WorldWideScience

Sample records for program interactive paired-function

  1. Programming Interactivity

    CERN Document Server

    Noble, Joshua

    2009-01-01

    Make cool stuff. If you're a designer or artist without a lot of programming experience, this book will teach you to work with 2D and 3D graphics, sound, physical interaction, and electronic circuitry to create all sorts of interesting and compelling experiences -- online and off. Programming Interactivity explains programming and electrical engineering basics, and introduces three freely available tools created specifically for artists and designers: Processing, a Java-based programming language and environment for building projects on the desktop, Web, or mobile phonesArduino, a system t

  2. Programming Interactivity

    CERN Document Server

    Noble, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    Ready to create rich interactive experiences with your artwork, designs, or prototypes? This is the ideal place to start. With this hands-on guide, you'll explore several themes in interactive art and design-including 3D graphics, sound, physical interaction, computer vision, and geolocation-and learn the basic programming and electronics concepts you need to implement them. No previous experience is necessary. You'll get a complete introduction to three free tools created specifically for artists and designers: the Processing programming language, the Arduino microcontroller, and the openFr

  3. Computer Assistance for Writing Interactive Programs: TICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplow, Ray; And Others

    1973-01-01

    A description of an on-line and interactive programing system (TICS - Teacher-Interactive-Computer-System), which is aimed at facilitating the authoring of interactive, instructional computer programs by persons who are experts on the subject matter being addressed, but not necessarily programers. (Author)

  4. Multiobjective Interaction Programming Problem with Interaction Constraint for Two Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Jiang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper extends an existing cooperative multi-objective interaction programming problem with interaction constraint for two players (or two agents. First, we define an s-optimal joint solution with weight vector to multi-objective interaction programming problem with interaction constraint for two players and get some properties of it. It is proved that the s-optimal joint solution with weight vector to the multi-objective interaction programming problem can be obtained by solving a corresponding mathematical programming problem. Then, we define another s-optimal joint solution with weight value to multi-objective interaction programming problem with interaction constraint for two players and get some of its properties. It is proved that the s-optimal joint solution with weight vector to multi-objective interaction programming problem can be obtained by solving a corresponding mathematical programming problem. Finally, we build a pricing multi-objective interaction programming model for a bi-level supply chain. Numerical results show that the interaction programming pricing model is better than Stackelberg pricing model and the joint pricing model.

  5. An interactive program on digitizing historical seismograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yihe; Xu, Tao

    2014-02-01

    Retrieving information from analog seismograms is of great importance since they are considered as the unique sources that provide quantitative information of historical earthquakes. We present an algorithm for automatic digitization of the seismograms as an inversion problem that forms an interactive program using Matlab® GUI. The program integrates automatic digitization with manual digitization and users can easily switch between the two modalities and carry out different combinations for the optimal results. Several examples about applying the interactive program are given to illustrate the merits of the method.

  6. Material Programming: A New Interaction Design Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vallgårda, Anna; Boer, Laurens; Tsaknaki, Vasiliki

    2016-01-01

    We propose the notion of material programming as a new practice for designing future interactive artifacts. Material programming would be a way for the interaction designer to better explore the dynamics of the materials at hand and through that familiarity be able to compose more sophisticated...... and complex temporal forms in their designs. As such it would blur the boundaries between programming and crafting these new smart and computational materials. We envision a material programming practice developed around physical tools (e.g. Fig 1) that draw on bodily skills and experiences (Fig 2) while...... enabling actions performed directly on the material with immediate effects (no program vs. execution mode). Finally, the tools would enable one layer of abstraction and as such encompass the potential of the computational materials but not that of possibly adjacent computers, which could run more complex...

  7. Rocket Science 101 Interactive Educational Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Dennis; Funkhouse, Deborah; DiMarzio, Donald

    2007-01-01

    To better educate the public on the basic design of NASA s current mission rockets, Rocket Science 101 software has been developed as an interactive program designed to retain a user s attention and to teach about basic rocket parts. This program also has helped to expand NASA's presence on the Web regarding educating the public about the Agency s goals and accomplishments. The software was designed using Macromedia s Flash 8. It allows the user to select which type of rocket they want to learn about, interact with the basic parts, assemble the parts to create the whole rocket, and then review the basic flight profile of the rocket they have built.

  8. Interactive data manipulation program FAWTEK user guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyer, W.B.

    1977-02-01

    The interactive data acquisitio and manipulation program FAWTEK is described. The program allows users of the electron beam data acquisition facility to control the R7912 digitizers and to perform a variety of mathematical operations on data arrays. Commands are entered in a high-level language via a Tektronix 4010 terminal console. Each command directive, aling with its associated parameters, is described in detail.

  9. Towards Interactive, Incremental Programming of ROS Nodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adam, Marian Sorin; Schultz, Ulrik Pagh

    Writing software for controlling robots is a complex task, usually demanding command of many programming languages and requiring significant experimentation. We believe that a bottom-up development process that complements traditional component- and MDSD-based approaches can facilitate...... experimentation. We propose the use of an internal DSL providing both a tool to interactively create ROS nodes and a behaviour-replacement mechanism to interactively reshape existing ROS nodes by wrapping the external interfaces (the publish/subscribe topics), dynamically controlled using the Python command line...

  10. An Interactive Program on Digitizing Historical Seismograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y.; Xu, T.

    2013-12-01

    Retrieving information from historical seismograms is of great importance since they are considered the unique sources that provide quantitative information of historical earthquakes. Modern techniques of seismology require digital forms of seismograms that are essentially a sequence of time-amplitude pairs. However, the historical seismograms, after scanned into computers, are two dimensional arrays. Each element of the arrays contains the grayscale value or RGB value of the corresponding pixel. The problem of digitizing historical seismograms, referred to as converting historical seismograms to digital seismograms, can be formulated as an inverse problem that generating sequences of time-amplitude pairs from a two dimension arrays. This problem has infinite solutions. The algorithm for automatic digitization of historical seismogram presented considers several features of seismograms, including continuity, smoothness of the seismic traces as the prior information, and assumes that the amplitude is a single-valued function of time. An interactive program based on the algorithm is also presented. The program is developed using Matlab GUI and has both automatic and manual modality digitization. Users can easily switch between them, and try different combinations to get the optimal results. Several examples are given to illustrate the results of digitizing seismograms using the program, including a photographic record and a wide-angle reflection/refraction seismogram. Digitized result of the program (redrawn using Golden Software Surfer for high resolution image). (a) shows the result of automatic digitization, and (b) is the result after manual correction.

  11. An Interactive Graphics Program for Investigating Digital Signal Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Billy K.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes development of an interactive computer graphics program for use in teaching digital signal processing. The program allows students to interactively configure digital systems on a monitor display and observe their system's performance by means of digital plots on the system's outputs. A sample program run is included. (JN)

  12. General purpose computer program for interacting supersonic configurations: Programmer's manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crill, W.; Dale, B.

    1977-01-01

    The program ISCON (Interacting Supersonic Configuration) is described. The program is in support of the problem to generate a numerical procedure for determining the unsteady dynamic forces on interacting wings and tails in supersonic flow. Subroutines are presented along with the complete FORTRAN source listing.

  13. Applications of interactive television to prevention programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, C

    1982-01-01

    The development of interactive television provides expanded opportunities for prevention research and practice. Three key prevention strategies are (1) intervening with populations at risk, (2) training caregivers, and (3) building competent communities. This paper describes these applications of interactive television. Three interactive systems--Berks Community Television in Reading, Pennsylvania; QUBE in Columbus, Ohio; and Hi-Ovis in Japan--are discussed in the context of their contributions to the promotion of competent communities.

  14. Interactive Programming Support for Secure Software Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Software vulnerabilities originating from insecure code are one of the leading causes of security problems people face today. Unfortunately, many software developers have not been adequately trained in writing secure programs that are resistant from attacks violating program confidentiality, integrity, and availability, a style of programming…

  15. Interactive Industrial Robot Programming for the Ceramic Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germano Veiga

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an interactive programming method for programming industrial robots in ceramic applications. The main purpose was to develop a simple but flexible programming system that empowers the user with product driven programming without compromising flexibility. To achieve this flexibility, a two step hybrid programming model was designed: first the user sketches the desired trajectory in a spatial augmented reality programming table using the final product and then relies on an advanced 3D graphical system to tune the robot trajectory in the final workcell. The results measured by the end-user feedback show that a new level of flexibility was reached for this type of application.

  16. Interactive Multidimensional Programming; Models for Locational Decision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Nijkamp (Peter); J. Spronk (Jaap)

    1981-01-01

    textabstractThe paper is devoted to an extension of traditional location theory in two directions. First, the usual assumption of a single cost function will be abandoned by introducing multiple objectives. This gives rise to a multidimensional programming framework for the traditional location

  17. EZLP: An Interactive Computer Program for Solving Linear Programming Problems. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, John J.; And Others

    Designed for student use in solving linear programming problems, the interactive computer program described (EZLP) permits the student to input the linear programming model in exactly the same manner in which it would be written on paper. This report includes a brief review of the development of EZLP; narrative descriptions of program features,…

  18. Instructional format and segment length in interactive video programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, Pleunes Willem; Breman, Jeroen; Breman, Jeroen; Simonson, Michael R.; Anderson, Mary Lagomarcino

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gather further insight into a previous investigation of the relationship between self-chosen and program-controlled segment length of an interactive videodisk program, and performance on post- and retention tests. The initial study by Verhagen, which questioned what

  19. Dolphin shows and interaction programs: benefits for conservation education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, L J; Zeigler-Hill, V; Mellen, J; Koeppel, J; Greer, T; Kuczaj, S

    2013-01-01

    Dolphin shows and dolphin interaction programs are two types of education programs within zoological institutions used to educate visitors about dolphins and the marine environment. The current study examined the short- and long-term effects of these programs on visitors' conservation-related knowledge, attitude, and behavior. Participants of both dolphin shows and interaction programs demonstrated a significant short-term increase in knowledge, attitudes, and behavioral intentions. Three months following the experience, participants of both dolphin shows and interaction programs retained the knowledge learned during their experience and reported engaging in more conservation-related behaviors. Additionally, the number of dolphin shows attended in the past was a significant predictor of recent conservation-related behavior suggesting that repetition of these types of experiences may be important in inspiring people to conservation action. These results suggest that both dolphin shows and dolphin interaction programs can be an important part of a conservation education program for visitors of zoological facilities. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. [Maternal-placental interactions and fetal programming].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadyrov, M; Moser, G; Rath, W; Kweider, N; Wruck, C J; Pufe, T; Huppertz, B

    2013-06-01

    Pregnancy-related complications not only represent a risk for maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality, but are also a risk for several diseases later in life. Many epidemiological studies have shown clear associations between an adverse intrauterine environment and an increased risk of diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, depression, obesity, and other chronic diseases in the adult. Some of these syndromes could be prevented by avoiding adverse stimuli or insults including psychological stress during pregnancy, intake of drugs, insufficient diet and substandard working conditions. Hence, all of these stimuli have the potential to alter health later in life. The placenta plays a key role in regulating the nutrient supply to the fetus and producing hormones that control the fetal as well as the maternal metabolism. Thus, any factor or stimulus that alters the function of the hormone producing placental trophoblast will provoke critical alterations of placental function and hence could induce programming of the fetus. The factors that change placental development may interfere with nutrient and oxygen supply to the fetus. This may be achieved by a direct disturbance of the placental barrier or more indirectly by, e. g., disturbing trophoblast invasion. For both path-ways, the respective pathologies are known: while preeclampsia is caused by alterations of the villous trophoblast, intra-uterine growth restriction is caused by insufficient invasion of the extravillous trophoblast. In both cases the effect can be undernutrition and/or fetal hypoxia, both of which adversely affect organ development, especially of brain and heart. However, the mechanisms responsible for disturbances of trophoblast differentiation and function remain elusive. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Evaluation of resources for an interactive infection control instructional program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Kandis V

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate educational resources used in developing and implementing an interactive infection control instructional program for first year (n=26) and second year (n=26) dental hygiene students in a baccalaureate program. An educator's toolkit was used to develop online and interactive learning modalities for teaching infection control content. Descriptive statistics were used to evaluate responses on a post instruction opinion survey on a 5-point Likert-type scale. Following the instructional program, most students reported on an opinion survey that they understood infection control principles (92% first year, 100% second year), felt prepared to work safely in clinic (96% first year, 100% second year) and liked working at their own pace (88% first year, 100% second year). First year students valued the online learning components and were less favorable toward supplemental textbook readings and the limited time to complete all 10 modules. Most second year students valued the interactive workshop but did not take the time to complete the online videos and did not watch all of them. Seventy-nine percent of second year students (n=20) preferred the interactive workshop method over traditional lecture instruction completed during their first year. This paper describes 1 institution's process of developing and implementing an infection control instructional program utilizing an educator's toolkit.

  2. Building Interactive Simulations in Web Pages without Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailen Kootsey, J; McAuley, Grant; Bernal, Julie

    2005-01-01

    A software system is described for building interactive simulations and other numerical calculations in Web pages. The system is based on a new Java-based software architecture named NumberLinX (NLX) that isolates each function required to build the simulation so that a library of reusable objects could be assembled. The NLX objects are integrated into a commercial Web design program for coding-free page construction. The model description is entered through a wizard-like utility program that also functions as a model editor. The complete system permits very rapid construction of interactive simulations without coding. A wide range of applications are possible with the system beyond interactive calculations, including remote data collection and processing and collaboration over a network.

  3. Interactive Fuzzy Programming for Stochastic Two-level Linear Programming Problems through Probability Maximization

    OpenAIRE

    Sakawa, M.; Kato, K.

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers stochastic two-level linear programming problems. Using the concept of chance constraints and probability maximization, original problems are transformed into deterministic ones. An interactive fuzzy programming method is presented for deriving a satisfactory solution efficiently with considerations of overall satisfactory balance.

  4. Ethics of prevention: an interactive computer-tailored program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hooren, Rob H; Van den Borne, Bart W; Curfs, Leopold M G; Widdershoven, Guy A M

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the contents of an interactive computer-tailored program. The program is based on previous studies of the practice of care for persons with Prader-Willi syndrome. This genetic condition is associated with a constant overeating behaviour with the risk of obesity. The aim of the program is to start a process of awareness, reflection, and discussion by caregivers who are confronted with the moral dilemma of respect for autonomy versus restricting overeating behaviour. The program focuses on values (such as health and well-being) that are relevant to caregivers in daily practice. Furthermore, the focus is on various ways of interaction with the client. Caregivers were expected to focus mainly on health, and on both paternalistic and interpretive/deliberative forms of interaction. Sixteen professionals and 12 parents pilot-tested the program contents. With a pre-test, responses on one central case were collected for tailored feedback; with a post-test, the effects of the program were measured. Significant correlations were found between the values of autonomy and consultation and between autonomy and well-being. In contrast to our expectations respondents valued all categories (autonomy, consultation, health, well-being, and liveability for others) as equally important in the pre-test. No significant changes in scores were found between pre- and post-test. The open answers and remarks of participants support the program contents. Participants' responses support previous research findings, advocating a concept of autonomy in terms of positive freedom, through support by others. The promotion of the client's self-understanding and self-development is central in this concept.

  5. Program Predicts Time Courses of Human/Computer Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Alonso; Howes, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    CPM X is a computer program that predicts sequences of, and amounts of time taken by, routine actions performed by a skilled person performing a task. Unlike programs that simulate the interaction of the person with the task environment, CPM X predicts the time course of events as consequences of encoded constraints on human behavior. The constraints determine which cognitive and environmental processes can occur simultaneously and which have sequential dependencies. The input to CPM X comprises (1) a description of a task and strategy in a hierarchical description language and (2) a description of architectural constraints in the form of rules governing interactions of fundamental cognitive, perceptual, and motor operations. The output of CPM X is a Program Evaluation Review Technique (PERT) chart that presents a schedule of predicted cognitive, motor, and perceptual operators interacting with a task environment. The CPM X program allows direct, a priori prediction of skilled user performance on complex human-machine systems, providing a way to assess critical interfaces before they are deployed in mission contexts.

  6. Design principles for an interactive program derivation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Uday S.

    1988-01-01

    The main design principles of an interactive program transformation system called FOCUS are outlined. Its important characteristics are its human-oriented deduction techniques based replacement, emphasis on small search spaces, and the use of a tree structure to organize program derivations. The tree structure presents to the user a static picture of the derivation process and promotes flexibility in the development of derivations. The system keeps track of dependencies between different parts of derivations, and records the derivation activity for later use in automatic replay.

  7. Supporting secure programming in web applications through interactive static analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jun; Xie, Jing; Lipford, Heather Richter; Chu, Bill

    2014-07-01

    Many security incidents are caused by software developers' failure to adhere to secure programming practices. Static analysis tools have been used to detect software vulnerabilities. However, their wide usage by developers is limited by the special training required to write rules customized to application-specific logic. Our approach is interactive static analysis, to integrate static analysis into Integrated Development Environment (IDE) and provide in-situ secure programming support to help developers prevent vulnerabilities during code construction. No additional training is required nor are there any assumptions on ways programs are built. Our work is motivated in part by the observation that many vulnerabilities are introduced due to failure to practice secure programming by knowledgeable developers. We implemented a prototype interactive static analysis tool as a plug-in for Java in Eclipse. Our technical evaluation of our prototype detected multiple zero-day vulnerabilities in a large open source project. Our evaluations also suggest that false positives may be limited to a very small class of use cases.

  8. Supporting secure programming in web applications through interactive static analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Many security incidents are caused by software developers’ failure to adhere to secure programming practices. Static analysis tools have been used to detect software vulnerabilities. However, their wide usage by developers is limited by the special training required to write rules customized to application-specific logic. Our approach is interactive static analysis, to integrate static analysis into Integrated Development Environment (IDE and provide in-situ secure programming support to help developers prevent vulnerabilities during code construction. No additional training is required nor are there any assumptions on ways programs are built. Our work is motivated in part by the observation that many vulnerabilities are introduced due to failure to practice secure programming by knowledgeable developers. We implemented a prototype interactive static analysis tool as a plug-in for Java in Eclipse. Our technical evaluation of our prototype detected multiple zero-day vulnerabilities in a large open source project. Our evaluations also suggest that false positives may be limited to a very small class of use cases.

  9. An Interactive Online Education System for the Supplemental Nutrition Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alma Ohene-Opare

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Public health education is a key component in the variety of services provided by local health departments, particularly for the low-income demographic. In addition to helping the participants to live a healthier lifestyle, nutrition education sessions are a required component of a specific program for low-income mothers and children, entitled the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC. However, some women in the Utah County WIC program were not receiving the sessions because the inconvenient class times and scheduling difficulty. With the increasing availability of the internet access by WIC participants, we can increase the availability and effectiveness of the nutrition education by providing courses online via the Utah County's WIC website. We are designing a system consisting of a web interface and a database backend, where health workers can author and publish interactive content, track users' progress, and evaluate the outcome of the courses taken.

  10. Design on an enhanced interactive satellite communications system analysis program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Kevin Robert

    1991-09-01

    This thesis describes the design of a user-friendly interactive satellite communications analysis program for use on a personal computer. The user inputs the various parameters of a satellite orbit, ground station location and communications equipment. The output generated allows a user to view the satellite ground trace and footprint, calculate satellite rise and set times, and analyze the performance of the communications link. The link analysis allows the user to input various signal losses and jamming interference. Care was taken to ensure that the program is simple to operate and that it provides on-line help for each segment. A principle goal of this thesis effort is to provide an educational tool that familiarizes the user with the communications segment of a space system. The initial success of the program based upon student response validates the use of object-oriented like software tools that enhance user understanding of complex subjects.

  11. TICS: A System For The Authoring and Delivery Of Interactive Instructional Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplow, Roy; And Others

    The Teacher-Interactive Computer System (TICS) is an on-line and interactive programing system for authoring interactive programs, particularly instructional programs. The system provides a fairly natural language, in which the author's statements for creating items in a program, for examining the structure and flow, for simulating its use by…

  12. Interactive Multiobjective Fuzzy Random Linear Programming through Fractile Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Yano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose an interactive fuzzy decision making method for multiobjective fuzzy random linear programming problems through fractile criteria optimization. In the proposed method, it is assumed that the decision maker has fuzzy goals for not only objective functions but also permissible probability levels in a fractile optimization model, and such fuzzy goals are quantified by eliciting the corresponding membership functions. Using the fuzzy decision, such two kinds of membership functions are integrated. In the integrated membership space, the satisfactory solution is obtained from among an extended Pareto optimal solution set through the interaction with the decision maker. An illustrative numerical example is provided to demonstrate the feasibility and efficiency of the proposed method.

  13. CHEF An Interactive Program for Accelerator Optics Calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Michelotti, Leo

    2005-01-01

    We introduce CHEF, a program built on a "Collaborative Hierarchical Exploratory Framework" for doing optical calculations in accelerator physics. CHEF organizes and shares information between independent components that employ graphical user interfaces for interactive use. Among them are: a browser to display the beamline model's structure; a site viewer to show a line's geometry; phase space windows to oversee development of tracking calculations; a trace window to display the passage of a probe particle through beam position monitors; a plotter for displaying optical functions; a parser which constructs beamline models defined in MAD8 format and allows for interactive editing and debugging of the lattice files. Calculations are carried out by a hierarchy of C++ class libraries, most notably: MXYZPTLK handles automatic differentiation and differential algebra; BEAMLINE contains classes for modeling accelerator components; PHYSICS_TOOLKIT encapsulates specific calculations. Python bindings to these libraries ...

  14. Structural mode significance using INCA. [Interactive Controls Analysis computer program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Frank H.; Downing, John P.; Thorpe, Christopher J.

    1990-01-01

    Structural finite element models are often too large to be used in the design and analysis of control systems. Model reduction techniques must be applied to reduce the structural model to manageable size. In the past, engineers either performed the model order reduction by hand or used distinct computer programs to retrieve the data, to perform the significance analysis and to reduce the order of the model. To expedite this process, the latest version of INCA has been expanded to include an interactive graphical structural mode significance and model order reduction capability.

  15. A look at an interactive classroom-based drug abuse prevention program: interactive contents and suggestions for research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Steve; Rohrbach, Louise A; Patel, Ravi; Holiday, Karen

    2003-01-01

    Interactivity has been shown to be a critical element of effective drug abuse prevention programs. This study examined the contents of Project Towards No Drug Abuse, a program that has revealed strong effects only when delivered in a highly interactive version. Types of teacher and student interactive messages were identified. It is speculated that explicit action on the part of the teacher to have students make statements and ask questions of one another may be the essence of effective drug education program delivery. Suggestions for future research on interactivity were made.

  16. Program for studying fundamental interactions at the PIK reactor facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebrov, A. P.; Vassiljev, A. V.; Varlamov, V. E.; Geltenbort, P.; Gridnev, K. A.; Dmitriev, S. P.; Dovator, N. A.; Egorov, A. I.; Ezhov, V. F.; Zherebtsov, O. M.; Zinoviev, V. G.; Ivochkin, V. G.; Ivanov, S. N.; Ivanov, S. A.; Kolomensky, E. A.; Konoplev, K. A.; Krasnoschekova, I. A.; Lasakov, M. S.; Lyamkin, V. A.; Martemyanov, V. P.; Murashkin, A. N.; Neustroev, P. V.; Onegin, M. S.; Petelin, A. L.; Pirozhkov, A. N.; Polyushkin, A. O.; Prudnikov, D. V.; Ryabov, V. L.; Samoylov, R. M.; Sbitnev, S. V.; Fomin, A. K.; Fomichev, A. V.; Zimmer, O.; Cherniy, A. V.; Shoka, I. V.

    2016-05-01

    A research program aimed at studying fundamental interactions by means of ultracold and polarized cold neutrons at the GEK-4-4' channel of the PIK reactor is presented. The apparatus to be used includes a source of cold neutrons in the heavy-water reflector of the reactor, a source of ultracold neutrons based on superfluid helium and installed in a cold-neutron beam extracted from the GEK-4 channel, and a number of experimental facilities in neutron beams. An experiment devoted to searches for the neutron electric dipole moment and an experiment aimed at a measurement the neutron lifetime with the aid of a large gravitational trap are planned to be performed in a beam of ultracold neutrons. An experiment devoted to measuring neutron-decay asymmetries with the aid of a superconducting solenoid is planned in a beam of cold polarized neutrons from the GEK-4' channel. The second ultracold-neutron source and an experiment aimed at measuring the neutron lifetime with the aid of a magnetic trap are planned in the neutron-guide system of the GEK-3 channel. In the realms of neutrino physics, an experiment intended for sterile-neutrino searches is designed. The state of affairs around the preparation of the experimental equipment for this program is discussed.

  17. Interactive, Computer-Based Training Program for Radiological Workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trinoskey, P.A.; Camacho, P.I.; Wells, L.

    2000-01-18

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is redesigning its Computer-Based Training (CBT) program for radiological workers. The redesign represents a major effort to produce a single, highly interactive and flexible CBT program that will meet the training needs of a wide range of radiological workers--from researchers and x-ray operators to individuals working in tritium, uranium, plutonium, and accelerator facilities. The new CBT program addresses the broad diversity of backgrounds found at a national laboratory. When a training audience is homogeneous in terms of education level and type of work performed, it is difficult to duplicate the effectiveness of a flexible, technically competent instructor who can tailor a course to the express needs and concerns of a course's participants. Unfortunately, such homogeneity is rare. At LLNL, they have a diverse workforce engaged in a wide range of radiological activities, from the fairly common to the quite exotic. As a result, the Laboratory must offer a wide variety of radiological worker courses. These include a general contamination-control course in addition to radioactive-material-handling courses for both low-level laboratory (i.e., bench-top) activities as well as high-level work in tritium, uranium, and plutonium facilities. They also offer training courses for employees who work with radiation-generating devices--x-ray, accelerator, and E-beam operators, for instance. However, even with the number and variety of courses the Laboratory offers, they are constrained by the diversity of backgrounds (i.e., knowledge and experience) of those to be trained. Moreover, time constraints often preclude in-depth coverage of site- and/or task-specific details. In response to this situation, several years ago LLNL began moving toward computer-based training for radiological workers. Today, that CBT effort includes a general radiological safety course developed by the Department of Energy's Hanford facility and

  18. Interactive Computer-Supported Learning in Mathematics: A Comparison of Three Learning Programs on Trigonometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Elisabeth; Heiß, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Three different versions of a learning program on trigonometry were compared, a program controlled, non-interactive version (CG), an interactive, conflict inducing version (EG 1), and an interactive one which was supposed to reduce the occurrence of a cognitive conflict regarding the central problem solution (EG 2). Pupils (N = 101) of a…

  19. The impact of banners on digital television: the role of program interactivity and product involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauberghe, Verolien; De Pelsmacker, Patrick

    2008-02-01

    In a sample of 281 respondents, the effect of a noninteractive and a medium-interactive television program on recall and brand attitudes for low- and high-involvement products advertised in banners during these programs was investigated. Medium-interactive programs resulted in less product and brand recall and recognition of brands in embedded banner advertisements, but generated more positive brand attitudes than noninteractive programs. These effects were more outspoken for a high-involvement product than for a low-involvement product. The impact of perceived program interactivity on brand attitude is fully mediated program valence and involvement for low-involvement products, but not for high-involvement products, for which perceived program interactivity had a direct impact on brand attitude.

  20. 76 FR 79214 - Certain Products Containing Interactive Program Guide and Parental Controls Technology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ... COMMISSION Certain Products Containing Interactive Program Guide and Parental Controls Technology... Corporation of Santa Clara, California; and Index Systems, Inc. of Tortola, the British Virgin Islands. The... interactive program guide and parental controls technology by reason of infringement of certain claims of U.S...

  1. Use of an Interactive Laserdisc Parent Training Program with Teenage Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagges, Ann M.; Gordon, Donald A.

    1999-01-01

    Investigates the effectiveness of a brief interactive laserdisc training program in instructing teenage parents and pregnant teenagers (N=62). Those who used the interactive laserdisc program and participated in group discussion scored significantly higher at two month follow-up on several parenting measures than those who did not use the…

  2. The Effects of Using Interactive Teaching Programs on Preschool Children's Literacy Development: Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahwaji, Nahla M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents findings of a case study that investigates the effects of using interactive teaching programs on literacy development for preschool children. The significant of this study comes from the lack of studies associated with using interactive teaching programs for preschool children in Saudi Arabia. Data are presented from analyzing…

  3. Enhancing Programming Lectures Using Interactive Web-Based Lecture Slides

    OpenAIRE

    Albinson, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Programming is often seen as a difficult subject to teach and keep students engaged and motivated about. Also programming results are frequently found to be lower than for other subjects (Jenkins 2002; Robins et al. 2003; Bennedsen and Caspersen 2007). Therefore, the challenge is to find a way of improving programming education to address these problems. This paper considers the use of innovative pedagogy approaches to do this due to their ability to enhance learning experiences. An innovativ...

  4. Designing an E-Mentoring Program for Novice Teachers in Turkey and Investigating Online Interactions and Program Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemdag, Ecenaz; Erdem, Mukaddes

    2017-01-01

    In this collaborative research, we designed an e-mentoring program for novice teachers and explored online interactions between mentors and mentees, participant satisfaction, and the perceived benefits of the program for mentees and mentors. Our study included 14 mentees, 14 mentors, and 6 teacher educators. Data were gathered through online…

  5. Towards Meaningful Interaction in Multimedia Programs for Language Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Uschi

    1998-01-01

    Examines the interactive potential for teaching four language skills (listening, reading, writing, and speaking) in the context of what is available across a range of multimedia technologies, from CD-ROMs to the World Wide Web. Identifies three levels of interactivity in the multimedia environment and notes the advantages that multimedia…

  6. Learning SQL Programming with Interactive Tools: From Integration to Personalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusilovsky, Pete; Sosnovsky, Sergey; Yudelson, Michael V.; Lee, Danielle H.; Zadorozhny, Vladimir; Zhou, Xin

    2010-01-01

    Rich, interactive eLearning tools receive a lot of attention nowadays from both practitioners and researchers. However, broader dissemination of these tools is hindered by the technical difficulties of their integration into existing platforms. This article explores the technical and conceptual problems of using several interactive educational…

  7. New Pathways to Resilience: Interactive report on CCAA program ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2012-11-08

    Nov 8, 2012 ... The Climate Change Adaptation in Africa (CCAA) program was a joint initiative of the UK's Department for International Development (DFID) and IDRC that supported research and capacity building to reduce climate change vulnerability in Africa. Over the course of the program, from 2006-2012, ...

  8. FACILITATORS' PERCEPTION OF INTERACTIONS IN AN ONLINE LEARNING PROGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan CALISKAN

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Schools and colleges all around the world have started making use of advanced technology to provide learners effective, efficient and adequate instruction. The use of Internet and Web for learning and teaching has caused many online courses to be offered when teaching-learning activities are required for both students and faculty. The Internet has shown a rapid and important growth in the extent of online education. This has created a new paradigm for teaching and learning that is different from the traditional classroom experience and also different from earlier technology-based attempts (Kearsley, 1998. One of the most important online course components has proven to be interaction, especially learner to learner interaction. Alexander C. lists the top ten ranking components of an optimal online environment, giving peer interaction the first place. Kearsley (1998 also states that discussions among learners are among the most important components. This is not surprising because one of the most important factors in learning appears to be interaction among learners and interaction between instructor and learners. No matter how learning takes place, interaction has always been of great importance so that an effective learning can occur. Especially when instruction is given to learners learning at a distance, this interaction component is of vital importance. Having the lack of social interaction, learners may feel alone and helpless at times they need to get help from someone, especially from their peers taking same course as in any traditional classrooms. Studies suggest that facilitators’ active interactions with students have significant effects on the quality of online distance learning (Thomas, Caswell, Price & Petre, 1998.

  9. Phase 1 user instruction manual. A geological formation - drill string dynamic interaction finite element program (GEODYN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinianow, M.A.; Rotelli, R.L. Jr.; Baird, J.A.

    1984-06-01

    User instructions for the GEODYN Interactive Finite Element Computer Program are presented. The program is capable of performing the analysis of the three-dimensional transient dynamic response of a Polycrystalline Diamond Compact Bit - Bit Sub arising from the intermittent contact of the bit with the downhole rock formations. The program accommodates non-linear, time dependent, loading and boundary conditions.

  10. Geological formation - drill string dynamic interaction finite-element program (GEODYN). Phase 1. Theoretical description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baird, J.A.; Apostal, M.C.; Rotelli, R.L. Jr.; Tinianow, M.A.; Wormley, D.N.

    1984-06-01

    The Theoretical Description for the GEODYN interactive finite-element computer program is presented. The program is capable of performing the analysis of the three-dimensional transient dynamic response of a Polycrystalline Diamond Compact Bit-Bit Sub arising from the intermittent contact of the bit with the downhole rock formations. The program accommodates nonlinear, time-dependent, loading and boundary conditions.

  11. An Interactive Preprocessor Program with Graphics for a Three-Dimensional Finite Element Code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Claude Hayden, III

    The development and capabilities of an interactive preprocessor program with graphics for an existing three-dimensional finite element code is presented. This preprocessor program, EDGAP3D, is designed to be used in conjunction with the Texas Three Dimensional Grain Analysis Program (TXCAP3D). The code presented in this research is capable of the…

  12. Interactive programs with preschool children bring smiles and conversation to older adults: time-sampling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Kumiko; Kobayashi, Minako

    2013-10-18

    Keeping older adults healthy and active is an emerging challenge of an aging society. Despite the importance of personal relationships to their health and well-being, changes in family structure have resulted in a lower frequency of intergenerational interactions. Limited studies have been conducted to compare different interaction style of intergenerational interaction. The present study aimed to compare the changes in visual attention, facial expression, engagement/behaviour, and intergenerational conversation in older adults brought about by a performance-based intergenerational (IG) program and a social-oriented IG program to determine a desirable interaction style for older adults. The subjects of this study were 25 older adults who participated in intergenerational programs with preschool children aged 5 to 6 years at an adult day care centre in Tokyo. We used time sampling to perform a structured observation study. The 25 older participants of intergenerational programs were divided into two groups based on their interaction style: performance-based IG program (children sing songs and dance) and social-oriented IG program (older adults and children play games together). Based on the 5-minute video observation, we compared changes in visual attention, facial expression, engagement/behaviour, and intergenerational conversation between the performance-based and social-oriented IG programs. Constructive behaviour and intergenerational conversation were significantly higher in the social-oriented IG programming group than the performance-based IG programming group (pprogramming group than the performance-based IG programming (pprogramming group than the social-oriented IG programming group (pIntergenerational programs with preschool children brought smiles and conversation to older adults. The social-oriented IG program allowed older adults to play more roles than the performance-based IG program. The intergenerational programs provide opportunities to fulfil

  13. An interactive program for digitization of seabed photographs

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramprasad, T.; Sharma, R.

    A program for dignitization of seabed photographs to compute coverage and abundance of polymetallic nodules is developed. Since the objects in the seabed photograph are partially covered by thin sediment layer, the automatic scanning devices may...

  14. Interactive debug program for evaluation and modification of assembly-language software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpasi, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    An assembly-language debug program written for the Honeywell HDC-601 and DDP-516/316 computers is described. Names and relative addressing to improve operator-machine interaction are used. Features include versatile display, on-line assembly, and improved program execution and analysis. The program is discussed from both a programmer's and an operator's standpoint. Functional diagrams are included to describe the program, and each command is illustrated.

  15. Excel Programming Your Visual Blueprint for Creating Interactive Spreadsheets

    CERN Document Server

    Etheridge, Denise

    2010-01-01

    A great guide to Excel programming that is perfect for visual learners and takes you beyond Excel basics!. This book is the perfect reference for Excel users who want to delve deeper into the application to create powerful and dynamic programs. From creating macros to customizing dialog boxes, this step-by-step guide helps you get more out of Excel than you knew was possible. Each step has callouts so you can see exactly where the action takes place and this Web site offers tons of usable code and sample macros that you can put to use instantly.: Explains step-by-step how to automate Excel, th

  16. Children's Attitudes and Classroom Interaction in an Intergenerational Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, Charlotte Chorn; Casadonte, Dominick

    2009-01-01

    This research reports findings from an intergenerational science program, Project Serve, which placed senior volunteers in elementary and junior high science classrooms to assist teachers and augment instruction. Items from the Children's View of Aging survey (Newman, 1997; Newman & Faux, 1997) were administered before and after the project with…

  17. A comparison of five common drug-drug interaction software programs regarding accuracy and comprehensiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheshti, Raziyeh; Aalipour, Mohammadsadegh; Namazi, Soha

    2016-01-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) can cause failure in treatment and adverse events. DDIs screening software is an important tool to aid clinicians in the detection and management of DDIs. However, clinicians should be aware of the advantages and limitations of these programs. We compared the ability of five common DDI programs to detect clinically important DDIs. Lexi-Interact, Micromedex Drug Interactions, iFacts, Medscape, and Epocrates were evaluated. The programs' sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were determined to assess their accuracy in detecting DDIs. The accuracy of each program was identified using 360 unknown pair interactions, taken randomly from prescriptions, and forty pairs of clinically important ones. The major reference was a clinical pharmacist alongside the Stockley's Drug Interaction and databases including PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar. Comprehensiveness of each program was determined by the number of components in the drug interaction monograph. The aggregate score for accuracy and comprehensiveness was calculated. Scoring 250 out of possible 400 points, Lexi-Interact and Epocrates, provided the most accurate software programs. Micromedex, Medscape, and iFacts ranked third, fourth, and fifth, scoring 236, 202, and 191, respectively. In comprehensiveness test, iFacts showed the highest score, 134 out of possible 134 points, whereas Lexi-Interact rated second, with a score of 120. Scoring 370 and 330 out of possible 534 points, Lexi-Interact and Micromedex, respectively, provided the most competent, complete, and user-friendly applications. Lexi-Interact and Micromedex showed the best performances. An increase in sensitivity is possible by the combination of more than one programs and expert pharmacist intervention.

  18. InfoVis Interaction Techniques in Animation of Recursive Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Pérez-Carrasco

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Algorithm animations typically assist in educational tasks aimed simply at achieving understanding. Potentially, animations could assist in higher levels of cognition, such as the analysis level, but they usually fail in providing this support because they are not flexible or comprehensive enough. In particular, animations of recursion provided by educational systems hardly support the analysis of recursive algorithms. Here we show how to provide full support to the analysis of recursive algorithms. From a technical point of view, animations are enriched with interaction techniques inspired by the information visualization (InfoVis field. Interaction tasks are presented in seven categories, and deal with both static visualizations and dynamic animations. All of these features are implemented in the SRec system, and visualizations generated by SRec are used to illustrate the article.

  19. Testing interaction effects of the dimensions of market orientation on marketing program creativity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Im, Subin; Hussain, Mahmood; Sengupta, Sanjit

    2008-01-01

    Despite the plethora of research on market orientation, our understanding of how different dimensions of market orientation interact with each other in generating new intelligence for marketing programs is limited...

  20. A Teaching Exercise for the Identification of Bacteria Using An Interactive Computer Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Trevor N.; Smith, John E.

    1979-01-01

    Describes an interactive Fortran computer program which provides an exercise in the identification of bacteria. Provides a way of enhancing a student's approach to systematic bacteriology and numerical identification procedures. (Author/MA)

  1. Screening Doses for Induction of Cancers Calculated with the Interactive RadioEpidemiological Program (IREP)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kocher, David C; Apostoaei, Julian A

    2007-01-01

    .... Screening doses for 32 cancer types were calculated with the Interactive RadioEpidemiological Program, which is used by the Department of Veterans Affairs in adjudicating claims for compensation...

  2. Collaborative Clinical Placements: Interactions Among Students From Different Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lait, Jana

    2015-08-01

    Shortages of clinical placements for health care students in Canada have led education and health care organizations to explore innovative ways to increase placement capacity. One way to increase capacity is to bring together students from various programs for their placements, which also allows students to learn about each other's roles and how to work collaboratively. This article describes shared placements for students from bachelor of nursing, practical nurse, and health care aide programs. Qualitative interviews were used. Students benefited from this approach by learning about the roles of other providers and how to coordinate care with others. The challenges of the approach were competition among students for opportunities to practice clinical procedures and concerns about how to communicate with other students when sharing the care of patients. The objectives of increasing student placement capacity and expanding collaboration opportunities were partially achieved through this approach to clinical education. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Programs Visualize Earth and Space for Interactive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Kevin Hussey and others at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory produced web applications to visualize all of the spacecraft in orbit around Earth and in the Solar System. Hussey worked with Milwaukee, Wisconsin-based The Elumenati to rewrite the programs, and after licensing them, the company started offering a version that can be viewed on spheres and dome theaters for schools, museums, science centers, and other institutions.

  4. Introduction to ''Interactive models of computation and program behaviour"

    OpenAIRE

    Curien, Pierre-Louis

    2009-01-01

    Since the mid-eighties of the last century, a fruitful interplay between computer scientists and mathematicians has led to much progress in the understanding of programming languages, and has given new impulse to areas of mathematics such as proof theory or category theory. The volume of which this text is an introduction contains three contributions: Categorical semantics of linear logic, by P.-A. Melliès, Realizability in classical logic, by J.-L. Krivien, Abstract machines for dialogue gam...

  5. Interactions between Energy Efficiency Programs funded under the Recovery Act and Utility Customer-Funded Energy Efficiency Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, Charles A.; Stuart, Elizabeth; Hoffman, Ian; Fuller, Merrian C.; Billingsley, Megan A.

    2011-02-25

    -funded energy efficiency programs administered by state energy offices: the State Energy Program (SEP) formula grants, the portion of Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) formula funds administered directly by states, and the State Energy Efficient Appliance Rebate Program (SEEARP). Since these ARRA programs devote significant monies to energy efficiency and serve similar markets as utility customer-funded programs, there are frequent interactions between programs. We exclude the DOE low-income weatherization program and EECBG funding awarded directly to the over 2,200 cities, counties and tribes from our study to keep its scope manageable. We summarize the energy efficiency program design and funding choices made by the 50 state energy offices, 5 territories and the District of Columbia. We then focus on the specific choices made in 12 case study states. These states were selected based on the level of utility customer program funding, diversity of program administrator models, and geographic diversity. Based on interviews with more than 80 energy efficiency actors in those 12 states, we draw observations about states strategies for use of Recovery Act funds. We examine interactions between ARRA programs and utility customer-funded energy efficiency programs in terms of program planning, program design and implementation, policy issues, and potential long-term impacts. We consider how the existing regulatory policy framework and energy efficiency programs in these 12 states may have impacted development of these selected ARRA programs. Finally, we summarize key trends and highlight issues that evaluators of these ARRA programs may want to examine in more depth in their process and impact evaluations.

  6. A Meta-analysis of the Effectiveness of Interactive Middle School Cannabis Prevention Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lize, Steven E; Iachini, Aidyn L; Tang, Weizhou; Tucker, Joshua; Seay, Kristen D; Clone, Stephanie; DeHart, Dana; Browne, Teri

    2017-01-01

    This meta-analysis examines the effectiveness of interactive middle school-based drug prevention programs on adolescent cannabis use in North America, as well as program characteristics that could moderate these effects. Interactive programs, compared to more didactic, lecture style programs, involve participants in skill-building activities and focus on interaction among participants. A systematic literature search was conducted for English-language studies from January 1998 to March 2014. Studies included evaluations using random assignment or a quasi-experimental design of interactive school-based substance use prevention programs delivered to adolescents (aged 12-14) in North American middle schools (grades 6-8). Data were extracted using a coding protocol. The outcomes of interest were post-treatment cannabis use, intent to use, and refusal skills compared across intervention and control groups. Effect sizes (Cohen's d) were calculated from continuous measures, and dichotomous measures were converted to the d index. A total of 30 studies yielding 23 independent samples were included. The random effects pooled effect size for cannabis use (k = 21) was small ([Formula: see text]= -0.07, p skills (k = 3) were not significant. Moderator analyses indicated significant differences in program effectiveness between instructor types, with teachers found to be most effective ([Formula: see text]= -0.08, p = 0.02). The findings provide further support for the use of interactive school-based programs to prevent cannabis use among middle school students in North America.

  7. 76 FR 46841 - Certain Products Containing Interactive Program Guides and Parental Controls Technology; Notice...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-03

    ... COMMISSION Certain Products Containing Interactive Program Guides and Parental Controls Technology; Notice of... Video Properties of Santa Clara, California, ] and Index Systems, Inc., of the British Virgin Islands... program guide and parental controls technology by reason of the infringement of certain claims of U.S...

  8. Program Evaluation: The Board Game--An Interactive Learning Tool for Evaluators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Febey, Karen; Coyne, Molly

    2007-01-01

    The field of program evaluation lacks interactive teaching tools. To address this pedagogical issue, the authors developed a collaborative learning technique called Program Evaluation: The Board Game. The authors present the game and its development in this practitioner-oriented article. The evaluation board game is an adaptable teaching tool…

  9. Reaching Graduate Students at Risk for Suicidal Behavior through the Interactive Screening Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffitt, Lauren B.; Garcia-Williams, Amanda; Berg, John P.; Calderon, Michelle E.; Haas, Ann P.; Kaslow, Nadine J.

    2014-01-01

    Suicidal behavior is a significant concern among graduate students. Because many suicidal graduate students do not access mental health services, programs to connect them to resources are essential. This article describes the Interactive Screening Program (ISP), an anonymous, Web-based tool for screening and engaging at-risk graduate school…

  10. Advanced Reactor Safety Program – Stakeholder Interaction and Feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szilard, Ronaldo H. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, Curtis L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-08-01

    In the Spring of 2013, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) began discussions with industry stakeholders on how to upgrade our safety analysis capabilities. The focus of these improvements would primarily be on advanced safety analysis capabilities that could help the nuclear industry analyze, understand, and better predict complex safety problems. The current environment in the DOE complex is such that recent successes in high performance computer modeling and simulation could lead the nuclear industry to benefit from these advances, as long as an effort to translate these advances into realistic applications is made. Upgrading the nuclear industry modeling analysis capabilities is a significant effort that would require participation and coordination from all industry segments: research, engineering, vendors, and operations. We focus here on interactions with industry stakeholders to develop sound advanced safety analysis applications propositions that could have a positive impact on industry long term operation, hence advancing the state of nuclear safety.

  11. Improvement of training process of powerlifters on the basis of an interactive program "PersTrainer"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodymyr Ashanin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to develop and scientifically substantiate the program "PersTrainer" for improving the training process of powerlifters. Material & Methods: the study involved the powerlifters of 16–18 years. The following research methods were used: analysis and generalization of the literary sources and data of the Internet, pedagogical observation and the method of information modeling. Results: the interactive program "PersTrainer" is developed and theoretically justified, which allows individually calculating the training load in different training cycles. Conclusion: it is possible to plan training loads on the basis of individually proposed exercise complexes, which are presented in the interactive program "PersTrainer".

  12. Development and validation of an online interactive, multimedia wound care algorithms program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beitz, Janice M; van Rijswijk, Lia

    2012-01-01

    To provide education based on evidence-based and validated wound care algorithms we designed and implemented an interactive, Web-based learning program for teaching wound care. A mixed methods quantitative pilot study design with qualitative components was used to test and ascertain the ease of use, validity, and reliability of the online program. A convenience sample of 56 RN wound experts (formally educated, certified in wound care, or both) participated. The interactive, online program consists of a user introduction, interactive assessment of 15 acute and chronic wound photos, user feedback about the percentage correct, partially correct, or incorrect algorithm and dressing choices and a user survey. After giving consent, participants accessed the online program, provided answers to the demographic survey, and completed the assessment module and photographic test, along with a posttest survey. The construct validity of the online interactive program was strong. Eighty-five percent (85%) of algorithm and 87% of dressing choices were fully correct even though some programming design issues were identified. Online study results were consistently better than previously conducted comparable paper-pencil study results. Using a 5-point Likert-type scale, participants rated the program's value and ease of use as 3.88 (valuable to very valuable) and 3.97 (easy to very easy), respectively. Similarly the research process was described qualitatively as "enjoyable" and "exciting." This digital program was well received indicating its "perceived benefits" for nonexpert users, which may help reduce barriers to implementing safe, evidence-based care. Ongoing research using larger sample sizes may help refine the program or algorithms while identifying clinician educational needs. Initial design imperfections and programming problems identified also underscored the importance of testing all paper and Web-based programs designed to educate health care professionals or guide

  13. Neuro-immune Interactions Drive Tissue Programming in Intestinal Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabanyi, Ilana; Muller, Paul A; Feighery, Linda; Oliveira, Thiago Y; Costa-Pinto, Frederico A; Mucida, Daniel

    2016-01-28

    Proper adaptation to environmental perturbations is essential for tissue homeostasis. In the intestine, diverse environmental cues can be sensed by immune cells, which must balance resistance to microorganisms with tolerance, avoiding excess tissue damage. By applying imaging and transcriptional profiling tools, we interrogated how distinct microenvironments in the gut regulate resident macrophages. We discovered that macrophages exhibit a high degree of gene-expression specialization dependent on their proximity to the gut lumen. Lamina propria macrophages (LpMs) preferentially expressed a pro-inflammatory phenotype when compared to muscularis macrophages (MMs), which displayed a tissue-protective phenotype. Upon luminal bacterial infection, MMs further enhanced tissue-protective programs, and this was attributed to swift activation of extrinsic sympathetic neurons innervating the gut muscularis and norepinephrine signaling to β2 adrenergic receptors on MMs. Our results reveal unique intra-tissue macrophage specialization and identify neuro-immune communication between enteric neurons and macrophages that induces rapid tissue-protective responses to distal perturbations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. SEPAC data analysis in support of the environmental interaction program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chin S.

    1990-01-01

    Injections of nonrelativistic electron beams from an isolated equipotential conductor into a uniform background of plasma and neutral gas were simulated using a two dimensional electrostatic particle code. The ionization effects of spacecraft charging are examined by including interactions of electrons with neutral gas. The simulations show that the conductor charging potential decreases with increasing neutral background density due to the production of secondary electrons near the conductor surface. In the spacecraft wake, the background electrons accelerated towards the charged space craft produced an enhancement of secondary electrons and ions. Simulations run for longer times indicate that the spacecraft potential is further reduced and short wavelength beam-plasma oscillations appear. The results are applied to explain the space craft charging potential measured during the SEPAC experiments from Spacelab 1. A second paper is presented in which a two dimensional electrostatic particle code was used to study the beam radial expansion of a nonrelativistic electron beam injected from an isolated equipotential conductor into a background plasma. The simulations indicate that the beam radius is generally proportional to the beam electron gyroradius when the conductor is charged to a large potential. The simulations also suggest that the charge buildup at the beam stagnation point causes the beam radial expansion. From a survey of the simulation results, it is found that the ratio of the beam radius to the beam electron gyroradius increases with the square root of beam density and decreases inversely with beam injection velocity. This dependence is explained in terms of the ratio of the beam electron Debye length to the ambient electron Debye length. These results are most applicable to the SEPAC electron beam injection experiments from Spacelab 1, where high charging potential was observed.

  15. An Exercise in Invariant-based Programming with Interactive and Automatic Theorem Prover Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph-Johan Back

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Invariant-Based Programming (IBP is a diagram-based correct-by-construction programming methodology in which the program is structured around the invariants, which are additionally formulated before the actual code. Socos is a program construction and verification environment built specifically to support IBP. The front-end to Socos is a graphical diagram editor, allowing the programmer to construct invariant-based programs and check their correctness. The back-end component of Socos, the program checker, computes the verification conditions of the program and tries to prove them automatically. It uses the theorem prover PVS and the SMT solver Yices to discharge as many of the verification conditions as possible without user interaction. In this paper, we first describe the Socos environment from a user and systems level perspective; we then exemplify the IBP workflow by building a verified implementation of heapsort in Socos. The case study highlights the role of both automatic and interactive theorem proving in three sequential stages of the IBP workflow: developing the background theory, formulating the program specification and invariants, and proving the correctness of the final implementation.

  16. Programming as Design: The Role of Programming in Interactive Media Curriculum in Art and Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Faramarz

    2011-01-01

    The number of university undergraduate courses in the area of interactive media is increasing. Many of these courses are based in the schools of art and design that have traditionally valued and focused on developing the aesthetic and artistic design skills of their students. However, because of the rapid changes in new technology the relation…

  17. CRITIC2: A program for real-space analysis of quantum chemical interactions in solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero-de-la-Roza, A.; Johnson, Erin R.; Luaña, Víctor

    2014-03-01

    We present CRITIC2, a program for the analysis of quantum-mechanical atomic and molecular interactions in periodic solids. This code, a greatly improved version of the previous CRITIC program (Otero-de-la Roza et al., 2009), can: (i) find critical points of the electron density and related scalar fields such as the electron localization function (ELF), Laplacian, … (ii) integrate atomic properties in the framework of Bader’s Atoms-in-Molecules theory (QTAIM), (iii) visualize non-covalent interactions in crystals using the non-covalent interactions (NCI) index, (iv) generate relevant graphical representations including lines, planes, gradient paths, contour plots, atomic basins, … and (v) perform transformations between file formats describing scalar fields and crystal structures. CRITIC2 can interface with the output produced by a variety of electronic structure programs including WIEN2k, elk, PI, abinit, Quantum ESPRESSO, VASP, Gaussian, and, in general, any other code capable of writing the scalar field under study to a three-dimensional grid. CRITIC2 is parallelized, completely documented (including illustrative test cases) and publicly available under the GNU General Public License. Catalogue identifier: AECB_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AECB_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: yes No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 11686949 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 337020731 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 77 and 90. Computer: Workstations. Operating system: Unix, GNU/Linux. Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Shared-memory parallelization can be used for most tasks. Classification: 7.3. Catalogue identifier of previous version: AECB_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 180 (2009) 157 Nature of problem: Analysis of quantum

  18. A digital computer program for the dynamic interaction simulation of controls and structure (DISCOS), volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodley, C. S.; Devers, A. D.; Park, A. C.; Frisch, H. P.

    1978-01-01

    A theoretical development and associated digital computer program system for the dynamic simulation and stability analysis of passive and actively controlled spacecraft are presented. The dynamic system (spacecraft) is modeled as an assembly of rigid and/or flexible bodies not necessarily in a topological tree configuration. The computer program system is used to investigate total system dynamic characteristics, including interaction effects between rigid and/or flexible bodies, control systems, and a wide range of environmental loadings. In addition, the program system is used for designing attitude control systems and for evaluating total dynamic system performance, including time domain response and frequency domain stability analyses.

  19. User's manual for interactive LINEAR: A FORTRAN program to derive linear aircraft models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniewicz, Robert F.; Duke, Eugene L.; Patterson, Brian P.

    1988-01-01

    An interactive FORTRAN program that provides the user with a powerful and flexible tool for the linearization of aircraft aerodynamic models is documented in this report. The program LINEAR numerically determines a linear system model using nonlinear equations of motion and a user-supplied linear or nonlinear aerodynamic model. The nonlinear equations of motion used are six-degree-of-freedom equations with stationary atmosphere and flat, nonrotating earth assumptions. The system model determined by LINEAR consists of matrices for both the state and observation equations. The program has been designed to allow easy selection and definition of the state, control, and observation variables to be used in a particular model.

  20. An interactive multimedia program to prevent HIV transmission in men with intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Jennifer; Clark, Khaya; Sarno, Karen

    2014-05-01

    The efficacy of a computer-based interactive multimedia HIV/AIDS prevention program for men with intellectual disability (ID) was examined using a quasi-experimental within-subjects design. Thirty-seven men with mild to moderate intellectual disability evaluated the program. The pretest and posttest instruments assessed HIV/AIDS knowledge (high-risk fluids, HIV transmission, and condom facts) and condom application skills. All outcome measures showed statistically significant gains from pretest to posttest, with medium to large effect sizes. In addition, a second study was conducted with twelve service providers who work with men with ID. Service providers reviewed the HIV/AIDS prevention program, completed a demographics questionnaire, and a program satisfaction survey. Overall, service providers rated the program highly on several outcome measures (stimulation, relevance, and usability).

  1. Investigation of the interaction of benzene with vanadium-molybdenum oxide catalysts by programmed thermal desorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belokopytov, Yu.V.; Pyatnitskii, Yu.I.; Grebennikov, Yu.N.

    1985-09-01

    Programmed thermal desorption was used to investigate the interaction of benzene with vanadium-molybdenum oxide catalysts. It was established that the amount of maleic anhydride desorbed from the catalyst surface depends on the catalyst composition and that it varies with its activity and selectivity.

  2. 77 FR 33487 - Certain Products Containing Interactive Program Guide and Parental Control Technology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-06

    ... COMMISSION Certain Products Containing Interactive Program Guide and Parental Control Technology; Institution... Technologies Corporation of Santa Clara, California; Starsight Telecast, Inc. of Santa Clara; United Video Properties, Inc. of Santa Clara, California; and Index Systems, Inc. of the British Virgin Islands. The...

  3. 75 FR 71737 - In the Matter of: Certain Products Containing Interactive Program Guide and Parental Controls...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-24

    ... Technology; Notice of Investigation AGENCY: U.S. International Trade Commission. ACTION: Institution of..., Inc. of Santa Clara, California; and Index Systems, Inc. of British Virgin Islands, VG. The complaint... interactive program guide and parental controls technology by reason of infringement of certain claims of U.S...

  4. Knowledge Exchange, Social Interactions, and Empowerment in an Intergenerational Technology Program at School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamliel, Tova; Gabay, Nadav

    2014-01-01

    This is a sequel to previous theoretical papers (Gamliel, Reichental, & Eyal, 2007a, 2007b) that proposed a Model of Knowledge in Volume 33 of this journal. The study examines the effects of digital education on intergenerational empowerment and social interaction among participants in the Israeli Multigenerational Connection Program (MCP).…

  5. A Survey of the Interactions between Psychiatry Residency Programs and the Pharmaceutical Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varley, Christopher K.; Jibson, Michael D.; McCarthy, Mary; Benjamin, Sheldon

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors report a survey of the American Association of Directors of Psychiatry Residency Training (AADPRT) on interactions between the pharmaceutical industry and psychiatry residency programs. METHODS: American Association of Directors of Psychiatry Residency Training membership was anonymously surveyed by e-mail and by paper…

  6. Human seat interaction simulation using RAMSIS and the dynamic simulation program MADYMO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Happee, R.; Loczi, J.

    1999-01-01

    Both RAMSIS and MADYMO are widely applied for computer aided vehicle design. Both programs are used to simulate occupant-vehicle interactions where RAMSIS focuses on ergonomics in normal driving conditions and MADYMO focuses on passive safety in impact conditions. This paper describes simulations of

  7. A Joint Interactive Storybook Intervention Program for Preschool and Kindergarten Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaknin-Nusbaum, Vered; Nevo, Einat

    2017-01-01

    The effectiveness of a joint interactive storybook reading program delivered by class teachers to develop literacy skills is examined in Hebrew-speaking preschool and kindergarten children. Post-intervention, both groups achieved significantly higher gains in language and print concept skills than age-matched comparison groups that did not have…

  8. Conservation program delivery in the southern U.S.: Preferences and interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galik, Christopher S; Grala, Robert K

    2017-08-01

    A lingering challenge in implementation of ecosystem-based planning is translating high-level conservation objectives to discrete management initiatives. Recent research underscores this, emphasizing the importance of the processes by which plans are developed and how programs to implement plans are delivered to stakeholders. This study contributes to the existing program design, research methodology, and conservation practice literature through an assessment of landowner and conservation practitioner relationships in the Gulf Coastal Plains and Ozarks (GCPO) region of the southern U.S. The study utilizes online and mail surveys to gather data on landowner interactions with conservation practitioner organizations and interactions between practitioner organizations themselves. Data from the surveys suggest different patterns of interaction as reported by landowners and those reported by practitioner organizations working in the region, with landowners generally interacting more with extension and industry organizations and conservation practitioners interacting more with state and federal agencies. Key informant data also allows for analysis of the conservation practitioner network in the GCPO region. Resulting analysis suggests a well-connected network among the state and federal organizations critical to development and delivery of conservation programs in the GCPO LCC region. Though such configurations may be beneficial for the diffusion of innovative practices across a network, they may nonetheless require continued efforts to coordinate activities at the regional scale, an important component of practice-driven, ecosystem-level management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of a dolphin interaction program on children with autism spectrum disorders – an exploratory research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Interaction programs involving dolphins and patients with various pathologies or developmental disorders (e.g., cerebral palsy, intellectual impairment, autism, atopic dermatitis, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression) have stimulated interest in their beneficial effects and therapeutic potential. However, the true effects observed in different clinical and psycho-educational setups are still controversial. Results An evaluation protocol consisting of the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS), Psychoeducational Profile-Revised (PEP-R), Autism Treatment Evaluation Checklist (ATEC), Theory of Mind Tasks (ToM Tasks) and a custom-made Interaction Evaluation Grid (IEG) to evaluate behavioural complexity during in-pool interactions was applied to 10 children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders. The ATEC, ToM Tasks and CARS results show no benefits of the dolphin interaction program. Interestingly, the PEP-R suggests some statistically significant effects on ‘Overall development score’, as well as on their ‘Fine motor development’, ‘Cognitive performance’ and ‘Cognitive verbal development’. Also, a significant evolution in behavioural complexity was shown by the IEG. Conclusions This study does not support significant developmental progress resulting from the dolphin interaction program. PMID:22537536

  10. Effects of a dolphin interaction program on children with autism spectrum disorders: an exploratory research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgueiro, Emílio; Nunes, Laura; Barros, Alexandra; Maroco, João; Salgueiro, Ana Isabel; Dos Santos, Manuel E

    2012-04-26

    Interaction programs involving dolphins and patients with various pathologies or developmental disorders (e.g., cerebral palsy, intellectual impairment, autism, atopic dermatitis, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression) have stimulated interest in their beneficial effects and therapeutic potential. However, the true effects observed in different clinical and psycho-educational setups are still controversial. An evaluation protocol consisting of the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS), Psychoeducational Profile-Revised (PEP-R), Autism Treatment Evaluation Checklist (ATEC), Theory of Mind Tasks (ToM Tasks) and a custom-made Interaction Evaluation Grid (IEG) to evaluate behavioural complexity during in-pool interactions was applied to 10 children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders. The ATEC, ToM Tasks and CARS results show no benefits of the dolphin interaction program. Interestingly, the PEP-R suggests some statistically significant effects on 'Overall development score', as well as on their 'Fine motor development', 'Cognitive performance' and 'Cognitive verbal development'. Also, a significant evolution in behavioural complexity was shown by the IEG. This study does not support significant developmental progress resulting from the dolphin interaction program.

  11. Influences of a dedicated parental training program on parent-child interaction in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhardt, Alina; Hinner, Patricia; Kühn, Thomas; Roehr, Charles C; Rüdiger, Mario; Reichert, Jörg

    2015-03-01

    To investigate influences on the interaction between preterm infants and their parents by a dedicated parental training program on the care of preterm infants. Standardized scenarios of mother-child interactions (50 mother-child dyads of very low birth weight infants (VLBWI), birth weightparents were integrated in the daily care by pediatric nurses, while additionally PC-A had a structured parental training program. PC-A and PC-B were comparable regarding patient spectrum and number of admissions of VLBWIs/year. Both centers had similar care values with respect to the "baby friendly" initiative. No significant differences were seen in characteristics of patients (gestational age, birth weight, postnatal age) and mothers (age, parity, marital status, professions). However, in scoring the mother-child interactions significant differences were observed: In contrast to PC-B the recorded behavior in mother-child dyads of PC-A was significantly more often scored as interaction-oriented. A dedicated, structured, and actively encouraging training program for parents of preterm infants was found to be more strongly correlated toward neurodevelopmental enhancing mother-child-interactions than an approach of merely integrating parents into daily care routine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [Interactional therapy program for mothers with postpartum mental disorders. First results of a pilot project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornstein, C; Trautmann-Villalba, P; Hohm, E; Rave, E; Wortmann-Fleischer, S; Schwarz, M

    2007-06-01

    The period around delivery frequently causes psychiatric diseases that may disturb maternal competence and influence bonding behaviour with the child. Until now only a few possibilities have existed for inpatient treatment and therapy for these problems. The therapy program developed in Wiesloch, Germany, is especially well suited to such patients. Fifty-three mothers with postpartum disorders (33 depressive, 20 psychotic) were examined before and after therapy. Psychopathologic severity, psychosocial level of functioning, and parameters of the mother-child interaction were assessed and compared. Overall the results showed clear improvements in the assessed parameters at the end of treatment for both psychotic mothers and those with affective disorders. The interactional treatment program for postpartum mental disorders leads to a significant reduction in psychic/psychiatric severity and the associated psychosocial impairment and disturbed mother-child interaction. Considerations of the effects of therapy were not possible due to the study design.

  13. Technology-enhanced instruction in learning world languages: The Middlebury interactive learning program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Lake

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Middlebury Interactive Language (MIL programs are designed to teach world language courses using blended and online learning for students in kindergarten through grade 12. Middlebury Interactive courses start with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of world-language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. As students progress through the course levels, they deepen their understanding of the target language, continuing to focus on the three modes of communication: interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational. The extensive use of authentic materials (video, audio, images, or texts is intended to provide a contextualized and interactive presentation of the vocabulary and the linguistic structures. In the present paper, we describe the MIL program and the results of a mixed-methods survey and case-study evaluation of its implementation in a broad sample of schools. Technology application is examined with regard to MIL instructional strategies and the present evaluation approach relative to those employed in the literature.

  14. Three-dimensional interactive Molecular Dynamics program for the study of defect dynamics in crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patriarca, M.; Kuronen, A.; Robles, M.; Kaski, K.

    2007-01-01

    The study of crystal defects and the complex processes underlying their formation and time evolution has motivated the development of the program ALINE for interactive molecular dynamics experiments. This program couples a molecular dynamics code to a Graphical User Interface and runs on a UNIX-X11 Window System platform with the MOTIF library, which is contained in many standard Linux releases. ALINE is written in C, thus giving the user the possibility to modify the source code, and, at the same time, provides an effective and user-friendly framework for numerical experiments, in which the main parameters can be interactively varied and the system visualized in various ways. We illustrate the main features of the program through some examples of detection and dynamical tracking of point-defects, linear defects, and planar defects, such as stacking faults in lattice-mismatched heterostructures. Program summaryTitle of program:ALINE Catalogue identifier:ADYJ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADYJ_v1_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer for which the program is designed and others on which it has been tested: Computers:DEC ALPHA 300, Intel i386 compatible computers, G4 Apple Computers Installations:Laboratory of Computational Engineering, Helsinki University of Technology, Helsinki, Finland Operating systems under which the program has been tested:True64 UNIX, Linux-i386, Mac OS X 10.3 and 10.4 Programming language used:Standard C and MOTIF libraries Memory required to execute with typical data:6 Mbytes but may be larger depending on the system size No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:16 901 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.:449 559 Distribution format:tar.gz Nature of physical problem:Some phenomena involving defects take place inside three-dimensional crystals at times which can be hardly predicted. For this reason they are

  15. Reducing Channel Interaction Through Cochlear Implant Programming May Improve Speech Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie A. Bierer

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Speech perception among cochlear implant (CI listeners is highly variable. High degrees of channel interaction are associated with poorer speech understanding. Two methods for reducing channel interaction, focusing electrical fields, and deactivating subsets of channels were assessed by the change in vowel and consonant identification scores with different program settings. The main hypotheses were that (a focused stimulation will improve phoneme recognition and (b speech perception will improve when channels with high thresholds are deactivated. To select high-threshold channels for deactivation, subjects’ threshold profiles were processed to enhance the peaks and troughs, and then an exclusion or inclusion criterion based on the mean and standard deviation was used. Low-threshold channels were selected manually and matched in number and apex-to-base distribution. Nine ears in eight adult CI listeners with Advanced Bionics HiRes90k devices were tested with six experimental programs. Two, all-channel programs, (a 14-channel partial tripolar (pTP and (b 14-channel monopolar (MP, and four variable-channel programs, derived from these two base programs, (c pTP with high- and (d low-threshold channels deactivated, and (e MP with high- and (f low-threshold channels deactivated, were created. Across subjects, performance was similar with pTP and MP programs. However, poorer performing subjects (scoring  2. These same subjects showed slightly more benefit with the reduced channel MP programs (5 and 6. Subjective ratings were consistent with performance. These finding suggest that reducing channel interaction may benefit poorer performing CI listeners.

  16. A Pilot Study for Linking Adolescent Patients to an Interactive Tobacco Prevention Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabro, Karen S; Marani, Salma K; Le, Thuan A; Khalil, Georges E; Tami-Maury, Irene M; Prokhorov, Alexander V

    2017-01-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics and professional guidelines recommend intervening with adolescents about avoiding tobacco use in the health-care setting. Barriers in the clinical setting limit consistent provision of this critical service. This pilot study compared 2 approaches for referring adolescents to an evidence-based tobacco prevention and cessation program in the outpatient setting. Secondary aims assessed tobacco use, knowledge, and program evaluation. The study setting was a medical and dental clinic. Participants aged 13 to 18 received tobacco advice and instructions to work through "A Smoking Prevention Interactive Experience." The program addresses health concerns of adolescents about tobacco use and is founded on behavioral change theories. The link to access it is featured on the website of the National Cancer Institute's Research-Tested Interventions. Participants (N = 197) were randomized to 1 of 2 approaches (ie, a program link via e-mail or referral by a printed card). The program was accessed by 57% (112 of 197) of participants. Both referral approaches were equally effective. Non-Hispanics were twice as likely to access the program as Hispanics (adjusted odds ratio = 2.1, 95% confidence interval = 1.2-3.8, P tobacco and evaluated the program as beneficial in increasing knowledge and motivation to remain tobacco-free. Linking adolescent patients to an evidence-based tobacco prevention/cessation program at a community health clinic was highly promising and feasible. We present conclusions for future research.

  17. Analyzing the Quality of Students Interaction in a Distance Learning Object-Oriented Programming Discipline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Simão Carvalho

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Teaching object-oriented programming to students in an in-classroom environment demands well-thought didactic and pedagogical strategies in order to guarantee a good level of apprenticeship. To teach it on a completely distance learning environment (e-learning imposes possibly other strategies, besides those that the e-learning model of Open University of Portugal dictates. This article analyses the behavior of the students of the 1st cycle in Computer Science while interacting with the object-oriented programming (OOP discipline available to them on the Moodle platform. Through the evaluation of the level of interaction achieved in a group of relevant selected actions by the students, it is possible to identify their relevancy to the success of the programming learning process. Data was extracted from Moodle, numerically analyzed, and, with the use of some charts, behavior patterns of students were identified. This paper points out potential new approaches to be considered in e-learning in order to enhance programming learning results, besides confirming a high level of drop-out and a low level of interaction, thus finding no clear correlation between students’ success and the number of online actions (especially in forums, which reveals a possible failure of the main pillar on which the e-learning model relies.

  18. Towards Interactive Visual Exploration of Parallel Programs using a Domain-Specific Language

    KAUST Repository

    Klein, Tobias

    2016-04-19

    The use of GPUs and the massively parallel computing paradigm have become wide-spread. We describe a framework for the interactive visualization and visual analysis of the run-time behavior of massively parallel programs, especially OpenCL kernels. This facilitates understanding a program\\'s function and structure, finding the causes of possible slowdowns, locating program bugs, and interactively exploring and visually comparing different code variants in order to improve performance and correctness. Our approach enables very specific, user-centered analysis, both in terms of the recording of the run-time behavior and the visualization itself. Instead of having to manually write instrumented code to record data, simple code annotations tell the source-to-source compiler which code instrumentation to generate automatically. The visualization part of our framework then enables the interactive analysis of kernel run-time behavior in a way that can be very specific to a particular problem or optimization goal, such as analyzing the causes of memory bank conflicts or understanding an entire parallel algorithm.

  19. SEISPRHO: An interactive computer program for processing and interpretation of high-resolution seismic reflection profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasperini, Luca; Stanghellini, Giuseppe

    2009-07-01

    SEISPRHO is an interactive computer program for processing and interpreting high-resolution seismic reflection profiles developed using the Delphi/Kylix multiplatform programming environment. For this reason, it is available under Windows™ and Linux™ operating systems. The program allows the users to handle SEG-Y data files (and other non-standard formats) carrying out a processing sequence over the data to obtain, as a final result, bitmap images of seismic sections. Some basic algorithms are implemented, including filtering and deconvolution. However, the main feature of SEISPRHO is its interactive graphic interface, which provides the user with several tools for interpreting the data, such as reflector picking and map digitizing. Moreover, the program allows importing and geo-referencing maps and seismic profiles in the form of digital images. Trace-by-trace analysis of seismic signal and sea-bottom reflectivity is also implemented, as well as other special functions such as compilation of time-slice maps from close-spaced grids of seismic lines. SEISPRHO is distributed as public domain software for non-commercial purposes by the Marine Geology division of the Istituto di Scienze Marine ( ISMAR-CNR). This paper is an introduction to the program and a preliminary guide to the users.

  20. Control system design and analysis using the INteractive Controls Analysis (INCA) program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Frank H.; Downing, John P.

    1987-01-01

    The INteractive Controls Analysis (INCA) program was developed at the Goddard Space Flight Center to provide a user friendly efficient environment for the design and analysis of linear control systems. Since its inception, INCA has found extensive use in the design, development, and analysis of control systems for spacecraft, instruments, robotics, and pointing systems. Moreover, the results of the analytic tools imbedded in INCA have been flight proven with at least three currently orbiting spacecraft. This paper describes the INCA program and illustrates, using a flight proven example, how the package can perform complex design analyses with relative ease.

  1. "What Should I Draw? I'll Draw You!": Facilitating Interaction and Learning Opportunities in Intergenerational Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydon, Rachel; Daly, Bridget

    2008-01-01

    Intergenerational (IG) programming creates a means for meaningful and relevant experiences and interactions between participants. Focusing on child participants and art programming, this article describes an accordion book project. Vignettes highlight some of the project's learning opportunities and interactions for elders and young children.

  2. Petri Nets Based Modelling of Control Flow for Memory-Aid Interactive Programs in Telemedicine

    CERN Document Server

    Khoromskaia, V K

    2004-01-01

    Petri Nets (PN) based modelling of the control flow for the interactive memory assistance programs designed for personal pocket computers and having special requirements for robustness is considered. The proposed concept allows one to elaborate the programs which can give users a variety of possibilities for a day-time planning in the presence of environmental and time restrictions. First, a PN model for a known simple algorithm is constructed and analyzed using the corresponding state equations and incidence matrix. Then a PN graph for a complicated algorithm with overlapping actions and choice possibilities is designed, supplemented by an example of its analysis. Dynamic behaviour of this graph is tested by tracing of all possible paths of the flow of control using the PN simulator. It is shown that PN based modelling provides reliably predictable performance of interactive algorithms with branched structures and concurrency requirements.

  3. Developing Critical Thinking Skills through Interactive Radio Programs (IRPs: Building Online Knowledge Networks In Distance Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulsun KURUBACAK

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In considering how best to optimize distance education systems, economy (cost effectiveness and efficiency, technology (communication technologies and equity (gender, accessibility, minority, language, religion etc. are vital issues in any distance education systems. Moreover, how end-users, distance learners, can equally share and exchange knowledge and resources for educational purposes, how they can promote their higher-order thinking skills as well as how they can cope with the limitations they have (such as time, age, gender, language etc. are major concerns in distance education milieus. Kurubacak strongly emphasize that interactive radio programs, as a forgotten educational media, with a little cost can effectively integrate in any distance education systems. Therefore, the main purpose of this paper is to focus on interactive radio programs to build critical and creative knowledge networks among diverse learners in the distance education systems of developing countries.

  4. Effects of a dolphin interaction program on children with autism spectrum disorders – an exploratory research

    OpenAIRE

    Salgueiro, Emílio; Nunes, Laura; Barros, Alexandra; Maroco, João; Salgueiro, Ana Isabel; dos Santos, Manuel E

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Interaction programs involving dolphins and patients with various pathologies or developmental disorders (e.g., cerebral palsy, intellectual impairment, autism, atopic dermatitis, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression) have stimulated interest in their beneficial effects and therapeutic potential. However, the true effects observed in different clinical and psycho-educational setups are still controversial. Results An evaluation protocol consisting of the Childhood Au...

  5. Interact for What? The Relationship between Interpersonal Interaction Based on Motivation and Educational Outcomes among Students in Manufacturing Programs at Two-Year Technical Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Hsun-yu; Wang, Xueli

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study explored the relationship between different types of interpersonal interaction, characterized by their underlying motivations, and educational outcomes among students in manufacturing programs at two-year colleges. While there exist several ways to classify interaction, motivation as an inherent attribute that fuels behaviors…

  6. [Computer-assisted multimedia interactive learning program "Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, V B; Zenz, H; Eisenmann, D; Tekaat, C J; Wagner, R; Jacobi, K W

    1996-05-01

    Advances in the area of information technology have opened up new possibilities for the use of interactive media in the training of medical students. Classical instructional technologies, such as video, slides, audio cassettes and computer programs with a textbook orientation, have been merged into one multimedia computer system. The medical profession has been increasingly integrating computer-based applications which can be used, for example, for record keeping within a medical practice. The goal of this development is to provide access to all modes of information storage and retrieval as well as documentation and training systems within a specific context. Since the beginning of the winter semester 1995, the Department of Ophthalmology in Giessen has used the learning program "Primary Open Angle Glaucoma" in student instruction. One factor that contributed to the implementation of this project was that actual training using patients within the clinic is difficult to conduct. Media-supported training that can provide a simulation of actual practice offers a suitable substitute. The learning program has been installed on Power PCs (Apple MacIntosh), which make up the technical foundation of our system. The program was developed using Hypercard software, which provides userfriendly graphical work environment. This controls the input and retrieval of data, direct editing of documents, immediate simulation, the creation of on-screen documents and the integration of slides that have been scanned in as well as QuickTime films. All of this can be accomplished without any special knowledge of programming language or operating systems on the part of the user. The glaucoma learning program is structured along the lines of anatomy, including an explanation of the circulation of the aqueous humor, pathology, clinical symptoms and findings, diagnosis and treatment. This structure along with the possibility for creating a list of personal files for the user with a collection

  7. Teaching a Systematic Approach for Transitioning Patients to College: An Interactive Continuing Medical Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Adele; Derenne, Jennifer; Chan, Vivien

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to determine the effectiveness of a hands-on continuing education program for practicing child and adolescent psychiatrists (CAPs) with a focus on best practices in transitioning psychiatric patients to college. The plan was to build on the unique knowledge and skill set of CAPs, use audience and facilitator feedback from prior programs to inform program content, structure, and format, and incorporate findings from the evolving literature. A 3-h interactive workshop was designed with an emphasis on audience participation. The workshop was divided into three main segments: didactics, whole group discussion/brainstorming, and small group discussion of illustrative case vignettes. Improvements and changes in knowledge, skills, and attitudes related to transition planning were identified by program participants. Quantitative feedback in the form of course evaluations, pre- and posttests, and a 6-month follow-up questionnaire indicate that the use of interactive teaching techniques is a productive learning experience for practicing CAPs. Qualitative feedback was that the discussion of the case vignettes was the most helpful. The use of a workshop format is an effective strategy to engage practicing CAPs in learning about and implementing best practices to support the transition of their patients to college and into young adulthood. Comprehensive and proactive transition planning, facilitated by clinicians, should promote the wellness of college-bound patients and help to reduce the potential risks in the setting of an upcoming transition.

  8. A Pilot Study for Linking Adolescent Patients to an Interactive Tobacco Prevention Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen S. Calabro

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Context: The American Academy of Pediatrics and professional guidelines recommend intervening with adolescents about avoiding tobacco use in the health-care setting. Barriers in the clinical setting limit consistent provision of this critical service. Objectives: This pilot study compared 2 approaches for referring adolescents to an evidence-based tobacco prevention and cessation program in the outpatient setting. Secondary aims assessed tobacco use, knowledge, and program evaluation. Design, Setting, and Participants: The study setting was a medical and dental clinic. Participants aged 13 to 18 received tobacco advice and instructions to work through “A Smoking Prevention Interactive Experience.” The program addresses health concerns of adolescents about tobacco use and is founded on behavioral change theories. The link to access it is featured on the website of the National Cancer Institute’s Research-Tested Interventions. Participants (N = 197 were randomized to 1 of 2 approaches (ie, a program link via e-mail or referral by a printed card. Results: The program was accessed by 57% (112 of 197 of participants. Both referral approaches were equally effective. Non-Hispanics were twice as likely to access the program as Hispanics (adjusted odds ratio = 2.1, 95% confidence interval = 1.2-3.8, P < .05. Over 95% of participants identified themselves as nonusers of tobacco and evaluated the program as beneficial in increasing knowledge and motivation to remain tobacco-free. Conclusion: Linking adolescent patients to an evidence-based tobacco prevention/cessation program at a community health clinic was highly promising and feasible. We present conclusions for future research.

  9. [Programmed necrosis mediated by receptor-interacting protein 3: a new target for liver disease research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Jing, Y; Li, Y N; Zhou, L; Wang, B M

    2016-09-20

    Hepatocyte death mainly includes apoptosis and necrosis and is a critical process in the pathophysiological mechanism of liver injury caused by various reasons. Recent studies have shown that key regulatory molecules in the inhibition of apoptosis such as caspase cannot be used as targets for inhibiting disease progression in clinical practice. In recent years, programmed necrosis mediated by receptor-interacting protein 3(RIP3)becomes a new hot research topic. It not only plays an important role in inducing inflammatory response, but also is closely regulated by intracellular signal factors, and it is a type of active cell death which can be interfered with. Compared with apoptosis, programmed necrosis is accompanied by the release of various inflammatory factors, which significantly affects local immune microenvironment. RIP3-mediated programmed necrosis has been taken seriously in many diseases. Although its mechanism of action in liver disease remains unclear, the results of recent studies confirmed its important role in the development of liver disease. This article reviews the research advances in the role of RIP3-mediated programmed necrosis signaling pathway in liver disease of various causes and investigates the possibility of RIP3-mediated programmed necrosis as a new target in the treatment of liver disease.

  10. A descriptive study of the interaction behaviors in a language video program and in live elementary language classes using that video program

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes, Solange Aparecida

    1996-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to describe: 1) the predominant types of interaction behaviors encountered in a foreign language video program; and 2) the types of teacher-student interaction features that resulted from use of the instructional video in elementary school classrooms. Based on the findings, the second purpose of the study was to examine how these interaction behaviors shaped amount of teacher and student talk in the two sources of data. The researcher exami...

  11. An interactive program for computer-aided map design, display, and query: EMAPKGS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouch, G.W.

    1997-01-01

    EMAPKGS2 is a user-friendly, PC-based electronic mapping tool for use in hydrogeologic exploration and appraisal. EMAPKGS2 allows the analyst to construct maps interactively from data stored in a relational database, perform point-oriented spatial queries such as locating all wells within a specified radius, perform geographic overlays, and export the data to other programs for further analysis. EMAPKGS2 runs under Microsoft?? Windows??? 3.1 and compatible operating systems. EMAPKGS2 is a public domain program available from the Kansas Geological Survey. EMAPKGS2 is the centerpiece of WHEAT, the Windows-based Hydrogeologic Exploration and Appraisal Toolkit, a suite of user-friendly Microsoft?? Windows??? programs for natural resource exploration and management. The principal goals in development of WHEAT have been ease of use, hardware independence, low cost, and end-user extensibility. WHEAT'S native data format is a Microsoft?? Access?? database. WHEAT stores a feature's geographic coordinates as attributes so they can be accessed easily by the user. The WHEAT programs are designed to be used in conjunction with other Microsoft?? Windows??? software to allow the natural resource scientist to perform work easily and effectively. WHEAT and EMAPKGS have been used at several of Kansas' Groundwater Management Districts and the Kansas Geological Survey on groundwater management operations, groundwater modeling projects, and geologic exploration projects. ?? 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  12. Participant satisfaction with a school telehealth education program using interactive compressed video delivery methods in rural Arkansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bynum, Ann B; Cranford, Charles O; Irwin, Cathy A; Denny, George S

    2002-08-01

    Socioeconomic and demographic factors can affect the impact of telehealth education programs that use interactive compressed video technology. This study assessed program satisfaction among participants in the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences' School Telehealth Education Program delivered by interactive compressed video. Variables in the one-group posttest study were age, gender, ethnicity, education, community size, and program topics for years 1997-1999. The convenience sample included 3,319 participants in junior high and high schools. The School Telehealth Education Program provided information about health risks, disease prevention, health promotion, personal growth, and health sciences. Adolescents reported medium to high levels of satisfaction regarding program interest and quality. Significantly higher satisfaction was expressed for programs on muscular dystrophy, anatomy of the heart, and tobacco addiction (p Education Program, delivered by interactive compressed video, promoted program satisfaction among rural and minority populations and among junior high and high school students. Effective program methods included an emphasis on participants' learning needs, increasing access in rural areas among ethnic groups, speaker communication, and clarity of the program presentation.

  13. Combining interactive multiple goal linear programming with an inter-stakeholder communication matrix to generate land use options

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nidumolu, U.B.; Keulen, van H.; Lubbers, M.T.M.H.; Mapfumo, P.

    2007-01-01

    An Interactive Multiple Goal Linear Programming (IMGLP) model is developed that considers objectives of multiple stakeholders, i.e. different farmer groups, district agricultural officers and agricultural scientists for agricultural land use analysis. The analysis focuses on crop selection;

  14. Methods to optimize livestock breeding programs with genotype by environment interaction and genetic heterogeneity of environmental variance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, H.A.

    2007-01-01

    Genotype by environment interaction (G × E) and genetic heterogeneity of environmental variance are both related to genetic variation in environmental sensitivity. Both phenomena can have consequences for livestock breeding programs. This thesis focuses on developing methods to optimize livestock

  15. Mitigation of adverse interactions in pairs of clinical practice guidelines using constraint logic programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilk, Szymon; Michalowski, Wojtek; Michalowski, Martin; Farion, Ken; Hing, Marisela Mainegra; Mohapatra, Subhra

    2013-04-01

    We propose a new method to mitigate (identify and address) adverse interactions (drug-drug or drug-disease) that occur when a patient with comorbid diseases is managed according to two concurrently applied clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). A lack of methods to facilitate the concurrent application of CPGs severely limits their use in clinical practice and the development of such methods is one of the grand challenges for clinical decision support. The proposed method responds to this challenge. We introduce and formally define logical models of CPGs and other related concepts, and develop the mitigation algorithm that operates on these concepts. In the algorithm we combine domain knowledge encoded as interaction and revision operators using the constraint logic programming (CLP) paradigm. The operators characterize adverse interactions and describe revisions to logical models required to address these interactions, while CLP allows us to efficiently solve the logical models - a solution represents a feasible therapy that may be safely applied to a patient. The mitigation algorithm accepts two CPGs and available (likely incomplete) patient information. It reports whether mitigation has been successful or not, and on success it gives a feasible therapy and points at identified interactions (if any) together with the revisions that address them. Thus, we consider the mitigation algorithm as an alerting tool to support a physician in the concurrent application of CPGs that can be implemented as a component of a clinical decision support system. We illustrate our method in the context of two clinical scenarios involving a patient with duodenal ulcer who experiences an episode of transient ischemic attack. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Prediction of protein interaction hot spots using rough set-based multiple criteria linear programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ruoying; Zhang, Zhiwang; Wu, Di; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Xinyang; Wang, Yong; Shi, Yong

    2011-01-21

    Protein-protein interactions are fundamentally important in many biological processes and it is in pressing need to understand the principles of protein-protein interactions. Mutagenesis studies have found that only a small fraction of surface residues, known as hot spots, are responsible for the physical binding in protein complexes. However, revealing hot spots by mutagenesis experiments are usually time consuming and expensive. In order to complement the experimental efforts, we propose a new computational approach in this paper to predict hot spots. Our method, Rough Set-based Multiple Criteria Linear Programming (RS-MCLP), integrates rough sets theory and multiple criteria linear programming to choose dominant features and computationally predict hot spots. Our approach is benchmarked by a dataset of 904 alanine-mutated residues and the results show that our RS-MCLP method performs better than other methods, e.g., MCLP, Decision Tree, Bayes Net, and the existing HotSprint database. In addition, we reveal several biological insights based on our analysis. We find that four features (the change of accessible surface area, percentage of the change of accessible surface area, size of a residue, and atomic contacts) are critical in predicting hot spots. Furthermore, we find that three residues (Tyr, Trp, and Phe) are abundant in hot spots through analyzing the distribution of amino acids. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Interactive software tool to comprehend the calculation of optimal sequence alignments with dynamic programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra, Ignacio L; Melo, Francisco

    2010-07-01

    Dynamic programming (DP) is a general optimization strategy that is successfully used across various disciplines of science. In bioinformatics, it is widely applied in calculating the optimal alignment between pairs of protein or DNA sequences. These alignments form the basis of new, verifiable biological hypothesis. Despite its importance, there are no interactive tools available for training and education on understanding the DP algorithm. Here, we introduce an interactive computer application with a graphical interface, for the purpose of educating students about DP. The program displays the DP scoring matrix and the resulting optimal alignment(s), while allowing the user to modify key parameters such as the values in the similarity matrix, the sequence alignment algorithm version and the gap opening/extension penalties. We hope that this software will be useful to teachers and students of bioinformatics courses, as well as researchers who implement the DP algorithm for diverse applications. The software is freely available at: http:/melolab.org/sat. The software is written in the Java computer language, thus it runs on all major platforms and operating systems including Windows, Mac OS X and LINUX. All inquiries or comments about this software should be directed to Francisco Melo at fmelo@bio.puc.cl.

  18. K-12 Neuroscience Education Outreach Program: Interactive Activities for Educating Students about Neuroscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deal, Alex L.; Erickson, Kristen J.; Bilsky, Edward J.; Hillman, Susan J.; Burman, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The University of New England’s Center for Excellence in the Neurosciences has developed a successful and growing K-12 outreach program that incorporates undergraduate and graduate/professional students. The program has several goals, including raising awareness about fundamental issues in neuroscience, supplementing science education in area schools and enhancing undergraduate and graduate/professional students’ academic knowledge and skill set. The outreach curriculum is centered on core neuroscience themes including: Brain Safety, Neuroanatomy, Drugs of Abuse and Addiction, Neurological and Psychiatric Disorders, and Cognition and Brain Function. For each theme, lesson plans were developed based upon interactive, small-group activities. Additionally, we’ve organized our themes in a “Grow-up, Grow-out” approach. Grow-up refers to returning to a common theme, increasing in complexity as we revisit students from early elementary through high school. Grow-out refers to integrating other scientific fields into our lessons, such as the chemistry of addiction, the physics of brain injury and neuronal imaging. One of the more successful components of our program is our innovative team-based model of curriculum design. By creating a team of undergraduate, graduate/professional students and faculty, we create a unique multi-level mentoring opportunity that appears to be successful in enhancing undergraduate students’ skills and knowledge. Preliminary assessments suggest that undergraduates believe they are enhancing their content knowledge and professional skills through our program. Additionally, we’re having a significant, short-term impact on K-12 interest in science. Overall, our program appears to be enhancing the academic experience of our undergraduates and exciting K-12 students about the brain and science in general. PMID:25565921

  19. K-12 Neuroscience Education Outreach Program: Interactive Activities for Educating Students about Neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deal, Alex L; Erickson, Kristen J; Bilsky, Edward J; Hillman, Susan J; Burman, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    The University of New England's Center for Excellence in the Neurosciences has developed a successful and growing K-12 outreach program that incorporates undergraduate and graduate/professional students. The program has several goals, including raising awareness about fundamental issues in neuroscience, supplementing science education in area schools and enhancing undergraduate and graduate/professional students' academic knowledge and skill set. The outreach curriculum is centered on core neuroscience themes including: Brain Safety, Neuroanatomy, Drugs of Abuse and Addiction, Neurological and Psychiatric Disorders, and Cognition and Brain Function. For each theme, lesson plans were developed based upon interactive, small-group activities. Additionally, we've organized our themes in a "Grow-up, Grow-out" approach. Grow-up refers to returning to a common theme, increasing in complexity as we revisit students from early elementary through high school. Grow-out refers to integrating other scientific fields into our lessons, such as the chemistry of addiction, the physics of brain injury and neuronal imaging. One of the more successful components of our program is our innovative team-based model of curriculum design. By creating a team of undergraduate, graduate/professional students and faculty, we create a unique multi-level mentoring opportunity that appears to be successful in enhancing undergraduate students' skills and knowledge. Preliminary assessments suggest that undergraduates believe they are enhancing their content knowledge and professional skills through our program. Additionally, we're having a significant, short-term impact on K-12 interest in science. Overall, our program appears to be enhancing the academic experience of our undergraduates and exciting K-12 students about the brain and science in general.

  20. Community translation of the Math Interactive Learning Experience Program for children with FASD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kable, Julie A; Taddeo, Elles; Strickland, Dorothy; Coles, Claire D

    2015-04-01

    The Math Interactive Learning Experience (MILE), a program designed to address academic and behavioral problems found in children with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD), was found to be effective in a randomized clinical trials with results that persisted at a 6-month follow-up. The current study evaluated the effectiveness of a community translation, in partnership with several community sites in the metropolitan Atlanta area. A total of 60 participants were randomly assigned to one of the three treatment groups: the MILE program administered at a specialty care center (Center MILE) or in the community (Community MILE), or to parent math instruction only (Parent Instruction). This study evaluated instructor satisfaction with the training program, knowledge related to FASD and the MILE program, adherence to the MILE teaching methodology, participant math outcomes, and parents' satisfaction with their treatment experience. Instructors reported a high degree of satisfaction with the overall training and mean site fidelity ratings were positively correlated with change in math performance. Those in the MILE intervention groups demonstrated more positive gains in math skills than those in the Parent Instruction group but did not differ from each other. Parents in the Parent Instruction group reported less satisfaction with their intervention than those assigned to the Center MILE group but satisfaction ratings did not differ between those in the MILE intervention groups. These results indicate that the community translation and the MILE instructor training program developed as part of this process were well-received and effective in producing positive treatment outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Contact: Effects of an Intervention Program To Foster Harmonious Interactions between Deaf-Blind Children and Their Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Marleen J.; Riksen-Walraven, J. Marianne; Van Dijk, Jan P. M.

    2003-01-01

    This study examined the effects of an intervention program to improve the quality of daily interaction between six congenitally deaf-blind children and their 14 educators (teachers, caregivers, and mothers). With video analysis as the most important tool, the interaction coaches trained the educators to recognize the children's signals and attune…

  2. A Cognitive Model of How Interactive Multimedia Authoring Facilitates Conceptual Understanding of Object-Oriented Programming in Novices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Timothy; Liu, Min

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a cognitive model of how interactive multimedia authoring (IMA) affect novices' cognition in object-oriented programming. This model was generated through an empirical study of first year computer science students at the university level being engaged in interactive multimedia authoring of a role-playing game. Clinical…

  3. Arctic Connections, an Interactive CD-ROM Program for Middle School Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, S. A.

    2003-12-01

    In this project we developed an interactive CD-ROM program for middle school students, accompanied by an interactive web site. The project was sponsored by a grant from the NSF ESIE Instructional Materials Development program. One of the major goals of this project was to involve middle school students in inquiry-based science education, using topics that are of interest to students in Arctic communities. Native Alaskan students have traditionally done poorly in science at the secondary level, and few have gone on to major in the sciences in college or to pursue scientific careers. Part of the problem is a perceived dichotomy between science and traditional Native ways of knowing about the natural world. Hence some students reject the scientific method as being foreign to their native culture. Our goal was to help bridge this cultural barrier, and to demonstrate to native students that the scientific method is not antithetical to their traditional way of life. The program uses story modules that discuss both scientific and Native ways of understanding, through the use of action-adventure stories and brief learning modules. The aim was to show students the relevance of science to their daily lives, and to convince them that scientific methods are a vital tool in solving major problems in arctic communities. Each action-adventure story contains a series of problems that the program user must solve through interactive participation, in order for the story to progress. The interactive elements include answering quiz questions correctly, measuring pH by comparing litmus paper colors, measuring archaeological artifact dimensions, finding the location of fossil bones in a photograph, and correctly identifying photographs of whale species, arctic plants, and fish. The stories contain a mixture of live-action film sequences and voice-over sketch art story boards. The ten modules include such topics as arctic flora and fauna (including terrestrial and sea mammals), arctic

  4. Building Interactivity in Higher Education to Support Student Engagement in Spatial Problem Solving and Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulland, E.-K.; Veenendaal, B.; Schut, A. G. T.

    2012-07-01

    Problem-solving knowledge and skills are an important attribute of spatial sciences graduates. The challenge of higher education is to build a teaching and learning environment that enables students to acquire these skills in relevant and authentic applications. This study investigates the effectiveness of traditional face-to-face teaching and online learning technologies in supporting the student learning of problem-solving and computer programming skills, techniques and solutions. The student cohort considered for this study involves students in the surveying as well as geographic information science (GISc) disciplines. Also, students studying across a range of learning modes including on-campus, distance and blended, are considered in this study. Student feedback and past studies reveal a lack of student interest and engagement in problem solving and computer programming. Many students do not see such skills as directly relevant and applicable to their perceptions of what future spatial careers hold. A range of teaching and learning methods for both face-to-face teaching and distance learning were introduced to address some of the perceived weaknesses of the learning environment. These included initiating greater student interaction in lectures, modifying assessments to provide greater feedback and student accountability, and the provision of more interactive and engaging online learning resources. The paper presents and evaluates the teaching methods used to support the student learning environment. Responses of students in relation to their learning experiences were collected via two anonymous, online surveys and these results were analysed with respect to student pass and retention rates. The study found a clear distinction between expectations and engagement of surveying students in comparison to GISc students. A further outcome revealed that students who were already engaged in their learning benefited the most from the interactive learning resources and

  5. BUILDING INTERACTIVITY IN HIGHER EDUCATION TO SUPPORT STUDENT ENGAGEMENT IN SPATIAL PROBLEM SOLVING AND PROGRAMMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.-K. Gulland

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Problem-solving knowledge and skills are an important attribute of spatial sciences graduates. The challenge of higher education is to build a teaching and learning environment that enables students to acquire these skills in relevant and authentic applications. This study investigates the effectiveness of traditional face-to-face teaching and online learning technologies in supporting the student learning of problem-solving and computer programming skills, techniques and solutions. The student cohort considered for this study involves students in the surveying as well as geographic information science (GISc disciplines. Also, students studying across a range of learning modes including on-campus, distance and blended, are considered in this study. Student feedback and past studies reveal a lack of student interest and engagement in problem solving and computer programming. Many students do not see such skills as directly relevant and applicable to their perceptions of what future spatial careers hold. A range of teaching and learning methods for both face-to-face teaching and distance learning were introduced to address some of the perceived weaknesses of the learning environment. These included initiating greater student interaction in lectures, modifying assessments to provide greater feedback and student accountability, and the provision of more interactive and engaging online learning resources. The paper presents and evaluates the teaching methods used to support the student learning environment. Responses of students in relation to their learning experiences were collected via two anonymous, online surveys and these results were analysed with respect to student pass and retention rates. The study found a clear distinction between expectations and engagement of surveying students in comparison to GISc students. A further outcome revealed that students who were already engaged in their learning benefited the most from the interactive

  6. PENGEMBANGAN INTERACTIVE E-BOOK BIDANG ASESMEN BAHASA UNTUK MENGEMBANGKAN KOMPETENSI DAN KEMANDIRIAN MAHASISWA PROGRAM PENDIDIKAN BAHASA

    OpenAIRE

    Sri Wahyuni

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to produce an interactive electronic book (e-book) model for language assessment to develop the competency and autonomy of the students of the Indonesian language study program. The study employed a research and development procedure consisting of: a preliminary study, planning, and product development. The results of the study are as follows. First, the developed interactive e-book package consists of Lecturer’s Manual, Student’s Manual, and an interactive e-book on language ...

  7. Community structure detection for overlapping modules through mathematical programming in protein interaction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Bennett

    Full Text Available Community structure detection has proven to be important in revealing the underlying properties of complex networks. The standard problem, where a partition of disjoint communities is sought, has been continually adapted to offer more realistic models of interactions in these systems. Here, a two-step procedure is outlined for exploring the concept of overlapping communities. First, a hard partition is detected by employing existing methodologies. We then propose a novel mixed integer non linear programming (MINLP model, known as OverMod, which transforms disjoint communities to overlapping. The procedure is evaluated through its application to protein-protein interaction (PPI networks of the rat, E. coli, yeast and human organisms. Connector nodes of hard partitions exhibit topological and functional properties indicative of their suitability as candidates for multiple module membership. OverMod identifies two types of connector nodes, inter and intra-connector, each with their own particular characteristics pertaining to their topological and functional role in the organisation of the network. Inter-connector proteins are shown to be highly conserved proteins participating in pathways that control essential cellular processes, such as proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis and their differences with intra-connectors is highlighted. Many of these proteins are shown to possess multiple roles of distinct nature through their participation in different network modules, setting them apart from proteins that are simply 'hubs', i.e. proteins with many interaction partners but with a more specific biochemical role.

  8. AZTECA, a y-y diagram oriented interactive computer program for optical system design and optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Hernandez, Ricardo

    1995-09-01

    The Centro de Investigaciones en Optica is developing the AZTECA optical design program to exploit the full synthesis capabilities intrinsic to Delano's y-y method. Both the y- y diagram and its dual the (omega) -(omega) diagram, are manipulated in real time to introduce changes at any point or line in those diagrams. These changes result in altered new versions of the optical system by means of a specialized subroutine that incorporates the fundamental synthesis equations for those diagrams. To display results on the computer's screen as the optimization process progress, AZTECA makes wide use of the fact that the y-y and the (omega) -(omega) diagrams display graphically all the first order attributes of an optical system. This program adjoins to these features the calculation of Buchdahl's 3rd, 5th, and 7th order aberration coefficients to the output. This results in a real time display of the system's paraxial and aberrational behavior. Efficient graphic displays, the program's modular structure and an interactive mode of operation, also contribute to make the AZTECA a versatile platform. It will be further developed as a new tool for efficient optical system design.

  9. A Computer-Based Interactive Multimedia Program to Reduce HIV Transmission for Women with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaine, Khaya

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite recent recognition of the need for preventive sexual health materials for people with intellectual disability (ID), there have been remarkably few health-based interventions designed for people with mild to moderate ID. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a computer-based interactive multimedia (CBIM) program to teach HIV/AIDS knowledge, skills, and decision-making. Methods Twenty-five women with mild to moderate intellectual disability evaluated the program. The study used a quasi-experimental within-subjects design to assess the efficacy of the CBIM program. Research participants completed five qualitative and quantitative instruments that assessed HIV knowledge, and decision-making skills regarding HIV prevention practices and condom application skills (i.e., demonstration of skills opening a condom and putting it on a model penis). In addition, 18 service providers who work with women with ID reviewed the program and completed a demographics questionnaire and a professional customer satisfaction survey. Results Women with ID showed statistically significant increases from pretest to posttest in all knowledge and skill domains. Furthermore, the statistical gains were accompanied by medium to large effect sizes. Overall, service providers rated the program highly on several outcome measures (stimulation, relevance, and usability). Conclusions The results of this study indicate the CBIM program was effective in increasing HIV/AIDS knowledge and skills among women with ID, who live both semi-independently and independently, in a single-session intervention. Since the CBIM program is not dependent on staff for instructional delivery, it is a highly efficient teaching tool; and CBIM is an efficacious means to provide behavioral health content, compensating for the dearth of available health promotion materials for people with ID. As such, it has a potential for broad distribution and implementation by medical practitioners, and

  10. User`s manual for PVFORM: A photovoltaic system simulation program for stand-alone and grid-interactive applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menicucci, D.F.; Fernandez, J.P.

    1989-10-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has integrated improved photovoltaic (PV) system modelling techniques into a simplified program named PVFORM. The new model simulates hourly performance for a one-year period and is applicable to a grid-interactive or stand-alone PV flat-plate system. The program can be run on mainframe or personal computers. This manual describes how to operate the PVFORM program, with detailed examples of the required inputs. Sample outputs are also included and discussed. 8 refs.

  11. Operational Demands of AAC Mobile Technology Applications on Programming Vocabulary and Engagement During Professional and Child Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Jessica; Light, Janice; Drager, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    Typically, the vocabulary in augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) technologies is pre-programmed by manufacturers or by parents and professionals outside of daily interactions. Because vocabulary needs are difficult to predict, young children who use aided AAC often do not have access to vocabulary concepts as the need and interest arises in their daily interactions, limiting their vocabulary acquisition and use. Ideally, parents and professionals would be able to add vocabulary to AAC technologies "just-in-time" as required during daily interactions. This study compared the effects of two AAC applications for mobile technologies: GoTalk Now (which required more programming steps) and EasyVSD (which required fewer programming steps) on the number of visual scene displays (VSDs) and hotspots created in 10-min interactions between eight professionals and preschool-aged children with typical development. The results indicated that, although all of the professionals were able to create VSDs and add vocabulary during interactions with the children, they created more VSDs and hotspots with the app with fewer programming steps than with the one with more steps, and child engagement and programming participation levels were high with both apps, but higher levels for both variables were observed with the app with fewer programming steps than with the one with more steps. These results suggest that apps with fewer programming steps may reduce operational demands and better support professionals to (a) respond to the child's input, (b) use just-in-time programming during interactions, (c) provide access to more vocabulary, and (d) increase participation.

  12. Interactive computer program for learning genetic principles of segregation and independent assortment through meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoli; Ge, Rong; Yang, Yufei; Shen, Hao; Li, Yingjie; Tseng, Charles C

    2009-01-01

    Teaching fundamental principles of genetics such as segregation and independent assortment of genes could be challenging for high school and college biology instructors. Students without thorough knowledge in meiosis often end up of frustration and failure in genetics courses. Although all textbooks and laboratory manuals have excellent graphic demonstrations and photographs of meiotic process, students may not always master the concept due to the lack of hands-on exercise. In response to the need for an effective lab exercise to understand the segregation of allelic genes and the independent assortment of the unlinked genes, we developed an interactive program for students to manually manipulate chromosome models and visualize each major step of meiosis so that these two genetic principles can be thoroughly understood.

  13. Hypothalamic neuroendocrine circuitry is programmed by maternal obesity: interaction with postnatal nutritional environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Chen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Early life nutrition is critical for the development of hypothalamic neurons involved in energy homeostasis. We previously showed that intrauterine and early postnatal overnutrition programmed hypothalamic neurons expressing the appetite stimulator neuropeptide Y (NPY and suppressor proopiomelanocortin (POMC in offspring at weaning. However, the long-term effects of such programming and its interactions with post-weaning high-fat-diet (HFD consumption are unclear. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Female Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to chow or HFD for 5 weeks before mating, throughout gestation and lactation. On postnatal day 1, litters were adjusted to 3/litter to induce postnatal overnutrition (vs. 12 in control. At postnatal day 20, half of the rats from each maternal group were weaned onto chow or HFD for 15 weeks. Hypothalamic appetite regulators, and fuel (glucose and lipid metabolic markers were measured. RESULTS: Offspring from obese dams gained more weight than those from lean dams independent of post-weaning diet. Maternal obesity interacted with post-weaning HFD consumption to cause greater levels of hyperphagia, adiposity, hyperlipidemia, and glucose intolerance in offspring. This was linked to increased hypothalamic NPY signaling and leptin resistance in adult offspring. Litter size reduction had a detrimental impact on insulin and adiponectin, while hypothalamic NPY and POMC mRNA expression were suppressed in the face of normal energy intake and weight gain. CONCLUSIONS: Maternal obesity, postnatal litter size reduction and post-weaning HFD consumption caused obesity via different neuroendocrine mechanism. There were strong additive effects of maternal obesity and post-weaning HFD consumption to increase the metabolic disorders in offspring.

  14. Tailored Interactive Multimedia Computer Programs to Reduce Health Disparities: Opportunities and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerant, Anthony; Sohler, Nancy; Fiscella, Kevin; Franks, Becca; Franks, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Objective To review the theory and research evidence suggesting that tailored interactive multimedia computer programs (IMCPs) aimed at optimizing patient health behaviors could lessen socio-demographic health disparities. Methods Selective critical review of research regarding IMCPs tailored to psychological mediators of behavior and their effects on health behavior and outcomes among socio-demographically disadvantaged patients. Results Tailored IMCPs can address patient factors (e.g. language barriers, low self-efficacy) and buffer provider (e.g. cognitive bias) and health system (e.g. office visit time constraints) factors that contribute to poor provider-patient communication and, thereby, suboptimal health behaviors. Research indicates disadvantaged individuals' interactions with providers are disproportionately affected by such factors, and that their behaviors respond favorably to tailored information, thus suggesting tailored IMCPs could mitigate disparities. However, no randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have examined this question. The optimal design and deployment of tailored IMCPs for disadvantaged patients also requires further study. Conclusion Preliminary research suggests tailored IMCPs have the potential to reduce health disparities. RCTs designed expressly to examine this issue are warranted. Practice Implications Many socio-demographic health disparities exist, and there is a dearth of proven disparity-reducing interventions. Thus, if tailored IMCPs were shown to lessen disparities, the public health implications would be considerable. PMID:21146950

  15. FIT: Computer Program that Interactively Determines Polynomial Equations for Data which are a Function of Two Independent Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbuckle, P. D.; Sliwa, S. M.; Roy, M. L.; Tiffany, S. H.

    1985-01-01

    A computer program for interactively developing least-squares polynomial equations to fit user-supplied data is described. The program is characterized by the ability to compute the polynomial equations of a surface fit through data that are a function of two independent variables. The program utilizes the Langley Research Center graphics packages to display polynomial equation curves and data points, facilitating a qualitative evaluation of the effectiveness of the fit. An explanation of the fundamental principles and features of the program, as well as sample input and corresponding output, are included.

  16. The development of laser-plasma interaction program LAP3D on thousands of processors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Hu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Modeling laser-plasma interaction (LPI processes in real-size experiments scale is recognized as a challenging task. For explorering the influence of various instabilities in LPI processes, a three-dimensional laser and plasma code (LAP3D has been developed, which includes filamentation, stimulated Brillouin backscattering (SBS, stimulated Raman backscattering (SRS, non-local heat transport and plasmas flow computation modules. In this program, a second-order upwind scheme is applied to solve the plasma equations which are represented by an Euler fluid model. Operator splitting method is used for solving the equations of the light wave propagation, where the Fast Fourier translation (FFT is applied to compute the diffraction operator and the coordinate translations is used to solve the acoustic wave equation. The coupled terms of the different physics processes are computed by the second-order interpolations algorithm. In order to simulate the LPI processes in massively parallel computers well, several parallel techniques are used, such as the coupled parallel algorithm of FFT and fluid numerical computation, the load balance algorithm, and the data transfer algorithm. Now the phenomena of filamentation, SBS and SRS have been studied in low-density plasma successfully with LAP3D. Scalability of the program is demonstrated with a parallel efficiency above 50% on about ten thousand of processors.

  17. Application of an interactive computer program to manage a problem-based dental curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Colman; Comfort, Margaret B; Luo, Yan; Samaranayake, Lakshman P; Clark, Christopher D

    2006-04-01

    Managing the change from traditional to problem-based learning (PBL) curricula is complex because PBL employs problem cases as the vehicle for learning. Each problem case covers a wide range of different learning issues across many disciplines and is coordinated by different facilitators drawn from the school's multidisciplinary pool. The objective of this project was to adapt an interactive computer program to manage a problem-based dental curriculum. Through application of a commercial database software--CATs (Curriculum Analysis Tools)--an electronic database for all modules of a five-year problem-based program was developed. This involved inputting basic information on each problem case relating to competencies covered, key words (learning objectives), participating faculty, independent study, and homework assignments, as well as inputting information on contact hours. General reports were generated to provide an overview of the curriculum. In addition, competency, key word, manpower, and clock-hour reports at three levels (individual PBL course component, yearly, and the entire curriculum) were produced. Implications and uses of such reports are discussed. The adaptation of electronic technology for managing dental curricula for use in a PBL curriculum has implications for all those involved in managing new-style PBL dental curricula and those who have concerns about managing the PBL process.

  18. Gene-regulatory interactions in embryonic stem cells represent cell-type specific gene regulatory programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Misook; Hong, Soondo

    2017-10-13

    Pluripotency, the ability of embryonic stem cells to differentiate into specialized cell types, is determined by ESC-specific gene regulators such as transcription factors and chromatin modification factors. It is not well understood how ESCs are poised for differentiation, however, and methods are needed for prognosis of the molecular changes in the differentiation of ESCs into specific organs. We describe a new approach to infer cell-type specific gene regulatory programs based on gene regulatory interactions in ESCs. Our method infers the molecular logic of gene regulatory mechanisms by mapping the position-specific combinatory patterns of numerous regulators in ESCs into cell-type specific gene regulations. We validate the proposed approach by recapitulating the RNA-seq and microarray data of neuronal progenitor cells, adult liver cells, and ESCs from the integrated patterns of diverse gene regulators in ESCs. We find that the collective functions of diverse gene regulators in ESCs represent distinct gene regulatory programs in specialized cell types. Our new approach expands our understanding of the differential gene regulatory information in developments encoded in regulatory networks of ESCs. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. Effectiveness of education for gastric cancer patients: a controlled prospective trial comparing interactive vs. lecture-based programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, Hermann; Koch, Gunter F; Reusch, Andrea; Pauli, Paul; Allgayer, Hubert

    2009-07-01

    Although patient education may enhance knowledge, coping with illness, and quality of life among cancer patients, it is uncertain which didactic method is most effective. We compared the impact of an interactive, patient-oriented group program to a lecture-based, information-only program in gastric cancer patients. In this prospective, controlled trial, 121 gastric cancer patients attending inpatient rehabilitation after surgical treatment received either the interactive intervention or lectures providing information. The outcomes were patients' disease-related knowledge, active coping with illness, and quality of life (QoL) at the end of their stay and 6 and 12 months thereafter. Both groups improved their knowledge and QoL during rehabilitation; however, knowledge was significantly higher in the interactive group compared to the lecture group. This difference was maintained at the 6- and 12-months follow-ups. In addition, the interactive group proved superior to the lecture group regarding active coping with illness and QoL at the end of rehabilitation, but not during follow-up. A structured, interactive patient education program proved superior to lecture-based provision of information in regards to short-term and long-term knowledge as well as short-term coping and QoL. In gastric cancer patients, interactive patient education seems preferable over lectures.

  20. Integrative Review on the Effectiveness of Internet-Based Interactive Programs for Women With Breast Cancer Undergoing Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiemin; Ebert, Lyn; Wai-Chi Chan, Sally

    2017-03-01

    Internet-based interactive programs have been developed to address health needs for women with breast cancer undergoing treatment, but evidence has been inadequate to establish the effectiveness of these programs. This article aims to synthesize studies published in English or Chinese regarding the effectiveness of these programs on the outcomes of symptom distress, social support, self-efficacy, quality of life, and psychological well-being for women with breast cancer undergoing treatment.
. CINAHL Complete, MEDLINE®, Mosby's Nursing Index, PsycINFO®, Scopus, Web of Science, Joanna Briggs Institute, Cochrane Library, Embase, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure. Databases were searched from the start of the database to April 2015.
. 174 articles were retrieved, yielding 23 eligible articles. A manual search led to an additional five eligible articles. After 10 were excluded, 3 qualitative and 15 quantitative studies were evaluated. Data were analyzed to identify similarities and differences across articles.
. Internet-based interactive programs moderated by healthcare professionals have demonstrated positive effects on women's self-efficacy, symptom distress, and psychological well-being, but inconclusive effects have been found on social support and quality of life.
. Moderated Internet-based interactive programs are a promising intervention for women with breast cancer undergoing treatment.
. Studies with more robust research designs and theoretical frameworks and conducted in different countries and cultures are warranted to elucidate the effectiveness of these programs.

  1. Socio-cognitive habilitation using the math interactive learning experience program for alcohol-affected children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kable, Julie A; Coles, Claire D; Taddeo, Elles

    2007-08-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) has been recognized as a disabling condition with a significant impact on the neurobehavioral functioning of affected individuals, including cognition, behavior, and academic functioning, but little research has been performed on targeted interventions for these children. A socio-cognitive habilitative program focused on improving behavior and math functioning in children 3 to 10 years of age (n=61) was developed and evaluated. The intervention provided parental instruction on FAS, advocacy, and behavioral regulation via workshops and interactive math tutoring with children. All families received parental instruction and were then randomly assigned to either the math instruction or standard psychoeducational care groups. Satisfaction with workshops was very high, with over 90% agreeing that trainers were knowledgeable and materials easy to understand and helpful. Significant gains in knowledge were found for information provided in the instructional groups. At posttesting, caregivers reported fewer problem behaviors on the Achenbach Child Behavior Checklist, Internalizing Problem Behavior, Externalizing Problem Behavior, and Total Problem Behavior summary scales. After 5 months, both groups of children demonstrated gains in math knowledge but significantly higher gains were found in the group receiving direct math instruction. The math treatment group was also more likely to demonstrate a gain of over 1 standard deviation on any of the 4 math outcome measures used. These findings suggest that parents of children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FAS(D)) benefit from instruction in understanding their child's alcohol-related neurological damage and strategies to provide positive behavioral supports and that targeted psychoeducational programs may be able to remediate some of the math deficits associated with prenatal alcohol exposure.

  2. ConsDock: A new program for the consensus analysis of protein-ligand interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Nicodème; Rognan, Didier

    2002-06-01

    Protein-based virtual screening of chemical libraries is a powerful technique for identifying new molecules that may interact with a macromolecular target of interest. Because of docking and scoring limitations, it is more difficult to apply as a lead optimization method because it requires that the docking/scoring tool is able to propose as few solutions as possible and all of them with a very good accuracy for both the protein-bound orientation and the conformation of the ligand. In the present study, we present a consensus docking approach (ConsDock) that takes advantage of three widely used docking tools (Dock, FlexX, and Gold). The consensus analysis of all possible poses generated by several docking tools is performed sequentially in four steps: (i) hierarchical clustering of all poses generated by a docking tool into families represented by a leader; (ii) definition of all consensus pairs from leaders generated by different docking programs; (iii) clustering of consensus pairs into classes, represented by a mean structure; and (iv) ranking the different means starting from the most populated class of consensus pairs. When applied to a test set of 100 protein-ligand complexes from the Protein Data Bank, ConsDock significantly outperforms single docking with respect to the docking accuracy of the top-ranked pose. In 60% of the cases investigated here, ConsDock was able to rank as top solution a pose within 2 A RMSD of the X-ray structure. It can be applied as a postprocessing filter to either single- or multiple-docking programs to prioritize three-dimensional guided lead optimization from the most likely docking solution. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. [The use of interactive medical data transfer to increase effectiveness of a mass screening program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Paweł; Zbroch, Tomasz; Knapp, Piotr

    2004-11-01

    Cervical cancer is still called the most frequent neoplasm refer to women's genital tract (incidence rate 30-35/100,000/year). Scandinavian countries experiences have shown that effective screening program especially used multimedia (radio, TV, Internet) is one of the based elements, which should improve situation in prevention of cervical cancer. The aim of this study was an attempt to create medical Website including specialized and basic informations for doctors and patients about cervical and breast cancer, their prophylactic and treatment. An influence of these data to increase active participation in screening program was also analysed. Material covers a random sample of 1200 women (30-59 years of age) who were invited to participate in cytology screening in two edition of the program (1997-99, 2000-02). In the years of 2000-02 information about Website was added to the invitation. Medical Website was created as server information. A special questionnaire prepared by Sociology Department was distributed to 1200 women. In both group participation during two screening edition was compared and analysed. All data were statistically correlated. Website address was created: http://pkzr.ac.bialystok.pl. From the group of 1200 questioned (mean age--41.8) answered 1059 women (88.25%). 6.98% (n=74) have never used this Website but 20 of them have done cytology test after receiving an invitation which were posted to all 1200 women. The last of 985 women analysed Website. 80.4% (n=792) have received enough informations about cervical and breast cancer (4.67 point) and decided to participate in cervical cancer screening. From this group only 428 women actively took part in cytology exams in 1997-99. 189 women participated in the screening programme from the last 193 patients (19.6%) who analysed server informations (4.89 point). From 141 people who have not answered for the questionnaire 23 have done cytology test. Participation in the second edition of cervical cancer

  4. Randomized controlled trial to determine the effectiveness of an interactive multimedia food safety education program for clients of the special supplemental nutrition program for women, infants, and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trepka, Mary Jo; Newman, Frederick L; Davila, Evelyn P; Matthew, Karen J; Dixon, Zisca; Huffman, Fatma G

    2008-06-01

    Pregnant women and the very young are among those most susceptible to foodborne infections and at high risk of a severe outcome from foodborne infections. To determine if interactive multimedia is a more effective method than pamphlets for delivering food safety education to Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) clients. A randomized controlled trial of WIC clients was conducted. Self-reported food safety practices were compared between pre- and postintervention questionnaires completed >or=2 months after the intervention. Pregnant WIC clients or female caregivers (usually mothers) of WIC clients who were 18 years of age or older and able to speak and read English were recruited from an inner-city WIC clinic. Participants were randomized to receive food safety pamphlets or complete an interactive multimedia food safety education program on a computer kiosk. Change from pre- to postintervention food safety scores. A mean food safety score was determined for each participant for the pre- and postintervention questionnaires. The scores were used in a two-group repeated measures analysis of variance. Of the 394 participants, 255 (64.7%) completed the postintervention questionnaire. Satisfaction with the program was high especially among those with no education beyond high school. When considering a repeated measures analysis of variance model with the two fixed between-subject effects of group and age, a larger improvement in score in the interactive multimedia group than in the pamphlet group (P=0.005) was found, but the size of the group effect was small (partial eta(2)=0.033). Women aged 35 years or older in the interactive multimedia group had the largest increase in score. The interactive multimedia was well-accepted and resulted in improved self-reported food safety practices, suggesting that interactive multimedia is an effective option for food safety education in WIC clinics.

  5. An Intervention Program Focused on Self-Understanding and Interpersonal Interactions to Prevent Psychosocial Distress among Japanese University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Mikayo

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the impact of a preventive intervention program focused on self-understanding and interpersonal interactions to prevent psychosocial distress among Japanese university students. Two hundred and twenty-two undergraduate students were divided into a treatment group and a control group to complete Time 1 and Time 2 surveys. The…

  6. Differences between High School Students Who Do and Do Not Volunteer To Participate in a Peer Interaction Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Erik W.; Hughes, Carolyn; Copeland, Susan R.; Breen, Catherine

    2001-01-01

    A study examined differences between 30 high school students who participated in a peer buddy program with peers with severe disabilities and 30 who chose not to volunteer. After one semester, participants showed greater social willingness to interact with those with disabilities, greater knowledge of disabilities, and increased contact scores.…

  7. The Effects of Scripted Peer Tutoring and Programming Common Stimuli on Social Interactions of a Student with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petursdottir, Anna-Lind; McComas, Jennifer; McMaster, Kristen; Horner, Kathy

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the effects of scripted peer-tutoring reading activities, with and without programmed common play-related stimuli, on social interactions between a kindergartner with autism spectrum disorder and his typically developing peer-tutoring partners during free play. A withdrawal design with multiple baselines across peers showed no…

  8. Use of an interactive video gaming program compared with conventional physiotherapy for hospitalised older adults: a feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laver, Kate; George, Stacey; Ratcliffe, Julie; Quinn, Steve; Whitehead, Craig; Davies, Owen; Crotty, Maria

    2012-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of a physiotherapy intervention using an interactive gaming program compared with conventional physiotherapy for hospitalised older people. Randomised controlled pilot study in a geriatric rehabilitation unit within an acute public hospital. Participants were randomly allocated to physiotherapy using an interactive gaming program (n = 22) or conventional physiotherapy in a ward-based gym (n = 22). Feasibility was assessed by comparing the effects of the intervention on clinical outcome measures (primary outcome: mobility as assessed by the Timed Up and Go test, secondary outcomes: safety, adherence levels, eligibility and consent rates). Participants (n = 44) had a mean age of 85 years (SD 4.5) and the majority (80%) were women. Univariable analyses showed no significant difference between groups following intervention. However, multivariable analyses suggested that participants using the interactive gaming program improved more on the Timed Up and Go test (p = 0.048) than participants receiving conventional physiotherapy. There were no serious adverse events and high levels of adherence to therapy were evident in both groups. Only a small proportion of patients screened were recruited to the study. In this feasibility study, the use of a commercially available interactive gaming program by physiotherapists with older people in a hospital setting was safe and adherence levels were comparable with conventional therapy. Preliminary results suggest that further exploration of approaches using games as therapy for older people could include commonly used measures of balance and function.

  9. Advanced Visualization and Interactive Display Rapid Innovation and Discovery Evaluation Research (VISRIDER) Program Task 6: Point Cloud Visualization Techniques for Desktop and Web Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    ADVANCED VISUALIZATION AND INTERACTIVE DISPLAY RAPID INNOVATION AND DISCOVERY EVALUATION RESEARCH (VISRIDER) PROGRAM TASK 6: POINT CLOUD...To) OCT 2013 – SEP 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE ADVANCED VISUALIZATION AND INTERACTIVE DISPLAY RAPID INNOVATION AND DISCOVERY EVALUATION RESEARCH

  10. Automated identification of protein-ligand interaction features using Inductive Logic Programming: a hexose binding case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Santos Jose C

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a need for automated methods to learn general features of the interactions of a ligand class with its diverse set of protein receptors. An appropriate machine learning approach is Inductive Logic Programming (ILP, which automatically generates comprehensible rules in addition to prediction. The development of ILP systems which can learn rules of the complexity required for studies on protein structure remains a challenge. In this work we use a new ILP system, ProGolem, and demonstrate its performance on learning features of hexose-protein interactions. Results The rules induced by ProGolem detect interactions mediated by aromatics and by planar-polar residues, in addition to less common features such as the aromatic sandwich. The rules also reveal a previously unreported dependency for residues cys and leu. They also specify interactions involving aromatic and hydrogen bonding residues. This paper shows that Inductive Logic Programming implemented in ProGolem can derive rules giving structural features of protein/ligand interactions. Several of these rules are consistent with descriptions in the literature. Conclusions In addition to confirming literature results, ProGolem’s model has a 10-fold cross-validated predictive accuracy that is superior, at the 95% confidence level, to another ILP system previously used to study protein/hexose interactions and is comparable with state-of-the-art statistical learners.

  11. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    interaction between a human operator and an artificial actor or agent. We can apply insights from puppetry to develop culturally-aware robots. Here we describe the development of a robotic marionette theatre wherein robotic controllers assume the role of human puppeteers. The system has been built, tested...... including puppetry and dance. However, the aesthetics of these traditions vary across cultures and carry different associative and interpretive meanings. Puppetry offers a useful frame for understanding the relationship between abstract and imitative gestures and behavior, and instantiates the complex...

  12. Preventing eating disorders with an interactive gender-adapted intervention program in schools: study protocol of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, Angelika; Gumz, Antje; Uhlenbusch, Natalie; Wegscheider, Karl; Romer, Georg; Löwe, Bernd

    2015-02-12

    There are a high number of adolescents who are at risk of developing an eating disorder. There is, therefore, a strong need to implement prevention programs aimed at reducing the incidence of eating disorders at this critical age. Among other factors, successful prevention programs have been shown to be interactive, carried out by professionals, focused on educational as well as psychosocial elements and have taken risk factors as well as resources into account. The objective of this study protocol is to present the design of a new prevention program for eating disorders in schools. The gender-adapted prevention program extends over six school hours. It contains interactive and educational elements about eating disorders and their treatment. Participants pass through different exercises and reflect on the influences of the media, self-esteem, body perception and individual resources. A cluster-randomized controlled trial is chosen to evaluate the program. Based on an estimated effect size of d = 0.3 a total of 1848 participants are enrolled in the study. Eating disorder risk, internalization of Western beauty ideals, body dissatisfaction, self-concept as well as anxiety and symptoms of depression are measured before and immediately after the intervention as well as at a six-month follow-up. In addition, the intervention group evaluates the different components of the program. The study intends to test the practicability and efficacy of an interactive, gender-adapted ED prevention program in schools. Moreover, it will provide valuable information about the occurrence of eating disorder risk factors in school-aged children. ISRCTN97989348; Registered 19 December 2012.

  13. The Blue Dog: evaluation of an interactive software program to teach young children how to interact safely with dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwebel, David C; Morrongiello, Barbara A; Davis, Aaron L; Stewart, Julia; Bell, Melissa

    2012-04-01

    Pre-post-randomized design evaluated The Blue Dog, a dog safety software program. 76 children aged 3.5-6 years completed 3 tasks to evaluate dog safety pre- and postintervention: (a) pictures (recognition of safe/risky behavior), (b) dollhouse (recall of safe behavior via simulated dollhouse scenarios), and (c) live dog (actual behavior with unfamiliar live dog). Following preintervention evaluation, children were randomly assigned to dog or fire safety conditions, each involving 3 weeks of home computer software use. Children using Blue Dog had greater change in recognition of risky dog situations than children learning fire safety. No between-group differences emerged in recall (dollhouse) or engagement (live-dog) in risky behavior. Families enjoyed using the software. Blue Dog taught children knowledge about safe engagement with dogs, but did not influence recall or implementation of safe behaviors. Dog bites represent a significant pediatric injury concern and continued development of effective interventions is needed.

  14. Gender Differences in the Use of Computers, Programming, and Peer Interactions in Computer Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoilescu, Dorian; Egodawatte, Gunawardena

    2010-01-01

    Research shows that female and male students in undergraduate computer science programs view computer culture differently. Female students are interested more in the use of computers than in doing programming, whereas male students see computer science mainly as a programming activity. The overall purpose of our research was not to find new…

  15. Interactions between youth and mental health professionals: The Youth Aware of Mental health (YAM) program experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Camilla; Postuvan, Vita; Herta, Dana; Iosue, Miriam; Värnik, Peeter; Carli, Vladimir

    2018-01-01

    The Youth Aware of Mental health (YAM) experience Youth stand at the core of much mental health promotion, yet little is written about their experiences of such efforts. We aimed to take this on by interviewing youth after they participated in Youth Aware of Mental Health (YAM), a universal mental health promotion program. YAM has a non-anticipatory methodology that provides youth with a safe space for reflection, role-play, and discussion. Addressing everyday mental health, YAM invites the experiences and issues relevant to the youth present to influence the program in a slightly different direction every time. The YAM instructor guides the participants but does not present the youth with given formulas on how to solve their problems. Like any mental health promotion, YAM appeals to some more than others in its intended audience and individuals engage with the program in many different ways. We set out to learn more about these experiences. Conversations about mental health Thirty-two semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15–17 year olds in Estonia, Italy, Romania and Spain. In these interviews, the researchers made an effort to discuss mental health in terms relevant to youth. Still, wide-ranging levels of motivation, ease with engaging in dialogue with mental health professionals, and comfort with the format and content of YAM were detected. The youth were clustered in five different groups relating to their positioning vis-à-vis the researcher during the interview. The following evocative labels were used: “interested”, “foot in the door”, “respect for authority”, “careful”, and “not my topic”. Corresponding labels were devised for their YAM experience: “engaged”, “initially hesitant”, “cautious”, “eager to please”, or “disengaged”. We also observed that the researchers brought their own expectations and employed a variety of approaches that led to anticipating answers, stating the obvious, or getting along

  16. COMPUTER SIMULATION OF GLICOPHORIN A AND 4-METHYL-2,6-DIISOBORNILFENOL INTERACTION BY AUTODOCK AND HEXSERVER PROGRAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Ostrikova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available 4-methyl-2,6-diisobornilphenol (dibornol – a promising drug with a hemorheological activity. Glycophorin A is one of erythrocyte membrane proteins involved in the aggregation and possibly mediating rheological effects of dibornol.Objective: to conduct a modeling of the interaction dibornol and glycophorin A by AutoDock and HexServer programs.Material and methods. We used three-dimensional models of molecules dibornol and glycophorin A. Information on the three-dimensional model of glycophorin A was received from the database RCSB Protein Data Bank – 1AFO. Modeling the three-dimensional model of a dibornol (4-methyl-2,6- diisobornilfenol was modeling by PRODRG Server.Results. This paper presents the results of computer modeling of interaction dibornol and glycophorin A by HexServer and AutoDock programs. We used the electrostatic properties of the molecule glycophorin A, site of interaction is position chain A VAL83, chain B – ALA82, GLY83, GLY86, THR87. The energy of binding was –6.73 kcal/mol by AutoDock program, HexServer – –2.89 kcal/mol. The charge of the molecular complex dibornol-glycophorin A decreased to –4.126 (the charge of the native molecule glycophorin A – –4.003.Conclusion. Integrated use of the program AutoDock and HexServer helps significantly reduce the time and computational resources in the modeling. The study identified the amino acids that may play a key role in the interaction with dibornol glycophorin A. This study has given us reason to believe that as a result of such interaction dibornol may prevent adhesion of red blood cells.

  17. Sustained Energy Savings Achieved through Successful Industrial Customer Interaction with Ratepayer Programs: Case Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, Amelie [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hedman, Bruce [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Taylor, Robert P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Russell, Christopher [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Many states have implemented ratepayer-funded programs to acquire energy efficiency as a predictable and reliable resource for meeting existing and future energy demand. These programs have become a fixture in many U.S. electricity and natural gas markets as they help postpone or eliminate the need for expensive generation and transmission investments. Industrial energy efficiency (IEE) is an energy efficiency resource that is not only a low cost option for many of these efficiency programs, but offers productivity and competitive benefits to manufacturers as it reduces their energy costs. However, some industrial customers are less enthusiastic about participating in these programs. IEE ratepayer programs suffer low participation by industries across many states today despite a continual increase in energy efficiency program spending across all types of customers, and significant energy efficiency funds can often go unused for industrial customers. This paper provides four detailed case studies of companies that benefited from participation in their utility’s energy efficiency program offerings and highlights the business value brought to them by participation in these programs. The paper is designed both for rate-payer efficiency program administrators interested in improving the attractiveness and effectiveness of industrial efficiency programs for their industrial customers and for industrial customers interested in maximizing the value of participating in efficiency programs.

  18. Development of a prototype interactive learning system using multi-media technology for mission independent training program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Jack E.

    1992-01-01

    The Spacelab Mission Independent Training Program provides an overview of payload operations. Most of the training material is currently presented in workbook form with some lecture sessions to supplement selected topics. The goal of this project was to develop a prototype interactive learning system for one of the Mission Independent Training topics to demonstrate how the learning process can be improved by incorporating multi-media technology into an interactive system. This report documents the development process and some of the problems encountered during the analysis, design, and production phases of this system.

  19. Survey of methadone-drug interactions among patients of methadone maintenance treatment program in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Although methadone has been used for the maintenance treatment of opioid dependence for decades, it was not introduced in China or Taiwan until 2000s. Methadone-drug interactions (MDIs) have been shown to cause many adverse effects. However, such effects have not been scrutinized in the ethnic Chinese community. Methods The study was performed in two major hospitals in southern Taiwan. A total of 178 non-HIV patients aged ≥ 20 years who had participated in the Methadone Maintenance Treatment Program (MMTP) ≥ 1 month were recruited. An MDI is defined as concurrent use of drug(s) with methadone that may result in an increase or decrease of effectiveness and/or adverse effect of methadone. To determine the prevalence and clinical characteristics of MDIs, credible data sources, including the National Health Insurance (NHI) database, face-to-face interviews, medical records, and methadone computer databases, were linked for analysis. Socio-demographic and clinical factors associated with MDIs and co-medications were also examined. Results 128 (72%) MMTP patients took at least one medication. Clinically significant MDIs included withdrawal symptoms, which were found among MMTP patients co-administered with buprenorphine or tramadol; severe QTc prolongation effect, which might be associated with use of haloperidol or droperidol; and additive CNS and respiratory depression, which could result from use of methadone in combination with chlorpromazine or thioridazine. Past amphetamine use, co-infection with hepatitis C, and a longer retention in the MMTP were associated with increased odds of co-medication. Among patients with co-medication use, significant correlates of MDIs included the male gender and length of co-medication in the MMTP. Conclusions The results demonstrate clinical evidence of significant MDIs among MMTP patients. Clinicians should check the past medical history of MMTP clients carefully before prescribing medicines. Because combinations of

  20. Survey of methadone-drug interactions among patients of methadone maintenance treatment program in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Hsin-Ya

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although methadone has been used for the maintenance treatment of opioid dependence for decades, it was not introduced in China or Taiwan until 2000s. Methadone-drug interactions (MDIs have been shown to cause many adverse effects. However, such effects have not been scrutinized in the ethnic Chinese community. Methods The study was performed in two major hospitals in southern Taiwan. A total of 178 non-HIV patients aged ≥ 20 years who had participated in the Methadone Maintenance Treatment Program (MMTP ≥ 1 month were recruited. An MDI is defined as concurrent use of drug(s with methadone that may result in an increase or decrease of effectiveness and/or adverse effect of methadone. To determine the prevalence and clinical characteristics of MDIs, credible data sources, including the National Health Insurance (NHI database, face-to-face interviews, medical records, and methadone computer databases, were linked for analysis. Socio-demographic and clinical factors associated with MDIs and co-medications were also examined. Results 128 (72% MMTP patients took at least one medication. Clinically significant MDIs included withdrawal symptoms, which were found among MMTP patients co-administered with buprenorphine or tramadol; severe QTc prolongation effect, which might be associated with use of haloperidol or droperidol; and additive CNS and respiratory depression, which could result from use of methadone in combination with chlorpromazine or thioridazine. Past amphetamine use, co-infection with hepatitis C, and a longer retention in the MMTP were associated with increased odds of co-medication. Among patients with co-medication use, significant correlates of MDIs included the male gender and length of co-medication in the MMTP. Conclusions The results demonstrate clinical evidence of significant MDIs among MMTP patients. Clinicians should check the past medical history of MMTP clients carefully before prescribing medicines

  1. PISCES program plasma-surface interactions research: Summary of research, 1988--1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-05-01

    This paper discusses the following about the Pisces program: Major objectives of the program; Staff in the PISCES program at UCLA; Highlights in the program; Collaborations with other institutions; PISCES-A facility; PISCES-B facility; Fast scanning Langmuir probe; Omegatron mass spectrometer; Spectroscopic diagnostics; Data acquisition system; Redeposition effect on carbon chemical erosion; Erosion of carbon tokamakium from TFTR; Effect of boron-doping on carbon chemical erosion; Radiation enhanced sublimation of carbon; Surface analysis of TEXTOR titles; Spectroscopic analysis of carbon impurities; Biased limiter and divertor; Biased divertor channel; Gaseous divertor experiments; Presheath profile measurements; Particle transport in CCT tokamak; and Biased divertor experiments in CCT.

  2. User’s Guide for the Incremental Construction, Soil-Structure Interaction Program SOILSTRUCT with Far-Field Boundary Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-01

    Unlimited , TIC t’%i ELECTE •m• Y2 5,1, ඦ 5" 23 116 Prepared for Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers The contents of this report an not to be...evaluation of soil-structure interaction of earth retaining structures. The initial version of the program was developed by Profesors G. W. Clough and J

  3. Dietary Improvements among African American Youth: Results of an Interactive Nutrition Promotion Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosemond, Tiara N.; Blake, Christine E.; Jenkins, Kelli A.; Buff, Scotty M.; Moore, Justin B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Junior Doctors of Healthq (JDOH) program was developed from a collaboration between a large medical university, school district, and community organization to address obesity-related behaviors in children through education, skill building, and mentoring. Purpose: Evaluate the impact of the JDOH program on self-efficacy for and…

  4. Teaching and Learning Logic Programming in Virtual Worlds Using Interactive Microworld Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosinakis, Spyros; Anastassakis, George; Koutsabasis, Panayiotis

    2018-01-01

    Logic Programming (LP) follows the declarative programming paradigm, which novice students often find hard to grasp. The limited availability of visual teaching aids for LP can lead to low motivation for learning. In this paper, we present a platform for teaching and learning Prolog in Virtual Worlds, which enables the visual interpretation and…

  5. Primary School Pupils' Attitudes toward Learning Programming through Visual Interactive Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asad, Khaled; Tibi, Moanis; Raiyn, Jamal

    2016-01-01

    New generations are using and playing with mobile and computer applications extensively. These applications are the outcomes of programming work that involves skills, such as computational and algorithmic thinking. Learning programming is not easy for students children. In recent years, academic institutions like the Massachusetts Institute of…

  6. Promoting Positive Family Interactions: Evaluating a Free Early Childhood Book Distribution Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funge, Simon P.; Sullivan, Dana J.; Tarter, Kirsten

    2017-01-01

    The Dolly Parton Imagination Library (DPIL) program encourages reading among families of preschool children by mailing age-appropriate books, once per month, until the child reaches the age of five. An evaluation of a DPIL program in a southern state in the U.S. was conducted to assess the impact on enrolled children. Focus groups were conducted…

  7. An interactive microcomputer program for calculation of combined parenteral and enteral nutrition for neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, R; Gale, J; Branski, D; Armon, Y; Zelingher, J; Roll, D

    1983-11-01

    A responsive, iterating program is described (available on diskette from first author), which enables the physician to formulate a balanced, total parenteral nutrition (TPN) for low-birth-weight and sick newborns. The program allows for the possibility of TPN or simultaneous intravenous, intraarterial, and oral feeding. It calculates the overall balance of fluids, nutrients, calories, electrolytes, minerals, trace elements, and vitamins. It features the integration of algorithms and limit tests of nutritional balance, to produce a feeding program that can be modified by clinical considerations of the physician, specific for each patient. The entire procedure can be accomplished, and a record of the entries and orders to the pharmacy and to the ward staff printed, within about 4-5 min. The program, which is written in BASIC, can be accommodated within and operated with a 16K byte microcomputer, equipped with a monitor, a printer, and a diskette or other program storage device.

  8. Developing an interactive web-based learning program on skin cancer: the learning experiences of clinical educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Waqas R; Geller, Alan; Alexander, Gwen; Asgari, Maryam M; Chanange, Gunther J; Dusza, Stephen; Eide, Melody J; Fletcher, Suzanne W; Goulart, Jacqueline M; Halpern, Allan C; Landow, Shoshana; Marghoob, Ashfaq A; Quigley, Elizabeth A; Weinstock, Martin A

    2012-12-01

    Web-based learning in medical education is rapidly growing. However, there are few firsthand accounts on the rationale for and development of web-based learning programs. We present the experience of clinical educators who developed an interactive online skin cancer detection and management course in a time-efficient and cost-efficient manner without any prior skills in computer programming or technical construction of web-based learning programs. We review the current state of web-based learning including its general advantages and disadvantages as well as its specific utility in dermatology. We then detail our experience in developing an interactive online skin cancer curriculum for primary care clinicians. Finally, we describe the main challenges faced and lessons learned during the process. This report may serve medical educators who possess minimal computer programming and web design skills but want to employ the many strengths of web-based learning without the huge costs associated with hiring a professional development team.

  9. The Development of an Interactive Computer-Based Training Program for Timely and Humane On-Farm Pig Euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, Caitlyn R; Pairis-Garcia, Monique D; Campler, Magnus R; Anthony, Raymond; Johnson, Anna K; Coleman, Grahame J; Rault, Jean-Loup

    2018-02-05

    With extensive knowledge and training in the prevention, management, and treatment of disease conditions in animals, veterinarians play a critical role in ensuring good welfare on swine farms by training caretakers on the importance of timely euthanasia. To assist veterinarians and other industry professionals in training new and seasoned caretakers, an interactive computer-based training program was created. It consists of three modules, each containing five case studies, which cover three distinct production stages (breeding stock, piglets, and wean to grower-finisher pigs). Case study development was derived from five specific euthanasia criteria defined in the 2015 Common Swine Industry Audit, a nationally recognized auditing program used in the US. Case studies provide information regarding treatment history, clinical signs, and condition severity of the pig and prompt learners to make management decisions regarding pig treatment and care. Once a decision is made, feedback is provided so learners understand the appropriateness of their decision compared to current industry guidelines. In addition to training farm personnel, this program may also be a valuable resource if incorporated into veterinary, graduate, and continuing education curricula. This innovative tool represents the first interactive euthanasia-specific training program in the US swine industry and offers the potential to improve timely and humane on-farm pig euthanasia.

  10. Use of interactive multimedia disks in the applied environmental sciences program at the Oregon Institute of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Charles R.

    Although a number of studies have been performed regarding the use of interactive multimedia disks in education, none were found which investigated their effect on either retention or recruitment for universities. The purpose of this case study was to gather information regarding student and teacher perceptions on the use of interactive multimedia disks and their effect on retention and recruitment. The primary source of data for this case study was student and teacher interviews. A purposive sample of students taking courses using the interactive multimedia disks in course at the Oregon Institute of Technology and at two Oregon high schools was chosen for the case study. Major findings of the case study were as follows: (1) Students interviewed in this case study perceived the interactive multimedia disk-based instructional method to be equally as effective as the lecture method. (2) Time flexibility in class scheduling was slightly more beneficial to female students than male students and the lack of instructor-led classroom interaction was more of a problem for female students than male students. (3) There was no difference in the perceptions of the college students and the high school students regarding the benefits and drawbacks of the interactive multimedia disk-based classes. (4) The flexible class scheduling made possible through the use of interactive multimedia disks influences some Oregon Institute of Technology students to stay and complete their degree programs. (5) There is some potential for interactive multimedia disk-based courses to be a recruiting tool. However, there is no evidence that it has been a successful recruiting tool for the Oregon Institute of Technology yet.

  11. The influence of interactive technology on student performance in an Oklahoma secondary Biology I program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltman, Vallery

    Over the last decade growth in technologies available to teach students and enhance curriculum has become an important consideration in the educational system. The profile of today's secondary students have also been found to be quite different than those of the past. Their learning styles and preferences are issues that should be addressed by educators. With the growth and availability of new technologies students are increasingly expecting to use these as learning tools in their classrooms. This study investigates how interactive technology may impact student performance. This study specifically focuses on the use of the Apple Ipad in 4 Biology I classrooms. This study used an experimental mixed method design to examine how using Ipads for learning impacted student achievement, motivation to learn, and learning strategies. Qualitatively the study examined observed student behaviors and student perceptions regarding the use of interactive technologies. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics, t-tests, 2-way ANOVAs, and qualitative analysis. Quantitatively the results revealed no significant difference between students who used the interactive technology to learn and those who did not. Qualitative data revealed behaviors indicative of being highly engaged with the subject matter and the development of critical thinking skills which may improve student performance. Student perceptions also revealed overall positive experiences with using interactive technology in the classroom. It is recommended that further studies be done to look at using interactive technologies for a longer period of time using multiple subjects areas. This would provide a more in-depth exploration of interactive technologies on student achievement.

  12. A Pilot Study for Linking Adolescent Patients to an Interactive Tobacco Prevention Program

    OpenAIRE

    Karen S. Calabro; Salma K. Marani; Le, Thuan A.; Khalil, Georges E.; Irene M. Tami-Maury; Prokhorov, Alexander V

    2017-01-01

    Context: The American Academy of Pediatrics and professional guidelines recommend intervening with adolescents about avoiding tobacco use in the health-care setting. Barriers in the clinical setting limit consistent provision of this critical service. Objectives: This pilot study compared 2 approaches for referring adolescents to an evidence-based tobacco prevention and cessation program in the outpatient setting. Secondary aims assessed tobacco use, knowledge, and program evaluation. Design,...

  13. The interaction of social networks and child obesity prevention program effects: the pathways trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hee-Sung; Valente, Thomas W; Riggs, Nathaniel R; Huh, Jimi; Spruijt-Metz, Donna; Chou, Chih-Ping; Ann Pentz, Mary

    2014-06-01

    Social network analysis was used to examine whether peer influence from one's social networks moderates obesity prevention program effects on obesity-related behaviors: healthful and unhealthful. Participants included 557 children residing in Southern California. The survey assessed health-promoting behaviors (i.e., physical activity at school, physical activity outside of school, and fruit and vegetable intake), as well as unhealthful behaviors (high-calorie, low-nutrient intake and sedentary activity), and peer exposure calculated from social network nominations as indicators of peer influence. Multilevel models were conducted separately on outcomes predicted by program participation, peer exposure, and program participation by peer exposure. Results indicated that peer exposure was positively associated with one's own healthful and unhealthful behaviors. Program participation effects were moderated by peer influence, but only when unhealthful peer influence was present. Results suggest that peer influence can diminish or amplify prevention programs Future interventions should consider peer-led components to promote healthful influence of peers on healthful and unhealthful behaviors, and programs should be mindful that their effects are moderated by social networks. Copyright © 2014 The Obesity Society.

  14. Feasibility study of an interactive multimedia electronic problem solving treatment program for depression: a preliminary uncontrolled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Margit I; Buckey, Jay C; Hull, Jay G; Linardatos, Eftihia; Song, Sueyoung L; McLellan, Robert K; Hegel, Mark T

    2014-05-01

    Computer-based depression interventions lacking live therapist support have difficulty engaging users. This study evaluated the usability, acceptability, credibility, therapeutic alliance and efficacy of a stand-alone multimedia, interactive, computer-based Problem Solving Treatment program (ePST™) for depression. The program simulated live treatment from an expert PST therapist, and delivered 6 ePST™ sessions over 9weeks. Twenty-nine participants with moderate-severe symptoms received the intervention; 23 completed a minimally adequate dose of ePST™ (at least 4 sessions). Program usability, acceptability, credibility, and therapeutic alliance were assessed at treatment midpoint and endpoint. Depressive symptoms and health-related functioning were assessed at baseline, treatment midpoint (4weeks), and study endpoint (10weeks). Depression outcomes and therapeutic alliance ratings were also compared to previously published research on live PST and computer-based depression therapy. Participants rated the program as highly usable, acceptable, and credible, and reported a therapeutic alliance with the program comparable to that observed in live therapy. Depressive symptoms improved significantly over time. These findings also provide preliminary evidence that ePST™ may be effective as a depression treatment. Larger clinical trials with diverse samples are indicated. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Approaching tobacco dependence in youngsters: impact of an interactive smoking cessation program in a population of Romanian adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Esanu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The main objective of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of an interactive smoking cessation program when first implemented in a naïve population of Romanian adolescents. The secondary objective was to assess youngsters’ attitudes and beliefs towards tobacco dependence, their compliance to smoking cessation interventions and success rate of a standard smoking cessation pilot program.Materials and methods: A total of 231 subjects 14-19 years old participated in the Adolescent Smoking Cessation (ASC pilot program in Romania in 2005. Subjects were evaluated based on the ASC questionnaire, a validated set of questions about smoking and cessation profile, whether current smoker or not. Smoking status was validated by carbon monoxide determination in exhaled air. Participants were delivered 6 interactive ASC sessions about smoking hazards and methods to quit smoking. A final evaluation was done to assess overall program’s impact and to reward quitters and reducers by prizes.Results: Study population was made of 52.4% every day smokers, 10.4% at least once/week but not every day smokers, 6% less than once/week smokers, 23.4% never smokers and 7.8% ex-smokers. Cessation rate was 12.3% in every day smokers and 16.6 % in at least once a week but not every day smokers. Also, 4.1% every day smokers and 30 % at least once/week not every day smokers reduced number of cigarettes smoked/day. The program registered a high attendance rate/sessions as 85.2 % of subjects were present in all sessions. Also, significant changes occurred in participant’s beliefs about smoking and cessation.Conclusions: Pilot ASC was an efficient program with 12.3% of daily smokers to quit smoking and its positive impact on personal smoking and cessation beliefs in 90 % of participants. J Clin Exp Invest 2010; 1(3: 150-155

  16. Structure and interactions of the human programmed cell death 1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaoxiao; Veverka, Vaclav; Radhakrishnan, Anand; Waters, Lorna C; Muskett, Frederick W; Morgan, Sara H; Huo, Jiandong; Yu, Chao; Evans, Edward J; Leslie, Alasdair J; Griffiths, Meryn; Stubberfield, Colin; Griffin, Robert; Henry, Alistair J; Jansson, Andreas; Ladbury, John E; Ikemizu, Shinji; Carr, Mark D; Davis, Simon J

    2013-04-26

    PD-1, a receptor expressed by T cells, B cells, and monocytes, is a potent regulator of immune responses and a promising therapeutic target. The structure and interactions of human PD-1 are, however, incompletely characterized. We present the solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based structure of the human PD-1 extracellular region and detailed analyses of its interactions with its ligands, PD-L1 and PD-L2. PD-1 has typical immunoglobulin superfamily topology but differs at the edge of the GFCC' sheet, which is flexible and completely lacks a C" strand. Changes in PD-1 backbone NMR signals induced by ligand binding suggest that, whereas binding is centered on the GFCC' sheet, PD-1 is engaged by its two ligands differently and in ways incompletely explained by crystal structures of mouse PD-1 · ligand complexes. The affinities of these interactions and that of PD-L1 with the costimulatory protein B7-1, measured using surface plasmon resonance, are significantly weaker than expected. The 3-4-fold greater affinity of PD-L2 versus PD-L1 for human PD-1 is principally due to the 3-fold smaller dissociation rate for PD-L2 binding. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that the PD-1/PD-L1 interaction is entropically driven, whereas PD-1/PD-L2 binding has a large enthalpic component. Mathematical simulations based on the biophysical data and quantitative expression data suggest an unexpectedly limited contribution of PD-L2 to PD-1 ligation during interactions of activated T cells with antigen-presenting cells. These findings provide a rigorous structural and biophysical framework for interpreting the important functions of PD-1 and reveal that potent inhibitory signaling can be initiated by weakly interacting receptors.

  17. A Preliminary Exploration of the Effects of a 6-week Interactive Video Dance Exercise Program in an Adult Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia-Downs, Anne; Fruth, Stacie J; Clifford, Anne; Hine, Stephanie; Huckstep, Jeremy; Merkel, Heidi; Wilkinson, Hilary; Yoder, Jason

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a 6-week interactive video dance game (IVDG) program on adult participants' cardiorespiratory status and body mass index (BMI). Twenty-seven healthy adult participants attended IVDG sessions over a 6-week period. Participants completed pre- and post-testing consisting of a submaximal VO(2) treadmill test, assessment of resting heart rate (RHR) and blood pressure (BP), BMI, and general health questionnaires. Data were analyzed using descriptives, paired t-tests to assess pre-to post-testing differences, and one-way ANOVAs to analyze variables among select groups of participants. Questionnaire data was manually coded and assessed. Twenty participants attended at least 75% of available sessions and were used in data analysis. Mean BMI decreased significantly (from 26.96 kg/m(2) to 26.21 kg/m(2); 2.87%) and cardiorespiratory fitness measured by peak VO(2) increased significantly (from 20.63 ml/kg/min to 21.69 ml/kg/min; 5.14%). Most participants reported that the IVDG program was a good workout, and that they were encouraged to continue or start an exercise routine. Forty percent reported improvements in sleep, and nearly half stated they had or were considering purchasing a home version of a video dance game. Interactive video dance game is an effective and enjoyable exercise program for adults who wish to decrease their BMI and improve components of cardiorespiratory fitness.

  18. Are All Program Elements Created Equal? Relations Between Specific Social and Emotional Learning Components and Teacher-Student Classroom Interaction Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abry, Tashia; Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E; Curby, Timothy W

    2017-02-01

    School-based social and emotional learning (SEL) programs are presented to educators with little understanding of the program components that have the greatest leverage for improving targeted outcomes. Conducted in the context of a randomized controlled trial, the present study used variation in treatment teachers' (N = 143) implementation of four core components of the Responsive Classroom approach to examine relations between each component and the quality of teachers' emotional, organizational, and instructional interactions in third, fourth, and fifth grade classrooms (controlling for pre-intervention interaction quality and other covariates). We also examined the extent to which these relations varied as a function of teachers' baseline levels of interaction quality. Indices of teachers' implementation of Morning Meeting, Rule Creation, Interactive Modeling, and Academic Choice were derived from a combination of teacher-reported surveys and classroom observations. Ratings of teacher-student classroom interactions were aggregated across five observations conducted throughout the school year. Structural path models indicated that teachers' use of Morning Meeting and Academic Choice related to higher levels of emotionally supportive interactions; Academic Choice also related to higher levels of instructional interactions. In addition, teachers' baseline interaction quality moderated several associations such that the strongest relations between RC component use and interaction quality emerged for teachers with the lowest baseline interaction quality. Results highlight the value of examining individual program components toward the identification of program active ingredients that can inform intervention optimization and teacher professional development.

  19. Evaluating an Adaptive and Interactive mHealth Smoking Cessation and Medication Adherence Program: A Randomized Pilot Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Jennifer B; Anderson, Melissa L; Bradley, Katharine; An, Lawrence C; Catz, Sheryl L

    2016-08-03

    Mobile health (mHealth) interventions hold great promise for helping smokers quit since these programs can have wide reach and facilitate access to comprehensive, interactive, and adaptive treatment content. However, the feasibility, acceptability, and effectiveness of these programs remain largely untested. To assess feasibility and acceptability of the My Mobile Advice Program (MyMAP) smoking cessation program and estimate its effects on smoking cessation and medication adherence to inform future research planning. Sixty-six smokers ready to quit were recruited from a large regional health care system and randomized to one of two mHealth programs: (1) standard self-help including psychoeducational materials and guidance how to quit smoking or (2) an adaptive and interactive program consisting of the same standard mHealth self-help content as controls received plus a) real-time, adaptively tailored advice for managing nicotine withdrawal symptoms and medication side-effects and b) asynchronous secure messaging with a cessation counselor. Participants in both arms were also prescribed a 12-week course of varenicline. Follow-up assessments were conducted at 2 weeks post-target quit date (TQD), 3 months post-TQD, and 5 months post-TQD. Indices of program feasibility and acceptability included acceptability ratings, utilization metrics including use of each MyMAP program component (self-help content, secure messaging, and adaptively tailored advice), and open-ended feedback from participants. Smoking abstinence and medication adherence were also assessed to estimate effects on these treatment outcomes. Utilization data indicated the MyMAP program was actively used, with higher mean program log-ins by experimental than control participants (10.6 vs 2.7, Pprogram could help other people quit smoking (22/24, 92%) and consistently take their stop-smoking medication (17/22, 97%) and would recommend the program to others (20/23, 87%). They also rated the program as

  20. Subjective Cognitive Workload, Interactivity and Feedback in a Web-Based Writing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Lisa; MacKay, Bruce R.

    2006-01-01

    This investigation compares and analyses the experiences and subjective cognitive workload of students undertaking a lesson on an aspect of micro-level writing skills in a web-based and paperbased version. Both versions of the lesson were based on the principles of interactive learning, specifically on a modified version of Chou's (2003) model.…

  1. Studying the Impact of Using Multimedia Interactive Programs at Children Ability to Learn Basic Math Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusir, Sawsan; Alsmadi, Izzat; Al-Kabi, Mohammed; Sharadgah, Fatima

    2012-01-01

    The continuous inventions and evolutions in all information technology fields open new channels and opportunities to enhance teaching and educational methods. In one side, those may improve the abilities of educators to present information in an interactive and media enhanced formats relative to traditional methods. This may help students or…

  2. Studying the Impact of Using Multimedia Interactive Programs on Children's Ability to Learn Basic Math Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusir, Sawsan; Alsmadi, Izzat; Al-Kabi, Mohammed; Sharadgah, Fatima

    2013-01-01

    The continuous inventions and evolutions in all information technology fields open new channels and opportunities to enhance teaching and educational methods. On one side, these may improve the abilities of educators to present information in interactive and media-enhanced formats relative to traditional methods. This may help students or learners…

  3. Whole Language versus Code-Based Skills and Interactional Patterns in Singapore's Early Literacy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaish, Viniti

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyzes whole language and code-based skills approaches in early literacy and the specific patterns of interaction present in both approaches. Nineteen hours of video data were coded to analyze the nature of whole language versus code-based skills instruction and document the allocation of time spent on each approach in a reading…

  4. Interactivity between protégés and scientists in an electronic mentoring program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnett, Cara; Wildemuth, Barbara M.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    2006-01-01

    Interactivity is defined by Henri (1992) as a three-step process involving communication of information, a response to this information, and a reply to that first response. It is a key dimension of computer-mediated communication, particularly in the one-on-one communication involved in an electr...

  5. A Computer-Based Interactive Multimedia Program to Reduce HIV Transmission for Women with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, J.; Clark, K. D.; Sarno, K.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Despite recent recognition of the need for preventive sexual health materials for people with intellectual disability (ID), there have been remarkably few health-based interventions designed for people with mild to moderate ID. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a computer-based interactive multimedia (CBIM)…

  6. Use of Interactive Electronic Audience Response Tools (Clickers) to Evaluate Knowledge Gained in Extension Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Patrick; Loy, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Effectively measuring short-term impact, particularly a change in knowledge resulting from Extension programming, can prove to be challenging. Clicker-based technology, when used properly, is one alternative that may allow educators to better evaluate this aspect of the logic model. While the potential interface between clicker technology and…

  7. Analyzing the Quality of Students Interaction in a Distance Learning Object-Oriented Programming Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Elizabeth Simão

    2015-01-01

    Teaching object-oriented programming to students in an in-classroom environment demands well-thought didactic and pedagogical strategies in order to guarantee a good level of apprenticeship. To teach it on a completely distance learning environment (e-learning) imposes possibly other strategies, besides those that the e-learning model of Open…

  8. Children and Adults Reading Interactively: The Social Benefits of an Exploratory Intergenerational Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaki, Emi; Harmon, Mary Towle

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory Intergenerational Program (IGP) focused on reading to determine whether it affects mood and communication in older adults with mild dementia and neurocognitive deficits, and if it influences school-aged children's perceptions of older adults over time. Six older adults with cognitive-communication deficits and 12 school-aged…

  9. College Student-Athletes as Peer Educators for Substance Abuse Prevention: An Interactive Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricker, Ray

    2009-01-01

    Athletes can be involved as role models and leaders--in collaboration with coaches and other staff--to enhance life skills and prevent substance use among their peers. "Drugs in Sport" is a peer education program involving collegiate athletes visiting middle schools to speak with school children. This article discusses the structure of the Drugs…

  10. Evolution of natural and social science interactions in global change research programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Harold A.; Duraiappah, Anantha; Larigauderie, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to develop a global understanding of the functioning of the Earth as a system began in the mid-1980s. This effort necessitated linking knowledge from both the physical and biological realms. A motivation for this development was the growing impact of humans on the Earth system and need to provide solutions, but the study of the social drivers and their consequences for the changes that were occurring was not incorporated into the Earth System Science movement, despite early attempts to do so. The impediments to integration were many, but they are gradually being overcome, which can be seen in many trends for assessments, such as the Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services, as well as both basic and applied science programs. In this development, particular people and events have shaped the trajectories that have occurred. The lessons learned should be considered in such emerging research programs as Future Earth, the new global program for sustainability research. The transitioning process to this new program will take time as scientists adjust to new colleagues with different ideologies, methods, and tools and a new way of doing science. PMID:23297237

  11. The Decision-Making Process in Language Program Placement: Test and Nontest Factors Interacting in Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plakans, Lia; Burke, Maureen

    2013-01-01

    The use of tests has been targeted as a critical point in validity, which suggests that contexts for test use warrant closer investigation. This article describes a study of decision making during test use in the context of a university intensive English language program. Over a period of 2 1/2 years, data were collected by audio-recording…

  12. An interactive method to solve infeasibility in linear programming test assembling models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huitzing, HA

    2004-01-01

    In optimal assembly of tests from item banks, linear programming (LP) models have proved to be very useful. Assembly by hand has become nearly impossible, but these LP techniques are able to find the best solutions, given the demands and needs of the test to be assembled and the specifics of the

  13. The Soil Stack: An Interactive Computer Program Describing Basic Soil Science and Soil Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattle, S. R.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A computer program dealing with numerous aspects of soil degradation has a target audience of high school and university students (16-20 year olds), and is presented in a series of cards grouped together as stacks. Describes use of the software in Australia. (LZ)

  14. 2012 Gordon Research Conference and Seminar on Atomic and Molecular Interactions - Formal Schedule and Speaker/Poster Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwier, Timothy S. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2012-07-20

    The Gordon Research Conference on ATOMIC & MOLECULAR INTERACTIONS was held at Stonehill College Easton, Massachusetts, July 15-20, 2012. The Conference was well-attended with 121 participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. Of the 121 attendees, 64 voluntarily responded to a general inquiry regarding ethnicity which appears on our registration forms. Of the 64 respondents, 11% were Minorities – 2% Hispanic, 9% Asian and 0% African American. Approximately 20% of the participants at the 2012 meeting were women. The Gordon Research SEMINAR on ATOMIC & MOLECULAR INTERACTIONS was held at Stonehill College Easton, Massachusetts, July 14 - 15, 2012. The Conference was well-attended with 42 participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. Of the 42 attendees, 20 voluntarily responded to a general inquiry regarding ethnicity which appears on our registration forms. Of the 20 respondents, 10% were Minorities – 0% Hispanic, 10% Asian and 0% African American. Approximately 29% of the participants at the 2012 meeting were women. In designing the formal speakers program, emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field. There was a conscious effort to stimulate lively discussion about the key issues in the field today. Time for formal presentations was limited in the interest of group discussions. In order that more scientists could communicate their most recent results, poster presentation time was scheduled. Attached is a copy of the formal schedule and speaker program and the poster program. In addition to

  15. Interactive Learning Program (ILP)- a concept for life long learning and Capacity Building of Stakeholders in Integrated Flood Management (IFM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasche, E.; Manojlovic, N.; Basener, S.; Behzadnia, N.

    2009-04-01

    In the paradigm shift in flood management from traditional to more integrated approach the key to initialising this transition stage is capacity building of stakeholders. It supports the effective participation of stakeholders within their role by giving the individuals/professionals and institutions required knowledge and skills. Such a process of empowering targeted stakeholder groups should be based on the interactive learning rather than mere delivering of flood related information. It can be achieved by initiating the learning process and developing life-long learning programs in form of blended learning that combines both, supervised online and face-to-face approaches. The learning concept based on the didactic principle of Kolb/Fry, has been used as a basis for development of the Interactive Learning Program (ILP) presented in this paper. Kolb/Fry define learning as a cyclic process dividing it into four steps: concrete experience, reflection & observation, forming abstract concepts, testing of acquainted knowledge in new situations. As the knowledge to understand the complexity of IFM is extensive and required level usually cannot be achieved within the face-to-face phase, additional autodidactic learning module tailored to the individual skills should be included in the learning program. ILP combines both, the face-to-face sessions following the Kolb?s learning cycle including theoretical and practical aspects and autodidactic phase by means of the e-learning platform based on the web dissemination strategy for IFM- Kalypso Inform (Pasche/Kraus/Manojlovic). According to this strategy, the access to the flood related information is enabled through three different modules Tutorial, Knowledge Base and Virtual Trainer enabling interaction with the system. This ILP is generic and can be tailored to requirements of different stakeholder groups depending on their role and level of integration in IFM. The first results, obtained for both public and private

  16. A Design Case Featuring the Graduate Design Studio at Indiana University Bloomington’s Human-Computer Interaction Design Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Callison

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the author illustrates the design of a physical space that was created to serve as a performance intervention for graduate students in the Human-Computer Interaction Design (HCId program in the School of Informatics, Indiana University Bloomington. Opened in Fall 2010, the HCId Graduate Design Studio was designed to help facilitate collaboration between students and faculty in the HCId Program. An effort was made to document the Studio and students working in the Studio over an extended period of time. The author visited the Design Studio a minimum of ten times between late January and late April 2011. Visits were conducted on different days of the week (Monday - Friday and at different times of the day to capture a variety of students and activity level in the Studio. In order to gain a perspective on the two distinct groups of students who utilize the Studio, interviews of graduate students from both the HCId Master of Science and Doctoral program were conducted. In addition interviews were conducted of two other important stakeholders, the HCId Program Director and the Director of Facilities for the School of Informatics, both of whom were heavily involved in the design of the Studio. Through faculty and student interviews, text descriptions, photographs, and audio and video recordings this article addresses the design features and their impact, both successful and unsuccessful, on student and faculty collaboration of the HCId Graduate Design Studio.

  17. The Effects of a Web-Based Interactive Psycho-Educational Program and a Traditional Psycho-Educational Program Based on Cognitive- Behavioral Approach upon Children’s Cognitive Distortions and Psychological Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet BUĞA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study is to compare the effects of a web-based interactive psycho-educational program and a traditional psycho-educational program based on the cognitive-behavioral approach upon children’s cognitive distortions and psychological symptoms. The study group of the research consisted of a total of 36 8th grade middle school students. Of the participants, 12 students participated in the web-based interactive psycho-educational program, 12 students participated in the traditional psycho-educational program, and 12 students were in the control group. Children’s Negative Cognitive Distortions Questionnaire (CNCDQ, which was adapted into Turkish by Aydın (2006, and Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI adapted for adolescents by Şahin, Batıgün and Uğurtaş (2002 were used as data collection tools. The students included in the web-based interactive psycho-educational program participated in an online program which covered 10 modules, one module for each week. The students in the traditional psycho-educational program participated in an 8-week program. The control group did not participate in any programs. A post-test was administered one week after the research was completed, and follow-up measurements were done both one month and three months later. The results of the research indicated that cognitive distortions of children who participated in the web-based interactive psycho-educational program and the traditional psycho-educational program decreased after the intervention, and that the decrease continued in the follow-up periods. Psychological symptoms decreased in the children who participated in the web-based interactive program, and this decrease lasted in follow-up periods. However, there was no statistical difference in psychological symptoms of the children who participated in the traditional psycho-educational program and the control group

  18. News from strong interactions program of the NA61/SHINE experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Grebieszkow, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    The NA61/SHINE experiment aims to discover the critical point of strongly interacting matter and study the properties of the onset of deconfinement. This is performed by a two dimensional phase diagram ($T-\\mu_B$) scan of measurements of particle spectra and fluctuations in proton-proton, proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus interactions as a function of collision energy and system size. In this contribution new NA61/SHINE results on negative pion production, as well as transverse momentum and multiplicity fluctuations in Ar+Sc collisions are presented. Moreover, the latest results on higher order moments of net-charge multiplicity distribution in p+p collisions are also discussed. The Ar+Sc results are compared to NA61 p+p and Be+Be data, as well as to NA49 $A+A$ results.

  19. SET Careers Program: An interactive science, engineering, and technology career education exhibit. [A brief summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, P.R.

    1993-03-31

    The New York Hall of Science, in response to the national crisis in education and employment in science and engineering, is developing and pilot testing a unique, interactive, video-based, hypermedia series on energy-related and other science and engineering careers for middle and junior high school students. Working in collaboration with the Consortium for Mathematics and its Applications (COMAP) and the Educational Film Center (EFC), this pilot-demonstration phase will last 14 months, during which time the basic design, production, and testing of eight science and engineering career modules (video and software) will be completed and installed as an interactive educational exhibit at the New York Hall of Science. This career education package will then be distributed to other science technology centers nationwide.

  20. Blended Infant Massage–Parenting Enhancement Program on Recovering Substance-Abusing Mothers' Parenting Stress, Self-Esteem, Depression, Maternal Attachment, and Mother-Infant Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz S. Porter, PhD, ARNP, FAANP, FAAN

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: The findings suggest that infant massage blended into a structured parenting program has value-added effects in decreasing parenting stress and maternal depressive symptoms, but not on SAM's self-esteem, attachment, or maternal-infant interaction.

  1. BEAMR: An interactive graphic computer program for design of charged particle beam transport systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, R. F.; Giamati, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    A computer program for a PDP-15 is presented which calculates, to first order, the characteristics of charged-particle beam as it is transported through a sequence of focusing and bending magnets. The maximum dimensions of the beam envelope normal to the transport system axis are continuously plotted on an oscilloscope as a function of distance along the axis. Provision is made to iterate the calculation by changing the types of magnets, their positions, and their field strengths. The program is especially useful for transport system design studies because of the ease and rapidity of altering parameters from panel switches. A typical calculation for a system with eight elements is completed in less than 10 seconds. An IBM 7094 version containing more-detailed printed output but no oscilloscope display is also presented.

  2. Connecting the Learners: Improving Uptake of a Nursing Home Educational Program by Focusing on Staff Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S.; Pinheiro, Sandro O.; Anderson, Ruth A.; Porter, Kristie; McConnell, Eleanor; Corazzini, Kirsten; Hancock, Kathryn; Lipscomb, Jeffery; Beales, Julie; Simpson, Kelly M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: The CONNECT intervention is designed to improve staff connections, communication, and use of multiple perspectives for problem solving. This analysis compared staff descriptions of the learning climate, use of social constructivist learning processes, and outcomes in nursing facilities receiving CONNECT with facilities receiving a falls education program alone. Design and Methods: Qualitative evaluation of a randomized controlled trial was done using a focus group design...

  3. Program to enrich science and mathematics experiences of high school students through interactive museum internships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reif, R.J. [State Univ. of New York, New Paltz, NY (United States); Lock, C.R. [Univ. of North Carolina, Charlotte, NC (United States)

    1998-11-01

    This project addressed the problem of female and minority representation in science and mathematics education and in related fields. It was designed to recruit high school students from under-represented groups into a program that provided significant, meaningful experiences to encourage those young people to pursue careers in science and science teaching. It provided role models for those students. It provided experiences outside of the normal school environment, experiences that put the participants in the position to serve as role models themselves for disadvantaged young people. It also provided encouragement to pursue careers in science and mathematics teaching and related careers. In these respects, it complemented other successful programs to encourage participation in science. And, it differed in that it provided incentives at a crucial time, when career decisions are being made during the high school years. Further, it encouraged the pursuit of careers in science teaching. The objectives of this project were to: (1) provide enrichment instruction in basic concepts in the life, earth, space, physical sciences and mathematics to selected high school students participating in the program; (2) provide instruction in teaching methods or processes, including verbal communication skills and the use of questioning; (3) provide opportunities for participants, as paid student interns, to transfer knowledge to other peers and adults; (4) encourage minority and female students with high academic potential to pursue careers in science teaching.

  4. The immediate early gene product EGR1 and polycomb group proteins interact in epigenetic programming during chondrogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Spaapen

    Full Text Available Initiation of and progression through chondrogenesis is driven by changes in the cellular microenvironment. At the onset of chondrogenesis, resting mesenchymal stem cells are mobilized in vivo and a complex, step-wise chondrogenic differentiation program is initiated. Differentiation requires coordinated transcriptomic reprogramming and increased progenitor proliferation; both processes require chromatin remodeling. The nature of early molecular responses that relay differentiation signals to chromatin is poorly understood. We here show that immediate early genes are rapidly and transiently induced in response to differentiation stimuli in vitro. Functional ablation of the immediate early factor EGR1 severely deregulates expression of key chondrogenic control genes at the onset of differentiation. In addition, differentiating cells accumulate DNA damage, activate a DNA damage response and undergo a cell cycle arrest and prevent differentiation associated hyper-proliferation. Failed differentiation in the absence of EGR1 affects global acetylation and terminates in overall histone hypermethylation. We report novel molecular connections between EGR1 and Polycomb Group function: Polycomb associated histone H3 lysine27 trimethylation (H3K27me3 blocks chromatin access of EGR1. In addition, EGR1 ablation results in abnormal Ezh2 and Bmi1 expression. Consistent with this functional interaction, we identify a number of co-regulated targets genes in a chondrogenic gene network. We here describe an important role for EGR1 in early chondrogenic epigenetic programming to accommodate early gene-environment interactions in chondrogenesis.

  5. The Space Station Photovoltaic Panels Plasma Interaction Test Program: Test plan and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Felder, Marian C.; Sater, Bernard L.; Staskus, John V.

    1989-01-01

    The Plasma Interaction Test performed on two space station solar array panels is addressed. This includes a discussion of the test requirements, test plan, experimental set-up, and test results. It was found that parasitic current collection was insignificant (0.3 percent of the solar array delivered power). The measured arcing threshold ranged from -210 to -457 V with respect to the plasma potential. Furthermore, the dynamic response of the panels showed the panel time constant to range between 1 and 5 microsec, and the panel capacitance to be between .01 and .02 microF.

  6. The Space Station photovoltaic panels plasma interaction test program - Test plan and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Felder, Marian C.; Sater, Bernard L.; Staskus, John V.

    1990-01-01

    The plasma Interaction Test performed on two space station solar array panels is addressed. This includes a discussion of the test requirements, test plan, experimental set-up, and test results. It was found that parasitic current collection was insignificant (0.3 percent of the solar array delivered power). The measured arcing threshold ranged from -210 to -457 V with respect to the plasma potential. Furthermore, the dynamic response of the panels showed the panel time constant to range between 1 and 5 microsec, and the panel capacitance to be between .01 and .02 microF.

  7. Transportable, university-level educational programs in interactive information storage and retrieval systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominick, Wayne D.; Roquemore, Leroy

    1984-01-01

    Pursuant to the specifications of a research contract entered into in December, 1983 with NASA, the Computer Science Departments of the University of Southwestern Louisiana and Southern University will be working jointly to address a variety of research and educational issues relating to the use, by non-computer professionals, of some of the largest and most sophiticated interactive information storage and retrieval systems available. Over the projected 6 to 8 year life of the project, in addition to NASA/RECON, the following systems will be examined: Lockheed DIALOG, DOE/RECON, DOD/DTIC, EPA/CSIN, and LLNL/TIS.

  8. Neurologist consistency in interpreting information provided by an interactive visualization software for deep brain stimulation postoperative programming assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallavaram, Srivatsan; Phibbs, Fenna T; Tolleson, Christopher; Davis, Thomas L; Fang, John; Hedera, Peter; Li, Rui; Koyama, Tatsuki; Dawant, Benoit M; D'Haese, Pierre-François

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative programming in deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy for movement disorders can be challenging and time consuming. Providing the neurologist with tools to visualize the electrode location relative to the patient's anatomy along with models of tissue activation and statistical data can therefore be very helpful. In this study, we evaluate the consistency between neurologists in interpreting and using such information provided by our DBS programming assistance software. Five neurologists experienced in DBS programming were each given a dataset of 29 leads implanted in 17 patients. For each patient, probabilistic maps of stimulation response, anatomical images, models of tissue activation volumes, and electrode positions were presented inside a software framework called CRAnialVault Explorer (CRAVE) developed in house. Consistency between neurologists in optimal contact selection using the software was measured. With only the efficacy map, the average consistency among the five neurologists with respect to the mode and mean of their selections was 97% and 95%, respectively, while these numbers were 93% and 89%, respectively, when both efficacy and an adverse effect map were used simultaneously. Fleiss' kappa statistic also showed very strong agreement among the neurologists (0.87 when using one map and 0.72 when using two maps). Our five neurologists demonstrated high consistency in interpreting information provided by the CRAVE interactive visualization software for DBS postoperative programming assistance. Three of our five neurologists had no prior experience with the software, which suggests that the software has a short learning curve and contact selection is not dependent on familiarity with the program tools. © 2013 Vanderbilt University.

  9. SENSITIVE COMMUNICATION AND INTERACTION SKILLS FOR CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL EDUCATION NEEDS USING THE PRINCIPLE’S OF THE ICDP PROGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nergis RAMO AKGJUN

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In the earliest stages, sensitive special educators interpret a child’s activities as he or she expresses his or her will, purpose, emotions, and desires. The child is participating in a dialogue with the special educator, based on the educator’s interpretative reactions. In this way, the child gradually enters the world of common human values, intentions, wishes, and emotions.The basic aim of the master thesis, presented in 227 pages, is to realize the necessity of implementing more sensitive communication techniques and interaction skills with pupils in special schools and institutions, according to the principles of ICDP program. This was accomplished through self-evaluation questionnaires given to special educators, asking them to make an evaluation of their own communication skills with pupils in special schools and institutions. Consideration was also made toward the need for establishing sensitive communication skills between the special education teacher and the child, as collected from the responses given by pupils and their parents.The thesis contains the following parts: introduction, theoretical approach to the research problem, research methodology, research results, discussion, conclusion, proposal recommendations, and bibliography, along with the data from questionnaires and surveys used for the research. The introduction highlights the need for research in assessing the importance of implementing sensitive communication techniques and interaction skills for special educators who work with children who have intellectual disabilities in special institutions.The theoretical approach to the research problem describes the intellectual disability by defining the concept, etiology of intellectual disability, classification, prevalence and characteristics of children with mild, medium, severe and profound intellectual disabilities. Furthermore, this section makes a detailed description of the ICDP program’s aims, tasks, and

  10. Introducing Scenario Based Learning interactive to postgraduates in UQ Orthodontic Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naser-ud-Din, S

    2015-08-01

    E-learning has gained momentum in health sciences and seems to have great potential in specialist dental education. Higher acceptability by learners is particularly associated with the surge of smart devices. Currently, there are limited number of e-learning modules available for dental education, particularly in Orthodontics. Scenario Based Learning interactive (SBLi(®)) software was used for the first time in Orthodontics Postgraduate training at the University of Queensland. Nine interactive modules were created embedded with clinical procedure videos, web-links, evidence-based literature, along with opportunity for self-assessment and evaluation. Qualitative data were collected before and after the administration of the SBLi(®) for Orthodontics. The purpose of this data was to investigate learning styles and the acceptance of e-modules as part of postgraduate training. Advantages of the package included high acceptance rate, greater confidence in the application of clinical skills covered in the modules and reduced contact time particularly with limited academic staff. E-modules demonstrated high compatibility with the learning styles of the participants and were considered engaging. It seems apparent that e-learning is most effective in a blended learning environment, supplemented with the traditional classroom approach, rather than as a sole mechanism for postgraduate training. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Ties That Work: The Interaction between Group Assignment Method and a Culturally-Relevant Curriculum in the Context of Middle School Anti-Tobacco Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolan, Brian V.; Unger, Jennifer B.; Johnson, C. Anderson; Valente, Thomas W.

    2007-01-01

    Peer-led programs that employ classroom-based group exercises have been shown to be the most effective in preventing adolescent tobacco use. In addition, health promotion programs that include cultural referents have also been shown to be advantageous. The purpose of this study was to test the interaction between the method by which leaders and…

  12. The Effectiveness of an Interactive Training Program in Developing a Set of Non-Cognitive Skills in Students at University of Petra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheith, Eman; Aljaberi, Nahil M.

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of interactive training programs in developing a set of non-cognitive skills in students at the University of Petra. Furthermore, it sought to examine the impact of the sex, academic year, and university major variables on developing these skills in students who underwent the training program, as…

  13. The Negative and Positive Characteristics of Teacher Technology Professional Development Programs in Relation to Efficient Classroom Integration and Knowledge of Interactive Whiteboards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bey, Marie A.

    2012-01-01

    The key to educational reform is the well-prepared teacher. Giving the teacher continuous, immediate, and supported access to interactive whiteboard (IWB) professional development programs (PDPs) is necessary for creating the potential for deep and sustained changes of the educational programs. This qualitative case study explored the negative and…

  14. The interactive web-based program MSmonitor for self-management and multidisciplinary care in multiple sclerosis : utilization and valuation by patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongen, Peter Joseph; Sinnige, Ludovicus G.; van Geel, Bjoern M.; Verheul, Freek; Verhagen, Wim I.; van der Kruijk, Ruud A.; Haverkamp, Reinoud; Schrijver, Hans M.; Baart, Jacoba C.; Visser, Leo H.; Arnoldus, Edo P.; Gilhuis, Herman Jacobus; Pop, Paul; Booy, Monique; Heerings, Marco; Kool, Anton; van Noort, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Background: MSmonitor is an interactive web-based program for self-management and integrated, multidisciplinary care in multiple sclerosis. Methods: To assess the utilization and valuation by persons with multiple sclerosis, we held an online survey among those who had used the program for at least

  15. Interactive statistical-distribution-analysis program utilizing numerical and graphical methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glandon, S. R.; Fields, D. E.

    1982-04-01

    The TERPED/P program is designed to facilitate the quantitative analysis of experimental data, determine the distribution function that best describes the data, and provide graphical representations of the data. This code differs from its predecessors, TEDPED and TERPED, in that a printer-plotter has been added for graphical output flexibility. The addition of the printer-plotter provides TERPED/P with a method of generating graphs that is not dependent on DISSPLA, Integrated Software Systems Corporation's confidential proprietary graphics package. This makes it possible to use TERPED/P on systems not equipped with DISSPLA. In addition, the printer plot is usually produced more rapidly than a high-resolution plot can be generated. Graphical and numerical tests are performed on the data in accordance with the user's assumption of normality or lognormality. Statistical analysis options include computation of the chi-squared statistic and its significance level and the Kolmogorov-Smirnov one-sample test confidence level for data sets of more than 80 points. Plots can be produced on a Calcomp paper plotter, a FR80 film plotter, or a graphics terminal using the high-resolution, DISSPLA-dependent plotter or on a character-type output device by the printer-plotter. The plots are of cumulative probability (abscissa) versus user-defined units (ordinate). The program was developed on a Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) PDP-10 and consists of 1500 statements. The language used is FORTRAN-10, DEC's extended version of FORTRAN-IV.

  16. Connecting the learners: improving uptake of a nursing home educational program by focusing on staff interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S; Pinheiro, Sandro O; Anderson, Ruth A; Porter, Kristie; McConnell, Eleanor; Corazzini, Kirsten; Hancock, Kathryn; Lipscomb, Jeffery; Beales, Julie; Simpson, Kelly M

    2014-06-01

    The CONNECT intervention is designed to improve staff connections, communication, and use of multiple perspectives for problem solving. This analysis compared staff descriptions of the learning climate, use of social constructivist learning processes, and outcomes in nursing facilities receiving CONNECT with facilities receiving a falls education program alone. Qualitative evaluation of a randomized controlled trial was done using a focus group design. Facilities (n = 8) were randomized to a falls education program alone (control) or CONNECT followed by FALLS (intervention). A total of 77 staff participated in 16 focus groups using a structured interview protocol. Transcripts were analyzed using framework analysis, and summaries for each domain were compared between intervention and control facilities. Notable differences in descriptions of the learning climate included greater learner empowerment, appreciation of the role of all disciplines, and seeking diverse viewpoints in the intervention group. Greater use of social constructivist learning processes was evidenced by the intervention group as they described greater identification of communication weaknesses, improvement in communication frequency and quality, and use of sense-making by seeking out multiple perspectives to better understand and act on information. Intervention group participants reported outcomes including more creative fall prevention plans, a more respectful work environment, and improved relationships with coworkers. No substantial difference between groups was identified in safety culture, shared responsibility, and self-reported knowledge about falls. CONNECT appears to enhance the use of social constructivist learning processes among nursing home staff. The impact of CONNECT on clinical outcomes requires further study.

  17. Optimizationof neural network architecture using genetic programming improvesdetection and modeling of gene-gene interactions in studies of humandiseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hahn Lance W

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Appropriate definitionof neural network architecture prior to data analysis is crucialfor successful data mining. This can be challenging when the underlyingmodel of the data is unknown. The goal of this study was to determinewhether optimizing neural network architecture using genetic programmingas a machine learning strategy would improve the ability of neural networksto model and detect nonlinear interactions among genes in studiesof common human diseases. Results Using simulateddata, we show that a genetic programming optimized neural network approachis able to model gene-gene interactions as well as a traditionalback propagation neural network. Furthermore, the genetic programmingoptimized neural network is better than the traditional back propagationneural network approach in terms of predictive ability and powerto detect gene-gene interactions when non-functional polymorphismsare present. Conclusion This study suggeststhat a machine learning strategy for optimizing neural network architecturemay be preferable to traditional trial-and-error approaches forthe identification and characterization of gene-gene interactionsin common, complex human diseases.

  18. User's manual for PVFORM: A photovoltaic system simulation program for stand-alone and grid-interactive applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menicucci, D.F.; Fernandez, J.P.

    1989-10-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has integrated improved photovoltaic (PV) system modelling techniques into a simplified program named PVFORM. The new model simulates hourly performance for a one-year period and is applicable to a grid-interactive or stand-alone PV flat-plate system. The program can be run on mainframe or personal computers. This manual describes how to operate the PVFORM program, with detailed examples of the required inputs. Sample outputs are also included and discussed. 8 refs.

  19. Gene - environment interaction in programming hippocampal plasticity: focus on adult neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel eKoehl

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between genes and environment are a critical feature of development and both contribute to shape individuality. They are at the chore of vulnerability / resiliency for mental illnesses. During the early postnatal period, several brain structures involved in cognitive and emotional processing, such as the hippocampus, still develop and it is likely that interferences with this neuronal development, which is genetically determined, might lead to long-lasting structural and functional consequences and increase the risk of developing psychopathology. One particular target is adult neurogenesis, which is involved in the regulation of cognitive and emotional processes. Insights into the dynamic interplay between genes and environmental factors in setting up individual rates of neurogenesis have come from laboratory studies exploring experience-dependent changes in adult neurogenesis as a function of individual’s genetic makeup. These studies have implications for our understanding of the mechanisms regulating adult neurogenesis, which could constitute a link between environmental challenges and psychopathology.

  20. [Emergency Doctor Training for Psychiatric Emergencies: Evaluation of an Interactive Training Program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flüchter, Peter; Müller, Vincent; Bischof, Felix; Pajonk, Frank-Gerald Bernhard

    2017-03-01

    Aim Emergency physicians are often confronted with psychiatric emergencies, but are not well trained for it and often feel unable to cope sufficiently with them. The aim of this investigation was to examine whether multisensoric training may improve learning effects in the training of emergency physicians with regard to psychiatric emergencies. Method Participation in a multi-modal, multi-media training program with video case histories and subsequent evaluation by questionnaire. Results 66 emergency physicians assessed their learning effects. 75 % or 73 % rated it as "rather high" or "very high". In particular, in comparison with classical training/self-study 89 % assessed the effects in learning as "rather high" or "very high" . Conclusion This training receives a high level of acceptance. Using videos, learning content may be provided more practice-related. Thus, emergency physicians are able to develop a greater understanding of psychiatric emergencies. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Critical interactions between the Global Fund-supported HIV programs and the health system in Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atun, Rifat; Pothapregada, Sai Kumar; Kwansah, Janet

    2011-01-01

    of the strengths and weaknesses of the relationship between Global Fund-supported activities and the health system and to identify positive synergies and unintended consequences of integration. Ghana has a well-functioning sector-wide approach to financing its health system, with a strong emphasis on integrated...... exponentially. Global Fund-supported activities have been well integrated into key health system functions to strengthen them, especially financing, planning, service delivery, and demand generation. Yet, with governance and monitoring and evaluation functions, parallel structures to national systems have......The support of global health initiatives in recipient countries has been vigorously debated. Critics are concerned that disease-specific programs may be creating vertical and parallel service delivery structures that to some extent undermine health systems. This case study of Ghana aimed to explore...

  2. PISCES Program: Plasma-materials interactions and edge-plasma physics research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conn, R.W.; Hirooka, Y.

    1992-07-01

    This program investigates and characterizes the behavior of materials under plasma bombordment, in divertor regions. The PISCES facility is used to study divertor and plasma edge management concepts (in particular gas target divertors), as well as edge plasma turbulence and transport. The plasma source consists of a hot LaB[sub 6] cathode with an annular, water-cooled anode and attached drift tube. This cross sectional area of the plasma can be adjusted between 3 and 10 cm. A fast scanning diagnostic probe system was used for mapping plasma density profiles during biased limiter and divertor simulation experiments. Some experimental data are given on: (1) materials and surface physics, (2) edge plasma physics, and (3) a theoretical analysis of edge plasma modelling.

  3. Language delays, reading delays, and learning difficulties: interactive elements requiring multidimensional programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Ian; Elias, Gordon; Fielding-Barnsley, Ruth; Homel, Ross; Freiberg, Kate

    2007-01-01

    Researchers have hypothesized four levels of instructional dialogue and claimed that teachers can improve children's language development by incorporating these dialogue levels in their classrooms. It has also been hypothesized that enhancing children's early language development enhances children's later reading development. This quasi-experimental research study investigated both of these hypotheses using a collaborative service delivery model for Grade 1 children with language difficulties from a socially and economically disadvantaged urban community in Australia. Comparing the end-of-year reading achievement scores for the 57 children who received the language intervention with those of the 59 children in the comparison group, the findings from this research are supportive of both hypotheses. The interrelationships between learning difficulties, reading difficulties, and language difficulties are discussed along with children's development in vocabulary, use of memory strategies and verbal reasoning, and the need for multidimensional programming.

  4. Food Security and Weight Status in Children: Interactions With Food Assistance Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Binh T; Ford, Christopher N; Yaroch, Amy L; Shuval, Kerem; Drope, Jeffrey

    2017-02-01

    It is unclear whether Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) or National School Lunch Program (NSLP) participation modifies the relationship between food insecurity and obesity in children. Data were included for 4,719 children aged 9-17 years who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Survey between 2003-2004 and 2011-2012. Linear regression was used to examine the relationship between household food security (full, marginal, low, and very low) and BMI percentile. Adjusted models were also stratified by SNAP and NSLP participation. There was no significant overall relationship between household food security and BMI percentile. In SNAP non-participants, there was no apparent overall relationship between BMI percentile and household food security. However, BMI percentile in children from households with low food security was significantly higher than that of children from fully food-secure households (risk difference [RD]=5.95, 95% CI=1.11, 10.80). Among SNAP participants, there was no significant relationship between household food security and BMI percentile. By NSLP participation category, there was a non-significant trend toward increasing BMI percentile with decreasing household food security in those reporting two or fewer (RD=1.75, 95% CI= -0.79, 4.29) and two to three (RD=1.07; 95% CI= -1.74, 3.89) lunches/week. There was no apparent relationship between household food security and BMI percentile in those reporting four or more lunches/week. Although the overall relationship between household food security and weight status in school-aged children was not statistically significant, there was some evidence that the relationship may differ by SNAP or NSLP participation, suggesting the need for more research. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Impact of a school-based disordered eating prevention program in adolescent girls: general and specific effects depending on adherence to the interactive activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Guimerà, Gemma; Sánchez-Carracedo, David; Fauquet, Jordi; Portell, Mariona; Raich, Rosa M

    2011-05-01

    This study assessed the impact of a school-based program aimed at preventing disordered eating. The program was based on the media-literacy approach and has interactive format. The program was assessed under strong methodological conditions. Seven schools with 263 Spanish adolescent girls in the area of Barcelona, were randomly assigned to either the complete prevention program condition, the partial program condition or the non-treatment control condition, and assessed at pre, post and 6-month follow-up. The program was effective in generating positive changes at follow-up. The effects sizes (ES(d) = 0.29 to ES(d) = 0.38) were greater, on average, than that obtained up to now in selective-universal programs, and similar or greater than that achieved by targeted prevention programs. The results indicate a greater and relevant effect size of the intervention in those participants who completed the inter-session interactive activities (ES(d) = 0.29 to ES(d) = 0.45) although the differences were not significant. These results suggest the importance of monitoring adherence to the activities in all programs defined as "interactive". The implications and limitations of this study are discussed.

  6. A truly human interface: Interacting face-to-face with someone whose words are determined by a computer program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin eCorti

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We use speech shadowing to create situations wherein people converse in person with a human whose words are determined by a conversational agent computer program. Speech shadowing involves a person (the shadower repeating vocal stimuli originating from a separate communication source in real-time. Humans shadowing for conversational agent sources (e.g., chat bots become hybrid agents (echoborgs capable of face-to-face interlocution. We report three studies that investigated people’s experiences interacting with echoborgs and the extent to which echoborgs pass as autonomous humans. First, participants in a Turing Test spoke with a chat bot via either a text interface or an echoborg. Human shadowing did not improve the chat bot’s chance of passing but did increase interrogators’ ratings of how human-like the chat bot seemed. In our second study, participants had to decide whether their interlocutor produced words generated by a chat bot or simply pretended to be one. Compared to those who engaged a text interface, participants who engaged an echoborg were more likely to perceive their interlocutor as pretending to be a chat bot. In our third study, participants were naïve to the fact that their interlocutor produced words generated by a chat bot. Unlike those who engaged a text interface, the vast majority of participants who engaged an echoborg neither sensed nor suspected a robotic interaction. These findings have implications for android science, the Turing Test paradigm, and human-computer interaction. The human body, as the delivery mechanism of communication, fundamentally alters the social psychological dynamics of interactions with machine intelligence.

  7. A truly human interface: interacting face-to-face with someone whose words are determined by a computer program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corti, Kevin; Gillespie, Alex

    2015-01-01

    We use speech shadowing to create situations wherein people converse in person with a human whose words are determined by a conversational agent computer program. Speech shadowing involves a person (the shadower) repeating vocal stimuli originating from a separate communication source in real-time. Humans shadowing for conversational agent sources (e.g., chat bots) become hybrid agents ("echoborgs") capable of face-to-face interlocution. We report three studies that investigated people's experiences interacting with echoborgs and the extent to which echoborgs pass as autonomous humans. First, participants in a Turing Test spoke with a chat bot via either a text interface or an echoborg. Human shadowing did not improve the chat bot's chance of passing but did increase interrogators' ratings of how human-like the chat bot seemed. In our second study, participants had to decide whether their interlocutor produced words generated by a chat bot or simply pretended to be one. Compared to those who engaged a text interface, participants who engaged an echoborg were more likely to perceive their interlocutor as pretending to be a chat bot. In our third study, participants were naïve to the fact that their interlocutor produced words generated by a chat bot. Unlike those who engaged a text interface, the vast majority of participants who engaged an echoborg did not sense a robotic interaction. These findings have implications for android science, the Turing Test paradigm, and human-computer interaction. The human body, as the delivery mechanism of communication, fundamentally alters the social psychological dynamics of interactions with machine intelligence.

  8. A truly human interface: interacting face-to-face with someone whose words are determined by a computer program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corti, Kevin; Gillespie, Alex

    2015-01-01

    We use speech shadowing to create situations wherein people converse in person with a human whose words are determined by a conversational agent computer program. Speech shadowing involves a person (the shadower) repeating vocal stimuli originating from a separate communication source in real-time. Humans shadowing for conversational agent sources (e.g., chat bots) become hybrid agents (“echoborgs”) capable of face-to-face interlocution. We report three studies that investigated people’s experiences interacting with echoborgs and the extent to which echoborgs pass as autonomous humans. First, participants in a Turing Test spoke with a chat bot via either a text interface or an echoborg. Human shadowing did not improve the chat bot’s chance of passing but did increase interrogators’ ratings of how human-like the chat bot seemed. In our second study, participants had to decide whether their interlocutor produced words generated by a chat bot or simply pretended to be one. Compared to those who engaged a text interface, participants who engaged an echoborg were more likely to perceive their interlocutor as pretending to be a chat bot. In our third study, participants were naïve to the fact that their interlocutor produced words generated by a chat bot. Unlike those who engaged a text interface, the vast majority of participants who engaged an echoborg did not sense a robotic interaction. These findings have implications for android science, the Turing Test paradigm, and human–computer interaction. The human body, as the delivery mechanism of communication, fundamentally alters the social psychological dynamics of interactions with machine intelligence. PMID:26042066

  9. The Effects of a Web-Based Interactive Psycho-Educational Program and a Traditional Psycho-Educational Program Based on Cognitive- Behavioral Approach upon Children’s Cognitive Distortions and Psychological Symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    BUĞA, Ahmet; HAMAMCI, Zeynep

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to compare the effects of a web-based interactive psycho-educational program and a traditional psycho-educational program based on the cognitive-behavioral approach upon children’s cognitive distortions and psychological symptoms. The study group of the research consisted of a total of 36 8th grade middle school students. Of the participants, 12 students participated in the web-based interactive psycho-educational program, 12 students participated in the tr...

  10. Web‐based interactive learning programs for dentistry concept and its evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitka Feberová

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The change in pedagogy relates partly to the development of electronic media and communication possibilities that are available in networked environments. This new technology dominates and supports the international educational content and learning. The aim of our study was to evaluate this progress in dental edu­cation. The education was compared parallel in two groups of Czech and international students. Groups and teaching hours were in the fourth year of the MD curriculum. Stomatology course materials were prepared and published on the portals of the individual dental study programs (http://dl.cuni.cz. The lectures had different access levels, ranging from materials that were freely available to all International WEB dental faculties’ sources to materials that were accessible only after receiving permission from the authors. A number of software tools were used for the creation of ­e-learning courses, such as, e.g., WebCT, Blackboard, Adobe Connect or Microsoft Class Server. The 291 students who were included in our study were divided into two groups according to the ­e-learning program. The goal of our study was to check student activities during the educational process, namely online work – lessons, articles, videos, lite­rature, quizzes and direct Internet access. The statisticaly significant differences were found in the results of the questionnaire based on five-point Likert scale. The Mann Whitney non-parametric test was used to evaluate students’ activities during the edu­cation process. The ­e-learning course had a direct influence on learning experiences, dental information, opinions and comments. Our results verified that satisfaction is an important and influential factor in determining whether a student decides to choose a dentistry and maxillofacial surgery course. Students prefer to have more time for practical therapy in the clinic. It was demonstrated that examination results did not correspond to the type of

  11. Effectiveness of a selective alcohol prevention program targeting personality risk factors: Results of interaction analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammers, Jeroen; Goossens, Ferry; Conrod, Patricia; Engels, Rutger; Wiers, Reinout W; Kleinjan, Marloes

    2017-08-01

    To explore whether specific groups of adolescents (i.e., scoring high on personality risk traits, having a lower education level, or being male) benefit more from the Preventure intervention with regard to curbing their drinking behaviour. A clustered randomized controlled trial, with participants randomly assigned to a 2-session coping skills intervention or a control no-intervention condition. Fifteen secondary schools throughout The Netherlands; 7 schools in the intervention and 8 schools in the control condition. 699 adolescents aged 13-15; 343 allocated to the intervention and 356 to the control condition; with drinking experience and elevated scores in either negative thinking, anxiety sensitivity, impulsivity or sensation seeking. Differential effectiveness of the Preventure program was examined for the personality traits group, education level and gender on past-month binge drinking (main outcome), binge frequency, alcohol use, alcohol frequency and problem drinking, at 12months post-intervention. Preventure is a selective school-based alcohol prevention programme targeting personality risk factors. The comparator was a no-intervention control. Intervention effects were moderated by the personality traits group and by education level. More specifically, significant intervention effects were found on reducing alcohol use within the anxiety sensitivity group (OR=2.14, CI=1.40, 3.29) and reducing binge drinking (OR=1.76, CI=1.38, 2.24) and binge drinking frequency (β=0.24, p=0.04) within the sensation seeking group at 12months post-intervention. Also, lower educated young adolescents reduced binge drinking (OR=1.47, CI=1.14, 1.88), binge drinking frequency (β=0.25, p=0.04), alcohol use (OR=1.32, CI=1.06, 1.65) and alcohol use frequency (β=0.47, p=0.01), but not those in the higher education group. Post hoc latent-growth analyses revealed significant effects on the development of binge drinking (β=-0.19, p=0.02) and binge drinking frequency (β=-0.10, p=0

  12. Showcasing the InTeGrate STEP Center principles and implementation programs through interactive webinars and websites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, C. H.; McFadden, R.; Manduca, C. A.; Newman, A.

    2016-12-01

    Teaching sustainability curriculum provides an opportunity for building connections between academic learning and examples, experiences, and issues from beyond academia. Done well, this can increase students interest in a topic that feels relevant to their lives and help them transfer this learning to real life situations in their professional and personal lives. To support this approach to teaching, the NSF STEP Center InTeGrate developed a set of five core principles to guide development of teaching materials and programs that draw content from grand challenges to society and work to improve students' ability to understand the nature of science and think like a scientist. These principles include both effective pedagogical approaches and an interdisciplinary framework and are reflected in example curriculum modules, and implementation programs supported by InTeGrate. In order to promote adoption of teaching aligned with the InTeGrate philosophy and to use the InTeGrate-developed materials as tools, we organized a public webinar series led by materials developers and program leaders in the InTeGrate community. The webinars highlight programs that have addressed bigger-scale challenges such as increasing diversity of our majors and creating pathways to the workforce, as well as the materials used by these programs. They provide detailed examples designed to help other groups implement similar programs including showcase teaching activities and examples of their use in a wide range of settings. The webinars are interactive, with built-in activities and reflections that promote discussion among participants and speakers. Topics include natural hazards and risks, water resources and sustainability, energy and atmosphere, integrating sustainability into your course, and tracing environmental contaminants. These have clear components of geoscience, but promote an interdisciplinary perspective, that provides a deeper and more thorough discussion. Each webinar is archived

  13. Effects of an Intervention to Reduce Hospitalizations From Nursing Homes: A Randomized Implementation Trial of the INTERACT Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Robert L; Huckfeldt, Peter; Tappen, Ruth; Engstrom, Gabriella; Rojido, Carolina; Newman, David; Yang, Zhiyou; Ouslander, Joseph G

    2017-09-01

    Medicare payment initiatives are spurring efforts to reduce potentially avoidable hospitalizations. To determine whether training and support for implementation of a nursing home (NH) quality improvement program (Interventions to Reduce Acute Care Transfers [INTERACT]) reduced hospital admissions and emergency department (ED) visits. This analysis compared changes in hospitalization and ED visit rates between the preintervention and postintervention periods for NHs randomly assigned to receive training and implementation support on INTERACT to changes in control NHs. The analysis focused on 85 NHs (36 717 NH residents) that reported no use of INTERACT during the preintervention period. The study team provided training and support for implementing INTERACT, which included tools that help NH staff identify and evaluate acute changes in NH resident condition and document communication between physicians; care paths to avoid hospitalization when safe and feasible; and advance care planning and quality improvement tools. All-cause hospitalizations, hospitalizations considered potentially avoidable, 30-day hospital readmissions, and ED visits without admission. All-cause hospitalization rates were calculated for all resident-days, high-risk days (0-30 days after NH admission), and lower-risk days (≥31 days after NH admission). We found that of 85 NHs, those that received implementation training and support exhibited statistically nonsignificant reductions in hospitalization rates compared with control NHs (net difference, -0.13 per 1000 resident-days; P = .25), hospitalizations during the first 30 days after NH admission (net difference, -0.37 per 1000 resident-days; P = .48), hospitalizations during periods more than 30 days after NH admission (net difference, -0.09 per 1000 resident-days; P = .39), 30-day readmission rates (net change in rate among hospital discharges, -0.01; P = .36), and ED visits without admission (net difference, 0.02 per 1000

  14. Upregulation of Programmed Death-1 and Its Ligand in Cardiac Injury Models: Interaction with GADD153.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Baban

    Full Text Available Programmed Death-1 (PD-1 and its ligand, PD-L1, are regulators of immune/ inflammatory mechanisms. We explored the potential involvement of PD-1/PD-L1 pathway in the inflammatory response and tissue damage in cardiac injury models.Ischemic-reperfused and cryoinjured hearts were processed for flow cytometry and immunohistochemical studies for determination of cardiac PD-1 and PD-L1 in the context of assessment of the growth arrest- and DNA damage-inducible protein 153 (GADD153 which regulates both inflammation and cell death. Further, we explored the potential ability of injured cardiac cells to influence proliferation of T lymphocytes.The isolated ischemic-reperfused hearts displayed marked increases in expression of PD-1 and PD-L1 in cardiomyocytes; however, immunofluorescent studies indicate that PD-1 and PD-L1 are not primarily co-expressed on the same cardiomyocytes. Upregulation of PD-1/PD-L1 was associated with a marked increases in GADD153 and interleukin (IL-17 but a mild increase in IL-10 and b disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential (ψm as well as apoptotic and necrotic cell death. Importantly, while isotype matching treatment did not affect the aforementioned changes, treatment with the PD-L1 blocking antibody reversed those effects in association with marked cardioprotection. Further, ischemic-reperfused cardiac cells reduced proliferation of T lymphocytes, an effect partially reversed by PD-L1 antibody. Subsequent studies using the cryoinjury model of myocardial infarction revealed significant increases in PD-1, PD-L1, GADD153 and IL-17 positive cells in association with significant apoptosis/necrosis.The data suggest that upregulation of PD-1/PD-L1 pathway in cardiac injury models mediates tissue damage likely through a paracrine mechanism. Importantly, inhibition of T cell proliferation by ischemic-reperfused cardiac cells is consistent with the negative immunoregulatory role of PD-1/PD-L1 pathway, likely reflecting an

  15. Interactive program system for application of modern evaluation of coal deposits and their parts under complicated conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Hoňková

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available In the contribution methodical procedures of modeling and assessing of coal deposits, applied in the frame of the solution of the (Grant Agency of the Czech Republic project No 105/03/1417 entitled „Interactive program system for application of modern methods of evaluation of coal deposits and their parts under complicated conditions“, are presented. The development of the computer technology as well as the new results in the domain of scientific geoinformatics have enabled an application of new modeling procedures and subsequent assessing of coal seams. Above all, the procedures in the sphere of the statistical data processing, geostatistics, selection and the application of a proper interpolation method, the graphic elaboration of maps and the 3D visualization of modeled coal seams and further procedures facilitating the selection of in-seam balanced thickness as well as identifying and correlating of coal seams are concerned. The program system formed in this way is conceived for applying to all types of coal deposits occurring in the Czech Republic.

  16. Web-based technology: its effects on small group "problem-based learning" interactions in a professional veterinary medical program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld-Tacher, Regina; Bright, Janice M; McConnell, Sherry L; Marley, Wanda S; Kogan, Lori R

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to ascertain whether and how the introduction of a new technology (WebCT) influenced faculty teaching styles while facilitating small group problem-based learning (PBL) sessions in a professional veterinary medical (PVM) program. The following questions guided the study: (1) How does the use of technology affect faculty teaching behaviors? (2) Do the facilitators' interactions with WebCT technology change over the course of one semester? (3) What is the perceived impact of WebCT on facilitators' role in PBL? The study employed a combination of qualitative (case study) and semi-quantitative (survey) methods to explore these issues. Nine clinical sciences faculty members, leading a total of six PBL groups, were observed over the course of an academic semester for a total of 20 instructional sessions. The qualitative data gathered by observing faculty as they facilitated PBL sessions yielded three major themes: (1) How do PBL facilitators adapt to the addition of WebCT technology? (2) Does this technology affect teaching? and (3) How do PBL facilitators interact with their students and each other over the course of a semester? No direct evidence was found to suggest that use of WebCT affected teaching behaviors (e.g., student-centered vs. teacher-centered instruction). However, all facilitators showed a moderate increase in comfort with the technology during the semester, and one participant showed remarkable gains in technology skills. The teaching theme provided insight into how facilitators foster learning in a PBL setting as compared to a traditional lecture. A high degree of variability in teaching styles was observed, but individuals' styles tended to remain stable over the course of the semester. Nevertheless, all facilitators interacted similarly with students, in a more caring and approachable manner, when compared to the classroom or clinic atmospheres.

  17. The CHANGE program: comparing an interactive vs. prescriptive approach to self-management among university students with obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Erin S; Irwin, Jennifer D; Morrow, Don; Battram, Danielle S; Melling, C W James

    2013-02-01

    To assess the effectiveness of 2 self-management (SM) approaches on obesity via a 12-week telephone-based intervention. An interactive motivational interviewing administered via Co-Active Life Coaching (MI-via-CALC) and a structured lifestyle treatment following the LEARN Program for Weight Management were compared. A secondary purpose was to explore the experiences of participants qualitatively. University students 18-24 years of age with a body mass index ≥30 kg/m(2) (n = 45) were randomized to either the: 1) MI-via-CALC condition that involved working with a certified Co-Active coach to achieve personal goals through dialogue, or 2) LEARN Program that entailed learning from a trained specialist who provided scripted, education-based lessons pertaining to lifestyle, exercise, attitudes, relationships and nutrition. Food consumption patterns, anthropometric and lipid profiles were examined at baseline, mid- and immediately posttreatment, and 3 and 6 months after the program. A semistructured questionnaire was completed at all follow-ups. Analyses revealed a significant time effect for weight (p = 0.01) with the LEARN group decreasing more (M = -7.76 lb) than the MI-VIA-CALC group (M = -2.5 lb) between baseline and week 12. MI-via-CALC participants decreased caloric intake more (M = -662.76) than LEARN participants (M = -105.5) during this same period. The MI-via-CALC group focused on self-understanding, and self-responsibility as primary outcomes of their experience; the LEARN group stressed their appreciation of practical knowledge gained. Both conditions seem similarly effective and are warranted as SM treatments. The best fit and unique contributions of each approach should be considered when working with this population. Copyright © 2013 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. An innovative, multidisciplinary educational program in interactive information storage and retrieval. Presentation visuals. M.S. Thesis Final Report, 1 Jul. 1985 - 31 Dec. 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (Editor); Gallagher, Mary C.

    1985-01-01

    This Working Paper Series entry represents a collection of presentation visuals associated with the companion report entitled An Innovative, Multidisciplinary Educational Program in Interactive Information Storage and Retrieval, USL/DBMS NASA/RECON Working Paper Series report number DBMS.NASA/RECON-12. The project objectives are to develop a set of transportable, hands-on, data base management courses for science and engineering students to facilitate their utilization of information storage and retrieval programs.

  19. Unveiling interactions among mitochondria, caspase-like proteases, and the actin cytoskeleton during plant programmed cell death (PCD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina E N Lord

    Full Text Available Aponogeton madagascariensis produces perforations over its leaf surface via programmed cell death (PCD. PCD begins between longitudinal and transverse veins at the center of spaces regarded as areoles, and continues outward, stopping several cells from these veins. The gradient of PCD that exists within a single areole of leaves in an early stage of development was used as a model to investigate cellular dynamics during PCD. Mitochondria have interactions with a family of proteases known as caspases, and the actin cytoskeleton during metazoan PCD; less is known regarding these interactions during plant PCD. This study employed the actin stain Alexa Fluor 488 phalloidin, the actin depolymerizer Latrunculin B (Lat B, a synthetic caspase peptide substrate and corresponding specific inhibitors, as well as the mitochondrial pore inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA to analyze the role of these cellular constituents during PCD. Results depicted that YVADase (caspase-1 activity is higher during the very early stages of perforation formation, followed by the bundling and subsequent breakdown of actin. Actin depolymerization using Lat B caused no change in YVADase activity. In vivo inhibition of YVADase activity prevented PCD and actin breakdown, therefore substantiating actin as a likely substrate for caspase-like proteases (CLPs. The mitochondrial pore inhibitor CsA significantly decreased YVADase activity, and prevented both PCD and actin breakdown; therefore suggesting the mitochondria as a possible trigger for CLPs during PCD in the lace plant. To our knowledge, this is the first in vivo study using either caspase-1 inhibitor (Ac-YVAD-CMK or CsA, following which the actin cytoskeleton was examined. Overall, our findings suggest the mitochondria as a possible upstream activator of YVADase activity and implicate these proteases as potential initiators of actin breakdown during perforation formation via PCD in the lace plant.

  20. Application of Genetic Programming (GP) Formalism for Building Disease Predictive Models from Protein-Protein Interactions (PPI) Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Renu; Bapat, Sanket; Goel, Purva; Karthikeyan, Muthukumarasamy; Tambe, Sanjeev S; Kulkarni, Bhaskar D

    2016-10-26

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) play a vital role in the biological processes involved in the cell functions and disease pathways. The experimental methods known to predict PPIs require tremendous efforts and the results are often hindered by the presence of a large number of false positives. Herein, we demonstrate the use of a new Genetic Programming (GP) based Symbolic Regression (SR) approach for predicting PPIs related to a disease. In a case study, a dataset consisting of one hundred and thirty five PPI complexes related to cancer was used to construct a generic PPI predicting model with good PPI prediction accuracy and generalization ability. A high correlation coefficient(CC) of 0.893, low root mean square error (RMSE) and mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) values of 478.221 and 0.239, respectively were achieved for both the training and test set outputs. To validate the discriminatory nature of the model, it was applied on a dataset of diabetes complexes where it yielded significantly low CC values. Thus, the GP model developed here serves a dual purpose: (a)a predictor of the binding energy of cancer related PPI complexes, and (b)a classifier for discriminating PPI complexes related to cancer from those of other diseases.

  1. Engaging Communities in Research on Cumulative Risk and Social Stress-Environment Interactions: Lessons Learned from EPA's STAR Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne-Sturges, Devon C; Korfmacher, Katrina Smith; Cory-Slechta, Deborah A; Jimenez, Maria; Symanski, Elaine; Carr Shmool, Jessie L; Dotson-Newman, Ogonnaya; Clougherty, Jane E; French, Robert; Levy, Jonathan I; Laumbach, Robert; Rodgers, Kathryn; Bongiovanni, Roseann; Scammell, Madeleine K

    2015-12-01

    Studies have documented cumulative health effects of chemical and nonchemical exposures, particularly chronic environmental and social stressors. Environmental justice groups have advocated for community participation in research that assesses how these interactions contribute to health disparities experienced by low-income and communities of color. In 2009, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency issued a request for research applications (RFA), "Understanding the Role of Nonchemical Stressors and Developing Analytic Methods for Cumulative Risk Assessments." Seven research projects were funded to help address this knowledge gap. Each engaged with communities in different ways. We describe the community engagement approaches of the seven research projects, which ranged from outreach through shared leadership/participatory. We then assess the experiences of these programs with respect to the community engagement goals of the RFA. We present insights from these community engagement efforts, including how the grants helped to build or enhance the capacity of community organizations in addition to contributing to the research projects. Our analysis of project proposals, annual grantee reports, and participant observation of these seven projects suggests guidelines for the development of future funding mechanisms and for conducting community-engaged research on cumulative risk involving environmental and social stressors including: 1) providing for flexibility in the mode of community engagement; 2) addressing conflict between research timing and engagement needs, 3) developing approaches for communicating about the uniquely sensitive issues of nonchemical stressors and social risks; and 4) encouraging the evaluation of community engagement efforts.

  2. Does parental involvement make a difference? The impact of parent interactive activities on students in a school-based AIDS prevention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, K; Levy, S R; Gordon, A K; Handler, A; Perhats, C; Flay, B R

    1997-02-01

    In this study, we test the effectiveness of involving parents in school-based AIDS education with respect to altering AIDS-related knowledge, attitudes, behavioral intentions, communications patterns, and behavior of students. Fifteen high risk school districts (pre-test N = 2,392) were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: parent-interactive (classroom curricula + parent-interactive component); parent non-interactive (classroom curricula only); control (basic AIDS education ordinarily provided by the school). Students were tested over time in grades 7, 8 and 9. Results indicate that both treatment conditions (parent-interactive and non-interactive) had a strong positive impact in enhancing student's knowledge, attitudes, communication patterns and behavioral intentions. Further, results indicate that there were no behavioral outcome differences between the treatment groups and the control condition. Results demonstrate few outcome differences between the two experimental conditions. In the two treatment groups (parent-interactive and parent non-interactive), the program effects appear to be the result of school-based curricula and of student self-determined intentions and behaviors, rather than the presence or absence of planned parental involvement. Whether or not structured or planned parental involvement becomes part of a school-based educational activity should perhaps be determined by (a) the existing level of parent-school interaction based on the nature of the community, (b) the amount of money readily available to follow through on a program of parent involvement without compromising on student programs, (c) the age of the child and the sensitivity of the issue, and (d) the ability of the parent/family to be involved effectively without extraordinary expense or sacrifice by either parent or school. Our findings speak to the positive role of the school regardless of parent participation.

  3. The interactive web-based program MSmonitor for self-management and multidisciplinary care in multiple sclerosis : Concept, content, and pilot results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongen, Peter Joseph; Sinnige, Ludovicus G.; van Geel, Bjoern M.; Verheul, Freek; Verhagen, Wim I.; van der Kruijk, Ruud A.; Haverkamp, Reinoud; Schrijver, Hans M.; Baart, J. Coby; Visser, Leo H.; Arnoldus, Edo P.; Gilhuis, H. Jacobus; Pop, Paul; Booy, Monique; Lemmens, Wim; Donders, Rogier; Kool, Anton; van Noort, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is a growing need to offer persons with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) possibilities for self-management and to integrate multidisciplinary health data. In 2009-2014 we developed a patient-reported outcome based, interactive, web-based program (MSmonitor) for (self-) monitoring,

  4. The interactive web-based program MSmonitor for self-management and multidisciplinary care in multiple sclerosis: concept, content, and pilot results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongen, P.J.; Sinnige, L.G.; Geel, B.M. van; Verheul, F.; Verhagen, W.I.; Kruijk, R.A. van der; Haverkamp, R.; Schrijver, H.M.; Baart, J.C.; Visser, L.H.; Arnoldus, E.P.J.; Gilhuis, H.J.; Pop, P.; Booy, M.; Lemmens, W.; Donders, R.; Kool, A.; Noort, E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a growing need to offer persons with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) possibilities for self-management and to integrate multidisciplinary health data. In 2009-2014 we developed a patient-reported outcome based, interactive, web-based program (MSmonitor) for (self-)monitoring,

  5. The Effectiveness of Positive Parenting Program (Triple-P on Parental Self-Efficacy and Mother-Child Interaction in Childeren Suffering from Intellectual Disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ashori

    2015-08-01

    Conclusion: The findings of the present study proposed that as enhancing parenting skills leads to an increase in parental self-efficacy as well as mother-child interaction within children suffering from the intellectual disability, it seems essential to plan training the positive parenting program for mothers of such children.

  6. Behavioral Outcomes of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy and Triple P-Positive Parenting Program: A Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Rae; Zimmer-Gembeck, Melanie

    2007-01-01

    We conducted a review and meta-analyses of 24 studies to evaluate and compare the outcomes of two widely disseminated parenting interventions--Parent-Child Interaction Therapy and Triple P-Positive Parenting Program. Participants in all studies were caregivers and 3- to 12-year-old children. In general, our analyses revealed positive effects of…

  7. Evaluating a staff training program on the interaction between staff and people with intellectual disability and challenging behaviour : An observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Zijlmans, L.; Gerits, L.; Bosman, A.M.T.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a training program focusing on improvement of emotional intelligence (EI) and support staffs’ awareness of their behaviour towards people with an intellectual disability based on interactional patterns. The support provided regarding

  8. Interactive Methods for Teaching Action Potentials, an Example of Teaching Innovation from Neuroscience Postdoctoral Fellows in the Fellowships in Research and Science Teaching (FIRST) Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen-Rhinehart, E; Eisen, A; Eaton, D; McCormack, K

    2009-01-01

    Acquiring a faculty position in academia is extremely competitive and now typically requires more than just solid research skills and knowledge of one's field. Recruiting institutions currently desire new faculty that can teach effectively, but few postdoctoral positions provide any training in teaching methods. Fellowships in Research and Science Teaching (FIRST) is a successful postdoctoral training program funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) providing training in both research and teaching methodology. The FIRST program provides fellows with outstanding interdisciplinary biomedical research training in fields such as neuroscience. The postdoctoral research experience is integrated with a teaching program which includes a How to Teach course, instruction in classroom technology and course development and mentored teaching. During their mentored teaching experiences, fellows are encouraged to explore innovative teaching methodologies and to perform science teaching research to improve classroom learning. FIRST fellows teaching neuroscience to undergraduates have observed that many of these students have difficulty with the topic of neuroscience. Therefore, we investigated the effects of interactive teaching methods for this topic. We tested two interactive teaching methodologies to determine if they would improve learning and retention of this information when compared with standard lectures. The interactive methods for teaching action potentials increased understanding and retention. Therefore, FIRST provides excellent teaching training, partly by enhancing the ability of fellows to integrate innovative teaching methods into their instruction. This training in turn provides fellows that matriculate from this program more of the characteristics that hiring institutions desire in their new faculty.

  9. Application programming in C# environment with recorded user software interactions and its application in autopilot of VMAT/IMRT treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Henry; Xing, Lei

    2016-11-08

    An autopilot scheme of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT)/intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning with the guidance of prior knowl-edge is established with recorded interactions between a planner and a commercial treatment planning system (TPS). Microsoft (MS) Visual Studio Coded UI is applied to record some common planner-TPS interactions as subroutines. The TPS used in this study is a Windows-based Eclipse system. The interactions of our application program with Eclipse TPS are realized through a series of subrou-tines obtained by prerecording the mouse clicks or keyboard strokes of a planner in operating the TPS. A strategy to autopilot Eclipse VMAT/IMRT plan selection process is developed as a specific example of the proposed "scripting" method. The autopiloted planning is navigated by a decision function constructed with a reference plan that has the same prescription and similar anatomy with the case at hand. The calculation proceeds by alternating between the Eclipse optimization and the outer-loop optimization independent of the Eclipse. In the C# program, the dosimetric characteristics of a reference treatment plan are used to assess and modify the Eclipse planning parameters and to guide the search for a clinically sensible treatment plan. The approach is applied to plan a head and neck (HN) VMAT case and a prostate IMRT case. Our study demonstrated the feasibility of application programming method in C# environment with recorded interactions of planner-TPS. The process mimics a planner's planning process and automatically provides clinically sensible treatment plans that would otherwise require a large amount of manual trial and error of a planner. The proposed technique enables us to harness a commercial TPS by application programming via the use of recorded human computer interactions and provides an effective tool to greatly facilitate the treatment planning process. © 2016 The Authors.

  10. Assessing the impact of natural service bulls and genotype by environment interactions on genetic gain and inbreeding in organic dairy cattle genomic breeding programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, T; Wensch-Dorendorf, M; Simianer, H; Swalve, H H; König, S

    2014-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare genetic gain and inbreeding coefficients of dairy cattle in organic breeding program designs by applying stochastic simulations. Evaluated breeding strategies were: (i) selecting bulls from conventional breeding programs, and taking into account genotype by environment (G×E) interactions, (ii) selecting genotyped bulls within the organic environment for artificial insemination (AI) programs and (iii) selecting genotyped natural service bulls within organic herds. The simulated conventional population comprised 148 800 cows from 2976 herds with an average herd size of 50 cows per herd, and 1200 cows were assigned to 60 organic herds. In a young bull program, selection criteria of young bulls in both production systems (conventional and organic) were either 'conventional' estimated breeding values (EBV) or genomic estimated breeding values (GEBV) for two traits with low (h 2=0.05) and moderate heritability (h 2=0.30). GEBV were calculated for different accuracies (r mg), and G×E interactions were considered by modifying originally simulated true breeding values in the range from r g=0.5 to 1.0. For both traits (h 2=0.05 and 0.30) and r mg⩾0.8, genomic selection of bulls directly in the organic population and using selected bulls via AI revealed higher genetic gain than selecting young bulls in the larger conventional population based on EBV; also without the existence of G×E interactions. Only for pronounced G×E interactions (r g=0.5), and for highly accurate GEBV for natural service bulls (r mg>0.9), results suggests the use of genotyped organic natural service bulls instead of implementing an AI program. Inbreeding coefficients of selected bulls and their offspring were generally lower when basing selection decisions for young bulls on GEBV compared with selection strategies based on pedigree indices.

  11. WheelerLab: An interactive program for sequence stratigraphic analysis of seismic sections, outcrops and well sections and the generation of chronostratigraphic sections and dynamic chronostratigraphic sections

    OpenAIRE

    Adewale Amosu; Yuefeng Sun

    2017-01-01

    WheelerLab is an interactive program that facilitates the interpretation of stratigraphic data (seismic sections, outcrop data and well sections) within a sequence stratigraphic framework and the subsequent transformation of the data into the chronostratigraphic domain. The transformation enables the identification of significant geological features, particularly erosional and non-depositional features that are not obvious in the original seismic domain. Although there are some software produ...

  12. Development of Integrated Programs for Aerospace-vehicle Design (IPAD): Product manufacture interactions with the design process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, H. A.

    1979-01-01

    The product manufacturing interactions with the design process and the IPAD requirements to support the interactions are described. The data requirements supplied to manufacturing by design are identified and quantified. Trends in computer-aided manufacturing are discussed and the manufacturing process of the 1980's is anticipated.

  13. Studying design and use of healthcare technologies in interaction: the social learning perspective in a Dutch quality improvement collaborative program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loon, Esther; Oudshoorn, Nelly E.J.; Bal, R.A.; Bal, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Designing technologies is a process that relies on multiple interactions between design and use contexts. These interactions are essential to the development and establishment of technologies. This article seeks to understand the attempts of healthcare organisations to integrate use contexts into

  14. A Fortran 90 program to solve the Hartree-Fock equations for interacting spin- 1/2 > fermions confined in harmonic potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Hridis Kumar; Shukla, Alok

    2008-08-01

    A set of weakly interacting spin- 1/2 > Fermions, confined by a harmonic oscillator potential, and interacting with each other via a contact potential, is a model system which closely represents the physics of a dilute gas of two-component fermionic atoms confined in a magneto-optic trap. In the present work, our aim is to present a Fortran 90 computer program which, using a basis set expansion technique, solves the Hartree-Fock (HF) equations for spin- 1/2 > Fermions confined by a three-dimensional harmonic oscillator potential, and interacting with each other via pair-wise delta-function potentials. Additionally, the program can also account for those anharmonic potentials which can be expressed as a polynomial in the position operators x, y, and z. Both the restricted-HF (RHF), and the unrestricted-HF (UHF) equations can be solved for a given number of Fermions, with either repulsive or attractive interactions among them. The option of UHF solutions for such systems also allows us to study possible magnetic properties of the physics of two-component confined atomic Fermi gases, with imbalanced populations. Using our code we also demonstrate that such a system exhibits shell structure, and follows Hund's rule. Program summaryProgram title: trap.x Catalogue identifier: AEBB_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEBB_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 17 750 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 205 138 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: mostly Fortran 90 Computer: PCs—SUN, HP Alpha, IBM Operating system: Linux, Solaris, Tru64, AIX Classification: 7.7 Nature of problem: The simplest description of a spin 1/2 >; trapped system at the mean field level is given by the Hartree-Fock method. This

  15. Effects of a Parent-Child Interactive Program for Families on Reducing the Exposure of School-Aged Children to Household Smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Ting; Hsiao, Fei-Hsiu; Lee, Ching-Mei; Wang, Ruey-Hsia; Chen, Ping-Ling

    2016-03-01

    Parental smoking has been identified as the major source of children's exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS). Therefore, parental involvement is critical in ETS exposure prevention programs. This study examined the effects of a parent-child interactive program on reducing children's exposure to ETS at home and enhancing parents' and children's prevention strategies. A clustered randomized controlled trial was administered to 75 families of school-aged children from six primary schools in New Taipei City, Taiwan. Families in the intervention group received a parent-child interactive intervention, and parents in the control group received written materials on tobacco hazards. Data on children's exposure and the prevention of children's exposure to ETS at home were obtained at baseline, 8-week, and 20-week or 6-month assessments. The percentage of children with urine cotinine levels greater than or equal to 6 ng/ml was significantly lower in the intervention group than it was in the control group at both the 8-week and 6-month assessments. The intervention significantly reduced parental smoking in the presence of children and increased parents' prevention of children's ETS exposure and children's ETS avoidance behavior from the baseline to the 20-week assessment. This is a preliminary study design aimed at creating a program for reducing children's ETS exposure at home. Further research to produce evidence supporting the application of the parent-child interactive program in primary schools is suggested. The theoretical basis of the intervention design can serve as a reference for nursing education and the design of health education programs. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Final report for the 'Melt-Vessel Interactions' Project. European Union R and TD Program 4th Framework. MVI project final research report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Dinh, T.N.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Bui, V.A.; Green, J.; Kolb, G.; Karbojian, A.; Theerthan, S.A.; Gubaidulline, A. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Nuclear Power Safety; Helle, M.; Kymaelaeinen, O.; Tuomisto, H. [IVO Power Engineering Ltd., Vantaa (Finland); Bonnet, J.M.; Rouge, S.; Narcoux, M.; Liegeois, A. [CEA - Grenoble (France); Turland, B.D.; Dobson, G.P. [AEA Technology plc, Dorchester (United Kingdom); Siccama, A. [ECN Nuclear Research, Petten (Netherlands); Ikonen, K. [VTT Energy, Helsinki (Finland); Parozzi, F. [ENEL - SRI/PAM/GRA, Segrate, MI (Italy); Kolev, N. [Siemens AG, Erlangen (Germany); Caira, M. [Univ. of Roma (Italy)

    1999-04-01

    The Melt Vessel Interaction (MVI) project is concerned with the consequences of the interactions that a core melt, generated during a postulated severe accident in a light water reactor, may have with the pressure vessel. In particular, the issues concerned with the failure of the vessel bottom head are the focus of the research. The specific objectives of the project are to obtain data and develop validated models, which could be applied to prototypic plants, and accident conditions, for resolution of issues related to the melt vessel interactions. The project work has been performed by nine partners having varied responsibility. The work included a large number of experiments, with simulant materials, whose observations and results are employed, respectively, to understand the physical mechanisms and to develop validated models. Applications to the prototypic geometry and conditions have also been performed. This report is volume 1 of the Final Report for the Project, in which a summary of the progress achieved in the experimental program is provided. We have, however, included some aspects of the modeling activities. Volume 2 of the Final report describes the progress achieved in the modeling program. The progress achieved in the experimental and modeling parts of the Project has led to the resolution of some of the issues of melt vessel interaction. Considerable progress was also achieved towards resolution of the remaining issues.

  17. Interactive Timetabling

    OpenAIRE

    Muller, Tomas; Bartak, Roman

    2001-01-01

    Timetabling is a typical application of constraint programming whose task is to allocate activities to slots in available resources respecting various constraints like precedence and capacity. In this paper we present a basic concept, a constraint model, and the solving algorithms for interactive timetabling. Interactive timetabling combines automated timetabling (the machine allocates the activities) with user interaction (the user can interfere with the process of timetabling). Because the ...

  18. The effect of parasocial interaction on intention to register as organ donors through entertainment-education programs in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hyeonju; Park, Hyun Soon

    2015-03-01

    This study is based on the theory of reasoned action and self-efficacy, and it examines the mediating role of attitude, subjective norm, and self-efficacy between parasocial interaction and the intention to donate organs. Judgment sampling was used and 329 respondents were participated in the survey. Participants consisted of 102 males (30.9%) and 227 females (69.1%), and their ages ranged from 13 to 77 years. The Cronbach's α for each scale was .81 for parasocial interaction scale (M = 3.01, SD = 0.55), .89 for attitude scale (M = 4.28, SD = 0.55), .89 for subjective norm (M = 4.28, SD = 0.55), and .76 for self-efficacy (M = 3.31, SD = 0.89). The level of parasocial interaction was found to be significantly associated with attitude and subjective norms that predicted intention to register as organ donors. Although the mediating effect of self-efficacy between parasocial interaction and intention has been proven, self-efficacy showed a conflicting result in the process of model testing in that the level of parasocial interaction affected the degree of subjective norms, which in turn influenced intention by enhancing self-efficacy. The results indicate that parasocial interaction has an indirect effect on intention to register as organ donors through attitude and subjective norms. It is expected that this finding contributes to developing a number of strategies to encourage people's intention to register as organ donors. © 2013 APJPH.

  19. Discovering Protein-Protein Interactions within the Programmed Cell Death Network Using a Protein-Fragment Complementation Screen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuval Gilad

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis and autophagy are distinct biological processes, each driven by a different set of protein-protein interactions, with significant crosstalk via direct interactions among apoptotic and autophagic proteins. To measure the global profile of these interactions, we adapted the Gaussia luciferase protein-fragment complementation assay (GLuc PCA, which monitors binding between proteins fused to complementary fragments of a luciferase reporter. A library encompassing 63 apoptotic and autophagic proteins was constructed for the analysis of ∼3,600 protein-pair combinations. This generated a detailed landscape of the apoptotic and autophagic modules and points of interface between them, identifying 46 previously unknown interactions. One of these interactions, between DAPK2, a Ser/Thr kinase that promotes autophagy, and 14-3-3τ, was further investigated. We mapped the region responsible for 14-3-3τ binding and proved that this interaction inhibits DAPK2 dimerization and activity. This proof of concept underscores the power of the GLuc PCA platform for the discovery of biochemical pathways within the cell death network.

  20. SATELLITE BASED LIVE AND INTERACTIVE DISTANCE LEARNING PROGRAM IN THE FIELD OF GEOINFORMATICS – A PERSPECTIVE OF INDIAN INSTITUTE OF REMOTE SENSING, INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. L. N. Raju

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Geoinformatics is a highly specialized discipline that deals with Remote Sensing, Geographical Information System (GIS, Global Positioning System (GPS and field surveys for assessing, quantification, development and management of resources, planning and infrastructure development, utility services etc. Indian Institute of Remote Sensing (IIRS, a premier institute and one of its kinds has played a key role for capacity Building in this specialized area since its inception in 1966. Realizing the large demand, IIRS has started outreach program in basics of Remote Sensing, GIS and GPS for universities and institutions. EDUSAT (Educational Satellite is the communication satellite built and launched by ISRO in 2004 exclusively for serving the educational sector to meet the demand for an interactive satellite based distance education system for the country. IIRS has used EDUSAT (shifted to INSAT 4 CR recently due to termination of services from EDUSAT for its distance learning program to impart basic training in Remote Sensing, GIS and GPS, catering to the universities spread across India. The EDUSAT based training is following similar to e-learning method but has advantage of live interaction sessions between teacher and the students when the lecture is delivered using EDUSAT satellite communication. Because of its good quality reception the interactions are not constrained due to bandwidth problems of Internet. National Natural Resource Management System, Department of Space, Government of India, under Standing Committee in Training and Technology funded this unique program to conduct the basic training in Geoinformatics. IIRS conducts 6 weeks basic training course on "Remote Sensing, GIS and GPS" regularly since the year 2007. The course duration is spread over the period of 3 months beginning with the start of the academic year (1st semester i.e., July to December every year, for university students. IIRS has utilized EDUSAT satellite for

  1. Satellite Based Live and Interactive Distance Learning Program in the Field of Geoinformatics - a Perspective of Indian Institute of Remote Sensing, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, P. L. N.; Gupta, P. K.; Roy, P. S.

    2011-09-01

    Geoinformatics is a highly specialized discipline that deals with Remote Sensing, Geographical Information System (GIS), Global Positioning System (GPS) and field surveys for assessing, quantification, development and management of resources, planning and infrastructure development, utility services etc. Indian Institute of Remote Sensing (IIRS), a premier institute and one of its kinds has played a key role for capacity Building in this specialized area since its inception in 1966. Realizing the large demand, IIRS has started outreach program in basics of Remote Sensing, GIS and GPS for universities and institutions. EDUSAT (Educational Satellite) is the communication satellite built and launched by ISRO in 2004 exclusively for serving the educational sector to meet the demand for an interactive satellite based distance education system for the country. IIRS has used EDUSAT (shifted to INSAT 4 CR recently due to termination of services from EDUSAT) for its distance learning program to impart basic training in Remote Sensing, GIS and GPS, catering to the universities spread across India. The EDUSAT based training is following similar to e-learning method but has advantage of live interaction sessions between teacher and the students when the lecture is delivered using EDUSAT satellite communication. Because of its good quality reception the interactions are not constrained due to bandwidth problems of Internet. National Natural Resource Management System, Department of Space, Government of India, under Standing Committee in Training and Technology funded this unique program to conduct the basic training in Geoinformatics. IIRS conducts 6 weeks basic training course on "Remote Sensing, GIS and GPS" regularly since the year 2007. The course duration is spread over the period of 3 months beginning with the start of the academic year (1st semester) i.e., July to December every year, for university students. IIRS has utilized EDUSAT satellite for conducting 4 six weeks

  2. Parents and Young Children with Disabilities: The Effects of a Home-Based Music Therapy Program on Parent-Child Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yen-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    Responsive parenting style and synchronous parent-child interactions have a positive impact on children in terms of language, cognitive, and social-emotional development. Despite widely documented benefits of music therapy on parent-child interactions, empirical evidence for the effects of music therapy on parent-child synchrony is lacking. To examine effects of parent-child dyads' participation in a six-week home-based music therapy program on parent response, child initiation, and parent-child synchrony, as well as parents' daily use of musical activities with their child. Twenty-six parent-child dyads participated in this pretest-posttest within-subject single-group design study. Participating dyads included parents and their child with disabilities or developmental delays (ages 1-3 years inclusive). Parent-child dyads participated in a home-based music therapy program that included six weekly 40-minute sessions, and incorporated five responsive teaching strategies (i.e., affect, match, reciprocity, shared control, and contingency). Observational data were recorded for parent-child interactions and parent-child synchrony. Parents' positive physical and verbal responses, as well as children's positive verbal initiations, increased significantly pre- to post-intervention; however, children's positive physical initiations did not increase significantly. Parent-child synchrony also improved significantly pre- to post-intervention. Findings support the use of home-based music therapy programs to facilitate parent-child interactions in the areas of parental responsiveness and child-initiated communication, as well as parent-child synchrony. © the American Music Therapy Association 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Increasing the satisfaction of general practitioners with continuing medical education programs: A method for quality improvement through increasing teacher-learner interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fogelman Yacov

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Continuing medical education (CME for general practitioners relies on specialist-based teaching methods in many settings. Formal lectures by specialists may not meet the learning needs of practitioners and may cause dissatisfaction with traditional CME. Increasing learner involvement in teaching programs may improve learner satisfaction. Methods A quality improvement program for CME for 18 general practitioners in the Tel Aviv region was designed as a result of dissatisfaction with traditional CME activities. A two-step strategy for change was developed. The CME participants first selected the study topics relevant to them from a needs assessment and prepared background material on the topics. In the second step, specialist teachers were invited to answer questions arising from the preparation of selected topics. Satisfaction with the traditional lecture program and the new participatory program were assessed by a questionnaire. The quality criteria included the relevance, importance and applicability of the CME topic chosen to the participant's practice, the clarity of the presentation and the effective use of teaching aids by the lecturer and the potential of the lecturer to serve as a consultant to the participant. Results The participatory model of CME significantly increased satisfaction with relevance, applicability and interest in CME topics compared to the traditional lecture format. Conclusions Increased learner participation in the selection and preparation of CME topics, and increased interaction between CME teachers and learners results in increased satisfaction with teaching programs. Future study of the effect of this model on physician performance is required.

  4. Neuroendocrine-immune (NEI) circuitry from neuron-glial interactions to function: Focus on gender and HPA-HPG interactions on early programming of the NEI system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morale, M C; Gallo, F; Tirolo, C; Testa, N; Caniglia, S; Marletta, N; Spina-Purrello, V; Avola, R; Caucci, F; Tomasi, P; Delitala, G; Barden, N; Marchetti, B

    2001-08-01

    Bidirectional communication between the neuroendocrine and immune systems during ontogeny plays a pivotal role in programming the development of neuroendocrine and immune responses in adult life. Signals generated by the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis (i.e. luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone, LHRH, and sex steroids), and by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis (glucocorticoids (GC)), are major players coordinating the development of immune system function. Conversely, products generated by immune system activation exert a powerful and long-lasting regulation on neuroendocrine axes activity. The neuroendocrine-immune system is very sensitive to preperinatal experiences, including hormonal manipulations and immune challenges, which may influence the future predisposition to several disease entities. We review our work on the ongoing mutual regulation of neuroendocrine and immune cell activities, both at a cellular and molecular level. In the central nervous system, one chief compartment is represented by the astroglial cell and its mediators. Hence, neuron-glial signalling cascades dictate major changes in response to hormonal manipulations and pro-inflammatory triggers. The interplay between LHRH, sex steroids, GC and pro-inflammatory mediators in some physiological and pathological states, together with the potential clinical implications of these findings, are summarized. The overall study highlights the plasticity of this intersystem cross-talk for pharmacological targeting with drugs acting at the neuroendocrine-immune interface.

  5. Evaluating the Sharing Stories youth theatre program: an interactive theatre and drama-based strategy for sexual health promotion among multicultural youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Meagan; Lobo, Roanna; Sorenson, Anne

    2017-03-01

    Issue addressed Rates of sexually transmissible infections among young people are high, and there is a need for innovative, youth-focused sexual health promotion programs. This study evaluated the effectiveness of the Sharing Stories youth theatre program, which uses interactive theatre and drama-based strategies to engage and educate multicultural youth on sexual health issues. The effectiveness of using drama-based evaluation methods is also discussed. Methods The youth theatre program participants were 18 multicultural youth from South East Asian, African and Middle Eastern backgrounds aged between 14 and 21 years. Four sexual health drama scenarios and a sexual health questionnaire were used to measure changes in knowledge and attitudes. Results Participants reported being confident talking to and supporting their friends with regards to safe sex messages, improved their sexual health knowledge and demonstrated a positive shift in their attitudes towards sexual health. Drama-based evaluation methods were effective in engaging multicultural youth and worked well across the cultures and age groups. Conclusions Theatre and drama-based sexual health promotion strategies are an effective method for up-skilling young people from multicultural backgrounds to be peer educators and good communicators of sexual health information. Drama-based evaluation methods are engaging for young people and an effective way of collecting data from culturally diverse youth. So what? This study recommends incorporating interactive and arts-based strategies into sexual health promotion programs for multicultural youth. It also provides guidance for health promotion practitioners evaluating an arts-based health promotion program using arts-based data collection methods.

  6. The interactive web-based program MSmonitor for self-management and multidisciplinary care in multiple sclerosis: utilization and valuation by patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongen, Peter Joseph; Sinnige, Ludovicus G; van Geel, Björn M; Verheul, Freek; Verhagen, Wim I; van der Kruijk, Ruud A; Haverkamp, Reinoud; Schrijver, Hans M; Baart, Jacoba C; Visser, Leo H; Arnoldus, Edo P; Gilhuis, Herman Jacobus; Pop, Paul; Booy, Monique; Heerings, Marco; Kool, Anton; van Noort, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Background MSmonitor is an interactive web-based program for self-management and integrated, multidisciplinary care in multiple sclerosis. Methods To assess the utilization and valuation by persons with multiple sclerosis, we held an online survey among those who had used the program for at least 1 year. We evaluated the utilization and meaningfulness of the program’s elements, perceived use of data by neurologists and nurses, and appreciation of care, self-management, and satisfaction. Results Fifty-five persons completed the questionnaire (estimated response rate 40%). The Multiple Sclerosis Impact Profile (MSIP), Medication and Adherence Inventory, Activities Diary, and electronic consultation (e-consult) were used by 40%, 55%, 47%, and 44% of respondents and were considered meaningful by 83%, 81%, 54%, and 88%, respectively. During out-patient consultations, nurses reportedly used the MSmonitor data three to six times more frequently than neurologists. As to nursing care, more symptoms were dealt with (according to 54% of respondents), symptoms were better discussed (69%), and the overall quality of care had improved (60%) since the use of the program. As to neurological care, these figures were 24%, 31%, and 27%, respectively. In 46% of the respondents, the insight into their symptoms and disabilities had increased since the use of the program; the MSIP, Activities Diary, and e-consult had contributed most to this improvement. The overall satisfaction with the program was 3.5 out of 5, and 73% of the respondents would recommend the program to other persons with multiple sclerosis. Conclusion A survey among persons with multiple sclerosis using the MSmonitor program showed that the MSIP, Medication and Adherence Inventory, Activities Diary, and e-consult were frequently used and that the MSIP, Medication and Adherence Inventory, and e-consult were appreciated the most. Moreover, the quality of nursing care, but not so neurological care, had improved, which

  7. WheelerLab: An interactive program for sequence stratigraphic analysis of seismic sections, outcrops and well sections and the generation of chronostratigraphic sections and dynamic chronostratigraphic sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amosu, Adewale; Sun, Yuefeng

    WheelerLab is an interactive program that facilitates the interpretation of stratigraphic data (seismic sections, outcrop data and well sections) within a sequence stratigraphic framework and the subsequent transformation of the data into the chronostratigraphic domain. The transformation enables the identification of significant geological features, particularly erosional and non-depositional features that are not obvious in the original seismic domain. Although there are some software products that contain interactive environments for carrying out chronostratigraphic analysis, none of them are open-source codes. In addition to being open source, WheelerLab adds two important functionalities not present in currently available software: (1) WheelerLab generates a dynamic chronostratigraphic section and (2) WheelerLab enables chronostratigraphic analysis of older seismic data sets that exist only as images and not in the standard seismic file formats; it can also be used for the chronostratigraphic analysis of outcrop images and interpreted well sections. The dynamic chronostratigraphic section sequentially depicts the evolution of the chronostratigraphic chronosomes concurrently with the evolution of identified genetic stratal packages. This facilitates a better communication of the sequence-stratigraphic process. WheelerLab is designed to give the user both interactive and interpretational control over the transformation; this is most useful when determining the correct stratigraphic order for laterally separated genetic stratal packages. The program can also be used to generate synthetic sequence stratigraphic sections for chronostratigraphic analysis.

  8. WheelerLab: An interactive program for sequence stratigraphic analysis of seismic sections, outcrops and well sections and the generation of chronostratigraphic sections and dynamic chronostratigraphic sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adewale Amosu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available WheelerLab is an interactive program that facilitates the interpretation of stratigraphic data (seismic sections, outcrop data and well sections within a sequence stratigraphic framework and the subsequent transformation of the data into the chronostratigraphic domain. The transformation enables the identification of significant geological features, particularly erosional and non-depositional features that are not obvious in the original seismic domain. Although there are some software products that contain interactive environments for carrying out chronostratigraphic analysis, none of them are open-source codes. In addition to being open source, WheelerLab adds two important functionalities not present in currently available software: (1 WheelerLab generates a dynamic chronostratigraphic section and (2 WheelerLab enables chronostratigraphic analysis of older seismic data sets that exist only as images and not in the standard seismic file formats; it can also be used for the chronostratigraphic analysis of outcrop images and interpreted well sections. The dynamic chronostratigraphic section sequentially depicts the evolution of the chronostratigraphic chronosomes concurrently with the evolution of identified genetic stratal packages. This facilitates a better communication of the sequence-stratigraphic process. WheelerLab is designed to give the user both interactive and interpretational control over the transformation; this is most useful when determining the correct stratigraphic order for laterally separated genetic stratal packages. The program can also be used to generate synthetic sequence stratigraphic sections for chronostratigraphic analysis.

  9. PENGEMBANGAN INTERACTIVE E-BOOK BIDANG ASESMEN BAHASA UNTUK MENGEMBANGKAN KOMPETENSI DAN KEMANDIRIAN MAHASISWA PROGRAM PENDIDIKAN BAHASA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Wahyuni

    2014-07-01

    in general the students consider the product very good (90%. Fifth, the class validation shows that there is a significant difference between the pretest score and the posttest score. Therefore, the developed interactive e-book is effective to be used in language assessment learning.

  10. Monitoring Student Interaction during Collaborative Learning: Design and Evaluation of a Training Program for Pre-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaendler, Celia; Wiedmann, Michael; Leuders, Timo; Rummel, Nikol; Spada, Hans

    2016-01-01

    The monitoring by teachers of collaborative, cognitive, and meta-cognitive student activities in collaborative learning is crucial for fostering beneficial student interaction. In a quasi-experimental study, we trained pre-service teachers (N = 74) to notice behavioral indicators for these three dimensions of student activities. Video clips of…

  11. Experience of Adult Facilitators in a Virtual-Reality-Based Social Interaction Program for Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Fengfeng; Im, Tami; Xue, Xinrong; Xu, Xinhao; Kim, Namju; Lee, Sungwoong

    2015-01-01

    This phenomenological study explored and described the experiences and perceptions of adult facilitators who facilitated virtual-reality-based social interaction for children with autism. Extensive data were collected from iterative, in-depth interviews; online activities observation; and video analysis. Four salient themes emerged through the…

  12. Disclosing celebrity endorsement in a television program to mitigate persuasion: how disclosure type and celebrity credibility interact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, K.; van Reijmersdal, E.A.

    2013-01-01

    This experiment (N = 165) examined the effects of two aspects of in-program celebrity endorsement on brand attitudes and product claim acceptance: credibility of the celebrity and the effects of disclosure types. Although there is an increasing call for endorsement disclosures, the effects of these

  13. Modelagua, a new interactive program of inverse mass-balance model for hydrogeochemical studies -- an example of its application in Aguascalientes, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, P.; Fagundo, J.; Fagundo, R.; Suárez, M.; Melian, C.; Cortes, A.; Ramos, J. A.

    2003-04-01

    The geochemical models consists on the application of physical-chemical principles to the interpretation of hydrogeochemical systems. This methodology has been developed according to two approaches: a) the inverse one, mass-balance, that uses a well-known data of the chemical composition of the water and the rock with the objective of identifying in a quantitative way the geochemical reactions that give origin to this composition, and b) the direct one that in the basis of some well-known initial conditions of the water-rock system, it predicts the characteristics of the resulting solution of the performance of hypothetical chemical reactions. With the reference of interactive programs such as BALANCE and NETPATH, for modelling net geochemical mass-balance reactions between an initial and final water along a hydrologic flow path, which also computes the mixing proportion of two initial waters and net geochemical reactions that can account for the observed composition of a final water, an interactive program of inverse model has been developed (MODELAGUA) that not only allow starting from well-known data of the chemical composition of the water and the rock to identify in a quantitative way the geochemical reactions that give origin to this composition, but allow to do analysis of mixture of waters and net geochemical reactions that can account for the observed composition of a final water, making use of natural tracer whose geochemical behavior allows them to be used as conservative ions. In this work is presented MODELAGUA, as a new interactive program of inverse model mass-balance and an example in Aguascalientes, Mexico of its application.

  14. Development of Motivate4Change Using the Intervention Mapping Protocol: An Interactive Technology Physical Activity and Medication Adherence Promotion Program for Hospitalized Heart Failure Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterom-Calo, Rony; Te Velde, Saskia J; Stut, Wim; Brug, Johannes

    2015-07-20

    It is important that heart failure (HF) patients adhere to their medication regimen and engage in physical activity. Evidence shows that adherence to these HF self-management behaviors can be improved with appropriate interventions. To further promote medication adherence and physical activity among HF patients, we developed an intervention for hospitalized HF patients. The intervention mapping protocol was applied in the development of the intervention. This entailed performing a needs assessment, defining change objectives, selecting determinants and strategies, and developing the materials. The resulting intervention, Motivate4Change, makes use of interactive technology and provides HF patients with personalized feedback and advice. Specific change objectives were defined. The relevant behavioral determinants for the physical activity program were practical knowledge on physical activity performance and self-efficacy for, and perceived benefits of, physical activity. For medication-taking, the selected determinants were practical knowledge on medication-taking, perceived barriers to medication-taking, beliefs about the necessity and harm regarding the medication prescribed, and beliefs about overprescribing and harm of medication in general. The change objectives and behavior change determinants were translated in feedback and advice strategies in an interactive technology program that included tailored feedback and advice, and role models in videos in which the behaviors and overcoming barriers were demonstrated. Relevant stakeholders were involved in the interventions development process. The intervention was pretested among HF patients and adjustments were made accordingly. The interactive technology physical activity and medication adherence promotion program for hospitalized HF patients was systematically developed using the intervention mapping protocol and was based on the available theory and evidence regarding HF self-management behavior change. The

  15. Do all roads lead to Rome? The role of neuro-immune interactions before birth in the programming of offspring obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine eJasoni

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The functions of the nervous system can be powerfully modulated by the immune system. Although traditionally considered to be quite separate, neuro-immune interactions are increasingly recognized as critical for both normal and pathological nervous system function in the adult. However, a growing body of information supports a critical role for neuro-immune interactions before birth, particularly in the prenatal programming of later-life neurobehavioral disease risk. This review will focus on maternal obesity, as it represents an environment of pathological immune system function during pregnancy that elevates offspring neurobehavioral disease risk. We will first delineate the normal role of the immune system during pregnancy, including the role of the placenta as both a barrier and relayer of inflammatory information between the maternal and fetal environments. This will be followed by the current exciting findings of how immuno-modulatory molecules may elevate offspring risk of neurobehavioral disease by altering brain development and, consequently, later life function. Finally, by drawing parallels with pregnancy complications other than obesity, we will suggest that aberrant immune activation, irrespective of its origin, may lead to neuro-immune interactions that otherwise would not exist in the developing brain. These interactions could conceivably derail normal brain development and/or later life function, and thereby elevate risk for obesity and other neurobehavioral disorders later in the offspring’s life.

  16. Blended Infant Massage-Parenting Enhancement Program on Recovering Substance-Abusing Mothers' Parenting Stress, Self-Esteem, Depression, Maternal Attachment, and Mother-Infant Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Luz S; Porter, Brian O; McCoy, Virginia; Bango-Sanchez, Vivian; Kissel, Bonnie; Williams, Marjorie; Nunnewar, Sachin

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to determine whether a blended Infant Massage-Parenting Enhancement Program (IMPEP) improved maternal psychosocial health outcomes (parenting stress, depressive symptoms, self-esteem, maternal attachment) and maternal-infant interaction among substance-addicted mothers (SAMs) actively engaged in outpatient rehabilitation. Designed as a randomized, three-group controlled trial testing two levels of psychoeducational intervention (IMPEP vs. PEP) and a control group (standard care parenting resources), the study was conducted in two substance abuse centers in southeast Florida on a convenience sample of 138 recovering SAM-infant pairs. IMPEP or PEP classes were held weekly on Weeks 2-5, with data collected at baseline (Week 1), Week 6, and Week 12 via structured interviews, observation (Observation Checklist on Maternal-Infant Interaction), and self-administered questionnaires (Abidin Parenting Stress Index, Beck Depression Inventory, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, Muller's Maternal Attachment Inventory), analyzed descriptively and inferentially using Kruskall-Wallis analysis of variance and post hoc Wilcoxon rank sum and Mann-Whitney U tests. Both IMPEP and PEP groups had significantly increased Parenting Stress Index scores (decreased parenting stress) and decreased Beck Depression Inventory scores (decreased depressive symptoms) compared to controls at Week 12, whereas there were no clinically meaningful differences among study groups in Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, Muller's Maternal Attachment Inventory, or Observation Checklist on Maternal-Infant Interaction scores. Only the IMPEP group showed significant improvements in both psychological and physical (waist-hip ratio) measures of parenting stress over time. The findings suggest that infant massage blended into a structured parenting program has value-added effects in decreasing parenting stress and maternal depressive symptoms, but not on SAM's self-esteem, attachment, or maternal

  17. Light water reactor safety research program quarterly report, July--September 1976. [Molten core-concrete interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlgren, D.A.

    1977-03-01

    The Molten Core--Concrete Interactions Study was initiated on July 15, 1975, to provide a qualitative, extensive exploration of the phenomena associated with contact between molten-core materials and concrete. The experimental elements of this study are divided into four categories: (1) deposition of corium-type melts onto concrete, (2) kinetics and stoichiometry of the thermal decomposition of concrete, (3) response of concrete to heat fluxes at one surface, and (4) simulation experiments that explore phenomena at the interface between a melt and a decomposing solid. Experimental results are being incorporated in a scaling analysis that will establish scaling parameters for the system and identify key elements of the melt-concrete interaction. A number of major tests were performed during this period. Six large-scale molten steel/concrete interactions were performed to complete the test series. Several small-scale thermite melt/concrete tests were performed. The test series concerning the response of concrete to high heat flux was completed. Additional tests were performed concerning the thermal decomposition of concrete.

  18. Learner-control vs. program-control instructional multimedia: a comparison of two interactions when teaching principles of orthodontic appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, M; Elen, J; Willems, G

    2005-11-01

    Many studies have compared computer assisted learning (CAL) to more traditional learning formats and have shown CAL to be as effective as or superior to the alternative resources. However, there are only scarce attempts to show which style of CAL leads to the best learning outcomes in orthodontics. To compare the effectiveness of a learner-control (group A) vs. program-control (group B) multimedia learning environment courseware packages regarding knowledge, understanding and transfer of content when applied to teaching principles of orthodontic appliances to undergraduate students. Pre- and post-test assessments of undergraduate dental students (n = 30) who either studied a learner-control multimedia learning environment courseware package (n = 15) or a program-control version (n = 15) on equivalent material of the orthodontic appliances curriculum. Both groups were evaluated by means of multiple-choice questions covering knowledge, understanding and application. A one-way ANOVA was carried out in order to check for statistical difference between the two groups. The P-value was set at 0.05. There was no difference in prior knowledge between both groups at baseline. Although, both groups significantly improved their scores after having studied the course, no significant difference was found between both groups in relation to answers to questions about knowledge, understanding and application. In this study, the learner-control instructional multimedia program was found to be as effective as the program-control version when teaching principles of the orthodontic appliances to undergraduate students. The focus needs to be on improving the value of CAL. Comparative evaluations of how different CAL approaches compare with or complement one another are certainly needed.

  19. The CHANGE program: comparing an interactive versus prescriptive obesity intervention on university students' self-esteem and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Erin S; Irwin, Jennifer D; Morrow, Don; Hall, Craig R

    2012-11-01

    Previous studies incorporating Motivational Interviewing administered via Co-Active Life Coaching tools (MI-via-CALC) have elicited positive results among adults with obesity. However, there is a paucity of this research that includes sufficient power and a comparison group. This study's purpose was to compare MI-via-CALC with a validated obesity intervention among university students. Participants (n = 45) were randomised to either a telephone-based 12-week: (a) MI-via-CALC program whereby a certified coach worked with subjects to achieve goals through dialogue; or (b) lifestyle modification treatment following the LEARN Program for Weight Management. Participants completed the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and Short Form Functional Health Status Scale (SF-36) at baseline, mid-, and post-treatment, and 3 and 6 months following the program. Analyses revealed that both conditions elicited significant time effects between baseline and 6 months for self-esteem and all dimensions of the SF-36 (e.g. overall health). MI-via-CALC compares favorably with LEARN as an obesity treatment. Given that self-esteem and quality of life are essential for promoting behavior change among individuals with obesity, this study offers unique insights into their change processes. Future research should provide both treatments and allow participants to choose based on their personal preferences, learning styles, and needs. © 2012 The Authors. Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being © 2012 The International Association of Applied Psychology.

  20. A novel training program for Police Officers that improves interactions with mentally ill individuals and is cost-effective

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    Yasmeen eKrameddine

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Police and law enforcement providers frequently come into contact with individuals who have psychiatric disorders, sometimes with tragic results. Repeated studies suggest that greater understanding of psychiatric conditions by police officers would be beneficial. Here we present a novel approach to training police officers to improve their interactions with those who might have a mental illness. This approach involved developing a carefully scripted role-play training, which involved police officers (n=663 interacting with highly trained actors during six realistic scenarios. The primary goal of the training was to improve empathy, communication skills, and the ability of officers to de-escalate potentially difficult situations. Uniquely, feedback was given to officers after each scenario by several individuals including experienced police officers, a mental health professional, and by the actors involved (with insights such as this is how you made me feel. Results showed that there were no changes in attitudes of the police towards the mentally ill comparing data at baseline and at 6 months after the training in those who completed both ratings (n=170. In contrast, there were significant improvements in directly measured behaviours (n=142 as well as in indirect measurements of behaviour throughout the police force. Thus, compared to previous years, there was a significant increase in the recognition of mental health issues as a reason for a call (40%, improved efficiency in dealing with mental health issues, and a decrease in weapon or physical interactions with mentally ill individuals. The training cost was $120 per officer but led to significant cost savings (more than $80,000 in the following 6 months. In conclusion, this novel one-day training course significantly changed behaviour of police officers in meaningful ways and also led to cost savings. We propose that this training model could be adopted by other police agencies.

  1. The program at JPL to investigate the nuclear interaction of RTG's with scientific instruments on deep space probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truscello, V.

    1972-01-01

    A major concern in the integration of a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) with a spacecraft designed to explore the outer planets is the effect of the emitted radiation on the normal operation of scientific instruments. The necessary techniques and tools developed to allow accurate calculation of the neutron and gamma spectrum emanating from the RTG. The specific sources of radiation were identified and quantified. Monte Carlo techniques are then employed to perform the nuclear transport calculations. The results of these studies are presented. An extensive experimental program was initiated to measure the response of a number of scientific components to the nuclear radiation.

  2. The Development and Evaluation of a Computer-Based System for Managing the Design and Pilot-Testing of Interactive Videodisc Programs. Training and Development Research Center, Project Number Forty-Three.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayre, Scott Alan

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a computer-based system that would allow interactive video developers to integrate and manage the design components prior to production. These components of an interactive video (IVD) program include visual information in a variety of formats, audio information, and instructional techniques,…

  3. Identification of water quality management policy of watershed system with multiple uncertain interactions using a multi-level-factorial risk-inference-based possibilistic-probabilistic programming approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Li, Yongping; Huang, Guohe; Fu, Haiyan; Zhang, Junlong; Cheng, Guanhui

    2017-06-01

    In this study, a multi-level-factorial risk-inference-based possibilistic-probabilistic programming (MRPP) method is proposed for supporting water quality management under multiple uncertainties. The MRPP method can handle uncertainties expressed as fuzzy-random-boundary intervals, probability distributions, and interval numbers, and analyze the effects of uncertainties as well as their interactions on modeling outputs. It is applied to plan water quality management in the Xiangxihe watershed. Results reveal that a lower probability of satisfying the objective function (θ) as well as a higher probability of violating environmental constraints (q i ) would correspond to a higher system benefit with an increased risk of violating system feasibility. Chemical plants are the major contributors to biological oxygen demand (BOD) and total phosphorus (TP) discharges; total nitrogen (TN) would be mainly discharged by crop farming. It is also discovered that optimistic decision makers should pay more attention to the interactions between chemical plant and water supply, while decision makers who possess a risk-averse attitude would focus on the interactive effect of q i and benefit of water supply. The findings can help enhance the model's applicability and identify a suitable water quality management policy for environmental sustainability according to the practical situations.

  4. Gender and obesity interaction in quality of life in adults assisted by family doctor program in Niterói, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Dala Paula Torres

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Obesity impacts the quality of life (HRQL. Studies about the effects of a possible interaction between gender and body mass are rare. The objective of the present paper is to estimate the biological interaction between gender and obesity on HRQL. This was a cross-sectional study based on data from CAMELIA study with population assisted by the Family Doctor Program of Niteroi visited between June 2006 and December 2007. HRQL was assessed by the SF-36. The exposure categories were: obese women, non-obese women, obese men and non-obese men, the reference category. Obese women showed higher percentages of low overall, physical and mental quality of life with the largest associations in the physical component. The excess risk due to interaction was statistically significant in physical dimension: RERI = 1.97 (0.40-3.52 and RERIa = 1,97 (0.40-1.7. Among the Brazilian population aged 20–64 years, obesity was independently associated with low HRQL. This association differed by gender, being significant for women. The possibility of the combined effect takes greater importance in the context of increasing incidence of obesity globally. Healthcare professionals in primary care settings should pay attention to gender differences in the impact of obesity on HRQL.

  5. PISCES Program: Plasma-materials interactions and edge-plasma physics research. Progress report, 1991--1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conn, R.W.; Hirooka, Y.

    1992-07-01

    This program investigates and characterizes the behavior of materials under plasma bombordment, in divertor regions. The PISCES facility is used to study divertor and plasma edge management concepts (in particular gas target divertors), as well as edge plasma turbulence and transport. The plasma source consists of a hot LaB{sub 6} cathode with an annular, water-cooled anode and attached drift tube. This cross sectional area of the plasma can be adjusted between 3 and 10 cm. A fast scanning diagnostic probe system was used for mapping plasma density profiles during biased limiter and divertor simulation experiments. Some experimental data are given on: (1) materials and surface physics, (2) edge plasma physics, and (3) a theoretical analysis of edge plasma modelling.

  6. Operations Program Executive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fague, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    Ground Resource Operations Program executive (GROPE) is control program for binding system of programs into single, easily operated entity. It relieves user from complexity arising from decomposition of large application into number of interacting program units. System simplifies job control, data management, and recordkeeping for interacting programs.

  7. Interactive Television.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisesi, Michael; Felder, B. Dell

    1986-01-01

    Universities can offer opportunities for workers in high-technology fields to gain state-of-the-art information and skills without traveling to campus, through interactive television training. Careful organization and planning of such programs, including selection of effective faculty and remote site personnel, are essential to their success. (MSE)

  8. The interactive web-based program MSmonitor for self-management and multidisciplinary care in multiple sclerosis: concept, content, and pilot results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongen, Peter Joseph; Sinnige, Ludovicus G; van Geel, Björn M; Verheul, Freek; Verhagen, Wim I; van der Kruijk, Ruud A; Haverkamp, Reinoud; Schrijver, Hans M; Baart, J Coby; Visser, Leo H; Arnoldus, Edo P; Gilhuis, H Jacobus; Pop, Paul; Booy, Monique; Lemmens, Wim; Donders, Rogier; Kool, Anton; van Noort, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Background There is a growing need to offer persons with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) possibilities for self-management and to integrate multidisciplinary health data. In 2009–2014 we developed a patient-reported outcome based, interactive, web-based program (MSmonitor) for (self-)monitoring, self-management and integrated, multidisciplinary care in MS. Methods The notions underlying the MSmonitor concept and the program’s elements are described. We analyze MSmonitor’s role in the self-management of fatigue by retrospective comparison of fatigue and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) before and after usage of specific elements of MSmonitor, and by a correlative analysis between frequency of usage and fatigue change. Results After a step-wise development the program comprises six validated questionnaires: Multiple Sclerosis Impact Profile, Modified Fatigue Impact Scale-5 items (MFIS-5), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life-54 items, and the 8-item Leeds Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life (LMSQoL) questionnaires; two inventories: Medication and Adherence Inventory, Miction Inventory; two diaries: Activities Diary, Miction Diary; and two functionalities: e-consult and personal e-logbook. The program is now used in 17 hospitals by 581 PwMS and their neurologists, MS nurses, physical therapists, rehabilitative doctors, continence nurses, and family doctors. Those PwMS (N=105) who used the LMSQoL and MFIS-5 questionnaires at least twice in a period of up to 6 months, showed improved HRQoL (P<0.026). In the subgroup (N=56) who had also used the Activities Diary twice or more, the frequency of diary usage correlated modestly with the degree of fatigue improvement (r=0.292; P=0.028). Conclusion MSmonitor is an interactive web-based program for self-management and integrated care in PwMS. Pilot data suggest that the repeated use of the short MFIS-5 and LMSQoL questionnaires is associated with an increase in HRQoL, and that a

  9. Effects of an Interactive School-Based Program for Preventing Adolescent Sexual Harassment: A Cluster-Randomized Controlled Evaluation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lijster, Gaby P A; Felten, Hanneke; Kok, Gerjo; Kocken, Paul L

    2016-05-01

    Many adolescents experience sexual harassment and victims of sexual harassment have higher risks regarding well-being and health behaviors such as higher risks of suicidal thoughts, suicidal ideation and feeling unsafe at school. A peer-performed play and school lessons on preventing sexual harassment behavior were presented to secondary school students. We evaluated its effectiveness, using a cluster-randomized controlled design to assign schools to an experimental condition [n = 14 schools; 431 students (51 % female)] and a control condition [n = 11 schools; 384 students (51 % female)]. To measure the effects of the intervention at first post-test and 6-month follow-up, our multilevel analyses used a two-level random intercept model. Outcome measures were sexual harassment behaviors, behavioral determinants and distal factors influencing these behaviors. At post-test, students in the experimental group reported a reduced intention to commit sexual harassment behavior and higher self-efficacy in rejecting it. At post-test and follow-up there was a significant positive effect on social norms for rejecting sexual harassment behavior. At follow-up, sexual self-esteem was higher in students in the experimental group than in the control group. Effects on these determinants will benefit adolescents' future sexual behaviors. In combination, the play and lessons, possibly together with continued sexual health education and skills programs on social-emotional learning in subsequent school years, have potential for preventing sexual harassment behavior.

  10. A STUDY OF CODE SWITCHING AND CODE MIXING IN EFL CLASSROOM: A SURVEY OF CLASSROOM INTERACTION AT ENGLISH EDUCATION STUDY PROGRAM OF UIN RADEN FATAH PALEMBANG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annisa Astrid

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The Study was conducted in oder to find out a phenomena of code switching and code mixing happened in EFL classrom. The writer collected the data from English Education Study Program of UIN Raden Fatah Palembang. Four classes were observed to have the phenomena of code switching and code mixing. A set of questionnaire was given to 120 students and 15 lecturers of English in order to assess their attitude and feedback toward the use of code switching and code mixing. The Results of the research study showed that the lecturers and the students employed code switching and code mixing in the interactions which happened along teaching and learning activities with various patterns and considerations. Finally the data from the questionnaire reflects the positive attitude toward the use of code switching and code mixing along teaching and learning activities in the classroom.

  11. Interactive RadioEpidemiological Program (IREP): a web-based tool for estimating probability of causation/assigned share of radiogenic cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocher, David C; Apostoaei, A Iulian; Henshaw, Russell W; Hoffman, F Owen; Schubauer-Berigan, Mary K; Stancescu, Daniel O; Thomas, Brian A; Trabalka, John R; Gilbert, Ethel S; Land, Charles E

    2008-07-01

    The Interactive RadioEpidemiological Program (IREP) is a Web-based, interactive computer code that is used to estimate the probability that a given cancer in an individual was induced by given exposures to ionizing radiation. IREP was developed by a Working Group of the National Cancer Institute and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and was adopted and modified by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) for use in adjudicating claims for compensation for cancer under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000. In this paper, the quantity calculated in IREP is referred to as "probability of causation/assigned share" (PC/AS). PC/AS for a given cancer in an individual is calculated on the basis of an estimate of the excess relative risk (ERR) associated with given radiation exposures and the relationship PC/AS = ERR/ERR+1. IREP accounts for uncertainties in calculating probability distributions of ERR and PC/AS. An accounting of uncertainty is necessary when decisions about granting claims for compensation for cancer are made on the basis of an estimate of the upper 99% credibility limit of PC/AS to give claimants the "benefit of the doubt." This paper discusses models and methods incorporated in IREP to estimate ERR and PC/AS. Approaches to accounting for uncertainty are emphasized, and limitations of IREP are discussed. Although IREP is intended to provide unbiased estimates of ERR and PC/AS and their uncertainties to represent the current state of knowledge, there are situations described in this paper in which NIOSH, as a matter of policy, makes assumptions that give a higher estimate of the upper 99% credibility limit of PC/AS than other plausible alternatives and, thus, are more favorable to claimants.

  12. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... entire surgical team with quality, comprehensive education. The standardized interactive program has been developed by the American ... Ostomy Home Skills Hospital Quality Improvement Package The standardized interactive program has been developed by the American ...

  13. Classroom interactions and science inquiry: A comparative study examining differential implementation of a science program in two middle school classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Jennifer Sarah

    This dissertation explores two classroom communities during the implementation of a new environmental science curriculum. The classrooms are similar in that both are located in the same middle school and led by experienced classroom teachers. Despite these similarities, differences among learning outcomes are found in analyses of student pre- and post-science tests in the two rooms. Through videotape analysis of classroom interaction within parallel curricular activities, learning opportunities are contrasted in terms of the social and cognitive organization of science activities and the roles played by teachers, students, and scientists as manifested in their discourse. In one classroom, tasks flow between whole class discussions and small group work. Curricular activities are interwoven with transitions eased as goals are shared with students. Scientific concepts are connected through various activities and related to ideas outside of the classroom. Furthermore, the classroom community is united, established largely through the teacher's discourse patterns, such as deictics (specifically, inclusive personal pronouns). Moreover, the teacher emphasizes that she is learning alongside the students. In the other classroom, the focus of their science period is typically centered around whole class instruction or small group work depending on the particular lesson. This organization accompanied by a heavy use of directives leads to an implicit goal of completing the assigned task. Curricular activities are isolated, with an emphasis on following protocol instructions. Through discursive patterns, such as endearing address terms and exclusive pronouns, a dichotomy is created between the teacher and student. As the designated expert, this teacher imparts her knowledge of science to the students. Several implications emerge from this study. Although pre-packaged, curricular lessons appear identical on paper, the enacted curriculum differs, even in similar settings. Without

  14. Defining the functional domain of programmed cell death 10 through its interactions with phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher F Dibble

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM are vascular abnormalities of the central nervous system predisposing blood vessels to leakage, leading to hemorrhagic stroke. Three genes, Krit1 (CCM1, OSM (CCM2, and PDCD10 (CCM3 are involved in CCM development. PDCD10 binds specifically to PtdIns(3,4,5P3 and OSM. Using threading analysis and multi-template modeling, we constructed a three-dimensional model of PDCD10. PDCD10 appears to be a six-helical-bundle protein formed by two heptad-repeat-hairpin structures (alpha1-3 and alpha4-6 sharing the closest 3D homology with the bacterial phosphate transporter, PhoU. We identified a stretch of five lysines forming an amphipathic helix, a potential PtdIns(3,4,5P3 binding site, in the alpha5 helix. We generated a recombinant wild-type (WT and three PDCD10 mutants that have two (Delta2KA, three (Delta3KA, and five (Delta5KA K to A mutations. Delta2KA and Delta3KA mutants hypothetically lack binding residues to PtdIns(3,4,5P3 at the beginning and the end of predicted helix, while Delta5KA completely lacks all predicted binding residues. The WT, Delta2KA, and Delta3KA mutants maintain their binding to PtdIns(3,4,5P3. Only the Delta5KA abolishes binding to PtdIns(3,4,5P3. Both Delta5KA and WT show similar secondary and tertiary structures; however, Delta5KA does not bind to OSM. When WT and Delta5KA are co-expressed with membrane-bound constitutively-active PI3 kinase (p110-CAAX, the majority of the WT is co-localized with p110-CAAX at the plasma membrane where PtdIns(3,4,5P3 is presumably abundant. In contrast, the Delta5KA remains in the cytoplasm and is not present in the plasma membrane. Combining computational modeling and biological data, we propose that the CCM protein complex functions in the PI3K signaling pathway through the interaction between PDCD10 and PtdIns(3,4,5P3.

  15. Interactions between Global Health Initiatives and country health systems: the case of a neglected tropical diseases control program in Mali.

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    Anna Cavalli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recently, a number of Global Health Initiatives (GHI have been created to address single disease issues in low-income countries, such as poliomyelitis, trachoma, neonatal tetanus, etc.. Empirical evidence on the effects of such GHIs on local health systems remains scarce. This paper explores positive and negative effects of the Integrated Neglected Tropical Disease (NTD Control Initiative, consisting in mass preventive chemotherapy for five targeted NTDs, on Mali's health system where it was first implemented in 2007. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Campaign processes and interactions with the health system were assessed through participant observation in two rural districts (8 health centres each. Information was complemented by interviews with key informants, website search and literature review. Preliminary results were validated during feedback sessions with Malian authorities from national, regional and district levels. We present positive and negative effects of the NTD campaign on the health system using the WHO framework of analysis based on six interrelated elements: health service delivery, health workforce, health information system, drug procurement system, financing and governance. At point of delivery, campaign-related workload severely interfered with routine care delivery which was cut down or totally interrupted during the campaign, as nurses were absent from their health centre for campaign-related activities. Only 2 of the 16 health centres, characterized by a qualified, stable and motivated workforce, were able to keep routine services running and to use the campaign as an opportunity for quality improvement. Increased workload was compensated by allowances, which significantly improved staff income, but also contributed to divert attention away from core routine activities. While the campaign increased the availability of NTD drugs at country level, parallel systems for drug supply and evaluation requested extra efforts

  16. The Arthur Interactive Media Study: Initial Findings From a Cross-Age Peer Mentoring and Digital Media-Based Character Development Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmond P. Bowers

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the midst of increasing emphasis on the inclusion of character education in both school and out-of-school time programs, digital technologies have become ubiquitous in these settings. Based on the potential of these technologies to enhance children’s character development, the Arthur Interactive Media (AIM study investigated if one specific unit or set of digital media-based activities engaged youth in discussions about character. First and second grade students were paired with 4th and 5th grade students, respectively, while engaging with an online interactive graphic novel (IGN about a character-relevant story based on the Arthur cartoon series. Teachers (n = 8 completed surveys about the AIM Unit, and conversations between cross-age peer dyads (n = 27 dyads during their engagement with the IGN were analyzed. Results indicated that teachers were very satisfied with the materials and reported that children were very engaged throughout. Analyses of children’s conversations indicated that children participated in character-relevant conversations involving humility, forgiveness, and future-mindedness while engaging with the IGN.

  17. An Interactive Fuzzy Programming Approach for Designing a Multi-Echelon, Multi-Product, Multi-Period Supply Chain Network Under Uncertainty Considering Cost and Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Amirkhan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The supply chain network design has attracted the attention of many researchers during recent years. This paper presents a new bi-objective mixed-integer linear programming (MILP model to integrate procurement, production and distribution planning under uncertainty. This model is set up for the network of a multi-echelon, multi-product, multi-channel, multi-period supply chain with regard to two conflicting objectives, which minimize the costs and minimize the sum of backorders and surpluses of products in all periods using “activity-based costing and the total cost of ownership” and “JIT” concepts, respectively. To solve the presented model, an interactive fuzzy approach is used. The associated results show the amount of purchasing of each supplier, the quantity of producing, the inventory of raw materials and products, backorder or surplus delivery of goods, the mode of transportation, the amount of goods transported between facilities and suppliers used in each period. In addition, a numerical example is presented to demonstrate the applicability of the presented model and exhibit the efficiency of the proposed interactive fuzzy approach. Finally, the results and conclusion are provided.

  18. Analysis of interaction of triple helix in a federal public program: A study of the centers of support for innovation management (NAGIS [doi: 10.21529/RECADM.2016015

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    Aurora Carneiro Zen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to analyze interactions among government, universities and enterprises, components of Triple helix model, considering the implementation process of governmental program to foster innovation in Brazil. To do so, we conducted a qualitative exploratory research within five Centers of Support for Innovation Management (Núcleos de Apoio à Gestão de Inovação – Nagis, which are projects financed through support from federal government, in order to encourage innovation in enterprises of the country. We analized trajectory of these Nagis, their methodology and their difficulties during implantation of each center. The source of data was documents and interviews with Nagis’s managers, using a script about the operationalization of project (structure, methodology of innovation management and the experiency with this methodology. Then, we analized the role of the relationship of the component in the Triple Helix model and the development of Nagis. As a main conclusion, we identified that synergy between government, university and industry spheres is limited, which does not allow more relevant advances of this program. The evidences indicate a need to restructure the role of each "helix" aiming at changes in bilateral relations. Companies need to be sensitized more emphatically about the importance of innovation and to adopt a more proactive strategy. We recommend to academy adopts a more entrepreneurial stance and the government should take a position not only as a financier, but coordinatior and facilitator of innovative activities.   Keywords Nagi; Innovation management; Triple Helix.

  19. The Albany Two-Way Radio Conferences, 1955-1981: a retrospective look at a program providing interactive continuing medical education at a distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulgan, Henry

    2014-01-01

    Despite early widespread recognition of the necessity of continuing medical education (CME) for practicing physicians and surgeons, medical schools and national medical organizations were slow to mobilize to address the need. One pioneering program, developed by the Albany Medical College in New York, not only provided CME, but did so in a live distance education format that allowed for interaction between the participants and the faculty presenters. The Albany Program commenced in 1955 using what was then state-of-the-art technology; it exemplified principles and practices that can be seen as the precursors for the distance education approaches used to reach physicians today. This short article describes the contributions of the Albany Two-Way Radio Conferences and places them in the context of developments in national organizations and policies in the 20th century. © 2014 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on Continuing Medical Education, Association for Hospital Medical Education.

  20. Utility of a Three-Dimensional Interactive Augmented Reality Program for Balance and Mobility Rehabilitation in the Elderly: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Dal Jae; Ku, Jeunghun; Kim, Yeun Joon; Cho, Sangwoo; Cho, Yun Kyung; Lim, Teo; Lee, Hye Sun; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kang, Youn Joo

    2015-06-01

    To improve lower extremity function and balance in elderly persons, we developed a novel, three-dimensional interactive augmented reality system (3D ARS). In this feasibility study, we assessed clinical and kinematic improvements, user participation, and the side effects of our system. Eighteen participants (age, 56-76 years) capable of walking independently and standing on one leg were recruited. The participants received 3D ARS training during 10 sessions (30-minute duration each) for 4 weeks. Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and the Timed Up and Go (TUG) scores were obtained before and after the exercises. Outcome performance variables, including response time and success rate, and kinematic variables, such as hip and knee joint angle, were evaluated after each session. Participants exhibited significant clinical improvements in lower extremity balance and mobility following the intervention, as shown by improved BBS and TUG scores (pincreased across sessions (p<0.001). All participants completed the program without experiencing any adverse effects. Substantial clinical and kinematic improvements were observed after applying a novel 3D ARS training program, suggesting that this system can enhance lower extremity function and facilitate assessments of lower extremity kinematic capacity.

  1. Building Technologies Program Multi-Year Program Plan Program Portfolio Management 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2008-01-01

    Building Technologies Program Multi-Year Program Plan 2008 for program portfolio management, including the program portfolio management process, program analysis, performance assessment, stakeholder interactions, and cross-cutting issues.

  2. The interactive web-based program MSmonitor for self-management and multidisciplinary care in multiple sclerosis: utilization and valuation by patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jongen PJ

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Peter Joseph Jongen,1,2 Ludovicus G Sinnige,3 Björn M van Geel,4 Freek Verheul,5 Wim I Verhagen,6 Ruud A van der Kruijk,7 Reinoud Haverkamp,8 Hans M Schrijver,9 Jacoba C Baart,10 Leo H Visser,11 Edo P Arnoldus,12 Herman Jacobus Gilhuis,13 Paul Pop,14 Monique Booy,15 Marco Heerings,16 Anton Kool,17 Esther van Noort17 1Department of Community and Occupational Medicine, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, 2MS4 Research Institute, Nijmegen, 3Multiple Sclerosis Centre Leeuwarden, Medical Centre Leeuwarden, Leeuwarden, 4Department of Neurology, Medical Centre Alkmaar, Alkmaar, 5Department of Neurology, Groene Hart Hospital, Gouda, 6Department of Neurology, Canisius Wilhelmina Hospital, Nijmegen, 7Department of Neurology, Slingeland Hospital, Doetinchem, 8Department of Neurology, Zuwe Hofpoort Hospital, Woerden, 9Multiple Sclerosis Centre, Westfries Gasthuis, Hoorn, 10Department of Neurology, Ziekenhuisgroep Twente, Almelo-Hengelo, 11Multiple Sclerosis Centre Midden Brabant, St Elisabeth Hospital, Tilburg, 12Multiple Sclerosis Centre Midden Brabant, Tweesteden Hospital, 13Department of Neurology, Reinier de Graaf Gasthuis, Delft, 14Department of Neurology, Viecuri Medical Centre, Venlo-Venray, 15Multiple Sclerosis Centre, Amphia Hospital, Breda, 16MH Advies en organisatiebureau, Assen, 17Curavista bv, Geertruidenberg, the Netherlands Background: MSmonitor is an interactive web-based program for self-management and integrated, multidisciplinary care in multiple sclerosis.Methods: To assess the utilization and valuation by persons with multiple sclerosis, we held an online survey among those who had used the program for at least 1 year. We evaluated the utilization and meaningfulness of the program’s elements, perceived use of data by neurologists and nurses, and appreciation of care, self-management, and satisfaction.Results: Fifty-five persons completed the questionnaire (estimated response rate 40%. The

  3. A Statistical Test for Differential Item Pair Functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bechger, T.M.; Maris, G.

    This paper presents an IRT-based statistical test for differential item functioning (DIF). The test is developed for items conforming to the Rasch (Probabilistic models for some intelligence and attainment tests, The Danish Institute of Educational Research, Copenhagen, 1960) model but we will

  4. The interactive web-based program MSmonitor for self-management and multidisciplinary care in multiple sclerosis: concept, content, and pilot results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jongen PJ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Peter Joseph Jongen,1,2 Ludovicus G Sinnige,3 Björn M van Geel,4 Freek Verheul,5 Wim l Verhagen,6 Ruud A van der Kruijk,7 Reinoud Haverkamp,8 Hans M Schrijver,9 J Coby Baart,10 Leo H Visser,11 Edo P Arnoldus,12 H Jacobus Gilhuis,13 Paul Pop,14 Monique Booy,15 Wim Lemmens,16 Rogier Donders,16 Anton Kool,17 Esther van Noort17 1Department of Community and Occupational Medicine, University Medical Center Groningen, University Groningen, Groningen, 2MS4 Research Institute, Nijmegen, 3Multiple Sclerosis Centre Leeuwarden, Medical Centre Leeuwarden, Leeuwarden, 4Department of Neurology, Medical Centre Alkmaar, Alkmaar, 5Department of Neurology, Groene Hart Hospital, Gouda, 6Department of Neurology, Canisius Wilhelmina Hospital, Nijmegen, 7Department of Neurology, Slingeland Hospital, Doetinchem, 8Department of Neurology, Zuwe Hofpoort Hospital, Woerden, 9Multiple Sclerosis Centre, Westfries Gasthuis, Hoorn, 10Department of Neurology, Ziekenhuisgroep Twente, Almelo-Hengelo, 11Multiple Sclerosis Centre Midden Brabant, St Elisabeth Hospital, 12Multiple Sclerosis Centre Midden Brabant, Tweesteden Hospital, Tilburg, 13Department of Neurology, Reinier de Graaf Gasthuis, Delft, 14Department of Neurology, Viecuri Medical Centre, Venlo-Venray, 15Multiple Sclerosis Centre, Amphia Hospital, Breda, 16Department for Health Evidence, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, 17Curavista bv, Geertruidenberg, the Netherlands Background: There is a growing need to offer persons with multiple sclerosis (PwMS possibilities for self-management and to integrate multidisciplinary health data. In 2009–2014 we developed a patient-reported outcome based, interactive, web-based program (MSmonitor for (self-monitoring, self-management and integrated, multidisciplinary care in MS.Methods: The notions underlying the MSmonitor concept and the program’s elements are described. We analyze MSmonitor’s role in the self-management of fatigue by retrospective

  5. MOEPGA: A novel method to detect protein complexes in yeast protein-protein interaction networks based on MultiObjective Evolutionary Programming Genetic Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Buwen; Luo, Jiawei; Liang, Cheng; Wang, Shulin; Song, Dan

    2015-10-01

    The identification of protein complexes in protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks has greatly advanced our understanding of biological organisms. Existing computational methods to detect protein complexes are usually based on specific network topological properties of PPI networks. However, due to the inherent complexity of the network structures, the identification of protein complexes may not be fully addressed by using single network topological property. In this study, we propose a novel MultiObjective Evolutionary Programming Genetic Algorithm (MOEPGA) which integrates multiple network topological features to detect biologically meaningful protein complexes. Our approach first systematically analyzes the multiobjective problem in terms of identifying protein complexes from PPI networks, and then constructs the objective function of the iterative algorithm based on three common topological properties of protein complexes from the benchmark dataset, finally we describe our algorithm, which mainly consists of three steps, population initialization, subgraph mutation and subgraph selection operation. To show the utility of our method, we compared MOEPGA with several state-of-the-art algorithms on two yeast PPI datasets. The experiment results demonstrate that the proposed method can not only find more protein complexes but also achieve higher accuracy in terms of fscore. Moreover, our approach can cover a certain number of proteins in the input PPI network in terms of the normalized clustering score. Taken together, our method can serve as a powerful framework to detect protein complexes in yeast PPI networks, thereby facilitating the identification of the underlying biological functions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Programmed cell death 4 protein (Pdcd4) and homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (Hipk2) antagonistically control translation of Hipk2 mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnheiser, Johanna; Ferlemann, Eva; Haas, Astrid; Müller, Jan P; Werwein, Eugen; Fehler, Olesja; Biyanee, Abhiruchi; Klempnauer, Karl-Heinz

    2015-07-01

    The tumor suppressor protein programmed cell death 4 (Pdcd4) is a highly conserved RNA-binding protein that inhibits the translation of specific mRNAs. Here, we have identified the homeobox-interacting protein kinase-2 (Hipk2) mRNA as a novel translational target of Pdcd4. Unlike most other protein kinases Hipk2 is constitutively active after being synthesized by the ribosome and its expression and activity are thought to be mainly controlled by modulation of the half-life of the kinase. Our work provides the first evidence that Hipk2 expression is also controlled on the level of translation. We show that Hipk2 stimulates the translation of its own mRNA and that Pdcd4 suppresses the translation of Hipk2 mRNA by interfering with this auto-regulatory feedback mechanism. We also show that the translation of the related kinase Hipk1 is controlled by a similar feedback loop and that Hipk2 also stimulates the translation of Hipk1 mRNA. Taken together, our work describes a novel mechanism of translational suppression by Pdcd4 and shows for the first time that Hipk2 controls its own synthesis by an auto-regulatory feedback mechanism. Furthermore, the effect of Hipk2 on the translation of Hipk1 RNA suggests that Hipk2 and Pdcd4 can act in similar manner to control the translation of other mRNAs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Piloting Telepresence-Enabled Education and Outreach Programs from a UNOLS Ship - Live Interactive Broadcasts from the R/V Endeavor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, M.; Coleman, D.; Donovan, S.; Sanders, R.; Gingras, A.; DeCiccio, A.; Bilbo, E.

    2016-02-01

    The University of Rhode Island's R/V Endeavor was recently equipped with a new satellite telecommunication system and a telepresence system to enable live ship-to-shore broadcasts and remote user participation through the Inner Space Center. The Rhode Island Endeavor Program, which provides state-funded ship time to support local oceanographic research and education, funded a 5-day cruise off the Rhode Island coast that involved a multidisciplinary team of scientists, engineers, students, educators and video producers. Using two remotely operated vehicle (ROV) systems, several dives were conducted to explore various shipwrecks including the German WWII submarine U-853. During the cruise, a team of URI ocean engineers supported ROV operations and performed engineering tests of a new manipulator. Colleagues from the United States Coast Guard Academy operated a small ROV to collect imagery and environmental data around the wreck sites. Additionally, a team of engineers and oceanographers from URI tested a new acoustic sound source and small acoustic receivers developed for a fish tracking experiment. The video producers worked closely with the participating scientists, students and two high school science teachers to communicate the oceanographic research during live educational broadcasts streamed into Rhode Island classrooms, to the public Internet, and directly to Rhode Island Public Television. This work contributed to increasing awareness of possible career pathways for the Rhode Island K-12 population, taught about active oceanographic research projects, and engaged the public in scientific adventures at sea. The interactive nature of the broadcasts included live responses to questions submitted online and live updates and feedback using social media tools. This project characterizes the power of telepresence and video broadcasting to engage diverse learners and exemplifies innovative ways to utilize social media and the Internet to draw a varied audience.

  8. From the Experience of Interactivity and Entertainment to Lower Intention to Smoke: A Randomized Controlled Trial and Path Analysis of a Web-Based Smoking Prevention Program for Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Georges Elias; Wang, Hua; Calabro, Karen Sue; Mitra, Natasha; Shegog, Ross; Prokhorov, Alexander V

    2017-02-16

    Web-based programs for smoking prevention are being increasingly used with some success among adolescents. However, little is known about the mechanisms that link the experience of such programs to intended nicotine or tobacco control outcomes. Based on the experiential learning theory and extended elaboration likelihood model, this study aimed to evaluate the impact of a Web-based intervention, A Smoking Prevention Interactive Experience (ASPIRE), on adolescents' intention to smoke, while considering the experience of interactivity and entertainment as predictors of reduced intention to smoke, under a transitional user experience model. A total of 101 adolescents were recruited from after-school programs, provided consent, screened, and randomized in a single-blinded format to 1 of 2 conditions: the full ASPIRE program as the experimental condition (n=50) or an online , text-based version of ASPIRE as the control condition (n=51). Data were collected at baseline and immediate follow-up. Repeated-measures mixed-effects models and path analyses were conducted. A total of 82 participants completed the study and were included in the analysis. Participants in the experimental condition were more likely to show a decrease in their intention to smoke than those in the control condition (beta=-0.18, P=.008). Perceived interactivity (beta=-0.27, P=.004) and entertainment (beta=-0.20, P=.04) were each associated with a decrease in intention to smoke independently. Results of path analyses indicated that perceived interactivity and perceived entertainment mediated the relationship between ASPIRE use and emotional involvement. Furthermore, perceived presence mediated the relationship between perceived interactivity and emotional involvement. There was a direct relationship between perceived entertainment and emotional involvement. Emotional involvement predicted a decrease in intention to smoke (beta=-0.16, P=.04). Adolescents' experience of interactivity and entertainment

  9. Material Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vallgårda, Anna; Boer, Laurens; Tsaknaki, Vasiliki

    2017-01-01

    , and color, but additionally being capable of sensing, actuating, and computing. Indeed, computers will not be things in and by themselves, but embedded into the materials that make up our surroundings. This also means that the way we interact with computers and the way we program them, will change....... Consequently we ask what the practice of programming and giving form to such materials would be like? How would we be able to familiarize ourselves with the dynamics of these materials and their different combinations of cause and effect? Which tools would we need and what would they look like? Will we program...... these computational composites through external computers and then transfer the code them, or will the programming happen closer to the materials? In this feature we outline a new research program that floats between imagined futures and the development of a material programming practice....

  10. Effectiveness of small-group interactive education vs. lecture-based information-only programs on motivation to change and lifestyle behaviours. A prospective controlled trial of rehabilitation inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reusch, Andrea; Ströbl, Veronika; Ellgring, Heiner; Faller, Hermann

    2011-02-01

    Although patient education may promote motivation to change health behaviours, the most effective method has not yet been determined. This prospective, controlled trial compared an interactive, patient-oriented group program with lectures providing only information. We evaluated motivational stages of change and self-reported behaviours in three domains (sports, diet, relaxation) at four times up to one year (60% complete data) among 753 German rehabilitation inpatients (mean age 50 years, 52% male) with orthopaedic (59%) or cardiologic disorders (10%) or diabetes mellitus (31%). We found improvements between baseline and follow up regarding each outcome (psports (p=.006). Interactive group patients reported healthier diets both after 3 months (p=0.013) and 12 months (p=0.047), more relaxation behaviours (p=.029) after 3 months and higher motivation for sports after 12 months (p=.08). The superior effectiveness of the interactive group was only partly confirmed. This short, 5-session interactive program may not be superior to lectures to induce major sustainable changes in motivation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Formal Verification of Interactions of the RTOS, Memory System, and Application Programs at the PowerPC 750 Binary Code Level Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In the proposed project, we will formally verify the correctness of the interaction between a Real-Time Operating System (RTOS) and user processes under various...

  12. Automata-theoretic protocol programming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongmans, Sung-Shik Theodorus Quirinus

    2016-01-01

    Parallel programming has become essential for writing scalable programs on general hardware. Conceptually, every parallel program consists of workers, which implement primary units of sequential computation, and protocols, which implement the rules of interaction that workers must abide by. As

  13. Image-Enhancement Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Christine G.; Stacy, Kathryn

    1993-01-01

    ENHANCETOOL computer program has capabilities for interactive enhancement of digital images. Includes particularly useful combination of algorithms not existing in single interactive program. Software package also provides means through which additional image-enhancement algorithms easily integrated and made available to user. Written in C Language.

  14. Integrating Cross-Cultural Interaction through Video-Communication and Virtual Worlds in Foreign Language Teaching Programs: Burden or Added Value?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauregi, Kristi; de Graaff, Rick; Canto, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    Organizing and implementing telecollaboration projects in foreign language curricula is not an easy endeavour (Belz & Thorne, 2006; Guth & Helm, 2010), as pedagogical, organizational and technical issues have to be addressed before cross-cultural interaction sessions can be carried out (O'Dowd & Ritter, 2006). These issues make many teaching…

  15. Integrating Cross-Cultural Interaction through Video-Communication and Virtual Worlds in Foreign Language Teaching Programs: Is There an Added Value?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canto, Silvia; Jauregi, Kristi; van den Bergh, Huub

    2013-01-01

    Organizing and implementing telecollaboration projects in foreign language curricula is not an easy endeavour (Belz & Thorne, 2006; Guth & Helm, 2010), as pedagogical, organizational and technical issues have to be addressed before cross-cultural interaction sessions can be carried out (O'Dowd & Ritter, 2006; O'Dowd, 2011). These issues make many…

  16. The Effect of Peer- and Sibling-Assisted Aquatic Program on Interaction Behaviors and Aquatic Skills of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Their Peers/Siblings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chia-Hua; Pan, Chien-Yu

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of peer- and sibling-assisted learning on interaction behaviors and aquatic skills in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Outcome measures were also examined in their typically developing (TD) peers/siblings. Twenty-one children with ASD and 21 TD children were assigned in three groups:…

  17. Teaching Programming with Scratch

    OpenAIRE

    MIHALIČ, PETRA

    2014-01-01

    There are quite a few good programing languages and environments for teaching kids how to program. They help beginners learn basic programming constructs usually with help of interactive environment. In this thesis I will describe and compare a few of those languages and environments. Scratch is a language and programming environment that is also intended for learning programming using blocks that make writing complicated instructions easier and reduce beginners' difficulties with syntax erro...

  18. The Interaction Effects of Program Training, Dosage, and Implementation Quality on Targeted Student Outcomes for The RULER Approach to Social and Emotional Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Maria Regina; Brackett, Marc A.; Rivers, Susan E.; Elbertson, Nicole A.; Salovey, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This study examined how training, dosage, and implementation quality of a social and emotional learning program, The RULER Approach, were related to students' social and emotional competencies. There were no main effects for any of the variables on student outcomes, but students had more positive outcomes when their teachers (a) attended more…

  19. The Effectiveness of Aquatic Group Therapy for Improving Water Safety and Social Interactions in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Pilot Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaniz, Michele L.; Rosenberg, Sheila S.; Beard, Nicole R.; Rosario, Emily R.

    2017-01-01

    Drowning is the number one cause of accidental death in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Few studies have examined the effectiveness of swim instruction for improving water safety skills in children with moderate to severe ASD. This study examines the feasibility and effectiveness of an aquatic therapy program on water safety and…

  20. PlanAlyzer, an Interactive Computer-Assisted Program to Teach Clinical Problem-Solving in Diagnosing Anemia and Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Harold C.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    The computer-based PlanAlyzer program was designed to teach clinical diagnosis to medical students, taking into account several characteristics common to the clinical problem solver: limited capacity for short-term memory; use of heuristic strategies; sequential information seeking; and problem conceptualization. Six years of development and…

  1. Interactive protein manipulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SNCrivelli@lbl.gov

    2003-07-01

    We describe an interactive visualization and modeling program for the creation of protein structures ''from scratch''. The input to our program is an amino acid sequence -decoded from a gene- and a sequence of predicted secondary structure types for each amino acid-provided by external structure prediction programs. Our program can be used in the set-up phase of a protein structure prediction process; the structures created with it serve as input for a subsequent global internal energy minimization, or another method of protein structure prediction. Our program supports basic visualization methods for protein structures, interactive manipulation based on inverse kinematics, and visualization guides to aid a user in creating ''good'' initial structures.

  2. SET Careers Program: An interactive science, engineering, and technology career education exhibit. Annual progress report, September 1, 1992--October 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, P.R.

    1993-03-31

    The New York Hall of Science, in response to the national crisis in education and employment in science and engineering, is developing and pilot testing a unique, interactive, video-based, hypermedia series on energy-related and other science and engineering careers for middle and junior high school students. Working in collaboration with the Consortium for Mathematics and its Applications (COMAP) and the Educational Film Center (EFC), this pilot-demonstration phase will last 14 months, during which time the basic design, production, and testing of eight science and engineering career modules (video and software) will be completed and installed as an interactive educational exhibit at the New York Hall of Science. This career education package will then be distributed to other science technology centers nationwide.

  3. A program of data synthesis from the ALSEP/CPLEE ALSEP/SIDE, and Explorer 35 magnetometer to investigate lunar terminator and nightside particle fluxes and surface interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reasoner, D. L.

    1976-01-01

    Lunar nightside electron fluxes were studied with the aid of the ALSEP/CPLEE and other instruments. The flux events were shown to be due to (a) electrons propagating upstream from the earth's bow shock, (b) electrons thermalized and scattered to the lunar surface by disturbances along the boundary of the lunar solarwind cavity, and (c) solar wind electrons scattered to the lunar surface by lunar limb shocks and/or compressional disturbances. These electrons were identified as a cause of the high night surface negative potentials observed in tha ALSEP/SIDE ion data. A study was also made of the shadowing of magnetotail plasma sheet electrons by interactions between the lunar body and the ambient magnetic field and by interactions between charged particles and lunar remnant magnetic fields. These shadowing effects were shown to modify lunar surface and near-lunar potential distributions.

  4. Effect of Nutritional Intervention on Food Choices of French Students in Middle School Cafeterias, Using an Interactive Educational Software Program (Nutri-Advice).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnin, Marie-Christine; Buisson, Jean-Christophe; Ahluwalia, Namanjeet; Cazals, Laurent; Bolzonella-Pene, Caroline; Fouquet-Martineau, Caroline; Martini, Pascale; Tauber, Maïthé; Hanaire, Hélène

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the impact of interactive Nutri-Advice kiosks on children's nutritional skills and their ability to apply it to food choices in a middle school cafeteria menu (food choice competencies). Quasi-experimental design; pre/post-test. Freestanding interactive computer terminals (kiosks) were installed in three middle schools in Toulouse, France. A total of 580 children were enrolled into the study (mean age, 13 ± 1 years). Each child's physiological profile was stored in a personal barcode card. During 1 school year, once a day, each child could access the kiosk with this card, trying to find the most balanced meal according to his or her profile and the food available on the cafeteria menu. Children's food choice competency changes and body mass index z-score were evaluated. Significance of change in food choice competencies (postintervention vs baseline) was examined using paired t test. Across the study, children chose significantly less cheese and pastry or desserts, and significantly more starchy food and dairy, and tended to choose fruits and vegetables more often. Body mass index z-score decreased significantly during the period. Personalized nutrition counseling through an interactive device has the potential to improve the food choice competencies of children. Copyright © 2016 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Fundamentals in Java Programming

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    drag present roll Drag-and-Drop Exercise Presentation roll Interactive Media Element This interactive tutorial reviews the following in Java programming: Building blocks, Appropriate and accurate definition of componentsThe interactions in this tutorial include mouse over information, and a matching exercise. OA2200 Computation Methods for Operational Research

  6. Comparison of the Effectiveness of Interactive Didactic Lecture Versus Online Simulation-Based CME Programs Directed at Improving the Diagnostic Capabilities of Primary Care Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, Pam; Crim, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Diagnostic errors in primary care contribute to increased morbidity and mortality, and billions in costs each year. Improvements in the way practicing physicians are taught so as to optimally perform differential diagnosis can increase patient safety and lower the costs of care. This study represents a comparison of the effectiveness of two approaches to CME training directed at improving the primary care practitioner's diagnostic capabilities against seven common and important causes of joint pain. Using a convenience sampling methodology, one group of primary care practitioners was trained by a traditional live, expert-led, multimedia-based training activity supplemented with interactive practice opportunities and feedback (control group). The second group was trained online with a multimedia-based training activity supplemented with interactive practice opportunities and feedback delivered by an artificial intelligence-driven simulation/tutor (treatment group). Before their respective instructional intervention, there were no significant differences in the diagnostic performance of the two groups against a battery of case vignettes presenting with joint pain. Using the same battery of case vignettes to assess postintervention diagnostic performance, there was a slight but not statistically significant improvement in the control group's diagnostic accuracy (P = .13). The treatment group, however, demonstrated a significant improvement in accuracy (P tutor.

  7. Interactive DIF Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preheim, Larry E.; Amy, Laraine; Young, Jimmie D.

    1993-01-01

    Interactive DIF Generator (IDG) computer program serves as utility to generate and manipulate directory interchange format (DIF) files. Creates and updates DIF files, sent to NASA's Master Directory, also referred to as International Global Change Directory at Goddard Space Flight Center. Many government and university data systems use Master Directory to advertise availability of research data. IDG is interactive software tool and requires mouse or trackball to operate. Written in C language.

  8. Sequential Convex Programming for Power Set-point Optimization in a Wind Farm using Black-box Models, Simple Turbine Interactions, and Integer Variables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovgaard, Tobias Gybel; Larsen, Lars F. S.; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    2012-01-01

    from the wind farm model, enabling us to use a very simple linear relationship for describing the turbine interactions. In addition, we allow individual turbines to be turned on or off introducing integer variables into the optimization problem. We solve this within the same framework of iterative......We consider the optimization of power set-points to a large number of wind turbines arranged within close vicinity of each other in a wind farm. The goal is to maximize the total electric power extracted from the wind, taking the wake effects that couple the individual turbines in the farm...... into account. For any mean wind speed, turbulence intensity, and direction we find the optimal static operating points for the wind farm. We propose an iterative optimization scheme to achieve this goal. When the complicated, nonlinear, dynamics of the aerodynamics in the turbines and of the fluid dynamics...

  9. An Innovative, Multidisciplinary Educational Program in Interactive Information Storage and Retrieval. M.S. Thesis Final Report, 1 Jul. 1985 - 31 Dec. 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (Editor); Gallagher, Mary C.

    1985-01-01

    There exists a large number of large-scale bibliographic Information Storage and Retrieval Systems containing large amounts of valuable data of interest in a wide variety of research applications. These systems are not used to capacity because the end users, i.e., the researchers, have not been trained in the techniques of accessing such systems. This thesis describes the development of a transportable, university-level course in methods of querying on-line interactive Information Storage and Retrieval systems as a solution to this problem. This course was designed to instruct upper division science and engineering students to enable these end users to directly access such systems. The course is designed to be taught by instructors who are not specialists in either computer science or research skills. It is independent of any particular IS and R system or computer hardware. The project is sponsored by NASA and conducted by the University of Southwestern Louisiana and Southern University.

  10. Genomic selection strategies in breeding programs: Strong positive interaction between application of genotypic information and intensive use of young bulls on genetic gain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch, Line Hjortø; Sørensen, Morten Kargo; Berg, Peer

    2012-01-01

    We tested the following hypotheses: (i) breeding schemes with genomic selection are superior to breeding schemes without genomic selection regarding annual genetic gain of the aggregate genotype (ΔGAG), annual genetic gain of the functional traits and rate of inbreeding per generation (ΔF), (ii......) a positive interaction exists between the use of genotypic information and a short generation interval on ΔGAG and (iii) the inclusion of an indicator trait in the selection index will only result in a negligible increase in ΔGAG if genotypic information about the breeding goal trait is known. We examined...... four breeding schemes with or without genomic selection and with or without intensive use of young bulls using pseudo-genomic stochastic simulations. The breeding goal consisted of a milk production trait and a functional trait. The two breeding schemes with genomic selection resulted in higher ΔGAG...

  11. The Effectiveness of Aquatic Group Therapy for Improving Water Safety and Social Interactions in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Pilot Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaniz, Michele L; Rosenberg, Sheila S; Beard, Nicole R; Rosario, Emily R

    2017-12-01

    Drowning is the number one cause of accidental death in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Few studies have examined the effectiveness of swim instruction for improving water safety skills in children with moderate to severe ASD. This study examines the feasibility and effectiveness of an aquatic therapy program on water safety and social skills in children with mild to severe ASD (n = 7). Water safety skills were evaluated using the Aquatics Skills Checklist and social skills were measured using the Social Skills Improvement Scale. We provide preliminary evidence that children with ASD can improve water safety skills (p = 0.0002), which are important for drowning prevention after only 8 h of intervention. However, social skills did not respond to intervention (p = 0.6409).

  12. Multimedia programming with pure data

    CERN Document Server

    Chung, Bryan

    2013-01-01

    A quick and comprehensive tutorial book for media designers to jump-start interactive multimedia production with computer graphics, digital audio, digital video, and interactivity, using the Pure Data graphical programming environment.An introductory book on multimedia programming for media artists/designers who like to work on interactivity in their projects, digital art/design students who like to learn the first multimedia programming technique, and audio-visual performers who like to customize their performance sets

  13. Documentation of a computer program to simulate lake-aquifer interaction using the MODFLOW ground water flow model and the MOC3D solute-transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Michael L.; Konikow, Leonard F.

    2000-01-01

    Heads and flow patterns in surficial aquifers can be strongly influenced by the presence of stationary surface-water bodies (lakes) that are in direct contact, vertically and laterally, with the aquifer. Conversely, lake stages can be significantly affected by the volume of water that seeps through the lakebed that separates the lake from the aquifer. For these reasons, a set of computer subroutines called the Lake Package (LAK3) was developed to represent lake/aquifer interaction in numerical simulations using the U.S. Geological Survey three-dimensional, finite-difference, modular ground-water flow model MODFLOW and the U.S. Geological Survey three-dimensional method-of-characteristics solute-transport model MOC3D. In the Lake Package described in this report, a lake is represented as a volume of space within the model grid which consists of inactive cells extending downward from the upper surface of the grid. Active model grid cells bordering this space, representing the adjacent aquifer, exchange water with the lake at a rate determined by the relative heads and by conductances that are based on grid cell dimensions, hydraulic conductivities of the aquifer material, and user-specified leakance distributions that represent the resistance to flow through the material of the lakebed. Parts of the lake may become ?dry? as upper layers of the model are dewatered, with a concomitant reduction in lake surface area, and may subsequently rewet when aquifer heads rise. An empirical approximation has been encoded to simulate the rewetting of a lake that becomes completely dry. The variations of lake stages are determined by independent water budgets computed for each lake in the model grid. This lake budget process makes the package a simulator of the response of lake stage to hydraulic stresses applied to the aquifer. Implementation of a lake water budget requires input of parameters including those representing the rate of lake atmospheric recharge and evaporation

  14. Heme oxygenase-1 delays gibberellin-induced programmed cell death of rice aleurone layers subjected to drought stress by interacting with nitric oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huangming eWu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cereal aleurone layers undergo a gibberellin (GA-regulated process of programmed cell death (PCD following germination. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 is known as a rate-liming enzyme in the degradation of heme to biliverdin IXα (BV, carbon monoxide (CO, and free iron ions (Fe2+. It is a critical component in plant development and adaptation to environment stresses. Our previous studies confirmed that HO-1 inducer hematin (Ht promotes the germination of rice seeds in drought (20% polyethylene glycol-6000, PEG conditions, but the corresponding effects of HO-1 on the alleviation of germination-triggered PCD in GA-treated rice aleurone layers remain unknown. The present study has determined that GA co-treated with PEG results in lower HO-1 transcript levels and HO activity, which in turn results in the development of vacuoles in aleurone cells, followed by PCD. The pharmacology approach illustrated that up- or down-regulated HO-1 gene expression and HO activity delayed or accelerated GA-induced PCD. Furthermore, the application of the HO-1 inducer hematin and nitric oxide (NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP not only activated HO-1 gene expression, HO activity, and endogenous NO content, but also blocked GA-induced rapid vacuolation and accelerated aleurone layers PCD under drought stress. However, both HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPPIX and NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl0-4, 4, 5, 5-tetramethylimidazoline-l-oxyl-3-oxide potassium salt (cPTIO reserved the effects of hematin and SNP on rice aleurone layer PCD under drought stress by down-regulating endogenous HO-1 and NO, respectively. The inducible effects of hematin and SNP on HO-1 gene expression, HO activity, and NO content were blocked by cPTIO. Together, these results clearly suggest that HO-1 is involved in the alleviation of GA-induced PCD of drought-triggered rice aleurone layers by associating with NO.

  15. What Is an Attractive Body? Using an Interactive 3D Program to Create the Ideal Body for You and Your Partner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossley, Kara L.; Cornelissen, Piers L.; Tovée, Martin J.

    2012-01-01

    What is the ideal body size and shape that we want for ourselves and our partners? What are the important physical features in this ideal? And do both genders agree on what is an attractive body? To answer these questions we used a 3D interactive software system which allows our participants to produce a photorealistic, virtual male or female body. Forty female and forty male heterosexual Caucasian observers (females mean age 19.10 years, s.d. 1.01; 40 males mean age 19.84, s.d. 1.66) set their own ideal size and shape, and the size and shape of their ideal partner using the DAZ studio image manipulation programme. In this programme the shape and size of a 3D body can be altered along 94 independent dimensions, allowing each participant to create the exact size and shape of the body they want. The volume (and thus the weight assuming a standard density) and the circumference of the bust, waist and hips of these 3D models can then be measured. The ideal female body set by women (BMI = 18.9, WHR = 0.70, WCR = 0.67) was very similar to the ideal partner set by men, particularly in their BMI (BMI = 18.8, WHR = 0.73, WCR = 0.69). This was a lower BMI than the actual BMI of 39 of the 40 women. The ideal male body set by the men (BMI = 25.9, WHR = 0.87, WCR = 0.74) was very similar to the ideal partner set by the women (BMI = 24.5, WHR = 0.86, WCR = 0.77). This was a lower BMI than the actual BMI of roughly half of the men and a higher BMI than the other half. The results suggest a consistent preference for an ideal male and female body size and shape across both genders. The results also suggest that both BMI and torso shape are important components for the creation of the ideal body. PMID:23209791

  16. What is an attractive body? Using an interactive 3D program to create the ideal body for you and your partner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kara L Crossley

    Full Text Available What is the ideal body size and shape that we want for ourselves and our partners? What are the important physical features in this ideal? And do both genders agree on what is an attractive body? To answer these questions we used a 3D interactive software system which allows our participants to produce a photorealistic, virtual male or female body. Forty female and forty male heterosexual Caucasian observers (females mean age 19.10 years, s.d. 1.01; 40 males mean age 19.84, s.d. 1.66 set their own ideal size and shape, and the size and shape of their ideal partner using the DAZ studio image manipulation programme. In this programme the shape and size of a 3D body can be altered along 94 independent dimensions, allowing each participant to create the exact size and shape of the body they want. The volume (and thus the weight assuming a standard density and the circumference of the bust, waist and hips of these 3D models can then be measured. The ideal female body set by women (BMI = 18.9, WHR = 0.70, WCR = 0.67 was very similar to the ideal partner set by men, particularly in their BMI (BMI = 18.8, WHR = 0.73, WCR = 0.69. This was a lower BMI than the actual BMI of 39 of the 40 women. The ideal male body set by the men (BMI = 25.9, WHR = 0.87, WCR = 0.74 was very similar to the ideal partner set by the women (BMI = 24.5, WHR = 0.86, WCR = 0.77. This was a lower BMI than the actual BMI of roughly half of the men and a higher BMI than the other half. The results suggest a consistent preference for an ideal male and female body size and shape across both genders. The results also suggest that both BMI and torso shape are important components for the creation of the ideal body.

  17. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... supports the entire surgical team with quality, comprehensive education. The standardized interactive program has been developed by the American College of Surgeons (ACS) in collaboration with the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons (ASCRS), American Urological ...

  18. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Kits Broadcast Rights for Hospitals Ostomy Home Skills Hospital Quality Improvement Package The standardized interactive program has been developed by the ... and Associates Medical Students International Surgeons ...

  19. Interactive numerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Although Arabic numerals (like ‘2016’ and ‘3.14’) are ubiquitous, we show that in interactive computer applications they are often misleading and surprisingly unreliable. We introduce interactive numerals as a new concept and show, like Roman numerals and Arabic numerals, interactive numerals introduce another way of using and thinking about numbers. Properly understanding interactive numerals is essential for all computer applications that involve numerical data entered by users, including finance, medicine, aviation and science. PMID:28484609

  20. The Greenfoot Programming Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolling, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Greenfoot is an educational integrated development environment aimed at learning and teaching programming. It is aimed at a target audience of students from about 14 years old upwards, and is also suitable for college- and university-level education. Greenfoot combines graphical, interactive output with programming in Java, a standard, text-based…

  1. MIDI Programming in Scheme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørmark, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    makes it possible to carry out systematic modifications and transformations of MIDI contents with use of pure functional programming. Side by side with the XML-inspired MIDI language, the paper describes an Emacs-based, textual programming environment that supports the MIDI programming process....... The programming environment also supports a variety of interactive features - similar to MIDI sequencers - but restricted to a textual representation of the music. The main contributions of the work are considered to be (1) An accumulated MIDI function library, which can transform MIDI files in many non......-trivial ways; (2) A proposed working process alternating between creative mode and programmatic editing mode within a MIDI programming environment; and (3) A textual MIDI programming environment with embedded support of many interactive, MIDI-related functionalities....

  2. Floor interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marianne Graves; Krogh, Peter; Ludvigsen, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Within architecture, there is a long tradition of careful design of floors. The design has been concerned with both decorating floors and designing floors to carry information. Ubiquitous computing technology offers new opportunities for designing interactive floors. This paper presents three...... different interactive floor concepts. Through an urban perspective it draws upon the experiences of floors in architecture, and provides a set of design issues for designing interactive floors....

  3. Teaching innovation is social interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Monika Hoeck; Olsen, Bente

    2015-01-01

    The paper aims to explore how teaching practitioners teach innovation – by cross comparing the local nursing college innovation program and the innovation teaching at the bachelor program in Mechatronic engineering at the local University; to explore and develop attention points in understanding ...... that emerging entrepreneurial attitudes are linked to the social processes of interaction between the participants of teachers and students....

  4. Playful Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    The video Playful Interaction describes a future architectural office, and envisions ideas and concepts for playful interactions between people, materials and appliances in a pervasive and augmented working environment. The video both describes existing developments, technologies and designs...... as well as ideas not yet implemented such as playful modes of interaction with an augmented ball. Playful Interaction has been used as a hybrid of a vision video and a video prototype (1). Externally the video has been used to visualising our new ideas, and internally the video has also worked to inspire...

  5. Interactive benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawson, Lartey; Nielsen, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    We discuss individual learning by interactive benchmarking using stochastic frontier models. The interactions allow the user to tailor the performance evaluation to preferences and explore alternative improvement strategies by selecting and searching the different frontiers using directional...... in the suggested benchmarking tool. The study investigates how different characteristics on dairy farms influences the technical efficiency....

  6. Kinesthetic Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogtmann, Maiken Hillerup; Fritsch, Jonas; Kortbek, Karen Johanne

    2008-01-01

    Within the Human-Computer Interaction community there is a growing interest in designing for the whole body in interaction design. The attempts aimed at addressing the body have very different outcomes spanning from theoretical arguments for understanding the body in the design process, to more...... practical examples of designing for bodily potential. This paper presents Kinesthetic Interaction as a unifying concept for describing the body in motion as a foundation for designing interactive systems. Based on the theoretical foundation for Kinesthetic Interaction, a conceptual framework is introduced...... to reveal bodily potential in relation to three design themes – kinesthetic development, kinesthetic means and kinesthetic disorder; and seven design parameters – engagement, sociality, movability, explicit motivation, implicit motivation, expressive meaning and kinesthetic empathy. The framework is a tool...

  7. Aesthetic Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ludvigsen, Martin; Petersen, M.G.; Iversen, O.

    2004-01-01

    There is a growing interest in considering aesthetic aspects in the design of interactive systems. A set of approaches are emerging each representing different applications of the terminology as well as different inherent assumptions on the role of the user, designer and interaction ideals....... In this paper, we use the concept of Pragmatist Aesthetics to provide a framework for distinguishing between different approaches to aesthetics. Moreover, we use our own design cases to illustrate how pragmatist aesthetics is a promising path to follow in the context of designing interactive systems......, as it promotes aesthetics of use, rather than aesthetics of appearance. We coin this approach in the perspective of aesthetic interaction. Finally we make the point that aesthetics is not re-defining everything known about interactive systems. We provide a framework placing this perspective among other...

  8. An Interactive Computational Aerodynamics Analysis Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-01

    C) U) C C LU cc: :D Co -j C Figure 58. Very Smooth Airfoil Plot (CPLOT). A-161 Lfl CD -uJ C:) Cli ~L) U-i 5 .- CD o)LL o - Cc IO 90Ŕ to O 00 td 90...366S2Si56?E+00 -*2?26C 7 2C94-E+Oi LO 9;499192A-IE+03 -*.;iG353G$4c7E-Oi -s12340?1,3?F+]2 it .;9OCJ3OnGE-Lj -*12773152’ j8E +a)O -,!83C7rI £3 0 50211󈧎E

  9. Interaction graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seiller, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Interaction graphs were introduced as a general, uniform, construction of dynamic models of linear logic, encompassing all Geometry of Interaction (GoI) constructions introduced so far. This series of work was inspired from Girard's hyperfinite GoI, and develops a quantitative approach that should...... be understood as a dynamic version of weighted relational models. Until now, the interaction graphs framework has been shown to deal with exponentials for the constrained system ELL (Elementary Linear Logic) while keeping its quantitative aspect. Adapting older constructions by Girard, one can clearly define...... "full" exponentials, but at the cost of these quantitative features. We show here that allowing interpretations of proofs to use continuous (yet finite in a measure-theoretic sense) sets of states, as opposed to earlier Interaction Graphs constructions were these sets of states were discrete (and finite...

  10. Embarrassing Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deterding, Sebastian; Lucero, Andrés; Holopainen, Jussi

    2015-01-01

    Wherever the rapid evolution of interactive technologies disrupts standing situational norms, creates new, often unclear situational audiences, or crosses cultural boundaries, embarrassment is likely. This makes embarrassment a fundamental adoption and engagement hurdle, but also a creative desig...... space for human-computer interaction. However, research on embarrassment in HCI has remained scattered and unsystematic so far. This workshop therefore convenes researchers and practitioners to assemble and advance the current state of research on embarrassing interactions.......Wherever the rapid evolution of interactive technologies disrupts standing situational norms, creates new, often unclear situational audiences, or crosses cultural boundaries, embarrassment is likely. This makes embarrassment a fundamental adoption and engagement hurdle, but also a creative design...

  11. Interaction Widget

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingstrup, Mads

    2003-01-01

    This pattern describes the idea of making a user interface of discrete, reusable entities---here called interaction widgets. The idea behind widgets is described using two perspectives, that of the user and that of the developer. It is the forces from these two perspectives that are balanced...... in the pattern. The intended audience of the pattern is developers and researchers within the field of human computer interaction....

  12. Theoretical studies of molecular interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lester, W.A. Jr. [Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research program is directed at extending fundamental knowledge of atoms and molecules including their electronic structure, mutual interaction, collision dynamics, and interaction with radiation. The approach combines the use of ab initio methods--Hartree-Fock (HF) multiconfiguration HF, configuration interaction, and the recently developed quantum Monte Carlo (MC)--to describe electronic structure, intermolecular interactions, and other properties, with various methods of characterizing inelastic and reaction collision processes, and photodissociation dynamics. Present activity is focused on the development and application of the QMC method, surface catalyzed reactions, and reorientation cross sections.

  13. Social Interaction in Adventure Recreation Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael A. Schuett

    1992-01-01

    This study investigated the social interaction of white water kayakers and attempted to predict the level of enduring involvement of participants. It was hypothesized that social interaction would shift from classes and programs to peers of similar interests as level of involvement increased. The results did show that social interaction is a primary reason for...

  14. Examining Interactivity in Synchronous Virtual Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Florence; Parker, Michele A.; Deale, Deborah F.

    2012-01-01

    Interaction is crucial to student satisfaction in online courses. Adding synchronous components (virtual classroom technologies) to online courses can facilitate interaction. In this study, interaction within a synchronous virtual classroom was investigated by surveying 21 graduate students in an instructional technology program in the…

  15. Programming Language Software For Graphics Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckman, Brian C.

    1993-01-01

    New approach reduces repetitive development of features common to different applications. High-level programming language and interactive environment with access to graphical hardware and software created by adding graphical commands and other constructs to standardized, general-purpose programming language, "Scheme". Designed for use in developing other software incorporating interactive computer-graphics capabilities into application programs. Provides alternative to programming entire applications in C or FORTRAN, specifically ameliorating design and implementation of complex control and data structures typifying applications with interactive graphics. Enables experimental programming and rapid development of prototype software, and yields high-level programs serving as executable versions of software-design documentation.

  16. Interactive governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eva; Torfing, Jacob; Peters, B. Guy

    Governance has become one of the most commonly used concepts in contemporary political science. It is, however, often used to mean a variety of different things. This book helps to clarify this conceptual muddle by concentrating on one variety of governance-interactive governance. The authors argue...... that although the state may remain important for many aspects of governing, interactions between state and society represent an important, and perhaps increasingly important, dimension of governance. These interactions may be with social actors such as networks, with market actors or with other governments......, but all these forms represent means of governing involving mixtures of state action with the actions of other entities.This book explores thoroughly this meaning of governance, and links it to broader questions of governance. In the process of explicating this dimension of governance the authors also...

  17. Interactive Graphics Analysis for Aircraft Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, J. C.

    1983-01-01

    Program uses higher-order far field drag minimization. Computer program WDES WDEM preliminary aerodynamic design tool for one or two interacting, subsonic lifting surfaces. Subcritical wing design code employs higher-order far-field drag minimization technique. Linearized aerodynamic theory used. Program written in FORTRAN IV.

  18. Program with Ixquic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Ramos

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is to explain the story telling, game design, game play and how is the interaction with the game Program with Ixquic. Here is the description about the new approach to this video game I called Program with Ixquic. Initially focused on an educational video game but now is a hybrid, now has more levels and provides moments of great fun, where each player can have some much fun in each different level and environments of interaction.

  19. Cardiopulmonary interactions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-08-28

    Aug 28, 2006 ... applications to a particular subspecialty,2-5 the reader is advised to have .... Using Ohm's law, it is known that PVR = (mean PAP – mean LAP)/Qp. PVR is determined by the interactions of the large capacitance vessels of the pulmonary arterial tree and ..... care setting, the application of this gas is usually.

  20. Explicit Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Löwgren, Jonas; Eriksen, Mette Agger; Linde, Per

    2006-01-01

    as an interpretation of palpability, comprising usability as well as patient empowerment and socially performative issues. We present a prototype environment for video recording during physiotherapeutical consultation which illustrates our current thoughts on explicit interaction and serves as material for further...

  1. Interacting Components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orlic, B.; Broenink, Johannes F.; Welch, Peter; Kerridge, Jon; Barnes, Fred

    2006-01-01

    SystemCSP is a graphical modeling language based on both CSP and concepts of component-based software development. The component framework of SystemCSP enables specification of both interaction scenarios and relative execution ordering among components. Specification and implementation of

  2. Interactive Storytelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoenau-Fog, Henrik; Reng, Lars

    2015-01-01

    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Interactive Digital Storytelling, ICIDS 2015, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in November/December 2015. The 18 revised full papers and 13 short papers presented together with 9 posters, 9 workshop descriptions...

  3. Interactive Dynamic-System Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Korn, Granino A

    2010-01-01

    Showing you how to use personal computers for modeling and simulation, Interactive Dynamic-System Simulation, Second Edition provides a practical tutorial on interactive dynamic-system modeling and simulation. It discusses how to effectively simulate dynamical systems, such as aerospace vehicles, power plants, chemical processes, control systems, and physiological systems. Written by a pioneer in simulation, the book introduces dynamic-system models and explains how software for solving differential equations works. After demonstrating real simulation programs with simple examples, the author

  4. Interactive radio: distance education in the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    The Honduran Association for Socioeconomic Growth and Development (AVANCE) in conjunction with the U.S. Agency for International Development's Radio Learning Project has developed and promoted programs for radio that encourage interactive learning in Latin America. The Second Interamerican Conference on Interactive Radio was recently held in Tela, Honduras where educators and participants came to attend workshops on scriptwriting, instructional design, community support and other related topics. The participants had the opportunity to study the second generation of interactive radio. Beginning in 1973, Nicaragua began an interactive radio program written for early grade mathematics students. Currently, Honduras is marketing a mathematics program entitled, La Familia de los Numeros," or the Family of Numbers to other countries. In Bolivia, an organization called, "Fe y Alegria," or Faith and Happiness is broadcasting educational programs through the use of interactive radio. In Ecuador, testing has begun to study the viability of interactive radio for their educational system, and in Costa Rica, replication of Honduras' "Familia de los Numeros" has begun. Teachers have noted an improved grasp of subject matter and better attentiveness through the use of interactive radio programs. The programs present 30 minutes of mathematics information and 30 minutes of language information. For each grade, 170 programs have been developed.

  5. Interactive computations: toward risk management in interactive intelligent systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowron, Andrzej; Jankowski, Andrzej

    Understanding the nature of interactions is regarded as one of the biggest challenges in projects related to complex adaptive systems. We discuss foundations for interactive computations in interactive intelligent systems (IIS), developed in the Wistech program and used for modeling complex systems. We emphasize the key role of risk management in problem solving by IIS. The considerations are based on experience gained in real-life projects concerning, e.g., medical diagnosis and therapy support, control of an unmanned helicopter, fraud detection algorithmic trading or fire commander decision support.

  6. Learning logic through interactive computer game

    OpenAIRE

    Koželj, Ksenija

    2011-01-01

    In this final thesis we presented interactivity in education and some online interactive games. Furthermore we created interactive computer game with program tool Adobe Flash, through which students can learn logic. CD with this game is attached to this final thesis. We wanted to know if there are any differences in knowledge between the students that learn frontal and students that learn through game. In first chapter we presented interactivity in education and different ways for teachers...

  7. Interactive cinema : engagement and interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vosmeer, Mirjam; Schouten, Ben; Mitchell, Alex; Fernández-Vara, Clara; Thue, David

    2014-01-01

    Technologies that were initially developed to be applied within the domain of video games are currently being used in experiments to explore their meaning and possibilities for cinema and cinema audiences. In this position paper we examine how narrativity, interactivity and engagement are mutually

  8. Interactive Macroeconomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Guilmi, Corrado; Gallegati, Mauro; Landini, Simone

    2017-04-01

    Preface; List of tables; List of figures, 1. Introduction; Part I. Methodological Notes and Tools: 2. The state space notion; 3. The master equation; Part II. Applications to HIA Based Models: 4. Financial fragility and macroeconomic dynamics I: heterogeneity and interaction; 5. Financial fragility and macroeconomic Dynamics II: learning; Part III. Conclusions: 6. Conclusive remarks; Part IV. Appendices and Complements: Appendix A: Complements to Chapter 3; Appendix B: Solving the ME to solve the ABM; Appendix C: Specifying transition rates; Index.

  9. How Programming Fits with Technology Education Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Geoffrey A.; Rich, Peter; Leatham, Keith R.

    2012-01-01

    Programming is a fundamental component of modern society. Programming and its applications influence much of how people work and interact. Because of people's reliance on programming in one or many of its applications, there is a need to teach students to be programming literate. Because the purpose of the International Technology and Engineering…

  10. Program specialization

    CERN Document Server

    Marlet, Renaud

    2013-01-01

    This book presents the principles and techniques of program specialization - a general method to make programs faster (and possibly smaller) when some inputs can be known in advance. As an illustration, it describes the architecture of Tempo, an offline program specializer for C that can also specialize code at runtime, and provides figures for concrete applications in various domains. Technical details address issues related to program analysis precision, value reification, incomplete program specialization, strategies to exploit specialized program, incremental specialization, and data speci

  11. Temporal Concurrent Constraint Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valencia, Frank Dan

    Concurrent constraint programming (ccp) is a formalism for concurrency in which agents interact with one another by telling (adding) and asking (reading) information in a shared medium. Temporal ccp extends ccp by allowing agents to be constrained by time conditions. This dissertation studies...

  12. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Liability Reform GME and Workforce Trauma and EMS ... the entire surgical team with quality, comprehensive education. The standardized interactive program has been developed by the American College of Surgeons (ACS) in collaboration with the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons (ASCRS), American Urological Association (AUA), ...

  13. Interactive Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Governance analysis has exploded in recent years, and it has become nearly impossible to tell what difference the concept and practice of governance makes from those of government and state. In addition governance analysis has been placed more and more in the shadow of the new institutionalisms and...... and growth. However, interactive governance is not a property or effect of institutions; nor does it apply solely to those individuals who seek success above everything else. It is connective more than individualistic or collectivistic in nature; and it manifests a governability capacity which...

  14. Interactive Workspaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Preben Holst

    Many application domains such as architecture, engineering, industrial design, city planning, environmental supervision, health care etc. share the properties of users working collaboratively with complex mixtures of physical and digital materials. Studies in such domains show that it is hard...... augmented reality, interactive building elements, and mobile devices to support new ways of working in a diversity of application domains with work situations ranging from individual work, through local collaboration, to distributed collaboration. The work situations may take place in offices/project rooms...

  15. Electromagnetic interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Bosanac, Slobodan Danko

    2016-01-01

    This book is devoted to theoretical methods used in the extreme circumstances of very strong electromagnetic fields. The development of high power lasers, ultrafast processes, manipulation of electromagnetic fields and the use of very fast charged particles interacting with other charges requires an adequate theoretical description. Because of the very strong electromagnetic field, traditional theoretical approaches, which have primarily a perturbative character, have to be replaced by descriptions going beyond them. In the book an extension of the semi-classical radiation theory and classical dynamics for particles is performed to analyze single charged atoms and dipoles submitted to electromagnetic pulses. Special attention is given to the important problem of field reaction and controlling dynamics of charges by an electromagnetic field.

  16. Extreme Programming: Maestro Style

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Jeffrey; Fox, Jason; Rabe, Kenneth; Shu, I-Hsiang; Powell, Mark

    2009-01-01

    "Extreme Programming: Maestro Style" is the name of a computer programming methodology that has evolved as a custom version of a methodology, called extreme programming that has been practiced in the software industry since the late 1990s. The name of this version reflects its origin in the work of the Maestro team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory that develops software for Mars exploration missions. Extreme programming is oriented toward agile development of software resting on values of simplicity, communication, testing, and aggressiveness. Extreme programming involves use of methods of rapidly building and disseminating institutional knowledge among members of a computer-programming team to give all the members a shared view that matches the view of the customers for whom the software system is to be developed. Extreme programming includes frequent planning by programmers in collaboration with customers, continually examining and rewriting code in striving for the simplest workable software designs, a system metaphor (basically, an abstraction of the system that provides easy-to-remember software-naming conventions and insight into the architecture of the system), programmers working in pairs, adherence to a set of coding standards, collaboration of customers and programmers, frequent verbal communication, frequent releases of software in small increments of development, repeated testing of the developmental software by both programmers and customers, and continuous interaction between the team and the customers. The environment in which the Maestro team works requires the team to quickly adapt to changing needs of its customers. In addition, the team cannot afford to accept unnecessary development risk. Extreme programming enables the Maestro team to remain agile and provide high-quality software and service to its customers. However, several factors in the Maestro environment have made it necessary to modify some of the conventional extreme-programming

  17. Web Interactive Campus Map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marylene S. Eder

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Interactive campus map is a web based application that can be accessed through a web browser. With the Google Map Application Programming Interface availability of the overlay function has been taken advantage to create custom map functionalities. Collection of building points were gathered for routing and to create polygons which serves as a representation of each building. The previous campus map provides a static visual representation of the campus. It uses legends building name and its corresponding building number in providing information. Due to its limited capabilities it became a realization to the researchers to create an interactive campus map.Storing data about the building room and staff information and university events and campus guide are among the primary features that this study has to offer. Interactive Web-based Campus Information System is intended in providing a Campus Information System.It is open to constant updates user-friendly for both trained and untrained users and capable of responding to all needs of users and carrying out analyses. Based on the data gathered through questionnaires researchers analyzed the results of the test survey and proved that the system is user friendly deliver information to users and the important features that the students expect.

  18. Transgenerational developmental programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Catherine E; Ozanne, Susan E

    2014-01-01

    The concept of developmental programming suggests that the early life environment influences offspring characteristics in later life, including the propensity to develop diseases such as the metabolic syndrome. There is now growing evidence that the effects of developmental programming may also manifest in further generations without further suboptimal exposure. This review considers the evidence, primarily from rodent models, for effects persisting to subsequent generations, and evaluates the mechanisms by which developmental programming may be transmitted to further generations. In particular, we focus on the potential role of the intrauterine environment in contributing to a developmentally programmed phenotype in subsequent generations. The literature was systematically searched at http://pubmed.org and http://scholar.google.com to identify published findings regarding transgenerational (F2 and beyond) developmental programming effects in human populations and animal models. Transmission of programming effects is often viewed as a form of epigenetic inheritance, either via the maternal or paternal line. Evidence exists for both germline and somatic inheritance of epigenetic modifications which may be responsible for phenotypic changes in further generations. However, there is increasing evidence for the role of both extra-genomic components of the zygote and the interaction of the developing conceptus with the intrauterine environment in propagating programming effects. The contribution of a suboptimal reproductive tract environment or maternal adaptations to pregnancy may be critical to inheritance of programming effects via the maternal line. As the effects of age exacerbate the programmed metabolic phenotype, advancing maternal age may increase the likelihood of developmental programming effects being transmitted to further generations. We suggest that developmental programming effects could be propagated through the maternal line de novo in generations

  19. A distributed program composition system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    A graphical technique for creating distributed computer programs is investigated and a prototype implementation is described which serves as a testbed for the concepts. The type of programs under examination is restricted to those comprising relatively heavyweight parts that intercommunicate by passing messages of typed objects. Such programs are often presented visually as a directed graph with computer program parts as the nodes and communication channels as the edges. This class of programs, called parts-based programs, is not well supported by existing computer systems; much manual work is required to describe the program to the system, establish the communication paths, accommodate the heterogeneity of data types, and to locate the parts of the program on the various systems involved. The work described solves most of these problems by providing an interface for describing parts-based programs in this class in a way that closely models the way programmers think about them: using sketches of diagraphs. Program parts, the computational modes of the larger program system are categorized in libraries and are accessed with browsers. The process of programming has the programmer draw the program graph interactively. Heterogeneity is automatically accommodated by the insertion of type translators where necessary between the parts. Many decisions are necessary in the creation of a comprehensive tool for interactive creation of programs in this class. Possibilities are explored and the issues behind such decisions are presented. An approach to program composition is described, not a carefully implemented programming environment. However, a prototype implementation is described that can demonstrate the ideas presented.

  20. A Runtime System for Interactive Web Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, Claus; Møller, Anders; Sandholm, Anders

    1999-01-01

    Interactive web services are increasingly replacing traditional static web pages. Producing web services seems to require a tremendous amount of laborious low-level coding due to the primitive nature of CGI programming. We present ideas for an improved runtime system for interactive web services ...

  1. Enhancing Learning through Human Computer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Elspeth, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    Enhancing Learning Through Human Computer Interaction is an excellent reference source for human computer interaction (HCI) applications and designs. This "Premier Reference Source" provides a complete analysis of online business training programs and e-learning in the higher education sector. It describes a range of positive outcomes for linking…

  2. A Runtime System for Interactive Web Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, Claus; Møller, Anders; Sandholm, Anders

    1999-01-01

    Interactive web services are increasingly replacing traditional static web pages. Producing web services seems to require a tremendous amount of laborious low-level coding due to the primitive nature of CGI programming. We present ideas for an improved runtime system for interactive web services...... built on top of CGI running on virtually every combination of browser and HTTP/CGI server. The runtime system has been implemented and used extensively in , a tool for producing interactive web services....

  3. Professional Android Sensor Programming

    CERN Document Server

    Milette, Greg

    2012-01-01

    Learn to build human-interactive Android apps, starting with device sensors This book shows Android developers how to exploit the rich set of device sensors—locational, physical (temperature, pressure, light, acceleration, etc.), cameras, microphones, and speech recognition—in order to build fully human-interactive Android applications. Whether providing hands-free directions or checking your blood pressure, Professional Android Sensor Programming shows how to turn possibility into reality. The authors provide techniques that bridge the gap between accessing sensors and putting the

  4. Psychology of programming

    CERN Document Server

    Hoc, J-M

    1991-01-01

    Psychology provides a backdrop for most of the study of human*b1computer interaction. In this volume the psychological issues that pertain to programming, rather than systems design, are examined in four sections: Theoretical and Methodological Issues; Language Design and Skill Acquisition; Expert Programming; and the Future.****The book was inspired by working groups in France and the United Kingdom but also includes work by major North American figures (such as Curtis and Soloway). It is the first comprehensive work on this topic since the early 1980s.

  5. A Video Technology Program Containing a Complete System of Tactile Communications for Individuals Who Are Deaf-Blind. A Tactile Signing Project: Tactile Interactive Signing and Primitive Signaling (Project TIPS). A Final Narrative Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utah State Univ., Logan. Dept. of Communicative Disorders.

    This report describes the development of two sets of videotapes on early tactile signaling and on interactive signing systems to be used with individuals who are deaf-blind. A tactile signal is defined as a touch cue, tactile gesture, and/or action cue, and these motions help to promote communication for the child who is deaf-blind. The process of…

  6. Neutrino Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamyshkov, Yuri [Univ. of Tennesse, Knoxville, TN (United States); Handler, Thomas [Univ. of Tennesse, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-10-24

    The neutrino group of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville was involved from 05/01/2013 to 04/30/2015 in the neutrino physics research funded by DOE-HEP grant DE-SC0009861. Contributions were made to the Double Chooz nuclear reactor experiment in France where second detector was commissioned during this period and final series of measurements has been started. Although Double Chooz was smaller experimental effort than competitive Daya Bay and RENO experiments, its several advantages make it valuable for understanding of systematic errors in measurements of neutrino oscillations. Double Chooz was the first experiment among competing three that produced initial result for neutrino angle θ13 measurement, giving other experiments the chance to improve measured value statistically. Graduate student Ben Rybolt defended his PhD thesis on the results of Double Chooz experiment in 2015. UT group has fulfilled all the construction and analysis commitments to Double Chooz experiment, and has withdrawn from the collaboration by the end of the mentioned period to start another experiment. Larger effort of UT neutrino group during this period was devoted to the participation in another DOE-HEP project - NOvA experiment. The 14,000-ton "FAR" neutrino detector was commissioned in northern Minnesota in 2014 together with 300-ton "NEAR" detector located at Fermilab. Following that, the physics measurement program has started when Fermilab accelerator complex produced the high-intensity neutrino beam propagating through Earth to detector in MInnessota. UT group contributed to NOvA detector construction and developments in several aspects. Our Research Associate Athanasios Hatzikoutelis was managing (Level 3 manager) the construction of the Detector Control System. This work was successfully accomplished in time with the commissioning of the detectors. Group was involved in the development of the on-line software and study of the signatures of the cosmic ray backgrounds

  7. Interactive problem solving using LOGO

    CERN Document Server

    Boecker, Heinz-Dieter; Fischer, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    This book is unique in that its stress is not on the mastery of a programming language, but on the importance and value of interactive problem solving. The authors focus on several specific interest worlds: mathematics, computer science, artificial intelligence, linguistics, and games; however, their approach can serve as a model that may be applied easily to other fields as well. Those who are interested in symbolic computing will find that Interactive Problem Solving Using LOGO provides a gentle introduction from which one may move on to other, more advanced computational frameworks or more

  8. Parenting Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Martín-Quintana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper was aimed at emphasizing the importance of using parenting programs to promote parental competences. There is a need for this support taking into account the complexity of the parenting task in our modern societies. Following the European recommendation on positive parenting, those parenting programs are considered important measures to support parents in their educational role. Forward, several generations of parenting programs at the international context were briefly described and some examples of programs within the national context, as well. This paper provides some reflection on three models of parental education, and shows the results of an experiential parenting programs addressed to parents in psychosocial risk situation in two Spanish communities. A new program “Crecer felices en familia”, still in the implementation phase, was also described. As a conclusion, the paper emphasized the importance of evaluating programs in order to know more about their efficacy and to improve the way of implementation in real settings.

  9. A survey of object oriented languages in programming environments

    OpenAIRE

    Haakonsen, Harald

    1987-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited This thesis addresses object oriented programming languages; and a restrictive definition of object oriented programming languages is presented and defended. Differences between programming languages are discussed and related to interactive integrated programming environments. Topics related to user friendly interface to the computer system and modem programming practice are discussed. The thesis especially addresses features in ...

  10. Strengthening 4-H Program Communication through Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robideau, Kari; Santl, Karyn

    2011-01-01

    Advances in technology are transforming how youth and parents interact with programs. The Strengthening 4-H Communication through Technology project was implemented in eight county 4-H programs in Northwest Minnesota. This article outlines the intentional process used to effectively implement technology in program planning. The project includes:…

  11. Students' Ways of Experiencing Visual Program Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorva, Juha; Lönnberg, Jan; Malmi, Lauri

    2013-01-01

    Visual program simulation (VPS) is a new, interactive form of educational program visualisation, in which learners use graphical controls to direct a program's execution rather than simply watching an animation of it. In this article, we report on a qualitative empirical study of novice programmers learning through VPS. From an analysis of…

  12. Interactive Computer Graphics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenwright, David

    2000-01-01

    Aerospace data analysis tools that significantly reduce the time and effort needed to analyze large-scale computational fluid dynamics simulations have emerged this year. The current approach for most postprocessing and visualization work is to explore the 3D flow simulations with one of a dozen or so interactive tools. While effective for analyzing small data sets, this approach becomes extremely time consuming when working with data sets larger than one gigabyte. An active area of research this year has been the development of data mining tools that automatically search through gigabyte data sets and extract the salient features with little or no human intervention. With these so-called feature extraction tools, engineers are spared the tedious task of manually exploring huge amounts of data to find the important flow phenomena. The software tools identify features such as vortex cores, shocks, separation and attachment lines, recirculation bubbles, and boundary layers. Some of these features can be extracted in a few seconds; others take minutes to hours on extremely large data sets. The analysis can be performed off-line in a batch process, either during or following the supercomputer simulations. These computations have to be performed only once, because the feature extraction programs search the entire data set and find every occurrence of the phenomena being sought. Because the important questions about the data are being answered automatically, interactivity is less critical than it is with traditional approaches.

  13. Building interactive queries with LINQPad

    CERN Document Server

    Finot, Sébastien

    2013-01-01

    A step-by-step practical guide that will introduce you to LINQPad's key features, thereby helping you to query databases interactively.This book is aimed at C#/.Net developers who wish to learn LINQ programming and leverage the easy way of using LINQPad. No prior knowledge of LINQ or LINQPad is expected. A basic knowledge of SQL and XML is required for some chapters.

  14. Yucca Mountain Project public interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reilly, B.E.

    1990-04-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to keeping the citizens of Nevada informed about activities that relate to the high-level nuclear waste repository program. This paper presents an overview of the Yucca Mountain Project`s public interaction philosophy, objectives, activities and experiences during the two years since Congress directed the DOE to conduct site characterization activities only for the Yucca Mountain site.

  15. Effective Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, Jacob

    To investigate the use of VTLoE as a basis for formal derivation of functional programs with effects. As a part of the process, a number of issues central to effective formal programming are considered. In particular it is considered how to develop a proof system suitable for pratical reasoning......, how to implement this system in the generic proof assistant Isabelle and finally how to apply the logic and the implementation to programming....

  16. Program Fullerene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wirz, Lukas; Peter, Schwerdtfeger,; Avery, James Emil

    2013-01-01

    Fullerene (Version 4.4), is a general purpose open-source program that can generate any fullerene isomer, perform topological and graph theoretical analysis, as well as calculate a number of physical and chemical properties. The program creates symmetric planar drawings of the fullerene graph......-Fowler, and Brinkmann-Fowler vertex insertions. The program is written in standard Fortran and C++, and can easily be installed on a Linux or UNIX environment....

  17. Dynamic sensorimotor interactions in locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossignol, Serge; Dubuc, Réjean; Gossard, Jean-Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Locomotion results from intricate dynamic interactions between a central program and feedback mechanisms. The central program relies fundamentally on a genetically determined spinal circuitry (central pattern generator) capable of generating the basic locomotor pattern and on various descending pathways that can trigger, stop, and steer locomotion. The feedback originates from muscles and skin afferents as well as from special senses (vision, audition, vestibular) and dynamically adapts the locomotor pattern to the requirements of the environment. The dynamic interactions are ensured by modulating transmission in locomotor pathways in a state- and phase-dependent manner. For instance, proprioceptive inputs from extensors can, during stance, adjust the timing and amplitude of muscle activities of the limbs to the speed of locomotion but be silenced during the opposite phase of the cycle. Similarly, skin afferents participate predominantly in the correction of limb and foot placement during stance on uneven terrain, but skin stimuli can evoke different types of responses depending on when they occur within the step cycle. Similarly, stimulation of descending pathways may affect the locomotor pattern in only certain phases of the step cycle. Section ii reviews dynamic sensorimotor interactions mainly through spinal pathways. Section iii describes how similar sensory inputs from the spinal or supraspinal levels can modify locomotion through descending pathways. The sensorimotor interactions occur obviously at several levels of the nervous system. Section iv summarizes presynaptic, interneuronal, and motoneuronal mechanisms that are common at these various levels. Together these mechanisms contribute to the continuous dynamic adjustment of sensorimotor interactions, ensuring that the central program and feedback mechanisms are congruous during locomotion.

  18. Programming F#

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Why learn F#? This multi-paradigm language not only offers you an enormous productivity boost through functional programming, it also lets you develop applications using your existing object-oriented and imperative programming skills. With Programming F#, you'll quickly discover the many advantages of Microsoft's new language, which includes access to all the great tools and libraries of the .NET platform. Learn how to reap the benefits of functional programming for your next project -- whether it's quantitative computing, large-scale data exploration, or even a pursuit of your own. With th

  19. ISS Robotic Student Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, J.; Benavides, J.; Hanson, R.; Cortez, J.; Le Vasseur, D.; Soloway, D.; Oyadomari, K.

    2016-01-01

    The SPHERES facility is a set of three free-flying satellites launched in 2006. In addition to scientists and engineering, middle- and high-school students program the SPHERES during the annual Zero Robotics programming competition. Zero Robotics conducts virtual competitions via simulator and on SPHERES aboard the ISS, with students doing the programming. A web interface allows teams to submit code, receive results, collaborate, and compete in simulator-based initial rounds and semi-final rounds. The final round of each competition is conducted with SPHERES aboard the ISS. At the end of 2017 a new robotic platform called Astrobee will launch, providing new game elements and new ground support for even more student interaction.

  20. Efficient Session Type Guided Distributed Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaramakrishnan, K. C.; Nagaraj, Karthik; Ziarek, Lukasz; Eugster, Patrick

    Recently, there has been much interest in multi-party session types (MPSTs) as a means of rigorously specifying protocols for interaction among multiple distributed participants. By capturing distributed interaction as series of typed interactions, MPSTs allow for the static verification of compliance of corresponding distributed object programs. We observe that explicit control flow information manifested by MPST opens intriguing avenues also for performance enhancements. In this paper, we present a session type assisted performance enhancement framework for distributed object interaction in Java. Experimental evaluation within our distributed runtime infrastructure illustrates the costs and benefits of our composable enhancement strategies.

  1. Computer Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Tiffoni

    This module provides information on development and use of a Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) software program that seeks to link literacy skills education, safety training, and human-centered design. Section 1 discusses the development of the software program that helps workers understand the MSDSs that accompany the chemicals with which they…

  2. Interactions between antidepressants and antihypertensive and glucose lowering drugs among patients in the HIPERDIA Program, Coronel Fabriciano, Minas Gerais State, Brazil Interações entre antidepressivos e medicamentos e anti-hipertensivos e hipo-glicemiantes em pacientes do Programa HIPERDIA em Coronel Fabriciano, Minas Gerais, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Vieira Coelho

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to investigate the prevalence and to describe the most frequent potential interactions between antidepressants and antihypertensive and glucose lowering drugs in the HIPERDIA Program at two primary care units in Coronel Fabriciano, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. Data were collected through the patient registry in the HIPERDIA Program and the local psychoactive drug dispensing system. Interactions were classified as due to pharmacokinetic and/or pharmacodynamic mechanisms. Prevalence of antidepressant use in the HIPERDIA Program was 4.37% (29 of patient 663 records. Of the HIPERDIA patients in treatment with antidepressants, 19 were exposed to 47 interactions, 23.4% of which involving pharmacokinetic, 61.7% pharmacodynamic synergy, and 15.9% simultaneous pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic mechanisms. Complications can arise from drug-drug interactions, a situation that can escape the attention of prescribing health professionals.O objetivo do estudo foi investigar a prevalência e descrever as possíveis interações de medicamentos mais freqüentes entre antidepressivos e anti-hipertensivos/hipoglicemiantes do programa HIPERDIA de duas unidades básicas de saúde do Município de Coronel Fabriciano, Minas Gerais, Brasil. A coleta de dados foi realizada mediante consulta ao caderno de cadastro dos pacientes usuários do programa de HIPERDIA e pela consulta ao sistema de dispensação de psicotrópicos do município. As interações foram classificadas segundo o mecanismo farmacocinético e farmacodinâmico. A prevalência do uso de antidepressivos em pacientes do HIPERDIA foi de 4,37% (29 de 663 cadastros analisados. Dos pacientes do HIPERDIA em tratamento com antidepressivos, 19 estão expostos a 47 interações, 23,4% delas ocorrem por mecanismos farmacocinéticos, 61,7% por mecanismos farmacodinâmicos de sinergismo e 15,9% interagem das duas formas simultaneamente. Complicações podem ser provocadas por intera

  3. Choreographic Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montesi, Fabrizio

    , as they offer a concise view of the message flows enacted by a system. For this reason, in the last decade choreographies have been used in the development of programming languages, giving rise to a programming paradigm that in this dissertation we refer to as Choreographic Programming. Recent studies show...... endpoint described in a choreography can then be automatically generated, ensuring that such implementations are safe by construction. However, current formal models for choreographies do not deal with critical aspects of distributed programming, such as asynchrony, mobility, modularity, and multiparty...... sessions; it remains thus unclear whether choreographies can still guarantee safety when dealing with such nontrivial features. This PhD dissertation argues for the suitability of choreographic programming as a paradigm for the development of safe distributed systems. We proceed by investigating its...

  4. Education in Astronomy Through English Programs

    OpenAIRE

    鈴木, 右文

    2012-01-01

    The author is a member of an educational program funded by Kyushu University called “Developing a New Education Program in Studying Astronomy”. The program aims to promote basic knowledge of Science and Technology and refine the social interaction of students. His activities in the 2011 academic year included using a textbook on astrophysics with his English class, arranging a class meeting on astronomy in the Kyushu University summer program held at Pembroke College at the University of Camb...

  5. 2012 Wind Program Peer Review Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zayas, Jose [Energy Efficiencey and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States); Higgins, Mark [Energy Efficiencey and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States)

    2012-06-01

    This report summarizes the proceedings of the 2012 Wind Program Peer Review, the goals of which were to review and evaluate the strategy and goals of the Wind Program; review and evaluate the progress and accomplishments of the program's projects funded in fiscal year (FY) 2010 and FY 2011; and foster interactions among the national laboratories, industry, and academic institutions conducting research and development on behalf of the program.

  6. Interactive computing in BASIC an introduction to interactive computing and a practical course in the BASIC language

    CERN Document Server

    Sanderson, Peter C

    1973-01-01

    Interactive Computing in BASIC: An Introduction to Interactive Computing and a Practical Course in the BASIC Language provides a general introduction to the principles of interactive computing and a comprehensive practical guide to the programming language Beginners All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code (BASIC). The book starts by providing an introduction to computers and discussing the aspects of terminal usage, programming languages, and the stages in writing and testing a program. The text then discusses BASIC with regard to methods in writing simple arithmetical programs, control stateme

  7. Public Service Communication Satellite Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    The proposed NASA Public Service Communication Satellite Program consists of four different activities designed to fulfill the needs of public service sector. These are: interaction with the users, experimentation with existing satellites, development of a limited capability satellite for the earliest possible launch, and initiation of an R&D program to develop the greatly increased capability that future systems will require. This paper will discuss NASA efforts in each of these areas.

  8. An Educational Tool for Interactive Parallel and Distributed Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagliarini, Luigi; Lund, Henrik Hautop

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we try to describe how the Modular Interactive Tiles System (MITS) can be a valuable tool for introducing students to interactive parallel and distributed processing programming. This is done by providing an educational hands-on tool that allows a change of representation...... of the abstract problems related to designing interactive parallel and distributed systems. Indeed, MITS seems to bring a series of goals into the education, such as parallel programming, distributedness, communication protocols, master dependency, software behavioral models, adaptive interactivity, feedback...... parallel and distributed processing with different software behavioural models such as open loop, randomness based, rule based, user interaction based, AI and ALife based software....

  9. Facilitating Interpersonal Interaction and Learning Online: Linking Theory and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargeant, Joan; Curran, Vernon; Allen, Michael; Jarvis-Selinger, Sandra; Ho, Kendall

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: An earlier study of physicians' perceptions of interactive online learning showed that these were shaped both by program design and quality and the quality and quantity of interpersonal interaction. We explore instructor roles in enhancing online learning through interpersonal interaction and the learning theories that inform these.…

  10. Drug Interaction API

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Interaction API is a web service for accessing drug-drug interactions. No license is needed to use the Interaction API. Currently, the API uses DrugBank for its...

  11. Programming Python

    CERN Document Server

    Lutz, Mark

    2011-01-01

    If you've mastered Python's fundamentals, you're ready to start using it to get real work done. Programming Python will show you how, with in-depth tutorials on the language's primary application domains: system administration, GUIs, and the Web. You'll also explore how Python is used in databases, networking, front-end scripting layers, text processing, and more. This book focuses on commonly used tools and libraries to give you a comprehensive understanding of Python's many roles in practical, real-world programming. You'll learn language syntax and programming techniques in a clear and co

  12. Process Machine Interactions Predicition and Manipulation of Interactions between Manufacturing Processes and Machine Tool Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Hollmann, Ferdinand

    2013-01-01

    This contributed volume collects the scientific results of the DFG Priority Program 1180 Prediction and Manipulation of Interactions between Structure and Process. The research program has been conducted during the years 2005 and 2012, whereas the primary goal was the analysis of the interactions between processes and structures in modern production facilities. This book presents the findings of the 20 interdisciplinary subprojects, focusing on different manufacturing processes such as high performance milling, tool grinding or metal forming. It contains experimental investigations as well as mathematical modeling of production processes and machine interactions. New experimental advancements and novel simulation approaches are also included.

  13. Educational treasures in Radiology: Annotate – creating interactive teaching files

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talanow, Roland

    2009-01-01

    This article focuses on Annotate (www.annotate.org) – an online program for image editing and creation of interactive teaching files. This program is free to use, does not need any installation or plugin and can be used from any workstation with internet access. Multiple tools and preferences allow a customization of the program to the user needs. PMID:22470637

  14. Educational treasures in Radiology: Annotate - creating interactive teaching files.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talanow, Roland

    2009-01-01

    This article focuses on Annotate (www.annotate.org) - an online program for image editing and creation of interactive teaching files. This program is free to use, does not need any installation or plugin and can be used from any workstation with internet access. Multiple tools and preferences allow a customization of the program to the user needs.

  15. Integrated predictive maintenance program vibration and lube oil analysis: Part I - history and the vibration program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, H.

    1996-12-01

    This paper is the first of two papers which describe the Predictive Maintenance Program for rotating machines at the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station. The organization has recently been restructured and significant benefits have been realized by the interaction, or {open_quotes}synergy{close_quotes} between the Vibration Program and the Lube Oil Analysis Program. This paper starts with the oldest part of the program - the Vibration Program and discusses the evolution of the program to its current state. The {open_quotes}Vibration{close_quotes} view of the combined program is then presented.

  16. Programming Python

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lutz, Mark

    2006-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 3 3 8 9 15 17 20 22 2. A Sneak Preview "Programming Python: The Short Story" The Task Step 1: Representing Records Step 2: Storing Records Persistently Step 3...

  17. Linear programming

    CERN Document Server

    Solow, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    This text covers the basic theory and computation for a first course in linear programming, including substantial material on mathematical proof techniques and sophisticated computation methods. Includes Appendix on using Excel. 1984 edition.

  18. Predicting effectiveness of the Home-Start parenting support program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asscher, J.J.; Hermanns, J.M.A.; Dekovic, M.; Reitz, E.

    2007-01-01

    The current study examines predictive effects of participant's characteristics, program characteristics, and their interaction, on changes in parenting behavior of mothers who participated in the Home-Start parenting support program. The results confirm previous findings that effects of

  19. Excel Initiative: Excellence in Youth Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynne M. Borden

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Excellence in Youth Programming (Excel Initiative strives to support youth programs in delivering high quality programs. The backbone of Excel is the Youth Development Observational Tool (YDOT which allows for the virtual assessment of program staff who work with children and youth ages 9-18 years. The YDOT also allows Excel to provide structured feedback to programs. Excel has several unique features, including a virtual platform and a focus on the relationships between adults and youth participating in after-school programs. Offering structured assessment and interaction online eliminates expenses, provides convenient access for programs around the globe, and allows for unobtrusive assessment of worker-youth interactions. Excel is also integrated into a broader network of resources, tools, and research for those working with children and youth ages 9-18.

  20. INCA- INTERACTIVE CONTROLS ANALYSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, F. H.

    1994-01-01

    The Interactive Controls Analysis (INCA) program was developed to provide a user friendly environment for the design and analysis of linear control systems, primarily feedback control systems. INCA is designed for use with both small and large order systems. Using the interactive graphics capability, the INCA user can quickly plot a root locus, frequency response, or time response of either a continuous time system or a sampled data system. The system configuration and parameters can be easily changed, allowing the INCA user to design compensation networks and perform sensitivity analysis in a very convenient manner. A journal file capability is included. This stores an entire sequence of commands, generated during an INCA session into a file which can be accessed later. Also included in INCA are a context-sensitive help library, a screen editor, and plot windows. INCA is robust to VAX-specific overflow problems. The transfer function is the basic unit of INCA. Transfer functions are automatically saved and are available to the INCA user at any time. A powerful, user friendly transfer function manipulation and editing capability is built into the INCA program. The user can do all transfer function manipulations and plotting without leaving INCA, although provisions are made to input transfer functions from data files. By using a small set of commands, the user may compute and edit transfer functions, and then examine these functions by using the ROOT_LOCUS, FREQUENCY_RESPONSE, and TIME_RESPONSE capabilities. Basic input data, including gains, are handled as single-input single-output transfer functions. These functions can be developed using the function editor or by using FORTRAN- like arithmetic expressions. In addition to the arithmetic functions, special functions are available to 1) compute step, ramp, and sinusoid functions, 2) compute closed loop transfer functions, 3) convert from S plane to Z plane with optional advanced Z transform, and 4) convert from Z

  1. Problem of interactions: electromagnetic particles interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Sannikov-Proskuryakov, S S

    2001-01-01

    The electromagnetic interactions between charged particles are derived on the basis of the particles dynamic theory, proposed in the work of Sannikov. The electromagnetic interactions exist only in the relativistic model of the bihamiltonian system, based on the Heisenberg algebra. Existence of this type of interactions is connected with the U sub e (1)-degeneration of the basic state of the relativistic bihamiltonian system, lying in the basis of the given theory

  2. IDG - INTERACTIVE DIF GENERATOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preheim, L. E.

    1994-01-01

    The Interactive DIF Generator (IDG) utility is a tool used to generate and manipulate Directory Interchange Format files (DIF). Its purpose as a specialized text editor is to create and update DIF files which can be sent to NASA's Master Directory, also referred to as the International Global Change Directory at Goddard. Many government and university data systems use the Master Directory to advertise the availability of research data. The IDG interface consists of a set of four windows: (1) the IDG main window; (2) a text editing window; (3) a text formatting and validation window; and (4) a file viewing window. The IDG main window starts up the other windows and contains a list of valid keywords. The keywords are loaded from a user-designated file and selected keywords can be copied into any active editing window. Once activated, the editing window designates the file to be edited. Upon switching from the editing window to the formatting and validation window, the user has options for making simple changes to one or more files such as inserting tabs, aligning fields, and indenting groups. The viewing window is a scrollable read-only window that allows fast viewing of any text file. IDG is an interactive tool and requires a mouse or a trackball to operate. IDG uses the X Window System to build and manage its interactive forms, and also uses the Motif widget set and runs under Sun UNIX. IDG is written in C-language for Sun computers running SunOS. This package requires the X Window System, Version 11 Revision 4, with OSF/Motif 1.1. IDG requires 1.8Mb of hard disk space. The standard distribution medium for IDG is a .25 inch streaming magnetic tape cartridge in UNIX tar format. It is also available on a 3.5 inch diskette in UNIX tar format. The program was developed in 1991 and is a copyrighted work with all copyright vested in NASA. SunOS is a trademark of Sun Microsystems, Inc. X Window System is a trademark of Massachusetts Institute of Technology. OSF/Motif is a

  3. beam-beam interaction

    CERN Multimedia

    2017-01-01

    The Beam 1 (represented in blue) and the Beam 2 (represented in red) are colliding with an angle at the Interaction Point (IP). The angle is needed to avoid unwanted multiple collisions along the interaction region. Despite of the separation introduced by the angle, the two beams interact via their electromagnetic field, the so called "beam-beam" interaction.

  4. Designing for mobile interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nazzi, Elena

    2009-01-01

    The theme of this PhD project is designing for mobile interaction with devices and services, for the accessing, making, and sharing of information, taking into account the dynamic physical and social settings that embrace this interaction. To narrow down this theme, the whole project focuses...... on the exploitation of social interaction --- in particular among senior citizens --- to enhance and support mobile interaction....

  5. Student-Faculty Lunch Program to Increase Mentoring and Facilitate Cross-Program Relationships in School of Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewinski, Allison; Wainwright, Kristin; Gordon, Helen; Derouin, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Let's DU Lunch is a pilot program launched to explore the impact of a low-cost, student-faculty lunch program to increase mentoring and facilitate cross-program relationships. This program gave students the opportunity to go to lunch with a faculty member of their choice. A total of 71 students and 25 faculty participated. This program provided the opportunity for positive student-faculty interaction and mentoring and facilitated cross-program relationships.

  6. Army Programs: Army Energy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-02-03

    the Energy Program. o Expands the responsibilities of the Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management (para 1-4). o Includes ridesharing as...not been highlighted. Summary. This regulation establishes poli- cies, procedures, and responsibilities for the Army Energy Program. Applicability ...Energy Technology Service (FETS) • 3–13, page 6 Energy Surveys • 3–14, page 6 Army Energy Awareness Seminars • 3–15, page 6 Army ridesharing • 3–16

  7. Interaction for visualization

    CERN Document Server

    Tominski, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Visualization has become a valuable means for data exploration and analysis. Interactive visualization combines expressive graphical representations and effective user interaction. Although interaction is an important component of visualization approaches, much of the visualization literature tends to pay more attention to the graphical representation than to interaction.The goal of this work is to strengthen the interaction side of visualization. Based on a brief review of general aspects of interaction, we develop an interaction-oriented view on visualization. This view comprises five key as

  8. A History of Intergenerational Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Sally

    1989-01-01

    The social service field of "Intergenerational Programming and Exchange" has emerged in response to the growing elderly population and problems of age segregation and decreased interaction among older and younger generations. This article presents a chronology of events and initiatives contributing to the growth of the field from 1963 to…

  9. The Minnesota Couples Communication Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunnally, Elam W.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    This article describes the Minnesota Couples Communication Program which offers a structured educational experience directed toward equipping couples with skills for (1) heightening awareness of self and self's contributions to interaction, (2) effectively expressing self-awareness, (3) accurately understanding partner's communications, and (4)…

  10. An Implementation of Nested Pattern Matching in Interaction Nets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abubakar Hassan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Reduction rules in interaction nets are constrained to pattern match exactly one argument at a time. Consequently, a programmer has to introduce auxiliary rules to perform more sophisticated matches. In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of a system for interaction nets which allows nested pattern matching on interaction rules. We achieve a system that provides convenient ways to express interaction net programs without defining auxiliary rules.

  11. Interactive CFD simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Duque Lombana, Juan Fernando

    2007-01-01

    This project is about the development of an implementable Interactive Computer Fluid Dynamics methodology -- The range of this work begins with an overview of the current status of computational fluid dynamics simulation software and methodologies, continues with an introduction to what interactive and interactivity mean, develops an all original interactive CFD methodology to follow for the solution of fluid scenarios and finally, the description of the implementation of an interactive solve...

  12. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Program Commission on Cancer National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers National Cancer Database National Accreditation Program for Rectal Cancer Oncology Medical Home Accreditation Program Stereotactic Breast Biopsy Accreditation Program Cancer Programs Staff Information Children's ...

  13. Programming Entity Framework

    CERN Document Server

    Lerman, Julia

    2009-01-01

    Programming Entity Framework is a thorough introduction to Microsoft's new core framework for modeling and interacting with data in .NET applications. This highly-acclaimed book not only gives experienced developers a hands-on tour of the Entity Framework and explains its use in a variety of applications, it also provides a deep understanding of its architecture and APIs -- knowledge that will be extremely valuable as you shift to the Entity Framework version in .NET Framework 4.0 and Visual Studio 2010. From the Entity Data Model (EDM) and Object Services to EntityClient and the Metadata Work

  14. Scientific program and abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerich, C. (ed.)

    1983-01-01

    The Fifth International Conference on High-Power Particle Beams is organized jointly by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Physics International Company. As in the previous conferences in this series, the program includes the following topics: high-power, electron- and ion-beam acceleration and transport; diode physics; high-power particle beam interaction with plasmas and dense targets; particle beam fusion (inertial confinement); collective ion acceleration; particle beam heating of magnetically confined plasmas; and generation of microwave/free-electron lasers.

  15. Programming Entity Framework

    CERN Document Server

    Lerman, Julia

    2010-01-01

    Get a thorough introduction to ADO.NET Entity Framework 4 -- Microsoft's core framework for modeling and interacting with data in .NET applications. The second edition of this acclaimed guide provides a hands-on tour of the framework latest version in Visual Studio 2010 and .NET Framework 4. Not only will you learn how to use EF4 in a variety of applications, you'll also gain a deep understanding of its architecture and APIs. Written by Julia Lerman, the leading independent authority on the framework, Programming Entity Framework covers it all -- from the Entity Data Model and Object Service

  16. Programming Algol

    CERN Document Server

    Malcolme-Lawes, D J

    2014-01-01

    Programming - ALGOL describes the basics of computer programming using Algol. Commands that could be added to Algol and could increase its scope are described, including multiplication and division and the use of brackets. The idea of labeling or naming a command is also explained, along with a command allowing two alternative results. Most of the important features of Algol syntax are discussed, and examples of compound statements (that is, sets of commands enclosed by a begin ... end command) are given.Comprised of 11 chapters, this book begins with an introduction to the digital computer an

  17. ICD programming

    OpenAIRE

    Biffi, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Background: Appropriate ICD programming is the key to prevent inappropriate shock delivery, that is closely associated to a negative patients' outcome. Methods: Review of the literature on ICD therapy to generate ICD programmings that can be applied to the broad population of ICD and CRT-D carriers. Results: Arrhythmia detection should occur with a detection time ranging 9″–12″ in the VF zone, and 15″–60″ in the VT zone. Discriminator should be applied at least up to 200 bpm. ATP therap...

  18. Interactive Teaching in Interpersonal Skills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jørgen Erik; Karhu, Markku; Christensen, Cecillia

    2013-01-01

    skills, leadership and awareness. Consequently, educational programs for teaching engineers should work with the fact that the capability of communicating with people with different background competences is important, nevertheless the engineering education has traditionally focused on technical skills......Engineers are very much part of the ongoing globalization and they are encountering problems of cross-disciplinary nature. Team working skills respecting other peoples’ qualifications are required so therefore interpersonal skills are becoming more and more important, including communications...... to the CDIO (conceive, design, implement and operate) approach in the autumn of 2008. The CDIO pedagogy encouraged to develop an interactive course in interpersonal skills, where the students have to take an active part in the exercises as well as involve themselves in the interactive communication process...

  19. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Safety Conference Registry Login SCR Training and Testing Cancer Cancer Programs Cancer Programs Overview of Cancer Programs Cancer Programs News American Joint Committee on ...

  20. Food and Drug Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jong Hwan; Ko, Chang Mann

    2017-01-01

    Natural foods and vegetal supplements have recently become increasingly popular for their roles in medicine and as staple foods. This has, however, led to the increased risk of interaction between prescribed drugs and the bioactive ingredients contained in these foods. These interactions range from pharmacokinetic interactions (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion influencing blood levels of drugs) to pharmacodynamic interactions (drug effects). In a quantitative respect, these interactions occur mainly during metabolism. In addition to the systemic metabolism that occurs mainly in the liver, recent studies have focused on the metabolism in the gastrointestinal tract endothelium before absorption. Inhibition of metabolism causes an increase in the blood levels of drugs and could have adverse reactions. The food-drug interactions causing increased blood levels of drugs may have beneficial or detrimental therapeutic effects depending on the intensity and predictability of these interactions. It is therefore important to understand the potential interactions between foods and drugs should and the specific outcomes of such interactions.

  1. Yoink: An interaction-based partitioning API.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Min; Waller, Mark P

    2018-01-05

    Herein, we describe the implementation details of our interaction-based partitioning API (application programming interface) called Yoink for QM/MM modeling and fragment-based quantum chemistry studies. Interactions are detected by computing density descriptors such as reduced density gradient, density overlap regions indicator, and single exponential decay detector. Only molecules having an interaction with a user-definable QM core are added to the QM region of a hybrid QM/MM calculation. Moreover, a set of molecule pairs having density-based interactions within a molecular system can be computed in Yoink, and an interaction graph can then be constructed. Standard graph clustering methods can then be applied to construct fragments for further quantum chemical calculations. The Yoink API is licensed under Apache 2.0 and can be accessed via yoink.wallerlab.org. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Program Proposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskas, Richard S.

    2012-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine if a deficiency, or learning gap, existed in a particular working environment. To determine if an assessment was to be conducted, a program proposal would need to be developed to explore this situation. In order for a particular environment to react and grow with other environments, it must be able to take on…

  3. Sprego Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Csernoch

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Spreadsheet management is a border-land between office applications and programming, however, it is rather communicated that spreadsheet is nothing more than an easily handled fun piece. Consequently, the complexity of spreadsheet handling, the unprepared end-users, their problem solving abilities and approaches do not match. To overcome these problems we have developed and introduced Sprego (Spreadsheet Lego. Sprego is a simplified functional programming language in spreadsheet environment, and such as can be used both as introductory language and the language of end-user programmers. The essence of Sprego is that we use as few and simple functions as possible and based on these functions build multilevel formulas. With this approach, similar to high level programming, we are able solve advanced problems, developing algorithmic skills, computational thinking. The advantage of Sprego is the simplicity of the language, when the emphasis is not on the coding but on the problem. Beyond that spreadsheets would provide real life problems with authentic data and tables which students are more interested in than the artificial environment and semi-authentic problems of high level programming languages.

  4. Teachers interact with radio in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlak, P A

    1987-01-01

    The Nepal Radio Education Teacher Training Project (RETT) is an interactive program for upgrading underqualified primary school teachers, 27% of whom lack the 10th grade school leaving certificate. Nepal is so mountainous that reaching rural areas is too expensive to train teachers effectively. This program uses curriculum principles such as systematic planning, distributed learning, cyclical instruction, and radio techniques such as intensive broadcasting, interactive learning, immediate reinforcement and an engaging instructional pace for this adult audience. With the help of USAID, Radio Nepal operates a 100,000 watt shortwave transmitter from a studio in suburban Kathmandu. As of August 1980, 5593 teachers from 72 of 75 districts have enrolled, and 2944 have been certified. The 1st phase of the program taught Nepali, mathematics, social studies, health, physical education and art. The 2nd phase emphasizes the content taught in years 7-10, added English, mathematics, science and Nepali. There are major differences in this interactive program compared to those instituted in Kenya, Nicaragua, the Dominican Republic and Thailand, with young audiences. These adults are teachers, unmonitored, individual listeners, in a home setting, usually studying in the evenings in competition with other radio programming, and learning secondary school subject matter. In contrast, prior programs elsewhere have had captive children in primary school monitored by teachers. Incentives are being provided to keep teachers in the courses, such as discounted radios, job security, pay increments and certification. The use of repetition and rapid feedback inherent in interactive radio programming helps to meet the challenges in voluntary participation.

  5. Implementing a Multidisciplinary Program for Developing Learning,

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mc Goldrick, Niamh B.; Marzec, Bartosz; Scully, P. Noelle; Draper, Sylvia M.

    2013-01-01

    Since 2002, a multidisciplinary program has been used to encourage science students to build on their chemical knowledge and to appreciate how it applies to the world around them. The program is interactive and instills a new set of core learning skills that are often underrepresented in undergraduate curricula, namely, cooperative learning,…

  6. Using Technology to Enhance an Automotive Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Denis

    2009-01-01

    Denis Ashton uses technology in his automotive technology program at East Valley Institute of Technology (EVIT) to positively impact student outcomes. Ashton, the department chair for the automotive programs at EVIT, in Mesa, Arizona, says that using an interactive PowerPoint curriculum makes learning fun for students and provides immediate…

  7. A Conceptual Perspective of Teacher Education Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Robert

    This model for a conceptual structure of teacher education programs is intended to codify and accumulate aspects of knowledge related to teacher education programs, and to identify available studies on the topic as well as to note problems that need further investigation. It seeks to provide an understanding of the dynamics and interactions of…

  8. Interactive Video Games in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trout, Josh; Christie, Brett

    2007-01-01

    As the obesity epidemic in the United States spreads among children and teenagers, due in part to sedentary lifestyles, some physical education programs are using interactive video games to keep students engaged in physical activity. These innovative games make physical activity fun and challenging for both high- and low-skilled students. Although…

  9. 3D immersive and interactive learning

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, Yiyu

    2014-01-01

    This book reviews innovative uses of 3D for immersive and interactive learning, covering gifted programs, normal stream and special needs education. Reports on curriculum-based 3D learning in classrooms, and co-curriculum-based 3D student research projects.

  10. Effects of Intergenerational Interaction on Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Carmen Requena; Gonzalez, Marta Zubiaur

    2008-01-01

    The world population pyramid has changed shape. However, this does not mean that societies have changed their negative concept of old age. Our study proposes an intergenerational service-learning program with 179 university students and 101 slightly depressed elderly people. The results show that the elderly people who interacted improved in…

  11. BUY CLEAN MANUAL INTERACTIVE CD-ROM

    Science.gov (United States)

    This interactive CD-ROM contains exercises and opportunities to help users develop a Buy Clean Program for janitorial cleaning products. CD users can learn about Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS), complete an inventory list, and compare cleaning products to see which have the le...

  12. Algorithm validation and hardware design interactive approach

    OpenAIRE

    Lazarescu, Mihai Teodor; M. Sartori

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we will describe a modality to speed up the design of the VLSI digital (mainly DSP) circuits and to reduce the design errors by increasing the interaction between the ad-hoc software program developed to validate the algorithm and the VHDL description and simulation. A real case of a digital power analyzer will be used for exemplification

  13. Mutual Group Hypnosis: A Social Interaction Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Shirley

    Mutual Group Hypnosis is discussed in terms of its similarity to group dynamics in general and in terms of its similarity to a social interaction program (Role Modeling) designed to foster the expression of warmth and acceptance among group members. Hypnosis also fosters a regression to prelogical thought processes in the service of the ego. Group…

  14. Sea Turtle Interaction Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Sea Turtle Interaction Report is a report sent out in pdf format to authorized individuals that summarizes sea turtle interactions in the longline fishery. The...

  15. Health Data Interactive (HDI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Health Data Interactive (HDI) presents a broad range of important public health indicators through an interactive web-based application that provides access to...

  16. Fundamental symmetries and interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jungmann, KP

    2005-01-01

    In nuclear physics numerous possibilities exist to investigate fundamental symmetries and interactions. In particular, the precise measurements of properties of fundamental fermions, searches for new interactions in beta-decays, and violations of discrete symmeties offer possibilities to search for

  17. Interactive chalk murals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Muzzillo, Sarah; Santos, John

    2013-01-01

      Muzzillo and Santos discuss interactive chalk murals. Last summer, Apex High School art teacher Ian Sands was scrolling through his Twitter feed when he saw a tweet describing an interactive art park...

  18. Interacting agents in finance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hommes, C.; Durlauf, S.N.; Blume, L.E.

    2008-01-01

    Interacting agents in finance represent a behavioural, agent-based approach in which financial markets are viewed as complex adaptive systems consisting of many boundedly rational agents interacting through simple heterogeneous investment strategies, constantly adapting their behaviour in response

  19. Constraint Programming versus Mathematical Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper

    2003-01-01

    Constraint Logic Programming (CLP) is a relatively new technique from the 80's with origins in Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence. Lately, much research have been focused on ways of using CLP within the paradigm of Operations Research (OR) and vice versa. The purpose of this paper...

  20. Food and Drug Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Jong Hwan; Ko, Chang Mann

    2017-01-01

    Natural foods and vegetal supplements have recently become increasingly popular for their roles in medicine and as staple foods. This has, however, led to the increased risk of interaction between prescribed drugs and the bioactive ingredients contained in these foods. These interactions range from pharmacokinetic interactions (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion influencing blood levels of drugs) to pharmacodynamic interactions (drug effects). In a quantitative respect, these...

  1. Interaction Nets in Russian

    OpenAIRE

    Salikhmetov, Anton

    2013-01-01

    Draft translation to Russian of Chapter 7, Interaction-Based Models of Computation, from Models of Computation: An Introduction to Computability Theory by Maribel Fernandez. "In this chapter, we study interaction nets, a model of computation that can be seen as a representative of a class of models based on the notion of 'computation as interaction'. Interaction nets are a graphical model of computation devised by Yves Lafont in 1990 as a generalisation of the proof structures of linear logic...

  2. Linear programming

    CERN Document Server

    Karloff, Howard

    1991-01-01

    To this reviewer’s knowledge, this is the first book accessible to the upper division undergraduate or beginning graduate student that surveys linear programming from the Simplex Method…via the Ellipsoid algorithm to Karmarkar’s algorithm. Moreover, its point of view is algorithmic and thus it provides both a history and a case history of work in complexity theory. The presentation is admirable; Karloff's style is informal (even humorous at times) without sacrificing anything necessary for understanding. Diagrams (including horizontal brackets that group terms) aid in providing clarity. The end-of-chapter notes are helpful...Recommended highly for acquisition, since it is not only a textbook, but can also be used for independent reading and study. —Choice Reviews The reader will be well served by reading the monograph from cover to cover. The author succeeds in providing a concise, readable, understandable introduction to modern linear programming. —Mathematics of Computing This is a textbook intend...

  3. Device-less interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monaci, G.; Triki, M.; Sarroukh, B.E.

    2009-01-01

    This document describes the results of a technology survey for device-less interaction. The Device-less Interaction project (2007-307) aims at providing interaction options for future home appliances without resorting to a remote control or any other dedicated control device. The target home

  4. Interactivity: A Forgotten Art?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Rod

    1997-01-01

    This paper promotes further discussion and analysis of interactivity in learning environments and contains a classification of interaction types appropriate for consideration in multimedia settings. Through an examination of related factors associated with navigation and control, a matrix of interactive dimensions is proposed. (Author)

  5. Gaze Interactive Building Instructions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, John Paulin; Ahmed, Zaheer; Mardanbeigi, Diako

    We combine eye tracking technology and mobile tablets to support hands-free interaction with digital building instructions. As a proof-of-concept we have developed a small interactive 3D environment where one can interact with digital blocks by gaze, keystroke and head gestures. Blocks may be moved...

  6. Global Interaction in Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Audrey Grace

    2010-01-01

    Based on a virtual conference, Glide'08 (Global Interaction in Design Education), that brought international design scholars together online, this special issue expands on the topics of cross-cultural communication and design and the technological affordances that support such interaction. The author discusses the need for global interaction in…

  7. ECCE Toolkit: Prototyping Sensor-Based Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellucci, Andrea; Aedo, Ignacio; Díaz, Paloma

    2017-01-01

    Building and exploring physical user interfaces requires high technical skills and hours of specialized work. The behavior of multiple devices with heterogeneous input/output channels and connectivity has to be programmed in a context where not only the software interface matters, but also the hardware components are critical (e.g., sensors and actuators). Prototyping physical interaction is hindered by the challenges of: (1) programming interactions among physical sensors/actuators and digital interfaces; (2) implementing functionality for different platforms in different programming languages; and (3) building custom electronic-incorporated objects. We present ECCE (Entities, Components, Couplings and Ecosystems), a toolkit for non-programmers that copes with these issues by abstracting from low-level implementations, thus lowering the complexity of prototyping small-scale, sensor-based physical interfaces to support the design process. A user evaluation provides insights and use cases of the kind of applications that can be developed with the toolkit. PMID:28241502

  8. ECCE Toolkit: Prototyping Sensor-Based Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Bellucci

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Building and exploring physical user interfaces requires high technical skills and hours of specialized work. The behavior of multiple devices with heterogeneous input/output channels and connectivity has to be programmed in a context where not only the software interface matters, but also the hardware components are critical (e.g., sensors and actuators. Prototyping physical interaction is hindered by the challenges of: (1 programming interactions among physical sensors/actuators and digital interfaces; (2 implementing functionality for different platforms in different programming languages; and (3 building custom electronic-incorporated objects. We present ECCE (Entities, Components, Couplings and Ecosystems, a toolkit for non-programmers that copes with these issues by abstracting from low-level implementations, thus lowering the complexity of prototyping small-scale, sensor-based physical interfaces to support the design process. A user evaluation provides insights and use cases of the kind of applications that can be developed with the toolkit.

  9. ECCE Toolkit: Prototyping Sensor-Based Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellucci, Andrea; Aedo, Ignacio; Díaz, Paloma

    2017-02-23

    Building and exploring physical user interfaces requires high technical skills and hours of specialized work. The behavior of multiple devices with heterogeneous input/output channels and connectivity has to be programmed in a context where not only the software interface matters, but also the hardware components are critical (e.g., sensors and actuators). Prototyping physical interaction is hindered by the challenges of: (1) programming interactions among physical sensors/actuators and digital interfaces; (2) implementing functionality for different platforms in different programming languages; and (3) building custom electronic-incorporated objects. We present ECCE (Entities, Components, Couplings and Ecosystems), a toolkit for non-programmers that copes with these issues by abstracting from low-level implementations, thus lowering the complexity of prototyping small-scale, sensor-based physical interfaces to support the design process. A user evaluation provides insights and use cases of the kind of applications that can be developed with the toolkit.

  10. Programming languages for synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh, P; Naveen, F; Rao, Chanchala Uma Maheswara; Nair, Achuthsankar S

    2010-12-01

    In the backdrop of accelerated efforts for creating synthetic organisms, the nature and scope of an ideal programming language for scripting synthetic organism in-silico has been receiving increasing attention. A few programming languages for synthetic biology capable of defining, constructing, networking, editing and delivering genome scale models of cellular processes have been recently attempted. All these represent important points in a spectrum of possibilities. This paper introduces Kera, a state of the art programming language for synthetic biology which is arguably ahead of similar languages or tools such as GEC, Antimony and GenoCAD. Kera is a full-fledged object oriented programming language which is tempered by biopart rule library named Samhita which captures the knowledge regarding the interaction of genome components and catalytic molecules. Prominent feature of the language are demonstrated through a toy example and the road map for the future development of Kera is also presented.

  11. Preparing participants for intergenerational interaction training for success

    CERN Document Server

    Hawkins, Melissa; Mcguire, Francis A

    2013-01-01

    Preparing Participants for Intergenerational Interaction: Training for Success examines established intergenerational programs and provides the training methods necessary for activity directors or practitioners to start a similar program. This book contains exercises that will help you train colleagues and volunteers for these specific programs and includes criteria for activity evaluations. Preparing Participants for Intergenerational Interaction will help you implement programs that enable older adults to build friendships, pass down their skills and knowledge to adolescents, and provide youths with positive role models. Discussing the factors that often limit the interaction of older adults with youths, this text stresses the importance of conveying information and history to younger generations. You will learn why the exchange between different generations is crucial to society and to the improvement of the community in which you live. Preparing Participants for Intergenerational Interaction provides you ...

  12. Montevidisco: An Anecdotal History of an Interactive Videodisc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Larrie E.

    1983-01-01

    The development of an interactive videodisc-microcomputer simulation of a visit to a Mexican village for college-level Spanish instruction is described. Problems encountered, production considerations, computer program development, hardware, and classroom results are discussed. (MSE)

  13. SHARING SCIENCE: CHARACTERISTICS OF EFFECTIVE SCIENTIST-TEACHER INTERACTIONS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nancy J. Pelaez; Barbara L. Gonzalez

    2002-01-01

    .... Conducted under the auspices of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, a symposium examined several programs where professional scientists interact with classroom teachers to improve science education...

  14. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Inspiring Quality Initiative Resources Continuous Quality Improvement ACS Clinical Scholars in Residence AHRQ Safety Program for ISCR ... Advocacy Efforts Cancer Liaison Program Cancer Programs Conference Clinical Research Program Commission on Cancer National Accreditation Program ...

  15. Part 2 -- current program integrating strategies and lubrication technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, B.

    1996-12-01

    This paper is the second of two that describe the Predictive Maintenance Program for rotating machinery at the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station. The Predictive Maintenance program has been enhanced through organizational changes and improved interdisciplinary usage of technology. This paper will discuss current program strategies that have improved the interaction between the Vibration and Lube Oil programs. The {open_quotes}Lube Oil{close_quotes} view of the combined program along with case studies will then be presented.

  16. Food-Drug Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Arshad Yar Khan; Nousheen Aslam; Rabia Bushra

    2011-01-01

    The effect of drug on a person may be different than expected because that drug interacts with another drug the person is taking (drug-drug interaction), food, beverages, dietary supplements the person is consuming (drug-nutrient/food interaction) or another disease the person has (drug-disease interaction). A drug interaction is a situation in which a substance affects the activity of a drug, i.e. the effects are increased or decreased, or they produce a new effect that neither produces on i...

  17. On the Consequences of Television-Related Parent-Child Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messaris, Paul; Sarett, Carla

    1981-01-01

    Discusses parent-child interactions in which the content of television programing appears as explicit subject matter. Examines ways in which a child's development may be affected by these parent-child interactions. (JMF)

  18. Automata-based Optimization of Interaction Protocols for Scalable Multicore Platforms (Technical Report)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.-S.T.Q. Jongmans (Sung-Shik); S. Halle; F. Arbab (Farhad)

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractMulticore platforms offer the opportunity for utilizing massively parallel resources. However, programming them is challenging. We need good compilers that optimize commonly occurring synchronization/interaction patterns. To facilitate optimization, a programming language must convey

  19. Programming Pig

    CERN Document Server

    Gates, Alan

    2011-01-01

    This guide is an ideal learning tool and reference for Apache Pig, the open source engine for executing parallel data flows on Hadoop. With Pig, you can batch-process data without having to create a full-fledged application-making it easy for you to experiment with new datasets. Programming Pig introduces new users to Pig, and provides experienced users with comprehensive coverage on key features such as the Pig Latin scripting language, the Grunt shell, and User Defined Functions (UDFs) for extending Pig. If you need to analyze terabytes of data, this book shows you how to do it efficiently

  20. Programming Razor

    CERN Document Server

    Chadwick, Jess

    2011-01-01

    Take Razor for a test drive and discover first hand how this scripting syntax simplifies the way you create dynamic, data-driven websites. With this concise guide, you'll work with Razor syntax by building example websites with Microsoft WebMatrix and ASP.NET MVC. You'll quickly learn how Razor lets you combine code and content in a fluid and expressive manner on Windows-based servers. Programming Razor also explores components of the Razor API, and shows you how Razor templates are turned into rendered HTML. By the end of this book, you'll be able to create Razor-based websites with custom

  1. The Interactive Learning Toolkit: supporting interactive classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, S.; McCauley, V.; Mazur, E.

    2004-05-01

    Research-based interactive learning techniques have dramatically improved student understanding. We have created the 'Interactive Learning Toolkit' (ILT), a web-based learning management system, to help implement two such pedagogies: Just in Time Teaching and Peer Instruction. Our main goal in developing this toolkit is to save the instructor time and effort and to use technology to facilitate the interaction between the students and the instructor (and between students themselves). After a brief review of both pedagogies, we will demonstrate the many exciting new features of the ILT. We will show how technology can not only implement, but also supplement and improve these pedagogies. We would like acknowdge grants from NSF and DEAS, Harvard University

  2. Interactive design for new media and the web

    CERN Document Server

    Iuppa, Nick

    2001-01-01

    In an age where digital technology makes just about anything possible, Interactive Design for New Media and the Web demonstrates how to realize that promise through the creation of outstanding interactive programs. This hands-on, practical book examines the ever-expanding capabilities of all forms of digital presentation for increasing interactivity, and the design principles and interface guidelines needed to deliver the required message or story with this technology.Interactive Design for New Media and the Web covers the technology as well as the tools and practices of interactive design, in

  3. Plasma Simulation Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwald, Martin

    2011-10-04

    Many others in the fusion energy and advanced scientific computing communities participated in the development of this plan. The core planning team is grateful for their important contributions. This summary is meant as a quick overview the Fusion Simulation Program's (FSP's) purpose and intentions. There are several additional documents referenced within this one and all are supplemental or flow down from this Program Plan. The overall science goal of the DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) Fusion Simulation Program (FSP) is to develop predictive simulation capability for magnetically confined fusion plasmas at an unprecedented level of integration and fidelity. This will directly support and enable effective U.S. participation in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) research and the overall mission of delivering practical fusion energy. The FSP will address a rich set of scientific issues together with experimental programs, producing validated integrated physics results. This is very well aligned with the mission of the ITER Organization to coordinate with its members the integrated modeling and control of fusion plasmas, including benchmarking and validation activities. [1]. Initial FSP research will focus on two critical Integrated Science Application (ISA) areas: ISA1, the plasma edge; and ISA2, whole device modeling (WDM) including disruption avoidance. The first of these problems involves the narrow plasma boundary layer and its complex interactions with the plasma core and the surrounding material wall. The second requires development of a computationally tractable, but comprehensive model that describes all equilibrium and dynamic processes at a sufficient level of detail to provide useful prediction of the temporal evolution of fusion plasma experiments. The initial driver for the whole device model will be prediction and avoidance of discharge-terminating disruptions, especially at high performance, which are a

  4. An educational tool for interactive parallel and distributed processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagliarini, Luigi; Lund, Henrik Hautop

    2012-01-01

    In this article we try to describe how the modular interactive tiles system (MITS) can be a valuable tool for introducing students to interactive parallel and distributed processing programming. This is done by providing a handson educational tool that allows a change in the representation...... of abstract problems related to designing interactive parallel and distributed systems. Indeed, the MITS seems to bring a series of goals into education, such as parallel programming, distributedness, communication protocols, master dependency, software behavioral models, adaptive interactivity, feedback...... interactive parallel and distributed processing with different behavioral software models such as open loop, randomness-based, rule-based, user interaction-based, and AI- and ALife-based software....

  5. Geothermal Technologies Program Overview - Peer Review Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milliken, JoAnn [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States)

    2011-06-06

    This Geothermal Technologies Program presentation was delivered on June 6, 2011 at a Program Peer Review meeting. It contains annual budget, Recovery Act, funding opportunities, upcoming program activities, and more.

  6. Matching Alcoholics to Coping Skills or Interactional Therapies: Posttreatment Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadden, Ronald M.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Randomly assigned 96 persons from inpatient alcoholism treatment program to aftercare group treatment consisting of either coping skills training or interactional therapy. Found that coping skills training was more effective for subjects higher in sociopathy or psychopathology; interactional therapy was more effective for subjects lower in…

  7. Food-drug interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lars E; Dalhoff, Kim

    2002-01-01

    Interactions between food and drugs may inadvertently reduce or increase the drug effect. The majority of clinically relevant food-drug interactions are caused by food-induced changes in the bioavailability of the drug. Since the bioavailability and clinical effect of most drugs are correlated......, the bioavailability is an important pharmacokinetic effect parameter. However, in order to evaluate the clinical relevance of a food-drug interaction, the impact of food intake on the clinical effect of the drug has to be quantified as well. As a result of quality review in healthcare systems, healthcare providers...... are increasingly required to develop methods for identifying and preventing adverse food-drug interactions. In this review of original literature, we have tried to provide both pharmacokinetic and clinical effect parameters of clinically relevant food-drug interactions. The most important interactions are those...

  8. Grasp interaction with tablets

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    This book presents guidelines for a future device type: a tablet that allows ergonomic front- and back-of-device interaction. These guidelines help designers and developers of user interfaces to build ergonomic applications for tablet devices, in particular for devices that enable back-of-device interaction. In addition, manufacturers of tablet devices obtain arguments that back-of-device interaction is a promising extension of the interaction design space and results in increased input capabilities, enriched design possibilities, and proven usability. The guidelines are derived from empirical studies and developed to fit the users’ skills to the way the novel device type is held. Three particular research areas that are relevant to develop design guidelines for tablet interaction are investigated: ergonomic gestures, interaction areas, and pointing techniques.

  9. Cation-alkane interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premkumar, J Richard; Sastry, G Narahari

    2014-12-04

    Ab initio computations, up to CCSD(T)/CBS on model systems, and MP2/cc-pVTZ and DFT calculations are performed on cation-alkane and cation-alkene complexes, cation = Li(+), Na(+), Be(2+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Cu(+) and Zn(2+); alkane = C(n)H2(n+2) (n = 1-10) and C6H12; and alkene = C2H4 and C6H6. Density functional theory-symmetry adapted perturbation theory (DFT-SAPT) calculations reveal that the cation-alkane interactions are predominantly constituted of induction component. The dramatic modulation of the strength of their interaction and the topological features obtained from atoms in molecules (AIM) analysis are consistent with the characteristics of a typical noncovalent interaction. In contrast to many of the conventional noncovalent interactions, cation-alkane interactions are substantially strong and are comparable in strength to the well studied cation-π interactions.

  10. How Interactive Is the Interactive Whiteboard?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quashie, Valerie

    2009-01-01

    An interactive whiteboard (IWB) is simply a surface onto which a computer screen can be displayed, via a projector. It is touch-sensitive and lets one use a pen like a mouse, controlling the computer from the board itself. Everything that can be displayed on a computer can be displayed onto the whiteboard and, if the computer is linked to speakers…

  11. The change tool for changing programs and scripts. Version 2.03 of April 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grcar, J.F.

    1993-05-01

    Change is a computer program that interactively changes other programs. It allows one source text to move among many computers without proliferating versions for different compilers, precisions and the like. Change also modifies makefiles, shell scripts and programs embedded in makefiles and shell scripts. This is a guide to the program`s use and a description of its operation.

  12. Choices: An Interactive Decision Spport Program for Breast Cancer Treatment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pierce, Penny Fay

    2000-01-01

    When patients choose a treatment plan in a manner consistent with their values, preferences, and individual decision making style, they generally have better outcomes in part, because involvement also...

  13. Choices: An Interactive Decision Support Program for Breast Cancer Treatment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pierce, Penny Fay

    1998-01-01

    This project is developing a computer-assisted prototype of an individualized decision support system, called Choices, to assist women newly diagnosed with breast cancer in making stressful treatment...

  14. Academy of Program/Project & Engineering Leadership: Interactive Case Studies

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Case studies illustrate the kinds of decisions and dilemmas managers face every day, and as such provide an effective learning tool for project management. Due to...

  15. Small Groups in Programmed Environments: Behavioral and Biological Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-04-01

    York: Wiley, 1956, 218. Eberhart, J.A., Keverne, E.B., and Meller , R.E. Social influences on plasma testosterone levels in male talopoin monkeys...Kansas Dr. Douglas McCann Ohio State University 404C West 17th Avenue Columbus, Ohio 43210 Ms. Sandra Mumford Navy Department (NMPC-623) Washington

  16. ENTREPRENEURSHIP AS SOCIAL INTERACTION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Henry; Lima, Patricia; Olsen, Bente

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to explore how entrepreneurs work with innovation; to explore and develop attention points in understanding entrepreneurship as social processes of interaction between people. Through interviews and engagement with entrepreneurs and key stakeholders, their actual social practices...... entrepreneurship as socially constructed through local interactions between players and identify key themes in these interactions within the organisation, such as leadership, becoming part of the initiative and trust/mistrust. By doing so, this paper contributes to an understanding of entrepreneurship as social...

  17. Quantum interaction. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruza, Peter [Queensland Univ. of Technology, Brisbane (Australia). Faculty of Science and Technology; Sofge, Donald [Navy Center for Applied Research in Artificial Intelligence, Washington, DC (United States). Naval Research Lab.; Lawless, William [Paine Coll., Augusta, GA (United States); Rijsbergen, Keith van [Glasgow Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Computing Science; Klusch, Matthias (eds.) [German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence, Saarbruecken (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Quantum Interaction, QI 2009, held in Saarbruecken, Germany, in March 2009. The 21 revised full papers presented together with the 3 position papers were carefully reviewed and selected from numerous submissions. The papers show the cross-disciplinary nature of quantum interaction covering topics such as computation, cognition, decision theory, information retrieval, information systems, social interaction, computational linguistics and finance. (orig.)

  18. Interactive Strategy-Making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Torben Juul

    2015-01-01

    to failed communication and execution of the planned actions. However, effective strategy-making comprises both central reasoning from forward-looking planning considerations and decentralised responses to emerging events as interacting elements in a dynamic adaptive system. The interaction between......This article outlines an interactive strategy-making model that combines central reasoning with ongoing learning from decentralised responses. The management literature often presents strategy as implementing an optimal plan identified through rational analysis and ascribes potential shortcomings...

  19. Food-drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushra, Rabia; Aslam, Nousheen; Khan, Arshad Yar

    2011-03-01

    The effect of drug on a person may be different than expected because that drug interacts with another drug the person is taking (drug-drug interaction), food, beverages, dietary supplements the person is consuming (drug-nutrient/food interaction) or another disease the person has (drug-disease interaction). A drug interaction is a situation in which a substance affects the activity of a drug, i.e. the effects are increased or decreased, or they produce a new effect that neither produces on its own. These interactions may occur out of accidental misuse or due to lack of knowledge about the active ingredients involved in the relevant substances. Regarding food-drug interactions physicians and pharmacists recognize that some foods and drugs, when taken simultaneously, can alter the body's ability to utilize a particular food or drug, or cause serious side effects. Clinically significant drug interactions, which pose potential harm to the patient, may result from changes in pharmaceutical, pharmacokinetic, or pharmacodynamic properties. Some may be taken advantage of, to the benefit of patients, but more commonly drug interactions result in adverse drug events. Therefore it is advisable for patients to follow the physician and doctors instructions to obtain maximum benefits with least food-drug interactions. The literature survey was conducted by extracting data from different review and original articles on general or specific drug interactions with food. This review gives information about various interactions between different foods and drugs and will help physicians and pharmacists prescribe drugs cautiously with only suitable food supplement to get maximum benefit for the patient.

  20. Food-Drug Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshad Yar Khan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of drug on a person may be different than expected because that drug interacts with another drug the person is taking (drug-drug interaction, food, beverages, dietary supplements the person is consuming (drug-nutrient/food interaction or another disease the person has (drug-disease interaction. A drug interaction is a situation in which a substance affects the activity of a drug, i.e. the effects are increased or decreased, or they produce a new effect that neither produces on its own. These interactions may occur out of accidental misuse or due to lack of knowledge about the active ingredients involved in the relevant substances. Regarding food-drug interactions physicians and pharmacists recognize that some foods and drugs, when taken simultaneously, can alter the body's ability to utilize a particular food or drug, or cause serious side effects. Clinically significant drug interactions, which pose potential harm to the patient, may result from changes in pharmaceutical, pharmacokinetic, or pharmacodynamic properties. Some may be taken advantage of, to the benefit of patients, but more commonly drug interactions result in adverse drug events. Therefore it is advisable for patients to follow the physician and doctors instructions to obtain maximum benefits with least fooddrug interactions. The literature survey was conducted by extracting data from different review and original articles on general or specific drug interactions with food. This review gives information about various interactions between different foods and drugs and will help physicians and pharmacists prescribe drugs cautiously with only suitable food supplement to get maximum benefit for the patient.