an increased and accelerated accumulation of many defense-related transcripts. Despite the biotrophic nature of the interaction, this included the non-canonical activation of a jasmonic acid/ethylene-dependent transcriptional program. In contrast to a non-adapted powdery mildew pathogen, the adapted powdery mildew fungus is able to defeat the accumulation of defense-relevant indolic metabolites in a MLO protein-dependent manner. We suggest that a broad and fast activation of immune responses in mlo2 mlo6 mlo12 plants can compensate for the lack of single or few defense pathways. In addition, our results point to a role of Arabidopsis MLO2, MLO6, and MLO12 in enabling defense suppression during invasion by adapted powdery mildew fungi.

  1. Key Components of Different Plant Defense Pathways Are Dispensable for Powdery Mildew Resistance of the Arabidopsis mlo2 mlo6 mlo12 Triple Mutant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Hannah; Lorek, Justine; Kwaaitaal, Mark; Consonni, Chiara; Becker, Katia; Micali, Cristina; Ver Loren van Themaat, Emiel; Bednarek, Paweł; Raaymakers, Tom M.; Appiano, Michela; Bai, Yuling; Meldau, Dorothea; Baum, Stephani; Conrath, Uwe; Feussner, Ivo; Panstruga, Ralph

    2017-01-01

    Loss of function mutations of particular plant MILDEW RESISTANCE LOCUS O (MLO) genes confer durable and broad-spectrum penetration resistance against powdery mildew fungi. Here, we combined genetic, transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses to explore the defense mechanisms in the fully resistant Arabidopsis thaliana mlo2 mlo6 mlo12 triple mutant. We found that this genotype unexpectedly overcomes the requirement for indolic antimicrobials and defense-related secretion, which are critical for incomplete resistance of mlo2 single mutants. Comparative microarray-based transcriptome analysis of mlo2 mlo6 mlo12 mutants and wild type plants upon Golovinomyces orontii inoculation revealed an increased and accelerated accumulation of many defense-related transcripts. Despite the biotrophic nature of the interaction, this included the non-canonical activation of a jasmonic acid/ethylene-dependent transcriptional program. In contrast to a non-adapted powdery mildew pathogen, the adapted powdery mildew fungus is able to defeat the accumulation of defense-relevant indolic metabolites in a MLO protein-dependent manner. We suggest that a broad and fast activation of immune responses in mlo2 mlo6 mlo12 plants can compensate for the lack of single or few defense pathways. In addition, our results point to a role of Arabidopsis MLO2, MLO6, and MLO12 in enabling defense suppression during invasion by adapted powdery mildew fungi. PMID:28674541

  2. The quiet revolution: continuous glider monitoring at ocean 'choke' points as a key component of new cross-platform ocean observation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heslop, E. E.; Tintore, J.; Ruiz, S.; Allen, J.; López-Jurado, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    A quiet revolution is taking place in ocean observations; in the last decade new multi-platform, integrated ocean observatories have been progressively implemented by forward looking countries with ocean borders of economic and strategic importance. These systems are designed to fill significant gaps in our knowledge of the ocean state and ocean variability, through long-term, science and society-led, ocean monitoring. These ocean observatories are now delivering results, not the headline results of a single issue experiment, but carefully and systematically improving our knowledge of ocean variability, and thereby, increasing model forecast skill and our ability to link physical processes to ecosystem response. Here we present the results from a 3-year quasi-continuous glider monitoring of a key circulation 'choke' point in the Western Mediterranean, undertaken by SOCIB (Balearic Islands Coastal Ocean Observing and Forecasting System). For the first time data from the high frequency glider sampling show variations in the transport volumes of water over timescales of days to weeks, as large as those previously only identifiable as seasonal or eddy driven. Although previous surveys noted high cruise-to-cruise variability, they were insufficient to show that in fact water volumes exchanged through this narrow 'choke' point fluctuate on 'weather' timescales. Using the glider data to leverage an 18-year record of ship missions, we define new seasonal cycles for the exchange of watermasses, challenging generally held assumptions. The pattern of the exchange is further simplified through the characterisation of 5 circulation modes and the defining of a new seasonal cycle for the interplay between mesoscale and basin scale dynamics. Restricted 'choke points' between our ocean basins are critical locations to monitor water transport variability, as they constrain the inter-basin exchange of heat, salt and nutrients. At the Ibiza Channel 'choke' point, the exchange of

  3. DOD Business Systems Modernization: Key Navy Programs' Compliance with DOD's Federated Business Enterprise Architecture Needs to be Adequately Demonstrated

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hite, Randolph C; Lakhmani, Neela; Barkakati, Nabajyoti; Doherty, Neil; Glover, Nancy; Longcore, Emily; Holland, Michael; Le, Anh; Leiling, Josh; McCracken, Lee; Srikanth, Sushmita

    2008-01-01

    .... In particular, the programs BEA compliance assessments did not: * Include all relevant architecture products, such as products that specify the technical standards needed to promote interoperability among related systems...

  4. Does adding an emotion component enhance the Triple P-Positive Parenting Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Karen; Dittman, Cassandra; Sanders, Matthew; Burson, Rebecca; Hammington, Josie

    2014-04-01

    This pilot study aimed to compare the efficacy of a regular offering of the group-delivered Triple P-Positive Parenting Program for child behavior problems with an enhanced version tailored to promote child emotion competence. Families of children between ages 3 and 6 years displaying early-onset conduct problems were randomly assigned to Group Triple P (GTP; final n = 18) or Emotion Enhanced Triple P (EETP; final n = 18), in which parents were encouraged to incorporate emotion labels and causes and to coach emotion competence during discussions of everyday emotional experiences with their child. Compared with parents who received GTP, parents who received EETP increased their discussion of emotion labels and emotion causes in conversations with their child at postintervention, but this advantage was lost by the 4-month follow-up. Parents in the EETP condition also used more emotion coaching postintervention and at follow-up. There were no differences at postintervention or follow-up in children's emotion knowledge skills. Postintervention improvement in disruptive child behavior was greater for GTP, but the groups converged at follow-up. Parents were similarly satisfied with both interventions. Overall, EETP showed little advantage over regular GTP delivery. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  5. Are national policies and programs for prevention and management of postpartum hemorrhage and preeclampsia adequate? A key informant survey in 37 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jeffrey Michael; Currie, Sheena; Cannon, Tirza; Armbruster, Deborah; Perri, Julia

    2014-08-01

    Although maternal mortality has declined substantially in recent years, efforts to address postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) and preeclampsia/eclampsia (PE/E) must be systematically scaled up in order for further reduction to take place. In 2012, a key informant survey was conducted to identify both national and global gaps in PPH and PE/E program priorities and to highlight focus areas for future national and global programming. Between January and March 2012, national program teams in 37 countries completed a 44-item survey, consisting mostly of dichotomous yes/no responses and addressing 6 core programmatic areas: policy, training, medication distribution and logistics, national reporting of key indicators, programming, and challenges to and opportunities for scale up. An in-country focal person led the process to gather the necessary information from key local stakeholders. Some countries also provided national essential medicines lists and service delivery guidelines for comparison and further analysis. Most surveyed countries have many elements in place to address PPH and PE/E, but notable gaps remain in both policy and practice. Oxytocin and magnesium sulfate were reported to be regularly available in facilities in 89% and 76% of countries, respectively. Only 27% of countries, however, noted regular availability of misoprostol in health facilities. Midwife scope of practice regarding PPH and PE/E is inconsistent with global norms in a number of countries: 22% of countries do not allow midwives to administer magnesium sulfate and 30% do not allow them to perform manual removal of the placenta. Most countries surveyed have many of the essential policies and program elements to prevent/manage PPH and PE/E, but absence of commodities (especially misoprostol), limitations in scope of practice for midwives, and gaps in inclusion of maternal health indicators in the national data systems have impeded efforts to scale up programs nationally.

  6. Key Factors for a High-Quality Peritoneal Dialysis Program — The Role of the PD Team and Continuous Quality Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Wei; Ni, Zhaohui; Qian, Jiaqi

    2014-01-01

    The proportion of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients on peritoneal dialysis (PD) has increased very fast in China over the last decade. Renji Hospital, affiliated with Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, is a recognized high-quality PD unit with a high PD utilization rate, excellent patient and technique survival (1-year and 5-year patient survival rate of 93% and 71%, and 1-year and 5-year technique survival of 96% and 82%, respectively), low peritonitis rate and a well-documented good quality of life of the treated patients. We believe that a dedicated and experienced PD team, a structured patient training program, continuous patient support, establishing and utilizing standardized protocols, starting PD with low dialysis dose, monitoring key performance indicators (KPIs), and continuous quality improvement (CQI) are the key factors underlying this successful PD program. PMID:24962961

  7. Group key management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunigan, T.; Cao, C.

    1997-08-01

    This report describes an architecture and implementation for doing group key management over a data communications network. The architecture describes a protocol for establishing a shared encryption key among an authenticated and authorized collection of network entities. Group access requires one or more authorization certificates. The implementation includes a simple public key and certificate infrastructure. Multicast is used for some of the key management messages. An application programming interface multiplexes key management and user application messages. An implementation using the new IP security protocols is postulated. The architecture is compared with other group key management proposals, and the performance and the limitations of the implementation are described.

  8. [PSYCHOEDUCATIONAL PROGRAM AS A WAY OF CORRECTING MOTIVATIONAL COMPONENTS IN PATIENTS WITH PARANOID SCHIZOPHRENIA WITH ABDOMINAL OBESITY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinayko, V; Korovina, L

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of motivational and targeted psychoeducational programs designed for patients with paranoid schizophrenia with abdominal obesity. We observed 34 women aged 18-42 with continuous-flow type paranoid schizophrenia. All patients had a concomitant abdominal obesity, which developed secondarily after long-term administration of second generation antipsychotic medications (at least 1 year). Based on clinical-psychopathological and psychometric methods of assessment and on the analysis of Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire we have developed modules for psychoeducational programs. Based on the results of the treatment we conclude that the application of psychoeducational programs is an effective component of complex treatment of patients with paranoid schizophrenia. Abdominal obesity should be regarded as an important and the main side effect of long-term therapy with atypical antipsychotic medications. It has a marked negative effect on subjective assessment of patients and decreases the level of their mental and social adaptation. This factor should be the basis for the formation of re-socialization and compliance-oriented actions.

  9. EMBEDDED PROTOSTARS IN THE DUST, ICE, AND GAS IN TIME (DIGIT) HERSCHEL KEY PROGRAM: CONTINUUM SEDs, AND AN INVENTORY OF CHARACTERISTIC FAR-INFRARED LINES FROM PACS SPECTROSCOPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Joel D.; Evans, Neal J. II; Rascati, Michelle R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, TX 78712-1205 (United States); Jorgensen, Jes K.; Dionatos, Odysseas; Lindberg, Johan E. [Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Herczeg, Gregory J. [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Kristensen, Lars E.; Yildiz, Umut A.; Van Kempen, Tim A. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300-RA Leiden (Netherlands); Lee, Jeong-Eun [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Kyung Hee University, Gyeonggi 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Salyk, Colette [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Meeus, Gwendolyn [Dpt. Fisica Teorica, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Campus Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Bouwman, Jeroen [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Visser, Ruud; Bergin, Edwin A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1042 (United States); Van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Karska, Agata; Fedele, Davide [Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Postfach 1312, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Dunham, Michael M., E-mail: joel@astro.as.utexas.edu [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Collaboration: DIGIT Team1

    2013-06-20

    We present 50-210 {mu}m spectral scans of 30 Class 0/I protostellar sources, obtained with Herschel-PACS, and 0.5-1000 {mu}m spectral energy distributions, as part of the Dust, Ice, and Gas in Time Key Program. Some sources exhibit up to 75 H{sub 2}O lines ranging in excitation energy from 100 to 2000 K, 12 transitions of OH, and CO rotational lines ranging from J = 14 {yields} 13 up to J = 40 {yields} 39. [O I] is detected in all but one source in the entire sample; among the sources with detectable [O I] are two very low luminosity objects. The mean 63/145 {mu}m [O I] flux ratio is 17.2 {+-} 9.2. The [O I] 63 {mu}m line correlates with L{sub bol}, but not with the time-averaged outflow rate derived from low-J CO maps. [C II] emission is in general not local to the source. The sample L{sub bol} increased by 1.25 (1.06) and T{sub bol} decreased to 0.96 (0.96) of mean (median) values with the inclusion of the Herschel data. Most CO rotational diagrams are characterized by two optically thin components ( = (0.70 {+-} 1.12) x 10{sup 49} total particles). N{sub CO} correlates strongly with L{sub bol}, but neither T{sub rot} nor N{sub CO}(warm)/N{sub CO}(hot) correlates with L{sub bol}, suggesting that the total excited gas is related to the current source luminosity, but that the excitation is primarily determined by the physics of the interaction (e.g., UV-heating/shocks). Rotational temperatures for H{sub 2}O ( = 194 +/- 85 K) and OH ( = 183 +/- 117 K) are generally lower than for CO, and much of the scatter in the observations about the best fit is attributed to differences in excitation conditions and optical depths among the detected lines.

  10. Maintenance: the key to successful periodontal and implant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, Pamela K

    2014-09-01

    The management of periodontal diseases requires an effective treatment and maintenance program, as well as collaboration among clinicians. Having a better understanding of the factors contributing to periodontal maintenance is key. The components of a maintenance program and determining proper intervals ensure that patients increase their chances for maintaining their teeth and implants in an optimal state of health.

  11. Effect of components of a workplace lactation program on breastfeeding duration among employees of a public-sector employer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkam, Jane A Johnston; Cadwell, Karin; Fein, Sara B

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of the individual services offered via a workplace lactation program of one large public-sector employer on the duration of any breastfeeding and exclusive breastfeeding. Exclusive breastfeeding was defined as exclusive feeding of human milk for the milk feeding. A cross-sectional mailed survey approach was used. The sample (n = 128) consisted of women who had used at least one component of the lactation program in the past 3 years and who were still employed at the same organization when data were collected. Descriptive statistics included frequency distributions and contingency table analysis. Chi-square analysis was used for comparison of groups, and both analysis of variance (ANOVA) and univariate analysis of variance from a general linear model were used for comparison of means. The survey respondents were primarily older, white, married, well-educated, high-income women. More of the women who received each lactation program service were exclusively breastfeeding at 6 months of infant age in all categories of services, with significant differences in the categories of telephone support and return to work consultation. After adjusting for race and work status, logistic regression analysis showed the number of services received was positively related to exclusive breastfeeding at 6 months and participation in a return to work consultation was positively related to any breastfeeding at 6 months. The study demonstrated that the workplace lactation program had a positive impact on duration of breastfeeding for the women who participated. Participation in the telephone support and return to work consultation services, and the total number of services used were related to longer duration of exclusive and/or any breastfeeding.

  12. California Energy Incentive Programs: An Annual Update on Key Energy Issues and Financial Opportunities for Federal Sites in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2011-12-01

    A spate of recently enacted energy legislation and associated program changes is providing numerous opportunities to help California federal energy managers cut costs and meet their renewables, energy efficiency and GHG emissions goals. In April 2011, Governor Jerry Brown approved the nation’s most ambitious renewable portfolio standard (RPS), which requires 33% of the state’s electricity to come from renewable energy sources by 2020. Policy changes that will support the RPS include expanded eligibility rules that fill previous gaps in incentives for certain sizes of on-site renewable energy systems. Program updates described in this document include: $200 million more in funding for California Solar Initiative rebates to commercial and industrial customers; an increase in the eligible system size for the Feed-In-Tariff (FIT) from 1.5MW to 3MW; and pending changes that may allow customer-side systems to sell tradable renewable energy credits (TRECs) to entities with RPS compliance obligations in California.

  13. Transcriptome Analysis of Sexually Dimorphic Chinese White Wax Scale Insects Reveals Key Differences in Developmental Programs and Transcription Factor Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Pu; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Liu, Wei-Wei; Feng, Ying; Sun, Tao

    2015-01-01

    The Chinese white wax scale insect, Ericerus pela, represents one of the most dramatic examples of sexual dimorphism in any insect species. In this study, we showed that although E. pela males display complete metamorphosis similar to holometabolous insects, the species forms the sister group to Acyrthosiphon pisum and cluster with hemimetabolous insects. The gene expression profile and Gene Ontology (GO) analyses revealed that the two sexes engaged in distinct developmental programs. In particular, female development appeared to prioritize the expression of genes related to cellular, metabolic, and developmental processes and to anatomical structure formation in nymphs. By contrast, male nymphal development is characterized by the significant down-regulation of genes involved in chitin, the respiratory system, and neurons. The wing and appendage morphogenesis, anatomical and tissue structure morphogenesis programs activated after male nymphal development. Transcription factors (that convey juvenile hormone or ecdysone signals, and Hox genes) and DNA methyltransferase were also differentially expressed between females and males. These results may indicate the roles that these differentially expressed genes play in regulating sexual dimorphism through orchestrating complex genetic programs. This differential expression was particularly prominent for processes linked to female development and wing development in males. PMID:25634031

  14. Key components of the Mozart effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauscher, F H; Shaw, G L

    1998-06-01

    The results of studies intended to replicate the enhancement of spatial-temporal reasoning following exposure to 10 min. of Mozart's Sonata for Two Pianos in D Major (K.448) have been varied. While some studies have replicated the effect, others have not. We suggest that researchers' diverse choice of dependent measures may account for these varied results. This paper provides a neurophysiological context for the enhancement and considers theoretical and experimental factors, including the choice of dependent measures, the presentation order of the conditions, the selection of the musical composition, and the inclusion of a distractor task, that may contribute to the various findings. More work is needed before practical applications can be derived.

  15. Reflection: A Key Component to Thinking Critically

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol M. Lerch

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The ability to think critically is an important trait of all members of society. With today’s multinational, multicultural, complex issues, citizens must be able to sift through large amounts of various data to make intelligent decisions. Thinking critically must be a focus of higher education in order to provide the intellectual training for its students to participate in this world. This qualitative study examined critical reflection through student writing as seen in three different college settings. Structured reflections were analyzed using Marzano’s New Taxonomy of Educational Objectives (2001.La capacité d’exercer son esprit critique est une caractéristique importante de tous les membres de la société. De nos jours, les enjeux sont multinationaux, multiculturels et complexes. Les citoyens doivent être capables de filtrer de grandes quantités de données diverses pour prendre des décisions intelligentes. L’enseignement supérieur doit être axé sur la pensée critique afin de procurer aux étudiants la formation intellectuelle qui leur permettra de participer au monde qui les entoure. La présente étude qualitative se penche sur la réflexion critique dans les écrits des étudiants de trois différents collèges. Les chercheurs ont analysé les réflexions structurées à l’aide de la nouvelle taxonomie des objectifs pédagogiques de Marzano (2001.

  16. Reflection: A Key Component to Thinking Critically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colley, Binta M.; Bilics, Andrea R.; Lerch, Carol M.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to think critically is an important trait of all members of society. With today's multinational, multicultural, complex issues, citizens must be able to sift through large amounts of various data to make intelligent decisions. Thinking critically must be a focus of higher education in order to provide the intellectual training for its…

  17. Achievements of the Australian Access to Allied Psychological Services (ATAPS) program: summarising (almost) a decade of key evaluation data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassilios, Bridget; Nicholas, Angela; Reifels, Lennart; King, Kylie; Fletcher, Justine; Machlin, Anna; Ftanou, Maria; Blashki, Grant; Burgess, Philip; Pirkis, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Introduced in July 2001, Australian Access to Allied Psychological Services (ATAPS) was the inaugural national policy initiative to provide community access to government-funded psychological services in primary care. Our aim was to examine the achievements of ATAPS in relation to its stated objectives using a set of indicators that largely drew on data from a minimum data set that we designed for the evaluation of ATAPS. We used de-identified professional-, consumer- and session-level data from the minimum dataset, and secondary analyses of our quantitative and qualitative data collected for a series of specific evaluation studies. Available data covered the period from 1 July 2003 to 31 December 2012. Approximately 350,000 referrals were made to the ATAPS program over the 9.5 year analysis period, 79 % of which resulted in services. Over 1.4 million sessions were offered. Overall, 29 % of consumers were male, 4 % children, and 3 % Aboriginal people; 54 % of consumers had depression and 41 % an anxiety disorder; at least 60 % were on low incomes; and around 50 % resided outside of major cities. The most common interventions delivered were cognitive and behavioural therapies. Selected outcome measures indicated improvement in mental health symptoms. Access to Allied Psychological Services achieved its objectives within a decade of operation. The program delivered evidence-based services to a substantial number of consumers who were disadvantaged and historically would not have accessed services. Importantly, where data were available, there were indications that ATAPS achieved positive clinical outcomes for consumers. This suggests that ATAPS carved an important niche by successfully addressing unmet need of hard-to-reach consumers and through means that were not available via other programs. It will be interesting to see the effects from July 2016 of the reform of ATAPS, which will see ATAPS subsumed under psychological services commissioned by regional

  18. Some key considerations in evolving a computer system and software engineering support environment for the space station program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckay, C. W.; Bown, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    The space station data management system involves networks of computing resources that must work cooperatively and reliably over an indefinite life span. This program requires a long schedule of modular growth and an even longer period of maintenance and operation. The development and operation of space station computing resources will involve a spectrum of systems and software life cycle activities distributed across a variety of hosts, an integration, verification, and validation host with test bed, and distributed targets. The requirement for the early establishment and use of an apporopriate Computer Systems and Software Engineering Support Environment is identified. This environment will support the Research and Development Productivity challenges presented by the space station computing system.

  19. Uranium from Seawater Marine Testing Program at the University of Miami’s Broad Key Island Research Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, Gary A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Sequim, WA (United States). Marine Sciences Lab.; Kuo, Li-Jung [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Sequim, WA (United States). Marine Sciences Lab.; Strivens, Jonathan E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Sequim, WA (United States). Marine Sciences Lab.; Wood, Jordana R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Sequim, WA (United States). Marine Sciences Lab.; Schlafer, Nicholas J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Sequim, WA (United States). Marine Sciences Lab.; D' Alessandro, Evan [Univ. of Miami, FL (United States). Rosensteil School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences

    2016-09-30

    Marine testing at Broad Key Island (BKI), Florida was conducted to validate adsorption capacity and adsorption kinetics results obtained for several formulations of the ORNL amidoxime-based polymeric adsorbents in Sequim Bay, Washington in another location with different oceanographic and water quality conditions (e.g. temperature, dissolved organic carbon, salinity and trace element content). Broad Key is a small island off the southeast coast of Florida at the southern end of Biscayne Bay. Flow-through column and recirculating flume experiments were conducted at BKI using ambient filtered seawater and identical exposure systems as were used at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s (PNNL) Marine Sciences laboratory (MSL). Testing was conducted in two periods in FY 2015 and FY 2016 with five different amidoxime-based adsorbent materials, four produced by ORNL (AF1, AI8, AF8, and AF1-DMSO) and one by LCW technologies (LCW-10). All exposures were conducted at ambient seawater temperatures, with moderate temperature control on the ambient seawater to mitigate large daily swings in the seawater temperature. The ORNL adsorbents AF1, AI8 and AF1-AO-DMSO all had fairly similar adsorption capacities (6.0 to 6.6 g U/ kg adsorbent) after 56 days of exposure at ambient temperature (26 to 31 °C) and salinity (35.7 to 37.4), but the AF8 adsorbent was considerably lower at 4.4 g U/kg adsorbent. All the adsorbents tested at BKI had higher capacities than was observed at PNNL, with the higher temperatures likely a major factor contributing to this difference. In general, the elemental distribution (expressed as a relative percentage) on all the adsorbents agreed well, including good agreement with the elemental distribution pattern for AF1 adsorbent exposed at PNNL. The most notable exception to a uniform elemental distributional pattern across the various adsorbents occurs with vanadium. The relative mass percentage for vanadium retained by the adsorbents ranged from a

  20. A Food Transfer Program without a Formal Education Component Modifies Complementary Feeding Practices in Poor Rural Mexican Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Luzuriaga, María J; Unar-Munguía, Mishel; Rodríguez-Ramírez, Sonia; Rivera, Juan A; González de Cosío, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Inadequate complementary feeding partially explains micronutrient deficiencies in the first 2 y of life. To prevent malnutrition, the Mexican government implemented the Programa de Apoyo Alimentario (PAL), which transferred either food baskets containing micronutrient-fortified milk and animal food products or cash to beneficiary families along with educational sessions. This study evaluated the impact of PAL on 2 indicators of complementary feeding: minimum dietary diversity and consumption of iron-rich or iron-fortified foods in children aged 6-23 mo. A secondary analysis of the original PAL evaluation design was conducted through a randomized community trial implemented with 3 intervention groups (food basket with education, food basket without education, and cash transfer with education) and a control. The impact of PAL after 14 mo of exposure was estimated in 2 cross-sectional groups of children aged 6-23 mo at baseline and at follow-up in a panel of 145 communities by using difference-in-difference models. Only children who lived in households and communities that were similar between treatment groups at baseline were included in the analysis. These children were identified by using a propensity score. Of the 3 intervention groups, when compared with the control, only the food basket without education group component increased the consumption of iron-rich or iron-fortified foods by 31.2 percentage points (PP) (P food baskets that include fortified complementary foods may be more effective than cash transfers. The fact that the 2 food basket groups differed in the observed impact does not allow for more convincing conclusions to be made about the education component of the program. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01304888. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  1. The Key Determinants to Quality of Life in Parkinson's Disease Patients: Results from the Parkinson's Disease Biomarker Program (PDBP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lu; Lee, Eun-Young; Sterling, Nicholas W; Kong, Lan; Lewis, Mechelle M; Du, Guangwei; Eslinger, Paul J; Huang, Xuemei

    2016-05-31

    The impact of motor- and non-motor symptoms on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in Parkinson's disease (PD) has received increasing attention. To address this, the study explored a large cohort of patients enrolled in the PD Biomarker Program. The PD Questionnaire-39 (PDQ-39) measured HRQOL, whereas the Unified PD Rating Scale (UPDRS) assessed motor and non-motor symptoms. Determinants of HRQOL in PD patients were identified by stepwise linear regression analysis. The relationship between the PDQ-39 and UPDRS subscale scores then was explored through structural equation modeling. The mean disease duration was 6.8 years and the mean PDQ-39 summary index (PDQ-39SI) was 18.4. UPDRS-I (non-motor function) and UPDRS-II (motor questionnaire) scores demonstrated the strongest correlations with PDQ-39SI (r Ϡ 0.4, P Multiple linear stepwise regression analyses showed that age (β= -0.13, P stepwise regression. Structural equation modeling confirmed the association of UPDRS-II (β= 0.67, P < 0.001) and UPDRS-I (β= 0.35, P < 0.001) with the PDQ-39SI. Both motor and non-motor function scores impacted significantly HRQOL in PD. UPDRS-III, however, has limited contributions to HRQOL although it is used as a main outcome in many clinical trials.

  2. Model Youth Programs: A Key Strategy for Developing Community-University Partnerships Using a Community Youth Development Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Anyon

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Universities across the nation face the charge of enhancing their intellectual capital as a learning institution while also contributing to the greater social good. While there is great potential for university-community partnerships to generate lessons for youth workers and policy makers, create powerful new knowledge for the academic field, and provide transformative experiences for community members, partnerships often fail to produce such meaningful results. In the San Francisco Bay Area, community residents who have been involved in such unsuccessful initiatives frequently perceived that university partners spent insufficient time learning about the community context, prioritized research objectives over community needs and did not make long-term commitments. Despite these challenges, community-university partnerships can be useful strategies for advancing the field of youth development by strengthening research and practice in local contexts. This paper presents how the design and implementation of model youth programs served as an effective strategy in developing a partnership between a university-based center and two local communities over a 5-year period. It also describes essential lessons that other communities, research institutions or universities may use to launch, implement, expand and sustain their own successful partnerships to build local capacity to implement youth development practices, promote positive outcomes for young people, and generate knowledge about the impact of youth development approaches.

  3. Key learnings from performance of the U.S. EPA Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP) Tier 1 in vitro assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBaron, Matthew J; Coady, Katie K; O'Connor, John C; Nabb, Diane L; Markell, Lauren K; Snajdr, Suzanne; Sue Marty, M

    2014-02-01

    Tier 1 of the U.S. EPA Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program comprises 11 studies: five in vitro assays, four in vivo mammalian assays, and two in vivo nonmammalian assays. The battery is designed to detect compounds with the potential to interact with the estrogen, androgen, or thyroid signaling pathways. This article examines the procedures, results, and data interpretation for the five Tier 1 in vitro assays: estrogen receptor (ER) and androgen receptor binding assays, an ER transactivation assay, an aromatase assay, and a steroidogenesis assay. Data are presented from two laboratories that have evaluated approximately 11 compounds in the Tier 1 in vitro assays. Generally, the ER and androgen receptor binding assays and the aromatase assay showed good specificity and reproducibility. As described in the guideline for the ER transactivation assay, a result is considered positive when the test compound induces a reporter gene signal that reaches 10% of the response seen with 1 nM 17β-estradiol (positive control). In the experience of these laboratories, this cutoff criterion may result in false-positive responses. For the steroidogenesis assay, there is variability in the basal and stimulated production of testosterone and estradiol by the H295R cells. This variability in responsiveness, coupled with potential cell stress at high concentrations of test compound, may make it difficult to discern whether hormone alterations are specific steroidogenesis alterations (i.e., endocrine active). Lastly, both laboratories had difficulty meeting some recommended performance criteria for each Tier 1 in vitro assay. Data with only minor deviations were deemed valid. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. A three-component cognitive behavioural lifestyle program for preconceptional weight-loss in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS): a protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiskoot, G; Benneheij, S H; Beerthuizen, A; de Niet, J E; de Klerk, C; Timman, R; Busschbach, J J; Laven, J S E

    2017-03-06

    Obesity in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) negatively affects all clinical features, and a 5 to 10% weight loss has shown promising results on reproductive, metabolic and psychological level. Incorporating a healthy diet, increasing physical activity and changing dysfunctional thought patterns in women with PCOS are key points in losing weight. The biggest challenge in weight management programs is to achieve a reasonable and sustainable weight loss. The aim of this study is to explore whether Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) by a mental health professional, working in a multidisciplinary team with a dietician and a physical therapist (a three-component intervention), is more effective for weight loss in the long term, within 12 months. We will also explore whether mobile phone applications are effective in supporting behavioural change and sustainable weight loss. The present study is a longitudinal randomized controlled trial (RCT) to study the effectiveness of a three-component 1-year cognitive-behavioural lifestyle intervention in overweight/obese women with PCOS. A total of 210 participants are randomly assigned to three groups: 1) CBT provided by the multidisciplinary team or; 2) CBT provided by the multidisciplinary team and Short Message Service (SMS) or; 3) usual care: encourage weight loss through publicly available services (control group). The primary aim of the 12-month intervention is to explore whether a three-component 1-year cognitive-behavioural lifestyle intervention is effective to decrease weight, when compared to usual care. Secondary outcomes include: the effect of the intervention on the PCOS phenotype, waist circumference, waist to hip ratio, ovulation rates, total testosterone, SHBG, free androgen index (FAI), AMH, hirsutism, acne, fasting glucose, blood pressure and all psychological parameters. Additionally, we assessed time to pregnancy, ongoing pregnancies, clinical pregnancies, miscarriages and birth weight. All

  5. Understanding the “black box” of a health-promotion program: Keys to enable health among older persons aging in the context of migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmelie Barenfeld

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Although the need to make health services more accessible to persons who have migrated has been identified, knowledge about health-promotion programs (HPPs from the perspective of older persons born abroad is lacking. This study explores the design experiences and content implemented in an adapted version of a group-based HPP developed in a researcher–community partnership. Fourteen persons aged 70–83 years or older who had migrated to Sweden from Finland or the Balkan Peninsula were included. A grounded theory approach guided the data collection and analysis. The findings showed how participants and personnel jointly helped raise awareness. The participants experienced three key processes that could open doors to awareness: enabling community, providing opportunities to understand and be understood, and confirming human values and abilities. Depending on how the HPP content and design are being shaped by the group, the key processes could both inhibit or encourage opening doors to awareness. Therefore, this study provides key insights into how to enable health by deepening the understanding of how the exchange of health-promoting messages is experienced to be facilitated or hindered. This study adds to the scientific knowledge base of how the design and content of HPP may support and recognize the capabilities of persons aging in the context of migration.

  6. What Are the Key Elements of Educational Interventions for Lay Carers of Patients With Advanced Disease? A Systematic Literature Search and Narrative Review of Structural Components, Processes and Modes of Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquhar, Morag; Penfold, Clarissa; Walter, Fiona M; Kuhn, Isla; Benson, John

    2016-07-01

    Educating carers about symptom management may help meet patient and carer needs in relation to distressing symptoms in advanced disease. Reviews of the effectiveness of carer interventions exist, but few have focused on educational interventions and none on the key elements that comprise them but which could inform evidence-based design. To identify the key elements (structural components, processes, and delivery modes) of educational interventions for carers of patients with advanced disease. We systematically searched seven databases, applied inclusion and exclusion criteria, conducted quality appraisal, extracted data, and performed a narrative analysis. We included 62 articles related to 49 interventions. Two main delivery modes were identified: personnel-delivered interventions and stand-alone resources. Personnel-delivered interventions targeted individuals or groups, the former conducted at single or multiple time points, and the latter delivered as series. Just more than half targeted carers rather than patient-carer dyads. Most were developed for cancer; few focused purely on symptom management. Stand-alone resources were rare. Methods to evaluate interventions ranged from postintervention evaluations to fully powered randomized controlled trials but of variable quality. Published evaluations of educational interventions for carers in advanced disease are limited, particularly for non-cancer conditions. Key elements for consideration in developing such interventions were identified; however, lack of reporting of reasons for nonparticipation or dropout from interventions limits understanding of the contribution of these elements to interventions' effectiveness. When developing personnel-delivered interventions for carers in advanced disease, consideration of the disease (and, therefore, caring) trajectory, intervention accessibility (timing, location, and transport), and respite provision may be helpful. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc

  7. Are All Program Elements Created Equal? Relations Between Specific Social and Emotional Learning Components and Teacher-Student Classroom Interaction Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abry, Tashia; Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E; Curby, Timothy W

    2017-02-01

    School-based social and emotional learning (SEL) programs are presented to educators with little understanding of the program components that have the greatest leverage for improving targeted outcomes. Conducted in the context of a randomized controlled trial, the present study used variation in treatment teachers' (N = 143) implementation of four core components of the Responsive Classroom approach to examine relations between each component and the quality of teachers' emotional, organizational, and instructional interactions in third, fourth, and fifth grade classrooms (controlling for pre-intervention interaction quality and other covariates). We also examined the extent to which these relations varied as a function of teachers' baseline levels of interaction quality. Indices of teachers' implementation of Morning Meeting, Rule Creation, Interactive Modeling, and Academic Choice were derived from a combination of teacher-reported surveys and classroom observations. Ratings of teacher-student classroom interactions were aggregated across five observations conducted throughout the school year. Structural path models indicated that teachers' use of Morning Meeting and Academic Choice related to higher levels of emotionally supportive interactions; Academic Choice also related to higher levels of instructional interactions. In addition, teachers' baseline interaction quality moderated several associations such that the strongest relations between RC component use and interaction quality emerged for teachers with the lowest baseline interaction quality. Results highlight the value of examining individual program components toward the identification of program active ingredients that can inform intervention optimization and teacher professional development.

  8. Expansion of geographic information components in the educational programs of cartographers at Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Людмила Даценко

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the necessity to make changes in the university curriculum in accordance with the requirements of today. Modern cartography is integrated with GIS and remote sensing and in this context we see the prospect of training experts at universities. GIS education has some specific features that distinguish it from other types of training such as the interdisciplinary nature, a wide range of highly informative software applications, a combination of geographical and engineering knowledge. GIS specialists must have system knowledge and skills in the design, operation and development in this field. Only intensive use of mapping, GIS, geodetic, and photogrammetric knowledge and methods in scientific research and their effective use in the practice of modern production allow the international community to achieve high results. The main directions of educational programs at the Department of Geodesy and Cartography are preservation and further development of the rich heritage of scientific and pedagogical achievements of higher cartographical education in Ukraine; the study and involvement in the educational process of the best achievements of foreign higher education; preparation and updating of scientific and methodological support of educational process; modernization of material and technical basis for the learning process and field training practices; involvement of new professional teaching staff; training of the faculty staff. The demand on mapping courses and related workshops at the Department of Geodesy and Cartography Geography Department is determined by certain factors: the growth of interdisciplinary research involving extensive mapping component; growing of demand for mapping and GIS products from scientific, practical, commercial, and educational institutions; the need to increase productivity in the field of cartography, geoinformatics and adjacent to their fields of study and practice; issues of general improvement of

  9. Public Commitment, Resistance to Advertising, and Leisure Promotion in a School-Based Drug Abuse Prevention Program: A Component Dismantling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Serrano, Olga; Griffin, Kenneth W.; García-Fernández, José Manuel; Espada, Mireia; Orgilés José P.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine the contribution of three intervention components (public commitment, resistance to advertising, and leisure promotion) on alcohol and protective variables in a school-based substance use prevention program. Participants included 480 Spanish students aged from 14 to 16 who received the…

  10. Evaluation and Proposed Refinement of the Sampling Design for the Long Term Resource Monitoring Program's Fish Component

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ickes, Brian

    2002-01-01

    ... if the sampling design adequately addresses program goals and objectives. Periodic evaluations also permit assessment of a program's ability to provide adequate and useful information for changing management and science needs...

  11. Predictive factors of adherence to frequency and duration components in home exercise programs for neck and low back pain: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Mirapeix, Francesc; Escolar-Reina, Pilar; Gascón-Cánovas, Juan J; Montilla-Herrador, Joaquina; Jimeno-Serrano, Francisco J; Collins, Sean M

    2009-12-09

    Evidence suggests that to facilitate physical activity sedentary people may adhere to one component of exercise prescriptions (intensity, duration or frequency) without adhering to other components. Some experts have provided evidence for determinants of adherence to different components among healthy people. However, our understanding remains scarce in this area for patients with neck or low back pain. The aims of this study are to determine whether patients with neck or low back pain have different rates of adherence to exercise components of frequency per week and duration per session when prescribed with a home exercise program, and to identify if adherence to both exercise components have distinct predictive factors. A cohort of one hundred eighty-four patients with chronic neck or low back pain who attended physiotherapy in eight primary care centers were studied prospectively one month after intervention. The study had three measurement periods: at baseline (measuring characteristics of patients and pain), at the end of physiotherapy intervention (measuring characteristics of the home exercise program) and a month later (measuring professional behaviors during clinical encounters, environmental factors and self-efficacy, and adherence behavior). Adherence to duration per session (70.9% +/- 7.1) was more probable than adherence to frequency per week (60.7% +/- 7.0). Self-efficacy was a relevant factor for both exercise components (p exercises prescribed was predictive of frequency adherence (p exercise components. Frequency adherence is more probable if patients received clarification of their doubts (adjusted OR: 4.1; p exercises (adjusted OR: 3.3; p exercise prescription frequency and duration components have distinct levels and predictive factors. We recommend additional study, and advise that differential attention be given in clinical practice to each exercise component for improving adherence.

  12. About a Program “The Development of the Contents and the fulfillment of the conditions for the realization of the educational program “A Young Ecologist of Kuban” as a regional component for Main Educational Program (MEP”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey G. Stepanov

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available To fulfill all the main tasks of educational development claimed by the Concepts of the long-term social-economic development of the Russian Federation up to 2020, and also by the Strategy of the of the social economic development of the Krasnoyarsky region up to 2020, and also Municipal program of Sochi “The development of the educational branch of the city of Sochi” for 2014-2016 based on the Municipal preschool educational government-financed establishment of a kindergarten of a combined type №67 a Project “ The development of the contents and creation of the conditions to fulfill the educational program “ A Young Ecologist of Kuban” as a regional component of the educational program of the main educational program” is being developed and adopted. When the experiment is finished a program of the ecological education will be fulfilled and adopted, which will take into account the system-related approach to fulfill the FSESPE that wil allow to reach the following results: -\tto form educatees’ educational results based by the FSES; -\tto build a system of a non-stop education on the levels of PE-primary school; -\tto establish a net communication between educational and science organizations of Sochi.

  13. Predictive factors of adherence to frequency and duration components in home exercise programs for neck and low back pain: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimeno-Serrano Francisco J

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence suggests that to facilitate physical activity sedentary people may adhere to one component of exercise prescriptions (intensity, duration or frequency without adhering to other components. Some experts have provided evidence for determinants of adherence to different components among healthy people. However, our understanding remains scarce in this area for patients with neck or low back pain. The aims of this study are to determine whether patients with neck or low back pain have different rates of adherence to exercise components of frequency per week and duration per session when prescribed with a home exercise program, and to identify if adherence to both exercise components have distinct predictive factors. Methods A cohort of one hundred eighty-four patients with chronic neck or low back pain who attended physiotherapy in eight primary care centers were studied prospectively one month after intervention. The study had three measurement periods: at baseline (measuring characteristics of patients and pain, at the end of physiotherapy intervention (measuring characteristics of the home exercise program and a month later (measuring professional behaviors during clinical encounters, environmental factors and self-efficacy, and adherence behavior. Results Adherence to duration per session (70.9% ± 7.1 was more probable than adherence to frequency per week (60.7% ± 7.0. Self-efficacy was a relevant factor for both exercise components (p Conclusion We have shown in a clinic-based study that adherence to exercise prescription frequency and duration components have distinct levels and predictive factors. We recommend additional study, and advise that differential attention be given in clinical practice to each exercise component for improving adherence.

  14. Carbon concentrations of components of trees in 10-year-old Populus davidiana stands within the Desertification Combating Program of Northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Huitao; Zhang, Wanjun; Cao, Jiansheng; Zhang, Xiang; Xu, Quanhong; Yang, Xue; Xiao, Dengpan; Zhao, Yanxia

    2016-12-01

    Most studies do not consider the potential variation in carbon concentration among the different tree components of the same species in regional scale. This study examined the carbon concentrations of the components (i.e., foliage, branch, stem, and root) in a 10-year-old poplar species ( Populus davidiana Dode) from the Desertification Combating Program of Northern China. The highest and lowest carbon concentrations were found in the stem and foliage, respectively. There was a significant difference in carbon concentrations among the different tree components. All of the observed carbon concentrations of tree components were lower than those predicted using the conversion factor of 0.5 applied to component biomass. Stem carbon made up 59.7% of the total tree biomass carbon. The power equation estimating proportion of tree biomass carbon against the independent variable of diameter at breast height explained more than 90% of the variability in allocation of carbon among tree components. Tree height, as a second independent variable is also discussed. Our results suggest that the difference in organic carbon concentration among tree components should be incorporated into accurately develop forest carbon budget. Moreover, further investigations on how the diameter at breast height equation developed in the present study performs across broader scales are required.

  15. AN ANALYSIS OF SOME ASPECTS OF COMPONENT-BASED PROGRAMMING FOR SELECTING APPROPRIATE CATEGORICAL STRUCTURES AS THEIR MODELS

    OpenAIRE

    William STEINGARTNER; Davorka RADAKOVIC; Valerie NOVITZKA; Mohamed Ali M. ELDOJALI

    2017-01-01

    Formal methods and formal models are important tools in software engineering. Formal methods provide unambiguous meaning of programs written in some language or constructed from modules. Moreover, they provide the basic mathematical techniques necessary for those who are working with theoretical background in computer science. Categories are interesting mathematical structures which have become important for constructing the models of programs and program systems. In this paper we fo...

  16. Formative assessment in the development of an obesity prevention component for the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study conducted formative research (surveys, focus groups); to assess the nutrition education needs of clients in the Texas Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program prior to curriculum revision. Current participants in the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program from 3 Texas cities (...

  17. AXIOLOGICAL COMPONENT OF VOCATIONAL TRAINING (THE EXAMPLE OF BACHELOR PROGRAMS IN THE FIELD OF THE GARMENT INDUSTRY PRODUCTS DESIGN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyudmila V. Rosnovskaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to review and study the significance of an axiological component and its mechanisms implementation for bachelor vocational training in the field of designing garment industry products.Methods. The methods involve theoretical analysis of philosophical, psychological and pedagogical literature, as well as modeling and classification methods.Scientific novelty and results. An independent axiological component based on structural and content analysis of a clothes designer’s professional work is identified; the content of this component is justified and determined. The substantive characteristics of clothes designer professional competencies are determined in terms of the axiological component. The education objectives aimed at forming the axiological component of Bachelors’ of garment design competencies are classified in correlation with the functions of training. Activity-related information and specifications necessary for values related to actual practice are identified, including channels and mechanisms of translation values in the vocational education process. A model of the educational situation is elaborated, which is proposed to be used as an orientation basis for designing specific educational situations, adequate to this or that kind of value experience. The dialogue activity is shown as the most favorable environment and a form of student activities organization in the development of emotionally-valuable experience.Practical significance. The article is supposed to be used while the training process for the garment industry and the fashion industry staff.

  18. Analyzing best practices in employee health management: how age, sex, and program components relate to employee engagement and health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Paul E; Grossmeier, Jessica; Mangen, David J; Gingerich, Stefan B

    2013-04-01

    Examine the influence of employee health management (EHM) best practices on registration, participation, and health behavior change in telephone-based coaching programs. Individual health assessment data, EHM program data, and health coaching participation data were analyzed for associations with coaching program enrollment, active participation, and risk reduction. Multivariate analyses occurred at the individual (n = 205,672) and company levels (n = 55). Considerable differences were found in how age and sex impacted typical EHM evaluation metrics. Cash incentives for the health assessment were associated with more risk reduction for men than for women. Providing either a noncash or a benefits-integrated incentive for completing the health assessment, or a noncash incentive for lifestyle management, strengthened the relationship between age and risk reduction. In EHM programs, one size does not fit all. These results can help employers tailor engagement strategies for their specific population.

  19. Effect of a combined rugby conditioning and plyometric training program on selected physical and anthropometric components of university-level rugby players / Cindy Pienaar.

    OpenAIRE

    Pienaar, Cindy

    2009-01-01

    Plyometrics is a specialized, high-intensity training technique for the improvement of power and performances among athletes primarily participating in dynamic, explosive type of team sports such as rugby league and soccer. In spite of the power requirements of rugby union, no studies to date have attempted to determine the possible benefits of a combined rugby conditioning and plyometric training program on the anthropometric, physical and motor performance components of rugby union players....

  20. Efficacy of a multi-component psychosocial intervention program for caregivers of persons living with neurocognitive disorders, Alexandria, Egypt: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shata, Zeinab Nazeeh; Amin, Marwa R; El-Kady, Heba M; Abu-Nazel, Mervat W

    2017-01-01

    Unlike other chronic diseases, dementia caregiving is associated with enormous psychological burden, which stresses the need for caregivers-directed psychosocial interventions. Aim: This randomized controlled trial (RCT) was conducted to evaluate the short-term efficacy of a multi-component psychosocial intervention program for informal caregivers of persons with neurocognitive disorders in Alexandria, Egypt. Informal caregivers (120) were randomly assigned into intervention and control groups. The intervention group (60) participated in a multi-component program of 8 sessions, including psycho-education, group cognitive-behavioral therapy, and group social support. Program primary outcomes were assessed after program termination (post-1), and three months later (post-2). Measured outcomes included caregivers' knowledge, depression and anxiety symptoms, and perceived burden. Caregivers' depression, anxiety, and perceived burden demonstrated significant drop at post-1, and post-2 compared to the control group ( P psychosocial intervention for caregivers of persons with neurocognitive disorders demonstrated a short-term efficacy in reducing their burden, depression, and anxiety, as well as improving caregivers' knowledge. However, further research is needed to investigate long-term efficacy of the intervention.

  1. Use of a Web-based Delphi for identifying critical components of a professional science master's program in biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantz, Jeannine Wells

    The primary purpose of this research was to develop a model for a professional science master's program combining biotechnology and business. The objectives were to identify stakeholder preferences for various dimensions of a professional science master's program combining biotechnology and business and to identify differences in priorities between subgroups. A secondary purpose was to examine user preferences between Web-based and traditional methods of conducting a Delphi study and the panelist's impressions of its usefulness for program development. Prior to the first round, demographic data were collected on panelists regarding their gender, age, years experience in their current field, position title and education levels. Round 1 started with eight open-ended questions designed to investigate (a) learning objectives, (b) internships, (c) thesis vs. non-thesis degrees, (d) program focus (e) possible entry level positions, (f) roles for the industry advisory board, (g) recommended hours of hands-on experience and (h) other issues of importance. The final round ended with three questions to assess the panelists' perception of the usefulness of the Delphi for program development in higher education. Twenty-four panelists started Round 1 and participation in subsequent rounds varied from 17 in Round 2 to 11 in Round 4. Education level varied and included all levels of education in science and business. Issues emerged early in the study regarding development of different program tracks and the program goals, which were clarified in subsequent rounds. Significant differences occurred between industry and academic subgroups for two tracks, six skills designated for tracks, method of evaluating the internship, and entry-level positions appropriate for new graduates. When analyzed by level of confidence (high confidence vs. low confidence), significant differences occurred for (a) the number of semesters of hands-on experience students should have upon graduation, (b

  2. The effect of a multi-component camp-based weight-loss program on children's motor skills and physical fitness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kristian Traberg; Huang, Tao; Larsen, Lisbeth Runge

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many weight-loss programs in children are performed without specific foci on training both physical fitness and motor skills. The aim of this study was to describe the effect of a one-year weight-loss program on children's motor skills and physical fitness. METHODS: Participants...... included 115 overweight fifth-grade children (12.0 years) randomized into either a Day-Camp Intervention Arm (DCIA), with a subsequent family-based support program or a low-intense Standard Intervention Arm (SIA). Physical fitness was assessed by vertical jump, hand grip strength, and a progressive cardio...... the DCIA compared to the SIA. Contrary to the expected, children from the SIA improved aiming and catching skills relative to the DCIA children. Overall z-scores of the physical fitness components and cardio-respiratory fitness improved more in children from the DCIA compared to children from the SIA...

  3. IDENTIFICATION OF KEY MOLECULAR COMPONENTS OF THE RESISTANCE OF CHERRY TOMATO AGAINSTPhytophthora infestans Identificación de los principales componentes moleculares de la resistencia de tomate cherry contra Phytophthora infestans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LILIANA LÓPEZ KLEINE

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Cherry tomato Solanum lycopersicum var cerasiforme cv Matt's wild cherry is a very resistant cultivar to most Phytophthora infestans isolates. Two isolates were identified, US940480 and US970001 that cause an incompatible and a compatible interaction respectively. US970001 is one of the few isolates producing a compatible interaction with this cultivar. To identify genes with a differential gene expression between compatible and incompatible interactions, gene expression patterns were analyzed with tomato cDNA microarrays including 12,899 independent tomato cDNA clones at different time points after inoculation. A diverse set of statistical tools were used to identify key components of the plant response to the pathogen. Forty-three genes were up-regulated during the incompatible reaction at time point 36 hours, 15 globally at all time points and twelve were found both in globally and at 36 hours. Northern blots analysis was performed to confirm differential expression showed by microarray analysis and to study the differential expression of more plant resistance genes (PR genes between compatible and incompatible interactions for this interaction.El tomate cherry Solanum lycopersicum var cerasiforme cv Matt's es bastante resistente a la gran parte de aislamientos de Phytophthora infestans. Se han identificado dos aislamientos, US940480 y US970001 que causan interacción incompatible y compatible respectivamente. US970001 es uno de los pocos aislamientos causantes de interacción compatible con este cultivo. Con el fin de identificar genes con expresión diferencial en interacciones compatible e incompatible, analizamos DNA copia de 12899 clones independientes en tres tiempos posteriores a la inoculación del patógeno. Se aplicaron diversas herramientas estadísticas para identificar componentes moleculares claves de la respuesta de la planta al patógeno. Cuarenta y tres genes fueron detectados como activados durante la interacci

  4. The Effects of a Multi-Component Higher-Functioning Autism Anti-Stigma Program on Adolescent Boys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staniland, Jessica J.; Byrne, Mitchell K.

    2013-01-01

    A six-session higher-functioning autism anti-stigma program incorporating descriptive, explanatory and directive information was delivered to adolescent boys and the impact upon knowledge, attitudes and behavioural intentions towards peers with autism was evaluated. Participants were seventh-, eighth- and ninth-grade students (N = 395) from…

  5. Position of the American Dietetic Association, Society for Nutrition Education, and American School Food Service Association--Nutrition services: an essential component of comprehensive school health programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Marilyn; Safaii, SeAnne; Beall, Deborah Lane

    2003-04-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association (ADA), the Society for Nutrition Education (SNE), and the American School Food Service Association (ASFSA) that comprehensive nutrition services must be provided to all of the nation's preschool through grade twelve students. These nutrition services shall be integrated with a coordinated, comprehensive school health program and implemented through a school nutrition policy. The policy should link comprehensive, sequential nutrition education; access to and promotion of child nutrition programs providing nutritious meals and snacks in the school environment; and family, community, and health services' partnerships supporting positive health outcomes for all children. Childhood obesity has reached epidemic proportions and is directly attributed to physical inactivity and diet. Schools can play a key role in reversing this trend through coordinated nutrition services that promote policies linking comprehensive, sequential nutrition education programs, access to and marketing of child nutrition programs, a school environment that models healthy food choices, and community partnerships. This position paper provides information and resources for nutrition professionals to use in developing and supporting comprehensive school health programs. J Am Diet Assoc. 2003;103:505-514.

  6. A quality monitoring program for red blood cell components: in vitro quality indicators before and after implementation of semiautomated processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acker, Jason P; Hansen, Adele L; Kurach, Jayme D R; Turner, Tracey R; Croteau, Ioana; Jenkins, Craig

    2014-10-01

    Canadian Blood Services has been conducting quality monitoring of red blood cell (RBC) components since 2005, a period spanning the implementation of semiautomated component production. The aim was to compare the quality of RBC components produced before and after this production method change. Data from 572 RBC units were analyzed, categorized by production method: Method 1, RBC units produced by manual production methods; Method 2, RBC units produced by semiautomated production and the buffy coat method; and Method 3, RBC units produced by semiautomated production and the whole blood filtration method. RBC units were assessed using an extensive panel of in vitro tests, encompassing regulated quality control criteria such as hematocrit (Hct), hemolysis, and hemoglobin (Hb) levels, as well as adenosine triphosphate, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, extracellular K(+) and Na(+) levels, methemoglobin, p50, RBC indices, and morphology. Throughout the study, all RBC units met mandated Canadian Standards Association guidelines for Hb and Hct, and most (>99%) met hemolysis requirements. However, there were significant differences among RBC units produced using different methods. Hb content was significantly lower in RBC units produced by Method 2 (51.5 ± 5.6 g/unit; p < 0.001). At expiry, hemolysis was lowest in Method 2-produced RBC units (p < 0.05) and extracellular K(+) levels were lowest in units produced by Method 1 (p < 0.001). While overall quality was similar before and after the production method change, the observed differences, although small, indicate a lack of equivalency across RBC products manufactured by different methods. © 2014 AABB.

  7. Receptive vocabulary knowledge tests: Their potential importance for planning a well-balanced vocabulary component of a language program

    OpenAIRE

    Wakeling, Elliott

    2015-01-01

    iii Abstract Nation and Webb (2011) state ‘Testing is one of the major jobs of the vocabulary teacher, because without good information about our learners’ vocabulary knowledge, we cannot do the most important job of planning a well-balanced program’ (p. 219). This paper evaluated different receptive vocabulary knowledge tests and assessed their potential to help a teacher plan a well-balanced vocabulary program. The Vocabulary Levels Test (VLT) was selected to assess the vocabulary kno...

  8. The results of the program to change the cognitive component of social representations about the consequences of drug use in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.P. Ryabov

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We argue the need of development and implementation of informational programs to focus drug prevention in adolescents due to the fact that the researchers neglected the distortion of knowledge and ideas about the consequences of drug use. The results of the program aimed at change the cognitive component of social representations of teenagers about taking drugs are presented. The program implemented in general education school is based on informational approach: a video is shown about the consequences of drug use on human health and life. The study involved 158 adolescents aged 15 to 18 years, students of 9th and 11th grades. As a result of the program, we recorded a significant reduction in the desire of teens to try drugs, their increased knowledge about the consequences of drug use, change in the hierarchy of consequences of initiation to drugs important for adolescents, and their life orientations. We identified and described age-and gender-specific impact of the program on the study parameters.

  9. THE ANALYSIS OF EFFECTIVENESS OF CORRECTIVE PROGRAM OF FORMING OF COMPONENTS OF PROFESSIONAL SELF-DEVELOPMENT OF FUTURE PRIMARY SCHOOL TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artem Smoliuk

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of effectiveness of corrective program of forming of components of professional self-development of future primary school teachers is made in the article. The methodological base of design of corrective program was the principles of systematic and genetic, personal and active, action approaches to the professional self-development, humanist theory of self- actualization and self-realization of the personality. The program, designed by author consisted of: diagnostic, forming and recovering, psychical and preventive and correctional, control blocks. In the psychical and preventive and correctional process the gaming technologies, which consist of numerous exercises and performed both individually and within groups, psychological actions and role games and quests, personality-oriented technologies of professional development were used. The conducted justification of effectiveness of corrective program showed, that the specially arranged events allowed to increase levels of such components of professional self-development of future primary school teachers as: need and motivational, reflexive and value and social-communicative. During the conducting of pedagogical correction the specially organized training as the addition to traditional educational forms were used. The objectives of such education are the following: the promotion of forming of subjective position of the personality about the professional promotion; the supporting of personal-professional development; the stimulating of upward professional mobility and career growth in the pedagogical activity; optimization of attitude to oneself as to the professional; the expansion of oriental level in the professional field; the actualization of personal resources in the professional self-development; help in passing of new professional status of future pedagogue; the prognostication of possible difficulties, which are related to the future pedagogical activity. Thus proved, that the

  10. Transcriptional program of ciliated epithelial cells reveals new cilium and centrosome components and links to human disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona A Hoh

    Full Text Available Defects in the centrosome and cilium are associated with a set of human diseases having diverse phenotypes. To further characterize the components that define the function of these organelles we determined the transcriptional profile of multiciliated tracheal epithelial cells. Cultures of mouse tracheal epithelial cells undergoing differentiation in vitro were derived from mice expressing GFP from the ciliated-cell specific FOXJ1 promoter (FOXJ1:GFP. The transcriptional profile of ciliating GFP+ cells from these cultures was defined at an early and a late time point during differentiation and was refined by subtraction of the profile of the non-ciliated GFP- cells. We identified 649 genes upregulated early, when most cells were forming basal bodies, and 73 genes genes upregulated late, when most cells were fully ciliated. Most, but not all, of known centrosome proteins are transcriptionally upregulated early, particularly Plk4, a master regulator of centriole formation. We found that three genes associated with human disease states, Mdm1, Mlf1, and Dyx1c1, are upregulated during ciliogenesis and localize to centrioles and cilia. This transcriptome for mammalian multiciliated epithelial cells identifies new candidate centrosome and cilia proteins, highlights similarities between components of motile and primary cilia, and identifies new links between cilia proteins and human disease.

  11. Effects of a progressive resistance exercise program with high-speed component on the physical function of older women with sarcopenic obesity: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina S. S. Vasconcelos

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background Sarcopenic obesity is associated with disability in older people, especially in women. Resistance exercises are recommended for this population, but their efficacy is not clear. Objective To evaluate the effects of a progressive resistance exercise program with high-speed component on the physical function of older women with sarcopenic obesity. Method Twenty-eight women 65 to 80 years old, with a body mass index ≥30kg/m2 and handgrip strength ≤21kg were randomly allocated to two groups. The experimental group underwent a 10-week resistance exercise program designed to improve strength, power, and endurance of lower-limb muscles, with open chain and closed chain exercises. The control group had their health status monitored through telephone calls. The primary outcomes were lower limb muscle performance measured by knee extensor strength, power and fatigue by isokinetic dynamometry, and mobility measured by the Short Physical Performance Battery and by gait velocity. The secondary outcome was health-related quality of life assessed by the SF-36 Questionnaire. Results The average rate of adherence was 85%, with few mild adverse effects. There were no significant between-group differences for any of the outcomes. Conclusion In this study, a progressive resistance exercise program with high-speed component was not effective for improving the physical function of older women with sarcopenic obesity.

  12. Effectiveness in improving knowledge, practices, and intakes of "key problem nutrients" of a complementary feeding intervention developed by using linear programming: experience in Lombok, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmida, Umi; Kolopaking, Risatianti; Santika, Otte; Sriani, Sriani; Umar, Jahja; Htet, Min Kyaw; Ferguson, Elaine

    2015-03-01

    Complementary feeding recommendations (CFRs) with the use of locally available foods can be developed by using linear programming (LP). Although its potential has been shown for planning phases of food-based interventions, the effectiveness in the community setting has not been tested to our knowledge. We aimed to assess effectiveness of promoting optimized CFRs for improving maternal knowledge, feeding practices, and child intakes of key problem nutrients (calcium, iron, niacin, and zinc). A community-intervention trial with a quasi-experimental design was conducted in East Lombok, West Nusa Tenggara Province, Indonesia, on children aged 9-16 mo at baseline. A CFR group (n = 240) was compared with a non-CFR group (n = 215). The CFRs, which were developed using LP, were promoted in an intervention that included monthly cooking sessions and weekly home visits. The mother's nutrition knowledge and her child's feeding practices and the child's nutrient intakes were measured before and after the 6-mo intervention by using a structured interview, 24-h recall, and 1-wk food-frequency questionnaire. The CFR intervention improved mothers' knowledge and children's feeding practices and improved children's intakes of calcium, iron, and zinc. At the end line, median (IQR) nutrient densities were significantly higher in the CFR group than in the non-CFR group for iron [i.e., 0.6 mg/100 kcal (0.4-0.8 mg/100 kcal) compared with 0.5 mg/100 kcal (0.4-0.7 mg/100 kcal)] and niacin [i.e., 0.8 mg/100 kcal (0.5-1.0 mg/100 kcal) compared with 0.6 mg/100 kcal (0.4-0.8 mg/100 kcal)]. However, median nutrient densities for calcium, iron, niacin, and zinc in the CFR group (23, 0.6, 0.7, and 0.5 mg/100 kcal, respectively) were still below desired densities (63, 1.0, 0.9, and 0.6 mg/100 kcal, respectively). The CFRs significantly increased intakes of calcium, iron, niacin, and zinc, but nutrient densities were still below desired nutrient densities. When the adoption of optimized CFRs is

  13. Food security status of older adult home-delivered meals program participants and components of its measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerr, Lynn

    2006-01-01

    Food security status was assessed for 143 West Central Indiana community-dwelling older adults participating in a home-delivered meals program, using the national CPS-FSSM survey, based on economics, and augmented items, including such factors as ability to prepare and/or shop for food. Results showed that 74.8% were food secure, much lower than the national rate for households with elderly (94.0%). Gender and age were found to be statistically significant predictors of food security status (national items). Scores based on national versus augmented items were significantly correlated, but scores for augmented items showed more food insecurity, indicating these items identified more food insecure older adults than the national items alone.

  14. Weight loss programs for urban-based, postpartum African-American women: perceived barriers and preferred components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setse, Rosanna; Grogan, Ruby; Cooper, Lisa A; Strobino, Donna; Powe, Neil R; Nicholson, Wanda

    2008-01-01

    There are currently 1.85 million reproductive-aged women in the United States with diabetes or glucose intolerance. While it is known that postpartum weight retention can lead to obesity and diabetes, particularly among African-American women, little is known about African-American women's preferences for postpartum weight loss programs. Our objective was to explore urban-based African-American women's attitudes toward weight gain, perceived barriers to postpartum weight loss, and preferences for weight intervention strategies. Focus groups of pregnant African-American women (n = 22) were conducted by a race-concordant moderator. Open-ended questions were posed to stimulate discussions which were audio taped and transcribed verbatim. Transcriptions were independently reviewed by two investigators who extracted quotations and coded each statement to identify major themes. The median age of participants was 26 years. Median pre-pregnancy or first trimester body-mass index was 31 kg/m(2). Fifty-seven percent of the women were multiparous and 68% were Medicaid recipients. We identified 16 themes with the majority of participant comments focused on: (1) effect of postpartum depression on motivation to lose weight; (2) strong desire to lose weight; (3) knowledge of adverse effects of obesity; (4) costs of weight loss programs; (5) negative impact of media coverage of successful celebrity postpartum weight loss; (6) limitations of childcare on ability to exercise; and (7) family-centered lifestyle behaviors that promote unhealthy eating. Weight loss interventions for African-American women with postpartum obesity should address psychological effects of childbearing, affordability, and perceptions of body image. Interventions should incorporate family-centered approaches and weight loss maintenance strategies.

  15. The risk component in Land Use Planning Programs: the case of the Regional and Marine Use Planning Program for the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Antonio Rosete Vergés

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The concern to include in the land use planning programs aspects related to risk management has about 15 years. In a few cases the presence of a specific danger has been the trigger to start a land use planning process. This is true for processes like The Regional Land Use Planning of the Popocatepetl Volcano and his Core Area, The Land Use Planning of the Monarch Butterfly Region or The Regional Land Use Planning of the Necaxa and Laxaxalpan Watersheds. On the other hand, even though the use of spatial models focused on the selection of vulnerable areas to climate change risks has been as strong research issue for the last 14 years, the last six years were determinant as in this time models have grown stronger on the methodological level. The identification of those climate change danger vulnerable areas has been only recently incorporated into the methodology. With the increase of natural danger associated to global climate change, the inclusion of guidelines focused on mitigation and adaptation in the Land Use Planning Programs is a must, especially in those areas that proof to be more vulnerable to those effects.

  16. NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) Acropora palmata snail corallivore removal evaluation in the Florida Keys from 2011-2013 (NCEI Accession 0161266)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data contains visual observations as well as Predatory snail removal and analysis on several reef plots in the Florida Keys. During the initial removal in June...

  17. Research. Energy and information society, two key-points of the 5. R and D framework-program; Recherche. L`energie et la societe de l`information, deux points cles du 5. programme cadre de recherche et developpement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1999-04-01

    The start up of a new European framework-program is an important fact as it defines a large part of orientation of research efforts in Europe. This paper presents the main points of the 5. program that concern the actors of electric power, electronics and telecommunication industries. The program comprises 4 themes (quality of life and management of life resources, convivial information society, competitive and durable growth, energy, environment and durable development) and 23 key-actions. The key actions of the `energy, environment and durable development` theme are: the water durable management and quality, the Earth`s change, climate and bio-diversity, the durable management of marine ecosystems, tomorrows town and the cultural patrimony, the clean energy and the renewable energy sources, an economical and efficient energy, the controlled thermonuclear fusion, and the nuclear fission. Short paper. (J.S.)

  18. Effectiveness in delaying the initiation of sexual intercourse of girls aged 12-14. Two components of the Girls Incorporated Preventing Adolescent Pregnancy Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postrado, L T; Nicholson, H J

    1992-03-01

    The Girls Incorporated, formerly Girls Clubs of America, program in Preventing Adolescent Pregnancy, which was initiated in 1985, was evaluated to obtain information about sexual behavior and attitudes related to pregnancy, educational and career expectations, and sociodemographic characteristics, and to ascertain the effectiveness of 2 components for girls aged 12-14 in delaying early sexual involvement. The theoretical base of intervention is discussed and delineation of 3 themes recurrent in the literature. Program interventions are also described. The 2 program components evaluated were Will Power/Won't Power which taught skill in general and specific assertiveness, and Growing Together, which facilitated communication between parents and daughters. The sample consisted of 412 virgin girls 12-14 years, of which 25% did not participate in either program, from communities in which the adolescent pregnancy rate was higher than the national average. Participants were required to have completed 1 complete year which included before and after surveys. 257 participated in Will Power/Won't Power; 84 in Growing Together; and 46 in both programs. Participants and nonparticipants were similar in background characteristics. The profile was one of primarily African American 12 year olds of a Protestant religion. Growing Together participants were slightly different and less likely to engage in early sexual intercourse. The findings of the bivariate and logistic regression analyses were that nonparticipants were 2.5 times more likely to initiate sexual intercourse during the study year than participants in Growing Together, but this was only marginally statistically significant. It is suggested however that when controlling for age, religion, race and having contact with a pregnant teen that Growing Together participation contributed to a delay in the initiation of sexual intercourse. Participation in Will Power did not account for any differences in likelihood of initiating

  19. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Towed-diver Surveys of Benthic Habitat, Key Benthic Species, and Marine Debris Sightings of the Pacific Remote Island Areas since 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The towed-diver method is used to conduct benthic surveys, assessing large-scale disturbances (e.g., bleaching) and quantifying benthic components such as habitat...

  20. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Towed-diver Surveys of Benthic Habitat, Key Benthic Species, and Marine Debris Sightings of the Marianas since 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The towed-diver method is used to conduct benthic surveys, assessing large-scale disturbances (e.g., bleaching) and quantifying benthic components such as habitat...

  1. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Towed-diver Surveys of Benthic Habitat, Key Benthic Species, and Marine Debris Sightings of American Samoa in 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The towed-diver method is used to conduct benthic surveys, assessing large-scale disturbances (e.g., bleaching) and quantifying benthic components such as habitat...

  2. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Towed-diver Surveys of Benthic Habitat, Key Benthic Species, and Marine Debris Sightings of the Hawaiian Archipelago in 2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The towed-diver method is used to conduct benthic surveys, assessing large-scale disturbances (e.g., bleaching) and quantifying benthic components such as habitat...

  3. Components of an effective large scale program for the prevention of inherited hemoglobin disorders; the paradigm of Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Loukopoulos

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Large scale prevention programs for Thalassemia major or Sickle cell disease have already been set up in several places with high frequency of the deleterious genes. The Greek health authorities realized the magnitude of the problem and allowed the creation of a National Thalassemia Center in 1972. The incidence of thalassemia in Greece varies from 1-2 per cent up to 15%, the mean being around 8 per cent. With an annual number of births around 100,000, if no prevention measures are taken, the expected yearly number of newborns with thalassemia major in Greece should be of the order of 100-120. To these one should add a few decades of sickle cell patients, homozygotes or compound HbS/β-thalassemia heterozygotes. The total number of patients with thalassemia major now surviving is estimated at 4,000 plus another 600-800 patients with sickle cell disease. The National Thalassemia Center Center defined a network of peripheral Thalassemia Units in the major regional hospitals of the country, let them provide free carrier identification to couples requesting the test. When both partners were identified as carriers, they were given preliminary information locally and were referred to the Central Laboratory in Athens for further genetic counselling and, if so decided, prenatal diagnosis. Prenatal diagnosis was provided initially by fetoscopy and fetal blood biosynthesis; this approach was soon replaced by chorionic villi sampling and molecular techniques. The number of prenatal diagnoses carried out yearly over the last decade appears to cover the needs; the number of positive diagnoses is very close to the expected 25%, which also excludes overdiagnosis. The overall evaluation of the the program is reflected in the number of infants who were admitted to the pediatric clinics of the country in need of transfusion over the years the program was functioning. In fact, over the past years this number has steadily decreased to approximately 10 missed

  4. p21(WAF1) is component of a positive feedback loop that maintains the p53 transcriptional program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Lisa Y; Scott, Mary; Hayward, Richard L; Mohammed, Hisham; Whitelaw, C Bruce A; Smith, Graeme C M; Hupp, Ted R

    2011-03-15

    The regulation of p53 activity through the MDM2 negative feedback loop is driven in part by an extrinsic ATM-pulse that maintains p53 oscillations in response to DNA damage. We report here that the p53 pathway has evolved an intrinsic positive feedback loop that is maintained by the p53-inducible gene product p21(WAF1). p21-null cancer cells have defects in p53 protein turnover, reductions in MDM2-mediated degradation of p53, and reduced DNA damage-induced ubiquitination of p53. TLR3-IRF1 or ATM-dependent signaling to p53 is defective in p21-null cells and complementation of the p21 gene in p21-null cancer cells restores the p53 transcriptional response. The mechanism of p53 inactivity in p21-null cells is linked to a p53 protein equilibrium shift from chromatin into cytosolic fractions and complementation of the p21 gene into p21-null cells restores the nuclear localization of p53. A loss of p53 transcriptional function in murine B-cells heterozygous or homozygous null for p21 highlights a p21-gene dosage effect that maintains the full p53 transcriptional response. ATM inhibition results in nuclear exclusion of p53 highlighting a positive genetic interaction between ATM and p21. P21 protein oscillates in undamaged proliferating cells, and reductions of p21 protein using siRNA eliminate the DNA damage-induced p53 pulse. The p53 transcription program has evolved a negative feedback loop maintained by MDM2 that is counteracted by a positive feedback loop maintained by ATM-p21 the balance of which controls the specific activity of p53 as a transcription factor.

  5. Identifying and Leveraging Trust as a Key Element in the Development, Implementation and Sustainment of the Salt Lake City Fire Department’s Intelligence Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Disentanglement and Protest Deterrence Training, which consisted of didactic and tactical training programs and had built several working relationships with...This program also includes joint training, both didactic and tactile, taking this network development to a higher level by improving the mutual...the book , From Good to Great, Jim Collins wrote a chapter called, First Who…Then What.152 The significant finding of his research on the core of

  6. LOVE FOR THE HOMELAND (HEIMAT AND MOTHERLAND AS THE KEY COMPONENTS OF WARMIAN RELIGIOUS IDENTITY. A MODEL OF WARMIAN IDENTITY IN THE “WARMIAN HOME CALENDAR” (1857-1938

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Sapała

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Representatives of the Warmian intellectual elite, who published the “Warmian Home Calendar”, intended to create a medium adjusted to the needs and mentality of the local community. They developed a tool which had great ideological potential and could be used for shaping religious as well as political and social attitudes. From the very beginning, the model of Warmian identity promoted by the “Warmian Home Calendar” had three main interrelated components. Apart from the Catholic faith, based upon forms of religious belief specific to the Warmia region, these identity constructs are comprised of love for the homeland (Heimat and love for the motherland. However, an analysis of the available volumes of the “Calendar” revealed that the desired model of Warmian identity, based on the above three pillars, was unstable, and its components underwent modifications in response to the changing political situation.

  7. Secondary prevention through cardiac rehabilitation: physical activity counselling and exercise training: key components of the position paper from the Cardiac Rehabilitation Section of the European Association of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corrà, Ugo; Piepoli, Massimo F; Carré, François

    2010-01-01

    of a healthy lifestyle. These secondary prevention targets are included in the overall goal of cardiac rehabilitation (CR). Cardiac rehabilitation can be viewed as the clinical application of preventive care by means of a professional multi-disciplinary integrated approach for comprehensive risk reduction...... and global long-term care of cardiac patients. The CR approach is delivered in tandem with a flexible follow-up strategy and easy access to a specialized team. To promote implementation of cardiac prevention and rehabilitation, the CR Section of the EACPR (European Association of Cardiovascular Prevention...... and Rehabilitation) has recently completed a Position Paper, entitled 'Secondary prevention through cardiac rehabilitation: A condition-oriented approach'. Components of multidisciplinary CR for seven clinical presentations have been addressed. Components include patient assessment, physical activity counselling...

  8. Minnesota 4-H Youth Program Quality Improvement Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Margo; Grant, Samantha

    2015-01-01

    The University of Minnesota Extension Center for Youth Development made an organizational decision in 2011 to invest in a system-wide approach to implement youth program quality into the 4-H program using the Youth Program Quality Assessment (YPQA) tool. This article describes the four key components to the Minnesota Youth Program Quality…

  9. Early Entry for Youth into the Ocean Science Pipeline Through Ocean Science School Camp and Summer Camp Programs: A Key Strategy for Enhancing Diversity in the Ocean Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, N. L.; Wasser, A.; Weiss, T.; Sullivan, M.; Jones, A.

    2004-12-01

    Educators, policymakers, employers and other stakeholders in ocean and other geo-science fields face the continuing challenge of a lack of diversity in these fields. A particular challenge for educators and geo-science professionals promoting ocean sciences is to create programs that have broad access, including access for underrepresented youth. Experiential learning in environments such as intensive multi-day science and summer camps can be a critical captivator and motivator for young people. Our data suggest that youth, especially underrepresented youth, may benefit from exposure to the oceans and ocean science through intensive, sustained (eg more than just an afternoon), hands-on, science-based experiences. Data from the more than 570 youth who have participated in Camp SEA Lab's academically based experiential ocean science camp and summer programs provide compelling evidence for the importance of such programs in motivating young people. We have paid special attention to factors that might play a role in recruiting and retaining these young people in ocean science fields. Over 50% of program attendees were underrepresented youth and on scholarship, which gives us a closer look at the impact of such programs on youth who would otherwise not have the opportunity to participate. Both cognitive (knowledge) and affective (personal growth and motivation) indicators were assessed through surveys and questionnaires. Major themes drawn from the data for knowledge growth and personal growth in Camp SEA Lab youth attendees will be presented. These will be placed into the larger context of critical factors that enhance recruitment and retention in the geo-science pipeline. Successful strategies and challenges for involving families and broadening access to specialized programs such as Camp SEA Lab will also be discussed.

  10. Computer science: Key to a space program renaissance. The 1981 NASA/ASEE summer study on the use of computer science and technology in NASA. Volume 2: Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, R. A., Jr. (Editor); Carlson, P. A. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    Adoption of an aggressive computer science research and technology program within NASA will: (1) enable new mission capabilities such as autonomous spacecraft, reliability and self-repair, and low-bandwidth intelligent Earth sensing; (2) lower manpower requirements, especially in the areas of Space Shuttle operations, by making fuller use of control center automation, technical support, and internal utilization of state-of-the-art computer techniques; (3) reduce project costs via improved software verification, software engineering, enhanced scientist/engineer productivity, and increased managerial effectiveness; and (4) significantly improve internal operations within NASA with electronic mail, managerial computer aids, an automated bureaucracy and uniform program operating plans.

  11. Reorganizing the instructional reading components: could there be a better way to design remedial reading programs to maximize middle school students with reading disabilities' response to treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoon, Mary Beth; Sandow, Alexia; Hunter, Charles V

    2010-06-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to explore if there could be a more beneficial method in organizing the individual instructional reading components (phonological decoding, spelling, fluency, and reading comprehension) within a remedial reading program to increase sensitivity to instruction for middle school students with reading disabilities (RD). Three different modules (Alternating, Integrated, and Additive) of the Reading Achievement Multi-Modular Program were implemented with 90 middle school (sixth to eighth grades) students with reading disabilities. Instruction occurred 45 min a day, 5 days a week, for 26 weeks, for approximately 97 h of remedial reading instruction. To assess gains, reading subtests of the Woodcock Johnson-III, the Gray Silent Reading Test, and Oral Reading Fluency passages were administered. Results showed that students in the Additive module outperformed students in the Alternating and Integrated modules on phonological decoding and spelling and students in the Integrated module on comprehension skills. Findings for the two oral reading fluency measures demonstrated a differential pattern of results across modules. Results are discussed in regards to the effect of the organization of each module on the responsiveness of middle school students with RD to instruction.

  12. Public key infrastructure for DOE security research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aiken, R.; Foster, I.; Johnston, W.E. [and others

    1997-06-01

    This document summarizes the Department of Energy`s Second Joint Energy Research/Defence Programs Security Research Workshop. The workshop, built on the results of the first Joint Workshop which reviewed security requirements represented in a range of mission-critical ER and DP applications, discussed commonalties and differences in ER/DP requirements and approaches, and identified an integrated common set of security research priorities. One significant conclusion of the first workshop was that progress in a broad spectrum of DOE-relevant security problems and applications could best be addressed through public-key cryptography based systems, and therefore depended upon the existence of a robust, broadly deployed public-key infrastructure. Hence, public-key infrastructure ({open_quotes}PKI{close_quotes}) was adopted as a primary focus for the second workshop. The Second Joint Workshop covered a range of DOE security research and deployment efforts, as well as summaries of the state of the art in various areas relating to public-key technologies. Key findings were that a broad range of DOE applications can benefit from security architectures and technologies built on a robust, flexible, widely deployed public-key infrastructure; that there exists a collection of specific requirements for missing or undeveloped PKI functionality, together with a preliminary assessment of how these requirements can be met; that, while commercial developments can be expected to provide many relevant security technologies, there are important capabilities that commercial developments will not address, due to the unique scale, performance, diversity, distributed nature, and sensitivity of DOE applications; that DOE should encourage and support research activities intended to increase understanding of security technology requirements, and to develop critical components not forthcoming from other sources in a timely manner.

  13. How do eHealth Programs for Adolescents With Depression Work? A Realist Review of Persuasive System Design Components in Internet-Based Psychological Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Patrick J

    2017-01-01

    Background Major depressive disorders are common among adolescents and can impact all aspects of their daily life. Traditional therapies, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), and interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) have been delivered face-to-face. However, Internet-based (online) delivery of these therapies is emerging as an option for adolescents. Internet-based CBT and IPT involve therapeutic content, interaction between the user and the system, and different technological features embedded into the online program (eg, multimedia). Studies of Internet-based CBT and IPT for adolescent depression differ on all three aspects, and variable, positive therapy effects have been reported. A better understanding of the treatment conditions that influence therapy outcomes is important to designing and evaluating these novel therapies. Objective Our aim was to examine the technological and program delivery features of Internet-based CBT and IPT for adolescent depression and to document their potential relation to treatment outcomes and program use. Methods We performed a realist synthesis. We started with an extensive search of published and gray literature. We included intervention studies that evaluated Internet-based CBT or IPT for adolescent depression. We included mixed-methods and qualitative studies, theoretical papers, and policy/implementation documents if they included a focus on how Internet-based psychological therapy is proposed to work for adolescents with depression/depressive symptoms. We used the Mixed-Methods Appraisal Tool to assess the methodological quality of studies. We used the Persuasive System Design (PSD) model as a framework for data extraction and analysis to examine how Internet-based CBT and IPT, as technology-based systems, influence the attitudes and behaviors of system users. PSD components described for the therapies were linked to reported outcomes using a cross-case comparison method and thematic synthesis. Results We identified 19

  14. How do eHealth Programs for Adolescents With Depression Work? A Realist Review of Persuasive System Design Components in Internet-Based Psychological Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozney, Lori; Huguet, Anna; Bennett, Kathryn; Radomski, Ashley D; Hartling, Lisa; Dyson, Michele; McGrath, Patrick J; Newton, Amanda S

    2017-08-09

    Major depressive disorders are common among adolescents and can impact all aspects of their daily life. Traditional therapies, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), and interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) have been delivered face-to-face. However, Internet-based (online) delivery of these therapies is emerging as an option for adolescents. Internet-based CBT and IPT involve therapeutic content, interaction between the user and the system, and different technological features embedded into the online program (eg, multimedia). Studies of Internet-based CBT and IPT for adolescent depression differ on all three aspects, and variable, positive therapy effects have been reported. A better understanding of the treatment conditions that influence therapy outcomes is important to designing and evaluating these novel therapies. Our aim was to examine the technological and program delivery features of Internet-based CBT and IPT for adolescent depression and to document their potential relation to treatment outcomes and program use. We performed a realist synthesis. We started with an extensive search of published and gray literature. We included intervention studies that evaluated Internet-based CBT or IPT for adolescent depression. We included mixed-methods and qualitative studies, theoretical papers, and policy/implementation documents if they included a focus on how Internet-based psychological therapy is proposed to work for adolescents with depression/depressive symptoms. We used the Mixed-Methods Appraisal Tool to assess the methodological quality of studies. We used the Persuasive System Design (PSD) model as a framework for data extraction and analysis to examine how Internet-based CBT and IPT, as technology-based systems, influence the attitudes and behaviors of system users. PSD components described for the therapies were linked to reported outcomes using a cross-case comparison method and thematic synthesis. We identified 19 Internet-based CBT programs in 59 documents

  15. Interacting Components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orlic, B.; Broenink, Johannes F.; Welch, Peter; Kerridge, Jon; Barnes, Fred

    2006-01-01

    SystemCSP is a graphical modeling language based on both CSP and concepts of component-based software development. The component framework of SystemCSP enables specification of both interaction scenarios and relative execution ordering among components. Specification and implementation of

  16. An economic analysis methodology for project evaluation and programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Economic analysis is a critical component of a comprehensive project or program evaluation methodology that considers all key : quantitative and qualitative impacts of highway investments. It allows highway agencies to identify, quantify, and value t...

  17. Demographic, Behavioral, and Psychosocial Correlates of Using the Website Component of a Worksite Physical Activity and Healthy Nutrition Promotion Program: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robroek, Suzan JW; Brouwer, Wendy; Lindeboom, Dennis; Oenema, Anke

    2010-01-01

    Background Internet-delivered behavior change programs have the potential to reach a large population. However, low participation levels and high levels of attrition are often observed. The worksite could be a setting suitable for reaching and retaining large numbers of people, but little is known about reach and use of Internet-delivered health promotion programs in the worksite setting. Objective This study aimed (1) to gain more insight in the use of the website component of a worksite behavior change intervention and (2) to identify demographic, behavioral, and psychosocial factors associated with website use. Methods The study was an observational study among participants from 5 workplaces in a cluster randomized controlled trial. At baseline, all participants visited a study website to fill out the baseline questionnaire. Then a physical health check was done followed by face-to-face advice. After this contact, all participants received an email to promote visiting the website to view their health check results and the personal advice based on the baseline questionnaire. In the subsequent period, only participants in the intervention group received monthly email messages to promote website visits and were offered additional Web-based tools (self-monitors and a food frequency questionnaire [FFQ] assessing saturated fat intake) to support their behavior change. Website use was monitored by website statistics registering website access. Complete data were available for 726 employees. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify characteristics of employees who visited and used the website. Results In total, 43% of the participants visited the website after the email to promote website visits. Participants who were insufficiently physically active were less likely to visit the website (odds ratio [OR] 0.63, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.45-0.88), whereas individuals with an elevated total cholesterol level visited the website more often (OR 1.44, 95

  18. Proactividad Medioambiental en la Empresa: Clasificación Empírica y Determinación de Aspectos Clave (Environmental proactiveness in the company: an empirical categorization and its key components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Val Segarra Oña

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available La proactividad medioambiental es partefundamental de la responsabilidad socialcorporativa de las empresas y genera beneficiostanto tangibles como intangibles. En estetrabajo se presenta un modelo de evaluacióny clasificación empresarial en función de laorientación hacia el medioambiente. Un análisisempírico a través de técnicas cuantitativasaplicadas a noventa y seis empresas industrialesespañolas ubicadas en la Comunidad Valencianapermite clasificar la muestra en tres gruposdiferentes. Se identifican también los factores quedeterminan dicha orientación y que caracterizanel grado de proactividad medioambiental. Losresultados obtenidos, por una parte, permitenorientar adecuadamente las actividades internasde la empresa al poner de manifiesto las causasy efectos que la proactividad medioambientaltiene sobre la competitividad de las empresasy, por otra parte, deben servir de guía paradefinir, de manera eficiente, las políticas públicasencaminadas a mejorar y aumentar la implicaciónmedioambiental del tejido empresarial.   ABSTRACT Environmental proactiveness is afundamental component of any company´scorporate social responsibility that producesboth tangible and intangible benefits. Thispaper presents an evaluation and categorizationmodel from an environmental point of view.An empirical analysis made with quantitativetechniques to 96 Spanish industrial companieslocated in the Valencia Community, allowedus to distribute the sample in three distinctivegroups. The factors leading to that distributionand characterizing the degree of environmentalproactiveness were also identified. The resultsmake possible to steer a company´s internalactivities by highlighting the causes and effectsthat environmental proactiveness has on itscompetitiveness, and serve as a guide to shape uppublic policies aimed at increasing and improvingthe environmental involvement of businessnetworks.

  19. Electronic components

    CERN Document Server

    Colwell, Morris A

    1976-01-01

    Electronic Components provides a basic grounding in the practical aspects of using and selecting electronics components. The book describes the basic requirements needed to start practical work on electronic equipment, resistors and potentiometers, capacitance, and inductors and transformers. The text discusses semiconductor devices such as diodes, thyristors and triacs, transistors and heat sinks, logic and linear integrated circuits (I.C.s) and electromechanical devices. Common abbreviations applied to components are provided. Constructors and electronics engineers will find the book useful

  20. Diamond turning microstructure optical components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wenda

    2009-05-01

    Microstructure optical components in the form of Fresnel, TIR, microgroove, micro lens array provide a lot design freedom for high compact optical systems. It is a key factor which enables the cutting edge technology for telecommunication, surveillance and high-definition display system. Therefore, the demand of manufacturing such element is rapidly increasing. These elements usually contain high precision, tiny structure and complex form, which have posed many new challenges for tooling, programming as well as ultra-precision machining. To cope with the fast development of the technology and meet the increasing demand of the market, we have developed our own manufacturing process to fabricate microstructure optical components by way of Diamond tuning, Shaping, Raster cutting, Slow Slide Servo (SSS), Diamond milling and Post polishing. This paper is to focus on how we employed these methods to produce complex prototype of microstructure optical components and precision mold inserts which either contains aspheric lens array or freeform V grooves. The high quality finish of these surfaces meets application requirements. Measurement results are presented. Advantages and disadvantages of these methods are compared and discussed in the paper.

  1. Components of laboratory accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royal, P D

    1995-12-01

    Accreditation or certification is a recognition given to an operation or product that has been evaluated against a standard; be it regulatory or voluntary. The purpose of accreditation is to provide the consumer with a level of confidence in the quality of operation (process) and the product of an organization. Environmental Protection Agency/OCM has proposed the development of an accreditation program under National Environmental Laboratory Accreditation Program for Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) laboratories as a supplement to the current program. This proposal was the result of the Inspector General Office reports that identified weaknesses in the current operation. Several accreditation programs can be evaluated and common components identified when proposing a structure for accrediting a GLP system. An understanding of these components is useful in building that structure. Internationally accepted accreditation programs provide a template for building a U.S. GLP accreditation program. This presentation will discuss the traditional structure of accreditation as presented in the Organization of Economic Cooperative Development/GLP program, ISO-9000 Accreditation and ISO/IEC Guide 25 Standard, and the Canadian Association for Environmental Analytical Laboratories, which has a biological component. Most accreditation programs are managed by a recognized third party, either privately or with government oversight. Common components often include a formal review of required credentials to evaluate organizational structure, a site visit to evaluate the facility, and a performance evaluation to assess technical competence. Laboratory performance is measured against written standards and scored. A formal report is then sent to the laboratory indicating accreditation status. Usually, there is a scheduled reevaluation built into the program. Fee structures vary considerably and will need to be examined closely when building a GLP program.

  2. A computer program for the determination of the solar risk in Argentina by dermatologists employing NASA TOMS satellite ozone data as a key geophysical variable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piacentini, R.; Cede, A.; Luccini, E.; Stengel, F.

    The connection between skin cancer and solar ultraviolet radiation has been well documented (i.e., UNEP report "Environmental Effects of Ozone Depletion. 1998 Assessment"). In this work wepresent a computer software that can be used by dermatologists for determining the risk of persons that are exposed to solar UV radiation incident in Argentina, a country largely extended from low (tropical) to high southern hemisphere latitudes. In particular, its spectral distribution weighted by the CIE standard erythemal action spectrum and integrated in wavelength usually called "erythemal irradiance", is calculated including the following geophysical variables: ozone, solar elevation, Sun-Earth distance, altitude, aerosol and albedo. Other variables that have less influence in the final results are the vertical ozone, aerosol, pressure and temperature profiles, the extraterrestrial spectral solar UV irradiance and the ozone photoabsorption cross section. The ozone total column was obtained from the corresponding seasonal and latitudinal climatological NASA TOMS satellite data, including monthly averages, standard deviations and tendencies for the particular geographical situation of Argentina. The program considers also the different skin types, in order to determine the skin risk without or with a sunscreen protection at each moment of the day and for different days of the year. We present the program output for typical examples of persons exposed in extreme conditions, like in the high altitude tropical Puna of Atacama desert in the North- West, or when the ozone hole event overpasses Ushuaia in the South, as well as in Buenos Aires, the largest populated city in the country and one of the megacities of the world. The availability of a large satellite ozone data set gives us the possibility to make a clear sky day solar risk forecast for all the year, that can be applied in all places of the country. This work was made possible through a collaboration between the Argentina

  3. L1448-MM OBSERVATIONS BY THE HERSCHEL KEY PROGRAM, ''DUST, ICE, AND GAS IN TIME'' (DIGIT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jinhee; Lee, Jeong-Eun [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Kyung Hee University, Yongin-shi, Kyungki-do 449-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seokho [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Green, Joel D.; Evans, Neal J. II [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, TX 78712-1205 (United States); Choi, Minho [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, 776 Daedeokdaero, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Kristensen, Lars [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, MS78, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Dionatos, Odysseas; Jørgensen, Jes K., E-mail: jeongeun.lee@khu.ac.kr [Centre for Star and Planet Formation, Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, Øster Voldgade 5-7, 1350 Copenhagen (Denmark); Collaboration: DIGIT Team

    2013-11-01

    We present Herschel/Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) observations of L1448-MM, a Class 0 protostar with a prominent outflow. Numerous emission lines are detected at 55 <λ < 210 μm including CO, OH, H{sub 2}O, and [O I]. We investigate the spatial distribution of each transition to find that lines from low energy levels tend to distribute along the outflow direction while lines from high energy levels peak at the central spatial pixel. Spatial maps reveal that OH emission lines are formed in a relatively small area, while [O I] emission is extended. According to the rotational diagram analysis, the CO emission can be fitted by two (warm and hot) temperature components. For H{sub 2}O, the ortho-to-para ratio is close to 3. The non-LTE large velocity gradient (LVG) calculations suggest that CO and H{sub 2}O lines could instead be formed in a high kinetic temperature (T > 1000 K) environment, indicative of a shock origin. For OH, IR-pumping processes play an important role in the level population. The molecular emission in L1448-MM is better explained with a C-shock model, but the atomic emission of PACS [O I] and Spitzer/Infrared Spectrograph [Si II] emission is not consistent with C-shocks, suggesting multiple shocks in this region. Water is the major line coolant of L1448-MM in the PACS wavelength range, and the best-fit LVG models predict that H{sub 2}O and CO emit (50%-80%) of their line luminosity in the PACS wavelength range.

  4. Continuous variable quantum key distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong-Min; Wang, Xu-Yang; Bai, Zeng-Liang; Liu, Wen-Yuan; Yang, Shen-Shen; Peng, Kun-Chi

    2017-04-01

    Not Available Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61378010 and 11504219), the Key Project of the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (Grant No. 2016YFA0301403), the Natural Science Foundation of Shanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2014011007-1), and the Program for the Outstanding Innovative Teams of Higher Learning Institutions of Shanxi Province, China.

  5. Key performance indicators score (KPIs-score) based on clinical and laboratorial parameters can establish benchmarks for internal quality control in an ART program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, José G; Petersen, Claudia G; Mauri, Ana L; Vagnini, Laura D; Renzi, Adriana; Petersen, Bruna; Mattila, M C; Comar, Vanessa A; Ricci, Juliana; Dieamant, Felipe; Oliveira, João Batista A; Baruffi, Ricardo L R

    2017-06-01

    KPIs have been employed for internal quality control (IQC) in ART. However, clinical KPIs (C-KPIs) such as age, AMH and number of oocytes collected are never added to laboratory KPIs (L-KPIs), such as fertilization rate and morphological quality of the embryos for analysis, even though the final endpoint is the evaluation of clinical pregnancy rates. This paper analyzed if a KPIs-score strategy with clinical and laboratorial parameters could be used to establish benchmarks for IQC in ART cycles. In this prospective cohort study, 280 patients (36.4±4.3years) underwent ART. The total KPIs-score was obtained by the analysis of age, AMH (AMH Gen II ELISA/pre-mixing modified, Beckman Coulter Inc.), number of metaphase-II oocytes, fertilization rates and morphological quality of the embryonic lot. The total KPIs-score (C-KPIs+L-KPIs) was correlated with the presence or absence of clinical pregnancy. The relationship between the C-KPIs and L-KPIs scores was analyzed to establish quality standards, to increase the performance of clinical and laboratorial processes in ART. The logistic regression model (LRM), with respect to pregnancy and total KPIs-score (280 patients/102 clinical pregnancies), yielded an odds ratio of 1.24 (95%CI = 1.16-1.32). There was also a significant difference (pKPIs-score mean value between the group of patients with clinical pregnancies (total KPIs-score=20.4±3.7) and the group without clinical pregnancies (total KPIs-score=15.9±5). Clinical pregnancy probabilities (CPP) can be obtained using the LRM (prediction key) with the total KPIs-score as a predictor variable. The mean C-KPIs and L-KPIs scores obtained in the pregnancy group were 11.9±2.9 and 8.5±1.7, respectively. Routinely, in all cases where the C-KPIs score was ≥9, after the procedure, the L-KPIs score obtained was ≤6, a revision of the laboratory procedure was performed to assess quality standards. This total KPIs-score could set up benchmarks for clinical pregnancy. Moreover

  6. The Feasibility of Embedding Data Collection into the Routine Service Delivery of a Multi-Component Program for High-Risk Young People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Knight

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is little evidence about how to improve outcomes for high-risk young people, of whom Indigenous young people are disproportionately represented, due to few evaluation studies of interventions. One way to increase the evidence is to have researchers and service providers collaborate to embed evaluation into the routine delivery of services, so program delivery and evaluation occur simultaneously. This study aims to demonstrate the feasibility of integrating best-evidence measures into the routine data collection processes of a service for high-risk young people, and identify the number and nature of risk factors experienced by participants. Methods: The youth service is a rural based NGO comprised of multiple program components: (i engagement activities; (ii case management; (iii diversionary activities; (iv personal development; and (v learning and skills. A best-evidence assessment tool was developed by staff and researchers and embedded into the service’s existing intake procedure. Assessment items were organised into demographic characteristics and four domains of risk: education and employment; health and wellbeing; substance use; and crime. Descriptive data are presented and summary risk variables were created for each domain of risk. A count of these summary variables represented the number of co-occurring risks experienced by each participant. The feasibility of this process was determined by the proportion of participants who completed the intake assessment and provided research consent. Results: This study shows 85% of participants completed the assessment tool demonstrating that data on participant risk factors can feasibly be collected by embedding a best-evidence assessment tool into the routine data collection processes of a service. The most prevalent risk factors were school absence, unemployment, suicide ideation, mental distress, substance use, low levels of physical activity, low health service utilisation

  7. Cryptographic Key Management and Critical Risk Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abercrombie, Robert K [ORNL

    2014-05-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (DOE-OE) CyberSecurity for Energy Delivery Systems (CSEDS) industry led program (DE-FOA-0000359) entitled "Innovation for Increasing CyberSecurity for Energy Delivery Systems (12CSEDS)," awarded a contract to Sypris Electronics LLC to develop a Cryptographic Key Management System for the smart grid (Scalable Key Management Solutions for Critical Infrastructure Protection). Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Sypris Electronics, LLC as a result of that award entered into a CRADA (NFE-11-03562) between ORNL and Sypris Electronics, LLC. ORNL provided its Cyber Security Econometrics System (CSES) as a tool to be modified and used as a metric to address risks and vulnerabilities in the management of cryptographic keys within the Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) domain of the electric sector. ORNL concentrated our analysis on the AMI domain of which the National Electric Sector Cyber security Organization Resource (NESCOR) Working Group 1 (WG1) has documented 29 failure scenarios. The computational infrastructure of this metric involves system stakeholders, security requirements, system components and security threats. To compute this metric, we estimated the stakes that each stakeholder associates with each security requirement, as well as stochastic matrices that represent the probability of a threat to cause a component failure and the probability of a component failure to cause a security requirement violation. We applied this model to estimate the security of the AMI, by leveraging the recently established National Institute of Standards and Technology Interagency Report (NISTIR) 7628 guidelines for smart grid security and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 63351, Part 9 to identify the life cycle for cryptographic key management, resulting in a vector that assigned to each stakeholder an estimate of their average loss in terms of dollars per day of system

  8. Fibre Optic Communication Key Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Grote, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    The book gives an in-depth description of the key devices of current and next generation fibre optic communication networks. In particular, the book covers devices such as semiconductor lasers, optical amplifiers, modulators, wavelength filters, and detectors but the relevant properties of optical fibres as well. The presentations include the physical principles underlying the various devices, the technologies used for the realization of the different devices, typical performance characteristics and limitations, and development trends towards more advanced components are also illustrated. Thus the scope of the book spans relevant principles, state-of-the-art implementations, the status of current research and expected future components.

  9. Predictive factors of adherence to frequency and duration components in home exercise programs for neck and low back pain: an observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Jimeno-Serrano Francisco J; Montilla-Herrador Joaquina; Gascón-Cánovas Juan J; Escolar-Reina Pilar; Medina-Mirapeix Francesc; Collins Sean M

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Evidence suggests that to facilitate physical activity sedentary people may adhere to one component of exercise prescriptions (intensity, duration or frequency) without adhering to other components. Some experts have provided evidence for determinants of adherence to different components among healthy people. However, our understanding remains scarce in this area for patients with neck or low back pain. The aims of this study are to determine whether patients with neck or ...

  10. Geoethics As a Key Component to an Undergraduate Capstone Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissman, J. W.; McFadden, L. D.

    2014-12-01

    We have taught a required, senior, capstone course, with a focus on geoscience communication, for almost 35 years. While both of us were at the University of New Mexico, we alternated responsibility for teaching this course. The first author continues to teach a similar course at the University of Texas at Dallas. As the course has evolved and new approaches taken, we have incorporated more and more subject matter related to ethics in science and in particular the geological sciences. Our experiences indicate that (1) students are typically enthralled by and curious about the subject, (2) students have received little if any exposure to the subject in any form of formal classroom environment, and (3) students have personally experienced situations or have learned of situations from their peers that have left them in an uncomfortable position and left them questioning the appropriateness of the actions witnessed. We typically introduce the subject of GeoEthics by drawing students' attention to the many Codes of Ethics or Professional Conduct assembled by Geoscience societies. Many students are quick to volunteer their experiences related to specific topics. For example, the statement in the Geological Society of America Code of Conduct, "Geoscientists should treat associates with respect, regardless of the level of their formal education, encourage them, learn with them, share ideas honestly, and give credit for their contributions" often incites lively discussion and reveals repeated behavior by some individuals.

  11. Extracellular proteins: Novel key components of metal resistance in cyanobacteria?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquin eGiner-Lamia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Metals are essential for all living organisms and required for fundamental biochemical processes. However, when in excess, metals can turn into highly-toxic agents able to disrupt cell membranes, alter enzymatic activities and damage DNA. Metal concentrations are therefore tightly controlled inside cells, particularly in cyanobacteria. Cyanobacteria are ecologically relevant prokaryotes that perform oxygenic photosynthesis and can be found in many different marine and freshwater ecosystems, including environments contaminated with heavy metals. As their photosynthetic machinery imposes high demands for metals, homeostasis of these micronutrients has been widely studied in cyanobacteria. So far, most studies have focused on how cells are capable of controlling their internal metal pools, with a strong bias towards the analysis of intracellular processes. Ultrastructure, modulation of physiology, dynamic changes in transcription and protein levels have been studied, but what takes place in the extracellular environment when cells are exposed to an unbalanced metal availability remains largely unknown. The interest in studying the subset of proteins present in the extracellular space has only recently begun and the identification and functional analysis of the cyanobacterial exoproteomes are just emerging. Remarkably, metal-related proteins such as the copper-chaperone CopM or the iron-binding protein FutA2 have already been identified outside the cell. With this perspective, we aim to raise the awareness that metal-resistance mechanisms are not yet fully known and hope to motivate future studies assessing the role of extracellular proteins on bacterial metal homeostasis, with a special focus on cyanobacteria.

  12. Extracellular proteins: Novel key components of metal resistance in cyanobacteria?

    OpenAIRE

    Joaquin eGiner-Lamia; Joaquin eGiner-Lamia; Sara Bernardes Pereira; Sara Bernardes Pereira; Miquel eBovea-Marco; Matthias Erwin Futschik; Matthias Erwin Futschik; Paula eTamagnini; Paula eTamagnini; Paula eTamagnini; Paulo eOliveira; Paulo eOliveira

    2016-01-01

    Metals are essential for all living organisms and required for fundamental biochemical processes. However, when in excess, metals can turn into highly-toxic agents able to disrupt cell membranes, alter enzymatic activities and damage DNA. Metal concentrations are therefore tightly controlled inside cells, particularly in cyanobacteria. Cyanobacteria are ecologically relevant prokaryotes that perform oxygenic photosynthesis and can be found in many different marine and freshwater ecosystems, i...

  13. Extracellular Proteins: Novel Key Components of Metal Resistance in Cyanobacteria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giner-Lamia, Joaquín; Pereira, Sara B; Bovea-Marco, Miquel; Futschik, Matthias E; Tamagnini, Paula; Oliveira, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Metals are essential for all living organisms and required for fundamental biochemical processes. However, when in excess, metals can turn into highly-toxic agents able to disrupt cell membranes, alter enzymatic activities, and damage DNA. Metal concentrations are therefore tightly controlled inside cells, particularly in cyanobacteria. Cyanobacteria are ecologically relevant prokaryotes that perform oxygenic photosynthesis and can be found in many different marine and freshwater ecosystems, including environments contaminated with heavy metals. As their photosynthetic machinery imposes high demands for metals, homeostasis of these micronutrients has been widely studied in cyanobacteria. So far, most studies have focused on how cells are capable of controlling their internal metal pools, with a strong bias toward the analysis of intracellular processes. Ultrastructure, modulation of physiology, dynamic changes in transcription and protein levels have been studied, but what takes place in the extracellular environment when cells are exposed to an unbalanced metal availability remains largely unknown. The interest in studying the subset of proteins present in the extracellular space has only recently begun and the identification and functional analysis of the cyanobacterial exoproteomes are just emerging. Remarkably, metal-related proteins such as the copper-chaperone CopM or the iron-binding protein FutA2 have already been identified outside the cell. With this perspective, we aim to raise the awareness that metal-resistance mechanisms are not yet fully known and hope to motivate future studies assessing the role of extracellular proteins on bacterial metal homeostasis, with a special focus on cyanobacteria.

  14. KEY COMPONENTS OF A MOTORCYCLE-TRAFFIC SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. HUSSAIN

    2005-01-01

    The small- and medium-sized type motorcycles (150c.c. and below made up 99% of the motorcycles population in Malaysia. A static motorcyclist measured about 0.8m in width, 2.0m in length, and requires an operating width of 1.3m. At a lane width of 1.7m or below, motorcycle flow applies the lane or headway concept. Above this optimum value, motorcycle flow adopted the space concept. This implied that a motorcycle path should be more than 1.7m wide to allow two motorcyclists to pass each other.

  15. Diagnostic testing: a key component of high-value care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucien J. Cardinal

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This is the fourth article of a series on fundamental concepts in biostatistics and research. In this article, the author reviews the fundamental concepts in diagnostic testing, sensitivity, and specificity and how they relate to the concept of high-value care. The topics are discussed in common language, with a minimum of jargon and mathematics, and with clinical examples. Emphasis is given to conceptual understanding. A companion article will follow focusing on predictive value and prior probability.

  16. Transdisciplinary training: key components and prerequisites for success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Justin M

    2008-08-01

    The training of transdisciplinary science is distinct in its intention to develop scientists who synthesize the theoretical and methodologic approaches of different disciplines. As a result, transdisciplinary scientists are better prepared to address the complexities of health problems. The most common form of transdisciplinary training is the multi-mentor apprenticeship model, with each mentor training from his or her own discipline. The transdisciplinary trainee is faced with many challenges, including learning the languages and cultures of different disciplines along with learning how to navigate within and between disciplines. The trainee also confronts unique career development risks. The climb up the academic ladder can be slower, rougher, and less linear than that of the trainee's single-disciplinary-trained peers. A number of factors can help the trainee in overcoming the challenges: being able to develop a core set of values and behaviors that are essential for transdisciplinary scientists; having the commitment and support of training institutions, training directors, and mentors; and having training structures and processes in place to prevent the training and trainee from naturally regressing back to familiar single-disciplinary approaches. There is relatively little known empirically about transdisciplinary training. Future efforts can focus on developing a better understanding of the unique characteristics of transdisciplinary training, identifying the effective elements that relate to training outcomes, defining the critical outcome metrics at different time points during and following training, and creating toolkits to help with training processes.

  17. BET proteins are a key component of immunoglobulin gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Jung Min; Lee, Jin S; Russell, Kirsty E; Wiegman, Coen H; Barnes, Peter J; Fear, David; Adcock, Ian M; Durham, Andrew L

    2017-04-01

    BET proteins have been shown to regulate gene expression including inflammatory genes. In order to investigate the role of the BET proteins in immunoglobulin production we treated the human B-cell line CLNH11.4 and primary human B cells and ozone-exposed mice with BET inhibitors (JQ1 or IBET151). Both proliferation and IgG production were reduced by JQ1 in a concentration-dependent manner. JQ1 significantly reduced immunoglobulin gene transcription. In vivo treatment of ozone-exposed mice with the BET inhibitor IBET151 similarly inhibited ozone-induced immunoglobulin production. JQ1 did not reduce the protein levels of Brd4 or Oct2 per se but reduced the ability of Brd4 and Oct2 to co-immunoprecipitate and of Oct2 to bind to immunoglobulin gene promoters. Our results indicate that BET proteins including Brd4 play a crucial role regulation B-cell-specific gene expression and immunoglobulin production.

  18. Integrating Spirituality as a Key Component of Patient Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzette Brémault-Phillips

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Patient care frequently focuses on physical aspects of disease management, with variable attention given to spiritual needs. And yet, patients indicate that spiritual suffering adds to distress associated with illness. Spirituality, broadly defined as that which gives meaning and purpose to a person’s life and connectedness to the significant or sacred, often becomes a central issue for patients. Growing evidence demonstrates that spirituality is important in patient care. Yet healthcare professionals (HCPs do not always feel prepared to engage with patients about spiritual issues. In this project, HCPs attended an educational session focused on using the FICA Spiritual History Tool to integrate spirituality into patient care. Later, they incorporated the tool when caring for patients participating in the study. This research (1 explored the value of including spiritual history taking in clinical practice; (2 identified facilitators and barriers to incorporating spirituality into person-centred care; and (3 determined ways in which HCPs can effectively utilize spiritual history taking. Data were collected using focus groups and chart reviews. Findings indicate positive impacts at organizational, clinical/unit, professional/personal and patient levels when HCPs include spirituality in patient care. Recommendations are offered.

  19. WRKY Transcription Factors: Key Components in Abscisic Acid Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    by the resistance protein MLA . This occurs in the cytoplasm and leads to a subsequent association of the MLA resistance protein with HvWRKY1 and...cold and drought responses (Marè et al., 2004) while also being a repressor of basal defence that directly interacts with the MLA resistance protein...Q.H., Saijo, Y., Mauch, S., Biskup, C., Bieri, S., Keller, B., Seki, H., Ulker, B., Somssich, I.E. and Schulze-Lefert, P. (2007) Nuclear activity of MLA

  20. Quantum key management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Richard John; Thrasher, James Thomas; Nordholt, Jane Elizabeth

    2016-11-29

    Innovations for quantum key management harness quantum communications to form a cryptography system within a public key infrastructure framework. In example implementations, the quantum key management innovations combine quantum key distribution and a quantum identification protocol with a Merkle signature scheme (using Winternitz one-time digital signatures or other one-time digital signatures, and Merkle hash trees) to constitute a cryptography system. More generally, the quantum key management innovations combine quantum key distribution and a quantum identification protocol with a hash-based signature scheme. This provides a secure way to identify, authenticate, verify, and exchange secret cryptographic keys. Features of the quantum key management innovations further include secure enrollment of users with a registration authority, as well as credential checking and revocation with a certificate authority, where the registration authority and/or certificate authority can be part of the same system as a trusted authority for quantum key distribution.

  1. Principal components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hallin, M.; Hörmann, S.; Piegorsch, W.; El Shaarawi, A.

    2012-01-01

    Principal Components are probably the best known and most widely used of all multivariate analysis techniques. The essential idea consists in performing a linear transformation of the observed k-dimensional variables in such a way that the new variables are vectors of k mutually orthogonal

  2. Public Key Cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapson, Frank

    1996-01-01

    Describes public key cryptography, also known as RSA, which is a system using two keys, one used to put a message into cipher and another used to decipher the message. Presents examples using small prime numbers. (MKR)

  3. Key Management Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides a secure environment to research and develop advanced electronic key management and networked key distribution technologies for the Navy and DoD....

  4. Financial Key Ratios

    OpenAIRE

    Tănase Alin-Eliodor

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on computing techniques starting from trial balance data regarding financial key ratios. There are presented activity, liquidity, solvency and profitability financial key ratios. It is presented a computing methodology in three steps based on a trial balance.

  5. LOCKS AND KEYS SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    Locks and Keys Service

    2002-01-01

    The Locks and Keys service (ST/FM) will move from building 55 to building 570 from the 2nd August to the 9th August 2002 included. During this period the service will be closed. Only in case of extreme urgency please call the 164550. Starting from Monday, 12th August, the Locks and Keys Service will continue to follow the activities related to office keys (keys and locks) and will provide the keys for furniture. The service is open from 8h30 to 12h00 and from 13h00 to 17h30. We remind you that your divisional correspondents can help you in the execution of the procedures. We thank you for your comprehension and we remain at your service to help you in solving all the matters related to keys for offices and furniture. Locks and Keys Service - ST Division - FM Group

  6. Cultural sensitivity and health education: essential components to the success of the early detection cancer screening program for Latinas at MedStar Georgetown University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makariou-Pikis, Chrissy; Peled, Anne Warren; Newland, Georgeen Melanson; Wessel, Lois A; Warren, Robert D

    2014-05-01

    Over 13 years, the Celebremos la Vida (CLV) program has offered free breast examinations, mammograms, and cervical cancer screenings to uninsured Latinas residing in the Northern Virginia suburbs of Washington, D.C. The CLV program aims to educate participants on the importance of breast self-examination and regular cancer screening for the early detection of breast and cervical cancer.

  7. Incorporating Language Structure in a Communicative Task: An Analysis of the Language Component of a Communicative Task in the LINC Home Study Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenchuk, Iryna

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to analyze a task included in the LINC Home Study (LHS) program. LHS is a federally funded distance education program offered to newcomers to Canada who are unable to attend regular LINC classes. A task, in which a language structure (a gerund) is chosen and analyzed, was selected from one instructional module of LHS…

  8. Is the Green Key standard the golden key for sustainability measurement in the hospitality sector?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietbergen, M.G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/14111634X; Van Rheede, A.

    2014-01-01

    The Green Key is an eco-rating program that aims at promoting sustainable business practices in the hospitality sector. The Green Key assesses amongst others the sustainable management of energy, water and waste within hotels and other hospitality firms. The Green Key standard awards points if

  9. No evidence for induction of key components of the Notch signaling pathway (Notch-1, Jagged-1) by treatment with UV-B, 1,25(OH)(2)D(3), and/or epigenetic drugs (TSA, 5-Aza) in human keratinocytes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichrath, Sandra; Reichrath, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    Notch signaling is of high importance for growth and survival of various cell types. We now analyzed the protein expression of two key components of the Notch signaling pathway (Notch-1, Jagged-1) in spontaneously immortalized (HaCaT) and in malignant (SCL-1) human keratinocytes, using western analysis. We found that Notch-1 and its corresponding ligand Jagged-1 are expressed in both cell lines, with no marked change following UV-B treatment. Moreover, treatment of both cell lines before or after UV-B irradiation with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3), the biologically active form of vitamin D, and/or epigenetic modulating drugs (TSA; 5-Aza) did not result in a marked modulation of the protein expression of Notch-1 or Jagged-1. Under the experimental conditions of this study, treatment with 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) protected human keratinocytes in part against the antiproliferative effects of UV-B-radiation. In conclusion, our findings do not point at a differential expression of these two key components of Notch signaling in non-malignant as compared to malignant human keratinocytes, indicating that alterations in their expression are not of importance for the photocarcinogenesis of human squamous cell carcinomas. Moreover, our findings do not support the hypothesis that modulation of Notch signaling may be involved in the photoprotective effect of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3), that we and others reported previously. Additionally, we demonstrate that epigenetic modulating drugs (TSA, 5-Aza) do not markedly modulate the expression Notch-1 or Jagged-1 in UV-B-treated human keratinocytes in vitro.

  10. Evaluation of 4 weeks' neonatal antiretroviral prophylaxis as a component of a prevention of mother-to-child transmission program in a resource-rich setting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ferguson, Wendy

    2011-05-01

    In resource-rich settings, universal adoption of a 4- rather than 6-week neonatal antiretroviral (ARV) prophylaxis regimen could reduce toxicity and results in cost savings, provided prevention of mother-to-child transmission program effectiveness is not compromised.

  11. Public-Key Cryptography (Dagstuhl Seminar 16371)

    OpenAIRE

    Fischlin, Marc; May, Alexander; Pointcheval, David; Rabin, Tal

    2017-01-01

    This report documents the program and results of Dagstuhl seminar 16731 “Public-Key Cryptography” which took place September 11th -16th, 2016. The goal of the seminar was to bring together different sub areas from public-key cryptography and to promote research among these areas.

  12. The compact key

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1966-01-01

    Here is given a sample of a new sort of identification key, recently developed by Dr. P. W. Leenhouts of the Rijksherbarium. Having to sort many specimens of Sapindaceae into genera, he became dissatisfied with the common dichotomous key, which too often does not work when the material is not

  13. Public Key Infrastructure Increment 2 (PKI Inc 2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    2016 Major Automated Information System Annual Report Public Key Infrastructure Increment 2 (PKI Inc 2) Defense Acquisition Management...6615 DSN Phone: 244-4900 DSN Fax: Date Assigned: July 1, 2015 Program Information Program Name Public Key Infrastructure Increment 2 (PKI Inc 2... Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) is a critical enabling technology for Information Assurance (IA) services to support seamless secure information flows

  14. Response of Basic Structural Elements and B-52 Structural Components to Simulated Nuclear Overpressure. Volume I-Program Description and Results (Basic Structural Elements)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-09-30

    determining the response of high-frequency structural components, such as aircraft skin panels, stringers, frames and radomes. As a result of the moratorium ...5) 00 C\\1 co a u- Cj 0 V) w CD -) (D - ~LLJO( 4-3 COD ) Ci Il 02 0 S-i 61 LL. 41) 05C LLI- <w C3 Co 0C 0l I-0 M- u cX< I- Z CD - Li -::I C.D 0 X: LLI

  15. Religious Challenges to School Voucher and Tax Benefit/Scholarship Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Martha

    2016-01-01

    A key component of current school reform efforts focuses on increasing parental choice through voucher systems and programs that provide tax benefits for contributions to scholarship programs for private school tuition. Indeed, proposals to adopt such programs have been or currently are being considered in four-fifths of the states, and about half…

  16. Key drivers of airline loyalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolnicar, Sara; Grabler, Klaus; Grün, Bettina; Kulnig, Anna

    2011-10-01

    This study investigates drivers of airline loyalty. It contributes to the body of knowledge in the area by investigating loyalty for a number of a priori market segments identified by airline management and by using a method which accounts for the multi-step nature of the airline choice process. The study is based on responses from 687 passengers. Results indicate that, at aggregate level, frequent flyer membership, price, the status of being a national carrier and the reputation of the airline as perceived by friends are the variables which best discriminate between travellers loyal to the airline and those who are not. Differences in drivers of airline loyalty for a number of segments were identified. For example, loyalty programs play a key role for business travellers whereas airline loyalty of leisure travellers is difficult to trace back to single factors. For none of the calculated models satisfaction emerged as a key driver of airline loyalty.

  17. Keys to the City

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monsson, Christian Kjær

    2014-01-01

    Review of: Keys to the City: How Economics, Institutions, Social Interaction, and Politics Shape Development / Michael Storper Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ, 2013, 288 pp., $39.95/£27.95 (cloth), ISBN 9780691143118......Review of: Keys to the City: How Economics, Institutions, Social Interaction, and Politics Shape Development / Michael Storper Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ, 2013, 288 pp., $39.95/£27.95 (cloth), ISBN 9780691143118...

  18. Scientific Component Technology Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohn, S; Bosl, B; Dahlgren, T; Kumfert, G; Smith, S

    2003-02-07

    The laboratory has invested a significant amount of resources towards the development of high-performance scientific simulation software, including numerical libraries, visualization, steering, software frameworks, and physics packages. Unfortunately, because this software was not designed for interoperability and re-use, it is often difficult to share these sophisticated software packages among applications due to differences in implementation language, programming style, or calling interfaces. This LDRD Strategic Initiative investigated and developed software component technology for high-performance parallel scientific computing to address problems of complexity, re-use, and interoperability for laboratory software. Component technology is an extension of scripting and object-oriented software development techniques that specifically focuses on the needs of software interoperability. Component approaches based on CORBA, COM, and Java technologies are widely used in industry; however, they do not support massively parallel applications in science and engineering. Our research focused on the unique requirements of scientific computing on ASCI-class machines, such as fast in-process connections among components, language interoperability for scientific languages, and data distribution support for massively parallel SPMD components.

  19. A Multi-Component Day-Camp Weight-Loss Program Is Effective in Reducing BMI in Children after One Year

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kristian Traberg; Huang, Tao; Ried-Larsen, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a one-year multi-component immersive day-camp weight-loss intervention for children with overweight and obesity. The study design was a parallel-group randomized controlled trial. One hundred fifteen 11-13-year-old children...... with overweight and obesity were randomized into either: A six-week day-camp intervention arm focusing on increased physical activity, and healthy diet followed by a subsequent one-year family-based intervention, or a standard intervention arm consisting of one weekly exercise session for six weeks. Body mass...

  20. The KiVa antibullying program in primary schools in Chile, with and without the digital game component: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Gaete, J; Valenzuela, D; Rojas-Barahona, C; Valenzuela, E.; Araya, R.; Salmivalli, C

    2017-01-01

    Background Bullying is a major problem worldwide and Chile is no exception. Bullying is defined as a systematic aggressive behavior against a victim who cannot defend him or herself. Victims suffer social isolation and psychological maladjustment, while bullies have a higher risk for conduct problems and substance use disorders. These problems appear to last over time. The KiVa antibullying program has been evaluated in Finland and other European countries, showing preventive effects on victi...

  1. Preventing Internalizing Problems in Young Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial of the Feelings and Friends (Year 3) Program with a Motor Skills Component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennant, Ruhamah G; Martin, Katie K; Rooney, Rosanna; Hassan, Sharinaz; Kane, Robert T

    2017-01-01

    Anxiety and depression are common mental health problems experienced by children in Australia. The impact of these internalizing disorders is pervasive, affecting many areas of life. By the time problems have been detected in children they can be severe in nature and harder to treat. Hence, early intervention is of utmost importance. Despite the existence of numerous prevention programs for children, there is limited empirical evidence for a program that has an impact on symptoms of both anxiety and depression. Physical activity and improved motor coordination have been indicated as having positive effects on children's mental health, although the impact of including these in a program targeting internalizing disorders has not been established. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of the Feelings and Friends (Year 3) program (FFY3), revised to include activities to build motor-coordination and encourage physical activity. Participants were 24 children from the Perth metropolitan area alongside one of each of their parents. Results indicated significant short-term intervention effects on one of the primary outcome variables; intervention group parents reported significant pre-post improvement in child depressive symptoms, which were maintained at 3-month follow-up (η p2 = 0.10). There were also intervention effects observed for parent-reported separation anxiety (η p2 = 0.10), externalizing symptoms (η p2 = 0.19), and conduct problems (η p2 = 0.16). An additional finding indicated the intervention students reported significant improvement from session one to session two in global distress (η p2 = 0.22). No other significant intervention effects were evident. Findings from this study indicate that FFY3 is a promising intervention to address internalizing and externalizing symptoms in 8-9 year-old children.

  2. The KiVa antibullying program in primary schools in Chile, with and without the digital game component: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaete, Jorge; Valenzuela, Daniela; Rojas-Barahona, Cristian; Valenzuela, Eduardo; Araya, Ricardo; Salmivalli, Christina

    2017-02-20

    Bullying is a major problem worldwide and Chile is no exception. Bullying is defined as a systematic aggressive behavior against a victim who cannot defend him or herself. Victims suffer social isolation and psychological maladjustment, while bullies have a higher risk for conduct problems and substance use disorders. These problems appear to last over time. The KiVa antibullying program has been evaluated in Finland and other European countries, showing preventive effects on victimization and self-reported bullying. The aims of this study are (1) to develop a culturally appropriate version of the KiVa material and (2) to test the effectiveness of the KiVa program, with and without the online game, on reducing experiences of victimization and bullying behavior among vulnerable primary schools in Santiago (Chile), using a cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT) design with three arms: (1) full KiVa program group, (2) partial KiVa (without online game) program group and (3) control group. This is a three-arm, single-blind, cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT) with a target enrolment of 1495 4th and 5th graders attending 13 vulnerable schools per arm. Students in the full and partial KiVa groups will receive universal actions: ten 2-h lessons delivered by trained teachers during 1 year; they will be exposed to posters encouraging them to support victims and behave constructively when witnessing bullying; and a person designated by the school authorities will be present in all school breaks and lunchtimes using a visible KiVa vest to remind everybody that they are in a KiVa school. KiVa schools also will have indicated actions, which consist of a set of discussion groups with the victims and with the bullies, with proper follow-up. Only full KiVa schools will also receive an online game which has the aim to raise awareness of the role of the group in bullying, increase empathy and promote strategies to support victimized peers. Self-reported victimization

  3. Development and pretest of key visual imagery in a campaign for the prevention of child maltreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charest, Émilie; Gagné, Marie-Hélène; Goulet, Julie

    2017-08-01

    This article discusses the development and pretesting of key visual imagery in a promotional campaign developed in Quebec, Canada. This campaign is the media-based component of a broader prevention strategy involving the use of the Triple P program (Sanders, 1999). The purpose was to pretest with parents the preliminary version of a poster that uses the campaign's key visual imagery prior to final production. In total, 26 parents from the regions of Quebec City and Montreal participated in four focus groups. Two general themes emerged from the focus groups: (i) emotions and reactions arising from the key visual imagery; and (ii) comprehension of the message being conveyed. Based on this information, recommendations were made to the marketing agency, which then modified the campaign's key visual imagery and proposed a final layout.

  4. Reactor Materials Program - Baseline Material Property Handbook - Mechanical Properties of 1950's Vintage Stainless Steel Weldment Components, Task Number 89-23-A-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoner, K.J.

    1999-11-05

    The Process Water System (primary coolant) piping of the nuclear production reactors constructed in the 1950''s at Savannah River Site is comprised primarily of Type 304 stainless steel with Type 308 stainless steel weld filler. A program to measure the mechanical properties of archival PWS piping and weld materials (having approximately six years of service at temperatures between 25 and 100 degrees C) has been completed. The results from the mechanical testing has been synthesized to provide a mechanical properties database for structural analyses of the SRS piping.

  5. Orientation: the key to successful, engaged staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackhurst, Kristi; Dowd, Terry

    2009-01-01

    Orientation programs are an important component of employee retention and engagement, yet the importance of orientation is often overlooked by many organizations. A lack of an adequate orientation program can result in new employees finding it difficult to adapt to the organization's culture,and may lead to high turnover rates. This article relates the story of Banner Baywood Medical Center's quest to cultivate an effective orientation program and increase retention of quality, engaged employees.

  6. Keys through ARQ

    CERN Document Server

    Latif, Mohamed Abdel; Gamal, Hesham El

    2009-01-01

    This paper develops a novel framework for sharing secret keys using the well-known Automatic Repeat reQuest (ARQ) protocol. The proposed key sharing protocol does not assume any prior knowledge about the channel state information (CSI), but, harnesses the available opportunistic secrecy gains using only the one bit feedback, in the form of ACK/NACK. The distribution of key bits among multiple ARQ epochs, in our approach, allows for mitigating the secrecy outage phenomenon observed in earlier works. We characterize the information theoretic limits of the proposed scheme, under different assumptions on the channel spatial and temporal correlation function, and develop low complexity explicit implementations. Our analysis reveals a novel role of "dumb antennas" in overcoming the negative impact of spatial correlation, between the legitimate and eavesdropper channels, on the achievable secrecy rates. We further develop an adaptive rate allocation policy which achieves higher secrecy rates by exploiting the channe...

  7. HERSCHEL KEY PROGRAM, ''DUST, ICE, AND GAS IN TIME'' (DIGIT): THE ORIGIN OF MOLECULAR AND ATOMIC EMISSION IN LOW-MASS PROTOSTARS IN TAURUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong-Eun; Lee, Seokho [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Kyung Hee University, Yongin-shi, Kyungki-do 449-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jinhee [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-2451 (United States); Evans II, Neal J.; Green, Joel D., E-mail: jeongeun.lee@khu.ac.kr [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, TX 78712-1205 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Six low-mass embedded sources (L1489, L1551-IRS5, TMR1, TMC1-A, L1527, and TMC1) in Taurus have been observed with Herschel-PACS to cover the full spectrum from 50 to 210 μm as part of the Herschel key program, ''Dust, Ice, and Gas In Time''. The relatively low intensity of the interstellar radiation field surrounding Taurus minimizes contamination of the [C II] emission associated with the sources by diffuse emission from the cloud surface, allowing study of the [C II] emission from the source. In several sources, the [C II] emission is distributed along the outflow, as is the [O I] emission. The atomic line luminosities correlate well with each other, as do the molecular lines, but the atomic and molecular lines correlate poorly. The relative contribution of CO to the total gas cooling is constant at ∼30%, while the cooling fraction by H{sub 2}O varies from source to source, suggesting different shock properties resulting in different photodissociation levels of H{sub 2}O. The gas with a power-law temperature distribution with a moderately high density can reproduce the observed CO fluxes, indicative of CO close to LTE. However, H{sub 2}O is mostly subthermally excited. L1551-IRS5 is the most luminous source (Ł{sub bol} = 24.5 L {sub ☉}) and the [O I] 63.1 μm line accounts for more than 70% of its FIR line luminosity, suggesting complete photodissociation of H{sub 2}O by a J shock. In L1551-IRS5, the central velocity shifts of the [O I] line, which exceed the wavelength calibration uncertainty (∼70 km s{sup –1}) of PACS, are consistent with the known redshifted and blueshifted outflow direction.

  8. Key World Energy Statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    The IEA produced its first handy, pocket-sized summary of key energy data in 1997. This new edition responds to the enormously positive reaction to the book since then. Key World Energy Statistics produced by the IEA contains timely, clearly-presented data on supply, transformation and consumption of all major energy sources. The interested businessman, journalist or student will have at his or her fingertips the annual Canadian production of coal, the electricity consumption in Thailand, the price of diesel oil in Spain and thousands of other useful energy facts. It exists in different formats to suit our readers' requirements.

  9. Advanced Power Electronics Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarze, Gene E.

    2004-01-01

    This paper will give a description and status of the Advanced Power Electronics Materials and Components Technology program being conducted by the NASA Glenn Research Center for future aerospace power applications. The focus of this research program is on the following: 1) New and/or significantly improved dielectric materials for the development of power capacitors with increased volumetric efficiency, energy density, and operating temperature. Materials being investigated include nanocrystalline and composite ceramic dielectrics and diamond-like carbon films; 2) New and/or significantly improved high frequency, high temperature, low loss soft magnetic materials for the development of transformers/inductors with increased power/energy density, electrical efficiency, and operating temperature. Materials being investigated include nanocrystalline and nanocomposite soft magnetic materials; 3) Packaged high temperature, high power density, high voltage, and low loss SiC diodes and switches. Development of high quality 4H- and 6H- SiC atomically smooth substrates to significantly improve device performance is a major emphasis of the SiC materials program; 4) Demonstration of high temperature (> 200 C) circuits using the components developed above.

  10. SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT – KEY FACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Daniela DINU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper exposes Supply Chain Management by its key factors. Briefly, where the Supply Chain Management is treated as strategic part of a company then maintaining both control and influence throughout the entire supply chain are key factors and critical to success. On the other hand, finding the right partner to manage the non-strategic Supply Chains would be another key factor too. To define the most important key factors within Supply Chain Management means a deeply understanding of both Supply Chain’ s components, procedures, workflow, processes and the importance of Supply Chain Management into maximizing company's value. SCORE model able to provide solid information about measuring performance and identifying priorities within Supply Chain Management will help us to understand the key factors by analyzing its elements: Plan, Source, Make, Deliver,Return, Enable. These elements covers all the challenging areas from first to third tier of Supply Chain Management.

  11. Keyed shear joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus

    This report gives a summary of the present information on the behaviour of vertical keyed shear joints in large panel structures. An attemp is made to outline the implications which this information might have on the analysis and design of a complete wall. The publications also gives a short...

  12. Cryptographic Key Management System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    No, author

    2014-02-21

    This report summarizes the outcome of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contract DE-OE0000543, requesting the design of a Cryptographic Key Management System (CKMS) for the secure management of cryptographic keys for the energy sector infrastructure. Prime contractor Sypris Electronics, in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL), Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Valicore Technologies, and Purdue University's Center for Education and Research in Information Assurance and Security (CERIAS) and Smart Meter Integration Laboratory (SMIL), has designed, developed and evaluated the CKMS solution. We provide an overview of the project in Section 3, review the core contributions of all contractors in Section 4, and discuss bene ts to the DOE in Section 5. In Section 6 we describe the technical construction of the CKMS solution, and review its key contributions in Section 6.9. Section 7 describes the evaluation and demonstration of the CKMS solution in different environments. We summarize the key project objectives in Section 8, list publications resulting from the project in Section 9, and conclude with a discussion on commercialization in Section 10 and future work in Section 11.

  13. Locks and Keys Service

    CERN Multimedia

    Claude Ducastel

    The GS-LS-SEM section is pleased to inform you that as from Monday 30 November 2009, the opening hours of the Locks and Keys service will be the following: 08h30 - 12h30 / 13h30 - 16:30, Mondays to Fridays. GS-SEM-LS 73333

  14. Key performance indicators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwetsloot, G.I.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses how organisations can use OSH performance indicators. This is an important way to mainstream OSH into business management. Key performance indicators (KPIs) should provide objective data on the OSH situation. It is often said that ‘what gets measured gets managed’. Without

  15. The diagnosis of turbine component degradation - case histories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubiak S, J. [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Morelos, Cuernavaca (Mexico). Centro de Investigacio en Ingeniera y Ciencias; Garcia-Gutierrez, A. [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas,Gerencia de Geotermia, Temixco (Mexico); Urquiza B, G. [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Gerencia de Turbomaquinaria, Temixco (Mexico)

    2002-12-01

    Four case histories of steam and gas turbine components degradation identified during operation and verified during overhaul are presented. The diagnosis was carried out before the overhauls to indicate major problems to the personnel of the plants. The estimation of degrees of degradation of the steam turbine components was carried out applying simplified flow equation considering three key pressures. In the case of the gas turbine the output capacity and pressures, temperature and air and gas flow were analyzed. The results obtained during on-line analysis were confirmed by measurements of the dimensions of degraded components during an overhaul. Also, the results obtained from a sophisticated computer program proved the usefulness of the applied methods.(author)

  16. Fibre optic communication key devices

    CERN Document Server

    Grote, Norbert

    2017-01-01

    The book gives an in-depth description of key devices of current and next generation fibre optic communication networks. Devices treated include semiconductor lasers, optical amplifiers, modulators, wavelength filters and other passives, detectors, all-optical switches, but relevant properties of optical fibres and network aspects are included as well. The presentations include the physical principles underlying the various devices, technologies used for their realization, typical performance characteristics and limitations, but development trends towards more advanced components are also illustrated. This new edition of a successful book was expanded and updated extensively. The new edition covers among others lasers for optical communication, optical switches, hybrid integration, monolithic integration and silicon photonics. The main focus is on Indium phosphide-based structures but silicon photonics is included as well. The book covers relevant principles, state-of-the-art implementations, status of curren...

  17. Physician Appraisals: Key Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klich Jacek

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of the article is to identify key criteria being used for physician appraisals and to find how communication skills of physicians are valued in those appraisals. ScienceDirect and EBSCOhost databases were used for this search. The results show that a physician appraisal is underestimated both theoretically and empirically. The particular gap exists with respect to the communication skills of physicians, which are rarely present in medical training syllabi and physician assessments. The article contributes to the theoretical discourse on physician appraisals and points out at the inconsistency between the high status of physicians as a key hospital resource on the one hand and, on the other hand, at inadequate and poorly researched assessment of their performance with a special emphasis on communication skills. The article may inspire health managers to develop and implement up-to-date assessment forms for physicians and good managerial practices in this respect in hospitals and other health care units.

  18. Ancel Keys: a tribute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VanItallie Theodore B

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ancel Keys, Ph.D., who died in November, 2004, at the age of 100, was among the first scientists to recognize that human atherosclerosis is not an inevitable consequence of aging, and that a high-fat diet can be a major risk factor for coronary heart disease. During World War II, he and a group of talented co-workers at the University of Minnesota conducted a large-scale study of experimentally-induced human starvation. The data generated by this study – which was immediately recognized to be a classic – continue to be of inestimable value to nutrition scientists. In his later years, Keys spent more time at his home in Naples, Italy, where he had the opportunity to continue his personal study of the beneficial effects on health and longevity of a Mediterranean diet.

  19. Chapter 06: Identification key

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex Wiedenhoeft

    2011-01-01

    The key is written to guide you through the identification process in the most efficient and accurate way possible. It presents you with a numbered series of questions and asks you to answer them. The answers you provide will be based on your interpretations of the anatomical characters in your unknown specimen and will lead you to a new set of questions. Each time you...

  20. Phylogenetic Co-Occurrence of ExoR, ExoS, and ChvI, Components of the RSI Bacterial Invasion Switch, Suggests a Key Adaptive Mechanism Regulating the Transition between Free-Living and Host-Invading Phases in Rhizobiales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Ellen Heavner

    Full Text Available Both bacterial symbionts and pathogens rely on their host-sensing mechanisms to activate the biosynthetic pathways necessary for their invasion into host cells. The Gram-negative bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti relies on its RSI (ExoR-ExoS-ChvI Invasion Switch to turn on the production of succinoglycan, an exopolysaccharide required for its host invasion. Recent whole-genome sequencing efforts have uncovered putative components of RSI-like invasion switches in many other symbiotic and pathogenic bacteria. To explore the possibility of the existence of a common invasion switch, we have conducted a phylogenomic survey of orthologous ExoR, ExoS, and ChvI tripartite sets in more than ninety proteobacterial genomes. Our analyses suggest that functional orthologs of the RSI invasion switch co-exist in Rhizobiales, an order characterized by numerous invasive species, but not in the order's close relatives. Phylogenomic analyses and reconstruction of orthologous sets of the three proteins in Alphaproteobacteria confirm Rhizobiales-specific gene synteny and congruent RSI evolutionary histories. Evolutionary analyses further revealed site-specific substitutions correlated specifically to either animal-bacteria or plant-bacteria associations. Lineage restricted conservation of any one specialized gene is in itself an indication of species adaptation. However, the orthologous phylogenetic co-occurrence of all interacting partners within this single signaling pathway strongly suggests that the development of the RSI switch was a key adaptive mechanism. The RSI invasion switch, originally found in S. meliloti, is a characteristic of the Rhizobiales, and potentially a conserved crucial activation step that may be targeted to control host invasion by pathogenic bacterial species.

  1. Key Concepts in Microbial Oceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, B. C.; Achilles, K.; Walker, G.; Weersing, K.; Team, A

    2008-12-01

    The Center for Microbial Oceanography: Research and Education (C-MORE) is a multi-institution Science and Technology Center, established by the National Science Foundation in 2006. C-MORE's research mission is to facilitate a more comprehensive understanding of the diverse assemblages of microorganisms in the sea, ranging from the genetic basis of marine microbial biogeochemistry including the metabolic regulation and environmental controls of gene expression, to the processes that underpin the fluxes of carbon, related bioelements, and energy in the marine environment. The C-MORE education and outreach program is focused on increasing scientific literacy in microbial oceanography among students, educators, and the general public. A first step toward this goal is defining the key concepts that constitute microbial oceanography. After lengthy discussions with scientists and educators, both within and outside C-MORE, we have arrived at six key concepts: 1) Marine microbes are very small and have been around for a long time; 2) Life on Earth could not exist without microbes; 3) Most marine microbes are beneficial; 4) Microbes are everywhere: they are extremely abundant and diverse; 5) Microbes significantly impact our global climate; and 6) There are new discoveries every day in the field of microbial oceanography. A C-MORE-produced brochure on these six key concepts will be distributed at the meeting. Advanced copies may be requested by email or downloaded from the C-MORE web site(http://cmore.soest.hawaii.edu/downloads/MO_key_concepts_hi-res.pdf). This brochure also includes information on career pathways in microbial oceanography, with the aim of broadening participation in the field. C-MORE is eager to work in partnership to incorporate these key concepts into other science literacy publications, particularly those involving ocean and climate literacy. We thank the following contributors and reviewers: P Chisholm, A Dolberry, and A Thompson (MIT); N Lawrence

  2. Human Reliability Program Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodin, Michael

    2012-09-25

    This presentation covers the high points of the Human Reliability Program, including certification/decertification, critical positions, due process, organizational structure, program components, personnel security, an overview of the US DOE reliability program, retirees and academia, and security program integration.

  3. Radiology Aide. Instructor Key [and] Student Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwein, Jon; Dunham, John

    This manual can be used independently by students in secondary health occupations programs or by persons receiving on-the-job training in a radiology department. The manual includes an instructor's key that provides answers to the activity sheets and unit evaluations. The manual consists of the following five units: (1) orientation to radiology;…

  4. Number Theory and Public-Key Cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefton, Phyllis

    1991-01-01

    Described are activities in the study of techniques used to conceal the meanings of messages and data. Some background information and two BASIC programs that illustrate the algorithms used in a new cryptographic system called "public-key cryptography" are included. (CW)

  5. Five Keys for Teaching Mental Math

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, James R.

    2015-01-01

    After studying the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM) and brain-based learning research, James Olsen believes mental math instruction in secondary school mathematics (grades 7-12) and in teacher education programs needs increased attention. The purpose of this article is to share some keys for teaching mental math. Olsen also…

  6. Pacific Reef Assessment and Monitoring Program: Towed-diver Surveys of Benthic Habitat, Key Benthic Species, including Marine Debris Sightings, of the U.S. Pacific Reefs from 2000 to 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The towed-diver method is used to conduct benthic surveys, assessing large-scale disturbances (e.g., bleaching) and quantifying benthic components such as habitat...

  7. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Towed-diver Surveys of Benthic Habitats, Key Benthic Species, and Marine Debris Sightings of the Pacific Remote Island Areas from 2017-04-02 to 2017-04-20 (NCEI Accession 0164023)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The towed-diver method is used to conduct benthic surveys, assessing large-scale disturbances (e.g., bleaching) and quantifying benthic components such as habitat...

  8. Pacific Reef Assessment and Monitoring Program: Towed-diver Surveys of Benthic Habitats, Key Benthic Species, and Marine Debris Sightings of the U.S. Pacific Reefs from 2000-09-09 to 2012-05-19 (NCEI Accession 0163745)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The towed-diver method is used to conduct benthic surveys, assessing large-scale disturbances (e.g., bleaching) and quantifying benthic components such as habitat...

  9. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Towed-diver Surveys of Benthic Habitat, Key Benthic Species, including Marine Debris Sightings, of the Pacific Remote Island Areas from 2015-01-26 to 2015-04-26 (NCEI Accession 0157564)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The towed-diver method is used to conduct benthic surveys, assessing large-scale disturbances (e.g., bleaching) and quantifying benthic components such as habitat...

  10. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Towed-diver Surveys of Benthic Habitat, Key Benthic Species, including Marine Debris Sightings, of American Samoa from 2015-02-15 to 2015-03-23 (NCEI Accession 0157566)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The towed-diver method is used to conduct benthic surveys, assessing large-scale disturbances (e.g., bleaching) and quantifying benthic components such as habitat...

  11. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Towed-diver Surveys of Benthic Habitat, Key Benthic Species, including Marine Debris Sightings, of the Hawaiian Archipelago from 2016-07-13 to 2016-09-26 (NCEI Accession 0157565)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The towed-diver method is used to conduct benthic surveys, assessing large-scale disturbances (e.g., bleaching) and quantifying benthic components such as habitat...

  12. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Towed-diver Surveys of Benthic Habitats, Key Benthic Species, and Marine Debris Sightings of the Mariana Archipelago from 2017-05-04 to 2017-06-20 (NCEI Accession 0166629)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The towed-diver method is used to conduct benthic surveys, assessing large-scale disturbances (e.g., bleaching) and quantifying benthic components such as habitat...

  13. The Top 30 Rising Stars Program: an inter-organizational approach to leadership succession planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilworth, Katie; Lankshear, Sara; Cava, Maureen; Aldred, Jacqueline; Hawkes, Nancy; Lefebre, Nancy; Price, Jennifer; Lawler, Valerie

    2011-01-01

    An effective leadership development program is an organizational investment that advances individual performance while strengthening organizational capabilities. The Top 30 Rising Stars Program is a leadership succession program designed to enable leadership capacity building within and across organizations. Key components of the program include formal learning, stretch opportunities, and mentorship. Evaluation results reveal high participant satisfaction and an increase in reported self-confidence in their ability to assume a formal leadership position.

  14. Using program impact pathways to understand and improve program delivery, utilization, and potential for impact of Helen Keller International's homestead food production program in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olney, Deanna K; Vicheka, Sao; Kro, Meng; Chakriya, Chhom; Kroeun, Hou; Hoing, Ly Sok; Talukder, Aminzzaman; Quinn, Victoria; Iannotti, Lora; Becker, Elisabeth; Roopnaraine, Terry

    2013-06-01

    Evidence of the impact of homestead food production programs on nutrition outcomes such as anemia and growth is scant. In the absence of information on program impact pathways, it is difficult to understand why these programs, which have been successful in increasing intake of micronutrient-rich foods, have had such limited documented impact on nutrition outcomes. To conduct a process evaluation of Helen Keller International's (HKI's) homestead food production program in Cambodia to assess whether the program was operating as planned (in terms of design, delivery, and utilization) and to identify ways in which the program might need to be strengthened in order to increase its potential for impact. A program theory framework, which laid out the primary components along the hypothesized program impact pathways, was developed in collaboration with HKI and used to design the research. Semistructured interviews and focus group discussions with program beneficiaries (n = 36 and 12, respectively), nonbeneficiaries (n = 12), and program implementers (n = 17 and 2, respectively) and observations of key program delivery points, including health and nutrition training sessions (n = 6), village model farms (n = 6), and household gardens of beneficiaries (n = 36) and nonbeneficiaries (n = 12), were conducted to assess the delivery and utilization of the primary program components along the impact pathways. The majority of program components were being delivered and utilized as planned. However, challenges with some of the key components posited to improve outcomes such as anemia and growth were noted. Among these were a gap in the expected pathway from poultry production to increased intake of eggs and poultry meat, and some weaknesses in the delivery of the health and nutrition training sessions and related improvements in knowledge among the village health volunteers and beneficiaries. Although the program has been successful in delivering the majority of the program

  15. Commercial Off-the-Shelf (COTS) Components and Enterprise Component Information System (eCIS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Minihan; Ed Schmidt; Greg Enserro; Melissa Thompson

    2008-06-30

    The purpose of the project was to develop the processes for using commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) parts for WR production and to put in place a system for implementing the data management tools required to disseminate, store, track procurement, and qualify vendors. Much of the effort was devoted to determining if the use of COTS parts was possible. A basic question: How does the Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) begin to use COTS in the weapon Stockpile Life Extension Programs with high reliability, affordability, while managing risk at acceptable levels? In FY00, it was determined that a certain weapon refurbishment program could not be accomplished without the use of COTS components. The elements driving the use of COTS components included decreased cost, greater availability, and shorter delivery time. Key factors that required implementation included identifying the best suppliers and components, defining life cycles and predictions of obsolescence, testing the feasibility of using COTS components with a test contractor to ensure capability, as well as quality and reliability, and implementing the data management tools required to disseminate, store, track procurement, and qualify vendors. The primary effort of this project then was to concentrate on the risks involved in the use of COTS and address the issues of part and vendor selection, procurement and acceptance processes, and qualification of the parts via part and sample testing. The Enterprise Component Information System (eCIS) was used to manage the information generated by the COTS process. eCIS is a common interface for both the design and production of NWC components and systems integrating information between SNL National Laboratory (SNL) and the Kansas City Plant (KCP). The implementation of COTS components utilizes eCIS from part selection through qualification release. All part related data is linked across an unclassified network for access by both SNL and KCP personnel. The system includes not

  16. Sexual Harassment on Campus: ACE Revises Its Model Policy and Program on Deterrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Business Officer, 1993

    1993-01-01

    The American Council on Education's recently revised statement on sexual harassment on college campuses discusses the importance of developing a campus program, outlines key components of such a program, defines sexual harassment, and offers guidelines for developing school policy. Need for prevention, grievance procedures, and due process are…

  17. The Growth of River Kayaking and Its Indirect Effect on Institutional Whitewater Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Geoff

    Historically, whitewater kayaking has been a key component of some institutional outdoor programs, offering low-cost instruction that emphasizes safety, skill, and the spirit of down-river travel. Each year, several thousand students are introduced to the sport of kayaking through instructional seminars offered by university outdoor programs.…

  18. Weldbond Flight Component Design/Manufacturing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-12-01

    Element Analysis Preliminary analysis of bondline stresses was performed using Lockheed-Georgia Company’s Flutter and Matrix Algebra System (FAMAS...inspection and then removed. A lineal inspection rate of eight feet per minute is a potential advantage in using the TIRIS infrared system for

  19. Reserve Component Programs Fiscal Year 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-04-01

    conversion of the second C-130 unit Force Reserve F-4 units would from C-130s to C-5s. These two units modernize to the F-16A/B by FY 1991. at Kelly AFB...Staff Directors Colonel Michael D. Brownell Captain Donald C. Gillies Colonel Billy R. Lingo US Army Reserve US Naval Reserve US Air Force Reserve Colonel

  20. Reserve Component Programs, Fiscal Year 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-02-28

    1991 Resere Forces Policy Board 1 ŝ * Kelly , Ambassador John H. * Nelson, Major General Fred R., USAF Assistant Secretary of State for Deputy Chief of...Michael D, Brownell Captain Mileva M. Hartman Colonel Robert M. RlFhards, Jr. U.S. Army Reserve U.S. Naval Reserve U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Enlisted

  1. 24 CFR 585.3 - Program components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... individuals with limited English proficiency, secondary educational services and activities designed to lead... construction terminology and concepts; and (3) Strategies to coordinate with local trade unions and... business development; (2) Assistance to correct learning disabilities; or (3) Drivers' education courses...

  2. TRANSITIONAL JUSTICE AND DEMOCRATIC CHANGE: KEY CONCEPTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELENA ANDREEVSKA

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This Article proposes a genealogy of transitional justice and focuses on transitional justice as one of the key steps in peace building that needs to be taken to secure a stable democratic futureTransitional justice is a response to systematic or widespread violations of human rights. It seeks recognition for victims and promotion of possibilities for peace, reconciliation and democracy. The paper focuses on key concepts of transitional justice before addressing its traditional components: justice, reparation, truth and institutional reform. This Article meeting point on the transitional process in a society which has experienced a violent conflict and needs adequate mechanisms to deal with the legacies of the past in order to prevent future violence and cover the way for reconciliation and democratic consolidation. It provides key stakeholders with an overview of transitional justice and its different components, while examining key challenges faced by those working in this area. The present paper concludes with some remarks that challenge the traditional concept of transitional justice and its processes in order to initiate important debate on where future work in this field is needed.

  3. PERBANDINGAN APLIKASI MENGGUNAKAN METODE CAMELLIA 128 BIT KEY DAN 256 BIT KEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanny Sutanto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development of the Internet today to easily exchange data. This leads to high levels of risk in the data piracy. One of the ways to secure data is using cryptography camellia. Camellia is known as a method that has the encryption and decryption time is fast. Camellia method has three kinds of scale key is 128 bit, 192 bit, and 256 bit.This application is created using the C++ programming language and using visual studio 2010 GUI. This research compare the smallest and largest key size used on the file extension .Txt, .Doc, .Docx, .Jpg, .Mp4, .Mkv and .Flv. This application is made to comparing time and level of security in the use of 128-bit key and 256 bits. The comparison is done by comparing the results of the security value of avalanche effect 128 bit key and 256 bit key.

  4. Advanced Optoelectronic Components for All-Optical Networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shapiro, Jeffrey H

    2002-01-01

    Under APOSR Grant F49620-96-1-0126, 'Advanced Optoelectronic Components for All-Optical Networks', we have worked to develop key technologies and components to substantially improve the performance...

  5. Mechanical design of machine components

    CERN Document Server

    Ugural, Ansel C

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical Design of Machine Components, Second Edition strikes a balance between theory and application, and prepares students for more advanced study or professional practice. It outlines the basic concepts in the design and analysis of machine elements using traditional methods, based on the principles of mechanics of materials. The text combines the theory needed to gain insight into mechanics with numerical methods in design. It presents real-world engineering applications, and reveals the link between basic mechanics and the specific design of machine components and machines. Divided into three parts, this revised text presents basic background topics, deals with failure prevention in a variety of machine elements and covers applications in design of machine components as well as entire machines. Optional sections treating special and advanced topics are also included.Key Features of the Second Edition:Incorporates material that has been completely updated with new chapters, problems, practical examples...

  6. Sets, Subsets, and Dichotomous Keys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, E. James

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the procedures that should be observed in constructing a dichotomous key. The keying exercise described was used as a laboratory activity in a biology course for elementary education majors, however it could be used in other courses. (JR)

  7. Component technology for Stirling power converters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thieme, L.G.

    1994-09-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center has organized a component technology program as part of the efforts to develop Stirling converter technology for space power applications. The Stirling space power program is part of the NASA High Capacity Power Project of the Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). NASA Lewis is also providing technical management for a DOE/Sandia program to develop Stirling converters for solar terrestrial power producing electricity for the utility grid. The primary contractors for the space power and solar terrestrial programs develop component technologies directly related to their program goals. This Lewis component technology effort, while coordinated with the main programs, aims at longer term issues, advanced technologies, and independent assessments. This paper will present an overview of work on linear alternators, engine/alternator/load interactions and controls, heat exchangers, materials, life and reliability, and bearings.

  8. Key Concepts in Informatics: Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szlávi, Péter; Zsakó, László

    2014-01-01

    "The system of key concepts contains the most important key concepts related to the development tasks of knowledge areas and their vertical hierarchy as well as the links of basic key concepts of different knowledge areas." (Vass 2011) One of the most important of these concepts is the algorithm. In everyday life, when learning or…

  9. Secret-key certificates (continued)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.A. Brands (Stefan)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractA new construction is described for designing secret-key certificate schemes based on signature schemes other than of the Fiat-Shamir type. Also described are practical secret-key certificate issuing protocols that enable the Certification Authority to certify public keys, without being

  10. Formal Component-Based Semantics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Madlener

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the proposed solutions for improving the scalability of semantics of programming languages is Component-Based Semantics, introduced by Peter D. Mosses. It is expected that this framework can also be used effectively for modular meta theoretic reasoning. This paper presents a formalization of Component-Based Semantics in the theorem prover Coq. It is based on Modular SOS, a variant of SOS, and makes essential use of dependent types, while profiting from type classes. This formalization constitutes a contribution towards modular meta theoretic formalizations in theorem provers. As a small example, a modular proof of determinism of a mini-language is developed.

  11. Enhanced Usage of Keys Obtained by Physical, Unconditionally Secure Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kish, Laszlo B.; Granqvist, Claes-Göran

    2015-04-01

    Unconditionally secure physical key distribution schemes are very slow, and it is practically impossible to use a one-time-pad based cipher to guarantee unconditional security for the encryption of data because using the key bits more than once gives out statistical information, for example via the known-plain-text-attack or by utilizing known components of the protocol and language statistics. Here, we outline a protocol that reduces this speed problem and allows almost-one-time-pad based communication with an unconditionally secure physical key of finite length. The physical, unconditionally secure key is not used for data encryption but is employed in order to generate and share a new software-based key without any known-plain-text component. The software-only-based key distribution is then changed from computationally secure to unconditionally secure, because the communicated key-exchange data (algorithm parameters, one-way functions of random numbers, etc.) are encrypted in an unconditionally secure way with a one-time-pad. For practical applications, this combined physical/software key distribution based communication looks favorable compared to the software-only and physical-only key distribution based communication whenever the speed of the physical key distribution is much lower than that of the software-based key distribution. A mathematical security proof of this new scheme remains an open problem.

  12. CPR: Key to Cardiac Consciousness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyner, Gerald C.; Box, Colin E.

    1980-01-01

    Recommendations are made for improving certification standards for programs providing training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Training techniques, cost effectiveness, and teachers for CPR programs are discussed. (JD)

  13. Variability and component composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. van der Storm (Tijs)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIn component-based product populations, feature models have to be described at the component level to be able to benefit from a product family approach. As a consequence, composition of components becomes very complex. We describe how component-level variability can be managed in the

  14. Mitigating component performance variation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gara, Alan G.; Sylvester, Steve S.; Eastep, Jonathan M.; Nagappan, Ramkumar; Cantalupo, Christopher M.

    2018-01-09

    Apparatus and methods may provide for characterizing a plurality of similar components of a distributed computing system based on a maximum safe operation level associated with each component and storing characterization data in a database and allocating non-uniform power to each similar component based at least in part on the characterization data in the database to substantially equalize performance of the components.

  15. Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sottile, Matthew [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States)

    2010-06-30

    The UO portion of the larger TASCS project was focused on the usability subproject identified in the original project proposal. The key usability issue that we tacked was that of supporting legacy code developers in migrating to a component-oriented design pattern and development model with minimal manual labor. It was observed during the lifetime of the TASCS (and previous CCA efforts) that more often than not, users would arrive with existing code that was developed previous to their exposure to component design methods. As such, they were faced with the task of both learning the CCA toolchain and at the same time, manually deconstructing and reassembling their existing code to fit the design constraints imposed by components. This was a common complaint (and occasional reason for a user to abandon components altogether), so our task was to remove this manual labor as much as possible to lessen the burden placed on the end-user when adopting components for existing codes. To accomplish this, we created a source-based static analysis tool that used code annotations to drive code generation and transformation operations. The use of code annotations is due to one of the key technical challenges facing this work programming languages are limited in the degree to which application-specific semantics can be represented in code. For example, data types are often ambiguous. The C pointer is the most common example cited in practice. Given a pointer to a location in memory, should it be interpreted as a singleton or an array. If it is to be interpreted as an array, how many dimensions does the array have? What are their extents? The annotation language that we designed and implemented addresses this ambiguity issue by allowing users to decorate their code in places where ambiguity exists in order to guide tools to interpret what the programmer really intends.

  16. Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Mathew Sottile

    2010-06-30

    The UO portion of the larger TASCS project was focused on the usability subproject identified in the original project proposal. The key usability issue that we tacked was that of supporting legacy code developers in migrating to a component-oriented design pattern and development model with minimal manual labor. It was observed during the lifetime of the TASCS (and previous CCA efforts) that more often than not, users would arrive with existing code that was developed previous to their exposure to component design methods. As such, they were faced with the task of both learning the CCA toolchain and at the same time, manually deconstructing and reassembling their existing code to fit the design constraints imposed by components. This was a common complaint (and occasional reason for a user to abandon components altogether), so our task was to remove this manual labor as much as possible to lessen the burden placed on the end-user when adopting components for existing codes. To accomplish this, we created a source-based static analysis tool that used code annotations to drive code generation and transformation operations. The use of code annotations is due to one of the key technical challenges facing this work | programming languages are limited in the degree to which application-specific semantics can be represented in code. For example, data types are often ambiguous. The C pointer is the most common example cited in practice. Given a pointer to a location in memory, should it be interpreted as a singleton or an array. If it is to be interpreted as an array, how many dimensions does the array have? What are their extents? The annotation language that we designed and implemented addresses this ambiguity issue by allowing users to decorate their code in places where ambiguity exists in order to guide tools to interpret what the programmer really intends.

  17. Secure key storage and distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Punit

    2015-06-02

    This disclosure describes a distributed, fault-tolerant security system that enables the secure storage and distribution of private keys. In one implementation, the security system includes a plurality of computing resources that independently store private keys provided by publishers and encrypted using a single security system public key. To protect against malicious activity, the security system private key necessary to decrypt the publication private keys is not stored at any of the computing resources. Rather portions, or shares of the security system private key are stored at each of the computing resources within the security system and multiple security systems must communicate and share partial decryptions in order to decrypt the stored private key.

  18. Near-term hybrid vehicle program, phase 1. Appendix B: Design trade-off studies. [various hybrid/electric power train configurations and electrical and mechanical drive-line components

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    The relative attractiveness of various hybrid/electric power train configurations and electrical and mechanical drive-line components was studied. The initial screening was concerned primarily with total vehicle weight and economic factors and identified the hybrid power train combinations which warranted detailed evaluation over various driving cycles. This was done using a second-by-second vehicle simulation program which permitted the calculations of fuel economy, electricity usage, and emissions as a function of distance traveled in urban and highway driving. Power train arrangement possibilities were examined in terms of their effect on vehicle handling, safety, serviceability, and passenger comfort. A dc electric drive system utilizing a separately excited motor with field control and battery switching was selected for the near term hybrid vehicle. Hybrid vehicle simulations showed that for the first 30 mi (the electric range of the vehicle) in urban driving, the fuel economy was 80 mpg using a gasoline engine and 100 mpg using a diesel engine. In urban driving the hybrid would save about 75% of the fuel used by the conventional vehicle and in combined urban/highway driving the fuel saving is about 50%.

  19. The Efficacy of Key Performance Indicators in Ontario Universities as Perceived by Key Informants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Vivian

    2015-01-01

    The Ontario Ministry of Education and Training's Task Force on University Accountability first proposed key performance indicators (KPIs) for colleges and universities in Ontario in the early 1990s. The three main KPIs for Ontario universities are the rates of (1) graduation, (2) employment, and (3) Ontario Student Assistance Program loan default.…

  20. Components Needed to Support Graduate Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casarett, Alison

    1989-01-01

    Faculty involvement, research, and formal instruction are described as components of graduate education. The process of doctoral education and an outline of a doctoral program at Cornell University in the Division of Nutritional Sciences are discussed. (MLW)