WorldWideScience

Sample records for program includes measurement

  1. Education Program on Fossil Resources Including Coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usami, Masahiro

    Fossil fuels including coal play a key role as crucial energies in contributing to economic development in Asia. On the other hand, its limited quantity and the environmental problems causing from its usage have become a serious global issue and a countermeasure to solve such problems is very much demanded. Along with the pursuit of sustainable development, environmentally-friendly use of highly efficient fossil resources should be therefore, accompanied. Kyushu-university‧s sophisticated research through long years of accumulated experience on the fossil resources and environmental sectors together with the advanced large-scale commercial and empirical equipments will enable us to foster cooperative research and provide internship program for the future researchers. Then, this program is executed as a consignment business from the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry from 2007 fiscal year to 2009 fiscal year. The lecture that uses the textbooks developed by this program is scheduled to be started a course in fiscal year 2010.

  2. Diversity: Including People with Disabilities in Outdoor Adventure Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugerman, Deb

    1996-01-01

    Organizations that offer outdoor adventure activities can integrate programs to include individuals with disabilities. The paper describes how one organization includes diverse groups of people with and without disabilities in its outdoor activities, focusing on each member's strengths and encouraging cooperation. (SM)

  3. Mitigation measures and programs in Hungary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molnar, S. [Systemexpert Consulting Ltd., Budapest (Hungary)

    1996-12-31

    In Hungary there are four main governmental programs, which may result in a decrease of emissions of anthropogenic greenhouse gases (GHGs): (1) National program of energy efficiency improvement and energy conservation, (2) Afforestation program, (3) Volatile organic compounds (VOC) emission reduction program, and (4) Program to reduce the use of ozone depleting substances. These ambitious programs were launched in the beginning of the 90`s, but they have been slowed down because of budgetary problems. The comprehensive action plan for mitigation of GHG emissions should be based on these ongoing programs. These programs should be expanded by further measures and programs in order to fulfill the requirements of the FCCC. In the next sections the results and prospects of the above mentioned programs will be summarized. Also the results of the mitigation study supported by the U.S. Country Studies Program are included.

  4. Benefits of including methane measurements in selection strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, D L; Oddy, V H

    2016-09-01

    Estimates of genetic/phenotypic covariances and economic values for slaughter weight, growth, feed intake and efficiency, and three potential methane traits were compiled to explore the effect of incorporating methane measurements in breeding objectives for cattle and meat sheep. The cost of methane emissions was assumed to be zero (scenario A), A$476/t (based on A$14/t CO equivalent and methane's 100-yr global warming potential [GWP] of 34; scenario B), or A$2,580/t (A$30/t CO equivalent combined with methane's 20-yr GWP of 86; scenario C). Methane traits were methane yield (MY; methane production divided by feed intake based on measurements over 1 d in respiration chambers) or short-term measurements of methane production adjusted for live weight (MPadjWt) in grazing animals, e.g., 40-60 min measurements in portable accumulation chambers (PAC) on 1 or 3 occasions, or measurements for 1 wk using a GreenFeed Emissions Monitor (GEM) on 1 or 3 occasions. Feed costs included the cost of maintaining the breeding herd and growth from weaning to slaughter. Sheep were assumed to be grown and finished on pasture (A$50/t DM). Feed costs for cattle included 365 d on pasture for the breeding herd and averages of 200 d postweaning grow-out on pasture and 100 d feedlot finishing. The greatest benefit of including methane in the breeding objective for both sheep and cattle was as a proxy for feed intake. For cattle, 3 GEM measurements were estimated to increase profit from 1 round of selection in scenario A (no payment for methane) by A$6.24/animal (from A$20.69 to A$26.93) because of reduced feed costs relative to gains in slaughter weight and by A$7.16 and A$12.09/animal, respectively, for scenarios B and C, which have payments for reduced methane emissions. For sheep, the improvements were more modest. Returns from 1 round of selection (no methane measurements) were A$5.06 (scenario A), A$4.85 (scenario B), and A$3.89 (scenario C) compared to A$5.26 (scenario A), A$5

  5. Measurement of visceral fat: should we include retroperitoneal fat?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Sheng Hung

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Whether retroperitoneal fat should be included in the measurement of visceral fat remains controversial. We compared the relationships of fat areas in peritoneal, retroperitoneal, and subcutaneous compartments to metabolic syndrome, adipokines, and incident hypertension and diabetes. METHODS: We enrolled 432 adult participants (153 men and 279 women in a community-based cohort study. Computed tomography at the umbilicus level was used to measure the fat areas. RESULTS: Retroperitoneal fat correlated significantly with metabolic syndrome (adjusted odds ratio (OR, 5.651, p<0.05 and the number of metabolic abnormalities (p<0.05. Retroperitoneal fat area was significantly associated with blood pressure, plasma glycemic indices, lipid profile, C-reactive protein, adiponectin (r =  -0.244, P<0.05, and leptin (r = 0.323, p<0.05, but not plasma renin or aldosterone concentrations. During the 2.94 ± 0.84 years of follow-up, 32 participants developed incident hypertension. Retroperitoneal fat area (hazard ration (HR 1.62, p = 0.003 and peritoneal fat area (HR 1.62, p = 0.009, but not subcutaneous fat area (p = 0.14 were associated with incident hypertension. Neither retroperitoneal fat area, peritoneal fat area, nor subcutaneous fat areas was associated with incident diabetes after adjustment. CONCLUSIONS: Retroperitoneal fat is similar to peritoneal fat, but differs from subcutaneous fat, in terms of its relationship with metabolic syndrome and incident hypertension. Retroperitoneal fat area should be included in the measurement of visceral fat for cardio-metabolic studies in human.

  6. Designing monitoring programs for chemicals of emerging concern in potable reuse ⋯ What to include and what not to include?

    KAUST Repository

    Drewes, Jorg

    2012-11-01

    This study discussed a proposed process to prioritize chemicals for reclaimed water monitoring programs, selection of analytical methods required for their quantification, toxicological relevance of chemicals of emerging concern regarding human health, and related issues. Given that thousands of chemicals are potentially present in reclaimed water and that information about those chemicals is rapidly evolving, a transparent, science-based framework was developed to guide prioritization of which compounds of emerging concern (CECs) should be included in reclaimed water monitoring programs. The recommended framework includes four steps: (1) compile environmental concentrations (e.g., measured environmental concentration or MEC) of CECs in the source water for reuse projects; (2) develop a monitoring trigger level (MTL) for each of these compounds (or groups thereof) based on toxicological relevance; (3) compare the environmental concentration (e.g., MEC) to the MTL; CECs with a MEC/MTL ratio greater than 1 should be prioritized for monitoring, compounds with a ratio less than \\'1\\' should only be considered if they represent viable treatment process performance indicators; and (4) screen the priority list to ensure that a commercially available robust analytical method is available for that compound. © IWA Publishing 2013.

  7. Hearing of Personnel Included in the USAF Hearing Conservation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-02-01

    ORGNIZTIO NAE AN ADRES - 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT. TASK 9. PFORINGORGAIZAIONNAMEANDADDESSAREA ft WORK UNIT NUMBERS USAF School of Aerospace Medicine...0 0)~’ to (00w " 0 -q N~ m M VC0 CO~j 0 N 01) a)inUjU) tD -4 N o O 0 N 0 a) m m~0 di .. 0 alO1 O0- cn cO N - m -4N (0-00N (0 it) W N n N . o4Ca 0 0

  8. BSN Program Admittance Criteria: Should Emotional Intelligence Be Included?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tanya

    2017-01-01

    Emotional intelligence refers to the ability to identify and monitor emotions and remain aware of how emotions affect thoughts and actions. Emotional intelligence has been discussed as a better predictor of personal and occupational success than performance on intellectual intelligence tests. Despite the importance of one's emotional intelligence, BSN (Bachelor of Science in Nursing) nursing schools routinely admit candidates based on the student's cumulative college course grade point average (GPA). Nursing is a profession that requires one's ability to empathize, care, and react in emotionally sound manners. Is the GPA enough to determine if a student will evolve into a professional nurse? This article will explore the routine admittance criteria for BSN nursing programs and propose the concept of using the emotional intelligence tool as an adjunct to the cumulative college course GPA. The emotional intelligence theory will be identified and applied to the nursing profession. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Information to Include in Curriculum Vitae | Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applicants are encouraged to use their current curriculum vitae and to add any necessary information. Please include your name and a page number on each page of the curriculum vitae. Some of the information requested below will not be applicable to all individuals. Please do not print or type your information on this page. Personal Information Name (First middle last) Gender (optional) Race (optional) Date of birth Place of birth (city,

  10. NASA's Optical Measurement Program 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowardin, H.; Lederer, S.; Stansbery, G.; Seitzer, P.; Buckalew, B.; Abercromby, K.; Barker, E.

    2014-01-01

    The Optical Measurements Group (OMG) within the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office (ODPO) addresses U.S. National Space Policy goals by monitoring and characterizing debris. Since 2001, the OMG has used the Michigan Orbital Debris Survey Telescope (MODEST) at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in Chile for general orbital debris survey. The 0.6-m Schmidt MODEST provides calibrated astronomical data of GEO targets, both catalogued and uncatalogued debris, with excellent image quality. The data are utilized by the ODPO modeling group and are included in the Orbital Debris Engineering Model (ORDEM) v. 3.0. MODEST and the CTIO/SMARTS (Small and Moderate Aperture Research Telescope System) 0.9 m both acquire filter photometric data, as well as synchronously observing targets in selected optical filters. This information provides data used in material composition studies as well as longer orbital arc data on the same target, without time delay or bias from a rotating, tumbling, or spinning target. NASA, in collaboration with the University of Michigan, began using the twin 6.5-m Magellan telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile for deep imaging (Baade) and spectroscopic data (Clay) in 2011. Through the data acquired on Baade, debris have been detected that are 3 magnitudes fainter than detections with MODEST, while the data from Clay provide better resolved information used in material characterization analyses via selected bandpasses. To better characterize and model optical data, the Optical Measurements Center (OMC) at NASA/JSC has been in operation since 2005, resulting in a database of comparison laboratory data. The OMC is designed to emulate illumination conditions in space using equipment and techniques that parallel telescopic observations and source-target-sensor orientations. Lastly, the OMG is building the Meter Class Autonomous Telescope (MCAT) at Ascension Island. The 1.3-m telescope is designed to observe GEO and LEO targets, using a

  11. GNSS-Based Space Weather Systems Including COSMIC Ionospheric Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komjathy, Attila; Mandrake, Lukas; Wilson, Brian; Iijima, Byron; Pi, Xiaoqing; Hajj, George; Mannucci, Anthony J.

    2006-01-01

    The presentation outline includes University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) and Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) product comparisons, assimilating ground-based global positioning satellites (GPS) and COSMIC into JPL/University of Southern California (USC) Global Assimilative Ionospheric Model (GAIM), and JPL/USC GAIM validation. The discussion of comparisons examines Abel profiles and calibrated TEC. The JPL/USC GAIM validation uses Arecibo ISR, Jason-2 VTEC, and Abel profiles.

  12. 34 CFR 263.4 - What training costs may a Professional Development program include?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What training costs may a Professional Development... GRANT PROGRAMS Professional Development Program § 263.4 What training costs may a Professional Development program include? (a) A Professional Development program may include, as training costs, assistance...

  13. Measurement problem in PROGRAM UNIVERSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noyes, H.P.; Gefwert, C.

    1984-12-01

    We present a discrete theory that meets the measurement problem in a new way. We generate a growing universe of bit strings, labeled by 2/sup 127/ + 136 strings organized by some representation of the closed, four level, combinatorial hierarchy, of bit-length N/sub 139/ greater than or equal to 139. The rest of the strings for each label, which grow in both length and number, are called addresses. The generating algorithm, called PROGRAM UNIVERSE, starts from a random choice between the two symbols ''0'' and ''1'' and grows (a) by discriminating between two randomly chosen strings and adjoining a novel result to the universe, or when the string so generated is not novel, by (b) adjoining a randomly chosen bit at the growing end of each string. We obtain, by appropriate definitions and interpretations, stable ''particles'' which satisfy the usual relativistic kinematics and quantized angular momentum without being localizable in a continuum space-time. The labeling scheme is congruent with the ''standard model'' of quarks and leptons with three generations, but for the problem at hand, the implementation of this aspect of the theory is unimportant. What matters most is that (a) these complicated ''particles'' have the periodicities familiar from relativistic ''deBroglie waves'' and resolve in a discrete way the ''wave-particle dualism'' and (b) can be ''touched'' by our discrete equivalent of ''soft photons'' in such a way as to follow, macroscopically, the usual Rutherford scattering trajectories with the associated bound states. Thus our theory could provide a discrete description of ''measurement'' in a way that allows no conceptual barrier between the ''micro'' and the ''macro'' worlds, if we are willing to base our physics on

  14. 34 CFR 86.100 - What must the IHE's drug prevention program include?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must the IHE's drug prevention program include? 86.100 Section 86.100 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DRUG AND ALCOHOL ABUSE PREVENTION Institutions of Higher Education § 86.100 What must the IHE's drug prevention program include? The...

  15. 36 CFR 1223.14 - What elements must a vital records program include?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What elements must a vital... RECORDS ADMINISTRATION RECORDS MANAGEMENT MANAGING VITAL RECORDS § 1223.14 What elements must a vital records program include? To achieve compliance with this section, an agency's vital records program must...

  16. A tool to include gamma analysis software into a quality assurance program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnew, Christina E; McGarry, Conor K

    2016-03-01

    To provide a tool to enable gamma analysis software algorithms to be included in a quality assurance (QA) program. Four image sets were created comprising two geometric images to independently test the distance to agreement (DTA) and dose difference (DD) elements of the gamma algorithm, a clinical step and shoot IMRT field and a clinical VMAT arc. The images were analysed using global and local gamma analysis with 2 in-house and 8 commercially available software encompassing 15 software versions. The effect of image resolution on gamma pass rates was also investigated. All but one software accurately calculated the gamma passing rate for the geometric images. Variation in global gamma passing rates of 1% at 3%/3mm and over 2% at 1%/1mm was measured between software and software versions with analysis of appropriately sampled images. This study provides a suite of test images and the gamma pass rates achieved for a selection of commercially available software. This image suite will enable validation of gamma analysis software within a QA program and provide a frame of reference by which to compare results reported in the literature from various manufacturers and software versions. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  17. Efficacy of an Individualized Prevention Program Including Social Media Support on University Students with Gingivitis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carlos Alberto Serrano Méndez; Karen Andrea Avendaño Calderón; Paula Andrea Moreno Caro

    2017-01-01

    ...: Thirty-eight students with gingivitis participated in a program that included: Individualized oral hygiene instruction, professional removal of plaque and calculus and, recall and support on oral hygiene through the use of social media...

  18. Comprehensive Adolescent Health Programs That Include Sexual and Reproductive Health Services: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Jenita; Tunçalp, Özge; Turke, Shani; Blum, Robert William

    2014-01-01

    We systematically reviewed peer-reviewed and gray literature on comprehensive adolescent health (CAH) programs (1998–2013), including sexual and reproductive health services. We screened 36 119 records and extracted articles using predefined criteria. We synthesized data into descriptive characteristics and assessed quality by evidence level. We extracted data on 46 programs, of which 19 were defined as comprehensive. Ten met all inclusion criteria. Most were US based; others were implemented in Egypt, Ethiopia, and Mexico. Three programs displayed rigorous evidence; 5 had strong and 2 had modest evidence. Those with rigorous or strong evidence directly or indirectly influenced adolescent sexual and reproductive health. The long-term impact of many CAH programs cannot be proven because of insufficient evaluations. Evaluation approaches that take into account the complex operating conditions of many programs are needed to better understand mechanisms behind program effects. PMID:25320876

  19. Measuring Student Transformation in Entrepreneurship Education Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven A. Gedeon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes how to measure student transformation primarily within a university entrepreneurship degree program. Student transformation is defined as changes in knowledge (“Head”, skills (“Hand”, and attitudinal (“Heart” learning outcomes. Following the institutional impact model, student transformation is the primary goal of education and all other program goals and aspects of quality desired by stakeholders are either input factors (professors, courses, facilities, support, etc. or output performance (number of startups, average starting salary, % employment, etc.. This goal-setting framework allows competing stakeholder quality expectations to be incorporated into a continuous process improvement (CPI model when establishing program goals. How to measure these goals to implement TQM methods is shown. Measuring student transformation as the central focus of a program promotes harmony among competing stakeholders and also provides a metric on which other program decisions (e.g., class size, assignments, and pedagogical technique may be based. Different stakeholders hold surprisingly different views on defining program quality. The proposed framework provides a useful way to bring these competing views into a CPI cycle to implement TQM requirements of accreditation. The specific entrepreneurial learning outcome goals described in the tables in this article may also be used directly by educators in nonaccredited programs and single courses/workshops or for other audiences.

  20. 29 CFR 1472.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must I include in my drug-free awareness program? 1472.215 Section 1472.215 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) FEDERAL MEDIATION AND... of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c) Any...

  1. 29 CFR 94.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true What must I include in my drug-free awareness program? 94.215 Section 94.215 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE... inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a...

  2. 31 CFR 20.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must I include in my drug-free awareness program? 20.215 Section 20.215 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for Recipients Other Than...

  3. 38 CFR 17.255 - Applications for grants for programs which include construction projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applications for grants... Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Grants for Exchange of Information § 17.255 Applications for grants for programs which include construction projects. In addition to the documents and...

  4. Integrative Biological Chemistry Program Includes the Use of Informatics Tools, GIS and SAS Software Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Malcolm J.; Kashmar, Richard J.; Hurst, Kent; Fiedler, Frank; Gross, Catherine E.; Deol, Jasbir K.; Wilson, Alora

    2015-01-01

    Wesley College is a private, primarily undergraduate minority-serving institution located in the historic district of Dover, Delaware (DE). The College recently revised its baccalaureate biological chemistry program requirements to include a one-semester Physical Chemistry for the Life Sciences course and project-based experiential learning…

  5. Force measuring valve assemblies, systems including such valve assemblies and related methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWall, Kevin George [Pocatello, ID; Garcia, Humberto Enrique [Idaho Falls, ID; McKellar, Michael George [Idaho Falls, ID

    2012-04-17

    Methods of evaluating a fluid condition may include stroking a valve member and measuring a force acting on the valve member during the stroke. Methods of evaluating a fluid condition may include measuring a force acting on a valve member in the presence of fluid flow over a period of time and evaluating at least one of the frequency of changes in the measured force over the period of time and the magnitude of the changes in the measured force over the period of time to identify the presence of an anomaly in a fluid flow and, optionally, its estimated location. Methods of evaluating a valve condition may include directing a fluid flow through a valve while stroking a valve member, measuring a force acting on the valve member during the stroke, and comparing the measured force to a reference force. Valve assemblies and related systems are also disclosed.

  6. 20 CFR 627.220 - Coordination with programs under title IV of the Higher Education Act including the Pell grant...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the Higher Education Act including the Pell grant program. 627.220 Section 627.220 Employees' Benefits... of the Higher Education Act including the Pell grant program. (a) Coordination. Financial assistance programs under title IV of the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended (HEA) (the Pell Grant program, the...

  7. Measuring Outcomes in Adult Weight Loss Studies That Include Diet and Physical Activity: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel A. Millstein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Measuring success of obesity interventions is critical. Several methods measure weight loss outcomes but there is no consensus on best practices. This systematic review evaluates relevant outcomes (weight loss, BMI, % body fat, and fat mass to determine which might be the best indicator(s of success. Methods. Eligible articles described adult weight loss interventions that included diet and physical activity and a measure of weight or BMI change and body composition change. Results. 28 full-text articles met inclusion criteria. Subjects, settings, intervention lengths, and intensities varied. All studies measured body weight (−2.9 to −17.3 kg, 9 studies measured BMI (−1.1 to −5.1 kg/m2, 20 studies measured % body fat (−0.7 to −10.2%, and 22 studies measured fat mass (−0.9 to −14.9 kg. All studies found agreement between weight or BMI and body fat mass or body fat % decreases, though there were discrepancies in degree of significance between measures. Conclusions. Nearly all weight or BMI and body composition measures agreed. Since body fat is the most metabolically harmful tissue type, it may be a more meaningful measure of health change. Future studies should consider primarily measuring % body fat, rather than or in addition to weight or BMI.

  8. Specific balance training included in an endurance-resistance exercise program improves postural balance in elderly patients undergoing haemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frih, Bechir; Mkacher, Wajdi; Jaafar, Hamdi; Frih, Ameur; Ben Salah, Zohra; El May, Mezry; Hammami, Mohamed

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of 6 months of specific balance training included in endurance-resistance program on postural balance in haemodialysis (HD) patients. Forty-nine male patients undergoing HD were randomly assigned to an intervention group (balance training included in an endurance-resistance training, n = 26) or a control group (resistance-endurance training only, n = 23). Postural control was assessed using six clinical tests; Timed Up and Go test, Tinetti Mobility Test, Berg Balance Scale, Unipodal Stance test, Mini-Balance Evaluation Systems Test and Activities Balance Confidence scale. All balance measures increased significantly after the period of rehabilitation training in the intervention group. Only the Timed Up and Go, Berg Balance Scale, Mini-Balance Evaluation Systems Test and Activities Balance Confidence scores were improved in the control group. The ranges of change in these tests were greater in the balance training group. In HD patients, specific balance training included in a usual endurance-resistance training program improves static and dynamic balance better than endurance-resistance training only. Implications for rehabilitation Rehabilitation using exercise in haemodialysis patients improved global mobility and functional abilities. Specific balance training included in usual endurance resistance training program could lead to improved static and dynamic balance.

  9. Transportation R and D included in thermal and mechanical sciences program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is a multiprogram research and development laboratory operated by The University of Chicago for the US Department of Energy. At Argonne, applied research in thermal and mechanical sciences is performed within the Thermal and Mechanical Sciences Section of the Energy Technology Division. Current program areas include compact evaporators and condensers for the process and transportation industries, ice slurries for district cooling, advanced fluids for improved heat transfer and reduced pressure drop, flow-induced vibration and flow distribution in shell-and-tube heat exchangers, and dynamics and control of maglev systems. In general, the objective of the research is to extend the technology base in each of these areas and to facilitate its application in solving problems of importance to US industries and utilities. This is accomplished by developing validated design correlations and predictive methods. The staff of the Thermal and Mechanical Sciences Section have extensive experimental and analytical experience in heat transfer, multiphase flow, structural dynamics and control, fluid-structure interaction, transient flow and mixing, thermally driven flows, and flow visualization using ultra-high-speed video. Large, general-purpose test facilities and smaller, single-purpose test apparatuses are available for experiments and component design evaluation. A world-class capability in the study of flow-induced vibrations exists within the Section. Individual fact sheets, describing currently active research program areas, related facilities, and listing, as a contact, the principal investigator, are included.

  10. Body Image and quality of life of senior citizens included in a cardiac rehabilitation program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Vargas Amaral

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Most people who have to live with some kind of disease tend to adopt healthy habits and create new ways of seeing themselves. The aim of this study is to explore the relationship between the index of quality of life and self perception of patients included in a cardiovascular rehabilitation program in Florianopolis/Brazil. The sample consists of 24 subjects of 62 ± 1.3 years of age, who have coronary artery disease. The Minnesota Living With Heart Failure Questionnaire (MLHFQ was used to assess the quality of life, and to identify the degree of body image discontentment the Stunkard and Sorensen questionnaire (1993 was applied. Statistical analysis was made through statistics programs and the software SPSS 11.0. The degree of association between variables was studied with Kendall test. It was verified that the higher the BMI and the current body shape, the greatest the degree of body image dissatisfaction. The emotional symptoms also appear to be significantly correlated with a desire for a smaller body shape and with indicators of lower quality of life (r = 0474 = 0735, p major 0.05. The physical symptoms were also considerably associated with the emotional symptoms. These results suggest that the variables concerning the quality of life are meaningful to significant body image and satisfaction, which seems to correlate with fewer emotional problems and better facing of the disease. Cardiovascular Rehabilitation Programs that implement physical activity in daily habits proves to be a suitable tool for improving these ailments in this post-acute phase

  11. Description of a multifaceted rehabilitation program including overground gait training for a child with cerebral palsy: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Elizabeth; Naber, Erin; Geigle, Paula

    2010-01-01

    This case describes the outcomes of a multifaceted rehabilitation program including body weight-supported overground gait training (BWSOGT) in a nonambulatory child with cerebral palsy (CP) and the impact of this treatment on the child's functional mobility. The patient is a nonambulatory 10-year-old female with CP who during an inpatient rehabilitation stay participated in direct, physical therapy 6 days per week for 5 weeks. Physical therapy interventions included stretching of her bilateral lower extremities, transfer training, bed mobility training, balance training, kinesiotaping, supported standing in a prone stander, two trials of partial weight-supported treadmill training, and for 4 weeks, three to five times per week, engaged in 30 minutes of BWSOGT using the Up n' go gait trainer, Lite Gait Walkable, and Rifton Pacer gait trainer. Following the multifaceted rehabilitation program, the patient demonstrated increased step initiation, increased weight bearing through bilateral lower extremities, improved bed mobility, and increased participation in transfers. The child's Gross Motor Functional Measure (GMFM) scores increased across four dimensions and her Physical Abilities and Mobility Scale (PAMS) increased significantly. This case report illustrates that a multifaceted rehabilitation program including BWSOGT was an effective intervention strategy to improve functional mobility in this nonambulatory child with CP.

  12. Alcohol intake and colorectal cancer: a comparison of approaches for including repeated measures of alcohol consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Wu, Kana; Grønbaek, Morten

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In numerous studies, alcohol intake has been found to be positively associated with colorectal cancer risk. However, the majority of studies included only one exposure measurement, which may bias the results if long-term intake is relevant.METHODS: We compared different approaches...... for including repeated measures of alcohol intake among 47,432 US men enrolled in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Questionnaires including questions on alcohol intake had been completed in 1986, 1990, 1994, and 1998. The outcome was incident colorectal cancer during follow-up from 1986 to 2002.RESULTS......: During follow-up, 868 members of the cohort experienced colorectal cancer. Baseline, updated, and cumulative average alcohol intakes were positively associated with colorectal cancer, with only minor differences among the approaches. These results support moderately increased risk for intake >30 g...

  13. Reliability Analysis of Brittle Material Structures - Including MEMS(?) - With the CARES/Life Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Noel N.

    2002-01-01

    Brittle materials are being used, or considered, for a wide variety of high tech applications that operate in harsh environments, including static and rotating turbine parts. thermal protection systems, dental prosthetics, fuel cells, oxygen transport membranes, radomes, and MEMS. Designing components to sustain repeated load without fracturing while using the minimum amount of material requires the use of a probabilistic design methodology. The CARES/Life code provides a general-purpose analysis tool that predicts the probability of failure of a ceramic component as a function of its time in service. For this presentation an interview of the CARES/Life program will be provided. Emphasis will be placed on describing the latest enhancements to the code for reliability analysis with time varying loads and temperatures (fully transient reliability analysis). Also, early efforts in investigating the validity of using Weibull statistics, the basis of the CARES/Life program, to characterize the strength of MEMS structures will be described as as well as the version of CARES/Life for MEMS (CARES/MEMS) being prepared which incorporates single crystal and edge flaw reliability analysis capability. It is hoped this talk will open a dialog for potential collaboration in the area of MEMS testing and life prediction.

  14. Environmental Measurements Laboratory program review, December 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volchok, H.L.; de Planque, G. (EDS.)

    1984-03-01

    This volume contains all of the written material that was submitted to the panel of Reviewers in advance of a Program Review conducted by the US Department of Energy, Office of Health and Environmental Research at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) December 7-9, 1983. In addition to a general introduction there are nineteen papers grouped into the five broad program categories covering all of the scientific and engineering projects of the Laboratory: Natural Radioactivity and Radiation, Anthropogenic Radioactivity and Radiation, Non-nuclear, Quality Assurance, and Development and Support. These short articles, for the most part, focus on the rationale for EML's involvement in each project, emphasizing their relevance to the EML and Department of Energy missions. Project results and their interpretation were presented at the Review and can be found in the material referenced in this volume.

  15. Spectral Interferometry-Based Chromatic Dispersion Measurement of Fibre Including the Zero-Dispersion Wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlubina, P.; Kadulová, M.; Ciprian, D.

    2012-05-01

    We report on a simple spectral interferometric technique for chromatic dispersion measurement of a short length optical fibre including the zero-dispersion wavelength. The method utilizes a supercontinuum source, a dispersion balanced Mach-Zehnder interferometer and a fibre under test of known length inserted in one of the interferometer arms and the other arm with adjustable path length. The method is based on resolving one spectral interferogram (spectral fringes) by a low-resolution NIR spectrometer. The fringe order versus the precise wavelength position of the interference extreme in the recorded spectral signal is fitted to the approximate function from which the chromatic dispersion is obtained. We verify the applicability of the method by measuring the chromatic dispersion of two polarization modes in a birefringent holey fibre. The measurement results are compared with those obtained by a broad spectral range (500-1600 nm) measurement method, and good agreement is confirmed.

  16. 78 FR 67369 - National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program: Addition to the Vaccine Injury Table to Include All...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program: Addition to the Vaccine Injury Table to Include All Vaccines Against Seasonal Influenza AGENCY: Health... vaccines against seasonal influenza are covered under the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program...

  17. Including nonadditive genetic effects in mating programs to maximize dairy farm profitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliloo, H; Pryce, J E; González-Recio, O; Cocks, B G; Goddard, M E; Hayes, B J

    2017-02-01

    We compared the outcome of mating programs based on different evaluation models that included nonadditive genetic effects (dominance and heterozygosity) in addition to additive effects. The additive and dominance marker effects and the values of regression on average heterozygosity were estimated using 632,003 single nucleotide polymorphisms from 7,902 and 7,510 Holstein cows with calving interval and production (milk, fat, and protein yields) records, respectively. Expected progeny values were computed based on the estimated genetic effects and genotype probabilities of hypothetical progeny from matings between the available genotyped cows and the top 50 young genomic bulls. An index combining the traits based on their economic values was developed and used to evaluate the performance of different mating scenarios in terms of dollar profit. We observed that mating programs with nonadditive genetic effects performed better than a model with only additive effects. Mating programs with dominance and heterozygosity effects increased milk, fat, and protein yields by up to 38, 1.57, and 1.21 kg, respectively. The inclusion of dominance and heterozygosity effects decreased calving interval by up to 0.70 d compared with random mating. The average reduction in progeny inbreeding by the inclusion of nonadditive genetic effects in matings compared with random mating was between 0.25 to 1.57 and 0.64 to 1.57 percentage points for calving interval and production traits, respectively. The reduction in inbreeding was accompanied by an average of A$8.42 (Australian dollars) more profit per mating for a model with additive, dominance, and heterozygosity effects compared with random mating. Mate allocations that benefit from nonadditive genetic effects can improve progeny performance only in the generation where it is being implemented, and the gain from specific combining abilities cannot be accumulated over generations. Continuous updating of genomic predictions and mate

  18. Water vapor measurement system in global atmospheric sampling program, appendix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englund, D. R.; Dudzinski, T. J.

    1982-01-01

    The water vapor measurement system used in the NASA Global Atmospheric Sampling Program (GASP) is described. The system used a modified version of a commercially available dew/frostpoint hygrometer with a thermoelectrically cooled mirror sensor. The modifications extended the range of the hygrometer to enable air sample measurements with frostpoint temperatures down to -80 C at altitudes of 6 to 13 km. Other modifications were made to permit automatic, unattended operation in an aircraft environment. This report described the hygrometer, its integration with the GASP system, its calibration, and operational aspects including measurement errors. The estimated uncertainty of the dew/frostpoint measurements was + or - 1.7 Celsius.

  19. CP violation and limits on New Physics including recent Bs measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Botella, Francisco J.; Branco, Gustavo C; Nebot Gómez, Miguel

    2007-01-01

    We analyse present constraints on the SM parameter space and derive, in a model independent way, various bounds on New Physics contributions to $B_d^0$--$\\bar B_d^0$ and $B_s^0$--$\\bar B_s^0$ mixings. Our analyses include information on a large set of asymmetries, leading to the measurement of the CKM phases $\\gamma$ and $\\bar\\beta$, as well as recent data from D0 and CDF related to the $B_s^0$--$\\bar B_s^0$ system such as the measurement of $\\Delta M_{B_s}$, $A_{SL}$ and $\\Delta\\Gamma_{s}^{C...

  20. Social network analysis of public health programs to measure partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoen, Martin W; Moreland-Russell, Sarah; Prewitt, Kim; Carothers, Bobbi J

    2014-12-01

    In order to prevent chronic diseases, community-based programs are encouraged to take an ecological approach to public health promotion and involve many diverse partners. Little is known about measuring partnership in implementing public health strategies. We collected data from 23 Missouri communities in early 2012 that received funding from three separate programs to prevent obesity and/or reduce tobacco use. While all of these funding programs encourage partnership, only the Social Innovation for Missouri (SIM) program included a focus on building community capacity and enhancing collaboration. Social network analysis techniques were used to understand contact and collaboration networks in community organizations. Measurements of average degree, density, degree centralization, and betweenness centralization were calculated for each network. Because of the various sizes of the networks, we conducted comparative analyses with and without adjustment for network size. SIM programs had increased measurements of average degree for partner collaboration and larger networks. When controlling for network size, SIM groups had higher measures of network density and lower measures of degree centralization and betweenness centralization. SIM collaboration networks were more dense and less centralized, indicating increased partnership. The methods described in this paper can be used to compare partnership in community networks of various sizes. Further research is necessary to define causal mechanisms of partnership development and their relationship to public health outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparison of three intraocular pressure measurement methods including biomechanical properties of the cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedowski, Adrian; Weglarz, Beata; Tarnawska, Dorota; Kaarniranta, Kai; Wylegala, Edward

    2014-02-04

    The aim of this study was to show the usefulness of three methods for measuring IOP: Goldmann applanation tonometry, rebound tonometry, and Ultra-High-Speed Scheimpflug technology. The examined group consisted of 96 patients (192 eyes), including 63 women and 33 men with a mean age of 59.3 ± 19.9 years. Together, 152 healthy eyes and 40 eyes with different pathologies were examined. Intraocular pressure was measured using the Goldmann applanation tonometer (GAT), the Icare Pro rebound tonometer (RT), and Ultra-High-Speed Scheimpflug technology (UHS ST; Corvis ST with pachymetry). Additionally, corneal pachymetry was conducted with a Scheimpflug camera (Pentacam) and an Ultrasound Pachymeter (A-scan Plus) as a comparison for Corvis ST pachymetry. The mean IOPs were 15.6 ± 3.75 mm Hg, 15.6 ± 3.5 mm Hg, and 16.1 ± 4.0 mm Hg when measured with the GAT, the RT, and the UHS ST, respectively. The mean central corneal thickness (CCT) was 543.7 ± 52.7 μm, 547.9 ± 54.0 μm, and 556.25 ± 38.8 μm as measured with the UHS ST, the Pentacam, and the Ultrasound Pachymeter, respectively. In comparison between devices, there was a significant difference between IOP values measured with the GAT and the RT versus the UHS ST (P < 0.001), and there was no significant difference between GAT and RT (P = 0.5). No significant differences were observed in CCT measured with the UHS ST, Pentacam, and Ultrasound Pachymeter. We showed that the RT Icare Pro ensures IOP measurements that are more comparable with the measurements obtained with the GAT than the measurements that are provided by UHS ST.

  2. IntelliGO: a new vector-based semantic similarity measure including annotation origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devignes Marie-Dominique

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Gene Ontology (GO is a well known controlled vocabulary describing the biological process, molecular function and cellular component aspects of gene annotation. It has become a widely used knowledge source in bioinformatics for annotating genes and measuring their semantic similarity. These measures generally involve the GO graph structure, the information content of GO aspects, or a combination of both. However, only a few of the semantic similarity measures described so far can handle GO annotations differently according to their origin (i.e. their evidence codes. Results We present here a new semantic similarity measure called IntelliGO which integrates several complementary properties in a novel vector space model. The coefficients associated with each GO term that annotates a given gene or protein include its information content as well as a customized value for each type of GO evidence code. The generalized cosine similarity measure, used for calculating the dot product between two vectors, has been rigorously adapted to the context of the GO graph. The IntelliGO similarity measure is tested on two benchmark datasets consisting of KEGG pathways and Pfam domains grouped as clans, considering the GO biological process and molecular function terms, respectively, for a total of 683 yeast and human genes and involving more than 67,900 pair-wise comparisons. The ability of the IntelliGO similarity measure to express the biological cohesion of sets of genes compares favourably to four existing similarity measures. For inter-set comparison, it consistently discriminates between distinct sets of genes. Furthermore, the IntelliGO similarity measure allows the influence of weights assigned to evidence codes to be checked. Finally, the results obtained with a complementary reference technique give intermediate but correct correlation values with the sequence similarity, Pfam, and Enzyme classifications when compared to

  3. Including health insurance in poverty measurement: The impact of Massachusetts health reform on poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenman, Sanders D; Remler, Dahlia K

    2016-12-01

    We develop and implement what we believe is the first conceptually valid health-inclusive poverty measure (HIPM) - a measure that includes health care or insurance in the poverty needs threshold and health insurance benefits in family resources - and we discuss its limitations. Building on the Census Bureau's Supplemental Poverty Measure, we construct a pilot HIPM for the under-65 population under ACA-like health reform in Massachusetts. This pilot demonstrates the practicality, face validity and value of a HIPM. Results suggest that public health insurance benefits and premium subsidies accounted for a substantial, one-third reduction in the health inclusive poverty rate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Educational program in crisis management for cardiac surgery teams including high realism simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Louis-Mathieu; Cooper, Jeffrey B; Raemer, Daniel B; Schneider, Robert C; Frankel, Allan S; Berry, William R; Agnihotri, Arvind K

    2012-07-01

    Cardiac surgery demands effective teamwork for safe, high-quality care. The objective of this pilot study was to develop a comprehensive program to sharpen performance of experienced cardiac surgical teams in acute crisis management. We developed and implemented an educational program for cardiac surgery based on high realism acute crisis simulation scenarios and interactive whole-unit workshop. The impact of these interventions was assessed with postintervention questionnaires, preintervention and 6-month postintervention surveys, and structured interviews. The realism of the acute crisis simulation scenarios gradually improved; most participants rated both the simulation and whole-unit workshop as very good or excellent. Repeat simulation training was recommended every 6 to 12 months by 82% of the participants. Participants of the interactive workshop identified 2 areas of highest priority: encouraging speaking up about critical information and interprofessional information sharing. They also stressed the importance of briefings, early communication of surgical plan, knowing members of the team, and continued simulation for practice. The pre/post survey response rates were 70% (55/79) and 66% (52/79), respectively. The concept of working as a team improved between surveys (P = .028), with a trend for improvement in gaining common understanding of the plan before a procedure (P = .075) and appropriate resolution of disagreements (P = .092). Interviewees reported that the training had a positive effect on their personal behaviors and patient care, including speaking up more readily and communicating more clearly. Comprehensive team training using simulation and a whole-unit interactive workshop can be successfully deployed for experienced cardiac surgery teams with demonstrable benefits in participant's perception of team performance. Copyright © 2012 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Algorithms and Programs for Strong Gravitational Lensing In Kerr Space-time Including Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Kantowski, Ronald; Dai, Xinyu; Baron, Eddie; Maddumage, Prasad

    2015-05-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and quasars are important astrophysical objects to understand. Recently, microlensing observations have constrained the size of the quasar X-ray emission region to be of the order of 10 gravitational radii of the central supermassive black hole. For distances within a few gravitational radii, light paths are strongly bent by the strong gravity field of the central black hole. If the central black hole has nonzero angular momentum (spin), then a photon’s polarization plane will be rotated by the gravitational Faraday effect. The observed X-ray flux and polarization will then be influenced significantly by the strong gravity field near the source. Consequently, linear gravitational lensing theory is inadequate for such extreme circumstances. We present simple algorithms computing the strong lensing effects of Kerr black holes, including the effects on polarization. Our algorithms are realized in a program “KERTAP” in two versions: MATLAB and Python. The key ingredients of KERTAP are a graphic user interface, a backward ray-tracing algorithm, a polarization propagator dealing with gravitational Faraday rotation, and algorithms computing observables such as flux magnification and polarization angles. Our algorithms can be easily realized in other programming languages such as FORTRAN, C, and C++. The MATLAB version of KERTAP is parallelized using the MATLAB Parallel Computing Toolbox and the Distributed Computing Server. The Python code was sped up using Cython and supports full implementation of MPI using the “mpi4py” package. As an example, we investigate the inclination angle dependence of the observed polarization and the strong lensing magnification of AGN X-ray emission. We conclude that it is possible to perform complex numerical-relativity related computations using interpreted languages such as MATLAB and Python.

  6. ALGORITHMS AND PROGRAMS FOR STRONG GRAVITATIONAL LENSING IN KERR SPACE-TIME INCLUDING POLARIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Bin; Maddumage, Prasad [Research Computing Center, Department of Scientific Computing, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Kantowski, Ronald; Dai, Xinyu; Baron, Eddie, E-mail: bchen3@fsu.edu [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and quasars are important astrophysical objects to understand. Recently, microlensing observations have constrained the size of the quasar X-ray emission region to be of the order of 10 gravitational radii of the central supermassive black hole. For distances within a few gravitational radii, light paths are strongly bent by the strong gravity field of the central black hole. If the central black hole has nonzero angular momentum (spin), then a photon’s polarization plane will be rotated by the gravitational Faraday effect. The observed X-ray flux and polarization will then be influenced significantly by the strong gravity field near the source. Consequently, linear gravitational lensing theory is inadequate for such extreme circumstances. We present simple algorithms computing the strong lensing effects of Kerr black holes, including the effects on polarization. Our algorithms are realized in a program “KERTAP” in two versions: MATLAB and Python. The key ingredients of KERTAP are a graphic user interface, a backward ray-tracing algorithm, a polarization propagator dealing with gravitational Faraday rotation, and algorithms computing observables such as flux magnification and polarization angles. Our algorithms can be easily realized in other programming languages such as FORTRAN, C, and C++. The MATLAB version of KERTAP is parallelized using the MATLAB Parallel Computing Toolbox and the Distributed Computing Server. The Python code was sped up using Cython and supports full implementation of MPI using the “mpi4py” package. As an example, we investigate the inclination angle dependence of the observed polarization and the strong lensing magnification of AGN X-ray emission. We conclude that it is possible to perform complex numerical-relativity related computations using interpreted languages such as MATLAB and Python.

  7. CP violation and limits on New Physics including recent B measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botella, Francisco J.; Branco, Gustavo C.; Nebot, Miguel

    2007-04-01

    We analyse present constraints on the SM parameter space and derive, in a model independent way, various bounds on New Physics contributions to Bd0-B¯d0 and Bs0-B¯s0 mixings. Our analyses include information on a large set of asymmetries, leading to the measurement of the CKM phases γ and β¯, as well as recent data from D0 and CDF related to the Bs0-B¯s0 system such as the measurement of ΔMB_s, A and ΔΓsCP. We examine in detail several observables such as the asymmetries Asld, A, the width differences ΔΓ and ΔΓsCP and discuss the rôle they play in establishing the limits on New Physics. The present data clearly favour the SM, with the New Physics favoured region placed around the SM solution. A New Physics solution significantly different from the SM is still allowed, albeit quite disfavoured (2.6% probability). We analyse the presently available indirect knowledge on the phase χ¯ entering in Bs0-B¯s0 mixing and study the impact of a future measurement of χ¯ to be achieved at LHC, through the measurement of the time-dependent CP asymmetry in B→J/ΨΦ decays.

  8. Measuring adherence to a women's walking program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbur, J; Chandler, P; Miller, A M

    2001-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the use of a self-report exercise log and a heart-rate monitor in the measurement of adherence to the dimensions of an exercise prescription and to propose an alternative way to define adherence to a 24-week home-based women's walking program, which reflects the dynamic process of behavior change. Adherence was measured with exercise logs, Polar Vantage XL Heart-Rate Monitors, and pre- to postintervention change in VO2 max. Of the dimensions of the exercise prescription, frequency of walks documented by both the heart-rate monitor and the exercise log had a higher correlation than duration and intensity of walking, with change in VO2 max suggesting that frequency was potentially the most predictive adherence measure. Examination of the total number of walks and the number and sequence of weeks without walks over the 24-week intervention revealed dynamic patterns of adherence suggesting variation in the degree of behavioral change.

  9. A Call to Include Severe Combined Immunodeficiency in Newborn Screening Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raz Somech

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantification of the T cell receptor excision circles (TRECs has recently emerged as a useful non-invasive clinical and research tool to investigate thymic activity. It allows the identification of T cell production by the thymus. Quantification of TREC copies has recently been implemented as the preferred test to screen neonates with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID or significant lymphopenia. Neonatal genetic screening for SCID is highly important in countries with high rates of consanguinous marriages, such as Israel, and can be used for early diagnosis, enabling prompt therapeutic intervention that will save lives and improve the outcome of these patients. TREC measurement is also applicable in clinical settings where T cell immunity is involved, including any T cell immunodeficiencies, HIV infection, the aging process, autoimmune diseases, and immune reconstitution after bone marrow transplantation.

  10. 34 CFR 84.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy... assistance programs; and (d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the workplace. (Authority: E.O.s 12549 and 12689; 20 U.S.C. 1082, 1094, 1221e-3 and 3474; and Sec...

  11. 25 CFR 170.623 - How are IRR Program projects and activities included in a self-governance agreement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How are IRR Program projects and activities included in a self-governance agreement? 170.623 Section 170.623 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... self-governance agreement? To include an IRR Program project or activity in a self-governance agreement...

  12. NEWBORN CONDITION AND ANTHROPOMETRIC MEASURES IN BABY FRIENDLY PROGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Momcilo Djordjevic

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Mother’s breast milk is the best product that the new born infant could be fed with. It contains nutritious matters necessary for growth and progress of the new born infants, ideally adapted for the baby. This is not only the food. It provides the support for protection against infections.The aim of the investigation was to establish whether the newborn condition right after the birth and anthropometric measures affect entering the baby friendly program. The study was conducted during 2003 in OGC CC Kragujevac and included 216 new born infants included in baby friendly program and 216 new born infants outside the program.The following parameters in newborn infants were observed: Apgar score, body mass, body length, head circumference.Significantly most often in both examined groups (73 up to 75%, the value of Apgar score of the new born infants was in the interval 9 – 10 and it did not affect the selection into baby friendly program.New born infants from baby friendly program statistically had significantly greater weight than the infants outside the program-on average for about 80 g. The greater weight positively affects entering the baby friendly program.Body length and infant head circumference did not statistically significantly differed between the examined groups.Statistically important difference in body mass can be justified by higher surveillance of pregnant women from the program. The treatment should reflect in controlled nourishment, avoidance of all harmful causes like consumption of cigarettes and alcoholic drinks, which are proven risks for the newborn infants from such pregnancies to have lesser body mass. The advantage of greater body mass lies in the fact that after the childbirth, the relative loss of the body weight is lesser compared to the infants outside the program.

  13. [Michigan Technological University Pre-Service Teacher Enhancement Program]. [Includes a copy of the Student Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, C.S.; Yarroch, W.L.

    1993-04-27

    The Michigan Technological University Teacher Education Program received funding from the US Department of Energy for the purpose of providing capable and suitably inclined, MTU Engineering and Science students a chance to explore high school level science and mathematics teaching as a career option. Ten undergraduate students were selected from nominations and were paired with mentor teachers for the study. This report covers the experience of the first ten nominees and their participation in the program.

  14. Validity of a questionnaire measuring motives for choosing foods including sustainable concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sautron, Valérie; Péneau, Sandrine; Camilleri, Géraldine M; Muller, Laurent; Ruffieux, Bernard; Hercberg, Serge; Méjean, Caroline

    2015-04-01

    Since the 1990s, sustainability of diet has become an increasingly important concern for consumers. However, there is no validated multidimensional measurement of motivation in the choice of foods including a concern for sustainability currently available. In the present study, we developed a questionnaire that measures food choice motives during purchasing, and we tested its psychometric properties. The questionnaire included 104 items divided into four predefined dimensions (environmental, health and well-being, economic and miscellaneous). It was administered to 1000 randomly selected subjects participating in the Nutrinet-Santé cohort study. Among 637 responders, one-third found the questionnaire complex or too long, while one-quarter found it difficult to fill in. Its underlying structure was determined by exploratory factor analysis and then internally validated by confirmatory factor analysis. Reliability was also assessed by internal consistency of selected dimensions and test-retest repeatability. After selecting the most relevant items, first-order analysis highlighted nine main dimensions: labeled ethics and environment, local and traditional production, taste, price, environmental limitations, health, convenience, innovation and absence of contaminants. The model demonstrated excellent internal validity (adjusted goodness of fit index = 0.97; standardized root mean square residuals = 0.07) and satisfactory reliability (internal consistency = 0.96, test-retest repeatability coefficient ranged between 0.31 and 0.68 over a mean 4-week period). This study enabled precise identification of the various dimensions in food choice motives and proposed an original, internally valid tool applicable to large populations for assessing consumer food motivation during purchasing, particularly in terms of sustainability. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Simulated selection responses for breeding programs including resistance and resilience to parasites in Creole goats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gunia, M.; Phocas, F.; Gourdine, J.L.; Bijma, P.; Mandonnet, N.

    2013-01-01

    The Creole goat is a local breed used for meat production in Guadeloupe (French West Indies). As in other tropical countries, improvement of parasite resistance is needed. In this study, we compared predicted selection responses for alternative breeding programs with or without parasites resistance

  16. 77 FR 61012 - Expansion of Importer Self-Assessment Program To Include Qualified Importers of Focused...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-05

    ..., and to discuss the scope and methodology of the self-testing plan developed by the company. Companies... assessment methodology used by the company; the testing methodology; the frequency of self-testing activities... conducted at least annually. ( www.cbp.gov/xp/cgov/trade/trade_programs/importer_self_assessment/ ). Once...

  17. Program Review - Geothermal Exploration and Assessment Technology Program; Including a Report of the Reservoir Engineering Technical Advisory Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielson, Dennis L., ed.

    1979-12-01

    In 1978, The Division of Geothermal Energy of the Department of Energy established the Geothermal Exploration and Assessment Technology Program. The purpose of this program is to ''provide assistance to the Nation's industrial community by helping to remove technical and associated economic barriers which presently inhibit efforts to bring geothermal electric power production and direct heat application on line''. In the near term this involves the adaptation of exploration and assessment techniques from the mineral and petroleum industry to geothermal applications. In the near to far term it involves the development of new technology which will improve the cost effectiveness of geothermal exploration.

  18. Orbital Debris and NASA's Measurement Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Africano, J. L.; Stansbery, E. G.

    2002-05-01

    Since the launch of Sputnik in 1957, the number of manmade objects in orbit around the Earth has dramatically increased. The United States Space Surveillance Network (SSN) tracks and maintains orbits on over nine thousand objects down to a limiting diameter of about ten centimeters. Unfortunately, active spacecraft are only a small percentage ( ~ 7%) of this population. The rest of the population is orbital debris or ``space junk" consisting of expended rocket bodies, dead payloads, bits and pieces from satellite launches, and fragments from satellite breakups. The number of these smaller orbital debris objects increases rapidly with decreasing size. It is estimated that there are at least 130,000 orbital debris objects between one and ten centimeters in diameter. Most objects smaller than 10 centimeters go untracked! As the orbital debris population grows, the risk to other orbiting objects, most importantly manned space vehicles, of a collision with a piece of debris also grows. The kinetic energy of a solid 1 cm aluminum sphere traveling at an orbital velocity of 10 km/sec is equivalent to a 400 lb. safe traveling at 60 mph. Fortunately, the volume of space in which the orbiting population resides is large, collisions are infrequent, but they do occur. The Space Shuttle often returns to earth with its windshield pocked with small pits or craters caused by collisions with very small, sub-millimeter-size pieces of debris (paint flakes, particles from solid rocket exhaust, etc.), and micrometeoroids. To get a more complete picture of the orbital-debris environment, NASA has been using both radar and optical techniques to monitor the orbital debris environment. This paper gives an overview of the orbital debris environment and NASA's measurement program.

  19. 48 CFR 1819.7214 - Measurement of program success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Measurement of program success. 1819.7214 Section 1819.7214 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE... of program success. (a) NASA will measure the overall success of the Program by the extent to which...

  20. Measuring Satisfaction in the Program Manager, Procuring Contracting Officer Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Contracting Officer) and one of her customers (a U. S. Navy Program Manager ). From an examination of this relationship , the most appropriate criteria... Customer Satisfaction, Performance Measurement, Metrics, Contracting, Program Management 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT Unclassified...methodology for developing an instrument to measure the satisfaction of their customers , Navy Program Managers . The purpose of this thesis was to develop

  1. The case for including reach as a key element of program theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montague, Steve; Porteous, Nancy L

    2013-02-01

    This paper suggests that there is a need to build reach in the logic models and results frameworks of public health initiatives. A lack of explicit thinking about reach in logic models can lead to problems such as narrow/constricted understanding of impacts chain, favoring of 'narrow and efficient' initiatives over 'wide and engaging' initiatives and biased thinking against equity considerations. An alternative approach described in this paper that explicitly considers reach demonstrates that an explicit description of reach in program theory and results logic depictions can improve equity in health and social systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Including everyone: A peer learning program that works for under-represented minorities?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques van der Meer

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Peer learning has long been recognised as an effective way to induct first-year students into the academic skills required to succeed at university. One recognised successful model that has been extensively researched is the Supplemental Instruction (SI model; it has operated in the US since the mid-1970s. This model is commonly known in Australasia as the Peer Assisted Study Sessions (PASS program. Although there is a considerable amount of research into SI and PASS, very little has been published about the impact of peer learning on different student groups, for example indigenous and other ethnic groups. This article reports on the results from one New Zealand university of the effectiveness of PASS for Māori and Pasifika students. The questions this article seeks to address are whether attendance of the PASS program results in better final marks for these two groups of students, and whether the number of sessions attended has an impact on the final marks.

  3. Measurement network design including traveltime determinations to minimize model prediction uncertainty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, G.M.C.M.; Valstar, J.R.; Zee, S.E.A.T.M. van der

    2008-01-01

    Traveltime determinations have found increasing application in the characterization of groundwater systems. No algorithms are available, however, to optimally design sampling strategies including this information type. We propose a first-order methodology to include groundwater age or tracer arrival

  4. 76 FR 32815 - Medicaid Program; Payment Adjustment for Provider-Preventable Conditions Including Health Care...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-06

    ... correct adverse outcomes that may result from such errors. To address and reduce the occurrence of these... health system agendas to promote quality outcomes. We believe the use of evidence-based measures and the... following total knee replacement or hip replacement in pediatric and obstetric patients, as the minimum...

  5. Prenatal Triclosan Exposure and Anthropometric Measures Including Anogenital Distance in Danish Infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Tina Harmer; Frederiksen, Hanne; Kyhl, Henriette Boye

    2016-01-01

    (median 28.7 weeks, range 26.4-34.0), and urinary TCS concentration was measured by isotope dilution TurboFlow-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to examine associations between prenatal TCS exposure and measures of size at birth (birth weight...

  6. 42 CFR 137.275 - May Self-Governance Tribes include IHS construction programs in a construction project agreement...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false May Self-Governance Tribes include IHS construction... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Construction Purpose and Scope § 137.275 May Self-Governance Tribes include IHS construction programs in a construction project agreement or in a funding...

  7. Advanced theoretical and experimental studies in automatic control and information systems. [including mathematical programming and game theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desoer, C. A.; Polak, E.; Zadeh, L. A.

    1974-01-01

    A series of research projects is briefly summarized which includes investigations in the following areas: (1) mathematical programming problems for large system and infinite-dimensional spaces, (2) bounded-input bounded-output stability, (3) non-parametric approximations, and (4) differential games. A list of reports and papers which were published over the ten year period of research is included.

  8. Research program in nuclear and solid state physics. [including pion absorption spectra and muon spin precession

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    The survey of negative pion absorption reactions on light and medium nuclei was continued. Muon spin precession was studied using an iron target. An impulse approximation model of the pion absorption process implied that the ion will absorb almost exclusively on nucleon pairs, single nucleon absorption being suppressed by energy and momentum conservation requirements. For measurements on both paramagnetic and ferromagnetic iron, the external magnetic field was supplied by a large C-type electromagnet carrying a current of about 100 amperes.

  9. 76 FR 9283 - Medicaid Program; Payment Adjustment for Provider-Preventable Conditions Including Health Care...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-17

    ... base of an OPPC, we propose to define OPPC to include, at a minimum, wrong surgical or other invasive... experience serious injury and/or death if they undergo erroneous surgical or other invasive procedures and.... Under these NCDs, Medicare does not cover a particular surgical or other invasive procedure to treat a...

  10. A manual on methods for measuring primary production in aquatic environments: including a chapter on bacteria

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vollenweider, Richard A; Talling, J. F; Westlake, D. F

    1969-01-01

    The present manual starts from methods used to assess standing crops of phytoplankton, periphyton and higher aquatic, and proceeds to techniques of rate measurement currently available for these three...

  11. 34 CFR 403.202 - What must each State's system of core standards and measures of performance include?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... academic skills; (2) One or more measures of the following: (i) Student competency attainment. (ii) Job or... measures of performance include? 403.202 Section 403.202 Education Regulations of the Offices of the... system of core standards and measures of performance include? (a) The statewide system of core standards...

  12. PDF uncertainties in precision electroweak measurements, including the W mass, in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Now that the Higgs mass is known all the parameters of the SM are known- but with what accuracy? Precision EW measurements test the self-consistency of the SM- and thus can give hints of BSM physics. Precision measurements of $sin^2\\theta _W$ and the W mass are limited by PDF uncertainties This contribution discusses these uncertainties and what can be done to improve them.

  13. Palliative sedation for cancer patients included in a home care program: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Espinos, Claudio; Ruiz de Gaona, Estefania; Gonzalez, Cristina; Ruiz de Galarreta, Lucia; Lopez, Cristina

    2015-06-01

    Palliative sedation is a common treatment in palliative care. The home is a difficult environment for research, and there are few studies about sedation at home. Our aim was to analyze this practice in a home setting. We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional descriptive study in a home cohort during 2011. The inclusion criteria were as follows: 18 years or older and enrolled in the Palliative Home Care Program (PHCP) with advanced cancer. The variables employed were: sex, age, primary tumor location, and place of death. We also registered indication, type, drug and dose, awareness of diagnosis and prognosis, consent, survival, presence or absence of rales, painful mouth, and ulcers in patients sedated at home. We also collected the opinions of family members and professionals about the suffering of sedated patients. A total of 446 patients (56% at home) of the 617 admitted to the PHCP between January and December of 2011 passed away. The typical patient in our population was a 70-year-old man with a lung tumor. Some 35 (14%) home patients required sedation, compared to 93 (49%) at the hospital. The most frequent indication was delirium (70%), with midazolam the most common drug (mean dose, 40 mg). Survival was around three days. Rales were frequent (57%) as well as awareness of diagnosis and prognosis (77 and 71%, respectively). Perception of suffering after sedation was rare among relatives (17%) and professionals (8%). In most cases, the decision was made jointly by professionals and family members. Our study confirmed the role of palliative sedation as an appropriate therapeutic tool in the home environment.

  14. Measuring Satisfaction in the Program Manager, Procuring Contracting Officer Relationship

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gray, John

    1997-01-01

    .... To comply with this Executive Order, Navy contracting offices require an effective methodology for developing an instrument to measure the satisfaction of their customers, Navy Program Managers...

  15. National Guard State Partnership Program: Measuring Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-14

    future development of partnerships. To use an idiomatic expression , gone are the days when we could pick our players and practice before the game. In the...Director, Graduate Degree Programs Robert F. Baumann, Ph.D. The opinions and conclusions expressed herein are those of the student

  16. Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar Technology for Space Based Wind Measurements Including SPARCLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    1999-01-01

    It has been over 30 years since coherent lidar systems first measured wind velocity, and over 20 years since the "ultimate application" of measuring Earth's winds from space was conceived. Coherent or heterodyne optical detection involves the combination (or mixing) of the returned optical field with a local oscillator (LO) laser's optical field on the optical detector. This detection technique yields the benefits of dramatically improved signal-to-noise ratios; insensitivity to detector noise, background light and multiply scattered light; reduction of the returned signal's dynamic range; and preservation of the optical signal spectrum for electronic and computer processing. (Note that lidar systems are also referred to as optical radar, laser radar, and LADAR systems.) Many individuals, agencies, and countries have pursued the goal of space-based wind measurements through technology development, experiments, field campaigns and studies.

  17. Measurement control program for NDA instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsue, S.T.; Marks, T.

    1983-01-01

    Measurement control checks for nondestructive assay instruments have been a constant and continuing concern at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This paper summarizes the evolution of the measurement control checks in the various high-resolution gamma systems we have developed. In-plant experiences with these systems and checks will be discussed. Based on these experiences, a set of measurement control checks is recommended for high-resolution gamma-ray systems.

  18. Guide for Operational Configuration Management Program including the adjunct programs of design reconstitution and material condition and aging management. Part 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-01

    This standard presents program criteria and implementation guidance for an operational configuration management program for DOE nuclear and non-nuclear facilities. This Part 2 includes chapters on implementation guidance for operational configuration management, implementation guidance for design reconstitution, and implementation guidance for material condition and aging management. Appendices are included on design control, examples of design information, conduct of walkdowns, and content of design information summaries.

  19. Ca analysis: An Excel based program for the analysis of intracellular calcium transients including multiple, simultaneous regression analysis☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greensmith, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Here I present an Excel based program for the analysis of intracellular Ca transients recorded using fluorescent indicators. The program can perform all the necessary steps which convert recorded raw voltage changes into meaningful physiological information. The program performs two fundamental processes. (1) It can prepare the raw signal by several methods. (2) It can then be used to analyze the prepared data to provide information such as absolute intracellular Ca levels. Also, the rates of change of Ca can be measured using multiple, simultaneous regression analysis. I demonstrate that this program performs equally well as commercially available software, but has numerous advantages, namely creating a simplified, self-contained analysis workflow. PMID:24125908

  20. Ca analysis: an Excel based program for the analysis of intracellular calcium transients including multiple, simultaneous regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greensmith, David J

    2014-01-01

    Here I present an Excel based program for the analysis of intracellular Ca transients recorded using fluorescent indicators. The program can perform all the necessary steps which convert recorded raw voltage changes into meaningful physiological information. The program performs two fundamental processes. (1) It can prepare the raw signal by several methods. (2) It can then be used to analyze the prepared data to provide information such as absolute intracellular Ca levels. Also, the rates of change of Ca can be measured using multiple, simultaneous regression analysis. I demonstrate that this program performs equally well as commercially available software, but has numerous advantages, namely creating a simplified, self-contained analysis workflow. Copyright © 2013 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Augmentation of the In Vivo Elastic Properties Measurement System to Include Bulk Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    within 4.6% of the value (2.2 kPa) determined using an independent measurement made with a mechanical shaker and laser vibrometer ...attenuation and scattering quantified in this initial study also indicated that the next version of CFE would require a vibrometer digitizer with a

  2. Multiple shooting applied to robust reservoir control optimization including output constraints on coherent risk measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Codas, Andrés; Hanssen, Kristian G.; Foss, Bjarne

    2017-01-01

    . In this work, we propose a new formulation for robust optimization of reservoir well controls. It is inspired by the multiple shooting (MS) method which permits a broad range of parallelization opportunities and output constraint handling. This formulation exploits coherent risk measures, a concept...

  3. Roughing It Up: Including Jump Components in the Measurement, Modeling and Forecasting of Return Volatility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollerslev, Tim; Andersen, Torben G.; Diebold, Francis X.

    -Nielsen and Shephard (2004a, 2005) for related bi-power variation measures, the present paper provides a practical and robust framework for non-parametrically measuring the jump component in asset return volatility. In an application to the DM/$ exchange rate, the S&P500 market index, and the 30-year U.S. Treasury...... bond yield, we find that jumps are both highly prevalent and distinctly less persistent than the continuous sample path variation process. Moreover, many jumps appear directly associated with specific macroeconomic news announcements. Separating jump from non-jump movements in a simple...... but sophisticated volatility forecasting model, we find that almost all of the predictability in daily, weekly, and monthly return volatilities comes from the non-jump component. Our results thus set the stage for a number of interesting future econometric developments and important financial applications...

  4. Polarization birefringence measurements for characterizing the myocardium, including healthy, infarcted, and stem-cell-regenerated tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Michael F. G.; Ghosh, Nirmalya; Wallenburg, Marika A.; Li, Shu-Hong; Weisel, Richard D.; Wilson, Brian C.; Li, Ren-Ke; Vitkin, I. Alex

    2010-07-01

    Myocardial infarction leads to structural remodeling of the myocardium, in particular to the loss of cardiomyocytes due to necrosis and an increase in collagen with scar formation. Stem cell regenerative treatments have been shown to alter this remodeling process, resulting in improved cardiac function. As healthy myocardial tissue is highly fibrous and anisotropic, it exhibits optical linear birefringence due to the different refractive indices parallel and perpendicular to the fibers. Accordingly, changes in myocardial structure associated with infarction and treatment-induced remodeling will alter the anisotropy exhibited by the tissue. Polarization-based linear birefringence is measured on the myocardium of adult rat hearts after myocardial infarction and compared with hearts that had received mesenchymal stem cell treatment. Both point measurement and imaging data show a decrease in birefringence in the region of infarction, with a partial rebound back toward the healthy values following regenerative treatment with stem cells. These results demonstrate the ability of optical polarimetry to characterize the micro-organizational state of the myocardium via its measured anisotropy, and the potential of this approach for monitoring regenerative treatments of myocardial infarction.

  5. Simultaneous measurements of work function and H‒ density including caesiation of a converter surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristofaro, S.; Friedl, R.; Fantz, U.

    2017-08-01

    Negative hydrogen ion sources rely on the surface conversion of neutral atomic hydrogen and positive hydrogen ions to H-. The efficiency of this process depends on the actual work function of the converter surface. By introducing caesium into the source the work function decreases, enhancing the negative ion yield. In order to study the impact of the work function on the H- surface production at similar conditions to the ones in ion sources for fusion devices like ITER and DEMO, fundamental investigations are performed in a flexible laboratory experiment. The work function of the converter surface can be absolutely measured by photoelectric effect, while a newly installed cavity ring-down spectroscopy system (CRDS) measures the H- density. The CRDS is firstly tested and characterized by investigations on H- volume production. Caesiation of a stainless steel sample is then performed in vacuum and the plasma effect on the Cs layer is investigated also for long plasma-on times. A minimum work function of (1.9±0.1) eV is reached after some minutes of plasma treatment, resulting in a reduction by a value of 0.8 eV compared to vacuum measurements. The H- density above the surface is (2.1±0.5)×1015 m-3. With further plasma exposure of the caesiated surface, the work function increases up to 3.75 eV, due to the impinging plasma particles which gradually remove the Cs layer. As a result, the H- density decreases by a factor of at least 2.

  6. Towards identifying programming expertise with the use of physiological measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kontogiorgos, Dimosthenis; Manikas, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    In this position paper we propose means of measuring programming expertise on novice and expert programmers. Our approach is to measure the cognitive load of programmers while they assess Java/Python code in accordance with their experience in programming. Our hypothesis is that expert programmers...... encounter smaller pupillary dilation within programming problem solving tasks. We aim to evaluate our hypothesis using the EMIP Distributed Data Collection in order to confirm or reject our approach....

  7. 45 CFR 287.130 - Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments, job creation and economic development...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... assessments, job creation and economic development activities? 287.130 Section 287.130 Public Welfare... creation and economic development activities? (a) A Tribe may conduct job market assessments within its NEW Program. These might include the following: (1) Consultation with the Tribe's economic development staff...

  8. Experiences of Students with Specific Learning Disorder (Including ADHD) in Online College Degree Programs: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunch, Seleta LeAnn

    2016-01-01

    Enrollment in online degree programs is rapidly expanding due to the convenience and affordability offered to students and improvements in technology. The purpose of this hermeneutical phenomenological study was to understand the shared experiences of students with documented specific learning disorders (including Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity…

  9. 12 CFR 303.46 - Financial education programs that include the provision of bank products and services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... principles of personal financial management, banking operations, or the benefits of saving for the future... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Financial education programs that include the provision of bank products and services. 303.46 Section 303.46 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE...

  10. Software Programs Derive Measurements from Photographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Even under the most unfortunate circumstances, NASA continues on a path of innovation. After the Space Shuttle Columbia reentered the atmosphere on February 1, 2003, it experienced a catastrophic failure, and the entire crew and vehicle were lost. For the two weeks prior to the accident, Columbia STS-107 was on a mission to perform physical, life, and space sciences research in the unique environment of microgravity. Following the accident, the remaining shuttles - Endeavor, Atlantis, and Discovery - were grounded, and an intense investigation ensued. The Columbia Accident Investigation Board spent nearly 7 months examining the cause of the accident and determining what would ensure a safe return to flight. To this end, investigators performed an extensive review down five analytic paths: aerodynamic, thermodynamic, sensor data timeline, debris reconstruction, and imaging. As part of the evaluation of all the available imagery from Columbia's ascent, orbit, and entry, investigators needed a new method for analyzing still video images to determine the size of the material that fell from Columbia, as well as the distance that the material traveled. John Lane, a scientist at Kennedy Space Center, devised a software program to calculate the unknown dimension of the material in the images, and soon after the investigation was complete, continued to enhance the technology. Eventually, the program that assisted in the Columbia investigation became available for licensing.

  11. 7 CFR 1484.72 - How is program effectiveness measured?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS PROGRAMS TO HELP DEVELOP FOREIGN... of activity results. (b) Evaluation is an integral element of program planning and implementation... export sales achieved, including the ratio of additional export sales in relation to Cooperator program...

  12. Cost and benefit including value of life, health and environmental damage measured in time units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager; Friis-Hansen, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Key elements of the authors' work on money equivalent time allocation to costs and benefits in risk analysis are put together as an entity. This includes the data supported dimensionless analysis of an equilibrium relation between total population work time and gross domestic product leading...... to the definition of the life quality time allocation index (LQTAI). On the basis of a postulate of invariance of the LQTAI, a rule is obtained for allocating societal value in terms of time to avoid life shortening fatalities as well as serious injuries that shorten the life in good health. The excess...... of this societal value over the actual costs, used by the owner for economically optimizing an activity, motivates a simple risk accept criterion suited to be imposed on the owner by the public. An illustration is given concerning allocation of economical means for mitigation of loss of life and health on a ferry...

  13. Design and Optimization of Capacitated Supply Chain Networks Including Quality Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystel K. Castillo-Villar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents (1 a novel capacitated model for supply chain network design which considers manufacturing, distribution, and quality costs (named SCND-COQ model and (2 five combinatorial optimization methods, based on nonlinear optimization, heuristic, and metaheuristic approaches, which are used to solve realistic instances of practical size. The SCND-COQ model is a mixed-integer nonlinear problem which can be used at a strategic planning level to design a supply chain network that maximizes the total profit subject to meeting an overall quality level of the final product at minimum costs. The SCND-COQ model computes the quality-related costs for the whole supply chain network considering the interdependencies among business entities. The effectiveness of the proposed solution approaches is shown using numerical experiments. These methods allow solving more realistic (capacitated supply chain network design problems including quality-related costs (inspections, rework, opportunity costs, and others within a reasonable computational time.

  14. Kinetic equilibrium reconstruction of KSTAR plasmas including internal pitch angle profile measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanzheng; Sabbagh, Steven; Park, Youngseok; Ahn, Jaeheon; Ko, Jinseok

    2017-10-01

    High fidelity kinetic equilibrium reconstructions are an essential requirement for accurate stability and disruption prediction analyses to support continuous operation of high beta KSTAR tokamak plasmas. The present work significantly expands our past magnetics-only equilibrium reconstruction capability. The present kinetic equilibrium reconstructions include Thomson scattering (TS) data, charge exchange spectroscopy (CES) data, and allowance for fast particle pressure in addition to external magnetics and shaping field current data, and inclusion of vacuum vessel and passive plate currents following a ``partial kinetic'' approach used successfully in other devices. In addition, up to 25 channels of Motional Stark Effect (MSE) data are used to constrain the local magnetic field pitch angle to produce reliable evaluation of the safety factor profile. The ramifications of the inclusion of the kinetic profiles and MSE data are examined in the context of plasma stability evaluation, and parameters and analysis used for disruption event characterization and forecasting (DECAF). Supported by US DOE Grant DE-SC0016614.

  15. Specific absorption rate benefits of including measured electric field interactions in parallel excitation pulse design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniz, Cem Murat; Alon, Leeor; Brown, Ryan; Sodickson, Daniel K; Zhu, Yudong

    2012-01-01

    Specific absorption rate management and excitation fidelity are key aspects of radiofrequency pulse design for parallel transmission at ultra-high magnetic field strength. The design of radiofrequency pulses for multiple channels is often based on the solution of regularized least-squares optimization problems for which a regularization term is typically selected to control the integrated or peak pulse waveform amplitude. Unlike single-channel transmission, the specific absorption rate of parallel transmission is significantly influenced by interferences between the electric fields associated with the individual transmission elements, which a conventional regularization term does not take into account. This work explores the effects upon specific absorption rate of incorporating experimentally measurable electric field interactions into parallel transmission pulse design. Results of numerical simulations and phantom experiments show that the global specific absorption rate during parallel transmission decreases when electric field interactions are incorporated into pulse design optimization. The results also show that knowledge of electric field interactions enables robust prediction of the net power delivered to the sample or subject by parallel radiofrequency pulses before they are played out on a scanner. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. An assessment of PCB degradation by microogransims including methods for measuring mineralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadden, C.; Edenborn, H.; Osborne, T.; Holdsworth, G.; Revis, N.

    1990-12-31

    These studies sought to isolate and identify organism(s) from PCB contaminated soil and sediment that degrade PCB; to provide information on the potential of organisms in soil samples taken from a PCB-contaminated area to mineralize or dechlorinate PCB congeners; to assess potential enhancement of PCB biodegradation as a result of nutritional amendment of the samples; and to carry out analyses of successive lysimeter samples to determine whether field treatments have had an effect on the capacity of soil microbes to mineralize PCBS. We have expended considerable effort to validate the fractionation procedure used to assess mineralization and conversion of PCB substrates. The assessment relies on the ability to measure [{sup 14}C]-labeled CO{sub 2} in the presence of potentially volatile [{sup 14}C]-labeled PCB and degradation products to differentiate between volatile and non-volatile [{sup 14}C]-labeled compounds between water-soluble products of metabolism and a mixture of unchanged substrate and other water-insoluble products and between metabolism and loss or non-extractability of the substrate.

  17. Simulation and Evaluation of Urban Growth for Germany Including Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Hoymann

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Decision-makers in the fields of urban and regional planning in Germany face new challenges. High rates of urban sprawl need to be reduced by increased inner-urban development while settlements have to adapt to climate change and contribute to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions at the same time. In this study, we analyze conflicts in the management of urban areas and develop integrated sustainable land use strategies for Germany. The spatial explicit land use change model Land Use Scanner is used to simulate alternative scenarios of land use change for Germany for 2030. A multi-criteria analysis is set up based on these scenarios and based on a set of indicators. They are used to measure whether the mitigation and adaptation objectives can be achieved and to uncover conflicts between these aims. The results show that the built-up and transport area development can be influenced both in terms of magnitude and spatial distribution to contribute to climate change mitigation and adaptation. Strengthening the inner-urban development is particularly effective in terms of reducing built-up and transport area development. It is possible to reduce built-up and transport area development to approximately 30 ha per day in 2030, which matches the sustainability objective of the German Federal Government for the year 2020. In the case of adaptation to climate change, the inclusion of extreme flood events in the context of spatial planning requirements may contribute to a reduction of the damage potential.

  18. Geothermal Exploration and Assessment Technology Program (review), including a report of the Reservoir Engineering Technical Advisory Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielson, D.L. (ed.)

    1979-12-01

    The FY 1979 Program, recommended seismic surveys in conjunction with DOE/DGE's industry coupled program in the Northern Basin and Range Province, and the objectives of the Marina del Rey conference are presented. Final reports of six committees which met to define the state-of-the-art in geothermal exploration and to recommend exploration technology development are included. These committees are: structure, stratigraphy, and igneous processes; exploration architecture; electrical methods; seismic methods; thermal methods; water/rock interaction; and reservoir engineering. (MHR)

  19. Measurement problem in Program Universe. Revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noyes, H.P.; Gefwert, C.; Manthey, M.J.

    1985-07-01

    The ''measurement problem'' of contemporary physics is in our view an artifact of its philosophical and mathematical underpinnings. We describe a new philosophical view of theory formation, rooted in Wittgenstein, and Bishop's and Martin-Loef's constructivity, which obviates such discussions. We present an unfinished, but very encouraging, theory which is compatible with this philosophical framework. The theory is based on the concepts of counting and combinatorics in the framework provided by the combinatorial hierarchy, a unique hierarchy of bit strings which interact by an operation called discrimination. Measurement criteria incorporate c, h-bar and m/sub p/ or (not ''and'') G. The resulting theory is discrete throughout, contains no infinities, and, as far as we have developed it, is in agreement with quantum mechanical and cosmological fact. 15 refs.

  20. Measurement and Analysis of P2P IPTV Program Resource

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxian Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of P2P technology, P2P IPTV applications have received more and more attention. And program resource distribution is very important to P2P IPTV applications. In order to collect IPTV program resources, a distributed multi-protocol crawler is proposed. And the crawler has collected more than 13 million pieces of information of IPTV programs from 2009 to 2012. In addition, the distribution of IPTV programs is independent and incompact, resulting in chaos of program names, which obstructs searching and organizing programs. Thus, we focus on characteristic analysis of program resources, including the distributions of length of program names, the entropy of the character types, and hierarchy depth of programs. These analyses reveal the disorderly naming conventions of P2P IPTV programs. The analysis results can help to purify and extract useful information from chaotic names for better retrieval and accelerate automatic sorting of program and establishment of IPTV repository. In order to represent popularity of programs and to predict user behavior and popularity of hot programs over a period, we also put forward an analytical model of hot programs.

  1. Designing a Strategic Measurement Program for Software Engineering Organizations: Discovering Difficulties and Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitre-Hernández Hugo A.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Software measurement is widely recognized as an essential part of understanding, controlling, monitoring, predicting, and evaluating software development and maintenance projects. Both, software process improvement (SPI and software measurement literature include many case studies of successful companies and descriptions of their measurement programs. However, there are still concerns on how to design efficient strategic measurement programs. These concerns include the lack of involvement of the SEO’s personnel, bad alignment with its strategy and improvement initiative, difficulty to justify the utility of using standards or improvement initiatives, etc. All of the former results in inadequate measurement programs that often lead to poor decisions and economic loss. This paper describes a pilot study to observe and analyze the operation of measurement teams when using measurement methods such as Balanced Objective-Quantifiers Method (BOQM, Practical Software Measurement (PSM and Balanced Scorecard and Goal-Driven Measurement (BSC&GQ[I]M to design a strategic measurement program. From the results of the study, we gained some insight on common difficulties and problems, which are useful to consider when designing of strategic measurement programs. This paper describes an important milestone in achieving our main research goal, evaluate and find suggestions to design a strategic measurement program aligned correctly with the strategic goals, for effective decision making at all organization levels and justify the utilities or benefits of integrating improvement initiatives.

  2. MSTor: A program for calculating partition functions, free energies, enthalpies, entropies, and heat capacities of complex molecules including torsional anharmonicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jingjing; Mielke, Steven L.; Clarkson, Kenneth L.; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2012-08-01

    We present a Fortran program package, MSTor, which calculates partition functions and thermodynamic functions of complex molecules involving multiple torsional motions by the recently proposed MS-T method. This method interpolates between the local harmonic approximation in the low-temperature limit, and the limit of free internal rotation of all torsions at high temperature. The program can also carry out calculations in the multiple-structure local harmonic approximation. The program package also includes six utility codes that can be used as stand-alone programs to calculate reduced moment of inertia matrices by the method of Kilpatrick and Pitzer, to generate conformational structures, to calculate, either analytically or by Monte Carlo sampling, volumes for torsional subdomains defined by Voronoi tessellation of the conformational subspace, to generate template input files, and to calculate one-dimensional torsional partition functions using the torsional eigenvalue summation method. Catalogue identifier: AEMF_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEMF_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 77 434 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3 264 737 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 90, C, and Perl Computer: Itasca (HP Linux cluster, each node has two-socket, quad-core 2.8 GHz Intel Xeon X5560 “Nehalem EP” processors), Calhoun (SGI Altix XE 1300 cluster, each node containing two quad-core 2.66 GHz Intel Xeon “Clovertown”-class processors sharing 16 GB of main memory), Koronis (Altix UV 1000 server with 190 6-core Intel Xeon X7542 “Westmere” processors at 2.66 GHz), Elmo (Sun Fire X4600 Linux cluster with AMD Opteron cores), and Mac Pro (two 2.8 GHz Quad-core Intel Xeon

  3. 48 CFR 819.7114 - Measurement of program success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Measurement of program success. 819.7114 Section 819.7114 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... success. The overall success of the VA Mentor-Protégé Program encompassing all participating mentors and...

  4. 48 CFR 519.7005 - Measurement of program success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Measurement of program success. 519.7005 Section 519.7005 Federal Acquisition Regulations System GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION... success. The overall success of the GSA Mentor-Protégé Program encompassing all participating mentors and...

  5. Clarifying the use of aggregated exposures in multilevel models: self-included vs. self-excluded measures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etsuji Suzuki

    Full Text Available Multilevel analyses are ideally suited to assess the effects of ecological (higher level and individual (lower level exposure variables simultaneously. In applying such analyses to measures of ecologies in epidemiological studies, individual variables are usually aggregated into the higher level unit. Typically, the aggregated measure includes responses of every individual belonging to that group (i.e. it constitutes a self-included measure. More recently, researchers have developed an aggregate measure which excludes the response of the individual to whom the aggregate measure is linked (i.e. a self-excluded measure. In this study, we clarify the substantive and technical properties of these two measures when they are used as exposures in multilevel models.Although the differences between the two aggregated measures are mathematically subtle, distinguishing between them is important in terms of the specific scientific questions to be addressed. We then show how these measures can be used in two distinct types of multilevel models-self-included model and self-excluded model-and interpret the parameters in each model by imposing hypothetical interventions. The concept is tested on empirical data of workplace social capital and employees' systolic blood pressure.Researchers assume group-level interventions when using a self-included model, and individual-level interventions when using a self-excluded model. Analytical re-parameterizations of these two models highlight their differences in parameter interpretation. Cluster-mean centered self-included models enable researchers to decompose the collective effect into its within- and between-group components. The benefit of cluster-mean centering procedure is further discussed in terms of hypothetical interventions.When investigating the potential roles of aggregated variables, researchers should carefully explore which type of model-self-included or self-excluded-is suitable for a given situation

  6. SIRHEN : a data reduction program for photonic Doppler velocimetry measurements.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolan, Daniel H., III; Ao, Tommy

    2010-06-01

    SIRHEN (Sandia InfraRed HEtrodyne aNalysis) is a program for reducing data from photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) measurements. SIRHEN uses the short-time Fourier transform method to extract velocity information. The program can be run in MATLAB (2008b or later) or as a Windows executable. This report describes the new Sandia InfraRed HEtrodyne aNalysis program (SIRHEN; pronounced 'siren') that has been developed for efficient and robust analysis of PDV data. The program was designed for easy use within Sandia's dynamic compression community.

  7. The Role of Endothelial Dysfunction Markers in Pregnant Women with Chorion Detachment, Included in the Program of Auxiliary Reproductive Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya Lytvyn

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available An urgent medical and social problem is the restoration of reproductive function of womenwho suffer from infertility, which became possible due to auxiliary reproductive technologies. Women with induced pregnancy make thegroup of a high-risk on miscarriage, due to interrelated processes –immunological disorders and endothelial dysfunction that occur in the body of pregnant women after the use of extracorporal fertilization programs, and can lead to the chorion detachment and the formation of subchorionic hematomas. The purpose of the study is to determine the role of endothelial dysfunction as one of the leading factors that determine the development of a local non-progressive chorion detachment in infertile patients included in the program of auxiliary reproductive technologies. Materials and methods. We have examined 130 pregnant women, who were divided into groups: the control group included 30 women, whose pregnancy occurred in the natural cycle and with uncomplicated gestational course; the main group – 50 patients with induced pregnancy and risk factors of the occurrence of chorion detachment, who wereperformed the proposed pre-gravidapreparation; the comparative group – 50 pregnant women who received a standard scheme of pregnancy management before and after in-vitro fertilization. A general clinical examination, ultrasound examination, homocysteine level determination, endothelin-1 and nitrogen oxide metabolites were performed. Results. In women included into the program of auxiliary reproductive technologies with local chorion detachment were recorded changes of vascular endothelial function with a possible increase in endothelin-1 production and a decrease of the nitric oxidesynthesis. During the induced pregnancy with the presence of subchorionic hematoma, an increase of the level of endothelium-damaging factor of homocysteine was noted. Conclusions.This study identifies the parameters that reflect the main links of endothelial

  8. Satellite data sets for the atmospheric radiation measurement (ARM) program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, L.; Bernstein, R.L. [SeaSpace Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    This abstract describes the type of data obtained from satellite measurements in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. The data sets have been widely used by the ARM team to derive cloud-top altitude, cloud cover, snow and ice cover, surface temperature, water vapor, and wind, vertical profiles of temperature, and continuoous observations of weather needed to track and predict severe weather.

  9. A Methodology to Measure Synergy Among Energy-Efficiency Programs at the Program Participant Level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonn, B.E.

    2003-11-14

    This paper presents a methodology designed to measure synergy among energy-efficiency programs at the program participant level (e.g., households, firms). Three different definitions of synergy are provided: strong, moderate, and weak. Data to measure synergy can be collected through simple survey questions. Straightforward mathematical techniques can be used to estimate the three types of synergy and explore relative synergistic impacts of different subsets of programs. Empirical research is needed to test the concepts and methods and to establish quantitative expectations about synergistic relationships among programs. The market for new energy-efficient motors is the context used to illustrate all the concepts and methods in this paper.

  10. Prevention of diabetes in overweight/obese children through a family based intervention program including supervised exercise (PREDIKID project): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenaza, Lide; Medrano, María; Amasene, María; Rodríguez-Vigil, Beatriz; Díez, Ignacio; Graña, Manuel; Tobalina, Ignacio; Maiz, Edurne; Arteche, Edurne; Larrarte, Eider; Huybrechts, Inge; Davis, Catherine L; Ruiz, Jonatan R; Ortega, Francisco B; Margareto, Javier; Labayen, Idoia

    2017-08-10

    The global pandemic of obesity has led to an increased risk for prediabetes and type-2 diabetes (T2D). The aims of the current project are: (1) to evaluate the effect of a 22-week family based intervention program, including supervised exercise, on insulin resistance syndrome (IRS) risk in children with a high risk of developing T2D and (2) to identify the profile of microRNA in circulating exosomes and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in children with a high risk of developing T2D and its response to a multidisciplinary intervention program including exercise. A total of 84 children, aged 8-12 years, with a high risk of T2D will be included and randomly assigned to control (N = 42) or intervention (N = 42) groups. The control group will receive a family based lifestyle education and psycho-educational program (2 days/month), while the intervention group will attend the same lifestyle education and psycho-educational program plus the exercise program (3 days/week, 90 min per session including warm-up, moderate to vigorous aerobic activities, and strength exercises). The following measurements will be evaluated at baseline prior to randomization and after the intervention: fasting insulin, glucose and hemoglobin A1c; body composition (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry); ectopic fat (magnetic resonance imaging); microRNA expression in circulating exosomes and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MiSeq; Illumina); cardiorespiratory fitness (cardiopulmonary exercise testing); dietary habits and physical activity (accelerometry). Prevention and identification of children with a high risk of developing T2D could help to improve their cardiovascular health and to reduce the comorbidities associated with obesity. ClinicalTrials.gov, ID: NCT03027726 . Registered on 16 January 2017.

  11. Pulmonary rehabilitation program including respiratory conditioning for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): Improved hyperinflation and expiratory flow during tidal breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimi, Kaku; Ueki, Jun; Seyama, Kuniaki; Takizawa, Makiko; Yamaguchi, Seiko; Kitahara, Eriko; Fukazawa, Shinji; Takahama, Yukiko; Ichikawa, Masako; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Fukuchi, Yoshinosuke

    2012-06-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation has generally relieved symptoms, strengthened exercise endurance and improved health-related quality of life (QOL) in patients with COPD, but recovery of pulmonary function remains questionable. This analysis of our innovative rehabilitation program is directed at documenting changes in patients' expiratory airflow limitation, pulmonary symptoms and QOL. This program is designed to provide "respiratory conditioning", a physical therapist-assisted intensive flexibility training that focuses on stretching and rib cage mobilization. Thirty-one patients with COPD who attended rehabilitation sessions at Juntendo University Hospital from 1999 to 2006 were analyzed. Pulmonary function, expiratory flow limitation during tidal breathing, six minute walk distance (6MWD), respiratory muscle strength, and St. George Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) were measured before and after pulmonary rehabilitation. In participants ages 68±7 years, the FEV(1)% predicted was 39.3±15.7%. 6MWD, SGRQ and respiratory muscle strength were significantly improved after pulmonary rehabilitation. Although neither FEV(1)% predicted nor FEV(1)/FVC was affected to a significant extent, indicating little effect on airflow limitation, expiratory flow limitation in supine as well as seated during tidal breathing improved significantly. Moreover, rehabilitation significantly diminished TLC% predicted, FRC% predicted, RV% predicted and RV/TLC values, thus indicating a reduction of hyperinflation of the lungs at rest. The present results suggest that our rehabilitation program with respiratory conditioning significantly lowered the hyperinflation of lungs at rest as well as the expiratory flow limitation during tidal breathing. In patients with COPD, overall pulmonary function improved, exercise endurance increased and health-related QOL was enhanced.

  12. 76 FR 81004 - Imposition of Nonproliferation Measures Against Foreign Persons, Including a Ban on U.S...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-27

    ... Imposition of Nonproliferation Measures Against Foreign Persons, Including a Ban on U.S. Government.... SUMMARY: A determination has been made that a number of foreign entities and one foreign person have... Korea, and Syria Nonproliferation Act. The Act provides for penalties on entities and individuals for...

  13. Measuring Community Programs and Policies in the Healthy Communities Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawcett, Stephen B.; Collie-Akers, Vicki L.; Schultz, Jerry A.; Kelley, Melinda

    2015-01-01

    Childhood obesity is a challenging public health issue facing communities throughout the U.S. Local efforts are believed to be essential to assuring environments that support physical activity and healthy food/beverage consumption among children and their families. However, little is known about how broadly and intensively communities are implementing combinations of programs and policies that address childhood nutrition, physical activity, and weight control. The Healthy Communities Study is a nationwide scientific study in diverse communities to identify characteristics of communities and programs that may be associated with childhood obesity. Data collection occurred in 2013–2015; data analysis will be completed in 2016. As part of the Healthy Communities Study, researchers designed a measurement system to assess the number and scope of community programs and policies and to examine possible associations between calculated “intensity” scores for these programs and policies and behavioral and outcome measures related to healthy weight among children. This report describes the protocol used to capture and code instances of community programs and policies, to characterize attributes of community programs and policies related to study hypotheses, and to calculate the intensity of combinations of community programs and policies (i.e., using the attributes of change strategy, duration, and reach). PMID:26384934

  14. 45 CFR 284.30 - What information must the State include in its assessment of the impact of the TANF program(s) in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... program(s); (2) The total amount of State and Tribal spending on TANF cash assistance payments; (3) The... Food Stamp Program or other State supportive and assistance programs; (4) The proportion of students...

  15. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Science Plan. Current Status and Future Directions of the ARM Science Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackerman, Thomas P.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Ellingson, Robert G.; Ferrare, Richard A.; Klein, Steve A.; McFarquhar, Gregory M.; Lamb, Peter J.; Long, Charles M.; Verlinde, Johannes

    2004-10-30

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has matured into one of the key programs in the U.S. Climate Change Science Program. The ARM Program has achieved considerable scientific success in a broad range of activities, including site and instrument development, atmospheric radiative transfer, aerosol science, determination of cloud properties, cloud modeling, and cloud parameterization testing and development. The focus of ARM science has naturally shifted during the last few years to an increasing emphasis on modeling and parameterization studies to take advantage of the long time series of data now available. During the next 5 years, the principal focus of the ARM science program will be to: Maintain the data record at the fixed ARM sites for at least the next five years; Improve significantly our understanding of and ability to parameterize the 3-D cloud-radiation problem at scales from the local atmospheric column to the global climate model (GCM) grid square; Continue developing techniques to retrieve the properties of all clouds, with a special focus on ice clouds and mixed-phase clouds; Develop a focused research effort on the indirect aerosol problem that spans observations, physical models, and climate model parameterizations; Implement and evaluate an operational methodology to calculate broad-band heating rates in the atmospheric columns at the ARM sites; Develop and implement methodologies to use ARM data more effectively to test atmospheric models, both at the cloud-resolving model scale and the GCM scale; and, Use these methodologies to diagnose cloud parameterization performance and then refine these parameterizations to improve the accuracy of climate model simulations. In addition, the ARM Program is actively developing a new ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) that will be available for short deployments (several months to a year or more) in climatically important regions. The AMF will have much of the same instrumentation as the remote

  16. CD4+ T Cell Help Confers a Cytotoxic T Cell Effector Program Including Coinhibitory Receptor Downregulation and Increased Tissue Invasiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrends, Tomasz; Spanjaard, Aldo; Pilzecker, Bas; Bąbała, Nikolina; Bovens, Astrid; Xiao, Yanling; Jacobs, Heinz; Borst, Jannie

    2017-11-21

    CD4+ T cells optimize the cytotoxic T cell (CTL) response in magnitude and quality, by unknown molecular mechanisms. We here present the transcriptomic changes in CTLs resulting from CD4+ T cell help after anti-cancer vaccination or virus infection. The gene expression signatures revealed that CD4+ T cell help during priming optimized CTLs in expression of cytotoxic effector molecules and many other functions that ensured efficacy of CTLs throughout their life cycle. Key features included downregulation of PD-1 and other coinhibitory receptors that impede CTL activity, and increased motility and migration capacities. "Helped" CTLs acquired chemokine receptors that helped them reach their tumor target tissue and metalloprotease activity that enabled them to invade into tumor tissue. A very large part of the "help" program was instilled in CD8+ T cells via CD27 costimulation. The help program thus enhances specific CTL effector functions in response to vaccination or a virus infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation design of a reactivation care program to prevent functional loss in hospitalised elderly: A cohort study including a randomised controlled trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Asmus-Szepesi, Kirsten; Vreede, Paul; Nieboer, Anna; Wijngaarden, Jeroen; Bakker, Ton; Steyerberg, Ewout; Mackenbach, Johan

    2011-01-01

    ... patients by comparing a new intervention program to two usual care programs. Methods/Design. This study will include an effect, process and cost evaluation using a mixed methods design of quantitative and qualitative methods...

  18. Ranking the dermatology programs based on measurements of academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jashin J; Ramirez, Claudia C; Alonso, Carol A; Berman, Brian; Tyring, Stephen K

    2007-07-13

    The only dermatology rankings in the past were based on National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding and journal citations. To determine the highest ranking academic dermatology programs based on 5 outcome measures and on an overall ranking scale. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to rank the dermatology programs on 4 of the following outcome measures of academic achievement and with an overall ranking. We collected extensive 2001 to 2004 data ranging from total publications to grant funding on 107 U.S. dermatology programs and their full-time faculty. Data from part-time and volunteer faculty were not used. Publications in 2001 to 2004; NIH funding in 2004; Dermatology Foundation grants in 2001 to 2004; faculty lectures in 2004 delivered at national conferences; number of full-time faculty members who were on the editorial boards of the top 3 U.S. dermatology journals and the top 4 subspecialty journals We used the 5 outcome measures to tabulate the highest ranking programs in each category. Using a weighted ranking system, we also tabulated the overall top 30 dermatology programs based on these 5 outcome measures. We were not able to determine the total amount of NIH funding in dollars of the dermatology divisions. The impact factors of the journal in which these publications appeared was not factored into our calculations. Since faculty members may collaborate on the same publication, some publications may have been double-counted. In descending order, the 5 highest ranked academic programs are the University of Pennsylvania; University of California, San Francisco; Yale-New Haven Medical Center; New York University; and University of Michigan. This ranking system may allow residents and faculty to improve the academic achievements at their respective programs.

  19. Development of a Computer Program for the Integrated Control of the Fuel Homogeneity Measurement System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, H. S.; Jang, J. W.; Lee, Y. H.; Oh, S. J.; Park, H. D.; Kim, C. K

    2005-11-15

    The computer program is developed based on Visual C++, which is equipped with a user-friendly interface of the input/output(I/O) and a display function for the measuring conditions. This program consists of three parts which are the port communication, PLC(Programmable Logic Controller) and the MCA(Multi Channel Analyzer) control parts. The communication type between the CPU of the PLC module box and the computer is selected as be the Rs-232 asynchronous type and the thread method is adapted in the development of the first part of the program. The PLC-related program has been developed so that the data communication between the PLC CPU and the computer could be harmonized with the unique commands which have already been defined in the PLC. The measuring space and time intervals, the start and end ROI(region of interest) values, and the allowable error limitation are input at each measurement in this program. Finally the controlling MCA program has been developed by using Canberra's programming library which contains several files including the head files in which the variable and the function of C++ are declared according to the MCA function. The performance test has been carried out through an application of the developed computer program to the homogeneity measurement system. The gamma counts at 28 measuring points of a fuel rod of 700 mm in length are measured for 50 sec at each point. It was revealed that the measurement results are better than the previous ones in respects of the measurement accuracy and a measurement time saving could be achieved. It was concluded that the gamma measurement system can be improved through equipping it with the developed control program.

  20. The Efficacy of Stuttering Measurement Training: Evaluating Two Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, Lauren A.; Stavros, Candace; Ebrahimian, Mineh; Wang, Yuedong; Ingham, Roger J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Two stuttering measurement training programs currently used for training clinicians were evaluated for their efficacy in improving the accuracy of total stuttering event counting. Method: Four groups, each with 12 randomly allocated participants, completed a pretest-posttest design training study. They were evaluated by their counts of…

  1. Science Plan for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The purpose of this Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Plan is to articulate the scientific issues driving the ARM Program, and to relate them to DOE`s programmatic objectives for ARM, based on the experience and scientific progress gained over the past five years. ARM programmatic objectives are to: (1) Relate observed radiative fluxes and radiances in the atmosphere, spectrally resolved and as a function of position and time, to the temperature and composition of the atmosphere, specifically including water vapor and clouds, and to surface properties, and sample sufficient variety of situations so as to span a wide range of climatologically relevant possibilities; (2) develop and test parameterizations that can be used to accurately predict the radiative properties and to model the radiative interactions involving water vapor and clouds within the atmosphere, with the objective of incorporating these parameterizations into general circulation models. The primary observational methods remote sending and other observations at the surface, particularly remote sensing of clouds, water vapor and aerosols.

  2. The Effects of a Family Support Program Including Respite Care on Parenting Stress and Family Quality of Life Perceived by Primary Caregivers of Children with Disabilities in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Minjung; Park, Jiyeon

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a family support program was carried out for primary caregivers of children with disabilities. The program included respite care, recreation programs, counseling, and social support coordination based on individual needs of each family. In order to verify the intervention effects, parenting stress and family quality of life were…

  3. [Study of the nutritional status of patients over 65 years included in the home care program in an urban population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Díaz, Belén; Arenas de Larriva, Antonio P; Molina-Recio, Guillermo; Moreno-Rojas, Rafael; Martínez de la Iglesia, Jorge

    2018-02-01

    To analyse the nutritional status of patients older than 65 years included in the home care program (PAD). Croos-sectional study. 3 urban health centers. 218 patients in the PAD. Mini Nutritional Assessment questionnaire (MNA) was applied. Sociodemographic, anthropometric, dependency, emotional and cognitive status and analytical parameters: 57 variables were collected. Possible associations were analysed by applying the chi square and variance analysis. The level of significance was considered to be Pnutritional status and older age, lower BMI, greater dependence on basic and instrumental activities of daily living and greater cognitive impairment. The lowest mean hemoglobin, albumin, and iron levels were also associated with malnutrition and risk of malnutrition. More than half of PAD patients are malnourished or at risk for it, and a high proportion of them some laboratory abnormality susceptible to be corrected. Most cognitive impairment and functional dependence are closely related to malnutrition; so patients with these characteristics should receive more attention from the nutritional point of view. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of 8-week body weight control program including sea tangle (Laminaria japonica) supplementation in Korean female college students

    OpenAIRE

    You, Jeong Soon; Sung, Min Jung; Chang, Kyung Ja

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of a body weight control program with supplementation of sea tangle (20 g/day) on 22 female college students. The contents of the program for 8 weeks contained diet therapy, exercise and behavioral modification through nutrition education. Body composition, dietary habit scores, serum lipid profiles, daily nutrient intakes and the quality of life were assessed at the beginning and at the end of the program. Average age of subjects and height we...

  5. Antioxidant activity of fish sauces including puffer (Lagocephalus wheeleri) fish sauce measured by the oxygen radical absorbance capacity method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Kazuki; Maeda, Toshimichi; Hasegawa, Yoshiro; Tokunaga, Takushi; Tamura, Yoshiyuki; Koizumi, Takeo

    2010-01-01

    Fish sauces are fermented seasonings traditionally used throughout Asia, including Japan. Here, we report on the antioxidant activity of 30 fish sauces, among them a puffer fish sauce developed specifically for this study. To determine the antioxidant activity (i.e., the peroxyl radical elimination capacity) of the fish sauces, the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) was measured. ORAC values ranged between 104 µmol (flatfish sauce 1) and 103 µmol (sandfish sauce) trolox equivalent (TE)/100 ml of fish sauce. Hydroxyl radical scavenging activity (IC50) was measured using electron spin resonance. IC50 values ranged between 0.081% (puffer fish sauce) and 0.653% (sardine fish sauce 7). Puffer fish sauce had a high ORAC value (8,365 µmol TE/100 ml) and the highest hydroxyl radical scavenging activity (0.081). The relationship between the ORAC and IC50 values of the 30 fish sauces was determined to be intermediate (r =-0.521, p=0.01).

  6. 25 CFR 170.137 - What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and trails program include?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and... INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Indian Reservation Roads Program Policy and Eligibility Recreation, Tourism and Trails § 170.137 What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and...

  7. Penempatan Optimal Phasor Measurement Unit (PMU) dengan Integer Programming

    OpenAIRE

    Yunan Helmy Amrulloh

    2013-01-01

    Phasor Measurement Unit (PMU) merupakan peralatan yang mampu memberikan pengukuran fasor tegangan dan arus secara real-time. PMU dapat digunakan untuk monitoring, proteksi dan kontrol pada sistem tenaga listrik. Tugas akhir ini membahas penempatan PMU secara optimal berdasarkan topologi jaringan sehingga sistem tenaga listrik  dapat diobservasi. Penempatan optimal PMU dirumuskan sebagai masalah Binary Integer Programming (BIP) yang akan memberikan variabel dengan pilihan nilai (0,1) yang menu...

  8. [Effects of a smoking cessation program including telephone counseling and text messaging using stages of change for outpatients after a myocardial infarction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Jung-Hyeon; Ha, Yeongmi

    2013-08-01

    This study was done to identify effects of a smoking cessation program including telephone counseling and text messaging using stages of change for outpatients who have had a myocardial infarction (MI). This research was a quasi-experimental design with a nonequivalent control group pretest-posttest. The participants were 48 outpatients (experimental group=24, control group=24) recruited from one university hospital. They were randomly assigned to one of two groups: (a) an experimental group with telephone counseling (once a week) and text messaging (five times a week) using stages of change, and (b) a control group with traditional telephone counseling (once a month). Efficacy of the intervention was measured by comparing the two groups on smoking-related variables at 3 weeks and 12 weeks. At the 3-week and 12-week measurements, there were significant differences between the experimental and control groups on smoking cessation self-efficacy (pstages of change is effective for outpatients after a MI. Further attention should be paid to the intensity of the smoking cessation program and periods for long-term follow-up.

  9. Expanding the Lessons Learned Program to Include Corps Support Command Commanders and Theater Army Area Command Commanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-03-10

    INTRODUCTION The Oral History Program’s purpose is to supplement oFficial histories , to isolate successful command, leadership and managerial...of -the program is to capture the experience of senior leaders in the areas of command, leadership , and management . The individual is interviewed...used to gain insight into command and management techniques and to further research in military history . In June of 1984, the Chief of Staff, General

  10. NASA's MEaSUREs Program Serving the Earth Science Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.; Tsaoussi, L.; Olding, S. W.

    2014-12-01

    A major need stated by the NASA Earth science research strategy is to develop long-term, consistent, and calibrated data and products that are valid across multiple missions and satellite sensors. NASA has invested in the creation of consistent time series satellite data sets over decades, through both mission science team-based and measurement-based data product reprocessing and through solicitations for merged data products. The NOAA/NASA Pathfinder Program, carried out in the mid-1990's, resulted in the reprocessing of four long time-series datasets from existing archives. The Research, Education and Applications Solutions Network (REASoN) Program, initiated in 2002, consisted of several projects that provided data products, information systems and services capabilities, and/or advanced data systems technologies, to address strategic needs in Earth science research, applications, and education. The Program named Making Earth System data records for Use in Research for Earth Science, or MEaSUREs has had two requests for proposals, the first in 2006 and the second in 2012. With this Program, the Earth Science Division has focused on generating datasets for particular Earth science research measurement needs, and refers to such datasets as Earth System Data Records (ESDRs). Climate Data Records (CDRs) are a particular case of ESDRs. An ESDR is defined as a unified and coherent set of observations of a given parameter of the Earth system, which is optimized to meet specific requirements in addressing science questions. Most of the MEaSUREs projects are five years long. They produce ESDRs using mature, peer-reviewed algorithms. The products are vetted by the user community in the respective scientific disciplines. They are made available publicly by the projects during their execution period. Before the projects end, the ESDRs are transferred to one of the NASA-assigned Distributed Active Archive Centers for longer-term archiving and distribution. Tens of millions of

  11. Provider performance measures in private and public programs: achieving meaningful alignment with flexibility to innovate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Aparna; Veselovskiy, German; McKown, Lauren

    2013-08-01

    In recent years there has been a significant expansion in the use of provider performance measures for quality improvement, payment, and public reporting. Using data from a survey of health plans, we characterize the use of such performance measures by private payers. We also compare the use of these measures among selected private and public programs. We studied twenty-three health plans with 121 million commercial enrollees--66 percent of the national commercial enrollment. The health plans reported using 546 distinct performance measures. There was much variation in the use of performance measures in both private and public payment and care delivery programs, despite common areas of focus that included cardiovascular conditions, diabetes, and preventive services. We conclude that policy makers and stakeholders who seek less variability in the use of performance measures to increase consistency should balance this goal with the need for flexibility to meet the needs of specific populations and promote innovation.

  12. The effect of slurry treatment including ozonation on odorant reduction measured by in-situ PTR-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dezhao; Feilberg, Anders; Adamsen, Anders P. S.; Jonassen, Kristoffer E. N.

    2011-07-01

    The emission of odorous compounds from intensive pig production facilities is a nuisance for neighbors. Slurry ozonation for odor abatement has previously been demonstrated in laboratory scale. In this study, the effect of slurry ozonation (combined with solid-liquid pre-separation and acidification) on emissions of odorous compounds was tested in an experimental full-scale growing pig facility using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) for online analysis of odorants. The measurements were performed to gain a better understanding of the effects of ozone treatment on emissions odorous compounds and to identify potential options for optimization of ozone treatment. The compounds monitored included volatile sulfur compounds, amine, carboxylic acids, ketones, phenols and indoles. Measurements were performed during nearly a one-month period in summertime. The compounds with the highest concentrations observed in the ventilation exhaust duct were acetic acid, hydrogen sulfide, propanoic acid and butanoic acid. The compounds with the highest removal efficiencies were hydrogen sulfide, 3-methyl-indole, phenol and acetic acid. Based on odor threshold values, methanethiol, butanoic acid, 4-methylphenol, hydrogen sulfide and C 5 carboxylic acids are estimated to contribute significantly to the odor nuisance. Emissions of odorous compounds were observed to be strongly correlated with temperature with the exception of hydrogen sulfide. Emission peaks of sulfur compounds were seen during slurry handling activities. Discharging of the slurry pit led to reduced hydrogen sulfide emissions, but emissions of most other odorants were not affected. The results indicate that emissions of odorants other than hydrogen sulfide mainly originate from sources other than the treated slurry, which limits the potential for further optimization. The PTR-MS measurements are demonstrated to provide a quantitative, accurate and detailed evaluation of ozone treatment for emission

  13. Challenges in Measuring Benefit of Clinical Research Training Programs--the ASH Clinical Research Training Institute Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Lillian; Crowther, Mark; Byrd, John; Gitlin, Scott D; Basso, Joe; Burns, Linda

    2015-12-01

    The American Society of Hematology developed the Clinical Research Training Institute (CRTI) to address the lack of training in patient-oriented research among hematologists. As the program continues, we need to consider metrics for measuring the benefits of such a training program. This article addresses the benefits of clinical research training programs. The fundamental and key components are education and mentorship. However, there are several other benefits including promotion of collaboration, job and advancement opportunities, and promotion of work-life balance. The benefits of clinical research training programs need to be measured so that funders and society can judge if they are worth the investment in time and resources. Identification of elements that are important to program benefit is essential to measuring the benefit of the program as well as program planning. Future work should focus on the constructs which contribute to benefits of clinical research training programs such as CRTI.

  14. Measuring energy-saving retrofits: Experiences from the Texas LoanSTAR program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haberl, J.S.; Reddy, T.A.; Claridge, D.E.; Turner, W.D.; O`Neal, D.L.; Heffington, W.M. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Energy Systems Lab.

    1996-02-01

    In 1988 the Governor`s Energy Management Center of Texas received approval from the US Department of Energy to establish a $98.6 million state-wide retrofit demonstration revolving loan program to fund energy-conserving retrofits in state, public school, and local government buildings. As part of this program, a first-of-its-kind, statewide Monitoring and Analysis Program (MAP) was established to verify energy and dollar savings of the retrofits, reduce energy costs by identifying operational and maintenance improvements, improve retrofit selection in future rounds of the LoanSTAR program, and initiate a data base of energy use in institutional and commercial buildings located in Texas. This report discusses the LoanSTAR MAP with an emphasis on the process of acquiring and analyzing data to measure savings from energy conservation retrofits when budgets are a constraint. This report includes a discussion of the program structure, basic measurement techniques, data archiving and handling, data reporting and analysis, and includes selected examples from LoanSTAR agencies. A summary of the program results for the first two years of monitoring is also included.

  15. Effectiveness of Human Research Protection Program Performance Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsan, Min-Fu; Nguyen, Yen

    2017-10-01

    We analyzed human research protection program performance metric data of all Department of Veterans Affairs research facilities obtained from 2010 to 2016. Among a total of 25 performance metrics, 21 (84%) showed improvement, four (16%) remained unchanged, and none deteriorated during the study period. The overall improvement from these 21 performance metrics was 81.1% ± 18.7% (mean ± SD), with a range of 30% to 100%. The four performance metrics that did not show improvement all had initial noncompliance/incidence rates of performance metrics that showed improvement ranged from 0.05% to 60%. However, of the 21 performance metrics that showed improvement, 10 had initial noncompliance/incidence rates of performance measurement is an effective tool in improving the performance of human research protection programs.

  16. NedWind 25 Blade Testing at NREL for the European Standards Measurement and Testing Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larwood, S.; Musial, W.; Freebury, G.; Beattie, A.G.

    2001-04-19

    In the mid-90s the European community initiated the Standards, Measurements, and Testing (SMT) program to harmonize testing and measurement procedures in several industries. Within the program, a project was carried out called the European Wind Turbine Testing Procedure Development. The second part of that project, called Blade Test Methods and Techniques, included the United States and was devised to help blade-testing laboratories harmonize their testing methods. This report provides the results of those tests conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

  17. Pilot monitoring program: geologic input for the hillslope component (includes a discussion of Caspar Creek geology and geomorphology)

    Science.gov (United States)

    T. E. Spittler

    1995-01-01

    The California Department of Conservation, Division of Mines and Geology (DMG) is submitting this report and accompanying maps to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CDF) to fulfill Interagency Agreement number 8CA38400, Pilot Monitoring Program -- Geologic Input for the Hillslope Component. Under this agreement, DMG has assisted CDF in the...

  18. Intensive lifestyle intervention including high-intensity interval training program improves insulin resistance and fasting plasma glucose in obese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Marquis-Gravel

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Following a 9-month intensive lifestyle intervention combining HIIT and MedD counseling, obese subjects experienced significant improvements of FPG and insulin resistance. This is the first study to expose the effects of a long-term program combining HIIT and MedD on glycemic control parameters among obese subjects.

  19. Quick Reference Guide: Working with Stakeholders to Identify Potential Improvement Strategies for Program Improvement (Including the SSIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for IDEA Early Childhood Data Systems (DaSy), 2015

    2015-01-01

    This 2015 quick reference guide is designed to assist states in understanding what information needs to be available in order for stakeholders to assist in selecting potential improvement strategies that will increase capacity of Local Education Agencies (LEAs), Early Intervention Services (EIS) programs, and practitioners to improve results for…

  20. Building a Steganography Program Including How to Load, Process, and Save JPEG and PNG Files in Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Mary F.; Stix, Allen

    2006-01-01

    Instructors teaching beginning programming classes are often interested in exercises that involve processing photographs (i.e., files stored as .jpeg). They may wish to offer activities such as color inversion, the color manipulation effects archived with pixel thresholding, or steganography, all of which Stevenson et al. [4] assert are sought by…

  1. 77 FR 22790 - ``Low Income Levels'' Used for Various Health Professions and Nursing Programs Included in Titles...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration ``Low Income Levels'' Used for Various... backgrounds, or (3) individuals from ``low-income'' families. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The various health..., public or private nonprofit schools which offer graduate programs in behavioral health and mental health...

  2. 76 FR 14417 - ``Low Income Levels'' Used for Various Health Professions and Nursing Programs Included in Titles...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration ``Low Income Levels'' Used for Various... backgrounds, or (3) individuals from ``low-income'' families. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The various health..., public or private nonprofit schools which offer graduate programs in behavioral health and mental health...

  3. Measuring the Impact of Programs that Challenge the Public Stigma of Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, Patrick W.; Shapiro, Jenessa R.

    2010-01-01

    Public stigma robs people with mental illnesses from rightful opportunities related to work and other important life goals. Advocates have developed anti-stigma programs meant to address the prejudice and discrimination associated with these conditions. Evidence is now needed to make sense of program impact; this paper looks at measurement issues related to stigma change. Community based participatory research is central to this research and includes the involvement of a diverse collection of stakeholders in all phases of evaluation. Investigators should be cautious about measures vis-à-vis social desirability effects and should directed by social validity of targeted audiences. Conceptual domains with some research support that correspond with assessments include behavior, penetration, psychological perspective, knowledge, and physiological/information processes. These issues are summarized as ten recommendations for evaluation of anti-stigma programs. PMID:20674114

  4. Evaluation of 8-week body weight control program including sea tangle (Laminaria japonica) supplementation in Korean female college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Jeong Soon; Sung, Min Jung; Chang, Kyung Ja

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of a body weight control program with supplementation of sea tangle (20 g/day) on 22 female college students. The contents of the program for 8 weeks contained diet therapy, exercise and behavioral modification through nutrition education. Body composition, dietary habit scores, serum lipid profiles, daily nutrient intakes and the quality of life were assessed at the beginning and at the end of the program. Average age of subjects and height were 20.8 years and 161.9 cm, respectively. After 8 weeks, there were significant reductions in body weight, body fat mass, percent body fat, waist-hip ratio and BMI. The dietary habit score such as a balanced diet, regularity of mealtime, overeating, eating while watching TV or using the computer and eating salty food were increased significantly. Serum lipid levels such as total cholesterol level, LDL-cholesterol level and triglyceride level were decreased but not significantly. There were decreases in intake of energy, protein and fat and increases in intakes of dietary fiber, folic acid, calcium and potassium from the beginning to the end of the program. There were significant improvements on subcomponents of quality of life; physical functioning, general-health and vitality. The limitation of this study was the fact that there was no control group, but an overall evaluation suggests the 8-week body weight control program consisting of diet therapy, exercise and behavioral modification with supplementation of sea tangle would be helpful to improve the body composition, dietary habits, daily nutrient intakes and quality of life in Korean female college students.

  5. HISTORY AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS OF THE US EPA'S SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION (SITE) MONITORING AND MEASUREMENT (MMT) PROGRAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    This manuscript presents the history and evolution of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Monitoring and Measurement Technology (MMT) Program. This includes a discussion of how the fundamental concepts of a performanc...

  6. Large scale intender test program to measure sub gouge displacements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Been, Ken; Lopez, Juan [Golder Associates Inc, Houston, TX (United States); Sancio, Rodolfo [MMI Engineering Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2011-07-01

    The production of submarine pipelines in an offshore environment covered with ice is very challenging. Several precautions must be taken such as burying the pipelines to protect them from ice movement caused by gouging. The estimation of the subgouge displacements is a key factor in pipeline design for ice gouged environments. This paper investigated a method to measure subgouge displacements. An experimental program was implemented in an open field to produce large scale idealized gouges on engineered soil beds (sand and clay). The horizontal force required to produce the gouge, the subgouge displacements in the soil and the strain imposed by these displacements were monitored on a buried model pipeline. The results showed that for a given keel, the gouge depth was inversely proportional to undrained shear strength in clay. The subgouge displacements measured did not show a relationship with the gouge depth, width or soil density in sand and clay tests.

  7. Atmospheric radiation measurement unmanned aerospace vehicle (ARM-UAV) program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolton, W.R. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1996-11-01

    ARM-UAV is part of the multi-agency U.S. Global Change Research Program and is addressing the largest source of uncertainty in predicting climatic response: the interaction of clouds and the sun`s energy in the Earth`s atmosphere. An important aspect of the program is the use of unmanned aerospace vehicles (UAVs) as the primary airborne platform. The ARM-UAV Program has completed two major flight series: The first series conducted in April, 1994, using an existing UAV (the General Atomics Gnat 750) consisted of eight highly successful flights at the DOE climate site in Oklahoma. The second series conducted in September/October, 1995, using two piloted aircraft (Egrett and Twin Otter), featured simultaneous measurements above and below clouds and in clear sky. Additional flight series are planned to continue study of the cloudy and clear sky energy budget in the Spring and Fall of 1996 over the DOE climate site in Oklahoma. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Measures and programs for preventing violence in school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gašić-Pavišić Slobodanka Ž.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In many countries across the world schools are no longer a safe place for both students and school staff. Violence in school is an issue scarcely studied in Serbia and there are few articles in domestic professional literature. At national and local level there are not developed strategies nor programs for preventing violence among students in our schools. There are no data about planned, systematic and organized prevention of violence in the practice of our schools. The data obtained by investigations indicate that it is necessary to apply adequate programs for preventing violence among students in our schools, despite the finding that violence in school is not that much conspicuous and serious problem like in other countries (USA Israel, Japan, Austria, Germany. On the basis of relevant literature review the present paper high­lights some very popular and less notorious measures and prevention programs applied in various countries. The aim of the paper is to transmit basic and essential pieces of information so as to gain insight into diverse existing approaches to prevention of violent behavior in school hopefully to encourage our schools to pay more attention to preventing violence in school as soon as possible before it is too late.

  9. DIADORIM: a Monte Carlo Program for liquid simulations including quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) facilities: applications to liquid ethanol

    OpenAIRE

    Freitas,Luiz Carlos Gomide

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a Metropolis Monte Carlo (MMC) computer program developed to simulate liquids and solutions including QM/MM facilities: the energy from intermolecular interactions is calculated with classical force field functions and the internal molecular energies are calculated using Quantum Chemistry methods. The following facilities were implemented: (i) the semiempirical MOPAC 6 quantum chemistry package was included as a subroutine of the main MMC simulation program; (ii) alternati...

  10. Broadening measures of success: results of a behavioral health translational research training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Julie A; Williamson, Heather J; Eaves, Emery R; Levin, Bruce L; Burton, Donna L; Massey, Oliver T

    2017-07-24

    While some research training programs have considered the importance of mentoring in inspiring professionals to engage in translational research, most evaluations emphasize outcomes specific to academic productivity as primary measures of training program success. The impact of such training or mentoring programs on stakeholders and local community organizations engaged in translational research efforts has received little attention. The purpose of this evaluation is to explore outcomes other than traditional academic productivity in a translational research graduate certificate program designed to pair graduate students and behavioral health professionals in collaborative service-learning projects. Semi-structured qualitative interviews with scholars, community mentors, and academic mentors were conducted regarding a translational research program to identify programmatic impacts. Interviews were transcribed and coded by the research team to identify salient themes related to programmatic outcomes. Results are framed using the Translational Research Impact Scale which is organized into three overarching domains of potential impact: (1) research-related impacts, (2) translational impacts, and (3) societal impacts. This evaluation demonstrates the program's impact in all three domains of the TRIS evaluation framework. Graduate certificate participants (scholars) reported that gaining experience in applied behavioral health settings added useful skills and expertise to their present careers and increased their interest in pursuing translational research. Scholars also described benefits resulting from networks gained through participation in the program, including valuable ties between the university and community behavioral health organizations. This evaluation of the outcomes of a graduate certificate program providing training in translational research highlights the need for more community-oriented and practice-based measures of success. Encouraging practitioner

  11. The NCI Patient Navigation Research Program Methods, Protocol and Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Karen M; Battaglia, Tracy A; Calhoun, Elizabeth; Dudley, Donald J.; Fiscella, Kevin; Paskett, Electra; Raich, Peter C.; Roetzheim, Richard G.

    2009-01-01

    Background Patient, provider, and systems barriers contribute to delays in cancer care, lower quality of care, and poorer outcomes in vulnerable populations, including low income, underinsured, and racial/ethnic minority populations. Patient navigation is emerging as an intervention to address this problem, but navigation requires a clear definition and a rigorous testing of its effectiveness. Pilot programs have provided some evidence of benefit, but have been limited by evaluation of single-site interventions and varying definitions of navigation. To overcome these limitations, a nine-site National Cancer Institute Patient Navigation Research Program (PNRP) was initiated. Methods The PNRP is charged with designing, implementing and evaluating a generalizable patient navigation program targeting vulnerable populations. Through a formal committee structure, the PNRP has developed a definition of patient navigation and metrics to assess the process and outcomes of patient navigation in diverse settings, compared with concurrent continuous control groups. Results The PNRP defines patient navigation as support and guidance offered to vulnerable persons with abnormal cancer screening or a cancer diagnosis, with the goal of overcoming barriers to timely, quality care. Primary outcomes of the PNRP are (1) time to diagnostic resolution, (2) time to initiation of cancer treatment, (3) patient satisfaction with care, and (4) cost effectiveness, for breast, cervical, colon/rectum, and/or prostate cancer. Conclusions The metrics to assess the processes and outcomes of patient navigation have been developed for the NCI-sponsored Patient Navigator Research Program. If the metrics are found to be valid and reliable, they may prove useful to other investigators. PMID:18951521

  12. International-Aerial Measuring System (I-AMS) Training Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasiolek, Piotre T. [National Security Technologies, LLC; Malchor, Russell L. [National Security Technologies, LLC; Maurer, Richard J. [National Security Technologies, LLC; Adams, Henry L. [National Security Technologies, LLC

    2015-10-01

    Since the Fukushima reactor accident in 2011, there has been an increased interest worldwide in developing national capabilities to rapidly map and assess ground contamination resulting from nuclear reactor accidents. The capability to rapidly measure the size of the contaminated area, determine the activity level, and identify the radionuclides can aid emergency managers and decision makers in providing timely protective action recommendations to the public and first responders. The development of an aerial detection capability requires interagency coordination to assemble the radiation experts, detection system operators, and aviation aircrews to conduct the aerial measurements, analyze and interpret the data, and provide technical assessments. The Office of International Emergency Management and Cooperation (IEMC) at the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) sponsors an International - Aerial Measuring System (I-AMS) training program for partner nations to develop and enhance their response to radiological emergencies. An initial series of courses can be conducted in the host country to assist in developing an aerial detection capability. As the capability develops and expands, additional experience can be gained through advanced courses with the opportunity to conduct aerial missions over a broad range of radiation environments.

  13. 32 CFR Appendix B to Part 80 - Procedures for Special Educational Programs (Including Related Services) for Preschool Children...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (Including Related Services) for Preschool Children and Children With Disabilities (3-21 years Inclusive) B... Related Services) for Preschool Children and Children With Disabilities (3-21 years Inclusive) A... of a parent of each preschool child or child, evaluate all preschool children or children who are...

  14. Penempatan Optimal Phasor Measurement Unit (PMU dengan Integer Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunan Helmy Amrulloh

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Phasor Measurement Unit (PMU merupakan peralatan yang mampu memberikan pengukuran fasor tegangan dan arus secara real-time. PMU dapat digunakan untuk monitoring, proteksi dan kontrol pada sistem tenaga listrik. Tugas akhir ini membahas penempatan PMU secara optimal berdasarkan topologi jaringan sehingga sistem tenaga listrik  dapat diobservasi. Penempatan optimal PMU dirumuskan sebagai masalah Binary Integer Programming (BIP yang akan memberikan variabel dengan pilihan nilai (0,1 yang menunjukkan tempat yang harus dipasang PMU. Dalam tugas akhir ini, BIP diterapkan untuk menyelesaikan masalah penempatan PMU secara optimal pada sistem tenaga listrik  Jawa-Bali 500 KV yang selanjutnya diterapkan dengan penambahan konsep incomplete observability. Hasil simulasi menunjukkan bahwa penerapan BIP pada sistem dengan incomplete observability memberikan jumlah PMU yang lebih sedikit dibandingkan dengan sistem tanpa konsep incomplete observability.

  15. Physical measurements including temperature profiles of coastal Waters off Central California in October 2006 (NODC Accession 0019214)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical measurements of Coastal Waters off Central California in October 2006. Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California, Technical Report NPS-OC-07-002. This...

  16. Measuring Poverty Reduction and Targeting Performance Under Multiple Government Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Paul Makdissi; Quentin Wodon

    2001-01-01

    The evaluation of the poverty impact and targeting performance of a given social program may depend on how other programs are treated in the analysis.Using well-known results from cooperative game theory, this paper proposes an empirically simple yet theoretically sound method for allocating between various programs the overall poverty reduction obtained from a set of programs, and for assessing the targeting performance of each program

  17. 20 CFR 664.410 - Must local programs include each of the ten program elements listed in WIA section 129(c)(2) as...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... school completion, including dropout prevention strategies; (2) Alternative secondary school offerings... 664.470; (5) Occupational skill training; (6) Leadership development opportunities, which include... individual service strategy. (WIA sec. 129(c)(2).) ...

  18. Methods for measuring maximal isometric grip strength during short and sustained contractions, including intra-rater reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagerström, C; Nordgren, B

    1996-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to develop methods for measuring maximal isometric grip strength during short and sustained contractions in a laboratory setting, and to evaluate the test-retest reliability of these methods in short- and long-term perspectives. Eleven healthy men and women were assessed on four occasions. Maximal voluntary isometric grip strength (MVC) was measured in standardized and optional positions, and sustained maximal isometric strength (SMVC) in the standardized position. The results indicated that three trials in a session might be insufficient to obtain a true measure of MVC. The within-session and test-retest reliability of the described multi-trial procedure was considered satisfactory. The mean score of the last three trials tended to show the highest short-term and long-term variability. There were no clear differences between scores obtained in standardized and optional positions. The standardized position seemed more consistently to yield higher test-retest reliability and lower variability over time. The described method for measuring SMVC, expressed as area and peak score, had high test-retest reliability and an acceptable degree of short-term and long-term variability. The time taken to reach the peak score was not a reliable measure.

  19. A non-linear optimization programming model for air quality planning including co-benefits for GHG emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrini, Enrico; Carnevale, Claudio; Finzi, Giovanna; Volta, Marialuisa

    2017-10-28

    This paper introduces the MAQ (Multi-dimensional Air Quality) model aimed at defining cost-effective air quality plans at different scales (urban to national) and assessing the co-benefits for GHG emissions. The model implements and solves a non-linear multi-objective, multi-pollutant decision problem where the decision variables are the application levels of emission abatement measures allowing the reduction of energy consumption, end-of pipe technologies and fuel switch options. The objectives of the decision problem are the minimization of tropospheric secondary pollution exposure and of internal costs. The model assesses CO2 equivalent emissions in order to support decision makers in the selection of win-win policies. The methodology is tested on Lombardy region, a heavily polluted area in northern Italy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Measurement and evaluation of national family planning programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauldin, W P

    1967-03-01

    ) segura de traducir las estadísticas de servicio en práticas y tal vez aún datos sobre suministro comercial en datos sabre tasas de natalidad. Esto incluye, par ejemplo, los esfuerzos para consolidar observaciones coma "cinco años-mujer de usa de IUD, a 400 condones equivalen a la prevención de un nacimiento," y esfuerzos como los de Pakistán de calcular tasas coma "años de protección de una pareja contra el embarazo."In the belief that a decrease in the rate of population growth will increase economic development, more than ten countries have inaugurated family planning programs in the past fifteen years. To provide a model for measuring the immediate, intermediate, and long-term effects of any such program, the authors use the Taiwan evaluation.The model suggests that a good system of evaluation should include monthly statistics on (1) participants, who are grouped by characteristics; (2) the distribution of supplies, reported at first by the characteristics of recipients, but after by gross volume only; (3) family planning activities of private physicians to measure the catalytic effect on the private sector; (4) new contacts and amount of advertising in mass media; (5) costs broken down by areas and by cost categories; and (6) distribution of commercial supplies. In addition, the program should conduct 300-400 interviews every 6-12 months to learn the rates of continuation and the rates and reasons for discontinuation. Finally, a KAP survey should be conducted every two years.The administration of the evaluation should be close to the director for policy decisions and for the ultimate work of evaluation-the finding of new ways to measure the main goal of change in fertility by the translation of statistics on Services provided and commercial supplies into birth rate data.

  1. A measurement system for large, complex software programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rone, Kyle Y.; Olson, Kitty M.; Davis, Nathan E.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes measurement systems required to forecast, measure, and control activities for large, complex software development and support programs. Initial software cost and quality analysis provides the foundation for meaningful management decisions as a project evolves. In modeling the cost and quality of software systems, the relationship between the functionality, quality, cost, and schedule of the product must be considered. This explicit relationship is dictated by the criticality of the software being developed. This balance between cost and quality is a viable software engineering trade-off throughout the life cycle. Therefore, the ability to accurately estimate the cost and quality of software systems is essential to providing reliable software on time and within budget. Software cost models relate the product error rate to the percent of the project labor that is required for independent verification and validation. The criticality of the software determines which cost model is used to estimate the labor required to develop the software. Software quality models yield an expected error discovery rate based on the software size, criticality, software development environment, and the level of competence of the project and developers with respect to the processes being employed.

  2. Validation of the Crime and Violence Scale (CVS) against the Rasch Measurement Model Including Differences by Gender, Race, and Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Kendon J.; Riley, Barth B.; Conrad, Karen M.; Chan, Ya-Fen; Dennis, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    In assessing criminality, researchers have used counts of crimes, arrests, and so on, because interval measures were not available. Additionally, crime seriousness varies depending on demographic factors. This study examined the Crime and Violence Scale (CVS) regarding psychometric quality using item response theory (IRT) and invariance of the…

  3. Challenges in Measuring Benefit of Clinical Research Training Programs – the ASH Clinical Research Training Institute Example

    OpenAIRE

    Sung, Lillian; Crowther, Mark; Byrd, John; Gitlin, Scott; Basso, Joe; Burns, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The American Society of Hematology developed the Clinical Research Training Institute (CRTI) to address the lack of training in patient oriented research among hematologists. As the program continues, we need to consider metrics for measuring the benefits of such a training program. This article addresses the benefits of clinical research training programs. The fundamental and key components are education and mentorship. However, there are several other benefits including promotion of collabo...

  4. Measurement of neutrino and antineutrino oscillations by the T2K experiment including a new additional sample of $\

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00508393; Andreopoulos, C.; Antonova, M.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Ashida, Y.; Ban, S.; Barbi, M.; Barker, G.J.; Barr, G.; Barry, C.; Batkiewicz, M.; Berardi, V.; Berkman, S.; Bhadra, S.; Bienstock, S.; Blondel, A.; Bolognesi, S.; Bordoni, S.; Boyd, S.B.; Brailsford, D.; Bravar, A.; Bronner, C.; Buizza Avanzini, M.; Calland, R.G.; Campbell, T.; Cao, S.; Cartwright, S.L.; Catanesi, M.G.; Cervera, A.; Chappell, A.; Checchia, C.; Cherdack, D.; Chikuma, N.; Christodoulou, G.; Coleman, J.; Collazuol, G.; Coplowe, D.; Cudd, A.; Dabrowska, A.; De Rosa, G.; Dealtry, T.; Denner, P.F.; Dennis, S.R.; Densham, C.; Di Lodovico, F.; Dolan, S.; Drapier, O.; Duffy, K.E.; Dumarchez, J.; Dunne, P.; Emery-Schrenk, S.; Ereditato, A.; Feusels, T.; Finch, A.J.; Fiorentini, G.A.; Friend, M.; Fujii, Y.; Fukuda, D.; Fukuda, Y.; Garcia, A.; Giganti, C.; Gizzarelli, F.; Golan, T.; Gonin, M.; Hadley, D.R.; Haegel, L.; Haigh, J.T.; Hansen, D.; Harada, J.; Hartz, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Hastings, N.C.; Hayashino, T.; Hayato, Y.; Hillairet, A.; Hiraki, T.; Hiramoto, A.; Hirota, S.; Hogan, M.; Holeczek, J.; Hosomi, F.; Huang, K.; Ichikawa, A.K.; Ikeda, M.; Imber, J.; Insler, J.; Intonti, R.A.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Iwai, E.; Iwamoto, K.; Izmaylov, A.; Jamieson, B.; Jiang, M.; Johnson, S.; Jonsson, P.; Jung, C.K.; Kabirnezhad, M.; Kaboth, A.C.; Kajita, T.; Kakuno, H.; Kameda, J.; Karlen, D.; Katori, T.; Kearns, E.; Khabibullin, M.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kim, H.; Kim, J.; King, S.; Kisiel, J.; Knight, A.; Knox, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Koch, L.; Koga, T.; Koller, P.P.; Konaka, A.; Kormos, L.L.; Koshio, Y.; Kowalik, K.; Kudenko, Y.; Kurjata, R.; Kutter, T.; Lagoda, J.; Lamont, I.; Lamoureux, M.; Lasorak, P.; Laveder, M.; Lawe, M.; Licciardi, M.; Lindner, T.; Liptak, Z.J.; Litchfield, R.P.; Li, X.; Longhin, A.; Lopez, J.P.; Lou, T.; Ludovici, L.; Lu, X.; Magaletti, L.; Mahn, K.; Malek, M.; Manly, S.; Maret, L.; Marino, A.D.; Martin, J.F.; Martins, P.; Martynenko, S.; Maruyama, T.; Matveev, V.; Mavrokoridis, K.; Ma, W.Y.; Mazzucato, E.; McCarthy, M.; McCauley, N.; McFarland, K.S.; McGrew, C.; Mefodiev, A.; Metelko, C.; Mezzetto, M.; Minamino, A.; Mineev, O.; Mine, S.; Missert, A.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Morrison, J.; Mueller, Th.A.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakahata, M.; Nakamura, K.G.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, K.D.; Nakanishi, Y.; Nakayama, S.; Nakaya, T.; Nakayoshi, K.; Nantais, C.; Nielsen, C.; Nishikawa, K.; Nishimura, Y.; Novella, P.; Nowak, J.; O'Keeffe, H.M.; Okumura, K.; Okusawa, T.; Oryszczak, W.; Oser, S.M.; Ovsyannikova, T.; Owen, R.A.; Oyama, Y.; Palladino, V.; Palomino, J.L.; Paolone, V.; Patel, N.D.; Paudyal, P.; Pavin, M.; Payne, D.; Petrov, Y.; Pickering, L.; Pinzon Guerra, E.S.; Pistillo, C.; Popov, B.; Posiadala-Zezula, M.; Poutissou, J.-M.; Pritchard, A.; Przewlocki, P.; Quilain, B.; Radermacher, T.; Radicioni, E.; Ratoff, P.N.; Rayner, M.A.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Riccio, C.; Rodrigues, P.A.; Rondio, E.; Rossi, B.; Roth, S.; Ruggeri, A.C.; Rychter, A.; Sakashita, K.; Sánchez, F.; Scantamburlo, E.; Scholberg, K.; Schwehr, J.; Scott, M.; Seiya, Y.; Sekiguchi, T.; Sekiya, H.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shah, R.; Shaikhiev, A.; Shaker, F.; Shaw, D.; Shiozawa, M.; Shirahige, T.; Smy, M.; Sobczyk, J.T.; Sobel, H.; Steinmann, J.; Stewart, T.; Stowell, P.; Suda, Y.; Suvorov, S.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, S.Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Tacik, R.; Tada, M.; Takeda, A.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tamura, R.; Tanaka, H.K.; Tanaka, H.A.; Thakore, T.; Thompson, L.F.; Tobayama, S.; Toki, W.; Tomura, T.; Tsukamoto, T.; Tzanov, M.; Vagins, M.; Vallari, Z.; Vasseur, G.; Vilela, C.; Vladisavljevic, T.; Wachala, T.; Walter, C.W.; Wark, D.; Wascko, M.O.; Weber, A.; Wendell, R.; Wilking, M.J.; Wilkinson, C.; Wilson, J.R.; Wilson, R.J.; Wret, C.; Yamada, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yano, T.; Yen, S.; Yershov, N.; Yokoyama, M.; Yu, M.; Zalewska, A.; Zalipska, J.; Zambelli, L.; Zaremba, K.; Ziembicki, M.; Zimmerman, E.D.; Zito, M.

    The T2K experiment reports an updated analysis of neutrino and antineutrino oscillations in appearance and disappearance channels. A sample of electron neutrino candidates at Super-Kamiokande in which a pion decay has been tagged is added to the four single-ring samples used in previous T2K oscillation analyses. Through combined analyses of these five samples, simultaneous measurements of four oscillation parameters, $|\\Delta m^2_{32}|$, $\\sin^2(\\theta_{23})$, $\\sin^2(\\theta_{13})$, and $\\delta_{CP}$ and of the mass ordering are made. A set of studies of simulated data indicates that the sensitivity to the oscillation parameters is not limited by neutrino interaction model uncertainty. Multiple oscillation analyses are performed, and frequentist and Bayesian intervals are presented for combinations of the oscillation parameters with and without the inclusion of reactor constraints on $\\sin^2(\\theta_{13})$. When combined with reactor measurements, the hypothesis of CP conservation ($\\delta_{CP}$$=0$ or $\\pi$) ...

  5. The BEAR program NRL plasma physics instrumentation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, D.N.; Baumback, M.M.; Haas, D.G.; Rodriguez, P.; Siefring, C.L.; Doggett, R.A. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)

    1989-11-15

    The BEAR program was a joint effort to launch, and demonstrate the feasibility of operating, a 1 MeV 10 ma Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) accelerator from a space platform. The accelerator design and manufacture were the responsibility of Los Alamos National Lab (LANL); diagnostics associated with accelerator operation and beam-plasma effects were also to be undertaken by LANL and NRL. Payload Integration and Telemetry was provided by the Air Force Geophysical Lab (AFGL) and Northeastern University (NEU). Beam effects on the local plasma in addition to accelerator produced vehicle effects (e.g., charging) were the responsibility of NRL as outlined herein. The BEAR rocket was launched successfully during the early morning hours of July 13 from White Sands Missile Range, White Sands, N.M. The NRL contribution to this effort included three instrument packages designed to diagnose beam-plasma and vehicle-plasma interactions. The instruments included: (1) Langmuir probe (LP) design consisting of 4 separate sensors; (2) High voltage (HIV) Langmuir Probe designed to monitor vehicle charging through current polarity changes; and (3) Plasma Wave Receive (PWR) designed to characterize the plasma wave emissions covering a broad frequency range from near DC to 50 MHz.

  6. Appraisal and analysis of opportunities for a joint DOE/DOD energy demonstration program. Final report. [Includes possible site information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziem, R.W.

    1980-05-01

    The basic objective of this study was to assess the potential for cooperative projects between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Department of Defense (DOD) in areas concerned with the development of Total Energy (TE) Systems and to do the groundwork and liaison necessary to initiate those projects. The scope of the potential joint projects includes cooperative effort in the development and test of a variety of heat engines (prime movers) capable of utilizing coal as well as synthetic liquid fuels derived from coal and oil shale; as well as the indication of potential Military Department sites which would be suitable for the demonstration of TE systems based on a variety of such prime movers. In order to accomplish the objective of the study, it was necessary to review a large number of DOD studies and plans and to discuss the objective of the TETAS studies with a large number of Military Department people. The DOD recognizes the requirement for an assured energy supply and the need to learn how to use the synthetic fuels from coal and shale being developed by the DOE. The need to modify engine systems to adapt them to differing fuel characteristics and make those engines more flexible relative to the range of fuels they will accept is clear. What is not so clear is the fact that the DOD has a much greater opportunity to conserve energy in now inefficient facility operations than it has in mobility operations which must continue to stress mission and high performance. This report indicates guidelines for the conduct of joint projects between the DOE and the DOD which can aid both in meeting their energy objective.

  7. Evaluation, including effects of storage and repeated freezing and thawing, of a method for measurement of urinary creatinine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garde, A H; Hansen, Åse Marie; Kristiansen, J

    2003-01-01

    The aims of this study were to elucidate to what extent storage and repeated freezing and thawing influenced the concentration of creatinine in urine samples and to evaluate the method for determination of creatinine in urine. The creatinine method was based on the well-known Jaffe's reaction.......1 mmol/L), was 0.3 mmol/L, and the recovery of a certified reference material was 97%. The relative precision at 3.15 mmol/L was 2.3%. It was concluded that the method is appropriate for measurement of urinary creatinine....

  8. Medium term effects of including manual therapy in a pulmonary rehabilitation program for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): a randomized controlled pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Roger Mark; Gonski, Peter; Beath, Ken; Vemulpad, Subramanyam

    2016-05-01

    Randomized clinical trial. To investigate the effect of including manual therapy (MT) in a pulmonary rehabilitation program for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The primary source of exercise limitation in people with COPD is dyspnea. The dyspnea is partly caused by changes in chest wall mechanics, with an increase in chest wall rigidity (CWR) contributing to a decrease in lung function. As MT is known to increase joint mobility, administering MT to people with COPD carries with it the potential to influence CWR and lung function. Thirty-three participants with COPD, aged between 55 and 70 years (mean = 65·5±4 years), were randomly assigned to three groups: pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) only, soft tissue therapy (ST) and PR, and ST, spinal manipulative therapy (SM), and PR. Outcome measures including forced expiratory volume in the 1st second (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), 6-minute walking test (6MWT), St. George's respiratory questionnaire (SGRQ), and the hospital anxiety and depression (HAD) scale were recorded at 0, 8, 16, and 24 weeks. There was a significant difference in FVC between the three groups at 24 weeks (P = 0·04). For the ST+SM+PR group versus PR only the increase was 0·40 l (CI: 0·02, 0·79; P = 0·03). No major or moderate adverse events (AE) were reported following the administration of 131 ST and 272 SM interventions. The increase in FVC is a unique finding. Although the underlying mechanisms responsible for this outcome are not yet understood, the most likely explanation is the synergistic effect resulting from the combination of interventions. These results support the call for a larger clinical trial in the use of MT for COPD.

  9. How useful is the DSM-5 severity indicator in bulimia nervosa? A clinical study including a measure of impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Paul E; Luck, Amy; Cardy, Jessica; Staniford, Jessica

    2016-12-30

    The severity criterion used in DSM-5 for bulimia nervosa (BN) was investigated in 214 individuals referred for treatment at a regional eating disorders service in the UK. In addition to comparing eating disorder symptoms, impairment secondary to these symptoms was also assessed. According to guidance in DSM-5, 94 individuals were classified as mild (43.9%), 70 as moderate (32.7%), 32 as severe (15.0%), and 8 as extreme (3.7%) levels of BN severity. Due to small numbers in the latter two groups, it was necessary to combine these to form one 'severe/extreme' group. Analyses on these three groups suggested no group effect on demographic variables but differences were seen on measures of eating pathology, psychological distress, and psychosocial impairment between the mild group and other groups. Individuals in the moderate and severe/extreme groups scored comparably on most measures of pathology and impairment. The results are broadly consistent with past studies on community samples although together question the demarcation between moderate and more severe groups of individuals with BN. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. International Programs and Centers for Instruction, Research and Public Service in the Western States (Including Instruction in Less Common Foreign Languages).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Frank C., Ed.

    Programs of education and research on international economy and trade, foreign cultures and languages, and other aspects of international affairs and located in the western states are listed in an annotated directory. The units are of varying types and include informal interdepartmental committees within academic institutions, well-established…

  11. Hydrocarbon emissions from gas engine CHP-units. 2011 measurement program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Dijk, G.H.J. [KEMA, Arnhem (Netherlands)

    2012-06-15

    In December 2009, the Ministry of Infrastructure and Environment (IandM) issued the Decree on Emission Limits for Middle Sized Combustion Installations (BEMS). This decree imposes a first-time emission limit value (ELV) of 1500 mg C/m{sup 3}{sub o} at 3% O{sub 2} for hydrocarbons emitted by gas engines. IandM used the findings of two hydrocarbon emission measurement programs, executed in 2007 and 2009, as a guideline for this initial ELV. The programs did reveal substantial variation in the hydrocarbon emissions of the gas engines tested. This variation, and especially the uncertainty as to the role of engine and/or other parameters causing such variation, was felt to hamper further policy development. IandM therefore commissioned KEMA to perform follow-up measurements on ten gas engine CHP-units in 2011. Aim of this 2011 program is to assess hydrocarbon emission variation in relation to engine parameters and process conditions including maintenance status, and to atmospheric conditions. The 2011 program comprised two identical measurement sessions, one in spring and one in winter.

  12. Sustained Implementation Support Scale: Validation of a Measure of Program Characteristics and Workplace Functioning for Sustained Program Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Lauren M; Turner, Karen M T; Sanders, Matthew R; Filus, Ania

    2017-07-01

    An evaluation measure of enablers and inhibitors to sustained evidence-based program (EBP) implementation may provide a useful tool to enhance organizations' capacity. This paper outlines preliminary validation of such a measure. An expert informant and consumer feedback approach was used to tailor constructs from two existing measures assessing key domains associated with sustained implementation. Validity and reliability were evaluated for an inventory composed of five subscales: Program benefits, Program burden, Workplace support, Workplace cohesion, and Leadership style. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis with a sample of 593 Triple P-Positive Parenting Program-practitioners led to a 28-item scale with good reliability and good convergent, discriminant, and predictive validity. Practitioners sustaining implementation at least 3 years post-training were more likely to have supervision/peer support, reported higher levels of program benefit, workplace support, and positive leadership style, and lower program burden compared to practitioners who were non-sustainers.

  13. On the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM): Bringing NASA's Earth System Science Program to the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, J. Marshall

    1998-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission is the first mission dedicated to measuring tropical and subtropical rainfall using a variety of remote sensing instrumentation, including the first spaceborne rain-measuring radar. Since the energy released when tropical rainfall occurs is a primary "fuel" supply for the weather and climate "engine"; improvements in computer models which predict future weather and climate states may depend on better measurements of global tropical rainfall and its energy. In support of the STANYS conference theme of Education and Space, this presentation focuses on one aspect of NASA's Earth Systems Science Program. We seek to present an overview of the TRMM mission. This overview will discuss the scientific motivation for TRMM, the TRMM instrument package, and recent images from tropical rainfall systems and hurricanes. The presentation also targets educational components of the TRMM mission in the areas of weather, mathematics, technology, and geography that can be used by secondary school/high school educators in the classroom.

  14. No psychological distress in sportsmen aged 45 years and older after cardiovascular screening, including cardiac CT : The Measuring Athlete’s Risk of Cardiovascular events (MARC) study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schurink, M. M.; Braber, T. L.; Prakken, N. H J; Doevendans, P. A F M; Backx, F. J G; Grobbee, D. E.; Rienks, R.; Nathoe, H. M.; Bots, M. L.; Velthuis, B. K.; Mosterd, A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Psychological distress caused by cardiovascular pre-participation screening (PPS) may be a reason not to implement a PPS program. We assessed the psychological impact of PPS, including cardiac computed tomography (CT), in 318 asymptomatic sportsmen aged ≥45 years. Methods Coronary artery

  15. No psychological distress in sportsmen aged 45 years and older after cardiovascular screening, including cardiac CT : The Measuring Athlete's Risk of Cardiovascular events (MARC) study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schurink, M. M.; Braber, T. L.; Prakken, N. H. J.; Doevendans, P. A. F. M.; Backx, F. J. G.; Grobbee, D. E.; Rienks, R.; Nathoe, H. M.; Bots, M. L.; Velthuis, B. K.; Mosterd, A.

    Background Psychological distress caused by cardiovascular pre-participation screening (PPS) may be a reason not to implement a PPS program. We assessed the psychological impact of PPS, including cardiac computed tomography (CT), in 318 asymptomatic sportsmen aged >= 45 years. Methods Coronary

  16. Measuring the effectiveness of an audiological counseling program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Kris; Archbold, Sue

    2014-02-01

    Audiologists routinely observe patients struggle with psycho-emotional difficulties associated with hearing loss, yet are often underprepared to manage this vital aspect of patient care. For this reason, a workshop was developed for audiologists interested in expanding their counselling skills. Since one-time workshops typically do not result in changes in practice, this program adopted a distributed-over-time learning model, consisting of 20 hours of participation across six weeks. The extended nature of the program provided multiple opportunities to learn several counselling strategies, and apply and evaluate the effectiveness of these strategies in clinical settings. Learning objectives were assessed throughout the six-week program. However, at the conclusion of each program, it was unknown whether new knowledge carried over into sustained new skills. Therefore, we surveyed attendees six months after their program, to determine if the program had affected changes in their practice. Twenty clinicians (response rate = 91%) participated in the survey. All respondents made some, and often many, changes in patient communication. They applied several counseling concepts to their work settings and reported positive changes in patient-clinician dynamics. Results suggest that a six-week program is effective in helping clinicians change their counseling skills within their practice.

  17. Is there a need to include HIV, HBV and HCV viruses in the Saudi premarital screening program on the basis of their prevalence and transmission risk factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alswaidi, F M; O'Brien, S J

    2010-11-01

    In January 2008, the Saudi Arabian health authority included mandatory testing for HIV, HBV and HCV viruses in the premarital screening program. Epidemiologically, there were few justifications for their inclusion as disease prevalences and distributions are poorly understood in the population. This study aims to provide information about HBV, HCV and HIV prevalences and risk factors for disease transmission and so produce evidence for informed decision-making on the inclusion of these infectious diseases in the screening program. This is a cross-sectional descriptive study embedded in the existing national premarital screening program for thalassaemia and sickle cell disease to estimate the prevalence of HIV, HBV and HCV infections (n=74,662 individuals), followed by a case-control study to identify risk factors responsible for infection transmission (n=540). The average HIV prevalence is 0.03%, 1.31% for HBV and 0.33% for HCV. Sharing personal belongings particularly razors, blood transfusions, cuts at barbershops and extramarital relationships showed the highest significant associations with the transmission of these viruses. The prevalences of HIV, HBV and HCV in Saudi Arabia are among the lowest worldwide. However, all the important risk factors associated with transmitting these viruses are significantly present in the Saudi community. Saudi Arabia is financially capable of screening for these infections in the mandatory premarital program and of providing medical care for the discovered cases, but focusing on the health education programs may offset the need to mandatory testing.

  18. Factors Determining Long-term Success of a Measurement Program: An Industrial Case Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Staron, Miroslaw; Meding, Wilhelm

    .... The establishing of a program, however, is only a part of the success. As organizations are dynamic entities, the measurement programs should constantly be maintained and adapted in order to cope with changing needs of the organizations...

  19. A water-based training program that include perturbation exercises to improve stepping responses in older adults: study protocol for a randomized controlled cross-over trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsedek Irit

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gait and balance impairments may increase the risk of falls, the leading cause of accidental death in the elderly population. Fall-related injuries constitute a serious public health problem associated with high costs for society as well as human suffering. A rapid step is the most important protective postural strategy, acting to recover equilibrium and prevent a fall from initiating. It can arise from large perturbations, but also frequently as a consequence of volitional movements. We propose to use a novel water-based training program which includes specific perturbation exercises that will target the stepping responses that could potentially have a profound effect in reducing risk of falling. We describe the water-based balance training program and a study protocol to evaluate its efficacy (Trial registration number #NCT00708136. Methods/Design The proposed water-based training program involves use of unpredictable, multi-directional perturbations in a group setting to evoke compensatory and volitional stepping responses. Perturbations are made by pushing slightly the subjects and by water turbulence, in 24 training sessions conducted over 12 weeks. Concurrent cognitive tasks during movement tasks are included. Principles of physical training and exercise including awareness, continuity, motivation, overload, periodicity, progression and specificity were used in the development of this novel program. Specific goals are to increase the speed of stepping responses and improve the postural control mechanism and physical functioning. A prospective, randomized, cross-over trial with concealed allocation, assessor blinding and intention-to-treat analysis will be performed to evaluate the efficacy of the water-based training program. A total of 36 community-dwelling adults (age 65–88 with no recent history of instability or falling will be assigned to either the perturbation-based training or a control group (no training

  20. Measuring parent satisfaction with a neonatal hearing screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazlan, Rafidah; Hickson, Louise; Driscoll, Carlie

    2006-04-01

    The primary aim of the present study was to investigate parent satisfaction with a neonatal hearing screening program through use of a valid and reliable questionnaire developed for this purpose (Parent Satisfaction Questionnaire with Neonatal Hearing Screening Program; PSQ-NHSP). Eighty parents whose children had received hearing screening participated in this study. High levels of satisfaction were reported with more than 90% of parents satisfied with all aspects of the program.The PSQ-NHSP was analyzed for validity and reliability and demonstrated excellent internal consistency reliability (sigma = 0.94) and excellent test-retest reliability (p = 0.97). Content validity of the PSQ-NHSP was partially established by reviewing available literature on parent satisfaction studies in other pediatric health-care service programs. Construct validity of the PSQ-NHSP was indicated by a significant positive relationship between overall satisfaction and the three specific dimensions in the questionnaire. The satisfaction questionnaire was found to be a useful instrument for identifying service shortfalls, and routine use of the PSQ-NHSP in other neonatal hearing screening programs is recommended.

  1. 34 CFR 303.15 - Include; including.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Include; including. 303.15 Section 303.15 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EARLY INTERVENTION PROGRAM FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS WITH...

  2. Augmented Lagrange Programming Neural Network for Localization Using Time-Difference-of-Arrival Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zifa; Leung, Chi Sing; So, Hing Cheung; Constantinides, Anthony George

    2017-08-15

    A commonly used measurement model for locating a mobile source is time-difference-of-arrival (TDOA). As each TDOA measurement defines a hyperbola, it is not straightforward to compute the mobile source position due to the nonlinear relationship in the measurements. This brief exploits the Lagrange programming neural network (LPNN), which provides a general framework to solve nonlinear constrained optimization problems, for the TDOA-based localization. The local stability of the proposed LPNN solution is also analyzed. Simulation results are included to evaluate the localization accuracy of the LPNN scheme by comparing with the state-of-the-art methods and the optimality benchmark of Cramér-Rao lower bound.

  3. Equilibrium adsorption data from temperature-programmed desorption measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foeth, F.; Mugge, J.M.; van der Vaart, R.; van der Vaart, Rick; Bosch, H.; Reith, T.

    1996-01-01

    This work describes a novel method that enables the calculation of a series of adsorption isotherms basically from a single Temperature-Programmed Desorption (TPD) experiment. The basic idea is to saturate an adsorbent packed in a fixed bed at a certain feed concentration and temperature and to

  4. Measuring Service Quality in Recreational Programs with SERVQUAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauch, Joel R.

    Many directors of college recreational programs are feeling pressure for increased accountability in the face of shrinking financial resources and increased demand for services. One method of providing that accountability and learning about the strengths and weaknesses of services offered is by assessing the level of client satisfaction. Developed…

  5. Measuring and Improving Student Performance in an Introductory Programming Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alturki, Raad A.

    2016-01-01

    Students' performances in introductory programming courses show large variation across students. There may be many reasons for these variations, such as methods of teaching, teacher competence in the subject, students' coding backgrounds and abilities, students' self-discipline, the teaching environment, and the resources available to students,…

  6. 76 FR 34385 - Program Integrity: Gainful Employment-Debt Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-13

    ... unprecedented public engagement is stronger regulations that (1) Are based on careful consideration of both the.... Programs that offer a rewarding education at an affordable price will prosper, and institutions will... Engineering Institution, Washington, DC, who testified that ``the purely material rewards of continued...

  7. Broadband Outdoor Radiometer Calibration Process for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooraghi, Michael [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program (ARM) maintains a fleet of monitoring stations to aid in the improved scientific understanding of the basic physics related to radiative feedback processes in the atmosphere, particularly the interactions among clouds and aerosols. ARM obtains continuous measurements and conducts field campaigns to provide data products that aid in the improvement and further development of climate models. All of the measurement campaigns include a suite of solar measurements. The Solar Radiation Research Laboratory at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory supports ARM's full suite of stations in a number of ways, including troubleshooting issues that arise as part of the data-quality reviews; managing engineering changes to the standard setup; and providing calibration services and assistance to the full fleet of solar-related instruments, including pyranometers, pyrgeometers, pyrheliometers, as well as the temperature/relative humidity probes, multimeters, and data acquisition systems that are used in the calibrations performed at the Southern Great Plains Radiometer Calibration Facility. This paper discusses all aspects related to the support provided to the calibration of the instruments in the solar monitoring fleet.

  8. [Education reform with the support of the faculty--introduction of a supplementary education program including teacher support and individual guidance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Keiji; Yoshimura, Teruki

    2015-01-01

      To deal with declining levels of academic ability and motivation among students (a situation attributable to fewer high school graduates, a greater number of universities, and the diversification of entrance examination methods), one must comprehend the conditions of faculties collectively, and take appropriate measures. Using the results of examinations carried out in each grade as indices, we examined levels of academic ability and established various support programs based on the results. Basic chemistry, biology, and physics courses were designed to help first-year students acquire essential academic skills. For second, third, and fourth-year students, two types of support programs were implemented: supplementary instruction to help students improve their understanding of basic topics in pharmaceutical sciences, and an e-learning system to promote self-study, requiring minimal assistance from teachers. Although educational benefits were observed in many students, the number of learners whose understanding failed to improve as a result of the support programs continued to increase. Consequently, The Support Section for Pharmaceutical Education opened in October 2011 to address these concerns. The support section functions mainly to provide individual assistance to students who lack strong academic abilities, and provides teachers with information useful for educational reform. Here, we describe the educational support provided by our faculty and its effectiveness.

  9. Measuring Perceptions of Engagement in Teamwork in Youth Development Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cater, Melissa; Jones, Kimberly Y.

    2014-01-01

    The literature regarding teamwork has supported the idea that the key to improving team performance is to understand team processes. Early work within the realm of teamwork focused on quantifiable measures of team performance, like number of products developed. The measure of a successful team hinged on whether or not the team accomplished the end…

  10. Improvement of air quality according to Mobile reduction measures to establish Korean Auto-oil program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunwoo, Y.; Jo, H.; Ma, Y.; Kim, S.; Hong, K.; Lim, Y.; Javascript:Setnextpage('sponsor')

    2011-12-01

    The mobile of NOx and PM10 emission of Korea in 2007 accounted for 42%, 23%, respectively (excluded fugitive dust). Seoul highly affected mobile emission which accounted for 46%, 49%, respectively. Korean government ,therefore, established "Special Act for improvement of air quality in Seoul metropolitan area" including mobile emission reduction measures and organized research forum including reformation of fuel and cars, risk assessment, control of greenhouse gas and assessment of air quality to establish Korean Auto-oil program This study quantitatively analyses improvement of air quality in Seoul according to the reformation of fuel and supply of DPF in Korean Auto-oil program. WRF-SMOKE-CMAQ were emploied for this study. SO2, CO, NOx, PM10 and VOCs emission are based on the INTEX-B emission inventory, NH3 were from the REAS emission inventory. Korea emission is derived by CAPSS (Clean Air Policy Support System) data. The reduction through reformation of fuel and supply of DPF is calculated by reduction ratio of air pollutants with strengthen fuel quality standard and number of car supplied DPF, refer to Metropolitan Air Quality Management Office Republic of Korea (2011) in detail. The effect of air quality is quantifiably comparing modeling results which are applied/not applied on the measures. This study will be provided basic data to establish Korean Auto-oil program through quantifying and predicting to improvement of air quality according to the mobile measures. Acknowledgement This research was supported in part by the "Assessment of risk and health benefits considering exposure characteristics of fuel" project sponsored by the Korea Automobile Environmental Association.

  11. Measuring the Effects of Virtual Pair Programming in an Introductory Programming Java Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharis, N. Z.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of virtual pair programming (VPP) on student performance and satisfaction in an introductory Java course. Students used online tools that integrated desktop sharing and real-time communication, and the metrics examined showed that VPP is an acceptable alternative to individual programming experience.…

  12. Optimal Design of Measurement Programs for the Parameter Identification of Dynamic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Brincker, Rune

    The design of a measured program devoted to parameter identification of structural dynamic systems is considered, the design problem is formulated as an optimization problem due to minimize the total expected cost of the measurement program. All the calculations are based on a priori knowledge...

  13. Spanish Educational Programs and Measures for Achieving European Objectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Luz Martínez Seijo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available European education policy is based on the principle of subsidiarity on common goals for the year 2020 among the member countries of the European Union. This article explores the educational context in Spain and the method used to achieve the European objectives. Currently we are living in a system of political decentralization and have experienced important legislative changes in recent years. Consequently, through a documentary analysis of the reports and papers produced by the Ministry of Education, the proposals for the Educational and Social Covenant of 2010 and Territorial Cooperation Programs, we identified the commitments that the Spanish government has undertaken to work in conjunction with the European objectives.

  14. Management Development Training; Multiple Measurement of Its Effect When Used to Increase the Impact of a Long Term Motivational Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camealy, John Bremer

    This field investigation applied multiple measures to determine effects of management development training when used to increase the benefits from a long term motivational program. Two experimental groups and a control group were used. Instruments applied included the Miner Sentence Completion Scale, the Leadership Opinion Questionnaire (LOQ), and…

  15. STX--Fortran-4 program for estimates of tree populations from 3P sample-tree-measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    L. R. Grosenbaugh

    1967-01-01

    Describes how to use an improved and greatly expanded version of an earlier computer program (1964) that converts dendrometer measurements of 3P-sample trees to population values in terms of whatever units user desires. Many new options are available, including that of obtaining a product-yield and appraisal report based on regression coefficients supplied by user....

  16. ESADA Plutonium Program Critical Experiments: Power Distribution Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akkurt, H.

    2001-06-12

    In 1967, a series of critical experiments were conducted at the Westinghouse Reactor Evaluation Center (WREC) using mixed-oxide (MOX) PuO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2} and/or UO{sub 2} fuels in various lattices and configurations. These experiments were performed under the joint sponsorship of Empire State Atomic Development Associates (ESADA) plutonium program and Westinghouse. The purpose of these experiments was to develop experimental data useful in validating analytical methods used in the design of plutonium-bearing replacement fuel for water reactors. Three different fuel types were used during the experimental program: two MOX fuels and a low-enriched UO{sub 2} fuel. The MOX fuels were distinguished by their {sup 240}Pu content: 8 wt % {sup 240}Pu and 24 wt % {sup 240}Pu. Both MOX fuels contained 2.0 wt % PuO{sub 2} in natural UO{sub 2}. The UO{sub 2} fuel with 2.72 wt % enrichment was used for comparison with the plutonium data and for use in multiregion experiments.

  17. The Role of Counseling in an Associate Degree in Labor Studies Program: Counseling in a Work Oriented Setting (The Importance of Including Counseling Courses within the Curriculum of the Associate Degree in Labor Studies Program at the Community College Level).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingery, Bruce

    This research had a two-fold purpose: (1) to assess the need for a labor studies program at the community college level; and (2) to consider the advisability of including within such a curriculum a cross-section of adult/family/worker-oriented counseling and guidance courses. The study employed a questionnaire completed by union delegates, which…

  18. A Comprehensive Program for Measurement of Military Aircraft Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Mengdawn [ORNL

    2009-11-01

    Emissions of gases and particulate matter by military aircraft were characterized inplume by 'extractive' and 'optical remote-sensing (ORS)' technologies. Non-volatile particle size distribution, number and mass concentrations were measured with good precision and reproducibly. Time-integrated particulate filter samples were collected and analyzed for smoke number, elemental composition, carbon contents, and sulfate. Observed at EEP the geometric mean diameter (as measured by the mobility diameter) generally increased as the engine power setting increased, which is consistent with downstream observations. The modal diameters at the downstream locations are larger than that at EEP at the same engine power level. The results indicate that engine particles were processed by condensation, for example, leading to particle growth in-plume. Elemental analysis indicated little metals were present in the exhaust, while most of the exhaust materials in the particulate phase were carbon and sulfate (in the JP-8 fuel). CO, CO{sub 2}, NO, NO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, HCHO, ethylene, acetylene, propylene, and alkanes were measured. The last five species were most noticeable under engine idle condition. The levels of hydrocarbons emitted at high engine power level were generally below the detection limits. ORS techniques yielded real-time gaseous measurement, but the same techniques could not be extended directly to ultrafine particles found in all engine exhausts. The results validated sampling methodology and measurement techniques used for non-volatile particulate aircraft emissions, which also highlighted the needs for further research on sampling and measurement for volatile particulate matter and semi-volatile species in the engine exhaust especially at the low engine power setting.

  19. [Assessment at distance of a self-measurement of blood pressure education program: The PEA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atallah, A; Pham Hoang Minh, A; Billy-Brissac, R; Dinarque, C

    2015-06-01

    Current recommendations advocate self-measurement of blood pressure (SMBP) for the diagnosis and monitoring of high blood pressure (HBP). The "PEA" is an education program of the HTA GWAD network. Its mission is to train hypertensive patients with SMBP. The objective of this study is to evaluate between 6 months to 1 year after the efficiency of this program on the theoretical and practical knowledge of patients, as well as their behavior towards hypertension. Hundred and twenty patients were included in the study. In an interview, their knowledge was assessed using a questionnaire. The acquisition of the technique, reading and figures transcription, purchase of a SMBP device were also evaluated. The average questionnaire score was 5.7/13 (σ=2.7) before the educational session, 9.5/13 (σ=1.9) 1 week after the educational session. This improvement persisted over time with 8.9/13 (σ=2.9) correct answers 6 months to 1 year later. Exactly 73.3% (n=88/120) had a self-measurement device. Among them, 44.3% (n=39/88) practiced SMBP before medical consultations and 10% systematically did it before each medical consultation. A number of 84.2% (n=101/120) mastered the technique and 76.7% (n=92/120) of patients knew how to transcribe figures. Reading and understanding figures were acquired by 61.7% (n=74/120) of patients. A high level of education was correlated with a high level of practice. PEA is a sustainable solid and stable education program. However, the practice of SMBP is not yet systematic and remains to be encouraged in some patients. Given this situation, the network offers improvements in its program: highlighting of objectives, calendar reminder, "coaching" nurse. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Program to increase the measurement capabilities of the AFGL (Air Force Geophysics Laboratory) fixed and mobile high altitude lidar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, Warren P.; Davidson, Gilbert

    1988-03-01

    The capabilities of the AFGL fixed and mobile (GLEAM and GLINT) high altitude lidar systems have been enhanced to include sodium fluorescence measurement capability and daytime Rayleigh backscatter measurement capability. A detector system has been designed and fabricated for the 24 inch telescope in the mobile system which includes a Fabry-Perot etalon to allow daytime measurements. Operational support has been provided during field programs to Wallops Island, Virginia, and to the Poker Flat Rocket Research Range, Alaska, and during experiments at the fixed location.

  1. USCEA/NIST measurement assurance programs for the radiopharmaceutical and nuclear power industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golas, D.B. [Council for Energy Awareness, Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-12-31

    In cooperation with the U.S. Council for Energy Awareness (USCEA), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) supervises and administers two measurement assurance programs for radioactivity measurement traceability. One, in existence since the mid 1970s, provides traceability to suppliers of radiochemicals and radiopharmaceuticals, dose calibrators, and nuclear pharmacy services. The second program, begun in 1987, provides traceability to the nuclear power industry for utilities, source suppliers, and service laboratories. Each program is described, and the results of measurements of samples of known, but undisclosed activity, prepared at NIST and measured by the participants are presented.

  2. Evaluation of a multi-faceted diabetes care program including community-based peer educators in Takeo province, Cambodia, 2007-2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn Taniguchi

    Full Text Available Early detection and treatment for diabetes are essential for reducing disability and death from the disease. Finding effective screening and treatment for individuals living with diabetes in resource-limited countries is a challenge. MoPoTsyo, a Cambodian non-governmental organization, addressed this gap by utilizing a multi-pronged approach with community-based peer educators, access to laboratory procedures, local outpatient medical consultation, and a revolving drug fund. This study evaluated outcomes of MoPoTsyo's diabetes program in Takeo Province by assessing glycemic and blood pressure outcomes for individuals diagnosed with diabetes over a 24-month follow-up period between 2007-2013.This is a retrospective cohort analysis of records without a comparison group. We calculated the mean fasting blood glucose (FBG and blood pressure (BP at regular intervals of follow-up. The proportion of patients reaching recommended treatment targets for FBG and BP was assessed.Of the 3411 patients enrolled in the program, 2230 were included in the study. The cohort was predominantly female (68.9% with a median age of 54 years. Median follow-up time in the program was 16 months (4.9-38.4 months. Mean FBG decreased 63.9 mg/dl in mean FBG (95% CI 58.5 to 69.3 at one year of follow-up (p<0.001. After one year, 45% (321/708 of patients achieved goal FBG < 126. Of the 41.6% (927/2230 with elevated BP at enrollment, systolic and diastolic BP levels significantly decreased (p<0.001 by 16.9 mmHg (95% CI 1.2 to 22.9 and 10 mm Hg (95% CI 0.7 to 12.9 respectively between enrollment and one year of follow-up. At one year of follow-up, 51.1%% (183/355 of these patients reached the BP goal < 140/90.The improved outcome indicators of diabetes care for MoPoTsyo's Takeo program evaluation showed promise. The program demonstrated a reasonable and practical approach to delivering effective diabetes care in a rural area and may serve as a model for other low-income communities

  3. Evaluation of a multi-faceted diabetes care program including community-based peer educators in Takeo province, Cambodia, 2007-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Dawn; LoGerfo, James; van Pelt, Maurits; Mielcarek, Bessie; Huster, Karin; Haider, Mahri; Thomas, Bernadette

    2017-01-01

    Early detection and treatment for diabetes are essential for reducing disability and death from the disease. Finding effective screening and treatment for individuals living with diabetes in resource-limited countries is a challenge. MoPoTsyo, a Cambodian non-governmental organization, addressed this gap by utilizing a multi-pronged approach with community-based peer educators, access to laboratory procedures, local outpatient medical consultation, and a revolving drug fund. This study evaluated outcomes of MoPoTsyo's diabetes program in Takeo Province by assessing glycemic and blood pressure outcomes for individuals diagnosed with diabetes over a 24-month follow-up period between 2007-2013. This is a retrospective cohort analysis of records without a comparison group. We calculated the mean fasting blood glucose (FBG) and blood pressure (BP) at regular intervals of follow-up. The proportion of patients reaching recommended treatment targets for FBG and BP was assessed. Of the 3411 patients enrolled in the program, 2230 were included in the study. The cohort was predominantly female (68.9%) with a median age of 54 years. Median follow-up time in the program was 16 months (4.9-38.4 months). Mean FBG decreased 63.9 mg/dl in mean FBG (95% CI 58.5 to 69.3) at one year of follow-up (p<0.001). After one year, 45% (321/708) of patients achieved goal FBG < 126. Of the 41.6% (927/2230) with elevated BP at enrollment, systolic and diastolic BP levels significantly decreased (p<0.001) by 16.9 mmHg (95% CI 1.2 to 22.9) and 10 mm Hg (95% CI 0.7 to 12.9) respectively between enrollment and one year of follow-up. At one year of follow-up, 51.1%% (183/355) of these patients reached the BP goal < 140/90. The improved outcome indicators of diabetes care for MoPoTsyo's Takeo program evaluation showed promise. The program demonstrated a reasonable and practical approach to delivering effective diabetes care in a rural area and may serve as a model for other low-income communities

  4. Limites e possibilidades dos programas de aceleração de aprendizagem The limits and possibilities of including students from remedial learning programs in regular schooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarilza Prado de Sousa

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available Pretendi neste trabalho analisar os limites e possibilidades da escola integrar alunos com atraso de escolaridade em processos de educação regular, que receberam apoio de programas de aceleração da aprendizagem. Baseada nas avaliações realizadas desses programas por professores do Programa de Estudos Pós-Graduados em Psicologia da Educação da PUCSP e por pesquisadores do Núcleo de Avaliação Educacional da Fundação Carlos Chagas, discuto os resultados efetivamente alcançados considerando duas categorias de análise. Na primeira categoria, analiso os efeitos da estratégia pedagógica promovida pelos programas, nas aprendizagens e progressos dos alunos participantes. Na segunda categoria, procuro analisar as possibilidades de integração/inclusão desses alunos no processo de educação regular. Finalmente, à guisa de conclusão, procuro fazer algumas considerações teórico-metodológicas. Distinguindo integração de inclusão, discuto os limites e possibilidades que as ações dos programas têm de realmente promoverem o desenvolvimento de uma escola sem exclusão.This article analyzes the limits and possibilities for schools to include students with schooling deficits who receive support from the accelerated learning programs, in their regular education processes. Based on evaluations of these programs done by professors from the Post Graduate Program in Educational Psychology of the Pontifical Catholic University of São Paulo and by researchers from the Nucleus for Educational Evaluation of the Carlos Chagas Foundation, the results will be discussed in two analytical categories. In the first category, I analyze the effects of the teaching strategies promoted by the programs on the learning and progress of the participating students. In the second category, I seek to analyze the possibilities for integration/inclusion of these students in the regular educational process. Finally by way of conclusion, I try to make some

  5. Benefits of a 12-week lifestyle modification program including diet and combined aerobic and resistance exercise on albuminuria in diabetic and non-diabetic Japanese populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto-Kabasawa, Keiko; Hosojima, Michihiro; Yata, Yusuke; Saito, Mariko; Tanaka, Noriko; Tanaka, Junta; Tanabe, Naohito; Narita, Ichiei; Arakawa, Masaaki; Saito, Akihiko

    2015-12-01

    Albuminuria is a biomarker for chronic kidney disease and an independent predictor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. A recent meta-analysis concluded that these risks increase with urinary albumin concentration, even when below the microalbuminuria threshold. Thus, minimizing urinary albumin may be a valuable therapeutic goal regardless of disease status. We investigated the benefits and safety of a 12-week lifestyle modification program including diet and combined aerobic and resistance exercise for reducing albuminuria in 295 normoalbuminuric or microalbuminuric Japanese adults, including 30 with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), 104 with metabolic syndrome (MS), and 145 with hypertension (HT). In the study population, the urinary albumin:creatinine ratio (UACR) was reduced significantly (ΔUACR -3.8 ± 16.8 mg/g, P < 0.001) with no change in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (ΔeGFR -0.4 ± 7.4 mL/min/1.73 m(2), P = 0.343). The reduction in UACR was associated with decreased fasting plasma glucose (P < 0.05). The UACR was also reduced in the T2DM, MS, and HT groups with no change in eGFR. Reduced UACR was associated with decreased fasting plasma glucose in the MS group and decreased systolic blood pressure in the HT group. The UACR was also reduced in 46 subjects using renin-angiotensin system inhibitors with no change in eGFR. Our 12-week lifestyle modification program reduced UACR, maintained eGFR, and improved multiple fitness findings in Japanese subjects including T2DM, MS, and HT patients.

  6. Anthropomorphic measurements that include central fat distribution are more closely related with key risk factors than BMI in CKD stage 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Philip D; McIntyre, Natasha J; Fluck, Richard J; McIntyre, Christopher W; Taal, Maarten W

    2012-01-01

    Body Mass Index (BMI) as a marker of obesity is an established risk factor for chronic kidney disease (CKD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, BMI can overestimate obesity. Anthropomorphic measurements that include central fat deposition are emerging as a more important risk factor. We studied BMI, waist circumference (WC), waist-to-height ratio (WHtR), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) and conicity index (CI) in a cohort of patients with CKD stage 3 and compared the associations with other known risk factors for CKD progression and CVD. 1740 patients with CKD stage 3 were recruited from primary care for the Renal Risk in Derby study. Each participant underwent clinical assessment, including anthropomorphic measurements and pulse wave velocity (PWV), as well as urine and serum biochemistry tests. The mean age of the cohort was 72.9±9 years with 60% females. The mean eGFR was 52.5±10.4 ml/min/1.73 m(2) and 16.9% of the cohort had diabetes. With the cohort divided into normal and increased risk of morbidity and mortality using each anthropomorphic measurement, those measurements that included increased central fat distribution were significantly associated with more risk factors for CKD progression and CVD than increased BMI. Univariable analysis demonstrated central fat distribution was correlated with more risk factors than BMI. Subgroup analyses using recognised BMI cut-offs to define obesity and quartiles of WHR and CI demonstrated that increasing central fat distribution was significantly associated with more CKD and CVD risk factors than increasing BMI. Anthropomorphic measurements that include a measure of central fat deposition are related to more key risk factors in CKD stage 3 patients than BMI. Central fat deposition may be of greater importance as a risk factor in CKD than BMI and reliance on BMI alone may therefore underestimate the associated risk.

  7. Anthropomorphic measurements that include central fat distribution are more closely related with key risk factors than BMI in CKD stage 3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip D Evans

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Body Mass Index (BMI as a marker of obesity is an established risk factor for chronic kidney disease (CKD and cardiovascular disease (CVD. However, BMI can overestimate obesity. Anthropomorphic measurements that include central fat deposition are emerging as a more important risk factor. We studied BMI, waist circumference (WC, waist-to-height ratio (WHtR, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR and conicity index (CI in a cohort of patients with CKD stage 3 and compared the associations with other known risk factors for CKD progression and CVD. METHODS: 1740 patients with CKD stage 3 were recruited from primary care for the Renal Risk in Derby study. Each participant underwent clinical assessment, including anthropomorphic measurements and pulse wave velocity (PWV, as well as urine and serum biochemistry tests. RESULTS: The mean age of the cohort was 72.9±9 years with 60% females. The mean eGFR was 52.5±10.4 ml/min/1.73 m(2 and 16.9% of the cohort had diabetes. With the cohort divided into normal and increased risk of morbidity and mortality using each anthropomorphic measurement, those measurements that included increased central fat distribution were significantly associated with more risk factors for CKD progression and CVD than increased BMI. Univariable analysis demonstrated central fat distribution was correlated with more risk factors than BMI. Subgroup analyses using recognised BMI cut-offs to define obesity and quartiles of WHR and CI demonstrated that increasing central fat distribution was significantly associated with more CKD and CVD risk factors than increasing BMI. CONCLUSION: Anthropomorphic measurements that include a measure of central fat deposition are related to more key risk factors in CKD stage 3 patients than BMI. Central fat deposition may be of greater importance as a risk factor in CKD than BMI and reliance on BMI alone may therefore underestimate the associated risk.

  8. FAR EAST TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS OF U.S. NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS (INCLUDING VOLUNTARY AGENCIES, MISSIONS, AND FOUNDATIONS), DIRECTORY - 1966.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BURGESS, MARY ELLEN, ED.

    PART 1 OF THIS PROGRAM GUIDE LISTS TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE AGENCIES AND OTHER ORGANIZATIONS FOR THE FAR EAST, TOGETHER WITH ADDRESSES, TELEPHONE NUMBERS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS, PROGRAM DIRECTORS, COUNTRIES SERVED, AND ESTIMATED COSTS. PART 2 GIVES PROGRAM DATA (ORGANIZATIONS, OPERATING AND SUPPORT PROGRAMS, TYPES OF ASSISTANCE, REGIONAL REPRESENTATIVES,…

  9. Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) Community Observer Program including the Science Enhancement Option Box (SEO Box) - 12 TB On-board Flash Memory for Serendipitous Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schingler, Robert; Villasenor, J. N.; Ricker, G. R.; Latham, D. W.; Vanderspek, R. K.; Ennico, K. A.; Lewis, B. S.; Bakos, G.; Brown, T. M.; Burgasser, A. J.; Charbonneau, D.; Clampin, M.; Deming, L. D.; Doty, J. P.; Dunham, E. W.; Elliot, J. L.; Holman, M. J.; Ida, S.; Jenkins, J. M.; Jernigan, J. G.; Kawai, N.; Laughlin, G. P.; Lissauer, J. J.; Martel, F.; Sasselov, D. D.; Seager, S.; Torres, G.; Udry, S.; Winn, J. N.; Worden, S. P.

    2010-01-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will perform an all-sky survey in a low-inclination, low-Earth orbit. TESS's 144 GB of raw data collected each orbit will be stacked, cleaned, cut, compressed and downloaded. The Community Observer Program is a Science Enhancement Option (SEO) that takes advantage of the low-radiation environment, technology advances in flash memory, and the vast amount of astronomical data collected by TESS. The Community Observer Program requires the addition of a 12 TB "SEO Box” inside the TESS Bus. The hardware can be built using low-cost Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) components and fits within TESS's margins while accommodating GSFC gold rules. The SEO Box collects and stores a duplicate of the TESS camera data at a "raw” stage ( 4.3 GB/orbit, after stacking and cleaning) and makes them available for on-board processing. The sheer amount of onboard storage provided by the SEO Box allows the stacking and storing of several months of data, allowing the investigator to probe deeper in time prior to a given event. Additionally, with computation power and data in standard formats, investigators can utilize data-mining techniques to investigate serendipitous phenomenon, including pulsating stars, eclipsing binaries, supernovae or other transient phenomena. The Community Observer Program enables ad-hoc teams of citizen scientists to propose, test, refine and rank algorithms for on-board analysis to support serendipitous science. Combining "best practices” of online collaboration, with careful moderation and community management, enables this `crowd sourced’ participatory exploration with a minimal risk and impact on the core TESS Team. This system provides a powerful and independent tool opening a wide range of opportunity for science enhancement and secondary science. Support for this work has been provided by NASA, the Kavli Foundation, Google, and the Smithsonian Institution.

  10. Program Fidelity Measures Associated With an Effective Child Restraint Program: Buckle-Up Safely

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keay, Lisa; Simpson, Judy M.; Brown, Julie; Bilston, Lynne E.; Fegan, Maureen; Cosgrove, Louise; Stevenson, Mark; Ivers, Rebecca Q.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We sought to identify the program fidelity factors associated with successful implementation of the Buckle-Up Safely program, targeting correct use of age-appropriate child car restraints. Methods. In 2010, we conducted a cluster randomized controlled trial of 830 families with children attending preschools and long day care centers in South West Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Families received the Buckle-Up Safely program in the intervention arm of the study (13 services). Independent observers assessed the type of restraint and whether it was used correctly. Results. This detailed process evaluation showed that the multifaceted program was implemented with high fidelity. Program protocols were adhered to and messaging was consistently delivered. Results from multilevel and logistic regression analyses show that age-appropriate restraint use was associated with attendance at a parent information session hosted at the center (adjusted odd ratio [AOR] = 3.66; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.61, 8.29) and adversely affected by the child being aged 2 to 3 years (AOR = 0.14; 95% CI = 0.07, 0.30) or being from a family with more than 2 children (AOR = 0.34; 95% CI = 0.17, 0.67). Conclusions. Findings highlight the importance of parents receiving hands-on education regarding the proper use of age-appropriate child restraints. PMID:25602901

  11. The reliability and internal consistency of an Internet-capable computer program for measuring utilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenert, L A

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the reliability and internal consistency of measurements of utilities performed with a computer program (iMPACT2) designed for Internet surveys and Internet patient decision-support systems. We implemented the Internet Multimedia Preference Assessor Construction Tool, version 2 (iMPACT2) program using the combination of a web server, HTML files, and a web-accessible database. The program randomized subjects, screened their responses for missing data and failures of internal consistency, assisted patients with resolving certain inconsistencies, and, upon a subject's completion of the protocol, provided a report of results to the research assistant administering the program. To validate the iMPACT2 program, we recruited 60 healthy community volunteers and elicited preferences in a research-lab setting using a visual analog scale (VAS) and the standard gamble (SG) for subject's current health and three hypothetical states. For purposes of comparison, we also administered a Short Form-12 (SF-12) health-assessment questionnaire. Subjects used the computer software on two occasions separated by 2-4 weeks of time. Visual analog scale and standard gamble ratings for subjects' current health were reliable (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of 0.82 and 0.84 (two outliers excluded -0.60 without exclusions), respectively) were comparable with the reliability of the Physical and Mental Component scales of the SF-12 (ICCs of 0.84 and 0.75, respectively). Subjects could easily discriminate between hypothetical states (D scores 0.74 for SG and 0.90 for VAS), and 94% had a completely internally consistent ordering of preference ratings for states. iMPACT2 produces measurements of standard gamble utilities that are reliable and have a high degree of internal consistency. Procedures for assessment of utilities developed for desktop computer programs can be translated to software designed for the Internet, facilitating the use of

  12. Developing measures of community-relevant outcomes for violence prevention programs: a community-based participatory research approach to measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausman, Alice J; Baker, Courtney N; Komaroff, Eugene; Thomas, Nicole; Guerra, Terry; Hohl, Bernadette C; Leff, Stephen S

    2013-12-01

    Community-Based Participatory Research is a research paradigm that encourages community participation in designing and implementing evaluation research, though the actual outcome measures usually reflect the "external" academic researchers' view of program effect and the policy-makers' needs for decision-making. This paper describes a replicable process by which existing standardized psychometric scales commonly used in youth-related intervention programs were modified to measure indicators of program success defined by community partners. This study utilizes a secondary analysis of data gathered in the context of a community-based youth violence prevention program. Data were retooled into new measures developed using items from the Alabama Parenting Questionnaire, the Hare Area Specific Self-Esteem Scale, and the Youth Asset Survey. These measures evaluated two community-defined outcome indicators, "More Parental Involvement" and "Showing Kids Love." Results showed that existing scale items can be re-organized to create measures of community-defined outcomes that are psychometrically reliable and valid. Results also show that the community definitions of parent or parenting caregivers exemplified by the two indicators are similar to how these constructs have been defined in previous research, but they are not synonymous. There are nuanced differences that are important and worthy of better understanding, in part through better measurement.

  13. Review of Evaluation, Measurement and Verification Approaches Used to Estimate the Load Impacts and Effectiveness of Energy Efficiency Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messenger, Mike; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Golemboski, Bill; Goldman, Charles A.; Schiller, Steven R.

    2010-04-14

    Public and private funding for end-use energy efficiency actions is expected to increase significantly in the United States over the next decade. For example, Barbose et al (2009) estimate that spending on ratepayer-funded energy efficiency programs in the U.S. could increase from $3.1 billion in 2008 to $7.5 and 12.4 billion by 2020 under their medium and high scenarios. This increase in spending could yield annual electric energy savings ranging from 0.58% - 0.93% of total U.S. retail sales in 2020, up from 0.34% of retail sales in 2008. Interest in and support for energy efficiency has broadened among national and state policymakers. Prominent examples include {approx}$18 billion in new funding for energy efficiency programs (e.g., State Energy Program, Weatherization, and Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants) in the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Increased funding for energy efficiency should result in more benefits as well as more scrutiny of these results. As energy efficiency becomes a more prominent component of the U.S. national energy strategy and policies, assessing the effectiveness and energy saving impacts of energy efficiency programs is likely to become increasingly important for policymakers and private and public funders of efficiency actions. Thus, it is critical that evaluation, measurement, and verification (EM&V) is carried out effectively and efficiently, which implies that: (1) Effective program evaluation, measurement, and verification (EM&V) methodologies and tools are available to key stakeholders (e.g., regulatory agencies, program administrators, consumers, and evaluation consultants); and (2) Capacity (people and infrastructure resources) is available to conduct EM&V activities and report results in ways that support program improvement and provide data that reliably compares achieved results against goals and similar programs in other jurisdictions (benchmarking). The National Action Plan for Energy

  14. Is expanding HPV vaccination programs to include school-aged boys likely to be value-for-money: a cost-utility analysis in a country with an existing school-girl program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Amber L; Kvizhinadze, Giorgi; Wilson, Nick; Smith, Megan; Canfell, Karen; Blakely, Tony

    2014-06-26

    Similar to many developed countries, vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) is provided only to girls in New Zealand and coverage is relatively low (47% in school-aged girls for dose 3). Some jurisdictions have already extended HPV vaccination to school-aged boys. Thus, exploration of the cost-utility of adding boys' vaccination is relevant. We modeled the incremental health gain and costs for extending the current girls-only program to boys, intensifying the current girls-only program to achieve 73% coverage, and extension of the intensive program to boys. A Markov macro-simulation model, which accounted for herd immunity, was developed for an annual cohort of 12-year-olds in 2011 and included the future health states of: cervical cancer, pre-cancer (CIN I to III), genital warts, and three other HPV-related cancers. In each state, health sector costs, including additional health costs from extra life, and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) were accumulated. The model included New Zealand data on cancer incidence and survival, and other cause mortality (all by sex, age, ethnicity and deprivation). At an assumed local willingness-to-pay threshold of US$29,600, vaccination of 12-year-old boys to achieve the current coverage for girls would not be cost-effective, at US$61,400/QALY gained (95% UI $29,700 to $112,000; OECD purchasing power parities) compared to the current girls-only program, with an assumed vaccine cost of US$59 (NZ$113). This was dominated though by the intensified girls-only program; US$17,400/QALY gained (95% UI: dominant to $46,100). Adding boys to this intensified program was also not cost-effective; US$128,000/QALY gained, 95% UI: $61,900 to $247,000).Vaccination of boys was not found to be cost-effective, even for additional scenarios with very low vaccine or program administration costs - only when combined vaccine and administration costs were NZ$125 or lower per dose was vaccination of boys cost-effective. These results suggest that

  15. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, November 2002.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holdridge, D. J.

    2002-12-03

    Fall 2002 Intensive Operation Periods: Single Column Model and Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle--In an Intensive Operation Period (IOP) on November 3-23, 2002, researchers at the SGP CART site are collecting a detailed data set for use in improving the Single Column Model (SCM), a scaled-down climate model. The SCM represents one vertical column of air above Earth's surface and requires less computation time than a full-scale global climate model. Researchers first use the SCM to efficiently improve submodels of clouds, solar radiation transfer, and atmosphere-surface interactions, then implement the results in large-scale global models. With measured values for a starting point, the SCM predicts atmospheric variables during prescribed time periods. A computer calculates values for such quantities as the amount of solar radiation reaching the surface and predicts how clouds will evolve and interact with incoming light from the sun. Researchers compare the SCM's predictions with actual measurements made during the IOP, then adjust the submodels to make predictions more reliable. A second IOP conducted concurrently with the SCM IOP involves high-altitude, long-duration aircraft flights. The original plan was to use an unmanned aerospace vehicle (UAV), but the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) aircraft Proteus will be substituted because all UAVs have been deployed elsewhere. The UAV is a small, instrument-equipped, remote-control plane that is operated from the ground by a computer. The Proteus is a manned aircraft, originally designed to carry telecommunications relay equipment, that can be reconfigured for uses such as reconnaissance and surveillance, commercial imaging, launching of small space satellites, and atmospheric research. The plane is designed for two on-board pilots in a pressurized cabin, flying to altitudes up to 65,000 feet for as long as 18 hours. The Proteus has a variable wingspan of 77-92 feet and is 56 feet long. The plane

  16. Measuring outcome in an early intervention program for toddlers with autism spectrum disorder: use of a curriculum-based assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Elizabeth C; Dufek, Sarah; Schreibman, Laura; Stahmer, Aubyn C; Pierce, Karen; Courchesne, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Measuring progress of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) during intervention programs is a challenge faced by researchers and clinicians. Typically, standardized assessments of child development are used within research settings to measure the effects of early intervention programs. However, the use of standardized assessments is not without limitations, including lack of sensitivity of some assessments to measure small or slow progress, testing constraints that may affect the child's performance, and the lack of information provided by the assessments that can be used to guide treatment planning. The utility of a curriculum-based assessment is discussed in comparison to the use of standardized assessments to measure child functioning and progress throughout an early intervention program for toddlers with risk for ASD. Scores derived from the curriculum-based assessment were positively correlated with standardized assessments, captured progress masked by standardized assessments, and early scores were predictive of later outcomes. These results support the use of a curriculum-based assessment as an additional and appropriate method for measuring child progress in an early intervention program. Further benefits of the use of curriculum-based measures for use within community settings are discussed.

  17. Measuring Outcome in an Early Intervention Program for Toddlers with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Use of a Curriculum-Based Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth C. Bacon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Measuring progress of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD during intervention programs is a challenge faced by researchers and clinicians. Typically, standardized assessments of child development are used within research settings to measure the effects of early intervention programs. However, the use of standardized assessments is not without limitations, including lack of sensitivity of some assessments to measure small or slow progress, testing constraints that may affect the child’s performance, and the lack of information provided by the assessments that can be used to guide treatment planning. The utility of a curriculum-based assessment is discussed in comparison to the use of standardized assessments to measure child functioning and progress throughout an early intervention program for toddlers with risk for ASD. Scores derived from the curriculum-based assessment were positively correlated with standardized assessments, captured progress masked by standardized assessments, and early scores were predictive of later outcomes. These results support the use of a curriculum-based assessment as an additional and appropriate method for measuring child progress in an early intervention program. Further benefits of the use of curriculum-based measures for use within community settings are discussed.

  18. Poverty reduction program in Georgia: facts and policy measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nino Shatberashvili

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses the capability of the social assistance programme in Georgia to reach its goal and examines its potential to enable the targeted poor to meet their needs and improve their social functioning. The method used for present - ing data includes a literature review, an analysis of reports and the use of the official statistics in the country. The main finding shows that the impact of the benefit varies across the population groups, with children remaining at the highest risk of poverty. Poverty rates vary across regions too, with mountainous regions being in the highest risk group. In June 2013, almost one-third of registered households in the database of socially unprotected families received a targeted Social Assistance Cash benefit. However, we can conclude that according to most benchmarks the programme has suc - ceeded in terms of targeting disadvantaged groups, while as concerns the programme’s efficiency and effectiveness there are areas for improvement regarding the coverage, the size and form of the benefit

  19. The Impact of the Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) Program on Student Reading Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordray, David S.; Pion, Georgine M.; Brandt, Chris; Molefe, Ayrin

    2013-01-01

    One of the most widely used commercially available systems incorporating benchmark assessment and training in differentiated instruction is the Northwest Evaluation Association's (NWEA) Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) program. The MAP program involves two components: (1) computer-adaptive assessments administered to students three to four…

  20. 75 FR 6673 - Expert Meeting on Measurement Criteria for Children's Health Insurance Program; Reauthorization...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-10

    ... Children's Health Insurance Program; Reauthorization Act Pediatric Quality Measures AGENCY: Agency for... (PQMP) under Section 1139A(b) of the Social Security Act as enacted in the Children's Health Insurance... INFORMATION: I. Purpose In early 2009, CHIPRA (Pub. L. 111-3) reauthorized the Child Health Insurance Program...

  1. Nutritional status and feeding-tube placement in patients with locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer included in an induction chemotherapy-based larynx preservation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozec, Alexandre; Benezery, Karen; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Ettaiche, Marc; Vandersteen, Clair; Dassonville, Olivier; Poissonnet, Gilles; Riss, Jean-Christophe; Hannoun-Lévi, Jean-Michel; Chand, Marie-Eve; Leysalle, Axel; Saada, Esma; Sudaka, Anne; Haudebourg, Juliette; Hebert, Christophe; Falewee, Marie-Noelle; Demard, François; Santini, José; Peyrade, Frédéric

    2016-09-01

    The objective of the study is to evaluate the nutritional status and determine its impact on clinical outcomes in patients with locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer included in an induction chemotherapy (ICT)-based larynx preservation program without prophylactic feeding-tube placement. All patients with locally advanced (T3/4, N0-3, M0) hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, technically suitable for total pharyngolaryngectomy, treated by docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (TPF)-ICT for larynx preservation at our institution between 2004 and 2013, were included in this retrospective study. Patients' nutritional status was closely monitored. Enteral nutrition was used if and when a patient was unable to sustain per-oral nutrition and hydration. The impact of nutritional status on clinical outcomes was investigated in univariate and multivariate analysis. A total of 53 patients (42 men and 11 women, mean age = 58.6 ± 8.2 years) were included in this study. Six (11.3 %) patients had lost more than 10 % of their usual body weight before therapy. Compared with patients' usual weight, the mean maximum patient weight loss during therapeutic management was 8.7 ± 4.5 kg. Enteral nutrition was required in 17 patients (32 %). We found no influence of the tested nutritional status-related factors on response to ICT, toxicity of ICT, overall, cause-specific and recurrence-free survival, and on post-therapeutic swallowing outcome. Maximum weight loss was significantly associated with a higher risk of enteral tube feeding during therapy (p = 0.03) and of complications (grade ≥3, p = 0.006) during RT. Without prophylactic feeding-tube placement, approximately one-third of the patients required enteral nutrition. There was no significant impact of nutritional status on oncologic or functional outcomes.

  2. A test program to measure fluid mechanical whirl-excitation forces in centrifugal pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennen, C. E.; Acosta, A. J.; Caughey, T. K.

    1980-01-01

    The details of a test program for the measurement of the unsteady forces on centrifugal impellers are discussed. Various hydrodynamic flows are identified as possible contributors to these destabilizing forces.

  3. A program to compute geographical positions of underwater artifact based on linear measurements

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ganesan, P.

    While carrying out underwater positioning in shallow waters, the Diver Archaeologists measure lengths and bearings from a base line of the well-established control network to each and every corner of the artifact. A program in Basic language...

  4. A Review of Quality Measures for Assessing the Impact of Antimicrobial Stewardship Programs in Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Richard Akpan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The growing problem of antimicrobial resistance (AMR has led to calls for antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASP to control antibiotic use in healthcare settings. Key strategies include prospective audit with feedback and intervention, and formulary restriction and preauthorization. Education, guidelines, clinical pathways, de-escalation, and intravenous to oral conversion are also part of some programs. Impact and quality of ASP can be assessed using process or outcome measures. Outcome measures are categorized as microbiological, patient or financial outcomes. The objective of this review was to provide an overview of quality measures for assessing ASP and the reported impact of ASP in peer-reviewed studies, focusing particularly on patient outcomes. A literature search of papers published in English between 1990 and June 2015 was conducted in five databases using a combination of search terms. Primary studies of any design were included. A total of 63 studies were included in this review. Four studies defined quality metrics for evaluating ASP. Twenty-one studies assessed the impact of ASP on antimicrobial utilization and cost, 25 studies evaluated impact on resistance patterns and/or rate of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI. Thirteen studies assessed impact on patient outcomes including mortality, length of stay (LOS and readmission rates. Six of these 13 studies reported non-significant difference in mortality between pre- and post-ASP intervention, and five reported reductions in mortality rate. On LOS, six studies reported shorter LOS post intervention; a significant reduction was reported in one of these studies. Of note, this latter study reported significantly (p < 0.001 higher unplanned readmissions related to infections post-ASP. Patient outcomes need to be a key component of ASP evaluation. The choice of metrics is influenced by data and resource availability. Controlling for confounders must be considered in the design of

  5. Comparison of LC–MS-MS and GC–MS Analysis of Benzodiazepine Compounds Included in the Drug Demand Reduction Urinalysis Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Erick Roman; Knapp, Joshua A.; Horn, Carl K.; Stillman, Stedra L.; Evans, James E.; Arfsten, Darryl P.

    2016-01-01

    Liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS-MS) offers specific advantages over gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS) such as the ability to identify and measure a broader range of compounds with minimal sample preparation. Comparative analysis of LC–MS-MS versus GC–MS was performed for urinalysis detection of five benzodiazepine compounds currently part of the Department of Defense (DoD) Drug Demand Reduction Program (DDRP) testing panel; alpha-hydroxyalprazolam, oxazepam, lorazepam, nordiazepam and temazepam. In the analyses of internally prepared control urine samples at concentrations around the DDRP administrative decision point for benzodiazepines (100 ng/mL), both technologies produced comparable results with average accuracies between 99.7 and 107.3% and average coefficients of variation (%CV) MS-MS analysis. However, the effects were controlled by using deuterated internal standards (ISTDs). Additionally, there was a 39% increase in nordiazepam mean concentration analyzed by LC–MS-MS due to suppression of the ISTD ion by the flurazepam metabolite 2-hydroxyethylflurazepam. The ease and speed of sample extraction, the broader range of compounds that can be analyzed and shorter run time make the LC–MS-MS technology a suitable and expedient alternative confirmation technology for benzodiazepine testing. PMID:26755538

  6. Measurement of area and personal breathing zone concentrations of diesel particulate matter (DPM) during oil and gas extraction operations, including hydraulic fracturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esswein, Eric J; Alexander-Scott, Marissa; Snawder, John; Breitenstein, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Diesel engines serve many purposes in modern oil and gas extraction activities. Diesel particulate matter (DPM) emitted from diesel engines is a complex aerosol that may cause adverse health effects depending on exposure dose and duration. This study reports on personal breathing zone (PBZ) and area measurements for DPM (expressed as elemental carbon) during oil and gas extraction operations including drilling, completions (which includes hydraulic fracturing), and servicing work. Researchers at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) collected 104 full-shift air samples (49 PBZ and 55 area) in Colorado, North Dakota, Texas, and New Mexico during a four-year period from 2008-2012. The arithmetic mean (AM) of the full shift TWA PBZ samples was 10 µg/m3; measurements ranged from 0.1-52 µg/m3. The geometric mean (GM) for the PBZ samples was 7 µg/m3. The AM of the TWA area measurements was 17 µg/m3 and ranged from 0.1-68 µg/m3. The GM for the area measurements was 9.5 µg/m3. Differences between the GMs of the PBZ samples and area samples were not statistically different (P > 0.05). Neither the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), NIOSH, nor the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) have established occupational exposure limits (OEL) for DPM. However, the State of California, Department of Health Services lists a time-weighted average (TWA) OEL for DPM as elemental carbon (EC) exposure of 20 µg/m3. Five of 49 (10.2%) PBZ TWA measurements exceeded the 20 µg/m3 EC criterion. These measurements were collected on Sandmover and Transfer Belt (T-belt) Operators, Blender and Chemical Truck Operators, and Water Transfer Operators during hydraulic fracturing operations. Recommendations to minimize DPM exposures include elimination (locating diesel-driven pumps away from well sites), substitution, (use of alternative fuels), engineering controls using advanced emission control technologies

  7. Development of a 2-h suicide prevention program for medical staff including nurses and medical residents: A two-center pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagami, Yukako; Kubo, Hiroaki; Katsuki, Ryoko; Sakai, Tomomichi; Sugihara, Genichi; Naito, Chisako; Oda, Hiroyuki; Hayakawa, Kohei; Suzuki, Yuriko; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Hashimoto, Naoki; Kobara, Keiji; Cho, Tetsuji; Kuga, Hironori; Takao, Kiyoshi; Kawahara, Yoko; Matsumura, Yumi; Murai, Toshiya; Akashi, Koichi; Kanba, Shigenobu; Otsuka, Kotaro; Kato, Takahiro A

    2018-01-01

    Suicide is a crucial global health concern and effective suicide prevention has long been warranted. Mental illness, especially depression is the highest risk factor of suicide. Suicidal risk is increased in people not only with mental illness but also with physical illnesses, thus medical staff caring for physically-ill patients are also required to manage people with suicidal risk. In the present study, we evaluated our newly developed suicide intervention program among medical staff. We developed a 2-h suicide intervention program for medical staff, based on the Mental Health First Aid (MHFA), which had originally been developed for the general population. We conducted this program for 74 medical staff members from 2 hospitals. Changes in knowledge, perceived skills, and confidence in early intervention of depression and suicide-prevention were evaluated using self-reported questionnaires at 3 points; pre-program, immediately after the program, and 1 month after program. This suicide prevention program had significant effects on improving perceived skills and confidence especially among nurses and medical residents. These significant effects lasted even 1 month after the program. Design was a single-arm study with relatively small sample size and short-term follow up. The present study suggests that the major target of this effective program is nurses and medical residents. Future research is required to validate the effects of the program with control groups, and also to assess long-term effectiveness and actual reduction in suicide rates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Simple model, including recoil, for the brightness of sodium guide stars created from CW single frequency fasors and comparison to measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Paul D.; Drummond, Jack D.; Denman, Craig A.; Fugate, Robert Q.

    2008-07-01

    Using a stable single frequency (Δυ fasor we have characterized the guide star radiance under several conditions, including routinely measuring the radiance at various launch powers and simultaneously illuminating the same spot with a second fasor with a range of different frequency separations. Making use of sodium's hyperfine energy diagram and allowed transitions it is shown that some transitions do not contribute to the radiance after a short time period thus greatly reducing the number of states whose populations need to be tracked in a simple rate equation model. An offshoot of this view is the importance of the pump source's spectral content for efficient sodium scattering. Accounting for atomic recoil, which causes atoms to be Doppler shifted out of resonance, we obtain model curves for photon return flux versus launch power for both linear and circular polarization, both agree with measurements; the only free parameter being the sodium column density on the single night both sets of data were taken. We attempted to measure the sodium velocity distribution due to recoil using two Fasors in a pump-probe arrangement. We have measured some subtle phenomena that this simple model does not explain and these will be discussed. These may imply the importance of understanding the collision rates for sodium atoms to re-equilibrate through velocity changing collisions, spin relaxation and coherent beam propagation under various atmospheric conditions.

  9. Using patient reported outcome measures in health services: A qualitative study on including people with low literacy skills and learning disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahagirdar Deepa

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs are self-report measures of health status increasingly promoted for use in healthcare quality improvement. However people with low literacy skills or learning disabilities may find PROMs hard to complete. Our study investigated stakeholder views on the accessibility and use of PROMs to develop suggestions for more inclusive practice. Methods Taking PROMs recommended for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD as an example, we conducted 8 interviews with people with low literacy skills and/or learning disabilities, and 4 focus groups with 20 health professionals and people with COPD. Discussions covered the format and delivery of PROMs using the EQ-5D and St George Respiratory Questionnaire as prompts. Thematic framework analysis focused on three main themes: Accessibility, Ease of Use, and Contextual factors. Results Accessibility included issues concerning the questionnaire format, and suggestions for improvement included larger font sizes and more white space. Ease of Use included discussion about PROMs’ administration. While health professionals suggested PROMs could be completed in waiting rooms, patients preferred settings with more privacy and where they could access help from people they know. Contextual Factors included other challenges and wider issues associated with completing PROMs. While health professionals highlighted difficulties created by the system in managing patients with low literacy/learning disabilities, patient participants stressed that understanding the purpose of PROMs was important to reduce intimidation. Conclusions Adjusting PROMs’ format, giving an explicit choice of where patients can complete them, and clearly conveying PROMs’ purpose and benefit to patients may help to prevent inequality when using PROMs in health services.

  10. Validation of a software program for measuring fatigue-related changes in keystroke durations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Ho; Johnson, Peter W

    2011-01-01

    Intensive computer use has been associated with musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). Although the underlying mechanisms are still not fully understood, muscle fatigue is thought to be a contributing factor. Previous studies have shown that keystroke durations are related to muscle twitch durations and may be used as a surrogate measure of muscle fatigue. Software tools have been developed to measure keystroke durations; however, the accuracy of these programs may be influenced by the computer and/or the operating system (OS). Keystrokes were collected from six subjects and analyzed to determine whether there were any differences in keystroke durations measured by an OS-dependant software program and keystrokes collected directly from the keyboard using a USB analyzer (gold standard). The results demonstrated that the OS-dependant software program underestimated keystroke durations by 3.8 ms (103.5 vs. 107.3 ms; p software program could be used to collect keystroke durations.

  11. Impact of Biological Feedback and Incentives on Blood Fatty Acid Concentrations, Including Omega-3 Index, in an Employer-Based Wellness Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBurney, Michael I; Bird, Julia K

    2017-08-05

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, C20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6n-3) are important fatty acids for the retina and brain. More than 95% of Americans have suboptimal EPA + DHA blood concentrations. This cross-sectional employer-based study assessed whole blood fatty acid levels of volunteers participating in an onsite wellness biometric screening program and was designed to determine if an incentive, a $5 coupon for a 90-day supply of fish oil supplement typically costing $18-30, stimulated incremental dietary behavior change relative to nutritional status assessment alone to increase EPA + DHA concentrations. Volunteers completed a dietary survey and finger stick blood samples were collected to be analyzed for fatty acid composition. In addition, 636 individuals participated in the initial onsite biometric screening. Three months later, and without prior knowledge, all employees were invited to a second screening. At the second screening, 198 employees volunteered for the first time and 149 employees had a second test (17.9%). At baseline, the average age (n = 834) was 45 year and omega-3 index was 5.0% with 41% female. EPA + DHA concentration, i.e., omega-3 index, was significantly lower in men (4.8%) than women (5.2%), as were DHA and linoleic acid (LA) concentrations (p omega-3 index was positively and linearly associated with omega-3 intake. Only 4% of volunteers had an omega-3 index >8% on initial screening. Among the 149 individuals with two measurements, omega-3 intake from supplements, but not food, increased significantly from 258 to 445 mg/d (p omega-3 index (+0.21, p omega-3 supplement.

  12. Impact of Biological Feedback and Incentives on Blood Fatty Acid Concentrations, Including Omega-3 Index, in an Employer-Based Wellness Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael I. McBurney

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, C20:5n-3 and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6n-3 are important fatty acids for the retina and brain. More than 95% of Americans have suboptimal EPA + DHA blood concentrations. This cross-sectional employer-based study assessed whole blood fatty acid levels of volunteers participating in an onsite wellness biometric screening program and was designed to determine if an incentive, a $5 coupon for a 90-day supply of fish oil supplement typically costing $18–30, stimulated incremental dietary behavior change relative to nutritional status assessment alone to increase EPA + DHA concentrations. Volunteers completed a dietary survey and finger stick blood samples were collected to be analyzed for fatty acid composition. In addition, 636 individuals participated in the initial onsite biometric screening. Three months later, and without prior knowledge, all employees were invited to a second screening. At the second screening, 198 employees volunteered for the first time and 149 employees had a second test (17.9%. At baseline, the average age (n = 834 was 45 year and omega-3 index was 5.0% with 41% female. EPA + DHA concentration, i.e., omega-3 index, was significantly lower in men (4.8% than women (5.2%, as were DHA and linoleic acid (LA concentrations (p < 0.05. Baseline omega-3 index was positively and linearly associated with omega-3 intake. Only 4% of volunteers had an omega-3 index >8% on initial screening. Among the 149 individuals with two measurements, omega-3 intake from supplements, but not food, increased significantly from 258 to 445 mg/d (p < 0.01 at the second test as did the omega-3 index (+0.21, p < 0.02. In this employed population, only 1% redeemed a coupon for an omega-3 supplement.

  13. Hanford Environmental Monitoring Program schedule for samples, analyses, and measurements for calendar year 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumer, P.J.; Price, K.R.; Eddy, P.A.; Carlile, J.M.V.

    1984-12-01

    This report provides the CY 1985 schedule of data collection for the routine Hanford Surface Environmental Monitoring and Ground-Water Monitoring Programs at the Hanford Site. The purpose is to evaluate and report the levels of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants in the Hanford environs, as required in DOE Order 5484.1. The routine sampling schedule provided herein does not include samples scheduled to be collected during FY 1985 in support of special studies, special contractor support programs, or for quality control purposes. In addition, the routine program outlined in this schedule is subject to modification during the year in response to changes in site operations, program requirements, or unusual sample results.

  14. THE INFLUENCE OF COMBINATION NON-MEDICAL TREATMENT INCLUDING FUNCTIONAL PROGRAMMED ELECTRICAL STIMULATION ON THE CLINICAL AND INSTRUMENTAL PARAMETERS IN PATIENTS WITH CEREBRAL PALSY WITH SPASTIC DIPLEGIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Eliseev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cerebral palsy is the leading cause of physical disability in pediatric  age. The search for new methods and improvement of old rehabil- itation techniques is ongoing, due to low efficacy of the latter. Aim: To assess the efficacy of a func- tional programmed electrical muscle stimulation as a part  of combination treatment of patients with cerebral palsy in the form of spastic diplegia. Materials and methods: We analyzed the results of treatment of 71 children with cerebral palsy and spastic diplegia, who had  been  randomized  into two groups  depending on the type of treatment. In  the  first group,  the  patients  (n = 38 received a course of functional programmed electric stim- ulation  in combination with  other  non-medical treatment  methods.  The  second   group   (n = 33 underwent a usual  course  of electrical  stimula- tion in combination with non-medical  treatment, similar to that  in the first group. The third group (control   included   41   children   without    cere- bral palsy. Clinical and  instrumental parameters were  assessed  in all study  participants. Results: After the course of combination treatment in the group  1, the  tonus  of m. gastrocnemius was de- creased significantly by 41%, that of the posterior group  of femur muscles by 43%, adductor group of femur muscles by 36%. In the group  2, the re- spective parameters decreased by 24, 21 and 21%. Muscle power  endurance was  increased  signifi- cantly in patients of both groups: that of long back extensors by 12.5 and 6.2 sec, of m. rectus abdomi- nis by 10.6 sec and 5.2 sec, of gluteal muscles by 9.3 and 4.6 sec, of m. quadriceps  by 19.8 and 7.2 sec, of m. anterior  tibialis by 12.1 and 4.6 sec, respec- tively. After the  treatment, the  active movement volume in the large joints of lower extremities  in the group 1 patients  improved as follows: by 15.6° in hip joints, by 11.1° in knee joints and by

  15. Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds (Including Dimethyl Sulfide), Aerosol Particles, and CCN in the Canadian Arctic: Preliminary Results from the Summer 2014 NETCARE Expedition Aboard the CCGS Amundsen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungall, E. L.; Abbatt, J.; Lee, A.; Ladino Moreno, L.

    2014-12-01

    The Arctic in summer is a cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) limited environment, and the controls on aerosol number and composition, and thus cloud formation, are poorly understood. A better understanding of these controls and their consequences is required in order to understand the region's changing climate. In order to advance that understanding, during Summer 2014 we deployed instrumentation aboard the CCGS Amundsen, the Canadian research icebreaker. We participated in Legs 1a and 1b of the cruise, affording us observations in locations as varied as the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Lancaster Sound, and the Nares Strait. We collected on-line measurements with high time resolution of particle number, size and CCN activity as well as mixing ratios of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) including dimethyl sulfide, which has been implicated as an important contributor to the CCN population in the Arctic. We also attempted to directly measure air-sea fluxes of dimethyl sulfide using a high resolution time of flight mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS, Aerodyne) sampling at 10 Hz. Here, we report preliminary results from those measurements.

  16. Including food 25-hydroxyvitamin D in intake estimates may reduce the discrepancy between dietary and serum measures of vitamin D status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Christine L; Patterson, Kristine Y; Roseland, Janet M; Wise, Stephen A; Merkel, Joyce M; Pehrsson, Pamela R; Yetley, Elizabeth A

    2014-05-01

    The discrepancy between the commonly used vitamin D status measures-intake and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations--has been perplexing. Sun exposure increases serum 25(OH)D concentrations and is often used as an explanation for the higher population-based serum concentrations in the face of apparently low vitamin D intake. However, sun exposure may not be the total explanation. 25(OH)D, a metabolite of vitamin D, is known to be present in animal-based foods. It has been measured and reported only sporadically and is not currently factored into U.S. estimates of vitamin D intake. Previously unavailable preliminary USDA data specifying the 25(OH)D content of a subset of foods allowed exploration of the potential change in the reported overall vitamin D content of foods when the presence of 25(OH)D was included. The issue of 25(OH)D potency was addressed, and available commodity intake estimates were used to outline trends in projected vitamin D intake when 25(OH)D in foods was taken into account. Given the data available, there were notable increases in the total vitamin D content of a number of animal-based foods when potency-adjusted 25(OH)D was included, and in turn there was a potentially meaningful increase (1.7-2.9 μg or 15-30% of average requirement) in vitamin D intake estimates. The apparent increase could reduce discrepancies between intake estimates and serum 25(OH)D concentrations. The relevance to dietary interventions is discussed, and the need for continued exploration regarding 25(OH)D measurement is highlighted.

  17. Measurement and verification of low income energy efficiency programs in Brazil: Methodological challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martino Jannuzzi, Gilberto De; Rodrigues da Silva, Ana Lucia; Melo, Conrado Augustus de; Paccola, Jose Angelo; Dourado Maia Gomes, Rodolfo (State Univ. of Campinas, International Energy Initiative (Brazil))

    2009-07-01

    Electric utilities in Brazil are investing about 80 million dollars annually in low-income energy efficiency programs, about half of their total compulsory investments in end-use efficiency programs under current regulation. Since 2007 the regulator has enforced the need to provide evaluation plans for the programs delivered. This paper presents the measurement and verification (MandV) methodology that has been developed to accommodate the characteristics of lighting and refrigerator programs that have been introduced in the Brazilian urban and peri-urban slums. A combination of household surveys, end-use measurements and metering at the transformers and grid levels were performed before and after the program implementation. The methodology has to accommodate the dynamics, housing, electrical wiring and connections of the population as well as their ability to pay for the electricity and program participation. Results obtained in slums in Rio de Janeiro are presented. Impacts of the programs were evaluated in energy terms to households and utilities. Feedback from the evaluations performed also permitted the improvement in the design of new programs for low-income households.

  18. Ceftazidime-avibactam Versus Doripenem for the Treatment of Complicated Urinary Tract Infections, Including Acute Pyelonephritis: RECAPTURE, a Phase 3 Randomized Trial Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenlehner, Florian M; Sobel, Jack D; Newell, Paul; Armstrong, Jon; Huang, Xiangning; Stone, Gregory G; Yates, Katrina; Gasink, Leanne B

    2016-09-15

    The global emergence of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae highlights the urgent need to reduce carbapenem dependence. The phase 3 RECAPTURE program compared the efficacy and safety of ceftazidime-avibactam and doripenem in patients with complicated urinary tract infection (cUTI), including acute pyelonephritis. Hospitalized adults with suspected or microbiologically confirmed cUTI/acute pyelonephritis were randomized 1:1 to ceftazidime-avibactam 2000 mg/500 mg every 8 hours or doripenem 500 mg every 8 hours (doses adjusted for renal function), with possible oral antibiotic switch after ≥5 days (total treatment duration up to 10 days or 14 days for patients with bacteremia). Of 1033 randomized patients, 393 and 417 treated with ceftazidime-avibactam and doripenem, respectively, were eligible for the primary efficacy analyses; 19.6% had ceftazidime-nonsusceptible baseline pathogens. Noninferiority of ceftazidime-avibactam vs doripenem was demonstrated for the US Food and Drug Administration co-primary endpoints of (1) patient-reported symptomatic resolution at day 5: 276 of 393 (70.2%) vs 276 of 417 (66.2%) patients (difference, 4.0% [95% confidence interval {CI}, -2.39% to 10.42%]); and (2) combined symptomatic resolution/microbiological eradication at test of cure (TOC): 280 of 393 (71.2%) vs 269 of 417 (64.5%) patients (difference, 6.7% [95% CI, .30% to 13.12%]). Microbiological eradication at TOC (European Medicines Agency primary endpoint) occurred in 304 of 393 (77.4%) ceftazidime-avibactam vs 296 of 417 (71.0%) doripenem patients (difference, 6.4% [95% CI, .33% to 12.36%]), demonstrating superiority at the 5% significance level. Both treatments showed similar efficacy against ceftazidime-nonsusceptible pathogens. Ceftazidime-avibactam had a safety profile consistent with that of ceftazidime alone. Ceftazidime-avibactam was highly effective for the empiric treatment of cUTI (including acute pyelonephritis), and may offer an alternative to carbapenems in

  19. The accuracy of reading speed measurement by stopwatch versus measurement with an automated computer program (rad-rd©).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radner, Wolfgang; Diendorfer, Gabriela; Kainrath, Bettina; Kollmitzer, Christian

    2017-03-01

    To compare the reading time and reading speed measurements obtained with a stopwatch with those of an automated computer program for measuring reading speed and acuity (rad-rd © ; patent: AT 504635B1/10-2006). The rad-rd © was used (in conjunction with a PC and microphone) for the computer-based measurements. In rotation, each of four examiners took a turn reading the 12 sentences from one of the four RADNER Reading Charts to three other examiners, who served as stoppers. The stoppers simultaneously measured the reading time with a stopwatch while a fifth investigator used the rad-rd © to obtain computerized measurements. The stopwatch measurements were then statistically compared with the rad-rd © measurements. The mean reading time obtained with the stopwatch measurements was 4.34 ± 0.57 seconds (196.21 ± 21.79 wpm), versus 4.44 ± 0.59 seconds (192.24 ± 22.20 wpm) by computer measurement (r = 0.84). Of the 144 stopwatch measurements, 97 (67.36%) were shorter, and 47 (32.64%) were equal to (n = 5) or longer than the computer measurements. The mean difference for the shorter measurements was -0.17 ± 0.1 seconds (3.91% of the mean reading time), and the mean difference for the longer measurements was 0.11 ± 0.1 seconds (2.53% of the mean reading time). Most differences ranged from -0.1 to 0.1 seconds (42.36%). The results did not differ significantly among the four stoppers. The rad-rd © is an accurate, automated computer program for measuring reading time. Stopwatch measurements, although subject to inaccuracy from several sources, remain a reliable and simple method for analysis of reading performance. © 2016 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Stratified Random Surveys (StRS) of Reef Fish, including Benthic Estimate Data of the Mariana Archipelago in 2014 (NCEI Accession 0157596)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data provided in this data set were collected as part of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC), Coral Reef Ecosystem Program (CREP) led NCRMP...

  1. Measurement issues in the evaluation of chronic disease self-management programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, Sandra; Elsworth, Gerald R; Newman, Stanton; Osborne, Richard H

    2013-09-01

    To provide an in-depth analysis of outcome measures used in the evaluation of chronic disease self-management programs consistent with the Stanford curricula. Based on a systematic review on self-management programs, effect sizes derived from reported outcome measures are categorized according to the quality of life appraisal model developed by Schwartz and Rapkin which classifies outcomes from performance-based measures (e.g., clinical outcomes) to evaluation-based measures (e.g., emotional well-being). The majority of outcomes assessed in self-management trials are based on evaluation-based methods. Overall, effects on knowledge--the only performance-based measure observed in selected trials--are generally medium to large. In contrast, substantially more inconsistent results are found for both perception- and evaluation-based measures that mostly range between nil and small positive effects. Effectiveness of self-management interventions and resulting recommendations for health policy makers are most frequently derived from highly variable evaluation-based measures, that is, types of outcomes that potentially carry a substantial amount of measurement error and/or bias such as response shift. Therefore, decisions regarding the value and efficacy of chronic disease self-management programs need to be interpreted with care. More research, especially qualitative studies, is needed to unravel cognitive processes and the role of response shift bias in the measurement of change.

  2. Are we making the grade? Practices and reported efficacy measures of primate conservation education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kling, Katherine J; Hopkins, Mariah E

    2015-04-01

    Conservation education is often employed alongside primate conservation efforts with the aim of changing knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors toward non-human primates. Recommended best-use practices include longevity, use of program incentives, collaboration among educators, and adaptive program assessment, among others. This study surveys primate conservation education programs (PCEPs) to assess the frequency of suggested best-use practices, and to investigate impacts on program efficacy. Online surveys were collected from PCEPs in 2013-2014 (N = 43). The majority of programs reported lengths of 5-10 years, with participant involvement ranging widely from a day to several years. Non-economic and economic incentives were distributed by approximately half of all programs, with programs that provided economic incentives reporting positive participant attitude changes more frequently than those that did not (P = 0.03). While >70% of PCEPs consulted with community leaders, local teachers, and research scientists, only 45.9% collaborated with other conservation educators and only 27% collaborated with cultural experts such as cultural anthropologists. Programs that collaborated with other conservation educators were more likely to report reductions in threats to primates, specifically to bushmeat hunting and capture of primates for the pet trade (P = 0.07). Formal program evaluations were employed by 72.1% of all programs, with the majority of programs using surveys to assess changes to participant attitudes and knowledge. Formal evaluations of participant behavior, community attitudes and behaviors, and threats to primate populations were less common. While results indicate that PCEPs follow many suggested best-use practices, program impacts may be enhanced by greater discussion of economic incentivization, increased collaboration between conservation educators, and improved commitment to adaptive evaluation of changes to behaviors in addition to attitudes and

  3. Effects of a veterinary student leadership program on measures of stress and academic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Dale A; Truscott, Marla L; St Clair, Lisa; Klingborg, Donald J

    2007-01-01

    Assuming leadership roles in veterinary student governance or club activities could be considered an added stressor for students because of the impact on time available for personal and academic activities. The study reported here evaluated the effects of participation in a leadership program and leadership activity across two classes of veterinary students on measures of stress, using the Derogatis Stress Profile (DSP), and on veterinary school academic performance, measured as annual grade-point average (GPA) over a three-year period. Program participants and their classmates completed the DSP three times across the first three years of veterinary school. On average, participating students reported self-declared stress levels that were higher and measured DSP stress levels that were lower than those of the general population. Students were more likely to assume elected or appointed leadership roles while in their first three years of the veterinary degree program if they participated in the optional leadership program and demonstrated lower stress in several dimensions. Some increased stress, as measured in some of the DSP stress dimensions, had a small but statistically significant influence on professional school GPA. The study determined that the most important predictors of students' cumulative GPA across the three-year period were the GPA from the last 45 credits of pre-veterinary coursework and their quantitative GRE scores. The results of the study indicate that neither participation in the leadership program nor taking on leadership roles within veterinary school appeared to influence veterinary school academic performance or to increase stress.

  4. Integron, Plasmid and Host Strain Characteristics of Escherichia coli from Humans and Food Included in the Norwegian Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring Programs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Sunde

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial resistant Escherichia coli (n=331 isolates from humans with bloodstream infections were investigated for the presence of class 1 and class 2 integrons. The integron cassettes arrays were characterized and the findings were compared with data from similar investigations on resistant E. coli from meat and meat products (n=241 produced during the same time period. All isolates were obtained from the Norwegian monitoring programs for antimicrobial resistance in human pathogens and in the veterinary sector. Methods used included PCR, sequencing, conjugation experiments, plasmid replicon typing and subtyping, pulsed-field-gel-electrophoresis and serotyping. Integrons of class 1 and 2 occurred significantly more frequently among human isolates; 45.4% (95% CI: 39.9-50.9 than among isolates from meat; 18% (95% CI: 13.2 -23.3, (p<0.01, Chi-square test. Identical cassette arrays including dfrA1-aadA1, aadA1, dfrA12-orfF-aadA2, oxa-30-aadA1 (class 1 integrons and dfrA1-sat1-aadA1 (class 2 integrons were detected from both humans and meat. However, the most prevalent cassette array in human isolates, dfrA17-aadA5, did not occur in isolates from meat, suggesting a possible linkage between this class 1 integron and a subpopulation of E. coli adapted to a human host. The drfA1-aadA1 and aadA1 class 1 integrons were found frequently in both human and meat isolates. These isolates were subjected to further studies to investigate similarities with regard to transferability, plasmid and host strain characteristics. We detected incF plasmids with pMLST profile F24:A-:B1 carrying drfA1-aadA1 integrons in isolates from pork and in a more distantly related E. coli strain from a human with septicaemia. Furthermore, we showed that most of the class 1 integrons with aadA1 were located on incF plasmids with pMLST profile F51:A-:B10 in human isolates. The plasmid was present in unrelated as well as closely related host strains, demonstrating that dissemination

  5. Image processing and analysis program for measurement of bone density changes in reference and follow-up standardized extraoral oblique lateral cephalometric radiographs of the mandible

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijter, J. M.; Verhoeven, J. W.; van der Linden, J. A. M.; Cune, M. S.; Terlou, M.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an image processing and analysis program for peri-implant bone density measurements of the mandible using extraoral radiographs, which includes a correction for the variable projection of the soft tissues of the face. The measurement procedure is based on pairs

  6. Uncertainty in measurement: a review of monte carlo simulation using microsoft excel for the calculation of uncertainties through functional relationships, including uncertainties in empirically derived constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrance, Ian; Frenkel, Robert

    2014-02-01

    The Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (usually referred to as the GUM) provides the basic framework for evaluating uncertainty in measurement. The GUM however does not always provide clearly identifiable procedures suitable for medical laboratory applications, particularly when internal quality control (IQC) is used to derive most of the uncertainty estimates. The GUM modelling approach requires advanced mathematical skills for many of its procedures, but Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) can be used as an alternative for many medical laboratory applications. In particular, calculations for determining how uncertainties in the input quantities to a functional relationship propagate through to the output can be accomplished using a readily available spreadsheet such as Microsoft Excel. The MCS procedure uses algorithmically generated pseudo-random numbers which are then forced to follow a prescribed probability distribution. When IQC data provide the uncertainty estimates the normal (Gaussian) distribution is generally considered appropriate, but MCS is by no means restricted to this particular case. With input variations simulated by random numbers, the functional relationship then provides the corresponding variations in the output in a manner which also provides its probability distribution. The MCS procedure thus provides output uncertainty estimates without the need for the differential equations associated with GUM modelling. The aim of this article is to demonstrate the ease with which Microsoft Excel (or a similar spreadsheet) can be used to provide an uncertainty estimate for measurands derived through a functional relationship. In addition, we also consider the relatively common situation where an empirically derived formula includes one or more 'constants', each of which has an empirically derived numerical value. Such empirically derived 'constants' must also have associated uncertainties which propagate through the functional relationship

  7. Uncertainty in Measurement: A Review of Monte Carlo Simulation Using Microsoft Excel for the Calculation of Uncertainties Through Functional Relationships, Including Uncertainties in Empirically Derived Constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrance, Ian; Frenkel, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (usually referred to as the GUM) provides the basic framework for evaluating uncertainty in measurement. The GUM however does not always provide clearly identifiable procedures suitable for medical laboratory applications, particularly when internal quality control (IQC) is used to derive most of the uncertainty estimates. The GUM modelling approach requires advanced mathematical skills for many of its procedures, but Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) can be used as an alternative for many medical laboratory applications. In particular, calculations for determining how uncertainties in the input quantities to a functional relationship propagate through to the output can be accomplished using a readily available spreadsheet such as Microsoft Excel. The MCS procedure uses algorithmically generated pseudo-random numbers which are then forced to follow a prescribed probability distribution. When IQC data provide the uncertainty estimates the normal (Gaussian) distribution is generally considered appropriate, but MCS is by no means restricted to this particular case. With input variations simulated by random numbers, the functional relationship then provides the corresponding variations in the output in a manner which also provides its probability distribution. The MCS procedure thus provides output uncertainty estimates without the need for the differential equations associated with GUM modelling. The aim of this article is to demonstrate the ease with which Microsoft Excel (or a similar spreadsheet) can be used to provide an uncertainty estimate for measurands derived through a functional relationship. In addition, we also consider the relatively common situation where an empirically derived formula includes one or more ‘constants’, each of which has an empirically derived numerical value. Such empirically derived ‘constants’ must also have associated uncertainties which propagate through the functional

  8. Value-based performance measures for Hanford Tank Waste Remedition System (TWRS) Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keeney, R.L.; von Winterfeldt, D.

    1996-01-01

    The Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) Program is responsible for the safe storage, retrieval, treatment, and preparation for disposal of high-level waste currently stored in underground storage tanks at the Hanford site in Richland. The TWRS program has adopted a logical approach to decision making that is based on systems engineering and decision analysis (Westinghouse Hanford Company, 1995). This approach involves the explicit consideration of stakeholder values and an evaluation of the TWRS alternatives in terms of these values. Such evaluations need to be consistent across decisions. Thus, an effort was undertaken to develop a consistent, quantifiable set of measures that can be used by TVVRS to assess alternatives against the stakeholder values. The measures developed also met two additional requirements: 1) the number of measure should be relatively small; and 2) performance with respect to the measures should be relatively easy to estimate.

  9. Cuba's De-Dollarization Program: Policy Measures, Main Objectives, and Principal Motivations

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez Corzo, Mario

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the main characteristics of Cuba’s de-dollarization program, the objectives of these policy measures, and their principal causes and motivations. The paper is organized in three sections. The first section describes the policy measures associated with the process of de-dollarization, followed by a detailed account of their main objectives (section two), and an analysis of their principal causes and motivations (section three).

  10. Development of thickness measurement program for transparent conducting oxide thin films

    OpenAIRE

    Mitsugi, Fumiaki; Matsuoka, Aya; Umeda, Yoshihiro; Ikegami, Tomoaki; ミツギ, フミアキ; マツオカ, アヤ; ウメダ, ヨシヒロ; イケガミ, トモアキ; 光木, 文秋; 松岡, 綾; 梅田, 佳宏; 池上, 知顯

    2010-01-01

    The gallium doped zinc oxide has been one of the candidates for the transparent conducting oxide thin film electrode. It is not suitable to use a conventional light interference method to measure the thickness of the gallium doped zinc oxide thin film because the refractive index and extinction coefficient of the thin film is unknown during the optimization of the deposition conditions. In this paper, we report on the details of the film thickness program which uses the measured optical and e...

  11. Performance planning and measurement for DOE EM-International Technology Integration Program. A report on a performance measurement development workshop for DOE`s environmental management international technology integration program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, G.B.; Reed, J.H.; Wyler, L.D.

    1997-03-01

    This report describes the process and results from an effort to develop metrics for program accomplishments for the FY 1997 budget submission of the U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Management International Technology Integration Program (EM-ITI). The four-step process included interviews with key EM-ITI staff, the development of a strawman program logic chart, and all day facilitated workshop with EM-ITI staff during which preliminary performance plans and measures were developed and refined, and a series of follow-on discussions and activities including a cross-organizational project data base. The effort helped EM-ITI to crystallize and develop a unified vision of their future which they can effectively communicate to their own management and their internal and external customers. The effort sets the stage for responding to the Government Performance and Results Act. The metrics developed may be applicable to other international technology integration programs. Metrics were chosen in areas of eight general performance goals for 1997-1998: (1) number of forums provided for the exchange of information, (2) formal agreements signed, (3) new partners identified, (4) customers reached and satisfied, (5, 6) dollars leveraged by EM technology focus area and from foreign research, (7) number of foreign technologies identified for potential use in remediation of DOE sites, and (8) projects advanced through the pipeline.

  12. A PC program for estimating measurement uncertainty for aeronautics test instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Philip Z.

    1995-01-01

    A personal computer program was developed which provides aeronautics and operations engineers at Lewis Research Center with a uniform method to quickly provide values for the uncertainty in test measurements and research results. The software package used for performing the calculations is Mathcad 4.0, a Windows version of a program which provides an interactive user interface for entering values directly into equations with immediate display of results. The error contribution from each component of the system is identified individually in terms of the parameter measured. The final result is given in common units, SI units, and percent of full scale range. The program also lists the specifications for all instrumentation and calibration equipment used for the analysis. It provides a presentation-quality printed output which can be used directly for reports and documents.

  13. Measuring Science Inquiry Skills in Youth Development Programs: The Science Process Skills Inventory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E. Arnold

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been an increased emphasis on science learning in 4-H and other youth development programs. In an effort to increase science capacity in youth, it is easy to focus only on developing the concrete skills and knowledge that a trained scientist must possess. However, when science learning is presented in a youth-development setting, the context of the program also matters. This paper reports the development and testing of the Science Process Skills Inventory (SPSI and its usefulness for measuring science inquiry skill development in youth development science programs. The results of the psychometric testing of the SPSI indicated the instrument is reliable and measures a cohesive construct called science process skills, as reflected in the 11 items that make up this group of skills. The 11 items themselves are based on the cycle of science inquiry, and represent the important steps of the complete inquiry process.

  14. 77 FR 24740 - Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP) Performance Measurement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-25

    ... Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP) Performance Measurement System AGENCY: Department of Labor... Act (PRA) requires this notice to set forth the effectiveness of information collection requirements..., Additional Indicator on Volunteer Work. See 77 FR 4654. ] DATES: On March 27, 2012, the Office of Management...

  15. Measuring Parental Treatment Adherence in a Multimodal Treatment Program for Children with ADHD: A Preliminary Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Craig; Reddy, Linda A.

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the clinical significance of measuring between session parental adherence on child and parent outcomes for 51 children (age 4 to 8.5 years) with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in a multimodal group training program. Three group treatment conditions: (a) child-only treatment (C1), (c) child and parent training…

  16. WINDOWS: a program for the analysis of spectral data foil activation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stallmann, F.W.; Eastham, J.F.; Kam, F.B.K.

    1978-12-01

    The computer program WINDOWS together with its subroutines is described for the analysis of neutron spectral data foil activation measurements. In particular, the unfolding of the neutron differential spectrum, estimated windows and detector contributions, upper and lower bounds for an integral response, and group fluxes obtained from neutron transport calculations. 116 references. (JFP)

  17. The Measurement, Analysis and Implementation of a Corporate Image Program: The Case of a Psychiatric Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbeck, Matt A.; Buchanan, Gary W.

    1987-01-01

    Measured a psychiatric hospital's image, using qualitative and quantitative methods. Used data from the consumer public to illustrate the development and implementation of an image program stressing multi-public awareness, preference and utilization of the hospital's services vis-a-vis the hospital's mission statement. This study demonstrated…

  18. The Atmospheric radiation measurement (ARM program network of microwave radiometers: instrumentation, data, and retrievals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Cadeddu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The Climate Research Facility of the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM Program operates a network of ground-based microwave radiometers. Data and retrievals from these instruments have been available to the scientific community for almost 20 yr. In the past five years the network has expanded to include a total of 22 microwave radiometers deployed in various locations around the world. The new instruments cover a frequency range between 22 and 197 GHz and are consistently and automatically calibrated. The latest addition to the network is a new generation of three-channel radiometers, currently in the early stage of deployment at all ARM sites. The network has been specifically designed to achieve increased accuracy in the retrieval of precipitable water vapor (PWV and cloud liquid water path (LWP with the long-term goal of providing the scientific community with reliable, calibrated radiometric data and retrievals of important geophysical quantities with well-characterized uncertainties. The radiometers provide high-quality, continuous datasets that can be utilized in a wealth of applications and scientific studies. This paper presents an overview of the microwave instrumentation, calibration procedures, data, and retrievals that are available for download from the ARM data archive.

  19. Altering Practices to Include Bimodal-bilingual (ASL-Spoken English) Programming at a Small School for the Deaf in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priestley, Karen; Enns, Charlotte; Arbuckle, Shauna

    2018-01-01

    Bimodal-bilingual programs are emerging as one way to meet broader needs and provide expanded language, educational and social-emotional opportunities for students who are deaf and hard of hearing (Marschark, M., Tang, G. & Knoors, H. (Eds). (2014). Bilingualism and bilingual Deaf education. New York, NY: Oxford University Press; Paludneviciene & Harris, R. (2011). Impact of cochlear implants on the deaf community. In Paludneviciene, R. & Leigh, I. (Eds.), Cochlear implants evolving perspectives (pp. 3-19). Washington, DC: Gallaudet University Press). However, there is limited research on students' spoken language development, signed language growth, academic outcomes or the social-emotional factors associated with these programs (Marschark, M., Tang, G. & Knoors, H. (Eds). (2014). Bilingualism and bilingual Deaf education. New York, NY: Oxford University Press; Nussbaum, D & Scott, S. (2011). The cochlear implant education center: Perspectives on effective educational practices. In Paludneviciene, R. & Leigh, I. (Eds.) Cochlear implants evolving perspectives (pp. 175-205). Washington, DC: Gallaudet University Press. The cochlear implant education center: Perspectives on effective educational practices. In Paludnevicience & Leigh (Eds). Cochlear implants evolving perspectives (pp. 175-205). Washington, DC: Gallaudet University Press; Spencer, P. & Marschark, M. (Eds.) (2010). Evidence-based practice in educating deaf and hard-of-hearing students. New York, NY: Oxford University Press). The purpose of this case study was to look at formal and informal student outcomes as well as staff and parent perceptions during the first 3 years of implementing a bimodal-bilingual (ASL and spoken English) program within an ASL milieu at a small school for the deaf. Speech and language assessment results for five students were analyzed over a 3-year period and indicated that the students made significant positive gains in all areas, although results were variable. Staff and parent

  20. Measuring improvement in knowledge of drug policy reforms following a police education program in Tijuana, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arredondo, J; Strathdee, S A; Cepeda, J; Abramovitz, D; Artamonova, I; Clairgue, E; Bustamante, E; Mittal, M L; Rocha, T; Bañuelos, A; Olivarria, H O; Morales, M; Rangel, G; Magis, C; Beletsky, L

    2017-11-08

    Mexico's 2009 "narcomenudeo reform" decriminalized small amounts of drugs, shifting some drug law enforcement to the states and mandating drug treatment diversion instead of incarceration. Data from Tijuana suggested limited implementation of this harm reduction-oriented policy. We studied whether a police education program (PEP) improved officers' drug and syringe policy knowledge, and aimed to identify participant characteristics associated with improvement of drug policy knowledge. Pre- and post-training surveys were self-administered by municipal police officers to measure legal knowledge. Training impact was assessed through matched paired nominal data using McNemar's tests. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify predictors of improved legal knowledge, as measured by officers' ability to identify conceptual legal provisions related to syringe possession and thresholds of drugs covered under the reform. Of 1750 respondents comparing pre- versus post training, officers reported significant improvement (p education were more likely to exhibit improvement of conceptual legal knowledge of syringe possession (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 2.6, 95% CI 1.4-3.2) and decriminalization for heroin (aOR 2.7, 95% CI 1.3-4.3), methamphetamine (aOR 2.2, 95% CI 1.4-3.2), and marijuana (aOR 2.5, 95% CI 1.6-4). Drug policy reform is often necessary, but not sufficient to achieve public health goals because of gaps in translating formal laws to policing practice. To close such gaps, PEP initiatives bundling occupational safety information with relevant legal content demonstrate clear promise. Our findings underscore additional efforts needed to raise technical knowledge of the law among personnel tasked with its enforcement. Police professionalization, including minimum educational standards, appear critical for aligning policing with harm reduction goals.

  1. OSMOSE program : statistical review of oscillation measurements in the MINERVE reactor R1-UO2 configuration.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoven, G.; Klann, R.; Zhong, Z.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-08-28

    The OSMOSE program is a collaboration on reactor physics experiments between the United States Department of Energy and the France Commissariat Energie Atomique. At the working level, it is a collaborative effort between the Argonne National Laboratory and the CEA Cadarache Research Center. The objective of this program is to measure very accurate integral reaction rates in representative spectra for the actinides important to future nuclear system designs, and to provide the experimental data for improving the basic nuclear data files. The main outcome of the OSMOSE measurement program will be an experimental database of reactivity-worth measurements in different neutron spectra for the heavy nuclides. This database can then be used as a benchmark to verify and validate reactor analysis codes. The OSMOSE program (Oscillation in Minerve of isotopes in Eupraxic Spectra) aims at improving neutronic predictions of advanced nuclear fuels through oscillation measurements in the MINERVE facility on samples containing the following separated actinides: {sup 232}Th, {sup 233}U, {sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 236}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 241}Pu, {sup 242}Pu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 243}Am, {sup 244}Cm, and {sup 245}Cm. The first part of this report provides an overview of the experimental protocol and the typical processing of a series of experimental results which is currently performed at CEA-Cadarache. In the second part of the report, improvements to this technique are presented, as well as the program that was created to process oscillation measurement results from the MINERVE facility in the future.

  2. [A mental health awareness anti-stigma program including user-trainers has a significant impact on knowledge, beliefs and attitudes of job centre professionals in Paris].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouet, E; Moineville, M; Favriel, S; Leriche, P; Greacen, T

    2014-04-01

    Developing programs and actions to fight stigma and discrimination against people living with mental disorders is a priority both internationally and in France. Involving mental health service users in these anti-stigma programs has proved to be a key element for effective programs. The present study evaluates the impact of user-trainers in an anti-stigma campaign with job counselors on their knowledge, beliefs, and desire for social distance with regard to mental illness and the mentally ill. Eighty-nine professionals participated in eight mental health awareness days from December 2008 to June 2009. Each training day was built around two pedagogical units: firstly, a psychiatrist providing a theoretical overview of mental illness and care and secondly, user-trainers describing their point of view on mental illness and exchanging with participants. A questionnaire administered at the beginning and at the end of the mental health awareness day assessed the impact of the day on participants' knowledge, beliefs, and desire for social distance. Answers to open questions were evaluated using thematic qualitative analysis. The intervention had statistically significant positive effects on all three training objectives: knowledge, beliefs and desire for social distance. Analysis of qualitative data confirmed participants' need for information and training with regard to providing support to clients with mental health problems; participants frequently attributed their improved self-confidence at the end of the day with regard to providing job coaching for this population group to the presence of user-trainers. A mental health awareness day using mental health service users and psychiatrists as trainers had significant positive effects in terms of reducing stigma with regard to people with mental illness. Further research is needed to understand whether the impact of such awareness approaches can be maintained in everyday professional practice over time. Copyright © 2013

  3. Fast Cycled Magnet demonstrator program at CERN: Instrumentation and measurement campaign

    CERN Document Server

    Willering, G; Borgnolutti, F; Bottura, L; Datskov, V; Deferne, G; Feuvrier, J; Fiscarelli, L; Giloux, C; Guinchard, M; Roger, V

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to develop economical magnets for an upgrade of the LHC injector complex, CERN started an R&D program on superconducting Fast Cycled Magnets (FCM) in 2009. One of the challenges in this program was to develop a test station, which started working in summer 2012 when the FCM dipole demonstrator was tested. The magnet contains several important features, like forced-flow cooling of supercritical He and it has a protection scheme based direct voltage measurement with co-wound voltage tap wires. In this paper we report on the cryogenic and powering requirements and operation, the quench protection system, the temperature and mechanical measurements. The functioning of the test station and instrumentation are evaluated and we will discuss the measurements on a detailed level.

  4. SPSS programs for the measurement of nonindependence in standard dyadic designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alferes, Valentim R; Kenny, David A

    2009-02-01

    Dyadic research is becoming more common in the social and behavioral sciences. The most common dyadic design is one in which two persons are measured on the same set of variables. Very often, the first analysis of dyadic data is to determine the extent to which the responses of the two persons are correlated-that is, whether there is nonindependence in the data. We describe two user-friendly SPSS programs for measuring nonindependence of dyadic data. Both programs can be used for distinguishable and indistinguishable dyad members. Inter1.sps is appropriate for interval measures. Inter2.sps applies to categorical variables. The SPSS syntax and data files related to this article may be downloaded as supplemental materials from brm.psychonomic-journals.org/content/supplemental.

  5. [Investigation of the educational effectiveness of including small group discussion as part of a drug abuse prevention program for junior high school students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Junichi; Takayanagi, Risa; Yokoyama, Haruko; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Sinohara, Satomi; Yamada, Yasuhiko

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of small group discussion (SGD) in association with a drug abuse prevention program for junior high school students. The students first received a lecture about drug abuse prevention, then participated in SGD. The discussion focused on how to take action when tempted to abuse drugs. We gave a questionnaire 3 times; before and after the lecture (before SGD), and after SGD. Seventy-seven students replied to these questionnaires. After the lecture, knowledge about drug abuse was improved and all students answered that they had never abused drugs. However, in answer to a different question, a few students noted that they might use drugs in some situations. We consider it necessary to give more consideration to this problem. After the lecture, 35.5% of the students felt that they had definitely acquired skills for drug abuse prevention, whereas after the SGD this was increased to 73.7%. In addition, more than 75% of the students answered that the SGD program was useful since the opinions of other students could be heard. These results suggest that more students acquired skills to prevent drug abuse by participation in SGD. Our findings showed that SGD was useful and that the students were able to more effectively understand important concepts related to drug abuse prevention.

  6. The development and practical study programs for remedial measures sprinter 10-16 years in the training process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitnikova N.S.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Developed and the complex program of restoration measures is practically grounded for athletes 10-16 years. The program is intended for setup time of training process. The program is directed on optimization of the functional state of the basic physiological systems of organism. The program takes into account age-dependent, individual and morphofunctional features of sportsmen. Basic structural this program elements it is been: water-playing complexes, hydromassage, selfmassage, thermal procedures, application of bioactive addition.

  7. Collective dose as a performance measure for occupational radiation protection programs: Issues and recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, D.J.; Harty, R.; Hickey, E.E.; Martin, J.B.; Peffers, M.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Kathren, R.L. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    1998-07-01

    Collective dose is one of the performance measures used at many US Department of Energy (DOE) contractor facilities to quantitatively assess the objectives of the radiation protection program. It can also be used as a management tool to improve the program for keeping worker doses as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Collective dose is used here to mean the sum of all total effective dose equivalent values for all workers in a specified group over a specified time. It is often used as a surrogate estimate of radiological risk. In principle, improvements in radiation protection programs and procedures will result in reduction of collective dose, all other things being equal. Within the DOE, most frequently, a single collective dose number, which may or may not be adjusted for workload and other factors, is used as a performance measure for a contractor. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the use of collective dose as a performance measure for ALARA programs at DOE sites.

  8. Weatherization and Indoor Air Quality: Measured Impacts in Single Family Homes Under the Weatherization Assistance Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pigg, Scott [Energy Center of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Cautley, Dan [Energy Center of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Francisco, Paul [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Hawkins, Beth A [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brennan, Terry M [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This report summarizes findings from a national field study of indoor air quality parameters in homes treated under the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP). The study involved testing and monitoring in 514 single-family homes (including mobile homes) located in 35 states and served by 88 local weatherization agencies.

  9. Effect of neurolinguistic programming training on self-actualization as measured by the Personal Orientation Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, R C; Konefal, J; Spechler, M M

    1990-06-01

    Neurolinguistic programming training is based on principles that should enable the trainee to be more "present"-oriented, inner-directed, flexible, self-aware, and responsive to others, that is, more self-actualized. This study reports within-person changes on self-actualization measures of the Personal Orientation Inventory following a 24-day residential training in neurolinguistic programming. Significant positive mean changes were found for 18 master practitioners on nine of the 12 scales and for 36 practitioners on 10 of the 12 scales. Findings are consistent with the hypothesis that training increases individual self-actualization scores.

  10. Electric Field Measurements During the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) Field Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Monte G.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Mach, Douglas M.

    2010-01-01

    During the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) field program, a system of 6 electric field mills was flown on one of NASA's Global Hawk aircraft. We placed several mills on the aircraft to enable us to measure the vector electric field. We created a distributed, ethernet-connected system so that each sensor has its own embedded Linux system, complete with web server. This makes our current generation system fully "sensor web enabled." The Global Hawk has several unique qualities, but relevant to quality storm electric field measurements are high altitude (20 km) and long duration (20-30 hours) flights. There are several aircraft participating in the GRIP program, and coordinated measurements are happening. Lightning and electric field measurements will be used to study the relationships between lightning and other storm characteristics. It has been long understood that lightning can be used as a marker for strong convective activity. Past research and field programs suggest that lightning flash rate may serve as an indicator and precursor for rapid intensification change in tropical cyclones and hurricanes. We have the opportunity to sample hurricanes for many hours at a time and observe intensification (or de-intensification) periods. The electrical properties of hurricanes during such periods are not well known. American

  11. Status update on the NIFFTE high precision fission cross section measurement program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laptev, Alexander B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tovesson, Fredrik [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Burgett, Eric [GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECH; Greife, Uwe [COLORADO SCHOOL OF THE MINES; Grimes, Steven [OHIO UNIV; Heffner, Michael D [LLNL; Hertel, Nolan E [GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECH; Hill, Tony [IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY; Isenhower, Donald [ABILENE CHRISTIN UNIV; Klay, Jennifer L [CALIFORNIA POLYTECHNIC STATE UNIV; Kornilov, Nickolay [OHIO UNIV; Kudo, Ryuho [CALIFORNIA POLYTECHNIC STATE UNIV; Loveland, Walter [OREGON STATE UNIV; Massey, Thomas [OHIO UNIV; Mc Grath, Chris [IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY; Pickle, Nathan [ABILENE CHRISTIAN UNIV; Qu, Hai [ABILENE CHRISTIAN UNIV; Sharma, Sarvagya [ABILENE CHRISTIAN UNIV; Snyder, Lucas [COLORADO SCHOOL OF THE MINES; Thornton, Tyler [ABILENE CHRISTIAN UNIV; Towell, Rusty S [ABILENE CHRISTIAN UNIV; Watson, Shon [ABILENE CHRISTIAN UNIV

    2010-01-01

    The Neutron Induced Fission Fragment Tracking Experiment (NIFFTE) program has been underway for nearly two years. The program's mission is to measure fission cross sections of the primary fissionable and fissile materials ({sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 238}U) as well as the minor actinides across energies from approximately 50 keV up to 20 MeV with an absolute uncertainty of less than one percent while investigating energy ranges from below an eV to 600 MeV. This basic nuclear physics data is being reinvestigated to support the next generation power plants and a fast burner reactor program. Uncertainties in the fast, resolved and unresolved resonance regions in plutonium and other transuranics are extremely large, dominating safety margins in the next generation nuclear power plants and power plants of today. This basic nuclear data can be used to support all aspects of the nuciear renaissance. The measurement campaign is utilizing a Time Projection Chamber or TPC as the tool to measure these cross sections to these unprecedented levels. Unlike traditional fission cross section measurements using time-of-flight and a multiple fission foil configurations in which fission cross sections in relation to that of {sup 235}U are performed, the TPC project uses time-of-flight and hydrogen as the benchmark cross section. Using the switch to hydrogen, a simple, smooth cross section that can be used which removes the uncertainties associated with the resolved and unresolved resonances in {sup 235}U.

  12. Measuring improvement in knowledge of drug policy reforms following a police education program in Tijuana, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Arredondo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mexico’s 2009 “narcomenudeo reform” decriminalized small amounts of drugs, shifting some drug law enforcement to the states and mandating drug treatment diversion instead of incarceration. Data from Tijuana suggested limited implementation of this harm reduction-oriented policy. We studied whether a police education program (PEP improved officers’ drug and syringe policy knowledge, and aimed to identify participant characteristics associated with improvement of drug policy knowledge. Methods Pre- and post-training surveys were self-administered by municipal police officers to measure legal knowledge. Training impact was assessed through matched paired nominal data using McNemar’s tests. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify predictors of improved legal knowledge, as measured by officers’ ability to identify conceptual legal provisions related to syringe possession and thresholds of drugs covered under the reform. Results Of 1750 respondents comparing pre- versus post training, officers reported significant improvement (p < 0.001 in their technical understanding of syringe possession (56 to 91% and drug amounts decriminalized, including marijuana (9 to 52%, heroin (8 to 71%, and methamphetamine (7 to 70%. The training was associated with even greater success in improving conceptual legal knowledge for syringe possession (67 to 96% (p < 0.001, marijuana (16 to 91%, heroin (11 to 91%, and methamphetamine (11 to 89%. In multivariable modeling, those with at least a high school education were more likely to exhibit improvement of conceptual legal knowledge of syringe possession (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 2.6, 95% CI 1.4–3.2 and decriminalization for heroin (aOR 2.7, 95% CI 1.3–4.3, methamphetamine (aOR 2.2, 95% CI 1.4–3.2, and marijuana (aOR 2.5, 95% CI 1.6–4. Conclusions Drug policy reform is often necessary, but not sufficient to achieve public health goals because of gaps in translating

  13. The Medicare Electronic Health Record Incentive Program: provider performance on core and menu measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Adam; Feblowitz, Joshua; Samal, Lipika; McCoy, Allison B; Sittig, Dean F

    2014-02-01

    To measure performance by eligible health care providers on CMS's meaningful use measures. Medicare Electronic Health Record Incentive Program Eligible Professionals Public Use File (PUF), which contains data on meaningful use attestations by 237,267 eligible providers through May 31, 2013. Cross-sectional analysis of the 15 core and 10 menu measures pertaining to use of EHR functions reported in the PUF. Providers in the dataset performed strongly on all core measures, with the most frequent response for each of the 15 measures being 90-100 percent compliance, even when the threshold for a particular measure was lower (e.g., 30 percent). PCPs had higher scores than specialists for computerized order entry, maintaining an active medication list, and documenting vital signs, while specialists had higher scores for maintaining a problem list, recording patient demographics and smoking status, and for providing patients with an after-visit summary. In fact, 90.2 percent of eligible providers claimed at least one exclusion, and half claimed two or more. Providers are successfully attesting to CMS's requirements, and often exceeding the thresholds required by CMS; however, some troubling patterns in exclusions are present. CMS should raise program requirements in future years. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  14. Pelvic floor muscle training included in a pregnancy exercise program is effective in primary prevention of urinary incontinence: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelaez, Mireia; Gonzalez-Cerron, Silvia; Montejo, Rocío; Barakat, Rubén

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effect of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) taught in a general exercise class during pregnancy on the prevention of urinary incontinence (UI) in nulliparous continent pregnant women. This was a unicenter two armed randomized controlled trial. One hundred sixty-nine women were randomized by a central computer system to an exercise group (EG) (exercise class including PFMT) (n = 73) or a control group (CG) (n = 96). 10.1% loss to follow-up: 10 from EG and 7 from CG. The intervention consisted of 70-75 sessions (22 weeks, three times per week, 55-60 min/session including 10 min of PFMT). The CG received usual care (which included follow up by midwifes including information about PFMT). Questions on prevalence and degree of UI were posed before (week 10-14) and after intervention (week 36-39) using the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Urinary Incontinence Short Form (ICIQ-UI SF). At the end of the intervention, there was a statistically significant difference in favor of the EG. Reported frequency of UI [Never: CG: 54/60.7%, EG: 60/95.2% (P prevention of UI in primiparous pregnant women. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. What is actually measured in process evaluations for worksite health promotion programs: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Numerous worksite health promotion program (WHPPs) have been implemented the past years to improve employees’ health and lifestyle (i.e., physical activity, nutrition, smoking, alcohol use and relaxation). Research primarily focused on the effectiveness of these WHPPs. Whereas process evaluations provide essential information necessary to improve large scale implementation across other settings. Therefore, this review aims to: (1) further our understanding of the quality of process evaluations alongside effect evaluations for WHPPs, (2) identify barriers/facilitators affecting implementation, and (3) explore the relationship between effectiveness and the implementation process. Methods Pubmed, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and Cochrane (controlled trials) were searched from 2000 to July 2012 for peer-reviewed (randomized) controlled trials published in English reporting on both the effectiveness and the implementation process of a WHPP focusing on physical activity, smoking cessation, alcohol use, healthy diet and/or relaxation at work, targeting employees aged 18-65 years. Results Of the 307 effect evaluations identified, twenty-two (7.2%) published an additional process evaluation and were included in this review. The results showed that eight of those studies based their process evaluation on a theoretical framework. The methodological quality of nine process evaluations was good. The most frequently reported process components were dose delivered and dose received. Over 50 different implementation barriers/facilitators were identified. The most frequently reported facilitator was strong management support. Lack of resources was the most frequently reported barrier. Seven studies examined the link between implementation and effectiveness. In general a positive association was found between fidelity, dose and the primary outcome of the program. Conclusions Process evaluations are not systematically performed alongside effectiveness studies for WHPPs. The quality

  16. Tomato Ribonuclease LX with the Functional Endoplasmic Reticulum Retention Motif HDEF Is Expressed during Programmed Cell Death Processes, Including Xylem Differentiation, Germination, and Senescence1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Karin; Hause, Bettina; Altmann, Dorit; Köck, Margret

    2001-01-01

    We have studied the subcellular localization of the acid S-like ribonuclease (RNase) LX in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cells using a combination of biochemical and immunological methods. It was found that the enzyme, unexpectedly excluded from highly purified vacuoles, accumulates in the endoplasmic reticulum. The evidence that RNase LX is a resident of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is supported by an independent approach showing that the C-terminal peptide HDEF of RNase LX acts as an alternative ER retention signal in plants. For functional testing, the cellular distribution of chimeric protein constructs based on a marker protein, Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa) 2S albumin, was analyzed immunochemically in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants. Here, we report that the peptide motif is necessary and sufficient to accumulate 2S albumin constructs of both vacuolar and extracellular final destinations in the ER. We have shown immunochemically that RNase LX is specifically expressed during endosperm mobilization and leaf and flower senescence. Using immunofluorescence, RNase LX protein was detected in immature tracheary elements, suggesting a function in xylem differentiation. These results support a physiological function of RNase LX in selective cell death processes that are also thought to involve programmed cell death. It is assumed that RNase LX accumulates in an ER-derived compartment and is released by membrane disruption into the cytoplasma of those cells that are intended to undergo autolysis. These processes are accompanied by degradation of cellular components supporting a metabolic recycling function of the intracellular RNase LX. PMID:11598219

  17. Validity of child anthropometric measurements in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, Catherine M; Alfonso, Vivian H; Whaley, Shannon E; Wang, May C

    2012-03-01

    The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) serves 50% of infants and 25% of preschool-aged children in the United States and collects height and weight measurements from eligible children every 6 mo, making WIC data a valuable resource for studying childhood growth and obesity. We assessed the accuracy of measurements collected by WIC staff by comparing them to "gold standard" measurements collected by trained research staff. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) measuring agreement between WIC and research protocol measurements for height, weight, and BMI were 0.96, 0.99, and 0.93, respectively. Although WIC measurements overestimated height by 0.6 cm and weight by 0.05 kg on average, BMI was underestimated by only 0.15 kg/m(2) on average. WIC BMI percentiles classified children as overweight/obese vs. underweight/normal with 86% sensitivity and 92% specificity. We conclude that height, weight, and BMI measurements of children aged 2-5 y collected by trained WIC staff are sufficiently accurate for monitoring and research purposes. At seven WIC clinics in southern California, 287 children aged 2-5 y measured for height and weight by WIC staff using WIC standard protocol were remeasured by research staff using a research protocol (duplicate measurements with shoes and outerwear removed were taken by trained personnel).

  18. A simple program to measure and analyse tree rings using Excel, R and SigmaScan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hietz, Peter

    2011-01-01

    I present a new software that links a program for image analysis (SigmaScan), one for spreadsheets (Excel) and one for statistical analysis (R) for applications of tree-ring analysis. The first macro measures ring width marked by the user on scanned images, stores raw and detrended data in Excel and calculates the distance to the pith and inter-series correlations. A second macro measures darkness along a defined path to identify latewood–earlywood transition in conifers, and a third shows the potential for automatic detection of boundaries. Written in Visual Basic for Applications, the code makes use of the advantages of existing programs and is consequently very economic and relatively simple to adjust to the requirements of specific projects or to expand making use of already available code. PMID:26109835

  19. A simple program to measure and analyse tree rings using Excel, R and SigmaScan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hietz, Peter

    I present a new software that links a program for image analysis (SigmaScan), one for spreadsheets (Excel) and one for statistical analysis (R) for applications of tree-ring analysis. The first macro measures ring width marked by the user on scanned images, stores raw and detrended data in Excel and calculates the distance to the pith and inter-series correlations. A second macro measures darkness along a defined path to identify latewood-earlywood transition in conifers, and a third shows the potential for automatic detection of boundaries. Written in Visual Basic for Applications, the code makes use of the advantages of existing programs and is consequently very economic and relatively simple to adjust to the requirements of specific projects or to expand making use of already available code.

  20. Measure Guideline: Summary of Interior Ducts in New Construction, Including an Efficient, Affordable Method to Install Fur-Down Interior Ducts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beal, D. [BA-PIRC, Cocoa, FL (United States); McIlvaine, J. [BA-PIRC, Cocoa, FL (United States); Fonorow, K. [BA-PIRC, Cocoa, FL (United States); Martin, E. [BA-PIRC, Cocoa, FL (United States)

    2011-11-01

    This document illustrates guidelines for the efficient installation of interior duct systems in new housing, including the fur-up chase method, the fur-down chase method, and interior ducts positioned in sealed attics or sealed crawl spaces.

  1. Measurement of Community Empowerment in Three Community Programs in Rapla (Estonia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasmel, Anu; Andersen, Pernille Tanggaard

    2011-01-01

    Community empowerment approaches have been proven to be powerful tools for solving local health problems. However, the methods for measuring empowerment in the community remain unclear and open to dispute. This study aims to describe how a context-specific community empowerment measurement tool was developed and changes made to three health promotion programs in Rapla, Estonia. An empowerment expansion model was compiled and applied to three existing programs: Safe Community, Drug/HIV Prevention and Elderly Quality of Life. The consensus workshop method was used to create the measurement tool and collect data on the Organizational Domains of Community Empowerment (ODCE). The study demonstrated considerable increases in the ODCE among the community workgroup, which was initiated by community members and the municipality’s decision-makers. The increase was within the workgroup, which had strong political and financial support on a national level but was not the community’s priority. The program was initiated and implemented by the local community members, and continuous development still occurred, though at a reduced pace. The use of the empowerment expansion model has proven to be an applicable, relevant, simple and inexpensive tool for the evaluation of community empowerment. PMID:21556179

  2. Recruitment into diabetes prevention programs: what is the impact of errors in self-reported measures of obesity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernan, Andrea; Philpot, Benjamin; Janus, Edward D; Dunbar, James A

    2012-07-08

    Error in self-reported measures of obesity has been frequently described, but the effect of self-reported error on recruitment into diabetes prevention programs is not well established. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of using self-reported obesity data from the Finnish diabetes risk score (FINDRISC) on recruitment into the Greater Green Triangle Diabetes Prevention Project (GGT DPP). The GGT DPP was a structured group-based lifestyle modification program delivered in primary health care settings in South-Eastern Australia. Between 2004-05, 850 FINDRISC forms were collected during recruitment for the GGT DPP. Eligible individuals, at moderate to high risk of developing diabetes, were invited to undertake baseline tests, including anthropometric measurements performed by specially trained nurses. In addition to errors in calculating total risk scores, accuracy of self-reported data (height, weight, waist circumference (WC) and Body Mass Index (BMI)) from FINDRISCs was compared with baseline data, with impact on participation eligibility presented. Overall, calculation errors impacted on eligibility in 18 cases (2.1%). Of n = 279 GGT DPP participants with measured data, errors (total score calculation, BMI or WC) in self-report were found in n = 90 (32.3%). These errors were equally likely to result in under- or over-reported risk. Under-reporting was more common in those reporting lower risk scores (Spearman-rho = -0.226, p-value resulted in only 6% of individuals at high risk of diabetes being incorrectly categorised as moderate or low risk of diabetes. Overall FINDRISC was found to be an effective tool to screen and recruit participants at moderate to high risk of diabetes, accurately categorising levels of overweight and obesity using self-report data. The results could be generalisable to other diabetes prevention programs using screening tools which include self-reported levels of obesity.

  3. Recruitment into diabetes prevention programs: what is the impact of errors in self-reported measures of obesity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernan Andrea

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Error in self-reported measures of obesity has been frequently described, but the effect of self-reported error on recruitment into diabetes prevention programs is not well established. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of using self-reported obesity data from the Finnish diabetes risk score (FINDRISC on recruitment into the Greater Green Triangle Diabetes Prevention Project (GGT DPP. Methods The GGT DPP was a structured group-based lifestyle modification program delivered in primary health care settings in South-Eastern Australia. Between 2004–05, 850 FINDRISC forms were collected during recruitment for the GGT DPP. Eligible individuals, at moderate to high risk of developing diabetes, were invited to undertake baseline tests, including anthropometric measurements performed by specially trained nurses. In addition to errors in calculating total risk scores, accuracy of self-reported data (height, weight, waist circumference (WC and Body Mass Index (BMI from FINDRISCs was compared with baseline data, with impact on participation eligibility presented. Results Overall, calculation errors impacted on eligibility in 18 cases (2.1%. Of n = 279 GGT DPP participants with measured data, errors (total score calculation, BMI or WC in self-report were found in n = 90 (32.3%. These errors were equally likely to result in under- or over-reported risk. Under-reporting was more common in those reporting lower risk scores (Spearman-rho = −0.226, p-value  Conclusions Overall FINDRISC was found to be an effective tool to screen and recruit participants at moderate to high risk of diabetes, accurately categorising levels of overweight and obesity using self-report data. The results could be generalisable to other diabetes prevention programs using screening tools which include self-reported levels of obesity.

  4. NMR measurement system including two synchronized ring buffers, with 128 rf coils for in situ water monitoring in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Kuniyasu; Haishi, Tomoyuki; Aoki, Masaru; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Morisaka, Shinichi; Hashimoto, Seitaro

    2017-01-01

    A small radio-frequency (rf) coil inserted into a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) can be used to acquire nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals from the water in a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) or in oxygen gas channels in the PEFC. Measuring the spatial distribution of the water in a large PEFC requires using many rf probes, so an NMR measurement system which acquires NMR signals from 128 rf probes at intervals of 0.5 s was manufactured. The system has eight rf transceiver units with a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) for modulation of the excitation pulse and quadrature phase detection of the NMR signal, and one control unit with two ring buffers for data control. The sequence data required for the NMR measurement were written into one ring buffer. The acquired NMR signal data were then written temporarily into the other ring buffer and then were transmitted to a personal computer (PC). A total of 98 rf probes were inserted into the PEFC that had an electrical generation area of 16 cm × 14 cm, and the water generated in the PEFC was measured when the PEFC operated at 100 A. As a result, time-dependent changes in the spatial distribution of the water content in the MEA and the water in the oxygen gas channels were obtained.

  5. NMR measurement system including two synchronized ring buffers, with 128 rf coils for in situ water monitoring in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Kuniyasu; Haishi, Tomoyuki; Aoki, Masaru; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Morisaka, Shinichi; Hashimoto, Seitaro

    2017-01-01

    A small radio-frequency (rf) coil inserted into a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) can be used to acquire nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals from the water in a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) or in oxygen gas channels in the PEFC. Measuring the spatial distribution of the water in a large PEFC requires using many rf probes, so an NMR measurement system which acquires NMR signals from 128 rf probes at intervals of 0.5 s was manufactured. The system has eight rf transceiver units with a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) for modulation of the excitation pulse and quadrature phase detection of the NMR signal, and one control unit with two ring buffers for data control. The sequence data required for the NMR measurement were written into one ring buffer. The acquired NMR signal data were then written temporarily into the other ring buffer and then were transmitted to a personal computer (PC). A total of 98 rf probes were inserted into the PEFC that had an electrical generation area of 16 cm × 14 cm, and the water generated in the PEFC was measured when the PEFC operated at 100 A. As a result, time-dependent changes in the spatial distribution of the water content in the MEA and the water in the oxygen gas channels were obtained.

  6. Accurate frequency domain measurement of the best linear time-invariant approximation of linear time-periodic systems including the quantification of the time-periodic distortions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louarroudi, E.; Pintelon, R.; Lataire, J.

    2014-10-01

    Time-periodic (TP) phenomena occurring, for instance, in wind turbines, helicopters, anisotropic shaft-bearing systems, and cardiovascular/respiratory systems, are often not addressed when classical frequency response function (FRF) measurements are performed. As the traditional FRF concept is based on the linear time-invariant (LTI) system theory, it is only approximately valid for systems with varying dynamics. Accordingly, the quantification of any deviation from this ideal LTI framework is more than welcome. The “measure of deviation” allows us to define the notion of the best LTI (BLTI) approximation, which yields the best - in mean square sense - LTI description of a linear time-periodic LTP system. By taking into consideration the TP effects, it is shown in this paper that the variability of the BLTI measurement can be reduced significantly compared with that of classical FRF estimators. From a single experiment, the proposed identification methods can handle (non-)linear time-periodic [(N)LTP] systems in open-loop with a quantification of (i) the noise and/or the NL distortions, (ii) the TP distortions and (iii) the transient (leakage) errors. Besides, a geometrical interpretation of the BLTI approximation is provided, leading to a framework called vector FRF analysis. The theory presented is supported by numerical simulations as well as real measurements mimicking the well-known mechanical Mathieu oscillator.

  7. Contributions of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the ARM Climate Research Facility to the U.S. Climate Change Science Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SA Edgerton; LR Roeder

    2008-09-30

    The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. The 2007 assessment (AR4) by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reports a substantial range among GCMs in climate sensitivity to greenhouse gas emissions. The largest contributor to this range lies in how different models handle changes in the way clouds absorb or reflect radiative energy in a changing climate (Solomon et al. 2007). In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program within the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To address this problem, BER has adopted a unique two-pronged approach: * The ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF), a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes. * The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report describes accomplishments of the BER ARM Program toward addressing the primary uncertainties related to climate change prediction as identified by the IPCC.

  8. Environmental Restoration Program pollution prevention performance measures for FY 1993 and 1994 remedial investigations: Generator training manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-01

    This computer-based program is designed to help waste generators in the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program prevent pollution at the DOE Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE-OR) facilities in Oak Ridge, Paducah, and Portsmouth. The Numerical Scoring System (NSS) is an interactive system designed to maintain data on ER Program pollution prevention efforts and to measure the success of these efforts through the ER Program life cycle.

  9. A Meta-Analysis to Determine if Lower Extremity Muscle Strengthening Should Be Included in Military Knee Overuse Injury-Prevention Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollock, Roger O; Andrews, Corey; Johnston, Ashlyn; Elliott, Teresa; Wilson, Alan E; Games, Kenneth E; Sefton, JoEllen M

    2016-11-01

     Knee overuse injuries are the most common musculoskeletal complaints in military trainees and are common in active-duty warfighters. Muscle strengthening is usually recommended; however, research is conflicting in this area, which makes it difficult to develop effective screening, prevention, and training interventions for warfighters.  To determine if lower extremity muscular weakness contributes to knee overuse injuries and identify specific muscular involvement.  We searched MEDLINE, PubMed, Web of Science, SPORTDiscus, CINAHL, and Military & Government Collection and reference lists of relevant articles published between January 1, 2000, and January 1, 2013.  For inclusion, requirements were uninjured and injured groups; provision of the sample size, means, and standard deviations for all groups; identification of the specific muscles assessed; and clearly defined knee injury.  Sample size, sex, and muscle strength means and standard deviations.  Twenty-five studies met these criteria. We used the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network algorithm to determine the appropriate tool for appraising article quality. Unweighted random-effects model meta-analyses were conducted. Separate meta-analyses were performed for the moderators of strength measurement scale (absolute or normalized muscle strength), muscle group, and sex. A weighted random-effects model with a Hedges g effect metric and 95% confidence intervals were used for comparison across studies.  Our meta-analysis suggests that individuals with symptoms of a knee overuse injury have lower absolute and normalized hip muscle strength. Specifically, they had lower absolute hip external-rotator, knee-extensor, and knee-flexor strength, as well as lower normalized hip external-rotator, hip-extensor, and hip-abductor strength, compared with asymptomatic control participants. The findings suggest a possible link between lower hip and thigh strength and knee overuse injuries. Further research is

  10. Project HAPI (Handicapped Achievement Program Improvement): Assessment plus Intervention equal I.E.P. A Handbook on How To Write an Individualized Education Program for Severe Disorders of Language, Including Aphasia and Other Speech-Language Handicapped (Communication Disorders). Book One.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Jean

    The first of five handbooks developed by Project HAPI (Handicapped Achievement Program Improvement), a multimedia staff development program to help teachers and specialists write effective individualized education programs (IEPs), is in looseleaf workbook format and focuses on children with severe disorders of language, including aphasia and other…

  11. Determination of potassium in several plants and study of potassium transfer to different beverages, including tequila, by measurement of 40K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete, J. M.; Muller, G.; Cabrera, L.; Martinez, T.

    2006-01-01

    Measurement of 40K was used for determination of potassium concentrations in leaves of agave and maguey cactus leaves, and coffee beans of various origins. The procedure was also used to study potassium transfer to tequila (alcoholic drink made of agave cactus), and the cactus and coffee infusions using 40K as a natural radioactive tracer. Counting of 40K in Marinelli containers with the aid of a low background NaI(Ti) scintillation detection system for 12 24 hours was employed. The method appeared to be simple and suitable for determination of potassium concentrations in large samples, which eliminates homogeneity problems.

  12. [Survey of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus control measures in hospitals participating in the VINCat program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopena-Galindo, Nieves; Hornero-Lopez, Anna; Freixas-Sala, Núria; Bella-Cueto, Feliu; Pérez-Jové, Josefa; Limon-Cáceres, Enric; Gudiol-Munté, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    VINCat is a nosocomial infection surveillance program in hospitals in Catalonia. The aim of the study was to determine the surveillance and control measures of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in these centres. An e-mail survey was carried out from January to March 2013 with questions related to the characteristics of the hospitals and their control measures for MRSA. A response was received from 53 hospitals (>500 beds: 7; 200-500 beds: 14;<200 beds: 32; had ICU: 29). Computer alert of readmissions was available in 63%. There was active surveillance of patients admitted from another hospital (46.2%) or a long-term-care centre (55.8%), both being significantly more common measures in hospitals with a rate of MRSA≤22% (global median). Compliance with hand hygiene was observed in 77.4% of the centres, and was greater than 50% in 69.7% of them. All hospitals had contact precautions, although 62.3% did not have exclusive frequently used clinical material in bedrooms. The room cleaning was performed more frequently in 54.7% of hospitals, and 67.9% of them had programs for the appropriate use of antibiotics. This study provides information on the implementation of measures to prevent MRSA in hospitals participating in the VINCat program. Most of the centres have an MRSA protocol, however compliance with it should be improved, especially in areas such as active detection on admission in patients at risk, hand hygiene adherence, cleaning frequency and optimising the use of antibiotics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  13. Sorption of Sr, Co and Zn on illite: Batch experiments and modelling including Co in-diffusion measurements on compacted samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, V.; Baeyens, B.; Glaus, M. A.; Kupcik, T.; Marques Fernandes, M.; Van Laer, L.; Bruggeman, C.; Maes, N.; Schäfer, T.

    2018-02-01

    Experimental investigations on the uptake of divalent cations (Sr, Co and Zn) onto illite (Illite du Puy, Le-Puy-en-Velay, France) were carried out by three different international research groups (Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal, KIT (Germany), Group Waste & Disposal, SCK-CEN, (Belgium) and Laboratory for Waste Management, PSI (Switzerland)) in the framework of the European FP7 CatClay project. The dependence of solid-liquid distribution ratios (Rd values) on pH at trace metal conditions (sorption edges) and on the metal ion concentration (sorption isotherms) was determined in dilute suspensions of homo-ionic Na-illite (Na-IdP) under controlled N2 atmosphere. The experimental results were modelled using the 2 Site Protolysis Non Electrostatic Surface Complexation and Cation Exchange (2SPNE SC/CE) sorption model. The sorption of Sr depends strongly on ionic strength, while a rather weak pH dependence is observed in a pH range between 3 and 11. The data were modelled with cation exchange reactions, taking into account competition with H, K, Ca, Mg and Al, and surface complexation on weak amphotheric edge sites at higher pH values. The sorption of Co on Na-IdP, however, is strongly pH dependent. Cation exchange on the planar sites and surface complexation on strong and weak amphoteric edge sites were used to describe the Co sorption data. Rd values for Co derived from in-diffusion measurements on compacted Na-IdP samples (bulk-dry density of 1700 kg m-3) between pH 5.0 and 9.0 are in good agreement with the batch sorption data. The equivalence of both approaches to measure sorption was thus confirmed for the present test system. In addition, the results highlight the importance of both major and minor surface species for the diffusive transport behaviour of strongly sorbing metal cations. While surface complexes at the edge sites determine largely the Rd value, the diffusive flux may be governed by those species bound to the planar sites, even at low fractional

  14. Outcomes of continuous process improvement of a nutritional care program incorporating TTR measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mears, Elia

    2002-12-01

    Early assessment of protein calorie malnutrition (PCM) can improve the outcome for hospitalized patients by allowing the initiation of nutrition support if required. In addition, monitoring nutritional status during the hospital stay can identify a decline in or improvement of PCM so that alterations to treatment regimens can be made if needed. The visceral protein albumin is the traditional laboratory indicator of PCM. In the past decade another protein has been lauded as a superior marker that can be used in conjunction. We undertook several studies to test the effectiveness of TTR as an aid in nutritional assessment. We found TTR to be a sensitive measure of nutritional status, allowing for earlier assessment and intervention, thus reducing length of stay and other hospital associated costs. Based on these findings, our hospital generated and implemented a multidisciplinary nutrition care program. Transthyretin is an integral portion of this program; levels are determined on admission and repeated twice weekly until discharge.

  15. Measuring impact of JAMA Dermatology Practice Gaps section on training in US dermatology residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Kristina M; Stratman, Erik J

    2013-07-01

    JAMA Dermatology Practice Gaps commentaries are intended to aid in the interpretation of the literature to make it more practical and applicable to daily patient care. Practice Gaps commentaries have had an impact on physician clinical practice and dermatology residency curricula. To assess the impact of JAMA Dermatology Practice Gaps commentaries on dermatology residency training programs in the United States, including journal club discussions and local quality improvement activities. A web-based questionnaire of 17 questions was sent via e-mail to US dermatology residency program directors (PDs) in February 2012. Program director report of incorporating Practice Gaps themes and discussions into resident journal club activities, clinical practice, quality improvement activities, or research projects in the residency programs, as a result of a Practice Gaps commentary. Of the 114 surveys distributed to US dermatology residency PDs, 48 were completed (42% response rate). Sixty percent of PDs reported familiarity with the Practice Gaps section of JAMA Dermatology, and 56% discuss these commentaries during resident journal club activities. Quality improvement and research projects have been initiated as a result of Practice Gaps commentaries. Practice Gaps commentaries are discussed during most dermatology residency journal club activities. Practice Gaps have had an impact on physician practice and dermatology residency curricula and can serve as a tool for enhanced continuing medical education and quality improvement initiatives.

  16. A FAST BREEDER REACTOR SPENT FUEL MEASUREMENTS PROGRAM FOR BN-350 REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. STAPLES; J. HALBIG; ET AL

    1999-04-01

    A project to verify the fissile content of fast breeder reactor spent nuclear fuel is underway in the Republic of Kasakhstan. There are a variety of assembly types with different irradiation histories and profiles in the reactor that require a variety of measurement and analysis procedures. These procedures will be discussed and compared as will the general process that has been designed to resolve any potential measurement discrepancies. The underwater counter is part of a system that is designed to assist the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in maintaining continuity of knowledge from the time of measurement until the measured item is placed in a welded container with a unique identification. In addition to satisfying IAEA requirements for the spent nuclear fuel, this measurement program is able to satisfy some of the measurement requirements for the Kasakhstan Atomic Energy Agency concerning the repackaging of the spent nuclear fuel into a standard canister. The project is currently operational in a mode requiring the IAEA's continuous presence.

  17. A unified multi-level model approach to assessing patient responsiveness including; return to normal, minimally important differences and minimal clinically important improvement for patient reported outcome measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, Adrian; Wylde, Vikki; Lenguerrand, Erik; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael; Dawson, Jill; Beard, David; Price, Andrew; Blom, Ashley W

    2017-07-21

    This article reviews and compares four commonly used approaches to assess patient responsiveness with a treatment or therapy (return to normal (RTN), minimal important difference (MID), minimal clinically important improvement (MCII), OMERACT-OARSI [Outcome Measures in Rheumatology-Osteoarthris Reseach Society International] (OO)) and demonstrates how each of the methods can be formulated in a multilevel modelling (MLM) framework. Cohort study. A cohort of patients undergoing total hip and knee replacement were recruited from a single UK National Health Service hospital. 400 patients from the Arthroplasty Pain Experience cohort study undergoing total hip (n=210) and knee (n=190) replacement who completed the Intermittent and Constant Osteoarthritis Pain questionnaire prior to surgery and then at 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery. The primary outcome was defined as a response to treatment following total hip or knee replacement. We compared baseline scores, change scores and proportion of individuals defined as 'responders' using traditional and MLM approaches with patient responsiveness. Using existing approaches, baseline and change scores are underestimated, and the variance of baseline and change scores overestimated in comparison with MLM approaches. MLM increases the proportion of individuals defined as responding in RTN, MID and OO criteria compared with existing approaches. Using MLM with the MCII criteria reduces the number of individuals identified as responders. MLM improves the estimation of the SD of baseline and change scores by explicitly incorporating measurement error into the model and avoiding regression to the mean when making individual predictions. Using refined definitions of responsiveness may lead to a reduction in misclassification when attempting to predict who does and does not respond to an intervention and clarifies the similarities between existing methods. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text

  18. Measurement of neutrino and antineutrino oscillations by the T2K experiment including a new additional sample of νe interactions at the far detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, K.; Amey, J.; Andreopoulos, C.; Antonova, M.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Ashida, Y.; Ban, S.; Barbi, M.; Barker, G. J.; Barr, G.; Barry, C.; Batkiewicz, M.; Berardi, V.; Berkman, S.; Bhadra, S.; Bienstock, S.; Blondel, A.; Bolognesi, S.; Bordoni, S.; Boyd, S. B.; Brailsford, D.; Bravar, A.; Bronner, C.; Buizza Avanzini, M.; Calland, R. G.; Campbell, T.; Cao, S.; Cartwright, S. L.; Catanesi, M. G.; Cervera, A.; Chappell, A.; Checchia, C.; Cherdack, D.; Chikuma, N.; Christodoulou, G.; Coleman, J.; Collazuol, G.; Coplowe, D.; Cudd, A.; Dabrowska, A.; De Rosa, G.; Dealtry, T.; Denner, P. F.; Dennis, S. R.; Densham, C.; Di Lodovico, F.; Dolan, S.; Drapier, O.; Duffy, K. E.; Dumarchez, J.; Dunne, P.; Emery-Schrenk, S.; Ereditato, A.; Feusels, T.; Finch, A. J.; Fiorentini, G. A.; Fiorillo, G.; Friend, M.; Fujii, Y.; Fukuda, D.; Fukuda, Y.; Garcia, A.; Giganti, C.; Gizzarelli, F.; Golan, T.; Gonin, M.; Hadley, D. R.; Haegel, L.; Haigh, J. T.; Hansen, D.; Harada, J.; Hartz, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Hastings, N. C.; Hayashino, T.; Hayato, Y.; Hillairet, A.; Hiraki, T.; Hiramoto, A.; Hirota, S.; Hogan, M.; Holeczek, J.; Hosomi, F.; Huang, K.; Ichikawa, A. K.; Ikeda, M.; Imber, J.; Insler, J.; Intonti, R. A.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Iwai, E.; Iwamoto, K.; Izmaylov, A.; Jamieson, B.; Jiang, M.; Johnson, S.; Jonsson, P.; Jung, C. K.; Kabirnezhad, M.; Kaboth, A. C.; Kajita, T.; Kakuno, H.; Kameda, J.; Karlen, D.; Katori, T.; Kearns, E.; Khabibullin, M.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kim, H.; Kim, J.; King, S.; Kisiel, J.; Knight, A.; Knox, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Koch, L.; Koga, T.; Koller, P. P.; Konaka, A.; Kormos, L. L.; Koshio, Y.; Kowalik, K.; Kudenko, Y.; Kurjata, R.; Kutter, T.; Lagoda, J.; Lamont, I.; Lamoureux, M.; Lasorak, P.; Laveder, M.; Lawe, M.; Licciardi, M.; Lindner, T.; Liptak, Z. J.; Litchfield, R. P.; Li, X.; Longhin, A.; Lopez, J. P.; Lou, T.; Ludovici, L.; Lu, X.; Magaletti, L.; Mahn, K.; Malek, M.; Manly, S.; Maret, L.; Marino, A. D.; Martin, J. F.; Martins, P.; Martynenko, S.; Maruyama, T.; Matveev, V.; Mavrokoridis, K.; Ma, W. Y.; Mazzucato, E.; McCarthy, M.; McCauley, N.; McFarland, K. S.; McGrew, C.; Mefodiev, A.; Metelko, C.; Mezzetto, M.; Minamino, A.; Mineev, O.; Mine, S.; Missert, A.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Morrison, J.; Mueller, Th. A.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakahata, M.; Nakamura, K. G.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, K. D.; Nakanishi, Y.; Nakayama, S.; Nakaya, T.; Nakayoshi, K.; Nantais, C.; Nielsen, C.; Nishikawa, K.; Nishimura, Y.; Novella, P.; Nowak, J.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Okumura, K.; Okusawa, T.; Oryszczak, W.; Oser, S. M.; Ovsyannikova, T.; Owen, R. A.; Oyama, Y.; Palladino, V.; Palomino, J. L.; Paolone, V.; Patel, N. D.; Paudyal, P.; Pavin, M.; Payne, D.; Petrov, Y.; Pickering, L.; Pinzon Guerra, E. S.; Pistillo, C.; Popov, B.; Posiadala-Zezula, M.; Poutissou, J.-M.; Pritchard, A.; Przewlocki, P.; Quilain, B.; Radermacher, T.; Radicioni, E.; Ratoff, P. N.; Rayner, M. A.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Riccio, C.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Rondio, E.; Rossi, B.; Roth, S.; Ruggeri, A. C.; Rychter, A.; Sakashita, K.; Sánchez, F.; Scantamburlo, E.; Scholberg, K.; Schwehr, J.; Scott, M.; Seiya, Y.; Sekiguchi, T.; Sekiya, H.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shah, R.; Shaikhiev, A.; Shaker, F.; Shaw, D.; Shiozawa, M.; Shirahige, T.; Smy, M.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Sobel, H.; Steinmann, J.; Stewart, T.; Stowell, P.; Suda, Y.; Suvorov, S.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Tacik, R.; Tada, M.; Takeda, A.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tamura, R.; Tanaka, H. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Thakore, T.; Thompson, L. F.; Tobayama, S.; Toki, W.; Tomura, T.; Tsukamoto, T.; Tzanov, M.; Vagins, M.; Vallari, Z.; Vasseur, G.; Vilela, C.; Vladisavljevic, T.; Wachala, T.; Walter, C. W.; Wark, D.; Wascko, M. O.; Weber, A.; Wendell, R.; Wilking, M. J.; Wilkinson, C.; Wilson, J. R.; Wilson, R. J.; Wret, C.; Yamada, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yano, T.; Yen, S.; Yershov, N.; Yokoyama, M.; Yu, M.; Zalewska, A.; Zalipska, J.; Zambelli, L.; Zaremba, K.; Ziembicki, M.; Zimmerman, E. D.; Zito, M.; T2K Collaboration

    2017-11-01

    The T2K experiment reports an updated analysis of neutrino and antineutrino oscillations in appearance and disappearance channels. A sample of electron neutrino candidates at Super-Kamiokande in which a pion decay has been tagged is added to the four single-ring samples used in previous T2K oscillation analyses. Through combined analyses of these five samples, simultaneous measurements of four oscillation parameters, |Δ m322 |, sin2θ23, sin2θ13, and δCP and of the mass ordering are made. A set of studies of simulated data indicates that the sensitivity to the oscillation parameters is not limited by neutrino interaction model uncertainty. Multiple oscillation analyses are performed, and frequentist and Bayesian intervals are presented for combinations of the oscillation parameters with and without the inclusion of reactor constraints on sin2θ13. When combined with reactor measurements, the hypothesis of C P conservation (δCP=0 or π ) is excluded at 90% confidence level. The 90% confidence region for δCP is [-2.95 ,-0.44 ] ([-1.47 ,-1.27 ] ) for normal (inverted) ordering. The central values and 68% confidence intervals for the other oscillation parameters for normal (inverted) ordering are Δ m322=2.54 ±0.08 (2.51 ±0.08 )×10-3 eV2/c4 and sin2θ23 =0.5 5-0.09+0.05 (0.5 5-0.08+0.05), compatible with maximal mixing. In the Bayesian analysis, the data weakly prefer normal ordering (Bayes factor 3.7) and the upper octant for sin2θ23 (Bayes factor 2.4).

  19. Measure Guideline: Summary of Interior Ducts in New Construction, Including an Efficient, Affordable Method to Install Fur-Down Interior Ducts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beal, D.; McIlvaine , J.; Fonorow, K.; Martin, E.

    2011-11-01

    This document illustrates guidelines for the efficient installation of interior duct systems in new housing, including the fur-up chase method, the fur-down chase method, and interior ducts positioned in sealed attics or sealed crawl spaces. This document illustrates guidelines for the efficient installation of interior duct systems in new housing. Interior ducts result from bringing the duct work inside a home's thermal and air barrier. Architects, designers, builders, and new home buyers should thoroughly investigate any opportunity for energy savings that is as easy to implement during construction, such as the opportunity to construct interior duct work. In addition to enhanced energy efficiency, interior ductwork results in other important advantages, such as improved indoor air quality, increased system durability and increased homeowner comfort. While the advantages of well-designed and constructed interior duct systems are recognized, the implementation of this approach has not gained a significant market acceptance. This guideline describes a variety of methods to create interior ducts including the fur-up chase method, the fur-down chase method, and interior ducts positioned in sealed attics or sealed crawl spaces. As communication of the intent of an interior duct system, and collaboration on its construction are paramount to success, this guideline details the critical design, planning, construction, inspection, and verification steps that must be taken. Involved in this process are individuals from the design team; sales/marketing team; and mechanical, insulation, plumbing, electrical, framing, drywall and solar contractors.

  20. A path-following driver-vehicle model with neuromuscular dynamics, including measured and simulated responses to a step in steering angle overlay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, David J.

    2012-04-01

    An existing driver-vehicle model with neuromuscular dynamics is improved in the areas of cognitive delay, intrinsic muscle dynamics and alpha-gamma co-activation. The model is used to investigate the influence of steering torque feedback and neuromuscular dynamics on the vehicle response to lateral force disturbances. When steering torque feedback is present, it is found that the longitudinal position of the lateral disturbance has a significant influence on whether the driver's reflex response reinforces or attenuates the effect of the disturbance. The response to angle and torque overlay inputs to the steering system is also investigated. The presence of the steering torque feedback reduced the disturbing effect of torque overlay and angle overlay inputs. Reflex action reduced the disturbing effect of a torque overlay input, but increased the disturbing effect of an angle overlay input. Experiments on a driving simulator showed that measured handwheel angle response to an angle overlay input was consistent with the response predicted by the model with reflex action. However, there was significant intra- and inter-subject variability. The results highlight the significance of a driver's neuromuscular dynamics in determining the vehicle response to disturbances.

  1. LHCb: Measurements of the relative branching fractions of the decay channel $B^{\\pm}\\to p \\bar{p} K^{\\pm}$ including charmonium contributions at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Cardinale, Roberta

    2011-01-01

    The study of the $B^{\\pm}\\to p \\bar{p} K^{\\pm}$ decay channel at LHCb is of great interest since it gives the possibility to study different aspects of the Standard Model and possibly Beyond Standard Model physics. A measurement of the direct CP asymmetry can be performed. Moreover intermediate states such as charmonium and "charmonium-like" resonances in the $p \\bar{p}$ final state can be observed and studied along with their characteristics. A multivariate selection has been implemented to select the interesting events using kinematic and topological variables and the particle identification information using the Ring Imaging Cherenkov detectors. The selection has a high signal efficiency and high background rejection capability. The ratios of the branching fractions of the $B^{\\pm}\\to p \\bar{p} K^{\\pm}$ decay channel, of the charmless component with $M_{p \\bar{p}} < 2.85 \\,{\\rm GeV/}c^{2}$ and of the charmonium contribution $\\eta_{c}$, ${\\mathcal B} (B^{\\pm}\\to \\eta_{c} K^{\\pm})\\times {\\mathcal B} (\\eta...

  2. Measurement of Fragmentation Products including Angular Distributions for 3, 5, and 10 GeV/A C and Si on several nuclear targets at the AGS

    CERN Document Server

    Pinsky, L; Broggi, F; Brugger, M; Campanella, M; Carboni, M; Cerutti, F; Colleoni, P; Crystl, M; D'Ambrosio, C; Elkhayari, N; Empl, A; Fassó, A; Ferrari, A; Ferrari, A; Gadioli, E; Garzelli, M V; Geutersloh, S; Heilbronn, L; Lantz, M; Lebourgeois, M; Lee, K T; Lukasik, G; Mairani, A; Margiotta, A; Mayes, B; Miller, J; Morone, M C; Mostacci, A; Muraro, S; Parodi, K; Patera, V; Pelliccioni, M; Ranft, J; Reddell, B; Roesler, S; Rollet, S; Sala, P R; Sarchiapone, L; Sioli, M; Smirnov, G; Sommerer, F; Theis, C; Trovati, S; Villari, R; Vinke, H; Vlachoudis, V; Vollaire, J; Wilson, T; Zapp, N; Zeitlin, C

    2010-01-01

    Motivated by differences in the predicted fragmentation of heavy ions at energies around 5 GeV/A as employed in the event generators used by the FLUKA Monte Carlo Code [1], a set of measurements were carried out at the AGS facility at the Brookhaven National Laboratory to determine as much information as possible about the cross sections to allow harmonization of those event generators for these incident lab energies. The FLUKA Code employs the RQMD event generator of Sorge [2] for heavy ion interactions starting at 100 MeV/A and extending into the region around 5 GeV/A. Above those energies the DPMJET code of Ranft and Roesler [3] is typically employed to simulate such interactions. The detailed predictions of these event generators had some disagreement in the vicinity of this crossover energy and in order to tune these codes to be in closer harmony at the transition, and of course to be simulating nature as closely as possible, data were taken at 3, 5 and 10 GeV/A with beams of Fe, Si and C on a variety of...

  3. A new method of measuring gravitational acceleration in an undergraduate laboratory program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiaochu; Wang, Chang; Xiao, Yunhuan; Schulte, Jurgen; Shi, Qingfan

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents a high accuracy method to measure gravitational acceleration in an undergraduate laboratory program. The experiment is based on water in a cylindrical vessel rotating about its vertical axis at a constant speed. The water surface forms a paraboloid whose focal length is related to rotational period and gravitational acceleration. This experimental setup avoids classical source errors in determining the local value of gravitational acceleration, so prevalent in the common simple pendulum and inclined plane experiments. The presented method combines multiple physics concepts such as kinematics, classical mechanics and geometric optics, offering the opportunity for lateral as well as project-based learning.

  4. The use of a knowledge translation program to increase use of standardized outcome measures in an outpatient pediatric physical therapy clinic: administrative case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Joseph; Marchetti, Gregory F; Racicot, Brook; Kaminski, Ellen

    2015-04-01

    Pediatric physical therapists face many challenges related to the application of research evidence to clinical practice. A multicomponent knowledge translation (KT) program may be an effective strategy to support practice change. The purpose of this case report is to describe the use of a KT program to improve the knowledge and frequency of use of standardized outcome measures by pediatric physical therapists practicing in an outpatient clinic. This program occurred at a pediatric outpatient facility with 1 primary clinic and 3 additional satellite clinics, and a total of 17 physical therapists. The initial underlying problem was inconsistency across staff recommendations for frequency and duration of physical therapist services. Formal and informal discussion with the department administrator and staff identified a need for increased use of standardized outcome measures to inform these decisions. The KT program to address this need spanned 6 months and included identification of barriers, the use of a knowledge broker, multiple workshop and practice sessions, online and hard-copy resources, and ongoing evaluation of the KT program with dissemination of results to staff. Outcome measures included pre- and post-knowledge assessment and self-report surveys and chart review data on use of outcome measures. Participants (N=17) gained knowledge and increased the frequency of use of standardized outcome measures based on data from self-report surveys, a knowledge assessment, and chart reviews. Administrators and others interested in supporting practice change in physical therapy may consider implementing a systematic KT program that includes a knowledge broker, ongoing engagement with staff, and a variety of accessible resources. © 2015 American Physical Therapy Association.

  5. Rheumatoid factor testing in Spanish primary care: A population-based cohort study including 4.8 million subjects and almost half a million measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsley, Klara; Miller, Anne; Luqmani, Raashid; Fina-Aviles, Francesc; Javaid, Muhammad Kassim; Edwards, Christopher J; Pinedo-Villanueva, Rafael; Medina, Manuel; Calero, Sebastian; Cooper, Cyrus; Arden, Nigel; Prieto-Alhambra, Daniel

    2018-02-26

    Rheumatoid factor (RF) testing is used in primary care in the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA); however a positive RF may occur without RA. Incorrect use of RF testing may lead to increased costs and delayed diagnoses. The aim was to assess the performance of RF as a test for RA and to estimate the costs associated with its use in a primary care setting. A retrospective cohort study using the Information System for the Development of Research in Primary Care database (contains primary care records and laboratory results of >80% of the Catalonian population, Spain). Participants were patients ≥18 years with ≥1 RF test performed between 01/01/2006 and 31/12/2011, without a pre-existing diagnosis of RA. Outcome measures were an incident diagnosis of RA within 1 year of testing, and the cost of testing per case of RA. 495,434/4,796,498 (10.3%) patients were tested at least once. 107,362 (21.7%) of those tested were sero-positive of which 2768 (2.6%) were diagnosed with RA within 1 year as were 1141/388,072 (0.3%) sero-negative participants. The sensitivity of RF was 70.8% (95% CI 69.4-72.2), specificity 78.7% (78.6-78.8), and positive and negative predictive values 2.6% (2.5-2.7) and 99.7% (99.6-99.7) respectively. Approximately €3,963,472 was spent, with a cost of €1432 per true positive case. Although 10% of patients were tested for RF, most did not have RA. Limiting testing to patients with a higher pre-test probability would significantly reduce the cost of testing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  6. Pain in patients with multiple sclerosis: a complex assessment including quantitative and qualitative measurements provides for a disease-related biopsychosocial pain model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalski D

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Dominik Michalski1,*, Stefanie Liebig1,*, Eva Thomae1,2, Andreas Hinz3, Florian Then Bergh1,21Department of Neurology, 2Translational Centre for Regenerative Medicine (TRM, 3Department of Medical Psychology and Medical Sociology, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany *These authors contributed equallyBackground: Pain of various causes is a common phenomenon in patients with Multiple Sclerosis (MS. A biopsychosocial perspective has proven a useful theoretical construct in other chronic pain conditions and was also started in MS. To support such an approach, we aimed to investigate pain in MS with special emphasis on separating quantitative and qualitative aspects, and its interrelation to behavioral and physical aspects.Materials and methods: Pain intensity (NRS and quality (SES were measured in 38 consecutive outpatients with MS (mean age, 42.0 ± 11.5 years, 82% women. Pain-related behavior (FSR, health care utilization, bodily complaints (GBB-24 and fatigue (WEIMuS were assessed by questionnaires, and MS-related neurological impairment by a standardized neurological examination (EDSS.Results: Mean pain intensity was 4.0 (range, 0–10 and mean EDSS 3.7 (range, 0–8 in the overall sample. Currently present pain was reported by 81.6% of all patients. Disease duration and EDSS did not differ between patients with and without pain and were not correlated to quality or intensity of pain. Patients with pain had significantly higher scores of musculoskeletal complaints, but equal scores of exhaustion, gastrointestinal and cardiovascular complaints. Pain intensity correlated only with physical aspects, whereas quality of pain was additionally associated with increased avoidance, resignation and cognitive fatigue.Conclusion: As in other conditions, pain in MS must be assessed in a multidimensional way. Further research should be devoted to adapt existing models to a MS-specific model of pain.Keywords: pain intensity, quality of pain, pain

  7. Assessing blood brain barrier dynamics or identifying or measuring selected substances, including ethanol or toxins, in a subject by analyzing Raman spectrum signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, James L. (Inventor); Borchert, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A non-invasive method for analyzing the blood-brain barrier includes obtaining a Raman spectrum of a selected portion of the eye and monitoring the Raman spectrum to ascertain a change to the dynamics of the blood brain barrier.Also, non-invasive methods for determining the brain or blood level of an analyte of interest, such as glucose, drugs, alcohol, poisons, and the like, comprises: generating an excitation laser beam at a selected wavelength (e.g., at a wavelength of about 400 to 900 nanometers); focusing the excitation laser beam into the anterior chamber of an eye of the subject so that aqueous humor, vitreous humor, or one or more conjunctiva vessels in the eye is illuminated; detecting (preferably confocally detecting) a Raman spectrum from the illuminated portion of the eye; and then determining the blood level or brain level (intracranial or cerebral spinal fluid level) of an analyte of interest for the subject from the Raman spectrum. In certain embodiments, the detecting step may be followed by the step of subtracting a confounding fluorescence spectrum from the Raman spectrum to produce a difference spectrum; and determining the blood level and/or brain level of the analyte of interest for the subject from that difference spectrum, preferably using linear or nonlinear multivariate analysis such as partial least squares analysis. Apparatus for carrying out the foregoing methods are also disclosed.

  8. A training program for anthropometric measurements by a dedicated nutrition support team improves nutritional status assessment of the critically ill child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valla, Frederic V; Ford-Chessel, Carole; Meyer, Rosan; Berthiller, Julien; Dupenloup, Christine; Follin-Arbelet, Nathalie; Hubert, Anna; Javouhey, Etienne; Peretti, Noel

    2015-03-01

    The cornerstone of an optimal nutrition approach in PICUs is to evaluate the nutritional status of any patient. Anthropometric measurements and nutritional indices calculation allow for nutritional status assessment, which is not often part of routine management, as it is considered difficult to perform in this setting. We designed a study to evaluate the impact of a training program by the PICU nutritional support team on the implementation of routine anthropometric measurements on our PICU. A prospective study was performed over a 2-year period, which included: a baseline evaluation of nutritional assessment, knowledge, anthropometric measurements (weight, height, and head and mid upper arm circumferences), and nutritional indices calculation in patient files. This was followed by a training program to implement the newly developed nutrition assessment guidelines, which included anthropometrical measurements and also the interpretation of these. The impact of this nutritional assessment program was reviewed annually for 2 years after the implementation. PICU--Lyon, France. PICU nursing and medical staff, and patients admitted in February 2011, 2012, and 2013. Training program. Ninety-nine percent of staff (n = 145) attended the individual teaching. We found significant progress in nutritional awareness and confidence about nutritional assessment following the teaching program. In addition, an improvement in staff knowledge about undernutrition and its consequences were found. We enrolled 41, 55, and 91 patients in 2011, 2012, and 2013, respectively. There was a significant increase in anthropometric measurements during this time: 32%, 65% (p = 0.002), and 96% in 2013 (p Nutritional indices were calculated in 20%, 74% (p nutritional assessment teaching program that highlights both the importance and techniques of anthropometrical measurements has successfully been implemented in a PICU. It managed to improve staff knowledge and nutritional practice.

  9. Direct assessment as a measure of institutional effectiveness in a dental hygiene distance education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmsted, Jodi L

    2014-10-01

    This ten-year, longitudinal examination of a dental hygiene distance education (DE) program considered student performance on standard benchmark assessments as direct measures of institutional effectiveness. The aim of the study was to determine if students face-to-face in a classroom with an instructor performed differently from their counterparts in a DE program, taking courses through the alternative delivery system of synchronous interactive television (ITV). This study used students' grade point averages and National Board Dental Hygiene Examination scores to assess the impact of ITV on student learning, filling a crucial gap in current evidence. The study's research population consisted of 189 students who graduated from one dental hygiene program between 1997 and 2006. One hundred percent of the institution's data files for these students were used: 117 students were face-to-face with the instructor, and seventy-two received instruction through the ITV system. The results showed that, from a year-by-year perspective, no statistically significant performance differences were apparent between the two student groups when t-tests were used for data analysis. The DE system examined was considered effective for delivering education if similar performance outcomes were the evaluation criteria used for assessment.

  10. 77 FR 35747 - Highway Safety Programs; Conforming Products List of Evidential Breath Alcohol Measurement Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-14

    ... BAC, respectively. It also included a test for the presence of acetone and an expanded definition of... BAC Systems, Inc., Ontario, Canada: Breath Analysis Computer X X CAMEC Ltd., North Shields, Tyne and... Evidential Breath Alcohol Measurement Devices AGENCY: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration...

  11. Beyond the NAS Parallel Benchmarks: Measuring Dynamic Program Performance and Grid Computing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderWijngaart, Rob F.; Biswas, Rupak; Frumkin, Michael; Feng, Huiyu; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The contents include: 1) A brief history of NPB; 2) What is (not) being measured by NPB; 3) Irregular dynamic applications (UA Benchmark); and 4) Wide area distributed computing (NAS Grid Benchmarks-NGB). This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  12. Design of the automatic motor Ke measurement system using the system on programming chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Sheng-Chan; Chang, Kai-Hsiung; Liu, Yen-Chih; An, Nia-Chun; Tsai, Hsiu-An

    2013-01-01

    The induced electromotive force of traditional motor measurement usually uses another motor to connect the tested motor with the drive shaft to measure its speed and obtain Ke value of induced electromotive force of the tested motor. If the tested motor is not suitable for connection to the connect coupling because of the shape or volume of the rotor, it is difficult to measure the Ke values of the tested motor. So some scholars have proposed two-phase motor which drives the three-phase motor, and gain the measurement method of Ke from the third phase in a few years ago. The mainly way is using the digital logic circuits to redefine the truth table by entering the signals to the motor driver chip from the three Hall sensors. So it can still maintain a positive torque above 0 even if used the two-phase driver and the motor can be rotated by the two-phase driver. But the drawback is that it can only be measured the fixed Ke value at the same phase. And it has to redefine the truth table to measure the values of the other two phase. This paper provides a new measurement method that made the motor speed accelerate to the measured speed at the beginning and measuring the value of third phases while the rotation is maintained by the other two-phase. The advantage is that it can change the phase of measurement, so it can easily measure the Ke value. And the most of digital components which including processor, keyboard decoder and frequency counter etc can be achieved in FPGA by using SOPC method. It can significantly reduce the complexity of circuit and increase system reliability degree.

  13. The Impact of a Developed Measurement and Evaluation Development Program on Pre-Service Physical Education Teachers' Perceptions Related to Measurement and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Yunus; Erturan Ilker, Gokce; Demirhan, Giyasettin

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of the Measurement and Evaluation Development Program on pre-service physical education teachers' general perceptions and competency perceptions related to alternative assessment in physical education, and their competency perceptions related to educational measurement and evaluation. The…

  14. National Cancer Institute Patient Navigation Research Program: methods, protocol, and measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Karen M; Battaglia, Tracy A; Calhoun, Elizabeth; Dudley, Donald J; Fiscella, Kevin; Paskett, Electra; Raich, Peter C; Roetzheim, Richard G

    2008-12-15

    Patient, provider, and systems barriers contribute to delays in cancer care, a lower quality of care, and poorer outcomes in vulnerable populations, including low-income, underinsured, and racial/ethnic minority populations. Patient navigation is emerging as an intervention to address this problem, but navigation requires a clear definition and a rigorous testing of its effectiveness. Pilot programs have provided some evidence of benefit, but have been limited by evaluation of single-site interventions and varying definitions of navigation. To overcome these limitations, a 9-site National Cancer Institute Patient Navigation Research Program (PNRP) was initiated. The PNRP is charged with designing, implementing, and evaluating a generalizable patient navigation program targeting vulnerable populations. Through a formal committee structure, the PNRP has developed a definition of patient navigation and metrics to assess the process and outcomes of patient navigation in diverse settings, compared with concurrent continuous control groups. The PNRP defines patient navigation as support and guidance offered to vulnerable persons with abnormal cancer screening or a cancer diagnosis, with the goal of overcoming barriers to timely, quality care. Primary outcomes of the PNRP are 1) time to diagnostic resolution; 2) time to initiation of cancer treatment; 3) patient satisfaction with care; and 4) cost effectiveness, for breast, cervical, colon/rectum, and/or prostate cancer. The metrics to assess the processes and outcomes of patient navigation have been developed for the NCI-sponsored PNRP. If the metrics are found to be valid and reliable, they may prove useful to other investigators.

  15. The study on modelled and measured weather data for building energy simulation programs for Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    >B Faizal,

    2013-06-01

    This paper will study the usability of future weather data generated from climate model for Malaysia. Detailed future weather data is required for the building energy assessment as input parameters. The future weather data required is normally achieved from climate prediction models. The purpose of this study is to examine the gaps between weather data generated by climate model and the data measured by weather station in Bayan Lepas, Penang. Furthermore, this studies also to establish the modelled weather data for the use for future building energy simulation program. In order to achieve this purpose, simulated weather data sets HadCM3 were supplied by the Hadley Centre in the UK. The measured weather data was supplied by Malaysian Meteorological Department for Bayan Lepas, Penang. The period of analysed time was 18 years from 1990 to 2007 where the available data overlaps between HadCM3 and measured data. Several major weather variables were used in these studies such as Dry-bulb temperature, Solar radiation and Wind speed. The outcome from this studies shows a good match between HadCM3 data and measured data indicates that HadCM3 model is suitable for the purpose of future building energy simulation for Malaysia.

  16. The role of the EPA radiation quality assurance program in the measurement quality assurance accreditation program for radioassay laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grady, T.M. [Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1993-12-31

    As the nature and extent of radiological contamination becomes better documented and more public, radioanalytical laboratories are faced with a constantly expanding variety of new and difficult analytical requirements. Concurrent with those requirements is the responsibility to provide customers, regulatory officials, or the public with defensible data produced in an environment of verifiable, controlled quality. To meet that need, a quality assurance accreditation program for radioassay laboratories has been proposed by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). The standard will provide the organizational framework and functional requirements needed to assure the quality of laboratory outputs. Under the proposed program, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Laboratory Intercomparison Program plays a key role as a reference laboratory. The current and proposed roles of the EPA Intercomparison Program are discussed, as are the functional relationships between EPA, the accreditating organization, and the service and monitoring laboratories.

  17. Design and implementation of an external quality assessment program for HIV viral load measurements using dried blood spots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prach, Lisa M; Puren, Adrian; Lippman, Sheri A; Carmona, Sergio; Stephenson, Sophie; Cutler, Ewalde; Barnhart, Scott; Liegler, Teri

    2015-03-01

    An external quality assurance program was developed for HIV-1 RNA viral load measurements taken from dried blood spots using a reference panel and field-collected specimens. The program demonstrated that accurate and reproducible quantitation can be obtained from field-collected specimens. Residual proviral DNA may confound interpretation in virologically suppressed subjects. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Perioperative Temperature Measurement Considerations Relevant to Reporting Requirements for National Quality Programs Using Data From Anesthesia Information Management Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Richard H; Dexter, Franklin; Hofer, Ira S; Rodriguez, Luis I; Schwenk, Eric S; Maga, Joni M; Hindman, Bradley J

    2017-06-08

    Perioperative hypothermia may increase the incidences of wound infection, blood loss, transfusion, and cardiac morbidity. U.S. national quality programs for perioperative normothermia specify the presence of at least 1 "body temperature" ≥35.5°C during the interval from 30 minutes before to 15 minutes after the anesthesia end time. Using data from 4 academic hospitals, we evaluated timing and measurement considerations relevant to the current requirements to guide hospitals wishing to report perioperative temperature measures using electronic data sources. Anesthesia information management system databases from 4 hospitals were queried to obtain intraoperative temperatures and intervals to the anesthesia end time from discontinuation of temperature monitoring, end of surgery, and extubation. Inclusion criteria included age >16 years, use of a tracheal tube or supraglottic airway, and case duration ≥60 minutes. The end-of-case temperature was determined as the maximum intraoperative temperature recorded within 30 minutes before the anesthesia end time (ie, the temperature that would be used for reporting purposes). The fractions of cases with intervals >30 minutes between the last intraoperative temperature and the anesthesia end time were determined. Among the hospitals, averages (binned by quarters) of 34.5% to 59.5% of cases had intraoperative temperature monitoring discontinued >30 minutes before the anesthesia end time. Even if temperature measurement had been continued until extubation, averages of 5.9% to 20.8% of cases would have exceeded the allowed 30-minute window. Averages of 8.9% to 21.3% of cases had end-of-case intraoperative temperatures <35.5°C (ie, a quality measure failure). Because of timing considerations, a substantial fraction of cases would have been ineligible to use the end-of-case intraoperative temperature for national quality program reporting. Thus, retrieval of postanesthesia care unit temperatures would have been necessary. A

  19. Indicators measuring the performance of malaria programs supported by the global fund in Asia, progress and the way forward.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinkou Zhao

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In 2010, the Global Fund provided more than 75% of external international financing for malaria control. The Global Fund uses performance based funding in the grants it finances. This paper analyses the indicators used to measure the performance of Global Fund supported malaria grants in Asia. METHODS: Indicators used in the performance frameworks for all Global Fund supported malaria grants in Asia were retrieved from grant database and grouped into impact, outcome, output and input categories and categorized by service delivery areas. Indicators of each group were compared over rounds. Indicators used in performance frameworks were compared with internationally adopted indicators included in the Monitoring and Evaluation Toolkit developed by the Global Fund and international technical agencies. RESULTS: Between 2002 and 2010, 1,434 indicators were included in the performance frameworks of the 48 malaria grants awarded in Asia, including 229 impact and 227 outcome indicators, 437 output and 541 input indicators, with an average of 29.9 indicators per grant. The proportion of impact and outcome indicators increased over rounds, with that of input indicators declining from 44.1% in Round 1 to 22.7% in Round 9. CONCLUSIONS: Input indicators, which have predominated the performance frameworks of the Global Fund supported malaria programs in Asia have declined between Rounds 1 and 9. However, increased alignment with internationally adopted indicators included in the Monitoring and Evaluation Toolkit is needed to improve the validity of reported results.

  20. Assessment of an outreach program for eighth-grade science students: Measurement of affective and cognitive gains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauge, James Brian

    1998-12-01

    The College of Sciences and Mathematics Science Outreach Initiative was a program designed to attract students with the interest and ability to succeed in science and to keep them interested until they entered college. In this way, the Initiative sought to address the problem of a projected shortfall of scientists and engineers in the future. This study was conducted to evaluate the goals of the eighth grade component of the COSAM Initiative. These goals included: increased interest in and self-efficacy relating to science, increased achievement in science and mathematics, and increased enrollment in science and mathematics classes. Data were collected from 48 participants and 43 non-participants with surveys and from student records. Pre-treatment Chi-Square tests revealed that the groups did not differ in ethnicity, race, family income, parents' education, or parents' occupation. The surveys used were a total battery interest survey including (1) the Learning Science Things Survey (to measure interest in science topics), the Activities Interest Survey (to measure interest in science activities), the Career Orientation Survey (to measure interest in science careers) and the Learning Methods Survey (to measure interest in learning by experiential methods), (2) the Saturday Academy Survey (to measure self-efficacy concerning science activities), (3) the Saturday Academy Electronics/Eye Quiz (to test ability relating to science activities), and (4) the Summer Science Camp Survey (to measure interest in and self-efficacy concerning science activities). Student grades, SAT, and OLSAT scores, and the kinds of science and mathematics courses enrolled in during seventh and eighth grades were obtained from school records. Analysis of data using a mixed ANOVA design revealed that participation in the COSAM Initiative had no significant effect on interest in science as measured by the total battery survey. Similar analysis of Saturday Academy Survey data revealed that the

  1. Measuring and reporting attrition from obesity treatment programs: A call to action!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Beth M L; Brennan, Leah

    2015-01-01

    The high attrition rates in obesity interventions are associated with poorer weight loss and maintenance for the individual and poorer overall treatment effectiveness and cost-effectiveness for the treatment provider. Increased knowledge about factors associated with attrition can facilitate the identification of individuals at risk of drop-out and inform treatment program improvements with the aim of maximising treatment retention. To date, a relatively small body of literature has explored attrition from weight-loss interventions using two methods of attrition assessment: identification of pre-treatment predictors of attrition and eliciting post-treatment reasons for attrition. A range of attrition rates have been reported and no reliable or consistent predictors of attrition have been found. It is unknown whether the lack of consistent findings reflects population or treatment differences, or if the discrepant findings simply reflect differences in definition and measurement of attrition. Further research is required to address these limitations. There is a need for a recognised definition of obesity treatment attrition, the consideration of predictors that are theoretically and empirically associated with attrition, the development of a well-validated and standardised measure of barriers to attendance, and assessment of both treatment completers and drop-outs. Understanding the factors that influence attrition can be used to inform the modification of treatment programs and to target those most at risk of drop-out so as to maximise the success of obesity interventions. Copyright © 2014 Asian Oceanian Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A method to measure the impact of primary care programs targeted to reduce racial and ethnic disparities in health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luther, Stephen L; Studnicki, James; Kromrey, Jeffrey; Lomando-Frakes, Kathleen; Grant, Pauline; Finley, Gabrielle C

    2003-01-01

    A retrospective population-based study was designed to test the impact on selected health outcomes of community-based primary care programs targeting racial and ethnic minorities. Zip codes were coded as either "high" or "low" access to targeted primary care programs to create the independent variable of interest. Outcome measures were chosen to represent unique dimensions of primary care. Generalized linear models were developed to compare rates for the outcome measures among blacks in high- and low-access areas. This study provides a useful approach that could be used to evaluate the impact of such programs in other communities.

  3. Reporting of quality measures in gynecologic oncology programs at Prospective Payment System (PPS)-Exempt Cancer Hospitals: an early glimpse into a challenging initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, David E; Leitao, Mario; Levenback, Charles; Berkowitz, Ross; Roman, Lynda; Lucci, Joseph; Kim, Sarah; Lancaster, Johnathon; Odunsi, Kunle; Wakabayashi, Mark; Goff, Barbara A

    2013-09-01

    The Affordable Care Act mandates the Prospective Payment System (PPS)-Exempt Cancer Hospitals Quality Reporting program. These 11 hospitals (which are paid fee-for-service rather than on a DRG system) began reporting measures (2 general safety, 2 breast, 1 colon) in 2013. Given this reporting mandate, we set out to determine whether the PPS-exempt gynecologic oncology programs could identify quality measures specific to the care of our patients. A list of 12 quality measures specific to gynecologic oncology was created (from sources including the National Quality Forum and the SGO). Measures already in use were not included. The list was ranked by the gynecologic oncology program directors at the PPS-exempt hospitals. Descriptive statistics (including mean and SD for rankings) were utilized. Despite mandatory reporting of quality measures for PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, little consensus exists regarding specific gynecologic cancer measures. Documentation of debulking status, cancer survival, and offering minimally invasive surgery (for endometrial cancer) and intraperitoneal chemotherapy (for ovarian cancer) are important, but with widely variable responses (when ranked 1-12, standard deviations are 2-3). General issues regarding adherence to guidelines for the use of GCSF, documentation of functional status, and tracking of patient satisfaction scores were ranked the lowest. Three of the directors reported that their compensation is partially linked to quality outcomes. There is wide variability in ranking of quality measures, and may relate to provider or institutional factors. Despite the mandatory reporting in PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, work remains to define gynecologic cancer quality measures. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Measuring The Performance Of Government Technology Programs: Lessons From Manufacturing Extension

    OpenAIRE

    Bradford J Jensen; Ron Jarmin

    1997-01-01

    Managers of government technology programs are under increasing pressure to demonstrate the effectiveness of their programs. In this paper we examine the issues involved in credibly evaluating such programs in the context of recent efforts to evaluate manufacturing extension programs in the U.S. We provide a stylized model of the dynamic competitive environment in which the plants and firms targeted by these programs operate and discuss its implications for evaluation. We compare and contrast...

  5. An empirical study to measure the impact of loan assignment for job creation and entrepreneurship programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Danaei

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the primary concerns of many governmental agencies is to create job and working opportunities. The job creation is often promoted by loans devoted from the banks. This paper performs an empirical study to measure the relative efficiency of job creation from year 2002 to 2010 in different cities including Semnan, Dameghan, Shahrood, Garmsar and Mahdishahr located in west region of Iran. The proposed model of this paper uses data envelopment analysis where there are two inputs including the granted loans to private sector and the job applicants and two outputs including the assigned to work and the number of jobs created. The results indicate that the city of Garmsar represents the highest efficiency and Damghan maintains the lowest efficiency.

  6. A Process Evaluation of the Friendships and Dating Program for Adults with Developmental Disabilities: Measuring the Fidelity of Program Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Karen M.; Windsor, Richard; Atkinson, Julie P.

    2012-01-01

    Adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities are frequently abused in dating and partnered relationships. The Friendships and Dating Program (FDP) was developed to prevent violence in dating and partnered relationships and to teach social skills needed to develop healthy, meaningful relationships among this population. A pilot study…

  7. Measurement of Light Collection of CMS PbWO4 Crystals Comparison with the Cristal Monte Carlo Simulation Program and Further Evaluation

    CERN Document Server

    Drobychev, Gleb; Peigneux, Jean-Pierre; Rivoalan, P

    1998-01-01

    The measurement of the signal for light collection limited by the effective area of the present APD detectors has been evaluated using a photomultiplier and co60 source. Comparison of the methods and experimental results for simple geometrical situations has been made with the results of the CRISTAL Monte Carlo program which is also used to evaluate more complicated geometries including evaluation of a wavelength shifter used with an APD as a photodetector.

  8. GLOBE at Night: a Worldwide Citizen-Science Program to Increase Awareness of Light Pollution by Measuring Night Sky Brightness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, C. E.; Pompea, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    The emphasis in the international citizen-science, star-hunting campaign, GLOBE at Night, is in bringing awareness to the public on issues of light pollution. Light pollution threatens not only observatory sites and our "right to starlight", but can affect energy consumption, wildlife and health. GLOBE at Night has successfully reached a few 100,000 citizen-scientists. What has contributed to its success? Foundational resources are available to facilitate the public's participation in promoting dark skies awareness. The GLOBE at Night website explains clearly the simple-to-participate-in 5 step program and offers background information and interactive games on key concepts. To promote the campaign via popular social media, GLOBE at Night created Facebook and Twitter pages. The program has been expanded to include trainings of the general public, but especially educators in schools, museums and science centers, in unique ways. Education kits for dark skies awareness have been distributed at the training workshops. The kit includes material for a light shielding demonstration, a digital Sky Quality Meter and "Dark Skies Rangers" activities. The activities are on how unshielded light wastes energy, how light pollution affects wildlife and how one can participate in a citizen-science star-hunt like GLOBE at Night. To increase participation in the 2011 campaign, children and adults submitted their sky brightness measurements in real time with smart phones or tablets using the web application at www.globeatnight.org/webapp/. With smart phones and tablets, the location, date and time register automatically. For those without smart mobile devices, user-friendly tools on the GLOBE at Night report page were reconfigured to determine latitude and longitude more easily and accurately. As a proto-type for taking multiple measurements, people in Tucson found it easy to adopt a street and take measurements every mile for the length of the street. The grid of measurements

  9. A UT/LS ozone climatology of the nineteen seventies deduced from the GASP aircraft measurement program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Schnadt Poberaj

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available We present ozone measurements of the Global Atmospheric Sampling Program (GASP performed from four commercial and one research aircraft in the late 1970s. The GASP quality assurance and control program was reviewed, and an ozone climatology of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS of the years 1975–1979 was built. The data set was estimated to have an overall uncertainty of 9% or 3 ppb whichever is greater for the first two years and 4% or 3 ppb for the remaining years, i.e. after implementation of silicone rubber membranes in the pumps. Two cases of nearly coincident flights of two GASP airliners along the same flight route, and the comparison with independent observations from the literature, including ozonesondes and aircraft campaigns, indicate that the ozone measurements are of high quality. The UT/LS climatology of the GASP data set is in general agreement with that derived from MOZAIC in the 1990s in regions covered by both programmes. GASP provides unique large-scale climatological information on UT/LS ozone above the northern hemisphere Pacific region, which is not covered by MOZAIC. There, the GASP climatology confirms several characteristic features derived from individual research aircraft campaigns and from ozone soundings. In particular, summertime ozone in the UT over the midlatitude eastern Pacific Ocean was significantly lower in the 1970s than over the American continent. The generally lower ozone concentrations in the tropics near the dateline as compared to farther east are indicative of convective uplifting of ozone poor air from the marine boundary layer.

  10. Evaluation of Learning Environments for Object-Oriented Programming: Measuring Cognitive Load with a Novel Measurement Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Murat Pasa

    2016-01-01

    Various methods and tools have been proposed to overcome the learning obstacles for Object-Oriented Programming (OOP). However, it remains difficult especially for novice learners. The problem may be not only adopting an instructional method, but also an Integrated Development Environment (IDE). Learners employ IDEs as a means to solve programming…

  11. Recommendations for Guidelines for Environment-Specific Magnetic-Field Measurements, Rapid Program Engineering Project #2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Electric Research and Management, Inc.; IIT Research Institute; Magnetic Measurements; Survey Research Center, University of California; T. Dan Bracken, Inc.

    1997-03-11

    The purpose of this project was to document widely applicable methods for characterizing the magnetic fields in a given environment, recognizing the many sources co-existing within that space. The guidelines are designed to allow the reader to follow an efficient process to (1) plan the goals and requirements of a magnetic-field study, (2) develop a study structure and protocol, and (3) document and carry out the plan. These guidelines take the reader first through the process of developing a basic study strategy, then through planning and performing the data collection. Last, the critical factors of data management, analysis reporting, and quality assurance are discussed. The guidelines are structured to allow the researcher to develop a protocol that responds to specific site and project needs. The Research and Public Information Dissemination Program (RAPID) is based on exposure to magnetic fields and the potential health effects. Therefore, the most important focus for these magnetic-field measurement guidelines is relevance to exposure. The assumed objective of an environment-specific measurement is to characterize the environment (given a set of occupants and magnetic-field sources) so that information about the exposure of the occupants may be inferred. Ideally, the researcher seeks to obtain complete or "perfect" information about these magnetic fields, so that personal exposure might also be modeled perfectly. However, complete data collection is not feasible. In fact, it has been made more difficult as the research field has moved to expand the list of field parameters measured, increasing the cost and complexity of performing a measurement and analyzing the data. The guidelines address this issue by guiding the user to design a measurement protocol that will gather the most exposure-relevant information based on the locations of people in relation to the sources. We suggest that the "microenvironment" become the base unit of area in a study, with

  12. Program to make remote time measurement on the new precise clock system on totem

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, David

    2016-01-01

    For my project at CERN, I worked in the TOTEM team with Michele Quinto and Francesco Cafagna as supervisors. Their team is currently working on an update on TOTEM that includes a module able to measure precisely the time of flight of particles emitted from the collision at CMS. With this additional data, TOTEM will be able to reconstruct precisely the point of the collision in CMS. The main problem posed for this new module is to provide a precise synchronized clock signal to both the TOTEM detectors situated 200 meters after and before CMS. In fact, due to some external parameters, as temperature, the length of the optical fiber guiding the clock signal can vary yielding thus a unwanted phase difference of the clock between the two detectors. The idea is to get rid of the noisy phase difference to make very precise time of flight measurement of the order of the picosecond. This is achieved by continuously measuring the phase difference and correcting the time measurements according to the current phase diffe...

  13. Constructing vulnerabilty and protective measures indices for the enhanced critical infrastructure protection program.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, R. E.; Buehring, W. A.; Whitfield, R. G.; Bassett, G. W.; Dickinson, D. C.; Haffenden, R. A.; Klett, M. S.; Lawlor, M. A.; Decision and Information Sciences; LANL

    2009-10-14

    The US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has directed its Protective Security Advisors (PSAs) to form partnerships with the owners and operators of assets most essential to the Nation's well being - a subclass of critical infrastructure and key resources (CIKR) - and to conduct site visits for these and other high-risk assets as part of the Enhanced Critical Infrastructure Protection (ECIP) Program. During each such visit, the PSA documents information about the facility's current CIKR protection posture and overall security awareness. The primary goals for ECIP site visits (DHS 2009) are to: (1) inform facility owners and operators of the importance of their facilities as an identified high-priority CIKR and the need to be vigilant in light of the ever-present threat of terrorism; (2) identify protective measures currently in place at these facilities, provide comparisons of CIKR protection postures across like assets, and track the implementation of new protective measures; and (3) enhance existing relationships among facility owners and operators; DHS; and various Federal, State, local tribal, and territorial partners. PSAs conduct ECIP visits to assess overall site security; educate facility owners and operators about security; help owners and operators identify gaps and potential improvements; and promote communication and information sharing among facility owners and operators, DHS, State governments, and other security partners. Information collected during ECIP visits is used to develop metrics; conduct sector-by-sector and cross-sector vulnerability comparisons; identify security gaps and trends across CIKR sectors and subsectors; establish sector baseline security survey results; and track progress toward improving CIKR security through activities, programs, outreach, and training (Snyder 2009). The data being collected are used in a framework consistent with the National Infrastructure Protection Plan (NIPP) risk criteria (DHS 2009). The

  14. From Soft Skills to Hard Data: Measuring Youth Program Outcomes. Second Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Ahlstrom, Alicia; Yohalem, Nicole; DuBois, David; Ji, Peter; Hillaker, Barbara; Weikart, David P.

    2014-01-01

    Everyone who runs a youth program believes in their hearts that their program helps kids, but in their heads, they know they need convincing data to prove it. This guide--updated from 2011--is here to help them get the data they need. The guide addresses a common problem throughout the youth field: Out-of-school time (OST) programs can help youth…

  15. Measuring the efficacy of a wildfire education program in Colorado Springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    G.H. Donovan; P.A. Champ; D.T. Butry

    2007-01-01

    We examine an innovative wildfire risk education program in Colorado Springs, which rated the wildfire risk of 35,000 homes in the city's wildland urban interface. Evidence from home sales before and after the program's implementation suggests that the program was successful at changing homebuyers' attitudes toward wildfire risk, particularly preferences...

  16. Measuring Nontechnical Aspects of Surgical Clinician Development in an Otolaryngology Residency Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jennifer J; Cunningham, Michael J; Emerick, Kevin G; Gray, Stacey T

    2016-05-01

    Surgical competency requires sound clinical judgment, a systematic diagnostic approach, and integration of a wide variety of nontechnical skills. This more complex aspect of clinician development has traditionally been difficult to measure through standard assessment methods. This study was conducted to use the Clinical Practice Instrument (CPI) to measure nontechnical diagnostic and management skills during otolaryngology residency training; to determine whether there is demonstrable change in these skills between residents who are in postgraduate years (PGYs) 2, 4, and 5; and to evaluate whether results vary according to subspecialty topic or method of administration. Prospective study using the CPI, an instrument with previously established internal consistency, reproducibility, interrater reliability, discriminant validity, and responsiveness to change, in an otolaryngology residency training program. The CPI was used to evaluate progression in residents' ability to evaluate, diagnose, and manage case-based clinical scenarios. A total of 248 evaluations were performed in 45 otolaryngology resident trainees at regular intervals. Analysis of variance with nesting and postestimation pairwise comparisons were used to evaluate total and domain scores according to training level, subspecialty topic, and method of administration. Longitudinal residency educational initiative. Assessment with the CPI during PGYs 2, 4, and 5 of residency. Among the 45 otolaryngology residents (248 CPI administrations), there were a mean (SD) of 5 (3) administrations (range, 1-4) during their training. Total scores were significantly different among PGY levels of training, with lower scores seen in the PGY-2 level (44 [16]) compared with the PGY-4 (64 [13]) or PGY-5 level (69 [13]) (P otolaryngology (mean [SD], 72 [14]) than in subspecialties (range, 55 [12], P = .003, to 56 [19], P < .001). Neither administering the examination with an electronic scoring system, rather than a

  17. Measurement of the area of venous ulcers using two software programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, Thaís Dresch; Lima, Suzinara Beatriz Soares de; Lopes, Luis Felipe Dias; Borges, Eline de Lima; Weiller, Teresinha Heck; Fonseca, Graziele Gorete Portella da

    2016-12-19

    to compare the measurement area of venous ulcers using AutoCAD(r) and Image Tool software. this was an assessment of reproducibility tests conducted in a angiology clinic of a university hospital. Data were collected from 21 patients with venous ulcers, in the period from March to July of 2015, using a collection form and photograph of wounds. Five nurses (evaluators) of the hospital skin wound study group participated. The wounds were measured using both software programs. Data were analyzed using intraclass correlation coefficient, concordance correlation coefficient and Bland-Altman analysis. The study met the ethical aspects in accordance with current legislation. the size of ulcers varied widely, however, without significant difference between the measurements; an excellent intraclass and concordance correlation was found between both software programs, which seem to be more accurate when measuring a wound area >10 cm². the use of both software programs is appropriate for measurement of venous ulcers, appearing to be more accurate when used to measure a wound area > 10 cm². comparar a mensuração de área de úlceras venosas por meio dos softwares AutoCAD(r) e Image Tool. trata-se de um estudo de avaliação de reprodutibilidade de testes, realizado em um ambulatório de angiologia de um hospital universitário. Os dados foram coletados de 21 pacientes com úlceras venosas, no período de março a julho de 2015, por meio de formulário de coleta e fotografia das feridas. Cinco enfermeiros (avaliadores) do Grupo de Estudos de Lesões de Pele do hospital participaram da pesquisa. As feridas foram mensuradas em ambos os softwares. Os dados foram analisados por meio do Coeficiente de correlação intraclasse, Coeficiente de correlação de concordância e procedimento de Bland e Altman. A pesquisa respeitou os aspectos éticos de acordo com a legislação vigente. os tamanhos das úlceras apresentaram grande amplitude, porém, sem diferença significativa entre

  18. Programs and measures to reduce GHG emissions in agriculture and waste treatment in Slovakia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mareckova, K.; Bratislava, S.; Kucirek, S.

    1996-12-31

    Slovakia is a UN FCCC Annex I country and is obliged to limit its anthropogenic GHG emissions in the year 2000 to 1990 level. The key greenhouse gas in Slovakia is CO{sub 2} resulting mainly from fuel combustion processes. However the share of CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O is approximately 20% of the total emissions on GWP basis. These gases are occurring mainly in non-energy sectors. The construction of the non-CO{sub 2} emission scenarios to reduce GHG and the uncertainty in N{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4} emission estimation are discussed focusing on agriculture and waste treatment. The presentation will also include information on emission trends of CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O since 1988. There are already implemented measures reducing GHG emissions in Slovakia, however, not motivated by global warming. A short view of implemented measures with an assessment of their benefit concerning non-CO{sub 2} GHG emissions reduction and some proposed mitigation options for agriculture and waste treatment are shown. Expected difficulties connected with preparing scenarios and with implementation of reducing measures are discussed.

  19. DANCE, BALANCE AND CORE MUSCLE PERFORMANCE MEASURES ARE IMPROVED FOLLOWING A 9-WEEK CORE STABILIZATION TRAINING PROGRAM AMONG COMPETITIVE COLLEGIATE Dancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graning, Jessica; McPherson, Sue; Carter, Elizabeth; Edwards, Joshuah; Melcher, Isaac; Burgess, Taylor

    2017-01-01

    Background Dance performance requires not only lower extremity muscle strength and endurance, but also sufficient core stabilization during dynamic dance movements. While previous studies have identified a link between core muscle performance and lower extremity injury risk, what has not been determined is if an extended core stabilization training program will improve specific measures of dance performance. Hypothesis/Purpose This study examined the impact of a nine-week core stabilization program on indices of dance performance, balance measures, and core muscle performance in competitive collegiate dancers. Study Design Within-subject repeated measures design. Methods A convenience sample of 24 female collegiate dance team members (age = 19.7 ± 1.1 years, height = 164.3 ± 5.3 cm, weight 60.3 ± 6.2 kg, BMI = 22.5 ± 3.0) participated. The intervention consisted of a supervised and non-supervised core (trunk musculature) exercise training program designed specifically for dance team participants performed three days/week for nine weeks in addition to routine dance practice. Prior to the program implementation and following initial testing, transversus abdominis (TrA) activation training was completed using the abdominal draw-in maneuver (ADIM) including ultrasound imaging (USI) verification and instructor feedback. Paired t tests were conducted regarding the nine-week core stabilization program on dance performance and balance measures (pirouettes, single leg balance in passe’ releve position, and star excursion balance test [SEBT]) and on tests of muscle performance. A repeated measures (RM) ANOVA examined four TrA instruction conditions of activation: resting baseline, self-selected activation, immediately following ADIM training and four days after completion of the core stabilization training program. Alpha was set at 0.05 for all analysis. Results Statistically significant improvements were seen on single leg balance in passe

  20. DANCE, BALANCE AND CORE MUSCLE PERFORMANCE MEASURES ARE IMPROVED FOLLOWING A 9-WEEK CORE STABILIZATION TRAINING PROGRAM AMONG COMPETITIVE COLLEGIATE Dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Todd; Graning, Jessica; McPherson, Sue; Carter, Elizabeth; Edwards, Joshuah; Melcher, Isaac; Burgess, Taylor

    2017-02-01

    Dance performance requires not only lower extremity muscle strength and endurance, but also sufficient core stabilization during dynamic dance movements. While previous studies have identified a link between core muscle performance and lower extremity injury risk, what has not been determined is if an extended core stabilization training program will improve specific measures of dance performance. This study examined the impact of a nine-week core stabilization program on indices of dance performance, balance measures, and core muscle performance in competitive collegiate dancers. Within-subject repeated measures design. A convenience sample of 24 female collegiate dance team members (age = 19.7 ± 1.1 years, height = 164.3 ± 5.3 cm, weight 60.3 ± 6.2 kg, BMI = 22.5 ± 3.0) participated. The intervention consisted of a supervised and non-supervised core (trunk musculature) exercise training program designed specifically for dance team participants performed three days/week for nine weeks in addition to routine dance practice. Prior to the program implementation and following initial testing, transversus abdominis (TrA) activation training was completed using the abdominal draw-in maneuver (ADIM) including ultrasound imaging (USI) verification and instructor feedback. Paired t tests were conducted regarding the nine-week core stabilization program on dance performance and balance measures (pirouettes, single leg balance in passe' releve position, and star excursion balance test [SEBT]) and on tests of muscle performance. A repeated measures (RM) ANOVA examined four TrA instruction conditions of activation: resting baseline, self-selected activation, immediately following ADIM training and four days after completion of the core stabilization training program. Alpha was set at 0.05 for all analysis. Statistically significant improvements were seen on single leg balance in passe' releve and bilateral anterior reach for the SEBT (both p ≤ 0

  1. The effects of a movement with music program on measures of balance and gait speed in healthy older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamburg, Janet; Clair, Alicia Ann

    2003-01-01

    A group of 16 healthy older adults participated in a movement with music program to enhance physical flexibility, balance, and gait speed. The program, designed by a Laban Movement Analyst, consisted of 14 movement sequences set to music composed to reflect the dynamics, rhythm, timing, and phrasing of the movements. After 5 weeks, individuals showed statistically significant increases in measures of one-foot stance balance, gait speed, and functional reach. From the 5th to the 14th week, improvements continued in all measures but were not statistically significant.

  2. Measuring improvement in knowledge of drug policy reforms following a police education program in Tijuana, Mexico

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    J. Arredondo; S. A. Strathdee; J. Cepeda; D. Abramovitz; I. Artamonova; E. Clairgue; E. Bustamante; M. L. Mittal; T. Rocha; A. Bañuelos; H. O. Olivarria; M. Morales; G. Rangel; C. Magis; L. Beletsky

    2017-01-01

    .... We studied whether a police education program (PEP) improved officers’ drug and syringe policy knowledge, and aimed to identify participant characteristics associated with improvement of drug policy knowledge...

  3. How can a cost/benefit ratio be optimized for an output measurement program of external photon radiotherapy beams?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapanen, Mika; Bly, Ritva; Sipilä, Petri; Järvinen, Hannu; Tenhunen, Mikko

    2011-04-07

    We estimated cost/benefit ratios for different quality control programs of radiation output measurements of medical linear accelerators. The cost/benefit ratios of quality control (QC) programs (a combination of output measurement time interval and measurement action levels) were defined as workload divided by achievable dose accuracy. Dose accuracy was assumed to be inversely proportional to the 99% confidence limit of shifts of total treatment doses and workload as inversely proportional to the output measurement time interval. Our previously reported method was used to estimate the distribution of shifts of total treatment doses due to changes in accelerator radiation output (Gy/MU). The confidence limits of dose shifts were estimated for different QC programs and for different levels of output measurement reproducibility. Output shifts used in the estimations had previously been observed for four linear accelerators over 5 years. We observed that the cost/benefit ratio increases remarkably when the output measurement time interval is less than 1 month. The ratio depends strongly on the action levels and reproducibility of the QC measurements. Improvement of these factors optimizes the cost/benefit ratio by a factor of several times. The most cost-effective output measurement time interval to achieve 99% confidence limits of ±2, ±2.5 or ±3% for dose shifts ranged from 0.25 month to as much as 6 months depending on the factors given above and the intended accuracy level. It is several times more cost effective to increase dose accuracy by lowering the action levels of the QC measurements and by attempting to improve their reproducibility than by simply shortening the time interval of the output measurements. Methods improving utilization and interpretation of the results of the QC measurements play a key role in further optimization of cost/benefit ratios in dosimetric QC.

  4. Sevilleta Long-Term Ecological Research Program: Measuring ecosystem reponses to environmental change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert R. Parmenter

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the research program of the Sevilleta Long-Term Ecological Research Program (LTER) at the University of New Mexico. Details and data for each of the research topics described can be found in the Sevilleta LTER Internet Homepage (http://sev.lternet.edu/).

  5. The Impact Factor: Measuring Student Professional Growth in an Online Doctoral Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Swapna; Dawson, Kara

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the impact of an online Ed.D. in educational technology based on data collected from students at regular intervals during the program. It documents how students who were working professionals applied learning from the program within their practice, enculturated into the educational technology community, and grew…

  6. RCS auditor trainee manual: renewable resource measures (revised). United States Department of Energy Technical Assistance Program for the Residential Conservation Service Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-10-01

    This manual describes the use of renewable measures and the procedures used to audit for them. Included are active solar space and water heating systems, passive solar space and water heating systems, and wind energy systems. Sample audit forms are completed for a house in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. A summary of installation standards for active solar systems is included. (WHK)

  7. Did we get our money's worth? Bridging economic and behavioral measures of program success in adolescent drug prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Kevin N; Scheier, Lawrence M

    2013-11-08

    The recent U.S. Congressional mandate for creating drug-free learning environments in elementary and secondary schools stipulates that education reform rely on accountability, parental and community involvement, local decision making, and use of evidence-based drug prevention programs. By necessity, this charge has been paralleled by increased interest in demonstrating that drug prevention programs net tangible benefits to society. One pressing concern is precisely how to integrate traditional scientific methods of program evaluation with economic measures of "cost efficiency". The languages and methods of each respective discipline don't necessarily converge on how to establish the true benefits of drug prevention. This article serves as a primer for conducting economic analyses of school-based drug prevention programs. The article provides the reader with a foundation in the relevant principles, methodologies, and benefits related to conducting economic analysis. Discussion revolves around how economists value the potential costs and benefits, both financial and personal, from implementing school-based drug prevention programs targeting youth. Application of heterogeneous costing methods coupled with widely divergent program evaluation findings influences the feasibility of these techniques and may hinder utilization of these practices. Determination of cost-efficiency should undoubtedly become one of several markers of program success and contribute to the ongoing debate over health policy.

  8. Did We Get Our Money’s Worth? Bridging Economic and Behavioral Measures of Program Success in Adolescent Drug Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Kevin N.; Scheier, Lawrence M.

    2013-01-01

    The recent U.S. Congressional mandate for creating drug-free learning environments in elementary and secondary schools stipulates that education reform rely on accountability, parental and community involvement, local decision making, and use of evidence-based drug prevention programs. By necessity, this charge has been paralleled by increased interest in demonstrating that drug prevention programs net tangible benefits to society. One pressing concern is precisely how to integrate traditional scientific methods of program evaluation with economic measures of “cost efficiency”. The languages and methods of each respective discipline don’t necessarily converge on how to establish the true benefits of drug prevention. This article serves as a primer for conducting economic analyses of school-based drug prevention programs. The article provides the reader with a foundation in the relevant principles, methodologies, and benefits related to conducting economic analysis. Discussion revolves around how economists value the potential costs and benefits, both financial and personal, from implementing school-based drug prevention programs targeting youth. Application of heterogeneous costing methods coupled with widely divergent program evaluation findings influences the feasibility of these techniques and may hinder utilization of these practices. Determination of cost-efficiency should undoubtedly become one of several markers of program success and contribute to the ongoing debate over health policy. PMID:24217178

  9. Did We Get Our Money’s Worth? Bridging Economic and Behavioral Measures of Program Success in Adolescent Drug Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence M. Scheier

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The recent U.S. Congressional mandate for creating drug-free learning environments in elementary and secondary schools stipulates that education reform rely on accountability, parental and community involvement, local decision making, and use of evidence-based drug prevention programs. By necessity, this charge has been paralleled by increased interest in demonstrating that drug prevention programs net tangible benefits to society. One pressing concern is precisely how to integrate traditional scientific methods of program evaluation with economic measures of “cost efficiency”. The languages and methods of each respective discipline don’t necessarily converge on how to establish the true benefits of drug prevention. This article serves as a primer for conducting economic analyses of school-based drug prevention programs. The article provides the reader with a foundation in the relevant principles, methodologies, and benefits related to conducting economic analysis. Discussion revolves around how economists value the potential costs and benefits, both financial and personal, from implementing school-based drug prevention programs targeting youth. Application of heterogeneous costing methods coupled with widely divergent program evaluation findings influences the feasibility of these techniques and may hinder utilization of these practices. Determination of cost-efficiency should undoubtedly become one of several markers of program success and contribute to the ongoing debate over health policy.

  10. A novel measure of dietary change in a prostate cancer dietary program incorporating mindfulness training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmody, James F; Olendzki, Barbara C; Merriam, Philip A; Liu, Qin; Qiao, Yongxia; Ma, Yunsheng

    2012-11-01

    Diet may represent a modifiable prostate cancer risk factor, but a vegetable-based prostate-healthy diet is a major change for most men. We used a ratio of animal to vegetable proteins (A:V) to evaluate whether a comprehensive dietary change was self-sustaining following completion of 11 weekly dietary and cooking classes that integrated mindfulness training. Thirty-six men with recurring prostate cancer were randomized to the intervention or wait-list control. Assessments were at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months. Of 17 men randomized to the intervention, 14 completed the requirements. Nineteen were randomized to control and 17 completed requirements. Compared with controls, a significant postintervention (3 months) decrease in A:V in the intervention group (P=0.01) was self-maintained 3 months postintervention (P=0.049). At each assessment, A:V was correlated with lycopene, fiber, saturated fat, and dietary cholesterol, four dietary components linked to clinically relevant outcomes in prostate cancer. Change in A:V was also significantly correlated with changes in fiber, saturated fat, and dietary cholesterol intake. Participants reported regular mindfulness training practice, and there was a significant correlation between mindfulness training practice and changes in both initiation and maintenance of the change in A:V. These pilot results provide encouraging evidence for the feasibility of a dietary program that includes mindfulness training in supporting dietary change for men with recurrent prostate cancer and invite further study to explore the possible role of mindfulness training as a means of supporting both initiation of dietary changes and maintenance of those changes over time. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. AMS at the ANU including biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fifield, L.K.; Allan, G.L.; Cresswell, R.G.; Ophel, T.R. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia); King, S.J.; Day, J.P. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry

    1993-12-31

    An extensive accelerator mass spectrometry program has been conducted on the 14UD accelerator at the Australian National University since 1986. In the two years since the previous conference, the research program has expanded significantly to include biomedical applications of {sup 26}Al and studies of landform evolution using isotopes produced in situ in surface rocks by cosmic ray bombardment. The system is now used for the measurement of {sup 10}Be, {sup 14}C, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 59}Ni and {sup 129}I, and research is being undertaken in hydrology, environmental geochemistry, archaeology and biomedicine. On the technical side, a new test system has permitted the successful off-line development of a high-intensity ion source. A new injection line to the 14UD has been established and the new source is now in position and providing beams to the accelerator. 4 refs.

  12. DL-sQUAL: A Multiple-Item Scale for Measuring Service Quality of Online Distance Learning Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaik, Naj; Lowe, Sue; Pinegar, Kem

    2006-01-01

    Education is a service with multiplicity of student interactions over time and across multiple touch points. Quality teaching needs to be supplemented by consistent quality supporting services for programs to succeed under the competitive distance learning landscape. ServQual and e-SQ scales have been proposed for measuring quality of traditional…

  13. A Measure of the Quality of Educational Leadership Programs for Social Justice: Integrating LGBTIQ Identities into Principal Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Michael P.; Capper, Colleen A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate how aspiring principals in the United States are prepared for social justice leadership, by focusing particular attention on equitable leadership for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex, and questioning (LGBTIQ) persons as a measure of the preparation program's commitment to social…

  14. FMCSA safety program effectiveness measurement : Intervention Model in fiscal year 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    This report presents results from FMCSAs Roadside Intervention Model for fiscal year 2007. The model estimates the number of crashes avoided, as well as injuries avoided and lives saved, as a result of the Agencys roadside inspection program. T...

  15. Technical Performance Measurement, Earned Value, and Risk Management: An Integrated Diagnostic Tool for Program Management

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pisano, N

    2002-01-01

    ...) and in private industry. Currently-reported earned value data contains invaluable planning and budget information with proven techniques for program management, however, shortcomings of the system are its emphasis...

  16. Measuring Success in Your Fuels Program: From the Report Card to Valuable Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula Nasiatka; David Christenson

    2006-01-01

    How can a unit learn in everyday fuels programs and from program reviews? How can a unit move from living in the “report card” culture to discovering more effective ways to improve what it knows and how it learns? Six specific tasks are critical to organizational learning according to David A. Garvin of Harvard Business School. By engaging in these tasks a unit can...

  17. Impact of a Senior Fitness Program on Measures of Physical and Emotional Health and Functioning

    OpenAIRE

    Hamar, Brent; Coberley, Carter R.; Pope, James E.; Rula, Elizabeth Y.

    2013-01-01

    The SilverSneakers fitness program is a health plan benefit for Medicare beneficiaries that provides older adults with fitness center membership, customized group exercise classes, and a supportive social environment that promotes socialization among participants. This study evaluated the impact of the SilverSneakers program on physical and emotional health and activities of daily living (ADLs). A quasi-experimental retrospective analysis compared annual survey responses from SilverSneakers m...

  18. Ice-tethered measurement platforms in the Arctic Ocean: a contribution by the FRAM infrastructure program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppmann, Mario; Nicolaus, Marcel; Rabe, Benjamin; Wenzhöfer, Frank; Katlein, Christian; Scholz, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The Arctic Ocean has been in the focus of many studies during recent years, investigating the state, the causes and the implications of the observed rapid transition towards a thinner and younger sea-ice cover. However, consistent observational datasets of sea ice, ocean and atmosphere are still sparse due to the limited accessibility and harsh environmental conditions. One important tool to fill this gap has become more and more feasible during recent years: autonomous, ice-tethered measurement platforms (buoys). These drifting instruments independently transmit their data via satellites, and enable observations over larger areas and over longer time periods than manned expeditions, even throughout the winter. One aim of the newly established FRAM (FRontiers in Arctic marine Monitoring) infrastructure program at the Alfred-Wegener-Institute is to realize and maintain an interdisciplinary network of buoys in the Arctic Ocean, contributing to an integrated, Arctic-wide observatory. The additional buoy infrastructure, ship-time, and developments provided by FRAM are critical elements in the ongoing international effort to fill the large data gaps in a rapidly changing Arctic Ocean. Our focus is the particularly underrepresented Eurasian Basin. Types of instruments range from snow depth beacons and ice mass balance buoys for monitoring ice growth and snow accumulation, over radiation and weather stations for energy budget estimates, to ice-tethered profiling systems for upper ocean monitoring. Further, development of new bio-optical and biogeochemical buoys is expected to enhance our understanding of bio-physical processes associated with Arctic sea ice. The first set of FRAM buoys was deployed in September 2015 from RV Polarstern. All datasets are publicly available on dedicated web portals. Near real time data are reported into international initiatives, such as the Global Telecommunication System (GTS) and the International Arctic Buoy Programme (IABP). The

  19. An Aspect-Oriented Programming-based approach to software development for fault detection in measurement systems

    CERN Document Server

    Arpaia, P; Inglese, Vitaliano; Bernardi, Mario Luca; Di Lucca, Giuseppe; Spiezia, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    An Aspect-Oriented Programming-based approach to the development of software components for fault detection in automatic measurement systems is proposed. Faults are handled by means of specific software units, the ``aspects{''}, in order to better modularize issues transversal to several components. As a case study, this approach was applied to the design of the fault detection software inside a flexible framework for magnetic measurements, developed at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). Experimental results of software modularity and performance measurements for comparing aspect- and objectoriented solutions in rotating coils tests on superconducting magnets are reported. (C) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Environmental assessment for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program: Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Policastro, A.J.; Pfingston, J.M.; Maloney, D.M.; Wasmer, F.; Pentecost, E.D.

    1992-03-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is aimed at supplying improved predictive capability of climate change, particularly the prediction of cloud-climate feedback. The objective will be achieved by measuring the atmospheric radiation and physical and meteorological quantities that control solar radiation in the earth`s atmosphere and using this information to test global climate and related models. The proposed action is to construct and operate a Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) research site in the southern Great Plains as part of the Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program whose objective is to develop an improved predictive capability of global climate change. The purpose of this CART research site in southern Kansas and northern Oklahoma would be to collect meteorological and other scientific information to better characterize the processes controlling radiation transfer on a global scale. Impacts which could result from this facility are described.

  1. Pressure simulation program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoll, B.; Phaff, J.C.; Gids, W.F. de

    1995-01-01

    A computer program has been developed to predict the wind pressure coefficients Cp on facades and roofs of block shaped buildings. The program is based on fits of measured data, including wind shielding by obstacles and terrain roughness. Main advantages of the program are: it needs no expertise of

  2. Valuation of green walls and green roofs as soundscape measures: including monetised amenity values together with noise-attenuation values in a cost-benefit analysis of a green wall affecting courtyards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veisten, Knut; Smyrnova, Yuliya; Klæboe, Ronny; Hornikx, Maarten; Mosslemi, Marjan; Kang, Jian

    2012-10-24

    Economic unit values of soundscape/acoustic effects have been based on changes in the number of annoyed persons or on decibel changes. The normal procedure has been the application of these unit values to noise-attenuation measures affecting the noisier façade of a dwelling. Novel modular vegetation-based soundscape measures, so-called green walls, might be relevant for both noisy and quieter areas. Moreover, their benefits will comprise noise attenuation as well as non-acoustic amenity effects. One challenge is to integrate the results of some decades of non-acoustic research on the amenity value of urban greenery into design of the urban sound environment, and incorporate these non-acoustic properties in the overall economic assessment of noise control and overall sound environment improvement measures. Monetised unit values for green walls have been included in two alternative cases, or demonstration projects, of covering the entrances to blocks of flats with a green wall. Since these measures improve the noise environment on the quiet side of the dwellings and courtyards, not the most exposed façade, adjustment factors to the nominal quiet side decibel reductions to arrive at an estimate of the equivalent overall acoustic improvement have been applied. A cost-benefit analysis of the green wall case indicates that this measure is economically promising, when valuing the noise attenuation in the quieter area and adding the amenity/aesthetic value of the green wall.

  3. Measurement of Functional Capacity Requirements of Farmers: IMPLICATIONS FOR A CARDIAC REHABILITATION TRAINING PROGRAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Shannon; Karcher, Justin; Rogers, Rebecca; Kennedy, Kathleen; Lawrence, Anne; Adams, Jenny

    2017-03-01

    Updated cardiac rehabilitation (CR) and return-to-work guidelines from the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) now include specificity of training for industrial athletes (exercise training that involves the muscle groups, movements, and energy systems that these patients use during occupational tasks). However, many CR facilities do not apply this principle, relying instead on the traditional protocol that consists primarily of aerobic exercise. This study was conducted to measure the metabolic cost of typical farming tasks and to compare 2 methods of calculating training intensities. Metabolic data were collected from 28 participants (23 men and 5 women, aged 18 to 57 years) while they loaded 10 hay bales, dug a fence posthole, filled 8 seed hoppers, and shoveled grain. Mean metabolic equivalent levels during these activities were 5.9 to 7.6 and participants reached 60% to 70% of heart rate reserve (HRR). By comparison, their mean resting heart rate + 30 beats per minute (RHR+30, a traditional CR intensity level) represented only 28% of HRR. Participants in the current study performed farming tasks within the ACSM's recommended range of 40% to 80% of HRR, and the results suggest that training at RHR+30 would have been inadequate for helping a farmer return to work after a cardiac event. Using the study tasks as a basis, we described exercises that would be appropriate for the supervised resistance training of farmers in a CR setting.

  4. Optical modulator including grapene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ming; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides for a one or more layer graphene optical modulator. In a first exemplary embodiment the optical modulator includes an optical waveguide, a nanoscale oxide spacer adjacent to a working region of the waveguide, and a monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to the spacer. In a second exemplary embodiment, the optical modulator includes at least one pair of active media, where the pair includes an oxide spacer, a first monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a first side of the spacer, and a second monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a second side of the spacer, and at least one optical waveguide adjacent to the pair.

  5. Photographic consulting services to the Earth Resources program. [using aerial photography as a tool for scientific measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    The recommendations, procedures, and techniques are summarized which provided by the Kodak Apparatus Division to the Ames Research Center to support the Earth Resources Aircraft Program at that facility. Recommendations, procedures, and calibration data are included for sensitometry, densitometry, laboratory cleanliness, and determination of camera exposure. Additional comments are made regarding process control procedures and general laboratory operations.

  6. Visual Impairment, Including Blindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Who Knows What? (log-in required) Select Page Visual Impairment, Including Blindness Mar 31, 2017 Links updated, ... doesn’t wear his glasses. Back to top Visual Impairments in Children Vision is one of our ...

  7. Easily Administered Patient-Reported Outcome Measures: Adolescents' Perceived Functional Changes After Completing an Intensive Chronic Pain Rehabilitation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempert, Heidi; Benore, Ethan; Heines, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    To determine whether patient-reported measures would be clinically sensitive and useful for identifying functional change within an intensive chronic pain program setting by examining 2 patient-reported measures administered as part of physical and occupational therapy for chronic pain. A retrospective data analysis of children and adolescents with chronic pain treated over a single calendar year. Paired t tests evaluated change in perceived function measures and pain over time. Standardized residual change scores were used in subsequent regression to assess associations between change scores. An interdisciplinary pediatric pain rehabilitation program that supports children and adolescents with chronic pain by increasing strength, flexibility, and endurance; facilitating a return to daily life activities; and using appropriate self-directed coping and pain management skills. Children and adolescents (N=109; age range, 8-19y; 83% girls) with various chronic pain diagnoses who were admitted to a 3- to 4-week intensive pain rehabilitation program. Participants were involved in physical and occupational therapy for 3 hours daily, as well as recreation therapy, psychology, school, aquatics, art therapy, and music therapy for a total of 8 hours daily. Parents were involved in parent education with therapists from all disciplines in conjunction with their child's programming. Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS), Upper Extremity Functional Index (UEFI), and self-reported pain severity rating on 0-to-10 numerical rating scale. Data demonstrated significant gains in LEFS and UEFI during the program. Improvement in perceived functioning was significantly correlated with a reduction in pain. The LEFS and UEFI provide a meaningful way to track progress in chronic pain rehabilitation. Using self-perceived measures, children and adolescents noted significant functional improvement, associated with less pain intensity. These findings increase our understanding of the

  8. Investigating the Needs for Measurement and Evaluation Course: A Case Study on English Language Teaching Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakus, Memet; Türkkan, Buket Turhan

    2017-01-01

    This study aims at investigating the needs related to the attainments, content, processes of teaching-learning and measurement-evaluation aspect of Measurement and Evaluation course. This research was designed as a case study which is one of the qualitative research designs. The most common problem in Measurement and Evaluation courses was found…

  9. Character recognition as an alternate measure of television exposure among children: findings from the Alam Simsim program in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimal, Rajiv N; Figueroa, Maria Elena; Storey, J Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of effects of mass media-based health interventions requires accurate assessments of exposure, which can be difficult to obtain when young children are the primary audience. Alam Simsim, the Egyptian version of Sesame Street, aired nationally in Egypt to teach preschoolers about numeracy, literacy, and gender-equitable attitudes. The purpose of this article was to assess the effect of the program through a first-of-its-kind household-level survey that interviewed caretakers (n = 426) and preschoolers (n = 486). The authors introduced and tested the efficacy of a parsimonious measure of exposure: children's recognition of the primary characters of the program. Overall, the authors' models explained as much as 53% of the variance in children's learning; exposure to the program was significantly associated with learning. Furthermore, the parsimonious measure of exposure was as effective as a more elaborate child-reported measure. Relative to these two measures of exposure, caretakers' report of children's viewing was not as good a predictor of learning.

  10. Listening to Include

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veck, Wayne

    2009-01-01

    This paper attempts to make important connections between listening and inclusive education and the refusal to listen and exclusion. Two lines of argument are advanced. First, if educators and learners are to include each other within their educational institutions as unique individuals, then they will need to listen attentively to each other.…

  11. Measuring the Impacts of a Volunteer-Based Community Development Program in Developing Volunteers' Leadership Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Amy; Singletary, Loretta; Hill, George

    2012-01-01

    This article summarizes the results of an evaluation of the impacts of a community development program to develop leadership skills in its adult volunteers. The evaluation featured 20 questions about leadership skills learned as a result of volunteer experiences. Data analysis strategies beyond a simple means ranking resulted in evidence…

  12. Measuring Student Self-Perceptions of Writing Skills in Programs of Journalism and Mass Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingwall, Andrew; Kuehn, Scott

    2013-01-01

    This study explored student self-perceptions of writing skills in journalism and mass communication programs at thirteen public state universities in the mid-Atlantic region. Factor analysis revealed seven sets of perceptions among 860 students. A Media Writing Self-Perception Scale was constructed and found to be reliable. The authors propose…

  13. Vulcamera: a program for measuring volcanic SO2 using UV cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Aiuppa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We report here on Vulcamera, a stand-alone program for the determination of volcanic SO2  fluxes using ultraviolet cameras. The code enables field image acquisition and all the required post-processing operations.

  14. Suicide Intervention Training for College Staff: Program Evaluation and Intervention Skill Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannonhouse, Laura; Lin, Yung-Wei Dennis; Shaw, Kelly; Wanna, Reema; Porter, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Suicide remains a pressing issue for college communities. Consequently, gatekeeper trainings are often provided for staff. This study examines the effect of one such program, Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST). Participants: 51 college employees received ASIST in August of 2014 and were compared to 30 wait-list control…

  15. Using Game Mechanics to Measure What Students Learn from Programming Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denner, Jill; Werner, Linda; Campe, Shannon; Ortiz, Eloy

    2014-01-01

    Despite the growing popularity of teaching children to program games, little is known about the benefits for learning. In this article, the authors propose that game mechanics can be used as a window into how the children are thinking and describe a strategy for using them to analyze students' games. The study involved sixty 10-14 year old…

  16. Is breast compression associated with breast cancer detection and other early performance measures in a population-based breast cancer screening program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshina, Nataliia; Sebuødegård, Sofie; Hofvind, Solveig

    2017-06-01

    We aimed to investigate early performance measures in a population-based breast cancer screening program stratified by compression force and pressure at the time of mammographic screening examination. Early performance measures included recall rate, rates of screen-detected and interval breast cancers, positive predictive value of recall (PPV), sensitivity, specificity, and histopathologic characteristics of screen-detected and interval breast cancers. Information on 261,641 mammographic examinations from 93,444 subsequently screened women was used for analyses. The study period was 2007-2015. Compression force and pressure were categorized using tertiles as low, medium, or high. χ 2 test, t tests, and test for trend were used to examine differences between early performance measures across categories of compression force and pressure. We applied generalized estimating equations to identify the odds ratios (OR) of screen-detected or interval breast cancer associated with compression force and pressure, adjusting for fibroglandular and/or breast volume and age. The recall rate decreased, while PPV and specificity increased with increasing compression force (p for trend cancer, PPV, sensitivity, and specificity decreased with increasing compression pressure (p for trend breast cancer compared with low compression pressure (1.89; 95% CI 1.43-2.48). High compression force and low compression pressure were associated with more favorable early performance measures in the screening program.

  17. Indoor Measurements of Environmental Tobacco Smoke Final Report to the Tobacco Related Disease Research Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apte, Michael G.; Gundel, Lara A.; Dod, Raymond L.; Russell, Marion L.; Singer, Brett C.; Sohn, Michael D.; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Chang, Gee-Minn; Sextro, Richard G.

    2004-03-02

    , quickly adsorbed on unconditioned surfaces so that nicotine concentrations in these rooms remained very low, even during smoking episodes. These findings suggest that using nicotine as a tracer of ETS particle concentrations may yield misleading concentration and/or exposure estimates. The results of the solanesol analyses were compromised, apparently by exposure to light during collection (lights in the chambers were always on during the experiments). This may mean that the use of solanesol as a tracer is impractical in ''real-world'' conditions. In the final phase of the project we conducted measurements of ETS particles and tracers in three residences occupied by smokers who had joined a smoking cessation program. As a pilot study, its objective was to improve our understanding of how ETS aerosols are transported in a small number of homes (and thus, whether limiting smoking to certain areas has an effect on ETS exposures in other parts of the building). As with the chamber studies, we examined whether measurements of various chemical tracers, such as nicotine, solanesol, FPM and UVPM, could be used to accurately predict ETS concentrations and potential exposures in ''real-world'' settings, as has been suggested by several authors. The ultimate goal of these efforts, and a future larger multiple house study, is to improve the basis for estimating ETS exposures to the general public. Because we only studied three houses no firm conclusions can be developed from our data. However, the results for the ETS tracers are essentially the same as those for the chamber experiments. The use of nicotine was problematic as a marker for ETS exposure. In the smoking areas of the homes, nicotine appeared to be a suitable indicator; however in the non-smoking regions, nicotine behavior was very inconsistent. The other tracers, UVPM and FPM, provided a better basis for estimating ETS exposures in the ''real world''. The use of

  18. Program to perform research on use of lidar for range resolved turbulence measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, Warren P.; Garner, Richard C.

    1989-11-01

    The design of a lidar system capable of measuring remotely range resolved atmospheric turbulence is presented. The connection between the measured quantities and the accepted turbulence strength parameter (C sub n)-sq is developed theoretically. Simulations of an operating system were made, and the results provide a measure of system capability. A typical value for (C sub n)-sq of 10(exp -16) m to the -2/3 power at 3 km vertical range is measurable with a 200 m range resolution.

  19. Analytic device including nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.

    2015-07-02

    A device for detecting an analyte in a sample comprising: an array including a plurality of pixels, each pixel including a nanochain comprising: a first nanostructure, a second nanostructure, and a third nanostructure, wherein size of the first nanostructure is larger than that of the second nanostructure, and size of the second nanostructure is larger than that of the third nanostructure, and wherein the first nanostructure, the second nanostructure, and the third nanostructure are positioned on a substrate such that when the nanochain is excited by an energy, an optical field between the second nanostructure and the third nanostructure is stronger than an optical field between the first nanostructure and the second nanostructure, wherein the array is configured to receive a sample; and a detector arranged to collect spectral data from a plurality of pixels of the array.

  20. 77 FR 286 - Medicaid Program: Initial Core Set of Health Care Quality Measures for Medicaid-Eligible Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-04

    ... population, including depression, schizophrenia, and substance use, in ] addition to measures that assessed... Supplemental Survey). 0418 CMS Screening for PQRS, CMS QIP, Clinical Health Homes Depression and Core, Shared... . Postpartum Care: Postpartum Care Rate (second component to CHIPRA core measure ``Timeliness of Prenatal Care...

  1. 76 FR 33565 - Medicare Program; Availability of Medicare Data for Performance Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ... correction; (3) a prototype for the required reports, including any narrative language, and dissemination... release to the public (if they are different) in their application, including the narrative language they.... Information extracted from institutional claims includes inpatient hospital, outpatient hospital, skilled...

  2. An Innovative Method of Measuring Changes in Access to Healthful Foods in School Lunch Programs: Findings from a Pilot Evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison P Hawkes

    Full Text Available A large local health department in Colorado partnered with 15 school districts to develop an approach to evaluate changes in access to healthy foods in reimbursable school lunches and a la carte offerings.School district nutrition managers were engaged at the start of this project. Health department dietitians developed criteria to classify food items as "Lower Fat and less added Sugar" (LFS and "Higher Fat and more added Sugar" (HFS based on the percentage of calories from fat and grams of added sugar. Lunch production sheets were obtained for two time periods, food items and the number of planned servings recorded. LFS and HFS planned servings were summed for each time period, and a LFS to HFS ratio calculated by dividing LFS planned servings by HFS planned servings. Additional analyses included calculating LFS: HFS ratios by school district, and for a la carte offerings.In 2009, the LFS: HFS ratio was 2.08, in 2011, 3.71 (P<0.0001. The method also detected changes in ratios at the school district level. For a la carte items, in 2009 the ratio of LFS: HFS was 0.53, and in 2011, 0.61 (not statistically significant.This method detected an increase in the LFS: HFS ratio over time and demonstrated that the school districts improved access to healthful food/drink by changing the contents of reimbursable school lunches. The evaluation method discussed here can generate information that districts can use in helping sustain and expand their efforts to create healthier environments for children and adults. Although federal regulations now cover all food and beverages served during the school day, there are still opportunities to improve and measure changes in food served in other settings such as child care centers, youth correction facilities, or in schools not participating in the National School Lunch Program.

  3. Local Neutron Flux Distribution Measurements by Wire-Dosimetry in the AMMON Experimental Program in the EOLE Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruel A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dosimetry measurements were carried out during the AMMON experimental program, in the EOLE facility. Al-0.1 wt% Au wires were positioned along curved fuel plates of JHR-type assemblies to investigate the azimuthal and axial gold capture rate profiles, directly linked to the thermal and epithermal flux. After irradiation, wires were cut into small segments (a few mm, and the gold capture rate of each part was measured by gamma spectrometry on the MADERE platform. This paper presents results in the “hafnium” configuration, and more specifically the azimuthal flux profile characterization. The final uncertainty on each measured wire lies below 1% (at 2 standard deviations. Experimental profiles are in a good agreement against Monte Carlo calculations, and the 4% capture rate increase at the plate edge is well observed. The flux dissymmetry due to assembly position in the core is also measured, and shows a 10% discrepancy between the two edges of the plate.

  4. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report. October 1 - December 31, 2010.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2011-02-01

    is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or datastream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous datastreams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Summary. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period October 1-December 31, 2010, for the fixed sites. Because the AMFs operate episodically, the AMF statistics are reported separately and not included in the aggregate average with the fixed sites. This first quarter comprises a total of 2,208 possible hours for the fixed sites and the AMF1 and 1,464 possible hours for the AMF2. The average of the fixed sites exceeded our goal this quarter. The AMF1 has essentially completed its mission and is shutting down to pack up for its next deployment to India. Although all the raw data from the operational instruments are in the Archive for the AMF2, only the processed data are tabulated. Approximately half of the AMF2 instruments have data that was fully processed, resulting in the 46% of all possible data made available to users through the Archive for this first quarter. Typically, raw data is not made available to users unless specifically requested.

  5. Measurement: Five Considerations to Add Even More Impact to Your Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurrell, Derek

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the author looks at some key considerations which have proven to be very useful in the teaching of measurement in the primary classroom. Five ideas that can form the basis of focusing on measurement to access other strands of the mathematics curriculum are then examined.

  6. 77 FR 35745 - Highway Safety Programs; Conforming Products List of Screening Devices To Measure Alcohol in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-14

    ... Solutions USA, LLC, submitted the AlcoMate SafeGuard (Model AL-2500, aka: AlcoScan AL-2500) alcohol... Screening Devices To Measure Alcohol in Bodily Fluids AGENCY: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration... Model Specifications for Screening Devices to Measure Alcohol in Bodily Fluids dated, March 31, 2008 (73...

  7. RELFIT: A program for determining prony series fits to measured relaxation data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, R.S.

    1997-04-01

    Viscoelastic materials are often characterized in terms of stress relaxation moduli which decay in time. Finite element programs which model viscoelastic materials frequently require that these relaxation functions be defined as an exponential series (i.e., Prony Series) to exploit the numerical advantages of developing recursive equations for evaluating hereditary integrals. Obtaining these data fits can be extremely difficult when the data is spread over many decades in the logarithm of time. RELFIT is a nonlinear optimization program that iteratively determines the Prony series coefficients and relaxation times so as to minimize the least squares error in the data fit. An overview of the code, a description of the required inputs (i.e., users`s instructions), and a demonstration problem are presented.

  8. Levels of exhaled carbon monoxide measured during an intervention program predict 1-year smoking cessation: a retrospective observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shie, Huei-Guan; Pan, Sheng-Wei; Yu, Wen-Kuang; Chen, Wei-Chih; Ho, Li-Ing; Ko, Hsin-Kuo

    2017-10-16

    Life-long smoking cessation is a critical public health objective, but it is difficult for numerous people. This study aimed to identify the independent predictors of 1-year abstinence in smokers motivated to quit and participating in an intervention program. This 6-year retrospective observational cohort study was conducted in smokers who participated in an intervention program. The exhaled carbon monoxide (CO) was sequentially measured on day 1, 8, 15, and 22 of the intervention program. The primary outcome measure was smoking status at 1 year of follow-up. A total of 162 participants were enrolled and divided into a successful quit group (n = 52) and unsuccessful quit group (n = 110). Using a multivariate logistic regression analysis, we reported that the intention to quit (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.475, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.169-1.862, P-value = 0.001), varenicline use (AOR = 3.199, 95% CI = 1.290-7.934, P -value = 0.012) and the exhaled CO level on day 8 (AOR = 0.937, 95% CI = 0.885-0.992, P-value = 0.025) independently predicted 1-year smoking cessation. Moreover, the level of exhaled CO smoking cessation (area under curve 0.761, sensitivity 88.2%, and specificity 57.8%, P-value intervention programs to achieve a higher rate of long-term smoking cessation. IDENTIFYING PREDICTORS OF SUCCESS: Researchers in Korea identify key predictors that pinpoint people most likely to quit smoking successfully during intervention programs. Millions are spent each year supporting people to quit smoking. However, successful quitters remain in the minority, with only 9-35 per cent of those in intervention programs abstaining for at least a year. Hsin-Kuo Ko at Taipei Veterans General Hospital and co-workers identified key independent indicators of successful abstinence in 162 smokers attending an intervention program. Alongside having a high intention to quit and using varenicline medication, a potential predictor

  9. Measurement of quality of life and participant experience with the mindfulness-based stress reduction program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flugel Colle, Kathleen F; Vincent, Ann; Cha, Stephen S; Loehrer, Laura L; Bauer, Brent A; Wahner-Roedler, Dietlind L

    2010-02-01

    Clinical studies of MBSR have reported efficacy in treating pain, mood disorders, arthritis, sleep disturbances, and stress. Several academic medical institutions in the United States offer MBSR to their patients, but it has never been offered at Mayo Clinic. The objective of this study was to collect quality-of-life data from subjects who participated in the first MBSR program offered at Mayo Clinic. The class was taught as a collaborative effort with the University of Minnesota that had an established MBSR program. Sixteen participants completed a validated, 12-question, linear analogue self-assessment instrument, administered at the beginning and end of the program. Comparison of assessment scores using paired t-tests showed statistically significant improvement in overall quality of life (P=0.04), mental well-being (P=0.005), physical well-being (Pactivity (P=.02), and spiritual well-being (P=0.006). Although positive changes also were observed for frequency of pain, severity of pain, level of fatigue, level of support from friends and family, and financial and legal concerns, they were not statistically significant. A short intervention in the education of mindfulness significantly improved quality of life for participants. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The ERAU Undergraduate Meteorology Program, Students' Learning, and Measures of Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, D.

    2008-12-01

    The goal of this paper is to introduce the relationship, teaching techniques, research experience, and critical thinking interactions between Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University(ERAU) McNair mentors and their meteorology students to ensure the students' continued academic success and path to graduate school. The primary goal of the McNair Scholars Program is to provide experiences that prepare selected undergraduate students for doctoral study. The overriding goal of the McNair programs is to increase the number of underrepresented students who will obtain doctoral degrees and go on to teach and do research in institutions of higher learning. The underrepresented students are often those with limited resources, however encouraging critical thinking and undergraduate research experience is an effective tool for engaging them in applied meteorology. How do we help underrepresented meteorology students become aware of their strong and weak sides, help their learning, improve their learning strategies, and guide them toward a successful graduate school path? What skills are particularly important in developing a solid undergraduate expertise in meteorology? How can these skills be taught effectively? What are the obstacles the McNair scholars have to overcome? Some students are under prepared in math or have math phobias, others are learning English as they are learning the complex vocabulary of meteorology, or arrive in the classroom with communication skills that are not fully developed. We discuss our experiences as part of the ERAU McNair Scholars Program and Department of meteorology faculty body.

  11. Use of Balanced Scorecard Methodology for Performance Measurement of the Health Extension Program in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teklehaimanot, Hailay D; Teklehaimanot, Awash; Tedella, Aregawi A; Abdella, Mustofa

    2016-05-04

    In 2004, Ethiopia introduced a community-based Health Extension Program to deliver basic and essential health services. We developed a comprehensive performance scoring methodology to assess the performance of the program. A balanced scorecard with six domains and 32 indicators was developed. Data collected from 1,014 service providers, 433 health facilities, and 10,068 community members sampled from 298 villages were used to generate weighted national, regional, and agroecological zone scores for each indicator. The national median indicator scores ranged from 37% to 98% with poor performance in commodity availability, workforce motivation, referral linkage, infection prevention, and quality of care. Indicator scores showed significant difference by region (P < 0.001). Regional performance varied across indicators suggesting that each region had specific areas of strength and deficiency, with Tigray and the Southern Nations, Nationalities and Peoples Region being the best performers while the mainly pastoral regions of Gambela, Afar, and Benishangul-Gumuz were the worst. The findings of this study suggest the need for strategies aimed at improving specific elements of the program and its performance in specific regions to achieve quality and equitable health services. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  12. RARE DECAYS INCLUDING PENGUINS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eigen, G

    2003-12-04

    The authors present a preliminary measurement of the exclusive charmless semileptonic B decays, B {yields} {rho}{ell}{nu}, and the extraction of the CKM parameters V{sub ub}. IN a data sample of 55 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} events they measure a branching fraction of {Beta}(B {yields} {rho}{ell}{nu}) = (3.39 {+-} 0.44{sub stat} {+-} 0.52{sub sys} {+-} 0.60{sub th}) x 10{sup -4} yielding |V{sub ub}| = (3.69 {+-} 0.23{sub stat} {+-} 0.27{sub sys -0.59th}{sup +0.40}) x 10{sup -3}. Next, they report on a preliminary study of the radiative penguin modes B {yields} K{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} and B {yields} K*{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}. In a data sample of 84 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} events they observe a significant signal (4.4{sigma}) in B {yields} K{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}, yielding a branching fraction of {Beta}(B {yields} K{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}) = (0.78{sub -0.20-0.18}{sup +0.24+0.11}) x 10{sup -6}. In B {yields} K*{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} the observed yield is not yet significant (2.8{sigma}), yielding an upper limit of the branching fraction of {Beta}(B {yields} K*{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}) 3.0 x 10{sup -6} {at} 90% confidence level. Finally, they summarize preliminary results of searches for B {yields} {rho}({omega}){gamma}, B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +} {nu}{bar {nu}} and B{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}.

  13. Being Included and Excluded

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korzenevica, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Following the civil war of 1996–2006, there was a dramatic increase in the labor mobility of young men and the inclusion of young women in formal education, which led to the transformation of the political landscape of rural Nepal. Mobility and schooling represent a level of prestige that rural...... politics. It analyzes how formal education and mobility either challenge or reinforce traditional gendered norms which dictate a lowly position for young married women in the household and their absence from community politics. The article concludes that women are simultaneously excluded and included from...... people regard as a prerequisite for participating in local community politics. Based on a fieldwork in two villages of Panchthar district in eastern Nepal, this article explores how these changes strengthen or weaken women’s political agency and how this is reflected in their participation in community...

  14. FMCSA safety program effectiveness measurement : roadside intervention effectiveness model, fiscal year 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), in cooperation with the John A. Volpe National Transportation Systems Center, has developed an analytic model to measure the effectiveness of roadside inspections and traffic enforcements in te...

  15. 75 FR 73090 - Medicare Program; Listening Session on Development of Additional Imaging Efficiency Measures for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-29

    ... imaging measures--(1) OP-8: MRI Lumbar Spine for Low Back Pain; (2) OP-9: Mammography Follow-up Rates; (3) OP- 10: Abdomen CT Use of Contrast Material; and (4) OP-11: Thorax CT Use of Contrast Material. These...

  16. AISI/DOE Advanced Process Control Program Vol. 5 of 6: Phase Measurement of Galvanneal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristopher Burnett; Ronald Guel; James R. Philips; L. Lowry; Beverly Tai

    1999-05-31

    Augmentation of the internal software of a commercial X-ray fluorescence gauge is shown to enable the instrument to extend its continuous on-line real-time measurements of a galvanneal coating's total elemental content to encompass similar measurements of the relative thickness of the coating's three principal metallurgical phases. The mathematical structure of this software augmentation is derived from the theory of neural networks. The performance of the augmented gauge is validated by comparing the gauge implied real-time phase distribution with the phase distribution independently measured off-line on between the gauge and laboratory measurements and to suggest preferred approaches to be followed in future application of the augmented gauge.

  17. Local foods can meet micronutrient needs for women in urban Burkina Faso, but only if rarely consumed micronutrient-dense foods are included in daily diets: A linear programming exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimond, Mary; Vitta, Bineti S; Martin-Prével, Yves; Moursi, Mourad; Dewey, Kathryn G

    2018-01-01

    Women of reproductive age are at nutritional risk due to their need for nutrient-dense diets. Risk is further elevated in resource-poor environments. In one such environment, we evaluated feasibility of meeting micronutrient needs of women of reproductive age using local foods alone or using local foods and supplements, while minimizing cost. Based on dietary recall data from Ouagadougou, we used linear programming to identify the lowest cost options for meeting 10 micronutrient intake recommendations, while also meeting energy needs and following an acceptable macronutrient intake pattern. We modeled scenarios with maximum intake per food item constrained at the 75th percentile of reported intake and also with more liberal maxima based on recommended portions per day, with and without the addition of supplements. Some scenarios allowed only commonly consumed foods (reported on at least 10% of recall days). We modeled separately for pregnant, lactating, and nonpregnant, nonlactating women. With maxima constrained to the 75th percentile, all micronutrient needs could be met with local foods but only when several nutrient-dense but rarely consumed items were included in daily diets. When only commonly consumed foods were allowed, micronutrient needs could not be met without supplements. When larger amounts of common animal-source foods were allowed, all needs could be met for nonpregnant, nonlactating women but not for pregnant or lactating women, without supplements. We conclude that locally available foods could meet micronutrient needs but that to achieve this, strategies would be needed to increase consistent availability in markets, consistent economic access, and demand. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Final Technical Report for Chief Scientist for Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerial Vehicle Program (AVP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greg M. McFarquhar

    2011-10-21

    The major responsibilities of the PI were identified as 1) the formulation of campaign plans, 2) the representation of AVP in various scientific communities inside and outside of ARM and the associated working groups, 3) the coordination and selection of the relative importance of the three different focus areas (routine observations, IOPs, instrument development program), 4) the examination and quality control of the data collected by AVP, and 5) providing field support for flight series. This report documents the accomplishments in each of these focus areas for the 3 years of funding for the grant that were provided.

  19. CASKS (Computer Analysis of Storage casKS): A microcomputer based analysis system for storage cask design review. User`s manual to Version 1b (including program reference)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, T.F.; Gerhard, M.A.; Trummer, D.J.; Johnson, G.L.; Mok, G.C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    CASKS (Computer Analysis of Storage casKS) is a microcomputer-based system of computer programs and databases developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for evaluating safety analysis reports on spent-fuel storage casks. The bulk of the complete program and this user`s manual are based upon the SCANS (Shipping Cask ANalysis System) program previously developed at LLNL. A number of enhancements and improvements were added to the original SCANS program to meet requirements unique to storage casks. CASKS is an easy-to-use system that calculates global response of storage casks to impact loads, pressure loads and thermal conditions. This provides reviewers with a tool for an independent check on analyses submitted by licensees. CASKS is based on microcomputers compatible with the IBM-PC family of computers. The system is composed of a series of menus, input programs, cask analysis programs, and output display programs. All data is entered through fill-in-the-blank input screens that contain descriptive data requests.

  20. EMF Rapid Program Engineering Projects, Project 1, Development of Recommendations for Guidelines for Field Source Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Electric Research and Management, Inc.

    1997-03-11

    The goal of this project is to develop a protocol for measuring the electric and magnetic fields around sources. Data from these measurements may help direct future biological effects research by better defining the complexity of magnetic and electric fields to which humanity is exposed, as well asprovide the basis for rigorous field exposure analysis and risk assessment once the relationship between field exposure and biological response. is better understood. The data base also should have sufficient spatial and temporal characteristics to guide electric and magnetic field management. The goal of Task A is to construct a set of characteristics that would be ideal to have for guiding and interpreting biological studies and for focusing any future effort at field management. This ideal set will then be quantified and reduced according to the availability (or possible development of) instrumentation to measure the desired characteristics. Factors that also will be used to define pragmatic data sets will be the cost of collecting the data, the cost of developing an adequate data base, and the needed precision in measuring specific characteristics. A field, electric or magnetic, will always be ,some function of time and space. The first step in this section of the protocol development will be to determine what span of time and what portion of space are required to quantify the electric and magnetic fields around sources such as appliances and electrical apparatus. Constraints on time will be set by examining measurement limitations and biological data requirements.

  1. Weight loss and dropout during a commercial weight-loss program including a very-low-calorie diet, a low-calorie diet, or restricted normal food: observational cohort study 1 2 3

    OpenAIRE

    Hemmingsson, Erik; Johansson, Kari; Eriksson, Jonas; Sundström, Johan; Neovius, Martin; Marcus, Claude

    2012-01-01

    Background: The effectiveness of commercial weight-loss programs consisting of very-low-calorie diets (VLCDs) and low-calorie diets (LCDs) is unclear. Objective: The aim of the study was to quantify weight loss and dropout during a commercial weight-loss program in Sweden (Itrim; cost: $1300/€1000; all participants paid their own fee). Design: This observational cohort study linked commercial weight-loss data with National Health Care Registers. Weight loss was induced with a 500-kcal liquid-...

  2. Operational setup of a diagnostic chain, implemented within the Proterina-C project, to include weather measures in the RISICO system for dynamic wildfire risk evaluation in Sardinia (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessy, C.; Di Carlo, L.; Fois, G.; Fiorucci, P.; d'Andrea, M.; Trasforini, E.

    2012-04-01

    Within the Operational Project "PROTERINA-C" (a forecast and prevention system for climate change impacts on risk variability for wildlands and urban areas), co-funded by the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) under the Italy-France Maritime Program, methods and strategies, already in use in the regions of Sardinia, Liguria and Corsica, for the predictions of wildlands fires have been developed and adapted; RISICO System, by CIMA Foundation which plays the role of technical and scientific support for the region of Liguria, used by the Italian National Civil Protection Department, is one of them. In such a prediction model of risk of wildlands fires it is arranged the integration, on a regional scale, of products related to the main meteorological, diagnostics and prognostics forcing measured by ground stations, weather radar and advanced limited area weather prediction models. With the aim to improve prediction of wildlands fires in Sardinia, an operational chain to insert in RISICO weather data provided in near-real time by the meteorological monitoring network has been designed and developed. In fact, the forecast errors can be reduced by conditioning the initial state of dynamic models of fuel moisture on the information obtained from sensors on land, at every time interval at which the fields of meteorological variables of interest are available. A dataset of wildlands fires occurred in Sardinia has been considered in order to valuate the system effectiveness; for these cases the developed setup has improved the fires risk assessment to respect a version of RISICO initialised only by a mesoscale numerical weather prediction model. In the present work the system setup, the configuration of the network of meteorological stations and some preliminary analysis results are argued.

  3. Development of an Outcome Measurement Tool for a Teen Parent Wraparound Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, Derrick; Carney, Karen J.; Blackman-Urteaga, Laura; Savas, Sue Ann

    2012-01-01

    This article chronicles the search for and development of an outcome measurement tool for teen parents receiving community-based wraparound services. The criteria for selecting functional assessment tools available in the literature is presented along with the barriers experienced in using two of these well-cited tools. The rationale for in-house…

  4. Measuring the Effects of a Media Literacy Program on Conflict and Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharrer, Erica

    2009-01-01

    A 5-session curricular unit on the topic of face-to-face conflict mediation and on-screen media violence was administered to 85 sixth graders. Repeated measures analyses were employed to study the 57 students for whom matched questionnaires were available. Results show students became more likely to choose a non-aggressive approach to two of three…

  5. 76 FR 33765 - CHIPRA Pediatric Quality Measures Program: Request for Nominations for Expert Panelists

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-09

    ... conflict of interest for the nominee or his or her family; if any, please describe the relationship with..., importance, understandability, or other criteria that should be considered when reviewing quality measures... to children and families who live in urban and rural medically underserved communities or who are...

  6. Evaluation of a Brazilian Postgraduate Dental Program by the Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Vale Placa, Rebeca; Ragghianti Zangrando, Mariana S.; Sant'Ana, Adriana C. P.; Greghi, Sebastião L. A.; de Rezende, Maria Lucia R.; Damante, Carla A.

    2015-01-01

    The evaluation of education environment is essential to provide to the professors a better understanding of the teaching process. One valuable tool for this assessment is the Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure (DREEM). This questionnaire has 50 questions and is divided in five dimensions: D1--Perceptions of teaching, D2--Perceptions of…

  7. Examining Rubrics Used to Measure Writing Performance in U.S. Intensive English Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    A scoring rubric acts as a useful guide for evaluating the quality of students' written responses. In second language writing, scoring rubrics can be used to measure a variety of discourse and linguistic features. However, certain advantages and disadvantages are associated with particular rubrics (see Hamp-Lyons, 2003; Weigle, 2002). Therefore,…

  8. Validation of a digital videodensitometric program analysis for measurement of left ventricular ejection fraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaux, J.C.; Angel, C.Y.; Pernes, J.M.; Raynaud, A.; Brenot, Ph.; Vuthien, H.; Letienne, G.

    1987-07-01

    Left ventricular (LV) function was studied in 30 patients using digital subtraction angiography by the intravenous approach. Each ventriculogram was processed with a specific video-densitometric analysis to determine LV ejection fraction. The program was verified in an experimental set-up consisting of nine latex balloons filled with contrast medium. Its validation has been established by comparing videodensitometric results with classical results supplied by geometric methods. A good correlation was obtained (r 0.9449) and, furthermore, with experimental models, videodensitometric analysis seemed to be more accurate than geometric analysis. Digital videodensitometry appears to be a valuable and accurate method for quantifying LV function, and a promising technique for determination of the real volumes.

  9. Measurement and evaluation of digital cervicography programs in two cervical cancer screening camps in East Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Curtis W.; Mink, Jonah; Levitz, David

    2017-03-01

    Cervical cancer disproportionately affects women living in low- and middle-income countries. To address this global crisis, many governments and NGOs have implemented community-based screening and treatment programs at outreach camps. Here, high volumes of patients are able to access care: screening and diagnosis followed by immediate treatment of precancerous lesions onsite. However, monitoring and evaluation (M&E) of these efforts presents challenges, since each event typically relies on a different health workforce, and refers patients to different facilities for follow up and advanced care. To address these challenges, a digital imaging intervention was deployed at several screening camps in East Africa. Trained nurses screened women using a connected low-cost mobile colposcope built around a smartphone. A decision support job aid was integrated into the app controlling the device, guiding nurses and recording their diagnosis and treatment decisions. Aggregating the data from the job aid allowed M&E of the screening camp in real-time. In this paper, the M&E data from 2 different screening camps in East Africa are compared. Additionally, screening camps are compared to stationary clinics. Differences in the patient screening times, treatment rates, and individual nurse statistics were all documented through the job aid allowing for much improved epidemiological information following outreach events thus enabling targeted program improvements and provider training. Reporting data from screening camps were also shared online via public web pages, facilitating broader dissemination of health needs in specific East African communities, and sparking conversations with regional stakeholders about local disease burden.

  10. Programming Non-Trivial Algorithms in the Measurement Based Quantum Computation Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alsing, Paul [United States Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base; Fanto, Michael [United States Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base; Lott, Capt. Gordon [United States Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base; Tison, Christoper C. [United States Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base

    2014-01-01

    We provide a set of prescriptions for implementing a quantum circuit model algorithm as measurement based quantum computing (MBQC) algorithm1, 2 via a large cluster state. As means of illustration we draw upon our numerical modeling experience to describe a large graph state capable of searching a logical 8 element list (a non-trivial version of Grover's algorithm3 with feedforward). We develop several prescriptions based on analytic evaluation of cluster states and graph state equations which can be generalized into any circuit model operations. Such a resulting cluster state will be able to carry out the desired operation with appropriate measurements and feed forward error correction. We also discuss the physical implementation and the analysis of the principal 3-qubit entangling gate (Toffoli) required for a non-trivial feedforward realization of an 8-element Grover search algorithm.

  11. High Altitude Pollution Program Stratospheric Measurement System Laboratory Performance Capability Report Chemical Conversion Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-02-01

    1000, 2500 and 10,,00 ppb Accuracy Limited by calibration sample Linearity ±1% oo full scale Interferences NH3 in NO mode Time Response 11 sec on all...sometimes used to describe this efficiency loss but the definition is loose. Finally, to maintain efficiency, oxidant scavengers or scrubbers are often...Analysis of NO2 and NH3 by NO-Measuring Instruments," JAPCA 23, 128, 1973. Clyne, M., et al., "Kinetics of the Chemiluminescent Reaction between Nitric

  12. Veterans Justice Outreach Program: VA Could Improve Management by Establishing Performance Measures and Fully Assessing Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    30According to VA, public order offenses include weapons offenses, prostitution , public intoxication, disorderly conduct, and driving while...Nevada 275 Arkansas 318 New Hampshire 75 California 1,202 New Jersey 53 Colorado 402 New Mexico 92 Connecticut 201 New York 886 Delaware 73

  13. Evidence of Progress - Measurement of Impacts of Australia's S&L Program from 1990-2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowenthal-Savy, Danielle; McNeil, Michael; Harrington, Lloyd

    2013-09-11

    Australia first put categorical energy efficiency labels on residential appliances in the mid-1980s, and the first Minimum Energy Performance Standards (MEPS) for refrigerators was implemented in 1999. Updated in 2005, these MEPS were aligned with US 2001 levels. Considered together, these actions set Australia apart as having one of the most aggressive appliance efficiency programs in the world. For these reasons, together with good data on product sales over time, Australia represents a potentially fruitful case study for understanding the dynamics energy efficiency standards and labeling (EES&L) programs impacts on appliance markets. This analysis attempts to distinguish between the impacts of labeling alone as opposed to MEPS, and to probe the time-dependency of such impacts. Fortunately, in the Australian case, detailed market sales data and a comprehensive registration system provides a solid basis for the empirical evaluation of these questions. This paper analyzes Australian refrigerator efficiency data covering the years 1993-2009. Sales data was purchased from a commercial market research organization (in this case, the GfK Group) and includes sales and average price in each year for each appliance model; this can be used to understand broader trends by product class and star rating category, even where data is aggregated. Statistical regression analysis is used to model market introduction and adoption of high efficiency refrigerators according to logistic adoption model formalism, and parameterizes the way in which the Australian programs accelerated adoption of high-efficiency products and phased out others. Through this analysis, the paper presents a detailed, robust and quantitative picture of the impacts of EES&L in the Australian case, but also demonstrates a methodology of the evaluation of program impacts that could form the basis of an international evaluation framework for similar programs in other countries.

  14. Evidence of progress. Measurement of impacts of Australia's S and L program from 1990-2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowenthal-Savy; McNeil, Michael; Harrington, Lloyd [Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, and Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Australia first put categorical energy efficiency labels on residential appliances in the mid-1980s, and the first Minimum Energy Performance Standards (MEPS) for refrigerators was implemented in 1999. Updated in 2005, these MEPS were aligned with US 2001 levels. Considered together, these actions set Australia apart as having one of the most aggressive appliance efficiency programs in the world. For these reasons, together with good data on product sales over time, Australia represents a potentially fruitful case study for understanding the dynamics energy efficiency standards and labeling (EES and L) programs impacts on appliance markets. This analysis attempts to distinguish between the impacts of labeling alone as opposed to MEPS, and to probe the time-dependency of such impacts. Fortunately, in the Australian case, detailed market sales data and a comprehensive registration system provides a solid basis for the empirical evaluation of these questions. This paper analyzes Australian refrigerator efficiency data covering the years 1993-2009. Sales data was purchased from a commercial market research organization (in this case, the GfK Group) and includes sales and average price in each year for each appliance model – this can be used to understand broader trends by product class and star rating category, even where data is aggregated. Statistical regression analysis is used to model market introduction and adoption of high efficiency refrigerators according to logistic adoption model formalism, and parameterizes the way in which the Australian programs accelerated adoption of high-efficiency products and phased out others. Through this analysis, the paper presents a detailed, robust and quantitative picture of the impacts of EES and L in the Australian case, but also demonstrates a methodology of the evaluation of program impacts that could form the basis of an international evaluation framework for similar programs in other countries.

  15. Suitability Measurement and Analysis for Fort Bliss Naval Air Facility OLS. Opportune Landing Site Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    duri- crusts or pedecretes. Often termed by constituent, calcium carbon - ate deposits become caliche or calcrete, dolomite becomes dolo- crete, gypsum...Caliche is a deposit of calcium carbonate , which acts as a cement with other materials, including gravel, sand, clay, and silt. Caliche occurs...volume of the sample, and is ex- pressed in %Vol. It is important to note that desert soils often have miner- als such as calcium sulfate, which can be

  16. Security Vs. Liberty: How to Measure Privacy Costs in Domestic Surveillance Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    with video , infrared imagery, and multispectral sensors, collect their biometric signatures, uniquely identify them, and presumably provide a...to include video , agile 105 Ibid., 9. 106 Ibid., 10. 107 Ibid., 10–11. 108 Ibid., 11. 109 Ibid., A-21. 25...maintain the same level of privacy intended by the framers of the Constitution. Chapter III concluded that a person exhibits a subjective expectation of

  17. Suitability Measurement and Analysis for El Centro Naval Air Facility OLS. Opportune Landing Site Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    along the RAS were used to estimate the number of bushes within the RAS and approximate size of the crown of the bushes. Vegeta- tion cover from the...holes during IOP #2, and only measuring at the surface during IOP #3. ERDC/CRREL TR-08-18 33 The PR2 probe consists of a sealed polycarbonate ...species) are at an average spac- ing of 2.5 m (8 ft), and the crown of the vegetation is roughly 1.5 m (5 ft). The bushes for the rest of the RAS are

  18. EMI Measurement and Mitigation Testing for the ARPA Hybrid Electric Vehicle Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-08-27

    Magnetic Field Open-Field Test Setup MONOPOLE, BICONICAL OR LOG PERIODIC ANTENNA 5 Various electromagnetic receiving antennas were placed on a...1kHz Biconical Antenna 20 MHz-300 MHz V,H 10kHz, 11\\.1Hz Log Periodic Antenna 300 MHz - 1 GHz V,H 10 kHz, 11\\.1Hz V = Vertical; H = Horizontal To...Measurements were made with various calibrated antennas designed to detect electric and magnetic field emissions in various frequency ranges. Electric

  19. Measuring quality and performance of assistive technology: results of a prospective monitoring program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, J G; LeBlanc, M; Mortola, P

    1994-01-01

    A crucial need in assistive technology delivery is follow-up to determine device performance and satisfaction from the individual with a disability's perception. As part of an overall research project on technology transfer, this investigation was designed to measure and document service delivery outcomes, first in a pilot study at the Rehabilitation Engineering Center (REC), Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford (LSPCH) with 60 consumers and then in a replication study in four other service delivery centers providing devices to 103 clients. One hundred sixty-three devices were delivered to 163 consumers by five service delivery centers. The results of this investigation indicate that user feedback can be documented through prospective and standardized data collection forms; outcome measures can be helpful in determining user satisfaction and device performance; user responses, compared with clinician evaluations, are reliable perceptions of device performance; provision of the selected assistive devices was demonstrably positive for the majority of device users; and for those individuals not initiating return visits, the phone-call follow-up provided information that would not have been available otherwise to the service providers.

  20. [Needle exchange programs are a cost-effective preventative measure against HIV in Iceland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eythórsson, Elías Sæbjorn; Ásgeirsdóttir, Tinna Laufey; Gottfređsson, Magnús

    2014-07-01

    In 2007 there was a sudden increase in HIV cases among intravenous drug users (IDUs) in Iceland. In 2007 - 2011 there were 34 new HIV cases among IDUs compared to four in the previous four year period. The purpose of this study was to assess whether needle exchange programs (NEPs) were cost-effective in preventing the spread of HIV among IDUs in Iceland. Cost-utility analysis was conducted from a societal perspective. Costs are presented at the 2011 price level and values were discounted using a 3% discount rate. A ten year period, 2011 - 2020 was compared with and without NEPs. The Incremental Cost-Utility Ratio (ICUR) was calculated as societal cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY). Sensitivity analysis was performed on study assumptions. The estimated societal costs associated with HIV infections among IDUs from 2011 - 2020 was 914.369.621 ISK without NEP and 947.653.758 ISK with NEP. Excess societal cost due to NEP was 33.284.137 ISK. Societal utility from NEP was 7,39 QALYs. Additionally, NEP prevented 4-5 HIV infections. The ICUR of providing NEP was 4.506.720 ISK. According to WHO an intervention is considered cost-effective if the ICUR is less than three-fold national GDP per capita. In 2011 the GDP per capita in Iceland was 15.315.000 ISK. Sensitivity analysis on study assumptions yielded a societal cost within the WHO limit. Therefore, the results indicate that NEPs are cost-effective in preventing the spread of HIV among IDUs in Iceland.

  1. Improved Body Mass Index Measures Following a Middle School-Based Obesity Intervention--The MATCH Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazorick, Suzanne; Fang, Xiangming; Hardison, George T.; Crawford, Yancey

    2015-01-01

    Background: Motivating Adolescents with Technology to CHOOSE Health™ (MATCH) is an educational and behavioral intervention in seventh grade. Methods: Teachers in 2 schools delivered the MATCH curriculum, with 1 control school. Using a quasi-experimental design, outcome measures included lessons completed, body mass index (BMI), BMI z-score (zBMI),…

  2. Exploring the utility of measures of critical thinking dispositions and professional behavior development in an audiology education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Stella L; Bartlett, Doreen J; Lucy, S Deborah

    2013-05-01

    Discussions about professional behaviors are growing increasingly prevalent across health professions, especially as a central component to education programs. A strong critical thinking disposition, paired with critical consciousness, may provide future health professionals with a foundation for solving challenging practice problems through the application of sound technical skill and scientific knowledge without sacrificing sensitive, empathic, client-centered practice. In this article, we describe an approach to monitoring student development of critical thinking dispositions and key professional behaviors as a way to inform faculty members' and clinical supervisors' support of students and ongoing curriculum development. We designed this exploratory study to describe the trajectory of change for a cohort of audiology students' critical thinking dispositions (measured by the California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory: [CCTDI]) and professional behaviors (using the Comprehensive Professional Behaviors Development Log-Audiology [CPBDL-A]) in an audiology program. Implications for the CCTDI and CPBDL-A in audiology entry-to-practice curricula and professional development will be discussed. This exploratory study involved a cohort of audiology students, studied over a two-year period, using a one-group repeated measures design. Eighteen audiology students (two male and 16 female), began the study. At the third and final data collection point, 15 students completed the CCTDI, and nine students completed the CPBDL-A. The CCTDI and CPBDL-A were each completed at three time points: at the beginning, at the middle, and near the end of the audiology education program. Data are presented descriptively in box plots to examine the trends of development for each critical thinking disposition dimension and each key professional behavior as well as for an overall critical thinking disposition score. For the CCTDI, there was a general downward trend from time point 1 to

  3. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report: October 1 - December 31, 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sisterson, DL

    2011-03-02

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  4. Implementation of the World Health Organization Trauma Care Checklist Program in 11 Centers Across Multiple Economic Strata: Effect on Care Process Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashoher, Angela; Schneider, Eric B; Juillard, Catherine; Stevens, Kent; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Berry, William R; Bloem, Christina; Chadbunchachai, Witaya; Dharap, Satish; Dy, Sydney M; Dziekan, Gerald; Gruen, Russell L; Henry, Jaymie A; Huwer, Christina; Joshipura, Manjul; Kelley, Edward; Krug, Etienne; Kumar, Vineet; Kyamanywa, Patrick; Mefire, Alain Chichom; Musafir, Marcos; Nathens, Avery B; Ngendahayo, Edouard; Nguyen, Thai Son; Roy, Nobhojit; Pronovost, Peter J; Khan, Irum Qumar; Razzak, Junaid Abdul; Rubiano, Andrés M; Turner, James A; Varghese, Mathew; Zakirova, Rimma; Mock, Charles

    2017-04-01

    Trauma contributes more than ten percent of the global burden of disease. Initial assessment and resuscitation of trauma patients often requires rapid diagnosis and management of multiple concurrent complex conditions, and errors are common. We investigated whether implementing a trauma care checklist would improve care for injured patients in low-, middle-, and high-income countries. From 2010 to 2012, the impact of the World Health Organization (WHO) Trauma Care Checklist program was assessed in 11 hospitals using a stepped wedge pre- and post-intervention comparison with randomly assigned intervention start dates. Study sites represented nine countries with diverse economic and geographic contexts. Primary end points were adherence to process of care measures; secondary data on morbidity and mortality were also collected. Multilevel logistic regression models examined differences in measures pre- versus post-intervention, accounting for patient age, gender, injury severity, and center-specific variability. Data were collected on 1641 patients before and 1781 after program implementation. Patient age (mean 34 ± 18 vs. 34 ± 18), sex (21 vs. 22 % female), and the proportion of patients with injury severity scores (ISS) ≥ 25 (10 vs. 10 %) were similar before and after checklist implementation (p > 0.05). Improvement was found for 18 of 19 process measures, including greater odds of having abdominal examination (OR 3.26), chest auscultation (OR 2.68), and distal pulse examination (OR 2.33) (all p < 0.05). These changes were robust to several sensitivity analyses. Implementation of the WHO Trauma Care Checklist was associated with substantial improvements in patient care process measures among a cohort of patients in diverse settings.

  5. Comparison of composite measure methodologies for rewarding quality of care: an analysis from the American Heart Association's Get With The Guidelines program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eapen, Zubin J; Fonarow, Gregg C; Dai, David; O'Brien, Sean M; Schwamm, Lee H; Cannon, Christopher P; Heidenreich, Paul A; Bhatt, Deepak L; Peterson, Eric D; Hernandez, Adrian F

    2011-11-01

    Composite indices of health care performance are an aggregation of underlying individual performance measures and are increasingly being used to rank hospitals. We sought to conduct an observational analysis to determine the influence of the opportunity-based and all-or-none composite performance measures on hospital rankings. We examined 194 245 patients hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction between July 2006 and June 2009 from 334 hospitals participating in the Get With The Guidelines--Coronary Artery Disease (GWTG-CAD) quality improvement program. We analyzed hospital opportunity-based and all-or-none composite scores and 30-day risk-standardized all-cause mortality and readmission rates. We found that the median calculated opportunity-based score for these hospitals was 95.5 (interquartile range, 90.4, 98.0). The median all-or-none score was 88.9 (interquartile range, 79.7, 94.4). The 2 scoring methods were significantly correlated with one another (r=0.98, PRankings generated by the two methods were significantly correlated (r=0.93, Prankings diminished similarly for both composite measures. When including additional performance measures into the composite score, the two methods produced similar changes in hospital rankings. The opportunity-based and all-or-none coronary artery disease composite indices are highly correlated and yield similar ranking of the top and bottom quintiles of hospitals. The two methods provide similarly modest correlations with 30-day mortality, but not readmission.

  6. Quality assurance program for LR 115 based radon concentration measurements in a case-control study: description and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bochicchio, F. E-mail: francesco.bochicchio@iss.it; Forastiere, F.; Farchi, S.; Marocco, D.; Quarto, M.; Sera, F

    2003-06-01

    A case-control study on lung cancer and radon exposure in dwellings has been carried out in Lazio, a high indoor radon region of Central Italy. A total of about 400 cases and 400 controls were recruited and radon concentration was measured in a total of about 1850 dwellings. In each dwelling, radon concentration measurement devices were placed in both the main bedroom and living room for two consecutive six-month periods. Each radon device, enclosed in a sealed polyethylene bag, contains two LR 115 detectors, each being covered by a thin absorber to reduce the alpha-energy within the detector sensitive range. A quality assurance program, described in this paper, was applied in order to reduce radon concentration measurement uncertainty, which have a significant impact on the results of an epidemiological study. The reported internal quality control and intercomparison results are compared with the results of other studies, and show that the radon measurement precision and accuracy obtained in this study can be considered quite good.

  7. SWSA 6 interim corrective measures environmental monitoring: FY 1990 results. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashwood, T.L.; Spalding, B.P.

    1991-07-01

    This report presents the results and conclusions from a multifaceted monitoring effort associated with the high-density polyethylene caps installed in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as an interim corrective measure (ICM). The caps were installed between November 1988 and June 1989 to meet Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements for closure of those areas of SWSA 6 that had received RCRA-regulated wastes after November 1980. Three separate activities were undertaken to evaluate the performance of the caps: (1) wells were installed in trenches to be covered by the caps, and water levels in these intratrench wells were monitored periodically; (2) samples were taken of the leachate in the intratrench wells and were analyzed for a broad range of radiological and chemical contaminants; and (3) water levels in wells outside the trenches were monitored periodically. With the exception of the trench leachate sampling, each of these activities spanned the preconstruction, construction, and postconstruction periods. Findings of this study have important implications for the ongoing remedial investigation in SWSA 6 and for the design of other ICMs. 51 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Analyzing the Measurement Equivalence of a Translated Test in a Statewide Assessment Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Carvajal-Espinoza

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available When tests are translated into one or more languages, the question of the equivalence of items across language forms arises. This equivalence can be assessed at the scale level by means of a multiple group confirmatory factor analysis (CFA in the context of structural equation modeling. This study examined the measurement equivalence of a Spanish translated version of a statewide Mathematics test originally constructed in English by using a multi-group CFA approach. The study used samples of native speakers of the target language of the translation taking the test in both the source and target language, specifically Hispanics taking the test in English and Spanish. Test items were grouped in twelve facet-representative parcels. The parceling was accomplished by grouping items that corresponded to similar content and computing an average for each parcel. Four models were fitted to examine the equivalence of the test across groups. The multi-group CFA fixed factor loadings across groups and results supported the equivalence of the two language versions (English and Spanish of the test. The statistical techniques implemented in this study can also be used to address the performance on a test based on dichotomous or dichotomized variables such as gender, socioeconomic status, geographic location and other variables of interest.

  9. Research report: User's manual for computer program AT81y003 SHABERTH. Steady state and transient thermal analysis of a shaft bearing system including ball, cylindrical and tapered roller bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadden, G. B.; Kleckner, R. J.; Ragen, M. A.; Sheynin, L.

    1981-01-01

    The SHABERTH program is capable of simulating the thermomechanical performance of a load support system consisting of a flexible shaft supported by up to five rolling element bearings. Any combination of ball, cylindrical, and tapered roller bearings can be used to support the shaft. The user can select models in calculating lubricant film thickness and traction forces. The formulation of the cage pocket/rolling element interaction model was revised to improve solution numerical convergence characteristics.

  10. From theory to application: using performance measures for contraceptive care in the Title X family planning program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyola Briceno, Ana Carolina; Kawatu, Jennifer; Saul, Katie; DeAngelis, Katie; Frederiksen, Brittni; Moskosky, Susan B; Gavin, Lorrie

    2017-09-01

    The objective was to describe a Performance Measure Learning Collaborative (PMLC) designed to help Title X family planning grantees use new clinical performance measures for contraceptive care. Twelve Title X grantee-service site teams participated in an 8-month PMLC from November 2015 to June 2016; baseline was assessed in October 2015. Each team documented their selected best practices and strategies to improve performance, and calculated the contraceptive care performance measures at baseline and for each of the subsequent 8 months. PMLC sites implemented a mix of best practices: (a) ensuring access to a broad range of methods (n=7 sites), (b) supporting women through client-centered counseling and reproductive life planning (n=8 sites), (c) developing systems for same-day provision of all methods (n=10 sites) and (d) utilizing diverse payment options to reduce cost as a barrier (n=4 sites). Ten sites (83%) observed an increase in the clinical performance measures focused on most and moderately effective methods (MME), with a median percent change of 6% for MME (from a median of 73% at baseline to 77% post-PMLC). Evidence suggests that the PMLC model is an approach that can be used to improve the quality of contraceptive care offered to clients in some settings. Further replication of the PMLC among other groups and beyond the Title X network will help strengthen the current model through lessons learned. Using the performance measures in the context of a learning collaborative may be a useful strategy for other programs (e.g., Federally Qualified Health Centers, Medicaid, private health plans) that provide contraceptive care. Expanded use of the measures may help increase access to contraceptive care to achieve national goals for family planning. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Medicare Program; Prospective Payment System and Consolidated Billing for Skilled Nursing Facilities for FY 2018, SNF Value-Based Purchasing Program, SNF Quality Reporting Program, Survey Team Composition, and Correction of the Performance Period for the NHSN HCP Influenza Vaccination Immunization Reporting Measure in the ESRD QIP for PY 2020. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-04

    This final rule updates the payment rates used under the prospective payment system (PPS) for skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) for fiscal year (FY) 2018. It also revises and rebases the market basket index by updating the base year from 2010 to 2014, and by adding a new cost category for Installation, Maintenance, and Repair Services. The rule also finalizes revisions to the SNF Quality Reporting Program (QRP), including measure and standardized resident assessment data policies and policies related to public display. In addition, it finalizes policies for the Skilled Nursing Facility Value-Based Purchasing Program that will affect Medicare payment to SNFs beginning in FY 2019. The final rule also clarifies the regulatory requirements for team composition for surveys conducted for investigating a complaint and aligns regulatory provisions for investigation of complaints with the statutory requirements. The final rule also finalizes the performance period for the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) Healthcare Personnel (HCP) Influenza Vaccination Reporting Measure included in the End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Quality Incentive Program (QIP) for Payment Year 2020.

  12. Use of coal fly ash and other waste products in soil stabilization and road construction including non-destructive testing of roadways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    An extensive laboratory testing program was performed on subgrade soils stabilized using fly ash and : lime kiln dust. The laboratory program included measurements of: compaction curves, small strain elastic moduli, : resilient modulus (Mr), Briaud C...

  13. Use of coal fly ash and other waste products in soil stabilization and road construction-including non-destructive testing of roadways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    An extensive laboratory testing program was performed on subgrade soils stabilized using fly ash and lime kiln dust. The laboratory : program included measurements of: compaction curves, small strain elastic moduli, resilient modulus (Mr), Briaud Com...

  14. Measuring implementation of a school-based violence prevention program : Fidelity and teachers' responsiveness as predictors of proximal outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultes, Marie Therese; Stefanek, Elisabeth; van de Schoot, Rens|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304833207; Strohmeier, Dagmar; Spiel, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    When school-based prevention programs are put into practice, evaluation studies commonly only consider one indicator of program implementation. The present study investigates how two different aspects of program implementation - fidelity and participant responsiveness - jointly influence proximal

  15. Development of an EMF Measurements Database, EMF Rapid Program, Project #5, Interim Report: April 1995-December 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Dan Bracken, Inc.

    1997-04-01

    The EMF measurement data sets in existence today were compiled with varying goals and techniques. Consequently, they have different information content as well as varying logical and physical structure. Future studies will continue to pursue varying goals and utilize techniques that cannot be known in advance. Primary goals for the EMF Measurements Database developed under the Department of Energy EMF RAPID Program are to develop a database structure that can accommodate the diversity of EMF data sets, provide guidance for production of future EMF data sets, and serve as an accessible repository of EMF measurement data. Specific objectives of the EMF Measurements Database are: o to preserve study descriptions, results and data; o to provide readily accessible, well-documented data; and o to facilitate communication among researchers. In addition, the EMF Measurements Database will encourage additional analysis of existing data sets, facilitate analysis of data from multiple projects, support design of new studies, and permit future issues in EMF exposure assessment to be addressed with existing data. Preservation of study descriptions and data is accomplished with a formal, but open, structure. Specifications have been developed for the various elements of the database. Each data set in the database is formally described by a metadata file. The structured metadata file describes the origin, development, logical and physical structure and distribution mechanism for each data set. The metadata for each data set is generated according to a specification developed for the EMF Measurements Database. The actual measurement data is contained in data Products for each data set. The number and type of data product will vary by data set. Most of the data products in the possession of the EMF Measurements Database are available for download from an Internet site. For some data sets, the data products will be maintained by other parties who may have their own access procedures

  16. FMCSA safety program effectiveness measurement compliance review effectiveness model results for carriers with compliance reviews in fiscal year 2009 : [analysis brief].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    This Analysis Brief documents the methodology and results from the Compliance Review Effectiveness Model (CREM) for carriers receiving CRs in fiscal year (FY) 2009. The model measures the effectiveness of the compliance review (CR) program, one of th...

  17. Measuring $\

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Jessica Sarah [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-01

    The MINOS Experiment consists of two steel-scintillator calorimeters, sampling the long baseline NuMI muon neutrino beam. It was designed to make a precise measurement of the ‘atmospheric’ neutrino mixing parameters, Δm2 atm. and sin2 (2 atm.). The Near Detector measures the initial spectrum of the neutrino beam 1km from the production target, and the Far Detector, at a distance of 735 km, measures the impact of oscillations in the neutrino energy spectrum. Work performed to validate the quality of the data collected by the Near Detector is presented as part of this thesis. This thesis primarily details the results of a vμ disappearance analysis, and presents a new sophisticated fitting software framework, which employs a maximum likelihood method to extract the best fit oscillation parameters. The software is entirely decoupled from the extrapolation procedure between the detectors, and is capable of fitting multiple event samples (defined by the selections applied) in parallel, and any combination of energy dependent and independent sources of systematic error. Two techniques to improve the sensitivity of the oscillation measurement were also developed. The inclusion of information on the energy resolution of the neutrino events results in a significant improvement in the allowed region for the oscillation parameters. The degree to which sin2 (2θ )= 1.0 could be disfavoured with the exposure of the current dataset if the true mixing angle was non-maximal, was also investigated, with an improved neutrino energy reconstruction for very low energy events. The best fit oscillation parameters, obtained by the fitting software and incorporating resolution information were: | Δm2| = 2.32+0.12 -0.08×10-3 eV2 and sin2 (2θ ) > 0.90(90% C.L.). The analysis provides the current world best measurement of the atmospheric neutrino mass

  18. Methane emissions from natural gas compressor stations in the transmission and storage sector: measurements and comparisons with the EPA greenhouse gas reporting program protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, R; Williams, Laurie L; Vaughn, Timothy L; Zimmerle, Daniel; Roscioli, Joseph R; Herndon, Scott C; Yacovitch, Tara I; Floerchinger, Cody; Tkacik, Daniel S; Mitchell, Austin L; Sullivan, Melissa R; Dallmann, Timothy R; Robinson, Allen L

    2015-03-03

    Equipment- and site-level methane emissions from 45 compressor stations in the transmission and storage (T&S) sector of the US natural gas system were measured, including 25 sites required to report under the EPA greenhouse gas reporting program (GHGRP). Direct measurements of fugitive and vented sources were combined with AP-42-based exhaust emission factors (for operating reciprocating engines and turbines) to produce a study onsite estimate. Site-level methane emissions were also concurrently measured with downwind-tracer-flux techniques. At most sites, these two independent estimates agreed within experimental uncertainty. Site-level methane emissions varied from 2-880 SCFM. Compressor vents, leaky isolation valves, reciprocating engine exhaust, and equipment leaks were major sources, and substantial emissions were observed at both operating and standby compressor stations. The site-level methane emission rates were highly skewed; the highest emitting 10% of sites (including two superemitters) contributed 50% of the aggregate methane emissions, while the lowest emitting 50% of sites contributed less than 10% of the aggregate emissions. Excluding the two superemitters, study-average methane emissions from compressor housings and noncompressor sources are comparable to or lower than the corresponding effective emission factors used in the EPA greenhouse gas inventory. If the two superemitters are included in the analysis, then the average emission factors based on this study could exceed the EPA greenhouse gas inventory emission factors, which highlights the potentially important contribution of superemitters to national emissions. However, quantification of their influence requires knowledge of the magnitude and frequency of superemitters across the entire T&S sector. Only 38% of the methane emissions measured by the comprehensive onsite measurements were reportable under the new EPA GHGRP because of a combination of inaccurate emission factors for leakers and

  19. Crisis Reliability Indicators Supporting Emergency Services (CRISES): A Framework for Developing Performance Measures for Behavioral Health Crisis and Psychiatric Emergency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfour, Margaret E; Tanner, Kathleen; Jurica, Paul J; Rhoads, Richard; Carson, Chris A

    2016-01-01

    Crisis and emergency psychiatric services are an integral part of the healthcare system, yet there are no standardized measures for programs providing these services. We developed the Crisis Reliability Indicators Supporting Emergency Services (CRISES) framework to create measures that inform internal performance improvement initiatives and allow comparison across programs. The framework consists of two components-the CRISES domains (timely, safe, accessible, least-restrictive, effective, consumer/family centered, and partnership) and the measures supporting each domain. The CRISES framework provides a foundation for development of standardized measures for the crisis field. This will become increasingly important as pay-for-performance initiatives expand with healthcare reform.

  20. Cloud Droplet Size and Liquid Water Path Retrievals From Zenith Radiance Measurements: Examples From the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program and the Aerosol Robotic Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, J. C.; Marshak, A.; Huang, C.-H.; Varnai, T.; Hogan, R. J.; Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Knyazikhin, Y.; O'Connor, E. J.; Wiscombe, W. J.

    2012-01-01

    The ground-based Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) and NASA Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) routinely monitor clouds using zenith radiances at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. Using the transmittance calculated from such measurements, we have developed a new retrieval method for cloud effective droplet size and conducted extensive tests for non-precipitating liquid water clouds. The underlying principle is to combine a water-absorbing wavelength (i.e. 1640 nm) with a nonwater-absorbing wavelength for acquiring information on cloud droplet size and optical depth. For simulated stratocumulus clouds with liquid water path less than 300 g/sq m and horizontal resolution of 201m, the retrieval method underestimates the mean effective radius by 0.8 m, with a root-mean-squared error of 1.7 m and a relative deviation of 13 %. For actual observations with a liquid water path less than 450 gm.2 at the ARM Oklahoma site during 2007-2008, our 1.5 min-averaged retrievals are generally larger by around 1 m than those from combined ground-based cloud radar and microwave radiometer at a 5min temporal resolution. We also compared our retrievals to those from combined shortwave flux and microwave observations for relatively homogeneous clouds, showing that the bias between these two retrieval sets is negligible, but the error of 2.6 m and the relative deviation of 22% are larger than those found in our simulation case. Finally, the transmittance-based cloud effective droplet radii agree to better than 11% with satellite observations and have a negative bias of 1 m. Overall, the retrieval method provides reasonable cloud effective radius estimates, which can enhance the cloud products of both ARM and AERONET.

  1. Respiratory Cytology--Current Trends Including Endobronchial Ultrasound-Guided Biopsy and Electromagnetic Navigational Bronchoscopy: Analysis of Data From a 2013 Supplemental Survey of Participants in the College of American Pathologists Interlaboratory Comparison Program in Nongynecologic Cytology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgis, Charles D; Marshall, Carrie B; Barkan, Guliz A; Booth, Christine N; Kurtycz, Daniel F I; Souers, Rhona J; Keylock, Joren B; Tabatabai, Z Laura; Russell, Donna K; Moriarty, Ann T; Doyle, Mary A; Thomas, Nicole; Yildiz-Aktas, Isil Z; Collins, Brian T; Laucirica, Rodolfo; Crothers, Barbara A

    2016-01-01

    Nongynecologic cytology (NGC) practices are expanding in relationship to historical gynecologic cytology screening programs. Bronchopulmonary cytology is experiencing an evolution regarding new procedural types. The College of American Pathologists (CAP) tracks practice patterns in NGC by developing questionnaires, surveying participants, and analyzing respondent data. To analyze responses to a 2013 CAP supplemental survey from the Interlaboratoy Comparison Program on bronchopulmonary NGC. The "NGC 2013 Supplemental Questionnaire: Demographics in Performance and Reporting of Respiratory Cytology" was mailed to 2074 laboratories. The survey response rate was 42% (880 of 2074) with 90% of respondents (788 of 880) indicating that their laboratories evaluated cytology bronchopulmonary specimens. More than 95% of respondents indicated interpreting bronchial washings (765 of 787) and bronchial brushings (757 of 787). A minority of laboratories (43%, 340 of 787) dealt with endobronchial ultrasound-guided samples, and an even smaller fraction of laboratories (14%, 110 of 787) saw cases from electromagnetic navigational bronchoscopy. Intraprocedural adequacy assessments by pathologists (and less often by cytotechnologists or pathologists-in-training) were routinely performed in percutaneous transthoracic aspiration cases (74%, 413 of 560) with less involvement for other case types. Most laboratories reported that newly diagnosed primary pulmonary adenocarcinomas were triaged for molecular testing of epidermal growth factor receptor and anaplastic lymphoma kinase. The parameters examined in this 2013 survey provide a snapshot of current pulmonary cytopathology practice and may be used as benchmarks in the future.

  2. Implementation of Get with the Guideline Acute Myocardial Infarction Program at Johns Hopkins Hospital and Its Effect on Core Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-25

    more zqWi buiccal dimarption ocur with non-enteric-costied aspirin formulations. ACC/AHA UAINSTEMI Guidelines t5) Clats I Antiplatelet therapy diould be...a true aspirin allerg (Level of Evidence: A). ACC/AHA LLVNSTFMI Guidelines (5) CIXXs I Antiplatelet therapy should he initiated promnptly, Aspirin ...through use of GWTG. Core measure medications include beta blockers and aspirin at arrival, smoking cessation, and the following discharge medications

  3. TOWARDS THE USE OF A NOVEL METHOD: The First Experiences on Measuring The Cognitive Load of Learned Programming Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Pas UYSAL

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Teaching object-oriented programming (OOP is a difficult task, especially to the beginners. First-time learners also find it difficult to understand. Although there is a considerable amount of study on the cognitive dimension, a few study points out its physiological meaning. Moreover, it has been suggested that neuroscientific studies and methods can enable educational researchers gain an insight into brain and cognitive processes as well. Therefore, this experimental study explored the previously learned OOP skills in terms of cognitive load. By using the functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS method, we measured the cognitive load of participants when executing OOP tasks. The average oxygenation changes in prefrontal cortex of the brain represented their total cognitive response to a set of OOP tasks. There were two research questions investigated by this study. The first research question explored whether the average oxygenation changed according to the participants’ academic achievements and task completion status. The second research question was for identifying the instant changes in the oxygenations to find out which programming tasks were more contributing to the oxygenation. Later, we compared the findings with experts’ judgments. We observed that the fNIRS system was an effective and promising technology for monitoring cognitive tasks both in classrooms and in experimental environments.

  4. Quality Oncology Practice Initiative Certification Program: measuring implementation of chemotherapy administration safety standards in the outpatient oncology setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Terry R; Schulmeister, Lisa; Jacobson, Joseph O

    2013-03-01

    The Quality Oncology Practice Initiative (QOPI) Certification Program (QCP) evaluates individual outpatient oncology practice performance in areas that affect patient care and safety and builds on the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) QOPI by assessing the compliance of a practice with certification standards based on the ASCO/Oncology Nursing Society standards for safe chemotherapy administration. To become certified, a practice must attain a benchmark quality score on certification measures in QOPI and attest that it complies with 17 QCP standards. Structured on-site reviews, initially performed in randomly selected practices, became mandatory beginning in September 2011. Of 111 practices that have undergone on-site review, only two were fully concordant with all of the standards (median, 11; range, seven to 17). Most practices were subsequently able to modify practice to become QOPI certified. The QCP addresses the call from the Institute of Medicine to close the quality gap by aligning evidence-based guidelines and consensus-driven standards with requirements for oncology practices to develop and maintain structural safety components, such as policies and procedures that ensure practice performance. On-site practice evaluation is a high-impact component of the program.

  5. Measuring the effectiveness of an intensive IPV training program offered to Greek general practitioners and residents of general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakaki, Maria; Petridou, Eleni; Kogevinas, Manolis; Lionis, Christos

    2013-03-28

    The need for effective training of primary care physicians in the prevention, detection and handling of intimate partner violence (IPV) has been widely acknowledged, given its frequency in daily practice. The current intervention study aimed to measure changes in the actual IPV knowledge, perceived knowledge, perceived preparedness and detection ability of practicing general practitioners (GPs) and general practice residents, following an intensive IPV training program. A pre/post-test design with a control group was employed to compare changes in baseline measures of IPV at the post intervention stage and at 12 months. A total of 40 participants provided full data; 25 GPs (11 in the intervention and 14 in the control) and 15 residents (intervention only). Three scales of the PREMIS survey were used to draw information on the study outcomes. The training program met high acceptance by both groups of participants and high practicality in clinical practice. The GPs in the intervention group performed better than the GPs in the control group on "Perceived preparedness" and "Perceived knowledge" in both the post-intervention (p= .012, r= .50 and p= .001, r= .68) and the 12-month follow-up (p= .024, r= .45 and p= .007, r= .54) as well as better than the residents in "Perceived preparedness" at post-intervention level (p= .037, r= .41). Residents on the other hand, performed better than the GPs in the intervention group on "Actual knowledge" at the 12-month follow-up (p= .012, r= .49). No significant improvements or between group differences were found in terms of the self-reported detection of IPV cases. Further studies are needed to decide whether residency training could serve as an early intervention stage for IPV training.

  6. External quality assurance programs as a tool for verifying standardization of measurement procedures: Pilot collaboration in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perich, C; Ricós, C; Alvarez, V; Biosca, C; Boned, B; Cava, F; Doménech, M V; Fernández-Calle, P; Fernández-Fernández, P; García-Lario, J V; Minchinela, J; Simón, M; Jansen, R

    2014-05-15

    Current external quality assurance schemes have been classified into six categories, according to their ability to verify the degree of standardization of the participating measurement procedures. SKML (Netherlands) is a Category 1 EQA scheme (commutable EQA materials with values assigned by reference methods), whereas SEQC (Spain) is a Category 5 scheme (replicate analyses of non-commutable materials with no values assigned by reference methods). The results obtained by a group of Spanish laboratories participating in a pilot study organized by SKML are examined, with the aim of pointing out the improvements over our current scheme that a Category 1 program could provide. Imprecision and bias are calculated for each analyte and laboratory, and compared with quality specifications derived from biological variation. Of the 26 analytes studied, 9 had results comparable with those from reference methods, and 10 analytes did not have comparable results. The remaining 7 analytes measured did not have available reference method values, and in these cases, comparison with the peer group showed comparable results. The reasons for disagreement in the second group can be summarized as: use of non-standard methods (IFCC without exogenous pyridoxal phosphate for AST and ALT, Jaffé kinetic at low-normal creatinine concentrations and with eGFR); non-commutability of the reference material used to assign values to the routine calibrator (calcium, magnesium and sodium); use of reference materials without established commutability instead of reference methods for AST and GGT, and lack of a systematic effort by manufacturers to harmonize results. Results obtained in this work demonstrate the important role of external quality assurance programs using commutable materials with values assigned by reference methods to correctly monitor the standardization of laboratory tests with consequent minimization of risk to patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. LiDAR-Assisted Multi-Source Program (LAMP for Measuring Above Ground Biomass and Forest Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuomo Kauranne

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Forest measurement for purposes like harvesting planning, biomass estimation and mitigating climate change through carbon capture by forests call for increasingly frequent forest measurement campaigns that need to balance cost with accuracy and precision. Often this implies the use of remote sensing based measurement methods. For any remote-sensing based methods to be accurate, they must be validated against field data. We present a method that combines field measurements with two layers of remote sensing data: sampling of forests by airborne laser scanning (LiDAR and Landsat imagery. The Bayesian model-based framework presented here is called Lidar-Assisted Multi-source Programme—or LAMP—for Above Ground Biomass estimation. The method has two variants: LAMP2 which splits the biomass estimation task into two separate stages: forest type stratification from Landsat imagery and mean biomass density estimation of each forest type by LiDAR models calibrated on field plots. LAMP3, on the other hand, estimates first the biomass on a LiDAR sample using models calibrated with field plots and then uses these LiDAR-based models to generate biomass density estimates on thousands of surrogate plots, with which a satellite image based model is calibrated and subsequently used to estimate biomass density on the entire forest area. Both LAMP methods have been applied to a 2 million hectare area in Southern Nepal, the Terai Arc Landscape or TAL to calculate the emission Reference Levels (RLs that are required for the UN REDD+ program that was accepted as part of the Paris Climate Agreement. The uncertainty of these estimates is studied with error variance estimation, cross-validation and Monte Carlo simulation. The relative accuracy of activity data at pixel level was found to be 14 per cent at 95 per cent confidence level and the root mean squared error of biomass estimates to be between 35 and 39 per cent at 1 ha resolution.

  8. Successful development of a direct observation program to measure health care worker hand hygiene using multiple trained volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linam, W Matthew; Honeycutt, Michele D; Gilliam, Craig H; Wisdom, Christy M; Bai, Shasha; Deshpande, Jayant K

    2016-05-01

    Direct observation of health care worker (HCW) hand hygiene (HH) remains the gold standard, but implementation is challenging. Our objective was to develop an accurate HH observation program using multiple HCW volunteers. HH compliance was defined as correct HH performed before and after contact with a patient or a patient's environment. HCW volunteers from each unit at our children's hospital were trained by infection preventionists to covertly collect HH observations during routine care using an electronic tool. Questionnaires sent to observers in February and December 2014 recorded demographic characteristics, observation time, and scenarios assessing accuracy. HCWs were surveyed regarding their awareness that their HH behavior was being recorded. There were 146 HH observers. The majority of observers reported making 1-2 observations per shift (65%) and taking ≤10 minutes recording an observation (85%). Between January 2012 and December 2014 there were 22,484 HH observations (average, 622 per month), including nurses (46%), physicians (21%), and other HCWs (33%). Observers correctly recorded HH behavior more than 90% of the time in 5 of the 6 scenarios. Most HCWs (86%) were unaware they were being observed. A direct observation program staffed by multiple HCW volunteers can inexpensively and accurately collect HCW HH data. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Measurement of functional capacity requirements to aid in development of an occupation-specific rehabilitation training program to help firefighters with cardiac disease safely return to work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jenny; Roberts, Joanne; Simms, Kay; Cheng, Dunlei; Hartman, Julie; Bartlett, Charles

    2009-03-15

    We designed a study to measure the functional capacity requirements of firefighters to aid in the development of an occupation-specific training program in cardiac rehabilitation; 23 healthy male firefighters with no history of heart disease completed a fire and rescue obstacle course that simulated 7 common firefighting tasks. They wore complete personal protective equipment and portable metabolic instruments that included a data collection mask. We monitored each subject's oxygen consumption (VO(2)) and working heart rate, then calculated age-predicted maximum heart rates (220 - age) and training target heart rates (85% of age-predicted maximum heart rate). During performance of the obstacle course, the subjects' mean working heart rates and peak heart rates were higher than the calculated training target heart rates (t(22) = 5.69 [working vs target, p <0.001] and t(22) = 15.14 [peak vs target, p <0.001]). These findings, with mean results for peak VO(2) (3,447 ml/min) and metabolic equivalents (11.9 METs), show that our subjects' functional capacity greatly exceeded that typically attained by patients in traditional cardiac rehabilitation programs (5 to 8 METs). In conclusion, our results indicate the need for intense, occupation-specific cardiac rehabilitation training that will help firefighters safely return to work after a cardiac event.

  10. Measures of Student Non-Cognitive Skills and Political Tolerance after Two Years of the Louisiana Scholarship Program. Louisiana Scholarship Program Evaluation Report #2. Technical Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Jonathan N.; Cheng, Albert; Hitt, Collin E.; Wolf, Patrick J.; Greene, Jay P.

    2016-01-01

    This report examines the short-term effects of the Louisiana Scholarship Program (LSP) on students' non-cognitive skills and civic values. While a growing number of studies have evaluated K-12 school voucher programs along academic dimensions, few have focused on the development of non-cognitive skills and civic values. This study aims to address…

  11. Food security status of older adult home-delivered meals program participants and components of its measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerr, Lynn

    2006-01-01

    Food security status was assessed for 143 West Central Indiana community-dwelling older adults participating in a home-delivered meals program, using the national CPS-FSSM survey, based on economics, and augmented items, including such factors as ability to prepare and/or shop for food. Results showed that 74.8% were food secure, much lower than the national rate for households with elderly (94.0%). Gender and age were found to be statistically significant predictors of food security status (national items). Scores based on national versus augmented items were significantly correlated, but scores for augmented items showed more food insecurity, indicating these items identified more food insecure older adults than the national items alone.

  12. Measurement of ozone and water vapor by Airbus in-service aircraft: The MOZAIC airborne program, An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marenco, Alain; Thouret, ValéRie; NéDéLec, Philippe; Smit, Herman; Helten, Manfred; Kley, Dieter; Karcher, Fernand; Simon, Pascal; Law, Kathy; Pyle, John; Poschmann, Georg; von Wrede, Rainer; Hume, Chris; Cook, Tim

    1998-10-01

    Tentative estimates, using three-dimensional chemistry and transport models, have suggested small ozone increases in the upper troposphere resulting from current aircraft emissions, but have also concluded to significant deficiencies in today's models and to the need to improve them through comparison with extended data sets. The Measurement of Ozone and Water Vapor by Airbus In-Service Aircraft (MOZAIC) program was initiated in 1993 by European scientists, aircraft manufacturers, and airlines to collect experimental data. Its goal is to help understand the atmosphere and how it is changing under the influence of human activity, with particular interest in the effects of aircraft. MOZAIC consists of automatic and regular measurements of ozone and water vapor by five long range passenger airliners flying all over the world. The aim is not to detect direct effects of aircraft emissions on the ozone budget inside the air traffic corridors but to build a large database of measurements to allow studies of chemical and physical processes in the atmosphere, and hence to validate global chemistry transport models. MOZAIC data provide, in particular, detailed ozone and water vapor climatologies at 9-12 km where subsonic aircraft emit most of their exhaust and which is a very critical domain (e.g., radiatively and stratosphere/troposphere exchanges) still imperfectly described in existing models. This will be valuable to improve knowledge about the processes occuring in the upper troposphere and the lowermost stratosphere, and the model treatment of near tropopause chemistry and transport. During MOZAIC I (January 1993-September 1996), fully automatic devices were developed, installed aboard five commercial Airbus A340s, and flown in normal airline service. A second phase, MOZAIC II, started in October 1996 with the aim of continuing the O3 and H2O measurements and doing a feasibility study of new airborne devices (CO, NOy). Between September 1994 and December 1997, 7500

  13. Objectively Measured Physical Activity Levels among Ethnic Minority Children Attending School-Based Afterschool Programs in a High-Poverty Neighborhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngdeok Kim, Marc Lochbaum

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Ethnic minority children living in high poverty neighborhoods are at high risk of having insufficient physical activity (PA during school days and, thus, the importance of school as a place to facilitate PA in these underserved children has been largely emphasized. This study examined the levels and patterns of PA in minority children, with particular focus on the relative contributions of regular physical education (PE and school-based afterschool PA program in promoting moderate- and vigorous-intensity PA (MVPA during school days. PA data were repeatedly measured using a Polar Active accelerometer across multiple school days (M = 5.3 days per child, from seventy-five ethnic minority children attending a Title I public elementary school in a high-poverty neighborhood in the US. The minutes and percentage of MVPA accumulated during school, PE, and afterschool PA program were compared to the current recommendations (≥30-min of MVPA during school hours; and ≥50% of MVPA during PE or afterschool PA program as well as by the demographic characteristics including sex, grade, ethnicity, and weight status using a general linear mixed model that accounts for repeated observations. On average, children spent 41.6 mins (SE = 1.8 of MVPA during school hours and of those, 14.1 mins (SE = 0.6 were contributed during PE. The average proportion of time spent in MVPA during PE was 31.3% (SE = 1.3, which was significantly lower than the recommendation (≥50% of MVPA, whereas 54.2% (SE = 1.2 of time in afterschool PA program were spent in MVPA. The percentage of monitoring days meeting current recommendations were 69.5% (SE = 0.03, 20.8% (SE = 0.02, and 59.6% (SE = 0.03 for during school, PE, and afterschool PA program, respectively. Our findings highlighted that school-based afterschool PA, in addition to regular PE classes, could be of great benefit to promote PA in minority children during school days. Further research and practice are still needed to

  14. In Vivo Monitoring Program Manual, PNL-MA-574, Rev 5.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, Timothy P.

    2011-09-12

    The following sections provide an overview of the administration for the In Vivo Monitoring Program (IVMP) for Hanford. This includes the organizational structure and program responsibilities; coordination of in vivo measurements; scheduling measurements; performing measurements; reporting results; and quality assurance.

  15. Role of performance measures in reengineering U.S. Department of Energy`s management of environmental management programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murthy, K.S.; Harroun, W.P.

    1996-06-01

    The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats) contributed to America`s defense up to the end of the Cold War. It is one of several large US Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear industrial facilities, currently undergoing cleanup and closure. The Site was constructed in a sparsely populated area along the Rocky Mountain Foothills, near Denver, in 1952. In the 45 years since, Denver has grown to a major metropolitan area. Over 2 million people live within the Site`s 50-mile radius. The Site is directly upstream of water supplies that serve over 300,000 people. As a result, accelerated cleanup, consolidation, reuse, and closure of the Site are the current essentials. The Site has had three management and operating (M and O) contractors since inception. In keeping with the shift in the Site`s paradigm from one of weapon-parts production program to cleanup and closure project, DOE changed its contracting philosophy for the Site from the M and O type of contract to a Performance-based Incentive Fee Integrating Management contract (PBIF IMC). Doe selected the Site`s fourth contractor as an IMC contractor in July 1995. Kaiser-Hill Company L.L.C. was awarded the contract and assumed IMC responsibility for the Site on July 1, 1995. Integral to this contract is the establishment and implementation of a performance measures system. Performance measures are the bases for incentives that motivate the IMC and the subcontractors working at Rocky Flats. This paper provides an overview of Performance Measures system practiced at Rocky Flats from July 1995 to December 1995. Also described are the developments in reengineering during the July 1995--March 1996 interval.

  16. Measuring Relativistic effects in the field of the Earth with Laser Ranged Satellites and the LARASE research program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchesi, David; Anselmo, Luciano; Bassan, Massimo; Magnafico, Carmelo; Pardini, Carmen; Peron, Roberto; Pucacco, Giuseppe; Stanga, Ruggero; Visco, Massimo

    2017-04-01

    The main goal of the LARASE (LAser RAnged Satellites Experiment) research program is to obtain refined tests of Einstein's theory of General Relativity (GR) by means of very precise measurements of the round-trip time among a number of ground stations of the International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS) network and a set of geodetic satellites. These measurements are guaranteed by means of the powerful and precise Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) technique. In particular, a big effort of LARASE is dedicated to improve the dynamical models of the LAGEOS, LAGEOS II and LARES satellites, with the objective to obtain a more precise and accurate determination of their orbit. These activities contribute to reach a final error budget that should be robust and reliable in the evaluation of the main systematic errors sources that come to play a major role in masking the relativistic precession on the orbit of these laser-ranged satellites. These error sources may be of gravitational and non-gravitational origin. It is important to stress that a more accurate and precise orbit determination, based on more reliable dynamical models, represents a fundamental prerequisite in order to reach a sub-mm precision in the root-mean-square of the SLR range residuals and, consequently, to gather benefits in the fields of geophysics and space geodesy, such as stations coordinates knowledge, geocenter determination and the realization of the Earth's reference frame. The results reached over the last year will be presented in terms of the improvements achieved in the dynamical model, in the orbit determination and, finally, in the measurement of the relativistic precessions that act on the orbit of the satellites considered.

  17. Measurement of $\\mathrm{ t \\bar{t} } $ production with additional jet activity, including b quark jets, in the dilepton decay channel using pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s} =$ 8 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Aşılar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Knünz, Valentin; König, Axel; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Matsushita, Takashi; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Lauwers, Jasper; Luyckx, Sten; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; De Bruyn, Isabelle; Deroover, Kevin; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Moreels, Lieselotte; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Van Parijs, Isis; Barria, Patrizia; Brun, Hugues; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lenzi, Thomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Maerschalk, Thierry; Marinov, Andrey; Perniè, Luca; Randle-conde, Aidan; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenoni, Florian; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Crucy, Shannon; Dobur, Didar; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Gul, Muhammad; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Poyraz, Deniz; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Tytgat, Michael; Van Driessche, Ward; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bondu, Olivier; Brochet, Sébastien; Bruno, Giacomo; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Mertens, Alexandre; Musich, Marco; Nuttens, Claude; Perrini, Lucia; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Beliy, Nikita; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Fábio Lúcio; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Hamer, Matthias; Hensel, Carsten; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Souza Santos, Angelo; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Moon, Chang-Seong; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Cheng, Tongguang; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Plestina, Roko; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Spiezia, Aniello; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Huaqiao; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Puljak, Ivica; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Micanovic, Sasa; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; El Sawy, Mai; El-khateeb, Esraa; Elkafrawy, Tamer; Mohamed, Amr; Salama, Elsayed; Calpas, Betty; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Veelken, Christian; Eerola, Paula; Pekkanen, Juska; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Machet, Martina; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Zghiche, Amina; Antropov, Iurii; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Cadamuro, Luca; Chapon, Emilien; Charlot, Claude; Dahms, Torsten; Davignon, Olivier; Filipovic, Nicolas; Florent, Alice; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Lisniak, Stanislav; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Miné, Philippe; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Pigard, Philipp; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Strebler, Thomas; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Buttignol, Michael; Chabert, Eric Christian; Chanon, Nicolas; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Coubez, Xavier; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goetzmann, Christophe; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Merlin, Jeremie Alexandre; Skovpen, Kirill; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouvier, Elvire; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Courbon, Benoit; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Lagarde, Francois; Laktineh, Imad Baptiste; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sabes, David; Sgandurra, Louis; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Toriashvili, Tengizi; Lomidze, David; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heister, Arno; Kiesel, Maximilian Knut; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Preuten, Marius; Raupach, Frank; Schael, Stefan; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Verlage, Tobias; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Endres, Matthias; Erdmann, Martin; Erdweg, Sören; Esch, Thomas; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Knutzen, Simon; Kreuzer, Peter; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Pook, Tobias; Radziej, Markus; Reithler, Hans; Rieger, Marcel; Scheuch, Florian; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Nehrkorn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Asin, Ivan; Bartosik, Nazar; Behnke, Olaf; Behrens, Ulf; Bell, Alan James; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Campbell, Alan; Choudhury, Somnath; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dolinska, Ganna; Dooling, Samantha; Dorland, Tyler; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Flucke, Gero; Gallo, Elisabetta; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gizhko, Andrii; Gunnellini, Paolo; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Karacheban, Olena; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Nayak, Aruna; Ntomari, Eleni; Perrey, Hanno; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Roland, Benoit; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Saxena, Pooja; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schröder, Matthias; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Trippkewitz, Karim Damun; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Erfle, Joachim; Garutti, Erika; Goebel, Kristin; Gonzalez, Daniel; Görner, Martin; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Junkes, Alexandra; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Marconi, Daniele; Meyer, Mareike; Nowatschin, Dominik; Ott, Jochen; Pantaleo, Felice; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Pietsch, Niklas; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Schwandt, Joern; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Tholen, Heiner; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Vormwald, Benedikt; Akbiyik, Melike; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; Colombo, Fabio; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Fink, Simon; Frensch, Felix; Friese, Raphael; Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Haitz, Dominik; Hartmann, Frank; Heindl, Stefan Michael; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Kornmayer, Andreas; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Maier, Benedikt; Mildner, Hannes; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Müller, Thomas; Plagge, Michael; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Röcker, Steffen; Roscher, Frank; Sieber, Georg; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weber, Marc; Weiler, Thomas; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Psallidas, Andreas; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Agapitos, Antonis; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Tziaferi, Eirini; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Loukas, Nikitas; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Strologas, John; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hazi, Andras; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Molnar, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Bartók, Márton; Makovec, Alajos; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Mal, Prolay; Mandal, Koushik; Sahoo, Deepak Kumar; Sahoo, Niladribihari; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chawla, Ridhi; Gupta, Ruchi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Anterpreet; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Mehta, Ankita; Mittal, Monika; Singh, Jasbir; Walia, Genius; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Garg, Rocky Bala; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Nishu, Nishu; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Sharma, Varun; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dey, Sourav; Dutta, Suchandra; Jain, Sandhya; Majumdar, Nayana; Modak, Atanu; Mondal, Kuntal; Mukherjee, Swagata; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Roy, Ashim; Roy, Debarati; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Chudasama, Ruchi; Dutta, Dipanwita; Jha, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguly, Sanmay; Ghosh, Saranya; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kole, Gouranga; Kumar, Sanjeev; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mitra, Soureek; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sarkar, Tanmay; Sur, Nairit; Sutar, Bajrang; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Chauhan, Shubhanshu; Dube, Sourabh; Sharma, Seema; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Behnamian, Hadi; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Goldouzian, Reza; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Caputo, Claudio; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Miniello, Giorgia; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Ranieri, Antonio; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Travaglini, Riccardo; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gonzi, Sandro; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Primavera, Federica; Calvelli, Valerio; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Monge, Maria Roberta; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Brianza, Luca; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Gerosa, Raffaele; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Marzocchi, Badder; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Esposito, Marco; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lanza, Giuseppe; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Thyssen, Filip; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bellato, Marco; Benato, Lisa; Bisello, Dario; Boletti, Alessio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Fanzago, Federica; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gonella, Franco; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Zanetti, Marco; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Braghieri, Alessandro; Magnani, Alice; Montagna, Paolo; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fedi, Giacomo; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; D'imperio, Giulia; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Gelli, Simone; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Preiato, Federico; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Traczyk, Piotr; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Kiani, Bilal; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Monteil, Ennio; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Ravera, Fabio; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Tamponi, Umberto; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; La Licata, Chiara; Marone, Matteo; Schizzi, Andrea; Zanetti, Anna; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Kong, Dae Jung; Lee, Sangeun; Oh, Young Do; Sakharov, Alexandre; Son, Dong-Chul; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, Tae Jeong; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Go, Yeonju; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Lee, Songkyo; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Ryu, Min Sang; Choi, Young-Il; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Donghyun; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Yusli, Mohd Nizam; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Byszuk, Adrian; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Leonardo, Nuno; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nguyen, Federico; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Bylinkin, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Bunichev, Viacheslav; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Korneeva, Natalia; Lokhtin, Igor; Miagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Perfilov, Maxim; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Santaolalla, Javier; Senghi Soares, Mara; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Castiñeiras De Saa, Juan Ramon; De Castro Manzano, Pablo; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Garcia-Ferrero, Juan; Gomez, Gervasio; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Trevisani, Nicolò; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benaglia, Andrea; Bendavid, Joshua; Benhabib, Lamia; Benitez, Jose F; Berruti, Gaia Maria; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Castello, Roberto; Cerminara, Gianluca; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daponte, Vincenzo; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Gruttola, Michele; De Guio, Federico; De Roeck, Albert; De Visscher, Simon; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dordevic, Milos; Dorney, Brian; Du Pree, Tristan; Dünser, Marc; Dupont, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Franzoni, Giovanni; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Guida, Roberto; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Hammer, Josef; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kirschenmann, Henning; Kortelainen, Matti J; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Magini, Nicolo; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Martelli, Arabella; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moortgat, Filip; Morovic, Srecko; Mulders, Martijn; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Neugebauer, Hannes; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuelle; Peruzzi, Marco; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Piparo, Danilo; Racz, Attila; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Ruan, Manqi; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Seidel, Markus; Sharma, Archana; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Steggemann, Jan; Stieger, Benjamin; Stoye, Markus; Takahashi, Yuta; Treille, Daniel; Triossi, Andrea; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Wardle, Nicholas; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Zagoździńska, Agnieszka; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Casal, Bruno; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Eller, Philipp; Grab, Christoph; Heidegger, Constantin; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Kasieczka, Gregor; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marionneau, Matthieu; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Masciovecchio, Mario; Meister, Daniel; Micheli, Francesco; Musella, Pasquale; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pata, Joosep; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrozzi, Luca; Quittnat, Milena; Rossini, Marco; Starodumov, Andrei; Takahashi, Maiko; Tavolaro, Vittorio Raoul; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Wallny, Rainer; Aarrestad, Thea Klaeboe; Amsler, Claude; Caminada, Lea; Canelli, Maria Florencia; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Cosa, Annapaola; Galloni, Camilla; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Lange, Clemens; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Pinna, Deborah; Robmann, Peter; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Salerno, Daniel; Yang, Yong; Cardaci, Marco; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Doan, Thi Hien; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Konyushikhin, Maxim; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Yu, Shin-Shan; Kumar, Arun; Bartek, Rachel; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Dietz, Charles; Fiori, Francesco; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Petrakou, Eleni; Tsai, Jui-fa; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Asavapibhop, Burin; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Cerci, Salim; Demiroglu, Zuhal Seyma; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Mehmet; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Isildak, Bora; Karapinar, Guler; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Yetkin, Elif Asli; Yetkin, Taylan; Cakir, Altan; Cankocak, Kerem; Sen, Sercan; Vardarlı, Fuat Ilkehan; Grynyov, Boris; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Aggleton, Robin; Ball, Fionn; Beck, Lana; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Meng, Zhaoxia; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Sakuma, Tai; Seif El Nasr-storey, Sarah; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Dominic; Smith, Vincent J; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Calligaris, Luigi; Cieri, Davide; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Womersley, William John; Worm, Steven; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Bundock, Aaron; Burton, Darren; Casasso, Stefano; Citron, Matthew; Colling, David; Corpe, Louie; Cripps, Nicholas; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; De Wit, Adinda; Della Negra, Michel; Dunne, Patrick; Elwood, Adam; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; Kenzie, Matthew; Lane, Rebecca; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Raymond, David Mark; Richards, Alexander; Rose, Andrew; Seez, Christopher; Tapper, Alexander; Uchida, Kirika; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Borzou, Ahmad; Call, Kenneth; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Pastika, Nathaniel; Charaf, Otman; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Arcaro, Daniel; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Gastler, Daniel; Lawson, Philip; Rankin, Dylan; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; St John, Jason; Sulak, Lawrence; Zou, David; Alimena, Juliette; Berry, Edmund; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Cutts, David; Dhingra, Nitish; Ferapontov, Alexey; Garabedian, Alex; Hakala, John; Heintz, Ulrich; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Mao, Zaixing; Narain, Meenakshi; Piperov, Stefan; Sagir, Sinan; Syarif, Rizki; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shalhout, Shalhout; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Stolp, Dustin; Tripathi, Mani; Wilbur, Scott; Yohay, Rachel; Cousins, Robert; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Saltzberg, David; Takasugi, Eric; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Ivova PANEVA, Mirena; Jandir, Pawandeep; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Malberti, Martina; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Wei, Hua; Wimpenny, Stephen; Yates, Brent; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Derdzinski, Mark; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Klein, Daniel; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Welke, Charles; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Flowers, Kristen; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Gran, Jason; Incandela, Joe; Mccoll, Nickolas; Mullin, Sam Daniel; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; Suarez, Indara; West, Christopher; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Anderson, Dustin; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Duarte, Javier; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Pierini, Maurizio; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Andrews, Michael Benjamin; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carlson, Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Sun, Menglei; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Jensen, Frank; Johnson, Andrew; Krohn, Michael; Mulholland, Troy; Nauenberg, Uriel; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chaves, Jorge; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Eggert, Nicholas; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Ryd, Anders; Skinnari, Louise; Soffi, Livia; Sun, Werner; Tan, Shao Min; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Tucker, Jordan; Weng, Yao; Wittich, Peter; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Apollinari, Giorgio; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hirschauer, James; Hu, Zhen; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Jung, Andreas Werner; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Kwan, Simon; Lammel, Stephan; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Tiehui; Lopes De Sá, Rafael; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena Ingrid; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Pedro, Kevin; Prokofyev, Oleg; Rakness, Gregory; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vernieri, Caterina; Verzocchi, Marco; Vidal, Richard; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Whitbeck, Andrew; Yang, Fan; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Carnes, Andrew; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Field, Richard D; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Hugon, Justin; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Low, Jia Fu; Ma, Peisen; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Rank, Douglas; Rossin, Roberto; Shchutska, Lesya; Snowball, Matthew; Sperka, David; Terentyev, Nikolay; Thomas, Laurent; Wang, Jian; Wang, Sean-Jiun; Yelton, John; Hewamanage, Samantha; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Ackert, Andrew; Adams, Jordon Rowe; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Diamond, Brendan; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Khatiwada, Ajeeta; Prosper, Harrison; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Bhopatkar, Vallary; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Noonan, Daniel; Roy, Titas; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Kurt, Pelin; O'Brien, Christine; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Silkworth, Christopher; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Wu, Zhenbin; Zakaria, Mohammed; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Durgut, Süleyman; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Snyder, Christina; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Anderson, Ian; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Eminizer, Nicholas; Fehling, David; Feng, Lei; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Martin, Christopher; Osherson, Marc; Roskes, Jeffrey; Sady, Alice; Sarica, Ulascan; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; Xin, Yongjie; You, Can; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Bruner, Christopher; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Majumder, Devdatta; Malek, Magdalena; Murray, Michael; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Wang, Quan; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Toda, Sachiko; Lange, David; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Anelli, Christopher; Baden, Drew; Baron, Owen; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Ferraioli, Charles; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Kunkle, Joshua; Lu, Ying; Mignerey, Alice; Shin, Young Ho; Skuja, Andris; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Apyan, Aram; Barbieri, Richard; Baty, Austin; Bierwagen, Katharina; Brandt, Stephanie; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; Demiragli, Zeynep; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Gulhan, Doga; Iiyama, Yutaro; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Klute, Markus; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Mcginn, Christopher; Mironov, Camelia; Narayanan, Siddharth; Niu, Xinmei; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Stephans, George; Sumorok, Konstanty; Varma, Mukund; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ta-Wei; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Zhukova, Victoria; Dahmes, Bryan; Evans, Andrew; Finkel, Alexey; Gude, Alexander; Hansen, Peter; Kalafut, Sean; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Lesko, Zachary; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rusack, Roger; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Fangmeier, Caleb; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kamalieddin, Rami; Keller, Jason; Knowlton, Dan; Kravchenko, Ilya; Meier, Frank; Monroy, Jose; Ratnikov, Fedor; Siado, Joaquin Emilo; Snow, Gregory R; Alyari, Maral; Dolen, James; George, Jimin; Godshalk, Andrew; Harrington, Charles; Iashvili, Ia; Kaisen, Josh; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Roozbahani, Bahareh; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Hortiangtham, Apichart; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Teixeira De Lima, Rafael; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Stoynev, Stoyan; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Dev, Nabarun; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Meng, Fanbo; Mueller, Charles; Musienko, Yuri; Pearson, Tessa; Planer, Michael; Reinsvold, Allison; Ruchti, Randy; Smith, Geoffrey; Taroni, Silvia; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Antonelli, Louis; Brinson, Jessica; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Ji, Weifeng; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Liu, Bingxuan; Luo, Wuming; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Winer, Brian L; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Koay, Sue Ann; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Palmer, Christopher; Piroué, Pierre; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Zuranski, Andrzej; Malik, Sudhir; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bortoletto, Daniela; Gutay, Laszlo; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Kurt; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shi, Xin; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Sun, Jian; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Xu, Lingshan; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Chen, Zhenyu; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Guilbaud, Maxime; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Northup, Michael; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Rorie, Jamal; Tu, Zhoudunming; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Petrillo, Gianluca; Tan, Ping; Verzetti, Mauro; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Lath, Amitabh; Nash, Kevin; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Foerster, Mark; Riley, Grant; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; York, Andrew; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Delgado, Andrea; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Mueller, Ryan; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Kunori, Shuichi; Lamichhane, Kamal; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Undleeb, Sonaina; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Janjam, Ravi; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Mao, Yaxian; Melo, Andrew; Ni, Hong; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Xu, Qiao; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Sun, Xin; Wang, Yanchu; Wolfe, Evan; Wood, John; Xia, Fan; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Gomber, Bhawna; Grothe, Monika; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Levine, Aaron; Long, Kenneth; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ruggles, Tyler; Sarangi, Tapas; Savin, Alexander; Sharma, Archana; Smith, Nicholas; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Woods, Nathaniel

    2016-07-07

    Jet multiplicity distributions in top quark pair ($ \\mathrm{ t \\bar{t} } $) events are measured in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb$^{-1}$. The measurement is performed in the dilepton decay channels ($ \\mathrm{ e^{+} e^{-} }$, $\\mu^{+} \\mu^{-} $, and $\\mathrm{ e^{\\pm} } \\mu^{\\mp} $). The absolute and normalized differential cross sections for $ \\mathrm{ t \\bar{t} } $ production are measured as a function of the jet multiplicity in the event for different jet transverse momentum thresholds and the kinematic properties of the leading additional jets. The differential $ \\mathrm{ t \\bar{t} b} $ and $ \\mathrm{ t \\bar{t} b \\bar{b} } $ cross sections are presented for the first time as a function of the kinematic properties of the leading additional b jets. Furthermore, the fraction of events without additional jets above a threshold is measured as a function of the transverse momenta of the leadi...

  18. Stable Carbon Isotope Ratios and Mixing Ratios of Several VOC Including n-Hexane, Benzene, Toluene, p-Xylene, n-Octane, and n-Decane Measured During the Border Air Quality Study Campaign (June-July, 2007)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornilova, A.; Moukhtar, S.; Huang, L.; Rudolph, J.

    2008-12-01

    Many important secondary pollutants are formed during the oxidation of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) in the atmosphere. These organic compounds can contribute significant mass to atmospheric particulate matter (PM) and therefore impact physical properties and composition of aerosols. Despite numerous studies, the formation processes for atmospheric PM are still not well understood. While there have been very extensive laboratory investigations of PM formation, nearly all of these studies have been conducted at VOC concentrations which exceed ambient atmospheric levels by several orders of magnitude. Consequently there is substantial uncertainty in the extrapolation of laboratory results to the atmosphere. Recently it has been demonstrated that stable carbon isotopic composition measurements can be very valuable in providing increased insight into the chemical and transport processes of VOC in the troposphere. Studies showed that isotope ratio measurements could aid in the determination of photochemical processing of individual VOC. It is expected that applying isotope measurements to studies of VOC oxidation products in the atmosphere will allow to establish quantitative relationship between the amount of precursor oxidized and the concentration of secondary pollutants formed during this process. Thus, the yield of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) from this reaction can be calculated. A cartridge technique was developed for field sampling of VOC and subsequent laboratory analysis by gas chromatography coupled with isotope ratio mass spectrometry. It was first implemented during the BAQS field study (June-July, 2007) parallel to PM sampling. Stable carbon isotopic composition and concentrations of several VOC were determined and compared to those of PM. The results of these measurements will be presented and discussed.

  19. The importance of dietary composition for efficacy of iron absorption measured in a whole diet that includes rye bread fortified with ferrous fumerate: A radioisotope study in young women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge; Larsen, T.M.; Kristensen, M.B.

    2005-01-01

    main meals. Fe absorption was determined from whole-body counter measurements of Fe-59 retention. The fractional non-haem Fe absorption (corrected to a 40 % standard absorption by measurements from the reference dose) was 1.9% v. 3.4% (P=0.04) for the low/high vitamin C diets, 3.0% v. 3.5% (P=0.......58) on the low/high meat diets and 4.9% v. 3.8% (P=0.24) on the low/high phytic acid diet, respectively. The total Fe absorbed (geometric mean with standard error) varied from 0.43 (se 0.11) mg from the diet with lowest bioavailability to 1.09 (se 0.18) mg from the diet with highest bioavailability (P ...Fe absorption is affected by many dietary factors. The objective of the present study was to measure the effects of high v. low content of vitamin C, meat and phytic acid in whole diets with Fe-fortified bread on the efficacy of Fe absorption. Thirty-two healthy women with low Fe stores were...

  20. Theory and operation of the Gould 32/27 programs ABLE-2A and EBLE for the tropospheric air motion measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, C.

    1986-01-01

    Software development for the Trospheric Air Motion Measurement Systems (TAMMS) is documented. In July/August the TAMMS was flown on the NASA/Goddard Flight Center Electra aircraft for 19 mission for the ABLE-2A (Amazon Boundary Layer Experiment) in Brazil. In December 1985, several flights were performed to assess the contamination and boundary layer of the Electra. Position data, flow angles, pressure transducer measurements were recorded. The programs written for the ABLE-2A were modified due to timing considerations for this particular program. The 3-step programs written for EBLE (Electra Boundary Layer Experiment) are described. Power up and log-on procedures are discussed. A few editing techniques are described for modification of the programs.

  1. Perfil de salud y escolar en menores con medidas de protección y de programas sociales (Health and school profile of minors receiving protection measures and social programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco González Sala

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This study determined the effect of health and school problems on minors receiving social aid, such as PER (Economic Aid Program and PEP (Economic Aid and Care Measures Program. A total of 174 minors and 123 minors receiving PEP and PEP, respectively, were analyzed. The results show that 25% of the minors have physical and/or mental health problems. Their schooling involves problems related to absenteeism, academic performance, social adaptation and a lack of school material. There are differences in the number of problems detected depending on what kind of aid measures they are receiving. Minors included in the PEP program tend to have more problems in the areas of physical health, mental health, school adaptation and educational needs. In addition, they are members of families in which there is an above average number of other minors who have lived or live in foster care outside the family. The results show that specialized community intervention programs should be implemented and that the existing health and educational resources should be more closely integrated. In addition, approaches should be found to encourage these families to become more involved in the existing family intervention programs.

  2. Use of the Central Sensitization Inventory (CSI) as a treatment outcome measure for patients with chronic spinal pain disorder in a functional restoration program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neblett, Randy; Hartzell, Meredith M; Williams, Mark; Bevers, Kelley R; Mayer, Tom G; Gatchel, Robert J

    2017-06-12

    The Central Sensitization Inventory (CSI) is a valid and reliable patient-reported instrument designed to identify patients whose presenting symptoms may be related to central sensitization (CS). Part A of the CSI measures a full array of 25 somatic and emotional symptoms associated with CS, and Part B asks if patients have previously been diagnosed with one or more specific central sensitivity syndromes (CSSs) and related disorders. The CSI has previously been validated in a group of patients with chronic pain who were screened by a trained psychiatrist for specific CSS diagnoses. It is currently unknown if the CSI can be a useful treatment-outcome assessment tool for patients with chronic spinal pain disorder (CSPD) who are not screened for comorbid CSSs. It is known, however, that previous studies have identified CS-related symptoms, and comorbid CSSs, in subsets of patients with CSPDs. Studies have also shown that CS-related symptoms can be influenced by cognitive and psychosocial factors, including abuse history in both childhood and adulthood, sleep disturbance, catastrophic and fear-avoidant cognitions, and symptoms of depression and anxiety. This study aimed to evaluate CSI scores, and their associations with other clinically relevant psychosocial variables, in a cohort of patients with CSPD who entered and completed a functional restoration program. A retrospective study of prospectively collected data from a cohort study of patients with CSPD, who completed the CSI at admission to, and discharge from, an interdisciplinary function restoration program (FRP) was carried out. A cohort of 763 patients with CSPD comprised the study sample. Clinical interviews evaluated mood disorders and abuse history. A series of self-reported measures evaluated comorbid psychosocial symptoms, including pain intensity, pain-related anxiety, depressive symptoms, somatization symptoms, perceived disability, and sleep disturbance, at FRP admission and discharge. Patients were

  3. Update of the ongoing comparison BIPM.RI(II)-K1.Se-75 to include recent activity measurements of the radionuclide {sup 75}Se by the LNE-LNHB (France)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michotte, C.; Courte, S.; Ratel, G. [Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM), Pavillon de Breteuil, F-92312 Sevres cedex (France); Moune, M.; Bobin, C. [Laboratoire national de metrologie et d' essais-Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel (LNE-LNHB), Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2011-06-15

    In 2006, to update their previous result of 1992, the LNE-LNHB submitted a new sample of {sup 75}Se with an activity of about 2.2 MBq to the International Reference System (SIR) for activity comparison at the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM). This comparison has the identifier BIPM.RI(II)-K1.Se-75. The degree of equivalence between the equivalent activity measured in the SIR for the new LNE-LNHB sample and the updated key comparison reference value (KCRV) has been calculated, as have the degrees of equivalence with each of the other participants. The results are given in the form of a matrix and a graphical presentation is also given. (authors)

  4. Digital Compared with Screen-Film Mammography: Measures of Diagnostic Accuracy among Women Screened in the Ontario Breast Screening Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prummel, Maegan V; Muradali, Derek; Shumak, Rene; Majpruz, Vicky; Brown, Patrick; Jiang, Hedy; Done, Susan J; Yaffe, Martin J; Chiarelli, Anna M

    2016-02-01

    To compare measures of diagnostic accuracy between large concurrent cohorts of women screened with digital computed radiography (CR), direct radiography (DR), and screen-film mammography (SFM). This study was approved by the University of Toronto Research Ethics Board; informed consent was not required. Three concurrent cohorts of women aged 50-74 years who were screened from 2008-2009 in the Ontario Breast Screening Program with SFM (487,334 screening examinations, 403,688 women), DR (254,758 screening examinations, 220,520 women), or CR (74,140 screening examinations, 64,210 women) were followed for 2 years or until breast cancer diagnosis. Breast cancers were classified as screening-detected or interval on the basis of the woman's final screening and assessment results. Interval cancer rate (per 10 000 negative screening examinations), sensitivity, and specificity were compared across the cohorts by using mixed-effects logistic regression analysis. Interval cancer rates were higher, although not significantly so, for CR (15.2 per 10,000; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 12.8, 17.8) and were similar for DR (13.7 per 10,000; 95% CI: 12.4, 15.0) compared with SFM (13.0 per 10,000; 95% CI: 12.1, 13.9). For CR versus SFM, specificity was similar while sensitivity was significantly lower (odds ratio [OR] = 0.62; 95% CI: 0.47, 0.83; P = .001), particularly for invasive cancers detected at a rescreening examination, for women with breast density of less than 75%, for women with no family history, and for postmenopausal women. For DR versus SFM, sensitivity was similar while specificity was lower (OR = 0.92; 95% CI: 0.87, 0.98; P = .01), particularly for rescreening examinations, for women aged 60-74 years, for women with breast density of less than 75%, for women with a family history, and for women who were postmenopausal. Given the 38% lower sensitivity of CR imaging systems compared with SFM, programs should assess the continued use of this technology for breast

  5. [Impact of a training program in full consciousness (mindfulness) in the measure of growth and personal self-realization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco Justo, Clemente; de la Fuente Arias, Manuel; Salvador Granados, Margarita

    2011-02-01

    This research focused on the impact of a full awareness (mindfulness) program on the sense of growth and personal self-realization in a sample of secondary school students. A randomized controlled design with an experimental group and waiting-list group was implemented. The Self-concept and Self-actualization Questionnaire (AURE) was used as dependent variable and was administrated before and after running the mindfulness program. The results show a statistically significant difference between pre-test and post-test scores on all factors and subfactors of the AURE. It is concluded that a program of meditation, focused on mindfulness training, may be a valid and appropriate instrument to improve a personal sense of self-realization and growth. It is also suggested that the use of such a program could be complementary with the Instructional-Emotive Program for Personal Growth and Self-realization (PIECAP) psycho-educational program.

  6. Including Students with Visual Impairments: Softball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian, Ali; Haegele, Justin A.

    2014-01-01

    Research has shown that while students with visual impairments are likely to be included in general physical education programs, they may not be as active as their typically developing peers. This article provides ideas for equipment modifications and game-like progressions for one popular physical education unit, softball. The purpose of these…

  7. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System Policy Changes and Fiscal Year 2016 Rates; Revisions of Quality Reporting Requirements for Specific Providers, Including Changes Related to the Electronic Health Record Incentive Program; Extensions of the Medicare-Dependent, Small Rural Hospital Program and the Low-Volume Payment Adjustment for Hospitals. Final rule; interim final rule with comment period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-17

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems for FY 2016. Some of these changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act), the Pathway for Sustainable Growth Reform(SGR) Act of 2013, the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014, the Improving Medicare Post-Acute Care Transformation Act of 2014, the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015, and other legislation. We also are addressing the update of the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits for FY 2016.As an interim final rule with comment period, we are implementing the statutory extensions of the Medicare dependent,small rural hospital (MDH)Program and changes to the payment adjustment for low-volume hospitals under the IPPS.We also are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) for FY 2016 and implementing certain statutory changes to the LTCH PPS under the Affordable Care Act and the Pathway for Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) Reform Act of 2013 and the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014.In addition, we are establishing new requirements or revising existing requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals,PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, and LTCHs) that are participating in Medicare, including related provisions for eligible hospitals and critical access hospitals participating in the Medicare Electronic Health Record (EHR)Incentive Program. We also are updating policies relating to the

  8. An Admission-to-Discharge BNP Increase Is a Predictor of Six-Month All-Cause Death in ADHF Patients: Inferences from Multivariate Analysis Including Admission BNP and Various Clinical Measures of Congestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vecchis, Renato; Ariano, Carmelina; Baldi, Cesare

    2016-11-10

    According to some authors, a single isolated measurement of serum B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) executed on hospital admission would not be a sufficiently accurate method to predict the outcome of patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). To verify this assumption, a retrospective study was conducted on patients hospitalized for ADHF. Our main objective was to ascertain whether there was any difference in midterm mortality among patients with increasing BNP at discharge as compared with those with decreasing BNP at discharge. Medical records were examined so as to make a partition of the ADHF patient population into two groups, the former characterized by a rise in BNP during hospitalization, and the latter exhibiting a decrease in BNP in the measurement taken at hospital discharge. 177 patients were enrolled in a retrospective study. Among them, 53 patients (30%) had increased BNP at the time of discharge, whereas 124 (70%) showed decreases in serum BNP during their hospital stay. The group with patients who exhibited BNP increases at the time of discharge had a higher degree of congestion evident in the higher frequency of persistent jugular venous distention and persistent orthopnea at discharge. Moreover, patients with increased BNP at the time of discharge had a lower reduction in inferior vena cava maximum diameter (1.58 ± 2.2 mm vs. 6.32 ± 1.82 mm; p (one-way ANOVA) = 0.001). In contrast, there was no significant difference in weight loss when patients with increased BNP at discharge were compared with those with no such increase. A total of 14 patients (7.9%) died during the six-month follow-up period. Multivariable Cox proportional-hazards regression analysis revealed that a BNP increase at the time of discharge was an independent predictor of six-month all-cause mortality after adjustment for persistent jugular venous distention, persistent orthopnea, reduction in inferior vena cava maximum diameter at discharge, weight loss, serum urea

  9. An Admission-to-Discharge BNP Increase Is a Predictor of Six-Month All-Cause Death in ADHF Patients: Inferences from Multivariate Analysis Including Admission BNP and Various Clinical Measures of Congestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato De Vecchis

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: According to some authors, a single isolated measurement of serum B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP executed on hospital admission would not be a sufficiently accurate method to predict the outcome of patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF. Aims: To verify this assumption, a retrospective study was conducted on patients hospitalized for ADHF. Our main objective was to ascertain whether there was any difference in midterm mortality among patients with increasing BNP at discharge as compared with those with decreasing BNP at discharge. Methods: Medical records were examined so as to make a partition of the ADHF patient population into two groups, the former characterized by a rise in BNP during hospitalization, and the latter exhibiting a decrease in BNP in the measurement taken at hospital discharge. Results: 177 patients were enrolled in a retrospective study. Among them, 53 patients (30% had increased BNP at the time of discharge, whereas 124 (70% showed decreases in serum BNP during their hospital stay. The group with patients who exhibited BNP increases at the time of discharge had a higher degree of congestion evident in the higher frequency of persistent jugular venous distention and persistent orthopnea at discharge. Moreover, patients with increased BNP at the time of discharge had a lower reduction in inferior vena cava maximum diameter (1.58 ± 2.2 mm vs. 6.32 ± 1.82 mm; p (one-way ANOVA = 0.001. In contrast, there was no significant difference in weight loss when patients with increased BNP at discharge were compared with those with no such increase. A total of 14 patients (7.9% died during the six-month follow-up period. Multivariable Cox proportional-hazards regression analysis revealed that a BNP increase at the time of discharge was an independent predictor of six-month all-cause mortality after adjustment for persistent jugular venous distention, persistent orthopnea, reduction in inferior vena cava

  10. RCS program evaluation plan options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stovall, T.K.; Bayne, C.K.

    1980-10-01

    The Residential Conservation Service (RCS) Program evaluation plan is designed to provide an ongoing evaluation during the RCS Program's active period as well as a measurement of the RCS Program's cumulative effect after the program's termination. The study options described include utility case studies, random survey sampling, directed survey sampling, and remote data collection. Survey techniques are described and appropriate questions are suggested. Several sample selection criteria are included as background for a DOE policy decision on this issue. Present and anticipated data sources are listed and discussed. Statistical data analysis plans include a preliminary determination of required sample sizes.

  11. Measured electric hot water standby and demand loads from Pacific Northwest homes. End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, R.G.; Ross, B.A.

    1991-11-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration began the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP) in 1983 to obtain metered hourly end-use consumption data for a large sample of new and existing residential and commercial buildings in the Pacific Northwest. Loads and load shapes from the first 3 years of data fro each of several ELCAP residential studies representing various segments of the housing population have been summarized by Pratt et al. The analysis reported here uses the ELCAP data to investigate in much greater detail the relationship of key occupant and tank characteristics to the consumption of electricity for water heating. The hourly data collected provides opportunities to understand electricity consumption for heating water and to examine assumptions about water heating that are critical to load forecasting and conservation resource assessments. Specific objectives of this analysis are to: (A) determine the current baseline for standby heat losses by determining the standby heat loss of each hot water tank in the sample, (B) examine key assumptions affecting standby heat losses such as hot water temperatures and tank sizes and locations, (C) estimate, where possible, impacts on standby heat losses by conservation measures such as insulating tank wraps, pipe wraps, anticonvection valves or traps, and insulating bottom boards, (D) estimate the EF-factors used by the federal efficiency standards and the nominal R-values of the tanks in the sample, (E) develop estimates of demand for hot water for each home in the sample by subtracting the standby load from the total hot water load, (F) examine the relationship between the ages and number of occupants and the hot water demand, (G) place the standby and demand components of water heating electricity consumption in perspective with the total hot water load and load shape.

  12. Characterization of graphite-supported palladium-cobalt catalysts by temperature-programmed reduction and magnetic measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noronha, F.B.; Schmal, M. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Nicot, C. [Institut de Recherches sur la Catalyse, Villeurbanne (France)] [and others

    1997-05-01

    Graphite-supported cobalt, palladium, and cobalt-palladium systems were prepared by a simple impregnation technique and submitted to hydrogen reduction in a temperature-programmed mode. Using X-ray diffraction to define the structure of the calcined precursors, magnetic measurements to determine the amount of metallic cobalt formed after reduction, and analysis of the gaseous medium during the reduction, a general model for the reduction of the graphite supported catalysts has been suggested. At room temperature, both pure PdO and PdO associated with Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} are reduced to the metallic state. In the case of bimetallic systems, a fraction of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} in close proximity or interfaced with PdO can be reduced to the metallic state and to COO species, demonstrating a strong catalytic effect of palladium on the reduction of cobalt oxides. At temperatures between 298 and 500 K, depending on the catalyst formulation, the presence of metallic palladium promotes the reduction of a large fraction of oxidized cobalt. At higher reduction temperature, at least two competitive phenomena were detected: direct reduction of the residual oxidized cobalt by the graphite, leading to carbon monoxide and dioxide formation, and hydrogasification of the graphite catalyzed by the supported metals, leading mainly to methane formation. Together with a possible short-range palladium-activated hydrogen migration, at low and moderate temperatures, long-range migration of particles is necessary to explain the observations. These migrations, in turn, favor the formation of bimetallic particles, after reduction at 773 K. 53 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Validation and use of a QuEChERS-based gas chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric method for multiresidue pesticide analysis in blackcurrants including studies of matrix effects and estimation of measurement uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walorczyk, Stanisław

    2014-03-01

    A triple quadrupole GC-QqQ-MS/MS method was optimized for multiresidue analysis of over 180 pesticides in blackcurrants. The samples were prepared by using a modified quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe (QuEChERS) analytical protocol. To reduce matrix co-extractives in the final extract, the supernatant was cleaned up by dispersive-solid phase extraction (dispersive-SPE) with a mixture of sorbents: primary secondary amine (PSA), octadecyl (C18) and graphitized carbon black (GCB). The validation results demonstrated fitness for purpose of the streamlined method. The overall recoveries at the three spiking levels of 0.01, 0.05 and 0.2 mg kg(-1) spanned between 70% and 116% (102% on average) with relative standard deviation (RSD) values between 3% and 19% except for chlorothalonil (23%). Response linearity was studied in the range between 0.005 and 0.5 mg kg(-1). The matrix effect for each individual compound was evaluated through the study of ratios of the slopes obtained in solvent and blackcurrant matrix. The optimized method provided small matrix effect (matrix effect was 10-20%, 20-30% and >30%, respectively. Following the application of "top-down" approach, the expanded measurement uncertainty was estimated as being 21% on average (coverage factor k=2, confidence level 95%). If compared with samples of other crops, the analyses of blackcurrants revealed a high percentage of exceedance of the legislative maximum residue levels (MRLs), as well as some instances of the detection of pesticides unapproved on this crop. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. An Investigation of Teaching and Learning Programs in Pharmacy Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strang, Aimee F; Baia, Patricia

    2016-05-25

    Objective. To investigate published, peer-reviewed literature on pharmacy teaching and learning development programs and to synthesize existing data, examine reported efficacy and identify future areas for research. Methods. Medline and ERIC databases were searched for studies on teaching development programs published between 2001 and 2015. Results. Nineteen publications were included, representing 21 programs. Twenty programs were resident teaching programs, one program described faculty development. The majority of programs spanned one year and delivered instruction on teaching methodologies and assessment measures. All except one program included experiential components. Thirteen publications presented outcomes data; most measured satisfaction and self-perceived improvement. Conclusion. Published literature on teacher development in pharmacy is focused more on training residents than on developing faculty members. Although programs are considered important and highly valued by program directors and participants, little data substantiates that these programs improve teaching. Future research could focus on measurement of program outcomes and documentation of teaching development for existing faculty members.

  15. An Investigation of Teaching and Learning Programs in Pharmacy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baia, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate published, peer-reviewed literature on pharmacy teaching and learning development programs and to synthesize existing data, examine reported efficacy and identify future areas for research. Methods. Medline and ERIC databases were searched for studies on teaching development programs published between 2001 and 2015. Results. Nineteen publications were included, representing 21 programs. Twenty programs were resident teaching programs, one program described faculty development. The majority of programs spanned one year and delivered instruction on teaching methodologies and assessment measures. All except one program included experiential components. Thirteen publications presented outcomes data; most measured satisfaction and self-perceived improvement. Conclusion. Published literature on teacher development in pharmacy is focused more on training residents than on developing faculty members. Although programs are considered important and highly valued by program directors and participants, little data substantiates that these programs improve teaching. Future research could focus on measurement of program outcomes and documentation of teaching development for existing faculty members. PMID:27293226

  16. Cost-Effectiveness Model for Youth EFNEP Programs: What Do We Measure and How Do We Do It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Elena; McFerren, Mary; Lambur, Michael; Ellerbock, Michael; Hosig, Kathy; Franz, Nancy; Townsend, Marilyn; Baker, Susan; Muennig, Peter; Davis, George

    2011-01-01

    The Youth Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) is one of the United States Department of Agriculture's hallmark nutrition education programs for limited-resource youth. The objective of this study was to gather opinions from experts in EFNEP and related content areas to identify costs, effects (impacts), and related instruments to…

  17. LC21-Hopes and Cautions for the Library of Congress; The NSF National Science, Mathematics, Engineering, and Technology Education Digital Library (NSDL) Program: A Progress Report; A Grammar of Dublin Core; Measuring the Impact of an Electronic Journal Collection on Library Costs: A Framework and Preliminary Observations; Emulation As a Digital Preservation Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, James J.; Zia, Lee L.; Baker, Thomas; Montgomery, Carol Hansen; Granger, Stewart

    2000-01-01

    Includes five articles: (1) discusses Library of Congress efforts to include digital materials; (2) describes the National Science Foundation (NSF) digital library program to improve science, math, engineering, and technology education; (3) explains Dublin Core grammar; (4) measures the impact of electronic journals on library costs; and (5)…

  18. Airline return-on-investment model for technology evaluation. [computer program to measure economic value of advanced technology applied to passenger aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    This report presents the derivation, description, and operating instructions for a computer program (TEKVAL) which measures the economic value of advanced technology features applied to long range commercial passenger aircraft. The program consists of three modules; and airplane sizing routine, a direct operating cost routine, and an airline return-on-investment routine. These modules are linked such that they may be operated sequentially or individually, with one routine generating the input for the next or with the option of externally specifying the input for either of the economic routines. A very simple airplane sizing technique was previously developed, based on the Brequet range equation. For this program, that sizing technique has been greatly expanded and combined with the formerly separate DOC and ROI programs to produce TEKVAL.

  19. Improving the power of an efficacy study of a social and emotional learning program: application of generalizability theory to the measurement of classroom-level outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashburn, Andrew J; Downer, Jason T; Rivers, Susan E; Brackett, Marc A; Martinez, Andres

    2014-04-01

    Social and emotional learning programs are designed to improve the quality of social interactions in schools and classrooms in order to positively affect students' social, emotional, and academic development. The statistical power of group randomized trials to detect effects of social and emotional learning programs and other preventive interventions on setting-level outcomes is influenced by the reliability of the outcome measure. In this paper, we apply generalizability theory to an observational measure of the quality of classroom interactions that is an outcome in a study of the efficacy of a social and emotional learning program called The Recognizing, Understanding, Labeling, Expressing, and Regulating emotions Approach. We estimate multiple sources of error variance in the setting-level outcome and identify observation procedures to use in the efficacy study that most efficiently reduce these sources of error. We then discuss the implications of using different observation procedures on both the statistical power and the monetary costs of conducting the efficacy study.

  20. Research methods to develop Measures of Effectiveness of the United States Coast Guard`s Vessel Inspection and Boarding Program. Volume 2, Main report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, T.; Cox, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gawande, K. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Economics; Stone, R.; Waisel, L.; Wallace, W.A. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, New York (United States). Dept. of Decision Sciences and Engineering Systems

    1995-04-01

    The primary objective of this study is to provide Measures of Effectiveness (MOEs) of the US Coast Guard Marine Inspection and Boarding Program based on objective scientific methods. A secondary objective of the study is to provide USCG management with a methodologically and theoretically sound aid to effective policy decision-making. The MOEs constructed in this study are specific to the Marine Inspection and Boarding Program, but the methodology of the study is based on sound theoretical principles that are probably applicable to a range of USCG activities. Hence the methodology applied equally to other important USCG programs and can be similarly used to measure their effectiveness and as an aid to decision-making.

  1. Center Innovation Fund: JSC CIF (also includes JSC IRAD) Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — JSC provides and applies its preeminent capabilities in science and technology to develop, operate, and integrate human exploration missions.  The Center...

  2. Program for reduction body mass and cellulite including aesthetic physiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolovska, Lence

    2012-01-01

    The study monitored the effect of separate eating, ultrasonic cavitation, presoterapy, radio frequency and vibrating platform (GREEN PLATE) weight reduction, cellulite removal and improved psycho-emotional status. Perform 3 weekly treatments. In the course of three months were examined 45 overweight women and cellulite.

  3. Essays on measurement and evaluation of demand side management programs in the electricity industry, and impacts of firm strategy on stock price in the biotechnology industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandres Motola, Miguel A.

    Essay one estimates changes in small business customer energy consumption (kWh) patterns resulting from a seasonally differentiated pricing structure. Econometric analysis leverages cross-sectional time series data across the entire population of affected customers, from 2007 through the present. Observations include: monthly energy usage (kWh), relevant customer segmentations, local daily temperature, energy price, and region-specific economic conditions, among other variables. The study identifies the determinants of responsiveness to seasonal price differentiation. In addition, estimated energy consumption changes occurring during the 2010 summer season are reported for the average customer and in aggregate grouped by relevant customer segments, climate zone, and total customer base. Essay two develops an econometric modeling methodology to evaluate load impacts for short duration demand response events. The study analyzes time series data from a season of direct load control program tests aimed at integrating demand response into the wholesale electricity market. I have combined "fuzzy logic" with binary variables to create "fuzzy indicator variables" that allow for measurement of short duration events while using industry standard model specifications. Typically, binary variables for every hour are applied in load impact analysis of programs dispatched in hourly intervals. As programs evolve towards integration with the wholesale market, event durations become irregular and often occur for periods of only a few minutes. This methodology is innovative in that it conserves the degrees of freedom in the model while allowing for analysis of high frequency data using fixed effects. Essay three examines the effects of strategies, intangibles, and FDA news on the stocks of young biopharmaceutical firms. An event study methodology is used to explore those effects. This study investigates 20,839 announcements from 1990 to 2005. Announcements on drug development

  4. Doctoral Training in Statistics, Measurement, and Methodology in Psychology: Replication and Extension of Aiken, West, Sechrest, and Reno's (1990) Survey of PhD Programs in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Leona S.; West, Stephen G.; Millsap, Roger E.

    2008-01-01

    In a survey of all PhD programs in psychology in the United States and Canada, the authors documented the quantitative methodology curriculum (statistics, measurement, and research design) to examine the extent to which innovations in quantitative methodology have diffused into the training of PhDs in psychology. In all, 201 psychology PhD…

  5. A software program to measure the three-dimensional length of the spine from radiographic images: Validation and reliability assessment for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Steve; Hasler, Carol-Claudius; Grant, Caroline A; Zheng, Guoyan; Schumann, Steffen; Büchler, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to validate a new program which aims at measuring the three-dimensional length of the spine's midline based on two calibrated orthogonal radiographic images. The traditional uniplanar T1-S1 measurement method is not reflecting the actual three dimensional curvature of a scoliotic spine and is therefore not accurate. The Spinal Measurement Software (SMS) is an alternative to conveniently measure the true spine's length. The validity, inter- and intra-observer variability and usability of the program were evaluated. The usability was quantified based on a subjective questionnaire filled by eight participants using the program for the first time. The validity and variability were assessed by comparing the length of five phantom spines measured based on CT-scan data and on radiographic images with the SMS. The lengths were measured independently by each participant using both techniques. The SMS is easy and intuitive to use, even for non-clinicians. The SMS measured spinal length with an error below 2 millimeters compared to length obtained using CT scan datasets. The inter- and intra-observer variability of the SMS measurements was below 5 millimeters. The SMS provides accurate measurement of the spinal length based on orthogonal radiographic images. The software is easy to use and could easily integrate the clinical workflow and replace current approximations of the spinal length based on a single radiographic image such as the traditional T1-S1 measurement. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Source Reduction Behavior as an Independent Measurement of the Impact of a Public Health Education Campaign in an Integrated Vector Management Program for the Asian Tiger Mosquito

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Strickman

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a public health educational campaign to reduce backyard mosquito-larval habitats. Three communities each, within two New Jersey counties, were randomly selected to receive: (1 both education and mosquito control, (2 education only, and (3 no education or mosquito control. Four separate educational events included a 5-day elementary school curriculum in the spring, and three door to door distributions of educational brochures. Before and after each educational event, the numbers of mosquito-larval container habitats were counted in 50 randomly selected homes per study area. Container surveys allowed us to measure source reduction behavior. Although we saw reductions in container habitats in sites receiving education, they were not significantly different from the control. Our results suggest that traditional passive means of public education, which were often considered the gold standard for mosquito control programs, are not sufficient to motivate residents to reduce backyard mosquito-larval habitats.

  7. Workshop on measurement quality assurance for ionizing radiation: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heath, J.A.; Swinth, K.L. [comps.

    1993-12-31

    This workshop was held to review the status of secondary level calibration accreditation programs, review related measurement accreditation programs, document lessons learned, and to present changes in programs due to new national priorities involving radioactivity measurements. Contents include: fundamentals of measurement quality assurance (MQA), standards for MQA programs; perspectives and policies; complete MQA programs; future MQA programs; QA/QC programs--radioactivity; QA/QC programs--dosimetry; laboratory procedures for QA/QC; in-house control of reference dosimetry laboratories; in-house controls of radioactivity laboratories; and poster session. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  8. Report: EPA Needs Accurate Data on Results of Pollution Prevention Grants to Maintain Program Integrity and Measure Effectiveness of Grants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #15-P-0276, September 4, 2015. Inaccurate reporting of results misrepresents the impacts of pollution prevention activities provided to the public, and misinforms EPA management on the effectiveness of its investment in the program.

  9. Measuring the Effectiveness of the Communications Electronics Life Cycle Management Command (CE-LCMC) Internship Pilot Training Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dickson, Thomas; Oberdick, Jan; Hodge, Jacqueline

    2006-01-01

    .... In 2003, the Communications Electronics Life Cycle Management Command (CE-LCMC) established a pilot training program that was intended to accelerate the training and development of contracting interns...

  10. Qualitative and quantitative composition of microplastics particles during the expeditionary measurement program in the South-Eastern Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esiukova, Elena; Bagaeva, Margarita; Chubarenko, Natalia

    2016-04-01

    According to the tasks of the Russian Science Foundation project "Physical and dynamical properties of marine microplastics particles and their transport in a basin with vertical and horizontal salinity gradient on the example of the Baltic Sea" number 15-17-10020, a comprehensive expeditionary program of measurements in the South-Eastern Baltic started. The project is aimed at finding solutions for a number of problems caused by superfluous plastic pollution in the World Ocean and, in particular, in the Baltic Sea. This pollution has been accumulating for years and just recently it has become obvious that only multidisciplinary approach (geographical, biological, chemical, etc.) to the issues related to the processes of transformation of properties and propagation of plastic particles will allow the study of physical aspects of the problem. During the first stage of the study samples should be selected from the water surface, water column at various horizons, bottom sediments in the Baltic Sea, from different areas at the beaches - in order to further examine the qualitative and quantitative composition of microplastic particles in different seasons for different hydrophysical situations. Reconnaissance survey was begun to choose the fields for research close to point and distributed sources of microplastics. Preference is given to those beaches that are exposed to maximum anthropogenic pollution: areas around the town of Baltiysk, the northern part of the Vistula Spit (near the settlement of Kosa), and the Sambia peninsula coast (settlements of Yantarny, Donskoye, Primorye, Kulikovo, towns of Svetlogorsk, Pionersky, Zelenogradsk). Locations for experimental sites were found in order to assess time for formation of microplastics (Vistula Spit, Kosa settlement). In June-November, 2015 there were 5 expeditions in the waters of the South-Eastern Baltic, 7 expeditions along the coast line of the Baltic Sea (in Kaliningrad Oblast), and 5 expeditions to the Vistula

  11. Evaluation of Carrying Capacity : Measure 7.1A of the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program : Report 1 of 4, Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neitzel, Duane A.; Johnson, Gary E.

    1996-05-01

    This report is one of four that the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff prepared to address Measure 7.1A in the Northwest Power Planning Council's (Council) Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) dated december 1994 (NPPC 1994). Measure 7.1A calls for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to fund an evaluation of salmon survival, ecology, carrying capacity, and limiting factors in freshwater, estuarine, and marine habitats. Additionally, the Measure asks for development of a study plan based on critical uncertainties and research needs identified during the evaluation. This report deals with the evaluation of carrying capacity. It describes the analysis of different views of capacity as it relates to salmon survival and abundance. The report ends with conclusions and recommendations for studying carrying capacity.

  12. Academic Productivity of US Neurosurgery Residents as Measured by H-Index: Program Ranking with Correlation to Faculty Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkiss, Christopher A; Riley, Kyle J; Hernandez, Christopher M; Oermann, Eric K; Ladner, Travis R; Bederson, Joshua B; Shrivastava, Raj K

    2017-06-01

    Engagement in research and academic productivity are crucial components in the training of a neurosurgeon. This process typically begins in residency training. In this study, we analyzed individual resident productivity as it correlated to publications across all Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited neurosurgery training programs in an attempt to identify how programs have developed and fostered a research culture and environment. We obtained a list of current neurosurgery residents in ACGME-accredited programs from the American Association of Neurological Surgeons database. An expanded PubMed and Scopus search was conducted for each resident through the present time. We tabulated all articles attributed to each resident. We then categorized the publications based on each neurosurgical subspecialty while in residency. A spreadsheet-based statistical analysis was performed. This formulated the average number of resident articles, h-indices, and most common subspecialty categories by training program. We analyzed 1352 current neurosurgery residents in 105 programs. There were a total of 10 645 publications, of which 3985 were resident first-author publications during the period of study. The most common subspecialties among all resident publications were vascular (24.9%), spine (16.9%), oncology (16.1%), pediatric (5.6%), functional (4.9%), and trauma (3.8%). The average resident published 2.9 first-author papers with average of 38.0 first-author publications by total residents at each program (range 0-241). The average h-index per resident is 2.47 ± 3.25. When comparing previously published faculty h-index program rankings against our resident h-index rankings, there is a strong correlation between the 2 datasets with a clear delineation between Top-20 productivity and that of other programs (average h-index 4.2 vs 1.7, respectively, P productivity on both the resident and faculty level (average h-index 1.6, 1.9, 3.9 for 1, 2, and

  13. Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters Final Report to the Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day-Lewis, Frederick; Singha, Kamini; Haggerty, Roy; Johnson, Timothy; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John

    2014-03-10

    . In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Our study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3-part research plan involving (1) development of computer codes and techniques to estimate mass-transfer parameters from time-lapse electrical data; (2) bench-scale experiments on synthetic materials and materials from cores from the Hanford 300 Area; and (3) field demonstration experiments at the DOE’s Hanford 300 Area.

  14. Voluntary Education of Enlisted Service Members: An Analysis of Program Effects on Retention and Other Outcome Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    study tested the theory of whether providing general education outside of the workplace increases employee retention . Firm-specific human capital...Flaherty’s results indicate that participation in the tuition-reimbursement program increases employee retention of those who were hired after

  15. Measuring the Effectiveness of Transfer of Learning Constructs and Intent to Transfer in a Simulation-Based Leadership Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hix, Joanne W.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of business training programs is to improve performance, which improved performance changes leadership behaviors based on the knowledge, skills, and abilities (KSAs) learned in training. One of the most common criticisms of leadership training is the tendency to focus on teaching theory but not on applying theory into practice, that…

  16. Comparison of two educational environments in early clinical exposure program based on Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SEDIGHEH EBRAHIMI

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The undergraduate curriculum of Shiraz medical school underwent a major reform during the recent years. It comprised of integrated education, supplemented with an early clinical experience program. This study was carried out to find out how early experience in clinical experience affects medical students’ perception and identify strengths and limitations of the available methods and the environment of its delivery. Methods: During the academic year 2011-2012, this descriptive study was undertaken and the subjects were first year students studying medicine at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences using a DREEM questionnaire. Results: The DREEM questionnaire showed evidence of desirable educational climate during the program. Overall, 98 percent of the students were satisfied with the course and believed that the program helped them to become more familiar with the clinical environment and reduce their fear. Conclusion: The students’ satisfaction and their positive attitudes toward early clinical exposure suggested that this program improve the quality of basic science courses and implementation of personal and professional identity and also reduce students’ stress of hospital practice.

  17. Using Evidence for Teacher Education Program Improvement and Accountability: An Illustrative Case of the Role of Value-Added Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plecki, Margaret L.; Elfers, Ana M.; Nakamura, Yugo

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors consider what can be learned from limited forms of evidence, for purposes of accountability and improvement of teacher education programs. They begin with a review of recent research on how evidence has been used to examine the effectiveness of teacher preparation and development. Using empirical evidence from a state…

  18. Towards the Use of a Novel Method: The First Experiences on Measuring the Cognitive Load of Learned Programming Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Murat Pasa

    2013-01-01

    Teaching object-oriented programming (OOP) is a difficult task, especially to the beginners. First-time learners also find it difficult to understand. Although there is a considerable amount of study on the cognitive dimension, a few study points out its physiological meaning. Moreover, it has been suggested that neuroscientific studies and…

  19. Will the Measurement Robots Take Our Jobs? An Update on the State of Automated M&V for Energy Efficiency