WorldWideScience

Sample records for program intellectual property

  1. 75 FR 54086 - Global Intellectual Property Academy Program Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-03

    ... . Include ``0651- 00xx Global Intellectual Property Academy Program Survey comment'' in the subject line of..., Program Manager, Global Intellectual Property Academy, United States Patent and Trademark Office, P.O. Box... Global Intellectual Property Academy (GIPA) technical assistance programs. The survey data will be...

  2. Intellectual Property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinson, John V.

    2000-01-01

    Intellectual property is a term that covers a number of different rights. Considers issues such as what are the basic forms of intellectual property; who owns the intellectual property created by a teacher; who owns intellectual property created by students; and use of downloaded materials from the internet. (Author/LM)

  3. Intellectual property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, W M

    2000-01-01

    "Intellectual property" (IP) is a generic legal term for patents, copyrights, and trademarks, all of which provide legal rights to protect ideas, the expression of ideas, and the inventors of such ideas (1). Intellectual property has many of the characteristics of real property (houses, buildings, and so forth); intellectual property can be bought, sold, assigned, and licensed. Additionally, the owner of IP can prevent "trespass" on his property by others, though in IP this is referred to as infringement. A patent provides legal protection for a new invention, that is, an application of a new idea, discovery, or concept that is useful. Copyright provides legal protection from copying for any creative work (e.g., works of art, literature [fiction ornonfiction], music, lyrics, photographs), as well as business and scientific publications, computer software, and compilations of information. A trademark provides rights to use symbols, particular words, logos, or other markings that indicate the source of a product or service. A further method of benefitting from an invention is simply to keep it secret, rather than to disclose it; the most famous trade secret of all time is the formula for Coca-Cola, still a closely guarded secret to this day (2,3). Trade secrets have the advantage that they never expire, but special measures are required to ensure the continued secrecy, and should it be violated, there is little legal protection for the owner (2,3).

  4. Intellectual property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MSc. Shpresa Ibrahimi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Montenue, a distinct French scholar of intellectual property, has suggested that IP is a “tool which surprisingly helps a lot”, and this definition on science, arts, culture, since the 16th century. Now, what would be the definition of intellectual property for the 21st century? Apparently not a “strange” tool, but a necessary tool, primary for enriching human knowledge, and for the new world order, especially in the global market sphere. Intellectual property is an integral part of international trade, and its importance keeps increasing, since effective use of knowledge is increasingly influencing the economic prosperity of peoples. One may say that there is little originality in the creative sphere. Naturally, this originality can only be reflected by individuality and human identity in intellectual creativity The author rights in the Kosovo legislation is a novelty, a necessity of developing a creative environment in the fields of science, arts and industrial property. First and foremost, the individual benefit, which is secured by the author as the creator of the work, is a moral and material right. Secondly, there is a need for harmonization, not only of values for the creator, but also for the development of science, culture, increased competitive advantage, and the public sphere, as a benefit for the public health and security, and the fiscal policy. The deficiency one must record is with the Office for Copy Rights, which is to play a strong role in implementing and protecting copy rights and other related rights by licensing collective management agencies, imposing administrative fines, awareness raising, provision of information, and other capacity building and educative measures. Naturally, the enactment of good legislation is a system without any meaning or sense if not associated with the court practice. Any establishment of a legal system not pursued with enforcement mechanisms remains only in legal frameworks.

  5. Intellectual Property Law and the Protection of Computer Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomio, J. Paul

    1990-01-01

    Briefly reviews the laws pertaining to copyrights, patents, and trade secrets, and discusses how each of these may be applied to the protection of computer programs. The comparative merits and limitations of each category of law are discussed and recent court decisions are summarized. (CLB)

  6. Intellectual Property Rights Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkærsig, Lars; Beukel, Karin; Reichstein, Toke

    Intellectual Property Rights Management explores how the entire toolbox of intellectual property (IP) protection and management are successfully combined and how firms generate value from IP. In particular, this book provides a framework of archetypes which firms will be able to self...

  7. Intellectual property and information controversy(I)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Hirokazu

    This paper deals with intellectual property as the results of various intellectual activities such as R & D, and intellectual proprietary rights which protect it. New technology, designs, literary works, computer programs, semiconductor chips, new plant breeding, brands, trading secrets, CI and others, and legislations which protect them are described. Then, the background of the fact that intellectual proprietary rights are emphasized as analyzed. The author points out items as follows; movement toward much larger size of R & D, generation of the areas to be newly protected, trend in enforcement of intellectual property protection, commercialization of intellectual property, trend in software evolution, movement in technological protectionism, and the present status on each item.

  8. Intellectual Property Rights Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkærsig, Lars; Beukel, Karin; Reichstein, Toke

    Intellectual Property Rights Management explores how the entire toolbox of intellectual property (IP) protection and management are successfully combined and how firms generate value from IP. In particular, this book provides a framework of archetypes which firms will be able to self-identify wit......Intellectual Property Rights Management explores how the entire toolbox of intellectual property (IP) protection and management are successfully combined and how firms generate value from IP. In particular, this book provides a framework of archetypes which firms will be able to self......-identify with and which will allow companies to focus on the IP and IP Management issues most relevant to them. By doing so, the authors offer further insights as to the use of IP and IP management practices across firms. By looking at empirical data covering the population of firms, the findings not only pertain...

  9. Intellectual Property Rights Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkærsig, Lars; Beukel, Karin; Reichstein, Toke

    Intellectual Property Rights Management explores how the entire toolbox of intellectual property (IP) protection and management are successfully combined and how firms generate value from IP. In particular, this book provides a framework of archetypes which firms will be able to self...... to large organization but also reflect the practices and operations that reside in SMEs. This volume also utilizes labor market and firm data to determine whether there is a definitive relationship between IP and economic performance on the firm level....

  10. Intellectual property rights vs. public access rights: ethical aspects of the DeCSS decryptation program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Vaagan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In 1999-2000, a Norwegian youth cracked a DVD-access code and published a decryptation program on the Internet. He was sued by the US DVD Copy Control Association (DVD-CCA and the Norwegian Motion Picture Association (MAP, allies of the US Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA, arrested by Norwegian police and charged with data crime. Two Norwegian court rulings in 2003 unanimously ruled that the program did not amount to a breach of Norwegian law, and he was fully acquitted. In the US, there have been related cases, some with other outcomes. Method. Based on a theoretical framework developed by Zwass, the paper discusses these court rulings and the wider issues of intellectual property rights versus public access rights. Analysis. The DVD-Jon case illustrates that intellectual property rights can conflict with public access rights, as the struggle between proprietary software and public domain software, as well as the SPARC and Open Archives Initiative reflect. Results. An assessment of the DVD-Jon case based on the Zwass framework does not give a clear information ethics answer. The analysis depends on whether one ascribes to consequentialist (e.g., utilitarian or de-ontological reflection, and also on which side of the digital gap is to be accorded most weight. Conclusion. While copyright interests are being legally strengthened, there may be ethically- grounded access rights that outweigh property rights.

  11. 75 FR 68325 - Government Programs to Assist Businesses Protect Their Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-05

    ... prioritize any countries identified. 4. Which specific types of intellectual property (copyrights, trademarks... pool resources to combat infringement abroad. It is difficult to overstate the value of intellectual... Trademark Office (USPTO) and the International Trade Administration (ITA), work alongside the IPEC and the...

  12. Commercializing Intellectual Property in Universities

    OpenAIRE

    Charbonneau, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    This presentation analyzes the Commercializing of intellectual Property in Universities. Patents and the quest for science imposes certain constraints based on how research projects are financed and the ownership of the results. Then, Copyright issues are explored, primarly open access, fair dealings as well as the Theses Canada program.

  13. Intellectual Property Rights Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkærsig, Lars; Beukel, Karin; Reichstein, Toke

    Intellectual Property Rights Management explores how the entire toolbox of intellectual property (IP) protection and management are successfully combined and how firms generate value from IP. In particular, this book provides a framework of archetypes which firms will be able to self......-identify with and which will allow companies to focus on the IP and IP Management issues most relevant to them. By doing so, the authors offer further insights as to the use of IP and IP management practices across firms. By looking at empirical data covering the population of firms, the findings not only pertain...

  14. Intellectual property rights management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkærsig, Lars; Beukel, Karin; Reichstein, Toke

    Intellectual Property Rights Management explores how the entire toolbox of intellectual property (IP) protection and management are successfully combined and how firms generate value from IP. In particular, this book provides a framework of archetypes which firms will be able to self-identify wit...... to large organization but also reflect the practices and operations that reside in SMEs. This volume also utilizes labor market and firm data to determine whether there is a definitive relationship between IP and economic performance on the firm level....

  15. Intellectual Property in Ethnomathematics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanchez, Aldo Ivan Parra

    2015-01-01

    Beginning from the reflections about a methodology used in a research project with an indigenous Colombian community, this paper outlines some possibilities for ethnomathematical research. Issues like intellectual property and social relevance are discussed in order to propose a broader concept...

  16. Statement on Intellectual Property

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of University Professors, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The management of university-generated intellectual property is complex and carries significant consequences for those involved in direct negotiations (faculty inventors, companies, university administrators, attorneys, and invention-management agents) as well as those who may be affected (competing companies, the public, patients, and the wider…

  17. Intellectual Property in Ethnomathematics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanchez, Aldo Ivan Parra

    2015-01-01

    Beginning from the reflections about a methodology used in a research project with an indigenous Colombian community, this paper outlines some possibilities for ethnomathematical research. Issues like intellectual property and social relevance are discussed in order to propose a broader concept o...

  18. Protecting Intellectual Property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasaway, Laura N.; Rush, James E.

    1993-01-01

    Two articles consider different aspects of the issue of protecting intellectual property rights. The first discusses the effects of a recent court ruling on information centers in the for-profit sector, focusing on fair use under the Copyright Act of 1976; and the second examines moral and economic issues in electronic information dissemination.…

  19. An intellectual property primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penner, Mark D

    2008-06-01

    While many may think of it as an "invention" of the modern age, intellectual property ("IP") has existed since at least as early as the 17th Century with the advent of the Statute of Monopolies in the U.K. Intellectual property has evolved significantly since then into an important aspect of modern day society touching all of our lives in some form or another Canadian health care in the 21st Century is no exception. This article attempts to provide health care professionals who may not be familiar with this subject matter with a general overview of what is "intellectual property". Many readers may be aware ofintellectual property on some level but may not understand how the various types of IP function and interrelate, as well as the possible impact on the nature and scope of health care services. The purpose of this article is to attempt to provide the reader with the tools, definition and 'jargon" to understand IP so that they can appreciate the issues discussed in greater detail in the remaining papers of this special edition.

  20. Intellectual Property Rights Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkærsig, Lars; Beukel, Karin; Reichstein, Toke

    Intellectual Property Rights Management explores how the entire toolbox of intellectual property (IP) protection and management are successfully combined and how firms generate value from IP. In particular, this book provides a framework of archetypes which firms will be able to self......-identify with and which will allow companies to focus on the IP and IP Management issues most relevant to them. By doing so, the authors offer further insights as to the use of IP and IP management practices across firms. By looking at empirical data covering the population of firms, the findings not only pertain...... to large organization but also reflect the practices and operations that reside in SMEs. This volume also utilizes labor market and firm data to determine whether there is a definitive relationship between IP and economic performance on the firm level....

  1. [Robots and intellectual property].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrieu, Jacques

    2013-12-01

    This topic is part of the global issue concerning the necessity to adapt intellectual property law to constant changes in technology. The relationship between robots and IP is dual. On one hand, the robots may be regarded as objects of intellectual property. A robot, like any new machine, could qualify for a protection by a patent. A copyright may protect its appearance if it is original. Its memory, like a database, could be covered by a sui generis right. On the other hand, the question of the protection of the outputs of the robot must be raised. The robots, as the physical embodiment of artificial intelligence, are becoming more and more autonomous. Robot-generated works include less and less human inputs. Are these objects created or invented by a robot copyrightable or patentable? To whom the ownership of these IP rights will be allocated? To the person who manufactured the machine ? To the user of the robot? To the robot itself? All these questions are worth discussing.

  2. Intellectual Property and Innovation

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Francis Gurry has led WIPO as Director General since 1st October, 2008. He was reappointed in May 2014 for a second six-year term, which runs until September 2020. Under his leadership, WIPO is addressing major challenges. These include managing the stress on the international patent and copyright systems produced by rapid technological change, by globalisation and increased demand; reducing the knowledge gap between developed and developing countries; and ensuring that the intellectual property (IP) system serves its fundamental purpose of encouraging creativity and innovation in all countries. Every year, WIPO publishes the Global Innovation Index (GII), which provides detailed metrics about the innovation performance of countries and economies around the world. The 2016 edition highlighted CERN as an example of successful, regional innovation initiatives. In this seminar Mr. Gurry will share his knowledge and views on the role of IP in innovation. You can read a message from Mr. Gurry here : http://...

  3. Immanuel Kant on intellectual property

    OpenAIRE

    Pozzo, Riccardo

    2006-01-01

    This text initially discusses the notion of intellectual property in Kant's philosophy and in the eighteenth century. Next, it restates the problem within a contemporary setting, taking into account the new technologies on reproduction of information.

  4. Using Intellectual Property Rights Strategically

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reitzig, Markus

    2003-01-01

    With the share of intellectual property among corporate value constantly rising,management's understanding of the strategic use of patents, trademarks, andcopyrights becomes ever more crucial. The vast majority of articles on patent ortrademark strategies, however, is written by and for lawyers...... be directly applicable bystrategy makers. Thus, up to the present a comprehensive description of thecomplexity and variety of using intellectual property rights as additional strategicelements is still missing in the literature. Elaborating on the premise that patentsand trademarks represent important assets...

  5. Legal ramifications of intellectual property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempf, Robert F.

    1990-01-01

    Recent government policy changes that have resulted in encouraging or requiring increased intellectual property rights of federally funded research and development activities are examined. The reasons for these changes are discussed, including considerations related to technology transfer, patent rights, copyrights, trade secrets, and computer software issues. The effect of these changes on traditional approaches to the dissemination of federally funded scientific and technical information is considered and predictions concerning future trends in intellectual property rights are given.

  6. Debates on Intellectual Property Rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula – Angela VIDRAŞCU

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper supports the understanding of the definition of intellectual property rights and strong connection with intangible assets and, on the other hand, provides a brief presentation of the organizations supporting the protection of such rights. The essential aim of this article is represented by the detailed information obtained as a result of research carried out in order to define, identify and study the application of IPR in general and especially in our country. At the end of the paper I mentioned what involves protecting intellectual property rights and brought little concerned how our country is perceived to protect such rights. Most often, intellectual property is defined as a formal document of title, like a lease, which means that the property is a legal concept distinct from real property that are actually good without concrete material form. Constitute a special category of assets being perceived as an original creation, derived from creative ideas; has or may have a commercial value due to its contribution to earnings for its owner. The need for protection of intellectual property rights has emerged because of the changes in the contemporary society. The aim and purpose of which is to protect human intelligence product and, at the same time, ensuring that consumers benefit from the use of the attributes of this product. Always remember that the violation of intellectual property rights, causes injury to major economic, signifying a strong threat to the consumers health and safety.

  7. Biotechnology as an intellectual property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, R G

    1984-04-27

    Recent advances in biotechnology have created many public policy and legal issues, one of the most significant of which is the treatment of biotechnological industrial products, particularly under the patent system. Patents represent one of several types of intellectual property; their ownership confers the right to exclude others from benefitting from the tangible products of a proprietary subject matter. Intellectual property law and its protections will play a major role in the rate at which biotechnology develops in the United States. In this article biotechnological intellectual property issues are reviewed in the context of their underlying legal requirements. The implications of other factors, such as international competition, research funding, and gene ownership, are also considered.

  8. Intellectual Property Law as an Internal Limit on Intellectual Property Rights and Autonomous Source of Liability for Intellectual Property Owners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Elizabeth F.

    2007-01-01

    This article considers the interplay between intellectual property rights and classic property rights raised by Hoffman v. Monsanto (2005) and advances the idea that intellectual property law can serve as an autonomous source of liability for intellectual property owners. The article develops the conceptual advantages of demarcating physical and…

  9. Getting smart about intellectual property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Bruce A.

    2010-08-01

    Intellectual Property, particularly a patent portfolio, is a critical part of many companies' assets. Yet many of these companies act dumb when it comes to Intellectual Property. Blundering forward without a plan or a manager, the company may throw money at a patent attorney pursuing a patent of little value; it may fool itself into thinking it has protection with a "provisional patent" it may fail to act in a timely fashion and lose its rights to a valuable patent. This paper highlights some of the mistakes some companies make so that you can avoid falling into the same pitfalls.

  10. Intellectual property and social justice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramalho, A.; Kakanowski, A.; Narusevich, M.

    2009-01-01

    The main goal of this chapter is to explore the relation between intellectual property and social justice. Particularly, the aim is assessing the impact of the former on the shaping of the latter. Hence, and after summarising a possible approach to social justice, the special characteristics of

  11. 39 CFR 501.19 - Intellectual property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intellectual property. 501.19 Section 501.19... POSTAGE EVIDENCING SYSTEMS § 501.19 Intellectual property. Providers submitting Postage Evidencing Systems to the Postal Service for approval are responsible for obtaining all intellectual property licenses...

  12. Constitutional Analysis of Intellectual Property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AJ van der Walt

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses the Constitutional Court’s treatment of property interests in the face of state regulation to gain an understanding of the type of state interference that is justifiable in terms of section 25(1 of the Bill of Rights. This is done by examining the Constitutional Court’s dicta relating to the meaning of deprivation and how these inform the meaning of property in the constitutional context. The methodology that the Constitutional Court has formulated to assess if state interference complies with the provisions of section 25 is explained to show the type of state regulation that has been found legitimate. We then consider how this understanding of constitutional property and the state’s legitimate exercise of its inherent police power interact in the setting of intellectual property by contrasting the various policy objectives underlying the different statutory regimes governing intellectual property. This theoretical analysis is then applied to two contemporary examples of feasible state interference with existing intellectual property interests, namely the proposed plain packaging measures which severely restrict the use of tobacco trade marks, and a fair dealing exception allowing the use of copyright works for the purpose of parody. These examples serve to illustrate the context and manner in which intellectual property interests may come before the Court and the necessary differentiation with which these interests should be treated. The appropriate judicial assessment of the true impact that state action could have on vested property interests is explained and contrasted with the balancing exercise that is employed at the earlier stage of policy making. This discussion is concluded by highlighting some of the interpretational issues that will arise and how some constitutional values could be curtailed in the absence of legislative intervention.

  13. 32 CFR 37.1310 - Intellectual property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intellectual property. 37.1310 Section 37.1310... REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in This Part § 37.1310 Intellectual property. Inventions, data, works of authorship, and other intangible products of intellectual effort that...

  14. A philosophical approach to intellectual property rights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lars Axel

    2000-01-01

    This paper investigates the legitimacy of intellectual property by focusing on three topical issues, viz., the question of indigenous cultural rights, of computer software intellectual rights, and of intellectual property rights to essential drugs. A scheme of different arguments for the legitimacy...

  15. Intellectual Property and biodiversity: interplay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhola, Ravi; Dave, Shreya

    2017-05-01

    Potentially divergent objectives and thereby obligations under the Convention on Biodiversity and Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights Agreement are also reflected in respective domestic legislations in India. The review article focuses on Biological Diversity Act, 2002 vis-à-vis Patents Act, 1970 of India with intricacies involved thereunder. Authors have analyzed the obligations under these domestic legislations. The article goes on to make a few suggestions to aid effective implementation of both the statutes. The scope of this review article is limited in two aspects; first, it speaks only about Indian landscape and second, it discusses about interplay of biodiversity law only with respect to patent law instead of all the domestic Intellectual Property enactments of India.

  16. 76 FR 13404 - Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program Intellectual Property Option to Collaborator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-11

    ... Collaborators to shoulder patent expenses (in a pro-rated manner) if they wish to exercise their option to the... commercially market any therapeutic they supply to the CTEP program (freedom to operate). The NCI believes that...

  17. Intellectual Property Rights vs. Public Access Rights: Ethical Aspects of the DeCSS Decryption Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaagan, Robert; Koehler, Wallace

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: In 1999-2000, a Norwegian youth cracked a DVD-access code and published a decryption program on the Internet. He was sued by the US DVD Copy Control Association (DVD-CCA) and the Norwegian Motion Picture Association (MAP), allies of the US Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA), arrested by Norwegian police and charged with…

  18. Intellectual property and information controversy (II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Hirokazu

    As advanced information has been proceeded rapidly, intellectual property has become more important than ever as business resources of enterprises. Based on the former report by the author "present status of and trend in intellectual property" this paper describes "information" related intellectual property controversy which have been occurred, that is, 1) affairs related to computer hardwares and softwares (the case of compatible machines and OS, the case of application softwares, computer crimes) and 2) affairs on trade secret (the case of revealing enterprises'secret, the case of industrial espionage). It also discusses how intellectual property should be protected and utilized from now on.

  19. Abschlussbericht des Arbeitskreises Intellectual Property Management

    OpenAIRE

    Martin A. Bader; Gassmann, Oliver

    2004-01-01

    (unveröffentlicht) - Abschlussprotokoll zum Arbeitskreis ?Intellectual Property Management? (7/03?3/04); branchenübergreifend mit neun grossen deutschen, schweizerischen und liechtensteinischen Industrieteilnehmern

  20. 10 CFR 603.1285 - Intellectual property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Intellectual property. 603.1285 Section 603.1285 Energy... Used in this Part § 603.1285 Intellectual property. Patents, trademarks, copyrights, mask works, protected data, and other forms of comparable property protected by Federal law and foreign counterparts. ...

  1. Involuntary transfer of Intellectual property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed habiba

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available IPR owners have a right about voluntary transfer but sometimes Intellectual property right transfer by force and thus, there are challenge that this article regard for its. IPR shall be devolved to their legitimate heirs after their death unless, owner indicate otherwise in their wills. The heirs have the exclusive right to exercise economic and moral rights, they decide upon publication of the work and in general do every exploitation. But, they shall exercise The decisive manner that IPR of holder intended before his death. On other hand, IPR may be liable to seizure or IPR have been used in mortgage loan. Thus they can be transfer to new person.Here, we regard to Involuntary transfer.This article highlight subject of involuntary transfer and analysis on aspects

  2. 15 CFR 296.11 - Intellectual property rights and procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... commercialize the technology in a timely fashion. (c) Patent procedures. Each award by the Program will include... Trade NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NIST EXTRAMURAL PROGRAMS TECHNOLOGY INNOVATION PROGRAM General § 296.11 Intellectual property rights and procedures. (a) Rights in...

  3. [Intellectual property in natural sciences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twardowski, Tomasz

    2008-01-01

    The way from scientific finding through invention to production line and finally to the consument is long and expensive and patent should be taken into account. This is evident because the investment connected with the new application needs clear definition of intellectual property rights. Independently what we personally think about patenting in nature sciences--this is a common practice around the world. The positive and negative parameters of patenting are focus on biotechnology. The development of biotechnology is a cumulative effect of co-operation of several disciplines: biology, biochemistry, chemistry, engineering, genetics, medicines and pharmacy and many more. Between not cited here is law and consequently the needs of cooperation between researchers and lawyers. There are several barriers in this co-operation, for example: nomenclature as well as the way of thinking. These borders could be pass only with intercommunication and cross-understanding. The dialog and transfer of knowledge is a must for understanding the nomenclature, terminology of nature by lawyers and by researchers in case of law. Polish legislation concerning intellectually rights is regulated by the law "Prawo własności przemysłowej" (30 June, 2000; Dz. U. 2003, Nr 119, pos. 1117, with later amendments). This legislation is related to European Union directives and Munich Convention. Accordingly patenting of product and process is possible in Poland. However, the procedure is time and money consuming, particularly in the case of patent submission in several countries. Amendment of the Polish law to biotechnology made possible patenting of living organism and their parts. It is worth to stress that patented inventions can be used free of charge for research and teaching.

  4. Implementation of Intellectual Property Law on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannix, John G.

    2002-01-01

    Because of the importance of intellectual property rights to the private sector, NASA has developed a reference guide to assist business leaders in understanding how the Intellectual Property Articles of the 1998 Intergovernmental Agreement on the International Space Station will be implemented. This reference guide discusses the statutory, regulatory and programmatic strictures on the deployment, utilization and ownership of intellectual property within the Space Station program. This guide presents an analysis of the intellectual property law aspects of the international agreements and documents pertaining to the International Space Station, and then relates them to NASA's authorities for entering into research and development agreements with private entities. This paper will discuss the reference guide and should aid potential agreement participants in understanding the legal environment for entering into agreements with NASA to fly research and development payloads on the International Space Station.

  5. Intellectual property : national and international perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    A consistent approach to managing intellectual property (IP) permits the effective transfer of the results of research : and encourages the use of products and services by client organizations. This Preliminary Investigation seeks to : capture curren...

  6. Contemporary intellectual property law and policy

    CERN Document Server

    MacQueen, Hector; Laurie, Graeme; Brown, Abbe

    2011-01-01

    Contemporary Intellectual Property: Law and Policy offers a unique perspective on intellectual property law, unrivalled amongst IP textbooks available today. Beyond providing an up-to-date account of intellectual property law, the text examines the complex policies that inform and guide modern IP law at the domestic (including Scottish), European and international levels, giving the reader a true insight into the discipline and the shape of things to come. The focus is on contemporary challenges to intellectual property law and policy and the reader is encouraged to engage critically both with the text and the subject matter. Carefully developed to ensure that the complexities of the subject are addressed in a clear and approachable manner, the extensive use of practical examples, exercises and visual aids throughout the text enliven the subject and stimulate the reader.

  7. Contemporary intellectual property law and policy

    CERN Document Server

    Waelde, Charlotte; Kheria, Smita; Cornwell, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Contemporary Intellectual Property: Law and Policy offers a unique perspective on intellectual property law. It goes beyond an up-to-date account of the law and examines the complex policies that inform and guide modern intellectual property law at the domestic (including Scottish), European and international levels, giving the reader a true insight into the discipline and the shape of things to come. The focus is on contemporary challenges to intellectual property law and policy and the reader is encouraged to engage critically both with the text and the subject matter. Carefully developed to ensure that the complexities of the subject are addressed in a clear and approachable manner, the extensive use of practical examples, exercises and visual aids throughout the text enliven the subject and stimulate the reader.

  8. Promoting justice in stem cell intellectual property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regenberg, Alan; Mathews, Debra J H

    2011-11-01

    According to the World Trade Organization, intellectual property rights are "rights given to persons over the creations of their minds. They usually give the creator an exclusive right over the use of his/her creation for a certain period of time." The rationale behind intellectual property rights is to offer a quid pro quo, between creators and the public, intended to spur innovation. Inventors gain exclusivity (and an opportunity for profits) in exchange for publicly disclosing details about their creations. The public gains free access to information - information that can then be used to support further innovation. Innovation is seen as an inherent good in this context, as it can lead to the development of things people need (e.g., treatments for disease, green energy technologies or a better mousetrap). Exclusive rights to intellectual property are managed via patents and licenses, with patenting being primarily regulated at the national level. Intellectual property rights are the dominant mechanism used in innovation policy, particularly in science. However, myriad modifications and alternatives to intellectual property rights have been proposed and utilized, including patent pooling, intellectual property exchanges and clearing houses, innovation prizes and open-source licenses. The challenges related to competing models of innovation policy present in a fairly consistent manner across most fields of science. However, this paper will focus exclusively on intellectual property rights and models of innovation policy in the context of stem cell science. It is not that the issues themselves are unique in this context, but rather that there are a series of factors that make a discussion of intellectual property rights and models of innovation policy particularly important in the context of stem cell science.

  9. Anticompetitive Settlement of Intellectual Property Disputes

    OpenAIRE

    Hovenkamp, Herbert; Janis, Mark; Lemley, Mark A.

    2003-01-01

    The overwhelming majority of intellectual property lawsuits settle before trial. These settlements involve agreements between the patentee and the accused infringer, parties who are often competitors before the lawsuit. Because these competitors may agree to stop competing, to regulate the price each charges, and to exchange information about products and prices, settlements of intellectual property disputes naturally raise antitrust concerns. In this paper, we suggest a way to reconcile the ...

  10. Progress and Innovation through Evaluation Intellectual Property

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriel I. NĂSTASE

    2011-01-01

    Practical assessment of intellectual property is a complex and difficult issue because there are many factors that influence it, and apply the methodologies differ from one country to another, from one continent to another. Therefore, the responsibility of carrying out transactions these intangible assets is maximum, because they have social implications and / or political. Classical methods of assessment of intellectual property are the same as those used for measuring intangible assets or i...

  11. Management of intellectual property rights in India: An updated review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, R; Tiwari, G; Rai, A K; Srivastawa, Birendra

    2011-01-01

    The World Trade Organization's agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights set global minimum standards for the protection of intellectual property, substantially increasing and expanding intellectual property rights, and generated clear gains for the pharmaceutical industry and the developed world. The present review elaborates all aspects of Intellectual Property Rights in detail, along with their protection criteria.

  12. Management of intellectual property rights in India: An updated review

    OpenAIRE

    Tiwari, R.; G Tiwari; Rai, A. K.; Srivastawa, Birendra

    2011-01-01

    The World Trade Organization's agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights set global minimum standards for the protection of intellectual property, substantially increasing and expanding intellectual property rights, and generated clear gains for the pharmaceutical industry and the developed world. The present review elaborates all aspects of Intellectual Property Rights in detail, along with their protection criteria.

  13. ORGANIZATIONAL SUPPORT OF INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AT THE ENTERPRISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Kornilova

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with theoretical issues of organizational support of intellectual property management at the enterprise. It is defined the nature, goals, objectives organization of intellectual property. It is selected the features, factors of influence on the choice of organizational structure and organizational form of intellectual property management on an enterprise. It is proposed systematization forms of organizational maintenance of intellectual property management at different classification criteria. Attention is paid to consider outsourcing forms of operations with intellectual property.

  14. CORRELATION BETWEEN INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY AND SCIENTIFIC ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliia Shust

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The article is dedicated to the analysis of legal nature and peculiarities of optimal correlation between the notions of intellectual property and scientific activity. Nowadays intellectual property as institution goes through the period of establishment in Ukraine. As the Soviet system of civil law was based on recognition and regulation of authors’ rights for the authors of scientific works, discoveries, inventions and innovation proposals as the ones having mainly relative, i.e. legally mandatory, but not absolute character.  Getting started to define the notion of intellectual property and intellectual property right in the system of interaction with scientific activity, it is important to say that such notion as “intellectual property” still needs enhancement. Its imperfection is due to the fact that this kind of property implies being formed by intellectual efforts of the author of scientific work, but legally it is processed with the help of documents that guarantee property right. Methods. General scientific method, philosophical method, specially-legal method of scientific research, system analysis method. Results: It is important to emphasize that not every result of scientific or creative work can become the object of intellectual property right, but the one that corresponds with law. Any scientific work falls within the purview of law if it corresponds with law demands. Scientific and technical results obtain legal protection only in case of appropriate qualification established by specific agency of State administration and issuement of law-enforcement document being limited by the territory of Ukraine. Protection of rights on the territory of other countries is realized only on the basis of correspondent international conventions and treaties. Discussion: Advanced modern countries realized the meaning and importance of usage and proper protection of creative and scientific work results known as “intellectual

  15. Investigating the Process of Property Acquisition in Intellectual Property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed habiba

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Right of private property is of the most important individual rights of society that lies in the heart of private law. In Islamic law protection of property as one of the five goals of fighhe, that is, protection of sagacity, religion, generation and self, is to be stipulated. Based on article 140 of civil code the process of property acquisition is restricted to four cases. On the other hand, legislator has limited the causes of property acquisition to four cases and prohibited any other acquisition out of these causes. The purpose of present article is investigating the process of property acquisition of intellectual works in the light of article 140 of civil code. However, at first, the value of intellectual works will be analyzed since it is the introduction of property acquisition of intellectual works and the quality of private property acquisition of intellectual works to its creator will be separately investigated afterward.

  16. Features of Intellectual Property Rights Lending

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Fedorovna Maslenkova

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the current situation in lending intellectual property (IP rights in Russia. Furthermore, I investigate the existing legal framework for this type of lending. Special attention is paid to Russian and foreign literature review, including dissertations. The author studied the dynamics of lending trademarks license contracts and based on the official data of Federal Service for Intellectual Property of the Russian Federation archives and intellectual activity of 2009 — 2016. I describe borrowers and lenders as well as Russian regional banks having experience in intellectual property rights lending in 2014 — 2016. The author identified and commented the benefits of implementing such credit for a commercial bank and the company-borrower. Special attention is paid to difficulties and risks for both the lender and the borrower. The author has developed a mechanism of intellectual property rights lending, which describes procedures for parties. The study has defined the preferred algorithms for both the company-borrower and profitable bank. Moreover, I have described the “problem loan”, or late repayment of credit and interest. The paper describes conditions, which are necessary for the successful implementation of the developed credit schemes. I have revealed the impact of the Central Bank of the Russian Federation on the status of lending of IP and proposed measures to improve the situation. Recommendations of the author would help to promote secured bank lending of IP rights. This will have positive results for both the borrowers and the regional banks

  17. INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW IN INDONESIA AFTER 2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie Selvie Sinaga

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the major changes of intellectual property condition in Indonesia after 2001. In that year, Indonesia, which has become a member of the Agreement on Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS since 1994, was ready to meet its commitment under TRIPS. To do so, Indonesiahas made changes in the areas of legislation, administration, court proceedings, and law enforcement. The paper also discusses problematic issues surrounded the implementation of such changes in Indonesia. Tulisan ini melihat kembali perubahan-perubahan besar dalam bidang hak kekayaan intelektual di Indonesia setelah tahun 2001. Pada tahun tersebut, Indonesia, yang telah menjadi anggota Agreement on Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS sejak 1994, siap untuk memenuhi komitmennya dalam TRIPS. Untuk memenuhi komitmen tersebut, Indonesia telah membuat perubahan-perubahan dalam bidang legislatif, administratif, tata cara pengadilan dan penegakan hukum. Tulisan ini juga membahas permasalahan di seputar pelaksanaan perubahan-perubahan tersebut.

  18. Pluralism and Context: Intellectual Property and the Social Understandings of Intellectual Goods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhart, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Intellectual property affects an increasingly large range of social life. Despite the breadth of goods and activities affected by intellectual property schemas, policy-makers, legislators, jurists and even many social theorists have a narrow understanding of the basis for instituting intellectual property rights and understanding their limits:…

  19. MITIGATING INNOVATION RISKS CONCERNING INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY INSTRUMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea DUMITRESCU

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available As protection of innovation is possible using a variety of intellectual property instruments, the current paper aims at emphasizing the vulnerabilities of these instruments in order to facilitate the right choice in terms of protection, exploitation and dissemination of innovation. Based on a review of the intellectual property instruments and their related risk factors, the study identifies and formulates specific proactive strategies which arise from the fact that an instrument alone does not allow for effective protection, exploitation and dissemination and oftentimes the owners of innovation should combine traditional and alternative instruments. Therefore, the results of this analysis represent a helpful tool for managers in the decisional process.

  20. Distance Learning and Intellectual Property Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisacreta, Edward A.

    1993-01-01

    Examines laws governing intellectual property that affect distance education. Topics addressed include copyright law, particularly the concept of fair use; traditional applications of copyright law in education, including photocopying and the Classroom Guidelines; and distance learning and copyright law, including works transmitted via…

  1. Indigenous Research, Publishing, and Intellectual Property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Kenneth D.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author makes a case for a greater understanding of Native research and how the academy can learn from it to become more sensitive to the concerns of the research constituencies. How academics handle the intellectual property that results from their research is also critical. What they make public and what they decide is better…

  2. Intellectual Property in the Connected Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiba, Diane J

    2015-07-01

    Concerns about intellectual property for nursing are becoming increasingly acute as information becomes highly accessible in the digital age. Nurse faculty members need to check policies of the agencies that they work for to evaluate explicit written policies for their protection and full understanding of the agency's rights. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Intellectual Property Rights, Globalization and Growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stryszowski, P.K.

    2006-01-01

    I present a model that combines the key features of a Schumpeterian growth model without scale effects and a North - South model of trade.All open economies converge to parallel growth paths because of costly technological transfer.I study the e¤ects of intellectual property rights (IPR) regimes and

  4. Who Owns Online Course Intellectual Property?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranch, Douglas A.

    2008-01-01

    Faculty develop intellectual property needed for online courses while employed by an academic institution. That institution has a claim on the copyright because the instructional materials developed by the faculty members could be seen as "works for hire." On the other hand, both tradition and case law have seen faculty as the copyright…

  5. Implementing the World Intellectual Property Organization's ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2009-04-23

    Apr 23, 2009 ... This book should be read by all those interested in the complex connections amongst international governance, intellectual property rights, and development. —Peter Drahos, Australian National University With contributions from leading scholars from around the world, this essential collection represents ...

  6. Computer Software & Intellectual Property. Background Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Office of Technology Assessment.

    This background paper reviews copyright, patent, and trade secret protections as these issues are related to computer software. Topics discussed include current issues regarding legal protection for computer software including the necessity for defining intellectual property, determining what should or should not be protected, commerical piracy,…

  7. Language Revitalization in Native North America – Issues of Intellectual Property Rights and Intellectual Sovereignty

    OpenAIRE

    Tatsch, Sheri

    2004-01-01

    Language revitalization, oral tradition and epistemology are expressions of Native peoples intellectual sovereignty, and thus the foundation for indigenous intellectual property rights. As the people of California move towards language and cultural revitalization the question arises: What constitutes or constructs the definitions of intellectual property and how can appropriation of indigenous knowledge be protected? Looking at the issues faced by the California's indigenous po...

  8. Drug patents and intellectual property rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Gerard Marshall; Priyadarshini, Rekha; Mathaiyan, Jayanthi

    2015-04-01

    Inquisitive scientists are untiring and relentless in the hard work they perform day in and day out. In this pursuit, a researcher has to exercise their intellectual expertise in its entirety. Eventually, all credit of the invention is vested with the inventor who has the right of control over their intellectual creation. Likewise, pharmaceutical companies spend extravagantly in successfully introducing a novel drug from hundreds and thousands of lead compounds. Hence, it is a prerogative for every company to protect its innovative products from unauthorized duplication. Certainly, "patents" are the sole custodians of these products of medical intelligence - the drugs! This review focuses on the various intricacies of the drug patent system all over the world with special emphasis on India, Europe, and the United States. A note on other intellectual properties such as copyrights, trademarks, and designs is also added.

  9. 10 CFR 603.550 - Acceptability of intellectual property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Acceptability of intellectual property. 603.550 Section... AGREEMENTS Pre-Award Business Evaluation Cost Sharing § 603.550 Acceptability of intellectual property. (a... costs associated with intellectual property if the costs are based on sound estimates of market value of...

  10. Data management in academic settings: an intellectual property perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Lisa

    2010-12-01

    Intellectual property can be an important asset for academic institutions. Good data management practices are important for capture, development and protection of intellectual property assets. Selected issues focused on the relationship between data management and intellectual property are reviewed and a thesis that academic institutions and scientists should honor their obligations to responsibly manage data.

  11. Advancements in Automated Circuit Grouping for Intellectual Property Trust Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-20

    Advancements in Automated Circuit Grouping for Intellectual Property Trust Analysis James Inge, Matthew Kwiec, Stephen Baka, John Hallman...grouping assembles related circuitry into hierarchical blocks of functions that can be independently analyzed. Keywords: Trust ; analysis...intellectual property; automation; functional discovery Introduction In today’s global supply chain, trusting intellectual property that makes up our most

  12. INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS (IPRS) AND MECHANISMS FOR INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY PROTECTION (IPP): A REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Rahul Dogra*, Vijay Dhiman and Nipun Gupta

    2012-01-01

    We have experienced a growing importance of intellectual capital and intangible assets and an increased tendency for firms and public institutions to privatize, by the use of patents or copyrights, their knowledge assets and creative expressions. Because control over the use of an intellectual property right (IPR) requires ownership or a licence, the growing importance of knowledge-based assets and creative expressions has been accompanied by recognition that patents and copyrights represent ...

  13. Open innovation and intellectual property rights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brem, Alexander; Nylund, Petra A.; Hitchen, Emma L.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to study the relationship between open innovation and the use of intellectual property rights (IPRs) in small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). The authors consider patents, industrial designs (i.e. design patents in the USA), trademarks, and copyrights...... sizes highlights the importance of further investigation into IP strategies and into open innovation in SMEs. Practical implications: Industrial designs are currently the most efficient IPR for SMEs to protect their intellectual property in open innovation collaborations. Depending on the company size....../value: This paper opens the black box of IPR in relation to open innovation in SMEs, and draws distinctive conclusions with regards to patents, industrial designs, trademarks, and copyrights....

  14. International Geneva: intellectual property under the spotlight

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    On 17 July, the Director-General of the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), Francis Gurry, will present his organisation to CERN people. You are invited to take part and discover the UN’s specialised agency for services, policy, information and cooperation relating to intellectual property.   This is the third in the “International Geneva comes to CERN” series of seminars, which presents other Geneva-based international organisations to CERN’s internal audience. In his seminar, Gurry will discuss how WIPO finds the right balance between the interests of innovators and the wider public and how the IP system aims to foster an environment in which creativity and innovation can flourish. In 2010, CERN and WIPO signed a collaboration agreement designed to strengthen the partnership between the two organisations. The agreement focused on four main areas for cooperation, namely: capacity building, awareness raising and knowledge sharing; tra...

  15. Intellectual Property Experimentalism By Way Of Competition Law

    OpenAIRE

    Tim Wu

    2013-01-01

    Competition law and Intellectual Property have divergent intellectual cultures–the former more pragmatic and experimentalist; the latter influenced by natural law and vested rights. Tim Wu (US Federal Trade Commission)

  16. Intellectual Property Rights in Computer Science

    OpenAIRE

    Bujlow, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Understanding of Intellectual Property Rights (IPRs) is crucial in order to facilitate commercialization of academic research and research performed in private companies. Unprotected inventions are usually wasted inventions. Research and development take a lot of time and require significant amount of money spent on equipment, technology, and salaries. Therefore, it is very important to secure the outcome by restricting other people from copying and selling the invention. There are several wa...

  17. Intellectual Property Rights and Market Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Fabrizio Cesaroni; Paola Giuri

    2005-01-01

    Two opposite models are currently operating in the modern economy, the strong intellectual property rights (IPR) model, and the open source/open science model. They have traditionally been applied to alternative institutional contexts. The strong IPR model has been associated to the business environment, while the open science model has been associated to the academic or research system. More recently, a strengthening of the IPR system has occurred in the public research system, and open scie...

  18. Introduction to intellectual property rights for investigators in health research and institutional intellectual property policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemdoe, Georges S

    2009-11-01

    The concept of Intellectual Property (IP) in the domain of technology has assumed enhanced importance and the subject matter has attracted more interest with time. As the world moves towards a knowledge-based economy, where wealth creation is no longer based on the capital investment per se, but rather more and more on the brainpower and ability to create, Intellectual Property has become an integral part of world business and a major source for wealth creation and economic growth (ARIPO, 2002). In recognizing the importance of IPR, African Malaria Network Trust (AMANET) has decided to include a module of intellectual property rights in its Health Research Ethics Training Courses for Investigators. This paper is introducing the subject of IP to investigators in health research so that they are able to recognize its importance as IP creators and utilizers of the IP system.

  19. Intellectual Property Rights and The Classroom: What Teachers Can Do

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcon, Raymond

    2010-01-01

    Intellectual property rights restrict teachers' and students' ability to freely explore the intellectual realms of the classroom. Copyright laws protect the author and their work but disable other intellectuals from investigating probable learning environments. This paper will look at key issues where educational institutions are conflicting with…

  20. Linking intellectual capital and intellectual property to company performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to measure the effects of intellectual capital components; namely, human capital, structural capital and relational capital on company performance in Iranian auto industry. The study uses a questionnaire consists of 100 questions to cover intellectual capital and company performance in Likert scale and it is distributed among 180 experts in one of Iranian auto industry. Cronbach alphas for intellectual capital components, i.e. human capital, relational capital and structural capital are 0.82, 0.80 and 0.80, respectively. In addition, Cronbach alpha for company performance is 0.82. Using structural equation modeling, the study has determined a positive and meaningful relationship between intellectual capital and company performance. The study has also determined a positive and meaningful relationship between human capital and structural capital. Among components of performance, efficiency maintained the highest effect while innovation represents the minimum effect.

  1. Trusted Module Acquisition Through Proof-Carrying Hardware Intellectual Property

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-22

    hardware intellectual property (PCHIP) framework, which aims to ensure the trustworthiness of third-party hardware IPs utilizing formal methods. We...published in non peer-reviewed journals: Final Report: Trusted Module Acquisition Through Proof-Carrying Hardware Intellectual Property Report Title By...borrowing ideas from the proof carrying code (PCC) in software domain, in this project we introduced the proof carrying hardware intellectual property

  2. Intellectual property protection: strategies for antibody inventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storz, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    In the last decade, therapeutic antibodies have become one of the commercially most successful classes of biopharmaceutical drugs. Major drug manufacturers who have successfully managed to occupy this new market, as well as biotechnology firms, some of which have experienced a quick growth and are now on par with the former, owe part of their success to suitable intellectual property strategies. This article provides an overview of the current thinking on antibody-related patents, and discusses strategies for protecting the antibody products of the future.

  3. NATURE OF INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY INSURANCE AND ITS ROLE IN MODERN ECONOMY

    OpenAIRE

    V. Bazylevych; V. Virchenko

    2015-01-01

    Article is devoted to theoretical analysis of nature and mechanism of intellectual property insurance. Types of intellectual property relations and its role in public reproduction are investigated. Peculiarities of intellectual property relations are considered. Classification of intellectual property objects depending on their most essential features is analyzed. Different approaches to classification of intellectual property subjects are considered. Nature and preconditions of origin of int...

  4. Is the Non-rivalrousness of Intellectual Objects a Problem for the Moral Justification of Economic Rights to Intellectual Property?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varelius, Jukka

    2015-08-01

    It is often argued that the fact that intellectual objects-objects like ideas, inventions, concepts, and melodies-can be used by several people simultaneously makes intellectual property rights impossible or particularly difficult to morally justify. In this article, I assess the line of criticism of intellectual ownership in connection with a central category of intellectual property rights, economic rights to intellectual property. I maintain that it is unconvincing.

  5. A Short Introduction to Intellectual Property Rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Trina; Paranjpe, Arvin S; Cook, Travis G; Garrison, Nicole D W

    2017-06-01

    Intellectual property (IP) is a term that describes a number of distinct types of intangible assets. IP protection allows a rightsholder to exclude others from interfering with or using the property right in specified ways. The main forms of IP are patents, copyrights, trademarks, and trade secrets. Each type of IP protection is different, varying in the subject matter that can be covered, timeframe of protection, and total expense. Although some inventions may be covered by multiple types of IP protection, it is important to consider a number of business and legal factors before selecting the best protection strategy. Some technologies require strong IP protection to commercialize, but unnecessary costs can derail bringing a product to market. IP departments of organizations weigh these various considerations and perform essential IP protection functions. This primer introduces researchers to the main forms of IP and its legal aspects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Mechanism of Intellectual Property Management in Engineering Companies

    OpenAIRE

    Pukhalskaya Anastasiya P.

    2013-01-01

    The article offers a mechanism of intellectual property management in engineering companies, which envisages synthesis of a system of opinions upon provision of management with existing objects of intellectual property (IP) in a company with the aim to attract them into economic turnover and increase efficiency of their use. Application of the described mechanism of IP management would provide a company with realisation of monopoly rights on results of intellectual activity and would facilita...

  7. African Innovation Research on Intellectual Property's Role in Open ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    African Innovation Research on Intellectual Property's Role in Open Development. Appropriate intellectual property (IP) rights policies could foster creativity and innovation, thereby promoting globally competitive African industries and services. Evidence suggests, however, that it is not only IP policies and laws (copyright, ...

  8. Intellectual Property and Higher Education: Challenges and Conflicts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dusen, Virgil

    2013-01-01

    Intellectual property has become a highly coveted asset that can potentially reap a financial windfall for the owner who exploits its utility. Higher education has focused on the discovery of new knowledge, which can translate into intellectual property, but legislation, higher education policy, and/or contractual engagement may dictate ownership…

  9. Intellectual Property in "College English"--and English Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVoss, Danielle Nicole

    2013-01-01

    In this review, I look back to the first issue of College English, and then across the years to trace the ways in which "Intellectual Property" (and this distinction from intellectual property is important) has been addressed by authors in the pages of the journal. I distinguish two periods of time marked by different approaches to IP issues, and…

  10. Essjay's "Ethos": Rethinking Textual Origins and Intellectual Property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, James J., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Discussions of intellectual property are often the focus of rhetoric and composition research, and the question of textual origins grounds these discussions. Through an examination of Wikipedia, the online encyclopedia anyone can edit, this essay addresses disciplinary concerns about textual origins and intellectual property through a discussion…

  11. Intellectual Property: What Do Teachers and Students Know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkey, Louise; Corbett, Susan; Bondy, Ann; Davidson, Susan

    2010-01-01

    As society changes from an industrial to a knowledge era increasing importance and value is being placed on intellectual property rights. Technology teachers need to have pedagogical content knowledge of intellectual property if they are to incorporate it into their learning programmes to enable students to consider how to respect others'…

  12. Maori intellectual property rights and the formation of ethnic boundaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijl, A.H.M. van

    2009-01-01

    This article questions and contextualizes the emergence of a discourse of intellectual property rights in Māori society. It is argued that Māori claims regarding intellectual property function primarily to demarcate ethnic boundaries between Māori and non-Māori. Māori consider the reinforcement of

  13. 15 CFR 290.9 - Intellectual property rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Intellectual property rights. 290.9... THE TRANSFER OF MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY § 290.9 Intellectual property rights. (a) Awards under the... cooperative agreements that are set out in Public Law 96-517 (35 U.S.C. chapter 18), the Presidential...

  14. Intellectual property rights in china: patents and economic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although China seeks to improve its image as a legitimate participant in the global Intellectual property ('IP') market and boost its economy, there are still patents and other IP related rights infringement and enforcement issues. This article aimed at discussing how Intellectual Property Rights (IPRs) may improve or decline ...

  15. The Amazing Diversity Framework of the Intellectual Property Rights Harmonisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Kleve (Pieter); K. van Noortwijk (Kees); R.V. de Mulder (Richard)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper, a number of EU directives in the field of intellectual property will be discussed. It will be argued that, for example, the harmonisation of the intellectual property rights with respect to ‘chips’, software and databases, as well as the attempt to create a more general

  16. Intellectual Property in Higher Education: A Legal Compendium. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byman, Abigail, Ed.; Geller, Randolph, Ed.

    This compendium focuses on intellectual property law, which includes copyrights, patents, and trademarks as well as applications of intellectual property in distance learning software, the Internet, and research data. It includes formal journal articles, policies, and outlines from the National Association of College and University Attorneys. Ten…

  17. People, Plants, and Patents: The Impact of Intellectual Property on ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The recent GATT agreement and the Biodiversity Convention have moved intellectual property rights to the centre of South-North relations. Decisions about intellectual property, particularly for plant life,have major implications for food security, agriculture, rural development,and the environment for every country in the South ...

  18. 76 FR 60114 - Section 306 Monitoring of Paraguay: Memorandum of Understanding on Intellectual Property Rights...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-28

    ... successfully entered into a Memorandum of Understanding on Intellectual Property Rights. USTR subsequently... enforcement of intellectual property rights. Dates: Submissions from the general public and foreign... ``Paraguay Memorandum of Understanding on Intellectual Property Rights'' in the ``Type comment'' field on...

  19. Intellectual property: the control of scientific information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelkin, D

    1982-05-14

    Control of scientific information is increasingly at the center of legal and administrative disputes, raising questions of sovereignty and secrecy, of proprietary rights over research. Disputes originate from efforts to extend the right of access to data at an early stage of research, from demands for information that threaten confidentiality, from proprietary interests in competitive areas of research, and from government restrictions on the free exchange of scientific ideas. They reflect policy changes with respect to information disclosure, university-industry collaboration, patent rights, and national security. A review of diverse situations that have led to disputes and of efforts to negotiate principles for controlling intellectual property suggests the problems of establishing such principles in the context of the changing role of science.

  20. Intellectual property law and genetic health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markward, N J

    2000-12-01

    This article provides a basic analysis of intellectual property law, the treatment of genetic information under Title 35 of the United States Code, the controversies surrounding patenting of genetic sequences and related products, and the effects that restriction of information may have on the quality of health care in the United States. In addition, this piece addresses technology transfer and historical developments in public policy that have influenced patent trends. The intended product is not a rigorous review of the scientific or legal literature, as the included cases have been cited elsewhere to accentuate the same points. However, the compact format of the material should be especially valuable for physicians and health personnel who might not have been exposed to these issues as part of their formal professional training.

  1. Intellectual property law: a primer for scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, William M

    2003-03-01

    Intellectual property (IP) is a generic legal term for patents, copyrights, and trademarks, which provide legal rights to protect ideas, the expression of ideas, and the inventors and creators of such ideas. A patent provides legal protection for a new invention, an application of a new idea, discovery, or concept that is useful. Copyright provides legal protection from copying for any creative work, as well as business and scientific publications, computer software, and compilations of information. A trademark provides rights to use symbols, particular words, logos, or other markings that indicate the source of a product or service. A further method of benefiting from an invention is simply to keep it secret, rather than to disclose it a trade secret. IP impinges on almost everything scientists do. As scientists are paid to come up with ideas and aspire to patent and/or publish their work, the protection of ideas and of written works especially should be of interest and concern to all.

  2. Language revitalization in Native North America--issues of intellectual property rights and intellectual sovereignty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsch, Sheri

    2004-01-01

    Language revitalization, oral tradition and epistemology are expressions of Native peoples intellectual sovereignty, and thus the foundation for indigenous intellectual property rights. As the people of California move towards language and cultural revitalization the question arises: What constitutes or constructs the definitions of intellectual property and how can appropriation of indigenous knowledge be protected? Looking at the issues faced by the California's indigenous populace and by implication, other indigenous peoples in the United States, this essay examines how protection may be afforded under the United Nations definition of 'heritage'. Given that the holding safe of a 'culture' or 'heritage' is inclusive of language, and thus has been determined to be a human right.

  3. Corporate governance as an intellectual property management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rstić Milan J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of more complex forms of organization of the company is to create the conditions of a small number of complex economic, but also organizationally complex and komlikovanijih corporate organizations whose successful conduct of the owners often did not have enough resources, so they hired a professional and competent teams of experts who are trusted with the management of such organizations. In exercising the power of new ideas and concepts based on knowledge, managers in corporations are becoming an indispensable element of every company will be able to change, adapt and create new opportunities to compete successfully in a changing business environment. However, the transfer of responsibility for the management of the corporation managers has resulted in the emergence of abuse of senior management positions in order to realize their own interests. The main objective of this paper is to show how unlike traditional enterprise, today we have a situation in which such property owners corporation is a conceptual and thoughtful decision managers, which should represent the members of their intellectual property.

  4. 'Justice Be Our Shield and Defender': An Intellectual Property Rights ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Protecting intellectual property rights has become essential in encouraging cutting-edge scholarship that advances the frontiers of knowledge. For a long time, the majority of Africa's intelligentsia has worked in local and international environments that have exploited the continent's intellectual capital. Even in contexts where ...

  5. [Public health and intellectual property in Cuba: a conceptual map].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Delgado, Beatriz; Di Fabio, José Luis; Vidal Casanovas, Jaume; Fitzgerald, James; Silva, Ana Paula

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze the legal framework for health and intellectual property in Cuba and its impact on people's access to health resources and on the roles of different social actors. The methods used were those developed by the Pan American Health Organization to implement the project of the Conceptual Map on Public Health and Intellectual Property. Information retrieved specifically on the legal framework for the National Health System, the Intellectual Property System and the strengthening of the country's biopharmaceutical industry-and on the framework's development over time-was processed and analyzed to generate Cuba's Conceptual Map on Public Health and Intellectual Property. Analysis of Cuba's adaptation of its legal framework and assessment of the interaction between the social actors involved show how the political will that has prevailed over several decades has had a positive impact on people's access to health resources.

  6. THE MAIN METHODICAL APPROACHES TO MANAGEMENT OF INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay N. Samojlenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the given article questions of management of intellectual property on the basis of using the system, innovative, information and reproduction, process and marketing approaches are considered. Peculiar features of each methodical approach to management are defined, the interrelation of the offered approaches to management is allocated and strategy of development of the modern enterprises on the basis of effective use of results of innovative activity and intellectual property is designated.

  7. Patenting Nanomedicines Legal Aspects, Intellectual Property and Grant Opportunities

    CERN Document Server

    Souto, Eliana B

    2012-01-01

    "Patenting Nanomedicines: Legal Aspects, Intellectual Property and Grant Opportunities" focuses on the fundamental aspects of Patenting Nanomedicines applied in different "Drug Delivery and Targeting Systems". The promoters of new findings in this field of research are numerous and spread worldwide; therefore, managing intellectual property portfolios, and the acquisition and exploitation of new knowledge face several contingency factors. Today, the scientific community is discussing issues of economic outcomes in the field of Nanomedicines. Major concerns include questions

  8. Stop Piracy with Edification: Intellectual Property Education in School

    OpenAIRE

    Lakhan, Shaheen

    2002-01-01

    From introduction: The global population is showing substantial disregard for intellectual property. As children, they practice the production of illegal music copies for friends and family and engage in plagiarism. Adults commit in addition software piracy, the purchasing of pirated video, and various other copyright violations. The utter disregard of such works and creativity is stumping innovation and stems from the lack of adequate intellectual property education. As an academic cour...

  9. Intellectual property rights in software acquired by DoD

    OpenAIRE

    Birmingham, Robert B.

    1995-01-01

    This research reviews the intellectual property rights in software acquired by the Department of Defense (DoD). The intent of the study is to analyze the effectiveness of the DoD's policy concerning noncommercial software intellectual property rights. Surveys were developed to assess the current policy. Contracting officials in the military and commercial sector were the respondents to the interviews. The conclusions based on this research are that contracting officers do not fully understand...

  10. Impact of Intellectual Property Laws on Part-Time Faculty. The Effective Voice for You.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duby, James R., Jr.

    This guide explains some of the intellectual property rights of part-time college faculty members and the circumstances under which faculty can defend intellectual property rights. The term "intellectual property" refers to proprietary information, materials, or products, the owner of which may possess intellectual property rights under trademark,…

  11. Mind the Gap! How the Digital Turn Upsets Intellectual Property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vică, Constantin; Socaciu, Emanuel-Mihail

    2017-10-27

    Intellectual property is one of the highly divisive issues in contemporary philosophical and political debates. The main objective of this paper is to explore some sources of tension between the formal rules of intellectual property (particularly copyright and patents) and the emerging informal norms of file sharing and open access in online environments. We look into the file sharing phenomena not only to illustrate the deepening gap between the two sets of norms, but to cast some doubt on the current regime of intellectual property as an adequate frame for the new type of interactions in online environments. Revisiting the classic Arrow-Demsetz debate about intellectual property and the epistemological issues involved in assessing institutions, we suggest that seeking out new institutional arrangements aligned with the norms-in-use seems to be a more promising strategy in the new technological setting than attempting to reinforce the current legal framework. Moreover, such a strategy is less prone to committing the so-called 'Nirvana fallacies'. As a secondary task, we try to cast some doubt on the two most common moral justifications of intellectual property as being able to ground the full extent of the current intellectual property regime.

  12. APPROPRIATING CREATIVE WORKS PROTECTED BY INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia DUMITRU

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The ownership, either public or private, is an expression for appropriating goods. Consequently, the appropriation takes the form of private (i.e. private property and common forms (i.e. public property. The common law property defines appropriation as „a deliberate act of acquisition of something, often without the permission of the owner”, but the intellectual property rights do not protect goods. Particularly in this case „the object” of appropriation does not represent a „res nullius” simply because the intellectual property right arises from the act of creation, therefore the appropriation of somebody else’s creation becomes equivalent with stealing (plagiarism. Consequently, if we are to admit that the authors have a right of ownership over them, then ownership in intellectual property law has (it must have other manifestations than those known and accepted in the common law of property.

  13. Intellectual property right in genetic resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milošević Mirjana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant genetic resources for food and agriculture are necessary in food production and biodiversity conservation. These are the most important natural resources, in addition to air, water and soil. Unfortunately, during the evolution large number of plant genetic resources has been lost. The biggest negative impact on loss of plant genetic resources had been made by humans through the modernization of agriculture and the creation of varieties of high genetic uniformity. FAO and its operation through international mechanisms, such as the adoption of the Convention on Biological Diversity, the first legal act which regulates all levels of biodiversity: ecosystems, species and genetic resources, biotechnology, including the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety (regulates the transfer of genetic material across the border, contributed to the conservation of plant genetic resources for food and agriculture. In addition to the Convention on Biological Diversity, FAO has been defined by the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture in more specific and detailed way, the preservation of genetic resources. The objectives of the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture are the conservation and sustainable use of all plant genetic resources for food and agriculture and the fair and equitable sharing of the benefits arising out of their use. There are four basic pillars which form the substance of the Contract, Sustainable use of plant genetic resources, Farmers' Rights, the Multilateral System and the Global Information System. Two organizations, the International Biodiversity and the International Union for the Protection of New Varieties of Plants trying to solve the issues of protection of the population and old varieties as intellectual property.

  14. Intellectual Property Protection for Computer Software: A Comparative Analysis of the United States and Japanese Intellectual Property Regimes

    OpenAIRE

    Arancibia, Rafael

    2003-01-01

    This thesis explores the reform of intellectual property regulation policies with respect to computer software within two advanced industrial nations after 1980. A comparative case analysis of the United States and Japan will provide insight as to how advanced industrial nations have responded to market forces, competing private interests, and international pressure for policy harmonization in the construction and implementation of intellectual property regulation reforms. This study will sho...

  15. The Constitution of Intellectual Property as an Academic Subject

    OpenAIRE

    Bellido, Jose

    2017-01-01

    This essay offers a reinterpretation of the constitution of intellectual property as an academic subject by focusing on the work of Thomas Anthony Blanco White (1916–2006). His textbooks were fundamental for the development of ‘intellectual property’ in Britain and the Commonwealth. Not only did they provide the basis for a discipline in the making, their timely publication also helped to connect and, more importantly, constitute a diverse audience of articled clerks, practitioners and studen...

  16. Leveraging Old Intellectual Property to Accelerate Technology Entrepreneurship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek Smith

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Acquiring or licensing assets to older technologies, including surviving intellectual property rights, is an often-overlooked viable strategy for accelerating technology entrepreneurship. This strategy can help entrepreneurs short-cut the growth of a customer base, reduce development effort, and shorten the time to market with a minimum viable product. However, this strategy is not without risk; entrepreneurs need to be careful that the acquired intellectual property rights are not fraught with issues that could severely outweigh any perceived value. Proper investigation is required to ensure success because the current literature fails to provide tools that an entrepreneur can apply when considering the acquisition of intellectual property. This article includes a case study of a technology company – Piranha Games – that indirectly acquired sole and exclusive access to a substantial historical customer base by acquiring and licensing older technology and surviving intellectual property assets. The founders then leveraged the existing product brand and its historical customers to acquire significant funding and went global with a minimum viable product in three years. The copyright and trademark assets provided value on day one to Piranha Games by making it difficult and risky for others to exploit the technology. Based on this case study, this article offers recommendations to entrepreneurs who may benefit from acquiring old intellectual property to accelerate the growth of their startups.

  17. Faktor-Faktor yang Mempengaruhi Pengungkapan Intellectual Capital Pada Perusahaan Property dan Real Estate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraya faradina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to find out the effect of firm age, firm size, leverage, profitability and concentration of ownership on intellectual capital disclosure. The sample of this study is from property and real estate firm that listed on Indonesian Stock Exchange from 2010 until 2014. This research using purposive sampling method, to determine the sample of this research with 80 companies as population and 16 companies as sample. This research using multiple linear regression analyzed method by SPSS program version 22 for windows. Partially, the results of this research indicate that only firm size has an effect on intellectual capital disclosure, while firm age, leverage, profitability and concentration of ownership do not have an effect on intellectual capital disclosure. The result also indicates that firm age, firm size, leverage, profitability and concentration of ownership simultaneously have an effect on intellectual capital disclosure.DOI: 10.15408/ess.v5i2.2350

  18. Who Owns Academic Work? Battling for Control of Intellectual Property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSherry, Corynne

    Drawing on legal, historical, and qualitative research, this book explores the way in which academic work has become property and shows how that process is shaking the foundations of the university, the professorate, and intellectual property law. Following an introduction, the chapters are: (1) Building an Epistemic Regime; (2) An Uncommon…

  19. Intellectual Property Rights and Responsibilities: The State and the Text.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willinsky, John

    1990-01-01

    Draws from literary and theoretical works to discuss the idea of written text as intellectual property. Examines the legal, economic, and moral issues surrounding books and writing. Reviews concepts of liability, imitation, plagiarism, property rights, and, in particular, the historical and contemporary responsibilities incurred in writing. (DMM)

  20. Did You Say "Intellectual Property"? It's a Seductive Mirage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallman, Richard M.

    2006-01-01

    The term "intellectual property" tends to warp thinking wherever it is used. It carries a bias in favor of dealing with a variety of issues as kinds of "property"; even worse, applying the term to various disparate issues focuses attention erroneously on the little that they have in common. The term should never be used, and we should not let…

  1. "The Fruits of Intellectual Labor": International Student Views of Intellectual Property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datig, Ilka; Russell, Beth

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the results of a study conducted at New York University Abu Dhabi in the fall of 2013. Our goal in the study was to gain a global college student perspective on issues related to intellectual property, including copyright and plagiarism. We found that, contrary to popular opinion, most of our students have a solid…

  2. Intellectual Property Rights in E-Learning Programmes: Report of the Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher Education Funding Council for England, Bristol.

    This report is a good practice guide for higher education institutions on intellectual property rights in e-learning programs. The report includes model clauses that may be included in contracts at higher education institutions and incorporates comments from a previous limited "expert" consultation. It focuses on how to manage…

  3. Intellectual property in consumer electronics, software and technology startups

    CERN Document Server

    Halt, Jr , Gerald B; Stiles, Amber R; Fesnak, Robert

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive guide to procuring, utilizing and monetizing intellectual property rights, tailored for readers in the high-tech consumer electronics and software industries, as well as technology startups.  Numerous, real examples, case studies and scenarios are incorporated throughout the book to illustrate the topics discussed.  Readers will learn what to consider throughout the various creative phases of a product’s lifespan from initial research and development initiatives through post-production.  Readers will gain an understanding of the intellectual property protections afforded to U.S. corporations, methods to pro-actively reduce potential problems, and guidelines for future considerations to reduce legal spending, prevent IP theft, and allow for greater profitability from corporate innovation and inventiveness. • Offers a comprehensive guide to intellectual property for readers in high-tech consumer electronics, software and technology startups; • Uses real case studies...

  4. Intellectual property and financing strategies for technology startups

    CERN Document Server

    Halt, Jr , Gerald B; Stiles, Amber R; Fesnak, Robert

    2017-01-01

    This book offers a comprehensive, easy to understand guide for startup entities and developing companies, providing insight on the various sources of funding that are available, how these funding sources are useful at each stage of a company’s development, and offers a comprehensive intellectual property strategy that parallels each stage of development. The IP strategies offered in this book take into consideration the goals that most startups and companies have at each stage of development, as well as the limitations that exist at each stage (i.e., limited available resources earmarked for intellectual property asset development), and provides solutions that startups and companies can implement to maximize their return on intellectual property investments. This book also includes a number of descriptive examples, case studies and scenarios to illustrate the topics discussed, and is intended for use by startups and companies across all industries. Readers will garner an appreciation for the value that inte...

  5. Synthetic biology and intellectual property rights: six recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minssen, Timo; Rutz, Berthold; van Zimmeren, Esther

    2015-02-01

    On 26th November 2013, the Danish Agency for Science, Technology and Innovation organized an expert meeting on "Synthetic Biology & Intellectual Property Rights" in Copenhagen sponsored by the European Research Area Network in Synthetic Biology (ERASynBio). The meeting brought together ten experts from different countries with a variety of professional backgrounds to discuss emerging challenges and opportunities at the interface of synthetic biology and intellectual property rights. The aim of this article is to provide a summary of the major issues and recommendations discussed during the meeting. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Intellectual Property Strategies of Multinational Companies Patenting in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolfram, Pierre; Schuster, Gerd; Brem, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    While global intellectual property trends show a stable rate of worldwide patent applications during the last five years, patent applications in emerging economies strongly increased within the same period. Unless the increasing number of applications in emerging economies, the indigenous legal s...... clustering reveals the existence of five patent strategy archetypes of companies patenting in economies with weak appropriability regimes.......While global intellectual property trends show a stable rate of worldwide patent applications during the last five years, patent applications in emerging economies strongly increased within the same period. Unless the increasing number of applications in emerging economies, the indigenous legal...

  7. The Property Rights Movement's Embrace of Intellectual Property: True Love or Doomed Relationship?

    OpenAIRE

    Menell, Peter S.

    2007-01-01

    The recent Supreme Court battle over the legal standard for permanent injunctions in patents cases (eBay v. MercExchange) marked an important new front in the Property Rights Movement's campaign to establish a strict and broad interpretation of property rights and their enforcement. This essay explores whether Professor Richard Epstein's embrace of intellectual property rights is likely to produce a durable marriage of traditional property rights theory and intellectual property protection or...

  8. Intellectual property protection for brand Jamaica’s creative industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisha LaRaine Ingram

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Since the last decade, strategies employed by governments to manage their country brands have evolved beyond tourism marketing techniques. It is quite commonplace now for most governments to hire marketing specialists to design and implement county brand campaigns and policies to promote country brands globally to attract foreign direct investment into that country. Whether it is the arts-based “creative industry” or an “enterprise culture”, these features have evolved to become the drivers of profit in global markets, and give each nation a “competitive edge” over other nations in regards to their national brand. Country brand management is integral for the successful development of industry sectors and is also dependent on good country image. For Brand Jamaica one such industry is the creative industries sector. Brand Jamaica’s creative industries are mostly comprised of the branded tourism accommodations, atmosphere, heritage and culture as well as the indigenous music and recordings of local artistes and singers. For the development of this sector which currently contributes to Jamaica GDP it is interpreted that enforced intellectual property will play a key role especially in the promoting of the brand online. Good management of country brands creative industries involves good business acumen on protecting and developing that sector as it is vital towards translating the intangible wealth of developing countries into economic growth. Enforced intellectual property protection for Brand Jamaica’s music, arts, theatrical productions and creative expressions ultimately lessen the occurrence of infringements of the brand’s assets, piracy and production of counterfeit goods and services produces, while creating future possibilities in cyberspace.Purpose – as a source of unlimited supply of intellectual property, Brand Jamaica requires formal management of those assets especially in the creative industries sector that the brand

  9. Investigations regarding the importance of acknowledging the impact of specific intellectual property risks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ramona Pakocs; Nouras Barbu Lupulescu

    2016-01-01

      The research is dedicated to a study regarding the level of importance given to specific intellectual property risks by Romanian managers and the levels of importance of different intellectual property protection forms...

  10. Managing intellectual property to develop medicines for the world's poorest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonteilles-Drabek, Sylvie; Reddy, David; Wells, Timothy N C

    2017-04-01

    It has been argued that patents impede the development and access of medicines for tropical diseases such as malaria. However, we believe that intellectual property can be a key tool to enable timely progression of drug development projects involving multiple partners and to ensure equitable access to successful products.

  11. Flexible intellectual property rights lead to greater innovation in Africa

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-27

    Apr 27, 2016 ... The Open African Innovation Research and Training (Open A.I.R.) research project investigated the unique collaborative dynamics of innovation and intellectual property in nine African countries: Botswana, Egypt, Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Mozambique, Nigeria, South Africa, and Uganda.

  12. An Overview of Intellectual Property and Intangible Asset Valuation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Jeffrey H.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reviews the economic models most commonly applied to estimate the value of intellectual property and other forms of intangible assets. It highlights the key strengths and weaknesses of these models. One of the apparent weaknesses of the most commonly used valuation models is the failure to incorporate legal rights into their…

  13. Ethical and Economic Issues: Intellectual Property, Who Owns It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voegel, George

    The concept of intellectual property rights (defined as the creative work of some unknown dimension) is put into the perspectives in this speech of the individual involved, the educational institution, and the general public. Such concerns are ethical implications, incentives, costs, quality, change and innovation, impact on lifelong learning…

  14. R&D Collaboration with Uncertain Intellectual Property Rights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czarnitzki, Dirk; Hussinger, Katrin; Schneider, Cédric

    - uncertain intellectual property rights (IPR) lead to reduced collaboration between firms and may hinder the production of knowledge. This has implications for technology policy as R&D collaborations are exempt from anti-trust legislation in order to increase R&D in the economy. We argue that a functional...

  15. Enforceability TBD: from status to contract in intellectual property law

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lobel, Orly

    2016-01-01

    ... of the contractual clauses, which employ language and terms far more expansive than the recognized boundaries of intellectual property, resulting in uncertainty about their enforceability. The courts employ multifactor tests to determine, ex post, the "reasonableness" of such clauses as non-compete, non-disclosure, innovation assignment, and holdov...

  16. African Innovation Research on Intellectual Property's Role in Open ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The project will foster capacity building on the part of African IP researchers, uptake of the research results by policymakers, and peer networking with researchers in Asia and Latin America. A network of African researchers will be coordinated by the Intellectual Property Law and Policy Research Unit, University of Cape ...

  17. Developments in Intellectual Property and Traditional Knowledge Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jane

    2009-01-01

    In order to protect indigenous/traditional knowledge, intellectual property law must be leveraged in a way that is responsive to the dynamic inter-relationships between law, society and culture. Over the last decade, increased attention to Indigenous concerns has produced a wealth of literature and prompted recognition of the diverse needs of…

  18. Enforcement of Intellectual Property Rights – Blessing or Curse? A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Mauritian economy is facing serious economic difficulties, and the government is being pressurised to maintain the competitive edge of various industries by giving a panoply of incentives, including laws and institutions that can effectively protect intellectual property rights, to the business community, both local and ...

  19. The evolution of intellectual property strategy in innovation ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holgersson, Marcus; Granstrand, Ove; Bogers, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we attempt to extend and nuance the debate on intellectual property (IP) strategy, appropriation, and open innovation in dynamic and systemic innovation contexts. We present the case of four generations of mobile telecommunications systems (covering the period 1980...

  20. Innovation and Intellectual Property: The Case of Genomic Patenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Brian A.

    2003-01-01

    In an effort to balance static and dynamic efficiency in the production and use of knowledge, societies institute intellectual property policies. In the United States, the patent system is a well-established mechanism to provide inventors with time-limited protection of new technologies in exchange for disclosure of information about their…

  1. Analysis of Intellectual Property Protection Issues in Offshore Outsourcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Satinder Pal

    2013-01-01

    Offshore outsourcing is a business strategy that involves contracting with a partner who can take over certain aspects of a company's business, such as information technology (IT) functions, in the interests of efficiency and cost savings. The purpose of this study was to analyze the intellectual property protection issues to achieve a better…

  2. Protecting Student Intellectual Property in the Entrepreneurial Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Sarah L.; Katz, Jerome A.

    2016-01-01

    While universities are intensely protective of revenue streams related to intellectual property interests for the institution and professors, the financial and legal interests of students in the entrepreneurial process have largely been overlooked. This lack of attention, both in universities and in the literature, is intriguing given the…

  3. Towards an Intellectual Property Rights Strategy for Innovation in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radauer, Alfred; Rodriguez, V.F.

    2009-01-01

    On October 13, 2009 the Science and Technology Options Assessment Panel (STOA) together with Knowledge4Innovation/The Lisbon Forum, supported by Technopolis Consulting Group and TNO, organised a half-day workshop entitled ‘Towards an Intellectual Property Rights Strategy for Innovation in Europe’.

  4. Intellectual Property Series. National Council of University Research Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Council of Univ. Research Administrators, Washington, DC.

    Materials on intellectual property are presented to help university research administrators negotiate and administer sponsored research agreements. The nine units cover: patents and patent rights, patent rights under government contracts, university patent policies and practices, patent clauses in industrial research agreements, patent licensing…

  5. R&D Collaboration with Uncertain Intellectual Property Rights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czarnitzki, Dirk; Hussinger, Katrin; Schneider, Cédric

    2015-01-01

    —uncertain intellectual property rights (IPRs) lead to reduced collaboration between firms and can, hence, hinder knowledge production. This has implications for technology policy as R&D collaborations are exempt from antitrust legislation in order to increase R&D in the economy. We argue that a functional IPR system...

  6. Knowledge diffusion from FDI and intellectual property rights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, R.; de Vaal, A.

    2011-01-01

    We study the extent to which a country's strength of Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) protection mediates knowledge spillovers from Foreign Direct Investment (FDI). Following the opposing views in the IPR debate, we propose a negative effect of IPR strength on unintentional horizontal

  7. Protection of intellectual property rights of indigenous knowledge in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Protection of intellectual property rights of indigenous knowledge in Tanzania : legal constraints and challenges. ... The new law on IPR and indigenous knowledge should, among other things, provide for a system that will recognize and protect the rights of an individual as well as communities of indigenous knowledge, ...

  8. Tort Liability That May Attach to Intellectual Property Licensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, William R.

    1979-01-01

    Examined are elements that complicate the relationship between tort law and intellectual property licensing (patents): governmental regulation of products, legal standards, the evolution of tort doctrine, international law and practice, trademark, technology and patent licensing. Available from P.O. Box 2600, Arlington, VA 22202. (MSE)

  9. Intellectual property rights, international trade and plant breeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eaton, D.J.F.

    2013-01-01

    Seed is the physical embodiment of the invention of the plant breeder. Plant varieties thus constitute a special form of innovation, and an assessment of intellectual property right (IPR) systems needs to take this into account. This thesis concentrates on IPRs but breeders do have a number of means

  10. NATURE OF INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RELATIONS AND ITS ROLE IN A PUBLIC REPRODUCTION

    OpenAIRE

    V. Virchenko

    2013-01-01

    Article is devoted to theoretical analysis of nature and structure of intellectual property relations. Types of intellectual property relations and its role in public reproduction are investigated. Peculiarities of intellectual property relations are considered. Two groups of approaches to classification of intellectual property objects are analysed: classification of objects depending on its characteristics which is based on the analysis of their most essential features, specificity of their...

  11. Intellectual property rights: An overview and implications in pharmaceutical industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Chandra Nath; Bhattacharya, Sanjib

    2011-04-01

    Intellectual property rights (IPR) have been defined as ideas, inventions, and creative expressions based on which there is a public willingness to bestow the status of property. IPR provide certain exclusive rights to the inventors or creators of that property, in order to enable them to reap commercial benefits from their creative efforts or reputation. There are several types of intellectual property protection like patent, copyright, trademark, etc. Patent is a recognition for an invention, which satisfies the criteria of global novelty, non-obviousness, and industrial application. IPR is prerequisite for better identification, planning, commercialization, rendering, and thereby protection of invention or creativity. Each industry should evolve its own IPR policies, management style, strategies, and so on depending on its area of specialty. Pharmaceutical industry currently has an evolving IPR strategy requiring a better focus and approach in the coming era.

  12. Intellectual property rights: An overview and implications in pharmaceutical industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Nath Saha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Intellectual property rights (IPR have been defined as ideas, inventions, and creative expressions based on which there is a public willingness to bestow the status of property. IPR provide certain exclusive rights to the inventors or creators of that property, in order to enable them to reap commercial benefits from their creative efforts or reputation. There are several types of intellectual property protection like patent, copyright, trademark, etc. Patent is a recognition for an invention, which satisfies the criteria of global novelty, non-obviousness, and industrial application. IPR is prerequisite for better identification, planning, commercialization, rendering, and thereby protection of invention or creativity. Each industry should evolve its own IPR policies, management style, strategies, and so on depending on its area of specialty. Pharmaceutical industry currently has an evolving IPR strategy requiring a better focus and approach in the coming era.

  13. MECHANICAL DEVELOPMENT OF THE INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY IN CHINA AND RUSSIAN: SIMILARITIES AND DIFFERENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Qi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the development of a mechanism of intellectual property rights in China. There is the same state of the system of intellectual property protection in China and Russia. This work paper identifies several similarities and differences between the Russian and Chinese protective system of intellectual property.

  14. 76 FR 76389 - Extension of Comment Period Regarding Comments on Intellectual Property Enforcement in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-07

    ... USPTO published a Request for Comments on Intellectual Property Enforcement in China. See 76 FR 64075... judiciary; and the State Intellectual Property Office (SIPO). In regard to the former, concerns over China's..., Under Secretary of Commerce for Intellectual Property and Director of the United States Patent and...

  15. 76 FR 7681 - Establishment of the Intellectual Property Enforcement Advisory Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-11

    ... Prioritizing Resources and Organization for Intellectual Property Act of 2008 (Public Law 110-403)(15 U.S.C... of the Intellectual Property Enforcement Advisory Committees By the authority vested in me as..., trademarks, trade secrets, and other forms of intellectual property, both in the United States and abroad...

  16. 77 FR 42765 - Request of the U.S. Intellectual Property Enforcement Coordinator for Public Comments...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-20

    ... Prioritizing Resources and Organization for Intellectual Property Act of 2008, Public Law 110-403 (Oct. 13... BUDGET Request of the U.S. Intellectual Property Enforcement Coordinator for Public Comments: Development of the Joint Strategic Plan on Intellectual Property Enforcement AGENCY: Office of the U.S...

  17. Impact of Intellectual Property in National and Business Development under the Context of the Current Globalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stalin Ballesteros García

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the document is to show the impact of the intellectual property on the national and enterprise development in the globalization context since the early twenty-first century. First, it is a historical telling of the intellectual property and its role in the international society; then outlining the arguments to infer the incidence degree of the intellectual property in the economic development of countries and then discussing the inclusion impact of concepts directly related to the intellectual property in business growth activities. It concludes with a reflection on the Colombian situation, in public and private context, in terms of intellectual property.

  18. The increasing importance of Intellectual Property in Transfusion Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardie, Ian D; Rooney, Catherine

    2011-08-01

    The Scottish National Blood Transfusion Service (SNBTS) originated in Edinburgh in the 1920's by dentist Jack Copland. Since that time the scope of Transfusion Medicine has broadened significantly to accommodate advances in technologies such as cell isolation, culture and manipulation. Many transfusion services, including SNBTS, now provide expertise both in the traditional field of blood transfusion and the newer, wider field of human cell (including 'adult' and embryonic stem cells) and tissue procurement and culture - in all the new science of "regenerative medicine". This paper describes the importance of Intellectual Property in the provision of Transfusion Medicine today and provides guidance on the management of Intellectual Property so that advances in the field have the best chance of successful translation into clinical practice. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Sharing Research Data and Intellectual Property Law: A Primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Michael W

    2015-08-01

    Sharing research data by depositing it in connection with a published article or otherwise making data publicly available sometimes raises intellectual property questions in the minds of depositing researchers, their employers, their funders, and other researchers who seek to reuse research data. In this context or in the drafting of data management plans, common questions are (1) what are the legal rights in data; (2) who has these rights; and (3) how does one with these rights use them to share data in a way that permits or encourages productive downstream uses? Leaving to the side privacy and national security laws that regulate sharing certain types of data, this Perspective explains how to work through the general intellectual property and contractual issues for all research data.

  20. Licensing Strategies of the Entreprising - But Vulnerable - `Intellectual property' Vendors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Lee N.

    This paper investigates in an exploratory manner the licensing strategies pursued by firms whose business model is based on developing and licensing out their intellectual property rights (IPRs). These are not traditional suppliers, since they do not engage in production or commercialization......, but focus solely on invention. While considerable anecdotal evidence exists about these IP vendors, there has been no systematic investigation of how they use licensing to appropriate value from their investments in R&D. In this paper, we suggest that the licensing strategies they pursue can....... On this basis, four main licensing strategies are identified. We investigate the relative benefits and costs of these four strategies, and the factors affecting licensing choices.Key words: Intellectual property, licensing, strategyJEL Codes: O31, OO34...

  1. Essays on the innovation and intellectual property system in Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Tuan Anh, Vu

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation provide not only a comprehensive overview on concepts and models of innovation, but it also provide critical analysis on the intellectual property system with an emphasize on the patent system and enforcement system in Vietnam. The empirical findings have suggested that legal business types, firm's age are amongst the determinant characteristics that indicate manufacturing innovation. Furthermore, a number of factors including rewarding scheme,average employee education,coll...

  2. Counterfeiting in China: a Great Challenge in Intellectual Property Protection

    OpenAIRE

    Lusita, Lusita

    2012-01-01

    Counterfeiting is an increasing problem for Intellectual Property Rights (“IPR”) protection throughout the world. Counterfeiting activities are generally related to trademark infringements as the counterfeiters are trying to generate instant benefits from the established trademarks around the world by using such marks without consent. Counterfeit products manufactured in People's Republic of China (“PRC”) might be considered as the greatest evidence of IPR law contravention. The national gove...

  3. Plagiarism Detection: Keeping Check on Misuse of Intellectual Property

    OpenAIRE

    Mathur, Iti; Joshi, Nisheeth

    2012-01-01

    Today, Plagiarism has become a menace. Every journal editor or conference organizers has to deal with this problem. Simply Copying or rephrasing of text without giving due credit to the original author has become more common. This is considered to be an Intellectual Property Theft. We are developing a Plagiarism Detection Tool which would deal with this problem. In this paper we discuss the common tools available to detect plagiarism and their short comings and the advantages of our tool over...

  4. Some Economic Considerations in the Intellectual Property Protection of Software.

    OpenAIRE

    Dam, Kenneth W

    1995-01-01

    Intellectual property has frequently had to confront the issue of how to protect new technologies. The rise of software as a major industry is one such new challenge. An economic approach to the protection of software adds to the already extensive legal analysis. On the one hand, existing copyright and patent law provides a sound basis for an economically efficient system of protection. Copyright law deals with the appropriability problem without creating significant monopoly or rent-seeking ...

  5. An Auction Model of Intellectual Property Protection: Patent Versus Copyright

    OpenAIRE

    Michael WATERSON; Norman IRELAND

    1998-01-01

    In this paper several firms compete for the right to obtain intellectual property protection for a basic idea which has subsequent potential applications. The modelling employs an auction analogy, taking the context to be an n-player all-pay auction, with a reserve. We find that, even taking only firms' own utilities into account, welfare has no interior maximum, so that either maximal, or minimal, protection is optimal. Through examining a simple version of this game, we suggest that softwar...

  6. Protection of Intellectual Property and its Economic Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Pelegrinová

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Intellectual property as assets in intangible form is classified in most countries under the definitions of the TRIPS Agreement and PCT according to the manner of its protection. This article presents results of an analysis of relationship between the protection of intellectual property rights at certain globalization level and verification of their influence on economic indicators in the selected countries of the research sample – 32 countries of a similar intellectual property protection system under the PCT. An examination of the level of globalization as a quantitative marker was enabled by the KOF Index of Globalization. The time and cross-sectional data enabled to test 352 objections by applying a non-parametric statistical method – panel data regression with the effect of random cross-sectional variables. The conclusions show that there is a statistically significant probability of the relation between the quantity of registered patents and the level of gross domestic product, gross domestic product per capita and adjusted net national income.

  7. Intellectual Property Rights in Computer Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bujlow, Tomasz

    of money spent on equipment, technology, and salaries. Therefore, it is very important to secure the outcome by restricting other people from copying and selling the invention. There are several ways of protecting our work: patents, design rights, copyrights, and trademarks. In software engineering...... the last two -- copyrights and trademarks -- are broadly used. Copyrighting computer programs is not only made for obtaining proper license fees in the future. Free software uses copyright to secure its freedom and to prohibit other users from making it proprietary and selling it for money. Making...

  8. Institutional Responses on Strengthened Intellectual Property Rights in Agriculture and Needs' Assessment on Intellectual Property Management of Public Research Institutions in Asian Developing Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payumo, Jane; Grimes, Howard

    2011-01-01

    Intellectual property rights (IPRs) are being introduced or strengthened in developing countries as a result of international agreements such as the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) of the World Trade Organization (WTO). This study conducted a web-based survey to gain perspective on the impact of IPRs to…

  9. Intellectual property education exemplified by the patents on the CRISPR/Cas9 system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiangyu; Liao, Guojian; Xie, Jianping

    2014-12-01

    With the accelerated globalization of the world economies, the role of intellectual property in the the competition is increasingly important. The universities are important base to instill the intellectual property awareness to the young generation. However, current model of intellectual property education cannot meet the needs of undergraduates. In this paper, we take the first patent issued for CRISPR/Cas9 system as a teaching example, and together with personal teaching experience in biomedicine related intellectual property, we propose a new way for intellectual property education which consists of two stages: enlightenment stage and in-depth training stage. In the former stage, we integrate the intellectual property education with the basic major courses. In the latter stage, students are encouraged to devote into intellectual property related career. This model can somehow solve the the current shortage of qualified teachers for biotechnology related intellectual property education and will facilitate the popularization of intellectual property in college students. Since genetics plays a pivotal role in biomedicine, this effort is illustrated by the novel genome editing technology based on the CRISPR/Cas9 system, which is one hotspot of recent studies. The trajectory of CRISPR/Cas9 from basic microbial genetics discovery to major tools for genome editing exeplified the essence of biomedicine related intellectual property education.

  10. 77 FR 38088 - Development of the Joint Strategic Plan on Intellectual Property Enforcement; Request of the U.S...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-26

    ... Intellectual Property Act of 2008, Public Law 110-403 (Oct. 13, 2008) (the ``PRO IP Act''). Pursuant to the PRO... BUDGET Development of the Joint Strategic Plan on Intellectual Property Enforcement; Request of the U.S. Intellectual Property Enforcement Coordinator for Public Comments AGENCY: Office of the U.S. Intellectual...

  11. Intellectual property: A strong determinant of economic growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munmun Rai

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The returns from almost all human endeavors can ultimately be translated into monetary gains. The past few years have seen increased attention paid to the strengthening of intellectual property rights due to globalization. The development of Intellectual property rights (IPR over the years has invariably brought an upsurge in the outlook of nations toward the aspect of societal and cultural growth, this being said with the preliminary assumption that economic growth has been the most affected realm and that it requires a separate spectrum of analysis. The artifacts between the IP regime and the national economy can be easily interpreted by the fact that India′s independence had itself brought an era where the enactment of the national IP laws were considered to stand on the touchstone of the market economy. The aim of the present article is to investigate the impact of a strong IP regime on the economic development of a nation and also a light is raised into Indian economy, and the creation of an efficient innovative system is discussed. A strong relation of the IPR with the pharma and biotech sectors has been discussed. Undoubtedly, the Intellectual property (IP systems must be developed so as to bring in socioeconomic well-being. The fact that a strong IPR actually provokes IPR infringements in many developing nations also seems to be an issue that needs to be analyzed while understanding the need of the former. The trade-off between unfair competition laws and IP also assumes importance of high magnitude and hence needs to be particularly emphasized. With the growing recognition of IPR, the importance of worldwide forums on IPR has been realized. Companies, universities, and industries want to protect their IPR internationally. In order to reach this goal, countries have signed numerous agreements and treaties.

  12. Canada's Patented Medicines (Notice of Compliance) Proceedings and Intellectual Property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Henry; McCourt, Conor

    2015-01-08

    Canada's Patent Register is a tool created by the Patented Medicines (Notice of Compliance) Regulations to help innovators protect their inventions relating to pharmaceuticals. This tool exists at the intersection between the intellectual property and drug approval regimes. By listing a patent on the Patent Register, an innovator can prevent a generic manufacturer from entering the marketplace rather than having to wait for his or her patent to be infringed. This article provides information on the requirements for listing a patent on the Patent Register and an overview of how the Patent Medicines (Notice of Compliance) Regulations affect the drug approval process. Copyright © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  13. Some Tax Implications of Traditional Knowledge Under Conventional Intellectual Property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Gutuza

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The proposed incorporation of traditional intellectual property into the definition of copyright, trade-marks and designs as defined in the Copyright Act 98 of 1978, the Trade Marks Act 94 of 1993 and the Designs Act 195 of 1993 may affect the income tax liability of parties where traditional knowledge is the object of such a transaction. The aim of this contribution is to consider the potential income tax consequences of this incorporation for those receiving income and incurring expenditure in relation to the use or disposal of traditional knowledge.

  14. Proper laboratory notebook practices: protecting your intellectual property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickla, Jason T; Boehm, Matthew B

    2011-03-01

    A laboratory notebook contains a wealth of knowledge that can be critical for establishing evidence in support of intellectual property rights and for refuting claims of research misconduct. The proper type, organization, use, maintenance, and storage of laboratory notebooks should be a priority for everyone at research institutions. Failure to properly document research activities can lead to serious problems, including the loss of valuable patent rights. Consequences of improper laboratory notebook practices can be harsh; numerous examples are described in court cases and journal articles, indicating a need for research institutions to develop strict policies on the proper use and storage of research documentation.

  15. Intellectual Property Rights Protection in Peer to Peer Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stylios, Georgios; Tsolis, Dimitrios

    Peer to Peer Networks are oftenly used by internet users to share and distribute digital content (images, audio and video) which is in most of cases protected by the Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) legislation. This fact threatens e-inclusion and Internet democracy as a whole as it forces organizations to block access to valuable content. This paper claims that IPR protection and P2P can be complementary. Specifically, a P2P infrastructure is presented which allows broad digital content exchange while on the same time supports data and copyright protection through watermarking technologies.

  16. A new perspective on patent and intellectual property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizawa, Toshio

    Recently proposed problem of intellectual property including patent, especially concerning high technology such as computer software and gene manipulation, are discussed. The patent application in Japan has amounted to 500 thousand cases a year, which causes a new international friction between Japan and U.S.A.or European countries. What dose such an enormous volume of application mean, or how have their contents changed in recent years? Copyright problems is the field of gene engineering including amino acid sequence are partially common to those of the software. A trend of such gene-related copyright in Japan and other countries is reviewed.

  17. Immanuel Kant on intellectual property Immanuel Kant sobre propriedade intelectual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Pozzo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This text initially discusses the notion of intellectual property in Kant's philosophy and in the eighteenth century. Next, it restates the problem within a contemporary setting, taking into account the new technologies on reproduction of information.Este texto inicialmente discute a noção de propriedade intelectual na filosofia de Kant e no século XVIII. Em seguida, recoloca o problema na atualidade em função das novas tecnologias de reprodução da informação.

  18. Six recommendations on “Synthetic Biology & Intellectual Property Rights”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minssen, Timo; Rutz, Berthold; van Zimmeren, Esther

    2015-01-01

    of this publication is to provide an unbiased overview of the major issues and recommendations discussed during the expert meeting. Although SB may involve many different IPRs, the discussions focused in particular on patents and patent-related rights. It should be emphasized, that the authors of the current document...... in the growing debates over the role of Intellectual Property Rights (IPRs) in stimulating or hindering research and development (R&D) and – ultimately – innovation .On 26th November 2013, the Danish Agency for Science, Technology and Innovation organized an expert meeting on “SB & IPRs” in Copenhagen sponsored...

  19. INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY IN ARCHITECTURE: BETWEEN LEGISLATIONS AND ETHICAL MANIFESTATIONS WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE EGYPTIAN CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nehad Mohamed Eweda

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Several international and local legislations have been enacted to protect intellectual property rights. Nevertheless, legislations cannot alone provide protection for architects, and defend the right of owners over architectural products. The importance of this research paper is derived from the hypothesis that accepting, fostering and valuing intellectual property in architecture education and practice are similarly essential to enacting laws. This paper is an analytical discussion of intellectual property in general and particularly in architecture, it is structured in four sections; the first provides a conceptual foundation about intellectual property; the second discusses the issue from an ethical point of view; the third demonstrates various opinions about intellectual property rights; and the last reviews some manifestations in the Egyptian society which affect the intellectual property rights in both the architectural education and practice. Finally, the paper concludes that the lack of awareness among students of architecture as well as practicing architects about intellectual property rights might lead –unintentionally- to violations, infringements, and consequently disputes. In addition, respecting intellectual property would rather begin during the years of architectural education as an ethical behavior, which will continue to regulate the architectural professional practice. Besides, architects need to understand their rights which are granted by the intellectual property legislations in order to consequently secure an atmosphere of fair competition among architects.

  20. Investigations regarding the evaluation of specific intellectual property production risks within Quality Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakocs, R.; Lupulescu, N. B.

    2016-11-01

    This paper is a theoretical research concerning methods for risk assessment of specific intellectual property production risks that are identified in the product achievement stage within the Quality Management System. In order to realize this, we will start by identifying the specific intellectual property production risks and by proposing some new calculating formulas for minimalizing their negative effects. The theoretical model proposed assessment of specific intellectual property production risks, will be realized based on 3 hypothetical situations. This study intends to reduce the intellectual property risks identified in the production process of commercial societies that have an industrial profile.

  1. Improving of intellectual property marketing management in the agrarian sphere of region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Мakhnusha Svetlana Mikhailovna

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the article the author proved that Ukraine’s economy needs to create more favorable conditions for the development of the agricultural sector by intensifying the development of innovation and implementation of intellectual property rights and effectively manage their marketing. It analyzes the main range of problems, which is embedded in an understanding of marketing management of intellectual property, and presents possible solutions and improvements in this background. It was formed mechanism of intellectual property marketing in the agricultural sector in the region and proposed approach to evaluating the effectiveness of measures to manage intellectual property marketing in the agricultural sector in the region.

  2. The Analysis of the Relationship between Clean Technology Transfer and Chinese Intellectual Property Countering the Climate Changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Min, Hao

    This report discusses the relationship between the Chinese intellectual property systems which counter with the climate change and the transfer of clean technology, and states how to encourage the developed countries transfer the clean technology to the developing countries according...... to the relative international climate convention program. The report also proposes the current hindrances and developing strategies according to Chinese current situation at this field. The report is mainly divided into three subjects: the relationship between clean technology transfer and the intellectual...... property countering the climate changes; the analysis of current technology transfer modes relating to the climate; the difficulties of Chinese countering climate changes technology transfer and strategic thinking....

  3. Intellectual property rights and patents in perspective of Ayurveda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Anand; Singh, Neetu

    2012-01-01

    Ayurveda is getting its due recognition as a rationale system of medicine worldwide despite the fact that medical and scientific fraternity of the globe has very strong opposite opinion regarding safety and efficacy of Ayurvedic medicines. Meanwhile, provisions of Intellectual Property Rights under World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) and Patents have attracted many individuals and organizations to explore possibilities of commercial benefits with Ayurvedic traditional knowledge. Although rules are not favoring to grant a patent on prior published knowledge, biopiracy managed grant of Patent on knowledge of Ayurvedic medicinal plants which has been successfully checked with references of data base of Traditional Knowledge Digital Library (TKDL). Current provisions of the Patent law of India are obstructive in nature for getting patent on Ayurvedic medicines. If we have to invite researchers from basic science to ensure quality, safety and efficacy of Ayurvedic medicines, there is an urgent need to amend laws of patent with pragmatic promotional policies. This will encourage more patents on numerous pharmaceutical, nutraceutical and cosmaceutical products based on Ayurveda. As every action of today's world is based on economic criteria so why stakeholders of Ayurveda should be deprived of it. New inventions would drive acceptance of Ayurveda as a global system of medicine. PMID:23049179

  4. Intellectual property rights and patents in perspective of Ayurveda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Anand; Singh, Neetu

    2012-01-01

    Ayurveda is getting its due recognition as a rationale system of medicine worldwide despite the fact that medical and scientific fraternity of the globe has very strong opposite opinion regarding safety and efficacy of Ayurvedic medicines. Meanwhile, provisions of Intellectual Property Rights under World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) and Patents have attracted many individuals and organizations to explore possibilities of commercial benefits with Ayurvedic traditional knowledge. Although rules are not favoring to grant a patent on prior published knowledge, biopiracy managed grant of Patent on knowledge of Ayurvedic medicinal plants which has been successfully checked with references of data base of Traditional Knowledge Digital Library (TKDL). Current provisions of the Patent law of India are obstructive in nature for getting patent on Ayurvedic medicines. If we have to invite researchers from basic science to ensure quality, safety and efficacy of Ayurvedic medicines, there is an urgent need to amend laws of patent with pragmatic promotional policies. This will encourage more patents on numerous pharmaceutical, nutraceutical and cosmaceutical products based on Ayurveda. As every action of today's world is based on economic criteria so why stakeholders of Ayurveda should be deprived of it. New inventions would drive acceptance of Ayurveda as a global system of medicine.

  5. The Intellectual Training Environment for Prolog Programming Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work is described a new complex training system, named SPprolog, intended for training and self-training in logic programming language - Prolog. This system includes elements related to Prolog and logic programming, and the elements of independent, complex, self-sufficient training system which is capable considerably to increase the quality of self-training, and to be effective assistant in training. The most useful application of the system can be in distance education and self-training. The main elements of SPprolog system are: Functionally expanded (in comparison with existing systems Prolog development environ-ment, with the multipurpose code editor, the automated organization system of the personal tools, automated advice mode "Expert Advice", based on the incorporated expert system for cultivated, effective and optimized programming; Link to foreign Prolog programs compiler which allow to compile the program to independent executable; Built in intellectual, interactive, multimedia Prolog interpreter integrated with expert system and the elements of the intellectuality, allowing to lead detailed program interpretation, with popular and evident, explanation of the theory and mechanisms used in it, applying audiovisual effects to increase the level of naturalness of process of explanation; Full digital training course of Prolog programming language presented in the form of the matrix of knowledge and supplied system of consecutive knowledge reproduction for self-training and evaluation; an intensive course of training to the Prolog language and Spprolog system, based on the programmed, consecutive set of actions, allowing using the previous two mechanisms of sys-tem for popular and evident explanation of the main principles of work of system and Prolog language.

  6. Investigating the Process of Property Acquisition in Intellectual Property

    OpenAIRE

    Saeed habiba; Majid Hoseinzadeh

    2014-01-01

    Right of private property is of the most important individual rights of society that lies in the heart of private law. In Islamic law protection of property as one of the five goals of fighhe, that is, protection of sagacity, religion, generation and self, is to be stipulated. Based on article 140 of civil code the process of property acquisition is restricted to four cases. On the other hand, legislator has limited the causes of property acquisition to four cases and prohibited any other acq...

  7. Intellectual property rights, human capital and the incidence of R&D expenditures

    OpenAIRE

    Bravo-Ortega, Claudio; Lederman, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Numerous studies predict that developing countries with low human capital may not benefit from the strengthening of intellectual property rights. The authors extend an influential theoretical framework to highlight the role of intellectual property rights in the process of innovation and structural change. The resulting theory is consistent with a stylized fact that appears in the data, na...

  8. Indigenous Knowledge and Intellectual Property Rights: Confronting Modern Norms to Promote Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbole-Chaudhuri, Pragati; Srikantaiah, Deepa; van Fleet, Justin

    2008-01-01

    The global proliferation of intellectual property rights (IPRs), most recently through the World Trade Organization's Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) Agreement, poses a grave threat for Indigenous knowledge systems. There is an increasing amount of "piracy" of Indigenous knowledge, whereby corporations and scientists…

  9. College Writing, Identification, and the Production of Intellectual Property: Voices from the Stanford Study of Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunsford, Andrea A.; Fishman, Jenn; Liew, Warren M.

    2013-01-01

    When, why, and how do college students come to value their writing as intellectual property? How do their conceptions of intellectual property reflect broader understandings and personal engagements with concepts of authorship, collaboration, identification, and capital? We address these questions based on findings from the Stanford Study of…

  10. 6 CFR 25.10 - Confidentiality and protection of Intellectual Property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... protection of Intellectual Property. (a) General. The Secretary, in consultation with the Office of... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Confidentiality and protection of Intellectual Property. 25.10 Section 25.10 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY...

  11. 31 CFR 515.527 - Certain transactions with respect to United States intellectual property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Certain transactions with respect to United States intellectual property. 515.527 Section 515.527 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... Certain transactions with respect to United States intellectual property. (a)(1) Transactions related to...

  12. Intellectual property implications for forestry research managers: Striving for win-win

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell Haines

    1999-01-01

    Competent management of intellectual property is now a key issue for research managers increasingly driven on the one hand by more commercial approaches to research management) and on the other by the need to enter into partnerships where both inputs and outputs are shared. Products of forestry research activities that are relevant to intellectual property discussions...

  13. LEGAL STATUS OF ADVISORS IN THE FIELD OF INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHT IN THE UNITED KINGDOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khrystyna Kmetyk

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to research the legal status of advisors in the field of intellectual property right in the United Kingdom. In this article an author distinguishes and gives a legal description of the types of advisors in the field of intellectual property right in the United Kingdom. The main provisions of the Rules of Conduct for Patent Attorneys, Ttrade Mark Attorneys and Other Regulated Persons (2015 are considered. Methods: to analyse the legal status of advisors in the field of intellectual property right in the United Kingdom the method of induction, systematic approach, formal legal methods were used. Results: this research provides an opportunity to broaden the understanding of the institute of advisors in the field of intellectual property right (in particular patent attorneys and trademark attorneys in the UK and thus include this knowledge in domestic research on intellectual property right. Conclusions: the majority of types of advisors in the field of intellectual property right in the United Kingdom (patent attorneys, chartered patent attorneys, European patent attorneys, registered trademark attorneys and trademark attorneys, European trademark attorneys, etc. is well-educated professionals in all areas of intellectual property and are able to advise on a wide range of technical and commercial issues in this field. The obtained results will have a positive impact on the reform of the institute of representatives in the field of intellectual property in Ukraine in order to ensure its effectiveness and relevance to the challenges of the present.

  14. History of theoretical conceptions development of nature and sources of intellectual property right

    OpenAIRE

    Virchenko, V.

    2013-01-01

    Article is devoted to analysis of evolution of the theoretical approaches to investigation of nature and sources of intellectual property right. Peculiarities of origin and contents of the industrial property theory, contractual theory, rent theory and delictual theory are investigated. Intangible construction and conception of personal rights are considered. The contents of sole rights theory, intellectual rights theory and clientella theory are analyzed.

  15. Global health and Brazilian foreign policy: the negotiations on innovation and intellectual property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Jordão Horácio da Silva

    2017-07-01

    Since the TRIPS Agreement (Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights) came into effect, Brazil, like other developing countries, has become more assertive in multilateral negotiations and begun to argue that the present international system of intellectual property should be better adapted to its needs and interests. In doing so, the country has emphasized that intellectual property is not a subject exclusively associated with trade, but also with public health and human rights. This paper discusses the activity of the Brazilian government in multilateral negotiations that involve public health, innovation and intellectual property. The conclusion from looking at Brazil's diplomatic activity in this area is that Brazil has been a protagonist in this debate, seeking solutions that mitigate the adverse effect of the present international intellectual property system on access to drugs, and other medical technologies, in the developing countries.

  16. [On the necessity of intellectual property rights involving standardization of acupuncture and moxibustion therapies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Guo-Feng; Wu, Xiao-Dong; Han, Yan-Jing; Wang, Xin; Wang, Jun-Wen

    2014-08-01

    In the process of working out and implementing standardization of acupuncture-moxibustion (acu-moxi) therapy, the issue of intellectual property rights has been frequently involved. Whether is the standardization inevitably involved in intellectual property rights? A reasonable answer to this question is definitely of important realistic guiding value and significance for acu-moxi standardization work. For this reason, authors of the present paper sum up historical development of correlation between acu-moxi standardization and intellectual property rights, and fully analyze the related causes under the conditions of knowledge economy from 1) increasing protection of acu-moxi intellectual property rights, 2) intrinsic requirements for raising the standardization level of acu-moxi, 3) profits drive of the intellectual property rights owners, and 4) increasing impetuous international economic trade competition.

  17. Changing drug markets under new intellectual property regimes: the view from Central America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy, Angelina Snodgrass; Cerón, Alejandro

    2011-07-01

    The intellectual property rules inscribed in the Central American Free Trade Agreement have generated concern about access to medicines. We examined the implementation of the new intellectual property regime by tracking the policies and practices in place across 4 Central American countries. Although all 4 were responding to the same requirements under the agreement, their implementation of intellectual property rules differed. Not only were institutional practices different, but the lists of drugs to which intellectual property protection was applied varied in both volume and content. We also found that even without the influence of intellectual property, drug pricing in the region was often unpredictable and that lower cost was not the only motivation driving governments' purchasing decisions.

  18. The Current Intellectual Property Debate: A Citation-Based Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Linder

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the research landscape of Intellectual PropertyRights. It describes and probes the key players and the mostinfluential journal publications. While most literature reviews arequalitative, in many cases highly subjective and necessarily selective,this paper takes another course. By using Social NetworkAnalysis and the Co-Author Citation Approach it constructs aquantitative approach. The outcome is threefold. First, the workswith the most influence are identified, as are 9 sub-networks intowhich the Intellectual Property research splits. Second, the researchinstitutions and their networks are analyzed. This researchillustrates that the Intellectual Property research landscape isshaped by a handful of universities, the rest follow suit. Third, itis demonstrated that North America dominates the academic IntellectualProperty debate by far. Regions such as South Americaand Africa do not even appear in the body of knowledge. This papergives an overview of Intellectual Property research. Based onthe quantitative output further research questions can be formulated.

  19. Intellectual property rights and detached human body parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pila, Justine

    2014-01-01

    This paper responds to an invitation by the editors to consider whether the intellectual property (IP) regime suggests an appropriate model for protecting interests in detached human body parts. It begins by outlining the extent of existing IP protection for body parts in Europe, and the relevant strengths and weaknesses of the patent system in that regard. It then considers two further species of IP right of less obvious relevance. The first are the statutory rights of ownership conferred by domestic UK law in respect of employee inventions, and the second are the economic and moral rights recognised by European and international law in respect of authorial works. In the argument made, both of these species of IP right may suggest more appropriate models of sui generis protection for detached human body parts than patent rights because of their capacity better to accommodate the relevant public and private interests in respect of the same.

  20. Does Intellectual Property Restrict Output? An Analysis of Pharmaceutical Markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakdawalla, Darius; Philipson, Tomas

    2012-02-01

    Standard normative analysis of intellectual property focuses on the balance between incentives for research and the static welfare costs of reduced price-competition from monopoly. However, static welfare loss from patents is not universal. While patents restrict price competition, they may also provide static welfare benefits by improving incentives for marketing, which is a form of non-price competition. We show theoretically how stronger marketing incentives mitigate, and can even offset, the static costs of monopoly pricing. Empirical analysis in the pharmaceutical industry context suggests that, in the short-run, patent expirations reduce consumer welfare as a result of decreased marketing effort. In the long-run, patent expirations do benefit consumers, but by 30% less than would be implied by the reduction in price alone. The social value of monopoly marketing to consumers alone is roughly on par with its costs to firms.

  1. Intellectual property rights and innovation: Evidence from the human genome*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Heidi L.

    2013-01-01

    Do intellectual property (IP) rights on existing technologies hinder subsequent innovation? Using newly-collected data on the sequencing of the human genome by the public Human Genome Project and the private firm Celera, this paper estimates the impact of Celera’s gene-level IP on subsequent scientific research and product development. Genes initially sequenced by Celera were held with IP for up to two years, but moved into the public domain once re-sequenced by the public effort. Across a range of empirical specifications, I find evidence that Celera’s IP led to reductions in subsequent scientific research and product development on the order of 20 to 30 percent. Taken together, these results suggest that Celera’s short-term IP had persistent negative effects on subsequent innovation relative to a counterfactual of Celera genes having always been in the public domain. PMID:24639594

  2. Biotechnology-related intellectual property law of iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasekh, Mohammad

    2009-07-01

    In this study, an attempt has been made to expound the Iranian law of intellectual property in relation to biotechnology. The most important themes studied are patents, industrial designs and trade marks. The latest relevant piece of legislation concerning the subject matters was passed in March 2008. However, the history of laws and regulations in this field goes back to early twentieth century (i.e. 1925). In this review, on the basis of the latest law passed in 2008, the topics explored are the responsible authority, patentable items and criteria, excluded items, registration procedure, rights conferred and sanctions. At the end, an attempt is made to put forward a few points as an analysis of the above Law from a critical point of view.

  3. The evolution of intellectual property strategy in innovation ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holgersson, Marcus; Granstrand, Ove; Bogers, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we attempt to extend and nuance the debate on intellectual property (IP) strategy, appropriation, and open innovation in dynamic and systemic innovation contexts. We present the case of four generations of mobile telecommunications systems (covering the period 1980......-2015), and describe and analyze the co-evolution of strategic IP management and innovation ecosystems. Throughout this development, technologies and technological relationships were governed with different and shifting degrees of formality. Simultaneously, firms differentiated technology accessibility across actors...... and technologies to benefit from openness and appropriation of innovation. Our analysis shows that the discussion of competitiveness and appropriability needs to be expanded from the focal appropriability regime and complementary assets to the larger context of the innovation ecosystem and its cooperative...

  4. Genome editing: intellectual property and product development in plant biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinkel, Helga; Schillberg, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Genome editing is a revolutionary technology in molecular biology. While scientists are fascinated with the unlimited possibilities provided by directed and controlled changes in DNA in eukaryotes and have eagerly adopted such tools for their own experiments, an understanding of the intellectual property (IP) implications involved in bringing genome editing-derived products to market is often lacking. Due to the ingenuity of genome editing, the time between new product conception and its actual existence can be relatively short; therefore knowledge about IP of the various genome editing methods is relevant. This point must be regarded in a national framework as patents are instituted nationally. Therefore, when designing scientific work that could lead to a product, it is worthwhile to consider the different methods used for genome editing not only for their scientific merits but also for their compatibility with a speedy and reliable launch into the desired market.

  5. The concept of intellectual property and its implication for oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, I C

    1993-01-01

    Oncologists and scientists in oncology centres work in an environment that seeks and promotes innovation and are under an ethical obligation to disseminate new knowledge for the benefit of society. That knowledge (which may give rise to intellectual property rights) may have substantial commercial value, and with it comes the need to protect employers' and employees' legitimate interests through patents and copyright. Employers and employees may not fully appreciate the legal and ethical obligations surrounding ownership of such knowledge, so both should co-operate in formulating policies which balance the need for disseminating new knowledge and the need to protect institutional interests. This is particularly appropriate for the new NHS trusts which may undertake research jointly with commercial organizations. This article outlines the important issues for consideration.

  6. Do Stronger Intellectual Property Rights Widen Growth Gap?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwan-Joo Seo

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Our study builds a model of cumulative growth in order to analyze the relationship between intellectual property rights (IPRs and economic growth for a cross-section of countries for the period 1975-2000. This article focuses on the impacts of IPRs on growth gap between countries using a catching-up model and USPTO database. We find that IPRs affect economic growth by stimulating the accumulation of physical capital. However, the economic effects of IPRs on innovation activity are absent in this study. We find also the cumulative causation relationship between investment and growth. Lastly, our estimation results show that the wide variety of possible growth paths available to countries, depending on their 'social capability'.

  7. 26 CFR 1.6050L-2 - Information returns by donees relating to qualified intellectual property contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... qualified intellectual property contributions. 1.6050L-2 Section 1.6050L-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... § 1.6050L-2 Information returns by donees relating to qualified intellectual property contributions... receives or accrues net income during a taxable year from any qualified intellectual property contribution...

  8. Modifying the 'Positive Parenting Program' for parents with intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazemakers, I; Deboutte, D

    2013-07-01

    Many parents with intellectual disabilities (ID) want and/or need professional guidance and support to learn skills and strategies to prevent and manage child behaviour problems. However, the available support is rarely suitable, and suitable support is rarely available. The aim of this study was to determine whether a popular mainstream parenting training programme, known as 'Group Triple P' (Positive Parenting Program), could be successfully modified for this parent group. A pilot study was undertaken to determine whether a modified version of Group Triple P would engage and retain parents with ID. A non-experimental, pre-test post-test study, involving a total of 30 parents with ID, was then undertaken to obtain preliminary efficacy data. Parent engagement and participation levels were high. No parent 'dropped out' of the programme. After completing the modified Group Triple P programme, parents reported a decrease in psychological distress, maladaptive parenting and child conduct problems. Parents reported high levels of satisfaction with the information and support they received. Research-informed adaptation of mainstream behavioural family interventions, such as Group Triple P, could make 'suitable support' more readily available, and more engaging for parents with ID. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd, MENCAP & IASSID.

  9. Order Without Intellectual Property Law: Open Science in Influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapczynski, Amy

    Today, intellectual property (IP) scholars accept that IP as an approach to information production has serious limits. But what lies beyond IP? A new literature on "intellectual production without IP" (or "IP without IP") has emerged to explore this question, but its examples and explanations have yet to convince skeptics. This Article reorients this new literature via a study of a hard case: a global influenza virus-sharing network that has for decades produced critically important information goods, at significant expense, and in a loose-knit group--all without recourse to IP. I analyze the Network as an example of "open science," a mode of information production that differs strikingly from conventional IP, and yet that successfully produces important scientific goods in response to social need. The theory and example developed here refute the most powerful criticisms of the emerging "IP without IP" literature, and provide a stronger foundation for this important new field. Even where capital costs are high, creation without IP can be reasonably effective in social terms, if it can link sources of funding to reputational and evaluative feedback loops like those that characterize open science. It can also be sustained over time, even by loose-knit groups and where the stakes are high, because organizations and other forms of law can help to stabilize cooperation. I also show that contract law is well suited to modes of information production that rely upon a "supply side" rather than "demand side" model. In its most important instances, "order without IP" is not order without governance, nor order without law. Recognizing this can help us better ground this new field, and better study and support forms of knowledge production that deserve our attention, and that sometimes sustain our very lives.

  10. Intellectual property as an instrument of interaction between government, business, science and society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitenko, S. M.; Mesyats, M. A.; Rozhkova, O. V.

    2017-09-01

    This article is devoted to research the characteristics associated with pledge of intellectual property in foreign and domestic practice. Holding intellectual property objects’ pledge transactions accelerates the pace of creating innovative systems in the economy. In present paper the modern scheme for bank loan, financing secured with patented intellectual property is researched. The authors give the brief description of features of pledge security registration for loans in some Europe countries. The Europe Union experience shows that as collateral for monetary loans can be used trademarks, patents on the intellectual property, as well as their registration requests. Russian experience of the pledge operations of the intellectual property is too small. This way of bank lending is at an early stage of development. The main constraint is the difficulty of assessing the value of the pledged intellectual property as intangible assets. However, taking into account world and domestic practice this direction for Russian market is estimated by the authors as promising one. Pledge transactions take place within the framework of the Quadruple-Helix Model concept that involves four participants: “science”, “business”, “government” and “society”. Intellectual property are estimates by the authors as an instrument of interaction between government, business, science and society.

  11. Intellectual Property and Technical Data Rights: It’s About the Money

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-19

    Data and Computer Software ……….26 vi Contractor Data Rights Assertions ……………………………………………...…..26 Intellectual Capital Considerations... Intellectual Capital Components ……………….………….28 x INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY AND TECHNICAL DATA RIGHTS: ―IT‘S ABOUT THE MONEY...data) and special license rights.105 Intellectual Capital Considerations Governmental control over technical data is a powerful tool, however it

  12. Innovation patterns and intellectual property in SMEs of a developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemente Forero-Pineda

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on empirical results, this article reopens the discussion about the relationship between intellectual property and innovation in developing countries. Intellectual property grants a monopoly over the commercial exploitation of innovations. Ex ante, this monopoly may promote innovation but ex post it may become a disincentive to diffusion and subsequent innovation. After reviewing the terms of the debate in the classical and current literature, we address two empirical issues: What patterns of intellectual property behavior coexist among the small and medium enterprises (SMEs of a developing country (Colombia and how these patterns relate to the innovation performance of these firms

  13. INTERNATIONAL JURISDICTION IN INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY MATTERS: IS THE RIGHT OF ACCESS TO JUSTICE GUARANTEED?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Bastos Carvalho

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to provide an overview of international jurisdiction rules when it comes to intellectual property. Moreover, it provides an analysis of whether access to justice is guaranteed in international conflicts related to intellectual property. Firstly, the concept of international jurisdiction and its related principles are defined. Secondly, an explanation of the intellectual property rights is done in order to introduce the analysis of how international instruments regulate these conflicts. International and national case law are also analyzed. Lastly, it is concluded that legal uncertainty in this field can be itself an obstacle to access to justice.

  14. Research on the pharmaceutical intellectual property protection and supervision of pharmacy administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhongyuan; Chen, Wei

    2017-05-01

    The patent system plays an important role in the pharmaceutical industry. In this paper, the authors analyze the pharmaceutical intellectual property protection and supervision of pharmacy administration. The intellectual property rights of drugs shall be granted to the inventor in accordance with the law, however, the pharmaceutical industry is concerned with the public health and social welfare. Therefore, we focus on the analysis of patent compulsory licensing system in the protection of intellectual property rights. Through case studies, we can see that although many countries do not implement compulsory licensing system, but this system still can become the chip for all countries to obtain authorization or reduce drug price.

  15. Intellectual property-A strong determinant of Economic Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Love k Singh

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available

    The returns from almost all human endeavors can ultimately be translated into monetary gains. The past few years
    have seen increased attention to the strengthening of intellectual property rights due to globalization. The development
    of Intellectual property rights (IPR over the years has invariably brought an upsurge in the outlook of
    nations towards the aspect of societal and cultural growth, this being said with the preliminary assumption that
    economic growth has been the most affected realm and that it requires a separate spectrum of analysis. The artifacts
    between the IP regime and the national economy can be easily interpreted by the fact that India’s independence
    had itself brought an era where the enactment of the national IP laws were considered to stand on the touchstone
    of the market economy. The aim of the present paper is to investigate the impact of strong IP regime in the
    economic development of a nation and also a light is raised into Indian economy and creation for an efficient
    innovating system is discussed. A strong relation of IPR wity pharma sector and biotech sector has been discussed.
    Undoubtedly, IP systems must be developed so as to bring in socio-economic well-being. The fact that
    strong IPR actually provoke IPR infringements in many developing nations also seems to be an issue which needs
    to be analyzed while understanding the need of the former. The trade-off between unfair competition laws and IP
    also assumes importance of high magnitude and hence needs to be particularly emphasized. With the growing
    recognition of IPR, the importance of world wide forums on IPR is realized. Companies, universities, and industries
    want to protect their IPR internationally. In order to reach this goal, countries have signed numerous agreements
    and treaties.

  16. Transfer of Teaching Materials between Universities: Where Is the Boundary between Legitimate Transaction and Violation of Moral Intellectual Property Rights?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiwald, Matthias; Harrington, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    Intellectual property rights have various facets. The best-known one is copyright, enabling the owner to legally utilise intellectual materials. However, there is a separate set of legal entitlements, termed moral intellectual property rights. The purpose of these is to prevent false attribution, damage to an author's reputation and some forms of…

  17. Cloud Computing Services: Benefits, Risks and Intellectual Property Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IONELA BĂLŢĂTESCU

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Major software players of the global market, such as Google, Amazon and Microsoft are developing cloud computing solutions, providing cloud services on demand: Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS, Platform as a Service (PaaS and Software as a service (SaaS. In software industry and also in ICT services market, cloud computing is playing an increasingly important role. Moreover, the expansion of cloud services indirectly contributed to the development and improvement of other types of services on the market – financial and accounting services, human resources services, educational services etc. – in terms of quality and affordability. Given the fact that cloud computing applications proved to be more affordable for small and medium enterprises (SME, an increasing number of companies in almost all the fields of activity have chosen cloud based solutions, such as Enterprise Resource Management (ERP software and Customer Relationship Management (CRM software. However, cloud computing services involve also some risks concerning privacy, security of data and lack of interoperability between cloud platforms. Patent strategy of certain proprietary software companies leaded to a veritable “patent war” and “patent arm race” endangering the process of standardization in software industry, especially in cloud computing. Intellectual property (IP legislation and court ruling in patent litigations is likely to have a significant impact on the development of cloud computing industry and cloud services.

  18. Plants genetic manipulation: an approach from intellectual property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Anisley Negrin; Rivero, Lazaro Pino

    2013-01-01

    From the end of the 20th century the Biotechnology has experimented a vertiginous advance so far, putting on approval concepts like bio-security and bioethics; becoming this way, the work with the genome of the plants, in a matter is worthy to be reconsidered by the juridical mark that regulates it, in order to moderate the norm to the new scientific context. The Intellectual Property, when recognizing patent rights on products that have incorporate biological material, as well as to the obtainer about the new vegetable varieties obtained, could mean an obstacle that impedes or hinder the access from the society to that product or that variety. In the same way is worthy of consideration, the fact that such products or varieties can be a risk for the human health or the Environment, and a monopoly of commercial exploitation for the holder of the patent or of the obtainer certificate. This study is about this topic; and valuation about aspects of Biotechnology related with the genome of the plants and their juridical protection, in the international sand as well in Cuba.

  19. Intellectual property rights, market competition and access to affordable antiretrovirals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The number of patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) has increased from around half a million in 2003 to almost 10 million in only 10 years, and will continue to increase in the coming years. Over 16 million more are eligible to start ART according to the last World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines. The demand is also switching from the less expensive antiretrovirals (ARVs) that allowed such scale-up to newer more expensive ones with fewer side effects or those that can be used by people who have developed resistance to first-line treatment. However, patents on these new drugs can delay robust generic competition and, consequently, price reduction made possible by economies of scale. Various ways to address this issue have been envisaged or implemented, including the use of the flexibilities available under the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS), systematic widespread voluntary licensing, of which the Medicines Patent Pool (MPP) is an example, and the application of different prices in different countries, called tiered pricing. This paper helps explain the impact of patents on market competition for ARVs and analyses various approaches available today to minimize this impact.

  20. Scientometrics Profile of Global Intellectual Property Rights Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gnanasekaran, D.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors in this paper aim to identify the growth of literature on Intellectual Property Rights (IPRs. The research publications on IPRs were downloaded from the Scopus online citation database and the authors found that there were 1,513,138 records contributed globally over a period of 10 years from 2005 to 2014. The distribution of publications based on the year, country, and document type were studied. Relative growth rate (RGR of the publications and doubling time (Td were calculated. Most productive organizations, source titles, and the productive authors on IPR research were studied. Most cited articles in the study area were identified. The results show that a number of publications under the subjects Medicine and Engineering were produced. The developed countries are very active in IPR research and producing publications. It is found that one institution which holds the sixth place among the top 10 most productive institutions belongs to Brazil, a developing country. Two developing countries such as China and India hold second and tenth positions respectively in the top 10 countries contributing literature on IPRs.

  1. Intellectual Property Rights and the Ancient Indian Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janani Ganapathi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Intellectual Property Rights (IPR appears to be vital for the sustenance of our present society. Not only do they seem to protect the original works of the creators but also help in fighting infringement, a major problem in today’s world. But do we really need to fear the use of our works by others? Is it right to consider knowledge as a commodity and seek recognition for it? Ancient Indian scriptures appear to suggest that people of the Indian sub-continent did not uphold the concept of ownership of knowledge and believed that knowledge was to be passed down without reservations: following the parampara (tradition of the Guru (the erudite teacher and Sishya (disciple. This article is an effort to understand the views and values of the present and past that appear consistently divergent. In this paper, we also recognise the growing initiatives that call for knowledge to be freely shared through means of open licensing. In fact, these initiatives across the world are indicative of a rising movement with high potential for change in people’s perspectives for a better world where knowledge is free. This paper in this context is our humble attempt to reconnect with the values of the past.

  2. Report: Creative Labour and the Role of Intellectual Property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ned Rossiter

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on findings from a survey posted to the fibreculture mailing list prior to the 3rd annual fibreculture meeting in Brisbane this July. Broadly speaking, the survey was interested in the extent to which the exploitation of intellectual property defines the condition of labour within the creative industries. At a methodological level, the article challenges prevailing assumptions about conducting empirical research in new media studies and enlists a processual media theory approach as a technique for drawing out the relationships between the condition of creative labour and reflexive, non-linear media-information systems of communication. Central to this article is an argument about the merits of the Italian autonomist concept of 'immaterial labour' against what I term 'disorganised labour'. The article suggests that the latter more accurately describes the current condition of creative labour. The article concludes by advocating the political strategy of organising creative labour in the form of networks rather than the traditional model of the party, as adopted by various unions.

  3. Intellectual Property Protection Strategies of Foreign Companies in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boo-Young Eom

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at analyzing the intellectual property (IP protection strategies of foreign companies in Korea to suggest policy implications. To this end, the Korean Innovation Survey (KIS data conducted by Science and Technology Policy Institute (STEPI is utilized to analyze various IP protection methods ? secrecy, lead time and complex design, as well as patent. Specifically, the following three questions were in focus: What are the methods used by foreign companies to protect their IP? How effective are the methods? Can they make more diversified IP protection strategies, compared with domestic companies? Major empirical findings are as follows. Compared with domestic companies, foreign companies are more likely to use secrecy and lead time (rather than patent and evaluate their effectiveness higher. Also, they tend to utilize more profiles of IP protection strategies than domestic companies. However, the results are true only in the service sector, where competitiveness is relatively low, but not in the manufacturing sector. This paper emphasizes the importance of spillovers from FDI or foreign R&D to Korean companies, especially in the service sector, and suggests policy implications for maximizing spillovers - the facilitation of academy-industry knowledge transfer channels, the improvement of IP protection environments and so on.

  4. The Impact of the Draft EC Horizontal Guidelines on Intellectual Property Rights and Innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Richard Taffet

    2010-01-01

    Do the Draft Guidelines seek to define problems and propose solutions in a manner that may be interpreted as reflecting a bias against the legitimate and pro-competitive exercise of intellectual property rights? Richard Taffet (Bingham)

  5. Evolution of Intellectual Property Protection in Post-Mao China: Law and Enforcement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Liu (Wenqi)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ In modern society, knowledge and information have become the most important resources. Knowledge and information bring dramatic changes and create great wealth for our society. Intellectual property (IP) rights, exclusive rights granted to right holders, are

  6. Big Data and Intellectual Property Rights in the Health and Life Sciences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minssen, Timo

    The vast prospects of Big Data and the shift to more “personalized”, “open” and “transparent” innovation models highlight the importance of an effective governance, regulation and stimulation of high-quality data-uses in the health and life sciences. Intellectual Property Rights (IPRs) and related...... selected areas that demonstrate emerging tensions and potential solutions at the interface of Big Data, Standardization and Intellectual Property Rights in the Health and Life Sciences....

  7. Jurisdiction for cross-border intellectual property infringement cases in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Torremans, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Cross-border infringement of intellectual property rights raises a number of issues. The Internet means that such cases arise ever more frequently. It is against this backdrop that this contribution looks at how the territorial international intellectual property system copes, and how EU rules on private international law can assist in resolving these issues. The contribution looks merely at jurisdiction issues, but includes suggestions to improve the private international law rules in this a...

  8. Intellectual Property Clearinghouses: The Effects of Reduced Transaction Costs in Licensing

    OpenAIRE

    Aoki, Reiko; Schiff, Aaron

    2008-01-01

    We focus on downstream uses that combine multiple intellectual property rights and examine the effects of introducing an intellectual property clearinghouse that reduces transaction costs associated with licensing. We show that this causes equilibrium royalties to rise in some cases and may harm licensors because clearinghouse by itself does not eliminate the 'tragedy of the anticommons'. Downstream welfare effects may also be positive or negative and we characterise the effects on downstream...

  9. How reasonable is the reasonable royalty rate?: Damage rules and probabilistic intellectual property rights

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Jay Pil

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates how different damage rules in patent infringement cases shape competition when intellectual property rights are probabilistic. I develop a simple model of oligopolistic competition to compare two main liability doctrines that have been used in the US to assess infringement damages - the unjust enrichment rule and the lost profit rule. It also points out the logical inconsistency in the concept of the reasonable royalty rates when intellectual property rights are not ir...

  10. Intellectual Property Protection of Software – At the Crossroads of Software Patents and Open Source Software

    OpenAIRE

    Tantarimäki, Maria

    2018-01-01

    The thesis considers the intellectual property protection of software in Europe and in the US, which is increasingly important subject as the world is globalizing and digitalizing. The special nature of software has challenges the intellectual property rights. The current protection of software is based on copyright protection but in this thesis, two other options are considered: software patents and open source software. Software patents provide strong protection for software whereas the pur...

  11. Intellectual property rights and public health: an impediment to access to medicines and health technology innovation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerina Boschiero

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Summary: 1. Pharmaceutical patents, the access to essential medicines and the question of innovation - 2. The actual and/or potential between the rights of inventors, international human rights law, trade rules and public health. The everlasting controversy on the allegedly adverse impact of intellectual property protection on access to medicines and health technologies - 3. Are human rights and intellectual property law really in conflict? A relation of interpretation, not of conflict - 4. Conclusions.

  12. WIPO and the Public-Private Web of Global Intellectual Property Governance

    OpenAIRE

    WECHSLER, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    The World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) has always been recognized as an important international economic institution for the global governance of intellectual property (IP) law. Moreover, its role in promoting, facilitating and supporting national, regional and local governance of IP law worldwide has long been uncontested. However, ever since the late 1980s, fundamental transformations in the IP landscape have challenged the established position of WIPO in global IP governance. ...

  13. "Interventions for Promoting Research Knowledge Translation: Intellectual Property Rights of Stakeholders for Promotion of Knowledge Translation"

    OpenAIRE

    Katayoun Maleki; Sharareh Ahghari; Reza Majdzadeh

    2009-01-01

    "nOne of the vital aspects of transferring research results is intellectual property of information. The key point in intellectual property is lack of use or misuse of research results. At times the urgent or early transfer of research results is necessary, and at times it is not possible prior to peer review. Since there were no specific rules in this field in the country, one of the innovations suggested for strengthening knowledge translation was compilation of an ethical code for res...

  14. The role of intellectual property rights in treatment access: challenges and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    't Hoen, Ellen; Passarelli, Carlos André

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to review relevant literature published from January 2011 to July 2012 that specifically addresses the impact of intellectual property protection on access to antiretroviral drugs. The articles reviewed discussed the relation of intellectual property protection and access to medicines. For most authors, the World Trade Organization (WTO) Trade-Related Intellectual Property Rights Agreement (TRIPS) and the 10-year anniversary of the 2001 WTO Doha Declaration on TRIPS and Public Health formed an important background for the review of the current state of play. Intellectual property plays an important role in implementing policies to ensure HIV treatment and care programmes. From the review, three main themes emerged: the implementation of the Doha Declaration, the role of generic competition in antiretroviral treatment scale-up and innovative licensing mechanisms. The attention for the effects of intellectual property on access to HIV medicines opened the path for new initiatives for the management of patents using public health objectives as the key driver such as the UNITAID-backed Medicines Patent Pool. Some of the literature addressed the question whether more fundamental changes in the intellectual property architecture were necessary.

  15. Investigations regarding the lowering of specific intellectual property risks identified in the production process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pakocs Ramona

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this research is to decrease the emergence of specific intellectual property risks within the production process as well as increasing risk management performance of IP by preventing them. In order to achieve this, previous studies regarding the main specific intellectual property risks from industrial companies were analyzed together with their managerial methods as well as the possibility of reducing their emergence. As a result of the research conducted were identified five types of intellectual property risks that have a high potential of emergence in the production process, namely: the risk of production of goods in violation of IP rights; the know-how, production knowledge and trade secret disclosure risk; the technological risk of unprotected utility models; the technological risk of unprotected integrated circuits topographies and finally the risk of product counterfeit. In order to achieve the main purpose of our investigation, we have proposed new formulas for estimating the specific intellectual property risks identified in the production process. Their purpose was to minimalize the risk’s negative effects on industrial companies and to increase the managerial performance from the intellectual property domain through a new type of management appropriately named: intellectual property management. The research is finalized with a case study regarding the lapse of rights of a patented invention. Based on a case analysis, it was proved that the exploitation of an invention without a contract represents a counterfeit.

  16. Experimental investigations on the basis for intellectual property rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast, Anne A; Olson, Kristina R; Mandel, Gregory N

    2016-08-01

    Lay people routinely misunderstand or do not obey laws protecting intellectual property (IP), leading to a variety of (largely unsuccessful) efforts by policymakers, IP owners, and researchers to change those beliefs and behaviors. The current work tests a new approach, inquiring whether lay people's views about IP protection can be modified by arguments concerning the basis for IP rights. Across 2 experiments, 572 adults (recruited through Amazon Mechanical Turk) read 1 of 6 arguments about the basis for IP protection (incentives, natural rights, expressive rights, plagiarism, commons, or no argument). Participants then reported their general support for IP protection. Participants also reported their evaluations of 2 scenarios that involved infringement of IP rights, including cases in which there were mitigating experiences (e.g., the copier acknowledged the original source), and completed several demographic questions. Three primary findings emerged: (a) exposure to the importance of the public commons (and to a lesser extent, exposure to the argument that plagiarism is the basis of IP protection) led participants to become less supportive of IP protection than the incentives, natural rights, expressive rights, and control conditions; (b) people believed that infringement was more acceptable if the infringer acknowledged the original creator of the work; and (c) older adults and women were especially likely to see infringement as problematic. These findings illustrate several ways in which lay beliefs are at odds with legal doctrine, and suggest that people's views about IP protection can be shaped in certain ways by learning the basis for IP rights. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Intellectual property protection (IPP) using obfuscation in C, VHDL, and Verilog coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Bäse, Uwe; Castillo, Encarni; Botella, Guillermo; Parrilla, L.; García, Antonio

    2011-06-01

    One of the big challenges in the design of embedded systems today is how to combine design reuse and intellectual property protection (IPP). Strong IP schemes such as hardware dongle or layout watermarking usually have a very limited design reuse for different FPGA/ASIC design platforms. Some techniques also do not fit well with protection of software in embedded microprocessors. Another approach to IPP that allows an easy design reuse and has low costs but a somehow reduced security is code "obfuscation." Obfuscation is a method to hide the design concept, or program algorithm included in the C or HDL source by using one or more transformations of the original code. Obfuscation methods include, for instance, renaming identifiers, removing comments or formatting of the code. More sophisticated obfuscation methods include data splitting or merging, and control flow changes. This paper shows strength and weakness of method obfuscating C, VHDL and Verilog code.

  18. Remote Memory Access Protocol Target Node Intellectual Property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Omar

    2013-01-01

    The MagnetoSpheric Multiscale (MMS) mission had a requirement to use the Remote Memory Access Protocol (RMAP) over its SpaceWire network. At the time, no known intellectual property (IP) cores were available for purchase. Additionally, MMS preferred to implement the RMAP functionality with control over the low-level details of the design. For example, not all the RMAP standard functionality was needed, and it was desired to implement only the portions of the RMAP protocol that were needed. RMAP functionality had been previously implemented in commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) products, but the IP core was not available for purchase. The RMAP Target IP core is a VHDL (VHSIC Hardware Description Language description of a digital logic design suitable for implementation in an FPGA (field-programmable gate array) or ASIC (application-specific integrated circuit) that parses SpaceWire packets that conform to the RMAP standard. The RMAP packet protocol allows a network host to access and control a target device using address mapping. This capability allows SpaceWire devices to be managed in a standardized way that simplifies the hardware design of the device, as well as the development of the software that controls the device. The RMAP Target IP core has some features that are unique and not specified in the RMAP standard. One such feature is the ability to automatically abort transactions if the back-end logic does not respond to read/write requests within a predefined time. When a request times out, the RMAP Target IP core automatically retracts the request and returns a command response with an appropriate status in the response packet s header. Another such feature is the ability to control the SpaceWire node or router using RMAP transactions in the extended address range. This allows the SpaceWire network host to manage the SpaceWire network elements using RMAP packets, which reduces the number of protocols that the network host needs to support.

  19. Intellectual Property and the Tourism Industry: From ACTA Protests towards a Restrictive Interpretation of Innovation Regulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Speriusi-Vlad Alin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2012 became reality James Boyle’s desire exposed in his essay from 1997 regarding a politics of intellectual property concerning the great deal of attention that must be paid to the Intellectual Property. At that time Boyle was disappointed by the lack of attention from lawyers, scholars, legal academics and the media for the Clinton administration’s proposal for copyright on the Net, a document that provided the blueprint of domestic and international regulatory efforts to expand intellectual property rights. Certainly this was not the case with ACTA where the public media forced by the private citizen’s protests tried to weight both the benefits and the costs of the new protection standards brought by the new international convention. After those moments Intellectual Property regulations are no more an esoteric and arcane field, something that is only interesting and comprehensible to the practitioners in the field, but a matter of public interests like the environment which arouse the attention of all the persons. In this way we all become aware that intellectual property radiates beyond the legal frame and interferes with several aspects of our lives, including our free time and the tourism consequently.

  20. Information Wants To Be Shared: An Alternative Framework for Approaching Intellectual Property Disputes in an Information Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavani, Herman T.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the debate over intellectual property rights for digital media. Topics include why intellectual property should be protected; the evolution of copyright law; fair use doctrine; case studies; the philosophical theories of property, including labor theory, utilitarian theory, and personality theory; natural law theory; the social role of…

  1. 75 FR 8137 - Coordination and Strategic Planning of the Federal Effort Against Intellectual Property...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    ...: The Joint Strategic Plan. The IPEC is currently working with the interagency advisory committee to... property rights in other countries by: Working with other countries to reduce intellectual property crimes.... Provide examples of existing successful agreements, in the U.S. or abroad, that have had a significant...

  2. The Management Of Intellectual Property In A Romanian State University Where Research Represents A Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tîţu, Aurel Mihail; Oprean, Constantin; Răulea, Andreea Simina

    2015-07-01

    The transition to the knowledge-based economy and society requires adaptation to constant change that implies intellectual property as a multidimensional concept that continually leaves its mark on generations contributing to their well-being in obvious and undeniable ways. The main objective of this article was to assess the present level of the management of intellectual property in a state university in Romania displaying their strengths and weaknesses. The overall objective of the work is to analyze the state of the art in a Romanian state university in order to find solutions to the current problems that the Romanian scientific environment is facing. The conclusions drawn in the study converge in directions and proposals for improving the way in which the intellectual property is regarded and its management in the state universities of Romania.

  3. Intellectual property rights related to the genetically modified glyphosate tolerant soybeans in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Roberta L; Lage, Celso L S; Vasconcellos, Alexandre G

    2011-06-01

    The present work analyzes the different modalities of protection of the intellectual creations in the biotechnology agricultural field. Regarding the Brazilian legislations related to the theme (the Industrial Property Law - no. 9. 279/96 and the Plant Variety Protection Law - no. 9. 456/97), and based in the international treaties signed by Brazil, the present work points to the inclusions of each of them, as well as to their interfaces using as reference the case study of glyphosate tolerant genetically modified soybean. For this case study, Monsanto's pipelines patents were searched and used to analyze the limits of patent protection in respect to others related to the Intellectual Property (IP) laws. Thus, it was possible to elucidate the complex scenario of the Intellectual Property of the glyphosate tolerant soybeans, since for the farmer it is hard to correlate the royalties payment with the IP enterprise's rights.

  4. Intuitive intellectual property law: A nationally-representative test of the plagiarism fallacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast, Anne A; Olson, Kristina R; Mandel, Gregory N

    2017-01-01

    Studies with convenience samples have suggested that the lay public's conception of intellectual property laws, including how the laws should regulate and why they should exist, are largely incommensurate with the actual intended purpose of intellectual property laws and their history in the United States. In this paper, we test whether these findings generalize to a more diverse and representative sample. The major findings from past work were replicated in the current study. When presented with several potential reasons for IP protection, the lay public endorsed plagiarism and felt that acknowledging the original source of a creative work should make copying that work permissible-viewpoints strongly divergent from lawmakers' intent and the law itself. In addition, we replicate the finding that lay people know remarkably little about intellectual property laws more generally and report little experience as users or creators of creative works.

  5. Journal of Intellectual Property Rights, 2002-2010: A Bibliometric Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dillip K. Swain

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the findings of a bibliometric study of Journal of Intellectual Property Rights. A total of 332 articles carrying 1,541 journal citations during the period of 2002-2010 were analyzed. 471 authors contributed articles during the nine years. Due to the absolute domination of solo contributions, the visibility of collaborative contribution was found remarkably less. About one third of the total publications received citations, more than half of the cited articles carried just 1 citation, one fourth got 2 citations, and the rest received citations between 3 to 9 times. The average number of citations against all published articles was found to be 0.66 per article. Moreover, it was discovered that self-citations among authors constituted 22.01% of the total cited scholarly papers. The top five cited journals were Journal of Intellectual Property Rights, European Intellectual Property Review, Research Policy, World Patent Information, Trademark Reporter, and Current Science.

  6. GENERAL GUIDELINES CONCERNING THE RELATION INTERNATIONAL INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY BUSINESS VERSUS HUMAN RIGHTS AND CIVIL LIBERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Speriusi-Vlad Alin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Today, the intellectual property protection is no longer an absolute social and legal that justifies adoption of any measures necessary to protect it. Initially seen as the prerequisite for sustainable development, implementation of new technologies, and encouragement of international trade, the intellectual property, especially prior to ACTA (Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement international trial implementation, and also thereafter, was increasingly identified as a source of violation of fundamental rights and civil liberties, i.e. the right to protection of personal data, the right to privacy, freedom to send and receive information freedom of information, freedom to contract, and freedom to carry out economic activities (freedom of commerce. As far as international trade transactions have often a component of intellectual property that requires to be protected, it is necessary to identify the landmarks, the rules establishing de facto limits in order to protect the intellectual property without risk of infringement of fundamental rights and civil liberties of other persons, in particular users or potential users of goods and services incorporating intellectual property. The best guidelines in this regard may be provided by the CJEU (Court of Justice of the European Union case-law both due to its reasoning underlying the decision of the Parliament to reject ACTA ratification and the fact that the case-law of this Court, especially the most recent one, is highly complex and nuanced, not denying in any way the importance of intellectual property, and identifying certain cases where their primacy persist and whose analysis leads to laying down some general rules in the field.

  7. [Research on basic questions of intellectual property rights of acupuncture and moxibustion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Guo-Feng; Wu, Xiao-Dong; Han, Yan-Jing; Meng, Hong; Wang, Xin

    2011-12-01

    Along with the modernization and internationalization of acupuncture-moxibustion (acu-moxibustion), the issue of intellectual property rights has been becoming prominent and remarkable increasingly. In the present paper, the authors explain the basic issues of acu-moxibustion learning from the concept, scope, subject, object, contents and acquisition way of intellectual property rights. To make clear these questions will help us inherit and carry forward the existing civilization achievements of acu-moxibustion, and unceasingly bring forth new ideas and further improvement in clinical application, so as to serve the people's health in a better way.

  8. Intellectual property enforcement at the EU border: the challenge of private imports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Clement Salung; Riis, Thomas; Schovsbo, Jens Hemmingsen

    2012-01-01

    Today, consumers in the EU are able to purchase counterfeit and pirated goods directly from sellers in non-EU member states (e.g. in Asia) that send the goods in small consignments, typically by post, directly to the EU consumers. This provides a challenge to right holders because, unlike commerc...... controversial results and distort traditional intellectual property law thinking....... commercial importers of counterfeit and pirated goods, a consumer who imports such goods for his or her private use does not infringe any intellectual property rights (IPR). This article discusses how and to what extent right holders may nonetheless use the Customs Regulation to enforce their IPR against...

  9. Technology and intellectual property strategy of a firm: A view through the commons theory lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukundan Raghavan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Strategy theory positions technology as a crucial resource of private value creation while commons theory provides governance structures pertinent to resource utilisation. The widening disconnect in the approach towards leveraging a resource and its governance increases the pressure on intellectual property that links strategy and commons. We discern in this work the existence of an implicit relationship between strategy and commons. Based on a multidisciplinary study of strategy, commons, and intellectual property theories, we propose patent pools in the form of semicommons as a strategic appropriation mechanism that balances technology strategy, IP strategy and commons in the pursuit of value creation.

  10. The intellectual property management for data sharing in a German liver cancer research network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shan; Ganzinger, Matthias; Knaup, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Sharing data in biomedical research networks has great potential benefits including efficient use of resources, avoiding duplicate experiments and promoting collaboration. However, concerns from data producers about difficulties of getting proper acknowledgement for their contributions are becoming obstacles for efficient and network wide data sharing in reality. Effective and convenient ways of intellectual property management and acknowledging contributions to the data producers are required. This paper analyzed the system requirements for intellectual property management in a German liver cancer research network and proposed solutions for facilitating acknowledgement of data contributors using informatics tools instead of pure policy level strategies.

  11. An assessment of prominent proposals to amend intellectual property regimes using a human rights framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Timmermann

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A wide range of proposals to alleviate the negative effects of intellectual property regimes is currently under discussion. This article offers a critical evaluation of six of these proposals: the Health Impact Fund, the Access to Knowledge movement, prize systems, open innovation models, compulsory licenses and South-South collaborations. An assessment on how these proposals target the human rights affected by intellectual property will be provided. The conflicting human rights that will be individually discussed are the rights: to benefit from one’s own scientific work, to benefit from the advancement of science, to participate in scientific enterprises and to self-determination.

  12. An assessment of prominent proposals to amend intellectual property regimes using a human rights framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Timmermann

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A wide range of proposals to alleviate the negative effects of intellectual property regimes is currently under discussion. This article offers a critical evaluation of six of these proposals: the Health Impact Fund, the Access to Knowledge movement, prize systems, open innovation models, compulsory licenses and South-South collaborations. An assessment on how these proposals target the human rights affected by intellectual property will be provided. The conflicting human rights that will be individually discussed are the rights: to benefit from one’s own scientific work, to benefit from the advancement of science, to participate in scientific enterprises and to self-determination.

  13. Global regulation of international intellectual property through Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS: The European Union and Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Aurélie Laurence Defossez

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – This paper focuses on the regulation of copyrights at international level by comparing the situation under the TRIPS agreement in Brazil and in the European Union. Methodology/approach/design – This article analyses standards and literature on regulation, as well as the role of TRIPS agreement. Attention was specially drawn to the market failure theory for justifying regulation, advocated by Baldwin & Cave. The TRIPS agreement will be analysed through Baldwin’s five criteria for good regulation. Findings – The TRIPS agreement substantially widened the scope of governance of copyrights but imposes the WTO view on the matter. Notwithstanding its flaws, the TRIPS agreement remains the most comprehensive international agreement on intellectual property. According to Baldwin’s theory, the TRIPS agreement as a regulation is a good regulation. Indeed, it achieves the major part of the goals it set. However, some of the declared goals have never come to existence and had been replaced by other goals. On the overall, the TRIPS agreement has the capacity to regulate international intellectual property. Originality/value – This paper analyses the TRIPS agreement as a way forward in the harmonization of the rules on intellectual property.

  14. Effect of a Hippotherapy Intervention Program on Static Balance and Strength in Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giagazoglou, Paraskevi; Arabatzi, Fotini; Dipla, Konstantina; Liga, Maria; Kellis, Eleftherios

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of a hippotherapy program on static balance and strength in adolescents with intellectual disability (ID). Nineteen adolescents with moderate ID were assigned either an experimental group (n = 10) or a control group (n = 9). The experimental group attended a 10-week hippotherapy program. To assess…

  15. Manufacturing “Culture”: The Promotion of Intellectual Property Rights in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Han

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This research examines China’s persistent effort to promote intellectual property rights (IPR since the 1980s. Laws of intellectual property were among the first batch of legislations in China’s market reform. Since the mid-1980s, the state propaganda apparatus launched nationwide campaigns in five-year cycles to “educate” Chinese people on the Party’s new market-oriented law and policy, including laws of IPR. When intellectual property became core state policy in the 2000s, new initiatives emerged under law promotion campaigns to “raise awareness” of intellectual property. Starting the late 2000s, the promotion of IPR became stand-alone endeavors devoted to an innovation-friendly “culture” of intellectual property that facilitated compliance with the law and promoted industrial growth in cultural and media sectors. The notion of “IPR culture” played a key role in governmental promotion endeavors after China developed its national IPR strategy in the mid-2000s. In official discourse, “IPR culture” is instrumental and serves to shape mind-sets and regulate behaviors. It seeks to extensively use the Leninist media system to impose top-down pre-packaged understanding of intellectual property. While engaging actively with Western theories and corporate practices, IPR propaganda in China marginalizes and represses bottom-up challenges to the official stance in protection of private cultural property. China’s intellectual property propaganda campaigns are part of the state’s efforts to legitimate and facilitate the market-oriented reform. Since the late 1970s, the market reform proceeded side-by-side with ruthless repression of bottom-up resistance. IPR stood out in the state’s reform scheme at a time when China’s (reinsertion into global capitalist political economy took place concurrently with communication industries playing a key role to propel growth and IPR systems serving as the cornerstone for the market. The

  16. Management of intellectual property in the football clubs: technology strategy and tactics (for example, municipal institution of FC «Rubin»)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guzel I. Gumerova; Elmira Sh. Shaimieva

    2014-01-01

    Objective to form the conceptual framework in the field of intellectual property management in football clubs to develop directions of intellectual property management development in FC quotRubinquot Kazan...

  17. THERRP: a thermodynamic properties program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deeds, R.S.

    1977-05-01

    The computer program THERPP, a program that calculates the thermodynamic properties of light hydrocarbons and mixtures of light hydrocarbons is documented. A specific pressure--temperature or pressure--enthalpy grid is input to obtain properties in the desired region. THERPP is a modification of the program HSGC. Thermodynamic properties are calculated using Starling's modification to the Benedict-Webb-Rubin equation of state.

  18. Seed systems and intellectual property rights: an inventory from five sub Saharan African Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahop, M.T.; Jonge, de B.; Munyi, P.

    2013-01-01

    Many developing countries are in the process of developing or updating their national Intellectual Property Rights (IPRs) systems in order to adhere to international agreements. With respect to the agricultural sector in developing countries, the importance of implementing a Plant Variety Protection

  19. Can you shrinkwrap a cow? Protections available for the intellectual property of the animal breeding industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, E R; Weigel, K

    2007-12-01

    There are currently four main intellectual property protection statutory schemes available: copyright, trade secret, trademark and patent. Each of these protects a different aspect of intellectual property, which leaves gaps of protection when an innovation does not fit squarely within the boundaries of the statutes. Contracts allow the industry to tailor the protection desired. One very common approach is to license the product via contract. Licences allow intellectual property owners to retain ownership and give permission to others to use the product. Although there are several types of licences, the most common is the field of use licence, which limits the licensee's use of the product. This often leads to price discrimination where various levels of restriction are offered at corresponding prices. The more rights retained by the owner, the more restricted the buyer is and the lower the purchase price allowing customers to choose the level of restriction they are willing to accept. Therefore, the different uses and needs of various customers can be accounted for and reflected in the price. The animal breeding industry is currently struggling to protect their innovations falling into these statutory gaps. The protection for animal breeding industry innovations is most likely through contract law rather than traditional intellectual property law. By taking advantage of the unique nature of contracts, industry will be able to tailor protection and pricing to best suit the variety of customers and uses for the products sold.

  20. Curriculum, Intellectual Property Rights and Open Educational Resources in British Universities--and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkridge, David; Armellini, Alejandro; Nikoi, Samuel; Rowlett, Tania; Witthaus, Gabi

    2010-01-01

    Is the curriculum in British universities being influenced by decisions about ownership of intellectual property rights (IPR) in "open educational resources" (OERs) that are available online under Creative Commons licenses, free of charge? This paper provides the context for, describes and analyses three significant examples in British…

  1. The ethics of intellectual property rights in an era of globalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Aakash Kaushik; Warsh, Jonathan; Kesselheim, Aaron S

    2013-01-01

    Since the 1980s, developed countries, led by the United States and the countries of the European Union, have sought to incorporate intellectual property rights provisions into global trade agreements. These countries successfully negotiated the World Trade Organization's 1994 Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS), which required developing countries to adopt intellectual property provisions comparable to developed countries. In this manuscript, we review the policy controversy surrounding TRIPS and examine the two main ethical arguments articulated in its support--a theory of natural rights and a utilitarian argument. We contend that these theories provide insufficient bases for an intellectual property rights regime that compromises access to essential medicines in the developing world. While the policy community has engaged in active debate around the policy effects of TRIPS, scholars have not thoroughly considered the full ethical underpinnings of those policy arguments. We believe that a more robust understanding of the ethical implications of the agreement should inform policy discussions in the future. © 2013 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  2. Psychometric Properties of a Sleep Questionnaire for Use in Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Anneke P. H. M.; Didden, Robert; Korzilius, Hubert; Braam, Wiebe; Collin, Philippe; Smits, Marcel G.; Curfs, Leopold M. G.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the psychometric properties of one part of the Sleep Questionnaire developed by Simonds and Parraga (SQ-SP; 1982), a questionnaire that is frequently used to explore sleep problems and behaviors related to sleep in individuals with intellectual disability (ID). The SQ-SP was completed for 345 individuals with ID (sleep clinic n = 146;…

  3. Curbing International Piracy of Intellectual Property. Policy Options for a Major Exporting Country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Gary M.; Marcou, George T.

    This report of the International Piracy Project addresses three major topics: (1) The Costs and Complications of Piracy; (2) Rights Enforcement Today; and (3) Policy Options for Curbing Piracy. The first section discusses piracy of copyrights, patents, and other intellectual property, including economic losses and damage to the finances and…

  4. Recent Developments in Intellectual Property Law: Avoiding Traps in the Pursuit of University Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garabedian, Todd E.

    2004-01-01

    U.S. patent laws have undergone many changes in recent years, both through Congress and the courts. This article summarizes recent developments relating to judicial decisions, legislative initiatives, and patent office policy, and provides some practical advice relating to administration of intellectual property. As illustrated by the latest…

  5. Comparing regulatory treatment of intellectual property at WTO and EU level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsmore, Matthew James

    2012-01-01

    Comprising the technologies, brands, artistic expression, and so on, attached to goods and services, intellectual property (IP) is an omnipresent feature of modern trade movement. Given the geographical scope of the businesses and consumers that create and use IP to give their goods and services...

  6. Property beyond princely authority: the intellectual and legal roots of Ulrik Huber's fundamental law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nifterik, G.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper I argue for a rule-of-law-reading of Ulrik Huber’s fundamental law on freedom of property. My aim is to show that there is enough contemporary intellectual and legal context for such a reading. I do so by arguing along three lines: the medieval tradition that rooted the origin of

  7. Bridging the gap: Private international law principles for intellectual property law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eechoud, M.

    2016-01-01

    This past decade has seen a veritable surge of development of ‘soft law’ private international instruments for intellectual property. A global network has been formed made up of academics and practitioners who work on the intersection of these domains. This article examines the synthesizing work of

  8. Distributed Authorship: A Feminist Case-Study Framework for Studying Intellectual Property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Sarah

    2003-01-01

    Recent, highly productive discussions of intellectual property and authorship in English studies have concentrated on two broad areas of inquiry. Scholars have repeatedly asserted fair use principles to mobilize resistance against the legal trends restricting texts' circulation. At the same time, growing appreciation of student writing and other…

  9. Intellectual Property and Global Health: From Corporate Social Responsibility to the Access to Knowledge Movement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermann, C.A.; Belt, van den H.

    2013-01-01

    Any system for the protection of intellectual property rights (IPRs) has three main kinds of distributive effects. It will determine or influence: (a) the types of objects that will be developed and for which IPRs will be sought; (b) the differential access various people will have to these objects;

  10. Public research in plant breeding and intellectual property rights: a new call for new institutional policies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tripp, R.; Eaton, D.J.F.; Louwaars, N.P.

    2006-01-01

    This paper addresses the issue of using intellectual property rights (IPRs) in public sector breeding, and the potential impact on breeding strategies and on the costs and benefits. The paper is based on a study on the impact of IPRs in the breeding industry in developing countries. There are three

  11. A decision framework to evaluate intellectual property strategies in the medical nutrition market.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weenen, T.C.; Jentink, A.W.; Pronker, E.S.; Commandeur, H.R.; Claassen, E.

    2013-01-01

    In the medical nutrition (MN) market, insights into the motives driving intellectual property (IP) protection strategies remain unclear. This emerging market has expressed the pressing need for clarity on the subject of applicable IP methods. The aim of this study is therefore to evaluate the role

  12. University Faculty and the Value of Their Intellectual Property: Comparing IP in Teaching and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentschke, Guilbert C.

    2017-01-01

    This chapter describes the protectionist and access functions of intellectual property for the teaching and research work of university faculty. The degree to which an individual piece of IP is protected or made accessible to others depends in large measure on its market-related characteristics, including costs of production, availability of…

  13. A decision framework to evaluate intellectual property strategies in the medical nutrition market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weenen, T.C.; Jentink, A.; Commandeur, H.R.; Pronker, E.S.; Claassen, E.

    2013-01-01

    In the medical nutrition (MN) market, insights into the motives driving intellectual property (IP) protection strategies remain unclear. This emerging market has expressed the pressing need for clarity on the subject of applicable IP methods. The aim of this study is therefore to evaluate the role

  14. Innovation and Competition: Conflicts over Intellectual Property Rights in New Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelson, Pamela

    1987-01-01

    Addresses conditions and concerns involved in accommodating the interests of both innovators of new technologies and the general public. Discusses the tension that exists in intellectual property law between innovators and competitors. Focuses on cases dealing with computer software and semiconductor chip designs, genetically-engineered life…

  15. The Implications of Incumbent Intellectual Property Strategies for Open Source Software Success and Commercialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Wen

    2012-01-01

    While open source software (OSS) emphasizes open access to the source code and avoids the use of formal appropriability mechanisms, there has been little understanding of how the existence and exercise of formal intellectual property rights (IPR) such as patents influence the direction of OSS innovation. This dissertation seeks to bridge this gap…

  16. 32 CFR 37.550 - May I accept intellectual property as cost sharing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... should not count costs of patents and other intellectual property (e.g., copyrighted material, including software) as cost sharing, because: (1) It is difficult to assign values to these intangible contributions... offer the use of commercially available software for which there is an established license fee for use...

  17. 78 FR 16875 - Request of the U.S. Intellectual Property Enforcement Coordinator for Public Comments...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-19

    ... BUDGET Request of the U.S. Intellectual Property Enforcement Coordinator for Public Comments: Legislative... of the rollout event is available at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vwgYahyQ754&feature=youtu.be... 22, 2013. ADDRESSES: All comments should be submitted electronically via http://www.regulations.gov...

  18. The Effect of Intellectual Property Standards on the Catch-Up Process Of Emerging Market Economies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darendeli, Izzet; Brandl, Kristin Martina; Hamilton, III, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    The catch-up process of emerging market economies is dependent on multiple factors, such as local governmental regulations but also global industry developments. We investigate how intellectual property (IP) protection standards affect this catch-up process. The alignment of these standards...

  19. The Effect of Intellectual Property Standards on the Catch-Up Process Of Emerging Market Economies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darendeli, Izzet Sidki; Brandl, Kristin; Mudambi, Ram

    The catch-up process of emerging market economies is dependent on multiple factors, such as local governmental regulations but also global industry developments. We investigate how intellectual property (IP) protection standards affect this catch-up process. The alignment of these standards...

  20. The Governance of European Intellectual Property Rights: Toward a Differentiated Community Approach.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kica, Evisa; Groenendijk, Nico

    2009-01-01

    In this article we argue that the regulation of Intellectual Property (IP) protection should go beyond the traditional regulatory models and follow a more flexible regulatory framework. Considering the range of industrial needs and developments, the article develops a differentiated Community IP

  1. Overprotection and Protection Overlaps in Intellectual Property Law - the Need for Horizontal Fair Use Defences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Senftleben, M.R.F.

    2011-01-01

    During the last decades, intellectual property protection has been expanded continuously. New technologies were found eligible for patent protection. New types of marks have been recognized in trademark law. Copyright law is no longer confined to the cultural domain. In parallel, the exclusive

  2. Research on Intellectual Property Right Problems of Peer-to-Peer Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ying; Li, Mingshu; Chen, Meizhang; Zheng, Shengli

    2002-01-01

    Discusses digital intellectual property rights relating to peer-to-peer networks, using Napster as an example. Suggests anti-piracy solutions to prevent litigation and considers how libraries can develop potential service models using peer-to-peer networks, including the development of personal libraries on the Internet, interlibrary loan,…

  3. Intellectual Property Rights and the productivity effects of MNE affiliates on host-country firms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, R.A.L.M.; Vaal, A. de

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the impact of increased Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) protection on the productivity effects that MNE affiliates exert on local host-country firms. Conceptually, we argue that IPR protection has two opposing effects: On the one hand, it weakens the productivity

  4. Protection of Geographical Indication Intellectual Property of Tea in Zhejiang Province

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Zhiguo; Xiong, Wanzhen; Wang, Shuting; Zhong, Xuebin

    2013-01-01

    As to tea resources in Zhejiang Province at present, there are 8 kinds of national geographical indication products, 23 national geographical indication trademarks, and 7 kinds of national geographical indication of agricultural products. From the geographical indication protection, geographical indication trademark registration, geographical indication registration of agricultural products, we conduct a analysis on the current protection of geographical indication intellectual property of te...

  5. An interactive multimedia program to prevent HIV transmission in men with intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Jennifer; Clark, Khaya; Sarno, Karen

    2014-05-01

    The efficacy of a computer-based interactive multimedia HIV/AIDS prevention program for men with intellectual disability (ID) was examined using a quasi-experimental within-subjects design. Thirty-seven men with mild to moderate intellectual disability evaluated the program. The pretest and posttest instruments assessed HIV/AIDS knowledge (high-risk fluids, HIV transmission, and condom facts) and condom application skills. All outcome measures showed statistically significant gains from pretest to posttest, with medium to large effect sizes. In addition, a second study was conducted with twelve service providers who work with men with ID. Service providers reviewed the HIV/AIDS prevention program, completed a demographics questionnaire, and a program satisfaction survey. Overall, service providers rated the program highly on several outcome measures (stimulation, relevance, and usability).

  6. Implementation of a new social skills training program for adults with intellectual disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Sequera Fernández

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study has the purpose to develop and apply a new training program in order to promote the use of social skills in a group of adults with intellectual disabilities. It contains a quasi-experimental methodological design to prove the program effectiveness. The sample used consists of 21 adults with intellectual disabilities, users of an occupational therapy day entity (10 persons participated in the program and 11 did not. The social skills were evaluated using an adjusted version of the Social Skills Scale Model of Gismero (2010. The outcomes of this study show a significant improvement in the overall score of the group included in the program in comparison with the rest of the group. Likewise, the group under the program obtained an increase in the scores within 5 out of 6 subscales evaluated. The identified improvements are key elements for the individual development of this group. The implications of the results are discussed.

  7. Development of Reading Comprehension Skills among Students with Intellectual Disabilities Using Technologically-Based Reading Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macklin, Ella M.

    2016-01-01

    This research paper reported the results from research conducted regarding technologically-based reading comprehension programs for students who have intellectual disabilities. It provided evidence-based research and theoretical bases for learning (i.e. Zone of Generativity, Constructivism, Self-Efficacy) on the issue of these students not being…

  8. Effects of a Mindfulness-Based Smoking Cessation Program for an Adult with Mild Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nirbhay N.; Lancioni, Giulio E.; Winton, Alan S. W.; Singh, Ashvind N. A.; Singh, Judy; Singh, Angela D. A.

    2011-01-01

    Smoking is a major risk factor for a number of health conditions and many smokers find it difficult to quit smoking without specific interventions. We developed and used a mindfulness-based smoking cessation program with a 31-year-old man with mild intellectual disabilities who had been a smoker for 17 years. The mindfulness-based smoking…

  9. Occupational Therapy Home Program for Children with Intellectual Disabilities: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuang, Yee-Pay; Ho, Guang-Sheng; Su, Chwen-Yng

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of a proposed occupational therapy home program (OTHP) for children with intellectual disabilities (ID). Children with ID were randomly and equally assigned to OTHP or to no OTHP groups. The primary outcome measures were Canadian Occupational Performance, Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor…

  10. Depression in People with Intellectual Disability: An Evaluation of a Staff-Administered Treatment Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillivray, Jane A.; McCabe, Marita P.; Kershaw, Mavis M.

    2008-01-01

    The prevalence of co-morbid depression in people with intellectual disability (ID) provides a strong rationale for the early identification and treatment of individuals at risk. The aim of this study was to evaluate a staff-administered group CBT program for the treatment of depression in people with mild ID. A sample of 13 staff employed at two…

  11. Peer Mentors in a Postsecondary Education Program for Students with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Justina A.; Gibbons, Melinda M.; Cihak, David F.

    2014-01-01

    Few researchers have examined peer mentors in a postsecondary program for students with intellectual disabilities. Peer mentors (N=39) were surveyed regarding their TypeFocus personality type and how the experience of mentoring affected them. The mentoring experience was assessed qualitatively and results are reported. Results indicated a strong…

  12. [On the interrelationship between standardization and intellectual property rights of acu-moxibustion therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mai-lan; Chang, Xiao-rong; Yuan, Yi-qin

    2014-10-01

    Under the condition of knowledge economy, the acu-moxibustion standardization definitely involves intellectual property rights. Then, what is the relationship between the standardization and the intellectual property rights of acu-moxibustion? The authors of the present paper hold that it is not only exclusive, but also syncretic. If their relationship cannot be handled properly, their own respective development will be affected adversely. Therefore, a proper handling of the relationship between the two is of great practical significance. The present paper makes a comprehensive analysis about their interaction (mutual promotion and mutual inhibition), similarities (systemic composition, dynamic implementation course, standardization-rated order and ultimate targets) and differences (in properties, working components, secret requirement, effectiveness-time limitation, usage cost, etc).

  13. Ethnobotany/ethnopharmacology and mass bioprospecting: issues on intellectual property and benefit-sharing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soejarto, D D; Fong, H H S; Tan, G T; Zhang, H J; Ma, C Y; Franzblau, S G; Gyllenhaal, C; Riley, M C; Kadushin, M R; Pezzuto, J M; Xuan, L T; Hiep, N T; Hung, N V; Vu, B M; Loc, P K; Dac, L X; Binh, L T; Chien, N Q; Hai, N V; Bich, T Q; Cuong, N M; Southavong, B; Sydara, K; Bouamanivong, S; Ly, H M; Thuy, Tran Van; Rose, W C; Dietzman, G R

    2005-08-22

    Ethnobotany/ethnopharmacology has contributed to the discovery of many important plant-derived drugs. Field explorations to seek and document indigenous/traditional medical knowledge (IMK/TMK), and/or the biodiversity with which the IMK/TMK is attached, and its conversion into a commercialized product is known as bioprospecting or biodiversity prospecting. When performed in a large-scale operation, the effort is referred to as mass bioprospecting. Experiences from the mass bioprospecting efforts undertaken by the United States National Cancer Institute, the National Cooperative Drug Discovery Groups (NCDDG) and the International Cooperative Biodiversity Groups (ICBG) programs demonstrate that mass bioprospecting is a complex process, involving expertise from diverse areas of human endeavors, but central to it is the Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) that recognizes issues on genetic access, prior informed consent, intellectual property and the sharing of benefits that may arise as a result of the effort. Future mass bioprospecting endeavors must take heed of the lessons learned from past and present experiences in the planning for a successful mass bioprospecting venture.

  14. Intellectual Property Is No Game: An Interview with James G. Gatto, JD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Copying within the games industry is reportedly widespread. Some people attribute this to the belief that this is just the way it is and has always been based on the notion that the "idea" for a game is not protectable. But as the game market grows, so too do the losses from copying suffered by game innovators. A contributing factor is that many game developers do not develop comprehensive strategies for protecting the valuable intellectual property that they create. In the following interview, Bill Ferguson, PhD, Editor of Games for Health Journal, discusses the hazards and ways to protect health game assets with intellectual property expert Jim Gatto, Leader of the Social Media, Entertainment & Technology Team at the respected law firm of Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP.

  15. [Essential medicines and the TRIPS Agreement: collision between the right to health and intellectual property rights].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard Soto, Raúl

    2015-03-01

    The strengthening of pharmaceutical patent protection globally puts strains on access to essential medicines. According to the present paper, this process has led to the collision of the intellectual property rights adopted in the World Trade Organization (WTO) Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) Agreement and the right to health stated in the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR). Several controversies disputed in the WTO illustrate the confrontation between countries with a powerful pharmaceutical industry and the interests of developing countries. It is concluded that the TRIPS-plus rules subscribed to by developing countries in free trade agreements which give the pharmaceutical patent holder more rights than those stipulated in the original TRIPS Agreement are incompatible with the obligations to provide access to essential medicines under the right to health of the ICESCR.

  16. Promoting global health: utilizing WHO to integrate public health, innovation and intellectual property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Tim K; Liang, Bryan A

    2012-12-01

    The appropriate role of innovation and intellectual property (IP) in global public health is a controversial issue. Discussion is one-sided, with potential benefits advocated by industry in stark contrast to condemnation by certain civil society players. WHO's Public Health, Innovation and Intellectual Property Department (PHI) was established to address healthcare resource need for developing countries, assess impact of innovation and IP on access to medicines, explore innovative funding mechanisms for R&D and provide evidence-based policy-making recommendations in response to the changing global health landscape. Importantly, PHI could represent a potential forum to bridge shared, yet often diverse, interests and opportunities between various public and private stakeholders, a crucial issue for ensuring the future viability of WHO. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Space Shuttle, private enterprise and intellectual properties in the context of space manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosenball, S. N.; Kempf, R. F.

    1983-01-01

    It is a national policy to make the capabilities of the Space Transportat ion System available to a wide range of potential users. This includes its availability as a space manufacturing facility for commercial activities, which may be carried out on a reimbursable basis or as a joint endeavor with NASA, but with substantial private investment. In any high risk, long lead-time research and development activity directed towards commercialization, the protection afforded the results of the research and development under the laws relating to intellectual property rights may provide an important incentive for private investment. The paper reviews NASA's policies and practices for the protection of privately-established intellectual property rights involved in STS use, with particular emphasis on reimbursable launch agreements and joint endeavor agreements.

  18. Intellectual Property as a Drive for Sustainable Medical Tourism – The Ana Aslan case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolos Mihaela Daciana

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The present paper studies the way intellectual property rights may encourage sustainable medical tourism, meaning the advantages that a patent, traditional knowledge, a trademark, or other IP right may offer to a hospital in order to attract foreign patients. The analysis is done trough the Institute of Gerontology and Geriatrics “Ana Aslan” case study, seen not from a medical point of view but from the perspective of the intellectual property importance for the development of medical tourism. The Institute of Gerontology and Geriatrics “Ana Aslan” was founded in 1952 and become an international renowned center in the study and the diminishing of old age effects. Many celebrities (artist and state presidents came to receive treatment here, even though Romania had, at that time, a communist regime.

  19. [Improving global access to new vaccines: intellectual property, technology transfer, and regulatory pathways].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crager, Sara Eve

    2015-01-01

    The 2012 World Health Assembly Global Vaccine Action Plan called for global access to new vaccines within 5 years of licensure. Current approaches have proven insufficient to achieve sustainable vaccine pricing within such a timeline. Paralleling the successful strategy of generic competition to bring down drug prices, a clear consensus is emerging that market entry of multiple suppliers is a critical factor in expeditiously bringing down prices of new vaccines. In this context, key target objectives for improving access to new vaccines include overcoming intellectual property obstacles, streamlining regulatory pathways for biosimilar vaccines, and reducing market entry timelines for developing-country vaccine manufacturers by transfer of technology and know-how. I propose an intellectual property, technology, and know-how bank as a new approach to facilitate widespread access to new vaccines in low- and middle-income countries by efficient transfer of patented vaccine technologies to multiple developing-country vaccine manufacturers.

  20. Improving global access to new vaccines: intellectual property, technology transfer, and regulatory pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crager, Sara Eve

    2014-11-01

    The 2012 World Health Assembly Global Vaccine Action Plan called for global access to new vaccines within 5 years of licensure. Current approaches have proven insufficient to achieve sustainable vaccine pricing within such a timeline. Paralleling the successful strategy of generic competition to bring down drug prices, a clear consensus is emerging that market entry of multiple suppliers is a critical factor in expeditiously bringing down prices of new vaccines. In this context, key target objectives for improving access to new vaccines include overcoming intellectual property obstacles, streamlining regulatory pathways for biosimilar vaccines, and reducing market entry timelines for developing-country vaccine manufacturers by transfer of technology and know-how. I propose an intellectual property, technology, and know-how bank as a new approach to facilitate widespread access to new vaccines in low- and middle-income countries by efficient transfer of patented vaccine technologies to multiple developing-country vaccine manufacturers.

  1. Canada and access to medicines in developing countries: intellectual property rights first.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lexchin, Joel

    2013-09-03

    Canadian reports have recommended that health as a human right must be Canada's overarching global commitment and that the primacy of human rights should be prioritized over other elements of international law including international trade and investment law as it applies to access to pharmaceuticals. This paper uses a series of case reports to examine Canada's commitment to this goal. Specifically it examines cases where improved access has been in conflict with increased intellectual property rights. The 6 cases are: Canada's position when 39 pharmaceutical companies took South Africa to court in 1998 over its legislation to allow parallel importation of patented medicines and to regulate the price of medications; the stance that Canada took in the negotiations around the Doha Declaration in 2001; the passage of Canada's Access to Medicines Regime in 2004 and subsequent attempts to amend the legislation in 2011 and 2012; Canada's involvement in the final declaration at the United Nations High-Level meeting on non-communicable diseases in 2012; Canada's views about the terms in the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement as expressed in 2009; and Canada's 2013 position on the extension of the exemption for least developed countries from having to comply with the terms of the Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights Agreement. In the first case Canada was neutral but in the remaining 5 cases Canada prioritized intellectual property rights over access. This position is consistent with how Canada has acted around domestic issues involving intellectual property rights for pharmaceutical products. Canada has supported strengthened rights despite the fact that their touted benefits have not been realized either domestically or in developing countries. As a result Canada has failed in its humanitarian duty to protect the human right to health in the form of safe and low cost medicines for the people in developing countries.

  2. Intellectual property and intangible assets: Alternative valuation and financing approaches for the knowledge economy in Luxembourg

    OpenAIRE

    Karius, Tim

    2016-01-01

    With the disappearance of the bank secrecy and loss of e-commerce tax in year 2015, Luxembourg will be confronted to an existential challenge. Therefore, Luxembourgish economy has to reinvent itself and develop new key drivers boosting country's economic growth. Well known for the strong fund industry, Luxembourg needs alternative burst of growth to ensure long-term sustainability. An option could be innovation that arises from a knowledge-based economy. Intellectual property (IP) and intelle...

  3. International intellectual property agreements as agents of sustainable development of developing countries

    OpenAIRE

    Ihugba, Bethel Uzoma; Onyesi, Ikenna Stanley

    2017-01-01

    The paper examines the implication of International Intellectual Property (ip) laws and agreements on the sustainable development of Least Developed Countries (ldcs) and Developed Countries (dcs) and suggests approaches for improving the development and wellbeing of people in the developing world through national ip laws. The paper argues that generally international ip agreements may appear biased against developing countries and most dcs are reluctant to challenge the status quo and/or use ...

  4. Application of the war of attrition game to the analysis of intellectual property disputes

    OpenAIRE

    Chávez-Angeles, Manuel G.; Sánchez-Medina, Patricia S.

    2015-01-01

    In many developing countries intellectual property infringement and the commerce of pirate goods is an entrepreneurial activity. Digital piracy is very often the only media for having access to music, cinema, books and software. At the same time, bio-prospecting and infringement of indigenous knowledge rights by international consortiums is usual in places with high biodiversity. In these arenas transnational actors interact with local communities. Accusations of piracy often go both ways. Th...

  5. Intellectual Property and the Changing of Information Professional Curricula: a huge necessity

    OpenAIRE

    Luciana Goulart Oliveira

    2010-01-01

    Information society represents a profound changing in the organization of the society and economy – a new paradigm – but, most of all it is a global phenomenon with potential for transforming social, economical and technical environment and activities performed by information specialists, because social reality is always affected by the infra-structure of available information. In this regard, the theme Intellectual Property has become one of the pillars of the new context of technolo...

  6. Taxing intellectual property transactions in developing countries : the case of pharmaceutical indusrty in Egypt and India

    OpenAIRE

    Khalil, Mahmoud Abdellatif

    2013-01-01

    Strengthening the protection measures of Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) in compliance with the TRIPS agreement creates a need for an appropriate tax treatment of IPR by developing countries. This need is important to stimulate locally developed IPR and protect the tax revenue arising from IPR transactions. This book examines the tax treatment of IPR in Egypt and India with refernce to pharmaceutical industry. The book employs a mixed research approach consisting of legal reasoning and eco...

  7. Intellectual property rights and research disclosure in the university environment: preserving the commercialization option and optimizing market interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patino, Robert

    2009-03-01

    Clinical and basic scientists at academic medical and biomedical research institutions often form ideas that could have both monetary and human health benefits if developed and applied to improvement of human wellbeing. However, such ideas lose much of their potential value in both regards if they are disclosed in traditional knowledge-sharing forums such as abstracts, posters, and oral presentations at research meetings. Learning the basics about intellectual property protection and obtaining professional guidance in the management of intellectual property from a knowledgeable technology management professional or intellectual property attorney can avoid such losses yet pose a minimal burden of confidentiality on the investigator. Knowing how to successfully navigate the early stages of intellectual property protection can greatly increase the likelihood that discoveries and knowledge will become available for the public good without diminishing the important mandate of disseminating knowledge through traditional knowledge-sharing forums.

  8. Proving the infringement of digital intellectual property rights: Overview of the Anglo-saxon legal system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spasić Vidoje

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The multifaceted process of identifying and proving the infringement of intellectual property rights is further complicated and aggravated in the so-called analogue environment. The development of Information Technologies has given rise to a new set of problems. The digital technology has facilitated the infringement of intellectual property rights and additionally aggravated the process of proving these infringements. Hence, it is the duty of digital forensics to identify relevant (valid evidence and present it in the court of law, which is not an easy task. In that course, the problems are twofold: legal and technical. First of all, the legislation in many countries is not adjusted to resolving the issues constantly emerging in the digital environment and there are apparent differences in the manner of regulating these issues. On the other hand, there is no standardized and unified technology which would provide for a uniform qualification and comprehensive treatment of these issues. Moreover, the place of commission of these criminal offences as a rule does not coincide with the place of occurring legal consequences. Yet, in spite of all these difficulties, there are technological methods and tools which facilitate the detection of cybercrime and provide evidence for securing relevant punishment. In the time to come, the developments in this area are expected to be aimed at strengthening the protection of legitimate interests of holders of intellectual property rights.

  9. Access to generic antiretrovirals: inequality, intellectual property law, and international trade agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Arachu; Westerhaus, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The governments of numerous low- and middle-income countries are currently instituting rules that strengthen changes in domestic intellectual property legislation, often made to conform to the mandates of "free" trade agreements signed with the United States. These measures frequently include intellectual property provisions that extend beyond the patent law standards agreed upon in recent World Trade Organization negotiations, which promised to balance the exigencies of public health and patent holders. In this paper, we analyze the concern that this augmentation of patent law standards will curtail access to essential medicines, particularly as they relate to the AIDS pandemic. We critically examine the potential threats posed by trade agreements vis-à-vis efforts to provide universal access to antiretroviral medications and contend that the conditioning of economic development upon the strengthening of intellectual property law demands careful attention when public health is at stake. Finally, we examine advocacy successes in challenging patent law and conclude that greater advocacy and policy strategies are needed to ensure the protection of global health in trade negotiations.

  10. Open source software, closed source software or both: impacts on industry growth and the role of intellectual property rights

    OpenAIRE

    von Engelhardt, Sebastian; Swaminathan, Sushmita

    2008-01-01

    There is considerable debate regarding the use of intellectual property rights (IPR) to spur innovation in the software industry. In this paper we focus on the choice of intellectual property right regimes and industry growth. We begin by developing a growth optimal mixture of open source and closed source software. This optimal scenario is then used as a basis to examine the co-existence of open and closed source software within various institutional frameworks ranging from no protection, co...

  11. Intellectual property management and commercialisation of forest genetic resources

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Verryn, SD

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available and commercialisation of forest genetic resources. S.D.Verryn1 1Natural Resources and the Environment, Pretoria, South Africa The CSIR Tree Improvement Research Group has an approximately 50 year old eucalypt and pine species breeding research program.... The CSIR has also monitored the genetic gains of various clones and seed sources, and has, for instance, recorded an increase of approximately 15% per generation in pure species breeding and much larger increases in clonal hybrid releases (e.g. 30...

  12. Beyond the Ingelfinger Rule: the intellectual property ethics after the end of biomedical journals' monopoly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germenis, A E

    1999-01-01

    According to the so-called Ingelfinger Rule (IR), biomedical journals do not accept for publication papers which have already been publicized elsewhere. This rule was subjected to fierce criticism which was mainly based on the fact that authors transfer the intellectual rights of their work to the journals. With the emergence of the Internet, the scientific community has a golden opportunity to re-evaluate the IR concept. Scientists no longer have to depend on the debatable benefits (i.e. publicity and review) stemming from journal publications; rather they can be free to explore novel communication opportunities and, subsequently, to tackle the emerging intellectual property issues. This approach should take into account the tight bond between applied research and the world economy, the need for teamwork instead of individual effort for effective scientific research, and the added value of journal publications. Based on such an analysis, it would appear that the inherent characteristics of the Internet promote a re-assessment of the intellectual property theory on three levels: the cognitive (the way in which knowledge is made up from its building blocks), the morphological (the use of hypertext) and finally the sociological (the formation of virtual scientific communities). It is concluded that publishing on the Internet necessitates a different approach to the question of intellectual property based on the primal values of science. This can be achieved only if the scientific community embraces and nourishes the academic nature of the Internet as well as laying down the rules to control the dissemination of ideas without the intervention of non-scientific third parties.

  13. Data Management Plan: Empowering Indigenous Peoples and Knowledge Systems Related to Climate Change and Intellectual Property Rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cath Traynor

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The 'Empowering Indigenous Peoples and Knowledge Systems Related to Climate Change and Intellectual Property Rights' project examines processes of open and collaborative science related to indigenous peoples knowledge, climate change and intellectual property rights. It assumes and challenges practices of open science as a process, one that should involve modes of being both open and closed. The project takes history into account when considering how indigenous peoples' are producing knowledge related to climate change and how such knowledge maybe characterized as indigenous peoples' intellectual property and/or impacted by dominant intellectual property regimes. The central questions the research is addressing are: (i How is climate change impacting indigenous Nama and Griqua communities? (ii How are these communities producing indigenous knowledge related to addressing climate change and offering alternative strategies? (iiiHow do indigenous Nama and Griqua characterize their knowledge as indigenous intellectual property (or not and decide to openly share their knowledge (or not internally or with the outside public? (iv How and what types of laws and policies (including intellectual property rights promote and/or hinder these indigenous strategies and open collaboration with the public? The data are being collected and created to answer these main questions. Furthermore, the researchers are critically tracking the research process itself and this data will be scrutinized to provide information on the open and collaborative science process and dilemmas and tensions around openness issues.

  14. The Intellectual Training Environment for Prolog Programming Language

    OpenAIRE

    Serghei PELIN

    2007-01-01

    In this work is described a new complex training system, named SPprolog, intended for training and self-training in logic programming language - Prolog. This system includes elements related to Prolog and logic programming, and the elements of independent, complex, self-sufficient training system which is capable considerably to increase the quality of self-training, and to be effective assistant in training. The most useful application of the system can be in distance education and self-trai...

  15. Ethical and intellectual property in the biological sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, E A

    1997-05-01

    Ethical concerns on patents in the biological sciences are increased by the prospect of patents for higher life forms. A Canadian patent grants the owner the right to exclude others in Canada from making, using, or selling or offering for sale his or her invention for the term of the patent; however, it does not give the patent owner any positive rights to do likewise. As with other forms of property, the right to make, use, or sell a patented invention may be regulated by other laws or guidelines. In Canada, higher life forms, medical and surgical methods are not patentable subject matter. Unicellular life forms and subcellular material are considered patentable. Decisions on ethical issues are not considered by patent officers. The Patent Office is guided only by legislation. Other regulations by the legislatures can direct public policy and minimize risks.

  16. Protecting intellectual property associated with Canadian academic clinical trials - approaches and impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Intellectual property is associated with the creative work needed to design clinical trials. Two approaches have developed to protect the intellectual property associated with multicentre trial protocols prior to site initiation. The ‘open access’ approach involves publishing the protocol, permitting easy access to the complete protocol. The main advantages of the open access approach are that the protocol is freely available to all stakeholders, permitting them to discuss the protocol widely with colleagues, assess the quality and rigour of the protocol, determine the feasibility of conducting the trial at their centre, and after trial completion, to evaluate the reported findings based on a full understanding of the protocol. The main potential disadvantage of this approach is the potential for plagiarism; however if that occurred, it should be easy to identify because of the open access to the original trial protocol, as well as ensure that appropriate sanctions are used to deal with plagiarism. The ‘restricted access’ approach involves the use of non-disclosure agreements, legal documents that must be signed between the trial lead centre and collaborative sites. Potential sites must guarantee they will not disclose any details of the study before they are permitted to access the protocol. The main advantages of the restricted access approach are for the lead institution and nominated principal investigator, who protect their intellectual property associated with the trial. The main disadvantages are that ownership of the protocol and intellectual property is assigned to the lead institution; defining who ‘needs to know’ about the study protocol is difficult; and the use of non-disclosure agreements involves review by lawyers and institutional representatives at each site before access is permitted to the protocol, significantly delaying study implementation and adding substantial indirect costs to research institutes. This extra step may discourage

  17. Protecting intellectual property associated with Canadian academic clinical trials - approaches and impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross Sue

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Intellectual property is associated with the creative work needed to design clinical trials. Two approaches have developed to protect the intellectual property associated with multicentre trial protocols prior to site initiation. The ‘open access’ approach involves publishing the protocol, permitting easy access to the complete protocol. The main advantages of the open access approach are that the protocol is freely available to all stakeholders, permitting them to discuss the protocol widely with colleagues, assess the quality and rigour of the protocol, determine the feasibility of conducting the trial at their centre, and after trial completion, to evaluate the reported findings based on a full understanding of the protocol. The main potential disadvantage of this approach is the potential for plagiarism; however if that occurred, it should be easy to identify because of the open access to the original trial protocol, as well as ensure that appropriate sanctions are used to deal with plagiarism. The ‘restricted access’ approach involves the use of non-disclosure agreements, legal documents that must be signed between the trial lead centre and collaborative sites. Potential sites must guarantee they will not disclose any details of the study before they are permitted to access the protocol. The main advantages of the restricted access approach are for the lead institution and nominated principal investigator, who protect their intellectual property associated with the trial. The main disadvantages are that ownership of the protocol and intellectual property is assigned to the lead institution; defining who ‘needs to know’ about the study protocol is difficult; and the use of non-disclosure agreements involves review by lawyers and institutional representatives at each site before access is permitted to the protocol, significantly delaying study implementation and adding substantial indirect costs to research institutes

  18. Protecting intellectual property associated with Canadian academic clinical trials--approaches and impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Sue; Magee, Laura; Walker, Mark; Wood, Stephen

    2012-12-27

    Intellectual property is associated with the creative work needed to design clinical trials. Two approaches have developed to protect the intellectual property associated with multicentre trial protocols prior to site initiation. The 'open access' approach involves publishing the protocol, permitting easy access to the complete protocol. The main advantages of the open access approach are that the protocol is freely available to all stakeholders, permitting them to discuss the protocol widely with colleagues, assess the quality and rigour of the protocol, determine the feasibility of conducting the trial at their centre, and after trial completion, to evaluate the reported findings based on a full understanding of the protocol. The main potential disadvantage of this approach is the potential for plagiarism; however if that occurred, it should be easy to identify because of the open access to the original trial protocol, as well as ensure that appropriate sanctions are used to deal with plagiarism. The 'restricted access' approach involves the use of non-disclosure agreements, legal documents that must be signed between the trial lead centre and collaborative sites. Potential sites must guarantee they will not disclose any details of the study before they are permitted to access the protocol. The main advantages of the restricted access approach are for the lead institution and nominated principal investigator, who protect their intellectual property associated with the trial. The main disadvantages are that ownership of the protocol and intellectual property is assigned to the lead institution; defining who 'needs to know' about the study protocol is difficult; and the use of non-disclosure agreements involves review by lawyers and institutional representatives at each site before access is permitted to the protocol, significantly delaying study implementation and adding substantial indirect costs to research institutes. This extra step may discourage sites from

  19. The Measurement of Intellectual Property: Evaluation of Technological Patents Based on the Integral Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grytsulenko Svitlana I.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The acknowledged tools for solution of practical tasks of management of innovative processes is the measurement and analysis of results of the intellectual (scientific and technical activities. To this end, the article defines an integral index of comparative evaluation of technological patents as one of analytical indicators of the innovation development of economy. The importance of system of information management for the efficiency of evaluation of technological patents, formed on the basis of the databases, accounted and not accounted in the balance of the intellectual property rights, has been substantiated. The characteristics of formation together with the specificity of economic use of the portfolio of technological patents have been explored, proceeding from which its particular estimates have been identified. Considering the accumulated positive experience in measuring the intellectual property, quantitative and qualitative indicators have been identified, which are the most significant for characteristics of portfolio of technological patents from the position of the contents and functioning of high technology in both the national and the global markets. The approach to calculating the integral index of technological patents has been outlined, directions for its practical application have been specified.

  20. Candidate Socioemotional Remediation Program for Individuals with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Bronwyn; Lothe, Amelie; Chabloz, Melanie; Dukes, Daniel; Pasca, Catherine; Redoute, Jerome; Eliez, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    The authors developed a computerized program, Vis-a-Vis (VAV), to improve socioemotional functioning and working memory in children with developmental disabilities. The authors subsequently tested whether participants showed signs of improving the targeted skills. VAV is composed of three modules: Focus on the Eyes, Emotion Recognition and…

  1. THE INTELLECTUAL CAPITAL DIMENSIONS OF DUCATI'S TURNAROUND: EXPLORING KNOWLEDGE ASSETS GROUNDING A CHANGE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM

    OpenAIRE

    GIOVANNI SCHIUMA; ANTONIO LERRO; DAMIANO SANITATE

    2008-01-01

    Despite the growing awareness of the importance of researching core strategic resources and capabilities for supporting organisational change, the work that has been done to the date has rarely examined and taken into account the relevance of Intellectual Capital (IC) for the success of a company's strategic turnaround program. Moreover, little attention has been given on what encompasses IC and how it can be conceptualised and interpreted in a change management perspective.Through an extensi...

  2. Institutionalised Exclusion: The Political Economy of Benefit Sharing and Intellectual Property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon West

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The Nagoya Protocol on Access to Genetic Resources and Benefit Sharing (Protocol has been hailed as providing unprecedented legal support for indigenous and community control over genetic resources and associated knowledge by ensuring that such groups benefit more equitably from the use and subsequent proceeds of biological resources. This paper will analyse this claim critically, situating access and benefit sharing (ABS regimes within the broader political economy of intellectual property articulated in the negotiations of the TRIPS Council monitoring the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS and the Conference of the Parties (COP to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD. While the CBD principle of sovereignty over natural resources allows biodiverse developing state parties to regulate access to intellectual and genetic resources subject to national laws and the aims of the CBD, the concept of ‘facilitated access’ used to fulfil this right attaches itself purely to state parties and does not necessarily improve the lot of local and indigenous peoples. Indeed, the implementation of state level access regimes together with the principle of downstream benefit-sharing effectively excludes local people from exercising any autonomous legal rights over resources and rather creates a state of legal dependency among knowledge and resource rich communities on dominant and exclusionary IPR structures. Therefore while the material interests of local and indigenous communities may have been addressed in a limited manner by the Protocol – for instance in terms of strengthening provider state obligation to implement benefit-sharing schemes – ABS regimes inherently preclude secure legal recognition for local and indigenous control over intellectual and genetic resources. Moreover the general lack of legalisation achieved by the Protocol stakes even these limited ‘gains’ upon further negotiations designed

  3. Identifying State Resources and Support Programs on E-Government Websites for Persons with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, Kathleen M.; Peterson, Justin D.; Albert, Jon D.

    2015-01-01

    This descriptive cross-sectional study identified resources and programs that are available nationwide on the Internet to support individuals and families with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), with a focus on intellectual disability. This evaluation included easily identifiable information on specific resources and highlighted unique programs found in individual states that were linked from e-government websites. Researchers documented the ease of access and available infor...

  4. Protecting intellectual property in space; Proceedings of the Aerospace Computer Security Conference, McLean, VA, March 20, 1985

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-07-01

    The primary purpose of the Aerospace Computer Security Conference was to bring together people and organizations which have a common interest in protecting intellectual property generated in space. Operational concerns are discussed, taking into account security implications of the space station information system, Space Shuttle security policies and programs, potential uses of probabilistic risk assessment techniques for space station development, key considerations in contingency planning for secure space flight ground control centers, a systematic method for evaluating security requirements compliance, and security engineering of secure ground stations. Subjects related to security technologies are also explored, giving attention to processing requirements of secure C3/I and battle management systems and the development of the Gemini trusted multiple microcomputer base, the Restricted Access Processor system as a security guard designed to protect classified information, and observations on local area network security.

  5. Protecting intellectual property in space; Proceedings of the Aerospace Computer Security Conference, McLean, VA, March 20, 1985

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    The primary purpose of the Aerospace Computer Security Conference was to bring together people and organizations which have a common interest in protecting intellectual property generated in space. Operational concerns are discussed, taking into account security implications of the space station information system, Space Shuttle security policies and programs, potential uses of probabilistic risk assessment techniques for space station development, key considerations in contingency planning for secure space flight ground control centers, a systematic method for evaluating security requirements compliance, and security engineering of secure ground stations. Subjects related to security technologies are also explored, giving attention to processing requirements of secure C3/I and battle management systems and the development of the Gemini trusted multiple microcomputer base, the Restricted Access Processor system as a security guard designed to protect classified information, and observations on local area network security.

  6. Whose body is it anyway? Human cells and the strange effects of property and intellectual property law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Robin

    2011-06-01

    Whatever else I might own in this world, it would seem intuitively obvious that I own the cells of my body. Where else could the notion of ownership begin, other than with the components of the tangible corpus that all would recognize as "me"? The law, however, does not view the issue so neatly and clearly, particularly when cells are no longer in my body. As so often happens in law, we have reached this point, not by design, but by the piecemeal development of disparate notions that, when gathered together, form a strange and disconcerting picture. This Article examines both property and intellectual property doctrines in relation to human cells that are no longer within the body. In particular, the Article discusses the Bilski decision, in the context of life science process patents, and the Molecular Pathology case, in the context of gene patents. For patent law, the Article concludes that the problem lies not with the fact that genes constitute patentable subject matter, but rather with the extent of the rights that are granted. For both property and intellectual property law, the Article concludes that a more careful application of basic legal principles would better reflect the interests of society as a whole and the interests of individual human subjects, as well as the interests of those who innovate.

  7. Canada’s Patented Medicines (Notice of Compliance) Proceedings and Intellectual Property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Henry; McCourt, Conor

    2015-01-01

    Canada’s Patent Register is a tool created by the Patented Medicines (Notice of Compliance) Regulations to help innovators protect their inventions relating to pharmaceuticals. This tool exists at the intersection between the intellectual property and drug approval regimes. By listing a patent on the Patent Register, an innovator can prevent a generic manufacturer from entering the marketplace rather than having to wait for his or her patent to be infringed. This article provides information on the requirements for listing a patent on the Patent Register and an overview of how the Patent Medicines (Notice of Compliance) Regulations affect the drug approval process. PMID:25573772

  8. Patents, innovation, and privatization: Commentary on: "Data management in academic settings: an intellectual property perspective".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albin, Ramona C

    2010-12-01

    The framers of the U.S. Constitution believed that intellectual property rights were crucial to scientific advancement. Yet, the framers also recognized the need to balance innovation, privatization, and public use. The courts' expansion of patent protection for biotechnology innovations in the last 30 years raises the question whether the patent system effectively balances these concerns. While the question is not new, only through a thorough and thoughtful examination of these issues can the current system be evaluated. It is then a policy decision for Congress if any change is necessary.

  9. Psychometric properties of a quality of life scale for adults with intellectual disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Dominguez Lara, Sergio Alexis; Universidad Inca Garcilaso de la Vega, Lima Perú

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to analyze the psychometric properties of the objective section of the Integral Quality of Life Scale in a sample of 102 personswith intellectual disabilities, 61 men (59.8 %) and 41 women (43.7 %), aged between 18 and 58 years (M = 24.05, SD = 9.57). Of theparticipants, 38 (37.3 %) have a mild disability, 46 (45.1 %) have a moderate disability, and 18 (17.6 %) have a severe disability, as reportedby the family and institutions. The confirmatory factor analysis conducted reveals t...

  10. Intellectual property, commercial needs and humanitarian benefits: must there be a conflict?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krattiger, Anatole

    2010-11-30

    'By far the best proof is experience,' wrote Francis Bacon. Given the experience of countries - both developing and developed - that have used intellectual property (IP), IP protection and IP management to stimulate innovation, there is ample proof that good IP management has benefited multitudes of people around the world with new technologies, products and services. Innovations in health and agriculture have greatly enriched lives. But does this experience apply to all countries? If the best proof is experience, then what can be said authoritatively about the effects of using IP systems wisely in developing countries? Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Extensions of intellectual property rights and delayed adoption of generic drugs: effects on medicaid spending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesselheim, Aaron S; Fischer, Michael A; Avorn, Jerry

    2006-01-01

    Rising prescription drug costs present a critical policy issue for Medicaid. Generic substitution can reduce costs, but the effects are undercut by extensions of intellectual property (IP) protection, elevated generic prices, and low substitution rates. Using Medicaid prescription data for amoxicillin/clavulanate, metformin, and omeprazole, we calculated the savings that could have been realized if generic drugs had been available and fully substituted at their lowest cost when IP protection first expired (an average delay of twenty-six months). The delay in availability, elevated prices, and slow uptake of generic alternatives for these three drugs alone cost Medicaid 1.5 billion dollars in 2000-2004.

  12. Research and intellectual property involving human material: after all, from whom are our genes?

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Mariana de Melo; Bonfim, Laura Melo; Romualdo, Vanderson Assis; Capanema, Flávio Diniz

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses ethical, scientific and legal aspects of the patenting of human genes, starting from a historical context of intellectual property of living beings and passing through the decision of the US Supreme Court in Myriad Genetics case, conflict over patent of the genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, related to breast cancer and ovarian cancer. Moreover, the article discusses regulatory instruments on the subject, considering both the Brazilian and international legislation. Finally, it con...

  13. An intellectual property sharing initiative in agricultural biotechnology: development of broadly accessible technologies for plant transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi-Ham, Cecilia L; Boettiger, Sara; Figueroa-Balderas, Rosa; Bird, Sara; Geoola, Josef N; Zamora, Pablo; Alandete-Saez, Monica; Bennett, Alan B

    2012-06-01

    The Public Intellectual Property Resource for Agriculture (PIPRA) was founded in 2004 by the Rockefeller Foundation in response to concerns that public investments in agricultural biotechnology benefiting developing countries were facing delays, high transaction costs and lack of access to important technologies due to intellectual property right (IPR) issues. From its inception, PIPRA has worked broadly to support a wide range of research in the public sector, in specialty and minor acreage crops as well as crops important to food security in developing countries. In this paper, we review PIPRA's work, discussing the failures, successes, and lessons learned during its years of operation. To address public sector's limited freedom-to-operate, or legal access to third-party rights, in the area of plant transformation, we describe PIPRA's patent 'pool' approach to develop open-access technologies for plant transformation which consolidate patent and tangible property rights in marker-free vector systems. The plant transformation system has been licensed and deployed for both commercial and humanitarian applications in the United States (US) and Africa, respectively. © 2012 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal © 2012 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Thought police. Healthcare executives must carefully guard intellectual property developed in their facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, J S

    1991-03-01

    Healthcare executives should have a working knowledge of intellectual property law--the legal principle that, for a limited period, treats intangible ideas and concepts as if they were products or property. Not only should administrators be aware of how to protect their facilities' patents, trademarks, copyrights, and trade secrets, but they must also be sure that employees in their own facilities do not infringe on the intellectual property of others. A patent is granted when an inventor proposes a useful new process, machine, "article of manufacture," or composition of matter, including any new and useful improvement on existing items in these same categories. A trademark is a name, symbol, device, or combination thereof adopted and used by an institution to identify its goods or services and to distinguish them from its competitors' goods or services. Expressions of ideas and thoughts set forth in words, sentences, paragraphs, sketches, pictures, graphs, or any other means of conveying ideas or concepts commonly understood to be works of authorship--both published and unpublished--may be protected by a copyright. Trade secret law applies to those who might misappropriate information that has been given to them because of their special relationship with the holder of the trade secret (i.e., through employment, contract, or other fiduciary or trust relationship).

  15. Evaluating Intellectual Property and Data Rights in Competition Source Selections - Leveraging the Assertions Process to a New Level to Foster Open Systems Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-30

    ååì~ä=^Åèìáëáíáçå= oÉëÉ~êÅÜ=póãéçëáìã= qÜìêëÇ~ó=pÉëëáçåë= sçäìãÉ=ff= = Evaluating Intellectual Property and Data Rights in Competition Source...SUBTITLE Evaluating Intellectual Property and Data Rights in Competition Source Selections - Leveraging the ’Assertions Process’ to a New Level to...effectively evaluate intellectual property in source selections to ensure the Government gets the intellectual property rights it needs to procure

  16. RETHINKING THE ROLE OF CLINICAL TRIAL DATA IN INTERNATIONAL INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW: THE CASE FOR A PUBLIC GOODS APPROACH

    Science.gov (United States)

    REICHMAN, JEROME H.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the growth and consequences of new intellectual property rights given to pharmaceutical developers, and it advocates treating clinical trials as a public good. Although the soaring cost of clinical trials is well known and discussed, too little attention is given to the underlying rationale for allowing drug developers to recoup their costs through the new intellectual property rights provided in multilateral, regional, and bilateral agreements. Known in the US as “market exclusivity” and in Europe as “data exclusivity,” these rights prohibit would-be generic producers from obtaining regulatory approval based on the original producers’ undisclosed test data. Market and data exclusivity is codified in US and European domestic law as well as the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and, to a lesser degree, the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS). Market and data exclusivity is binding an increasing number of developing countries via Free Trade Agreements (FTAs), which hinder developing countries from manufacturing generic drugs. At a minimum, negotiators should replace the norm of exclusive control over data with a liability rule, or take and pay rule, in which generic manufacturers can use original manufacturers’ clinical trial data in exchange for reasonable compensation. A more fundamental solution requires questioning the status quo of proprietary clinical trial data. The conventional wisdom is that market and data exclusivity, and drug developers’ consequent ability to limit competition from generics above and beyond patent protection, are a necessary incentive for drug developers to fund ever more expensive clinical trials. Clinical trial data, however, are public goods that will be undersupplied and over protected so long as private actors provide them. Moreover, manufacturers have an incentive to present clinical trial data so that they support regulatory approval at the

  17. RETHINKING THE ROLE OF CLINICAL TRIAL DATA IN INTERNATIONAL INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW: THE CASE FOR A PUBLIC GOODS APPROACH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichman, Jerome H

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the growth and consequences of new intellectual property rights given to pharmaceutical developers, and it advocates treating clinical trials as a public good. Although the soaring cost of clinical trials is well known and discussed, too little attention is given to the underlying rationale for allowing drug developers to recoup their costs through the new intellectual property rights provided in multilateral, regional, and bilateral agreements. Known in the US as "market exclusivity" and in Europe as "data exclusivity," these rights prohibit would-be generic producers from obtaining regulatory approval based on the original producers' undisclosed test data. Market and data exclusivity is codified in US and European domestic law as well as the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and, to a lesser degree, the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS). Market and data exclusivity is binding an increasing number of developing countries via Free Trade Agreements (FTAs), which hinder developing countries from manufacturing generic drugs. At a minimum, negotiators should replace the norm of exclusive control over data with a liability rule, or take and pay rule, in which generic manufacturers can use original manufacturers' clinical trial data in exchange for reasonable compensation. A more fundamental solution requires questioning the status quo of proprietary clinical trial data. The conventional wisdom is that market and data exclusivity, and drug developers' consequent ability to limit competition from generics above and beyond patent protection, are a necessary incentive for drug developers to fund ever more expensive clinical trials. Clinical trial data, however, are public goods that will be undersupplied and over protected so long as private actors provide them. Moreover, manufacturers have an incentive to present clinical trial data so that they support regulatory approval at the expense of public

  18. Working Memory Training in Children with Mild Intellectual Disability, Through Designed Computerized Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Delavarian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this research is designing a computerized program, in game format, for working memory training in mild intellectual disabled children. Methods: 24 students participated as test and control groups. The auditory and visual-spatial WM were assessed by primary test, which included computerized Wechsler numerical forward and backward sub- tests, and secondary tests, which contained three parts: dual visual-spatial test, auditory test, and a one-syllable word recalling test. Results: The results showed significant differnces between working memory capacity in the intellectually disabled children and normal ones (P-value<0.00001. After using the computerized working memory training, Visual-spatial WM, auditory WM, and speaking were improved in the trained group. The mentioned four tests showed significant differences between pre-test and post-test. The trained group showed more improvements in forward tasks. The trained participant’s processing speed increased with training. Discussion: According to the results, comprehensive human-computer interfaces and the aplication of computer in children training, especially in traing of intellectual disabled children with impairements in visual and auditory perceptions, could be more effective and vaulable.

  19. Ask: a health advocacy program for adolescents with an intellectual disability: a cluster randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Adolescents with intellectual disability often have poor health and healthcare. This is partly as a consequence of poor communication and recall difficulties, and the possible loss of specialised paediatric services. Methods/Design A cluster randomised trial was conducted with adolescents with intellectual disability to investigate a health intervention package to enhance interactions among adolescents with intellectual disability, their parents/carers, and general practitioners (GPs). The trial took place in Queensland, Australia, between February 2007 and September 2010. The intervention package was designed to improve communication with health professionals and families’ organisation of health information, and to increase clinical activities beneficial to improved health outcomes. It consisted of the Comprehensive Health Assessment Program (CHAP), a one-off health check, and the Ask Health Diary, designed for on-going use. Participants were drawn from Special Education Schools and Special Education Units. The education component of the intervention was delivered as part of the school curriculum. Educators were surveyed at baseline and followed-up four months later. Carers were surveyed at baseline and after 26 months. Evidence of health promotion, disease prevention and case-finding activities were extracted from GPs clinical records. Qualitative interviews of educators occurred after completion of the educational component of the intervention and with adolescents and carers after the CHAP. Discussion Adolescents with intellectual disability have difficulty obtaining many health services and often find it difficult to become empowered to improve and protect their health. The health intervention package proposed may aid them by augmenting communication, improving documentation of health encounters, and improving access to, and quality of, GP care. Recruitment strategies to consider for future studies in this population include ensuring potential

  20. Considerations about Intellectual Property Rights, Innovation and Economic Growth in the Digital Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Nadia CIOCOIU

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Three technological trends—the omnipresence of information in digital form, the generalised use of computer networks, and the rapid proliferation of the World Wide Web—have profound implications for the way intellectual property (IP is created, distributed, and accessed by every sector of society. In the last ten years much discussion of these issues has occurred in the literature and political and legislative domain. The information infrastructure offers an extraordinary ease of access to a vast array of information and peril for information to be reproduced inappropriately and for information access to be controlled in new and problematic ways. IPR regimes affect the diffusion of scientific knowledge, the innovation process and, ultimately, economic performance. Information technology raised some problems regarding the protection of intellectual property and drived to the discovery of a large number of solutions during past years. This paper’s purpose is to reveal what is the situation regarding IPR protection, economic growth and innovation in Romania, in the context of digital economy.

  1. Intellectual property considerations in the development and use of HRQL measures for clinical trial research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzon, R; Patrick, D; Guyatt, G; Conley, J M

    1994-08-01

    As a result of the expanded use of health-related quality of life (HRQL) measures in clinical trial research, a variety of legal and ethical issues have surfaced. These issues can be put in the form of the following questions: (1) Under what circumstances should access to HRQL measures be restricted? (2) Under what circumstances is it appropriate for the developers of HRQL measures to assert their intellectual property rights to the instruments? (3) Under what circumstances is personal profit from the sale and use of HRQL measures legally and socially appropriate? Access to HRQL research is to be encouraged since this is necessary for this field to progress. However, the need for protection against misuse of ongoing work is real and may justify the assertion of intellectual property rights. HRQL measures developed entirely with public monies should remain in the public domain or be managed for the public good. Instruments developed with private funds or with a mix of public and private funds should be treated in a manner that reflects a fair balance between the rights of the private developer and those of the scientific community and the public. HRQL questionnaires are regularly being refined; such work is costly. Investigators continuing research directly related to instrument refinement might reasonably ask for compensation from those who wish to use their work.

  2. Intellectual property rights and traditional medicine: policy dilemmas at the interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Karin

    2003-08-01

    Traditional medicines play an important role in the provision of health care in many developing countries. Their use is also significant in developed countries, increasing their commercial value. Several 'high-profile' cases of patenting of traditional medicines, without consent from or compensation to their holders, have further focussed attention on their importance. Traditional medicine usually involves biological resources and the knowledge of local and indigenous peoples and/or healers regarding their medicinal use; thus, it is interlinked with biodiversity conservation and indigenous peoples' rights over their knowledge and resources. At this multi-faceted interface, complex ethical questions arise. This article provides an overview and discussion of key issues, dilemmas and challenges. It points to possible modifications and at ways to devise new forms of intellectual property ownership that may better suit the needs of those who seek to protect traditional medicine. Yet it also questions whether such protection, which may restrict access, is the preferred option. While intellectual property protection for traditional medicines has multiple and diverse objectives, the priorities are often not clear and the strategies which could be deployed may interfere with each other, as well as with the prioritization of objectives. This is further aggravated by differences in stakeholders' concepts on ownership of knowledge and by uncertain or paradoxical effects of some potentially useful strategies. Thus, policymakers should address the multiple, multi-layered issues and questions, and try to develop a range of solutions in order to address and balance the various objectives and interests.

  3. Changes to intellectual property policy in South Africa: putting a stop to evergreening?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Julia E

    2014-08-01

    South Africa is a middle-income country with the world's largest HIV patient cohort and a growing burden of communicable and non-communicable diseases - a prime location for pharmaceutical companies looking to expand their markets. Yet, 20 years after the country's first democratic elections, poor health indicators and an over-burdened public health system belie persistently stark levels of socioeconomic inequality. As the South African government revises national intellectual property (IP) policies, the pharmaceutical industry and global access to medicines movement are watching, aware of ramifications South Africa's actions will have on patent laws and the availability of generic medicines in other middle-income countries and across Africa. South Africa's draft IP policy is meeting fierce resistance from industry, although proposed reforms are compliant with the Agreement on trade related aspects of intellectual property (TRIPS) and in line with on-going policies and actions of both developing and developed countries. Could the establishment of a patent examination system and new patentability criteria rein in evergreening and lead to lower medicine prices? What will be the potential impact of reform on medical innovation? And why is it both necessary and urgent that the South African government seek a fairer balance between private and public interests?

  4. The Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership, Intellectual Property Protection, and Access to Medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Belinda; Gleeson, Deborah; Lopert, Ruth

    2016-11-01

    The inclusion of elevated standards of intellectual property (IP) protection in the recently negotiated Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) agreement has raised serious public health concerns regarding access to medicines. A lesser-known trade agreement under negotiation in the Asia-Pacific region is the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP). Framed as an attempt to reassert ASEAN's position in response to the United States-led TPP, RCEP includes key players China and India as well as several low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Leaked drafts of IP provisions proposed by Japan and South Korea raise similar concerns in the Asia-Pacific region. This article identifies TRIPS (Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights agreement)-Plus provisions in leaked negotiating texts and examines their implications for LMICs that are not also parties to the TPP: Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Myanmar, the Philippines, Thailand, China, and India. We find that higher levels of IP protection delay the market entry of generic medicines, giving rise to increased costs to governments and reduced access to essential medicines. The article concludes that the public health community should recognize risks inherent in trade agreements that promote expansions of IP rights and engage with governments to ensure that public health is adequately and explicitly protected in trade and investment negotiations. © 2016 APJPH.

  5. The Effects of Intellectual Property Rights on Access to Medicines and Catastrophic Expenditure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Youn; Kwon, Soonman

    2015-01-01

    Since the introduction of Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) in 1995, there has been considerable concern that poor access to essential medicines in developing countries would be exacerbated because strengthening intellectual property rights (IPR) leads to monopoly of pharmaceutical markets and delayed entry of lower-cost generic drugs. However, despite extensive research and disputes regarding this issue, there are few empirical studies on the topic. In this study, we investigated the effect of IPR on access to medicines and catastrophic expenditure for medicines, using data from World Health Surveys 2002-2003. The index of patent rights developed by Ginarte and Park (1997) was used to measure the IPR protection level of each country. Estimates were adjusted for individual and country characteristics. In the results of multilevel logistic regression analyses, higher level of IPR significantly increased the likelihood of nonaccess to prescribed medicines even after controlling for individual socioeconomic status and national characteristics associated with access to medicines. This study's finding on the negative impact of IPR on access to medicines calls for the implementation of more active policy at the supra-national level to improve access in low- and middle-income countries. © SAGE Publications 2015.

  6. The impact of the legal regime of intellectual property protection in the pharmaceutical market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashkov, Vitaliy M; Golovanova, Iryna A; Olefir, Andrii A

    the functioning of the healthcare industry in any country is impossible without providing enough medicines for patient care. This problem can best be resolved only when the majority of drugs, especially vital, will be made at national plants (industry). In this context, competition from generic drugs is the most optimal strategy to reduce drug's prices. the paper should examine how the legal regime of intellectual property affects the availability of medicines for people and identify ways of supporting breakthrough inventions and counter ≪unreal innovations≫. for the purpose of study were generalized information from the scientific journals of medical and legal perspective, monographs by using a set of scientific methods. Namely under systematic approach have been analyzed the problems of pharmaceutical market, ways of producing generic and original drugs. Comparative legal method was useful for learning features of flexible mechanisms of the TRIPS Agreement and market regulation of medicines in the world. based on the research was found that developed countries with strong pharmaceutical industry are interested in maximizing the protection of intellectual property rights, including importing countries. Flexible mechanisms of the TRIPS Agreement can be useful for developing countries. thus, successful development of pharmaceutical industry and health care should be accompanied by the following measures: - improvement of public health must be recognized as a main task of government policy; - substantial state support aimed at increasing the availability of drugs in the domestic market and the strengthening of export potential; - decrease patent protection of medicines and stimulate market launch of generic copies.

  7. Intellectual property considerations for molecular diagnostic development with emphasis on companion diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glorikian, Harry; Warburg, Richard Jeremy; Moore, Kelly; Malinowski, Jennifer

    2018-02-01

    The development of molecular diagnostics is a complex endeavor, with multiple regulatory pathways to consider and numerous approaches to development and commercialization. Companion diagnostics, devices which are "essential for the safe and effective use of a corresponding drug or diagnostic product" (see U.S. Food & Drug Administration, In Vitro Diagnostics - Companion Diagnostics, U.S. Dept. of Health & Human Services(2016), available at https://www.fda.gov/medicaldevices/productsandmedicalprocedures/invitrodiagnostics/ucm407297.htm ) and complementary diagnostics, which are more broadly associated with a class of drug, are becoming increasingly important as integral components of the implementation of precision medicine. Areas covered: The following article will highlight the intellectual property ('IP') considerations pertinent to molecular diagnostics development with special emphasis on companion diagnostics. Expert opinion/commentary Summary: For all molecular diagnostics, intellectual property (IP) concerns are of paramount concern, whether the device will be marketed only in the United States or abroad. Taking steps to protect IP at each stage of product development is critical to optimize profitability of a diagnostic product. Also the legal framework around IP protection of diagnostic technologies has been changing over the previous few years and can be expected to continue to change in the foreseeable near future, thus, a comprehensive IP strategy should take into account the fact that changes in the law can be expected.

  8. Management of intellectual property in the football clubs: technology strategy and tactics (for example, municipal institution of FC «Rubin»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guzel I. Gumerova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective to form the conceptual framework in the field of intellectual property management in football clubs to develop directions of intellectual property management development in FC quotRubinquot Kazan. Methods general scientific methods of theoretical and empirical knowledge. Results the notions quotintellectual property management in football clubsquot and quotmanagement of corporate image of the football clubquot are differentiated the methodological approach to the management of the company39s value is developed basing on tangible and intangible assets management the issues of intellectual property objects patenting in the Russian sports football are studied the management of Russian and foreign football clubs is analyszed th system of intellectual property management in FC quotRubinquot Kazan is diagnosed. Scientific novelty the authors have developed the method of evaluation of intellectual property management in the football club based on the methodology for assessing the value of the brands of football clubs by Brand Finance consulting company UK generic and specific indicators are distinguished in the intellectual property management in a football club as in the intellectual property and corporate image management. Practical value the recommendations are formulated in the format strategy and tactics techniques concerning the industrial property management confidential documented information copyright for the intellectual property management in FC quotRubinquot Kazan.

  9. Patenting nature or protecting culture? Ethnopharmacology and indigenous intellectual property rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGonigle, Ian Vincent

    2016-04-01

    Ethnopharmacologists are scientists and anthropologists that study indigenous medicines and healing practices, and who often develop new therapies and medicines for wider use. Ethnopharmacologists do fieldwork with indigenous peoples in traditional societies, where they encounter a wide range of cultural values and varying ideas about the nature of property relations. This poses difficulties for protecting indigenous intellectual property and for making just trade agreements. This Note reviews the legal issues relevant to the protection of indigenous resources in ethnopharmacology trade agreements, and suggests that recent developments in anthropology and the social study of science could be instructive in furthering the legal discourse and in providing policy directions. Specifically, the Note introduces the concepts of 'ontological pluralism' and 'epistemic subsidiarity', which could help lawmakers write sui generis trade agreements to better protect indigenous knowledge and resources.

  10. Patenting nature or protecting culture? Ethnopharmacology and indigenous intellectual property rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGonigle, Ian Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Ethnopharmacologists are scientists and anthropologists that study indigenous medicines and healing practices, and who often develop new therapies and medicines for wider use. Ethnopharmacologists do fieldwork with indigenous peoples in traditional societies, where they encounter a wide range of cultural values and varying ideas about the nature of property relations. This poses difficulties for protecting indigenous intellectual property and for making just trade agreements. This Note reviews the legal issues relevant to the protection of indigenous resources in ethnopharmacology trade agreements, and suggests that recent developments in anthropology and the social study of science could be instructive in furthering the legal discourse and in providing policy directions. Specifically, the Note introduces the concepts of ‘ontological pluralism’ and ‘epistemic subsidiarity’, which could help lawmakers write sui generis trade agreements to better protect indigenous knowledge and resources. PMID:27774245

  11. A Long-Term Leisure Program for Individuals with Intellectual Disability in Residential Care Settings: Research to Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Robert A.; Burke, Amie M.; Fung, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    We studied the effectiveness of an individually-tailored leisure program implemented by direct care staff in a residential program for 28 adults with severe to profound intellectual disability using a multiple baseline design across two homes over a 1.5 year baseline and treatment period followed by another nearly 1.5 year maintenance phase. The…

  12. Effects of a nursing intervention program on the depression and perception of family functioning of mothers with intellectually disabled children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yıldırım, Arzu; Hacıhasanoğlu Aşılar, Rabia; Karakurt, Papatya

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the effect of psychosocial education provided to mothers with intellectually disabled children on the risk of depression and perception of family functioning in those mothers. Families with intellectually disabled children need encouragement, support and training to more actively participate in their children's education and to positively affect their children's growth and development. Randomised controlled study. The study included the mothers of 75 intellectually disabled children (40 intervention, 35 control). The mothers in the intervention group who participated in a routine program at private education and rehabilitation centres attended four different psychosocial educational sessions. Sessions were conducted once a week for four weeks and lasted 120 minutes. The control group attended only the routine program of the private education and rehabilitation centre. Our study results showed that after completion of the educational program, there was a greater decrease in the risk for depression in the intervention group when compared to the control group, and the former perceived their family functions better. These differences were statistically significant (p children with intellectual disabilities may be effective in reducing the risk for depression and in increasing the perception of healthy family functioning. Psychosocial nursing education program can contribute to the use of evidence-based education strategies in nursing practice to improve the mental health for mothers with intellectually disabled children. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Intellectual property rights related to the genetically modified glyphosate tolerant soybeans in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta L Rodrigues

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work analyzes the different modalities of protection of the intellectual creations in the biotechnology agricultural field. Regarding the Brazilian legislations related to the theme (the Industrial Property Law - no. 9. 279/96 and the Plant Variety Protection Law - no. 9. 456/97, and based in the international treaties signed by Brazil, the present work points to the inclusions of each of them, as well as to their interfaces using as reference the case study of glyphosate tolerant genetically modified soybean. For this case study, Monsanto's pipelines patents were searched and used to analyze the limits of patent protection in respect to others related to the Intellectual Property (IP laws. Thus, it was possible to elucidate the complex scenario of the Intellectual Property of the glyphosate tolerant soybeans, since for the farmer it is hard to correlate the royalties payment with the IP enterprise's rightsO presente trabalho analisa as diferentes modalidades de proteção das criações intelectuais no campo da biotecnologia agrícola. A partir das leis Brasileiras relacionadas ao tema (Lei da Propriedade Industrial - nº 9.279/96 e Lei da Proteção de Cultivares - nº 9.456/97, e com base nos tratados internacionais assinados pelo Brasil, o presente trabalho aponta as inclusões de cada uma, assim como, suas interfaces usando como referência o estudo de caso da soja geneticamente modificada para tolerância ao glifosato. Para este caso, patentes pipelines da Monsanto foram buscadas e usadas para analisar os limites de proteção das patentes frente às outras leis de Propriedade Intelectual (PI relacionadas. Assim, foi possível elucidar o cenário complexo da Propriedade Intelectual das sojas tolerantes ao glifosato, já que para o agricultor não é fácil correlacionar o pagamento dos royalties com os direitos de PI da empresa

  14. Patenting productivity and intellectual property policies at Research I universities: An exploratory comparative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Mendoza

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In the 1980s, the US government encouraged the cooperation of industries with universities in order to bridge funding gaps and cope with global competitive markets through legislations that allow universities to start spin-off businesses and to generate profits from patents. At the turn of the century, university partnerships with the private sector have greatly increased through research grants, licensing patents, and in some cases, the formation of new firms'mainly at research universities and in the hard sciences. In response to these entrepreneurial opportunities, university administrators developed intellectual property policies to facilitate the commercialization of research. The purpose of this study is to explore the differences across IP policies among nine research universities as potential sources of influence on faculty engagement in for-profit research ventures according to existing models of faculty role performance and achievement.

  15. Open Access Intellectual Property Systems: A Comparison to Commercial Solutions in Competitive Intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Cerny

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available ICT/IS management plays an important role within the framework of innovation management, and one of the key elements of this role is the support of Competitive Intelligence in the context of innovation processes. The strategic information needs of innovation management are also directed towards different kinds of intellectual property (IP information entities and commercialization. The purpose of this paper is to define these entities and IP information systems as an important part of a company’s Competitive Intelligence Unit for competitor analysis and technology trends. The open access IP information systems will be analysed together with commercial solutions.. The aim of this paper is to underline the importance of open access IP systems compared to added value commercial solutions for competitive intelligence purposes for SMEs. The comparison will be carried out using examples of patent searches within a concrete dataset.

  16. Wealth and Secular Stagnation: The Role of Industrial Organization and Intellectual Property Rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman Mark Schwartz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Changes in firm strategy and structure partially explain the sources and consequences of rising wealth inequality in America. Combining use of state-created monopolies around intellectual property rights (IPRs for profitability and firm-level strategies to transform their industrial organization by pushing physical capital and noncore labor outside the boundaries of the firm leads to rising levels of wealth and income inequality among firms as well as individuals. Income inequality among firms in turn reduces growth in productive investment and thus in aggregate demand. Slower growth reflexively deters firms from new investment, aggravating the shortfall in aggregate demand. Decreased protection for IPRs and increased protection for subcontracted workers would help increase aggregate demand and thus push growth back to its prior level, as well as reducing wealth and income inequality among individuals.

  17. Intellectual Property and the Changing of Information Professional Curricula: a huge necessity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Goulart Oliveira

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Information society represents a profound changing in the organization of the society and economy – a new paradigm – but, most of all it is a global phenomenon with potential for transforming social, economical and technical environment and activities performed by information specialists, because social reality is always affected by the infra-structure of available information. In this regard, the theme Intellectual Property has become one of the pillars of the new context of technology development and interchange communication between countries and people everywhere because the objects of intellectual property in all its extension, which are creations of the human mind and intellect, can be seen as pieces of information which can be incorporated in intangible objects at the same time in an unlimited number of copies, at different locations anywhere in the world. And all these objects have specific information inside and are reunited in databases with special characteristics, which have to be understood by the information professional and the knowledge on how to comprehend, handle and recover is a fundamental necessity. And most important is that this professional will have to acquire knowledge in multidisciplinar subjects, as economy, innovation, information technologies, human sciences, ethics and law. - In this context, some studies concerning “network society” (Castells, 2002 “cyberculture” (Lévy 1999, and information literacy of informational professional (Vitorino, 2007 and (Azevedo and Beraquet, 2010 put light on a necessity to review competences in the specific area of graduation because they bring other ways of thinking and implement a strong relation with reality, considering the existence of new informational economies. It is no longer possible for this specialist not to understand a student or teacher request concerning an advise on patent search, the environment of innovation or tendencies on the trademark world or

  18. The Patent and the Paper: a Few Thoughts on Late Modern Science and Intellectual Property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Hemmungs Wirtén

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Marie and Pierre Curie's decision not to patent the discovery (1898 and later isolation (1902 of radium is perhaps the most famous of all disinterested decisions in the history of science. To choose publishing instead of patenting and openness instead of enclosure was hardly a radical choice at the time. Traditionally, we associate academic publishing with 'pure science' and Mertonian ideals of openness, sharing and transparency. Patenting on the other hand, as a byproduct of 'applied science' is intimately linked to an increased emphasis and dependency on commercialization and technology transfer within academia. Starting from the Curies' mythological decision I delineate the contours of an increasing convergence of the patent and the paper (article from the end of the nineteenth-century until today. Ultimately, my goal is to suggest a few possible ways of addressing the hybrid space that today constitute the terrain of late modern science and intellectual property.

  19. Intellectual property rights, benefit-sharing and development of "improved traditional medicines": A new approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willcox, Merlin; Diallo, Drissa; Sanogo, Rokia; Giani, Sergio; Graz, Bertrand; Falquet, Jacques; Bodeker, Gerard

    2015-12-24

    Protection of intellectual property rights and benefit-sharing are key issues for all ethnopharmacological research. The International Society of Ethnobiology has produced helpful guidelines on access and benefit-sharing which are widely viewed as a "gold standard" but the question remains how best to apply these guidelines in practice. Difficult questions include ownership of traditional knowledge, making appropriate agreements, and how appropriately to share benefits. We present the case study of the development of an "improved traditional medicine" for malaria in Mali and we report how benefit-sharing was applied in this case. The knowledge about the selected plant came independently from several families and traditional healers. The IPR approach was to recognise that this traditional knowledge belongs to the people of Mali and was used for their benefit in developing a new "improved traditional medicine" (ITM). The traditional healer whose method of preparation was used, and who collaborated in clinical trials, did not request any financial reward but asked for the ITM to be named after him. The most sustainable benefit for the community was sharing the results of which preparation of which medicinal plant seemed to be the most effective for treating malaria. Attempts at providing a health centre and training a health worker for the village did not prove to be sustainable. Respect for intellectual property rights and benefit-sharing are possible even in a context where the knowledge is not owned by a clearly identified person or group of people. The most sustainable benefits are intangible rather than material: namely recognition, improved knowledge about which traditional treatment is the best and how to prepare and take it. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Psychometric Properties of the Hospital Anxiety and Depressions Scale Adapted for Use with People with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagnan, D.; Jahoda, A.; McDowell, K.; Masson, J.; Banks, P.; Hare, D.

    2008-01-01

    Background: There is increasing recognition of depression in people with intellectual disabilities (ID). There is a need to develop well-standardised self-report measures for both clinical and research purposes. This paper presents some psychometric properties of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) adapted for use with people with ID.…

  1. What Drives the Intellectual Property Output of High-Tech Firms? Regional-versus Firm-Level Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Masiak (Christian); C.O. Fisch (Christian); J.H. Block (Jörn)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThis study analyzes the effects of regional- and firm-level factors on the intellectual property (IP) output (i.e., patents and trademarks) of high-tech firms. So far, little is known on how regional factors influence the IP output of high-tech firms. We combine data on 8,317 German

  2. The right to health and medicines: the case of recent multilateral negotiations on public health, innovation and intellectual property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasquez, German

    2014-08-01

    The negotiations of the intergovernmental group known as the 'IGWG', undertaken by the Member States of the WHO, were the result of a deadlock in the World Health Assembly held in 2006 where the Member States of the WHO were unable to reach an agreement on what to do with the 60 recommendations in the report on 'Public Health, Innovation and Intellectual Property Rights submitted to the Assembly in the same year by a group of experts designated by the Director General of the WHO. The result of these negotiations was the 'Global strategy and plan of action on public health, innovation and intellectual property' which was approved by the World Health Assembly in 2008. The intention of the Global Strategy and Plan of Action (GSPOA) which was produced by the IGWG was to substantially reform the pharmaceuticals' research and development system in view of the findings that this system, whose purpose is to produce medicines for diseases which affect the greater part of the world population which lives in developing countries, had failed. The intellectual property rights imposed by the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) and the recent trade agreements could become one of the main obstacles to access to medicines. The GSPOA makes a critical analysis of this reality, and opens the door to searching for new solutions to this problem. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Legal Issues of Intellectual Property Rights and Licensing for E-Learning Content in the United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrpouyan, Azadeh; Razavi, Ghassem Khadem

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on the legal rules of intellectual property rights (IPR) in networked e-learning. Its purpose is to act as an awareness-raising device about IPR, especially in the public-sector e-learning community in the UK, by describing the relevant aspects of IPR, providing legal guidance on IPR in e-learning, especially on the use of…

  4. Intellectual Property Rights of Faculty in the Digital Age--Evolution or Dissolution in 21st Century Academia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron, Lynn S.; Roche, Catherine M.

    2015-01-01

    Unforeseen forces are at work in higher education today. The purpose of this article is to explore the issues involved in the changing landscape. Decisions are and will be made that impact the intellectual property rights of faculty. It is important to be cognizant of the factors involved and alert to possible ramifications. The basics of the…

  5. Special Issue: Intellectual Property in the Information Age: Knowledge as Commodity and its Legal Implications for Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jeffrey C., Ed.; Baez, Benjamin, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This monograph examines in great detail two kinds of intellectual property: copyrights and patents. Though the authors recognize the significance of trademarks and trade secrets, they focus primarily on copyrights and patents in this monograph because they represent the most significant issues in higher education in the information age.…

  6. "Innovation and Intellectual Property Policies in European Research Infrastructure Consortia - PART I: The Case of the European Spallation Source ERIC"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Helen; Wested, Jakob; Minssen, Timo

    2017-01-01

    , the European Spallation Source ERIC is required to adopt various policy documents relating to the operation and management of the facility. These cover a wide variety of issues such as user access, public procurement, intellectual property rights (IPR), data management, and dissemination. One of the main goals...

  7. A Primer on Employment and Intellectual Property Law: Legal Guidance for Supervisors of Assessment and Institutional Research Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, William; Lugg, Elizabeth Timmerman

    2017-01-01

    Institutional research (IR) leaders rely on staff members to accomplish office missions and support institutional decisions. Like any supervisors in higher education, IR leaders must be familiar with a host of employment and intellectual property laws that guide the institution/employee relationship. This chapter offers insights into specific…

  8. Intellectual Property Development and Use for Distance Education Courses: A Review of Law, Organizations, and Resources for Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemire, Ruth E.

    2007-01-01

    Advancement of knowledge and progress in technology drives the need for protecting inventions, new ideas, writings, music, and other media. While abundant, intellectual property and copyright issues are not simple, and the United States has adopted multiple rules via treaties worldwide. Academia has been fortunate with regard to the freedom…

  9. Changes in Intellectual Property Statutes and Policies at a Public University: Revising the Terms of Professional Labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaughter, Sheila; Rhoades, Gary

    1993-01-01

    A study investigated the ways in which changes in state law concerning intellectual property from 1969-89 has helped shape the climate for commercialization of science in a public university, and affected the terms of professional labor for faculty. Significant changes in the faculty-institution relationship and the government-school relationship…

  10. Intellectual property Protection in the Digital Environment According to Point of View of Academic Professors in Algeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hind Ulwy

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The digital revolution of technological information has started and would not stop. The use of information technology gives birth to new challenges and many problems in society, one of this case is, intellectual property for all digital intellectual receptacle witch to be affected in information society with law order. A new area, with new skills should be developed in the light of a care fully deeply through deontology to review and coordinate knowledge. The main skill is the reach information and knowledge but this value became an illegal penetrate to the privacy on cyberspace. This deontological problem throws many questions about the legal and deontological responsibility

  11. Integrating Remote Sensing Data with Socioeconomic Data: Sensitivity, Confidentiality, Privacy, and Intellectual Property Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, R. R.; Adamo, S. B.

    2014-12-01

    The integration of remote sensing data with socioeconomic data presents new opportunities for scientific discovery and analysis that can improve understanding of the environmental sustainability issues that society faces today. Such integrated data products and services can be used to study interdisciplinary issues by investigators representing various disciplines. In addition to the scientific benefits that can be attained by integrating remote sensing data with socioeconomic data, the integration of these data also present challenges that reflect the complex issues that arise when sharing and integrating different types of science data. When integrating one or more datasets that contain sensitive information, data producers need to be aware of the limitations that have been placed upon the data to protect private property, species or other inhabitants that reside on the property, or restricted information about a particular location. Similarly, confidentiality and privacy issues are a concern for data that have been collected about individual humans and families who have volunteered to serve as human research subjects or whose personal information may have been collected without their knowledge. In addition, intellectual property rights that are associated with a particular dataset may prevent integration with other data or pose constraints on the use of the resulting data products or services. These challenges will be described along with approaches that can be applied to address them when planning projects that involve the integration of remote sensing data with socioeconomic data.

  12. A Computer-Based Interactive Multimedia Program to Reduce HIV Transmission for Women with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaine, Khaya

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite recent recognition of the need for preventive sexual health materials for people with intellectual disability (ID), there have been remarkably few health-based interventions designed for people with mild to moderate ID. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a computer-based interactive multimedia (CBIM) program to teach HIV/AIDS knowledge, skills, and decision-making. Methods Twenty-five women with mild to moderate intellectual disability evaluated the program. The study used a quasi-experimental within-subjects design to assess the efficacy of the CBIM program. Research participants completed five qualitative and quantitative instruments that assessed HIV knowledge, and decision-making skills regarding HIV prevention practices and condom application skills (i.e., demonstration of skills opening a condom and putting it on a model penis). In addition, 18 service providers who work with women with ID reviewed the program and completed a demographics questionnaire and a professional customer satisfaction survey. Results Women with ID showed statistically significant increases from pretest to posttest in all knowledge and skill domains. Furthermore, the statistical gains were accompanied by medium to large effect sizes. Overall, service providers rated the program highly on several outcome measures (stimulation, relevance, and usability). Conclusions The results of this study indicate the CBIM program was effective in increasing HIV/AIDS knowledge and skills among women with ID, who live both semi-independently and independently, in a single-session intervention. Since the CBIM program is not dependent on staff for instructional delivery, it is a highly efficient teaching tool; and CBIM is an efficacious means to provide behavioral health content, compensating for the dearth of available health promotion materials for people with ID. As such, it has a potential for broad distribution and implementation by medical practitioners, and

  13. Teaching Grocery Store Purchasing Skills to Students with Intellectual Disabilities Using a Computer-Based Instruction Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, David L.; Morgan, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    This research evaluated effects of a multi-media computer-based instruction (CBI) program designed to teach grocery store purchasing skills to three high-school students with intellectual disabilities. A multiple baseline design across participants used measures of computer performance mastery and grocery store probes to evaluate the CBI. All…

  14. Impact of Inclusive College Programs Serving Students with Intellectual Disabilities on Disability Studies Interns and Typically Enrolled Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Margo Vreeburg; Shuman, Amy

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to confirm and extend prior research on the attitudes and experiences of typical college students towards students with intellectual disabilities who were enrolled in an inclusive postsecondary program. College students enrolled in a Disability Studies Internship class completed surveys, journals, and participated in…

  15. The Effectiveness of a Sex Education Program Facilitating Social Skills for People with Intellectual Disability in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Mayumi; Arakida, Mikako; Ohashi, Kazutomo

    2011-01-01

    Background: Sex education should include social skills, such as those that allow individuals to relate, socialise, and communicate with others, to assist people with intellectual disability (ID) to live life fully in the community. Objectives: We administered and investigated the effects of a program involving 8 interactive sex education sessions…

  16. Inclusion in the Workforce for Students with Intellectual Disabilities: A Case Study of a Spanish Postsecondary Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Sharon; Gasset, Dolores Izuzquiza

    2015-01-01

    The Autonomous University of Madrid (UAM) is the first Spanish university to provide training to young people with intellectual disabilities (ID) in the university environment, which qualifies them for inclusion in the workforce. In this practice brief we describe the UAM-Prodis Patronage Chair program, a successful model used at Spanish…

  17. Effectiveness of Leisure Time Activities Program on Social Skills and Behavioral Problems in Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eratay, Emine

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of leisure time activities program in individuals with intellectual disabilities in terms of developing social skills and reducing behavioral problems. Social skills assessment scale, behavioral assessment form for children and young adults, and teacher's report forms were used in the…

  18. Antitrust rules and Intellectual Property Rights in the EU and the US – Towards convergence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Todino

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In light of the exponential increase of the number of investigations raising the issue of how to reconcile competition rules and Intellectual Property Rights (IPRs, it is now clear that the area of Antitrust/IP intersection is becoming the battleground of antitrust enforcers around the Globe. In some areas inherently prone to market power accumulation, antitrust rules tend to clash with IPRs and prevail over the latter, for the intensity in the application of competition rules increasingly depends on the strength of the IPRs at stake, as well as on the sector involved. Information Communication Technology and Pharmaceuticals are the sectors most affected by this trend, as they both display specific market features calling for intensive antitrust scrutiny. Surprisingly enough, in these areas the EU and the US agencies are heading towards convergence, in light of the decisions taken in cases such as the judicial injunctions sought by FRAND-pledged SEPs holders and the reverse settlements in the Pharma sector. The purpose of this article is to show that in those areas more exposed to tension between antitrust and IP rules, there is an increasing level of convergence between the US and the EU. In particular, it is submitted that, like in the EU, the US is departing from the traditional symmetry principle under which antitrust rules are applied to IPRs exactly the same way as other property rights. In this new framework, inconsistency is more likely to come from the enforcement activity of NCAs across Europe.

  19. INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY: WILL THE DEVELOPING COUNTRIES LEAD OR FOLLOW?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichman, Jerome H.

    2010-01-01

    Developing countries, particularly the BRIC countries of Brazil, Russia, India, and China, should accommodate their national systems of innovation to the worldwide intellectual property (IP) regime emerging after the adoption of the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) in a way that maximizes global economic welfare in the foreseeable future. As many developed countries’ experience demonstrates, badly configured, over-protectionist IP regimes stifle innovation by making inputs to future innovation too costly and too cumbersome to sustain over time. More carefully considered IP regimes, however, are an important way to protect innovative small- and medium-sized firms from predatory, larger competitors. The challenge is for emerging economies to capture the benefits of IP without importing the serious problems that developed countries have themselves failed to solve. Emerging economies can attain this balance by pursuing a policy of counter-harmonization in which they take advantage of existing exemptions in international agreements governing IP to establish regional, local, and international practices that promote more innovative, flexible uses of IP. Such practices include a research exemption for experimental uses of IP, government imposed nonexclusive licensing, anti-blocking provisions, an essential facilities doctrine, and compulsory licenses. Additional tools include an ex ante regime of compensatory liability rules for small scale innovation and sensible exceptions, particularly for science as well as general fair use provisions, to the exclusive rights of domestic copyright laws. Emerging economies will have to overcome strong economic pressure to accept more restrictive IP regimes as part of free trade agreements as well as a lack of technical expertise and internal government coordination. However, emerging economies have already accrued enough experience to be aware of the strengths and weaknesses of various IP

  20. INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY: WILL THE DEVELOPING COUNTRIES LEAD OR FOLLOW?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichman, Jerome H

    2009-01-31

    Developing countries, particularly the BRIC countries of Brazil, Russia, India, and China, should accommodate their national systems of innovation to the worldwide intellectual property (IP) regime emerging after the adoption of the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) in a way that maximizes global economic welfare in the foreseeable future. As many developed countries' experience demonstrates, badly configured, over-protectionist IP regimes stifle innovation by making inputs to future innovation too costly and too cumbersome to sustain over time. More carefully considered IP regimes, however, are an important way to protect innovative small- and medium-sized firms from predatory, larger competitors. The challenge is for emerging economies to capture the benefits of IP without importing the serious problems that developed countries have themselves failed to solve. Emerging economies can attain this balance by pursuing a policy of counter-harmonization in which they take advantage of existing exemptions in international agreements governing IP to establish regional, local, and international practices that promote more innovative, flexible uses of IP. Such practices include a research exemption for experimental uses of IP, government imposed nonexclusive licensing, anti-blocking provisions, an essential facilities doctrine, and compulsory licenses. Additional tools include an ex ante regime of compensatory liability rules for small scale innovation and sensible exceptions, particularly for science as well as general fair use provisions, to the exclusive rights of domestic copyright laws. Emerging economies will have to overcome strong economic pressure to accept more restrictive IP regimes as part of free trade agreements as well as a lack of technical expertise and internal government coordination. However, emerging economies have already accrued enough experience to be aware of the strengths and weaknesses of various IP

  1. Self-concept of people with intellectual disabilities: Implications for support program development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Boban

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-concept is defined as a sum of perception, thoughts, feelings, evaluation and prediction about oneself as an experienced object, as a participant in the interaction with physical and social environment. As such, this topic is often encountered in working with children, young people and adults with intellectual disabilities (PWID. However, self-concept of PWID has been investigated mainly through psychometric paradigm, using different types of questionnaires for assessment. This did not provide either enough possibilities for active participation of people with ID in the research process, or the possibilities to reach adequate initial information about self-concept of PWID, which may serve as a baseline for development of support programs for self-determination of PWID. Therefore, this study aimed to examine self-concept of PWID in various domains of interest for PWID: global self-image, personality traits, competencies, difficulties in everyday life, awareness of one's own (intellectual disabilities. The research was conducted through a series of five focus groups, with active participation of PWID, through combined workshop activities and discussions in small groups. Focus groups were conducted once a week and 16 participants were divided into two groups, of different ages (22 to 53 years, sex, type and degree of difficulties. All participants spent most of their lives in institutions. Since 2004, they have been living at supported housing for people with disabilities. Based on the analysis of the participants' testimony, there were three global issues with regard to general self-concept: competences and interests, physical appearance, and social roles. With regard to personality traits, attributes such as 'good', 'obedient', 'valuable' occur most frequently. With regard to their competencies and difficulties, those which are most important for full daily life in supported housing have been cited most often. While they recognize their

  2. Turing Impossibility Properties for Stack Machine Programming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergstra, J.A.; Middelburg, C.A.

    2012-01-01

    The strong, intermediate, and weak Turing impossibility properties are introduced. Some facts concerning Turing impossibility for stack machine programming are trivially adapted from previous work. Several intriguing questions are raised about the Turing impossibility properties concerning different

  3. A community-based aquatic exercise program to improve endurance and mobility in adults with mild to moderate intellectual disability

    OpenAIRE

    Hakim, Ren?e M.; Ross, Michael D.; Runco, Wendy; Kane, Michael T.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of a community-based aquatic exercise program on physical performance among adults with mild to moderate intellectual disability (ID). Twenty-two community-dwelling adults with mild to moderate ID volunteered to participate in this study. Participants completed an 8-week aquatic exercise program (2 days/wk, 1 hr/session). Measures of physical performance, which were assessed prior to and following the completion of the aquatic exercise p...

  4. Effectiveness of a life story work program on older adults with intellectual disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bai X

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Xue Bai,1,2 Daniel WH Ho,2 Karen Fung,3 Lily Tang,3 Moon He,3 Kim Wan Young,4 Florence Ho,2 Timothy Kwok2,5 1Department of Applied Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong; 2Jockey Club Centre for Positive Ageing, Shatin, Hong Kong; 3Hong Chi Association, Hong Kong; 4Department of Social Work, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong; 5Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong Objective: This study examines the effectiveness of a life story work program (LSWp in older adults with mild-to-moderate levels of intellectual disability (ID. Methods: Using a quasiexperimental design, this study assigned 60 older adults who were between 50–90 years old with mild-to-moderate levels of ID to receive either the LSWp (intervention group, N=32 or usual activities (control group, N=28 during a period of 6 months. Evaluation was made based on the outcomes assessed by the Mood Interest and Pleasure Questionnaire, the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, and the Personal Well-being Index – ID. Results and conclusion: LSWp shows potential for improving the quality of life and preventing the loss of interest and pleasure in older adults with ID. It also shows promise in enhancing their socialization skills. Patients with better communication abilities seemed to benefit more from the LSWp. Keywords: life story work, life story book, intellectual disabilities, older adults, effectiveness

  5. Graduate Formation in Intellectual Property in Brazil: A Study Based on Academic Production of Thesis and Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heitor de Paula Filho

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present information on the graduate formation in Intellectual Property in Brazil based on academic production of thesis and dissertations. This study analyzed data from 278 documents indexed in Bank of Thesis of Capes. The results show that: 1 only in the last years started the formation of professionals at the master’s and doctorate degree levels being necessary efforts for learning and training in the area; 2 the formation of competences is much concentrated in the Southeast and South regions of the country and in the area of Law being necessary to correct these asymmetries; and 3 the principal focus of this academic production is related to intellectual property policy followed by patents.

  6. Multilateral Organization vs. Bilateral Negotiations: A Case of the Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namhoon Kwon

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available In the 1990s, the issue of intellectual property rights (IPR protection gained a prominent place on the international trade agenda, which led to the establishment of the trade-related aspects of intellectual property rights (TRIPs as a part of the WTO regime. Two questions are asked regarding this development: whether a multilateral organization such as the WTO performs better than bilateral negotiations in resolving IPR disputes, and what happened around the 1990s to create an environment favorable to the establishment of a multilateral organization. To deal with these issues, this paper takes the IPE (international political economy approach. Using a very simple game theory model, I derive the cases in which a multilateral organization has better performances. Then, it is used to show that political pressures due to the growth of the US trade deficit in the late 1980s could have been the reason that a multilateral organization became the institutional equilibrium.

  7. Intellectual Properties Rights-A strong determinant of economic growth in agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manju Chaudhary

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available

    In the past few decades the subject of intellectual property rights (IPRs has occupied center stage in debates about globalization, economic development and poverty elimination. This study concerns the strengthening of IPRs in the plant breeding industry and its effect on agriculture in India. In India, most of the population relies on agriculture for its livelihood. India is self-sufficient in wheat and paddy, but deficient in other agricultural products. Patents are good indicators of research and development output. Patent analysis makes it possible to map out the trend of technological change and life cycle of a technology – growth, development, maturity and decline. Patent information and patent statistical analysis have been used for examining present, technological status and to forecast future trends. One can determine the directions of corporate R&D and market interests by analyzing patent data. The present study is an attempt to analyze patents granted in India in the field of agriculture and importance of biotechnology-based innovations in agriculture

  8. Moving research to patient applications through commercialization: understanding and evaluating the role of intellectual property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patino, Robert M

    2010-03-01

    The advancement of research from discovery to the delivery of medical care can be limited without the support of industry to sponsor its continued development. Federal government financial support is generally crucial in early-stage development through funding from the NIH, National Science Foundation, and other federal agencies; however, government support generally stops shortly after basic research discoveries have been reported. Much of the cessation of financial support derives from the government's regulatory responsibilities, as sponsoring the commercialization of a product conflicts with regulation of the approval for clinical use of a drug or device. Furthermore, differences in goals, resources, and flexibility render government, as compared with private industry, inefficient and less responsive to market demands with regard to stream-lining the development of and enhancing the quality of products and services offered. Thus, industry and private investment provide the bridge that converts new discoveries into healthcare products that are available to consumers and patients. This conversion occurs through commercialization, which involves both high risks and high rewards. Taking advantage of the commercialization option for research development requires an understanding of the technology transfer process. This article reviews 5 topics: 1) industry motivation to invest in academic research; 2) institutional considerations in partnering with industry; 3) academia's interactions with inventors in the commercialization process; 4) the research institution's route to commercialization, and 5) the role of intellectual property and commercialization in the advancement of healthcare.

  9. After thalidomide - do we have the right balance between public health and intellectual property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldschreiber, Peter; Breckenridge, Alasdair

    2015-01-01

    The current European regulatory and consumer protection legal framework is the legacy of Thalidomide. The disaster led to the introduction of systematic biological and clinical data to endorse the safety and efficacy of new medicines. The European Medicines Directive outlined the pre-clinical, clinical data and product information to evaluate an appropriate benefit. Risk profile of new medicines and also allowed innovative companies to extend patent protection and data/marketing exclusivity periods to compensate for the cost for research and development. However in recent years it has become apparent that the costs and time for research and development are becoming increasingly burdensome, particularly for new drugs with recently discovered mechanisms of action for cancers and neurodegenerative disorders. The costs of development and the commercial uncertainty of such products is reducing commercialisation of these medicines. There is now considerable debate in the regulatory community as to how this regulatory burden may be eased by making earlier review of benefit risk and hence earlier access to authorised medicines. The Courts are moving away from the wide definition of medicinal product to a more nuanced view of the biological and clinical therapeutic mechanisms to satisfy the 'functional' limb definition in the Directive. This may be a move away from the rigorous scientific methodology generated after thalidomide. We discuss the ethical and public health implications of this shift in policy and the implications for intellectual property mechanisms currently available to protect the commercial needs of companies.

  10. Biological diversity, indigenous knowledge, drug discovery and intellectual property rights: creating reciprocity and maintaining relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, S R; Carlson, T J; Moran, K

    1996-04-01

    When new plant-derived therapeutics based on indigenous knowledge are being explored, it is important that the pharmaceutical companies return benefits to the native populations and the local governments from which the research material was obtained. When a potentially marketable plant product is being developed, it is essential that equitable agreements have already been established between the pharmaceutical companies and the people and/or countries from which this indigenous knowledge was acquired. Equally important is the commitment to provide immediate reciprocity that will enhance the welfare, the biocultural diversity and the well-being of the forest peoples. These measures should commence when a research project begins and continue during its duration. The development of these measures must be based upon the expressed needs of the indigenous communities. The relationship between the stability of the rain forest biocultural diversity, the creation and development of agro-forest resources and the long term benefits to the forest people is highlighted. Examples of initiatives taken by Shaman Pharmaceuticals Inc. and the Healing Forest Conservancy are described and discussed in the context of exploring appropriate use of intellectual property law to address the ethical issues facing all business and research groups working in the tropics.

  11. Moving Research to Patient Applications through Commercialization: Understanding and Evaluating the Role of Intellectual Property

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The advancement of research from discovery to the delivery of medical care can be limited without the support of industry to sponsor its continued development. Federal government financial support is generally crucial in early-stage development through funding from the NIH, National Science Foundation, and other federal agencies; however, government support generally stops shortly after basic research discoveries have been reported. Much of the cessation of financial support derives from the government's regulatory responsibilities, as sponsoring the commercialization of a product conflicts with regulation of the approval for clinical use of a drug or device. Furthermore, differences in goals, resources, and flexibility render government, as compared with private industry, inefficient and less responsive to market demands with regard to stream-lining the development of and enhancing the quality of products and services offered. Thus, industry and private investment provide the bridge that converts new discoveries into healthcare products that are available to consumers and patients. This conversion occurs through commercialization, which involves both high risks and high rewards. Taking advantage of the commercialization option for research development requires an understanding of the technology transfer process. This article reviews 5 topics: 1) industry motivation to invest in academic research; 2) institutional considerations in partnering with industry; 3) academia's interactions with inventors in the commercialization process; 4) the research institution's route to commercialization, and 5) the role of intellectual property and commercialization in the advancement of healthcare. PMID:20353687

  12. Intellectual property and access to medicines: an analysis of legislation in Central America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerón, Alejandro; Godoy, Angelina Snodgrass

    2009-10-01

    Globalization of intellectual property (IP) protection for medicines has been advancing during the past decade. Countries are obliged to adapt their legislation as a requirement of their membership to the World Trade Organization or as a condition of being part of international trade agreements. There is a growing recognition that, in low-income countries, stronger IP protection is a barrier to access to medicines. At the same time, the number of low-income countries writing national legislation to protect IP for pharmaceutical products is growing worldwide, but little research has been done on the ways in which this process is happening at the national level. This paper aims to contribute to the understanding of the implementation of IP legislation at the national level by providing a comparative analysis of the countries that are part of the United States-Dominican Republic-Central America Free Trade Agreement (DR-CAFTA). The analysis shows three trends. First, countries have often implemented stronger IP protection than required by trade agreements. Second, some countries have adopted IP protection before signing the trade agreements. Third, the process of ratification of DR-CAFTA increased public debate around these issues, which in some cases led to IP legislation that considers public health needs. These trends suggest that industrialized countries and the pharmaceutical industry are using more tactics than just trade agreements to push for increased IP protection and that the process of national legislation is a valid arena for confronting public health needs to those of the industry.

  13. Eco-tourism services in light of new clusters and application of intellectual property rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Vukašin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary eco-tourism includes the basic principles of sustainable development and actively contributes to the preservation of natural and cultural heritage of a specific area by involving the residents of local communities in the planning, development and distribution of generated revenues. It is based on the abundance of biodiversity (particularly rare and endemic species, the traditional knowledge and folklore tradition of a specific area. Products and services that are specific to this form of tourism have always been on the verge of being both beneficial and harmful for the identity of a particular area. Yet, one of the current solutions for attaining good economic results of eco-tourism is grouping all available resources within a particular local community for the purpose of promoting its distinctive features and diversity. In this paper, the author discusses a significant trend of forming eco-tourism clusters and points out to the contemporary solutions aimed at protecting the genetic resources, traditional knowledge and folklore of local communities within tourism services. The development of intellectual property protection, whose goal is to preserve traditional knowledge and skills of certain local communities, has a significant impact on the development of eco-tourism as well as on the increase of its competitiveness in the global market.

  14. THE NON-QUALITY OF COUNTERFEIT PRODUCTS AND THEIR EFFECT ON CONSUMERS AND THE INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHT

    OpenAIRE

    Emilia PASCU; Petronela-Sonia NEDEA; Oana-Maria MILEA

    2012-01-01

    Breaking the intellectual property rights (IPR) has huge effects on the free movement of merchandise and of the occupying degree of work places, affecting both economic development and consumers’ health, and the rightful trademark owners and the companies which legally exploit them are the main “actors” to undertake the effects of this phenomenon which, in the last few years, has grown with more than 1000% according to data published by the World Trade Organization. In the last 20 years, the ...

  15. Who shall live when not all can live? Intellectual property in accessing and benefit-sharing influenza viruses through the World Health Organisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Charles

    2011-03-01

    This article addresses the development of the World Health Organisation's (WHO) arrangements for accessing viruses and the development of vaccines to respond to potential pandemics (and other lesser outbreaks). It examines the ongoing "conflict" between the United Nations' Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) and the World Trade Organisation's Agreement on Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) in the context of the debates about the paramountcy of intellectual property, and the potential for other (equity and development) imperatives to over-ride respect for intellectual property and TRIPS. The article concludes that the same intellectual property fault lines are evident in the WHO forum as those apparent at the CBD and the WTO fora, and an ongoing failure to properly address questions of equity and development. This poses a challenge for the Australian Government in guaranteeing a satisfactory pandemic influenza preparation and response.

  16. Learning, technology and intellectual property: a survey of the philosophies and preferences of our trainees and peers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedoya, Maria A; Back, Susan J; Scanlon, Mary H; Delgado, Jorge; Darge, Kassa; Reid, Janet R

    2016-12-01

    Increasing workloads threaten the quality of teaching in academic radiology practices. There is a wealth of unfiltered educational resources for radiology on the internet. As a digital native, today's radiology trainee may have differing opinions from teachers about learning and intellectual property. To identify the preferences and philosophies regarding learning, technology and intellectual property toward the future development of an innovative radiology curriculum. An electronic survey with 22 questions was sent to 2,010 members of the Society for Pediatric Radiology and 100 radiology trainees. Three hundred sixty-one of the 2,110 surveys were returned. All questions were completed in 342 surveys. Fifty-three respondents were trainees (residents and fellows) and 289 respondents were radiologists (teachers). Time needed for a single learning activity in both groups is learning environments were point-of-care and outside work hours for both groups. Ideal lecture durations were 31-45 min for trainees and 21-30 min for teachers (P=0.001). Adoption of new technology showed late majority and laggard trends for both groups (P=0.296). Interest in gadgets was greater in trainees (17%) than teachers (2%) (Plearning styles of trainees and teachers are more similar than was previously believed. Trainees and teachers hold conflicting philosophies about intellectual property. Results herein speak favorably for revising our teaching portfolio to include practical learning materials of short duration available at point-of-care.

  17. How Reasonable is the ‘Reasonable’ Royalty Rate? Damage Rules and Probabilistic Intellectual Property Rights

    OpenAIRE

    Jay Pil Choi

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates how different damage rules in patent infringement cases shape competition when intellectual property rights are probabilistic. I develop a simple model of oligopolistic competition to compare two main liability doctrines that have been used in the US to assess infringement damages – the unjust enrichment rule and the lost profit rule. It also points out the logical inconsistency in the concept of the "reasonable royalty rates" when intellectual property rights are no...

  18. Program computes turbine steam rates and properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganapathy, V. (ABCO Industries, Inc., Abilene, TX (US))

    1988-11-01

    BASIC computer program quickly evaluates steam properties and rates during expansion in a steam turbine. Engineers involved in cogeneration projects and power plant studies often need to calculate the steam properties during expansion in a steam turbine to evaluate the theoretical and actual steam rates and hence, the electrical power output. With the help of this program written in BASIC, one can quickly evaluate all the pertinent data. Correlations used for steam property evaluation are also presented.

  19. Human-tissue-related inventions: ownership and intellectual property rights in international collaborative research in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andanda, P A

    2008-03-01

    There are complex unresolved ethical, legal and social issues related to the use of human tissues obtained in the course of research or diagnostic procedures and retained for further use in research. The question of intellectual property rights over commercially viable products or procedures that are derived from these samples and the suitability or otherwise of participants relinquishing their rights to the samples needs urgent attention. The complexity of these matters lies in the fact that the relationship between intellectual property rights and ownership or rights pertaining to the samples on which the intellectual property right is based may either be overlooked or taken for granted. What equally makes the matter complex is that samples may be obtained from participants in developing countries and exported to developed countries for analysis and research. It is important for research ethics committees to tread carefully when reviewing research protocols that raise such issues for purposes of ensuring that appropriate benefit sharing agreements, particularly with developing countries, are in place. This paper attempts to analyse the key questions related to ownership and intellectual property rights in commercially viable products derived from human tissue samples. Patent law is used as a point of reference as opposed to other forms of intellectual property rights such as industrial designs because it is the right that most inventors apply for in respect of human tissue-related inventions. The key questions are formulated following a systematic analysis of peer reviewed journal articles that have reported original investigations into relevant issues in this field. Most of the cases and reported studies that are referred to in this paper do not directly deal with HIV/AIDS research but the underlying principles are helpful in HIV/AIDS research as well. Pertinent questions, which members of ethics review committees should focus on in this regard are discussed and

  20. Identifying state resources and support programs on e-government websites for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Kathleen M; Peterson, Justin D; Albert, Jon D

    2015-01-01

    This descriptive cross-sectional study identified resources and programs that are available nationwide on the Internet to support individuals and families with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), with a focus on intellectual disability. This evaluation included easily identifiable information on specific resources and highlighted unique programs found in individual states that were linked from e-government websites. Researchers documented the ease of access and available information for all 50 states and the District of Columbia. A number of disparities and areas for improvement were recorded for states and I/DD websites. The researchers conclude that a number of additional health and support services will be needed to address the growing needs of this vulnerable population.

  1. The Managerial Perspective upon the Importance of Intellectual Property in Modern Society in Romania as a Member State of the European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Cezar Pantea

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Inventiveness and creativity are essential features that made possible the distinction between man, throughout his evolution, and all the other creatures alive. The ability of attributing those features a productive utility continues to be of utmost importance in the social and economic structures of human societies. The survival, of each man, of each enterprise, organization and even of a nation definitely depends on the ability of maintaining permanent contact with the development and progress in all respects. Intellectual property is composed of legal rights which result from the activity of intellectual creation in the following fields: scientific, literary and artistic field. The impossibly of protection through more possession over the object of intellectual property represents the basis of the entire notion of normative regulations regarding this kind of property whose purpose is to defend creators and other goods makers and intellectual services by means of assignment, limited period, the right of usage of these works or services.

  2. SENZITIVE COMUNICATION WITH CHILDREN WITH MODERATE INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY TROUGH THE EMOTIONAL-EXPRESIVE PRINCIPLES OF THE ICDP PROGRAME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nergis RAMO AKGJUN

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available While working with pupils with special educational needs, the necessity of compassion while communicating with them is more obvious. The exchange of emotions between the child and the special educator, as well as the way the special educator responds to them, is fundamental for the further development of their feelings. For this reason, the goal of our research was to confirm the necessity of more sensitive communication while working with pupils with moderate intellectual disability following the emotional-expressive principles of the ICDP program. According to the defined goal, the subject of this research was to gather information regarding the level of sensitive communication in our special educational system, trough special educators' self-evaluation procedure and evaluation of pupils with moderate intellectual disability and their parents. The representative sample was consisted of three groups: special educators, pupils with moderate intellectual disability and their parents. Every group was consisted of twenty examinees or in total the research included 60 participants. The statistical data processing was achieved via tables, graphics and with determination of the R X C Exact Contingency Table. The research results showed strong statistically significant difference in the answers provided by the three groups of examinees. Based on the results, the main conclusion is that during the educational activities in the special educational system, the pupils with moderate intellectual disability have needs for greater sensitivity in the communication and interaction with their special educators.

  3. A typology of intellectual property management for public health innovation and access: design considerations for policymakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taubman, Antony

    2010-01-19

    This paper seeks to set the practical discipline of public interest intellectual property (IP) management in public health into its broader policy context. The most immediate and direct impact of IP systems on public welfare results not from international standards nor from national legislation - though these norms are fundamentally important - but rather from the accumulated impact of numerous practical choices whether or not to seek IP protection; where and where not; and how any exclusive rights are deployed, by whom, and to what end. IP management is the essentially practical exercise of limited exclusive rights over protected subject matter, the judicious use of those rights to leverage outcomes that advance an institution's or a firm's objectives. Exclusive rights are used to construct and define knowledge-based relationships, to leverage access to technology and other necessary resources, and to enhance market-based incentives. IP management choices range across a broad spectrum, spanning public domain strategies, open or exclusive licensing, and strong exclusivity. The idea of 'exclusive rights', as a specific legal mechanism, can run counter to expectations of greater openness and accessibility, but actual outcomes will depend very much on how these mechanisms are used in practice. For public interest or public sector institutions concerned with health research and development, particularly the development of new medicines, IP management choices can be just as critical as they are for private firms, although a predominant institutional concentration on advancing direct public interest objectives may lead to significantly different approaches in weighing and exercising practical choices for IP management: even so, a private sector approach should not be conflated with exclusivity as an end in itself, nor need public interest IP management eschew all leverage over IP. This paper offers a tentative framework for a richer typology of those choices, to give a

  4. Validation of Evidence-Based Fall Prevention Programs for Adults with Intellectual and/or Developmental Disorders (FallPAIDD): A Modified Otago Exercise Program

    OpenAIRE

    Mindy Renfro; Donna Bernhardt Bainbridge; Matthew Lee Smith; Matthew Lee Smith

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Evidence-based fall prevention (EBFP) programs significantly decrease fall risk, falls, and fall-related injuries in community-dwelling older adults. To date, EBFP programs are only validated for use among people with normal cognition and, therefore, are not evidence-based for adults with intellectual and/or developmental disorders (IDD) such as Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias (ADRD), cerebral vascular accident (CVA), or traumatic brain injury (TBI). BACKGROUND: Adults...

  5. Validation of Evidence-Based Fall Prevention Programs for Adults with Intellectual and/or Developmental Disorders: A Modified Otago Exercise Program

    OpenAIRE

    Renfro, Mindy; Bainbridge, Donna B.; Smith, Matthew Lee

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Evidence-based fall prevention (EBFP) programs significantly decrease fall risk, falls, and fall-related injuries in community-dwelling older adults. To date, EBFP programs are only validated for use among people with normal cognition and, therefore, are not evidence-based for adults with intellectual and/or developmental disorders (IDD) such as Alzheimer?s disease and related dementias, cerebral vascular accident, or traumatic brain injury. Background Adults with IDD experience ...

  6. The Borders of EU Competences with Regard to the International Regulation of Intellectual Property Rights: Constructing a Dam to Resist a River Bursting Its Banks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yole Tanghe

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In view of the recent negotiations on the highly anticipated Free Trade Agreements to which the EU shall be party ('e.g.' CETA and TTIP, assessing the extent to which the EU can regulate intellectual property rights in its external relations seems relevant. Two recent cases of the Court of Justice of the EU have reversed its landmark decision in Opinion 1/94, in which intellectual property regulation was almost entirely excluded from the EU’s exclusive competence in trade matters. Firstly, in the 'Daiichi Sankyo' case, the Court elaborated upon the EU’s explicit external competence in the field of intellectual property. This explicit competence is provided for by Article 207 TFEU on the common commercial policy, which allows the EU to conclude agreements concerning the ‘commercial aspects of intellectual property’. In the 'Broadcasting Rights' case, the Court founded its decision on the EU’s implied competence to conclude international agreements, as provided for by Article 3(2 TFEU. Considering the outcome of these two judgments, the Court seems to grant the EU a wide scope of action with regard to intellectual property rights. As a consequence, questions arise with regard to the post-Lisbon era role that is left for the Member States in the field of intellectual property. Therefore, the aim of this article is to outline the scope of the EU’s exclusivity in IP matters and to highlight the borders.

  7. Ask: a health advocacy program for adolescents with an intellectual disability: a cluster randomised controlled trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lennox, Nicholas; Ware, Robert; Carrington, Suzanne; O'Callaghan, Michael; Williams, Gail; McPherson, Lyn; Bain, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Adolescents with intellectual disability often have poor health and healthcare. This is partly as a consequence of poor communication and recall difficulties, and the possible loss of specialised paediatric services...

  8. « Cognitus & Moi » : a computer-based cognitive remediation program for children with intellectual disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline eDemily

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Attentional, visuospatial and social cognition deficits have a negative impact on children’s adaptative and social competences and, as a result, on their ability to achieve a normal functioning and behavior. Until now and despite the frequency of those deficits, there is a lack of children’s specific cognitive remediation tools specifically dedicated to attentional and visuospatial areas.The « Cognitus & Moi » program involves a variety of exercises in a paper and/or pencil (n=30 or a computerized format (n=29 and a strategy coaching approach. Each module of « Cognitus & Moi » targets a single impaired cognitive area, within the limits of cognitive domains' overlapping. The little cartoon character named Cognitus, who illustrates the program, is supposed to be very friendly and kind towards children. Cognitus will accompany them throughout the program for an effective and positive reinforcement. The main goal of « Cognitus & Moi » is to adjust to children’s difficulties in daily life. Moreover, since the cognitive remediation benefit is complex to apply in daily life, the program is based on a metacognitive strategy. After a complete neuropsychological assessment and a psychoeducational session (with the child and the parents, 16 one hour-sessions of cognitive remediation with the therapist are proposed. Each session is composed of three parts: (1 computerized tasks focusing on specific attentional or visuo-spatial components (20 minutes. The attentional module targets hearing, visual and divided attention. A double attention task is also proposed. The visuo-spatial module targets eye tracking and gaze direction, spatial orientation, visuo-spatial memory and construction, and mental imagery.(2 pen and paper tasks focusing on the same processes (20 minutes and a facial emotion recognition task.(3 a proposal of a home-based task (during 20 minutes. Weekly, specific attentional and visuo-spatial home tasks are proposed to the child and

  9. Comparison the Impact of Spark Motor Program and Basketball Techniques on Improving Gross Motor Skills in Educable Intellectually Disabled Boys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashem Faal Moghanlo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives : Different types of practises are known for improving motor skills in intellectually disabled boys. The purpose of this study was to compar e the impact of spark motor program and basketball on improving of gross motor skills in this people.   Methods: In this semi-experimental study , from 98 educable intellectually disabled students who studied in special school in Urmia, 30 children ( age range of 9 to 13 years and IQ mean 64.4 were selected objectively and divided in three groups (2 experimental and 1 control based on pre - test. BOTMP was used as a measurement of motor ability. Selected motor program (Spark motor program including strengthening training, games, sports and basketball techniques was performed for 24 sessions. T-tests (dependent and co-variance were used to comparison of results.   Results: In Spark group after 24 sessions, there were significant effects on balance (p= 0.000, bilateral coordination (p=0.000 and strength (p=0.001. There was no significant effect in agility and speed (p= 0.343 in basketball techniques group after 24 sessions, there were significant effects in agility and speed (p= 0.001, balance (p= 0.000, bilateral coordination (p= 0.013 and strength (p= 0.007.   Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, it can be claimed that the Spark program and basketball techniques improve gross motor skills in educable intellectually disabled students. We also found a significant difference between the Spark program and basketball techniques efficacy on the improved skills. Furthermore, the efficacy of Spark program was significantly higher than basketball techniques (p<0.05.

  10. Idéias para um programa de História intelectual Ideas for a program of intellectual History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Altamirano

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Este texto define uma perspectiva e a indicação de um programa de trabalho dentro do campo conhecido como História intelectual. A preocupação central é a História intelectual latino-americana, habitualmente reduzida a uma História das idéias. O programa que se esboça formula uma alternativa que deveria apoiar-se nas ferramentas forjadas pela sociologia dos intelectuais, pela História política e pelos meios produzidos pela crítica literária para introduzir-se nas obras e nas práticas discursivas.The text introduces and explains the proposal for a research program within the field known as intellectual history. The central concern is Latin American intellectual history, more typically reduced to a history of ideas. The program outlined in the article formulates an alternative approach, based on tools created by the sociology of intellectuals, political history and literary criticism in its analysis of literary works and discursive practices.

  11. Intellectual Capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Herbert W.; Pierce, Jennifer Burek

    2002-01-01

    This review focuses on intellectual capital and its relationship to information professionals. Discusses asset recognition; national practices and the acceptance of intellectual capital; definitions of intellectual capital; measuring intellectual capital, including multiple and single variable measures; managing intellectual capital; and knowledge…

  12. The global intellectual property ecosystem for insulin and its public health implications: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Warren A; Beall, Reed F

    2017-01-01

    Lack of access to insulin and poor health outcomes are issues for both low and high income countries. This has been accompanied by a shift from relatively inexpensive human insulin to its more expensive analogs, marketed by three to four main global players. Nonetheless, patent-based market exclusivities are beginning to expire there for the first generation insulin analogs. This paper adds a global dimension to information on the U.S. patent landscape for insulin by reviewing the patent status of insulins with emphasis on the situation outside the US and Europe. Using the term "insulin", we searched for patents listed on the United States Food and Drug Administration's (USFDA) Orange Book and the Canadian Online Drug Product Database Online Query and its Patent Register. With this information, we expanded the search globally using the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) PatentScope database, the European Patent Office's INPADOC database and various country-specific Patent Offices. Patent protected insulins marketed in the U.S. and other countries are facing an imminent patent-expiration "cliff' yet the three companies that dominate the global insulin market are continuing to file for patents in and outside the U.S, but very rarely in Africa. Only a few local producers in the so-called "pharmerging" markets (e.g., Brazil, India, China) are filing for global patent protection on their own insulins. There is moderate, but statistically significant association between patent filings and diabetes disease burden. The global market dominance by a few companies of analog over human insulin will likely continue even though patents on the current portfolio of insulin analogs will expire very soon. Multinationals are continuing to file for more insulin patents in the bigger markets with large disease burdens and a rapidly emerging middle class. Off-patent human insulins can effectively manage diabetes. A practical way forward would be find (potential) generic

  13. Harnessing Intellectual Property for Development: Some Thoughts on an Appropriate Theoretical Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Bongiwe Ncube

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers how an appropriate theoretical framework for Intellectual Property may be constructed. Such a framework would be the lens through which contested IP issues may be resolved and upon which national IP policy and legislation might be based. The paper begins by highlighting the inherent tensions in IP, which are caused by the various stakeholder interests that this body of law seeks to balance, and by the cross-cutting nature of IP. It contends that in order to more equitably balance the contesting rights of the creators and users, IP rights should be formulated and enforced so as to meet societal goals or serve public interest, be responsive to the economic environment, and take cognisance of the human rights claims of both creators and users. National socio-economic goals should inform such a framework in a way that ensures that IP is used as a means to achieve these goals and is not perceived as an end. This will require nuances in policy and legislation that meet the country's needs. In particular, as a developing country South Africa would do well to exploit available flexibilities in the various international IP agreements by which it is bound. Due regard also ought to be had to the users' need for affordable access to IP-protected goods in order that they may exercise the right to work and access to knowledge, as provided for by ss 22 and 16 of the Constitution respectively. Similarly, creators ought to be given due recognition, together with reasonable reward and remuneration for their efforts. This will be achieved through the creation of an IP system that provides protection that is compatible with the nature of the good being protected and the manner in which the creative process unfolds. Such protection should rely on registration systems are efficient, simplified and affordable. The accompanying enforcement system should be equally accessible, although the costs of enforcement would depend on the forum used to

  14. Rise in legal skirmishes and intellectual property protectionism force companies to re-examine technology policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.

    2006-12-15

    The possession of intellectual property (IP) has become an important part of a technologically advanced oil and gas industry. Firms that specialize in IP law are now aiding oil and gas companies to establish company-wide IP policies to protect their inventions and properly profit from them. However, many companies do not have a clear policy to report on the commercial value of their IP assets or keep track of efforts made to gain value from them. A patent policy could require that patents be applied for only when the scientific merits and the business merits justify the allocation of personnel and financial resources. Patent disputes can be expensive and have led some companies into financial difficulties. Companies who have not successfully defended their patents may fall victim to patent trolls, who search for un-enforced patents in order to force companies to pay for licence fees or damage awards for the patents that they acquire. Anecdotal evidence suggests that licensing is becoming an important means of generating revenue from process innovations. Petrobank Energy and Resources Ltd. has formed its own research and development company to protect patents for its proprietary toe-to-heel air injection (THAI) oilsands recovery process, and has established a patent cooperation treaty, where patents are filed in various countries in a single procedure. However, many oil and gas companies insist that some new technologies are better protected as trade secrets. To secure a patent, a company must publicly disclose all aspects of an invention. Trade secrets are an option where secrecy can be maintained after commercialization. Unlike patent protection, which expires after 20 years, trade secrets can last indefinitely, as long as the secret is not publicly disclosed or independently developed by a competitor. While patenting may offer a competitive lead-time for some companies, many industry officials prefer to focus on using their innovations in the field. The oil and

  15. Developments of the Estonian intellectual property system to meet the challenges of the knowledge-based economy : [doktoritöö] / Aleksei Kelli ; Tartu Ülikool ; juhendaja: Heiki Pisuke

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kelli, Aleksei, 1977-

    2009-01-01

    Sisaldab artikleid: Intellectual property in an innovation-based economy // Review of Central and East European Law (2008) nr. 2, lk. 223-238 (kaasautor Heiki Pisuke) ; Some issues of the Estonian innovation and intellectual property policy // Juridica International. XV. Tartu, 2008, lk. 104-114 ; Improvement of the intellectual property system as a measure to enhance innovation // Juridica International. XVI. Tartu, 2009, lk. 114-125 ; Some issues regarding entrepreneurial universities and intellectual property // Juridica International. XII. Tartu, 2007, lk. 161-172 (kaasautor Heiki Pisuke). - Tutvustus // Tartu Ülikooli doktorite promoveerimine 2010. Tartu, 2010, lk. 5-6

  16. "We can talk while we're walking": seeking the views of adults with intellectual disability to inform a walking and social-support program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooker, Katie; Mutch, Allyson; McPherson, Lyn; Ware, Robert; Lennox, Nick; van Dooren, Kate

    2015-01-01

    To better understand how physical activity programs may contribute to improved health and social-support outcomes for people with intellectual disability, the authors conducted semistructured interviews with 11 people with intellectual disability and community-based volunteers in Brisbane, Australia. Three broad themes emerged: individual factors that generally facilitated activity, external factors that posed barriers to participation, and broader normative factors that directed participation. A key reflection arising out of the thematic analysis was that participants with intellectual disability and volunteers highlighted subtle but pervasive differences in barriers and facilitators to being active. Recommendations are provided for interventions aiming to improve physical activity and social support among those with intellectual disability. The authors' research process demonstrates the utility of seeking the views of potential participants before program rollout to inform implementation and demonstrates the usefulness of a qualitative, actively inclusive approach to health interventions.

  17. Accurate Programming: Thinking about programs in terms of properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid Taha

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Accurate programming is a practical approach to producing high quality programs. It combines ideas from test-automation, test-driven development, agile programming, and other state of the art software development methods. In addition to building on approaches that have proven effective in practice, it emphasizes concepts that help programmers sharpen their understanding of both the problems they are solving and the solutions they come up with. This is achieved by encouraging programmers to think about programs in terms of properties.

  18. Intellectual property rights in the era of “information society”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalin Angelo Ioan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of breaching the intellectual rights is one of a big interest in these days. The computers and the development of software, also the explosion of Internet throughout the World give the posibility of an easy breach of the author rights. We analyse in the paper some situations which are many of them at the limit of the law, but present every day in our life.

  19. Intellectual property rights in the era of “information society”

    OpenAIRE

    Catalin Angelo Ioan; Gina Ioan

    2012-01-01

    The phenomenon of breaching the intellectual rights is one of a big interest in these days. The computers and the development of software, also the explosion of Internet throughout the World give the posibility of an easy breach of the author rights. We analyse in the paper some situations which are many of them at the limit of the law, but present every day in our life.

  20. [Evolution of the international intellectual property rights system: patent protection for the pharmaceutical industry and access to medicines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Gabriela Costa; Oliveira, Maria Auxiliadora; Hasenclever, Lia; de Melo, Luiz Martins

    2007-02-01

    This article discusses the evolution of the international intellectual property rights system in three phases and the implications for public health, especially for the implementation of policies for access to medicines. During the first phase, characterized by the Paris and Berne Convention, signatory countries defined which technological fields should be protected (or not). Under the second phase, with the enforcement of the WTO TRIPS Agreement, countries are obliged to grant patent protection for all technological fields, including for the pharmaceutical industry. Within their national legislations, countries also have the opportunity to implement access to TRIPS flexibilities for medicines. With the third phase, characterized by the negotiation and signing of bilateral and regional free trade agreements, countries will have to implement TRIPS-plus provisions which may have negative implications for the TRIPS flexibilities as well as for policies for access to medicines. The authors conclude that the currently proposed international intellectual property rights system favors patent-holder rights and that a balance is needed between patent holders' and health rights.

  1. A Friendships and Dating Program for Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: A Formative Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Karen M.; Atkinson, Julie P.; Smith, Curtis A.; Windsor, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Meaningful relationships with others are often elusive for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, but no less desired for their full inclusion and participation in society. It is well documented that people with disabilities are victims of interpersonal violence at higher rates than peers without disabilities. This article…

  2. An Educational Programming Framework for a Subset of Students with Diverse Learning Needs: Borderline Intellectual Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Steven R.

    2008-01-01

    Students with intelligence test scores between 70 and 85 frequently fall into the gap between general and special education. Students with borderline intellectual functioning are a large population at-risk for school failure. Recent educational trends (e.g., the use of response to intervention models of special education eligibility,…

  3. A Computer-Based Interactive Multimedia Program to Reduce HIV Transmission for Women with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, J.; Clark, K. D.; Sarno, K.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Despite recent recognition of the need for preventive sexual health materials for people with intellectual disability (ID), there have been remarkably few health-based interventions designed for people with mild to moderate ID. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a computer-based interactive multimedia (CBIM)…

  4. International treaty on plant genetic resources for food and agriculture as a basis for limiting intellectual property of plant breeders in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veselinović Janko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is widely accepted that new plant varieties are protected as a form of intellectual property. Serbian legislation and international conventions protect new plant varieties, either through sui generis protection or by patent rights. However, International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture, also signed by Serbia, has endangered the rights of plant breeders in Serbia, because the greatest number of plant varieties in Serbia is not protected as intellectual property. On the other hand, the Treaty offers the possibility to natural and legal persons from other signatory countries to use new plant varieties of Serbian plant breeders. Seeing as the varieties are not protected, there is a possibility for the plant breeders' rights to be endangered. The goal of this paper is to try and consider the legal consequences, answering certain open questions regarding the protection of intellectual property in this field. A method of parallel comparison was used.

  5. Construction of a Family Quality of Life Support Program for families of young and adults with intellectual disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natxo MARTÍNEZ RUEDA

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper is grounded on current conceptions on Family Quality of Life (FQoL and family-centered intervention. It describes a part of the building process of a ‘Program for Supporting Family Quality of Life’, within the SAIOA-BBK frame a Gorabide’s information, guidance and support service for people with intellectual disability and their families. A major goal of this project is making proposals for professionals to fit the link between FQoL assessment and its improvement. The program was developed, constructed and tested through collaborative methods between professionals and university researchers, aiming to an increase of FQoL of families with sons or daughters among the youth and adulthood period. Program features, and how it was experimented in a pilot sample of families (n = 5 is presented.

  6. [Theoretical and practical aspects of cognitive remediation in intellectual disabilities: Relevance of the Cognitive Remediation Therapy program (CRT)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carteau-Martin, I; Amado, I; Thillay, A; Houy-Durand, E; Barthelemy, C; Bonnet-Brilhault, F

    2015-12-01

    Teenagers and adults with intellectual disabilities are nowadays "over-handicapped", often due to lack of care in self-sufficiency and continued learning, two essential domains for living in a community. Their cognitive limits, particularly on the executive functions, could be an obstacle to their involvement in the daily life activities, through their difficulties to plan, anticipate, shift and maintain information in working memory. These high level mental functions can be taught with the CRT program (Cognitive Remediation Therapy - Wykes and Reader 2005) developed in other pathologies and providing an adaptation regarding the developmental level of the person. Firstly, it is essential to determine cognitive developmental levels of the teenager or the adult, using standard tools, such as Wechsler scales. Secondly, functional and/or adaptative levels have to be assessed using specific tools, such as the Vineland Adaptative Behavior Scale 2nd Edition (VABS-II, Sparrow et al., 2005) and the Functional Intervention Scale (EFI, Willaye et al., 2005). Finally, in order to clearly distinguish what are the preserved and impaired cognitive domains, standard tools assessing executive functions such as the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, the Tower of London, Stroop Test and BADS are used if possible for the patient. The setting of cognitive remediation programs, previously developed for schizophrenic patients, requires adaptation for teenagers and adults with intellectual disabilities, taking into account the limitation of their cognitive abilities. In this paper, we will show that the CRT method for cognitive remediation is particularly relevant for subjects with intellectual disabilities. This method is hence focused on strategies and exercises to improve working memory, categorization and moreover executive functions. Of course this method might need adaptations, with examples based on simplification of the different tasks, notably for verbal materials, and with

  7. An Initial Evaluation of a Long-Term, Sustainable, Integrated Community-Based Physical Activity Program for Adults with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lante, Kerrie A.; Walkley, Jeff W.; Gamble, Merrilyn; Vassos, Maria V.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Physical activity (PA) programs for adults with intellectual disability (ID) have positive impacts, at least in the short term. No research has been reported on the effect of long-term engagement in PA programs for adults with ID. This paper explores the physical and psychosocial benefits gained by two individuals with mild ID who…

  8. Do people with intellectual disability use Nintendo Wii when placed in their home as part of a physiotherapy program? An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Alison M J; Harvey, Lisa A; Hassett, Leanne M

    2016-01-01

    To examine how much, and in what way, Nintendo Wii™ (Wii) is used when prescribed as part of a home-physiotherapy program for people with intellectual disability. Twenty people with intellectual disability were recruited. The following parameters were recorded about play patterns over a 12-week period: frequency, duration, perceived exertion, play position, play mode, initiation of play and games from Wii Sports and Wii Fit Plus. Participants used the Wii for a median of 101 min per week (interquartile range [IQR]: 50-172) in weeks one and two across a median of three days per week (IQR: 3-4), decreasing down to a median of 35 min per week (IQR: 0-141) in weeks 11 and 12 across a median of one day per week (IQR: 0-3). Usage of the Wii drops off rapidly when it is placed in the homes of people with intellectual disability as part of a physiotherapy program. Implications for Rehabilitation Usage of the Nintendo Wii drops off rapidly when it is placed in the homes of people with intellectual disability and they are instructed to use it as part of a home physiotherapy program. Games commonly played include bowling and boxing in Wii Sport, and penguin slide, ski jump and tight rope walk in Wii Fit Plus. Physiotherapists should use person and family centred practice to ensure that Nintendo Wii is a suitable intervention for the person with an intellectual disability and provide support to encourage ongoing usage.

  9. Evolution of approaches to intellectual property’s classification

    OpenAIRE

    Virchenko V.

    2013-01-01

    Article is devoted to analysis of the theoretical approaches to intellectual property classification. History of development of theoretical approaches to intellectual property classification is investigated. Advantages and disadvantages of different approaches to intellectual property classification are considered. The contents and peculiarities of incorporate intellectual property are analyzed.

  10. "Innovation and Intellectual Property Policies in European Research Infrastructure Consortia - PART I: The Case of the European Spallation Source ERIC"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Helen; Wested, Jakob; Minssen, Timo

    2017-01-01

    Research and innovation are key pillars of the EU’s strategy to create sustainable growth and prosperity in Europe. Research infrastructures (RIs) are central instruments to implement this strategy. They bring together a wide diversity of expertise and interests to look for solutions to many...... of the problems society is facing today. To facilitate the creation and operation of such RIs, the EU adopted legal frameworks for European Research Infrastructure Consortia (ERIC). On August 31, 2015, the European Spallation Source (ESS) was established as an ERIC. Under the ERIC Regulations and ESS Statutes......, the European Spallation Source ERIC is required to adopt various policy documents relating to the operation and management of the facility. These cover a wide variety of issues such as user access, public procurement, intellectual property rights (IPR), data management, and dissemination. One of the main goals...

  11. Genetically modified foods in China and the United States: A primer of regulation and intellectual property protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Yuen-Ting Wong

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Food is a basic and personal necessity to human. Safety of food is a prime factor to consider apart from nutrition, quality and cost. Genetically modified (GM foods first came on the market in 1994. Yet safety, transparency and traceability of GM foods are still under hot debate. Nonetheless, the market of GM foods is huge and attractive. Regulatory affairs and intellectual property (IP are two critical factors affecting the development and commercial success of a food product. This article will take a look at the GM food technology and regulatory framework for GM foods in China and the United States. This article will also discuss the unique patent issues and non-patent IP tools for safeguarding the technology in these two countries.

  12. "Innovation and Intellectual Property Policies in European Research Infrastructure Consortia - PART I: The Case of the European Spallation Source ERIC"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Helen; Wested, Jakob; Minssen, Timo

    2017-01-01

    of the problems society is facing today. To facilitate the creation and operation of such RIs, the EU adopted legal frameworks for European Research Infrastructure Consortia (ERIC). On August 31, 2015, the European Spallation Source (ESS) was established as an ERIC. Under the ERIC Regulations and ESS Statutes......, the European Spallation Source ERIC is required to adopt various policy documents relating to the operation and management of the facility. These cover a wide variety of issues such as user access, public procurement, intellectual property rights (IPR), data management, and dissemination. One of the main goals...... international research collaborations? The complex relationship between scientific excellence, innovation, and IPRs must be carefully considered. Taking the European Spallation Source ERIC as an example, this article investigates ERIC Regulations and EU policies and discusses what issues and perspectives ERICs...

  13. Intellectual property law and competition law in China - Analysis of the current framework and comparison with the EU approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeung Nga Man

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper Yeung Nga Man looks at the question of protection of intellectual property rights in the Chinese legal system with comparative reference to policy and practice in the European Union. What is the best way to stimulate competition but yet also protect innovation? Part I of the essay examines the present IPRs protection in China. In Part II, contrary to the myth that competition and IP law conflict with one another, the author argues that both foster innovation and development, and enhance consumer welfare. Part III discusses the competition law regime in China with a specific focus on AML and evaluation of the enforcement of the regime. Part IV outlines the European Union approach, which China might consider adopting. Part V discusses the Block Exemptions approach from the E.U. on horizontal agreements.

  14. A macro-economic framework for evaluation of cyber security risks related to protection of intellectual property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrijcic, Eva; Horowitz, Barry

    2006-08-01

    The article is based on the premise that, from a macro-economic viewpoint, cyber attacks with long-lasting effects are the most economically significant, and as a result require more attention than attacks with short-lasting effects that have historically been more represented in literature. In particular, the article deals with evaluation of cyber security risks related to one type of attack with long-lasting effects, namely, theft of intellectual property (IP) by foreign perpetrators. An International Consequence Analysis Framework is presented to determine (1) the potential macro-economic consequences of cyber attacks that result in stolen IP from companies in the United States, and (2) the likely sources of such attacks. The framework presented focuses on IP theft that enables foreign companies to make economic gains that would have otherwise benefited the U.S. economy. Initial results are presented.

  15. Reflections on the International Networking Conference “Ethical and Social Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights – Agrifood and Health”, Brussels, September 2011

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korthals, M.; Timmermann, C.A.

    2013-01-01

    Public goods, as well as commercial commodities, are affected by exclusive arrangements secured by intellectual property (IP) rights. These rights serve as an incentive to invest human and material capital in research and development. Particularly in the life sciences, IP rights regulate objects

  16. Intellectual Property Law Confers Rights in Respect of Online Distance Education, yet Most Learning Resources Are Still Free--Truth or Fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Bruce L.

    2009-01-01

    Educational technologists might well describe online distance education as "a series of instructional events over the Internet that find their expression as learning events in a student". As a legal construct however, "online distance education" is simply "the intellectual property of its owner". This description is…

  17. On proving syntactic properties of CPS programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier; Dzafic, Belmina; Pfenning, Frank

    1999-01-01

    Higher-order program transformations raise new challenges for proving properties of their output, since they resist traditional, first-order proof techniques. In this work, we consider (1) the “one-pass” continuation-passing style (CPS) transformation, which is second-order, and (2) the occurrences...... of parameters of continuations in its output. To this end, we specify the one-pass CPS transformation relationally and we use the proof technique of logical relations....

  18. Psychiatric hospitalisation among individuals with intellectual disability referred to the START crisis intervention and prevention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalb, L G; Beasley, J; Klein, A; Hinton, J; Charlot, L

    2016-12-01

    Little is known about inpatient psychiatric hospitalisation among adults with intellectual disability (ID) in the United States. Greater research is, therefore, required to inform efforts aimed at preventing this costly and restrictive form of care. Data were from 3299 individuals with ID (mean age = 31 years; SD = 14 years) who were referred to START (Systemic, Therapeutic, Assessment, Resources, and Treatment), a community-based crisis intervention and prevention programme. A random effects logistic regression model was used to examine the association between 11 factors and caregiver report of psychiatric hospitalisation in the past 12 months. Twenty eight percent of the sample had at least one psychiatric inpatient stay in the prior year. Factors associated with an increased likelihood of prior hospitalisation included: younger age, diagnosis of a psychotic disorder, a score of >30 on the irritability subscale of the Aberrant Behavior Checklist, increasing number of psychiatric diagnoses, less severe ID, Black/AA race and not having a home and community waiver. Among this high-risk referred group, more than 1 in 4 individuals were hospitalised in the year prior to referral. While results from the analyses will help profile those at risk for hospitalisation, the findings suggest that interventions at the policy level may play an important role in reducing psychiatric hospitalisation. © 2016 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The effect of a rhythmic gymnastics program on the dynamic balance ability of individuals with intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotiadou, Eleni G; Neofotistou, Konstantina H; Sidiropoulou, Maria P; Tsimaras, Vasilios K; Mandroukas, Athanasios K; Angelopoulou, Nickoletta A

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a rhythmic gymnastics program on the dynamic balance ability of a group of adults with intellectual disability (ID). The sample consisted of 18 adults with ID. The control group consisted of 8 adults and an intervention group of 10. The subjects were assigned to each group according to their desire to participate or not in the intervention program. Both groups were comparable in terms of age, weight, height, IQ, and socioeconomic background. The intervention group received a 12-week rhythmic gymnastics program at a frequency of 3 lessons per week, of 45 minutes. The methods of data collection included pre/post-test measurements of the dynamic balance for all subjects of both groups. The dynamic balance ability was measured by means of a balance deck (Lafayette) and was determined by the number of seconds the subject could remain standing on the platform of the stabilometer in durations of 30-, 45-, and 60-second intervals. As the results indicated, the intervention group showed a statistically significant improvement (p rhythmic gymnastics program when compared with the control group. It is concluded that adults with ID can improve their balance ability with the application of a well-designed rhythmic gymnastics program.

  20. A community-based aquatic exercise program to improve endurance and mobility in adults with mild to moderate intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Renée M; Ross, Michael D; Runco, Wendy; Kane, Michael T

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of a community-based aquatic exercise program on physical performance among adults with mild to moderate intellectual disability (ID). Twenty-two community-dwelling adults with mild to moderate ID volunteered to participate in this study. Participants completed an 8-week aquatic exercise program (2 days/wk, 1 hr/session). Measures of physical performance, which were assessed prior to and following the completion of the aquatic exercise program, included the timed-up-and-go test, 6-min walk test, 30-sec chair stand test, 10-m timed walk test, hand grip strength, and the static plank test. When comparing participants' measures of physical performance prior to and following the 8-week aquatic exercise program, improvements were seen in all measures, but the change in scores for the 6-min walk test, 30-sec chair stand test, and the static plank test achieved statistical significance ( P aquatic exercise program for adults with ID may promote improvements in endurance and balance/mobility.

  1. INFLUENCE OF TRADITIONAL DANCE TRAINING PROGRAMS ON DYNAMIC BALANCE OF PEOPLE WITH INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY: A SHORT REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasileios K. Tsimaras

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Traditional dance is gaining popularity as an intervention choice for improving poor balance ability of people with intellectual disability (ID. Balance improvement for individuals with ID through dance provides opportunities for participation in sport activities and promotes independent living. This short review provides in brief research evidence of dynamic balance improvement as measured by means of a balance deck in duration of 30, 45, and 60 sec intervals, highlighting the need to incorporate traditional dance programs in Physical Education (PE lessons applied on participants with ID. Overall, traditional dances provide emotional and cognitive interaction that has a direct positive effect on quality of life and successful motor performance of individuals with ID.

  2. The Effectiveness of Positive Parenting Program (Triple-P on Parental Self-Efficacy and Mother-Child Interaction in Childeren Suffering from Intellectual Disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ashori

    2015-08-01

    Conclusion: The findings of the present study proposed that as enhancing parenting skills leads to an increase in parental self-efficacy as well as mother-child interaction within children suffering from the intellectual disability, it seems essential to plan training the positive parenting program for mothers of such children.

  3. Three-Dimensions vs. Two-Dimensions Intervention Programs: The Effect on the Mediation Level and Behavioural Aspects of Children with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eden, S.; Bezer, M.

    2011-01-01

    The research examined the effect of an intervention program employing 3D immersive virtual reality (IVR), which focused on the perception of sequential time, on the mediation level and behavioural aspects of children with intellectual disability (ID). The intervention is based on the mediated learning experience (MLE) theory, which refers the…

  4. Effects of a Special Olympics Unified Sports Soccer Program on Psycho-Social Attributes of Youth with and without Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, D.; Baran, F.; Aktop, A.; Nalbant, S.; Aglamis, E.; Hutzler, Y.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of a Special Olympics (SO) Unified Sports (UNS) soccer program on psycho-social attributes of youth with and without intellectual disabilities (ID). Participants were 76 male youth with (n = 38) and without (n = 38) ID. Participants with ID were randomly allocated into a SO athletes group (n…

  5. Evaluating a staff training program on the interaction between staff and people with intellectual disability and challenging behaviour : An observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Zijlmans, L.; Gerits, L.; Bosman, A.M.T.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a training program focusing on improvement of emotional intelligence (EI) and support staffs’ awareness of their behaviour towards people with an intellectual disability based on interactional patterns. The support provided regarding

  6. The efficacy of an e-learning prevention program for substance use among adolescents with intellectual disabilities: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiewik, Marion; VanDerNagel, Joanne E L; Engels, Rutger C M E; DeJong, Cor A

    2017-04-01

    Adolescents with Intellectual Disability (ID) are at risk for tobacco and alcohol use, yet little or no prevention programs are available for this group. 'Prepared on time' is an e-learning program based on the attitude - social influence - efficacy model originally developed for fifth and sixth grades of mainstream primary schools. The goals of this study were (1) to examine the lifetime use of tobacco and alcohol among this target group and (2) to gain a first impression of the efficacy of 'Prepared on time' among 12-16-year old students with moderate or mild ID (MMID). Students form three secondary special-needs schools were assigned to the experimental (e-learning) group (n=37) or the control group (n=36). Pre-intervention and follow-up data (3 weeks after completion) were gathered using semi-structured interviews inquiring about substance use among students with MMID and the behavioral determinants of attitude, subjective norm, modelling, intention, and knowledge. The lifetime tobacco use and alcohol consumption rates in our sample were 25% and 59%, respectively. The e-learning program had a positive effect on the influence of modelling of classmates and friends. No significant effects were found on other behavioral determinants and knowledge. A substantial proportion of adolescents with MMID in secondary special-needs schools use tobacco or alcohol. This study showed that an e-learning prevention program can be feasible for adolescents with MMID. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A Critical Discourse Analysis of the Intellectual Property Chapter of the TPP: Confirming What the Critics Fear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karyn Hollis

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A host of organizations and citizens groups have convincingly pointed out that so called “Free Trade Agreements” have done more harm than good to the U.S. and other countries involved. Thanks to their protests, for the moment, the most ambitious multinational, neoliberal project of our young century, the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP, has been defeated. If the agreement had been adopted, the TPP would have shaped new rules of trade for over 8 million people, spanning 40% of the global economy. Using Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA, my study shows how the complex language of the actual treaty compared to its more simplistic and optimistic summary on the US Trade Representative website reveals the TPP to be a corporate power grab, depriving nation states, public institutions and individual citizens of their democratic rights. Due to its central importance in a number of realms (entertainment copyrights, pharmaceuticals, the internet, my analysis focuses on the Intellectual Property (IP chapter of the TPP. As labor leaders, environmentalists, internet defenders, concerned physicians, and others have pointed out, the IP chapter essentially would have essentially enforced a ratcheted-up version of US intellectual property law across member nations. Given the TPP’s raw financial motivation and the unequal economic status of signatory nations, an analysis of the IP chapter requires a methodology which centers on uncovering ideologies, power imbalances, gender inequalities and the like. CDA works well for this purpose as it aims to expose socially-constructed inequality by uncovering how public discourses such as laws and treaties relate to power structures and actually construct power itself. Using CDA, I will show how rhetorical devices such as implied audience, genre and style, as well as socio-economic, and historical/contextual representations hide power imbalances and erase subjectivities. CDA also welcomes quantitative measures such as

  8. The effects of business practices, licensing, and intellectual property on development and dissemination of the polymerase chain reaction: case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fore, Joe; Wiechers, Ilse R; Cook-Deegan, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was a seminal genomic technology discovered, developed, and patented in an industry setting. Since the first of its core patents expired in March, 2005, we are in a position to view the entire lifespan of the patent, examining how the intellectual property rights have impacted its use in the biomedical community. Given its essential role in the world of molecular biology and its commercial success, the technology can serve as a case study for evaluating the effects of patenting biological research tools on biomedical research. Case description Following its discovery, the technique was subjected to two years of in-house development, during which issues of inventorship and publishing/patenting strategies caused friction between members of the development team. Some have feared that this delay impeded subsequent research and may have been due to trade secrecy or the desire for obtaining lucrative intellectual property rights. However, our analysis of the history indicates that the main reasons for the delay were benign and were primarily due to difficulties in perfecting the PCR technique. Following this initial development period, the technology was made widely available, but was subject to strict licensing terms and patent protection, leading to an extensive litigation history. Discussion and evaluation PCR has earned approximately $2 billion in royalties for the various rights-holders while also becoming an essential research tool. However, using citation trend analysis, we are able to see that PCR's patented status did not preclude it from being adopted in a similar manner as other non-patented genomic research tools (specifically, pBR322 cloning vector and Maxam-Gilbert sequencing). Conclusion Despite the heavy patent protection and rigid licensing schemes, PCR seems to have disseminated so widely because of the practices of the corporate entities which have controlled these patents, namely through the use of business

  9. El derecho, la propiedad intelectual y el entorno digital The copyright, the intellectual property and the digital environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Silberleib

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Ante el crecimiento acelerado y la expansión que se han manifestado en el campo de las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación, no se puede dejar de considerar que la problemática de la propiedad intelectual y la seguridad de las transmisiones representan una porción sustancial a analizar dentro de dicha temática. En el marco de los actuales roles que le toca desempeñar al bibliotecario como intermediario entre los autores o creadores, los editores y los usuarios finales de la información, este profesional deberá cumplir funciones semejantes a las de antes, pero afrontando el cambio de los medios con los que va a realizarlas. Si el bibliotecario acepta esta nueva obligación de facilitar el acceso a la información a través de soportes digitales, y en particular, de Internet, deberá conocer y respetar profundamente los principios jurídicos para establecer contratos de transferencia de la información. Este trabajo pretende realizar un esbozo de la amplia temática de la propiedad intelectual en el mundo digital para que el bibliotecario pueda, a través de él, incursionar en esta área del derecho y avanzar en su profundización.In light of the accelerated growth and expansion of the field of information technology and communication, it is impossible to ignore that the problematic notions of intellectual property and transmission safety are a substantial part of what has to be analyzed in this field. In the framework of the roles that librarians presently play as mediators between authors or creators, editors, and consumers of information, this professional will fulfill similar functions as before, having to confront, however, the change in the media with which s/he carries them out. If the librarian takes on this new task of facilitating access to information through digital media, especially the Internet, s/he will have to really know and deeply respect the juridical principles behind the establishing of contracts on

  10. El derecho, la propiedad intelectual y el entorno digital = The Copyright, The intellectual Property and the Digital Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Silberleib

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Ante el crecimiento acelerado y la expansión que se han manifestado en el campo de las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación, no se puede dejar de considerar que la problemática de la propiedad intelectual y la seguridad de las transmisiones representan una porción sustancial a analizar dentro de dicha temática. En el marco de los actuales roles que le toca desempeñar al bibliotecario como intermediario entre los autores o creadores, los editores y los usuarios finales de la información, este profesional deberá cumplir funciones semejantes a las de antes, pero afrontando el cambio de los medios con los que va a realizarlas. Si el bibliotecario acepta esta nueva obligación de facilitar el acceso a la información a través de soportes digitales, y en particular, de Internet, deberá conocer y respetar profundamente los principios jurídicos para establecer contratos de transferencia de la información. Este trabajo pretende realizar un esbozo de la amplia temática de la propiedad intelectual en el mundo digital para que el bibliotecario pueda, a través de él, incursionar en esta área del derecho y avanzar en su profundización = In light of the accelerated growth and expansion of the field of information technology and communication, it is impossible to ignore that the problematic notions of intellectual property and transmission safety are a substantial part of what has to be analyzed in this field. In the framework of the roles that librarians presently play as mediators between authors or creators, editors, and consumers of information, this professional will fulfill similar functions as before, having to confront, however, the change in the media with which s/he carries them out. If the librarian takes on this new task of facilitating access to information through digital media, especially the Internet, s/he will have to really know and deeply respect the juridical principles behind the establishing of contracts on

  11. The influence of a yoga exercise program for young adults with intellectual disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brent L Hawkins

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID have an increased risk of obesity and are significantly less likely to engage in physical activity compared to their nondisabled peers. A growing body of research supports the physical and mental health benefits of yoga. While the benefits of yoga have been studied across a host of populations with varying ages and physical disabilities, no studies could be identified investigating the benefits of yoga for young adults with ID. Aims: This study investigated the impact of participating in yoga classes on the amount of exercise behavior and perception of physical exertion when compared to non-structured exercise sessions between two young adults with ID in a post-secondary education setting. Materials and Methods: A single subject multiple baseline research design was implemented across two young adults with mild ID to determine the effects of a yoga exercise class on frequency of exercise behavior and perception of physical exertion when compared to non-structured exercise sessions. Partial interval recording, the Eston-Parfitt curvilinear rating of perceived exertion scale, and the physical activity enjoyment scale were implemented to collect data on dependent variables and consumer satisfaction during each non-structured exercise session and each yoga class. Results: indicated that percentage of exercise behavior and perceived exertion levels during yoga group exercise sharply increased with large effect sizes when compared to non-structured exercise sessions.

  12. Additive Manufacturing: An Analysis of Intellectual Property Rights on Navy Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    33 E. DIGITAL FILE SHARING IN THE MUSIC INDUSTRY: NAPSTER CASE...Industrial property includes patents, trademarks, and trade secrets. Copyright covers literary works, films, music , artistic works, and architectural design...including cultivated sports , mutants, hybrids, and newly found seedlings” such as a new variety of rose (35 U.S.C. § 161). A design patent provides

  13. Propriedade Intelectual: proteção e gestão estratégica do conhecimento Intellectual Property: protection and management of knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elza Fernandes Araújo

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Além de garantir o direito de propriedade e exclusividade ao titular da criação intelectual, a proteção da propriedade intelectual permite o avanço da inovação e a divulgação dos conhecimentos, equilibrando os interesses do titular e acarretando benefícios para a sociedade. Neste sentido, a Propriedade Intelectual é estratégica no cenário globalizado e competitivo, no qual o conhecimento e a capacidade de inovar têm papel importante para o desenvolvimento de um país. Assim, visando à gestão da propriedade intelectual, com foco na inovação, faz-se necessário incentivar a cooperação entre a ICT e a empresa, para a realização de pesquisas e desenvolvimento tecnológico conjuntos, bem como dinamizar os processos de licenciamento e transferência de tecnologia. Nesse sentido, as ICTs com o auxílio dos NITs devem adotar políticas de gestão da Propriedade Intelectual, elaborando instrumentos jurídicos adequando o ambiente acadêmico ao contexto regulatório. Cabe às ICTs, por meio do NITs, estimularem a cultura da proteção da propriedade intelectual gerada na Instituição, podendo as mesmas atuarem em rede, aprimorando e avançando na gestão da propriedade intelectual. A Propriedade Intelectual é um fator estratégico para a inovação científica e tecnológica e, no Brasil, tem-se buscado a convergência dos setores público e empresarial, com o propósito de contribuir para o desenvolvimento científico, tecnológico e social do país, por meio de um processo contínuo com ações conjuntas e coordenadas.Besides ensuring property and exclusive rights to holders of intellectual creation, intellectual property protection allows innovation and spread of knowledge, balancing the interests of the holder and the benefits to society. In this sense, Intellectual Property is strategic in the globalized and competitive world scenario, in which knowledge and innovation capacity play an important role in the development of a

  14. Implementing Intellectual Property of Pharmaceuticals in Middle-Income Countries: A Case Study of Patent Regulation in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Fonseca, Elize Massard; Bastos, Francisco Inácio

    2016-06-01

    The protection of pharmaceutical intellectual property (IP) rights is one of the most controversial debates in contemporary public health as countries have to balance incentives for drug development with the necessity of providing life-saving drugs. Compliance with IP protections is mandatory for members of the World Trade Organization (WTO). However, because of the costs associated with IP implementation we should expect late and/or poor implementation in middle-income countries. Surprisingly, this was not the case in Brazil. The country not only just fully implemented the WTO's requirement but declined the grace period granted for countries to adapt and included extra IP protections, going against a coalition of local industrialists and activists. Notwithstanding, as the consequences of IP regulations unfolds, Brazil also promoted new alliances that tailored and adjusted the regulations toward public health. We demonstrate that arguments of foreign pressure and lobbying are exaggerated and call attention to domestic shifts, long-term processes of regulatory decision, and political dynamics happening at the local level. By analyzing the case of Brazil, we provide a nuanced contribution to the discussion of IP implementation in middle-income countries and call attention to new models of government-society interactions in regulatory policy. Copyright © 2016 by Duke University Press.

  15. Commercialization of Intellectual Property Objects in Nanoindustry as a Factor of Increasing the Competitiveness of the Russian Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksim Alekseevich Manyakin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Formation and development of the sixth technological mode in the global economy leads to the search for new ways to enhance the competitiveness of products both on the domestic and on the world market. Commercialization of intellectual property (IP objects, created in the field of nanotechnology, can be a significant factor in ensuring the competitiveness of the country. The article gives the notion of nanoindustry IP objects’ commercialization as an economic category. The specificity of this process, which takes into account research intensity, capital intensity and interdisciplinary essence of nanotechnology, is disclosed. The basic problems of the IP objects’ commercialization in Russian nanotechnology sphere, as well as the conditions that ensure the effectiveness of this process are characterized. On the basis of analysis of foreign experience in the IP objects’ commercialization in nanoindustry five models of mechanisms managing this process, depending on the role of the state, have been identified. The necessity of reorientation of Russian model of nanoindustry development from a predominant state to the private one in conditions of the budget financing deficit is substantiated. Main directions of improving the process of commercialization of the IP objects created in the field of nanotechnology in Russia are identified.

  16. Psychometric properties of the Chinese Behavior Problems Inventory-01 in children and adolescents with or at risk for intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Xiaozhu; Rojahn, Johannes; Curby, Timothy W; Ding, Yuezeng

    2014-10-28

    As the world's most populous country, China is likely to have the highest number of people with intellectual disabilities (ID) in the world. As many people with ID are susceptible to serious and persistent behavior problems, research by Chinese scientists on this public health issue is needed. However, there are only very few reliable Chinese-language behavior assessment instruments for problem behaviors. To fill this gap we translated the Behavior Problems Inventory-01 (BPI-01; Rojahn, Matson, Lott, Esbensen, & Smalls, 2001) into Chinese. The BPI-01 is an informant-based behavior rating instrument that was designed to assess self-injurious behavior (SIB), stereotyped behavior, and aggressive/destructive behavior in individuals with ID. We then assessed the behavior of 222 children and young adults (age range 1.5-21.5 years) with or at risk for ID from three special needs service programs in mainland China. Teachers or staff members, respectively, served as respondents. The Chinese version of the BPI-01 showed good reliability (internal consistency) and good factor validity tested by confirmatory factorial analysis. We conclude that the Chinese version of the BPI-01 can be used for research and clinical evaluation of Chinese children and adolescents with ID. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Monitoring and analysis of technology transfer and intellectual property regimes and their use results of a study carried out on behalf of the European Commission (DG Research)

    CERN Document Server

    Van Eecke, Patrick; Bolger, P; Truyens, M

    2008-01-01

    This report presents the results of a three-year study commissioned by the European Commission (DG Research) regarding the monitoring, analysis and use of technology transfer and intellectual property regimes in the European Union. This study was organised in the context of the 6th Framework Programme for R&D, and was jointly carried out by law firms Mason Hayes+Curran (Dublin) and DLA Piper (Brussels).

  18. Intellectual disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... high bilirubin levels in babies) Nutritional (such as malnutrition) Toxic ( intrauterine exposure to ... a family, you may suspect your child has an intellectual disability when your child has ...

  19. 28 September 2011 - Canadian Intellectual Property Office Policy, International and Research Office Director K. Georgaras visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Engineer M. Bajko and Senior Scientists P. Jenni and R. Voss.

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    28 September 2011 - Canadian Intellectual Property Office Policy, International and Research Office Director K. Georgaras visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Engineer M. Bajko and Senior Scientists P. Jenni and R. Voss.

  20. Faster and Cheaper: Creating a Culture of Innovation for AFRL Intellectual Property

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    program allowing civilian employees to take as long as a one-year sabbatical while still being paid their full salary.31 Then, at the end of the year... Sabbatical for Department of Defense Laboratory Scientists,” 69. 35 One recruitment tool would be former AFRL employees who took advantage of the...wp2017855. FY16 National Defense Authorization Act (Items of Interest), “Entrepreneurial Sabbatical for Department of Defense Laboratory Scientists

  1. To evaluate the effects of a simplified hand washing improvement program in schoolchildren with mild intellectual disability: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Regina L T; Lee, Paul H

    2014-11-01

    A quasi-experimental study using a pretest-posttest design with a control group was used to evaluate the effects of a simplified 5-step multimedia visualization hand hygiene improvement program by schoolchildren with mild intellectual disability (MID). A total of twenty schoolchildren aged 6-12 years old with MID (12 males) were recruited and they were assigned into intervention (n=10) and control (n=10) groups. To evaluate the quality of their hand washing, Glow gel, which contains plastic simulated germs that are visible under an ultra-violet lamp, was applied to participants' hands to assess the quality of hand washing by comparing the amount of visible Glow gel before and after hand washing using a 4-point scale. Four raters used this 4-point scale to assess the quality of hand washing through digital photo images of the participants' hands. A total of eight digital photos per participant were taken. A fifteen-minute hand washing training session was conducted every school day for 4 weeks for the intervention group. Those in the control group received no training. A multimedia visual package on steps of hand washing was presented together with a reward system, whereby a number of stars were earned each week depending on the quality of hand washing. Results showed encouraging findings, as the schoolchildren in the intervention group showed significant improvement in hand washing (phand washing improvement program can be successfully implemented in a special school, and the effect of integrating multimedia visuals in the hand hygiene program could improve hand hygiene among schoolchildren with MID. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Evolution of Views on the “Intellectual Capital” Notion

    OpenAIRE

    Klymovych Natalia I.

    2014-01-01

    The article conducts analysis of approaches to definition of the "intellectual capital" notion. It studies experience of both Ukrainian and foreign scientists. It conducts a thorough analysis of basic notions of the studied category - "intellectual capital", "intellect", "capital" and "knowledge". It compares the "intellectual capital" term with the "intellectual potential" and "intellectual property" terms. It offers a clarified definition of the "intellectual capital" term, in which it focu...

  3. Intellectual Freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Emily

    2011-01-01

    Support for intellectual freedom, a concept codified in the American Library Association's Library Bill of Rights and Code of Ethics, is one of the core tenets of modern librarianship. According to the most recent interpretation of the Library Bill of Rights, academic librarians are encouraged to incorporate the principles of intellectual freedom…

  4. The Idea of Sustainable Development to Reconcile the Environmental and Intellectual Property Protection of Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebreselassie, Abeba T.

    2010-01-01

    Sustainable development calls for environmental sustainability, economic sustainability and socio-political sustainability.The concept of sustainable development is enshrined in a number of global and regional treaties, declarations, and reports such as the Brundtland Commission Report, the Rio...... Declaration, Agenda 21, the Millennium Development Goals[MDGs], the Johannesburg Declaration and the Johannesburg Plan of Implementation, and the 2000 Cotonou Agreement between African, Caribbean and Pacific States and the European Union [the Cotonou Agreement]. The purpose of this Article is to integrate...... in the following sections shows, the successful implementation of the CBD partly depends on the cooperation of other states and that there is thus a need for an international integration of environmental protection into development laws, policies and programs. Second, the intersection between the CBD...

  5. Intellectual Estuaries: Connecting Learning and Creativity in Programs of Advanced Academics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beghetto, Ronald A.; Kaufman, James C.

    2009-01-01

    Academic learning and creativity should be overlapping goals that can be simultaneously pursued in programs of advanced academics. However, efforts aimed at nurturing creativity and academic learning sometimes are represented as two related but separate paths; this separation is unnecessary and can undermine the development of creative and…

  6. The Sports Background, Personality, Att Itudes, and Social Competencies of Coaches and Assistant Coaches in the Just Soccer Program for Pupils with Intellectual Disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Schliermann Rainer; Stolz Isabel; Anneken Volker

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to empirically analyze the sports background, personality dimensions, attitudes, and social competencies of adult head coaches and young assistant coaches involved in the German Einfach Fußball (Just Soccer) program, which promotes the participation of pupils with intellectual disabilities in soccer/sports and society. Methods. The study recruited 28 head coaches and 29 assistant coaches who completed a questionnaire battery of standardized instruments (...

  7. A Typology of Intellectual Property Management for Public Health Innovation and Access: Design Considerations for Policymakers§

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taubman, Antony

    2010-01-01

    This paper seeks to set the practical discipline of public interest intellectual property (IP) management in public health into its broader policy context. The most immediate and direct impact of IP systems on public welfare results not from international standards nor from national legislation – though these norms are fundamentally important - but rather from the accumulated impact of numerous practical choices whether or not to seek IP protection; where and where not; and how any exclusive rights are deployed, by whom, and to what end. IP management is the essentially practical exercise of limited exclusive rights over protected subject matter, the judicious use of those rights to leverage outcomes that advance an institution's or a firm's objectives. Exclusive rights are used to construct and define knowledge-based relationships, to leverage access to technology and other necessary resources, and to enhance market-based incentives. IP management choices range across a broad spectrum, spanning public domain strategies, open or exclusive licensing, and strong exclusivity. The idea of ‘exclusive rights’, as a specific legal mechanism, can run counter to expectations of greater openness and accessibility, but actual outcomes will depend very much on how these mechanisms are used in practice. For public interest or public sector institutions concerned with health research and development, particularly the development of new medicines, IP management choices can be just as critical as they are for private firms, although a predominant institutional concentration on advancing direct public interest objectives may lead to significantly different approaches in weighing and exercising practical choices for IP management: even so, a private sector approach should not be conflated with exclusivity as an end in itself, nor need public interest IP management eschew all leverage over IP. This paper offers a tentative framework for a richer typology of those choices, to

  8. Sodium channel SCN8A (Nav1.6: properties and de novo mutations in epileptic encephalopathy and intellectual disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janelle Elizabeth O'Brien

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The sodium channel Nav1.6, encoded by the gene SCN8A, is one of the major voltage-gated channels in human brain. The sequences of sodium channels have been highly conserved during evolution, and minor changes in biophysical properties can have a major impact in vivo. Insight into the role of Nav1.6 has come from analysis of spontaneous and induced mutations of mouse Scn8a during the past 18 years. Only within the past year has the role of SCN8A in human disease become apparent from whole exome and genome sequences of patients with sporadic disease. Unique features of Nav1.6 include its contribution to persistent current, resurgent current, repetitive neuronal firing, and subcellular localization at the axon initial segment and nodes of Ranvier. Loss of Nav1.6 activity results in reduced neuronal excitability, while gain-of-function mutations can increase neuronal excitability. Mouse Scn8a (med mutants exhibit movement disorders including ataxia, tremor and dystonia. Thus far, more than ten human de novo mutations have been identified in patients with two types of disorders, epileptic encephalopathy and intellectual disability. We review these human mutations as well as the unique features of Nav1.6 that contribute to its role in determining neuronal excitability in vivo. A supplemental figure illustrating the positions of amino acid residues within the 4 domains and 24 transmembrane segments of Nav1.6 is provided to facilitate the location of novel mutations within the channel protein.

  9. Measuring symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder in people with intellectual disabilities: the development and psychometric properties of the Impact of Event Scale-Intellectual Disabilities (IES-IDs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, James C; Jobson, Laura; Langdon, Peter E

    2014-09-01

    The aims of the study were to (1) revise the Impact of Event Scale-Revised for use with people with intellectual disabilities (IDs), creating the Impact of Event Scale-Intellectual Disabilities (IES-IDs), (2) assess the reliability of the IES-IDs, and (3) compare the IES-IDs to an existing measure trauma-related symptomatology, namely the Lancaster and Northgate Trauma Scale (LANTS), along with measures of anxiety and depression. Forty adults with IDs who had experienced at least one traumatic event were recruited and completed the IES-IDs and the LANTS on two occasions, separated by 2 weeks. Participants also completed the Glasgow Depression Scale and the Glasgow Anxiety Scale, along with the Trauma Information Form which was used to collect information about trauma history. Fifteen per cent of the sample had encountered five or more traumatic events. The IES-IDs and the LANTS had good to excellent internal consistency and test-retest reliability. Both measures correlated with self-report measures of depression and anxiety, although the strength of this correlation was greater with the LANTS. There was a significant positive correlation between trauma frequency and the IES-IDs, while trauma frequency did not correlate with the LANTS. Both the IES-IDs and the LANTS appear to have good reliability. There is a lack of well-developed questionnaires that can be used to assess symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in people with intellectual disabilities. The Impact of Event Scale-Revised was augmented creating the Impact of Event Scale-Intellectual Disabilities (IES-IDs). The IES-IDs was shown to have good psychometric properties. The IES-IDs was compared to the Lancaster and Northgate Trauma Scale (LANTS), but the LANTS did not correlate with trauma frequency. However, this study had a small sample size, and a much larger study is needed to examine the factor structure of both the IES-IDs and the LANTS. Future studies should attempt to recruit people with

  10. Validation of Evidence-Based Fall Prevention Programs for Adults with Intellectual and/or Developmental Disorders: A Modified Otago Exercise Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renfro, Mindy; Bainbridge, Donna B; Smith, Matthew Lee

    2016-01-01

    Evidence-based fall prevention (EBFP) programs significantly decrease fall risk, falls, and fall-related injuries in community-dwelling older adults. To date, EBFP programs are only validated for use among people with normal cognition and, therefore, are not evidence-based for adults with intellectual and/or developmental disorders (IDD) such as Alzheimer's disease and related dementias, cerebral vascular accident, or traumatic brain injury. Adults with IDD experience not only a higher rate of falls than their community-dwelling, cognitively intact peers but also higher rates and earlier onset of chronic diseases, also known to increase fall risk. Adults with IDD experience many barriers to health care and health promotion programs. As the lifespan for people with IDD continues to increase, issues of aging (including falls with associated injury) are on the rise and require effective and efficient prevention. A modified group-based version of the Otago Exercise Program (OEP) was developed and implemented at a worksite employing adults with IDD in Montana. Participants were tested pre- and post-intervention using the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Stopping Elderly Accidents Deaths and Injuries (STEADI) tool kit. Participants participated in progressive once weekly, 1-h group exercise classes and home programs over a 7-week period. Discharge planning with consumers and caregivers included home exercise, walking, and an optional home assessment. Despite the limited number of participants ( n  = 15) and short length of participation, improvements were observed in the 30-s Chair Stand Test, 4-Stage Balance Test, and 2-Minute Walk Test. Additionally, three individuals experienced an improvement in ambulation independence. Participants reported no falls during the study period. Promising results of this preliminary project underline the need for further study of this modified OEP among adults with IDD. Future multicenter study should include more

  11. «Cognitus & Moi»: A Computer-Based Cognitive Remediation Program for Children with Intellectual Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demily, Caroline; Rigard, Caroline; Peyroux, Elodie; Chesnoy-Servanin, Gabrielle; Morel, Aurore; Franck, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Attentional, visuospatial, and social cognition deficits have a negative impact on children's adaptative and social competences and, as a result, on their ability to achieve a normal functioning and behavior. Until now and despite the frequency of those deficits, there is a lack of children's specific cognitive remediation tools specifically dedicated to attentional and visuospatial areas. The «Cognitus & Moi» program involves a variety of exercises in a paper and/or pencil (n = 30) or a computerized format (n = 29) and a strategy coaching approach. Each module of «Cognitus & Moi» targets a single impaired cognitive area, within the limits of cognitive domains' overlapping. The little cartoon character named Cognitus, who illustrates the program, is supposed to be very friendly and kind toward children. Cognitus will accompany them throughout the program for an effective and positive reinforcement. The main goal of «Cognitus & Moi» is to adjust to children's difficulties in daily life. Moreover, since the cognitive remediation benefit is complex to apply in daily life, the program is based on a metacognitive strategy. After a complete neuropsychological assessment and a psychoeducational session (with the child and the parents), 16 1-h-sessions of cognitive remediation with the therapist are proposed. Each session is composed of three parts: (1) computerized tasks focusing on specific attentional or visuospatial components (20 min). The attentional module targets hearing, visual, and divided attention. A double attention task is also proposed. The visuospatial module targets eye tracking and gaze direction, spatial orientation, visuospatial memory and construction, and mental imagery; (2) pen and paper tasks focusing on the same processes (20 min) and a facial emotion recognition task; (3) a proposal of a home-based task (during 20 min). Weekly, specific attentional and visuospatial home tasks are proposed to the child and analyzed with the

  12. Intellectual property in ethnomathematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Parra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Partiendo de reflexiones sobre la metodología empleada en una experiencia con una comunidad indígena colombiana, este artículo propone posibilidades para la investigación en etnomatemática, que tienen implicaciones en aspectos como la propiedad intelectual y la pertinencia social, así como en el reconocimiento y legitimación de ámbitos alternativos de generación, difusión y transformación del conocimiento matemático. El texto tiene cinco secciones: a información sobre la comunidad indígena, b descripción del proceso investigativo (por su carácter colectivo y comunitario es narrado en primera persona del plural, y de la elaboración de sus productos bilingües, así como de la dinámica actual del grupo investigador, c consideraciones individuales del autor, discutiendo la consonancia de la metodología en investigaciones etnomatemáticas con los presupuestos teóricos, humanistas y políticos del campo disciplinar. d consideraciones finales, compartiendo elementos para un desarrollo posterior, e epílogo o lectura de la experiencia desde otra mirada, donde se discute el espíritu que anima los análisis hechos.

  13. Psychometric Properties of Two Measures of Crisis and Distress in Parents of Children with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benninger, Tara L.; Witwer, Andrea N.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Parents and their children with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDD) are under significant amounts of stress (Lecavalier, Leone & Wiltz, 2006). When stress escalates to crisis, some children with IDD are admitted to the emergency department or an inpatient unit. While existing measures evaluate stress over time, we…

  14. Collective Intellectual Property in Michoacán: Negotiating Economic and Cultural Agendas in the Artisanal Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucero Ibarra Rojas

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The state of Michoacán, México, has almost 50 collective trademarks registered for artisanal products, which were created by initiative of different state institutions. This article aims to understand the different influences that are mediated by law when collective forms of intellectual property are incorporated and negotiated by different institutions with different aims within the realm of the state. By looking closely at the experience in Michoacán, I argue that two economic/cultural agendas can be identified. On the one hand, there is the federal agenda that aims for a national and international projection of a Mexican product, focused on the successfully industrialized national products closely linked with México's imagery for a foreign audience. On the other hand, there are the expectations of Michoacán's local government, which are strongly related with a pluralist discourse and with the different policy approaches it inspires. Between the two, the country’s cultural agenda becomes shaped by economic concerns that are, in turn, defined by the worldviews of state institution's agents. El estado de Michoacán, México, tiene casi 50 marcas colectivas de productos artesanales, que fueron registradas por iniciativa de diferentes instituciones estatales. Este artículo busca comprender las variadas influencias que son mediadas por el derecho cuando se incorporan formas colectivas de propiedad intelectual, mediante la negociación de diferentes instituciones con diferentes objetivos dentro del ámbito estatal. A través de la experiencia de Michoacán, sostengo que se pueden identificar dos agendas económicas/culturales. Por un lado, se encuentra la agenda federal que busca una proyección nacional e internacional de un producto identificable como mexicano, enfocándose en los productos nacionales que han tenido una industrialización exitosa. Por otro lado, se encuentran las expectativas del gobierno local de Michoacán, que se

  15. The dilemma of intellectual property rights for pharmaceuticals: the tension between ensuring access of the poor to medicines and committing to international agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jillian Clare; Illingworth, Patricia

    2003-05-01

    In this paper, we provide an overview of how the outcomes of the Uruguay Round affected the application of pharmaceutical intellectual property rights globally. Second, we explain how specific pharmaceutical policy tools can help developing states mitigate the worst effects of the TRIPS Agreement. Third, we put forward solutions that could be implemented by the World Bank to help overcome the divide between creating private incentives for research and development of innovative medicines and ensuring access of the poor to medicine. Fourth, we evaluate these solutions on the basis of utilitarian considerations and urge that equitable pricing is morally preferable to the other solutions.

  16. Non-Academic Jobs for Fellows in Law Firms, Patent and Trademark Office and Scientific Intellectual Property | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    This workshop helps CCR fellows and staff scientists learn about and better position themselves for potential job opportunities at law firms, patent and trademark, and intellectual property protection across the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries. Guest speakers will shed light on how to best position yourself for obtaining these types of positions and how to improve your chances of success. They will describe ways in which you can use your time at NIH to better prepare for opportunities that may arise down the road in these fields.

  17. The use of agrobiodiversity for plant improvement and the intellectual property paradigm: institutional fit and legal tools for mass selection, conventional and molecular plant breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batur, Fulya; Dedeurwaerdere, Tom

    2014-12-01

    Focused on the impact of stringent intellectual property mechanisms over the uses of plant agricultural biodiversity in crop improvement, the article delves into a systematic analysis of the relationship between institutional paradigms and their technological contexts of application, identified as mass selection, controlled hybridisation, molecular breeding tools and transgenics. While the strong property paradigm has proven effective in the context of major leaps forward in genetic engineering, it faces a systematic breakdown when extended to mass selection, where innovation often displays a collective nature. However, it also creates partial blockages in those innovation schemes rested between on-farm observation and genetic modification, i.e. conventional plant breeding and upstream molecular biology research tools. Neither overly strong intellectual property rights, nor the absence of well delineated protection have proven an optimal fit for these two intermediary socio-technological systems of cumulative incremental innovation. To address these challenges, the authors look at appropriate institutional alternatives which can create effective incentives for in situ agrobiodiversity conservation and the equitable distribution of technologies in plant improvement, using the flexibilities of the TRIPS Agreement, the liability rules set forth in patents or plant variety rights themselves (in the form of farmers', breeders' and research exceptions), and other ad hoc reward regimes.

  18. Reducing Behavioural to Structural Properties of Programs with Procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gurov, Dilian; Huisman, Marieke

    2013-01-01

    There is an intimate link between program structure and behaviour. Exploiting this link to phrase program correctness problems in terms of the structural properties of a program graph rather than in terms of its unfoldings is a useful strategy for making analyses more tractable. The present paper

  19. Reducing Behavioural to Structural Properties of Programs with Procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gurov, D.; Huisman, Marieke; Jones, N.D.; Müller-Olm, M.

    2009-01-01

    There is an intimate link between program structure and behaviour. Exploiting this link to phrase program correctness problems in terms of the structural properties of a program graph rather than in terms of its unfoldings is a useful strategy for making analyses more tractable. This paper presents

  20. Validation of Evidence-Based Fall Prevention Programs for Adults with Intellectual and/or Developmental Disorders (FallPAIDD: A Modified Otago Exercise Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mindy Renfro

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Evidence-based fall prevention (EBFP programs significantly decrease fall risk, falls, and fall-related injuries in community-dwelling older adults. To date, EBFP programs are only validated for use among people with normal cognition and, therefore, are not evidence-based for adults with intellectual and/or developmental disorders (IDD such as Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias (ADRD, cerebral vascular accident (CVA, or traumatic brain injury (TBI. BACKGROUND: Adults with IDD experience not only a higher rate of falls than their community-dwelling, cognitively intact peers, but also higher rates and earlier onset of chronic diseases, also known to increase fall risk. Adults with IDD experience many barriers to healthcare and health promotion programs. As the lifespan for people with IDD continues to increase, issues of aging (including falls with associated injury are on the rise and require effective and efficient prevention. METHODS: A modified group-based version of the Otago Exercise Program (OEP was developed and implemented at a worksite employing adults with IDD in Montana. Participants were tested pre and post-intervention using the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC STopping Elderly Accidents Deaths and Injuries (STEADI tool kit. Participants participated in progressive once weekly, one-hour group exercise classes and home programs over a 7-week period. Discharge planning with consumers and caregivers included home exercise, walking, and an optional home assessment. RESULTS: Despite the limited number of participants (n=15 and short length of participation, improvements were observed in the 30-Second Chair Stand Test, 4-Stage Balance Test, and 2-Minute Walk Test. Additionally, three individuals experienced an improvement in ambulation independence. Participants reported no falls during the study period. DISCUSSION: Promising results of this preliminary project underline the need for further study

  1. Intellectual emotions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilyev, Igor A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the laboratory of O.K. Tikhomirov, the phenomenon of the acute emotional regulation of productive thinking was justified. This regulation is realized by means of the elaboration of the axiological profile of cognition. The following definition of intellectual emotions can be given: intellectual emotions are the appraisals of specific cognitive objects — contradictions, assumptions, probabilities, and the intermediate and final results of operations. The main aspect of the method used in the research consisted of the synchronous registration of an external (tactile elaboration of problems, skin galvanic response and verbal utterances regarding tasks to be completed in a game of chess. The principle position in Tikhomirov`s group is the following: intellectual emotions represent not only the energetic resource or catalysts for the thinking process, but also the determinants of its structure.

  2. Development and Evaluation of a Staff Training Program on Palliative Care for Persons with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Joan E.; Cadogan, Mary P.

    2011-01-01

    Persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) face barriers and disparities at end of life. Among these barriers are limited educational opportunities and a paucity of targeted training materials on palliative care for staff who provide their day-to-day care. This paper reports on a three-phase project undertaken to develop,…

  3. Effects of a School-Based Social Skills Training Program for Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plavnick, Joshua B.; Kaid, Tiffany; MacFarland, Mari C.

    2015-01-01

    Social deficits are a core characteristic of individuals with autism spectrum disorders and co-occurring intellectual disabilities (ASD-ID). Despite persistence of these deficits into adolescence, few social skills interventions have been empirically evaluated for older individuals with ASD-ID. The present investigation adapted an efficacious…

  4. Impact of the trade-related aspects of intellectual property rights (TRIPS) agreement on India as a supplier of generic antiretrovirals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babovic, Sonja; Wasan, Kishor M

    2011-03-01

    This is a commentary on how the trade-related aspects of intellectual property rights (TRIPS) agreement has impacted India as a supplier of generic antiretrovirals (ARVs). We provide a systematic review of the issues related to the TRIPS agreement that affects India. This includes discussion around (a) the legal landscape underpinning India as a supplier of generic ARVs; (b) supply of second-line ARVs; and (c) the future of generic drug production in India. The proclamation into force of TRIPS-compliant intellectual property law in India is likely to affect its position as a supplier of affordable ARVs, especially drugs brought to market after 2005. Currently, mechanisms exist for the generic production of almost all ARVs in India, including second-line drugs; however, the manufacture of these drugs by generic pharmaceutical companies may require additional market incentives. Compulsory licensing may emerge as an additional mechanism by which India can provide affordable versions of patented drugs to Least Developed Countries (LDCs). Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. The trends and constructive ambiguity in international agreements on intellectual property and pharmaceutical affairs: Implications for domestic legislations in low- and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Kyung-Bok; Lee, Tae-Jin

    2017-06-06

    The purpose of this study is to analyse the trends in international agreements including Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS), Korea-United States Free Trade Agreements, and Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreements on intellectual property and pharmaceutical affairs with the updated framework. The study also assesses constructive ambiguity in international agreements, which might affect the implementation process through interpretation and domestic legislations. Five flexibility clauses and three TRIPS-plus provisions were selected, and presence of constructive ambiguity in the agreements was analysed to draw actual trends in international agreements. Flexibility provisions excluding compulsory licensing were not noticeably changed, and TRIPS-plus provisions including data exclusivity and patent linkage were expanded in scope or newly appeared, respectively. The clause regarding compulsory licensing, extension of the patent term, data exclusivity, and patent linkage showed unclear definitions or the lack of adequate explanations. With constructive ambiguity in those clauses, a country who wants to join international agreements in the near future could amend domestic legislations to minimise the detrimental effect of international agreements on access to medicines.

  6. Innovation and Technology Dissemination in Clean Technology Markets and The Developing World: The Role of Trade, Intellectual Property Rights, and Uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina M. Lybecker

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Innovation is an inherently risky and uncertain process. Many of the broader challenges to innovation in general are both mirrored and exaggerated in clean technology innovation. The development of environmental technologies is further complicated by the public goods nature of knowledge, environmental externalities, and uncertainty. This study on clean technology focuses on recent work on the role of uncertainty, the participation of emerging and developing nations, the controversy surrounding intellectual property rights, and the variety of market actors and strategies in place. The paper also considers the policy instruments that are available, the cost, benefits and consequences of their use. As scholars continue to analyze when, where, why and how clean technology innovations are developed and adopted, it is essential that government policymakers aim to reduce uncertainty and risk, incentivize innovation with effective intellectual property rights, and foster transparency in the market. This continues to be a field of increasing future importance, and a rich area for continued academic study and analysis. Consumers, government policymakers and innovators would all benefit from a greater understanding of the process of technological change in the development, diffusion and financing of clean technologies.

  7. Prima facie reasons to question enclosed intellectual property regimes and favor open-source regimes for germplasm [version 1; referees: 2 approved, 1 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeleine-Thérèse Halpert

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In principle, intellectual property protections (IPPs promote and protect important but costly investment in research and development. However, the empirical reality of IPPs has often gone without critical evaluation, and the potential of alternative approaches to lend equal or greater support for useful innovation is rarely considered. In this paper, we review the mounting evidence that the global intellectual property regime (IPR for germplasm has been neither necessary nor sufficient to generate socially beneficial improvements in crop plants and maintain agrobiodiversity. Instead, based on our analysis, the dominant global IPR appears to have contributed to consolidation in the seed industry while failing to genuinely engage with the potential of alternatives to support social goods such as food security, adaptability, and resilience. The dominant IPR also constrains collaborative and cumulative plant breeding processes that are built upon the work of countless farmers past and present. Given the likely limits of current IPR, we propose that social goods in agriculture may be better supported by alternative approaches, warranting a rapid move away from the dominant single-dimensional focus on encouraging innovation through ensuring monopoly profits to IPP holders.

  8. L’innovation dans les relations sino-américaines : le cas des droits de la propriété intellectuelle Innovation in U.S.-China Relations: The Example of Intellectual Property Rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliette Bourdin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, innovation has become an essential strategical element and a key to competitiveness for all the countries now ruled by the “knowledge economy.” In order to maintain its leading position, the United States has managed to impose its own intellectual property rights (IPR regime on the rest of the world through the TRIPS agreements. Although China is now part of the World Trade Organization, IPR infringements are still widespread throughout the country which has become Washington’s main target in its fight to protect intellectual property rights. The IPR question is fundamental for the United States both because of the supposedly tremendous loss of expected earnings and because the future of U.S. society, whose socio-economic organization has been modified by the knowledge economy, will increasingly depend upon the respect of intellectual property rights.

  9. Extension of Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program's Fluid Property Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Kishan

    2011-01-01

    This internship focused on the development of additional capabilities for the General Fluid Systems Simulation Program (GFSSP). GFSSP is a thermo-fluid code used to evaluate system performance by a finite volume-based network analysis method. The program was developed primarily to analyze the complex internal flow of propulsion systems and is capable of solving many problems related to thermodynamics and fluid mechanics. GFSSP is integrated with thermodynamic programs that provide fluid properties for sub-cooled, superheated, and saturation states. For fluids that are not included in the thermodynamic property program, look-up property tables can be provided. The look-up property tables of the current release version can only handle sub-cooled and superheated states. The primary purpose of the internship was to extend the look-up tables to handle saturated states. This involves a) generation of a property table using REFPROP, a thermodynamic property program that is widely used, and b) modifications of the Fortran source code to read in an additional property table containing saturation data for both saturated liquid and saturated vapor states. Also, a method was implemented to calculate the thermodynamic properties of user-fluids within the saturation region, given values of pressure and enthalpy. These additions required new code to be written, and older code had to be adjusted to accommodate the new capabilities. Ultimately, the changes will lead to the incorporation of this new capability in future versions of GFSSP. This paper describes the development and validation of the new capability.

  10. 75 FR 60408 - Government Programs To Assist Businesses Protect Their Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-30

    ... (copyrights, trademarks, patents, trade secrets) present the most challenges to SMEs? Should U.S. government... pool resources to combat infringement abroad. DATES: Submissions must be received on or before Friday... Bureaus, namely the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) and the International Trade Administration...

  11. Development of an Intellectual Property Strategy: Research Notes to Support Department of Defense Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    into a “generic term.” Trademark history describes several distinctive marks that have become generic over time. Aspirin , cellophane, margarine...and the trademark owner’s reputation are linked in the minds of the public. Dilution is when a company in a different industry uses a mark that is so

  12. 75 FR 17412 - Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program Intellectual Property Option to Collaborator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-06

    ..., world-wide license to all Section B Inventions for research purposes only; (ii) a time-limited first...-sponsored clinical trial for which CTEP holds the investigational new drug (IND) application. DATES... result, both Collaborators and Institutions have claimed an ownership interest in inventions generated...

  13. Intellectual Capital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritsen, Jan; Bukh, Per Nikolaj

    2015-01-01

    Intellectual capital (IC) consists of human capital, organizational capital, and relational capital, and their relationships. It has been said to be important to explain the difference between market value and book value of a firm, but measurement of IC is more likely to be important because...

  14. Intellectual disability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters-Scheffer, N.C.; Didden, H.C.M.; Lang, R.

    2015-01-01

    Perhaps the most common and most debilitating comorbid disorder with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is intellectual disability (ID). The overlap of these conditions has been studied extensively. This chapter provides an overview of the research that has been published on the topic. Subjects such as

  15. Intellectual History

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    In the 5 Questions book series, this volume presents a range of leading scholars in Intellectual History and the History of Ideas through their answers to a brief questionnaire. Respondents include Michael Friedman, Jacques le Goff, Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht, Jonathan Israel, Phiip Pettit, John Pocock...

  16. The Intellectual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M. Novak

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Book jackets sometimes provide insightful provocation about the content and flavour of a text. Certainly the designers of the front jacket for Steve Fuller’s The Intellectual intended to be provocative when they placed the words, “the positive power of negative thinking,” at the top centre.

  17. From Pilot to Permanent: A Case Study of the Institutionalization of A Grant-Funded Transition Program for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities in A Public Research Institution in the Midwest of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavulic, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative intrinsic case study explored the institutionalization of a Transition and Postsecondary Education for Students with Intellectual Disabilities (TPSID) grant-funded program into a public four-year university in the Midwestern U.S. The study employed an ecological framework, and analyzed interview data from program stakeholders and…

  18. DOD Personal Property Shipment and Storage Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-04-10

    standards, and criteria governing the procurement of services required to ship, store, and handle personal property. The term does not include... of Services . Services may be procured only from respon- sible carriers, storage firms, arid contractors. To be determined responsible, carriers, their...standards, efficiency, economy, and cost-effectiveness, and ensure that it is consistent with the following criteria: 4y Vor 3I 3. ...f., 1. Procurement

  19. Automata-Based Verification of Temporal Properties on Running Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannakopoulou, Dimitra; Havelund, Klaus; Lan, Sonie (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to checking a running program against its Linear Temporal Logic (LTL) specifications. LTL is a widely used logic for expressing properties of programs viewed as sets of executions. Our approach consists of translating LTL formulae to finite-state automata, which are used as observers of the program behavior. The translation algorithm we propose modifies standard LTL to Buchi automata conversion techniques to generate automata that check finite program traces. The algorithm has been implemented in a tool, which has been integrated with the generic JPaX framework for runtime analysis of Java programs.

  20. Improving Search Properties in Genetic Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janikow, Cezary Z.; DeWeese, Scott

    1997-01-01

    With the advancing computer processing capabilities, practical computer applications are mostly limited by the amount of human programming required to accomplish a specific task. This necessary human participation creates many problems, such as dramatically increased cost. To alleviate the problem, computers must become more autonomous. In other words, computers must be capable to program/reprogram themselves to adapt to changing environments/tasks/demands/domains. Evolutionary computation offers potential means, but it must be advanced beyond its current practical limitations. Evolutionary algorithms model nature. They maintain a population of structures representing potential solutions to the problem at hand. These structures undergo a simulated evolution by means of mutation, crossover, and a Darwinian selective pressure. Genetic programming (GP) is the most promising example of an evolutionary algorithm. In GP, the structures that evolve are trees, which is a dramatic departure from previously used representations such as strings in genetic algorithms. The space of potential trees is defined by means of their elements: functions, which label internal nodes, and terminals, which label leaves. By attaching semantic interpretation to those elements, trees can be interpreted as computer programs (given an interpreter), evolved architectures, etc. JSC has begun exploring GP as a potential tool for its long-term project on evolving dextrous robotic capabilities. Last year we identified representation redundancies as the primary source of inefficiency in GP. Subsequently, we proposed a method to use problem constraints to reduce those redundancies, effectively reducing GP complexity. This method was implemented afterwards at the University of Missouri. This summer, we have evaluated the payoff from using problem constraints to reduce search complexity on two classes of problems: learning boolean functions and solving the forward kinematics problem. We have also