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Sample records for program included evaluating

  1. Evaluation design of a reactivation care program to prevent functional loss in hospitalised elderly: A cohort study including a randomised controlled trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Asmus-Szepesi, Kirsten; Vreede, Paul; Nieboer, Anna; Wijngaarden, Jeroen; Bakker, Ton; Steyerberg, Ewout; Mackenbach, Johan

    2011-01-01

    ... patients by comparing a new intervention program to two usual care programs. Methods/Design. This study will include an effect, process and cost evaluation using a mixed methods design of quantitative and qualitative methods...

  2. Evaluation of 8-week body weight control program including sea tangle (Laminaria japonica) supplementation in Korean female college students

    OpenAIRE

    You, Jeong Soon; Sung, Min Jung; Chang, Kyung Ja

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of a body weight control program with supplementation of sea tangle (20 g/day) on 22 female college students. The contents of the program for 8 weeks contained diet therapy, exercise and behavioral modification through nutrition education. Body composition, dietary habit scores, serum lipid profiles, daily nutrient intakes and the quality of life were assessed at the beginning and at the end of the program. Average age of subjects and height we...

  3. Evaluation of 8-week body weight control program including sea tangle (Laminaria japonica) supplementation in Korean female college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Jeong Soon; Sung, Min Jung; Chang, Kyung Ja

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of a body weight control program with supplementation of sea tangle (20 g/day) on 22 female college students. The contents of the program for 8 weeks contained diet therapy, exercise and behavioral modification through nutrition education. Body composition, dietary habit scores, serum lipid profiles, daily nutrient intakes and the quality of life were assessed at the beginning and at the end of the program. Average age of subjects and height were 20.8 years and 161.9 cm, respectively. After 8 weeks, there were significant reductions in body weight, body fat mass, percent body fat, waist-hip ratio and BMI. The dietary habit score such as a balanced diet, regularity of mealtime, overeating, eating while watching TV or using the computer and eating salty food were increased significantly. Serum lipid levels such as total cholesterol level, LDL-cholesterol level and triglyceride level were decreased but not significantly. There were decreases in intake of energy, protein and fat and increases in intakes of dietary fiber, folic acid, calcium and potassium from the beginning to the end of the program. There were significant improvements on subcomponents of quality of life; physical functioning, general-health and vitality. The limitation of this study was the fact that there was no control group, but an overall evaluation suggests the 8-week body weight control program consisting of diet therapy, exercise and behavioral modification with supplementation of sea tangle would be helpful to improve the body composition, dietary habits, daily nutrient intakes and quality of life in Korean female college students.

  4. [PIC Program Evaluation Forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, N. J.

    These 4 questionnaires are designed to elicit teacher and parent evaluations of the Prescriptive Instruction Center (PIC) program. Included are Teacher Evaluation of Program Effectiveness (14 items), M & M Evaluation of Program Implementation (methods and materials specialists; 11 items), Teacher Evaluation of Program Effectiveness--Case Study…

  5. Evaluation of a multi-faceted diabetes care program including community-based peer educators in Takeo province, Cambodia, 2007-2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn Taniguchi

    Full Text Available Early detection and treatment for diabetes are essential for reducing disability and death from the disease. Finding effective screening and treatment for individuals living with diabetes in resource-limited countries is a challenge. MoPoTsyo, a Cambodian non-governmental organization, addressed this gap by utilizing a multi-pronged approach with community-based peer educators, access to laboratory procedures, local outpatient medical consultation, and a revolving drug fund. This study evaluated outcomes of MoPoTsyo's diabetes program in Takeo Province by assessing glycemic and blood pressure outcomes for individuals diagnosed with diabetes over a 24-month follow-up period between 2007-2013.This is a retrospective cohort analysis of records without a comparison group. We calculated the mean fasting blood glucose (FBG and blood pressure (BP at regular intervals of follow-up. The proportion of patients reaching recommended treatment targets for FBG and BP was assessed.Of the 3411 patients enrolled in the program, 2230 were included in the study. The cohort was predominantly female (68.9% with a median age of 54 years. Median follow-up time in the program was 16 months (4.9-38.4 months. Mean FBG decreased 63.9 mg/dl in mean FBG (95% CI 58.5 to 69.3 at one year of follow-up (p<0.001. After one year, 45% (321/708 of patients achieved goal FBG < 126. Of the 41.6% (927/2230 with elevated BP at enrollment, systolic and diastolic BP levels significantly decreased (p<0.001 by 16.9 mmHg (95% CI 1.2 to 22.9 and 10 mm Hg (95% CI 0.7 to 12.9 respectively between enrollment and one year of follow-up. At one year of follow-up, 51.1%% (183/355 of these patients reached the BP goal < 140/90.The improved outcome indicators of diabetes care for MoPoTsyo's Takeo program evaluation showed promise. The program demonstrated a reasonable and practical approach to delivering effective diabetes care in a rural area and may serve as a model for other low-income communities

  6. Evaluation of a multi-faceted diabetes care program including community-based peer educators in Takeo province, Cambodia, 2007-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Dawn; LoGerfo, James; van Pelt, Maurits; Mielcarek, Bessie; Huster, Karin; Haider, Mahri; Thomas, Bernadette

    2017-01-01

    Early detection and treatment for diabetes are essential for reducing disability and death from the disease. Finding effective screening and treatment for individuals living with diabetes in resource-limited countries is a challenge. MoPoTsyo, a Cambodian non-governmental organization, addressed this gap by utilizing a multi-pronged approach with community-based peer educators, access to laboratory procedures, local outpatient medical consultation, and a revolving drug fund. This study evaluated outcomes of MoPoTsyo's diabetes program in Takeo Province by assessing glycemic and blood pressure outcomes for individuals diagnosed with diabetes over a 24-month follow-up period between 2007-2013. This is a retrospective cohort analysis of records without a comparison group. We calculated the mean fasting blood glucose (FBG) and blood pressure (BP) at regular intervals of follow-up. The proportion of patients reaching recommended treatment targets for FBG and BP was assessed. Of the 3411 patients enrolled in the program, 2230 were included in the study. The cohort was predominantly female (68.9%) with a median age of 54 years. Median follow-up time in the program was 16 months (4.9-38.4 months). Mean FBG decreased 63.9 mg/dl in mean FBG (95% CI 58.5 to 69.3) at one year of follow-up (p<0.001). After one year, 45% (321/708) of patients achieved goal FBG < 126. Of the 41.6% (927/2230) with elevated BP at enrollment, systolic and diastolic BP levels significantly decreased (p<0.001) by 16.9 mmHg (95% CI 1.2 to 22.9) and 10 mm Hg (95% CI 0.7 to 12.9) respectively between enrollment and one year of follow-up. At one year of follow-up, 51.1%% (183/355) of these patients reached the BP goal < 140/90. The improved outcome indicators of diabetes care for MoPoTsyo's Takeo program evaluation showed promise. The program demonstrated a reasonable and practical approach to delivering effective diabetes care in a rural area and may serve as a model for other low-income communities

  7. Education Program on Fossil Resources Including Coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usami, Masahiro

    Fossil fuels including coal play a key role as crucial energies in contributing to economic development in Asia. On the other hand, its limited quantity and the environmental problems causing from its usage have become a serious global issue and a countermeasure to solve such problems is very much demanded. Along with the pursuit of sustainable development, environmentally-friendly use of highly efficient fossil resources should be therefore, accompanied. Kyushu-university‧s sophisticated research through long years of accumulated experience on the fossil resources and environmental sectors together with the advanced large-scale commercial and empirical equipments will enable us to foster cooperative research and provide internship program for the future researchers. Then, this program is executed as a consignment business from the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry from 2007 fiscal year to 2009 fiscal year. The lecture that uses the textbooks developed by this program is scheduled to be started a course in fiscal year 2010.

  8. [Early stimulation > programs evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnier, C

    2007-09-01

    Early intervention include educational and neuroprotection strategies. Early educational strategies are based on the cerebral plasticity concept. Neuroprotection, initially reserved for molecules preventing cell death phenomena, can be extended now to all actions promoting harmonious development and preventing handicaps, and include organisational, therapeutic and environmental aspects. Early stimulation programs have been first devised in United States for vulnerable children who belong to an unfavorable socio-economic category ; positive effects were recorded in school failure rates and social problems ; programs have also been launched in several countries for premature infants and infants with a low birth weight, population exposed to a high risk of deficiencies. The programs are targetted either to the child, or to the parents, or combined to provide assistance for both the child and the parents. The programs given the best evaluation are NIDCAP Program in Sweden (Newborn Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program), intended for babies neonatal intensive care units, then a longitudinal, multisite program, known as IHDP (Infant Health and Development Program). It was launched in United States for infants stimulation is maintained and when mothers have a low level of education.

  9. RCS program evaluation plan options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stovall, T.K.; Bayne, C.K.

    1980-10-01

    The Residential Conservation Service (RCS) Program evaluation plan is designed to provide an ongoing evaluation during the RCS Program's active period as well as a measurement of the RCS Program's cumulative effect after the program's termination. The study options described include utility case studies, random survey sampling, directed survey sampling, and remote data collection. Survey techniques are described and appropriate questions are suggested. Several sample selection criteria are included as background for a DOE policy decision on this issue. Present and anticipated data sources are listed and discussed. Statistical data analysis plans include a preliminary determination of required sample sizes.

  10. Evaluating social marketing programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    Contraceptive social marketing programs (CSM) which use commercial marketing techniques and distribution networks to sell contraceptives at subsidized prices, have become an important source of contraceptives in many developing countries. However, research is needed to determine the extent to which CSM programs are recruiting new users or simply serving as an alternate source for those who already use contraceptives. 1st begun in India in 1967, today CSM programs are selling contraceptives in more than 20 countries, mostly selling condoms because they do not require medical supervision or usually have to be registered with governments as a pharmaceutical product. Most also sell oral contraceptives. Advertising is used to promote the program, both brand and generic, about family planning and the advantages of small families. In some countries only generic promotion is permitted. A CSM program begins with research on the marketplace and needs of potential customers, including baseline studies, group discussions, and personal interviews. Monitoring is done by market research on usage, acceptability and adequacy of distribution. Focus groups and surveys are also used. Evaluation methodologies are similar to those used in program planning and monitoring, including consumer intercept surveys and tracking studies. Program impact is an area often neglected, probably because of the unusual relationship between the private and public sectors that occurs in CSM. Couple-years of protection is the common measurement of impact, estimated from sales data (13 cycles of pills or 100 condoms or doses of spermicide/year is assumed to prevent conception). This method can be used to assess the contributions of different methods and distribution systems and to compare their cost-effectiveness by calculating the cost per couple-year of protection provided. Limitations on this measurement method are inability to discriminate sporadic use from careful compliance; sales may be substitutes

  11. Crisis intervention: program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simington, J A; Cargill, L; Hill, W

    1996-11-01

    Crisis intervention is based upon crisis theory and is defined as a short-term active mode of therapy that focuses on solving the client's immediate problem and reestablishing psychological equilibrium. The crisis intervention program was the first phase in the development of a broader mental health program with advancement decisions being based upon evaluation results of this initial phase. An evaluation methodology using the Stufflebeam Goal-Stakeholder Model (1980) was designed and implemented. A satisfaction survey was conducted to develop a database relative to the program's process. The Mental Health Category Measure, and the Crisis Call Outcome Rating Scale were used to capture outcome data. Analysis of the qualitative and quantitative data indicate that stakeholders are satisfied with the program. outcome data demonstrates that the program produces the intended outcomes. Triangulation, a method of comparing the qualitative and quantitative findings revealed consistency, and thus provides confidence in the accuracy of the findings.

  12. Diversity: Including People with Disabilities in Outdoor Adventure Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugerman, Deb

    1996-01-01

    Organizations that offer outdoor adventure activities can integrate programs to include individuals with disabilities. The paper describes how one organization includes diverse groups of people with and without disabilities in its outdoor activities, focusing on each member's strengths and encouraging cooperation. (SM)

  13. Introducing Program Evaluation Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raluca GÂRBOAN

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Programs and project evaluation models can be extremely useful in project planning and management. The aim is to set the right questions as soon as possible in order to see in time and deal with the unwanted program effects, as well as to encourage the positive elements of the project impact. In short, different evaluation models are used in order to minimize losses and maximize the benefits of the interventions upon small or large social groups. This article introduces some of the most recently used evaluation models.

  14. MRM Evaluation Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, James C.

    1998-01-01

    This is an interim report on the current output of the MRM evaluation research program. During 1998 this research program has used new and existing data to create an important tool for the development and improvement of "maintenance resource management" (MRM). Thousands of surveys completed by participants in airline MRM training and/or behavior change programs have, for the first time, been consolidated into a panel of "MRM Attitudes and Opinion Profiles." These profiles can be used to compare the attitudes about decision making and communication in any given company at any stage in its MRM program with attitudes of a large sample of like employees during a similar period in their MRM involvement. This panel of comparison profiles for attitudes and opinions is a tool to help audit the effectiveness of a maintenance human factors program. The profile panel is the first of several tools envisioned for applying the information accumulating in MRM databases produced as one of the program's long range objectives.

  15. Comprehensive Adolescent Health Programs That Include Sexual and Reproductive Health Services: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Jenita; Tunçalp, Özge; Turke, Shani; Blum, Robert William

    2014-01-01

    We systematically reviewed peer-reviewed and gray literature on comprehensive adolescent health (CAH) programs (1998–2013), including sexual and reproductive health services. We screened 36 119 records and extracted articles using predefined criteria. We synthesized data into descriptive characteristics and assessed quality by evidence level. We extracted data on 46 programs, of which 19 were defined as comprehensive. Ten met all inclusion criteria. Most were US based; others were implemented in Egypt, Ethiopia, and Mexico. Three programs displayed rigorous evidence; 5 had strong and 2 had modest evidence. Those with rigorous or strong evidence directly or indirectly influenced adolescent sexual and reproductive health. The long-term impact of many CAH programs cannot be proven because of insufficient evaluations. Evaluation approaches that take into account the complex operating conditions of many programs are needed to better understand mechanisms behind program effects. PMID:25320876

  16. A framework for including family health spillovers in economic evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Al-Janabi (Hareth); N.J.A. van Exel (Job); W.B.F. Brouwer (Werner); J. Coast (Joanna)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractHealth care interventions may affect the health of patients' family networks. It has been suggested that these health spillovers? should be included in economic evaluation, but there is not a systematic method for doing this. In this article, we develop a framework for including health

  17. Hearing of Personnel Included in the USAF Hearing Conservation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-02-01

    ORGNIZTIO NAE AN ADRES - 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT. TASK 9. PFORINGORGAIZAIONNAMEANDADDESSAREA ft WORK UNIT NUMBERS USAF School of Aerospace Medicine...0 0)~’ to (00w " 0 -q N~ m M VC0 CO~j 0 N 01) a)inUjU) tD -4 N o O 0 N 0 a) m m~0 di .. 0 alO1 O0- cn cO N - m -4N (0-00N (0 it) W N n N . o4Ca 0 0

  18. A Framework for Including Family Health Spillovers in Economic Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Janabi, Hareth; van Exel, Job; Brouwer, Werner; Coast, Joanna

    2016-02-01

    Health care interventions may affect the health of patients' family networks. It has been suggested that these "health spillovers" should be included in economic evaluation, but there is not a systematic method for doing this. In this article, we develop a framework for including health spillovers in economic evaluation. We focus on extra-welfarist economic evaluations where the objective is to maximize health benefits from a health care budget (the "health care perspective"). Our framework involves adapting the conventional cost-effectiveness decision rule to include 2 multiplier effects to internalize the spillover effects. These multiplier effects express the ratio of total health effects (for patients and their family networks) to patient health effects. One multiplier effect is specified for health benefit generated from providing a new intervention, one for health benefit displaced by funding this intervention. We show that using multiplier effects to internalize health spillovers could change the optimal funding decisions and generate additional health benefits to society. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. BSN Program Admittance Criteria: Should Emotional Intelligence Be Included?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tanya

    2017-01-01

    Emotional intelligence refers to the ability to identify and monitor emotions and remain aware of how emotions affect thoughts and actions. Emotional intelligence has been discussed as a better predictor of personal and occupational success than performance on intellectual intelligence tests. Despite the importance of one's emotional intelligence, BSN (Bachelor of Science in Nursing) nursing schools routinely admit candidates based on the student's cumulative college course grade point average (GPA). Nursing is a profession that requires one's ability to empathize, care, and react in emotionally sound manners. Is the GPA enough to determine if a student will evolve into a professional nurse? This article will explore the routine admittance criteria for BSN nursing programs and propose the concept of using the emotional intelligence tool as an adjunct to the cumulative college course GPA. The emotional intelligence theory will be identified and applied to the nursing profession. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Information to Include in Curriculum Vitae | Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applicants are encouraged to use their current curriculum vitae and to add any necessary information. Please include your name and a page number on each page of the curriculum vitae. Some of the information requested below will not be applicable to all individuals. Please do not print or type your information on this page. Personal Information Name (First middle last) Gender (optional) Race (optional) Date of birth Place of birth (city,

  1. FY08 VPP Program Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dossett, Sharon D.

    2008-01-01

    The Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) is a recognized third-party certification of worker safety and health program excellence, based on industry best practices that focus on management leadership and employee involvement, as well as other safety and health program elements. This Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) VPP Program Evaluation is the FY-2008 report of the PNNL VPP Steering Committee regarding the status of VPP at PNNL. It is an update of the previous annual report dated January, 2007 and was completed in January 2008. An annual evaluation of the status of VPP is required of all sites that participate in the DOE-VPP. This report provides a detailed summary of the PNNL VPP Steering Committee’s evaluation of program performance and documents both strengths and improvement opportunities related to the various aspects of the VPP model.

  2. Californium-252 Program Equipment Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chattin, Fred Rhea [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wilson, Kenton [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ezold, Julie G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-12-01

    To successfully continue the 252Cf production and meet the needs of the customers, a comprehensive evaluation of the Building 7920 processing equipment was requested to identify equipment critical to the operational continuity of the program.

  3. Reporting a program evaluation: Needs, program plan, intervention, and decisions

    OpenAIRE

    Chacón Moscoso, Salvador; Chaves, Susana Sanduvete; Vidal, Mariona Portell; Teresa Anguera Argilaga, M.

    2013-01-01

    The approach to intervention programs varies depending on the methodological perspective adopted. This means that health professionals lack clear guidelines regarding how best to proceed, and it hinders the accumulation of knowledge. The aim of this paper is to set out the essential and common aspects that should be included in any program evaluation report, thereby providing a useful guide for the professional regardless of the procedural approach used. Furthermore, the paper seeks to ...

  4. Evaluating Pain Education Programs: An Integrated Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Dubrowski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of educational programs and assessment of learning are essential to maintain high-standard health science education, which includes pain education. Current models of program evaluations applied to the education of the health professions, such as the Kirkpatrick model, are mainly outcome based. More recently, efforts have been made to examine other process-based models such as the Context Input Process Product model. The present article proposes an approach that integrates both outcome- and process-based models with models of clinical performance assessment to provide a deeper understanding of a program function. Because assessment instruments are a critical part of program evaluation, it is suggested that standardization and rigour should be used in their selection, development and adaptation. The present article suggests an alternative to currently used models in pain education evaluation.

  5. 34 CFR 263.4 - What training costs may a Professional Development program include?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What training costs may a Professional Development... GRANT PROGRAMS Professional Development Program § 263.4 What training costs may a Professional Development program include? (a) A Professional Development program may include, as training costs, assistance...

  6. Evaluating Dermatology Residency Program Websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashack, Kurt A; Burton, Kyle A; Soh, Jonathan M; Lanoue, Julien; Boyd, Anne H; Milford, Emily E; Dunnick, Cory; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2016-03-16

    Internet resources play an important role in how medical students access information related to residency programs.Evaluating program websites is necessary in order to provide accurate information for applicants and provide information regarding areas of website improvement for programs. To date, dermatology residency websites (D  WS) have not been evaluated.This paper evaluates dermatology residency websites based on availability of predefined measures. Using the FREIDA (Fellowship and Residency Electronic Interactive Database) Online database, authors searched forall accredited dermatology program websites. Eligible programs were identified through the FREIDA Online database and had a functioning website. Two authors independently extracted data with consensus or third researcher resolution of differences. This data was accessed and archived from July 15th to July 17th, 2015.Primary outcomes measured were presence of content on education, resident and faculty information, program environment, applicant recruitment, schedule, salary, and website quality evaluated using an online tool (WooRank.com). Out of 117 accredited dermatology residencies, 115 had functioning webpages. Of these, 76.5% (75) had direct links found on the FRIEDA Online database. Most programs contained information on education, faculty, program environment, and applicant recruitment. However, website quality and marketing effectiveness were highly variable; most programs were deemed to need improvements in the functioning of their webpages. Also, additional information on current residents and about potential away rotations were lacking from most websites with only 52.2% (60) and 41.7% (48) of programs providing this content, respectively. A majority of dermatology residency websites contained adequate information on many of the factors we evaluated. However, many were lacking in areas that matter to applicants. We hope this report will encourage dermatology residencyprograms

  7. Nuclear data evaluation methodology including estimates of covariances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith D.L.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Evaluated nuclear data rather than raw experimental and theoretical information are employed in nuclear applications such as the design of nuclear energy systems. Therefore, the process by which such information is produced and ultimately used is of critical interest to the nuclear science community. This paper provides an overview of various contemporary methods employed to generate evaluated cross sections and related physical quantities such as particle emission angular distributions and energy spectra. The emphasis here is on data associated with neutron induced reaction processes, with consideration of the uncertainties in these data, and on the more recent evaluation methods, e.g., those that are based on stochastic (Monte Carlo techniques. There is no unique way to perform such evaluations, nor are nuclear data evaluators united in their opinions as to which methods are superior to the others in various circumstances. In some cases it is not critical which approaches are used as long as there is consistency and proper use is made of the available physical information. However, in other instances there are definite advantages to using particular methods as opposed to other options. Some of these distinctions are discussed in this paper and suggestions are offered regarding fruitful areas for future research in the development of evaluation methodology.

  8. Including test errors in evaluating surveillance test intervals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, I.S.; Samanta, P.K. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Martorell, S. [Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (Spain); Vesely, W.E. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Technical Specifications require surveillance testing to assure that the standby systems important to safety will start and perform their intended functions in the event of plant abnormality. However, as evidenced by operating experience, the surveillance tests may be adversely impact safety because of their undesirable side effects, such as initiation of plant transients during testing or wearing-out of safety systems due to testing. This paper first defines the concerns, i.e., the potential adverse effects of surveillance testing, from a risk perspective. Then, we present a methodology to evaluate the risk impact of those adverse effects, focusing on two important kinds of adverse impacts of surveillance testing: (1) risk impact of test-caused trips and (2) risk impact of test-caused equipment wear. The quantitative risk methodology is demonstrated with several surveillance tests conducted at boiling water reactors, such as the tests of the main steam isolation valves, the turbine overspeed protection system, and the emergency diesel generators. We present the results of the risk-effectiveness evaluation of surveillance test intervals, which compares the adverse risk impact with the beneficial risk impact of testing from potential failure detection, along with insights from sensitivity studies.

  9. Designing monitoring programs for chemicals of emerging concern in potable reuse ⋯ What to include and what not to include?

    KAUST Repository

    Drewes, Jorg

    2012-11-01

    This study discussed a proposed process to prioritize chemicals for reclaimed water monitoring programs, selection of analytical methods required for their quantification, toxicological relevance of chemicals of emerging concern regarding human health, and related issues. Given that thousands of chemicals are potentially present in reclaimed water and that information about those chemicals is rapidly evolving, a transparent, science-based framework was developed to guide prioritization of which compounds of emerging concern (CECs) should be included in reclaimed water monitoring programs. The recommended framework includes four steps: (1) compile environmental concentrations (e.g., measured environmental concentration or MEC) of CECs in the source water for reuse projects; (2) develop a monitoring trigger level (MTL) for each of these compounds (or groups thereof) based on toxicological relevance; (3) compare the environmental concentration (e.g., MEC) to the MTL; CECs with a MEC/MTL ratio greater than 1 should be prioritized for monitoring, compounds with a ratio less than \\'1\\' should only be considered if they represent viable treatment process performance indicators; and (4) screen the priority list to ensure that a commercially available robust analytical method is available for that compound. © IWA Publishing 2013.

  10. Evaluation of renal masses including retrograde renal brushing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, W B; Bibbo, M; Thomsen, S; Lu, C T

    1976-02-01

    1. The evaluation of renal masses has become an increasingly important topic because of the increasing incidence of kidney cancer, the improved cure rate of renal carcinoma with the proper preoperative diagnosis, and the proliferation in renal mass diagnostic methodology. 2. A variety of benign entities can produce an abnormal renal mass with attendant difficulties in being distinguished from malignant neoplasms. Among these benign lesions are: simple renal cysts, polycystic kidneys, congenital variations in renal size and shape, segmental renal hypertrophy, renal infarcts, intrarenal hematomas, renal hamartomas, renal leiomyomas, renal adenomas, renal angiomas, renal fibrolipomatosis, hydronephrosis of a duplicated collecting system, renal abscesses, and xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis. 3. Nephrotomography, nephrosonography (ultrasound), adrenalin renal arteriography, selective magnification renal arteriography, renal venography and cavography, lymphangiography, renal scintillation scanning, abnormal levels of enzymes in blood and urine, immunologic studies (circulating antibodies and tumor-associated antigens), percutaneous needle aspirations, and retrograde renal brushing have all increased the diagnostic accuracy of determining the etiology of renal masses. None of these diagnostic procedures is infallible. A judicious combination of procedures gives the most reliable diagnostic results. 4. A search continues for (a) chemical agent(s) or a chemical profile in the blood or urine which is (are) specific for renal carcinoma, but as yet this is an investigational area and not a practical clinical reality.

  11. Evaluation of Programs: Reading Carol H. Weiss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Msila, Vuyisile; Setlhako, Angeline

    2013-01-01

    Carol Weiss did much to enhance the role of evaluation in her writings. Her work shows evaluators what affects their roles as they evaluate programs. Furthermore, her theory of change spells out the complexities involved in program evaluation. There are various processes involved in the evaluation of programs. The paper looks at some of the…

  12. The Practice of Health Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Sarah R

    2017-11-01

    The Practice of Health Program Evaluation provides an overview of the evaluation process for public health programs while diving deeper to address select advanced concepts and techniques. The book unfolds evaluation as a three-phased process consisting of identification of evaluation questions, data collection and analysis, and dissemination of results and recommendations. The text covers research design, sampling methods, as well as quantitative and qualitative approaches. Types of evaluation are also discussed, including economic assessment and systems research as relative newcomers. Aspects critical to conducting a successful evaluation regardless of type or research design are emphasized, such as stakeholder engagement, validity and reliability, and adoption of sound recommendations. The book encourages evaluators to document their approach by developing an evaluation plan, a data analysis plan, and a dissemination plan, in order to help build consensus throughout the process. The evaluative text offers a good bird's-eye view of the evaluation process, while offering guidance for evaluation experts on how to navigate political waters and advocate for their findings to help affect change.

  13. ENergy and Power Evaluation Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    In the late 1970s, national and international attention began to focus on energy issues. Efforts were initiated to design and test analytical tools that could be used to assist energy planners in evaluating energy systems, particularly in developing countries. In 1984, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) commissioned Argonne National Laboratory`s Decision and Information Sciences Division (DIS) to incorporate a set of analytical tools into a personal computer-based package for distribution in developing countries. The package developed by DIS staff, the ENergy and Power Evaluation Program (ENPEP), covers the range of issues that energy planners must face: economic development, energy demand projections, supply-and-demand balancing, energy system expansion, and environmental impact analysis. Following the original DOE-supported development effort, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), with the assistance from the US Department of State (DOS) and the US Department of Energy (DOE), provided ENPEP training, distribution, and technical support to many countries. ENPEP is now in use in over 60 countries and is an international standard for energy planning tools. More than 500 energy experts have been trained in the use of the entire ENPEP package or some of its modules during the international training courses organized by the IAEA in collaboration with Argonne`s Decision and Information Sciences (DIS) Division and the Division of Educational Programs (DEP). This report contains the ENPEP program which can be download from the internet. Described in this report is the description of ENPEP Program, news, forums, online support and contacts.

  14. 34 CFR 86.100 - What must the IHE's drug prevention program include?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must the IHE's drug prevention program include? 86.100 Section 86.100 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DRUG AND ALCOHOL ABUSE PREVENTION Institutions of Higher Education § 86.100 What must the IHE's drug prevention program include? The...

  15. Transportation R and D included in thermal and mechanical sciences program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is a multiprogram research and development laboratory operated by The University of Chicago for the US Department of Energy. At Argonne, applied research in thermal and mechanical sciences is performed within the Thermal and Mechanical Sciences Section of the Energy Technology Division. Current program areas include compact evaporators and condensers for the process and transportation industries, ice slurries for district cooling, advanced fluids for improved heat transfer and reduced pressure drop, flow-induced vibration and flow distribution in shell-and-tube heat exchangers, and dynamics and control of maglev systems. In general, the objective of the research is to extend the technology base in each of these areas and to facilitate its application in solving problems of importance to US industries and utilities. This is accomplished by developing validated design correlations and predictive methods. The staff of the Thermal and Mechanical Sciences Section have extensive experimental and analytical experience in heat transfer, multiphase flow, structural dynamics and control, fluid-structure interaction, transient flow and mixing, thermally driven flows, and flow visualization using ultra-high-speed video. Large, general-purpose test facilities and smaller, single-purpose test apparatuses are available for experiments and component design evaluation. A world-class capability in the study of flow-induced vibrations exists within the Section. Individual fact sheets, describing currently active research program areas, related facilities, and listing, as a contact, the principal investigator, are included.

  16. 38 CFR 1.15 - Standards for program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... in relation to their cost. In addition, these evaluations will determine each program's impact on related programs and its structure and mechanism for delivery of services. All programs will be evaluated... design. Alternatives include an assessment of cost of data collection vs. results necessary to support...

  17. Evaluation of a Community-Based Aging Intervention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hui-Chuan; Wang, Chun-Hou; Chen, Yi-Chun; Chang, Ming-Chen; Wang, Jean

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the outcome and process of a community-based aging intervention program for the elderly in Taiwan. The program included education on nutrition and dietary behavior and on physical activities. Outcome and process evaluations were conducted. The program may have had some effects on decreasing some dietary behavioral problems and…

  18. Program review: resource evaluation, reservoir confirmation, and exploration technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, S.H.

    1978-05-01

    The details of the program review are reported. A summary of the recommendations, means for their implementation, and a six year program of expenditures which would accomplish the objectives of the recommendations are presented. Included in appendices are the following: DOE/DGE consortia participants; program managers contacted for opinion; communications received from program managers; participants, program review panel; and program strategy for resource evaluation and reservoir confirmation. (MHR)

  19. Economic value evaluation in disease management programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnezi, Racheli; Reicher, Sima; Shani, Mordechai

    2008-05-01

    Chronic disease management has been a rapidly growing entity in the 21st century as a strategy for managing chronic illnesses in large populations. However, experience has shown that disease management programs have not been able to demonstrate their financial value. The objectives of disease management programs are to create quality benchmarks, such as principles and guidelines, and to establish a uniform set of metrics and a standardized methodology for evaluating them. In order to illuminate the essence of disease management and its components, as well as the complexity and the problematic nature of performing economic calculations of their profitability and value, we collected data from several reports that dealt with the economic intervention of disease management programs. The disease management economic evaluation is composed of a series of steps, including the following major categories: data/information technology, information generation, assessment/recommendations, actionable customer plans, and program assessment/reassessment. We demonstrate the elements necessary for economic analysis. Disease management is one of the most innovative tools in the managed care environment and is still in the process of being defined. Therefore, objectives should include the creation of quality measures, such as principles and guidelines, and the establishment of a uniform set of metrics and a standardized methodology for evaluating them.

  20. Including nonadditive genetic effects in mating programs to maximize dairy farm profitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliloo, H; Pryce, J E; González-Recio, O; Cocks, B G; Goddard, M E; Hayes, B J

    2017-02-01

    We compared the outcome of mating programs based on different evaluation models that included nonadditive genetic effects (dominance and heterozygosity) in addition to additive effects. The additive and dominance marker effects and the values of regression on average heterozygosity were estimated using 632,003 single nucleotide polymorphisms from 7,902 and 7,510 Holstein cows with calving interval and production (milk, fat, and protein yields) records, respectively. Expected progeny values were computed based on the estimated genetic effects and genotype probabilities of hypothetical progeny from matings between the available genotyped cows and the top 50 young genomic bulls. An index combining the traits based on their economic values was developed and used to evaluate the performance of different mating scenarios in terms of dollar profit. We observed that mating programs with nonadditive genetic effects performed better than a model with only additive effects. Mating programs with dominance and heterozygosity effects increased milk, fat, and protein yields by up to 38, 1.57, and 1.21 kg, respectively. The inclusion of dominance and heterozygosity effects decreased calving interval by up to 0.70 d compared with random mating. The average reduction in progeny inbreeding by the inclusion of nonadditive genetic effects in matings compared with random mating was between 0.25 to 1.57 and 0.64 to 1.57 percentage points for calving interval and production traits, respectively. The reduction in inbreeding was accompanied by an average of A$8.42 (Australian dollars) more profit per mating for a model with additive, dominance, and heterozygosity effects compared with random mating. Mate allocations that benefit from nonadditive genetic effects can improve progeny performance only in the generation where it is being implemented, and the gain from specific combining abilities cannot be accumulated over generations. Continuous updating of genomic predictions and mate

  1. 36 CFR 1223.14 - What elements must a vital records program include?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What elements must a vital... RECORDS ADMINISTRATION RECORDS MANAGEMENT MANAGING VITAL RECORDS § 1223.14 What elements must a vital records program include? To achieve compliance with this section, an agency's vital records program must...

  2. Efficacy of an Individualized Prevention Program Including Social Media Support on University Students with Gingivitis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carlos Alberto Serrano Méndez; Karen Andrea Avendaño Calderón; Paula Andrea Moreno Caro

    2017-01-01

    ...: Thirty-eight students with gingivitis participated in a program that included: Individualized oral hygiene instruction, professional removal of plaque and calculus and, recall and support on oral hygiene through the use of social media...

  3. Thermoelectric materials evaluation program. Technical summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinderman, J.D.

    1979-04-01

    Research progress on the thermoelectric materials evaluation program is reported covering the period January 1, 1976 to September 30, 1978. Topical reports are presented on (1) hot and cold end ..delta..T's, (2) hardware mobility, (3) p-leg sublimation suppression, (4) thermodynamic stability of p-legs, (5) n-leg material process improvements to reduce extraneous resistance, (6) n-leg cracking, (7) dynamic evaluation of converter, and (8) data base and degradation modes. Twenty attachments are included which present supporting drawings, specifications, procedures, and data. (WHK)

  4. Independent Panel Evaluation of Dry Sludge PISA Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F.F.

    1999-10-20

    Dr. Kirk Yeager and Mr. Marvin Banks from Energetic Material Research and Technology Center (EMRTC) evaluated the Savannah River Site (SRS) efforts in the Dry Sludge program. They evaluated four program areas: energetic material formation, stability, initiation, and propagation. The panel evaluation included a site visit (July 13, 1999 and July 14, 1999) as well as a review of various reports and presentations by researchers involved in the program.

  5. BALANCED SCORECARDS EVALUATION MODEL THAT INCLUDES ELEMENTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM USING AHP MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Jovanović

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The research is oriented on improvement of environmental management system (EMS using BSC (Balanced Scorecard model that presents strategic model of measurem ents and improvement of organisational performance. The research will present approach of objectives and environmental management me trics involvement (proposed by literature review in conventional BSC in "Ad Barska plovi dba" organisation. Further we will test creation of ECO-BSC model based on business activities of non-profit organisations in order to improve envir onmental management system in parallel with other systems of management. Using this approach we may obtain 4 models of BSC that includ es elements of environmen tal management system for AD "Barska plovidba". Taking into acc ount that implementation and evaluation need long period of time in AD "Barska plovidba", the final choice will be based on 14598 (Information technology - Software product evaluation and ISO 9126 (Software engineering - Product quality using AHP method. Those standards are usually used for evaluation of quality software product and computer programs that serve in organisation as support and factors for development. So, AHP model will be bas ed on evolution criteria based on suggestion of ISO 9126 standards and types of evaluation from two evaluation teams. Members of team & will be experts in BSC and environmental management system that are not em ployed in AD "Barska Plovidba" organisation. The members of team 2 will be managers of AD "Barska Plovidba" organisation (including manage rs from environmental department. Merging results based on previously cr eated two AHP models, one can obtain the most appropriate BSC that includes elements of environmental management system. The chosen model will present at the same time suggestion for approach choice including ecological metrics in conventional BSC model for firm that has at least one ECO strategic orientation.

  6. Effective Practices for Evaluating Education and Public Outreach Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, S.

    2013-12-01

    Stephanie Baird Wilkerson, PhD Carol Haden EdD Magnolia Consulting,LLC Education and public outreach (EPO) program developers and providers seeking insights regarding effective practices for evaluating EPO activities programs benefit from understanding why evaluation is critical to the success of EPO activities and programs, what data collection methods are appropriate, and how to effectively communicate and report findings. Based on our extensive experience evaluating EPO programs, we will share lessons learned and examples of how these practices play out in actual evaluation studies. EPO program developers, providers, and evaluators must consider several factors that influence which evaluation designs and data collection methods will be most appropriate, given the nature of EPO programs. Effective evaluation practices of EPO programs take into account a program's phase of development, duration, and budget as well as a program's intended outcomes. EPO programs that are just beginning development will have different evaluation needs and priorities than will well-established programs. Effective evaluation practices consider the 'life' of a program with an evaluation design that supports a program's growth through various phases including development, revision and refinement, and completion. It would be premature and inappropriate to expect the attainment of longer-term outcomes of activities during program development phases or early stages of implementation. During program development, EPO providers should clearly define program outcomes that are feasible and appropriate given a program's scope and expected reach. In many respects, this directly relates to the amount of time, or duration, intended audiences participate in EPO programs. As program duration increases so does the likelihood that the program can achieve longer-term outcomes. When choosing which outcomes are reasonable to impact and measure, program duration should be considered. Effective evaluation

  7. Energy-efficient buildings program evaluations. Volume 2: Evaluation summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, A.D.; Mayi, D.; Edgemon, S.D.

    1997-04-01

    This document presents summaries of code and utility building program evaluations reviewed as the basis for the information presented in Energy-Efficient Buildings Program Evaluations, Volume 1: Findings and Recommendations, DOE/EE/OBT-11569, Vol. 1. The main purpose of this volume is to summarize information from prior evaluations of similar programs that may be useful background for designing and conducting an evaluation of the BSGP. Another purpose is to summarize an extensive set of relevant evaluations and provide a resource for program designers, mangers, and evaluators.

  8. Educators Exchange: A Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, William B.

    The Educators Exchange Program (EEP) was established under a training and educational exchange agreement reached by California's San Diego Community College District (SDCCD) and the republic of Mexico. In the program, the District provided a 4-week technological training program to faculty at Centros de Capacitacion Tecnologica Industrial…

  9. Evaluation of Prevention Programs for Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Ernest, Jr.; Dodge, Kenneth A.

    This article focuses on the formal evaluation of large-scale preventive interventions promoting positive mental health in children and adolescents, using examples of conduct problems. The state of the art in program evaluation is discussed based on quantitative evaluations of mental illness prevention programs. The article reviews current thinking…

  10. Strategies for Evaluating Undergraduate Degree Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, James P.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluating higher education degree programs is an arduous task. This paper suggests innovative strategies for addressing four types of challenges that commonly occur during program evaluation: identifying theoretical models for evaluation, balancing potentially conflicting standards, accommodating faculty differences, and aligning courses.…

  11. Healing by Creating: Patient Evaluations of Art-Making Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiney, Sue P.; Darr-Hope, Heidi; Meriwether, Marian P.; Adams, Swann Arp

    2017-01-01

    The benefits of using art in health care, especially with cancer patients, have been described anecdotally. However, few manuscripts include a conceptual framework to describe the evaluation of patient programs. This paper describes patients' evaluation of a healing arts program developed within a hospital for cancer patients that used art-making,…

  12. Small Commercial Program DOE Project: Impact evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bathgate, R.; Faust, S. (Energy and Solid Waste Consultants, Montpelier, VT (United States))

    1992-08-12

    In 1991, Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) implemented a Department of Energy grant to conduct a small commercial energy conservation project. The small commercial Mom, and Pop'' grocery stores within WEC's service territory were selected as the target market for the project. Energy Solid Waste Consultant's (E SWC) Impact Evaluation is documented here. The evaluation was based on data gathered from a variety of sources, including load profile metering, kWh submeters, elapsed time indicators, and billing histories. Five stores were selected to receive measures under this program: Waits River General Store, Joe's Pond Store, Hastings Store, Walden General Store, and Adamant Cooperative. Specific measures installed in each store and description of each are included.

  13. Solar energy program evaluation: an introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    deLeon, P.

    1979-09-01

    The Program Evaluation Methodology provides an overview of the practice and methodology of program evaluation and defines more precisely the evaluation techniques and methodologies that would be most appropriate to government organizations which are actively involved in the research, development, and commercialization of solar energy systems. Formal evaluation cannot be treated as a single methodological approach for assessing a program. There are four basic types of evaluation designs - the pre-experimental design; the quasi-experimental design based on time series; the quasi-experimental design based on comparison groups; and the true experimental design. This report is organized to first introduce the role and issues of evaluation. This is to provide a set of issues to organize the subsequent sections detailing the national solar energy programs. Then, these two themes are integrated by examining the evaluation strategies and methodologies tailored to fit the particular needs of the various individual solar energy programs. (MCW)

  14. Observational Procedures in Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huberty, Carl J.

    The use of standardized instruments has demonstrated the ineffectiveness of traditional educational programs in providing optimum learning situations for large numbers of children with diversified backgrounds. Consequently, many new innovative programs have been designed and implemented for preschool children. However, it has become apparent that…

  15. Evaluating OO example programs for CS1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Börstler, Jürgen; Christensen, Henrik Bærbak; Bennedsen, Jens

    2008-01-01

    Example programs play an important role in learning to program. They work as templates, guidelines, and inspiration for learners when developing their own programs. It is therefore important to provide learners with high quality examples. In this paper, we discuss properties of example programs t...... that might affect the teaching and learning of object-oriented programming. Furthermore, we present an evaluation instrument for example programs and report on initial experiences of its application to a selection of examples from popular introductory programming textbooks.......Example programs play an important role in learning to program. They work as templates, guidelines, and inspiration for learners when developing their own programs. It is therefore important to provide learners with high quality examples. In this paper, we discuss properties of example programs...

  16. Traffic control device evaluation program : FY 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    This report presents findings on three different activities conducted in the Traffic Control Device Evaluation Program during the 2016 fiscal year. The first two activities are evaluations of full-matrix color light-emitting diode changeable message ...

  17. Evaluating Environmental Education Programs Using Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Ian G.

    1990-01-01

    Described is the evaluation of the Master of Environmental Science program at Monash University (Australia). The design of the evaluation is discussed, and the use of multiple sources of data and an innovative style are highlighted. (Author/CW)

  18. Clean Technology Evaluation & Workforce Development Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patricia Glaza

    2012-12-01

    The overall objective of the Clean Technology Evaluation portion of the award was to design a process to speed up the identification of new clean energy technologies and match organizations to testing and early adoption partners. The project was successful in identifying new technologies targeted to utilities and utility technology integrators, in developing a process to review and rank the new technologies, and in facilitating new partnerships for technology testing and adoption. The purpose of the Workforce Development portion of the award was to create an education outreach program for middle & high-school students focused on clean technology science and engineering. While originally targeting San Diego, California and Cambridge, Massachusetts, the scope of the program was expanded to include a major clean technology speaking series and expo as part of the USA Science & Engineering Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.

  19. Evaluating Prior Learning Assessment Programs: A Suggested Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan L. Travers and Marnie T. Evans

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past two decades, American institutions have been expected to include systematic program reviews to meet accrediting standards, either by independent or governmental review agencies. Program evaluation is critical for several reasons: it provides systematic ways to assess what needs improvement or what needs changing and it provides ways to validate practices, whether to internal or external audiences (Mishra, 2007. Most program evaluative models are focused on academic programs, which don’t fit the uniqueness of prior learning assessment programs. This paper proposes an evaluative framework for prior learning assessment programs, which takes into account the type of work within prior learning assessment programs and uses program portfolios, similar to how students are asked to document their work.

  20. Specific balance training included in an endurance-resistance exercise program improves postural balance in elderly patients undergoing haemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frih, Bechir; Mkacher, Wajdi; Jaafar, Hamdi; Frih, Ameur; Ben Salah, Zohra; El May, Mezry; Hammami, Mohamed

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of 6 months of specific balance training included in endurance-resistance program on postural balance in haemodialysis (HD) patients. Forty-nine male patients undergoing HD were randomly assigned to an intervention group (balance training included in an endurance-resistance training, n = 26) or a control group (resistance-endurance training only, n = 23). Postural control was assessed using six clinical tests; Timed Up and Go test, Tinetti Mobility Test, Berg Balance Scale, Unipodal Stance test, Mini-Balance Evaluation Systems Test and Activities Balance Confidence scale. All balance measures increased significantly after the period of rehabilitation training in the intervention group. Only the Timed Up and Go, Berg Balance Scale, Mini-Balance Evaluation Systems Test and Activities Balance Confidence scores were improved in the control group. The ranges of change in these tests were greater in the balance training group. In HD patients, specific balance training included in a usual endurance-resistance training program improves static and dynamic balance better than endurance-resistance training only. Implications for rehabilitation Rehabilitation using exercise in haemodialysis patients improved global mobility and functional abilities. Specific balance training included in usual endurance resistance training program could lead to improved static and dynamic balance.

  1. 29 CFR 1472.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must I include in my drug-free awareness program? 1472.215 Section 1472.215 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) FEDERAL MEDIATION AND... of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c) Any...

  2. 29 CFR 94.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true What must I include in my drug-free awareness program? 94.215 Section 94.215 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE... inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a...

  3. 31 CFR 20.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must I include in my drug-free awareness program? 20.215 Section 20.215 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for Recipients Other Than...

  4. 38 CFR 17.255 - Applications for grants for programs which include construction projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applications for grants... Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Grants for Exchange of Information § 17.255 Applications for grants for programs which include construction projects. In addition to the documents and...

  5. Integrative Biological Chemistry Program Includes the Use of Informatics Tools, GIS and SAS Software Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Malcolm J.; Kashmar, Richard J.; Hurst, Kent; Fiedler, Frank; Gross, Catherine E.; Deol, Jasbir K.; Wilson, Alora

    2015-01-01

    Wesley College is a private, primarily undergraduate minority-serving institution located in the historic district of Dover, Delaware (DE). The College recently revised its baccalaureate biological chemistry program requirements to include a one-semester Physical Chemistry for the Life Sciences course and project-based experiential learning…

  6. Program Evaluation of a Distance Master's Degree Dental Hygiene Program: A Program Effectiveness Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sensabaugh, Cynthia F; Mitchell, Tanya Villalpando; Overman, Pamela R; Van Ness, Christopher J; Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to conduct a program evaluation of the University of Missouri-Kansas City Master of Science in Dental Hygiene Education Program (MSDH). This evaluation examined long-term outcomes in the context of stakeholders (the profession, the student, and the degree-granting institution).Methods: A mixed-methods approach was used to gather data from the 28 graduates from the MSDH program. An electronic questionnaire included both open- and closed-ended questions including demographic and practice data, and data related to alumni preparedness to reach their career goals. Virtual focus groups provided valuable insight into whether the program has achieved its goals, and prepared the graduates to meet their program competencies and future goals.Results: Out of a total of 28 individuals who have successfully completed the distance program (2001-2011), 19 participated in an online survey (67.8%). The majority of the participants (73.7%) participated in one of 3 focus groups. Sixty-three percent of the graduates are currently employed in dental hygiene education. Eighty-four percent of the respondents have published their research conducted while in the program, thereby contributing to the dental hygiene body of knowledge. Sixty-eight percent indicated that had the distance option not existed, they would not have been able to obtain their advanced degree in dental hygiene. Twenty-one percent of the respondents report either being currently enrolled in a doctoral program, or having completed a doctoral degree.Conclusion: These results suggest that the University of Missouri-Kansas City Master of Science in Dental Hygiene Education Program is meeting its goals from the perspective of all stakeholders and providing its graduates with access to education and educational resources to meet the program competencies and ultimately achieve their career goals. Copyright © 2016 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  7. Evaluation of NASA's Mars Public Engagement Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viotti, M.; Bowman, C.

    2014-12-01

    From 2009-2014, NASA's Mars Public Engagement (MPE) Program developed and implemented project-level logic models and associated impacts and indicators tables using the NSF's "Framework for Evaluating Impacts of Informal Science Education Projects" (Friedman, 2008) as a key guiding document. This Framework was selected given the national-expert-level evaluation committee who synthesized evaluation in a way that allows project-to-project comparisons in key areas of measurable change, while also allowing variation for appropriate project-specific measures and outcomes. These logic models, revisited and refined annually, provide guidance for all measures developed, tested, and implemented with MPE projects, including the Mars Student Imaging Project (MSIP), the Imagine Mars Project, and Mars Educator Professional Development. Project questionnaires were developed, tested, refined, retested, and finalized following standard procedures outlined in Converse & Presser (1986), Dillman, Smyth, & Christian (2009), Krosnick & Presser (2010), and Presser, et al. (2004). Interview questions were drafted, reviewed by project staff, and revised following established interview question development guidelines (e.g., Kvale, 1996; Maxwell, 2005; Maykut & Morehouse, 1994; Strauss & Corbin, 1998). For MSIP final projects, a rubric guided by Lantz (2004) was developed to evaluate systematically the quality and completeness of the final projects. We will discuss our instruments as well as the important issue of nonresponse error, which is relevant to a wide range of NASA programs because most data is collected from customers who are voluntary participants, as opposed to grantees who must report as a condition of their grant. NASA programs that consider data and report results from voluntary samples must be cautious about claims or decisions based on those data. We will discuss the ways in which we consider and address this challenge.

  8. AAAS Communicating Science Program: Reflections on Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braha, J.

    2015-12-01

    The AAAS Center for Public Engagement (Center) with science builds capacity for scientists to engage public audiences by fostering collaboration among natural or physical scientists, communication researchers, and public engagement practitioners. The recently launched Leshner Leadership Institute empowers cohorts of mid-career scientists to lead public engagement by supporting their networks of scientists, researchers, and practitioners. The Center works closely with social scientists whose research addresses science communication and public engagement with science to ensure that the Communicating Science training program builds on empirical evidence to inform best practices. Researchers ( Besley, Dudo, & Storkdieck 2015) have helped Center staff and an external evaluator develop pan instrument that measures progress towards goals that are suggested by the researcher, including internal efficacy (increasing scientists' communication skills and confidence in their ability to engage with the public) and external efficacy (scientists' confidence in engagement methods). Evaluation results from one year of the Communicating Science program suggest that the model of training yields positive results that support scientists in the area that should lead to greater engagement. This talk will explore the model for training, which provides a context for strategic communication, as well as the practical factors, such as time, access to public engagement practitioners, and technical skill, that seems to contribute to increased willingness to engage with public audiences. The evaluation program results suggest willingness by training participants to engage directly or to take preliminary steps towards engagement. In the evaluation results, 38% of trained scientists reported time as a barrier to engagement; 35% reported concern that engagement would distract from their work as a barrier. AAAS works to improve practitioner-researcher-scientist networks to overcome such barriers.

  9. An Evaluation of State Energy Program Accomplishments: 2002 Program Year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweitzer, M.

    2005-07-13

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) State Energy Program (SEP) was established in 1996 by merging the State Energy Conservation Program (SECP) and the Institutional Conservation Program (ICP), both of which had been in existence since 1976 (U.S. DOE 2001a). The SEP provides financial and technical assistance for a wide variety of energy efficiency and renewable energy activities undertaken by the states and territories. SEP provides money to each state and territory according to a formula that accounts for population and energy use. In addition to these ''Formula Grants'', SEP ''Special Project'' funds are made available on a competitive basis to carry out specific types of energy efficiency and renewable energy activities (U.S. DOE 2003c). The resources provided by DOE typically are augmented by money and in-kind assistance from a number of sources, including other federal agencies, state and local governments, and the private sector. The states SEP efforts include several mandatory activities, such as establishing lighting efficiency standards for public buildings, promoting car and vanpools and public transportation, and establishing policies for energy-efficient government procurement practices. The states and territories also engage in a broad range of optional activities, including holding workshops and training sessions on a variety of topics related to energy efficiency and renewable energy, providing energy audits and building retrofit services, offering technical assistance, supporting loan and grant programs, and encouraging the adoption of alternative energy technologies. The scope and variety of activities undertaken by the various states and territories is extremely broad, and this reflects the diversity of conditions and needs found across the country and the efforts of participating states and territories to respond to them. The purpose of this report is to present estimates of the energy and

  10. Making program evaluation activities family-centered: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Katherine A; Cousins, J Bradley

    2014-01-01

    This study explored ways in which program evaluation activities in pediatric rehabilitation settings can become congruent with family-centered service (FCS) philosophy. Two Canadian pediatric rehabilitation centers participated in this study, which included focus groups with staff members and interviews with parents. Participants identified seven ways in which program evaluation practices could be made congruent with FCS. Suggestions included: (a) the inclusion of a diverse group of program recipients, (b) the use of processes that facilitate family involvement, (c) the recruitment of family champions, (d) the involvement of families in program development, (e) the establishment of evaluations that are relevant to families (f) the development of center-wide statements about family involvement in evaluation and (g) the compensation of families for their active participation in evaluation. For program evaluation practices to be useful and relevant, they should be improved and made consistent with FCS philosophy. Those evaluating pediatric rehabilitation programs need to use approaches and activities that respect the needs, characteristics, cultures and diversity of the program recipients. Such actions will help to improve the quality of care provided, the nature of program evaluation activities, as well as the overall level of FCS in pediatric rehabilitation settings.

  11. Aspect-oriented programming evaluated

    CERN Document Server

    Kleinschmager, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Hauptbeschreibung Aspect-oriented-programming is a relatively new technique that has evolved on top of the already well-established approach of object-oriented programming. When it is used correctly, it promises to remove many redundant parts of a code that appear repeatedly in an application, essentially untangling the original code. Thus, it can lead to a cleaner, more separated software design, to greater modularity and maintainability. Time-savings in software engineering can also be huge cost-savings, and anything that increases software quality is a welcome sight in an industr

  12. Evaluation du programme sciences humaines (Evaluation of Humanities Programs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quebec Commission on the Evaluation of Collegiate Teaching (Quebec).

    In 1990, social science programs in Quebec's colleges in Canada were revised to standardize core courses and objectives across individual courses. Subsequently, the province's Commission on the Evaluation of Collegiate Teaching undertook an evaluation of the revised program to determine its administration and effectiveness, as well as the…

  13. Evaluating Workplace English Language Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekkens, Kristin; Winke, Paula

    2009-01-01

    Companies across the United States provide workplace English classes to non-native-English-speaking employees to increase productivity, retention, and on-the-job safety. Institutions that financially support the programs often require evidence of learning through standardized tests as a prerequisite for continued funding. However, the tests…

  14. Strategies for Evaluating Complex Environmental Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, V.

    2011-12-01

    Evidence for the effectiveness of environmental education programs has been difficult to establish for many reasons. Chief among them are the lack of clear program objectives and an inability to conceptualize how environmental education programs work. Both can lead to evaluations that make claims that are difficult to substantiate, such as significant changes in student achievement levels or behavioral changes based on acquisition of knowledge. Many of these challenges can be addressed by establishing the program theory and developing a logic model. However, claims of impact on larger societal outcomes are difficult to attribute solely to program activities. Contribution analysis may offer a promising method for addressing this challenge. Rather than attempt to definitively and causally link a program's activities to desired results, contribution analysis seeks to provide plausible evidence that can reduce uncertainty regarding the 'difference' a program is making to observed outcomes. It sets out to verify the theory of change behind a program and, at the same time, takes into consideration other influencing factors. Contribution analysis is useful in situations where the program is not experimental-there is little or no scope for varying how the program is implemented-and the program has been funded on the basis of a theory of change. In this paper, the author reviews the feasibility of using contribution analysis as a way of evaluating the impact of the GLOBE program, an environmental science and education program. Initially conceptualized by Al Gore in 1995, the program's implementation model is based on worldwide environmental monitoring by students and scientists around the globe. This paper will make a significant and timely contribution to the field of evaluation, and specifically environmental education evaluation by examining the usefulness of this analysis for developing evidence to assess the impact of environmental education programs.

  15. PNNL FY2005 DOE Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) Program Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Patrick A.; Madson, Vernon J.; Isern, Nancy G.; Haney, Janice M.; Fisher, Julie A.; Goheen, Steven C.; Gulley, Susan E.; Reck, John J.; Collins, Drue A.; Tinker, Mike R.; Walker, Landon A.; Wynn, Clifford L.

    2005-01-31

    This document reports the results of the FY 2005 PNNL VPP Program Evaluation, which is a self-assessment of the operational and programmatic performance of the Laboratory related to worker safety and health. The report was compiled by a team of worker representatives and safety professionals who evaluated the Laboratory's worker safety and health programs on the basis of DOE-VPP criteria. The principle elements of DOE's VPP program are: Management Leadership, Employee Involvement, Worksite Analysis, Hazard Prevention and Control, and Safety and Health Training.

  16. FY-2007 PNNL Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) Program Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Patrick A.; Fisher, Julie A.; Goheen, Steven C.; Isern, Nancy G.; Madson, Vernon J.; Meicenheimer, Russell L.; Pugh, Ray; Schneirla, Keri A.; Shockey, Loretta L.; Tinker, Mike R.

    2008-08-15

    This document reports the results of the FY-2007 PNNL VPP Program Evaluation, which is a self-assessment of the operational and programmatic performance of the Laboratory related to worker safety and health. The report was compiled by a team of worker representatives and safety professionals who evaluated the Laboratory's worker safety and health programs on the basis of DOE-VPP criteria. The principle elements of DOE's VPP program are: Management Leadership, Employee Involvement, Worksite Analysis, Hazard Prevention and Control, and Safety and Health Training.

  17. Programming software for usability evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, T.L.; Allen, H.W.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides an overview of the work completed for a portion of the User Interface Testbed for Technology Packaging (UseIT) project. The authors present software methods for programming systems to record and view interactions with a graphical user interface. A brief description of the human factors design process is presented. The software methods exploit features available in the X Window System and the operating system for Windows{trademark} 95 and Windows{trademark} NT{reg_sign}.

  18. To Include or Not to Include: Evaluations and Reasoning about the Failure to Include Peers with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Elementary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottema-Beutel, Kristen; Turiel, Elliot; DeWitt, Mila N.; Wolfberg, Pamela J.

    2017-01-01

    Given the significant role that typically developing children play in the social lives of children with autism spectrum disorder, it is important to understand how they evaluate and reason about the inclusion/exclusion of children with autism spectrum disorder in social situations. The objective of this study is to determine elementary students'…

  19. Outcomes and lessons learned from evaluating TRICARE's disease management programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall, Timothy M; Askarinam Wagner, Rachel C; Zhang, Yiduo; Yang, Wenya; Arday, David R; Gantt, Cynthia J

    2010-06-01

    To share outcomes and lessons learned from an evaluation of disease management (DM) programs for asthma, congestive heart failure (CHF), and diabetes for TRICARE patients. Multiyear evaluation of participants in voluntary, opt-out DM programs. Patient-centered programs, administered by 3 regional contractors, provide phone-based consultations with a care manager, educational materials, and newsletters. The study sample consisted of 23,793 asthma, 4092 CHF, and 29,604 diabetes patients with at least 6 months' tenure in the program. Medical claims were analyzed to quantify program effect on healthcare utilization, medical costs, and clinical outcomes. Multivariate regression analysis with an historical control group was used to predict patient outcomes in the absence of DM. The difference between actual and predicted DM patient outcomes was attributed to the program. A patient survey collected data on program satisfaction and perceived usefulness of program information and services. Modest improvements in patient outcomes included reduced inpatient days and medical costs, and (with few exceptions) increased percentages of patients receiving appropriate medications and tests. Annual per patient reductions in medical costs were $453, $371, and $783 for asthma, CHF, and diabetes program participants, respectively. The estimated return on investment was $1.26 per $1.00 spent on DM services. Findings suggest that the DM programs more than pay for themselves, in addition to improving patient health and quality of life. Lessons learned in program design, implementation, effectiveness, and evaluation may benefit employers contemplating DM, DM providers, and evaluators of DM programs.

  20. 20 CFR 627.220 - Coordination with programs under title IV of the Higher Education Act including the Pell grant...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the Higher Education Act including the Pell grant program. 627.220 Section 627.220 Employees' Benefits... of the Higher Education Act including the Pell grant program. (a) Coordination. Financial assistance programs under title IV of the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended (HEA) (the Pell Grant program, the...

  1. Evaluation of Youth Leadership Training Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen A. Anderson

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Results of a two-year evaluation of youth leadership programs offered within community youth development programs in Connecticut are presented. Youth involved in leadership activities were contrasted with a comparison group of youth who were not involved in leadership programming. Participants in the leadership programs reported an improved sense of support from their local communities. Leadership training also appeared to offer an added benefit to males who reported significant improvements in their social self-efficacy in contrast to females engaged in leadership programs or youth comprising the comparison group. Youth who participated in the leadership programs appeared to be a uniquely talented group of individuals, initially scoring higher than the comparison group on a variety of youth outcome measures. However, a subgroup of youth who began the leadership program at a lower level of overall functioning were more likely than youth who began the program at a higher level of functioning to report positive changes.

  2. Deception in Program Evaluation Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-31

    Possible Deception: The Words of Satyam’s Chair Ramalinga Raju.” Journal of Business Ethics (March 2013): vol. 113, no. 2: 333-347. Faulkner , William ...Performance: A Field Study.” MIS Quarterly (June 2002): vol. 26, no. 2: 119-144. Cooley, William W. “The Inevitable Subjectivity of Evaluators

  3. An Evaluation System for the Online Training Programs in Meteorology and Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Zhi, Xiefei

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies the current evaluation system for the online training program in meteorology and hydrology. CIPP model that includes context evaluation, input evaluation, process evaluation and product evaluation differs from Kirkpatrick model including reactions evaluation, learning evaluation, transfer evaluation and results evaluation in…

  4. Jesse Owens Olympian Summer Youth Development Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuyahoga Community Coll., Cleveland, OH.

    An evaluation is given of an urban summer recreational program which was sponsored by a community college and designed to provide recreation, instruction, competition, and personal development for youth from 8 to 17 years. The program also offered inservice education to staff of community agencies working with youth. Activities included swimming,…

  5. Preadmission programs: development, implementation and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Meara, K; McAuliffe, M J; Motherway, D; Dunleavy, M J

    1983-01-01

    Preparation of children for hospitalization is utilized to mitigate the stresses which may accompany the experience. Preadmission programs provide preparation for the patient and family on a prehospital basis. The authors describe the development of family-centered, developmentally based programs which foster continuity and consistency in a large, pediatric tertiary care setting. Implementation and evaluation of the programs which contribute to quality patient care are discussed.

  6. 1994 Ergonomics Program Quality Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longbotham, L.; Miller, D.P.

    1995-06-01

    A telephone survey was conducted to evaluate the quality of service provided to the primary customers of the Corporate Ergonomics Group (CEG). One hundred clients who received services between October 1993 and June 1994 were asked questions on their expectations, implementation of ergonomic recommendations, follow-ups, time required, productivity improvements, symptom alleviation, and satisfaction. Suggestions on how processes could be improved were also solicited. In general, recommendations are being implemented, worksite evaluations are going smoothly, and customers are satisfied with the process. The CEG was pleased to learn that half of the people who implemented recommendations experienced improvements in productivity, and four out of five symptomatic customers experienced partial or complete relief. Through analysis of the data and by studying clients` suggestions for process improvement, the CEG has developed a strategy for changing and improving current procedures and practices. These plans can be found in the last section of this report.

  7. 5 CFR 9701.107 - Program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ....107 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM General Provisions § 9701.107 Program evaluation. (a) DHS will establish...

  8. Evaluating and Selecting Sport Management Undergraduate Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuneen, Jacquelyn; Sidwell, M. Joy

    1998-01-01

    States that the accelerated growth of sport management undergraduate programs that began in the 1980s has continued into the current decade. There are currently 180 sport management major programs in American colleges and universities. Describes the sports management approval process and suggests useful strategies to evaluate sport management…

  9. Evaluating the Georgia Master Naturalist Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildreth, Lauren; Mengak, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the Georgia Master Naturalist Program using an online survey. Survey participation was voluntary, and the survey addressed areas such as satisfaction, volunteerism, and future training. The program received high scores from survey respondents. They appreciated training on native plants, environmental awareness, and ecological…

  10. Motivation for Evaluation: A roadmap for Improving Program Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taber, J. J.; Bohon, W.; Bravo, T. K.; Dorr, P. M.; Hubenthal, M.; Johnson, J. A.; Sumy, D. F.; Welti, R.; Davis, H. B.

    2016-12-01

    Over the past year, the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS) Education and Public Outreach (EPO) program has undertaken a new effort to increase the rigor with which it evaluates its programs and products. More specifically we sought to make evaluation an integral part of our EPO staff's work, enable staff to demonstrate why we do the activities we do, enhance the impact or our products and programs, and empower staff to be able to make evidence-based claims. The challenges we faced included a modest budget, finding an applicable approach to both new and legacy programs ranging from formal and informal education to public outreach, and implementing the process without overwhelming staff. The Collaborative Impact Analysis Method (IAM; Davis and Scalice, 2015) was selected as it allowed us to combine the EPO staff's knowledge of programs, audiences and content with the expertise of an outside evaluation expert, through consultations and a qualitative rubric assessing the initial state of each product/program's evaluation. Staff then developed action plans to make incremental improvements to the evaluation of programs over time. We have found that this approach promotes the development of staff knowledge and skills regarding evaluation, provides a common language among staff, increases enthusiasm to collect and share data, encourages discussions of evaluative approaches when planning new activities, and improves each program's ability to capture the intended and unintended effects on the behaviors, attitudes, skills, interests, and/or knowledge of users/participants. We will share the initial IAM Scores for products and programs in the EPO portfolio, along with examples of the action plans for several key products and programs, and the impact that implementing those actions plans has had on our evaluations. Davis, H. & Scalice, D. (2015). Evaluate the Impact of your Education and Outreach Program Using the Quantitative Collaborative Impact Analysis

  11. Current mental health program evaluation in San Mateo County.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, A

    1967-09-01

    Examples of program evaluation studies are presented to illustrate the wide range of questions under review in the San Mateo County Mental Health Program. The variety of questions investigated is a reflection of the comprehensiveness and community orientation of the services included in this program. These studies are classified from four points of view, depending upon the focus of their activity: intraservice, interservice, division, and community. Some administrative factors related to the research function are discussed.

  12. Industrial Assessment Center Program Impact Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, M.A.

    2000-01-26

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy's Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) Program. The purpose of this program is to conduct energy, waste, and productivity assessments for small to medium-sized industrial firms. Assessments are conducted by 30 university-based industrial assessment centers. The purpose of this project was to evaluate energy and cost savings attributable to the assessments, the trained alumni, and the Websites sponsored by this program. How IAC assessments, alumni, and Web-based information may influence industrial energy efficiency decision making was also studied. It is concluded that appreciable energy and cost savings may be attributed to the IAC Program and that the IAC Program has resulted in more active and improved energy-efficiency decision making by industrial firms.

  13. Epilogue: lessons learned about evaluating health communication programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreps, Gary L

    2014-12-01

    Systematic evaluation research is needed to develop, implement, refine, and sustain effective health communication programs. Yet, evaluation research is not always well integrated into health communication intervention activities or even budgeted as part of health promotion efforts. If included in health promotion programs, evaluation research is often conducted superficially, after the fact, and does not provide the strategic information needed to make sure that health communication programs achieve their important goals. To rectify this problem, it is important to reassert and institutionalize the value of evaluation research in health promotion efforts. It is important to mandate that all major health communication programs are guided by robust evaluation research data. It is also important to help health promotion experts to conduct rigorous and revealing evaluation research as well as help them use evaluation research data to guide the development, refinement, and implementation of health communication programs. This Epilogue to this special section on Evaluating Health Communication Programs presents specific propositions that charts the course for using evaluation research to promote public health and recommends next steps for achieving this goal.

  14. Second Language Proficiency Assessment and Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunan, David

    A discussion of the role of second language proficiency assessment in the evaluation of language programs argues that for four reasons, the use of proficiency is inappropriate as a central element in evaluation. The reasons are: (1) the construct of proficiency has not been operationalized in a way that enables it to be used usefully; (2)…

  15. Discount method for programming language evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurtev, Svetomir; Christensen, Tommy Aagaard; Thomsen, Bent

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents work in progress on developing a Discount Method for Programming Language Evaluation inspired by the Discount Usability Evaluation method (Benyon 2010) and the Instant Data Analysis method (Kjeldskov et al. 2004). The method is intended to bridge the gap between small scale...

  16. Evaluation of Training Programs for Rural Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indira, A.

    2008-01-01

    An Evaluation of the "Impact Assessment of the Training Programs" of a National Level Training Institution in India was conducted using the Kirkpatrick Method (KP Method). The studied Institution takes up research, provides training, offers consultancy and initiates action in the rural sector of India. The evaluation study used a…

  17. Handbook of evaluation of utility DSM programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirst, E.; Reed, J. [eds.; Bronfman, B.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Hicks, E.; Hirst, E.; Hoffman, M.; Keating, K.; Michaels, H.; Nadel, S.; Peters, J.; Reed, J.; Saxonis, W.; Schoen, A.; Violette, D.

    1991-12-01

    Program evaluation has become a central issue in the world of utility integrated resource planning. The DSM programs that utilities were operating to meet federal requirements or to improve customer relations are now becoming big business. DSM is being considered an important resource in a utility`s portfolio of options. In the last five years, the amount of money that utilities have invested in DSM has grown exponentially in most regulatory jurisdictions. Market analysts are now talking about DSM being a $30 billion industry by the end of the decade. If the large volume of DSM-program investments was not enough to highlight the importance of evaluation, then the introduction of regulatory incentives has really focused the spotlight. This handbook was developed through a process that involved many of those people who represent the diverse constituencies of DSM-program evaluation. We have come to recognize the many technical disciplines that must be employed to evaluate DSM programs. An analysis might start out based on the principles of utility load research to find out what happened, but a combination of engineering and statistical methods must be used to ``triangulate`` an estimate of what would have happened without the program. The difference, of course, is that elusive but prized result of evaluation: what happened as the direct result of the DSM program. Technical performance of DSM measures is not the sole determinant of the answer, either. We also recognize the importance of such behavioral attributes of DSM as persistence and free ridership. Finally, DSM evaluation is meaningless without attention to planning an approach, communicating results to relevant decision-makers, and focusing as much on the process as the impacts of the program. These topics are all covered in this handbook.

  18. Sort, an evaluation program for TANSY-KM5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosshoeg, G

    1997-12-31

    The result of a measurement with the TANSY neutron spectrometer is stored in two list mode files. The files are divided into three parts, a header containing the parameters for the measurement, a data area containing the amplitude calibration data, and a body containing the measured data in list mode. The purpose of this program is the evaluation of the data for inspection and re-calibration of the instrument. Several options are included for investigation of as many of the properties of the instrument as possible. The program can also be used for the final evaluation and the presentation of the neutron spectra. However, the intention is that this should be done using SNAP, the general evaluation program for JET, written by Pieter van Belle. A spin-off of the program is that it is used as a support for the writing of the routines included in SNAP. The final result of the program is a neutron spectrum. Weight factors for the energy dependent sensitivity of the instrument are included. However, enhancement of the resolution using the response functions are not included and no routines are included for the evaluation of plasma parameters. This document is a complement to the files delivered with the program 24 refs, figs

  19. Super Efficient Refrigerator Program (SERP) evaluation. Volume 1: Process evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandahl, L.J.; Ledbetter, M.R.; Chin, R.I.; Lewis, K.S.; Norling, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted this study for the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the Super Efficient Refrigerator Program (SERP) Evaluation. This report documents the SERP formation and implementation process, and identifies preliminary program administration and implementation issues. The findings are based primarily on interviews with those familiar with the program, such as utilities, appliance manufacturers, and SERP administrators. These interviews occurred primarily between March and April 1995, when SERP was in the early stages of program implementation. A forthcoming report will estimate the preliminary impacts of SERP within the industry and marketplace. Both studies were funded by DOE at the request of SERP Inc., which sought a third-party evaluation of its program.

  20. EML Gamma Spectrometry Data Evaluation Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decker, Karin M. [Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML), New York, NY (United States)

    1998-02-28

    This report represents the results of the analyses for the second EML Gamma Spectrometry Data Evaluation Program (August 1997). A calibration spectrum, a background spectrum and three sample spectra were included for each software format as part of the evaluation. The calibration spectrum contained nuclides covering the range from 59.5 keV to 1836 keV. The participants were told fallout and fission product nuclides as well as naturally occurring nuclides could be present. The samples were designed to test the detection and quantification of very low levels of nuclides and the ability of the software and user to properly resolve multiplets. The participants were asked to report values and uncertainties as Becquerel per sample with no decay correction. Twenty-nine sets of results were reported from a total of 70 laboratories who received the spectra. The percentage of the results within 1 F of the expected value was 76, 67, and 55 for samples 1, 2, and 3, respectively. From all three samples, 12% of the results were more than 3 F from the expected value. Sixty-two nuclides out of a total of 580 expected results were not reported for the three samples. Sixty percent of these false negatives were due to nuclides which were present at the minimum detectable activity level. There were 53 false positives reported with 60% of the responses due to problems with background subtraction. The results indicate that the Program is beneficial to the participating laboratories in that it provides them with analysis problems that are difficult to create with spiked samples due to the unavailability of many nuclides and the short half-lives of others. EML will continue its annual distribution, the third is to be held in March 1999.

  1. Body Image and quality of life of senior citizens included in a cardiac rehabilitation program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Vargas Amaral

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Most people who have to live with some kind of disease tend to adopt healthy habits and create new ways of seeing themselves. The aim of this study is to explore the relationship between the index of quality of life and self perception of patients included in a cardiovascular rehabilitation program in Florianopolis/Brazil. The sample consists of 24 subjects of 62 ± 1.3 years of age, who have coronary artery disease. The Minnesota Living With Heart Failure Questionnaire (MLHFQ was used to assess the quality of life, and to identify the degree of body image discontentment the Stunkard and Sorensen questionnaire (1993 was applied. Statistical analysis was made through statistics programs and the software SPSS 11.0. The degree of association between variables was studied with Kendall test. It was verified that the higher the BMI and the current body shape, the greatest the degree of body image dissatisfaction. The emotional symptoms also appear to be significantly correlated with a desire for a smaller body shape and with indicators of lower quality of life (r = 0474 = 0735, p major 0.05. The physical symptoms were also considerably associated with the emotional symptoms. These results suggest that the variables concerning the quality of life are meaningful to significant body image and satisfaction, which seems to correlate with fewer emotional problems and better facing of the disease. Cardiovascular Rehabilitation Programs that implement physical activity in daily habits proves to be a suitable tool for improving these ailments in this post-acute phase

  2. Reliability Analysis of Brittle Material Structures - Including MEMS(?) - With the CARES/Life Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Noel N.

    2002-01-01

    Brittle materials are being used, or considered, for a wide variety of high tech applications that operate in harsh environments, including static and rotating turbine parts. thermal protection systems, dental prosthetics, fuel cells, oxygen transport membranes, radomes, and MEMS. Designing components to sustain repeated load without fracturing while using the minimum amount of material requires the use of a probabilistic design methodology. The CARES/Life code provides a general-purpose analysis tool that predicts the probability of failure of a ceramic component as a function of its time in service. For this presentation an interview of the CARES/Life program will be provided. Emphasis will be placed on describing the latest enhancements to the code for reliability analysis with time varying loads and temperatures (fully transient reliability analysis). Also, early efforts in investigating the validity of using Weibull statistics, the basis of the CARES/Life program, to characterize the strength of MEMS structures will be described as as well as the version of CARES/Life for MEMS (CARES/MEMS) being prepared which incorporates single crystal and edge flaw reliability analysis capability. It is hoped this talk will open a dialog for potential collaboration in the area of MEMS testing and life prediction.

  3. A tool to include gamma analysis software into a quality assurance program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnew, Christina E; McGarry, Conor K

    2016-03-01

    To provide a tool to enable gamma analysis software algorithms to be included in a quality assurance (QA) program. Four image sets were created comprising two geometric images to independently test the distance to agreement (DTA) and dose difference (DD) elements of the gamma algorithm, a clinical step and shoot IMRT field and a clinical VMAT arc. The images were analysed using global and local gamma analysis with 2 in-house and 8 commercially available software encompassing 15 software versions. The effect of image resolution on gamma pass rates was also investigated. All but one software accurately calculated the gamma passing rate for the geometric images. Variation in global gamma passing rates of 1% at 3%/3mm and over 2% at 1%/1mm was measured between software and software versions with analysis of appropriately sampled images. This study provides a suite of test images and the gamma pass rates achieved for a selection of commercially available software. This image suite will enable validation of gamma analysis software within a QA program and provide a frame of reference by which to compare results reported in the literature from various manufacturers and software versions. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  4. 78 FR 67369 - National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program: Addition to the Vaccine Injury Table to Include All...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program: Addition to the Vaccine Injury Table to Include All Vaccines Against Seasonal Influenza AGENCY: Health... vaccines against seasonal influenza are covered under the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program...

  5. [Evaluation of Mexican 'Sicalidad' health quality program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Buendía, Frida; Bello-Chavolla, Omar Y; Zubieta-Zavala, Adriana; Hernández-Ramírez, Luz; Zepeda-Tena, Carolina; Durán-Arenas, Luis

    2015-01-01

    To analize the implementation of the Sistema Integral de Calidad en Salud (Sicalidad) program of the Ministry of Health in the 2011. The study follows a cross sectional design, hybrid, with a qualitative and quantitative components. A cluster probabilístic sample was used with two stages. A total of 3 034 interviews were carried out in 13 states to evaluate the implementation of the eight components of the Sicalidad program. General indexes of performance (GIP) were formulated for structure process and satisfaction of users, physicians and nurses with the program. The GIP with the lower score was accreditation of health facilities with a range of scores between 25.4 and 28% in the medical units evaluated; The highest range of scores was in the component of nosocomial infection prevention between 78.3 and 92%. In brief the Sicalidad components evaluated suggest problems with both structure and critical process elements in the implementation of the quality initiatives.

  6. The Evaluation of the Resolving Conflict Creatively Program: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aber, J L; Brown, J L; Chaudry, N; Jones, S M; Samples, F

    1996-01-01

    The Resolving Conflict Creatively Program (RCCP) is a comprehensive, school-based program in conflict resolution and intercultural understanding implemented in more than 110 New York City public schools. The National Center for Children in Poverty is currently conducting an evaluation of the program in grades 1-6, although the program itself is implemented in grades K-12. The following components are included: teacher training, classroom instruction and staff development, the program curriculum, administrators' training, peer mediation, parent training, and a targeted intervention for high-risk youth. The program evolved out of practice-based theory. Researchers and practitioners have collaborated on and designed an evaluation that illustrates how the practice-based theory is consistent with and can be put into operation using developmental and ecological theories of the etiology of violence-related behaviors in middle childhood. The target population for this study is approximately 9,600 children, 5-12 years of age, in 15 elementary schools in New York City. The evaluation is being conducted over two years with two data-collection points in each year. A cross-sequential design is being used to examine the short- and intermediate-term utility with children at different ages/developmental stages. The relative effect of the beginning program can be compared to more comprehensive models. A total of 8,233 students responded to the baseline survey. The study population is largely Hispanic (41%) and African American (37%). Preliminary analyses indicate that baseline means of such constructs as aggressive fantasies, hostile attributional biases, and conduct problems increase with grade level. Ten years of practice-based experience and one year of a two-year quantitative evaluation have taught several important lessons about school-based program implementation and the evaluation of such programs. The scope and longevity of the RCCP and the empirically rigorous evaluation

  7. Method for including detailed evaluation of daylight levels in Be06

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Steffen

    2008-01-01

    Good daylight conditions in office buildings have become an important issue due to new European regulatory demands which include energy consumption for electrical lighting in the building energy frame. Good daylight conditions in offices are thus in increased focus as an energy conserving measure....... In order to evaluate whether a certain design is good daylight design or not building designers must perform detailed evaluation of daylight levels, including the daylight performance of dynamic solar shadings, and include these in the energy performance evaluation. However, the mandatory national...... calculation tool in Denmark (Be06) for evaluating the energy performance of buildings is currently using a simple representation of available daylight in a room and simple assumptions regarding the control of shading devices. In a case example, this is leading to an overestimation of the energy consumption...

  8. Educational program in crisis management for cardiac surgery teams including high realism simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Louis-Mathieu; Cooper, Jeffrey B; Raemer, Daniel B; Schneider, Robert C; Frankel, Allan S; Berry, William R; Agnihotri, Arvind K

    2012-07-01

    Cardiac surgery demands effective teamwork for safe, high-quality care. The objective of this pilot study was to develop a comprehensive program to sharpen performance of experienced cardiac surgical teams in acute crisis management. We developed and implemented an educational program for cardiac surgery based on high realism acute crisis simulation scenarios and interactive whole-unit workshop. The impact of these interventions was assessed with postintervention questionnaires, preintervention and 6-month postintervention surveys, and structured interviews. The realism of the acute crisis simulation scenarios gradually improved; most participants rated both the simulation and whole-unit workshop as very good or excellent. Repeat simulation training was recommended every 6 to 12 months by 82% of the participants. Participants of the interactive workshop identified 2 areas of highest priority: encouraging speaking up about critical information and interprofessional information sharing. They also stressed the importance of briefings, early communication of surgical plan, knowing members of the team, and continued simulation for practice. The pre/post survey response rates were 70% (55/79) and 66% (52/79), respectively. The concept of working as a team improved between surveys (P = .028), with a trend for improvement in gaining common understanding of the plan before a procedure (P = .075) and appropriate resolution of disagreements (P = .092). Interviewees reported that the training had a positive effect on their personal behaviors and patient care, including speaking up more readily and communicating more clearly. Comprehensive team training using simulation and a whole-unit interactive workshop can be successfully deployed for experienced cardiac surgery teams with demonstrable benefits in participant's perception of team performance. Copyright © 2012 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Algorithms and Programs for Strong Gravitational Lensing In Kerr Space-time Including Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Kantowski, Ronald; Dai, Xinyu; Baron, Eddie; Maddumage, Prasad

    2015-05-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and quasars are important astrophysical objects to understand. Recently, microlensing observations have constrained the size of the quasar X-ray emission region to be of the order of 10 gravitational radii of the central supermassive black hole. For distances within a few gravitational radii, light paths are strongly bent by the strong gravity field of the central black hole. If the central black hole has nonzero angular momentum (spin), then a photon’s polarization plane will be rotated by the gravitational Faraday effect. The observed X-ray flux and polarization will then be influenced significantly by the strong gravity field near the source. Consequently, linear gravitational lensing theory is inadequate for such extreme circumstances. We present simple algorithms computing the strong lensing effects of Kerr black holes, including the effects on polarization. Our algorithms are realized in a program “KERTAP” in two versions: MATLAB and Python. The key ingredients of KERTAP are a graphic user interface, a backward ray-tracing algorithm, a polarization propagator dealing with gravitational Faraday rotation, and algorithms computing observables such as flux magnification and polarization angles. Our algorithms can be easily realized in other programming languages such as FORTRAN, C, and C++. The MATLAB version of KERTAP is parallelized using the MATLAB Parallel Computing Toolbox and the Distributed Computing Server. The Python code was sped up using Cython and supports full implementation of MPI using the “mpi4py” package. As an example, we investigate the inclination angle dependence of the observed polarization and the strong lensing magnification of AGN X-ray emission. We conclude that it is possible to perform complex numerical-relativity related computations using interpreted languages such as MATLAB and Python.

  10. ALGORITHMS AND PROGRAMS FOR STRONG GRAVITATIONAL LENSING IN KERR SPACE-TIME INCLUDING POLARIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Bin; Maddumage, Prasad [Research Computing Center, Department of Scientific Computing, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Kantowski, Ronald; Dai, Xinyu; Baron, Eddie, E-mail: bchen3@fsu.edu [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and quasars are important astrophysical objects to understand. Recently, microlensing observations have constrained the size of the quasar X-ray emission region to be of the order of 10 gravitational radii of the central supermassive black hole. For distances within a few gravitational radii, light paths are strongly bent by the strong gravity field of the central black hole. If the central black hole has nonzero angular momentum (spin), then a photon’s polarization plane will be rotated by the gravitational Faraday effect. The observed X-ray flux and polarization will then be influenced significantly by the strong gravity field near the source. Consequently, linear gravitational lensing theory is inadequate for such extreme circumstances. We present simple algorithms computing the strong lensing effects of Kerr black holes, including the effects on polarization. Our algorithms are realized in a program “KERTAP” in two versions: MATLAB and Python. The key ingredients of KERTAP are a graphic user interface, a backward ray-tracing algorithm, a polarization propagator dealing with gravitational Faraday rotation, and algorithms computing observables such as flux magnification and polarization angles. Our algorithms can be easily realized in other programming languages such as FORTRAN, C, and C++. The MATLAB version of KERTAP is parallelized using the MATLAB Parallel Computing Toolbox and the Distributed Computing Server. The Python code was sped up using Cython and supports full implementation of MPI using the “mpi4py” package. As an example, we investigate the inclination angle dependence of the observed polarization and the strong lensing magnification of AGN X-ray emission. We conclude that it is possible to perform complex numerical-relativity related computations using interpreted languages such as MATLAB and Python.

  11. Antibullying programs in schools: how effective are evaluation practices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Wendy; Smith, J David

    2009-09-01

    Bullying is a problem for schools around the world, and is an important topic for research because it has been associated with negative outcomes on numerous social, psychological, and academic measures. Antibullying prevention and intervention programs have varied greatly in their outcomes, with some studies reporting positive results while others have reported little or no positive impacts. Prompted by accountability demands, many agencies have developed standards with which to assess whether social programs are effective. Antibullying program evaluations have not been systematically reviewed to determine whether these types of standards are being applied. The purpose of this study was to assess the rigor of recent peer-reviewed antibullying program evaluations. Thirty-one peer-reviewed evaluations of antibullying programs, published within the last 10 years, were identified and coded for study characteristics. Shortcomings were identified in many of these program evaluations. In order to improve evaluation practices, researchers should consider using more rigorous designs to identify cause-effect relationships, including control conditions and random assignment, using more appropriate pre-post intervals, using more advanced methods of analyses such as hierarchical linear modeling, and systematically verifying program integrity to obtain dosage data that can be used in the outcome analyses.

  12. An Evaluation of the NAMI Basics Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brister, Teri; Cavaleri, Mary A.; Olin, S. Serene; Shen, Sa; Burns, Barbara J.; Hoagwood, Kimberly E.

    2012-01-01

    This brief report describes results from an evaluation of NAMI Basics, a peer-delivered family education program for family caregivers of children and adolescents with mental illness. Over six classes, family members are given information (e.g. education about mental illness and treatments), skills training (e.g. family communication skills) and…

  13. The Vale rangeland rehabilitation program: an evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harold F. Heady

    1988-01-01

    This manuscript discusses the initiation, execution, and outcome of an 11-year (1962-1972) rangeland rehabilitation program in southeastern Oregon. Res. Bull. PNW-RB-070 (1977) is updated with 1986 measurements and evaluations of vegetational conditions, wildlife, recreational use, livestock grazing, and management of public rangelands. The mix of multiple uses has...

  14. Senior Program Officer, Evaluation | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The SPO facilitates evaluation processes that intentionally influence the focus, content and management of IDRC projects, programs and corporate policies, debates and approaches to improve the Centre's and its partners' performance and ensure accountability for the resources spent. Also, the SPO incorporates them in ...

  15. From Then to Now: Emerging Directions for Youth Program Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E. Arnold

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the impact of youth development programs has been an important topic since the programs first began, and the past 25 years in particular have witnessed considerable advances in the evaluation of youth development programs. This article presents a brief history of youth development program evaluation, considering how it has changed over the years. From there, three contemporary trends related to youth program evaluation are examined: 1 a new evaluation focus, which is the emphasis on evaluating program quality; 2 organizational structures related to effective program evaluation, primarily in the area of program evaluability and evaluation capacity building; and 3 an emerging evaluation approach, involving youth in evaluating the programs that affect them. The article concludes with a call for programs to attend carefully to program implementation quality.

  16. 34 CFR 84.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy... assistance programs; and (d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the workplace. (Authority: E.O.s 12549 and 12689; 20 U.S.C. 1082, 1094, 1221e-3 and 3474; and Sec...

  17. 25 CFR 170.623 - How are IRR Program projects and activities included in a self-governance agreement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How are IRR Program projects and activities included in a self-governance agreement? 170.623 Section 170.623 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... self-governance agreement? To include an IRR Program project or activity in a self-governance agreement...

  18. Integrating Program Theory and Systems-Based Procedures in Program Evaluation: A Dynamic Approach to Evaluate Educational Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammatikopoulos, Vasilis

    2012-01-01

    The current study attempts to integrate parts of program theory and systems-based procedures in educational program evaluation. The educational program that was implemented, called the "Early Steps" project, proposed that physical education can contribute to various educational goals apart from the usual motor skills improvement. Basic…

  19. Apples And Oranges: Obtaining Meaningful Corss-Program Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keesling, J. Ward; Shavelson, Richard J.

    1977-01-01

    Cross-program evaluation, the comparison of different types of educational programs, is discussed. The advantages and disadvantages of this type of evaluation are outlined, with respect to decision making and legislation regarding funding of programs. (GDC)

  20. Evaluation of otolaryngology residency program websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svider, Peter F; Gupta, Amar; Johnson, Andrew P; Zuliani, Giancarlo; Shkoukani, Mahdi A; Eloy, Jean Anderson; Folbe, Adam J

    2014-10-01

    Prior to applying or interviewing, most prospective applicants turn to the Internet when evaluating residency programs, making maintenance of a comprehensive website critical. While certain "intangibles" such as reputation may not be communicated effectively online, residency websites are invaluable for conveying other aspects of a program. Prior analyses have reported that certain criteria such as research experience and didactics are important considerations for applicants. To evaluate the comprehensiveness of otolaryngology residency websites. Review of otolaryngology residency program websites. Websites of 99 civilian residency programs were searched for the presence of 23 criteria. Presence of 23 criteria for application process, incentives, instruction, research, clinical training, and other. Only 5 programs contained at least three-quarters of the criteria analyzed; on average programs reported less than 50% of information sought. Among the 99 residency program websites, a description of the following criteria was noted: comprehensive faculty listing (88%), didactics (80%), contact e-mail (77%), current residents (74%), description of facilities (70%), intern schedule (70%), research requirements (69%), otolaryngology rotation schedule (64%), other courses (61%), ERAS (Electronic Residency Application Service) link (55%), year-to-year responsibility progression (47%), call schedule (40%), active/past research projects (37%), area information (34%), message from the program director (33%) or chair (23%), selection criteria (30%), salary (directly on site) (23%), surgical statistics (18%), parking (9%), and meal allowance (7%). The mean (SD) percentage present of factors encompassing "clinical training" was 55% (23%), significantly higher than the mean (SD) percentage of factors covered under the "incentives" category (19% [11%]; P = .01). The proportion of overall criteria present on websites did not differ on organizing programs by region (range, 42

  1. [Michigan Technological University Pre-Service Teacher Enhancement Program]. [Includes a copy of the Student Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, C.S.; Yarroch, W.L.

    1993-04-27

    The Michigan Technological University Teacher Education Program received funding from the US Department of Energy for the purpose of providing capable and suitably inclined, MTU Engineering and Science students a chance to explore high school level science and mathematics teaching as a career option. Ten undergraduate students were selected from nominations and were paired with mentor teachers for the study. This report covers the experience of the first ten nominees and their participation in the program.

  2. Program Evaluation for Sexually Transmitted Disease Programs: In Support of Effective Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Marion W

    2016-02-01

    Program evaluation is a key tool for gathering evidence about the value and effectiveness of sexually transmitted disease (STD) prevention programs and interventions. Drawing from published literature, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention evaluation framework, and program examples, this article lays out some of the key principles of program evaluation for STD program staff. The purpose is to offer STD program staff a stronger basis for talking about, planning, conducting, and advocating for evaluation within their respective program contexts.

  3. The Evaluation Of A Diversity Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christa Fouche

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on the evaluation of a programme that was designed and developed in an attempt to address the reasons why diversity programmes fail. A large company in the banking sector initiated the development of the product and keynote personnel from this company evaluated the content. The content was found to adhere to Best Practice requirements. OpsommingDie artikel evalueer die inhoud van ’n diversiteits-program wat ontwerp en ontwikkel is ten einde die redes waarom diversiteits-opleiding faal, aan te spreek.’n Groot maatskappy in die banksektor het die ontwikkeling geinisieer en ’n aantal senior personeellede is genader om die inhoud te evalueer. Daar is bevind dat die inhoud aan wêreldklas standaarde voldoen.

  4. Nursing doctoral program evaluation: Alumni outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakalys, J A; Stember, M L; Magilvy, J K

    2001-01-01

    Meaningful examination of program outcomes is one of the most challenging tasks facing faculty and administrators involved in the design and delivery of educational programs. This article reports the outcomes for one doctoral program in nursing and elucidates salient conceptual and methodologic issues in educational outcomes research for this discipline. Career development, scholarly productivity, and professional leadership were the foci of this outcomes study. Three instruments were used; data were provided by alumni, graduate faculty, and alumni supervisors. Data analysis techniques included content analysis and descriptive and correlational statistics. Results showed that graduates embarked on diverse career paths with the majority employed in academic institutions. Most graduates reported active involvement in research, publications, presentations, and professional leadership. Employment pattern differences were noted between academic year and summer-only program graduates with associated divergence in career emphasis, research productivity, and job satisfaction. A positive correlation of time since degree conferral with scholarly productivity and professional leadership was noted. Recommendations for future research include refining outcomes, linking process to outcome, using longitudinal designs, and attending to unique nursing student and doctoral program characteristics.

  5. Experimental evaluation of a photovoltaic simulation program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, R.; Doty, J.; Bailey, B.; Stewart, R. (AWS Scientific Inc., Albany, NY (United States))

    1994-04-01

    A widely used photovoltaic (PV) simulation code, PVFORM, is evaluated in a grid-connected configuration against experimental data from a prototype demand-side management PV array. Taking advantage of the comprehensive array monitoring program, each of the key algorithms composing the simulation code is evaluated independently. PVFORM as a whole was not found to have any major flaws, but was found to overpredict actual power output due mostly to assuming ideal array sun-tracking performance and ideal maximum power point tracking.

  6. Evaluation metrics of educational programs for teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Gwendolyn D.

    1995-01-01

    A system for evaluating the teacher programs and services in the Education Services Branch was developed. The primary stakeholder was interested in determining the worth or usefulness of these services to educators. Therefore, two instruments were developed to collect the data. One questionnaire was administered. Data was collected, analyzed and reported. The other questionnaire was pilot tested and will be administered to teachers during the school year.

  7. Some consequences of including low frequencies in the evaluation of floor impact sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindel, Jens Holger; Rasmussen, Birgit

    1996-01-01

    A method for including frequencies down to 50 Hz in the evaluation of floor impact sound has become available with the new version of ISO 717-2. In addition to the single number quantity for rating the impact sound insulation, a new spectrum adaptation term has been defined. The method has been......, and light floor constructions are evaluated less favourably than heavy constructions. Comparison with data from a 14-year-old Swedish survey suggests that the extended frequency range leads to a higher correlation with subjective evaluation of impact noise. The consequences of applying the extended...... frequency range in future building regulations or in a system for sound classification of dwellings have been considered. However, there are several problems to be solved, among which are a lack of available data for floor constructions at low frequencies, an increased measurement uncertainty, and the fact...

  8. Evaluation of Hospital-Based Palliative Care Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Karen Lynn; Rafalson, Lisa; Mariano, Kathleen; Michalek, Arthur

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated current hospital-based palliative care programs using recommendations from the Center to Advance Palliative Care (CAPC) as a framework. Seven hospitals located in Buffalo, New York were included based on the existence of a hospital-based palliative care program. Data was collected from August through October of 2013 by means of key informant interviews with nine staff members from these hospitals using a guide comprised of questions based on CAPC's recommendations. A gap analysis was conducted to analyze the current state of each hospital's program based upon CAPC's definition of a quality palliative care program. The findings identify challenges facing both existing/evolving palliative care programs, and establish a foundation for strategies to attain best practices not yet implemented. This study affirms the growing availability of palliative care services among these selected hospitals along with opportunities to improve the scope of services in line with national recommendations. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. A Qualitative Program Evaluation of a Structured Leadership Mentoring Program at a Large Aerospace Corporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teller, Romney P.

    2011-01-01

    The researcher utilized a qualitative approach to conduct a program evaluation of the organization where he is employed. The study intended to serve as a program evaluation for the structured in-house mentoring program at a large aerospace corporation (A-Corp). This program evaluation clarified areas in which the current mentoring program is…

  10. 76 FR 5821 - Earned Import Allowance Program: Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the Program for Certain...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-02

    ... COMMISSION Earned Import Allowance Program: Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the Program for Certain... investigation No. 332-503, Earned Import Allowance Program: Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the Program for... Import Allowance Program (EIAP) and directed the Commission to conduct annual reviews of the program for...

  11. Simulated selection responses for breeding programs including resistance and resilience to parasites in Creole goats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gunia, M.; Phocas, F.; Gourdine, J.L.; Bijma, P.; Mandonnet, N.

    2013-01-01

    The Creole goat is a local breed used for meat production in Guadeloupe (French West Indies). As in other tropical countries, improvement of parasite resistance is needed. In this study, we compared predicted selection responses for alternative breeding programs with or without parasites resistance

  12. 77 FR 61012 - Expansion of Importer Self-Assessment Program To Include Qualified Importers of Focused...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-05

    ..., and to discuss the scope and methodology of the self-testing plan developed by the company. Companies... assessment methodology used by the company; the testing methodology; the frequency of self-testing activities... conducted at least annually. ( www.cbp.gov/xp/cgov/trade/trade_programs/importer_self_assessment/ ). Once...

  13. Including α s1 casein gene information in genomic evaluations of French dairy goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carillier-Jacquin, Céline; Larroque, Hélène; Robert-Granié, Christèle

    2016-08-04

    Genomic best linear unbiased prediction methods assume that all markers explain the same fraction of the genetic variance and do not account effectively for genes with major effects such as the α s1 casein polymorphism in dairy goats. In this study, we investigated methods to include the available α s1 casein genotype effect in genomic evaluations of French dairy goats. First, the α s1 casein genotype was included as a fixed effect in genomic evaluation models based only on bucks that were genotyped at the α s1 casein locus. Less than 1 % of the females with phenotypes were genotyped at the α s1 casein gene. Thus, to incorporate these female phenotypes in the genomic evaluation, two methods that allowed for this large number of missing α s1 casein genotypes were investigated. Probabilities for each possible α s1 casein genotype were first estimated for each female of unknown genotype based on iterative peeling equations. The second method is based on a multiallelic gene content approach. For each model tested, we used three datasets each divided into a training and a validation set: (1) two-breed population (Alpine + Saanen), (2) Alpine population, and (3) Saanen population. The α s1 casein genotype had a significant effect on milk yield, fat content and protein content. Including an α s1 casein effect in genetic and genomic evaluations based only on male known α s1 casein genotypes improved accuracies (from 6 to 27 %). In genomic evaluations based on all female phenotypes, the gene content approach performed better than the other tested methods but the improvement in accuracy was only slightly better (from 1 to 14 %) than that of a genomic model without the α s1 casein effect. Including the α s1 casein effect in a genomic evaluation model for French dairy goats is possible and useful to improve accuracy. Difficulties in predicting the genotypes for ungenotyped animals limited the improvement in accuracy of the obtained estimated breeding values.

  14. Program Review - Geothermal Exploration and Assessment Technology Program; Including a Report of the Reservoir Engineering Technical Advisory Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielson, Dennis L., ed.

    1979-12-01

    In 1978, The Division of Geothermal Energy of the Department of Energy established the Geothermal Exploration and Assessment Technology Program. The purpose of this program is to ''provide assistance to the Nation's industrial community by helping to remove technical and associated economic barriers which presently inhibit efforts to bring geothermal electric power production and direct heat application on line''. In the near term this involves the adaptation of exploration and assessment techniques from the mineral and petroleum industry to geothermal applications. In the near to far term it involves the development of new technology which will improve the cost effectiveness of geothermal exploration.

  15. Evaluation of early stimulation programs for enhancing brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnier, Christine

    2008-07-01

    The term 'early intervention' designates educational and neuroprotection strategies aimed at enhancing brain development. Early educational strategies seek to take advantage of cerebral plasticity. Neuroprotection, a term initially used to characterize substances capable of preventing cell death, now encompasses all interventions that promote normal development and prevent disabilities, including organisational, therapeutic and environment-modifying measures, such as early stimulation programs. Early stimulation programs were first devised in the United States for vulnerable children in low-income families; positive effects were recorded regarding school failure rates and social problems. Programs have also been implemented in several countries for premature infants and low-birth-weight infants, who are at high risk for neurodevelopmental abnormalities. The programs target the child, the parents or both. The best evaluated programs are the NIDCAP (Newborn Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program) in Sweden for babiesneonatal intensive care units and the longitudinal multisite program IHDP (Infant Health and Development Program) created in the United States for infantsstimulation improved cognitive outcomes and child-parent interactions; cognition showed greater improvements than motor skills and larger benefits were obtained in families that combined several risk factors including low education attainment by the mothers.

  16. Evaluation of a Hospital-Based Pneumonia Nurse Navigator Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seldon, Lisa E; McDonough, Kelly; Turner, Barbara; Simmons, Leigh Ann

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a hospital-based pneumonia nurse navigator program. This study used a retrospective, formative evaluation. Data of patients admitted from January 2012 through December 2014 to a large community hospital with a primary or secondary diagnosis of pneumonia, excluding aspiration pneumonia, were used. Data included patient demographics, diagnoses, insurance coverage, core measures, average length of stay (ALOS), disposition, readmission rate, financial outcomes, and patient barriers to care were collected. Descriptive statistics and parametric testing were used to analyze data. Core measure performance was sustained at the 90th percentile 2 years after the implementation of the navigator program. The ALOS did not decrease to established benchmarks; however, the SD for ALOS decreased by nearly half after implementation of the navigator program, suggesting the program decreased the number and length of extended stays. Charges per case decreased by 21% from 2012 to 2014. Variable costs decreased by 4% over a 2-year period, which increased net profit per case by 5%. Average readmission payments increased by 8% from 2012 to 2014, and the net revenue per case increased by 8.3%. The pneumonia nurse navigator program may improve core measures, reduce ALOS, and increase net revenue. Future evaluations are necessary to substantiate these findings and optimize the cost and quality performance of navigator programs.

  17. 24 CFR 266.115 - Program monitoring and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Program monitoring and evaluation... Housing Finance Agency Requirements § 266.115 Program monitoring and evaluation. (a) HFA certifications... and evaluation. Monitoring and evaluation activities will focus on compliance with program...

  18. Evaluation of plant-wide WWTP control strategies including the effects of filamentous bulking sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flores Alsina, Xavier; Comas, J.S.; Rodríguez Roda, I.

    2009-01-01

    Model No. 2 (BSM2). In a second series of simulations the parameters of the secondary settler model in the BSM2 are automatically changed on the basis of an on-line calculated risk of filamentous bulking, in order to mimic the effect of growth of filamentous bacteria in the plant. The results...... are presented using multivariate analysis. Including the effects of filamentous bulking in the simulation model gives a—more realistic—deterioration of the plant performance during periods when the conditions for development of filamentous bulking sludge are favourable: compared to the reference case where......The main objective of this paper is to evaluate the effect of filamentous bulking sludge on the predicted performance of simulated plant-wide WWTP control strategies. First, as a reference case, several control strategies are implemented, simulated and evaluated using the IWA Benchmark Simulation...

  19. Faculty Development at One Midwestern Dental School: A Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C; Smith, Deborah B; Overman, Pamela R; Bunce, Larry

    2015-10-01

    Most dental school faculty members arrive on campus with a wealth of clinical experience but little to no teacher training. For the past two decades, there has been a call for schools to educate their faculty on a wide variety of topics including educational methodology and cutting-edge educational techniques through faculty development programs. Drawing on theories of general program evaluation as well as evaluation specific to educational programming, the aim of this study was to investigate outcomes of the Faculty Development Program at the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Dentistry between 2007 and 2014. A mixed-methods research design gathered quantitative data via email survey sent to all eligible teaching faculty members; it received an overall response rate of 54% (N=51). Qualitative data came from open-ended survey questions and a focus group with seven volunteer faculty participants. The survey data suggested that the stated outcomes of faculty development were being met for all stakeholder groups with varying degrees of success. Focus group results indicated a need for a more formal new faculty orientation and better communication with all about the specific charge of faculty development within the school. Evaluation of faculty development activities in academic dental institutions is a necessary component of the ongoing improvement of dental education. Suggestions for future evaluations include the idea of collaborating with other dental schools to increase sample sizes, which would increase participants' perception of the level of confidentiality and make statistical analyses more robust.

  20. The case for including reach as a key element of program theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montague, Steve; Porteous, Nancy L

    2013-02-01

    This paper suggests that there is a need to build reach in the logic models and results frameworks of public health initiatives. A lack of explicit thinking about reach in logic models can lead to problems such as narrow/constricted understanding of impacts chain, favoring of 'narrow and efficient' initiatives over 'wide and engaging' initiatives and biased thinking against equity considerations. An alternative approach described in this paper that explicitly considers reach demonstrates that an explicit description of reach in program theory and results logic depictions can improve equity in health and social systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Including everyone: A peer learning program that works for under-represented minorities?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques van der Meer

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Peer learning has long been recognised as an effective way to induct first-year students into the academic skills required to succeed at university. One recognised successful model that has been extensively researched is the Supplemental Instruction (SI model; it has operated in the US since the mid-1970s. This model is commonly known in Australasia as the Peer Assisted Study Sessions (PASS program. Although there is a considerable amount of research into SI and PASS, very little has been published about the impact of peer learning on different student groups, for example indigenous and other ethnic groups. This article reports on the results from one New Zealand university of the effectiveness of PASS for Māori and Pasifika students. The questions this article seeks to address are whether attendance of the PASS program results in better final marks for these two groups of students, and whether the number of sessions attended has an impact on the final marks.

  2. Advanced gas cooled nuclear reactor materials evaluation and development program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    Results of work performed from January 1, 1977 through March 31, 1977 on the Advanced Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program are presented. The objectives of this program are to evaluate candidate alloys for Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Process Heat and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications, in terms of the effect of simulated reactor primary coolant (impure Helium), high temperatures, and long time exposures, on the mechanical properties and structural and surface stability of selected candidate alloys. A second objective is to select and recommend materials for future test facilities and more extensive qualification programs. Work covered in this report includes progress to date on alloy selection for VHTR Nuclear Process Heat (NPH) applications and for DCHT applications. The present status on the simulated reactor helium loop design and on designs for the testing and analysis facilities and equipment is discussed.

  3. WHO standards for biotherapeutics, including biosimilars: an example of the evaluation of complex biological products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knezevic, Ivana; Griffiths, Elwyn

    2017-11-01

    The most advanced regulatory processes for complex biological products have been put in place in many countries to provide appropriate regulatory oversight of biotherapeutic products in general, and similar biotherapeutics in particular. This process is still ongoing and requires regular updates to national regulatory requirements in line with scientific developments and up-to-date standards. For this purpose, strong knowledge of and expertise in evaluating biotherapeutics in general and similar biotherapeutic products, also called biosimilars, in particular is essential. Here, we discuss the World Health Organization's international standard-setting role in the regulatory evaluation of recombinant DNA-derived biotherapeutic products, including biosimilars, and provide examples that may serve as models for moving forward with nonbiological complex medicinal products. A number of scientific challenges and regulatory considerations imposed by the advent of biosimilars are described, together with the lessons learned, to stimulate future discussions on this topic. In addition, the experiences of facilitating the implementation of guiding principles for evaluation of similar biotherapeutic products into regulatory and manufacturers' practices in various countries over the past 10 years are briefly explained, with the aim of promoting further developments and regulatory convergence of complex biological and nonbiological products. © 2017 The Authors. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. The World Health Organization retains copyright and all other rights in the manuscript of this article as submitted for publication.

  4. Two Computer Programs for Equipment Cost Estimation and Economic Evaluation of Chemical Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuri, Carlos J.; Corripio, Armando B.

    1984-01-01

    Describes two computer programs for use in process design courses: an easy-to-use equipment cost estimation program based on latest cost correlations available and an economic evaluation program which calculates two profitability indices. Comparisons between programed and hand-calculated results are included. (JM)

  5. Case Study Evaluation of the Boston Area Carpooling Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-05-01

    The report evaluates a carpooling program in operation in the Boston, Massachusetts area from August, 1973 through August, 1974. The program, entitled the WBZ/ALA Commuter Computer Campaign, was the first program in the nation to promote and organize...

  6. A Review of Economic Evaluations of Tobacco Control Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer W. Kahende

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Each year, an estimated 443,000 people die of smoking-related diseases in the United States. Cigarette smoking results in more than $193 billion in medical costs and productivity losses annually.In an effort to reduce this burden, many states, the federal government, and several national organizations fund tobacco control programs and policies. For this report we reviewed existing literature on economic evaluations of tobacco control interventions. We found that smoking cessation therapies, including nicotine replacement therapy (NRT and self-help are most commonly studied. There are far fewer studies on other important interventions, such as price and tax increases, media campaigns, smoke free air laws and workplace smoking interventions, quitlines, youth access enforcement, school-based programs, and community-based programs. Although there are obvious gaps in the literature, the existing studies show in almost every case that tobacco control programs and policies are either cost-saving or highly cost-effective.

  7. Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program, 1991 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deal, D.E.; Abitz, R.J.; Myers, J.; Martin, M.L.; Milligan, D.J.; Sobocinski, R.W.; Lipponer, P.P.J. [International Technology Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Belski, D.S. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States). Waste Isolation Div.

    1993-09-01

    The data presented in this report are the result of Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program (BSEP) activities at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plan (WIPP) during 1991. These BSEP activities document and investigate the origins, hydraulic characteristics, extent, and composition of brine occurrences in the Permian Salado Formation and seepage of that brine into the excavations at the WIPP. When excavations began at the WIPP in 1982, small brine seepages (weeps) were observed on the walls. Brine studies began as part of the Site Validation Program and were formalized as a program in its own right in 1985. During nine years of observations (1982--1991), evidence has mounted that the amount of brine seeping into the WIPP excavations is limited, local, and only a small fraction of that required to produce hydrogen gas by corroding the metal in the waste drums and waste inventory. The data through 1990 is discussed in detail and summarized by Deal and others (1991). The data presented in this report describes progress made during the calendar year 1991 and focuses on four major areas: (1) quantification of the amount of brine seeping across vertical surfaces in the WIPP excavations (brine ``weeps); (2) monitoring of brine inflow, e.g., measuring brines recovered from holes drilled downward from the underground drifts (downholes), upward from the underground drifts (upholes), and from subhorizontal holes; (3) further characterization of brine geochemistry; and (4) preliminary quantification of the amount of brine that might be released by squeezing the underconsolidated clays present in the Salado Formation.

  8. 42 CFR 137.275 - May Self-Governance Tribes include IHS construction programs in a construction project agreement...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false May Self-Governance Tribes include IHS construction... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Construction Purpose and Scope § 137.275 May Self-Governance Tribes include IHS construction programs in a construction project agreement or in a funding...

  9. Advanced theoretical and experimental studies in automatic control and information systems. [including mathematical programming and game theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desoer, C. A.; Polak, E.; Zadeh, L. A.

    1974-01-01

    A series of research projects is briefly summarized which includes investigations in the following areas: (1) mathematical programming problems for large system and infinite-dimensional spaces, (2) bounded-input bounded-output stability, (3) non-parametric approximations, and (4) differential games. A list of reports and papers which were published over the ten year period of research is included.

  10. 76 FR 9283 - Medicaid Program; Payment Adjustment for Provider-Preventable Conditions Including Health Care...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-17

    ... base of an OPPC, we propose to define OPPC to include, at a minimum, wrong surgical or other invasive... experience serious injury and/or death if they undergo erroneous surgical or other invasive procedures and.... Under these NCDs, Medicare does not cover a particular surgical or other invasive procedure to treat a...

  11. Program evaluation of FHWA pedestrian and bicycle safety activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    "Introduction : FHWAs Office of Highway Safety (HSA) initiated a program evaluation by Booz Allen Hamilton to assess the overall effectiveness of the Agencys Pedestrian and Bicycle Safety Program. The evaluation covers pedestrian and bicycle sa...

  12. ADEA/AAL Institute for Allied Health Educators: Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C; Overman, Pamela R; Grzesikowski, Tami; Tucker-Lively, Felicia; Weinstein, George; Haden, N Karl

    2015-05-01

    Revised accreditation standards for dental and dental hygiene education programs have increased emphasis on faculty development that can improve teaching and learning, foster curricular change including use of teaching and learning technologies, and enhance retention and satisfaction of faculty. The American Dental Education Association (ADEA) and Academy for Academic Leadership (AAL) established the Institute for Allied Health Educators (IAHE) in 2007 to address faculty development needs for allied dental and allied health educators. In 2009, it was transitioned to an online program, which resulted in increased enrollment and diversity of participants. After seven years, a comprehensive program evaluation was warranted. The authors developed an online questionnaire based on Kirkpatrick's four-level model of training evaluation; for this study, levels one (satisfaction), two (knowledge and skill acquisition), and three (behavior change) were examined. Of the 400 program participants invited to take part in the study, a 38% response rate was achieved, with the majority indicating full-time faculty status. Nearly all (95-97%) of the respondents agreed or strongly agreed the program contributed to their teaching effectiveness, and 88-96% agreed or strongly agreed it enhanced their knowledge of educational concepts and strategies. In addition, 83% agreed or strongly agreed the program helped them develop new skills and confidence with technology, with 69% agreeing or strongly agreeing that it helped them incorporate technology into their own educational setting. Nearly 90% were highly positive or positive in their overall assessment of the program; 95% indicated they would recommend it to a colleague; and 80% agreed or strongly agreed they had discussed what they learned with faculty colleagues at their home institutions who had not attended the program. Positive findings from this evaluation provide evidence that the IAHE has been able to meet its goals.

  13. Evaluation of Saudi family medicine training program: the application of CIPP evaluation format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khathami, Abdullah Dukhail

    2012-01-01

    The Saudi Diploma in Family Medicine (SDFM) was enacted in 2007 to fulfill the needs of qualified Primary Health Care providers in Saudi Arabia. Evaluation is not only an integral process for designing educational training programs, but an effective evaluation strategy that helps achieve program objectives and enhances the quality of learning objectives: (1) Construct a self-administered questionnaire based on Context, input, process and product (CIPP) format to seek trainees' perceptions about the SDFM program; (2) identify the strengths and weaknesses of the SDFM program in relation to the learning outcomes; and (3) define the main obstacles to achieve the outcomes. A self-administered questionnaire was designed based on the CIPP evaluation format after. its validity and reliability were tested through piloting. Then, all the SDFM program trainees were included. The study response rate was 91.2%. More than 77% of the trainees stated that they had achieved the program objectives; a significant difference was found among Saudis and non-Saudis (p = 0.002). The training period was reported by 84% as a main barrier to achieve the program objectives, particularly the hospital rotation period. Results indicate an overall satisfaction with the training objectives and the teaching methods used. These findings can be useful for the policy makers to implement the suggested recommendations and deal with obstacles to improve the SDFM program in order to provide effective and efficient primary care services.

  14. Evaluation of effectiveness for MC&A programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkey, D. D. (David Dennis); DeMuth, S. F. (Scott F.); Longmire, V. L. (Victoria L.); Sinkule, B. J. (Barbara J.); Strittmatter, R. B. (Richard B.); Stevens, R. S. (Rebecca S.); Dawson, P. (Pamela); Preston, L. (Lynne)

    2004-01-01

    This paper is a progress report on a joint Los Alamos and Sandia National Laboratories effort to develop tools to evaluate MC&A system effectiveness and perform vulnerability assessments based on the system effectiveness metrics. It summarizes the work that the two labs have completed to date and provides an overview of the work remaining. The Department of Energy Office of Technology Development, SO-20.3, is presently considering whether it is possible to model MC&A programs at DOE facilities in order to better determine the need for and prioritize potential technology development projects. The intent is to develop an objective method of evaluating MC&A programs, to model the effect of changes to the systems used by the programs, and to quantify the extent to which these changes improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the programs. Project milestones include a review of the risk analysis tool developed at Sandia, ATLAS, to determine how MC&A system elements could be incorporated, identification of MC&A system elements and activities for which effectiveness metrics can be developed, and developing the metrics for these system elements. In addition, the milestones include validation of the system elements and effectiveness metrics by potential users. Upon completion of the development of MC&A system effectiveness metrics, we will determine the feasibility of integrating the data elements and process required for evaluation of MC&A effectiveness metrics into ATLAS.

  15. Palliative sedation for cancer patients included in a home care program: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Espinos, Claudio; Ruiz de Gaona, Estefania; Gonzalez, Cristina; Ruiz de Galarreta, Lucia; Lopez, Cristina

    2015-06-01

    Palliative sedation is a common treatment in palliative care. The home is a difficult environment for research, and there are few studies about sedation at home. Our aim was to analyze this practice in a home setting. We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional descriptive study in a home cohort during 2011. The inclusion criteria were as follows: 18 years or older and enrolled in the Palliative Home Care Program (PHCP) with advanced cancer. The variables employed were: sex, age, primary tumor location, and place of death. We also registered indication, type, drug and dose, awareness of diagnosis and prognosis, consent, survival, presence or absence of rales, painful mouth, and ulcers in patients sedated at home. We also collected the opinions of family members and professionals about the suffering of sedated patients. A total of 446 patients (56% at home) of the 617 admitted to the PHCP between January and December of 2011 passed away. The typical patient in our population was a 70-year-old man with a lung tumor. Some 35 (14%) home patients required sedation, compared to 93 (49%) at the hospital. The most frequent indication was delirium (70%), with midazolam the most common drug (mean dose, 40 mg). Survival was around three days. Rales were frequent (57%) as well as awareness of diagnosis and prognosis (77 and 71%, respectively). Perception of suffering after sedation was rare among relatives (17%) and professionals (8%). In most cases, the decision was made jointly by professionals and family members. Our study confirmed the role of palliative sedation as an appropriate therapeutic tool in the home environment.

  16. Evaluation of the Health Rocks! Program: The Association of Youth Engagement with Program Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Xia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This evaluation research examined the relationship between program process and program outcome, specifically, youth engagement in the national 4-H Council Health Rocks! program and their program outcomes.  Based on program evaluation surveys completed after the program by participants, youths’ engagement in the program was associated with their gains in knowledge and skills about substance use, and personal assets related to avoiding risks.  When youth participants find a program interesting, are actively engaged in the program, and find the program staff friendly, they benefit more from the program.  Findings underscore the importance of engaging curriculum and friendly staff to the success of extension or afterschool youth programs. The evaluation method may offer an example of balancing rigor of evaluation design and feasibility of implementing an evaluation.

  17. Evaluating Tobacco Control Policies in 28 Countries (including 9 EU countries: The ITC Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Fong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Since its start in 2002, the ITC Project has been conducting evaluation studies of tobacco control policies via prospective cohort surveys of tobacco users in 28 countries, including 9 EU countries. This presentation will focus on the design of the ITC Project and how it differs from and complements existing evidence-gathering systems (monitoring and surveillance systems in measuring and understanding the impact of FCTC policies. The presentation will also describe the ITC Project's most recent initiatives: (1 the EUREST-PLUS study focusing on measuring the impact of the Tobacco Products Directive, and (2 a large-scale international cohort study of e-cigarettes starting in the United States, Canada, England, and Australia.

  18. Program Evaluation Interest and Skills of School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astramovich, Randall L.

    2017-01-01

    School counselors participated in a study examining their program evaluation interest and skills. Findings suggest that school counselors understand the importance of program evaluation, yet they may lack the skills and confidence to successfully engage in program evaluation activities. Professional development training may be an important method…

  19. Programming system for rapid evaluation of coal deposits

    OpenAIRE

    Stanìk Frantiek

    2002-01-01

    Programming system for rapid evaluation of coal deposits (calculation of coal reserves) based on data stored in coal deposit database including processing of textual and graphic outputs was elaborated. The nature of such outputs is based on conventional coal reserve calculations so that connection with coal reserve calculations made in the past is secured. Differences in particular coal deposits as well as in individual coal seams are respected in the system. Coal seams differ one from anothe...

  20. Alberta: evaluation of nursing retention and recruitment programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidner, Arlene; Graham, Carol; Smith, Jennifer; Aitken, Julia; Odell, Jill

    2012-03-01

    Retention and recruitment strategies are essential to address nursing workforce supply and ensure the viability of healthcare delivery in Canada. Knowledge transfer between experienced nurses and those new to the profession is also a focus for concern. The Multi-Employer/United Nurses of Alberta Joint Committee attempted to address these issues by introducing a number of retention and recruitment (R&R) initiatives for nurses in Alberta: in total, seven different programs that were introduced to some 24,000 nurses and employers across the province of Alberta in 2001 (the Transitional Graduate Nurse Recruitment Program) and 2007 (the remaining six R&R programs). Approximately 1,600 nurses participated in the seven programs between 2001 and 2009. Of the seven strategies, one supported entry into the workplace, two were pre-retirement strategies and four involved flexible work options. This project entailed a retrospective evaluation of the seven programs and differed from the other Research to Action (RTA) projects because it was solely concerned with evaluation of pre-existing initiatives. All seven programs were launched without a formal evaluation component, and the tracking of local uptake varied throughout the province. The union and various employers faced challenges in implementing these strategies in a timely fashion, as most were designed at the bargaining table during negotiations. As a result, systems, policy and procedural changes had to be developed to support their implementation after they became available.Participants in the programs indicated improvements over time in several areas, including higher levels of satisfaction with work–life balance, hours worked and their current practice and profession. The evaluation found that participation led to perceived improvements in nurses' confidence, greater control over their work environment, decreased stress levels, increased energy and morale and perceived improved ability to provide high-quality care

  1. 76 FR 46723 - Evaluation of State Coastal Management Programs and National Estuarine Research Reserves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-03

    ... continuing review of the performance of states with respect to coastal program implementation. Evaluation of... of financial assistance awards funded under the CZMA. Each evaluation will include a site visit... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Evaluation of State Coastal Management Programs and...

  2. National Evaluation of the Weatherization Assistance Program: Preliminary Evaluation Plan for Program Year 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ternes, Mark P [ORNL; Schweitzer, Martin [ORNL; Tonn, Bruce Edward [ORNL; Schmoyer, Richard L [ORNL; Eisenberg, Joel Fred [ORNL

    2007-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Weatherization Assistance Program was created by Congress in 1976 under Title IV of the Energy Conservation and Production Act. The purpose and scope of the Program as currently stated in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 10CFR 440.1 is 'to increase the energy efficiency of dwellings owned or occupied by low-income persons, reduce their total residential expenditures, and improve their health and safety, especially low-income persons who are particularly vulnerable such as the elderly, persons with disabilities, families with children, high residential energy users, and households with high energy burden' (Code of Federal Regulations, 2005). DOE sponsored a comprehensive evaluation of the Program in the early 1990's to provide policy makers and program implementers with up-to-date and reliable information they needed for effective decision making and cost-effective operations. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) managed the five part study which was based primarily on data from Program Year (PY) 1989 and supplemented by data from 1991-92 (Brown, Berry, and Kinney, 1994). In more recent years, ORNL has conducted four metaevaluations of the Program's energy savings using studies conducted by individual states between the years 1990-1996 (Berry, 1997), 1996-1998 (Schweitzer and Berry, 1999), 1993-2002 (Berry and Schweitzer, 2003), and 1993-2005 (Schweitzer, 2005). DOE announced through its Weatherization Program Notice 05-1 (DOE, 2004) that it would undertake a new national evaluation of the Program because the Program that was evaluated comprehensively in the early 1990's is vastly different from the Program of today. The Program has incorporated new funding sources, management principles, audit procedures, and energy-efficiency measures in response to findings and recommendations resulting from the 1989 National Evaluation, the Weatherization Plus strategic planning process, and other

  3. A Call to Include Severe Combined Immunodeficiency in Newborn Screening Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raz Somech

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantification of the T cell receptor excision circles (TRECs has recently emerged as a useful non-invasive clinical and research tool to investigate thymic activity. It allows the identification of T cell production by the thymus. Quantification of TREC copies has recently been implemented as the preferred test to screen neonates with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID or significant lymphopenia. Neonatal genetic screening for SCID is highly important in countries with high rates of consanguinous marriages, such as Israel, and can be used for early diagnosis, enabling prompt therapeutic intervention that will save lives and improve the outcome of these patients. TREC measurement is also applicable in clinical settings where T cell immunity is involved, including any T cell immunodeficiencies, HIV infection, the aging process, autoimmune diseases, and immune reconstitution after bone marrow transplantation.

  4. Evaluation of a Pharmacist and Nurse Practitioner Smoking Cessation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Zubair; Pogge, Elizabeth; Boomershine, Virginia

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of a smoking cessation program led by a pharmacist and a nurse practitioner. During a 6-month period, patients attended 7 one-on-one face-to-face smoking cessation counseling sessions with a pharmacist and 1 to 2 one-on-one face-to-face smoking cessation counseling sessions with a nurse practitioner. The primary outcome was smoking cessation point prevalence rates at months 1, 3, and 5 post-quit date. Secondary outcomes included medication adherence rates at months 1, 3, and 5 post-quit date, nicotine dependence at baseline versus program end, and patient satisfaction. Nine (47%) of 19 total participants completed the program. Seven of the 9 patients who completed the program were smoke-free upon study completion. Point prevalence rates at months 1, 3, and 5 post-quit date were 66%, 77%, and 77%, respectively, based on patients who completed the program. Medication adherence rates were 88.6%, 54.6%, and 75% at months 1, 3, and 5 post-quit date, respectively. Based on the Fagerstrom test, nicotine dependence decreased from baseline to the end of the study, 4.89 to 0.33 ( P < .001). Overall, participants rated the program highly. A joint pharmacist and nurse practitioner smoking cessation program can assist patients in becoming smoke-free.

  5. Guide for Operational Configuration Management Program including the adjunct programs of design reconstitution and material condition and aging management. Part 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-01

    This standard presents program criteria and implementation guidance for an operational configuration management program for DOE nuclear and non-nuclear facilities. This Part 2 includes chapters on implementation guidance for operational configuration management, implementation guidance for design reconstitution, and implementation guidance for material condition and aging management. Appendices are included on design control, examples of design information, conduct of walkdowns, and content of design information summaries.

  6. The SBIRT program matrix: a conceptual framework for program implementation and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Boca, Frances K; McRee, Bonnie; Vendetti, Janice; Damon, Donna

    2017-02-01

    Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) is a comprehensive, integrated, public health approach to the delivery of services to those at risk for the adverse consequences of alcohol and other drug use, and for those with probable substance use disorders. Research on successful SBIRT implementation has lagged behind studies of efficacy and effectiveness. This paper (1) outlines a conceptual framework, the SBIRT Program Matrix, to guide implementation research and program evaluation and (2) specifies potential implementation outcomes. Overview and narrative description of the SBIRT Program Matrix. The SBIRT Program Matrix has five components, each of which includes multiple elements: SBIRT services; performance sites; provider attributes; patient/client populations; and management structure and activities. Implementation outcomes include program adoption, acceptability, appropriateness, feasibility, fidelity, costs, penetration, sustainability, service provision and grant compliance. The Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment Program Matrix provides a template for identifying, classifying and organizing the naturally occurring commonalities and variations within and across SBIRT programs, and for investigating which variables are associated with implementation success and, ultimately, with treatment outcomes and other impacts. © 2017 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  7. Evaluation of medical education virtual program: P3 model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RITA REZAEE

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In e-learning, people get involved in a process and create the content (product and make it available for virtual learners. The present study was carried out in order to evaluate the first virtual master program in medical education at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences according to P3 Model. Methods: This is an evaluation research study with post single group design used to determine how effective this program was. All students 60 who participated more than one year in this virtual program and 21 experts including teachers and directors participated in this evaluation project. Based on the P3 e-learning model, an evaluation tool with 5-point Likert rating scale was designed and applied to collect the descriptive data. Results: Students reported storyboard and course design as the most desirable element of learning environment (2.30±0.76, but they declared technical support as the less desirable part (1.17±1.23. Conclusion: Presence of such framework in this regard and using it within the format of appropriate tools for evaluation of e-learning in universities and higher education institutes, which present e-learning curricula in the country, may contribute to implementation of the present and future e-learning curricula efficiently and guarantee its implementation in an appropriate way.

  8. Evaluation of Medical Education virtual Program: P3 model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaee, Rita; Shokrpour, Nasrin; Boroumand, Maryam

    2016-10-01

    In e-learning, people get involved in a process and create the content (product) and make it available for virtual learners. The present study was carried out in order to evaluate the first virtual master program in medical education at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences according to P3 Model. This is an evaluation research study with post single group design used to determine how effective this program was. All students 60 who participated more than one year in this virtual program and 21 experts including teachers and directors participated in this evaluation project. Based on the P3 e-learning model, an evaluation tool with 5-point Likert rating scale was designed and applied to collect the descriptive data. Students reported storyboard and course design as the most desirable element of learning environment (2.30±0.76), but they declared technical support as the less desirable part (1.17±1.23). Presence of such framework in this regard and using it within the format of appropriate tools for evaluation of e-learning in universities and higher education institutes, which present e-learning curricula in the country, may contribute to implementation of the present and future e-learning curricula efficiently and guarantee its implementation in an appropriate way.

  9. Objective Evaluation in an Online Geographic Information System Certificate Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott L. WALKER

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective Evaluation in an Online Geographic Information System Certificate Program Asst. Professor. Dr. Scott L. WALKER Texas State University-San Marcos San Marcos, Texas, USA ABSTRACT Departmental decisions regarding distance education programs can be subject to subjective decision-making processes influenced by external factors such as strong faculty opinions or pressure to increase student enrolment. This paper outlines an evaluation of a departmental distance-education program. The evaluation utilized several methods that strived to inject objectivity in evaluation and subsequent decision-making. A rapid multi-modal approach included evaluation methods of (1 considering the online psychosocial learning environment, (2 content analyses comparing the online version of classes to face-to-face versions, (3 cost comparisons in online vs. face-to-face classes, (4 student outcomes, (5 student retention, and (6 benchmarking. These approaches offer opportunities for departmental administrators and decision-making committees to make judgments informed by facts rather than being influenced by the emotions, beliefs, or opinions of organizational dynamics.

  10. Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program, 1990 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deal, D.E.; Abitz, R.J.; Myers, J.; Case, J.B.; Martin, M.L.; Roggenthen, W.M. [International Technology Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Belski, D.S. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States). Waste Isolation Div.

    1991-08-01

    The data presented in this report are the result of Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program (BSEP) activities at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) during 1990. When excavations began in 1982, small brine seepages (weeps) were observed on the walls. These brine occurrences were initially described as part of the Site Validation Program. Brine studies were formalized in 1985. The BSEP activities document and investigate the origins, hydraulic characteristics, extent, and composition of brine occurrences in the Permian Salado Formation and seepage of that brine into the excavations at the WIPP. The brine chemistry is important because it assists in understanding the origin of the brine and because it may affect possible chemical reactions in the buried waste after sealing the repository. The volume of brine and the hydrologic system that drives the brine seepage also need to be understood to assess the long-term performance of the repository. After more than eight years of observations (1982--1990), no credible evidence exists to indicate that enough naturally occurring brine will seep into the WIPP excavations to be of practical concern. The detailed observations and analyses summarized herein and in previous BSEP reports confirm the evidence apparent during casual visits to the underground workings -- that the excavations are remarkably dry.

  11. Program evaluation: Weatherization Residential Assistance Partnership (WRAP) Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, Bonnie B.; Lundien, Barbara; Kaufman, Jeffrey; Kreczko, Adam; Ferrey, Steven; Morgan, Stephen

    1991-12-01

    The Weatherization Residential Assistance Partnership,'' or WRAP program, is a fuel-blind conservation program designed to assist Northeast Utilities' low-income customers to use energy safely and efficiently. Innovative with respect to its collaborative approach and its focus on utilizing and strengthening the existing low-income weatherization service delivery network, the WRAP program offers an interesting model to other utilities which traditionally have relied on for-profit energy service contractors and highly centralized program implementation structures. This report presents appendices with surveys, participant list, and computers program to examine and predict potential energy savings.

  12. Adult vaccination strategies for the control of pertussis in the United States: an economic evaluation including the dynamic population effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Coudeville

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prior economic evaluations of adult and adolescent vaccination strategies against pertussis have reached disparate conclusions. Using static approaches only, previous studies failed to analytically include the indirect benefits derived from herd immunity as well as the impact of vaccination on the evolution of disease incidence over time. METHODS: We assessed the impact of different pertussis vaccination strategies using a dynamic compartmental model able to consider pertussis transmission. We then combined the results with economic data to estimate the relative cost-effectiveness of pertussis immunization strategies for adolescents and adults in the US. The analysis compares combinations of programs targeting adolescents, parents of newborns (i.e. cocoon strategy, or adults of various ages. RESULTS: In the absence of adolescent or adult vaccination, pertussis incidence among adults is predicted to more than double in 20 years. Implementing an adult program in addition to childhood and adolescent vaccination either based on 1 a cocoon strategy and a single booster dose or 2 a decennial routine vaccination would maintain a low level of pertussis incidence in the long run for all age groups (respectively 30 and 20 cases per 100,000 person years. These strategies would also result in significant reductions of pertussis costs (between -77% and -80% including additional vaccination costs. The cocoon strategy complemented by a single booster dose is the most cost-effective one, whereas the decennial adult vaccination is slightly more effective in the long run. CONCLUSIONS: By providing a high level of disease control, the implementation of an adult vaccination program against pertussis appears to be highly cost-effective and often cost-saving.

  13. Building the evaluation capacity of California's local tobacco control programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treiber, Jeanette; Cassady, Diana; Kipke, Robin; Kwon, Nicole; Satterlund, Travis

    2011-11-01

    Successful evaluation capacity building requires a dynamic balance between responding to local agency needs and ensuring that local staff have appropriate skills to conduct rigorous evaluations. In 2004, the California Tobacco Control Program established the Tobacco Control Evaluation Center (TCEC), based at a public research university, to provide evaluation technical assistance to approximately 100 local agencies implementing tobacco control programs. TCEC has been responsive to local needs, for instance, by answering 512 technical assistance requests in the first 5 years of operation and by tailoring training according to needs assessment results. About 50% of the technical assistance requests were for new data collection instruments (n = 255). TCEC has sought proactively to improve local evaluation skills, most recently in a data analysis and report writing skill building campaign that included a webinar, newsletter, and seven regional training meetings. Preliminary analysis suggests a 20% improvement in scores for the local final evaluation reports as a result of this campaign. It is concluded that evaluation technical assistance can be provided effectively by a university as long as the local context is kept in mind, and a balance of responsive and proactive technical assistance is provided.

  14. Evaluating disease management program effectiveness: an introduction to survival analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Ariel; Adams, John L; Roberts, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    Currently, the most widely used method in the disease management industry for evaluating program effectiveness is the "total population approach." This model is a pretest-posttest design, with the most basic limitation being that without a control group, there may be sources of bias and/or competing extraneous confounding factors that offer plausible rationale explaining the change from baseline. Survival analysis allows for the inclusion of data from censored cases, those subjects who either "survived" the program without experiencing the event (e.g., achievement of target clinical levels, hospitalization) or left the program prematurely, due to disenrollement from the health plan or program, or were lost to follow-up. Additionally, independent variables may be included in the model to help explain the variability in the outcome measure. In order to maximize the potential of this statistical method, validity of the model and research design must be assured. This paper reviews survival analysis as an alternative, and more appropriate, approach to evaluating DM program effectiveness than the current total population approach.

  15. Data Collection Methods for Evaluating Museum Programs and Exhibitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Amy Crack; Cohn, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Museums often evaluate various aspects of their audiences' experiences, be it what they learn from a program or how they react to an exhibition. Each museum program or exhibition has its own set of goals, which can drive what an evaluator studies and how an evaluation evolves. When designing an evaluation, data collection methods are purposefully…

  16. Evaluation of Development Programs: Randomized Controlled Trials or Regressions?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elbers, C.T.M.; Gunning, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    Can project evaluation methods be used to evaluate programs: complex interventions involving multiple activities? A program evaluation cannot be based simply on separate evaluations of its components if interactions between the activities are important. In this paper a measure is proposed, the total

  17. Evaluation of Mexico's Universal Vaccination Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-04-01

    This article summarizes findings from an evaluation of Mexico's Universal Vaccination Program during 1990-97, the progress achieved, the lessons learned, and objectives under decentralization. The evaluation assessed the cold chain and logistics systems, and the feasibility of vaccine production within Gerencia General de Biologicos y Reactivos. In 1996, 97% of children aged 1-4 years completed the full immunization schedule. Over the past 7 years, the incidence of preventable diseases declined. There were no poliomyelitis cases in the prior 7 years, no diphtheria cases in the prior 6 years, and a gradual decline in morbidity due to measles in the prior 5 years. Several government sectors are giving high priority to vaccination activities. Sufficient resources have been allocated for immunization. The government is planning on adding new vaccines that would benefit the adult population and/or prevent congenital defects. There is close coordination within institutions of the National Health System and with other public health organizations, such as PAHO and UNICEF. It is recommended that the central government perform high quality epidemiological surveillance and improve rapid analysis capacity, especially at the local and regional levels. Improvement is needed in the reporting capacity at the local level, to feed recent data to the central level in a timely fashion, and to use analysis to improve operations. Epidemiological training is needed at the operations level, as is private sector involvement at all levels. Underreporting of morbidity occurs. Regionalization must be monitored to ensure maximizing of resources.

  18. 45 CFR 287.130 - Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments, job creation and economic development...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... assessments, job creation and economic development activities? 287.130 Section 287.130 Public Welfare... creation and economic development activities? (a) A Tribe may conduct job market assessments within its NEW Program. These might include the following: (1) Consultation with the Tribe's economic development staff...

  19. Experiences of Students with Specific Learning Disorder (Including ADHD) in Online College Degree Programs: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunch, Seleta LeAnn

    2016-01-01

    Enrollment in online degree programs is rapidly expanding due to the convenience and affordability offered to students and improvements in technology. The purpose of this hermeneutical phenomenological study was to understand the shared experiences of students with documented specific learning disorders (including Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity…

  20. 12 CFR 303.46 - Financial education programs that include the provision of bank products and services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... principles of personal financial management, banking operations, or the benefits of saving for the future... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Financial education programs that include the provision of bank products and services. 303.46 Section 303.46 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE...

  1. 77 FR 14568 - Earned Import Allowance Program: Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the Program for Certain...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-12

    ... COMMISSION Earned Import Allowance Program: Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the Program for Certain... review in investigation No. 332-503, Earned Import Allowance Program: Evaluation of the Effectiveness of... Commerce to establish an Earned Import Allowance Program (EIAP) and directed the Commission to conduct...

  2. 78 FR 16297 - Earned Import Allowance Program: Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the Program for Certain...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-14

    ... COMMISSION Earned Import Allowance Program: Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the Program for Certain... fourth annual review in investigation No. 332-503, Earned Import Allowance Program: Evaluation of the... an Earned Import Allowance Program (EIAP) and directed the Commission to conduct annual reviews of...

  3. The Politics and Consequences of Including Stakeholders in International Development Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Anne E.; Coryn, Chris L. S.; Rugh, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Participatory evaluation approaches have a relatively long history of advocacy and application in the international development evaluation community. Despite widespread use and apparent resonance with practitioners and donors alike, very little empirical research exists on why and how participatory evaluation approaches are used in international…

  4. PROGRAM EVALUATION IN THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA: PLUS CA CHANGE

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    RV Segsworth

    2005-01-01

      This article describes the evolution of evaluation policy and practice from 1977, when the first policy on program evaluation was issued by Treasury Board, to the current state of evaluation in the Government of Canada...

  5. Curated Collections for Educators: Five Key Papers about Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Brent; Gottlieb, Michael; Boysen-Osborn, Megan; King, Andrew; Quinn, Antonia; Krzyzaniak, Sara; Pineda, Nicolas; Yarris, Lalena M; Chan, Teresa

    2017-05-04

    The evaluation of educational programs has become an expected part of medical education. At some point, all medical educators will need to critically evaluate the programs that they deliver. However, the evaluation of educational programs requires a very different skillset than teaching. In this article, we aim to identify and summarize key papers that would be helpful for faculty members interested in exploring program evaluation. In November of 2016, the 2015-2016 Academic life in emergency medicine (ALiEM) Faculty Incubator program highlighted key papers in a discussion of program evaluation. This list of papers was augmented with suggestions by guest experts and by an open call on Twitter. This resulted in a list of 30 papers on program evaluation. Our authorship group then engaged in a process akin to a Delphi study to build consensus on the most important papers about program evaluation for medical education faculty. We present our group's top five most highly rated papers on program evaluation. We also summarize these papers with respect to their relevance to junior medical education faculty members and faculty developers. Program evaluation is challenging. The described papers will be informative for junior faculty members as they aim to design literature-informed evaluations for their educational programs.

  6. Alternative Aviation Jet Fuel Sustainability Evaluation Report Task 1 : Report Evaluating Existing Sustainability Evaluation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-25

    This report describes how existing biofuel sustainability evaluation programs meet requirements that are under consideration or are in early phases of adoption and implementation in various US and international contexts. Biofuel sustainability evalua...

  7. Lazy evaluation of FP programs: A data-flow approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Y.H. [International Business Machines Corp., Yorktown Heights, NY (United States). Thomas J. Watson Research Center; Gaudiot, J.L. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Computer Research Inst.

    1988-12-31

    This paper presents a lazy evaluation system for the list-based functional language, Backus` FP in data-driven environment. A superset language of FP, called DFP (Demand-driven FP), is introduced. FP eager programs are transformed into DFP lazy programs which contain the notions of demands. The data-driven execution of DFP programs has the same effects of lazy evaluation. DFP lazy programs have the property of always evaluating a sufficient and necessary result. The infinite sequence generator is used to demonstrate the eager-lazy program transformation and the execution of the lazy programs.

  8. Geothermal Exploration and Assessment Technology Program (review), including a report of the Reservoir Engineering Technical Advisory Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielson, D.L. (ed.)

    1979-12-01

    The FY 1979 Program, recommended seismic surveys in conjunction with DOE/DGE's industry coupled program in the Northern Basin and Range Province, and the objectives of the Marina del Rey conference are presented. Final reports of six committees which met to define the state-of-the-art in geothermal exploration and to recommend exploration technology development are included. These committees are: structure, stratigraphy, and igneous processes; exploration architecture; electrical methods; seismic methods; thermal methods; water/rock interaction; and reservoir engineering. (MHR)

  9. Evaluation of the Meaning of Life Program in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasler, Jonathan; White, Gwyne W.; Elias, Maurice J.

    2013-01-01

    During the 2009-2010 academic year, 10 schools participated in the Meaning of Life educational program, an adaption of the popular U.S. Laws of Life program. The program sought to encourage each participant to develop a personal approach to finding meaning in life. To evaluate the success of the program, we conducted a study to compare measures of…

  10. Model Energy Efficiency Program Impact Evaluation Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document provides guidance on model approaches for calculating energy, demand, and emissions savings resulting from energy efficiency programs. It describes several standard approaches that can be used in order to make these programs more efficient.

  11. Results from a Multi-Modal Program Evaluation of a Four Year Statewide Juvenile Sex Offender Treatment and Reentry Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Lee A.; Dailey, Frances L. L.; Merino, Carrie; Crump, Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    The results of the Program Evaluation show the OJJ Statewide Sex Offender Treatment program is exceptionally productive in meeting over 90% of its established performance markers. These markers included successful screening and assessment of risk and psychosocial needs, completion of initial and master treatment plans, establishment of sex…

  12. Energy-Related Inventions Program: an overview of the evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soderstrom, E.J.; Bronfman, L.M.; Rorke, M.G.

    1983-09-01

    The Energy-Related Inventions Program (ERIP) is jointly administered by the US Departments of Energy and Commerce. Grants were awarded for 165 of 208 inventions recommended by the National Bureau of Standards (NBS). Of the 165 inventions, 46 have been able to acquire follow-on financing from a variety of sources. Further, 35 of the inventions have reached the marketplace, and their cumulative sales to date total $178 million. An additional 10 inventions are now starting into production. Jobs that have been created directly by production related to the inventions total 756; additional spin-off jobs attributable to the inventions include component and material suppliers, jobbers, franchisees, and distributors. The program was recently evaluated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, with the following conclusions: (1) the evaluation process at NBS has been successful in identifying technically and economically feasible inventions, (2) the success rate for the program is about equivalent to the reported success rates of private venture capital firms, (3) the program is supporting inventions at a point in their development where they are supported by neither the venture capital community nor industry, and (4) the one-time DOE grants and the associated ERIP support to inventors have been successful in readying inventors for follow-on financing from the private sector.

  13. Evaluation of the New Mexico ignition interlock program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    This Evaluation of the New Mexico Ignition Interlock Program begins by summarizing the development of : alcohol ignition interlock devices, laws, and programs during the past 22 years. It then reviews the laws that : were written in New Mexico from 1...

  14. An Impact Evaluation of Chile's Progressive Housing Program

    OpenAIRE

    Luis Marcano; Inder J. Ruprah

    2008-01-01

    This paper evaluates Progressive Housing Program; a public housing program that facilitates the purchase of a new home. The evaluation finds that the program’s package (savings requirement, voucher and mortgage) design is inappropriate if the program is targeted to the poor. In fact the pro-poor targeting of the program was poor with high under-coverage and high leakage. Further, the benefit, a minimum quality new house, was not sustainable as many households slipped back into the housing sho...

  15. Prevention of diabetes in overweight/obese children through a family based intervention program including supervised exercise (PREDIKID project): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenaza, Lide; Medrano, María; Amasene, María; Rodríguez-Vigil, Beatriz; Díez, Ignacio; Graña, Manuel; Tobalina, Ignacio; Maiz, Edurne; Arteche, Edurne; Larrarte, Eider; Huybrechts, Inge; Davis, Catherine L; Ruiz, Jonatan R; Ortega, Francisco B; Margareto, Javier; Labayen, Idoia

    2017-08-10

    The global pandemic of obesity has led to an increased risk for prediabetes and type-2 diabetes (T2D). The aims of the current project are: (1) to evaluate the effect of a 22-week family based intervention program, including supervised exercise, on insulin resistance syndrome (IRS) risk in children with a high risk of developing T2D and (2) to identify the profile of microRNA in circulating exosomes and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in children with a high risk of developing T2D and its response to a multidisciplinary intervention program including exercise. A total of 84 children, aged 8-12 years, with a high risk of T2D will be included and randomly assigned to control (N = 42) or intervention (N = 42) groups. The control group will receive a family based lifestyle education and psycho-educational program (2 days/month), while the intervention group will attend the same lifestyle education and psycho-educational program plus the exercise program (3 days/week, 90 min per session including warm-up, moderate to vigorous aerobic activities, and strength exercises). The following measurements will be evaluated at baseline prior to randomization and after the intervention: fasting insulin, glucose and hemoglobin A1c; body composition (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry); ectopic fat (magnetic resonance imaging); microRNA expression in circulating exosomes and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MiSeq; Illumina); cardiorespiratory fitness (cardiopulmonary exercise testing); dietary habits and physical activity (accelerometry). Prevention and identification of children with a high risk of developing T2D could help to improve their cardiovascular health and to reduce the comorbidities associated with obesity. ClinicalTrials.gov, ID: NCT03027726 . Registered on 16 January 2017.

  16. EML Gamma Spectrometry Data Evaluation Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decker, Karin M. [Environmental Measurements Lab. (EML), New York, NY (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This report presents the results of the analyses for the third EML Gamma Spectrometry Data Evaluation Program (October 1999). This program assists laboratories in providing more accurate gamma spectra analysis results and provides a means for users of gamma data to assess how a laboratory performed on various types of gamma spectrometry analyses. This is accomplished through the use of synthetic gamma spectra. A calibration spectrum, a background spectrum, and three sample spectra are sent to each participant in the spectral file format requested by the laboratory. The calibration spectrum contains nuclides covering the energy range from 59.5 keV to 1836 keV. The participants are told fallout and fission product nuclides could be present. The sample spectra are designed to test the ability of the software and user to properly resolve multiplets and to identify and quantify nuclides in a complicated fission product spectrum. The participants were asked to report values and uncertainties as Becquerel per sample with no decay correction. Thirty-one sets of results were reported from a total of 60 laboratories who received the spectra. Six foreign laboratories participated. The percentage of the results within 1 of the expected value was 68, 33, and 46 for samples 1, 2, and 3, respectively. From all three samples, 18% of the results were more than 3 from the expected value. Eighty-three (12%) values out of a total of 682 expected results were not reported for the three samples. Approximately 30% of these false negatives were due the laboratories not reporting 144Pr in sample 2 which was present at the minimum detectable activity level. There were 53 false positives reported with 25% of these responses due to problems with background subtraction. The results show improvement in the ability of the software or user to resolve peaks separated by 1 keV. Improvement is still needed either in the analysis report produced by the software or in the review of these

  17. Description of a multifaceted rehabilitation program including overground gait training for a child with cerebral palsy: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Elizabeth; Naber, Erin; Geigle, Paula

    2010-01-01

    This case describes the outcomes of a multifaceted rehabilitation program including body weight-supported overground gait training (BWSOGT) in a nonambulatory child with cerebral palsy (CP) and the impact of this treatment on the child's functional mobility. The patient is a nonambulatory 10-year-old female with CP who during an inpatient rehabilitation stay participated in direct, physical therapy 6 days per week for 5 weeks. Physical therapy interventions included stretching of her bilateral lower extremities, transfer training, bed mobility training, balance training, kinesiotaping, supported standing in a prone stander, two trials of partial weight-supported treadmill training, and for 4 weeks, three to five times per week, engaged in 30 minutes of BWSOGT using the Up n' go gait trainer, Lite Gait Walkable, and Rifton Pacer gait trainer. Following the multifaceted rehabilitation program, the patient demonstrated increased step initiation, increased weight bearing through bilateral lower extremities, improved bed mobility, and increased participation in transfers. The child's Gross Motor Functional Measure (GMFM) scores increased across four dimensions and her Physical Abilities and Mobility Scale (PAMS) increased significantly. This case report illustrates that a multifaceted rehabilitation program including BWSOGT was an effective intervention strategy to improve functional mobility in this nonambulatory child with CP.

  18. MSTor: A program for calculating partition functions, free energies, enthalpies, entropies, and heat capacities of complex molecules including torsional anharmonicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jingjing; Mielke, Steven L.; Clarkson, Kenneth L.; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2012-08-01

    We present a Fortran program package, MSTor, which calculates partition functions and thermodynamic functions of complex molecules involving multiple torsional motions by the recently proposed MS-T method. This method interpolates between the local harmonic approximation in the low-temperature limit, and the limit of free internal rotation of all torsions at high temperature. The program can also carry out calculations in the multiple-structure local harmonic approximation. The program package also includes six utility codes that can be used as stand-alone programs to calculate reduced moment of inertia matrices by the method of Kilpatrick and Pitzer, to generate conformational structures, to calculate, either analytically or by Monte Carlo sampling, volumes for torsional subdomains defined by Voronoi tessellation of the conformational subspace, to generate template input files, and to calculate one-dimensional torsional partition functions using the torsional eigenvalue summation method. Catalogue identifier: AEMF_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEMF_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 77 434 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3 264 737 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 90, C, and Perl Computer: Itasca (HP Linux cluster, each node has two-socket, quad-core 2.8 GHz Intel Xeon X5560 “Nehalem EP” processors), Calhoun (SGI Altix XE 1300 cluster, each node containing two quad-core 2.66 GHz Intel Xeon “Clovertown”-class processors sharing 16 GB of main memory), Koronis (Altix UV 1000 server with 190 6-core Intel Xeon X7542 “Westmere” processors at 2.66 GHz), Elmo (Sun Fire X4600 Linux cluster with AMD Opteron cores), and Mac Pro (two 2.8 GHz Quad-core Intel Xeon

  19. Alternative utility conservation program designs: an evaluation based on case study program experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreitler, V.

    1985-01-01

    Utilities around the nation are promoting residential conservation through a variety of program activities, ranging from customer education programs to financial incentive programs to direct installation programs. This report was undertaken to evaluate some of these alternative program designs, to compare their achievements against those of the RCS program, and to suggest program planning directions that seem most promising. Interviews with program managers were used to elucidate the rationale behind the alternative programs and to discuss program effectiveness. The experiences of nine utilities and one nonutility organization are reviewed. Program managers' opinions about RCS and their experiences with thirteen other programs are summarized. The effectiveness of the alternative program designs are compared and some implications for conservation program planning and implementation are highlighted.

  20. Small Commercial Program DOE Project: Impact evaluation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bathgate, R.; Faust, S. [Energy and Solid Waste Consultants, Montpelier, VT (United States)

    1992-08-12

    In 1991, Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) implemented a Department of Energy grant to conduct a small commercial energy conservation project. The small commercial ``Mom, and Pop`` grocery stores within WEC`s service territory were selected as the target market for the project. Energy & Solid Waste Consultant`s (E&SWC) Impact Evaluation is documented here. The evaluation was based on data gathered from a variety of sources, including load profile metering, kWh submeters, elapsed time indicators, and billing histories. Five stores were selected to receive measures under this program: Waits River General Store, Joe`s Pond Store, Hastings Store, Walden General Store, and Adamant Cooperative. Specific measures installed in each store and description of each are included.

  1. A systematic review of evaluated suicide prevention programs targeting indigenous youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlow, Alyssa F; Bohanna, India; Clough, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Indigenous young people have significantly higher suicide rates than their non-indigenous counterparts. There is a need for culturally appropriate and effective suicide prevention programs for this demographic. This review assesses suicide prevention programs that have been evaluated for indigenous youth in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the United States. The databases MEDLINE and PsycINFO were searched for publications on suicide prevention programs targeting indigenous youth that include reports on evaluations and outcomes. Program content, indigenous involvement, evaluation design, program implementation, and outcomes were assessed for each article. The search yielded 229 articles; 90 abstracts were assessed, and 11 articles describing nine programs were reviewed. Two Australian programs and seven American programs were included. Programs were culturally tailored, flexible, and incorporated multiple-levels of prevention. No randomized controlled trials were found, and many programs employed ad hoc evaluations, poor program description, and no process evaluation. Despite culturally appropriate content, the results of the review indicate that more controlled study designs using planned evaluations and valid outcome measures are needed in research on indigenous youth suicide prevention. Such changes may positively influence the future of research on indigenous youth suicide prevention as the outcomes and efficacy will be more reliable.

  2. Screening for Specific Language Impairment in Preschool Children: Evaluating a Screening Procedure Including the Token Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willinger, Ulrike; Schmoeger, Michaela; Deckert, Matthias; Eisenwort, Brigitte; Loader, Benjamin; Hofmair, Annemarie; Auff, Eduard

    2017-01-01

    Specific language impairment (SLI) comprises impairments in receptive and/or expressive language. Aim of this study was to evaluate a screening for SLI. 61 children with SLI (SLI-children, age-range 4-6 years) and 61 matched typically developing controls were tested for receptive language ability (Token Test-TT) and for intelligence (Wechsler…

  3. Redesigning and aligning assessment and evaluation for a federally funded math and science teacher educational program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardré, Patricia L; Slater, Janis; Nanny, Mark

    2010-11-01

    This paper examines the redesign of evaluation components for a teacher professional development project funded by the National Science Foundation. It focuses on aligning evaluation instrumentation and strategies with program goals, research goals and program evaluation best practices. The study identifies weaknesses in the original (year 1) program evaluation design and implementation, develops strategies and tracks changes for year 2 implementation, and then reports enhancement of findings and recommendations for year 3. It includes lessons learned about assessment and evaluation over the project lifespan, with implications for research and evaluation of a range of related programs. This study functions as a classic illustration of how critical it is to observe first principles of assessment and evaluation for funded programs, the risks that arise when they are ignored, and the benefits that accrue when they are systematically observed. Copyright (c) 2009. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. An Evaluation of a Parent Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quynh T.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a parent training program whose children are diagnosed with autism. The sample consisted of families who are currently participating in a parent training program. The study examined the stress levels of parents utilizing the Questionnaire on Resources and Stress at the beginning of the study and then again…

  5. Evaluating Youth Development Programs: Progress and Promise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Jodie L.; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2016-01-01

    Advances in theories of adolescent development and positive youth development have greatly increased our understanding of how programs and practices with adolescents can impede or enhance their development. In this article the authors reflect on the progress in research on youth development programs in the last two decades, since possibly the…

  6. 32 CFR Appendix B to Part 80 - Procedures for Special Educational Programs (Including Related Services) for Preschool Children...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (Including Related Services) for Preschool Children and Children With Disabilities (3-21 years Inclusive) B... Related Services) for Preschool Children and Children With Disabilities (3-21 years Inclusive) A... of a parent of each preschool child or child, evaluate all preschool children or children who are...

  7. From Implementation to Outcomes to Impacts: Designing a Comprehensive Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebby, S.

    2015-12-01

    Funders are often interested in learning about the impact of program activities, yet before the impacts are determined, educational evaluations should first examine program implementation and outcomes. Implementation evaluation examines how and the extent to which program activities are delivered as intended, including the extent to which activities reached the targeted participants. Outcome evaluation is comprised of a systematic examination of the effects that a program has on program participants, such as changes in knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, values, and behaviors. In this presentation, presenters will share insights on evaluating the implementation, outcomes, and impacts associated with an online science curriculum for K-2 students. The science curriculum was designed to provide students with access to science concepts and skills in an interactive and innovative environment, and teachers with embedded, aligned, and on-demand professional development. One of the most important—and challenging—steps in this evaluation was to select outcomes that were well-defined, measurable, and aligned to program activities, as well as relevant to program stakeholders. An additional challenge was to measure implementation given limited access to the classroom environment. This presentation will include a discussion of the process evaluators used to select appropriate implementation indicators and outcomes (teacher and student), design an evaluation approach, and craft data collection instruments. Although examples provided are specific to the K-2 science intervention, the best practices discussed are pertinent to all program and event evaluations. Impact evaluation goes beyond implementation and outcome evaluation to inform whether a program is working or not. It requires a comparison group to inform what outcomes would have been in the absence of the intervention. As such, this presentation will also include a discussion of impacts, including how impacts are defined

  8. Remote Infrared Audible Signage (RIAS) Pilot Program : evaluation report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    This report presents evaluation findings on the Remote Infrared Audible Signage (RIAS) Pilot Program in the Puget Sound Region of Washington. The installation, demonstration and evaluation of RIAS were required by a provision in the Safe, Accountable...

  9. Conceptual evaluation of population health surveillance programs: method and example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Allaki, Farouk; Bigras-Poulin, Michel; Ravel, André

    2013-03-01

    Veterinary and public health surveillance programs can be evaluated to assess and improve the planning, implementation and effectiveness of these programs. Guidelines, protocols and methods have been developed for such evaluation. In general, they focus on a limited set of attributes (e.g., sensitivity and simplicity), that are assessed quantitatively whenever possible, otherwise qualitatively. Despite efforts at standardization, replication by different evaluators is difficult, making evaluation outcomes open to interpretation. This ultimately limits the usefulness of surveillance evaluations. At the same time, the growing demand to prove freedom from disease or pathogen, and the Sanitary and Phytosanitary Agreement and the International Health Regulations require stronger surveillance programs. We developed a method for evaluating veterinary and public health surveillance programs that is detailed, structured, transparent and based on surveillance concepts that are part of all types of surveillance programs. The proposed conceptual evaluation method comprises four steps: (1) text analysis, (2) extraction of the surveillance conceptual model, (3) comparison of the extracted surveillance conceptual model to a theoretical standard, and (4) validation interview with a surveillance program designer. This conceptual evaluation method was applied in 2005 to C-EnterNet, a new Canadian zoonotic disease surveillance program that encompasses laboratory based surveillance of enteric diseases in humans and active surveillance of the pathogens in food, water, and livestock. The theoretical standard used for evaluating C-EnterNet was a relevant existing structure called the "Population Health Surveillance Theory". Five out of 152 surveillance concepts were absent in the design of C-EnterNet. However, all of the surveillance concept relationships found in C-EnterNet were valid. The proposed method can be used to improve the design and documentation of surveillance programs. It

  10. Assessment of Learning and Program Evaluation in Health Professions Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Donald E., Jr.

    2018-01-01

    This chapter proposes approaches for assessing learners and evaluating courses and curriculum that could be used by directors of health professions education (HPE) programs to determine the effectiveness and impact of their programs.

  11. Evaluating and Using Literature Including People with Disabilities in All Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oslick, Mary Ellen; Pearson, Mary

    2016-01-01

    To help students see their worlds differently and to expand those views beyond their own backyards, educators can expose them to quality multicultural children's literature. In this article, we focus on a subtopic within the genre of multicultural children's literature: literature including people with disabilities. We chose seven recent texts…

  12. Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation (FACE) Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Each day, between 12 to 13 U.S. workers die as a result of a traumatic injury on the job. Investigations conducted through the FACE program allow the identification...

  13. Program Development and Evaluation - Finance / Money Management

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Karen Biers: Ca$hing in on Business Opportunities: A Curriculum for Building an Effective Home-Based and Micro Business Educational Program. Susan E. Cosgrove: Statewide Personal Financial Literacy Campaign. Susan Shockey: Financial Education Helps IDA Participants Save Money.

  14. INCLUDING USERS’ SEMANTICS IN EVALUATING THE CREDIBILITY OF CROWDSOURCED LANDSCAPE DESCRIPTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Forati

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Landscape refers to the visible features of an area of land often considered in terms of their aesthetic appeal. The spatial configurations, composition conditions and perception situations of a landscape may be described by people, which reveal how they see and percept the landscape; thus they are different from person to person depending on the way they think or experience their surroundings. Especially, when the landscape descriptions are acquired through crowdsourcing processes, it is affected by users’ semantics, which results in descriptions with varying credibilities. This paper proposes an approach to consider the user’s semantics in evaluating the creditability of crowdsourced landscape descriptions.

  15. Including Users' Semantics in Evaluating the Credibility of Crowdsourced Landscape Descriptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forati, A.; Soleimani, S.; Karimipour, F.; Malek, M. R.

    2015-08-01

    Landscape refers to the visible features of an area of land often considered in terms of their aesthetic appeal. The spatial configurations, composition conditions and perception situations of a landscape may be described by people, which reveal how they see and percept the landscape; thus they are different from person to person depending on the way they think or experience their surroundings. Especially, when the landscape descriptions are acquired through crowdsourcing processes, it is affected by users' semantics, which results in descriptions with varying credibilities. This paper proposes an approach to consider the user's semantics in evaluating the creditability of crowdsourced landscape descriptions.

  16. The Role of Endothelial Dysfunction Markers in Pregnant Women with Chorion Detachment, Included in the Program of Auxiliary Reproductive Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya Lytvyn

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available An urgent medical and social problem is the restoration of reproductive function of womenwho suffer from infertility, which became possible due to auxiliary reproductive technologies. Women with induced pregnancy make thegroup of a high-risk on miscarriage, due to interrelated processes –immunological disorders and endothelial dysfunction that occur in the body of pregnant women after the use of extracorporal fertilization programs, and can lead to the chorion detachment and the formation of subchorionic hematomas. The purpose of the study is to determine the role of endothelial dysfunction as one of the leading factors that determine the development of a local non-progressive chorion detachment in infertile patients included in the program of auxiliary reproductive technologies. Materials and methods. We have examined 130 pregnant women, who were divided into groups: the control group included 30 women, whose pregnancy occurred in the natural cycle and with uncomplicated gestational course; the main group – 50 patients with induced pregnancy and risk factors of the occurrence of chorion detachment, who wereperformed the proposed pre-gravidapreparation; the comparative group – 50 pregnant women who received a standard scheme of pregnancy management before and after in-vitro fertilization. A general clinical examination, ultrasound examination, homocysteine level determination, endothelin-1 and nitrogen oxide metabolites were performed. Results. In women included into the program of auxiliary reproductive technologies with local chorion detachment were recorded changes of vascular endothelial function with a possible increase in endothelin-1 production and a decrease of the nitric oxidesynthesis. During the induced pregnancy with the presence of subchorionic hematoma, an increase of the level of endothelium-damaging factor of homocysteine was noted. Conclusions.This study identifies the parameters that reflect the main links of endothelial

  17. Evaluation Report, Brookville EEE Program, ESEA Title I, Summer, 1970.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Don L.

    Contained in this report is an evaluation of the ESEA Title I Environmental-Ecological Education Program for educationally disadvantaged students operated by the Brookville Area School District, Pennsylvania. The program is a modification of a previously operated ESEA Title III Rural Youth Enrichment Program. Conducted during the summer of 1970,…

  18. Lifeskills Program Evaluation at Mammoth Heights Elementary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Emma Moss

    2016-01-01

    This study is a program evaluation of the Life Skills Program at Mammoth Heights Elementary in the Douglas County School District. The overall goal of the Life Skills Program is to increase students' independent and daily living skills through the teaching of communication, social-emotional skills and academic skills. Students in the Life Skills…

  19. Blended Teacher Professional Development: A Synthesis of Three Program Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owston, Ron; Wideman, Herb; Murphy, Janet; Lupshenyuk, Denys

    2008-01-01

    This study synthesized the findings of three program evaluations of teacher blended professional development programs from the perspective of situated design and implementation, development of community, changes in teacher practice, and impact on students. We found that the blended programs were effective in providing teachers with an opportunity…

  20. Planning Adolescent Pregnancy Programs: Implications of a National Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Martha R.; Sonenstein, Freya L.

    In order to provide guidance for agencies in developing effective programs for pregnant and parenting teens, this article analyzes data from 21 federally funded care programs involved in a national evaluation. First, the question of a program's location and structure was addressed. Rural projects were found to be less service-rich than their urban…

  1. Evaluation of the Treatment of Congenital Penile Curvature Including Psychosexual Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachalski, Wojciech; Krajka, Kazimierz; Matuszewski, Marcin

    2015-08-01

    Penile corporoplasty is a well-established treatment method of congenital penile deviation (CPD). Anatomical results are good with only slight differences between surgical procedures used. The disease however has huge influence on young male quality of life. This issue is not well analyzed in the literature. The aim of the study was to evaluate quality of life of the patients affected with CPD before and after the surgical treatment Study population consisted of 107 patients with CPD referred for surgical management. Patients were evaluated with not only clinical assessment, but also by four questionnaires measuring various aspects of quality of life. They were: Short-Form Medical Outcomes, Sexual Quality of Life Questionnaire for Man, Beck Depression Inventory, and International Index of Erectile Function. Quality of life measurements showed deep decrease in the general quality of life, sexual performance, depression scale, as well as in physical and mental health in men with CPD. All these parameters were restored to normal after the successful surgical treatment with any method. CPD deeply decreases the quality of life of the affected men in many aspects. Surgical treatment is able to repair the anatomical deformity and as well as significantly restore the patients' psychosocial well-being. © 2015 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  2. Fourth Generation Evaluation, Program Review and the Institutional Researcher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowin, Bob

    Program evaluation can be understood as the process of looking at how all aspects of a program or department have been functioning as the basis for informed planning and decision making. Although the objective dimensions used in evaluations can vary, methodologies can be categorized according to the four category framework (i.e., describing…

  3. Evaluation of the Integrated Services Pilot Program from Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Peter; Cooper, Trudi; Bahn, Susanne

    2009-01-01

    Independent evaluation of refugee-focused programs in developed nations is increasingly a mandatory requirement of funding bodies and government agencies. This paper presents an evaluation of the Integrated Services Centre (ISC) Pilot Project that was conducted in Australia in 2007 and early 2008. The purpose of the ISC program was to provide…

  4. Learning and Leadership: Evaluation of an Australian Rural Leadership Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Wendy; O'Mullan, Cathy; Keen-Dyer, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Leadership programs have been extensively promoted in rural communities in Australia. However, few have been evaluated. The results of the evaluation of a rural leadership program provided in this paper highlight the need for adult learning theories to be more overtly identified and utilised as the basis of planning and implementing leadership…

  5. 40 CFR 51.353 - Network type and program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... evaluation to begin no later than 1 year after program start-up. (5) Areas that qualify for and choose to... those stations, or companies owning those stations, are contractually or legally barred from engaging in... subpart. (1) The State shall report the results of the program evaluation on a biennial basis, starting...

  6. GLOBE in the Czech Republic: A Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cincera, Jan; Maskova, Veronika

    2011-01-01

    The article presents results of the evaluation of the GLOBE program (Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment) in the Czech Republic. The evaluation explores the implementation of the program in schools and its impact on research skills. Four hundred and sixty six pupils, aged 13, from 28 different schools participated in the…

  7. 7 CFR 295.4 - Program evaluation status reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Program evaluation status reports. 295.4 Section 295.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... projects concerning evaluation of FNS food assistance programs. A copy of the current status report on...

  8. Creating a Minnesota Statewide SNAP-Ed Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Abby; Barno, Trina Adler; Sherman, Shelley; Lovett, Kathleen; Hurtado, G. Ali

    2013-01-01

    Systematic evaluation is an essential tool for understanding program effectiveness. This article describes the pilot test of a statewide evaluation tool for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education (SNAP-Ed). A computer algorithm helped Community Nutrition Educators (CNEs) build surveys specific to their varied educational settings…

  9. Symposium: Perspectives on Formative Evaluation of Children's Television Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977

    Evaluators of television programing and representatives of funding agencies discussed the impact of the perceptions of funding agencies on the evaluation of children's television. Participants also examined the interplay between the objectives of the television series and the evaluation, the relationship between production and evaluation, and the…

  10. Taiwan Teacher Preparation Program Evaluation: Some Critical Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tze-Chang

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the influences and changes of recent Taiwan teacher preparation program evaluation (TTPPE) as one of the national evaluation projects conducted by the Higher Education Evaluation and Accreditation Council of Taiwan. The main concerns are what kind of ideology is transformed through the policy by means of evaluation, and what…

  11. Proposing an Integrative Approach for Efficiency Evaluation of Network Structures Including Tour and Allocation Link

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    reza hejazi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Data envelopment analysis (DEA is known as one of the most common approaches for efficiency evaluation. Network models are new subjects in which, a DMU with all its subunits and links is considered as a network structure. One of the most widely used DEA methods for network data is the suggested approach of Lewis and Sexton. In this approach, performance of each DMU is measured compared to a similar DMU by moving on the effective paths and then computing the final outputs and classic primary inputs . In reality, many cases can be found that an original input or an intermediate product allocates to several subunits or forms a tour in a network. In such networks, the approach of Lewis and Sexton is not able to calculate efficiency. Therefore, in this paper, an approach has been proposed for solving such problems and computing the efficiency of such networks.

  12. Evaluation of a cognitive-behavioral program for chronically psychotic forensic inpatients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hornsveld, R.H.J.; Nijman, H.L.I.

    2005-01-01

    The present study evaluated the progress of four groups of chronically psychotic patients in treatment at De Kijvelanden Forensic Psychiatric Hospital. The psychotic patients were offered a cognitive-behavioral program, including psycho education, grief processing, stress management, functional

  13. Implementing and evaluating a program to facilitate chronic disease prevention and screening in primary care: a mixed methods program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manca, Donna Patricia; Aubrey-Bassler, Kris; Kandola, Kami; Aguilar, Carolina; Campbell-Scherer, Denise; Sopcak, Nicolette; O'Brien, Mary Ann; Meaney, Christopher; Faria, Vee; Baxter, Julia; Moineddin, Rahim; Salvalaggio, Ginetta; Green, Lee; Cave, Andrew; Grunfeld, Eva

    2014-10-08

    comprising the composite index include the following: process measures, referral/treatment measures, and target/change outcome measures related to cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer and associated lifestyle factors. The BETTER 2 program is a collaborative approach grounded in practice and built from existing work (i.e., integration not creation). The program evaluation is designed to provide an understanding of issues impacting the implementation of an effective approach for CDPS within primary care that may be adapted to become sustainable in the non-research setting.

  14. Object-oriented fault tree evaluation program for quantitative analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson-Hine, F. A.; Koen, B. V.

    1988-01-01

    Object-oriented programming can be combined with fault free techniques to give a significantly improved environment for evaluating the safety and reliability of large complex systems for space missions. Deep knowledge about system components and interactions, available from reliability studies and other sources, can be described using objects that make up a knowledge base. This knowledge base can be interrogated throughout the design process, during system testing, and during operation, and can be easily modified to reflect design changes in order to maintain a consistent information source. An object-oriented environment for reliability assessment has been developed on a Texas Instrument (TI) Explorer LISP workstation. The program, which directly evaluates system fault trees, utilizes the object-oriented extension to LISP called Flavors that is available on the Explorer. The object representation of a fault tree facilitates the storage and retrieval of information associated with each event in the tree, including tree structural information and intermediate results obtained during the tree reduction process. Reliability data associated with each basic event are stored in the fault tree objects. The object-oriented environment on the Explorer also includes a graphical tree editor which was modified to display and edit the fault trees.

  15. Evaluation of European air quality modelled by CAMx including the volatility basis set scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ciarelli

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Four periods of EMEP (European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme intensive measurement campaigns (June 2006, January 2007, September–October 2008 and February–March 2009 were modelled using the regional air quality model CAMx with VBS (volatility basis set approach for the first time in Europe within the framework of the EURODELTA-III model intercomparison exercise. More detailed analysis and sensitivity tests were performed for the period of February–March 2009 and June 2006 to investigate the uncertainties in emissions as well as to improve the modelling of organic aerosol (OA. Model performance for selected gas phase species and PM2.5 was evaluated using the European air quality database AirBase. Sulfur dioxide (SO2 and ozone (O3 were found to be overestimated for all the four periods, with O3 having the largest mean bias during June 2006 and January–February 2007 periods (8.9 pbb and 12.3 ppb mean biases respectively. In contrast, nitrogen dioxide (NO2 and carbon monoxide (CO were found to be underestimated for all the four periods. CAMx reproduced both total concentrations and monthly variations of PM2.5 for all the four periods with average biases ranging from −2.1 to 1.0 µg m−3. Comparisons with AMS (aerosol mass spectrometer measurements at different sites in Europe during February–March 2009 showed that in general the model overpredicts the inorganic aerosol fraction and underpredicts the organic one, such that the good agreement for PM2.5 is partly due to compensation of errors. The effect of the choice of VBS scheme on OA was investigated as well. Two sensitivity tests with volatility distributions based on previous chamber and ambient measurements data were performed. For February–March 2009 the chamber case reduced the total OA concentrations by about 42 % on average. In contrast, a test based on ambient measurement data increased OA concentrations by about 42 % for the same period bringing

  16. A framework for evaluation of technology transfer programs. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    The objective of this volume is to describe a framework with which DOE can develop a program specific methodology to evaluate it`s technology transfer efforts. This approach could also be applied to an integrated private sector technology transfer organization. Several benefits will be realized from the application of this work. While the immediate effect will be to assist program managers in evaluating and improving program performance, the ultimate benefits will accrue to the producing industry, the states, and the nation in the form of sustained or increased domestic oil production. This benefit depends also, of course, on the effectiveness of the technology being transferred. The managers of the Technology Transfer program, and the larger federal oil and gas R&D programs, will be provided with a means to design and assess the effectiveness of program efforts as they are developed, tested and performed. The framework allows deficiencies in critical aspects of the program to be quickly identified, allowing for timely corrections and improvements. The actual process of developing the evaluation also gives the staff of the Oil R&D Program or Technology Transfer subprogram the opportunity to become oriented to the overall program goals. The structure and focus imposed by the evaluation paradigm will guide program staff in selecting activities which are consistent with achieving the goals of the overall R&D program.

  17. Cardiovascular evaluation, including resting and exercise electrocardiography, before participation in competitive sports: cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofi, Francesco; Capalbo, Andrea; Pucci, Nicola; Giuliattini, Jacopo; Condino, Francesca; Alessandri, Flavio; Abbate, Rosanna; Gensini, Gian Franco; Califano, Sergio

    2008-07-03

    To evaluate the clinical usefulness of complete preparticipation cardiovascular screening in a large cohort of sports participants. Cross sectional study of data over a five year period. Institute of Sports Medicine in Florence, Italy. 30,065 (23,570 men) people seeking to obtain clinical eligibility for competitive sports. Results of resting and exercise 12 lead electrocardiography. Resting 12 lead ECG patterns showed abnormalities in 1812 (6%) participants, with the most common abnormalities (>80%) concerning innocent ECG changes. Exercise ECG showed an abnormal pattern in 1459 (4.9%) participants. Exercise ECG showed cardiac anomalies in 1227 athletes with normal findings on resting ECG. At the end of screening, 196 (0.6%) participants were considered ineligible for competitive sports. Among the 159 participants who were disqualified at the end of the screening for cardiac reasons, a consistent proportion (n=126, 79.2%) had shown innocent or negative findings on resting 12 lead ECG but clear pathological alterations during the exercise test. After adjustment for possible confounders, logistic regression analysis showed that age >30 years was significantly associated with an increased risk of being disqualified for cardiac findings during exercise testing. Among people seeking to take part in competitive sports, exercise ECG can identify those with cardiac abnormalities. Follow-up studies would show if disqualification of such people would reduce the incidence of CV events among athletes.

  18. Evaluation of Bonneville's 1988 and 1989 Residential Weatherization Program: A Northwest study of program dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.A.; White, D.L.

    1992-12-01

    This study continues the series of evaluations of the Bonneville Power Administration's long-term Residential Weatherization Program (RWP) by examining the energy saved by its 1988 and 1989 participants. The sample of participants for this study was drawn from 10 utilities covering the region's three climate zones. Six of these utilities were included in the 1988 RWP evaluation, and eight of them were included in the 1989 RWP evaluation. This study analyzes data on 356 participating households in 1988, 433 participants in 1989, and a comparison group of 1170 nonparticipants in 1988 and 1466 in 1989. Previous evaluations of Bonneville's earlier weatherization programs provide an historic context for analyzing program dynamics.

  19. Evaluation of Bonneville`s 1988 and 1989 Residential Weatherization Program: A Northwest study of program dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.A.; White, D.L.

    1992-12-01

    This study continues the series of evaluations of the Bonneville Power Administration`s long-term Residential Weatherization Program (RWP) by examining the energy saved by its 1988 and 1989 participants. The sample of participants for this study was drawn from 10 utilities covering the region`s three climate zones. Six of these utilities were included in the 1988 RWP evaluation, and eight of them were included in the 1989 RWP evaluation. This study analyzes data on 356 participating households in 1988, 433 participants in 1989, and a comparison group of 1170 nonparticipants in 1988 and 1466 in 1989. Previous evaluations of Bonneville`s earlier weatherization programs provide an historic context for analyzing program dynamics.

  20. Beowawe Geothermal Area evaluation program. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iovenitti, J. L

    1981-03-01

    Several exploration programs were conducted at the Beowawe Geothermal Prospect, Lander and Eureka County, Nevada. Part I, consisting of a shallow temperature hole program, a mercury soil sampling survey, and a self-potential survey were conducted in order to select the optimum site for an exploratory well. Part II consisted of drilling a 5927-foot exploratory well, running geophysical logs, conducting a drill stem test (2937-3208 feet), and a short-term (3-day) flow test (1655-2188 feet). All basic data collected is summarized.

  1. Beam propagation model for the laser hazard evaluations including optical instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulmeister, K.; Althaus, S.; Grabner, U.; Vees, G. [ARC Seibersdorf Research GmbH (Austria)

    2004-07-01

    A beam propagation model was developed to calculate the most hazardous position, the angular subtense of the apparent source, and the power that passes through a 7 mm representing the pupil of the eye for a Gaussian laser beam including the usage of magnifiers and telescopes. The results for the thermal retinal hazard are discussed and it is shown that for the telescope for most cases, at the most hazardous position, the beam waist can be treated as the apparent source, where the dependence and the regions are equivalent to those of the naked eye discussed elsewhere. For magnifying glasses, the beam is transformed in terms of beam waist diameter and divergence and consequently the dependencies and regions are also flipped. (orig.)

  2. Ludwig's angina: need for including airways and larynx in ultrasound evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narendra, P L; Vishal, N S; Jenkins, Brian

    2014-11-09

    Ludwig's angina is a deep neck space infection. Unlike other abscesses elsewhere in the body, rapid progression of the disease results in serious complications such as airway oedema, distortion, total obstruction with loss of airway and death. Thus, early diagnosis and skilful airway management is necessary. For safe airway management, fibreoptic intubation or tracheostomy under local anaesthesia is recommended.1 We describe a case report where an initial attempt at fibreoptic intubation failed and subsequently bleeding ensued causing difficulty in viewing the larynx by fibreoptic bronchoscopy. Radiological investigations such as ultrasound and computer tomography (CT) are commonly ordered by surgeons and emergency physicians to know the extension of disease, but airways and larynx are seldom included. We discuss the role of ultrasound in airway assessment in such critical cases to ensure safe and uncomplicated airway access.

  3. Evaluation of a child sexual abuse prevention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasan-Taber, L; Tabachnick, J

    1999-10-01

    A half-million children are believed to be sexually abused each year in the United States. In 1995, the American Medical Association declared sexual assault "a silent violent epidemic." The majority of efforts to stop child sexual abuse have focused on punishing abusers and treating victims and their families; prevention programs are uncommon and rely on educating children to report sexual abuse. This case study describes the evaluation of the first public health campaign designed to target adults for prevention. A baseline assessment of attitudes, awareness, knowledge, and policies was conducted in Vermont to identify facilitators and barriers to adult prevention of child sexual abuse. These included predisposing factors (50% of Vermont residents did not know the characteristics of an abuser), enabling factors (60% of Vermont residents did not know where to refer someone who may have sexual behavior problems), and reinforcing factors (when focus group participants knew an abuser, they were less likely to take action). This process guided the intervention, which included a broad-based media campaign targeting adults; a one-to-one communications strategy that provided information to agencies working with families at risk and a toll-free helpline for adults in an abuse situation; and a systems change strategy designed to educate decision-makers and leaders. Program evaluation measures included a random-digit dial survey, focus groups, a survey of Vermont decision-makers, and other data sets. The successes and limitations of these interventions, both as strategies in themselves and as data sources for evaluation, are discussed.

  4. Evolutionary Evaluation: implications for evaluators, researchers, practitioners, funders and the evidence-based program mandate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Jennifer Brown; Hargraves, Monica; Trochim, William M

    2014-08-01

    Evolutionary theory, developmental systems theory, and evolutionary epistemology provide deep theoretical foundations for understanding programs, their development over time, and the role of evaluation. This paper relates core concepts from these powerful bodies of theory to program evaluation. Evolutionary Evaluation is operationalized in terms of program and evaluation evolutionary phases, which are in turn aligned with multiple types of validity. The model of Evolutionary Evaluation incorporates Chen's conceptualization of bottom-up versus top-down program development. The resulting framework has important implications for many program management and evaluation issues. The paper illustrates how an Evolutionary Evaluation perspective can illuminate important controversies in evaluation using the example of the appropriate role of randomized controlled trials that encourages a rethinking of "evidence-based programs". From an Evolutionary Evaluation perspective, prevailing interpretations of rigor and mandates for evidence-based programs pose significant challenges to program evolution. This perspective also illuminates the consequences of misalignment between program and evaluation phases; the importance of supporting both researcher-derived and practitioner-derived programs; and the need for variation and evolutionary phase diversity within portfolios of programs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A water-based training program that include perturbation exercises to improve stepping responses in older adults: study protocol for a randomized controlled cross-over trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsedek Irit

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gait and balance impairments may increase the risk of falls, the leading cause of accidental death in the elderly population. Fall-related injuries constitute a serious public health problem associated with high costs for society as well as human suffering. A rapid step is the most important protective postural strategy, acting to recover equilibrium and prevent a fall from initiating. It can arise from large perturbations, but also frequently as a consequence of volitional movements. We propose to use a novel water-based training program which includes specific perturbation exercises that will target the stepping responses that could potentially have a profound effect in reducing risk of falling. We describe the water-based balance training program and a study protocol to evaluate its efficacy (Trial registration number #NCT00708136. Methods/Design The proposed water-based training program involves use of unpredictable, multi-directional perturbations in a group setting to evoke compensatory and volitional stepping responses. Perturbations are made by pushing slightly the subjects and by water turbulence, in 24 training sessions conducted over 12 weeks. Concurrent cognitive tasks during movement tasks are included. Principles of physical training and exercise including awareness, continuity, motivation, overload, periodicity, progression and specificity were used in the development of this novel program. Specific goals are to increase the speed of stepping responses and improve the postural control mechanism and physical functioning. A prospective, randomized, cross-over trial with concealed allocation, assessor blinding and intention-to-treat analysis will be performed to evaluate the efficacy of the water-based training program. A total of 36 community-dwelling adults (age 65–88 with no recent history of instability or falling will be assigned to either the perturbation-based training or a control group (no training

  6. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth: Should Screening Be Included in the Pre-fecal Microbiota Transplantation Evaluation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegretti, Jessica R; Kassam, Zain; Chan, Walter W

    2018-01-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is safe and effective for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (rCDI) and often involves terminal ileal (TI) stool infusion. Patients report gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms post-FMT despite rCDI resolution. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) screening is not routinely performed pre-FMT. The effect of donor/recipient SIBO status on FMT outcomes and post-FMT GI symptoms is unclear. We aim to evaluate the value of pre-FMT SIBO screening on post-FMT outcomes and symptoms. This was a prospective pilot study of consecutive adults with rCDI undergoing FMT by colonoscopy at a tertiary center. Routine pre-FMT screening and baseline lactulose breath tests (LBTs) were performed for donors and recipients. Positive LBT required a rise > 20 ppm in breath hydrogen or any methane level > 10 ppm within 90 min. The presence of GI symptoms and CDI resolution were assessed 8 weeks post-FMT. Fisher's exact/Student's t tests were performed for statistical analyses. Twenty recipients (58.3 years, 85% women) enrolled in the study. Fourteen (70%) FMTs involved TI stool infusion. Four (20%) recipients and six (30%) donors had positive LBT pre-FMT. At 8 weeks post-FMT, 17 (85%) recipients had CDI resolution and five (25%) reported GI symptoms. Pre-FMT LBT result was not associated with post-FMT CDI resolution or GI symptoms. There was a trend toward increased GI symptoms among recipients receiving stool from LBT-positive donors (50 vs 14.2%, p = 0.09). FMT is effective and well tolerated for rCDI. Positive LBT in asymptomatic donors may have an effect on post-FMT GI symptoms. Larger studies are needed.

  7. Addressing data center efficiency. Lessons learned from process evaluations of utility energy efficiency programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, A.J.; Holmes, J. [Energy Market Innovations, Inc, 83 Columbia St., Suite 303, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    This paper summarizes the unique challenges related to addressing energy efficiency in the data center industry and lessons learned from original research and two process evaluations of energy efficiency programs with components that specifically target data centers. The lessons learned include: creating program opportunities specifically focused on data centers; clearly identifying target data centers able to implement energy efficiency programs; understanding decision making in these facilities; and effectively communicating the program opportunities to the target market. The growing energy use of data centers has drawn international attention from policy makers, regulators, industry consortiums, and electric utilities. Any program effective at improving the energy performance of data centers must include specific strategies and processes aimed at confronting a number of challenges specific to this industry, including: the concentrated and rapidly growing energy use of these facilities; the rapid pace of innovation; the extremely high reliability requirements; and the significant split incentives due to the typical data center management structure. The process evaluations covered in this paper are the Pacific Gas and Electric (PG and E) High-Tech program and the Silicon Valley Power (SVP) Public Benefits Program. While the PG and E evaluation was a more complete process evaluation, the SVP evaluation focused specifically on participation from co-location facilities. These process evaluations together included interviews with program participants, nonparticipants and utility staff and also included outreach to a large variety of industry stakeholders. In addition, the PG and E evaluation included detailed process-mapping used to identify the necessity and importance of all program processes. The insights gathered from these evaluations are not only applicable to US electrical utilities but can also be applied to any international organization looking to create

  8. The historic camphenyl cation: a detailed structure evaluation including solvation energy calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunelle, P; Sorensen, T S; Taeschler, C

    2001-11-02

    The structure of the camphenyl cation 1 has been studied in detail, using both experimental and computational approaches. Like others, we find only one structure on the camphenyl-isobornyl cation PE surface, but this single structure shows some unusual features. These include a very soft PE surface for movement along the C2-C6 axis (a nonbonding distance in a classical description of the cation), and a result of this is that very high computational methods (optimization at MP4 or QCI levels) are required in order to get structural minima that "fit" the experimental data. This PE surface has been probed computationally using fixed C2-C6 distances, and when one also calculates chemical shifts for these "fixed" structures, one sees calculated (13)C NMR chemical shifts for the C2 carbon that are hugely dependent on this fixed distance value, giving near-linear slopes of ca. 25 ppm/0.1 A distance change. Since this distance can vary over at least 0.6 A with relatively small calculated energy changes, there is a total range of ca. 150 ppm involved here. In a second part of this work, and in response to a recent paper in which the historic Meerwein "carbocation intermediate" proposal was rejected, we have calculated solvation energies (SCI-PCM method) for four carbocation systems, including 1. We find carbocation solvation energies (epsilon = 10 "solvent") of 45-53 kcal/mol, and where comparison can be made, the data correlate well with the literature. On the basis of these results, we re-affirm the Meerwein "carbocation" mechanism, but in order to accommodate only a single carbocation intermediate, we offer a description that amounts to a subtle variation of both the nonclassical ion proposal and Meerwein's "two cation" mechanism, namely that the camphenyl cation, 1, as a ground-state structure, can be described as only very weakly interacting in the C2-C6 bridging sense, but that the PE surface along this "bond" is so shallow that an energy input of only 4-6 kcal

  9. Evaluation of a Soft Skills Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charoensap-Kelly, Piyawan; Broussard, Lauren; Lindsly, Mallory; Troy, Megan

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of a soft skills employee training program. We examined willingness to learn and delivery methods (face-to-face vs. online) and their associations with the training outcomes in terms of learning and behavioral change. Results showed that neither participants' willingness to learn nor delivery…

  10. Computer program package for PIXE spectra evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajfosz, J. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland)

    1992-12-31

    The computer programs described here were developed for calculating the concentrations of elements in samples analysed by the PIXE (Proton Induced X-ray Emission) method from the X-ray spectra obtained in those analyses. (author). 10 refs, 2 figs.

  11. Wilderness Experience Program. Final Evaluation Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, Richard Owen

    The Wilderness Experience is an innovative, experiential program under New Mexico's Statewide Forensic Treatment System for mentally disordered first offenders and those soon to be released on parole or probation. Developed from the concepts of Outward Bound, criminal offenders undergo an intensive 17-21 day confrontation with their physical,…

  12. Using Program Evaluation to Enhance Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairris, David

    2012-01-01

    Several years ago, when the author was associate dean in the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences, a new senior administrator on campus expressed the view that one of their premier first-year experience programs in the college was too expensive and that a different model, based on an approach taken at the administrator's previous…

  13. Evaluation of Emergency Medicine Community Educational Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia, Estevan Adan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Out-of-hospital emergencies occur frequently, and laypersons are often the first to respond to these events. As an outreach to our local communities, we developed “Basic Emergency Interventions Everyone Should Know,” a three-hour program addressing cardiopulmonary resuscitation and automated external defibrillator use, heart attack and stroke recognition and intervention, choking and bleeding interventions and infant and child safety. Each session lasted 45 minutes and was facilitated by volunteers from the emergency department staff. A self-administered 13-item questionnaire was completed by each participant before and after the program. A total of 183 participants completed the training and questionnaires. Average score pre-training was nine while the average score post-training was 12 out of a possible 13 (P< .0001. At the conclusion of the program 97% of participants felt the training was very valuable and 100% would recommend the program to other members of their community. [West J Emerg Med. 2010;11(5:416-418.

  14. Planning and Evaluating ICT in Education Programs Using the Four Dimensions of Sustainability: A Program Evaluation from Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouezevara, Sarah; Mekhael, Sabry William; Darcy, Niamh

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the findings from a program evaluation of an ICT in education project within the USAID-funded Girls Improved Learning Outcomes (GILO) program. The evaluation uses a framework of four dimensions of ICT sustainability to examine the appropriateness of the design and implementation of the project, which provided simple, relevant…

  15. 75 FR 16747 - Evaluation of State Coastal Management Programs and National Estuarine Research Reserves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-02

    ... continuing review of the performance of states with respect to coastal program implementation. Evaluation of... of financial assistance awards funded under the CZMA. Each evaluation will include a site visit...' most recent performance reports, as well as OCRM's evaluation notification and supplemental information...

  16. Program Officer, Evaluation | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    S/he participates with senior team members to conduct research in order to develop new and adapt existing methodologies for planning, monitoring and evaluation of research .... Contributes to the design and maintenance of information systems for storing, accessing and analyzing evaluation findings to promote their use.

  17. Evaluating Leadership Development in an Academic Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Brett; Cormack, Erica; Spice, Barb

    2011-01-01

    An evaluation of the Royal Military College of Canada's Aboriginal Leadership Opportunity Year leadership practicum was conducted in 2009. This novel approach used several human performance technology (HPT) models to frame the evaluation and identify the dimensions and subdimensions of merit. This article explains the theoretical framework of the…

  18. Senior Program Specialist, Evaluation | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    defines strategies for building new relationships with Northern and Southern institutions, practitioners, researchers, evaluators and the development community; • establishes contacts and ... manages the design and maintenance of information systems for storing, accessing and analysing evaluation findings; and • initiates ...

  19. Refrigerant Performance Evaluation Including Effects of Transport Properties and Optimized Heat Exchangers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brignoli, Riccardo; Brown, J Steven; Skye, H; Domanski, Piotr A

    2017-08-01

    Preliminary refrigerant screenings typically rely on using cycle simulation models involving thermodynamic properties alone. This approach has two shortcomings. First, it neglects transport properties, whose influence on system performance is particularly strong through their impact on the performance of the heat exchangers. Second, the refrigerant temperatures in the evaporator and condenser are specified as input, while real-life equipment operates at imposed heat sink and heat source temperatures; the temperatures in the evaporator and condensers are established based on overall heat transfer resistances of these heat exchangers and the balance of the system. The paper discusses a simulation methodology and model that addresses the above shortcomings. This model simulates the thermodynamic cycle operating at specified heat sink and heat source temperature profiles, and includes the ability to account for the effects of thermophysical properties and refrigerant mass flux on refrigerant heat transfer and pressure drop in the air-to-refrigerant evaporator and condenser. Additionally, the model can optimize the refrigerant mass flux in the heat exchangers to maximize the Coefficient of Performance. The new model is validated with experimental data and its predictions are contrasted to those of a model based on thermodynamic properties alone.

  20. Adjuvant occupational therapy for work-related major depression works: randomized trial including economic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schene, Aart H; Koeter, Maarten W J; Kikkert, Martijn J; Swinkels, Jan A; McCrone, Paul

    2007-03-01

    Major depression has far-reaching consequences for work functioning and absenteeism. In most cases depression is treated by medication and clinical management. The addition of occupational therapy (OT) might improve outcome. We determined the cost-effectiveness of the addition of OT to treatment as usual (TAU). Sixty-two adults with major depression and a mean absenteeism of 242 days were randomized to TAU (out-patient psychiatric treatment) or TAU+OT [6 months, including (i) diagnostic phase with occupational history and work reintegration plan, and (ii) therapeutic phase with individual sessions and group sessions]. Main outcome domains were depression, work resumption, work stress and costs. Assessments were at baseline and at 3, 6, 12 and 42 months. The addition of OT to TAU: (i) did not improve depression outcome, (ii) resulted in a reduction in work-loss days during the first 18 months, (iii) did not increase work stress, and (iv) had a 75.5% probability of being more cost-effective than TAU alone. Addition of OT to good clinical practice does not improve depression outcome, improves productivity without increasing work stress and is superior to TAU in terms of cost-effectiveness.

  1. Dosimetric evaluation of three adaptive strategies for prostate cancer treatment including pelvic lymph nodes irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantin, Audrey; Gingras, Luc; Archambault, Louis, E-mail: louis.archambault@phy.ulaval.ca [Département de Physique, de génie Physique et d’optique et Centre de Recherche sur le Cancer, Université Laval, Québec, Québec G1V 0A6, Canada and Département de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche du CHU de Québec, CHU de Québec—Université Laval, 11 côte du Palais, Québec, Québec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Lachance, Bernard; Foster, William [Département de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche du CHU de Québec, CHU de Québec—Université Laval, 11 côte du Palais, Québec, Québec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Goudreault, Julie [Département de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche du CHU de Québec, CHU de Québec—Université Laval, 11 côte du Palais, Québec, Québec G1R 2J6, Canada and Département de Radio-Oncologie, CSSS de Gatineau–Hôpital de Gatineau, 909 Boulevard La Vérendrye, Gatineau, Québec J8P 7H2 (Canada)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: The movements of the prostate relative to the pelvic lymph nodes during intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment can limit margin reduction and affect the protection of the organs at risk (OAR). In this study, the authors performed an analysis of three adaptive treatment strategies that combine information from both bony and gold marker registrations. The robustness of those treatments against the interfraction prostate movements was evaluated. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted on five prostate cancer patients with 7–13 daily cone-beam CTs (CBCTs). The clinical target volumes (CTVs) consisting of pelvic lymph nodes, prostate, and seminal vesicles as well as the OARs were delineated on each CBCT and the initial CT. Three adaptive strategies were analyzed. Two of these methods relied on a two-step patient positioning at each fraction. First step: a bony registration was used to deliver the nodal CTV prescription. Second step: a gold marker registration was then used either to (1) complete the dose delivered to the prostate (complement); (2) or give almost the entire prescription to the prostate with a weak dose gradient between the targets to compensate for possible motions (gradient). The third method (COR) used a pool of precalculated plans based on images acquired at previous treatment fractions. At each new fraction, a plan is selected from that pool based on the daily position of prostate center-of-mass. The dosimetric comparison was conducted and results are presented with and without the systematic shift in the prostate position on the CT planning. The adaptive strategies were compared to the current clinical standard where all fractions are treated with the initial nonadaptive plan. Results: The minimum daily prostate D{sub 95%} is improved by 2%, 9%, and 6% for the complement, the gradient, and the COR approaches, respectively, compared to the nonadaptive method. The average nodal CTV D{sub 95%} remains constant across the

  2. Financial evaluations of antibiotic stewardship programs-a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dik, Jan-Willem H; Vemer, Pepijn; Friedrich, Alex W; Hendrix, Ron; Lo-Ten-Foe, Jerome R; Sinha, Bhanu; Postma, Maarten J

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing awareness to counteract problems due to incorrect antimicrobial use. Interventions that are implemented are often part of an Antimicrobial Stewardship Program (ASPs). Studies publishing results from these interventions are increasing, including reports on the economical effects of ASPs. This review will look at the economical sections of these studies and the methods that were used. A systematic review was performed of articles found in the PubMed and EMBASE databases published from 2000 until November 2014. Included studies found were scored for various aspects and the quality of the papers was assessed following an appropriate check list (CHEC criteria list). 1233 studies were found, of which 149 were read completely. Ninety-nine were included in the final review. Of these studies, 57 only mentioned the costs associated with the antimicrobial medication. Others also included operational costs (n = 23), costs for hospital stay (n = 18), and/or other costs (n = 19). Nine studies were further assessed for their quality. These studies scored between 2 and 14 out of a potential total score of 19. This review gives an extensive overview of the current financial evaluation of ASPs and the quality of these economical studies. We show that there is still major potential to improve financial evaluations of ASPs. Studies do not use similar nor consistent methods or outcome measures, making it impossible draw sound conclusions and compare different studies. Finally, we make some recommendations for the future.

  3. An Evaluation of a Flight Deck Interval Management Algorithm Including Delayed Target Trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swieringa, Kurt A.; Underwood, Matthew C.; Barmore, Bryan; Leonard, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    NASA's first Air Traffic Management (ATM) Technology Demonstration (ATD-1) was created to facilitate the transition of mature air traffic management technologies from the laboratory to operational use. The technologies selected for demonstration are the Traffic Management Advisor with Terminal Metering (TMA-TM), which provides precise timebased scheduling in the terminal airspace; Controller Managed Spacing (CMS), which provides controllers with decision support tools enabling precise schedule conformance; and Interval Management (IM), which consists of flight deck automation that enables aircraft to achieve or maintain precise in-trail spacing. During high demand operations, TMA-TM may produce a schedule and corresponding aircraft trajectories that include delay to ensure that a particular aircraft will be properly spaced from other aircraft at each schedule waypoint. These delayed trajectories are not communicated to the automation onboard the aircraft, forcing the IM aircraft to use the published speeds to estimate the target aircraft's estimated time of arrival. As a result, the aircraft performing IM operations may follow an aircraft whose TMA-TM generated trajectories have substantial speed deviations from the speeds expected by the spacing algorithm. Previous spacing algorithms were not designed to handle this magnitude of uncertainty. A simulation was conducted to examine a modified spacing algorithm with the ability to follow aircraft flying delayed trajectories. The simulation investigated the use of the new spacing algorithm with various delayed speed profiles and wind conditions, as well as several other variables designed to simulate real-life variability. The results and conclusions of this study indicate that the new spacing algorithm generally exhibits good performance; however, some types of target aircraft speed profiles can cause the spacing algorithm to command less than optimal speed control behavior.

  4. The Analysis of Maternity Health Program by Using Comprehensive Evaluation Model (CIPPI – Tabriz, 1389

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Kalantari

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ​ Background and Objectives: In all health systems, maternity health program has an important role for its great effects. Therefore, the evaluation of this program constantly was at the center of attention of managers and policy makers. The current study aimed to analyze maternity health program by focusing on the evaluation process according to the evaluation comprehensive model (CIPPI in East Azarbaijan. Material and Methods: This is a descriptive cross-sectional study and its data were collected by qualitative methods such as observing and interviewing. By evaluating different levels of delivered services, interviewing process owners and customers and reviewing the documents, evaluation process was studied and the results were compared with CIPPI model. Results: The yielded results from the comparison of this program with CIPPI model indicated that from 24 analyzed items in 5 dimensions of this program, only 5 items were measured completely, 5 items measured partially and 14 items were not measured at all. There were other problems including weaknesses in checklist, standards and during the process of evaluation. Conclusion: According to the results, it is concluded that the current model of maternity health evaluation program in Eastern Azarbaijan has a notable gap with an ideal evaluation program and the need for a revise of this program according to efficient and effective evaluation models seems necessary.

  5. Hypertension and Diabetes Mellitus Program evaluation on user's view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Juliana Veiga Mottin; Mantovani, Maria de Fátima; Kalinke, Luciana Puchalski; Ulbrich, Elis Martins

    2015-01-01

    to evaluate the program proposed by the Reorganization Care Plan for Hypertension and Diabetes Mellitus on user's view, and describe aspects of the trajectory of the participants correlating with the program's evaluation. evaluative study with a qualitative approach conducted in health units with the Family Health Strategy, in a city of the metropolitan region of Curitiba, in the period from September to March, 2012. A total of 30 adults with hypertension and/or Diabetes mellitus were interviewed. Data were analyzed through content analysis. Four categories were identified: Disease diagnosis; Reasons for the program need; Knowledge of the program, and program evaluation. there was the recognition of the orientations, and the monitoring of activities developed, with emphasis in cost reduction for users.

  6. Evaluation Framework for NASA's Educational Outreach Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Rick; Booker, Angela; Linde, Charlotte; Preston, Connie

    1999-01-01

    The objective of the proposed work is to develop an evaluation framework for NASA's educational outreach efforts. We focus on public (rather than technical or scientific) dissemination efforts, specifically on Internet-based outreach sites for children.The outcome of this work is to propose both methods and criteria for evaluation, which would enable NASA to do a more analytic evaluation of its outreach efforts. The proposed framework is based on IRL's ethnographic and video-based observational methods, which allow us to analyze how these sites are actually used.

  7. Evaluation of an Eight Week Adult Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, John B.

    As part of a training program for families receiving public assistance, an eight-week summer adult education program for 54 students was conducted in 1965 by the Ramsey County (Minnesota) Welfare Department and the Saint Paul Public Schools under Title V of the Economic Opportunity Act. Each day's program included a staff planning period, an…

  8. Experimental evaluation of admission and disposition of artificial radionuclides including transuranium elements in agricultural plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozhakhanov, T.; Lukashenko, S. [Institute of radiation safety and ecology (Kazakhstan)

    2014-07-01

    Processes of radionuclides migration and transfer to agricultural plants are quite well developed worldwide, but the information on character of accumulation of {sup 241}Am and {sup 239+240}Pu transuranium radionuclides in agricultural plants is still fragmentary. Even in generalized materials of worldwide studies, IAEA guide, accumulation coefficient (AC) can have wide range of values (5-6 orders), no data exists on radionuclides' distribution in different organs of plants and they are given for joined groups of plants and types of soils. That is why the main aim of this work was to obtain basic quantitative parameters of radionuclides' migration in 'soil-plant' system, and firs of all- for transuranium elements.. In 2010 a series of experiments with agricultural plants was started at the territory of the former Semipalatinsk Test Site aimed to investigate entry of artificial radionuclides by crop products in natural climatic conditions. To conduct the experiment for study of coefficient of radionuclides' accumulation by agricultural corps, there was chosen a land spot at the STS territory, characterized by high concentration of radionuclides: {sup 241}Am - n*10{sup 4} Bq/kg, {sup 137}Cs - n*10{sup 3} Bq/kg, {sup 90}Sr - n*10{sup 3} Bq/kg and {sup 239+240}Pu- n*10{sup 5} Bq/kg. As objects of investigation, cultures, cultivated in Kazakhstan have been selected: wheat (Triticum vulgare), barley (Hordeum vulgare), oat (Avena sativa L.), water melon (Citrullus vulgaris), melon (Cucumis melo), potato (Solanum tuberosum), eggplant (Solanum melongena), pepper (Capsicum annuum), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), sunflower (Helianthus cultus), onion (Allium cepa), carrot (Daucus carota), parsley(Petroselinum vulgare)and cabbage (Brassica oleracea). Investigated plants have been planted within the time limits, recommended for selected types of agricultural plants. Cropping system included simple agronomic and amelioration measures. Fertilizers were not

  9. 45 CFR 284.30 - What information must the State include in its assessment of the impact of the TANF program(s) in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... program(s); (2) The total amount of State and Tribal spending on TANF cash assistance payments; (3) The... Food Stamp Program or other State supportive and assistance programs; (4) The proportion of students...

  10. Fatigue Sensor Evaluation Program Laboratory Test Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-10-01

    quantitative data treatment of fatigue sensor response using basic performance data derived from foregoing and current fatigue sensor programs. a...34 ’: « •IIIS ......... li : « rtrtintr : •* M» c f M i H ::::::;:• ;:« ...j . .... ..:. •f’ ::.::::: ^::|:::: n» VH ft;; ** ViH ! * 1 - •• •-•• ; i...family of calibration curves was developed using curve- fitting treatment of raw data. 3. Calibration response was slightly higher than indicated

  11. CD4+ T Cell Help Confers a Cytotoxic T Cell Effector Program Including Coinhibitory Receptor Downregulation and Increased Tissue Invasiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrends, Tomasz; Spanjaard, Aldo; Pilzecker, Bas; Bąbała, Nikolina; Bovens, Astrid; Xiao, Yanling; Jacobs, Heinz; Borst, Jannie

    2017-11-21

    CD4+ T cells optimize the cytotoxic T cell (CTL) response in magnitude and quality, by unknown molecular mechanisms. We here present the transcriptomic changes in CTLs resulting from CD4+ T cell help after anti-cancer vaccination or virus infection. The gene expression signatures revealed that CD4+ T cell help during priming optimized CTLs in expression of cytotoxic effector molecules and many other functions that ensured efficacy of CTLs throughout their life cycle. Key features included downregulation of PD-1 and other coinhibitory receptors that impede CTL activity, and increased motility and migration capacities. "Helped" CTLs acquired chemokine receptors that helped them reach their tumor target tissue and metalloprotease activity that enabled them to invade into tumor tissue. A very large part of the "help" program was instilled in CD8+ T cells via CD27 costimulation. The help program thus enhances specific CTL effector functions in response to vaccination or a virus infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Energy Star Lighting Verification Program (Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conan O' Rourke; Yutao Zhou

    2006-03-01

    The Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting (PEARL) is a watchdog program. It was created in response to complaints received by utility program managers about the performance of certain Energy Star lighting products being promoted within their service territories and the lack of a self-policing mechanism within the lighting industry that would ensure the reliability of these products and their compliance with ENERGY STAR specifications. To remedy these problems, PEARL purchases and tests products that are available to the consumers in the marketplace. The Lighting Research Center (LRC) tests the selected products against the corresponding Energy Star specifications. This report includes the experimental procedure and data results of Cycle Three of PEARL program during the period of October 2002 to April 2003, along with the description of apparatus used, equipment calibration process, experimental methodology, and research findings from the testing. The products tested are 20 models of screw-based compact fluorescent lamps (CFL) of various types and various wattages made or marketed by 12 different manufacturers, and ten models of residential lighting fixtures from eight different manufacturers.

  13. Energy Star Lighting Verification Program (Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conan O' Rourke; Yutao Zhou

    2006-03-01

    The Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting (PEARL) is a watchdog program. It was created in response to complaints received by utility program managers about the performance of certain Energy Star lighting products being promoted within their service territories and the lack of a self-policing mechanism within the lighting industry that would ensure the reliability of these products and their compliance with ENERGY STAR specifications. To remedy these problems, PEARL purchases and tests products that are available to the consumers in the marketplace. The Lighting Research Center (LRC) tests the selected products against the corresponding Energy Star specifications. This report includes the experimental procedure and data results of Cycle Four and Cycle Five of PEARL program during the period of October 2003 to April 2004, along with the description of apparatus used, equipment calibration process, experimental methodology, and research findings from the testing. The parameter tested for Cycle Four is lumen maintenance at 40% rated life, and parameters tested for Cycle Five are all parameters required in Energy Star specifications except lumen maintenance at 40% rated life.

  14. Energy Star Lighting Verification Program (Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conan O' Rourke; Yutao Zhou

    2006-03-01

    The Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting (PEARL) is a watchdog program. It was created in response to complaints received by utility program managers about the performance of certain Energy Star lighting products being promoted within their service territories and the lack of a self-policing mechanism within the lighting industry that would ensure the reliability of these products and their compliance with ENERGY STAR specifications. To remedy these problems, PEARL purchases and tests products that are available to the consumers in the marketplace. The Lighting Research Center (LRC) tests the selected products against the corresponding Energy Star specifications. This report includes the experimental procedure and data results of Cycle Three and Cycle Four of PEARL program during the period of April 2003 to October 2003, along with the description of apparatus used, equipment calibration process, experimental methodology, and research findings from the testing. The parameter tested for Cycle three is lumen maintenance at 40% rated life, and parameters tested for Cycle Four are all parameters required in Energy Star specifications except lumen maintenance at 40% rated life.

  15. Let's get technical: Enhancing program evaluation through the use and integration of internet and mobile technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materia, Frank T; Miller, Elizabeth A; Runion, Megan C; Chesnut, Ryan P; Irvin, Jamie B; Richardson, Cameron B; Perkins, Daniel F

    2016-06-01

    Program evaluation has become increasingly important, and information on program performance often drives funding decisions. Technology use and integration can help ease the burdens associated with program evaluation by reducing the resources needed (e.g., time, money, staff) and increasing evaluation efficiency. This paper reviews how program evaluators, across disciplines, can apply internet and mobile technologies to key aspects of program evaluation, which consist of participant registration, participant tracking and retention, process evaluation (e.g., fidelity, assignment completion), and outcome evaluation (e.g., behavior change, knowledge gain). In addition, the paper focuses on the ease of use, relative cost, and fit with populations. An examination on how these tools can be integrated to enhance data collection and program evaluation is discussed. Important limitations of and considerations for technology integration, including the level of technical skill, cost needed to integrate various technologies, data management strategies, and ethical considerations, are highlighted. Lastly, a case study of technology use in an evaluation conducted by the Clearinghouse for Military Family Readiness at Penn State is presented and illustrates how technology integration can enhance program evaluation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Program evaluation models and related theories: AMEE guide no. 67.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Ann W; Hemmer, Paul A

    2012-01-01

    This Guide reviews theories of science that have influenced the development of common educational evaluation models. Educators can be more confident when choosing an appropriate evaluation model if they first consider the model's theoretical basis against their program's complexity and their own evaluation needs. Reductionism, system theory, and (most recently) complexity theory have inspired the development of models commonly applied in evaluation studies today. This Guide describes experimental and quasi-experimental models, Kirkpatrick's four-level model, the Logic Model, and the CIPP (Context/Input/Process/Product) model in the context of the theories that influenced their development and that limit or support their ability to do what educators need. The goal of this Guide is for educators to become more competent and confident in being able to design educational program evaluations that support intentional program improvement while adequately documenting or describing the changes and outcomes-intended and unintended-associated with their programs.

  17. Evaluation of a respiratory rehabilitation program in children with scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solache-Carranco, Angela; Sánchez-Bringas, María Guadalupe

    2012-01-01

    Thoracic scoliosis is a lateral curvature of the spine associated with restrictive lung defects, manifested by a decrease in respiratory function tests. We undertook this study to evaluate the effect of a respiratory rehabilitation program over lung function in children with scoliosis. We carried out a prospective and deliberate intervention study including 25 consecutive patients, aged 6 to 18 years, diagnosed with thoracic scoliosis. The respiratory rehabilitation program was structured into two phases: institutional and private residence. Statistical analysis was carried out using descriptive parameters and paired t-test and Wilcoxon signed-ranks test. Spearman correlation was used to measure intensity of association among variables. Statistical significance was considered when p respiratory symptoms were dyspnea with poor effort tolerance in 52%. After treatment, 88% of patients were asymptomatic and only 4% presented poor effort tolerance. Oxygen saturation and forced vital capacity percentage had a significant increment after the program. Respiratory rehabilitation has a positive effect on increasing pulmonary function of children with scoliosis.

  18. A Guide to Evaluation Research in Terminal Care Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckingham, Robert W., III; Foley, Susan H.

    1978-01-01

    Pressure for greater accountability is being exerted on programs for care of terminally ill and increasing demand for evaluation research. Components, implications, and limitations of evaluation systems are discussed, and their application in the terminal care setting addressed. Buckingham evaluation of hospice home care service is cited as a…

  19. Creating an Information Literacy Badges Program in Blackboard: A Formative Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunon, Johanna; Ramirez, Laura Lucio; Ryckman, Brian; Campbell, Loy; Mlinar, Courtney

    2015-01-01

    A formative program evaluation using Stufflebeam's (2010) Context, Input, Process, Product (CIPP) model was conducted to assess the use of digital badges for tracking basic library instructional skills across academic programs at Nova Southeastern University. Based on the evaluation of pilot library modules and Blackboard Learn's badges…

  20. Evaluating the Implementation of an Olympic Education Program in Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammatikopoulos, Vasilios; Tsigilis, Nikolaos; Koustelios, Athanasios; Theodorakis, Yannis

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an instrument for evaluating how an education program has been implemented. Such evaluation can provide insight into the effectiveness of a program. Examined here was the Olympic Education Program used in Greek schools since 2000. In it, students learn the history of the Olympic games and the importance of exercise for health along with the principles and values of sports and volunteerism. The evaluation instrument underlying this study addressed the following six factors: `facilities', `administration', `educational material', `student-teacher relationships', `educational procedures', and `training'. Results indicate that the instrument, while adequate for assessing effectiveness, should be combined with advanced statistical methods.

  1. Improvement in genetic evaluation of female fertility in dairy cattle using multiple-trait models including milk production traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, C; Madsen, P; Lund, M S

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the improvement in genetic evaluation of fertility traits by using production traits as secondary traits (MILK = 305-d milk yield, FAT = 305-d fat yield, and PROT = 305-d protein yield). Data including 471,742 records from first lactations of Denmark Holstein cows, covering...... the model including FAT. In addition, it was found that single-trait models underestimated genetic trend of fertility traits. These results suggested that genetic evaluation of fertility traits would be improved using a multiple-trait model including MILK or PROT...... within 56 d after first service) were analyzed using single- and multiple-trait sire models including 1 or 3 production traits. Model stability was evaluated by correlation between EBV from 2 sub-data sets (DATAA and DATAB). Model predictive ability was assessed by the correlation between EBV from...

  2. Program Evaluation: The Board Game--An Interactive Learning Tool for Evaluators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Febey, Karen; Coyne, Molly

    2007-01-01

    The field of program evaluation lacks interactive teaching tools. To address this pedagogical issue, the authors developed a collaborative learning technique called Program Evaluation: The Board Game. The authors present the game and its development in this practitioner-oriented article. The evaluation board game is an adaptable teaching tool…

  3. The management of evaluating the European programs and policies implemented in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doctoral student ROMAN MIHAELA

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Starting with the reform and modernization of the public administration in Romania in the mid 1990s, an important element of this process being the development of the management process, respectively of planning and managing public policies, the Romanian government started also a process of developing the capacity for evaluating public programs and policies, both the ones with European or foreign financing and the ones with domestic financing. Up-to-date analyses and studies have showed, however, that at the level of the national public sector there is a major discrepancy between the progress made in the evaluation of European programs or the ones with foreign financing and the programs financed from public funds, namely that there is a consolidated evaluation practice as regards the first types of programs, which is virtually inexistent as regards programs financed from the public budget.This paper intends to identify the progress made at the level of the Romanian public administration as regards the management of evaluating programs with European financing, to see the characteristics of building the evaluation capacity within the national system of these programs and the motivation stimulating such approaches. The first part of this paper shall contain a presentation of the background of the current evaluation system, including both the legislative framework and the institutional framework with duties of management and evaluation of European programs; further, I shall analyze the evolution of this system in order to be able to draw conclusions regarding the evaluation capacity of Romania.

  4. Accident Sequence Evaluation Program: Human reliability analysis procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swain, A.D.

    1987-02-01

    This document presents a shortened version of the procedure, models, and data for human reliability analysis (HRA) which are presented in the Handbook of Human Reliability Analysis With emphasis on Nuclear Power Plant Applications (NUREG/CR-1278, August 1983). This shortened version was prepared and tried out as part of the Accident Sequence Evaluation Program (ASEP) funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and managed by Sandia National Laboratories. The intent of this new HRA procedure, called the ''ASEP HRA Procedure,'' is to enable systems analysts, with minimal support from experts in human reliability analysis, to make estimates of human error probabilities and other human performance characteristics which are sufficiently accurate for many probabilistic risk assessments. The ASEP HRA Procedure consists of a Pre-Accident Screening HRA, a Pre-Accident Nominal HRA, a Post-Accident Screening HRA, and a Post-Accident Nominal HRA. The procedure in this document includes changes made after tryout and evaluation of the procedure in four nuclear power plants by four different systems analysts and related personnel, including human reliability specialists. The changes consist of some additional explanatory material (including examples), and more detailed definitions of some of the terms. 42 refs.

  5. Evaluating a physician leadership development program - a mixed methods approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Throgmorton, Cheryl; Mitchell, Trey; Morley, Tom; Snyder, Marijo

    2016-05-16

    Purpose - With the extent of change in healthcare today, organizations need strong physician leaders. To compensate for the lack of physician leadership education, many organizations are sending physicians to external leadership programs or developing in-house leadership programs targeted specifically to physicians. The purpose of this paper is to outline the evaluation strategy and outcomes of the inaugural year of a Physician Leadership Academy (PLA) developed and implemented at a Michigan-based regional healthcare system. Design/methodology/approach - The authors applied the theoretical framework of Kirkpatrick's four levels of evaluation and used surveys, observations, activity tracking, and interviews to evaluate the program outcomes. The authors applied grounded theory techniques to the interview data. Findings - The program met targeted outcomes across all four levels of evaluation. Interview themes focused on the significance of increasing self-awareness, building relationships, applying new skills, and building confidence. Research limitations/implications - While only one example, this study illustrates the importance of developing the evaluation strategy as part of the program design. Qualitative research methods, often lacking from learning evaluation design, uncover rich themes of impact. The study supports how a PLA program can enhance physician learning, engagement, and relationship building throughout and after the program. Physician leaders' partnership with organization development and learning professionals yield results with impact to individuals, groups, and the organization. Originality/value - Few studies provide an in-depth review of evaluation methods and outcomes of physician leadership development programs. Healthcare organizations seeking to develop similar in-house programs may benefit applying the evaluation strategy outlined in this study.

  6. Comparative Evaluation of Financing Programs: Insights From California’s Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deason, Jeff [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Electricity Markets and Policy Group

    2017-07-31

    Berkeley Lab examines criteria for a comparative assessment of multiple financing programs for energy efficiency, developed through a statewide public process in California. The state legislature directed the California Alternative Energy and Advanced Transportation Financing Authority (CAEATFA) to develop these criteria. CAEATFA's report to the legislature, an invaluable reference for other jurisdictions considering these topics, discusses the proposed criteria and the rationales behind them in detail. Berkeley Lab's brief focuses on several salient issues that emerged during the criteria development and discussion process. Many of these issues are likely to arise in other states that plan to evaluate the impacts of energy efficiency financing programs, whether for a single program or multiple programs. Issues discussed in the brief include: -The stakeholder process to develop the proposed assessment criteria -Attribution of outcomes - such as energy savings - to financing programs vs. other drivers -Choosing the outcome metric of primary interest: program take-up levels vs. savings -The use of net benefits vs. benefit-cost ratios for cost-effectiveness evaluation -Non-energy factors -Consumer protection factors -Market transformation impacts -Accommodating varying program goals in a multi-program evaluation -Accounting for costs and risks borne by various parties, including taxpayers and utility customers, in cost-effectiveness analysis -How to account for potential synergies among programs in a multi-program evaluation

  7. HIV/AIDS Prevention Program Evaluation Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, Hortensia; Barker, Marybeth; Cassisy, Theresa; Hardy-Fanta, Carol; Hereen, Tim; Levenson, Suzette; McCloskey, Lois; Melendez, Michael

    This report addresses the four research objectives that were established by the Massachusetts Primary Prevention Group (MPPG) and the Massachusetts Department of Public Health's HIV/AIDS Bureau. The objectives were to: (1) review and summarize literature that formally evaluated HIV prevention interventions; (2) describe how currently funded…

  8. Teaching MBA Students Teamwork and Team Leadership Skills: An Empirical Evaluation of a Classroom Educational Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, Charles J.; Strupeck, David; Griffin, Andrea; Szostek, Jana; Rominger, Anna S.

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive educational program for teaching behavioral teamwork and team leadership skills was rigorously evaluated with 148 MBA students enrolled at an urban regional campus of a Midwestern public university. Major program components included (1) videotaped student teams in leaderless group discussion (LGD) exercises at the course beginning…

  9. Evaluation of Nosocomial Infection Control Programs in health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menegueti, Mayra Gonçalves; Canini, Silvia Rita Marin da Silva; Bellissimo-Rodrigues, Fernando; Laus, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    to evaluate the Nosocomial Infection Control Programs in hospital institutions regarding structure and process indicators. this is a descriptive, exploratory and quantitative study conducted in 2013. The study population comprised 13 Nosocomial Infection Control Programs of health services in a Brazilian city of the state of São Paulo. Public domain instruments available in the Manual of Evaluation Indicators of Nosocomial Infection Control Practices were used. The indicators with the highest average compliance were "Evaluation of the Structure of the Nosocomial Infection Control Programs" (75%) and "Evaluation of the Epidemiological Surveillance System of Nosocomial Infection" (82%) and those with the lowest mean compliance scores were "Evaluation of Operational Guidelines" (58.97%) and "Evaluation of Activities of Control and Prevention of Nosocomial Infection" (60.29%). The use of indicators identified that, despite having produced knowledge about prevention and control of nosocomial infections, there is still a large gap between the practice and the recommendations.

  10. Evaluation of the Healthy Schools Program: Part I. Interim Progress

    OpenAIRE

    Beam, Margaret; Ehrlich, Ginny; Donze Black, Jessica; Block, Audrey; Leviton, Laura C.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Federal and state policies identify schools as a setting to prevent childhood obesity, but schools need better health-promoting strategies. The objective of this study was to evaluate interim progress in schools receiving hands-on training from the Healthy Schools Program, the nation's largest school-based program aimed at preventing childhood obesity. The 4-year program targets schools with predominantly low-income, African American, or Hispanic students. Methods In 2010 we asse...

  11. An economic analysis methodology for project evaluation and programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Economic analysis is a critical component of a comprehensive project or program evaluation methodology that considers all key : quantitative and qualitative impacts of highway investments. It allows highway agencies to identify, quantify, and value t...

  12. Evaluation of FHWA Technology Transfer Program at HERPICC, Purdue University

    OpenAIRE

    Whitford, Robert K

    1984-01-01

    An evaluation of the FHWA technology transfer program at HERPICC, Purdue University based on a questionnaire sent to operation and management personnel of the highway road system. Future courses of action are also suggested.

  13. The Nursing Leadership Institute program evaluation: a critique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Havaei F

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Farinaz Havaei, Maura MacPhee School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada Abstract: A theory-driven program evaluation was conducted for a nursing leadership program, as a collaborative project between university faculty, the nurses' union, the provincial Ministry of Health, and its chief nursing officers. A collaborative logic model process was used to engage stakeholders, and mixed methods approaches were used to answer evaluation questions. Despite demonstrated, successful outcomes, the leadership program was not supported with continued funding. This paper examines what happened during the evaluation process: What factors failed to sustain this program? Keywords: leadership development, theory-driven evaluation, mixed methods, collaborative logic modeling

  14. 1992-1993 Bonneville Appliance Efficiency Program: Showerhead evaluation. Volume I - report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warwick, W.M.

    1995-01-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) provides wholesale electric power to over 100 retail distribution utilities in the Pacific Northwest. Bonneville is faced with meeting growing loads from these utilities. It acquires conservation as one means of meeting this load growth. Bonneville has offered a variety of conservation programs since 1980. Efficient showerheads have been a feature in residential conservation programs ever since. Bonneville launched the Residential Appliance Efficiency Program to focus on water-heater energy conservation opportunities in 1992. The Residential Appliance Efficiency Program consists of two parts, a water-heater efficiency program, and a hot-water efficiency program. This report evaluates the savings and costs of the first two years of the showerhead portion of the Residential Appliance Efficiency Program (the showerhead program). Although it is not a formal evaluation of the program limited to implementation or a {open_quotes}process{close_quotes} evaluation, observations about program design and implementation are included as appropriate. Results of this evaluation are limited to program participants within the Bonneville service territory.

  15. After-school programs for adolescents: a review of evaluation research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apsler, Robert

    2009-01-01

    During the last ten years, an infusion of private foundation and government funding markedly increased the number of after-school programs targeting adolescents. This review focuses on the quality of after-school program evaluation research. Numerous evaluations of after-school programs exist, but serious methodological flaws limit the conclusions that can be drawn with confidence from most of the studies. Major obstacles to conducting sound evaluations include difficulties in obtaining appropriate comparison groups and dealing with sporadic attendance and attrition. The review summarizes promising results, discusses the extent to which after-school programs have achieved their goals, describes characteristics associated with successful after-school programs, and reports on efforts to assess the cost effectiveness of after-school programs.

  16. Evaluating Patient Preferences for Different Incentive Programs to Optimize Pharmacist-Provided Patient Care Program Enrollment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszewski, Daniel; Cernohous, Tim; Vaidyanathan, Rajiv

    2017-11-01

    Employers have increased efforts to engage employees in health and wellness programs. Providing employees with incentives to participate in these programs has been shown to improve overall enrollment and engagement. One program that has had challenges with enrollment and engagement is medication therapy management (MTM). To (a) determine how individuals evaluate different financial incentives to improve participation in an MTM program and (b) measure the effect of participant characteristics on incentive preference. This study was composed of a paper-based survey administered to participants after focus group sessions. Participants included MTM-eligible beneficiaries from 2 employer groups and included MTM-naive and MTM-experienced participants. Incentive preference was measured based on 3 bipolar scales that compared 3 incentives: $100 gift certificates, $8 copay reduction for 6 months, and $100 added to paycheck. A total of 72 participants completed the survey: 34 participants were MTM experienced, and 38 were MTM naive. Overall participant preference reporting resulted in inconsistencies. Copay reduction was preferred to a gift certificate (55.6% vs. 37.5%); money in paycheck was preferred over copay reduction (48.6% vs. 40.3%); and gift certificates were preferred over money in paycheck (56.9% vs. 22.2%). However, subgroup analysis resulted in a more consistent preference reporting, with MTM-experienced participants consistently preferring copay reduction over gift certificates (67.6% vs. 23.5%) and money in paycheck (55.9% vs. 29.4%). MTM-naive participants preferred a gift certificate over copay reduction (51.4% vs. 44.7%) and cash in paycheck (68.4% vs. 23.7%). The results of this study suggest that gift certificates were preferred by MTM-naive participants, which supports the use of gift certificates as an incentive for MTM-naive patients to enroll in an MTM program. Conversely, the use of a copay reduction program was preferred by MTM

  17. Program Evaluation of a High School Science Professional Learning Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLelland-Crawley, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Teachers may benefit more from a professional learning community (PLC) than from professional development initiatives presented in single day workshops. The purpose of this program evaluation study was to identify characteristics of an effective PLC and to determine how the members of the PLC have benefitted from the program. Fullan's educational…

  18. Evaluating Nutrition Education Programming by Using a Dietary Screener

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Jennifer; Litchfield, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Short dietary assessment instruments known as screeners have potential for use in evaluating nutrition education programming because detecting change in dietary intake can demonstrate movement toward program goals. Using screeners results in objective dietary intake data but involves less administrative time, training, and cost than other…

  19. 5 CFR 339.205 - Medical evaluation programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... program must be clearly supported by the nature of the work. The specific positions covered must be... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Medical evaluation programs. 339.205 Section 339.205 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS MEDICAL...

  20. Parenting after Divorce: Evaluation of Preventive Programs for Divorcing Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Nancy J.; And Others

    Preventive educational programs are potentially useful in reducing the effects of divorce on children and families. Parenting After Divorce is an ongoing study designed to evaluate preventive programs. Divorcing families with children aged 7-12 are identified from court records and contacted to participate. Families are randomly assigned to one of…

  1. Situated Research Design and Methodological Choices in Formative Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supovitz, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Design-based implementation research offers the opportunity to rethink the relationships between intervention, research, and situation to better attune research and evaluation to the program development process. Using a heuristic called the intervention development curve, I describe the rough trajectory that programs typically follow as they…

  2. Evaluation of School-Based Smoking Prevention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Laura; Iobst, Emily A.; McGrady, Meghan E.

    2007-01-01

    The majority of individuals who will become "smokers" begin smoking during their teenage years. Schools are optimal settings for relaying messages about health risks associated with smoking and for implementing smoking prevention programs. This article presents successful components of smoking prevention programs, describes the evaluation process,…

  3. A Formative Evaluation of the Cooking with a Chef Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condrasky, Margaret D.; Griffin, Sara G.; Catalano, Patricia Michaud; Clark, Christine

    2010-01-01

    The Cooking with a Chef a culinary nutrition education series teams a chef and nutrition educator during cooking sessions with parents. Pilot program results were shared in the "Journal of Extension" in 2006. This formative evaluation presents data collected through focus groups and individual interviews examining program implementation,…

  4. Policy Evaluation of District Mobile Internet Service Center Program (MPLIK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulyono Yalia

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The research was motivated by a problem that is interesting to study the Provision of Facilities Policy Evaluation Program Universal Service Obligation (USO Internet Service Center District Mobile Program (MPLIK In Kuningan regency of West Java. The problem is how the Department of Communication and Information Policy in the Kuningan District MPLIK program in Kuningan District,? The aim is (1 want to know the Department of Communication and Information Policy in the Kuningan district MPLIK program in Kuningan district, (2 What factors are a supporter and obstacles in the implementation of policies in support of the Office of Communications and Informatics Program at Kabupaten MPLIK Brass, (3 Efforts effort whether carried out in the implementation of policies in support of the program Diskominfo MPLIK in Kuningan regency. The theory used as an approach to the problem of this research is the Evaluation of Policies Bardach. The research method used is a qualitative method of data collection techniques through participant observation and in-depth interviews. The results showed that in the Provision of Facilities Policy Evaluation Program USO MPLIK In Kuningan West Java through policy evaluation approach found another dimension, namely the importance of control, supervision, and coordination in addition to the four main dimensions of the policy evaluation is used as the approach in this study.

  5. CRECTJ: a computer program for compilation of evaluated nuclear data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, Tsuneo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1999-09-01

    In order to compile evaluated nuclear data in the ENDF format, the computer program CRECTJ has been developed. CRECTJ has two versions; CRECTJ5 treats the data in the ENDF/B-IV and ENDF/B-V format, and CRECTJ6 the data in the ENDF-6 format. These programs have been frequently used to make Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Library (JENDL). This report describes input data and examples of CRECTJ. (author)

  6. The Nursing Leadership Institute program evaluation: a critique

    OpenAIRE

    Havaei F; MacPhee M

    2015-01-01

    Farinaz Havaei, Maura MacPhee School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada Abstract: A theory-driven program evaluation was conducted for a nursing leadership program, as a collaborative project between university faculty, the nurses' union, the provincial Ministry of Health, and its chief nursing officers. A collaborative logic model process was used to engage stakeholders, and mixed methods approaches were used to answer evaluation questions. Despite dem...

  7. Evaluation of the Super Efficient Refrigerator Program (SERP) in the Bonneville Power Administration service territory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, A.D.; Conger, R.L.

    1996-06-01

    The Super Efficient Refrigerator Program (SERP) is a collaborative utility program intended to transform the market for energy-efficient and environmentally friendly refrigerators. it is one of the first examples of large-scale {open_quotes}market transformation{close_quotes} energy efficiency program. This report documents the evaluation of SERP ({open_quotes}the Program{close_quotes}) in the Bonneville Power Administration`s (Bonneville`s) service territory. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted this evaluation for Bonneville. This study includes the process evaluation, preliminary impact evaluation, and market transformation assessment. It is based on site visits and interviews with refrigerator dealers and manufacturers, industry data, and Bonneville information. Results from this study are compared with those from a parallel study that examines the Program across the 24 participating utilities.

  8. Evaluating the environmental impacts of the energy system: The ENPEP (ENergy and Power Evaluation Program) approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, B.P.; Sapinski, P.F.; Cirillo, R.R.; Buehring, W.A.

    1990-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has developed the ENergy and Power Evaluation Program (ENPEP), a PC-based energy planning package intended for energy/environmental analysis in developing countries. The IMPACTS module of ENPEP examines environmental implications of overall energy and electricity supply strategies that can be developed with other ENPEP modules, including ELECTRIC, the International Atomic Energy Agency's Wien Automatic System Planning Package (WASP-III). The paper presents the status and characteristics of a new IMPACTS module that is now under development at ANL. 3 figs.

  9. Evaluation of doctoral nursing programs in Japan by faculty members and their educational and research activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimoto, Azusa; Gregg, Misuzu F; Nagata, Satoko; Miki, Yuko; Murashima, Sachiyo

    2012-07-01

    Evaluation of doctoral programs in nursing is becoming more important with the rapid increase in the programs in Japan. This study aimed to evaluate doctoral nursing programs by faculty members and to analyze the relationship of the evaluation with educational and research activities of faculty members in Japan. Target settings were all 46 doctoral nursing programs. Eighty-five faculty members from 28 programs answered the questionnaire, which included 17 items for program evaluation, 12 items for faculty evaluation, 9 items for resource evaluation, 3 items for overall evaluations, and educational and research activities. A majority gave low evaluations for sources of funding, the number of faculty members and support staff, and administrative systems. Faculty members who financially supported a greater number of students gave a higher evaluation for extramural funding support, publication, provision of diverse learning experiences, time of supervision, and research infrastructure. The more time a faculty member spent on advising doctoral students, the higher were their evaluations on the supportive learning environment, administrative systems, time of supervision, and timely feedback on students' research. The findings of this study indicate a need for improvement in research infrastructure, funding sources, and human resources to achieve quality nursing doctoral education in Japan. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. 1992-1993 Bonneville Appliance Efficiency Program: Showerhead Evaluation Volume II - Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warwick, W.M.

    1995-01-01

    This report included the appendices for 1992-1993 Bonneville appliance efficiency program: showerhead evaluation. It consists of nine appendices, titled: Bonneville documents; overview of research projects; Puget Power and Light persistence study; hot-water flow analyses and assumptions documentation; regional end-use metering program; showerhead and faucet aerator performance assessment; Bonneville showerhead program distribution methods by participating utility; water- and energy-saving measure distribution methods literature review; REMP study load shape results.

  11. Evaluating environmental education, citizen science, and stewardship through naturalist programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merenlender, Adina M; Crall, Alycia W; Drill, Sabrina; Prysby, Michelle; Ballard, Heidi

    2016-12-01

    Amateur naturalists have played an important role in the study and conservation of nature since the 17th century. Today, naturalist groups make important contributions to bridge the gap between conservation science and practice around the world. We examined data from 2 regional naturalist programs to understand participant motivations, barriers, and perspectives as well as the actions they take to advance science, stewardship, and community engagement. These programs provide certification-based natural history and conservation science training for adults that is followed by volunteer service in citizen science, education, and stewardship. Studies in California and Virginia include quantitative and qualitative evaluation data collected through pre- and postcourse surveys, interviews, and long-term tracking of volunteer hours. Motivations of participants focused on learning about the local environment and plants and animals, connecting with nature, becoming certified, and spending time with people who have similar interests. Over half the participants surveyed were over 50 years old, two-thirds were women, and a majority reported household incomes of over $50,000 (60% in California, 85% in Virginia), and <20% of those surveyed in both states described themselves as nonwhite. Thus, these programs need to improve participation by a wider spectrum of the public. We interviewed younger and underrepresented adults to examine barriers to participation in citizen science. The primary barrier was lack of time due to the need to work and focus on career advancement. Survey data revealed that participants' ecological knowledge, scientific skills, and belief in their ability to address environmental issues increased after training. Documented conservation actions taken by the participants include invasive plant management, habitat restoration, and cleanups of natural areas and streams. Long-term data from Virginia on volunteer hours dedicated to environmental citizen science

  12. Evaluation of a cross-cultural training program for Pakistani educators: Lessons learned and implications for program planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Rebecca; Woodland, Rebecca H

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we share the results of a summative evaluation of PEILI, a US-based adult professional development/training program for secondary school Pakistani teachers. The evaluation was guided by the theories of cultural competence (American Psychological Association, 2003; Bamberger, 1999; Wadsworth, 2001) and established frameworks for the evaluation of professional development/training and instructional design (Bennett, 1975; Guskey, 2002; King, 2014; Kirkpatrick, 1967). The explicit and implicit stakeholder assumptions about the connections between program resources, activities, outputs, and outcomes are described. Participant knowledge and skills were measured via scores on a pre/posttest of professional knowledge, and a standards-based performance assessment rubric. In addition to measuring short-term program outcomes, we also sought to incorporate theory-driven thinking into the evaluation design. Hence, we examined participant self-efficacy and access to social capital, two evidenced-based determinants or "levers" that theoretically explain the transformative space between an intervention and its outcomes (Chen, 2012). Data about program determinants were collected and analyzed through a pre/posttest of self-efficacy and social network analysis. Key evaluation findings include participant acquisition of new instructional skills, increased self-efficacy, and the formation of a nascent professional support network. Lessons learned and implications for the design and evaluation of cross-cultural teacher professional development programs are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Effects of a Family Support Program Including Respite Care on Parenting Stress and Family Quality of Life Perceived by Primary Caregivers of Children with Disabilities in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Minjung; Park, Jiyeon

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a family support program was carried out for primary caregivers of children with disabilities. The program included respite care, recreation programs, counseling, and social support coordination based on individual needs of each family. In order to verify the intervention effects, parenting stress and family quality of life were…

  14. Space Discovery: Teaching with Space. Evaluation: Summer, Fall 1998 Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewell, Bob

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report of the 1998 NASA-sponsored evaluation of the effectiveness of the United States Space Foundation's five-day Space Discovery Standard Graduate Course (Living and Working in Space), the five-day Space Discovery Advanced Graduate Course (Advanced Technology and Biomedical Research), the five-day introductory course Aviation and Space Basics all conducted during the summer of 1998, and the Teaching with Space two-day Inservice program. The purpose of the program is to motivate and equip K- 12 teachers to use proven student-attracting space and technology concepts to support standard curriculum. These programs support the America 2000 National Educational Goals, encouraging more students to stay in school, increase in competence, and have a better opportunity to be attracted to math and science. The 1998 research program continues the comprehensive evaluation begun in 1992, this year studying five summer five-day sessions and five Inservice programs offered during the Fall of 1998 in California, Colorado, New York, and Virginia. A comprehensive research design by Dr. Robert Ewell of Creative Solutions and Dr. Darwyn Linder of Arizona State University evaluated the effectiveness of various areas of the program and its applicability on diverse groups. Preliminary research methodology was a set of survey instruments administered after the courses, and another to be sent in April-4-5 months following the last inservice involved in this study. This year, we have departed from this evaluation design in two ways. First, the five-day programs used NASA's new EDCATS on-line system and associated survey rather than the Linder/Ewell instruments. The Inservice programs were evaluated using the previously developed survey adapted for Inservice programs. Second, we did not do a follow-on survey of the teachers after they had been in the field as we have done in the past. Therefore, this evaluation captures only the reactions of the teachers to the programs

  15. [Study of the nutritional status of patients over 65 years included in the home care program in an urban population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Díaz, Belén; Arenas de Larriva, Antonio P; Molina-Recio, Guillermo; Moreno-Rojas, Rafael; Martínez de la Iglesia, Jorge

    2018-02-01

    To analyse the nutritional status of patients older than 65 years included in the home care program (PAD). Croos-sectional study. 3 urban health centers. 218 patients in the PAD. Mini Nutritional Assessment questionnaire (MNA) was applied. Sociodemographic, anthropometric, dependency, emotional and cognitive status and analytical parameters: 57 variables were collected. Possible associations were analysed by applying the chi square and variance analysis. The level of significance was considered to be Pnutritional status and older age, lower BMI, greater dependence on basic and instrumental activities of daily living and greater cognitive impairment. The lowest mean hemoglobin, albumin, and iron levels were also associated with malnutrition and risk of malnutrition. More than half of PAD patients are malnourished or at risk for it, and a high proportion of them some laboratory abnormality susceptible to be corrected. Most cognitive impairment and functional dependence are closely related to malnutrition; so patients with these characteristics should receive more attention from the nutritional point of view. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Critical evaluation of international health programs: Reframing global health and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Chunhuei; Tuepker, Anaïs; Schoon, Rebecca; Núñez Mondaca, Alicia

    2018-01-05

    Striking changes in the funding and implementation of international health programs in recent decades have stimulated debate about the role of communities in deciding which health programs to implement. An important yet neglected piece of that discussion is the need to change norms in program evaluation so that analysis of community ownership, beyond various degrees of "participation," is seen as central to strong evaluation practices. This article challenges mainstream evaluation practices and proposes a framework of Critical Evaluation with 3 levels: upstream evaluation assessing the "who" and "how" of programming decisions; midstream evaluation focusing on the "who" and "how" of selecting program objectives; and downstream evaluation, the focus of current mainstream evaluation, which assesses whether the program achieved its stated objectives. A vital tenet of our framework is that a community possesses the right to determine the path of its health development. A prerequisite of success, regardless of technical outcomes, is that programs must address communities' high priority concerns. Current participatory methods still seldom practice community ownership of program selection because they are vulnerable to funding agencies' predetermined priorities. In addition to critiquing evaluation practices and proposing an alternative framework, we acknowledge likely challenges and propose directions for future research. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Do Experimental and Nonexperimental Evaluations Give Different Answers about the Effectiveness of Government-Funded Training Programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, David H.; Michalopoulos, Charles; Robin, Philip K.

    2006-01-01

    This paper uses meta-analysis to investigate whether random assignment (or experimental) evaluations of voluntary government-funded training programs for the disadvantaged have produced different conclusions than nonexperimental evaluations. Information includes several hundred estimates from 31 evaluations of 15 programs that operated between…

  18. Educational Program Evaluation Model, From the Perspective of the New Theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soleiman Ahmady

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study is focused on common theories that influenced the history of program evaluation and introduce the educational program evaluation proposal format based on the updated theory. Methods: Literature searches were carried out in March-December 2010 with a combination of key words, MeSH terms and other free text terms as suitable for the purpose. A comprehensive search strategy was developed to search Medline by the PubMed interface, ERIC (Education Resources Information Center and the main journal of medical education regarding current evaluation models and theories. We included all study designs in our study. We found 810 articles related to our topic, and finally 63 with the full text article included. We compared documents and used expert consensus for selection the best model. Results: We found that the complexity theory using logic model suggests compatible evaluation proposal formats, especially with new medical education programs. Common components of a logic model are: situation, inputs, outputs, and outcomes that our proposal format is based on. Its contents are: title page, cover letter, situation and background, introduction and rationale, project description, evaluation design, evaluation methodology, reporting, program evaluation management, timeline, evaluation budget based on the best evidences, and supporting documents. Conclusion: We found that the logic model is used for evaluation program planning in many places, but more research is needed to see if it is suitable for our context.

  19. Methods of psychoeducational program evaluation in mental health settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, J

    1992-04-01

    Psychoeducational programs for families of the mentally ill became widespread during the 1980s as a means of providing a forum for the relevant education and mutual support of participants. While these programs are thought to be extremely useful as interventions, very little emphasis has been placed on evaluation as a means of demonstrating their effectiveness in achieving goals. There is a possibility, then, that psychoeducation will continue to flourish with little direct evidence of positive outcomes for its family participants. This article consists of a literature review of existing methods of psychoeducational program evaluation, both quantitative and qualitative, all of which may be applicable in certain circumstances. The process by which an evaluation instrument was developed for a program with families of the mentally ill is then presented in some detail.

  20. Line probe assay for differentiation within Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Evaluation on clinical specimens and isolates including Mycobacterium pinnipedii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Marianne Kirstine; Bek, Dorte; Rasmussen, Erik Michael

    2009-01-01

    A line probe assay (GenoType MTBC) was evaluated for species differentiation within the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). We included 387 MTBC isolates, 43 IS6110 low-copy MTBC isolates, 28 clinical specimens with varying microscopy grade, and 30 isolates of non-tuberculous mycobacteria...

  1. Program Evaluation for School Improvement: Guidelines for School Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Warna D.

    1995-01-01

    Fourth-generation program evaluation is a collaborative, responsive approach that attaches great importance to the claims, concerns, and issues set forth by various stakeholders. This model stresses value pluralism and has several community-involvement phases: planning, data collection, results, final evaluation report, and follow-up. (20…

  2. Evaluation of Training Programs in Russian Manufacturing Companies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucherov, Dmitry; Manokhina, Daria

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to examine the features of training evaluation process in Russian manufacturing companies. On the basis of three assumptions regarding the differences in group of employees involved in training, duration and costs of a training program, the authors tried to find out the peculiarities of training evaluation tools and levels…

  3. The Efficacy of Stuttering Measurement Training: Evaluating Two Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, Lauren A.; Stavros, Candace; Ebrahimian, Mineh; Wang, Yuedong; Ingham, Roger J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Two stuttering measurement training programs currently used for training clinicians were evaluated for their efficacy in improving the accuracy of total stuttering event counting. Method: Four groups, each with 12 randomly allocated participants, completed a pretest-posttest design training study. They were evaluated by their counts of…

  4. Evaluation of the Science, Technology, and Engineering Leadership Program, Year Two

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolanin, Natalie L.; Wade, Julie H.

    2013-01-01

    The Office of Shared Accountability (OSA) conducted an evaluation of the implementation of the second year (2011-2012) of the Science, Technology, and Engineering Leadership Program (STELP) in Montgomery County (Maryland) Public Schools (MCPS). Funding for STELP, including the evaluation study, is provided by a grant from the Howard Hughes Medical…

  5. Evaluating the Acceptability of Four Versions of a Child Sexual Abuse Prevention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Brandon; Miltenberger, Raymond G.

    2009-01-01

    Fifty-nine college students used a modified version of the Treatment Evaluation Inventory-Short Form to evaluate the acceptability of four versions of a sexual abuse prevention program for 10-year-old children. The four versions include an information-based training approach or a behavioral skills training (BST) approach with a focus on strangers…

  6. The Alabama Career Incentive Program: A Statewide Effort in Teacher Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiersma, William

    This paper summarizes the Alabama Career Incentive Program, a statewide effort to evaluate more than 30,000 teachers including specialists in guidance, speech therapy, and so on. The evaluation was based on 10 classroom competencies and five outside-the-class professional competencies. A low-inference instrument measured competencies by using…

  7. Teaching Note--Keeping It Real: Program Evaluation Projects for an Undergraduate Research Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Aesha; Bang, Eun-Jun

    2017-01-01

    This article describes a teaching innovation that focused on the redesign of an undergraduate social work research class. Students enrolled in the redesigned class had an opportunity to conduct program evaluation projects in community agencies. The projects included (a) pretest and posttest evaluation of reminiscence approach in improving the…

  8. 25 CFR 170.137 - What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and trails program include?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and... INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Indian Reservation Roads Program Policy and Eligibility Recreation, Tourism and Trails § 170.137 What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and...

  9. Evaluation des Programmes d'Informatique (Evaluation of Computer Science Programs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisan, Claude

    In March 1994, Quebec's Commission on the Evaluation of Collegiate Teaching initiated an evaluation of computer science programs in province colleges. This report describes the evaluation process and presents results. The first section describes the following four stages of the evaluation: the formation of a consulting committee and evaluation…

  10. Through the Looking Glass: What Happens When an Evaluator's Program Is Evaluated and Degrees of Strangeness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Alan G.; Baillie, Lynne E.

    1997-01-01

    Two articles present differing points of view on the evaluation of the development of a teacher education program. "Through the Looking Glass..." describes what happens when an evaluator becomes the evaluation client, and "Degrees of Strangeness" reports on the evaluator's findings and opinions. (SLD)

  11. Effectiveness and Evaluation of Crime Prevention Programs in Minas Gerais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Beato

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This essay analyzes previous studies evaluating the effectiveness of the crime prevention policies adopted by the Government of Minas Gerais (Brazil. In this work, greater emphasis is placed on studies evaluating outcomes than on studies dealing with the process of setting up and implementing programs and projects. In order to allow a more systematic discussion, the Maryland Scale, which categorizes research and evaluations according to the methodological strengths and weaknesses in five levels, is employed. Subsequently, the authors draw a parallel between Brazil and other settings. Finally, this essay lays out the implications of this discussion regarding the prevention programs

  12. Process evaluation of the Regional Biomass Energy Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, C.R.; Brown, M.A.; Perlack, R.D.

    1994-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) established the Regional Biomass Energy Program (RBEP) in 1983 to increase the production and use of biomass energy resources. Through the creation of five regional program (the Great Lakes, Northeast, Pacific Northwest, Southeast, and West), the RBEP focuses on regionally specific needs and opportunities. In 1992, Oak Ridge National (ORNL) conducted a process evaluation of the RBEP Program designed to document and explain the development of the goals and strategies of the five regional programs; describe the economic and market context surrounding commercialization of bioenergy systems; assess the criteria used to select projects; describe experiences with cost sharing; identify program accomplishments in the transfer of information and technology; and offer recommendations for program improvement.

  13. An Evaluation of CHAMPS: A Classroom Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnear, Holly J.

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation was designed to examine the impact of Conversation, Help, Activity, Movement, Participation, Success (CHAMPS), a classroom management program in elementary schools in a district in North Carolina. The participants included principals and teachers who attended a 2-day training course and implemented the CHAMPS program at their…

  14. [Evaluation of a workplace health promotion program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forette, Françoise; Brieu, Marie-Anne; Lemasson, Hervé; Salord, Jean-Claude; Le Pen, Claude

    2014-01-01

    Some studies suggest that a workplace prevention programme could reduce health inequalities related to education level and improve the health status of the employees. The objective of the study was to demonstrate the advantages for a company to implement a health prevention programme in the workplace in order to: 1-improve health literacy 2 - change health-related behaviours 3-improve the company image. A "before - after" methodology was used in a population of 2153 employees of three companies. Three areas of prevention were considered: nutrition, physical activity and prevention of back pain. The successive steps of the EBS programme included general communication, group workshops and individual coaching. Data collection was carried out using anonymous questionnaires sent by e-mail. A global assessment was performed based on the companies' pooled data, with separate analysis according to the steps of the programme. The programme mobilized employees with participation rates ranging from 25% to 45.5%. After completion of the full programme, 77.5% of respondents reported an improvement of their health knowledge versus 50.3% of those who only received general communication. Behavioural modification was observed, especially in the fields of nutrition and back pain.. EBS can be considered to be a vector of the company image for almost 7 out of 10 employees. A health prevention education programme provided by the company in the workplace mobilizes employees and contributes to improvement of health knowledge and behaviour change. All approaches tested were important and applicable to various types of companies or workers.

  15. Evaluation of the Capillary Blood Glucose Self-monitoring Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Cristina Augusto

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to evaluate the structure, process and results of the Capillary Blood Glucose Self-monitoring Program in a Brazilian city.METHOD: epidemiological, cross-sectional study. The methodological framework of Donabedian was used to construct indicators of structure, process and outcome. A random sample (n = 288 of users enrolled and 96 health professionals who worked in the program was studied. Two questionnaires were used that were constructed for this study, one for professionals and one for users, both containing data for the evaluation of structure, process and outcome. Anthropometric measures and laboratory results were collected by consulting the patients' health records. The analysis involved descriptive statistics.RESULTS: most of the professionals were not qualified to work in the program and were not knowledgeable about the set of criteria for patient registration. None of the patients received complete and correct orientations about the program and the percentage with skills to perform conducts autonomously was 10%. As regards the result indicators, 86.4% of the patients and 81.3% of the professionals evaluated the program positively.CONCLUSION: the evaluation indicators designed revealed that one of the main objectives of the program, self-care skills, has not been achieved.

  16. Developing a dancer wellness program employing developmental evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Terry; Gupta, Arun; Ho, Chester H

    2014-01-01

    Wellness programs are being increasingly employed with performing artists. Given their aim of reducing injuries, injury tracking is commonly employed as an outcome measure. Evaluating the development and process of a wellness program can also enhance its effectiveness. Developmental evaluation offers one methodological framework within which to conduct such investigations. This paper reports on a 2-year process involving feedback from professional ballet dancers, management and artistic staff, and healthcare providers at a ballet company in order to develop a dancer screening and wellness program. Following a consultation phase, an initial program composed of an expanded medical team and annual injury prevention screen was proposed. Alongside implementation with 30 professional ballet dancers, formal and informal feedback was sought from stakeholders and members across all levels of the ballet company to facilitate ongoing development, evaluation, and revision of the wellness program. The use of a process informed by developmental evaluation helped identify strengths and limitations within the screening process. The collective expertise of the assessors was used to modify the components and process of the screen to strive for ecological appropriateness. The process also fostered buy-in from all involved. Participant feedback helped refine the medical team available to the dancers and influenced the treatment and referral pathways via which dancers are able to access each member of the medical team. Furthermore, reflective discussions with artistic and management staff brought to light potential interactions between repertoire programming, fitness, and injury patterns. This prompted a reconsideration of how artists are trained and supported. Evaluation methods that focus on experiences and insight gained during program development stand to result in more efficient screening programs and health-promotion models and, ultimately, healthier performing artists.

  17. Financial evaluations of antibiotic stewardship programs : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dik, J.W.H.; Vemer, P.; Friedrich, A.W.; Hendrix, R.; Lo-Ten-Foe, J.R.; Sinha, B.; Postma, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: There is an increasing awareness to counteract problems due to incorrect antimicrobial use. Interventions that are implemented are often part of an Antimicrobial Stewardship Program (ASPs). Studies publishing results from these interventions are increasing, including reports on the

  18. Externalities in program evaluation: the impact of a women’s empowerment program on immunization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, W.

    2011-01-01

    Impact evaluations of development programs usually do not explicitly take into account externalities on non-participants. Based on a unique dataset we estimate the direct as well as the spillover effects of Mahila Samakhya, a women's empowerment program in India, on child immunization. The survey

  19. A Process Evaluation of the Alaska Native Colorectal Cancer Family Outreach Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redwood, Diana; Provost, Ellen; Lopez, Ellen D S; Skewes, Monica; Johnson, Rhonda; Christensen, Claudia; Sacco, Frank; Haverkamp, Donald

    2016-02-01

    This article presents the results of a process evaluation of the Alaska Native (AN) Colorectal Cancer (CRC) Family Outreach Program, which encourages CRC screening among AN first-degree relatives (i.e., parents, siblings, adult children; hereafter referred to as relatives) of CRC patients. Among AN people incidence and death rates from CRC are the highest of any ethnic/racial group in the United States. Relatives of CRC patients are at increased risk; however, CRC can be prevented and detected early through screening. The evaluation included key informant interviews (August to November 2012) with AN and non-AN stakeholders and program document review. Five key process evaluation components were identified: program formation, evolution, outreach responses, strengths, and barriers and challenges. Key themes included an incremental approach that led to a fully formed program and the need for dedicated, culturally competent patient navigation. Challenges included differing relatives' responses to screening outreach, health system data access and coordination, and the program impact of reliance on grant funding. This program evaluation indicated a need for more research into motivating patient screening behaviors, electronic medical records systems quality improvement projects, improved data-sharing protocols, and program sustainability planning to continue the dedicated efforts to promote screening in this increased risk population. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  20. An Evaluation of an Upper-Division, General Education Information Literacy Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Spackman Hopkins

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The Advanced Writing library instruction program at Brigham Young University’s Harold B. Lee Library (HBLL is intended to teach junior-level students advanced information literacy and research skills. Student participation in the program is required in each of six junior-level English courses. Anecdotal feedback from librarians and students identified problems with the program; therefore, a qualitative evaluation of the program was conducted with the objective of identifying problems and possible solutions. The evaluation included a student survey and focus groups with students, librarians, and English faculty. In this paper, we describe the HBLL Advanced Writing (AW instruction program, identify the problems with the current model, and convey recommendations from stakeholders for improvement. In addition, we share observations about the viability of such programs at other institutions.

  1. Limites e possibilidades dos programas de aceleração de aprendizagem The limits and possibilities of including students from remedial learning programs in regular schooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarilza Prado de Sousa

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available Pretendi neste trabalho analisar os limites e possibilidades da escola integrar alunos com atraso de escolaridade em processos de educação regular, que receberam apoio de programas de aceleração da aprendizagem. Baseada nas avaliações realizadas desses programas por professores do Programa de Estudos Pós-Graduados em Psicologia da Educação da PUCSP e por pesquisadores do Núcleo de Avaliação Educacional da Fundação Carlos Chagas, discuto os resultados efetivamente alcançados considerando duas categorias de análise. Na primeira categoria, analiso os efeitos da estratégia pedagógica promovida pelos programas, nas aprendizagens e progressos dos alunos participantes. Na segunda categoria, procuro analisar as possibilidades de integração/inclusão desses alunos no processo de educação regular. Finalmente, à guisa de conclusão, procuro fazer algumas considerações teórico-metodológicas. Distinguindo integração de inclusão, discuto os limites e possibilidades que as ações dos programas têm de realmente promoverem o desenvolvimento de uma escola sem exclusão.This article analyzes the limits and possibilities for schools to include students with schooling deficits who receive support from the accelerated learning programs, in their regular education processes. Based on evaluations of these programs done by professors from the Post Graduate Program in Educational Psychology of the Pontifical Catholic University of São Paulo and by researchers from the Nucleus for Educational Evaluation of the Carlos Chagas Foundation, the results will be discussed in two analytical categories. In the first category, I analyze the effects of the teaching strategies promoted by the programs on the learning and progress of the participating students. In the second category, I seek to analyze the possibilities for integration/inclusion of these students in the regular educational process. Finally by way of conclusion, I try to make some

  2. Evaluation of a naturopathic nutrition program for type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberg, Erica B.; Bradley, Ryan D.; Allen, Jason; McCrory, Megan A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To test feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary effectiveness of a naturopathic dietary intervention in patients with Type 2 diabetes. Methods: Prospective observational pilot study evaluating the change in clinical and patient-centered outcome measures following a 12-week individualized and group dietary education program delivered in naturopathic primary care. Results HbA1c improved in all participants (n=12); mean - 0.4% +/– .49% SD, (p=0.02). Adherence to healthful eating increased from 3.5 d/wk to 5.3 d/wk (p=0.05). Specific nutritional behavior modification included: days/week consuming ≥5 servings of fruit/vegetables (p=0.01), attention to fat intake (p=0.05), and –11.3% carbohydrate reduction. Measures of physical activity, self-efficacy and self-management also improved significantly. Conclusion A naturopathic dietary approach to diabetes appears to be feasible to implement among Type 2 diabetes patients. The intervention may also improve self-management, glycemic control, and have influences in other domains of self-care behaviors. Clinical trials evaluating naturopathic approaches to Type 2 diabetes are warranted. PMID:21742282

  3. Programming system for rapid evaluation of coal deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanìk František

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Programming system for rapid evaluation of coal deposits (calculation of coal reserves based on data stored in coal deposit database including processing of textual and graphic outputs was elaborated. The nature of such outputs is based on conventional coal reserve calculations so that connection with coal reserve calculations made in the past is secured. Differences in particular coal deposits as well as in individual coal seams are respected in the system. Coal seams differ one from another in their development by variability of seam thickness and seam quality within coal deposit etc. In addition to this, coal deposits are disturbed by tectonic failures and deformations. The system of evaluation of coal deposits is based on development of planar models of particular seams where calculation blocks are created and coal reserves contained in them are determined. Subsequently coal reserves of particular seams and of the whole deposit are determined. Natural limitation of seam model is given by determined minimum seam thickness and maximum ash content (i.e. content of inorganic component in coal. Basic model is structured according to detected main tectonic lines into tectonic blocks. According to further geological factors (e.g. erosion and contractual boundaries (e.g. demarcations, the deposit is structured into smaller units - calculation blocks. The whole system operates in a maximum automated regime with minimum manual interventions into solving procedure. The system enables rapid alternative calculations of coal reserves according to varying limit values of basic calculation parameters.

  4. Ca analysis: An Excel based program for the analysis of intracellular calcium transients including multiple, simultaneous regression analysis☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greensmith, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Here I present an Excel based program for the analysis of intracellular Ca transients recorded using fluorescent indicators. The program can perform all the necessary steps which convert recorded raw voltage changes into meaningful physiological information. The program performs two fundamental processes. (1) It can prepare the raw signal by several methods. (2) It can then be used to analyze the prepared data to provide information such as absolute intracellular Ca levels. Also, the rates of change of Ca can be measured using multiple, simultaneous regression analysis. I demonstrate that this program performs equally well as commercially available software, but has numerous advantages, namely creating a simplified, self-contained analysis workflow. PMID:24125908

  5. Ca analysis: an Excel based program for the analysis of intracellular calcium transients including multiple, simultaneous regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greensmith, David J

    2014-01-01

    Here I present an Excel based program for the analysis of intracellular Ca transients recorded using fluorescent indicators. The program can perform all the necessary steps which convert recorded raw voltage changes into meaningful physiological information. The program performs two fundamental processes. (1) It can prepare the raw signal by several methods. (2) It can then be used to analyze the prepared data to provide information such as absolute intracellular Ca levels. Also, the rates of change of Ca can be measured using multiple, simultaneous regression analysis. I demonstrate that this program performs equally well as commercially available software, but has numerous advantages, namely creating a simplified, self-contained analysis workflow. Copyright © 2013 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Expanding the Lessons Learned Program to Include Corps Support Command Commanders and Theater Army Area Command Commanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-03-10

    INTRODUCTION The Oral History Program’s purpose is to supplement oFficial histories , to isolate successful command, leadership and managerial...of -the program is to capture the experience of senior leaders in the areas of command, leadership , and management . The individual is interviewed...used to gain insight into command and management techniques and to further research in military history . In June of 1984, the Chief of Staff, General

  7. Addiction Research Training Programs: Four Case Studies and Recommendations for Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Aimee N C; Back, Sudie E; Ostroff, Jamie S; Hien, Denise A; Gourevitch, Marc N; Sheffer, Christine E; Brady, Kathleen T; Hanley, Kathleen; Bereket, Sewit; Book, Sarah

    : The presence of structured addiction research training programs helps to ensure that the scientific workforce includes well-trained, diverse scientists necessary to reduce the negative impact of alcohol, drug, and tobacco use disorders. Although the field has made significant progress in the development of standards for clinical training in addiction medicine, there remains significant room for improvement in the training of addiction researchers, and also opportunities to synergize across addiction research training programs. The purpose of this commentary is to describe 4 National Institutes of Health (NIH)-sponsored addiction research training programs, highlight critical components, and provide recommendations for more comprehensive and effective program evaluation. Moving forward, evaluation of addiction research training programs would be enhanced by the use of conceptual models to inform process and outcome evaluations, the application of innovative methods to ensure long-term data collection, the improvement of mentorship evaluation measures, and the integration of training methods from other fields of study. We encourage NIH and others in the field to be proactive in establishing core metrics for evaluation across programs. Furthermore, centralized tracking of NIH-funded addiction research trainees, analysis of aggregate data across programs, and innovative methods to effectively disseminate program materials and processes are recommended.

  8. Utility of the CIPP Model for Evaluating an Established Career Program in a Community College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Alfred R.

    How useful is Stufflebeam's Context, Input, Process, Product (CIPP) model for evaluating an established career program in a community college? On the basis of a case study, advantages of using CIPP include: comprehensiveness, flexibility, integration and decision-orientation. Implementation problems include: establishing procedures for delineating…

  9. Implementation and evaluation of a training program as part of the Cooperative Biological Engagement Program in Azerbaijan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    April eJohnson

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A training program for animal and human health professionals has been implemented in Azerbaijan through a joint agreement between the United States Defense Threat Reduction Agency and the Government of Azerbaijan. The training program is administered as part of the Cooperative Biological Engagement Program, and targets key employees in Azerbaijan’s disease surveillance system including physicians, veterinarians, epidemiologists, and laboratory personnel. Training is aimed at improving detection, diagnosis, and response to especially dangerous pathogens, although the techniques and methodologies can be applied to other pathogens and diseases of concern. Biosafety and biosecurity training is provided to all trainees within the program. Prior to 2014, a variety of international agencies and organizations provided training, which resulted in gaps related to lack of coordination of training materials and content. In 2014 a new training program was implemented in order to address those gaps. This paper provides an overview of the Cooperative Biological Engagement Program training program in Azerbaijan, a description of how the program fits into existing national training infrastructure, and an evaluation of the new program’s effectiveness to date. Long-term sustainability of the program is also discussed.

  10. Stakeholder evaluation of a high-risk prenatal nutrition intervention program in Prince Edward Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLellan, D; Bradley, D; Brimacombe, M

    2001-01-01

    Since 1971, a Prince Edward Island prenatal program has provided nutrition support to pregnant women at high risk for poor birth outcomes. Provincial changes in the delivery of health care services since 1986 have caused concern that the program is becoming less effective. The current research was designed to evaluate stakeholders satisfaction with the program; it was part of a larger study conducted in 1998 and 1999 to evaluate overall program effectiveness. Nutritionists (n=9), referring health professionals (n=57), and clients (n=50) completed a survey. The results indicated that program satisfaction was high for all stakeholders. Perceived program strengths included the counselling approach, program quality, food and income supplements, and accessibility. Perceived program weaknesses included inadequate staff/time, administrative requirements, limited communication/awareness, the counselling approach, and difficulty contacting clients. Recommendations for improvement fall into four key areas: staff services, program delivery, the counselling approach, and communication. The findings suggest that the components of prenatal education considered important vary among clients and staff, and that the relationship developed between staff and clients during counselling is an important contributor to program success.

  11. Assessing supervisory and motivational factors in the context of a program evaluation in rural Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Purnima; Mbuya, Mduduzi; Habicht, Jean-Pierre; Pelto, Gretel; Loechl, Cornelia U; Ruel, Marie T

    2008-03-01

    Staff supervisory and motivational factors were assessed in the context of an ongoing program evaluation in Haiti comparing 2 models of targeting an integrated health and nutrition program. The study objectives were to 1) understand and improve supervisory and motivational factors influencing program implementation and 2) compare these factors between the 2 program models being evaluated. Qualitative methods (focus group discussions and semistructured interviews) were used to understand factors related to supervision and motivation. Quantitative measures of supervisory and motivational factors were designed, and factor analysis was used, to develop summary scales of motivational factors and supervision. T-tests were used to compare mean scores on the scales between the 2 program models. Results from the qualitative research were discussed with program management and staff to help develop solutions to implementation bottlenecks. Staff at all levels of the program seemed motivated and generally well supervised. Constraints to motivation included perceived inadequacy of wages (before changes were made to salaries), heavy workloads, and logistical constraints. We found no salient differences between the 2 program models that could contribute to differential implementation or differences in impact. This lack of salient differences between the program models suggested that supervisory and motivational factors were unlikely to contribute to differences in impact. Assessing supervisory and motivational factors was feasible and desirable in the context of this evaluation and deepened understanding of the program context and constraints to implementation.

  12. One thousand words: evaluating an interdisciplinary art education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klugman, Craig M; Beckmann-Mendez, Diana

    2015-04-01

    Art Rounds, an innovative interdisciplinary program, began as a pilot project to determine if use of fine arts instructional strategies would be of benefit in health professional education. Specifically, students were exposed to fine art and taught to use visual thinking strategies (VTS). The initial evaluation of the pilot program revealed improved physical observation skills, increased tolerance for ambiguity, and increased interest in communication skills. More recently, the Art Rounds program has been expanded to an interdisciplinary elective course open to both nursing student and medical students at all levels. An evaluation of Art Rounds as a semester- long course was conducted by course faculty and compared to the original pilot program for differences and similarities. Outcomes have demonstrated that the use of visual arts and humanities continues to be highly effective in improving students' physical observation skills and a powerful tool for teaching nursing students how to be skilled clinicians. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Development of a 2-h suicide prevention program for medical staff including nurses and medical residents: A two-center pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagami, Yukako; Kubo, Hiroaki; Katsuki, Ryoko; Sakai, Tomomichi; Sugihara, Genichi; Naito, Chisako; Oda, Hiroyuki; Hayakawa, Kohei; Suzuki, Yuriko; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Hashimoto, Naoki; Kobara, Keiji; Cho, Tetsuji; Kuga, Hironori; Takao, Kiyoshi; Kawahara, Yoko; Matsumura, Yumi; Murai, Toshiya; Akashi, Koichi; Kanba, Shigenobu; Otsuka, Kotaro; Kato, Takahiro A

    2018-01-01

    Suicide is a crucial global health concern and effective suicide prevention has long been warranted. Mental illness, especially depression is the highest risk factor of suicide. Suicidal risk is increased in people not only with mental illness but also with physical illnesses, thus medical staff caring for physically-ill patients are also required to manage people with suicidal risk. In the present study, we evaluated our newly developed suicide intervention program among medical staff. We developed a 2-h suicide intervention program for medical staff, based on the Mental Health First Aid (MHFA), which had originally been developed for the general population. We conducted this program for 74 medical staff members from 2 hospitals. Changes in knowledge, perceived skills, and confidence in early intervention of depression and suicide-prevention were evaluated using self-reported questionnaires at 3 points; pre-program, immediately after the program, and 1 month after program. This suicide prevention program had significant effects on improving perceived skills and confidence especially among nurses and medical residents. These significant effects lasted even 1 month after the program. Design was a single-arm study with relatively small sample size and short-term follow up. The present study suggests that the major target of this effective program is nurses and medical residents. Future research is required to validate the effects of the program with control groups, and also to assess long-term effectiveness and actual reduction in suicide rates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Youth Can! Grow Healthy: A Formative Evaluation of a Positive Youth Development Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Carberry

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a formative evaluation of an afterschool program that combined positive youth development and school garden curricula. Novel approaches were used to teach elementary school children about gardening and nutrition, and to engage them in advocacy for healthy community physical activity and nutrition environments. The youth development curriculum included sessions on team building, community pride, healthy eating, physical activity, and advocacy. Photovoice methods were used to allow participants to assess their community and communicate findings with community leaders. The school garden curriculum included nutrition and gardening lessons. Formative evaluation was conducted for each session. Themes of the evaluation were: successful methods for engaging youth, issues in the social environment, and implications for program management. Evaluation results are discussed in relationship to relevant youth development literature to provide recommendations that will strengthen future programs.

  15. Evaluating fuzzy inequalities and solving fully fuzzified linear fractional programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanojević B.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In our earlier articles, we proposed two methods for solving the fully fuzzified linear fractional programming (FFLFP problems. In this paper, we introduce a different approach of evaluating fuzzy inequalities between two triangular fuzzy numbers and solving FFLFP problems. First, using the Charnes-Cooper method, we transform the linear fractional programming problem into a linear one. Second, the problem of maximizing a function with triangular fuzzy value is transformed into a problem of deterministic multiple objective linear programming. Illustrative numerical examples are given to clarify the developed theory and the proposed algorithm.

  16. The Role for an Evaluator: A Fundamental Issue for Evaluation of Education and Social Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Heng

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses one of the fundamental issues in education and social program evaluation: the proper role for an evaluator. Based on respective and comparative analysis of five theorists' positions on this fundamental issue, this paper reveals how different perspectives on other fundamental issues in evaluation such as value, methods, use and…

  17. Performing impact evaluations in industrial retrofit: The Energy Savings Plan Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riewer, S. [USDOE Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR (United States); Spanner, G.E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1991-08-01

    The Energy Savings Plan (ESP) is Bonneville Power Administration`s retrofit program for the industrial sector. The program pays incentives for energy conservation measures involving electrical energy efficiency improvements in manufacturing, processing, and refining industries. This paper will describe the ESP program, recount the techniques selected to evaluate the retrofits, and report the findings from five ESP project impact evaluations completed to date. The impact evaluations provide a framework for assessing the energy saving achieved by the provides implemented under the ESP. In addition to energy savings, the evaluations assess process changes, net utility impacts, levelized costs, and ``free ridership.`` The five ESP projects evaluated include: a waste heat recovery system for a food processing blancher, an energy management control system used to upgrade refrigeration, a variable speed drive for a fan motor in a lumber mill, a sludge screw press for waste water treatment, and replacement of rod anodes with blades anodes in mercury cells in an electrochemical plant.

  18. NATIONAL EVALUATION OF THE WEATHERIZATION ASSISTANCE PROGRAM DURING THE ARRA PERIOD: PROGRAM YEARS 2009-2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonn, Bruce Edward [ORNL; Rose, Erin M [ORNL; Schmoyer, Richard L [ORNL; Eisenberg, Joel Fred [ORNL; Ternes, Mark P [ORNL; Schweitzer, Martin [ORNL; Hendrick, Timothy P [ORNL

    2012-08-01

    This report describes the third major evaluation of the Program, encompassing program years 2009 to 2011. In this report, this period of time is referred to as the ARRA Period. This is a special period of time for the Program because the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 has allocated $5 billion of funding for the Program. In normal program years, WAP s annual appropriation is in the range of $200-250 million, supporting the weatherization of approximately 100,000 homes. With the addition of ARRA funding during these program years, the expectation is that weatherization activity will exceed 300,000 homes per year. In addition to saving energy and reducing low-income energy bills, expanded WAP funding is expected to stimulate the economy by providing new jobs in the weatherization field and allowing low-income households to spend more money on goods and services by spending less on energy.

  19. Pilot monitoring program: geologic input for the hillslope component (includes a discussion of Caspar Creek geology and geomorphology)

    Science.gov (United States)

    T. E. Spittler

    1995-01-01

    The California Department of Conservation, Division of Mines and Geology (DMG) is submitting this report and accompanying maps to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CDF) to fulfill Interagency Agreement number 8CA38400, Pilot Monitoring Program -- Geologic Input for the Hillslope Component. Under this agreement, DMG has assisted CDF in the...

  20. Intensive lifestyle intervention including high-intensity interval training program improves insulin resistance and fasting plasma glucose in obese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Marquis-Gravel

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Following a 9-month intensive lifestyle intervention combining HIIT and MedD counseling, obese subjects experienced significant improvements of FPG and insulin resistance. This is the first study to expose the effects of a long-term program combining HIIT and MedD on glycemic control parameters among obese subjects.

  1. Quick Reference Guide: Working with Stakeholders to Identify Potential Improvement Strategies for Program Improvement (Including the SSIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for IDEA Early Childhood Data Systems (DaSy), 2015

    2015-01-01

    This 2015 quick reference guide is designed to assist states in understanding what information needs to be available in order for stakeholders to assist in selecting potential improvement strategies that will increase capacity of Local Education Agencies (LEAs), Early Intervention Services (EIS) programs, and practitioners to improve results for…

  2. Building a Steganography Program Including How to Load, Process, and Save JPEG and PNG Files in Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Mary F.; Stix, Allen

    2006-01-01

    Instructors teaching beginning programming classes are often interested in exercises that involve processing photographs (i.e., files stored as .jpeg). They may wish to offer activities such as color inversion, the color manipulation effects archived with pixel thresholding, or steganography, all of which Stevenson et al. [4] assert are sought by…

  3. 77 FR 22790 - ``Low Income Levels'' Used for Various Health Professions and Nursing Programs Included in Titles...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration ``Low Income Levels'' Used for Various... backgrounds, or (3) individuals from ``low-income'' families. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The various health..., public or private nonprofit schools which offer graduate programs in behavioral health and mental health...

  4. 76 FR 14417 - ``Low Income Levels'' Used for Various Health Professions and Nursing Programs Included in Titles...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration ``Low Income Levels'' Used for Various... backgrounds, or (3) individuals from ``low-income'' families. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The various health..., public or private nonprofit schools which offer graduate programs in behavioral health and mental health...

  5. Towards Bridging the Gap Programming Language and Partial Evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Meur, Anne-Francoise; Lawall, Julia Laetitia; Consel, Charles

    2002-01-01

    . One reason is the difficulty of adequately describing specialization opportunities. Indeed, under-specialization or over-specialization often occurs, without any direct feedback to the user as to the source of the problem.We have developed a high-level, module-based language allowing the programmer...... to guide the choice of both the code to specialize and the invariants to exploit during the specialization process. To ease the use of partial evaluation, the syntax of this language is similar to the declaration syntax of the target language of the partial evaluator. To provide feedback to the programmer......Partial evaluation is a program-transformation technique that automatically specializes a program with respect to user-supplied invariants. Despite successful applications in areas such as graphics, operating systems, and software engineering, partial evaluators have yet to achieve widespread use...

  6. Overview of Evaluation Methods for R&D Programs. A Directory of Evaluation Methods Relevant to Technology Development Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruegg, Rosalie [TIA Consulting, Inc., Emeral Isle, NC (United States); Jordan, Gretchen B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2007-03-01

    This document provides guidance for evaluators who conduct impact assessments to determine the “realized” economic benefits and costs, energy, environmental benefits, and other impacts of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy’s (EERE) R&D programs. The focus of this Guide is on realized outcomes or impacts of R&D programs actually experienced by American citizens, industry, and others.

  7. An Analysis of Test And Evaluation in Rapid Acquisition Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Outfits DT Developmental Testing DT&E Development Test and Evaluation DTC Developmental Test Command E3 Electromagnetic Environmental Effects...by the OEM and evaluated by the Communication-Electronics Command (CECOM) Safety Office and the former Developmental Test Command ( DTC ) covering all...Force Management School AMC Army Materiel Command AOA Analysis of Alternatives AOR Area of Operation APC Acquisition Program Candidates APG Aberdeen

  8. Indigenous health program evaluation design and methods in Australia: a systematic review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokuge, Kamalini; Thurber, Katherine; Calabria, Bianca; Davis, Meg; McMahon, Kathryn; Sartor, Lauren; Lovett, Raymond; Guthrie, Jill; Banks, Emily

    2017-10-01

    Indigenous Australians experience a disproportionately higher burden of disease compared to non-Indigenous Australians. High-quality evaluation of Indigenous health programs is required to inform health and health services improvement. We aimed to quantify methodological and other characteristics of Australian Indigenous health program evaluations published in the peer-reviewed literature. Systematic review of peer-reviewed literature (November 2009-2014) on Indigenous health program evaluation. We identified 118 papers describing evaluations of 109 interventions; 72.0% were university/research institution-led. 82.2% of evaluations included a quantitative component; 49.2% utilised quantitative data only and 33.1% used both quantitative and qualitative data. The most common design was a before/after comparison (30.5%, n=36/118). 7.6% of studies (n=9/118) used an experimental design: six individual-level and three cluster-randomised controlled trials. 56.8% (67/118) reported on service delivery/process outcomes (versus health or health risk factor outcomes) only. Given the number of Indigenous health programs that are implemented, few evaluations overall are published in the peer-reviewed literature and, of these, few use optimal methodologies such as mixed methods and experimental design. Implications for public health: Multiple strategies are required to increase high-quality, accessible evaluation in Indigenous health, including supporting stronger research-policy-practice partnerships and capacity building for evaluation by health services and government. © 2017 The Authors.

  9. Evaluation of the 235U prompt fission neutron spectrum including a detailed analysis of experimental data and improved model information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neudecker Denise

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an evaluation of the 235U prompt fission neutron spectrum (PFNS induced by thermal to 20-MeV neutrons. Experimental data and associated covariances were analyzed in detail. The incident energy dependence of the PFNS was modeled with an extended Los Alamos model combined with the Hauser-Feshbach and the exciton models. These models describe prompt fission, pre-fission compound nucleus and pre-equilibrium neutron emissions. The evaluated PFNS agree well with the experimental data included in this evaluation, preliminary data of the LANL and LLNL Chi-Nu measurement and recent evaluations by Capote et al. and Rising et al. However, they are softer than the ENDF/B-VII.1 (VII.1 and JENDL-4.0 PFNS for incident neutron energies up to 2 MeV. Simulated effective multiplication factors keff of the Godiva and Flattop-25 critical assemblies are further from the measured keff if the current data are used within VII.1 compared to using only VII.1 data. However, if this work is used with ENDF/B-VIII.0β2 data, simulated values of keff agree well with the measured ones.

  10. Final Evaluation Report for the C.S. 211 Bilingual Gifted and Talented Program 1978-1979.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumberg, Stephan F.; Toledo, Victor

    This report provides a program description and evaluation findings of a bilingual program for gifted and talented children conducted at C.S. 211, an elementary school serving black and Hispanic children in an economically deprived area of the Bronx, New York. The program's goals, which included above grade level reading and mathematics performance…

  11. An Evaluation of the ELNP e-Learning Quality Assurance Program: Perspectives of Gap Analysis and Innovation Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Puu

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the appropriateness of a nationwide quality assurance framework for e-learning from participants' perspectives. Two types of quality evaluation programs were examined in this study, including the e-Learning Service Certification program (eLSC) and the e-Learning Courseware Certification program (eLCC). Gap…

  12. [Evaluation of the educational environment in medical specialty programs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Cristian A; Olivos, Trinidad; Román, José Antonio; Larraín, Antonia; Pizarro, Margarita; Solís, Nancy; Sarfatis, Alberto; Torres, Patricio; Padilla, Oslando; Le Roy, Catalina; Riquelme, Arnoldo

    2012-12-01

    The Postgraduate Hospital Education Environment Measure (PHEEM) questionnaire, is a valid and reliable instrument to measure the educational environment (EE) in postgraduate medical education. To evaluate the EE perceived by the residents of a postgraduate training program using the PHEEM. The PHEEM was applied in 2010-2011 in 35 specialty programs. We calculated their individual results and compared means of both global and individual domain scores of the PHEEM, by gender, university of origin and nationality. Cronbach's alpha coefficients and D study (Generalizability theory) were performed for reliability. Three hundred eighteen residents were surveyed (75.7% of the total universe). The mean score of the PHEEM was 105.09 ± 22.46 (65.7% of the maximal score) which is considered a positive EE. The instrument is highly reliable (Cronbach's alpha = 0.934). The D study found that 15 subjects are required to obtain reliable results (G coefficient = 0.813). There were no significant differences between gender and university of origin. Foreigners evaluated better the EE than Chileans and racism was not perceived. The programs showed a safe physical environment and teachers with good clinical skills. The negative aspects perceived were a lack of information about working hours, insufficient academic counseling, and scanty time left for extracurricular activities. This questionnaire allowed us to identify positive aspects of the EE, and areas to be improved in the specialty programs. The PHEEM is a useful instrument to evaluate the EE in Spanish-speaking participants of medical specialty programs.

  13. Physical Activity and Nutrition Program for Seniors (PANS): process evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Linda; Jancey, Jonine M; Howat, Peter; Lee, Andy H; Shilton, Trevor

    2013-07-01

    The Physical Activity and Nutrition Program for Seniors (PANS) program aimed to increase levels of physical activity and improve the diet of insufficiently active community-based seniors aged 60 to 70 years using a range of strategies. Comprehensive process evaluation was used to determine the suitability and appropriateness of the resources and effectiveness of the strategies. Process evaluation data (qualitative and quantitative) were collected on the program strategies and resources throughout, and at the conclusion of the intervention period. The program strategies/resources were found to be relevant to the population, assisting participants to increase their level of physical activity and improve their diet. Participants reported that the program resources were suitable for their age-group (84%), encouraged them to think about physical activity (78%), and nutrition (70%). Participants reported that they used the pedometer (91%) and recorded daily steps (78%). Moreover, the provision of group guides facilitated individuals to set and achieve personal goals. The PANS strategies and resources were appropriate, which supported the seniors in identifying, establishing, and achieving their physical activity and nutrition goals. Minor refinements of the program were recommended based on the findings.

  14. Evaluation of a Passive Nature Viewing Program Set to Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadman, Sally J

    2014-09-01

    Research has revealed that passive nature viewing (viewing nature scenes without actually being in nature) has many health benefits but little is known about the best method of offering this complementary modality. The purpose of this pilot program was to evaluate the impact of a passive nature viewing program set to music on stress reduction in adults living in the community. A pre- and postsurvey design along with weekly recordings of stress and relaxation levels were used to evaluate the effect of this passive nature viewing program on stress reduction. Participants watched one of three preselected nature scenes for 5 minutes a day over 1 month and rated their stress and relaxation levels weekly on a 100-mm Visual Analogue Scale before and after viewing the nature DVD. Quantitative analysis were not performed because of the less number of subjects (n = 10) completing the study. Qualitative analysis found five key categories that have an impact on program use: (a) technology, (b) personal preferences, (c) time, (d) immersion, and (e) use of the program. Holistic nurses may consider integrating patient preferences and immersion strategies in the design of future passive nature viewing programs to reduce attrition and improve success. © The Author(s) 2013.

  15. Economic evaluation of pediatric influenza immunization program compared with other pediatric immunization programs: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Edward; Begum, Najida; Sigmundsson, Birgir; Sackeyfio, Alfred; Hackett, Judith; Rajaram, Sankarasubramanian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study compared the economic value of pediatric immunisation programmes for influenza to those for rotavirus (RV), meningococcal disease (MD), pneumococcal disease (PD), human papillomavirus (HPV), hepatitis B (Hep B), and varicella reported in recent (2000 onwards) cost-effectiveness (CE) studies identified in a systematic review of PubMed, health technology, and vaccination databases. The systematic review yielded 51 economic evaluation studies of pediatric immunisation — 10 (20%) for influenza and 41 (80%) for the other selected diseases. The quality of the eligible articles was assessed using Drummond's checklist. Although inherent challenges and limitations exist when comparing economic evaluations of immunisation programmes, an overall comparison of the included studies demonstrated cost-effectiveness/cost saving for influenza from a European-Union-Five (EU5) and United States (US) perspective; point estimates for cost/quality-adjusted life-years (QALY) from dominance (cost-saving with more effect) to ≤45,444 were reported. The economic value of influenza programmes was comparable to the other vaccines of interest, with cost/QALY in general considerably lower than RV, Hep B, MD and PD. Independent of the perspective and type of analysis, the economic impact of a pediatric influenza immunisation program was influenced by vaccine efficacy, immunisation coverage, costs, and most significantly by herd immunity. This review suggests that pediatric influenza immunisation may offer a cost effective strategy when compared with HPV and varicella and possibly more value compared with other childhood vaccines (RV, Hep B, MD and PD). PMID:26837602

  16. Development and evaluation of a pharmacogenomics educational program for pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formea, Christine M; Nicholson, Wayne T; McCullough, Kristen B; Berg, Kevin D; Berg, Melody L; Cunningham, Julie L; Merten, Julianna A; Ou, Narith N; Stollings, Joanna L

    2013-02-12

    Objectives. To evaluate hospital and outpatient pharmacists' pharmacogenomics knowledge before and 2 months after participating in a targeted, case-based pharmacogenomics continuing education program.Design. As part of a continuing education program accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), pharmacists were provided with a fundamental pharmacogenomics education program.Evaluation. An 11-question, multiple-choice, electronic survey instrument was distributed to 272 eligible pharmacists at a single campus of a large, academic healthcare system. Pharmacists improved their pharmacogenomics test scores by 0.7 questions (pretest average 46%; posttest average 53%, p=0.0003).Conclusions. Although pharmacists demonstrated improvement, overall retention of educational goals and objectives was marginal. These results suggest that the complex topic of pharmacogenomics requires a large educational effort in order to increase pharmacists' knowledge and comfort level with this emerging therapeutic opportunity.

  17. Evaluation of an online continuing education program from the perspective of new graduate nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, Selcuk; Kucuk, Sevda; Aydemir, Melike

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the online continuing education program from the perspectives of new graduate nurses. An evaluation framework includes five factors (program and course structure, course materials, technology, support services and assessment). In this study, descriptive research methods were used. Participants of the study included 2.365 registered nurses enrolled in the first online nursing bachelor completion degree program in the country. Data were collected by survey. The findings indicated that students were mostly satisfied with this program. The results of this study suggest that well designed asynchronous online education methods can be effective and appropriate for registered nurses. However, the provision of effective support and technological infrastructure is as vital as the quality of teaching for online learners. © 2013.

  18. Evaluation of farmer's participation in National Special Program for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study evaluates farmer involvement in National Special Program for Food Security in Niger State, Nigeria. Purposive sampling techniques was used to select participants from the three Agricultural sites of the programme using structured interview schedule to gather information from one hundred and three respondents.

  19. Media Literacy Education Program Evaluators: What's the Job Description, Again?

    Science.gov (United States)

    DaCosta, Kneia Octavia

    2012-01-01

    School program evaluation researchers face a set of overlapping questions concerning our roles in the field: For the sake of "the data" and in quest of "the truth," am I a shrewd researcher before all else? For the sake of community-building and establishing respectful, reciprocal relationships with my school partners, am I first a gracious school…

  20. National Weatherization Assistance Program Evaluation: Assessment of Refrigerator Energy Use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonn, Bruce Edward [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Goeltz, Rick [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This report assesses the energy consumption characteristics and performance of refrigerators that were monintored as a component of the Indoor Air Quality Study that itself was a component of the retrospective evaluation of the Department of Energy's Weatherization Assistance Program.

  1. Monitoring and Evaluation for the Focus Cities Program in Asia ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Monitoring and Evaluation for the Focus Cities Program in Asia. IDRC's Focus Cities Research Initiative (FCRI) is supporting research teams in nine cities around the world to promote awareness, policy options and best practices for reducing environmental impacts in poor urban and periurban areas. Jakarta, Indonesia, and ...

  2. Using STPA in the evaluation of fighter pilots training programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plioutsias, Anastasios; Karanikas, Nektarios

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents how the application of the STPA method might support the evaluation of fighter pilots training programs and trigger procedural and technological changes. We applied the STPA method by considering the safety constraints documented in the Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) of a

  3. An Evaluation of a Biological Slide-Tutorial Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Gordon L.

    Described is an auto-tutorial slide program for zoology students. A self-paced system was devised for observing the subject matter covered in the twelve study units of a zoology course. The post-testing evaluation revealed that students with lower grade point averages achieved scores comparable with students of higher grade point averages.…

  4. Wilderness educators' evaluation of the Impact Monster Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    William W. Hendricks; Alan E. Watson

    1999-01-01

    Since its development by Jim Bradley in the late 1970s, the Impact Monster, a wilderness education skit designed to teach minimum impact techniques, has been used as a wilderness education tool by federal land management agencies. This paper reports on an evaluation of the perceived effectiveness of the Impact Monster program and its content. Results indicate that the...

  5. Counselor Competence, Performance Assessment, and Program Evaluation: Using Psychometric Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Kevin A.; Bloom, Margaret L.; Tassara, Marcel H.; Caperton, William

    2014-01-01

    Psychometric instruments have been underutilized by counselor educators in performance assessment and program evaluation efforts. As such, we conducted a review of the literature that revealed 41 instruments fit for such efforts. We described and critiqued these instruments along four dimensions--"Target Domain," "Format,"…

  6. Program Evaluation in Distance Education: Against the Technologisation of Reason.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemmis, Stephen

    Trends within the literature on program evaluation are reviewed and the implications of various trends for education are explored, with particular relevance for distance education. Distance education is an alternative educational approach based on correspondence, broadcasting, and long distance communication between teacher and student in a…

  7. Evaluating Quality in Associate Degree Culinary Arts Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertzman, Jean; Ackerman, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine which categories and indicators of quality are best suited to evaluating associate degree culinary arts programs (ADCAP). Design/methodology/approach: The researchers surveyed a national sample of culinary educators and industry chefs in the USA. The instrument asked the participants to rate the…

  8. Program Evaluation of Outcomes Based Orthotic and Prosthetic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    GANTT Chart: Accomplishment of Objectives…………….. 19 APPENDIX II. Program Evaluation Plan (.pdf file)………………………… 20 APPENDIX III. Photographs of...Clifton McDonald,Tony Pfle Jos Impression: Possible Pts. Pt. Management 1 Pt. History 1 Org of

  9. DIADORIM: a Monte Carlo Program for liquid simulations including quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) facilities: applications to liquid ethanol

    OpenAIRE

    Freitas,Luiz Carlos Gomide

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a Metropolis Monte Carlo (MMC) computer program developed to simulate liquids and solutions including QM/MM facilities: the energy from intermolecular interactions is calculated with classical force field functions and the internal molecular energies are calculated using Quantum Chemistry methods. The following facilities were implemented: (i) the semiempirical MOPAC 6 quantum chemistry package was included as a subroutine of the main MMC simulation program; (ii) alternati...

  10. Evaluation of Pre-Departure English Training Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Saukah

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The program evaluation reported in this article covers three batches of participants, from 1996 through 1997, sponsored by the Directorate General of Higher Education projects to prepare faculty members of teacher training institutions for overseas studies. The result outcomes could be achieved when the initial English competence requirred for participating in the program was at least at the Pre-Advanced level. The criterion validity of the TOEFL-Equivalent test developed by the program was assured, and the test could, therefore, be used as a good predictor of the International TOEFL. Other recommendations are also given for the improvement of the planning and implementation of the program in the future

  11. Learning Under the Tree : Evaluating Skillful Parenting Program in West Kenya ICS Full Evaluation Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Esch, R.P.; de Haan, M.J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The central purpose of this evaluation is to determine if and how the Skillful Parenting Program (SPP) effects the parenting of its participants. In addition, it aims to determine how the parenting program was adapted to the West Kenyan setting, and how the specific content and processes of

  12. Nuclear Structure Data Evaluation and the US Nuclear Data Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmer, Richard G.

    2001-10-01

    The United States Nuclear Data Program and the Nuclear Structure and Decay Data network of the International Atomic Energy Agency work in collaboration to provide recommended nuclear structure and decay data for use in basic and applied research. Data are evaluted for nuclear levels and for various types of radiation. In addition, an extensive bibliographic database of nuclear structure, reaction, and decay data references is maintained. The databases maintained by the National Nuclear Data Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory include the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF), the Experimental Unevaluated Nuclear Data Library (XUNDL), and the Nuclear Sciences References (NSR). These data are all available via the Internet and some are available in hard-copy. Although the data in the ENSDF database for a particular nucleus has often not been updated in the last few fears, XUNDL provides compiled experimental data from papers with a delay of only about one month. Also, the NSR bibliographic database is current for the many journals that are monitored regularly.

  13. Evaluation of the national tuberculosis surveillance program in Haiti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salyer, S. J.; Fitter, D. L.; Milo, R.; Blanton, C.; Ho, J. L.; Geffrard, H.; Morose, W.; Marston, B. J.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the quality of tuberculosis (TB) surveillance in Haiti, including whether underreporting from facilities to the national level contributes to low national case registration. METHODS We collected 2010 and 2012 TB case totals, reviewed laboratory registries, and abstracted individual TB case reports from 32 of 263 anti-tuberculosis treatment facilities randomly selected after stratification/weighting toward higher-volume facilities. We compared site results to national databases maintained by a non-governmental organization partner (International Child Care [ICC]) for 2010 and 2012, and the National TB Program (Programme National de Lutte contre la Tuberculose, PNLT) for 2012 only. RESULTS Case registries were available at 30/32 facilities for 2010 and all 32 for 2012. Totals of 3711 (2010) and 4143 (2012) cases were reported at the facilities. Case totals per site were higher in site registries than in the national databases by 361 (9.7%) (ICC 2010), 28 (0.8%) (ICC 2012), and 31 (0.8%) cases (PNLT 2012). Of abstracted individual cases, respectively 11.8% and 6.8% were not recorded in national databases for 2010 (n = 323) and 2012 (n = 351). CONCLUSIONS The evaluation demonstrated an improvement in reporting registered TB cases to the PNLT in Haiti between 2010 and 2012. Further improvement in case notification will require enhanced case detection and diagnosis. PMID:26260822

  14. Restructuring High School Science Curriculum: A Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Cathy Jean

    One rural Midwestern high school discovered a discrepancy among school, state, and national science skill attainment, verified by ACT scores. If students do not acquire vital science skills, they may not perform proficiently on science tests, thus impacting future college options. Inquiry based instruction and constructivism provided the basis for the theoretical framework. This study questioned associations between ACT scores, inquiry science technique usage, and ACT standard usage (Phase 1), and teachers' views on science instruction (Phase 2). This sequential explanatory mixed methods program evaluation included 469 ACT scores, surveys sent to 9 science teachers, and 8 interviews. Phase 1 used the inquiry science implementation scale survey and an ACT college readiness standards workbook to determine proportional associations between datasets. Descriptive statistics, one-sample t tests, and binomial tests were used to analyze Phase 1 data. Phase 2 interviews augmented Phase 1 data and were disassembled, reassembled, and interpreted for parallel viewpoints. Phase 1 data indicated that teachers use a slightly above average amount of inquiry and science ACT standards in the classroom; however, most science students did not test above the curriculum and there were inconsistencies in standards covered. Phase 2 data revealed teachers need time to collaborate and become skilled in inquiry methods to rectify the inconsistencies. The project was an evaluation report. This study will foster positive social change by giving the district a plan: adapt the science curriculum by integrating more ACT and inquiry standards and participate in more professional development that applies inquiry as a tool to increase science skill proficiency, thus generating locally competitive students for college and the workforce.

  15. Development of object oriented program `SONSHO` for strength evaluation. Manual of Version 4.0 program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosogai, Hiromi [Joyo Industries Co. Ltd., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Kasahara, Naoto

    1998-07-01

    Object Oriented Program `SONSHO` predicts creep fatigue damage factors based on Elevated Temperature Structural Design Guide for `Monju` and other various procedures from stress classification data obtained from structural analysis results. From view point of program implementation, it is required that external programs interface and frequent revise from update of material and creep fatigue evaluation methods. Object oriented approach was continuously introduced to improve these aspects of the program. Version 4.0 has the following new functions. (1) Material strength library was implemented as an independent program module based on Microsoft Active X control and 32bitDLL technologies, which can be accessed by general Windows programs. (2) Self instruction system `Wizard` enables manual less operation. (3) Microsoft common object model (COM) was adopted for program interface, and this program can communicate with Excel sheet data on memory. Sonsho Ver.4.0 can work on Windows 95 or Windows NT4.0. Microsoft Visual Basic 5.0 (Enterprose Edition) and Microsoft FORTRAN Power Station 4.0 were adopted for program. (author)

  16. Pulmonary rehabilitation program including respiratory conditioning for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): Improved hyperinflation and expiratory flow during tidal breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimi, Kaku; Ueki, Jun; Seyama, Kuniaki; Takizawa, Makiko; Yamaguchi, Seiko; Kitahara, Eriko; Fukazawa, Shinji; Takahama, Yukiko; Ichikawa, Masako; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Fukuchi, Yoshinosuke

    2012-06-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation has generally relieved symptoms, strengthened exercise endurance and improved health-related quality of life (QOL) in patients with COPD, but recovery of pulmonary function remains questionable. This analysis of our innovative rehabilitation program is directed at documenting changes in patients' expiratory airflow limitation, pulmonary symptoms and QOL. This program is designed to provide "respiratory conditioning", a physical therapist-assisted intensive flexibility training that focuses on stretching and rib cage mobilization. Thirty-one patients with COPD who attended rehabilitation sessions at Juntendo University Hospital from 1999 to 2006 were analyzed. Pulmonary function, expiratory flow limitation during tidal breathing, six minute walk distance (6MWD), respiratory muscle strength, and St. George Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) were measured before and after pulmonary rehabilitation. In participants ages 68±7 years, the FEV(1)% predicted was 39.3±15.7%. 6MWD, SGRQ and respiratory muscle strength were significantly improved after pulmonary rehabilitation. Although neither FEV(1)% predicted nor FEV(1)/FVC was affected to a significant extent, indicating little effect on airflow limitation, expiratory flow limitation in supine as well as seated during tidal breathing improved significantly. Moreover, rehabilitation significantly diminished TLC% predicted, FRC% predicted, RV% predicted and RV/TLC values, thus indicating a reduction of hyperinflation of the lungs at rest. The present results suggest that our rehabilitation program with respiratory conditioning significantly lowered the hyperinflation of lungs at rest as well as the expiratory flow limitation during tidal breathing. In patients with COPD, overall pulmonary function improved, exercise endurance increased and health-related QOL was enhanced.

  17. THE LEGITIMACY OF INCLUDING THE SOCIAL PARAMETERS IN EVALUATING THE HEALTH STATUS IN THE SOCIAL ASSURANCE SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIHAI NEDELCU

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The social state crisis encouraged a reductionist tendency which had recently developed in the evaluations of the health status in the social assurance system. A holistic, psycho-medical approach, which took in consideration the implications of the social factors regarding disability, was confronted with a strictly medical model, in which the illness is exclusively considered a person’s problem; therefore, the references towards the „social” are irrelevant. In this context, the present paper states the question of the legitimacy of using some sociological concepts, in medical expertise, considered relevant in this area, such as: „occupational access” or the „social functioning of the person”. The present study doesn’t stop at offering as arguments of legitimacy the authority of some recommendations regarding the use of the social-medical model, including the evaluation of the health status, recommendations received from the behalf of OMS and the European Council (see CIF. The paper presents the construction of specific evaluation instruments and tries to identify the sense in which using the references regarding the „social” could influence the pressures in the social assurance system.

  18. EPO Program and Product Evaluation Throughout the Development Lifecycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, C.; Butcher, G. J.

    2013-12-01

    Evaluation of successful education and public outreach (EPO) programs and products is becoming increasingly important for the continued development of such efforts. This presentation will detail the tools and techniques used to evaluate two EPO efforts- 1) NASA's REEL Science Communications Contest and Video Production Workshop, and 2) the 'Sensors, Circuits, and Satellites' product. A primary challenge with evaluating any EPO product geared towards children and students is the limitation on collecting information from minors. With regards to the REEL Science Contest, over 120 students participated in producing and entering 48 contest entries but because of the Office of Budget and Management (OBM) regulations that restrict collecting feedback from more than nine individuals, we were only able to collect evaluation data from a small subset of this group. The five winning students who participated in the final workshop took part in the evaluation. The benefit of a small group size is that it allowed for more in-depth one-on-one interviews with each student. The feedback collected from this evaluation offered valuable insight into what worked well along with areas of improvement for futures contests and workshops. The REEL Science video contest had another evaluation opportunity since NASA scientists, communications experts, and producers also participated in the program and worked directly with the students. A survey was administered for this audience in an effort to gauge the perceived value and success of the program from the perspective of the originating institution. We found that if a program is well received, the program is more likely to receive future support. Additionally, this component of the program evaluation provided useful feedback and lessons learned to help optimize the role of the internal audience for similar programs in the future. Implementing formative evaluation is key to developing a successful EPO product development. Collecting data at key

  19. An economic evaluation of public programs for internationalization: the case of the Diagnostic Program in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cansino, José M; Lopez-Melendo, Jaime; Pablo-Romero, María del P; Sánchez-Braza, Antonio

    2013-12-01

    This paper evaluates the Diagnostic Program in Spain which is a publicly funded program to promote internationalization of companies located in Andalusia (south of Spain). The methodology used is the propensity score-matching. The treatment group consists of companies which participated in the Program until 2008. The control group has companies which planned to participate in the Program but had not done so up to that date. The response variable measures the ratio of export to total sales for each company. Four covariates have been taken into account: activity, location, sales and number of employees. The analysis leads to the conclusion that the companies that participated in the Program improved their ratio of exports to total sales by about 10 percentage points. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Development of a peer teaching-assessment program and a peer observation and evaluation tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Jennifer M; DiVall, Margarita V; Barr, Judith; Gonyeau, Michael; Van Amburgh, Jenny A; Matthews, S James; Qualters, Donna

    2008-12-15

    To develop a formalized, comprehensive, peer-driven teaching assessment program and a valid and reliable assessment tool. A volunteer taskforce was formed and a peer-assessment program was developed using a multistep, sequential approach and the Peer Observation and Evaluation Tool (POET). A pilot study was conducted to evaluate the efficiency and practicality of the process and to establish interrater reliability of the tool. Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated. ICCs for 8 separate lectures evaluated by 2-3 observers ranged from 0.66 to 0.97, indicating good interrater reliability of the tool. Our peer assessment program for large classroom teaching, which includes a valid and reliable evaluation tool, is comprehensive, feasible, and can be adopted by other schools of pharmacy.

  1. Evaluation of an Online Educational Program for Parents and Caregivers of Children With Food Allergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Baqués, A; Contreras-Porta, J; Marques-Mejías, M; Cárdenas Rebollo, J M; Capel Torres, F; Ariño Pla, M N; Zorrozua Santisteban, A; Chivato, T

    2018-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of food allergy affects both patients and their families. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of an online educational program designed for parents and caregivers of children with food allergies. The program was developed by a multidisciplinary group comprising health care professionals, researchers, and expert patients under the participatory medicine model. Participants took a 2-week online educational program covering major topics in food allergy management. General knowledge about the disease, symptoms, treatment, and topics relevant to families' daily lives were evaluated. The contents included educational videos, online forums, and live video chats. A pretest/posttest questionnaire survey was used to evaluate the impact of the program. A total of 207 participants enrolled in the educational program, which was completed by 130 (62.8%). Knowledge acquisition improved significantly following participation in the program in 15 out of 30 items (50%), reaching P<.001 for 8 items (26.7%). Of the 207 participants who started the program, 139 (67.1%) visited online forums, and 27.5% attended video chats. Average overall satisfaction with the educational program was 8.78 (on a scale of 0 to 10). The results obtained show that parents improved their knowledge in all areas of food allergy. The high level of satisfaction among participants suggests that digital learning tools are effective and motivational, enabling patients to acquire appropriate knowledge and thus increasing their quality of life.

  2. Evaluation of a case-based urology learning program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Kirtishri; Snow-Lisy, Devon C; Ross, Jonathan; Goldfarb, David A; Goldman, Howard; Campbell, Steven C

    2013-12-01

    To address the challenges that today's trainees encounter, such as information overload and reduced immersion in the field, and recognizing their preference for novel educational resources, an electronic case-based urology learning program was developed. Each case was designed to illustrate the basic principles of the disease process and the fundamentals of evaluation and management using the Socratic method, recapitulating a prototypical patient encounter. A 21-question survey was developed after review of published reports of classroom and clinical learning environment surveys. The target group was 2 pilot urology training programs (the Cleveland Clinic and University Hospitals-Case Medical Center). The responses were entirely anonymous. A total of 32 trainees participated (8 fellows and 24 residents), representing a 53% response rate. Most trainees (79%) were able to process cases within an average of ≤ 10 minutes. Of the trainees, 91% reported referring back to particular cases for patient care, to review for examinations, or for studying. Most trainees believed a case-based urology learning program would be a potentially important resource for clinical practice (69%) and for preparing for the in-service (63%) or board (69%) examinations. Most trainees believed the program met its goals of illustrating the basics principles of the disease process (88%), outlining the fundamentals of evaluation and management (94%), and improving the trainees' knowledge base (91%). An electronic case-based urology learning program is feasible and useful and stimulates learning at all trainee levels. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Participatory evaluation in health programs: a proposal for the Adolescent Health Care Program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursztyn, Ivani; Ribeiro, José Mendes

    2005-01-01

    This article presents a model for participatory evaluation of the Adolescent Health Program (PROSAD) in Brazil. The study focuses on the concept of participation, with a review of internationally validated planning methodologies (RAP, logFRAME, ZOPP, PCM) and the programmatic characteristics of PROSAD. The proposed model comprises 4 steps, involving the constitution of the analytical matrix, a self-evaluation workshop, a summary of results, and graphic representation. The model promotes participatory practice in health program management by using techniques that allow a workshop to be held in 70 minutes (mean time), producing results that are recognized and easily grasped by the local team.

  4. Evaluating local food programs: the case of Select Nova Scotia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Andrew J

    2013-02-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of the buy local food program Select Nova Scotia; a government program with the goal to increase awareness and consumption of Nova Scotia produced and processed agri-food products by Nova Scotians and visitors. The evaluation methodology was based on prior evaluation resources and local food consumer research. Data were gathered through a web panel survey; 877 respondents completed the survey in June 2010. The results suggest that the program is reaching a wider audience than just those predisposed to local food initiatives. In addition, awareness of Select Nova was related to perceptions of local benefits and barriers, as well as purchase motivation and behavior. Respondents who were aware of Select Nova Scotia rated societal benefits as more important and viewed location and price as less of a barrier; they were also more likely to be highly motivated to purchase local foods. This study also informs results found in previous consumer research studies and identifies marketing opportunities to enhance the effectiveness of local food programs. The results suggest that societal benefits might be used as a way to differentiate products with similar attributes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of an Australian Alcohol Media Literacy Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Chloe S; Howard, Steven J; Jones, Sandra C; Kervin, Lisa K

    2016-11-01

    A 10-lesson alcohol media literacy program was developed, underpinned by the message interpretation processing model, inoculation theory, and constructivist learning theory, and was tailored to be culturally relevant to the Australian context. This program aimed to increase students' media deconstruction skills and reduce intent to drink alcohol. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the program in achieving these goals through a short-term quasi-experimental trial. Elementary schools were assigned to either the intervention group (83 students) or a wait-list control group (82 students). Student questionnaires were administered at three time points (baseline, after the intervention group completed the program, and after the wait-list control group completed the program) to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention. The intervention and wait-list control groups reported significantly higher media deconstruction skills as a result of the intervention. Both groups reported significantly lower social norms, whereas the wait-list control group reported significantly lower positive alcohol expectancies. There were no significant changes to self-efficacy to refuse alcohol, preference for alcohol-branded merchandise, and understanding of persuasive intent as a result of the intervention. To date, the majority of alcohol media literacy studies have been conducted in the United States and have focused on deconstructing television and print-based ads. This evaluation provides evidence that an alcohol media literacy program that was developed for a specific cultural context, and that incorporates a broad range of multimodal advertisements, can have a positive impact on beliefs and attitudes that are known predictors/precursors of drinking behaviors.

  6. Impacting Binational Health through Leadership Development: A Program Evaluation of the Leaders across Borders Program, 2010–2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar A. Contreras

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundWorkforce and leadership development is imperative for the advancement of public health along the U.S./Mexico border. The Leaders across borders (LaB program aims to train the public health and health-care workforce of the border region. The LaB is a 6-month intensive leadership development program, which offers training in various areas of public health. Program curriculum topics include: leadership, border health epidemiology, health diplomacy, border public policies, and conflict resolution.MethodsThis article describes the LaB program evaluation outcomes across four LaB cohort graduates between 2010 and 2014. LaB graduates received an invitation to participate via email in an online questionnaire. Eighty-five percent (n = 34 of evaluation participants indicated an improvement in the level of binationality since participating in the LaB program. Identified themes in the evaluation results included increased binational collaborations and partnerships across multidisciplinary organizations that work towards improving the health status of border communities. Approximately 93% (n = 37 of the LaB samples were interested in participating in future binational projects while 80% (n = 32 indicated interest in the proposal of other binational initiatives. Participants expressed feelings of gratitude from employers who supported their participation and successful completion of LaB.DiscussionPrograms such as LaB are important in providing professional development and education to a health-care workforce along the U.S./Mexico border that is dedicated to positively impacting the health outcomes of vulnerable populations residing in this region.

  7. Savannah River Restart Peer Evaluation Program final examination report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, M.P.; Draper, D.G.

    1991-12-01

    During the period of August 13, 1990 through September 6, 1991 the Savannah River Peer Evaluation Program was administered during three distinct phases to 73 certified Central Control Room Operators, Central Control Room Supervisors, and Shift Technical Engineers assigned to the K Reactor, on the Savannah River Site (SRS). This program was conceived and developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) and it's implementation satisfies recommendations made by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. The review identified both strengths and weaknesses of the procedures and personnel.

  8. Savannah River Restart Peer Evaluation Program final examination report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, M.P.; Draper, D.G.

    1991-12-01

    During the period of August 13, 1990 through September 6, 1991 the Savannah River Peer Evaluation Program was administered during three distinct phases to 73 certified Central Control Room Operators, Central Control Room Supervisors, and Shift Technical Engineers assigned to the K Reactor, on the Savannah River Site (SRS). This program was conceived and developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) and it`s implementation satisfies recommendations made by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. The review identified both strengths and weaknesses of the procedures and personnel.

  9. Evaluating the effectiveness of a multimedia program on home safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Mary Anne; Chiriboga, David A

    2003-06-01

    This study was designed to test the effectiveness and acceptance of multimedia home safety programming by community-dwelling seniors. A prototype CD-ROM was produced that required no reading or computer skills because the program included an audio narration of content and directions for operating the program on a touchscreen computer monitor. Volunteers (N = 126) from a senior center aged 55 and older were randomly assigned to (1) a multimedia group that used the interactive program to learn about home safety, (2) a traditional learning group that read well-established booklets on home safety, and (3) a control group that received no instruction on safety between the pre- and posttests. Repeated-measures multivariate analysis of variance showed that the multimedia group was the only group to improve in knowledge. The group was also very satisfied with the approach. Multimedia formats can effectively and economically provide information to older clients.

  10. Evaluation of a Workplace-Based Sleep Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Wayne N; Chen, Chin-Yu; Li, Xingquan; McCluskey, Maureen; Erickson, Denise; Barone, Daniel; Lattarulo, Charles; Schultz, Alyssa B

    2016-09-01

    Poor sleep is common among working adults. Chronic sleep deprivation is associated with health problems. A healthy sleep educational program (using webinars and other intranet-based resources) was offered to employees of a financial services corporation. In 2015, a total of 357 employees (50% completion rate) completed both a pre- and post-program questionnaire assessing sleep quality and workplace productivity. Many aspects of sleep statistically improved from T1 to T2 for program participants. These included improvements in hours of sleep, sleep quality, ease of getting asleep, feeling rested, nights of poor sleep, job performance, days of sleepiness, and others. Employees reporting any limitation in productivity also showed significant improvement. This workplace healthy sleep intervention was associated with significant improvements in sleep quality and quantity among program participants.

  11. Clemson University Science Master's Program in Sustainable and Resilient Infrastructure: A program evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sell, Elizabeth Eberhart

    The Clemson University Science Master's Program (SMP) in Sustainable and Resilient Infrastructure is a program which aims to link engineering, materials, construction, environment, architecture, business, and public policy to produce graduates with unique holistic perspective and expertise to immediately contribute to the workforce in the area of sustainable and resilient infrastructure. A program evaluation of the SMP has been performed to study the effectiveness of the SMP and identify areas where the goals and vision of the SMP are achieved and areas where improvements can be made. This was completed by analysis of trends within survey responses, review of Master's thesis reports, and review of courses taken. It was found that the SMP has facilitated new interdisciplinary research collaborations of faculty in different concentration areas within the Glenn Department of Civil Engineering, as well as collaboration with faculty in other departments. It is recommended that a course which provides instruction in all eight competency areas be required for all SMP students to provide a comprehensive overview and ensure all students are exposed to concepts of all competency areas. While all stakeholders are satisfied with the program and believe it has been successful thus far, efforts do need to be made as the program moves forward to address and improve some items that have been mentioned as needing improvement. The concerns about concentration courses, internship planning, and advising should be addressed. This evaluation provides benefits to prospective students, current SMP participants, and outside program supporters. The goal of this evaluation is to provide support that the SMP is an effective and worthwhile program for participating students, while attempting to identify any necessary program improvements and provide recommendations for achieving these improvements. This goal has been accomplished.

  12. Evaluating the SOS suicide prevention program: a replication and extension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glanovsky Jaime

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Suicide is a leading cause of death for children and youth in the United States. Although school based programs have been the principal vehicle for youth suicide prevention efforts for over two decades, few have been systematically evaluated. This study examined the effectiveness of the Signs of Suicide (SOS prevention program in reducing suicidal behavior. Methods 4133 students in 9 high schools in Columbus, Georgia, western Massachusetts, and Hartford, Connecticut were randomly assigned to intervention and control groups during the 2001–02 and 2002–03 school years. Self-administered questionnaires were completed by students in both groups approximately 3 months after program implementation. Results Significantly lower rates of suicide attempts and greater knowledge and more adaptive attitudes about depression and suicide were observed among students in the intervention group. Students' race/ethnicity, grade, and gender did not alter the impact of the intervention on any of the outcomes assessed in this analysis. Conclusion This study has confirmed preliminary analysis of Year 1 data with a larger and more racially and socio-economically diverse sample. SOS continues to be the only universal school-based suicide prevention program to demonstrate significant effects of self-reported suicide attempts in a study utilizing a randomized experimental design. Moreover, the beneficial effects of SOS were observed among high school-aged youth from diverse racial/ethnic backgrounds, highlighting the program's utility as a universal prevention program. Trial registration clinicaltrials.gov NCT000387855.

  13. Conducting Program Evaluation with Hispanics in Rural Settings: Ethical Issues and Evaluation Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loi, Claudia X. Aguado; McDermott, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Conducting evaluations that are both valid and ethical is imperative for the support and sustainability of programs that address underserved and vulnerable populations. A key component is to have evaluators who are knowledgeable about relevant cultural issues and sensitive to population needs. Hispanics in rural settings are vulnerable for many…

  14. Using student satisfaction data to evaluate a new online accelerated nursing education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazza, Elizabeth A; Matthias, April

    2016-10-01

    As increasing numbers of students enroll in online education, institutions of higher education are responsible for delivering quality online courses and programs. Agencies that accredit institutions and programs require evidence of program quality, including student satisfaction. A large state university in the Southeastern United States transitioned an online nursing education degree completion, or Registered Nurse-to-Bachelor of Science in Nursing, program to an online accelerated format in order to meet the needs of working nurses and ultimately, increase the number of nurses prepared at the baccalaureate level. This article describes a descriptive, cross-sectional study that evaluated the effectiveness of the new online accelerated program using the quality indicator of student satisfaction. Ninety-one (32%) of the 284 students who were enrolled or had been enrolled in a course within the online accelerated degree completion program between fall 2013 session 1 and summer 2014 session participated in the study. The electronic Noel-Levitz Priorities Survey for Online Learners™ was used to measure student satisfaction with the program and associated services. Results provided insight into the students' satisfaction with the new program format and served as the basis for an interdepartmental program enhancement plan aimed at maintaining and enhancing student satisfaction and overall program quality. Findings indicated that measuring and evaluating student satisfaction can provide valuable information about the effectiveness of an online program. Recommendations for using the measurement tool in online program planning and studying student satisfaction in relation to retention and program completion were identified. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Creating a Center of Choice: A Program Evaluation of Higher Quality Child Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenbrey, Taryn Caye

    2013-01-01

    This program evaluation focused on one year of Bridges to Tomorrow, a multi-year initiative designed by Metro United Way to better prepare at-risk children for academic success upon entering kindergarten. Bridges to Tomorrow provided three child care centers operating in at-risk neighborhoods with interventions that included a structured…

  16. Process Evaluation of a Parenting Program for Low-Income Families in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachman, Jamie M.; Kelly, Jane; Cluver, Lucie; Ward, Catherine L.; Hutchings, Judy; Gardner, Frances

    2018-01-01

    Objective: This mixed-methods process evaluation examined the feasibility of a parenting program delivered by community facilitators to reduce the risk of child maltreatment in low-income families with children aged 3-8 years in Cape Town, South Africa (N = 68). Method: Quantitative measures included attendance registers, fidelity checklists,…

  17. Non-leftmost Unfolding in Partial Evaluation of Logic Programs with Impure Predicates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Elvira; Puebla, German; Gallagher, John Patrick

    2006-01-01

    Partial evaluation of logic programs which contain impure predicates poses non-trivial challenges. Impure predicates include those which produce side-effects, raise errors (or exceptions), and those whose truth value varies according to the degree of instantiation of arguments. In particular, non...

  18. Pilot Evaluation of Parent and Child Enhancement Program for Disadvantaged Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Cynthia; Tsang, Sandra; Leung, Iona

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The present study was a pilot evaluation of the effectiveness of the Parent and Child Enhancement (PACE) program in enhancing child development for disadvantaged families with children aged 2 to 3. Method: Participants included 23 parent-child dyads who attended 2-hr sessions twice weekly for 20 weeks. Parents and children were assessed…

  19. Evaluation of the Navy Plaque Control Program, at Great Lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-02-01

    I 0 Individual clinicians who practice plaque control with their patients receive great reward and sense of accomplishment when dental caries is...Navy Dental Corps (43). The program requirements included plaque control instruction given through individual or small group sessions. The sessions... plaque removal techniques; demonstration of sulcular methods of tooth cleansing with the toothbrush ; and instruction in the use of plaque disclosing

  20. Analytical and Experimental Performance Evaluation of BLE Neighbor Discovery Process Including Non-Idealities of Real Chipsets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Perez-Diaz de Cerio

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to evaluate from a real perspective the performance of Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE as a technology that enables fast and reliable discovery of a large number of users/devices in a short period of time. The BLE standard specifies a wide range of configurable parameter values that determine the discovery process and need to be set according to the particular application requirements. Many previous works have been addressed to investigate the discovery process through analytical and simulation models, according to the ideal specification of the standard. However, measurements show that additional scanning gaps appear in the scanning process, which reduce the discovery capabilities. These gaps have been identified in all of the analyzed devices and respond to both regular patterns and variable events associated with the decoding process. We have demonstrated that these non-idealities, which are not taken into account in other studies, have a severe impact on the discovery process performance. Extensive performance evaluation for a varying number of devices and feasible parameter combinations has been done by comparing simulations and experimental measurements. This work also includes a simple mathematical model that closely matches both the standard implementation and the different chipset peculiarities for any possible parameter value specified in the standard and for any number of simultaneous advertising devices under scanner coverage.

  1. Nutritional status and feeding-tube placement in patients with locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer included in an induction chemotherapy-based larynx preservation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozec, Alexandre; Benezery, Karen; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Ettaiche, Marc; Vandersteen, Clair; Dassonville, Olivier; Poissonnet, Gilles; Riss, Jean-Christophe; Hannoun-Lévi, Jean-Michel; Chand, Marie-Eve; Leysalle, Axel; Saada, Esma; Sudaka, Anne; Haudebourg, Juliette; Hebert, Christophe; Falewee, Marie-Noelle; Demard, François; Santini, José; Peyrade, Frédéric

    2016-09-01

    The objective of the study is to evaluate the nutritional status and determine its impact on clinical outcomes in patients with locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer included in an induction chemotherapy (ICT)-based larynx preservation program without prophylactic feeding-tube placement. All patients with locally advanced (T3/4, N0-3, M0) hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, technically suitable for total pharyngolaryngectomy, treated by docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (TPF)-ICT for larynx preservation at our institution between 2004 and 2013, were included in this retrospective study. Patients' nutritional status was closely monitored. Enteral nutrition was used if and when a patient was unable to sustain per-oral nutrition and hydration. The impact of nutritional status on clinical outcomes was investigated in univariate and multivariate analysis. A total of 53 patients (42 men and 11 women, mean age = 58.6 ± 8.2 years) were included in this study. Six (11.3 %) patients had lost more than 10 % of their usual body weight before therapy. Compared with patients' usual weight, the mean maximum patient weight loss during therapeutic management was 8.7 ± 4.5 kg. Enteral nutrition was required in 17 patients (32 %). We found no influence of the tested nutritional status-related factors on response to ICT, toxicity of ICT, overall, cause-specific and recurrence-free survival, and on post-therapeutic swallowing outcome. Maximum weight loss was significantly associated with a higher risk of enteral tube feeding during therapy (p = 0.03) and of complications (grade ≥3, p = 0.006) during RT. Without prophylactic feeding-tube placement, approximately one-third of the patients required enteral nutrition. There was no significant impact of nutritional status on oncologic or functional outcomes.

  2. Purposive facebook recruitment endows cost-effective nutrition education program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, Barbara; Wamboldt, Patricia

    2013-08-15

    Recent legislation established a requirement for nutrition education in federal assistance programs to be evidence-based. Recruitment of low-income persons to participate and evaluate nutrition education activities can be challenging and costly. Facebook has been shown to be a cost-effective strategy to recruit this target audience to a nutrition program. The purpose of our study was to examine Facebook as a strategy to recruit participants, especially Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed) eligible persons, to view and evaluate an online nutrition education program intended to be offered as having some evidence base for SNAP-Ed programming. English-speaking, low-income Pennsylvania residents, 18-55 years with key profile words (eg, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, Food bank), responded to a Facebook ad inviting participation in either Eating Together as a Family is Worth It (WI) or Everyone Needs Folic Acid (FA). Participants completed an online survey on food-related behaviors, viewed a nutrition education program, and completed a program evaluation. Facebook set-up functions considered were costing action, daily spending cap, and population reach. Respondents for both WI and FA evaluations were similar; the majority were white, Cost per completed evaluation was US $25.48; cost per low-income completer was US $39.92. Results were similar for the FA evaluation; 795 Facebook users clicked on the ad with 110 unique site visitors, and 73 completing the evaluation (ie, 73/795, 9.2% of ad clickers and 73/110, 66% of site visitors completed the evaluation). Cost per valid completed survey with program evaluation was US $18.88; cost per low-income completer was US $27.53. With Facebook we successfully recruited low-income Pennsylvanians to online nutrition program evaluations. Benefits using Facebook as a recruitment strategy included real-time recruitment management with lower costs and more efficiency compared to previous data from

  3. The Danish national return-to-work program - aims, content, and design of the process and effect evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aust, Birgit; Helverskov, Trine; Nielsen, Maj Britt D.

    2012-01-01

    The Danish national return-to-work (RTW) program aims to improve the management of municipal sickness benefit in Denmark. A study is currently ongoing to evaluate the RTW program. The purpose of this article is to describe the study protocol. The program includes 21 municipalities encompassing...... absence, (iii) faster full RTW, (iv) more positive development in health, workability, pain, and sleep; it also tests whether the program is cost-effective. The process evaluation investigates: (i) whether the expected target population is reached; (ii) if the program is implemented as intended; (iii) how...

  4. Applying Program Theory-Driven Approach to Design and Evaluate a Teacher Professional Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Su-ching; Wu, Ming-sui

    2016-01-01

    This study was the first year of a two-year project which applied a program theory-driven approach to evaluating the impact of teachers' professional development interventions on students' learning by using a mix of methods, qualitative inquiry, and quasi-experimental design. The current study was to show the results of using the method of…

  5. Evaluation of an adolescent hospital-based injury prevention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Tanya Charyk; Polgar, Denise; Girotti, Murray J; Vingilis, Evelyn; Caro, Daniel; Corbett, Bradley A; Parry, Neil

    2009-05-01

    IMPACT (Impaired Minds Produce Actions Causing Trauma) is an adolescent, hospital-based program aimed to prevent injuries and their consequences caused by alcohol or drug impairment and other high-risk behaviors. The overall objective of this evaluation was to determine the effect of the program on students' knowledge and behavior regarding drinking and driving, over time. A randomized control trial between students randomly selected to attend IMPACT and those not selected served as a control group. Students completed a questionnaire before the program and at three posttime periods (1 week, 1 month, and 6 months). Panel data models were used to analyze the effects of the experiment on students' knowledge of alcohol and crash issues and negative driving behaviors (no seat belt, driving while using a cell phone, involved in conversation, eating, annoyed with other drivers, and drowsy). Descriptive statistics and logistic regression models were used to analyze the effect of IMPACT on students' influence on friends and family about road safety. This study consisted of 269 students (129 IMPACT; 140 control) with an overall response rate of 84% (range, 99% presurvey to 71% at 6 months). The IMPACT group had a 57%, 38%, and 43% increase in the number of correct answers on alcohol and crash issues during the three time periods, respectively (p driving behaviors. Men and students who drove more frequently had worse driving behavior. Our evaluation demonstrates that the IMPACT program had a statistically significant, positive effect on students' knowledge of alcohol and crash issues that was sustained over time. IMPACT had an initial effect on students' behaviors in terms of peer influence toward improving road safety (i.e., buckling up, not drinking, and driving) 1 week after the program, but this effect diminished after 1 month. Other negative driving behaviors had low prevalence at baseline and were not further influenced by the program.

  6. A Method for Evaluating Physical Activity Programs in Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Cheryl; Carpenter, Dick; Tucker, Elizabeth; Luna, Carmen; Donovan, John; Behrens, Timothy K

    2017-09-14

    Providing opportunities for students to be physically active during the school day leads to increased academic performance, better focus, and fewer behavioral problems. As schools begin to incorporate more physical activity programming into the school day, evaluators need methods to measure how much physical activity students are being offered through this programming. Because classroom-based physical activity is often offered in 3-minute to 5-minute bouts at various times of the day, depending on the teachers' time to incorporate it, it is a challenge to evaluate this activity. This article describes a method to estimate the number of physical activity minutes provided before, during, and after school. The web-based tool can be used to gather data cost-effectively from a large number of schools. Strategies to increase teacher response rates and assess intensity of activity should be explored.

  7. Evaluating the quality and effectiveness of hazardous waste training programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolpa, R.L.; Haffenden, R.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Weaver, M.A. [Headquarters Air Force Materiel Command, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH (United States)

    1996-05-01

    An installation`s compliance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous waste regulations is strongly dependent on the knowledge, skill, and behavior of all individuals involved in the generation and management of hazardous waste. Recognizing this, Headquarters Air Force Materiel Command (HQ/AFMC) determined that an in-depth evaluation of hazardous waste training programs at each AFMC installation was an appropriate element in assessing the overall effectiveness of installation hazardous waste management programs in preventing noncompliant conditions. Consequently, pursuant to its authority under Air Force Instruction (AFI) 32-7042, Solid and Hazardous Waste Compliance (May 12, 1994) to support and maintain hazardous waste training, HQ/AFMC directed Argonne National Laboratory to undertake the Hazardous Waste Training Initiative. This paper summarizes the methodology employed in performing the evaluation and presents the initiative`s salient conclusions.

  8. Epidemiologic surveillance program for evaluating occupational reproductive hazards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, O.; Morgan, R.W.; Whorton, M.D.

    1985-01-01

    A noninvasive and inexpensive epidemiologic program for evaluating the possible effects of occupational exposures on fertility is proposed. This surveillance program utilizes reproductive information obtainable from a short questionnaire (1-2 pages in length) or directly from existing medical, employment, or insurance records, and results can be generated readily on a routine basis. The proposed method should be viewed as a mechanism to provide an early signal for any potential hazard and to direct priority for other more in-depth epidemiologic or physiologic studies. The procedure is illustrated with data from individuals exposed to EDB, DBCP, and waste-water treatment plant processes. The method can be modified to compare the reproductive performance of an exposed group to that of an internal control group. With an internal control group, additional confounding factors can be taken into consideration. The relative merits of this approach compared to another method of fertility evaluation, semen analysis, are discussed.

  9. Evaluation of resources for an interactive infection control instructional program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Kandis V

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate educational resources used in developing and implementing an interactive infection control instructional program for first year (n=26) and second year (n=26) dental hygiene students in a baccalaureate program. An educator's toolkit was used to develop online and interactive learning modalities for teaching infection control content. Descriptive statistics were used to evaluate responses on a post instruction opinion survey on a 5-point Likert-type scale. Following the instructional program, most students reported on an opinion survey that they understood infection control principles (92% first year, 100% second year), felt prepared to work safely in clinic (96% first year, 100% second year) and liked working at their own pace (88% first year, 100% second year). First year students valued the online learning components and were less favorable toward supplemental textbook readings and the limited time to complete all 10 modules. Most second year students valued the interactive workshop but did not take the time to complete the online videos and did not watch all of them. Seventy-nine percent of second year students (n=20) preferred the interactive workshop method over traditional lecture instruction completed during their first year. This paper describes 1 institution's process of developing and implementing an infection control instructional program utilizing an educator's toolkit.

  10. Program evaluation of an integrated basic science medical curriculum in Shiraz Medical School, using CIPP evaluation model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    AZADEH ROOHOLAMINI; MITRA AMINI; LEILA BAZRAFKAN; MOHAMMAD REZA DEHGHANI; ZOHREH ESMAEILZADEH; PARISA NABEIEI; RITA REZAEE; JAVAD KOJURI

    2017-01-01

    ...) for undergraduate medical education. The purpose of this study was to provide the required data for the program evaluation of this curriculum for undergraduate medical students, using CIPP program evaluation model. Methods...

  11. 20 CFR 664.410 - Must local programs include each of the ten program elements listed in WIA section 129(c)(2) as...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... school completion, including dropout prevention strategies; (2) Alternative secondary school offerings... 664.470; (5) Occupational skill training; (6) Leadership development opportunities, which include... individual service strategy. (WIA sec. 129(c)(2).) ...

  12. Steps to a HealthierUS Cooperative Agreement Program: foundational elements for program evaluation planning, implementation, and use of findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Goldie; Garcia, Danyael; Zaza, Stephanie; Schooley, Michael; Compton, Don; Bryant, Terry; Bagnol, Lulu; Edgerly, Cathy; Haverkate, Rick

    2006-01-01

    The Steps to a HealthierUS Cooperative Agreement Program (Steps Program) enables funded communities to implement chronic disease prevention and health promotion efforts to reduce the burden of diabetes, obesity, asthma, and related risk factors. At both the national and community levels, investment in surveillance and program evaluation is substantial. Public health practitioners engaged in program evaluation planning often identify desired outcomes, related indicators, and data collection methods but may pay only limited attention to an overarching vision for program evaluation among participating sites. We developed a set of foundational elements to provide a vision of program evaluation that informs the technical decisions made throughout the evaluation process. Given the diversity of activities across the Steps Program and the need for coordination between national- and community-level evaluation efforts, our recommendations to guide program evaluation practice are explicit yet leave room for site-specific context and needs. Staff across the Steps Program must consider these foundational elements to prepare a formal plan for program evaluation. Attention to each element moves the Steps Program closer to well-designed and complementary plans for program evaluation at the national, state, and community levels.

  13. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Volume 2, Participants program final summary evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandes, S.D.; Robbins, G.A.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1994-05-01

    This 4.5-year project consisted of routine analytical support to DOE`s direct liquefaction process development effort (the Base Program), and an extensive effort to develop, demonstate, and apply new analytical methods for the characterization of liquefaction process streams (the Participants Program). The objective of the Base Program was to support the on-going DOE direct coal liquefaction process development program. Feed, process, and product samples were used to assess process operations, product quality, and the effects of process variables, and to direct future testing. The primary objective of the Participants Program was to identify and demonstrate analytical methods for use in support of liquefaction process develpment, and in so doing, provide a bridge between process design, development, and operation and analytical chemistry. To achieve this direct coal liquefaction-derived materials. CONSOL made an evaluation of each analytical technique. During the performance of this project, we obtained analyses on samples from numerous process development and research programs and we evaluated a variety of analytical techniques for their usefulness in supporting liquefaction process development. Because of the diverse nature of this program, we provide here an annotated bibliography of the technical reports, publications, and formal presentations that resulted from this program to serve as a comprehensive summary of contract activities.

  14. Alumni evaluation of a community-oriented master of public health program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeannot, Emilien; Stoll, Beat; Chastonay, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    Health workforce development is a public health priority for the World Health Organization. Public Health training programs need to be relevant in a public health perspective and efficient in and educational perspective. This implies evaluating the programs: in this regard student's perception might be interesting, or the opinion of external experts, or the experience of alumni. To study the perception of alumni of a master's program in public health in order to reevaluate the goals and objectives of the program, a cross-sectional survey through a self-administered questionnaire among former students that graduated from the Geneva University Master in Public Health program was done. This self-administered questionnaire included closed questions on a Likert five-point scale for regarding the use at work of tools acquired during the course, as well as open questions. Overall the alumni gave a positive evaluation of the course. As strong points were mentioned: networking opportunities, student-centered approach and multi-professional background of the student body. More critically judged were: tutorship, time constraints and costs. As most useful tools in their professional settings alumni mentioned: communication skills, project evaluation competencies and literature search strategies and again networking which in this case seemed to be quite active. Evaluation surveys among alumni allow reevaluation of the program's goals and objectives in the light of their professional needs.

  15. HISTORY AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS OF THE US EPA'S SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION (SITE) MONITORING AND MEASUREMENT (MMT) PROGRAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    This manuscript presents the history and evolution of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Monitoring and Measurement Technology (MMT) Program. This includes a discussion of how the fundamental concepts of a performanc...

  16. Impact evaluation for the Manufactured Housing Acquisition Program: Technical appendix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, A.D.; Taylor, Z.T.; Schrock, D.W.; Kavanaugh, D.C.; Chin, R.I.

    1995-10-01

    This document supplements the Manufactured Housing Acquisition Program (MAP) impact evaluation report, Lee et al. (1995). MAP is a voluntary energy-efficiency program for HUD-code manufactured homes conducted in the Pacific Northwest beginning in April 1992. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) prepared this and the impact evaluation reports for the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville). Lee et al. (1995) presents the objectives, methodology, and findings of the program evaluation. This report presents more details about specific aspects of the analysis. The authors used a three-tier approach to analyze the energy consumption of MAP and baseline homes. Chapter 2 discusses Tier 1, the billing data and simplified regression analysis. Chapter 3 presents the details of the Tier 2 analysis, the PRInceton Scorekeeping Method (PRISM). Chapter 4 presents details of the primary analysis technique that they used, a comprehensive regression analysis. Chapter 5 and 6 review two other studies of energy savings associated with MAP. Chapter 5 discusses the simulation model analysis conducted by Ecotope, Inc. Chapter 6 reviews the analysis by Regional Economic Research conducted for three Pacific Northwest investor-owned utilities. The final chapter, Chapter 7, presents details of the Bonneville levelized cost methodology used to estimate the cost of energy savings associated with MAP. Results are presented and discussed in many cases for the three different climate zones found in the Pacific Northwest. 18 refs., 29 tabs.

  17. Using Evaluability Assessment to Improve Program Evaluation for the Blue-Throated Macaw Environmental Education Project in Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatierra da Silva, Daniela; Jacobson, Susan K.; Monroe, Martha C.; Israel, Glenn D.

    2016-01-01

    An evaluability assessment of a program to save a critically endangered bird helped prepare the Blue-throated Macaw Environmental Education Project for evaluation and program improvement. The evaluability assessment facilitated agreement among key stakeholders on evaluation criteria and intended uses of evaluation information in order to maximize…

  18. Implementation and evaluation of a nursing home fall management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rask, Kimberly; Parmelee, Patricia A; Taylor, Jo A; Green, Diane; Brown, Holly; Hawley, Jonathan; Schild, Laura; Strothers, Harry S; Ouslander, Joseph G

    2007-03-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of a falls management program (FMP) for nursing homes (NHs). A quality improvement project with data collection throughout FMP implementation. NHs in Georgia owned and operated by a single nonprofit organization. All residents of participating NHs. A convenience sample of 19 NHs implemented the FMP. The FMP is a multifaceted quality improvement and culture change intervention. Key components included organizational leadership buy-in and support, a designated facility-based falls coordinator and interdisciplinary team, intensive education and training, and ongoing consultation and oversight by advanced practice nurses with expertise in falls management. Process-of-care documentation using a detailed 24-item audit tool and fall and physical restraint use rates derived from quality improvement software currently used in all Georgia NHs (MyInnerView). Care process documentation related to the assessment and management of fall risk improved significantly during implementation of the FMP. Restraint use decreased substantially during the project period, from 7.9% to 4.4% in the intervention NHs (a relative reduction of 44%), and decreased in the nonintervention NHs from 7.0% to 4.9% (a relative reduction of 30%). Fall rates remained stable in the intervention NHs (17.3 falls/100 residents per month at start and 16.4 falls/100 residents per month at end), whereas fall rates increased 26% in the NHs not implementing the FMP (from 15.0 falls/100 residents/per month to 18.9 falls/100 residents per month). Implementation was associated with significantly improved care process documentation and a stable fall rate during a period of substantial reduction in the use of physical restraints. In contrast, fall rates increased in NHs owned by the same organization that did not implement the FMP. The FMP may be a helpful tool for NHs to manage fall risk while attempting to reduce physical restraint use in response to the Centers for

  19. Position Paper: General Practice Residency and Advanced Education in General Dentistry Programs: Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Robert E.

    1983-01-01

    The currently used internal and external program evaluation processes for general practice residency and advanced education in general dentistry programs are discussed, noting accrediting and evaluation groups, criteria, and designs. A generalized evaluation plan is proposed. (MSE)

  20. Evaluating Teen Pregnancy Prevention Programs: Decades of Evolving Strategies and Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Philliber

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the changing strategies for both process and outcome evaluations of teen pregnancy prevention programs over the past few decades. Implementation evaluations have emphasized discovery of what program attributes are most effective in reducing teen pregnancy and its antecedents. Outcome evaluations have moved from collecting data to measure knowledge, attitudes, and program satisfaction to measuring behavior change including postponement of sexual involvement, increased used of contraception, or reduction in teen pregnancy. High quality randomized control trials or quasi-experimental designs are being increasingly emphasized, as are sophisticated analysis techniques using multi-variate analyses, controls for cluster sampling, and other strategies designed to build a more solid knowledge base about how to prevent early pregnancy.

  1. The Maps in Medicine program: An evaluation of the development and implementation of life sciences curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Jennifer

    There has been a downward trend in both science proficiency and interest in science in the United States, especially among minority students and students of a disadvantaged background. This has led to a downturn in the number of individuals within these groups considering a career in the sciences or a related field. Studies have identified many potential causes for this problem including the current structure of science curriculum, lack of teacher preparedness, and the lack of quality education and support for those students currently underrepresented in the sciences. Among the solutions to this problem include redesigning the science curriculum, offering high-quality professional development opportunities to teachers, and creating programs to give support to individuals currently underrepresented in the sciences, so that they may have a better chance of pursuing and obtaining a science career. The Maps in Medicine program (MiM) has been designed to incorporate all of the aforementioned solutions and apply them to the current science education problem. The Maps in Medicine (MiM) program was established at the University of Missouri -- Columbia, and is funded by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Newly developed MiM curricula and student activities are intended to promote positive attitude changes in those students who are currently underrepresented in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) fields, with the program also providing professional development to high school science teachers. It was important to determine if the MiM program's solution to the science education problem has been successful, and so the program evaluation piece was integral. A mixed-methods approach was used to evaluate the MiM program. Formative evaluation results indicated a positive response from teachers and students regarding curriculum and professional development, and student activities. These results have also lead to the identification of appropriate improvements

  2. Threshold evaluation data revision and computer program enhancement. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-02-27

    The Threshold Evaluation System was developed to assist the Division of Buildings and Community Systems of the Department of Energy in performing preliminary evaluation of projects being considered for funding. In addition, the evaluation has been applied to on-going projects, because information obtained through RD and D may alter the expected benefits and costs of a project, making it necessary to reevaluate project funding. The system evaluates each project according to its expected energy savings and costs. A number of public and private sector criteria are calculated, upon which comparisons between projects may be based. A summary of the methodology is given in Appendix B. The purpose of this task is to upgrade both the quality of the data used for input to the system and the usefulness and efficiency of the computer program used to perform the analysis. The modifications required to produce a better, more consistent set of data are described in Section 2. Program changes that have had a significant impact on the methodology are discussed in Section 3, while those that affected only the computer code are presented as a system flow diagram and program listing in Appendix C. These improvements in the project evaluation methodology and data will provide BCS with a more efficient and comprehensive management tool. The direction of future work will be toward integrating this system with a large scale (at ORNL) so that information used by both systems may be stored in a common data base. A discussion of this, and other unresolved problems is given in Section 4.

  3. The 2011 Program Evaluation Standards: a framework for quality in medical education programme evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhe, Valerie; Boudreau, J Donald

    2013-10-01

    Based on input from 400 stakeholders over 6 years, the 2011 Program Evaluation Standards represents an in-depth analysis of values, meaning and measurement and their relationships in programme evaluation. Evaluation quality is achieved by balancing five attributes: utility, feasibility, propriety, accuracy and evaluation accountability. These attributes are used to organize 30 standards, 200 strategies and 197 hazards. In response to a call from the authors of the standards, we have used them to guide our meta-evaluation of McGill's undergraduate physicianship programme. Our findings show how the standards illuminate the tensions, dilemmas and hazards inherent in all stages of programme evaluation studies and offer helpful strategies for designing and conducting high-quality evaluation studies. Based on our experience, the third edition needs to be used as a reference document in all stages of evaluations of medical education programmes. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The National Evaluation of School Nutrition Programs: program impact on dietary intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanes, S; Vermeersch, J; Gale, S

    1984-08-01

    This article describes the dietary analysis component of the National Evaluation of School Nutrition Programs. It addresses two research questions: 1) do participants and nonparticipants in the school nutrition programs have different calorie and nutrient intakes for 24 h, breakfast, and/or lunch and 2) if there are differences in the nutritional quality or total quantity of food consumed? Students who participate in the School Lunch Program get more than nonparticipants of almost all nutrients that were examined, both at lunch and during 24 h. The superior lunch and 24-h intakes of Lunch Program participants are due to the higher nutritional quality of the School Lunch compared with lunches that nonparticipants eat. The most important impact of the School Breakfast is that when the program is available, it increases the likelihood that children will eat breakfast, and children who eat breakfast have significantly higher intakes of nutrients than children who skip breakfast. The School Breakfast provides more calcium, phosphorus, protein, and magnesium than a non-US Department of Agriculture breakfast, but less vitamin A, vitamin B6, niacin, thiamin, and iron. The positive impacts of calcium and phosphorus carry over 24 h, while the negative impacts for vitamin A, vitamin B6, niacin, thiamin, and iron are made up during the remainder of the day. Although strong conclusions cannot be drawn about the impact of the Milk Program, milk is an important component of all US Department of Agriculture school nutrition programs and makes a major contribution to student dietary intake. Its presence in the meal patterns probably accounts for some of the greater nutrient intakes associated with participation in the School Lunch Program and most of the greater intakes associated with participation in the School Breakfast Program.

  5. Evaluation of a Shoulder Injury Prevention Program in Wheelchair Basketball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilroy, Jereme; Hibberd, Elizabeth

    2017-11-15

    Previous literature has theorized that alterations in shoulder physical characteristics are present in wheelchair athletes and contribute to shoulder pain and injury. Limited empirical evidence is present that evaluates the effectiveness of a shoulder injury prevention program focusing on improving these altered characteristics. To evaluate the effectiveness of a 6-week intervention program at improving characteristics that increases the risk of developing pain or shoulder injury. Pre and post-test. Home-based and controlled laboratory. Seven collegiate wheelchair athletes. Shoulder range of motion (ROM) and scapular muscle strength were assessed, and a 5-minute injury prevention program was taught to participants. Participants completed the intervention 3 times per week for 6 weeks. Following completion of the program, a post-intervention screening was performed. Internal/external rotation ROM, retraction strength, and internal/external rotation strength. Participants experienced a significant improvement in dominant limb shoulder internal rotation ROM (t6=3.56,p=0.012) with an average increase of 11.4° of IR ROM, and a significant improvement in dominant limb shoulder external rotation (ER) ROM (t6=2.79,p=0.032) with an average increase of 8.0° of ER ROM. There were no significant increases in shoulder IR or ER strength and scapular retraction strength (p>0.05). Improvements in ROM have previously been linked to decreases in shoulder pain and injury in other upper-extremity dominant sports by improving scapular kinematics. These results provide evidence that a 6-week strengthening and stretching intervention program may decrease risk factors for shoulder injury in wheelchair athletics.

  6. Integrating Oncology Massage Into Chemoinfusion Suites: A Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jun J; Wagner, Karen E; Seluzicki, Christina M; Hugo, Audra; Galindez, Laura K; Sheaffer, Heather; Fox, Kevin R

    2017-03-01

    This article reports on the development, implementation, and evaluation of an integrative clinical oncology massage program for patients undergoing chemotherapy for breast cancer in a large academic medical center. We describe the development and implementation of an oncology massage program embedded into chemoinfusion suites. We used deidentified program evaluation data to identify specific reasons individuals refuse massage and to evaluate the immediate impact of massage treatments on patient-reported outcomes using a modified version of the Distress Thermometer delivered via iPad. We analyzed premassage and postmassage data from the Distress Thermometer using paired t test and derived qualitative data from participants who provided written feedback on their massage experiences. Of the 1,090 massages offered, 692 (63%) were accepted. We observed a significant decrease in self-reported anxiety (from 3.9 to 1.7), nausea (from 2.5 to 1.2), pain (from 3.3 to 1.9), and fatigue (from 4.8 to 3.0) premassage and postmassage, respectively (all P massage, and 649 (94%) would recommend it to another patient undergoing treatment. Spontaneous patient responses overwhelmingly endorsed the massage as relaxing. No adverse events were reported. Among the 398 patients (36%) who declined a massage, top reasons were time concerns and lack of interest. A clinical oncology massage program can be safely and effectively integrated into chemoinfusion units to provide symptom control for patients with breast cancer. This integrative approach overcomes patient-level barriers of cost, time, and travel, and addresses the institutional-level barrier of space.

  7. A Program Evaluation Process to Meet the Needs of English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellante, Donna; Donne, Vicki

    2013-01-01

    The process of program evaluation was utilized to evaluate the education program, provide information to make decisions on its ability to comply with mandates from the state education department, and develop or improve the program to meet the goals of the new initiative to meet the needs of English language learners. The program evaluation process…

  8. Performance evaluation of alternative fuel/engine concepts 1990- 1995. Final report including addendum of diesel vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nylund, N.O.; Ikonen, M.; Kytoe, M.; Lappi, M.; Westerholm, M.; Laurikko, J. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Use

    1996-12-31

    Annex V within the IEA Agreement on Alternative Motor Fuels is the first subtask to generate new experimental data. The objective of the task is to generate information on the emission potential of alternative fuels in severe operating conditions and to evaluate new emission measurement methods. The work was carried out in three phases, Engine Tests, Vehicle Tests and Addendum of Diesel Vehicles. The work was carried out at VTT (Technical Research Centre of Finland) as a cost shared operation. Participants were Belgium (Parts Two and Three), Canada (Parts One and Two), Finland, Italy (Part One), Japan, the Netherlands Sweden and USA. The United Kingdom also joined at the end of the Annex. The work included 143 different vehicle/fuel/temperature combinations. FTP type emission tests were run on 14 vehicles powered with different gasoline compositions, methanol (M50 and M85), ethanol (E85), LPG, CNG and diesel. Both regulated and unregulated emission components were measured using the most up-to-date emissions measurement technology. The results indicated, that today`s advanced gasoline vehicles must be considered rather clean. Diesel is comparable with gasoline in the case of CO and HC. M85 gives low emissions in warm conditions, but unburned methanol must be controlled. Natural gas and LPG are inherently clean fuels which, using up-to-date engine technology, give low emissions in all conditions. (orig.) (29 refs.)

  9. Model Selection and Evaluation Based on Emerging Infectious Disease Data Sets including A/H1N1 and Ebola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendi Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to apply simple ODE models in the area of modeling the spread of emerging infectious diseases and show the importance of model selection in estimating parameters, the basic reproduction number, turning point, and final size. To quantify the plausibility of each model, given the data and the set of four models including Logistic, Gompertz, Rosenzweg, and Richards models, the Bayes factors are calculated and the precise estimates of the best fitted model parameters and key epidemic characteristics have been obtained. In particular, for Ebola the basic reproduction numbers are 1.3522 (95% CI (1.3506, 1.3537, 1.2101 (95% CI (1.2084, 1.2119, 3.0234 (95% CI (2.6063, 3.4881, and 1.9018 (95% CI (1.8565, 1.9478, the turning points are November 7,November 17, October 2, and November 3, 2014, and the final sizes until December 2015 are 25794 (95% CI (25630, 25958, 3916 (95% CI (3865, 3967, 9886 (95% CI (9740, 10031, and 12633 (95% CI (12515, 12750 for West Africa, Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone, respectively. The main results confirm that model selection is crucial in evaluating and predicting the important quantities describing the emerging infectious diseases, and arbitrarily picking a model without any consideration of alternatives is problematic.

  10. Comparison and clinical utility evaluation of four multiple allergen simultaneous tests including two newly introduced fully automated analyzers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Hoon Rim

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: We compared the diagnostic performances of two newly introduced fully automated multiple allergen simultaneous tests (MAST analyzers with two conventional MAST assays. Methods: The serum samples from a total of 53 and 104 patients were tested for food panels and inhalant panels, respectively, in four analyzers including AdvanSure AlloScreen (LG Life Science, Korea, AdvanSure Allostation Smart II (LG Life Science, PROTIA Allergy-Q (ProteomeTech, Korea, and RIDA Allergy Screen (R-Biopharm, Germany. We compared not only the total agreement percentages but also positive propensities among four analyzers. Results: Evaluation of AdvanSure Allostation Smart II as upgraded version of AdvanSure AlloScreen revealed good concordance with total agreement percentages of 93.0% and 92.2% in food and inhalant panel, respectively. Comparisons of AdvanSure Allostation Smart II or PROTIA Allergy-Q with RIDA Allergy Screen also showed good concordance performance with positive propensities of two new analyzers for common allergens (Dermatophagoides farina and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus. The changes of cut-off level resulted in various total agreement percentage fluctuations among allergens by different analyzers, although current cut-off level of class 2 appeared to be generally suitable. Conclusions: AdvanSure Allostation Smart II and PROTIA Allergy-Q presented favorable agreement performances with RIDA Allergy Screen, although positive propensities were noticed in common allergens. Keywords: Multiple allergen simultaneous test, Automated analyzer

  11. Appraisal and analysis of opportunities for a joint DOE/DOD energy demonstration program. Final report. [Includes possible site information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziem, R.W.

    1980-05-01

    The basic objective of this study was to assess the potential for cooperative projects between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Department of Defense (DOD) in areas concerned with the development of Total Energy (TE) Systems and to do the groundwork and liaison necessary to initiate those projects. The scope of the potential joint projects includes cooperative effort in the development and test of a variety of heat engines (prime movers) capable of utilizing coal as well as synthetic liquid fuels derived from coal and oil shale; as well as the indication of potential Military Department sites which would be suitable for the demonstration of TE systems based on a variety of such prime movers. In order to accomplish the objective of the study, it was necessary to review a large number of DOD studies and plans and to discuss the objective of the TETAS studies with a large number of Military Department people. The DOD recognizes the requirement for an assured energy supply and the need to learn how to use the synthetic fuels from coal and shale being developed by the DOE. The need to modify engine systems to adapt them to differing fuel characteristics and make those engines more flexible relative to the range of fuels they will accept is clear. What is not so clear is the fact that the DOD has a much greater opportunity to conserve energy in now inefficient facility operations than it has in mobility operations which must continue to stress mission and high performance. This report indicates guidelines for the conduct of joint projects between the DOE and the DOD which can aid both in meeting their energy objective.

  12. The evaluation of reproductive health PhD program in Iran: The input indicators analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbdiShahshahani, Mahshid; Ehsanpour, Soheila; Yamani, Nikoo; Kohan, Shahnaz

    2014-11-01

    Appropriate quality achievement of a PhD program requires frequent assessment and discovering the shortcomings in the program. Inputs, which are important elements of the curriculum, are frequently missed in evaluations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the input indicators of reproductive health PhD program in Iran based on the Context, Input, Process, and Product (CIPP) evaluation model. This is a descriptive and evaluative study based on the CIPP evaluation model. It was conducted in 2013 in four Iranian schools of nursing and midwifery of medical sciences universities. Statistical population consisted of four groups: heads of departments (n = 5), faculty members (n = 18), graduates (n = 12), and PhD students of reproductive health (n = 54). Data collection tools were five separate questionnaires including 37 indicators that were developed by the researcher. Content and face validity were evaluated based on the experts' indications. The Cronbach's alpha coefficient was calculated in order to obtain the reliability of the questionnaires. Collected data were analyzed by SPSS software. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics (mean, frequency, percentage, and standard deviation), and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and least significant difference (LSD) post hoc tests to compare means between groups. The results of the study indicated that the highest percentage of the heads of departments (80%), graduates (66.7%), and students (68.5%) evaluated the status of input indicators of reproductive health PhD program as relatively appropriate, while most of the faculties (66.7%) evaluated that as appropriate. It is suggested to explore the reasons for relatively appropriate evaluation of input indicators by further academic researches and improve the reproductive health PhD program accordingly.

  13. Integrative Reiki for cancer patients: a program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleisher, Kimberly A; Mackenzie, Elizabeth R; Frankel, Eitan S; Seluzicki, Christina; Casarett, David; Mao, Jun J

    2014-01-01

    This mixed methods study sought to evaluate the outcomes of an integrative Reiki volunteer program in an academic medical oncology center setting. We used de-identified program evaluation data to perform both quantitative and qualitative analyses of participants' experiences of Reiki sessions. The quantitative data were collected pre- and postsession using a modified version of the distress thermometer. The pre- and postsession data from the distress assessment were analyzed using a paired Student's : test. The qualitative data were derived from written responses to open-ended questions asked after each Reiki session and were analyzed for key words and recurring themes. Of the 213 pre-post surveys of first-time sessions in the evaluation period, we observed a more than 50% decrease in self-reported distress (from 3.80 to 1.55), anxiety (from 4.05 to 1.44), depression (from 2.54 to 1.10), pain (from 2.58 to 1.21), and fatigue (from 4.80 to 2.30) with P Reiki, we found 176 (82.6%) of participants liked the Reiki session, 176 (82.6%) found the Reiki session helpful, 157 (73.7%) plan to continue using Reiki, and 175 (82.2%) would recommend Reiki to others. Qualitative analyses found that individuals reported that Reiki induced relaxation and enhanced spiritual well-being. An integrative Reiki volunteer program shows promise as a component of supportive care for cancer patients. More research is needed to evaluate and understand the impact that Reiki may have for patients, caregivers, and staff whose lives have been affected by cancer.

  14. Sustainability of donor programs: evaluating and informing the transition of a large HIV prevention program in India to local ownership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Bennett

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability is the holy grail of many development projects, yet there is limited evidence about strategies that effectively support transition of programs from donor funding to national governments. The first phase of Avahan, the India AIDS Initiative supported by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (2003–2009, aimed to demonstrate an HIV/AIDS prevention program at scale, primarily targeted at high-risk groups. During the second phase (2009–2013, this large-scale program will be transitioned to its natural owners: the Government of India and local communities. This paper describes the evaluation design for the Avahan transition strategy.A detailed logic model for the transition was developed. The Avahan transition strategy focuses on three activities: 1 enhancing capacities among communities, non-governmental organizations (NGOs, and government entities, in line with India's national AIDS control strategy; 2 aligning technical and managerial aspects of Avahan programs with government norms and standards; and 3 promoting and sustaining commitment to services for most-at-risk populations. It is anticipated that programs will then transfer smoothly to government and community ownership, become institutionalized within the government system, and support a sustained HIV/AIDS response.The research design evaluates the implementation and effectiveness of 1 activities undertaken by the program; 2 intermediate effects including the process of institutionalization and the extent to which key Avahan organizational procedures and behaviors are integrated into government systems; and 3 overarching effects namely the impact of the transition process on the sustained delivery of HIV/AIDS prevention services to high-risk groups. Both qualitative and quantitative research approaches are employed so that the evaluation will both assess outcomes and explain why they have occurred.It is unusual for donor-supported projects in low- and middle

  15. Thinking inside the box: the health cube paradigm for health and wellness program evaluation and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Robert; Harris, Sharon

    2013-10-01

    Appropriately constructed health promotions can improve population health. The authors developed a practical model for designing, evaluating, and improving initiatives to provide optimal value. Three independent model dimensions (impact, engagement, and sustainability) and the resultant three-dimensional paradigm were described using hypothetical case studies, including a walking challenge, a health risk assessment survey, and an individual condition management program. The 3-dimensional model is illustrated and the dimensions are defined. Calculation of a 3-dimensional score for program comparisons, refinements, and measurement is explained. Program 1, the walking challenge, had high engagement and impact, but limited sustainability. Program 2, the health risk assessment survey, had high engagement and sustainability but limited impact. Program 3, the on-site condition management program, had measurable impact and sustainability but limited engagement, because of a lack of program capacity. Each initiative, though successful in 2 dimensions, lacked sufficient evolution along the third axis for optimal value. Calculation of a 3-dimensional score is useful for health promotion program development comparison and refinements, and overall measurement of program success.

  16. Participants' evaluation of a weight-loss program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattfeldt-Beman, M K; Corrigan, S A; Stevens, V J; Sugars, C P; Dalcin, A T; Givi, M J; Copeland, K C

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate participants' perceptions of the weight-loss intervention used in a hypertension prevention clinical trial. A total of 308 overweight and moderately obese subjects participated in the weight-management intervention. After the 18-month program, 281 participants completed a questionnaire designed to evaluate their perceptions of the program's effectiveness. Adult participants (224 men and 84 women) in the weight-loss modality of the Trials of Hypertension Prevention Phase I, surveyed in 1991. chi 2 Analyses were used to test for statistical significance of group differences. Intervention components that were most useful are presented. Older participants (older than 50 years) were most likely to attend sessions and women were most likely to identify stress and frustration because of disappointing results. Successful participants were more likely to incorporate exercise into their daily activities, exercise regularly, and use self-monitoring strategies. Few participants found group exercise to be useful. These findings suggest that interventionists in weight-loss programs need to find flexible and creative ways to maintain contact with participants, continue to develop better methods of self-monitoring, obtain the skills needed to recognize frustration and provide timely support, continue to couple the message of diet and exercise, and emphasize helping participants develop their problem-solving skills. This may require training outside the traditional field of dietetics.

  17. Evaluating the Maturity of Cybersecurity Programs for Building Control Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glantz, Clifford S.; Somasundaram, Sriram; Mylrea, Michael E.; Underhill, Ronald M.; Nicholls, Andrew K.

    2016-08-29

    The cyber-physical security threat to buildings is complex, non-linear, and rapidly evolving as operational and information technologies converge and connect buildings to cyberspace. Cyberattacks on buildings can exploit smart building controls and breach corporate networks, causing financial and reputational damage. This may result in the loss of sensitive building information or the disruption of, or damage to, the systems necessary for the safe and efficient operation of buildings. For the buildings and facility infrastructure, there is a need for a robust national cybersecurity strategy for buildings, guidance on the selection and implementation of appropriate cybersecurity controls for buildings, an approach to evaluate the maturity and adequacy of the cybersecurity programs. To provide an approach for evaluating the maturity of the cybersecurity programs for building control systems, the US Department of Energy’s widely used Cybersecurity Capability and Maturity Model (C2M2) has been adapted into a building control systems version. The revised model, the Buildings-C2M2 (B-C2M2) provides maturity level indicators for cybersecurity programmatic domains. A “B-C2M2 Lite” version allows facility managers and building control system engineers, or information technology personnel to perform rapid self-assessments of their cybersecurity program. Both tools have been pilot tested on several facilities. This paper outlines the concept of a maturity model, describes the B-C2M2 tools, presents results and observations from the pilot assessments, and lays out plans for future work.

  18. Evaluation of spacecraft technology programs (effects on communication satellite business ventures), volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenburg, J. S.; Kaplan, M.; Fishman, J.; Hopkins, C.

    1985-01-01

    The computational procedures used in the evaluation of spacecraft technology programs that impact upon commercial communication satellite operations are discussed. Computer programs and data bases are described.

  19. Economic Evaluation of a Comprehensive Teenage Pregnancy Prevention Program: Pilot Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Marjorie S.; Ross, Joseph S.; Bilodeau, RoseAnne; Richter, Rosemary S.; Palley, Jane E.; Bradley, Elizabeth H.

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous research has suggested that comprehensive teenage pregnancy prevention programs that address sexual education and life skills development and provide academic are effective in reducing births among enrolled teenagers. However, there have been limited data on costs and cost-effectiveness of such programs. Objectives To use a community-based participatory research approach, to develop estimates of the cost-benefit of the Pathways/Senderos Center, a comprehensive neighborhood-based program to prevent unintended pregnancies and promote positive development for adolescents. Methods Using data from 1997-2003, we conducted an in-time intervention analysis to determine program cost-benefit while teenagers were enrolled and then used an extrapolation analysis to estimate accyrred economibc benefits and cost-benefit up to age 30. Results The program operating costs totaled $3,228,152.59 and reduced the teenage childbearing rate from 94.10 to 40.00 per 1000 teenage females, averting $52,297.84 in total societal costs, with an economic benefit to society from program participation of $2,673,153.11. Therefore, total costs to society exceeded economic benefits by $559,677.05, or $1,599.08 per adolescent per year. In an extrapolation analysis, benefits to society exceed costs by $10,474.77 per adolescent per year by age 30 on average, with social benefits outweighing total social costs by age 20.1. Conclusions We estimate that this comprehensive teenage pregnancy prevention program would provide societal economic benefits once participants are young adults, suggesting the need to expand beyond pilot demonstrations and evaluate the long-range cost-effectiveness of similarly comprehensive programs when implemented more widely in high-risk neighborhoods. PMID:19896030

  20. Economic evaluation of a comprehensive teenage pregnancy prevention program: pilot program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Marjorie S; Ross, Joseph S; Bilodeau, Roseanne; Richter, Rosemary S; Palley, Jane E; Bradley, Elizabeth H

    2009-12-01

    Previous research has suggested that comprehensive teenage pregnancy prevention programs that address sexual education and life skills development and provide academic support are effective in reducing births among enrolled teenagers. However, there have been limited data on the costs and cost effectiveness of such programs. The study used a community-based participatory research approach to develop estimates of the cost-benefit of the Pathways/Senderos Center, a comprehensive neighborhood-based program to prevent unintended pregnancies and promote positive development for adolescents. Using data from 1997-2003, an in-time intervention analysis was conducted to determine program cost-benefit while teenagers were enrolled; an extrapolation analysis was then used to estimate accrued economic benefits and cost-benefit up to age 30 years. The program operating costs totaled $3,228,152.59 and reduced the teenage childbearing rate from 94.10 to 40.00 per 1000 teenage girls, averting $52,297.84 in total societal costs, with an economic benefit to society from program participation of $2,673,153.11. Therefore, total costs to society exceeded economic benefits by $559,677.05, or $1599.08 per adolescent per year. In an extrapolation analysis, benefits to society exceed costs by $10,474.77 per adolescent per year by age 30 years on average, with social benefits outweighing total social costs by age 20.1 years. This comprehensive teenage pregnancy prevention program is estimated to provide societal economic benefits once participants are young adults, suggesting the need to expand beyond pilot demonstrations and evaluate the long-range cost effectiveness of similarly comprehensive programs when they are implemented more widely in high-risk neighborhoods.

  1. Monitoring and evaluation of green public procurement programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adell, Aure [Ecoinstitut, Barcelona (Spain); Schaefer, Bettina [Ecoinstitut, Barcelona (Spain); Ravi, Kavita [US Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Corry, Jenny [Collaborative Labeling and Appliance Standards Program (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Effective procurement policies can help governments save considerable amounts of money while also reducing energy consumption. Additionally, private sector companies which purchase large numbers of energy-consuming devices can benefit from procurement policies that minimize life-cycle energy costs. Both public and private procurement programs offer opportunities to generate market-transforming demand for energy efficient appliances and lighting fixtures. In recent years, several governments have implemented policies to procure energy efficient products and services. When deploying these policies, efforts have focused on developing resources for implementation (guidelines, energy efficiency specifications for tenders, life cycle costing tools, training, etc.) rather than defining monitoring systems to track progress against the set objectives. Implementation resources are necessary to make effective policies; however, developing Monitoring and Evaluation (M and E) mechanisms are critical to ensure that the policies are effective. The purpose of this article is to provide policy makers and procurement officials with a preliminary map of existing approaches and key components to monitor Energy Efficient Procurement (EEP) programs in order to contribute to the improvement of their own systems. Case studies are used throughout the paper to illustrate promising approaches to improve the M and E of EEP programs, from the definition of the system or data collection to complementary instruments to improve both the monitoring response and program results.

  2. Iterative Evaluation in a Mobile Counseling and Testing Program to Reach People of Color at Risk for HIV--New Strategies Improve Program Acceptability, Effectiveness, and Evaluation Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielberg, Freya; Kurth, Ann; Reidy, William; McKnight, Teka; Dikobe, Wame; Wilson, Charles

    2011-01-01

    This article highlights findings from an evaluation that explored the impact of mobile versus clinic-based testing, rapid versus central-lab based testing, incentives for testing, and the use of a computer counseling program to guide counseling and automate evaluation in a mobile program reaching people of color at risk for HIV. The program's…

  3. Evaluation of the suicide prevention program in Kaohsiung City, Taiwan, using the CIPP evaluation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Wen-Wei; Chen, Wei-Jen; Ho, Chi-Kung; Lee, Ming-Been; Chen, Cheng-Chung; Chou, Frank Huang-Chih

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of the Kaohsiung Suicide Prevention Center (KSPC) of Kaohsiung City, Taiwan, during the period from June 2005 to June 2008. We used a modified CIPP evaluation model to evaluate the suicide prevention program in Kaohsiung. Four evaluation models were applied to evaluate the KSPC: a context evaluation of the background and origin of the center, an input evaluation of the resources of the center, a process evaluation of the activities of the suicide prevention project, and a product evaluation of the ascertainment of project objectives. The context evaluation revealed that the task of the KSPC is to lower mortality. The input evaluation assessed the efficiency of manpower and the grants supported by Taiwan's Department of Health and Kaohsiung City government's Bureau of Health. In the process evaluation, we inspected the suicide prevention strategies of the KSPC, which are a modified version of the National Suicide Prevention Strategy of Australia. In the product evaluation, four major objectives were evaluated: (1) the suicide rate in Kaohsiung, (2) the reported suicidal cases, (3) crisis line calls, and (4) telephone counseling. From 2005 to 2008, the number of telephone counseling sessions (1,432, 2,010, 7,051, 12,517) and crisis line calls (0, 4,320, 10,339, 14,502) increased. Because of the increase in reported suicidal cases (1,328, 2,625, 2,795, and 2,989, respectively), cases which were underreported in the past, we have increasingly been able to contact the people who need help. During this same time period, the half-year suicide re-attempt rate decreased significantly for those who received services, and the committed suicide rate (21.4, 20.1, 18.2, and 17.8 per 100,000 populations, respectively) also decreased. The suicide prevention program in Kaohsiung is worth implementing on a continual basis if financial constraints are addressed.

  4. The CEMHaVi program: control, evaluation, and modification of lifestyles in obese youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhelst, Jérémy; Marchand, Frédéric; Fardy, Paul; Zunquin, Gautier; Loeuille, Guy-André; Renaut, Hervé; Mikulovic, Jacques; Hurdiel, Rémy; Béghin, Laurent; Theunynck, Denis

    2010-01-01

    Obesity in children has increased in recent years. Many studies with differing methodologies have been undertaken to treat obesity. The Control, Evaluation, and Modification of Lifestyles in Obese Youth (CEMHaVi) program is a unique 2-year health-wellness program of physical activity and health education for obese youth. Findings of this study represent results at 1-year follow-up. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of the CEMHaVi program. Physician-referred subjects (N = 26) participated in the study, 14 girls (13.4 +/- 2.9 years) and 12 boys (12.3 +/- 2.8 years). Measurements included height, weight, body mass index (BMI), academic performance, sleep habits, and health knowledge. The intervention consisted of a unique program of physical activity, including a variety of games specifically selected to be enjoyable, maintain interest, and motivate subjects to adhere. Activity sessions were offered once per week, 2 hours each session, for 12 months. A health education program was offered once every 3 months for 2 hours per session. Health knowledge, academic performance, self-esteem, and sleep were assessed before and after the intervention. Means were calculated at baseline and following intervention and were compared by paired t tests. Findings suggest significant improvements in academic performance (P academic performance in obese children. The feasibility of a beneficial lifestyle intervention program is encouraging in addressing obesity and related issues in young boys and girls.

  5. Development and Evaluation of vetPAL, a Student-Led, Peer-Assisted Learning Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Lucy S W; Warman, Sheena; Pither, Zoe; Baillie, Sarah

    Based on an idea from a final-year student, Bristol Veterinary School introduced vetPAL, a student-led, peer-assisted learning program. The program involved fifth-year (final-year) students acting as tutors and leading sessions for fourth-year students (tutees) in clinical skills and revision (review) topics. The initiative aimed to supplement student learning while also providing tutors with opportunities to further develop a range of skills. All tutors received training and the program was evaluated using questionnaires collected from tutees and tutors after each session. Tutees' self-rated confidence increased significantly in clinical skills and for revision topics. Advantages of being taught by students rather than staff included the informal atmosphere, the tutees' willingness to ask questions, and the relatability of the tutors. The small group size and the style of learning in the revision sessions (i.e., group work, discussions, and interactivity) were additional positive aspects identified by both tutees and tutors. Benefits for tutors included developing their communication and teaching skills. The training sessions were considered key in helping tutors feel prepared to lead sessions, although the most difficult aspects were the lack of teaching experience and time management. Following the successful pilot of vetPAL, plans are in place to make the program permanent and sustainable, while incorporating necessary changes based on the evaluation and the student leader's experiences running the program. A vetPAL handbook has been created to facilitate organization of the program for future years.

  6. Methods for evaluating and ranking transportation energy conservation programs. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-04-30

    Methods for comparative evaluations of the Office of Transportation programs designed to help achieve significant reductions in the consumption of petroleum by different forms of transportation while maintaining public, commercial, and industrial mobility are described. Assessments of the programs in terms of petroleum savings, incremental costs to consumers of the technologies and activities, probability of technical and market success, and external impacts due to environmental, economic, and social factors are inputs to the evaluation methodologies presented. The methods described for evaluating the programs on a comparative basis are three ranking functions and a policy matrix listing important attributes of the programs and the technologies and activities with which they are concerned and include the traditional net present value measure which computes the present worth of petroleum savings less the present worth of costs. This is modified by dividing by the present value of DOE funding to obtain a net present value per program dollar, which is the second ranking function. The third ranking function is broader in that it takes external impacts into account and is known as the comprehensive ranking function. Procedures are described for making computations of the ranking functions and the attributes that require computation. Computations are made for the electric vehicle, Stirling engine, gas turbine, and MPG mileage guide program. (MCW)

  7. Development and evaluation of an automatic acne lesion detection program using digital image processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Seonguk; Kong, Hyoun-joong; Yoon, Chiyul; Kim, Hee Chan; Suh, Dae Hun

    2013-02-01

    Existing acne grading methods, which depend on overall impression, require a long training period and there is a high degree of variability among raters, including trained dermatologists. The use of lesion count provides fair reproducibility but the method is time consuming. New technologies in photographic equipment and software allow solutions to the problem of acne evaluation. This study was conducted to develop the automatic acne lesion program and evaluation of its usefulness. We made the conditions to optimize characterization of acne lesions and developed the counting program. Twenty-five volunteers with acne lesions were enrolled. Automated lesion counting for five subtypes of acne (papule, nodule, pustule, whitehead comedone, and blackhead comedone) was performed with image processing. The usefulness of the automatic lesion count program was assessed by a comparison with manual counting performed by an expert dermatologist. In a comparison with manual counting performed by an expert dermatologist, the sensitivity and positive predictive value of the lesion-counting program was greater than 70% for papules, nodules, pustules, and whitehead comedo. In a comparison with manual counting, findings with the use of the lesion-counting program were well correlated for papules, nodules, pustules, and whitehead comedo (r > 0.9). Automatic lesion-counting program can be a useful tool for acne severity evaluation. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  8. Evaluator and Program Manager Perceptions of Evaluation Capacity and Evaluation Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierro, Leslie A.; Christie, Christina A.

    2017-01-01

    The evaluation community has demonstrated an increased emphasis and interest in evaluation capacity building in recent years. A need currently exists to better understand how to measure evaluation capacity and its potential outcomes. In this study, we distributed an online questionnaire to managers and evaluation points of contact working in…

  9. International Programs and Centers for Instruction, Research and Public Service in the Western States (Including Instruction in Less Common Foreign Languages).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Frank C., Ed.

    Programs of education and research on international economy and trade, foreign cultures and languages, and other aspects of international affairs and located in the western states are listed in an annotated directory. The units are of varying types and include informal interdepartmental committees within academic institutions, well-established…

  10. Physiotherapists supporting self-management through health coaching: a mixed methods program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufour, Sinéad Patricia; Graham, Shane; Friesen, Josh; Rosenblat, Michael; Rous, Colin; Richardson, Julie

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate a program in support of chronic disease self-management (CDSM) that is founded on a health coaching (HC) approach, includes supervised exercise and mindfulness-based stress reduction components and is delivered within a private practice physiotherapy setting. An explanatory mixed method design, framed by theory-based program evaluation, was employed to evaluate an eight-week group-based program. Standardized self-rated and performance measures were evaluated pre- and post intervention. Additionally, participant focus groups were conducted following the intervention period. An inductive thematic approach was undertaken to analyze the qualitative data. Seventeen participants (N = 17) completed the study. Improvements were seen in both self-report and performance outcomes. Participants explained how and why they felt the program was beneficial. Six themes were generated: (1) group dynamic; (2) learning versus doing; (3) holism and comprehensive care; (4) self-efficacy and empowerment; (5) previous solutions versus new management strategies; and (6) healthcare provider support. This study established that a group program in support of CDSM founded on a HC approach demonstrated potential value from participants as well as favorable outcomes. A pragmatic randomized control trial is required to determine efficacy of this intervention.

  11. Evaluation of a Secure Laptop-Based Testing Program in an Undergraduate Nursing Program: Students' Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jinyuan; Gunter, Glenda; Tsai, Ming-Hsiu; Lim, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the many robust learning management systems, and the availability of affordable laptops, have made secure laptop-based testing a reality on many campuses. The undergraduate nursing program at the authors' university began to implement a secure laptop-based testing program in 2009, which allowed students to use their newly purchased laptops to take quizzes and tests securely in classrooms. After nearly 5 years' secure laptop-based testing program implementation, a formative evaluation, using a mixed method that has both descriptive and correlational data elements, was conducted to seek constructive feedback from students to improve the program. Evaluation data show that, overall, students (n = 166) believed the secure laptop-based testing program helps them get hands-on experience of taking examinations on the computer and gets them prepared for their computerized NCLEX-RN. Students, however, had a lot of concerns about laptop glitches and campus wireless network glitches they experienced during testing. At the same time, NCLEX-RN first-time passing rate data were analyzed using the χ2 test, and revealed no significant association between the two testing methods (paper-and-pencil testing and the secure laptop-based testing) and students' first-time NCLEX-RN passing rate. Based on the odds ratio, however, the odds of students passing NCLEX-RN the first time was 1.37 times higher if they were taught with the secure laptop-based testing method than if taught with the traditional paper-and-pencil testing method in nursing school. It was recommended to the institution that better quality of laptops needs to be provided to future students, measures needed to be taken to further stabilize the campus wireless Internet network, and there was a need to reevaluate the Laptop Initiative Program.

  12. Validation of a proposal for evaluating hospital infection control programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Cristiane Pavanello Rodrigues; Lacerda, Rúbia Aparecida

    2011-02-01

    To validate the construct and discriminant properties of a hospital infection prevention and control program. The program consisted of four indicators: technical-operational structure; operational prevention and control guidelines; epidemiological surveillance system; and prevention and control activities. These indicators, with previously validated content, were applied to 50 healthcare institutions in the city of São Paulo, Southeastern Brazil, in 2009. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the hospitals and indicator scores, and Cronbach's α coefficient was used to evaluate the internal consistency. The discriminant validity was analyzed by comparing indicator scores between groups of hospitals: with versus without quality certification. The construct validity analysis was based on exploratory factor analysis with a tetrachoric correlation matrix. The indicators for the technical-operational structure and epidemiological surveillance presented almost 100% conformity in the whole sample. The indicators for the operational prevention and control guidelines and the prevention and control activities presented internal consistency ranging from 0.67 to 0.80. The discriminant validity of these indicators indicated higher and statistically significant mean conformity scores among the group of institutions with healthcare certification or accreditation processes. In the construct validation, two dimensions were identified for the operational prevention and control guidelines: recommendations for preventing hospital infection and recommendations for standardizing prophylaxis procedures, with good correlation between the analysis units that formed the guidelines. The same was found for the prevention and control activities: interfaces with treatment units and support units were identified. Validation of the measurement properties of the hospital infection prevention and control program indicators made it possible to develop a tool for evaluating these programs

  13. Pilot Evaluation of an In-Store Nutrition Label Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukeshire, Steven; Nicks, Emily; Ferguson, Jennifer

    2014-12-01

    To describe and provide recommendations for the implementation of an evaluation for an already existing, in-store Nutrition Label Education Program (NLEP). We describe the development and implementation of an evaluation consisting of a pre- and postsurvey and one month follow-up. The evaluation was designed to assess satisfaction with the NLEP as well as changes in participant nutrition label knowledge, confidence in using nutrition labels, and actual changes in nutrition label use. Nineteen participants took part in the pilot evaluation. The evaluation was successful in demonstrating high levels of satisfaction with the NLEP as well as positive changes in participant confidence and some increased knowledge in using nutrition labels. However, only 3 people participated in the follow-up, limiting the ability to assess behaviour change. Ideally, NLEPs should include ongoing evaluation that extends beyond just assessing participant satisfaction. Recommendations are provided for conducting such evaluations, including the importance of incorporating the evaluation into the program itself, using existing questionnaires when possible, and employing pre- and postsurveys as well as follow-up interviews to assess change.

  14. Nurses on the move: evaluation of a program to assist international students undertaking an accelerated Bachelor of Nursing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibold, Carmel; Rolls, Colleen; Campbell, Michelle

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on an evaluation of a Teaching and Learning Enhancement Scheme (TALES) program designed to meet the unique need of the 2005 cohort of international nursing students undertaking an accelerated Bachelor of Nursing (BN) program at the Victorian campus of Australian Catholic University (ACU) National. The program involved a team approach with three academic mentors and the international students working together to produce satisfactory learning outcomes through fortnightly meetings and provision of additional assistance including compiling a portfolio, reflective writing, English, including colloquial English and pronunciation, as well as familiarisation with handover and abbreviations common in the clinical field, general communication, assistance with preparing a resume and participation in simulated interviews. This relatively small group of international students (20) confirmed the findings of other studies from other countries of international nursing students' in terms of concerns in regard to studying in a foreign country, namely English proficiency, communication difficulties, cultural differences and unfamiliarity with the health care environment. The assistance provided by the program was identified by the completing students as invaluable in helping them settle into study and successfully complete the theoretical and clinical components of the course.

  15. Development of an Automated Remedy Performance Evaluation Program - 13622

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonkin, Matthew J.; Kennel, Jonathan [S.S. Papadopulos and Assoc., Inc., 7944 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD (United States); Biebesheimer, Frederick; Dooley, David [CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Performance monitoring is a vital element of groundwater remediation. Unfortunately, the enormous efforts and costs that are expended procuring, managing, processing and storing monitoring data are often not subject to correspondingly rigorous evaluation. This is despite the fact that many steps in the process are predictable and are repeated many times over the remedy life cycle. At the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, a program is underway to automate many of these steps - processing, formatting any analyzing large volumes of heterogeneous data associated with the operation of several groundwater pump-and-treat (P and T) and in-situ remedies. The Automated Remedy Performance Evaluation Program (ARPEP) was developed from a work-flow process designed to deliver (a) monthly data summaries and preliminary analysis, (b) quarterly performance assessments, and (c) annual roll-up analyses that detect changes in long-term monitoring datasets and support remedy optimization. The intent of the ARPEP is to provide detailed, systematic and traceable data summaries, depictions and analyses that can be used by project scientists to complete their evaluation of remedy performance. The ARPEP work-flow was formalized following extensive review of applicable guidance, regulation and industry standards. The ARPEP incorporates disparate data types collected over different frequencies, such as water levels and pumping rates recorded every minute, and groundwater sample results obtained on quarterly, annual or irregular intervals. The data are processed, reduced to frequencies suitable for assessment, and combined in various ways leading to performance indicators such as (a) pumped well capacities and system downtime that reflect operational performance; (b) hydraulic gradients and areas of hydraulic containment that reflect hydraulic performance; and (c) time-series (longitudinal) and geo-statistical (spatial) trend analyses that reflect progress toward attainment of Remedial

  16. The Lassen Astrobiology Intern Program - Concept, Implementation and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Des Marais, D. J.; Dueck, S. L.; Davis, H. B.; Parenteau, M. N.; Kubo, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    The program goal was to provide a hands-on astrobiology learning experience to high school students by introducing astrobiology and providing opportunities to conduct field and lab research with NASA scientists. The program sought to increase interest in interdisciplinary science, technology, engineering, math and related careers. Lassen Volcanic National Park (LVNP), Red Bluff High School and the Ames Team of the NASA Astrobiology Institute led the program. LVNP was selected because it shares aspects of volcanism with Mars and it hosts thermal springs with microbial mat communities. Students documented volcanic deposits, springs and microbial mats. They analyzed waters and sampled rocks, water and microorganisms. They cultured microorganisms and studied chemical reactions between rocks and simulated spring waters. Each student prepared a report to present data and discuss relationships between volcanic rocks and gases, spring waters and microbial mats. At a "graduation" event the students presented their findings to the Red Bluff community. They visited Ames Research Center to tour the facilities and learn about science and technology careers. To evaluate program impact, surveys were given to students after lectures, labs, fieldwork and discussions with Ames scientists. Students' work was scored using rubrics (labs, progress reports, final report, presentation). Students took pre/post tests on core astrobiology concepts. Parents, teachers, rangers, Ames staff and students completed end-of-year surveys on program impact. Several outcomes were documented. Students had a unique and highly valued learning experience with NASA scientists. They understood what scientists do through authentic scientific work, and what scientists are like as individuals. Students became knowledgeable about astrobiology and how it can be pursued in the lab and in the field. The students' interest increased markedly in astrobiology, interdisciplinary studies and science generally.

  17. Evaluating Active U: an internet-mediated physical activity program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodrich David E

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Engaging in regular physical activity can be challenging, particularly during the winter months. To promote physical activity at the University of Michigan during the winter months, an eight-week Internet-mediated program (Active U was developed providing participants with an online physical activity log, goal setting, motivational emails, and optional team participation and competition. Methods This study is a program evaluation of Active U. Approximately 47,000 faculty, staff, and graduate students were invited to participate in the online Active U intervention in the winter of 2007. Participants were assigned a physical activity goal and were asked to record each physical activity episode into the activity log for eight weeks. Statistics for program reach, effectiveness, adoption, and implementation were calculated using the Re-Aim framework. Multilevel regression analyses were used to assess the decline in rates of data entry and goal attainment during the program, to assess the likelihood of joining a team by demographic characteristics, to test the association between various predictors and the number of weeks an individual met his or her goal, and to analyze server load. Results Overall, 7,483 individuals registered with the Active U website (≈16% of eligible, and 79% participated in the program by logging valid data at least once. Staff members, older participants, and those with a BMI P Conclusion Internet-mediated physical activity interventions that focus on physical activity logging and goal setting while incorporating team competition may help a significant percentage of the target population maintain their physical activity during the winter months.

  18. Evaluation of emergency medicine training programs in Egypt: Trainees’ perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Montaser, T.

    2013-01-01

    Emergency medicine (EM) is in the early development phase in Egypt. There is an Egyptian Board of Emergency Medicine that has been in existence for approximately 10 years, along with academic master degree in EM from three medical schools (Alexandria, Tanta and Suez Canal). Until now, there is not a specialty society in emergency medicine or national annual meetings to evaluate the training progress and give the trainees the chance to see and be seen. It is known that each program has two-fol...

  19. Evaluating Vocational Educators' Training Programs: A Kirkpatrick-Inspired Evaluation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravicchio, Fabrizio; Trentin, Guglielmo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the article is to describe the assessment model adopted by the SCINTILLA Project, a project in Italy aimed at the online vocational training of young, seriously-disabled subjects and their subsequent work inclusion in smart-work mode. It will thus describe the model worked out for evaluation of the training program conceived for the…

  20. A comparison of linear and systems thinking approaches for program evaluation illustrated using the Indiana Interdisciplinary GK-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyehouse, Melissa; Bennett, Deborah; Harbor, Jon; Childress, Amy; Dark, Melissa

    2009-08-01

    Logic models are based on linear relationships between program resources, activities, and outcomes, and have been used widely to support both program development and evaluation. While useful in describing some programs, the linear nature of the logic model makes it difficult to capture the complex relationships within larger, multifaceted programs. Causal loop diagrams based on a systems thinking approach can better capture a multidimensional, layered program model while providing a more complete understanding of the relationship between program elements, which enables evaluators to examine influences and dependencies between and within program components. Few studies describe how to conceptualize and apply systems models for educational program evaluation. The goal of this paper is to use our NSF-funded, Interdisciplinary GK-12 project: Bringing Authentic Problem Solving in STEM to Rural Middle Schools to illustrate a systems thinking approach to model a complex educational program to aid in evaluation. GK-12 pairs eight teachers with eight STEM doctoral fellows per program year to implement curricula in middle schools. We demonstrate how systems thinking provides added value by modeling the participant groups, instruments, outcomes, and other factors in ways that enhance the interpretation of quantitative and qualitative data. Limitations of the model include added complexity. Implications include better understanding of interactions and outcomes and analyses reflecting interacting or conflicting variables.

  1. Evaluating Student Success and Progress in the Maryland Sea Grant REU Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, F. C.; Allen, M. R.; Clark, J.

    2012-12-01

    The Maryland Sea Grant's Research Experiences for Undergraduate (REU) 12-week summer program is in its 24th year. This estuarine science-focused program has evolved, based in part on our use of assessment tools to measure the program's effectiveness. Our goal is to understand the REU program's effectiveness in such areas as improving student understanding of scientific research, scientific ethics and marine science careers. Initially, our assessment approach was limited to short surveys that used qualitative answers from students about their experience. However, in the last decade we have developed a more comprehensive approach to measure program effectiveness. Currently, we use paired pre- and post-survey questions to estimate student growth during the program. These matching questions evaluate the student's change in knowledge and perception of science research over the course of the summer program. Additionally, we administer several surveys during the 12 weeks of the program to measure immediate responses of students to program activities and to gauge the students' evolving attitudes to customize each year's program. Our 2011 cohort showed consistent improvement in numerous areas, including understanding the nature of science (pre: 4.35, post: 4.64 on a 5 point scale), what graduate school is like (3.71, 4.42), the job of a researcher (4.07, 4.50), and career options in science (3.86, 4.42). Student confidence also increased in numerous skills required for good scientists. To analyze the long-term impact of our program, we survey our alumni to assess graduate degrees earned and career choices. A large percentage (72%) of our tracked alumni have continued on to graduate school, with subsequent careers spanning the academic (51%), public (24%) and private (25%) sectors. These assessments demonstrate that our program is successful in meeting our key objectives of strengthening the training of undergraduates in the sciences and retaining them in marine science

  2. Evaluating a Graduate Professional Development Program for Informal Science Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Jeremy Paul

    This study is an examination and evaluation of the outcomes of a series of courses that I helped build to create a graduate certificate. Specifically, I wanted to evaluate whether or not the online iteration of the Informal Science Institutions Environmental Education Graduate Certificate Program truly provided the long term professional development needed to enhance the skills of the formal and informal educators participating so that they could contribute meaningfully to the improvement of science literacy in their respective communities. My role as an internal evaluator provided an extraordinary opportunity to know the intent of the learning opportunities and why they were constructed in a particular fashion. Through the combination of my skills, personal experiences both within the certificate's predecessor and as an educator, I was uniquely qualified to explore the outcomes of this program and evaluate its effectiveness in providing a long-term professional development for participants. After conducting a literature review that emphasized a need for greater scientific literacy in communities across America, it was evident that the formal education enterprise needs the support of informal educators working on the ground in myriad different settings in ways that provide science as both content and process, learning science facts and doing real science. Through a bridging of informal science educators with formal teachers, it was thought each could learn the culture of the other, making each more fluent in accessing community resources to help make these educators more collaborative and able to bridge the classroom with the outside world. This bridge promotes ongoing, lifelong learning, which in turn can help the national goal of greater scientific literacy. This study provided insight into the thinking involved in the learners' growth as they converted theory presented in course materials into practice. Through an iterative process of reviewing the course

  3. Use of nutritional biomarkers in program evaluation in the context of developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasantwisut, Emorn; Neufeld, Lynnette

    2012-01-01

    The Lancet series on maternal and child undernutrition emphasized the need for accurate and reliable biomarkers that reflect nutrient status and measure the impact of interventions. An initiative called Biomarkers of Nutrition for Development (BOND) by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development aims to provide guidance for the selection and interpretation of biomarkers that meet a range of interests, including research, clinical policy, and program development. This article summarizes the activities of the program working group of the BOND initiative. The working group specified biomarkers according to program objectives such as assessing the nutritional situation or status of target populations/areas; monitoring progress of intervention; and evaluating program impact. In addition, the biomarkers developed were required to be feasible in the field settings. Based on these considerations, population-based biomarkers for programs are proposed for case examples of vitamin A, folate, vitamin B-12, iron, and zinc. Biomarkers of underlying infection/inflammation, anthropometric measures of growth, and dietary intake are recommended to be included. A program manager guide and future research to develop biomarkers for program context are recommended.

  4. The Evaluation of a Sexual Assault Self-Defense and Risk-Reduction Program for College Women: A Prospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidycz, Christine A.; Rich, Cindy L.; Orchowski, Lindsay; King, Carrie; Miller, Audrey K.

    2006-01-01

    The present study evaluated the efficacy of a sexual assault risk-reduction program that included a physical self-defense component for college women ("N"=500). Program group women significantly increased their protective behaviors over the 6-month follow-up period compared to the waiting-list control group. However, there were no significant…

  5. Evaluation of Integrated Child Development Services program in Gujarat, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudasama, Rajesh K; Kadri, A M; Verma, Pramod B; Patel, Umed V; Joshi, Nirav; Zalavadiya, Dipesh; Bhola, Chirag

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS) program in terms of infrastructure of Anganwadi centers, inputs, process, coverage and utilization of services, and issues related to program operation in twelve districts of Gujarat, India. Facility (Anganwadi) based study. Twelve districts of Gujarat, India (April 1, 2012 to March 31, 2013). ICDS service providers (60 Anganwadi workers from 46 rural and 14 urban Anganwadi centers) and their beneficiaries. Coverage of supplementary nutrition, pre-school education, immunization and referral services. Supplementary nutrition coverage was reported in 48.3% in children. Interruption in supply of supplementary nutrition during last six months was reported in 61.7% Anganwadi centers. Only 20% centers reported 100% pre-school education coverage among children. Immunization of all children was recorded in only 10% Anganwadi centers, while in 76.7% centers, no such records were available. Regular health checkup of beneficiaries was done in 30% centers. Referral slips were available in 18.3% Anganwadi centers and referral of sick children was done from only 8.3% centers. There are program gaps in coverage of supplementary nutrition in children, its regular supply to the beneficiaries, in pre-school activities coverage, recording of immunization, and regular health check-up of beneficiaries and referral of sick children.

  6. [Evaluation of the school-lunch program in Campinas, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salay, E; de Carvalho, J F

    1995-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the calorie and protein adequacies, to establishoffe operation model and the operational difficulties of the School-Lunch Program in Campinas, Brazil. Six schools randomly selected (1,237 children) were investigated. Calorie and protein consumption were estimated by weighed records. A model food project was developed in order to analyse the city food-service operation. The adequacy values were very low: 48.6 +/- 17.3% for energy and 52.7 +/- 17.2% for protein. The Tukey test indicated that schools did not differ regarding adequacies (alpha = 0.005). The results suggested that the efficiency and/or the impact of Campinas program may be limited by both, lack of resources and several operation failures such as: preparation of large amount of food which is not served to the children; the type of the food served; the ineffective administrative controls; the low supervision frequency, low school garden production and inefficient staff training; as well as the lack of food quality control, evaluations, community participation, nutritional education had integration with health programs.

  7. Quantitative evaluation of a pediatric rheumatology transition program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Paul T; Karnes, Jill; Jones, Karla; Lehman, Amy; Rennebohm, Robert; Higgins, Gloria C; Spencer, Charles H; Ardoin, Stacy P

    2015-05-24

    Transition from pediatric to adult care can be a challenging process which leaves young people vulnerable to interruptions of care and worsening disease status. Efforts to improve transition processes and outcomes have included development of individualized transition plans, creation of transition clinics, and utilization of transition coordinators. Few interventions have assessed transition outcomes quantitatively. We assessed transition outcome and satisfaction of a social worker-centered transition program in a pediatric rheumatology clinic. The social worker met with patients who were 16 years or older and their families, provided transition education materials, assisted patients in developing an individualized transition plan, assisted in making appointments with an adult rheumatologist at time of transfer of care, and followed up with patients to assess transition outcomes. Patients were contacted 6-8 months after initial appointment with the adult rheumatologist to assess whether they remained in the care of the adult provider. Participants then completed a questionnaire to rate their satisfaction with the transition program. 210 adolescents and young adults participated in the transition program. Twenty-six similarly aged patients were eligible for transition services but did not participate in the program and were used as controls. Of the patients who participated in the program, 42% were considered to have transitioned successfully to adult care compared to 23% of controls (p-value = 0.002) of all patients. In the survey of satisfaction, 81% of participants said that they were satisfied with the transition process. This study shows that a social worker transition coordinator can significantly improve the rate of pediatric rheumatology patients who successfully transition to adult care. Furthermore, patients are largely satisfied with this process.

  8. Developing an evaluation framework for clinical redesign programs: lessons learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaranayake, Premaratne; Dadich, Ann; Fitzgerald, Anneke; Zeitz, Kathryn

    2016-09-19

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to present lessons learnt through the development of an evaluation framework for a clinical redesign programme - the aim of which was to improve the patient journey through improved discharge practices within an Australian public hospital. Design/methodology/approach The development of the evaluation framework involved three stages - namely, the analysis of secondary data relating to the discharge planning pathway; the analysis of primary data including field-notes and interview transcripts on hospital processes; and the triangulation of these data sets to devise the framework. The evaluation framework ensured that resource use, process management, patient satisfaction, and staff well-being and productivity were each connected with measures, targets, and the aim of clinical redesign programme. Findings The application of business process management and a balanced scorecard enabled a different way of framing the evaluation, ensuring measurable outcomes were connected to inputs and outputs. Lessons learnt include: first, the importance of mixed-methods research to devise the framework and evaluate the redesigned processes; second, the need for appropriate tools and resources to adequately capture change across the different domains of the redesign programme; and third, the value of developing and applying an evaluative framework progressively. Research limitations/implications The evaluation framework is limited by its retrospective application to a clinical process redesign programme. Originality/value This research supports benchmarking with national and international practices in relation to best practice healthcare redesign processes. Additionally, it provides a theoretical contribution on evaluating health services improvement and redesign initiatives.

  9. Evaluating the High School Lunar Research Projects Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaner, A. J.; Shipp, S. S.; Allen, J.; Kring, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    The Center for Lunar Science and Exploration (CLSE), a collaboration between the Lunar and Planetary Institute and NASA's Johnson Space Center, is one of seven member teams of the NASA Lunar Science Institute (NLSI). In addition to research and exploration activities, the CLSE team is deeply invested in education and outreach. In support of NASA's and NLSI's objective to train the next generation of scientists, CLSE's High School Lunar Research Projects program is a conduit through which high school students can actively participate in lunar science and learn about pathways into scientific careers. The objectives of the program are to enhance 1) student views of the nature of science; 2) student attitudes toward science and science careers; and 3) student knowledge of lunar science. In its first three years, approximately 140 students and 28 teachers from across the United States have participated in the program. Before beginning their research, students undertake Moon 101, a guided-inquiry activity designed to familiarize them with lunar science and exploration. Following Moon 101, and guided by a lunar scientist mentor, teams choose a research topic, ask their own research question, and design their own research approach to direct their investigation. At the conclusion of their research, teams present their results to a panel of lunar scientists. This panel selects four posters to be presented at the annual Lunar Science Forum held at NASA Ames. The top scoring team travels to the forum to present their research. Three instruments have been developed or modified to evaluate the extent to which the High School Lunar Research Projects meets its objectives. These three instruments measure changes in student views of the nature of science, attitudes towards science and science careers, and knowledge of lunar science. Exit surveys for teachers, students, and mentors were also developed to elicit general feedback about the program and its impact. The nature of science

  10. 75 FR 27992 - Solicitation of Applications for the Research and Evaluation Program: FY 2010 Mapping Regional...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-19

    ... Economic Development Administration Solicitation of Applications for the Research and Evaluation Program: FY 2010 Mapping Regional Innovation Clusters Project Competition AGENCY: Economic Development... Research and Evaluation program, the Economic Development Administration (EDA) solicits applications to...

  11. Outcome evaluation of a structured educational wellness program in patients with severe mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenmayer, Jean-Pierre; Khan, Anzalee; Wance, Deborah; Maccabee, Neta; Kaushik, Sashank; Kaushik, Saurabh

    2009-10-01

    Obesity is increasing at an alarming rate in the United States, as is the obesity rate in patients with schizophrenia. Our study retrospectively evaluated the effectiveness of the Solutions for Wellness and Team Solutions programs, 2 structured educational patient programs, and evaluated the effects on obesity and other metabolic markers in a large, naturalistic inpatient sample. Between September 18, 2006, and September 15, 2007, 275 inpatients with DSM-IV-TR-diagnosed chronic mental illness admitted to a tertiary care psychiatric facility were included in the 36-week comprehensive and manualized educational program for healthy lifestyles for patients with chronic mental illness incorporating psychoeducational small-group curricula. Patients were tested before and after each of three 12-week group periods by 30 knowledge-assessment questions, and metabolic markers were recorded at baseline, midpoint, and endpoint. Of the 275 included inpatients, 50.5% completed more than 5 modules, 20.4% completed less than or equal to 2 or fewer modules, and 5.1% completed all 11 modules. Significant increases in scores were observed for 7 of the 11 modules in the knowledge assessments (P /=30 (indicating obesity) at the start of the program. There was a significant mean weight loss of 4.88 lb (P = .035) together with a significant decrease in mean BMI (P = .045). Patients with diabetes showed a reduction in mean weight of 5.98 lb. Significant reductions were observed in glucose and triglyceride levels (both P program using a psychoeducational curriculum can be successfully implemented in a large, naturalistic psychiatric setting with unselected, chronically mentally ill inpatients. Results may help both clinicians and hospital managers to implement similar programs or to include successful components in existing programs for psychiatric patients. Copyright 2009 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  12. Is there a need to include HIV, HBV and HCV viruses in the Saudi premarital screening program on the basis of their prevalence and transmission risk factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alswaidi, F M; O'Brien, S J

    2010-11-01

    In January 2008, the Saudi Arabian health authority included mandatory testing for HIV, HBV and HCV viruses in the premarital screening program. Epidemiologically, there were few justifications for their inclusion as disease prevalences and distributions are poorly understood in the population. This study aims to provide information about HBV, HCV and HIV prevalences and risk factors for disease transmission and so produce evidence for informed decision-making on the inclusion of these infectious diseases in the screening program. This is a cross-sectional descriptive study embedded in the existing national premarital screening program for thalassaemia and sickle cell disease to estimate the prevalence of HIV, HBV and HCV infections (n=74,662 individuals), followed by a case-control study to identify risk factors responsible for infection transmission (n=540). The average HIV prevalence is 0.03%, 1.31% for HBV and 0.33% for HCV. Sharing personal belongings particularly razors, blood transfusions, cuts at barbershops and extramarital relationships showed the highest significant associations with the transmission of these viruses. The prevalences of HIV, HBV and HCV in Saudi Arabia are among the lowest worldwide. However, all the important risk factors associated with transmitting these viruses are significantly present in the Saudi community. Saudi Arabia is financially capable of screening for these infections in the mandatory premarital program and of providing medical care for the discovered cases, but focusing on the health education programs may offset the need to mandatory testing.

  13. Evaluation of a continuous quality improvement program in anticoagulant therapy: Feasibility, satisfaction and perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantin, Ariane; Lahaie, Alexandre; Odobasic, Bojan; Tremblay, Marie-Philip; Wazzan, Dana; Caron, Stéphanie; Leblanc, Caroline; Martineau, Josée; Lalonde, Lyne

    2016-11-01

    The ACO Program (Programme ACO), a continuous quality improvement program (CQIP) in anticoagulation therapy, was offered in community pharmacies as a pilot project. To evaluate the participants' appreciation for the various activities of the program. Participants had access to training activities, including an audit with feedback, online training activities (OTA), clinical tools and support from facilitators. Cognitive behavioural learning determinants were evaluated before and 5 months after the beginning of the program. Participants' satisfaction and perception were documented via online questionnaires and a semistructured interview. Of the 52 pharmacists in the ACO Program, 47 participated in this evaluation. Seventy-seven percent of the participants completed at least 1 OTA and 6% published on the forum. The feeling of personal effectiveness rose from 8.01 (7.67-8.35) to 8.62 (8.24-8.99). The audit and feedback, as well as the high-quality OTA and their lecturers, were the most appreciated elements. There was a high OTA participation rate. The facilitators seemed to play a key role in the CQIP. The low level of participation in the forum reflects the known phenomenon of social loafing. Technical difficulties affecting the platform and data collection for the audit with feedback constituted limitations. The CQIP in anticoagulation therapy is appreciated by community pharmacists and is associated with an improved feeling of personal effectiveness.

  14. Evaluation of the Radiography Program at Caldwell Community College and Technical Institute--Summer, 1982.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipes, V. David

    As part of a periodic evaluation of the occupational programs at Caldwell Community College and Technical Institute (CCC&TI), a study of the radiography program was conducted to collect information to facilitate planning, aid in program improvement, and meet accountability demands. The specific objectives of the program evaluation were to…

  15. A multi-stakeholder evaluation of the Baltimore City virtual supermarket program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Lagisetty

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing access to healthy foods and beverages in disadvantaged communities is a public health priority due to alarmingly high rates of obesity. The Virtual Supermarket Program (VSP is a Baltimore City Health Department program that uses online grocery ordering to deliver food to low-income neighborhoods. This study evaluates stakeholder preferences and barriers of program implementation. Methods This study assessed the feasibility, sustainability and efficacy of the VSP by surveying 93 customers and interviewing 14 programmatic stakeholders who had recently used the VSP or been involved with program design and implementation. Results We identified the following themes: The VSP addressed transportation barriers and food availability. The VSP impacted customers and the city by including improving food purchasing behavior, creating a food justice “brand for the city”, and fostering a sense of community. Customers appreciated using Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP benefits to pay for groceries, but policy changes are needed allow online processing of SNAP benefits. Conclusions This evaluation summarizes lessons learned and serves as a guide to other public health leaders interested in developing similar programs. Provisions in the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA Farm Bill 2014 allow for select grocers to pilot online transactions with SNAP benefits. If these pilots are efficacious, the VSP model could be easily disseminated.

  16. A multi-stakeholder evaluation of the Baltimore City virtual supermarket program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagisetty, Pooja; Flamm, Laura; Rak, Summer; Landgraf, Jessica; Heisler, Michele; Forman, Jane

    2017-10-23

    Increasing access to healthy foods and beverages in disadvantaged communities is a public health priority due to alarmingly high rates of obesity. The Virtual Supermarket Program (VSP) is a Baltimore City Health Department program that uses online grocery ordering to deliver food to low-income neighborhoods. This study evaluates stakeholder preferences and barriers of program implementation. This study assessed the feasibility, sustainability and efficacy of the VSP by surveying 93 customers and interviewing 14 programmatic stakeholders who had recently used the VSP or been involved with program design and implementation. We identified the following themes: The VSP addressed transportation barriers and food availability. The VSP impacted customers and the city by including improving food purchasing behavior, creating a food justice "brand for the city", and fostering a sense of community. Customers appreciated using Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits to pay for groceries, but policy changes are needed allow online processing of SNAP benefits. This evaluation summarizes lessons learned and serves as a guide to other public health leaders interested in developing similar programs. Provisions in the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Farm Bill 2014 allow for select grocers to pilot online transactions with SNAP benefits. If these pilots are efficacious, the VSP model could be easily disseminated.

  17. Program evaluation of remote heart failure monitoring: healthcare utilization analysis in a rural regional medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, William T; Keberlein, Pamela; Sorenson, Gigi; Mohler, Sailor; Tye, Blake; Ramirez, A Susana; Carroll, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Remote monitoring for heart failure (HF) has had mixed and heterogeneous effects across studies, necessitating further evaluation of remote monitoring systems within specific healthcare systems and their patient populations. "Care Beyond Walls and Wires," a wireless remote monitoring program to facilitate patient and care team co-management of HF patients, served by a rural regional medical center, provided the opportunity to evaluate the effects of this program on healthcare utilization. Fifty HF patients admitted to Flagstaff Medical Center (Flagstaff, AZ) participated in the project. Many of these patients lived in underserved and rural communities, including Native American reservations. Enrolled patients received mobile, broadband-enabled remote monitoring devices. A matched cohort was identified for comparison. HF patients enrolled in this program showed substantial and statistically significant reductions in healthcare utilization during the 6 months following enrollment, and these reductions were significantly greater compared with those who declined to participate but not when compared with a matched cohort. The findings from this project indicate that a remote HF monitoring program can be successfully implemented in a rural, underserved area. Reductions in healthcare utilization were observed among program participants, but reductions were also observed among a matched cohort, illustrating the need for rigorous assessment of the effects of HF remote monitoring programs in healthcare systems.

  18. Evaluating Realized Impacts of DOE/EERE R&D Programs. Standard impact evaluation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruegg, Rosalie [TIA Consulting, Inc. (United States); O' Connor, Alan C. [RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Loomis, Ross J. [RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2014-08-01

    This document provides guidance for evaluators who conduct impact assessments of research and development (R&D) programs for the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). It is also targeted at EERE program staff responsible for initiating and managing commissioned impact studies. The guide specifies how to estimate economic benefits and costs, energy saved and installed or generated, environmental impacts, energy security impacts, and knowledge impacts of R&D investments in advanced energy technologies.

  19. An evaluation of NASA's program for improving aircraft fuel efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    The report provides commentary and recommendations where appropriate on each of the major elements of the program. Key findings of the committee included a recommendation that closer ties be established between NASA and the FAA to expedite the use and acceptance of the new technology. The committee also cited the potential for fuel savings through an imporved air traffic control system and recommended that the management of NASA and the FAA discuss ways and means to work together to exploit more effectively the capabilities and responsibilities of each to develop air traffic control.

  20. Implementation evaluation of the Telephone Lifestyle Coaching (TLC) program: organizational factors associated with successful implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damschroder, Laura J; Reardon, Caitlin M; Sperber, Nina; Robinson, Claire H; Fickel, Jacqueline J; Oddone, Eugene Z

    2017-06-01

    The Telephone Lifestyle Coaching (TLC) program provided telephone-based coaching for six lifestyle behaviors to 5321 Veterans at 24 Veterans Health Administration (VHA) medical facilities. The purpose of the study was to conduct an evaluation of the TLC program to identify factors associated with successful implementation. A mixed-methods study design was used. Quantitative measures of organizational readiness for implementation and facility complexity were used to purposively select a subset of facilities for in-depth evaluation. Context assessments were conducted using interview transcripts. The Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR) was used to guide qualitative data collection and analysis. Factors most strongly correlated with referral rates included having a skilled implementation leader who used effective multi-component strategies to engage primary care clinicians as well as general clinic structures that supported implementation. Evaluation findings pointed to recommendations for local and national leaders to help anticipate and mitigate potential barriers to successful implementation.