WorldWideScience

Sample records for program financial opportunities

  1. Integrated Financial Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pho, Susan

    2004-01-01

    Having worked in the Employees and Commercial Payments Branch of the Financial Management Division for the past 3 summers, I have seen the many changes that have occurred within the NASA organization. As I return each summer, I find that new programs and systems have been adapted to better serve the needs of the Center and of the Agency. The NASA Agency has transformed itself the past couple years with the implementation of the Integrated Financial Management Program (IFMP). IFMP is designed to allow the Agency to improve its management of its Financial, Physical, and Human Resources through the use of multiple enterprise module applications. With my mentor, Joseph Kan, being the branch chief of the Employees and Commercial Payments Branch, I have been exposed to several modules, such as Travel Manager, WebTads, and Core Financial/SAP, which were implemented in the last couple of years under the IFMP. The implementation of these agency-wide systems has sometimes proven to be troublesome. Prior to IFMP, each NASA Center utilizes their own systems for Payroll, Travel, Accounts Payable, etc. But with the implementation of the Integrated Financial Management Program, all the "legacy" systems had to be eliminated. As a result, a great deal of enhancement and preparation work is necessary to ease the transformation from the old systems to the new. All this work occurs simultaneously; for example, e-Payroll will "go live" in several months, but a system like Travel Manager will need to have information upgraded within the system to meet the requirements set by Headquarters. My assignments this summer have given me the opportunity to become involved with such work. So far, I have been given the opportunity to participate in projects resulting from a congressional request, several bankcard reconciliations, updating routing lists for Travel Manager, updating the majordomo list for Travel Manager approvers and point of contacts, and a NASA Headquarters project involving

  2. Practical C++ financial programming

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Practical C++ Financial Programming is a hands-on book for programmers wanting to apply C++ to programming problems in the financial industry. The book explains those aspects of the language that are more frequently used in writing financial software, including the STL, templates, and various numerical libraries. The book also describes many of the important problems in financial engineering that are part of the day-to-day work of financial programmers in large investment banks and hedge funds. The author has extensive experience in the New York City financial industry that is now distilled in

  3. On Risks and Opportunities in Financial Markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.D. Lansdorp (Simon)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractInvesting in financial securities inevitably involves risks on the one hand and opportunities on the other hand. This thesis bundles four different studies on risks and/or opportunities in financial markets. In one study, we examine the cross-sectional explanatory power of different

  4. On Risks and Opportunities in Financial Markets

    OpenAIRE

    Lansdorp, Simon

    2012-01-01

    textabstractInvesting in financial securities inevitably involves risks on the one hand and opportunities on the other hand. This thesis bundles four different studies on risks and/or opportunities in financial markets. In one study, we examine the cross-sectional explanatory power of different risk-measures in pricing U.S. stocks and find that investors dislike downside risk. In the second study, we show that conventional short-term reversal strategies exhibit dynamic exposures to systematic...

  5. California Energy Incentive Programs: An Annual Update on Key Energy Issues and Financial Opportunities for Federal Sites in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2011-12-01

    A spate of recently enacted energy legislation and associated program changes is providing numerous opportunities to help California federal energy managers cut costs and meet their renewables, energy efficiency and GHG emissions goals. In April 2011, Governor Jerry Brown approved the nation’s most ambitious renewable portfolio standard (RPS), which requires 33% of the state’s electricity to come from renewable energy sources by 2020. Policy changes that will support the RPS include expanded eligibility rules that fill previous gaps in incentives for certain sizes of on-site renewable energy systems. Program updates described in this document include: $200 million more in funding for California Solar Initiative rebates to commercial and industrial customers; an increase in the eligible system size for the Feed-In-Tariff (FIT) from 1.5MW to 3MW; and pending changes that may allow customer-side systems to sell tradable renewable energy credits (TRECs) to entities with RPS compliance obligations in California.

  6. Online Financial Education Programs: Theory, Research, and Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhee Kim

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Technological advances have created unprecedented opportunities for online financial education that can be used to improve financial literacy and money management practices. While online financial education programs have become popular, relevant research and theoretical frameworks have rarely been considered in the development of such programs. This article synthesizes lessons from literature and theories for the development of an effective online financial education program. Drawing from literature on financial literacy education and online education, implications and recommendations for integrating technology into online financial education programs for adults are discussed.

  7. Financial Literacy with Families: Opportunity and Hope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Lorraine M.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the author explores the link between citizens' quantitative literacy abilities and their financial prosperity. The author applies a robust social justice research vision and a Freirean approach to describe personal flourishing within the context of numerical, mathematical, and financial literacy (NMFL) education. Four families…

  8. Financial Education in TRIO Programs. Institutional Policy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hannah; Kezar, Adrianna

    2009-01-01

    To address some of the financial challenges facing low-income students, federal policymakers enacted a provision in the 2008 Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA) that makes financial literacy a required service of all TRIO programs (or, in the case of McNair, simply makes permissible). Effective August 2008, these programs started offering…

  9. A Peer-Based Financial Planning & Education Service Program: An Innovative Pedagogic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Joseph W.; Durband, Dorothy B.; Halley, Ryan E.; Davis, Kimberlee

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a peer-based financial planning and education program as a strategy to address the lack of financial literacy among college students and provide an experiential learning opportunity for students majoring in financial planning or other financial services-related disciplines. Benefits of such programs to campus communities are…

  10. Office of Equal Opportunity Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Jennifer L.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Office of Equal Opportunity Programs works to provide quality service for all programs and/or to assist the Center in becoming a model workplace. During the summer of 2004, I worked with Deborah Cotleur along with other staff members to create and modify customer satisfaction surveys. This office aims to assist in developing a model workplace by providing functions as a change agent to the center by serving as an advisor to management to ensure equity throughout the Center. In addition, the office serves as a mediator for the Center in addressing issues and concerns. Lastly, the office provides assistance to employees to enable attainment of personal and organizational goals. The Office of Equal Opportunities is a staff office which reports and provides advice to the Center Director and Executive Leadership, implements laws, regulations, and presidential executive orders, and provides center wide leadership and assistance to NASA GRC employees. Some of the major responsibilities of the office include working with the discrimination complaints program, special emphasis programs (advisory groups), management support, monitoring and evaluation, contract compliance, and community outreach. During my internship in this office, my main objective was to create four customer satisfaction surveys based on EO retreats, EO observances, EO advisory boards, and EO mediation/counseling. I created these surveys after conducting research on past events and surveys as well as similar survey research created and conducted by other NASA centers, program for EO Advisory group members, leadership training sessions for supervisors, preventing sexual harassment training sessions, and observance events. I also conducted research on the style and format from feedback surveys from the Marshall Equal Opportunity website, the Goddard website, and the main NASA website. Using the material from the Office of Equal Opportunity Programs at Glenn Research Center along with my

  11. Business opportunities with international financial institutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulin, B.

    1994-12-31

    The marketing strategy developed for use in international markets by the S. M. Group International of Longueuil, Quebec, a company with interest and well-developed expertise in the environmental and energy sector, was described. The strategy is designed to aid in the selection of countries or regions of interest, in determining the sector of activity to be emphasized, in selecting a local partner or local business representatives, and in making contact locally with the people responsible for the development banks in the target countries in an effort to create awareness of the company. The company also tries, wherever possible, to promote its services to local governmental agencies through the industrial cooperation program of CIDA. Since development banks have a very conservative behaviour, past performances and constant provision of high quality services are of prime importance.

  12. ICU Telemedicine Program Financial Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilly, Craig M; Motzkus, Christine; Rincon, Teresa; Cody, Shawn E; Landry, Karen; Irwin, Richard S

    2017-02-01

    ICU telemedicine improves access to high-quality critical care, has substantial costs, and can change financial outcomes. Detailed information about financial outcomes and their trends over time following ICU telemedicine implementation and after the addition of logistic center function has not been published to our knowledge. Primary data were collected for consecutive adult patients of a single academic medical center. We compared clinical and financial outcomes across three groups that differed regarding telemedicine support: a group without ICU telemedicine support (pre-ICU intervention group), a group with ICU telemedicine support (ICU telemedicine group), and an ICU telemedicine group with added logistic center functions and support for quality-care standardization (logistic center group). The primary outcome was annual direct contribution margin defined as aggregated annual case revenue minus annual case direct costs (including operating costs of ICU telemedicine and its related programs). All monetary values were adjusted to 2015 US dollars using Producer Price Index for Health-Care Facilities. Annual case volume increased from 4,752 (pre-ICU telemedicine) to 5,735 (ICU telemedicine) and 6,581 (logistic center). The annual direct contribution margin improved from $7,921,584 (pre-ICU telemedicine) to $37,668,512 (ICU telemedicine) to $60,586,397 (logistic center) due to increased case volume, higher case revenue relative to direct costs, and shorter length of stay. The ability of properly modified ICU telemedicine programs to increase case volume and access to high-quality critical care with improved annual direct contribution margins suggests that there is a financial argument to encourage the wider adoption of ICU telemedicine. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. LMSS SERVICES FINANCIAL REPORT PROGRAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, R. G.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this Services Finance Report program is to provide a means for comparing alternative designs of LMSS systems or other services systems. This program is actually a Multiplan worksheet. The labels used in the worksheet were chosen for a satellite-based cellular communication service (LMSS - Land Mobile Satellite System) but the analysis is not restricted to such cases. A comprehensive financial model is used to calculate a 'figure of merit' which can be used to compare effects of equipment and operating costs, pricing strategy, and customer demand for different systems. The program also calculates the price that a company would have to charge customers to meet all its expenses and make a specified profit. A price estimate can be obtained for almost any service which is heavily dependent on capital investment and which has operating costs that depend on the amount of service sold. The economic analysis has two main components: supplier finances and customer finances. Supplier finances include amortization, interest, insurance, taxes, and operating and maintenance expenses. Customer finances include usage rate, subscription fees, equipment costs, and estimated traffic. Prices can defined as real or nominal to account for effects of escalation and inflation, and the profits can be regulated or unrestricted This program is written for interactive execution with Multiplan (version 1.2) and has been implemented on an IBM PC series computer operating under DOS (version 2.11). The LMSS worksheet has a space requirement of approximately 38K of 8 bit bytes. This worksheet was developed in 1984.

  14. VA Student Financial Aid. Opportunity To Reduce Overlap in Approving Education and Training Programs. Report to the Committee on Veterans' Affairs, U.S. Senate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Health, Education, and Human Services Div.

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) contracts with state approving agencies (SAAs) to assess whether schools and training programs offer education of sufficient quality for veterans to receive VA education assistance benefits when attending them. The General Accounting Office examined the gatekeeping activities of the VA and the Department of…

  15. Developing Financial Resources for School Arts Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Alan C.; Ambler, Nancy Morison

    This document provides a sampling of financial resources for fine arts programs in the schools and lists methods for submitting proposals and dealing with sponsors of funds. Financial sources for arts programs include school districts, organizations and institutions, special events, direct mail, individuals, associations and clubs, businesses and…

  16. 15 CFR 13.8 - Opportunity to comment on proposed Federal financial assistance and direct Federal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Opportunity to comment on proposed Federal financial assistance and direct Federal development. 13.8 Section 13.8 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVIEW OF DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES § 13.8 Opportunity to comment on...

  17. Banking on financial inclusion to promote economic opportunity ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-05-26

    May 26, 2016 ... Financial inclusion — improving access and availability of financial services ... When the poor have access to formal financial products such as ... Investing in Internet access boosts incomes, concludes Latin American study.

  18. Developing a Personal Financial Planning Program: More than Just Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Charles L., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Personal financial planning is considered one of the major growth professions of the coming decade. Besides providing an opportunity for employment, a major in personal financial planning can open the door to a rewarding and challenging career. Career opportunities in the personal financial planning field include opening a private practice or…

  19. The case and opportunity for public-supported financial incentives to implement integrated pest management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Michael J; Hoard, Robert J; Landis, Joy N; Elworth, Lawrence E

    2004-12-01

    Food, water, and worker protection regulations have driven availability, and loss, of pesticides for use in pest management programs. In response, public-supported research and extension projects have targeted investigation and demonstration of reduced-risk integrated pest management (IPM) techniques. But these new techniques often result in higher financial burden to the grower, which is counter to the IPM principle that economic competitiveness is critical to have IPM adopted. As authorized by the 2002 Farm Bill and administered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), conservation programs exist for delivering public-supported financial incentives to growers to increase environmental stewardship on lands in production. NRCS conservation programs are described, and the case for providing financial incentives to growers for implementing IPM is presented. We also explored the opportunity and challenge to use one key program, the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP), to aid grower adoption of IPM. The EQIP fund distribution to growers from 1997 to 2002 during the last Farm Bill cycle totaled approximately 1.05 billion dollars with a portion of funds supporting an NRCS-designed pest management practice. The average percentage of allocation of EQIP funds to this pest management practice among states was 0.77 +/- 0.009% (mean +/- SD). Using Michigan as an example, vegetable and fruit grower recognition of the program's use to implement IPM was modest (25% of growers surveyed), and their recognition of its use in aiding implementation of IPM was improved after educational efforts (74%). Proposals designed to enhance program usefulness in implementing IPM were delivered through the NRCS advisory process in Michigan. Modifications for using the NRCS pest management practice to address resource concerns were adopted, incentive rates for pest management were adjusted, and an expanded incentive structure for IPM

  20. Are Financial Education Programs Meeting the Needs of Financially Disadvantaged Consumers?

    OpenAIRE

    Yunhee Chang; Angela Lyons

    2007-01-01

    This paper uses data collected from a retrospective pre-test to investigate he impact that a financial education program has on participants’ financial behaviors. Specifically, we compare program impact across participants with varying levels of financial competency prior to the program and examine whether the program is meeting the educational needs of those it was designed to target – namely, financially disadvantaged consumers. The findings show that the program benefited all of the partic...

  1. Federal Financial and Economic Literacy Education Programs, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Angela A.; Mihaly, Kata; Yoong, Joanne K.

    2010-01-01

    Financial literacy--the ability to use knowledge and skills to manage financial resources effectively for a lifetime of financial well-being--is becoming more and more important as individuals and families become increasingly responsible for their own long-term financial well-being. Financial and economic literacy education programs have been…

  2. 75 FR 10464 - Broadband Technology Opportunities Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... window for Public Computer Center (PCC) and Sustainable Broadband Adoption (SBA) projects. DATES: All...; Extension of Application Closing Deadline for Comprehensive Community Infrastructure (CCI) Projects. SUMMARY... Infrastructure (CCI) projects under the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program (BTOP) is extended until 5:00...

  3. Cutting costs in your own backyard: opportunities in financial services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Londen, Jan; Zimmerman, Paul

    2012-03-01

    Hospitals looking to reduce cost and improve performance in financial services should focus on these areas: Treasury banking services costs and fees. The possibility of a revenue-generating vendor payment solution. The accounts payable process.

  4. American Indian Education Opportunities Program. Supplement 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molin, Paulette F.

    1997-01-01

    Activities of the American Indian Educational Opportunities Program (AIEOP) at Hampton University for this reporting period included the establishment of a student chapter of the American Indian Science & Engineering Society (AISES), a move to new office space, hosting events on campus for visiting students from the American Indian Education Program of Oxon Hill, Maryland and Onondaga Community College in Syracuse, New York, collaboration with the Multicultural Leadership Team at NASA Langley Research Center for a Native American elder to serve as a speaker, participation in Native American conferences and other events, and continuing efforts to recruit and retain American Indian students.

  5. Investment opportunities in infrastructure regardless of financial crisis

    OpenAIRE

    ILIE Georgeta

    2009-01-01

    During these times of dramatic change and financial market disorder, the challenge of infrastructure development is being drawn more into the highlight. Infrastructure will be rising in importance over the next years. The availability and quality of infrastructure directly affect where business operations are located and expanded. In this context, roads and power generation are the most urgent infrastructure needs. The paper reveals a few economic characteristics of current stage of infrastru...

  6. Financial Participation Programs in Polish Public Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Kozlowski

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The major purpose of this article is to analyze the most important FP programs in Poland in order to increase knowledge on the subject and to show the occurring relations between the programs applied and the socioeconomic results of enterprises. The emphasis has been put on showing the multidimensional relationships between employee financial ownership and economic results, as well as on proving the relationship mechanisms of employee ownership on productivity are complex interactions by nature. Additionally, it has helped to separate crucial characteristic features of the applied forms of FP. This empirical approach concentrates on qualitative research and not quantitative, which although broad based, does not precisely identify the aforementioned relationships too precisely.

  7. NOAA's Undergraduate Scholarship Program Outcomes and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, M.; Jabanoski, K.; Christenson, T.

    2017-12-01

    NOAA supports about 115 - 150 undergraduates per year through the Ernest F. Hollings Scholarship and the Educational Partnership Program Undergraduate Scholarship. These programs provide tuition support and paid summer internships at NOAA to exceptional students majoring in the geosciences. Multiple methods were used to evaluate program outcomes and track the career trajectories, including mining LinkedIn data and conducting evaluation surveys of recipients as well as students who applied but did not receive the award. Results show more than 75% of scholars continued on to graduate school, primarily in a NOAA mission fields. This compared to only 56% of nonrecipients. More than 60% of alumni had at least one professional record, with the most alumni working in private industry, followed by nongovernmental organizations and federal, state and local government. The evaluation identified 77 other scholarship programs applied to by NOAA scholarship recipients. The most commonly reported program was the NSF Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) for which 20% of scholars applied and 46% of applications were successful. Other common scholarships included the Goldwater Scholarship (received by 5% of NOAA scholars) and the Udall Scholarship (received by 4% of scholars). In the most recent class of 118 undergraduate scholars, 24% reported having another research experience by the time they arrived for orientation at the end of their sophomore year. These results suggest coordination across scholarship opportunities may be useful to engage and retain students in geoscience fields.

  8. Mainstreaming climate change in the financial sector and its governance. Part II: Identifying Opportunity Windows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morel, Romain; Cochran, Ian; Zou, Sani; Spencer, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    Addressing and responding to climate change is a step towards strengthening global financial stability, a mandate shared by institutions governing and regulating financial markets after the financial crisis. On the one hand, risk-adjusted returns on investment are affected by the climate-related losses aggravated by global climate change - as well as the climate and energy policies put into place to usher in a 2 deg. C-coherent society. On the other hand, a paradigm shift consistent with limiting temperature warming to 2 degrees by the end of this century presents new opportunities of productive investments. These risks and opportunities are detailed in the companion paper (Morel et al. 2015). This paper reviews current practices addressing the risks and opportunities that arise from climate change among international financial governance and regulatory institutions (IFGRIs) and national entities. It also identifies potential entry points for consideration that reinforce these institutions' mandates and draw on their existing tool-kits and processes. Finally, this paper offers a framework to structure the discussion of policy options and guidelines, focusing on the demand, supply and intermediary stages of low-carbon, climate-resilient investment. In each of these three categories, opportunities for financial governance and regulatory institutions to address climate-related issues and increase investment flows are discussed. Options include guidelines, surveillance and the provision of expertise on issues, as well as carbon pricing and fossil fuel subsidies, securitization, green bonds, accounting standards and risk assessment. (authors)

  9. Handbook of Student Financial Aid: Programs, Procedures, and Policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenske, Robert H.; And Others

    The full range of topics relevant to student financial aid are covered in this book by a variety of experts in financial aid administration and scholarship. The volume details how to organize, implement and assess a financial aid program--including how to determine student need, deal with student bankruptcy and aid termination, and improve…

  10. Employee Perceptions on Recognition and Opportunity for Advancement: The Case of a Financial Institution in Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    Veronica Adu-Brobbey

    2014-01-01

    Recognition and opportunity for advancement are facets of motivation that affect employee satisfaction at the workplace. For management to adequately attend to these, there is the need to know how the employees themselves feel about such issues. This study was conducted to assess the perceptions of employees of a financial institution in Ghana regarding recognition and opportunity for advancement. Survey with questionnaire and interview were used to collect data from 61 employees. Descriptive...

  11. Wellness Programs With Financial Incentives Through Disparities Lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuellar, Alison; LoSasso, Anthony T; Shah, Mona; Atwood, Alicia; Lewis-Walls, Tanya R

    2018-02-01

    To examine wellness programs with financial incentives and their effect on disparities in preventive care. Financial incentives were introduced by 15 large employers, from 2010 to 2013. Fifteen private employers. A total of 299 436 employees and adult dependents. Preventive services and participation in financial incentives. Multivariate linear regression. Disparities in preventive services widened after introduction of financial incentives. Asians were 3% more likely and African Americans were 3% less likely to receive wellness rewards than whites and non-Hispanics, controlling for other factors. Federal law limits targeting of wellness financial incentives by subgroups; thus, employers should consider outreach and culturally appropriate messaging.

  12. AFSC/NMML: Platforms of Opportunity Program (POP): 1950 - present

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Platforms of Opportunity Program (POP) is an opportunistic marine mammal sighting program that dates back to the 1950s and includes over 108,000 sightings....

  13. Views of potential research participants on financial conflicts of interest: barriers and opportunities for effective disclosure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinfurt, Kevin P; Friedman, Joëlle Y; Allsbrook, Jennifer S; Dinan, Michaela A; Hall, Mark A; Sugarman, Jeremy

    2006-09-01

    There is little guidance regarding how to disclose researchers' financial interests to potential research participants. To determine what potential research participants want to know about financial interests, their capacity to understand disclosed information and its implications, and the reactions of potential research participants to a proposed disclosure statement. Sixteen focus groups in 3 cities, including 6 groups of healthy adults, 6 groups of adults with mild chronic illness, 1 group of parents of healthy children, 1 group of parents of children with leukemia or brain tumor, 1 group of adults with heart failure, and 1 group of adults with cancer. Focus group discussions covered a range of topics including financial relationships in clinical research, whether people should be told about them, and how they should be told. Audio-recordings of focus groups were transcribed, verified, and coded for analysis. Participants wanted to know about financial interests, whether or not those interests would affect their participation. However, they varied in their desire and ability to understand the nature and implications of financial interests. Whether disclosure was deemed important depended upon the risk of the research. Trust in clinicians was also related to views regarding disclosure. If given the opportunity to ask questions during the consent process, some participants would not have known what to ask; however, after the focus group sessions, participants could identify information they would want to know. Financial interests are important to potential research participants, but obstacles to effective disclosure exist.

  14. Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions in India. Financial mechanisms and opportunities for EU-India collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atteridge, Aaron; Nilsson Axberg, Goeran; Goel, Nitu; Kumar, Atul; Lazarus, Michael; Ostwald, Madelene; Polycarp, Clifford; Tollefsen, Petter; Torvanger, Asbjoern; Upadhyaya, Prabhat; Zetterberg, Lars

    2009-10-15

    This report illuminates potential areas for collaboration between the EU and India on actions that reduce greenhouse gas emissions in India. If human-induced climate change is to have any hope of being limited to 2 degrees, it is essential that ways are found to address rapidly rising greenhouse gas emissions in India, as elsewhere. This is a challenging proposition: even though India's per capita emissions are very low, her 1.15 billion people are collectively a major source of greenhouse gas emissions. This fact, coupled with the immediate task of tackling widespread poverty, means that the international community must play a major role in providing financial and technological resources to support India's domestic efforts. As India's 2008 National Action Plan on Climate Change recognises, tackling the country's greenhouse gas emissions means not least finding ways to transform a rapidly growing energy sector. International financial mechanisms such as the Clean Development Mechanism and the Global Environment Facility have been unable to deliver the scale of transformative change needed to shift India's emissions trajectory. While the Indian government has already initiated some ambitious policy measures - particularly pertaining to solar energy and energy efficiency- the effectiveness of international finance mechanisms and other forms of international partnership will be crucial in determining the success of greenhouse gas mitigation efforts. The EU India Summit is held a month before COP15 negotiations in Copenhagen. While this provides challenges in terms of seeking concrete agreements on questions of finance, it is also an important opportunity to devise complementary efforts outside the UNFCCC process. Genuine, productive collaboration could not only be used to foster the sorts of transformative changes that are needed in India's growing economy but could also create a spirit of cooperation that spills over into UNFCCC

  15. Pilot Feasibility Study of an Oncology Financial Navigation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankaran, Veena; Leahy, Tony; Steelquist, Jordan; Watabayashi, Kate; Linden, Hannah; Ramsey, Scott; Schwartz, Naomi; Kreizenbeck, Karma; Nelson, Judy; Balch, Alan; Singleton, Erin; Gallagher, Kathleen; Overstreet, Karen

    2018-02-01

    Few studies have reported on interventions to alleviate financial toxicity in patients with cancer. We developed a financial navigation program in collaboration with our partners, Consumer Education and Training Services (CENTS) and Patient Advocate Foundation (PAF), to improve patient knowledge about treatment costs, provide financial counseling, and to help manage out-of-pocket expenses. We conducted a pilot study to assess the feasibility and impact of this program. Patients with cancer received a financial education course followed by monthly contact with a CENTS financial counselor and a PAF case manager for 6 months. We measured program adherence, self-reported financial burden and anxiety, program satisfaction, and type of assistance provided. Thirty-four patients (median age, 60.5 years) were consented (85% white and 50% commercially insured). Debt, income declines, and loans were reported by 55%, 55%, and 30% of patients, respectively. CENTS counselors assisted most often with budgeting, retirement planning, and medical bill questions. PAF case managers assisted with applications for appropriate insurance coverage, cost of living issues (eg, housing, transportation), and disability applications. High financial burden and anxiety about costs (4 or 5 on a Likert scale) were reported at baseline by 37% and 47% of patients, respectively. Anxiety about costs decreased over time in 33% of patients, whereas self-reported financial burden did not substantially change. Implementing an oncology financial navigation program is feasible, provides concrete assistance in navigating the cost of care, and mitigates anxiety about costs in a subset of patients. Future work will focus on measuring the program's impact on financial and clinical outcomes.

  16. Construction Management Program Builds Financial Development from the Ground up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobe, Michael D.; Shuler, Scott; Grosse, Larry

    2007-01-01

    Recent economic and legislative changes have hit higher education hard and threaten the financial viability of many educational programs nationwide. With state support dwindling to less than 10 percent in some cases, institutions across the nation face a financial crisis. Many strategies have been explored and implemented, from campaigns to…

  17. The Money Mentors Program: Increasing Financial Literacy in Utah Youths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Zurishaddai A.; Francis, Dave; Christensen, Amanda; MacArthur, Stacey S.; Memmott, Margie; Hill, Paul A.

    2017-01-01

    Utah 4-H and Fidelity Investments collaborated on a program for increasing the financial literacy of teens and children. The collaboration resulted in positive impacts for both Extension and Utah youths. Extension benefited through partnership with a corporation that provided content expertise, volunteers, and funding for a financial literacy…

  18. 77 FR 37742 - Community Development Financial Institutions Fund

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Community Development Financial Institutions Fund Funding Opportunity... pending for assistance under the FY 2012 round of the Community Development Financial Institutions Program... of the BEA Program. The BEA Program is administered by the Community Development Financial...

  19. Financial and Transactional Bylaw of Universities and Faculties of Medical Sciences: Opportunities and Threats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Abolhallaje

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: According to developments related to the relative autonomy of universities and acquired extensive powers by the board of trustees of universities of medical sciences and healthcare services in a twenty-year perspective of country and in the context of the fourth and fifth socio-economic cultural development of country, necessity of developing financial and transactional bylaw of universities of medical sciences has become increasingly clear throughout country. Materials and Methods: Grounded theory is the qualitative methodology used for this study in order to identify the threats and opportunities of new financial tax bylaw of universities and faculties of medical sciences and through the study of documents, surveys of experts and beneficiaries and elites by Delphi method. Results: Releasing potential of public administration in order to control sources and uses, increasing management confidence in documented decision making, establishing organizational concentration on controlling costs, providing conditions of decision-making according to financial reports, independency in firing and hiring manpower by adopting specific provisions and creating independency in method of keeping accounts are among the most important opportunities. While poor organizational structure, lack of knowledge and skills in the existing structure, mental processes caused by reactions and incompatibility of staff, lack of criteria and rules in selection appointment and dismissal of managers and employees, lack of discipline and proper mechanisms in order to pursue the purposes, calculating financial burden and human resources required and finally, passing through traditional thinking and management system are among the most threats. Conclusion: Considering the mentioned threats and opportunities, financial and transactional bylaw of universities and faculties of medical sciences was basically revised and modified in January 2006, and then after

  20. Case Mix Management Systems: An Opportunity to Integrate Medical Records and Financial Management System Data Bases

    OpenAIRE

    Rusnak, James E.

    1987-01-01

    Due to previous systems selections, many hospitals (health care facilities) are faced with the problem of fragmented data bases containing clinical, demographic and financial information. Projects to select and implement a Case Mix Management System (CMMS) provide an opportunity to reduce the number of separate physical files and to migrate towards systems with an integrated data base. The number of CMMS candidate systems is often restricted due to data base and system interface issues. The h...

  1. Opportune Landing Site Program: Opportune Landing Site Southeastern Indiana Field Data Collection and Assessment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Barna, Lynette A; Ryerson, Charles C; Affleck, Rosa T

    2008-01-01

    .... The opportune landing site (OLS) program utilized existing technologies to rapidly accelerate the process of selecting OLSs using remote sensing technology and state-of-the-ground forecast tools...

  2. Financial Management: Emergency Steel Loan Guarantee Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    In a February 1, 2001 letter, you expressed concerns about repayments of federally guaranteed loans by borrowers under the Emergency Steel Loan Guarantee Program and the effect of the program on the U.S. steel industry...

  3. Financial Recruitment Incentive Programs for Nursing Personnel in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Maria; Ryan, Dana

    2015-03-01

    Financial incentives are increasingly offered to recruit nursing personnel to work in underserved communities. The authors describe and compare the characteristics of federal, provincial and territorial financial recruitment incentive programs for registered nurses (RNs), nurse practitioners (NPs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs), registered practical nurses or registered psychiatric nurses. The authors identified incentive programs from government, health ministry and student aid websites and by contacting program officials. Only government-funded recruitment programs providing funding beyond the normal employee wages and benefits and requiring a service commitment were included. The authors excluded programs offered by hospitals, regional or private firms, and programs that rewarded retention. All provinces and territories except QC and NB offer financial recruitment incentive programs for RNs; six provinces (BC, AB, SK, ON, QC and NL) offer programs for NPs, and NL offers a program for LPNs. Programs include student loan forgiveness, tuition forgiveness, education bursaries, signing bonuses and relocation expenses. Programs target trainees, recent graduates and new hires. Funding and service requirements vary by program, and service requirements are not always commensurate with funding levels. This snapshot of government-funded recruitment incentives provides program managers with data to compare and improve nursing workforce recruitment initiatives. Copyright © 2015 Longwoods Publishing.

  4. Emergency Food Programs: Untapped Opportunities for Extension?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Amy R.

    2012-01-01

    This article reports results from a questionnaire that assessed the frequency and type of nutrition questions asked at emergency food programs to determine if Extension professionals need to increase direct outreach efforts. Emergency food program workers (n = 460) were recruited via mail to complete a self-administered survey. More than one-third…

  5. Principles for Promoting the Financial Sustainability of Online Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Katrina A.; Bruwelheide, Janis; Poulin, Russell

    2009-01-01

    The project described in this article was an attempt to uncover the principles of financial sustainability for online programs and to align these with a guide to managing online programs. An initial team of experienced online educators developed draft principles, which were then reviewed by an external consultant and revised; the revised…

  6. Case Mix Management Systems: An Opportunity to Integrate Medical Records and Financial Management System Data Bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusnak, James E.

    1987-01-01

    Due to previous systems selections, many hospitals (health care facilities) are faced with the problem of fragmented data bases containing clinical, demographic and financial information. Projects to select and implement a Case Mix Management System (CMMS) provide an opportunity to reduce the number of separate physical files and to migrate towards systems with an integrated data base. The number of CMMS candidate systems is often restricted due to data base and system interface issues. The hospital must insure the CMMS project provides a means to implement an integrated on-line hospital information data base for use by departments in operating under a DRG-based Prospective Payment System. This paper presents guidelines for use in selecting a Case Mix Mangement System to meet the hospital's financial and operations planning, budgeting, marketing, and other management needs, while considering the data base implications of the implementation.

  7. ICU early physical rehabilitation programs: financial modeling of cost savings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Robert K; Mayhew, Christopher R; Korupolu, Radha; Mantheiy, Earl C; Friedman, Michael A; Palmer, Jeffrey B; Needham, Dale M

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the potential annual net cost savings of implementing an ICU early rehabilitation program. Using data from existing publications and actual experience with an early rehabilitation program in the Johns Hopkins Hospital Medical ICU, we developed a model of net financial savings/costs and presented results for ICUs with 200, 600, 900, and 2,000 annual admissions, accounting for both conservative- and best-case scenarios. Our example scenario provided a projected financial analysis of the Johns Hopkins Medical ICU early rehabilitation program, with 900 admissions per year, using actual reductions in length of stay achieved by this program. U.S.-based adult ICUs. Financial modeling of the introduction of an ICU early rehabilitation program. Net cost savings generated in our example scenario, with 900 annual admissions and actual length of stay reductions of 22% and 19% for the ICU and floor, respectively, were $817,836. Sensitivity analyses, which used conservative- and best-case scenarios for length of stay reductions and varied the per-day ICU and floor costs, across ICUs with 200-2,000 annual admissions, yielded financial projections ranging from -$87,611 (net cost) to $3,763,149 (net savings). Of the 24 scenarios included in these sensitivity analyses, 20 (83%) demonstrated net savings, with a relatively small net cost occurring in the remaining four scenarios, mostly when simultaneously combining the most conservative assumptions. A financial model, based on actual experience and published data, projects that investment in an ICU early rehabilitation program can generate net financial savings for U.S. hospitals. Even under the most conservative assumptions, the projected net cost of implementing such a program is modest relative to the substantial improvements in patient outcomes demonstrated by ICU early rehabilitation programs.

  8. FIA BioSum: a tool to evaluate financial costs, opportunities and effectiveness of fuel treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeremy Fried; Glenn. Christensen

    2004-01-01

    FIA BioSum, a tool developed by the USDA Forest Services Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Program, generates reliable cost estimates, identifies opportunities and evaluates the effectiveness of fuel treatments in forested landscapes. BioSum is an analytic framework that integrates a suite of widely used computer models with a foundation of attribute-rich,...

  9. Managerial Opportunism: Monitoring Financial Risk of Malaysian Shariah-compliant Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziatul Waznah Ghazali

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Managerial opportunism, such as earnings management, is a rampant, but often discreet, among certain managers. Agency theory and the notion of conflict of interest are used as bases to assume that managers would resolve to engage with inappropriate activities for their personal benefits. Distortion of earnings would erode investor confidence and is detrimental to the capital market. The Islamic capital market with Shariah-compliant firms is expected not to engage in activities that go against the religion code of conduct. The main purpose of this study is to investigate managerial opportunism among Shariah-compliant companies, specifically the relationship between real earnings management and the risk of financial distress, leverage, and free cash flow. This study employs 4,115 data from 694 sample companies for five years (2009–2013. Findings conclude that the risk of financial distress, leverage, and free cash flow have a significant relationship with earnings management among Shariah-compliant companies. This study provides evidence that further improvements on corporate governance are necessary to ensure that Shariah-compliant companies adhere with the Shariah requirement.

  10. Cash Management Program Reaps Financial Rewards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saylor, Joan Nesenkar

    1984-01-01

    Basic components of a New Jersey district's profitable cash management program include consolidating funds using a negotiated bank agreement, a short term investment policy, accurate flowcharts for precise planning, and revenue and expenditure analysis. Data collection and analysis and the alternative of using a bank service agreement are…

  11. 2 CFR 215.20 - Purpose of financial and program management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Purpose of financial and program management... Financial and Program Management § 215.20 Purpose of financial and program management. Sections 215.21 through 215.28 prescribe standards for financial management systems, methods for making payments and rules...

  12. 34 CFR 74.20 - Purpose of financial and program management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Purpose of financial and program management. 74.20... Requirements Financial and Program Management § 74.20 Purpose of financial and program management. Sections 74.21 through 74.28 prescribe standards for financial management systems, methods for making payments...

  13. 22 CFR 518.20 - Purpose of financial and program management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Purpose of financial and program management. 518... ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 518.20 Purpose of financial and program management. Sections 518.21 through 518.28 prescribe standards for financial management systems, methods for...

  14. How to Integrate International Financial Reporting Standards into Accounting Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    It is expected the SEC will require U.S. domestic companies to prepare and file their annual 10Ks in accordance with international financial reporting standards (IFRS) by 2016. Given the probability that the FASB-IASB convergence project (i.e., Norwalk Agreement) will continue subsequent to mandatory adoption, US accounting programs will be…

  15. User's operating procedures. Volume 2: Scout project financial analysis program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, C. G.; Haris, D. K.

    1985-01-01

    A review is presented of the user's operating procedures for the Scout Project Automatic Data system, called SPADS. SPADS is the result of the past seven years of software development on a Prime mini-computer located at the Scout Project Office, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. SPADS was developed as a single entry, multiple cross-reference data management and information retrieval system for the automation of Project office tasks, including engineering, financial, managerial, and clerical support. This volume, two (2) of three (3), provides the instructions to operate the Scout Project Financial Analysis program in data retrieval and file maintenance via the user friendly menu drivers.

  16. Mathematical programming and financial objectives for scheduling projects

    CERN Document Server

    Kimms, Alf

    2001-01-01

    Mathematical Programming and Financial Objectives for Scheduling Projects focuses on decision problems where the performance is measured in terms of money. As the title suggests, special attention is paid to financial objectives and the relationship of financial objectives to project schedules and scheduling. In addition, how schedules relate to other decisions is treated in detail. The book demonstrates that scheduling must be combined with project selection and financing, and that scheduling helps to give an answer to the planning issue of the amount of resources required for a project. The author makes clear the relevance of scheduling to cutting budget costs. The book is divided into six parts. The first part gives a brief introduction to project management. Part two examines scheduling projects in order to maximize their net present value. Part three considers capital rationing. Many decisions on selecting or rejecting a project cannot be made in isolation and multiple projects must be taken fully into a...

  17. Opportunities at Independent Colleges and Universities in New York State through the Higher Education Opportunity Program = Oportunidades en los colegios y universidades independientes en el Estado de Nueva York a traves de los programas de oportunidad en educacion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    State Univ. of New York, Albany.

    Information on programs that address special needs of students from disadvantaged backgrounds who attend private colleges and universities in New York State is provided in separate English and Spanish reports. The Higher Education Opportunity Program (HEOP) provides supportive services and financial aid. Information is provided on: eligibility for…

  18. 36 CFR 1210.20 - Purpose of financial and program management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Financial and Program Management § 1210.20 Purpose of financial and program management. Sections 1210.21 through 1210.28 prescribe standards for financial management systems, methods for making payments and... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Purpose of financial and...

  19. 10 CFR 600.120 - Purpose of financial and program management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Purpose of financial and program management. 600.120 Section 600.120 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE RULES... financial and program management. Sections 600.121 through 600.128 prescribe standards for financial...

  20. Wider Opportunities for Women Nontraditional Work Programs: A Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wider Opportunities for Women, Inc., Washington, DC.

    Since 1970, Wider Opportunities for Women (WOW), in Washington, D.C., has conducted programs to train and place disadvantaged women in nontraditional jobs. The results have been record-breaking: high placement rates, high job retention rates, good starting salaries, and upward mobility for women who seemed doomed to a life of poverty and…

  1. Expanding Access and Opportunity: The Washington State Achievers Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Jennifer; Gorgol, Laura

    2010-01-01

    In 2001, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation launched a 10-year, multi-million dollar initiative, the Washington State Achievers Program (WSA), to increase opportunities for low-income students to attend postsecondary institutions in Washington State. The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation granted funds to the College Success Foundation…

  2. Financial impact of hand surgery programs on academic medical centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Jafar S; Chung, Kevin C; Storey, Amy F; Bolg, Mary L; Taheri, Paul A

    2007-02-01

    This study analyzes the financial performance of hand surgery in the Department of Surgery at the University of Michigan. This analysis can serve as a reference for other medical centers in the financial evaluation of a hand surgery program. Fiscal year 2004 billing records for all patients (n = 671) who underwent hand surgery procedures were examined. The financial data were separated into professional revenues and costs (relating to the hand surgery program in the Section of Plastic Surgery) and into facility revenues and costs (relating to the overall University of Michigan Health System). Professional net revenue was calculated by applying historical collection rates to procedural and clinic charges. Facility revenue was calculated by applying historical collection rates to the following charge categories: inpatient/operating room, clinic facility, neurology/electromyography, radiology facilities, and occupational therapy. Total professional costs were calculated by adding direct costs and allocated overhead costs. Facility costs were obtained from the hospital's cost accounting system. Professional and facility incomes were calculated by subtracting costs from revenues. The net professional revenue and total costs were 1,069,836 and 1,027,421 dollars, respectively. Professional operating income was 42,415 dollars, or 3.96 percent of net professional revenue. Net facility revenue and total costs were 5,500,606 and 4,592,534 dollars, respectively. Facility operating income was 908,071 dollars, or 16.51 percent of net facility revenues. While contributing to the academic mission of the institution, hand surgery is financially rewarding for the Department of Surgery. In addition, hand surgery activity contributes substantially to the financial well-being of the academic medical center.

  3. Institutional, Financial, Legal, and Cultural Factors in a Distance Learning Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeman, Rachel; Haseley, Dennis

    2015-06-01

    As psychoanalytic institutes evolve, adapting to the contemporary financial and social environment, the integration of new technologies into psychoanalytic education presents opportunities for expansion to candidates residing beyond the usual geographic boundaries. While the teaching of analytic content through distance learning programs appears to be relatively straightforward, factors including legalities, traditional mind-sets, and cross-cultural issues need to be considered as complicating the situation, as illustrated by one U.S. institute's distance learning initiative with a group in South Korea. © 2015 by the American Psychoanalytic Association.

  4. International Mentoring Programs: Leadership Opportunities to Enhance Worldwide Pharmacy Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubaka, Chukwuemeka; Brechtelsbauer, Erich; Goff, Debra A

    2017-07-01

    Health-system and community pharmacy practice in the United States is experiencing transformational change; however, this transformation is lagging in the international arena. As a result, efforts are being made to provide support and education to the international pharmacy leaders and practitioners. This article describes one effort, the Mandela Washington Fellows Program, and suggests areas where pharmacy leaders can be involved to help advance the practice of pharmacy on an international level. The Mandela Washington Fellows Program for young Africa leaders consists of a US-Africa pharmacy-mentoring program identified ranging from educational opportunities to collaboration for implementation of patient care programs. The specifics of the mentoring program include daily meetings, clinic and ward rounds, round table discussions with mentors, and visits to various hospital care systems. Lessons were learned and strategies for sustaining the program are discussed. These types of programs represent leadership opportunities that may not be apparent to most pharmacy directors, but expanding their view to helping international pharmacists expand their practice only strengthens the professional goal of providing patient-centered pharmacy services.

  5. The influence of financial incentive programs in promoting sustainable forestry on the nation's family forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael A. Kilgore; John L. Greene; Michael G. Jacobson; Thomas J. Straka; Steven E. Daniels

    2007-01-01

    Financial incentive programs were evaluated to assess their contribution to promoting sustainable forestry practices on the nation’s family forests. The evaluation consisted of an extensive review of the literature on financial incentive programs, a mail survey of the lead administrator of financial incentive programs in each state forestry agency, and focus groups...

  6. 10 CFR 605.5 - The Office of Energy Research Financial Assistance Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false The Office of Energy Research Financial Assistance Program. 605.5 Section 605.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS THE OFFICE OF ENERGY RESEARCH FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAM § 605.5 The Office of Energy Research Financial Assistance Program. (a) DOE may issue, under the Office o...

  7. 20 CFR 435.20 - Purpose of financial and program management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Purpose of financial and program management... ORGANIZATIONS, AND COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 435.20 Purpose of financial and program management. Sections 435.21 through 435.28 prescribe standards for...

  8. 24 CFR 84.20 - Purpose of financial and program management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and Program Management § 84.20 Purpose of financial and program management. Sections 84.21 through 84.28 prescribe standards for financial management systems, methods for making payments and rules for... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Purpose of financial and program...

  9. 45 CFR 2543.20 - Purpose of financial and program management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Purpose of financial and program management. 2543... OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 2543.20 Purpose of financial and program management. Sections 2543.21 through 2543.25 prescribe standards for...

  10. 12 CFR 1806.102 - Relationship to other Community Development Financial Institutions Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Financial Institutions Programs. 1806.102 Section 1806.102 Banks and Banking COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS FUND, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BANK ENTERPRISE AWARD PROGRAM General Provisions § 1806.102 Relationship to other Community Development Financial Institutions Programs. Prohibition against double funding...

  11. ESTIMATING FINANCIAL SUPPORT OF REGIONAL PROGRAMS OF SOCIAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna Kokhan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The given article presents the analysis of the experience of the financial support of the regional programs of social economic development and the areas of usage of internal and external resources of the area. Dynamic and balanced development of regions is one of the most important issues for further establishment of marketing relations and social transformations in Ukraine. The Aim lies in the evaluation of financial support of the approved regional programs and launching the amount of their financing. The assessment of social economic situation in Ivano-Frankivsk region in terms of nationwide tendencies allows asserting that economic growth depends on the amounts and sources provided by the state. To determine close connection between  the amount of financing  for the programs  and  gross domestic product, the coefficient of correlation was calculated according to Pierson. It was proved that the amount of financing regional programs of social economic development influences the growth rate of gross domestic product. During research period the activation of regional authority institutions is being surveyed regarding the adoption and financing target regional programs. It was determined that the dynamic activity of the regional community and its territorial units on realization in terms of defined strategic priorities for programs of social economic development will facilitate disproportion reduction and differences in the development of territory units in the region, as well as positively influences the growth of gross domestic product providing steady increase of social welfare. Keywords: social economic regional development, ecology programs, social programs, gross regional domestic product, Pierson’s correlation coefficient. JEL: R 58

  12. Clinical and financial considerations for implementing an ICU telemedicine program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruklitis, Robert J; Tracy, Joseph A; McCambridge, Matthew M

    2014-06-01

    As the population in the United States increases and ages, the need to provide high-quality, safe, and cost-effective care to the most critically ill patients will be of great importance. With the projected shortage of intensivists, innovative changes to improve efficiency and increase productivity will be necessary. Telemedicine programs in the ICUs (tele-ICUs) are a successful strategy to improve intensivist access to critically ill patients. Although significant capital and maintenance costs are associated with tele-ICUs, these costs can be offset by indirect financial benefits, such as decreased length of stay. To achieve the positive clinical outcomes desired, tele-ICUs must be carefully designed and implemented. In this article, we discuss the clinical benefits of tele-ICUs. We review the financial considerations, including direct and indirect reimbursement and development and maintenance costs. Finally, we review design and implementation considerations for tele-ICUs.

  13. Financial Management: Opportunities to Improve Experience and Training of Key Navy Comptrollers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1997-01-01

    .... Furthermore, accurate financial data are needed for measuring performance under GPRA. One key factor in agencies being able to achieve these objectives will be having trained and experienced financial management staff in key positions...

  14. Federal Student Loan Programs: Opportunities Exist to Improve Audit Requirements and Oversight Procedures. Report to Congressional Committees. GAO-10-668

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Kay L.

    2010-01-01

    The Higher Education Opportunity Act of 2008, Pub. L. No. 110-315, mandated GAO (Government Accountability Office) to study the financial and compliance audits and reviews required or conducted for the Federal Family Education Loan (FFEL) program and the Federal Direct Student Loan (DL) program. The Department of Education's (Education) Office of…

  15. 77 FR 16319 - Proposed Renewal; Comment Request; Anti-Money Laundering Programs for Various Financial Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-20

    ...; Anti-Money Laundering Programs for Various Financial Institutions AGENCY: Financial Crimes Enforcement... certain insurance companies to develop and implement written anti-money laundering programs reasonably designed to prevent those financial institutions from being used to facilitate money laundering and the...

  16. 10 CFR 600.341 - Monitoring and reporting program and financial performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Monitoring and reporting program and financial performance. 600.341 Section 600.341 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS FINANCIAL... Organizations Post-Award Requirements § 600.341 Monitoring and reporting program and financial performance. (a...

  17. 10 CFR 600.310 - Purpose of financial and program management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Purpose of financial and program management. 600.310... Requirements § 600.310 Purpose of financial and program management. Sections 600.311 through 600.318 prescribe standards for financial management systems; methods for making payments; and rules for cost sharing and...

  18. 28 CFR 70.20 - Purpose of financial and program management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., HOSPITALS AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 70.20 Purpose of financial and program management. Sections 70.21 through 70.28 prescribe standards for financial management systems, methods for making payments and rules for: Satisfying cost sharing and...

  19. 14 CFR 1260.120 - Purpose of financial and program management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Purpose of financial and program management... Requirements § 1260.120 Purpose of financial and program management. Sections 1260.121 through 1260.128 prescribe standards for financial management systems, methods for making payments and rules for: satisfying...

  20. 45 CFR 74.20 - Purpose of financial and program management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... standards for financial management systems, methods for making payments, and rules for satisfying cost... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Purpose of financial and program management. 74.20... NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS, AND COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program...

  1. A Review of Financial-Literacy Education Programs for Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amagir, Aisa; Groot, Wim; Maassen van den Brink, Henriëtte; Wilschut, Arie

    2018-01-01

    In this systematic literature review, we evaluate the effectiveness of financial-literacy education programs and interventions for children and adolescents. Furthermore, the key characteristics of the design of a successful financial-education curriculum are described. The evidence shows that school-based financial-education programs can improve…

  2. 41 CFR 105-72.300 - Purpose of financial and program management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Purpose of financial and.../Financial and Program Management § 105-72.300 Purpose of financial and program management. Sections 105-72... Property Management Regulations System (Continued) GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION Regional Offices-General...

  3. Using new financial instruments for improving oil trade across Africa: opportunities and limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutten, L.

    2001-01-01

    This brief paper discusses the potential for using new financial instruments for two purposes: improving intra-African oil trade; and improving the management of the financial flows that come with oil imports and exports. Although different, there are two significant similarities between these two issues. Firstly, the new financial instruments that can be used share some characteristics, and are often arranged/provided by one and the same department in trading companies and banks; they are often used together. Second, in both cases, the key problem that these financial instruments are meant to solve is that of risk. In one case, counterparty risk, in the other, price risk. (au)

  4. Opportunities and the Perception Ofspace Programs in the Developing Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abubakar, B. G.

    2006-08-01

    Although the space program as a whole is a true reflection of the level of achievement in human history in the field of Science and Technology, but it is also important to note that there are numbers of communities and societies on this earth that are ignorant about this great achievement, hence leading to the continuous diverting of Potential Astronomers, Aerospace Engineers and Astrologist to other disciplines, thereby undermining the development of the space program over time. It was in view of the above that this research was conducted and came up with the under listed Suggestions/Recommendations:- 1. The European Space Agency (ESA), National Aeronautic Space Agency (NASA) and the Russian Space Agency, should be organising and sponsoring public enlightenment conferences, seminars and workshops towards creating awareness and attracting Potential Astronomers and other Space Scientist mostly in the developing countries into the space program. 2. Esteemed organisations in space programs like NASA, ESA and others should be awarding scholarships to potential space scientist that lack the financial capability to pursue studies in the field of space science from the developing countries. 3. The European Space Agency, National Aeronautic Space Agency and the Russian Space Agency, should open their offices for the development of the space program in the third world countries. I believe that if the above suggestions/recommendations are adopted and implemented it will lead to the development of the space program in general, otherwise the rate at which potential Astronomers, Aerospace Engineers and Astrologists will be diverting into other disciplines will ever remain on the increase.

  5. Accounting for Money. Supervising: Economic and Financial Aspects. The Choice Series #70. A Self Learning Opportunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, Dennis

    This student guide is intended to assist persons employed as supervisors in accounting for money. Discussed in the first four sections are the following topics: the need for accounts; financial accounting (basics of financial accounting, creditors and debtors, assets and liabilities, and balance sheets); cost and management accounting (company,…

  6. 75 FR 32480 - Funding Opportunity: Affordable Care Act Medicare Beneficiary Outreach and Assistance Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Administration on Aging Funding Opportunity: Affordable Care Act Medicare Beneficiary Outreach and Assistance Program Funding for Title VI Native American Programs Purpose of Notice: Availability of funding opportunity announcement. Funding Opportunity Title/Program Name: Affordable Care Act Medicare...

  7. Financial evaluations of antibiotic stewardship programs - a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Willem Hendrik Dik

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThere is an increasing awareness to counteract problems due to incorrect antimicrobial use. Interventions that are implemented are often part of an Antimicrobial Stewardship Program (ASPs. Studies publishing results from these interventions are increasing, including reports on the economical effects of ASPs. This review will look at the economical sections of these studies and the methods that were used. MethodsA systematic review was performed of articles found in the PubMed and EMBASE databases published from 2000 until November 2014. Included studies found were scored for various aspects and the quality of the papers was assessed following an appropriate check list (CHEC criteria list.Results1233 studies were found, of which 149 were read completely. 99 were included in the final review. Of these studies, 57 only mentioned the costs associated with the antimicrobial medication. Others also included operational costs (n=23, costs for hospital stay (n=18 and/or other costs (n=19. 9 studies were further assessed for their quality. These studies scored between 2 and 14 out of a potential total score of 19.ConclusionsThis review gives an extensive overview of the current financial evaluation of ASPs and the quality of these economical studies. We show that there is still major potential to improve financial evaluations of ASPs. Studies do not use similar nor consistent methods or outcome measures, making it impossible draw sound conclusions and compare different studies. Finally, we make some recommendations for the future.

  8. Collaborating with congregations: opportunities for financial services in the inner city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fondation, L; Tufano, P; Walker, P

    1999-01-01

    In all economies, financial systems perform a basic set of functions, which include the need to pool resources, to save and borrow, to make payments, and to collect information. And yet, in rich and poor communities, the ways in which those needs are met differ greatly. In part, this is because traditional financial service firms have found it too expensive to serve poor neighborhoods. But it is possible to work with less traditional institutions to meet those needs. According to the authors, inner cities face two core impediments to financial services: lack of economies of scale and lack of good information. An inner-city investor with $500, for instance, does not warrant much attention from financial service firms. But 20,000 parishioners investing $500 apiece can collectively wield $10 million. By partnering with strong social organizations such as churches, financial institutions can benefit both themselves and investors. A lack of good information concerning credit histories--a common problem in poor communities--also makes low-income customers much less appealing to financial institutions. Churches can help close such information gaps by vouching for parishioners' reliability. There are certainly problems that come with mixing business and religion, as the authors concede. Ethical issues, trust issues, and issues of experience all come to mind. But understanding that functions need to dictate the structure of the financial service sector may be the first step toward achieving inner-city prosperity.

  9. Financial Awareness Education with Apprentices in the Australian Construction Industry: Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Plessis, Karin; Green, Emma

    2013-01-01

    A financial awareness education program was implemented with construction industry apprentices in Victoria, Australia. The program included face-to-face delivery of education around a range of financial management issues that apprentices face as they begin their apprenticeship. The paper reports on an evaluation of the program, which included…

  10. DUSEL-related Science at LBNL Program and Opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, Christian; Detweiler, Jason; Freedman, Stuart; Gilchriese, Murdock; Kadel, Richard; Koch, Volker; Kolomensky, Yury; Lesko, Kevin; von der Lippe, Henrik; Marks, Steve; Nomura, Yasunori; Plate, David; Roe, Natalie; Sichtermann, Ernst; Ligeti, Zoltan

    2009-01-01

    neutrinoless double beta decay searches. The Nuclear Physics Long Range Plan strongly endorses DUSEL and the associated nuclear physics programs. It mentions, in particular, neutrinoless double beta decay, and accelerator-based nuclear astrophysics measurements as key elements of the DUSEL nuclear physics experimental program. There are numerous fundamental scientific questions that experiments which can naturally be sited at DUSEL can address. LBNL has a long tradition and track record of successful experiments in all of these areas: neutrino physics, dark matter searches, and nuclear astrophysics. Clearly, DUSEL presents many scientific opportunities, and the committee was charged to present a roadmap for LBNL participation, the impact that LBNL is likely to have on experiments at the present level of effort, the value of additional manpower, and opportunities for synergistic Detector R and D activities. The Berkeley community is already deeply involved in a number of experiments and/or proposals, shown in Table 1, that will be relevant to science at DUSEL. The approximate time lines for all projects considered in this report are shown in Table 2. For the DUSEL-related experiments the depth at which they would be located is also shown. Section 2 of this report deals with nuclear astrophysics. Section 3 discusses neutrinoless double beta decays. Section 4 focuses on neutrino oscillations, including the search for CP violation and proton decay. Section 5 deals with dark matter searches. In each section we give a brief overview of that field, review the present Berkeley efforts, and discuss the opportunities going into the future. Section 6 contains our recommendations.

  11. 34 CFR 395.12 - Access to program and financial information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Access to program and financial information. 395.12... information. Each blind vendor under this part shall be provided access to all financial data of the State... annual financial reports, provided that such disclosure does not violate applicable Federal or State laws...

  12. The perceived influence of financial risk factors on the viability of nurse anesthesia educational programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Sonja J; Martin-Sheridan, Denise

    2002-10-01

    Monetary cutbacks have occurred in the healthcare industry with increasing incidence since the mid-1980s. Attempts at self-preservation through cost-constraint have been instituted by hospitals, Medicare and Medicaid, and private insurance companies. Curtailment of expenditures, as well as reestablishing profit, has taken many forms. These include managed care, mergers, changing profit status, and aggressive competition. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether directors of nurse anesthesia programs (NAPs) perceived these items as being detrimental to their NAPs. Data were gathered by descriptive survey design by completing a survey tool. Findings identified directors perceived NAPs at moderate to high risk for closure because of the financial constraints hospitals are experiencing as a result of healthcare reimbursement cutbacks. We found it interesting that many directors were either unaware or considered the hospitals' financial burdens as not impacting their NAP. However, directors who had taken courses or seminars with a focus on issues affecting the financing and reimbursement of healthcare institutions perceived significantly greater risk than those who did not. Potential learning opportunities and strategies to ameliorate risk were identified. Additional education may provide the knowledge and insight to find alternatives to risk, develop strategies, and promote more successful and stable nurse anesthesia educational programs.

  13. The College Opportunity Grant Program of the California State Scholarship and Loan Commission; A Report on and Evaluation of the 1969 and 1970 COG Selection Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingelhofer, Edwin L.

    The College Opportunity Grant (COG) program was established by the California legislature in 1968 and was intended to provide monetary grants to financially needy students, primarily from ethnic minorities, to assist them while attending college. This paper contains: (1) a side-by-side description of the characteristics of the 1969 and 1970…

  14. The Impact of a Holistic Conditional Cash Transfer Program in New York City on Parental Financial Investment, Student Time Use, and Educational Processes and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aber, J. Lawrence; Morris, Pamela; Wolf, Sharon; Berg, Juliette

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the impacts of Opportunity New York City-Family Rewards, the first holistic conditional cash transfer (CCT) program evaluated in the United States, on parental financial investments in children, and high school students' academic time use, motivations and self-beliefs, and achievement outcomes. Family Rewards, launched by the…

  15. 7 CFR 18.3 - Development and adoption of equal employment opportunity programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Development and adoption of equal employment opportunity programs. 18.3 Section 18.3 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY IN THE STATE COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICES § 18.3 Development and adoption of equal employment opportunity programs. (a) Submission....

  16. Iraqi Police Development Program: Opportunities for Improved Program Accountability and Budget Transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-24

    support, and aviation) raise red flags about the program’s fund requirements. This report identifies opportunities for improved program...tum now to the PSC audit coordination issue you raised. SIGlR unfailingly coordinates aJI of its State-related audits with State OIG prior to

  17. 32 CFR 34.41 - Monitoring and reporting program and financial performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Monitoring and reporting program and financial performance. 34.41 Section 34.41 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DoD... ORGANIZATIONS Post-award Requirements Reports and Records § 34.41 Monitoring and reporting program and financial...

  18. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 604 - Listing of Human Service Federal Financial Assistance Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Listing of Human Service Federal Financial... (Continued) FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CHARTER SERVICE Pt. 604, App. A Appendix A to Part 604—Listing of Human Service Federal Financial Assistance Programs Federal Programs...

  19. Acquisition Pattern Analyses for Recognising Cross-Sell Opportunities in the Financial Services Sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paas, L.; Kuijlen, A.A.A.

    2001-01-01

    In previously published papers it was shown that consumers often acquire financial products in the same order. Knowledge on such acquisition patterns is useful for marketing purposes. This study aims to define optimal utilisation of the acquisition pattern approach for cross-sell purposes. The

  20. The financial performance of rural hospitals and implications for elimination of the Critical Access Hospital program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, George M; Pink, George H; Friedman, Sarah A

    2013-01-01

    To compare the financial performance of rural hospitals with Medicare payment provisions to those paid under prospective payment and to estimate the financial consequences of elimination of the Critical Access Hospital (CAH) program. Financial data for 2004-2010 were collected from the Healthcare Cost Reporting Information System (HCRIS) for rural hospitals. HCRIS data were used to calculate measures of the profitability, liquidity, capital structure, and financial strength of rural hospitals. Linear mixed models accounted for the method of Medicare reimbursement, time trends, hospital, and market characteristics. Simulations were used to estimate profitability of CAHs if they reverted to prospective payment. CAHs generally had lower unadjusted financial performance than other types of rural hospitals, but after adjustment for hospital characteristics, CAHs had generally higher financial performance. Special payment provisions by Medicare to rural hospitals are important determinants of financial performance. In particular, the financial condition of CAHs would be worse if they were paid under prospective payment. © 2012 National Rural Health Association.

  1. Financial services FY 1996 site support program plan, WBS 6.10.4. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schafer, D.D.

    1995-09-01

    This program plan outlines the financial services to be provided to the Hanford reservation by the Westinghouse Hanford Company. The topics of the plan include the Hanford strategic plan, program mission, program strategy, technical requirements baseline, schedule baseline, cost baseline, performance measures, technical objectives, program performance and program funding required.

  2. Financial services FY 1996 site support program plan, WBS 6.10.4. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schafer, D.D.

    1995-09-01

    This program plan outlines the financial services to be provided to the Hanford reservation by the Westinghouse Hanford Company. The topics of the plan include the Hanford strategic plan, program mission, program strategy, technical requirements baseline, schedule baseline, cost baseline, performance measures, technical objectives, program performance and program funding required

  3. 28 CFR 30.8 - How does the Attorney General provide an opportunity to comment on proposed Federal financial...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How does the Attorney General provide an... PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES § 30.8 How does the Attorney General provide an opportunity to comment on proposed... Attorney General gives state processes or directly affected state, areawide, regional, and local officials...

  4. 49 CFR 17.8 - How does the Secretary provide states an opportunity to comment on proposed Federal financial...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 17.8 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVIEW OF DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES § 17.8 How does the Secretary provide states an opportunity... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How does the Secretary provide states an...

  5. GateWay Community College Water Resources Program Partnerships: An Opportunity for Program Success and Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaneda, M.

    2012-12-01

    GateWay Community College Water Resources Technologies (WRT) Program offers Certificate of Completions and Associate Degrees on Hydrologic Studies, Water Treatment and Wastewater Treatment. The program has been in existence since 1998 and has gone through several updates to meet the demand for professionals in those areas. The program includes theoretical and practical hands-on training in the monitoring of water quality and quantity as well as in water and industrial wastewater treatment. The WRT program offers online, face-to-face, and hybrid courses to address different student's needs for training. The program only Full-time faculty is supported by 15 adjunct- faculty professionals. Adjunct faculty is usually hired from a wide variety of professional people already working in the industry that have shown interest on teaching. Adjunct faculty also provide free tutoring to the WRT students when they are not teaching courses. The college Learning Center provides funding to support these tutoring activities. The program has an active Advisory Committee that provides guidance and recommends program changes to meet their training needs. This Advisory Committee is made of professionals from different federal, state, county agencies, and municipalities, private industry and consulting companies in the area. The Advisory Committee meets every year to provide feedback to GateWay on curriculum changes and commit to potential internship opportunities for the WRT students. Those internships (or voluntary work) are paid directly by the municipalities or agencies or can be paid by the GateWay WRT program. These internship jobs provides with an opportunity to actively promote the WRT program throughout the valley. The GateWay WRT program considers the Advisory Committee an essential component for the program success: the committee supports the program in recommending and acquiring the latest field equipment needed for the hands-on training. One of the main WRT program

  6. Isotope Production and Distribution Program`s Fiscal Year 1997 financial statement audit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-27

    The Department of Energy Isotope Production and Distribution Program mission is to serve the national need for a reliable supply of isotope products and services for medicine, industry and research. The program produces and sells hundreds of stable and radioactive isotopes that are widely utilized by domestic and international customers. Isotopes are produced only where there is no U.S. private sector capability or other production capacity is insufficient to meet U.S. needs. The Department encourages private sector investment in new isotope production ventures and will sell or lease its existing facilities and inventories for commercial purposes. The Isotope Program reports to the Director of the Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology. The Isotope Program operates under a revolving fund established by the Fiscal Year (FY) 1990 Energy and Water Appropriations Act and maintains financial viability by earning revenues from the sale of isotopes and services and through annual appropriations. The FY 1995 Energy and Water Appropriations Act modified predecessor acts to allow prices charged for Isotope Program products and services to be based on production costs, market value, the needs of the research community, and other factors. Although the Isotope Program functions as a business, prices set for small-volume, high-cost isotopes that are needed for research purposes may not achieve full-cost recovery. As a result, isotopes produced by the Isotope Program for research and development are priced to provide a reasonable return to the U.S. Government without discouraging their use. Commercial isotopes are sold on a cost-recovery basis. Because of its pricing structure, when selecting isotopes for production, the Isotope Program must constantly balance current isotope demand, market conditions, and societal benefits with its determination to operate at the lowest possible cost to U.S. taxpayers. Thus, this report provides a financial analysis of this situation.

  7. Carbon and Energy Saving Financial Opportunities in the Industrial Compressed Air Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vittorini, Diego; Cipollone, Roberto

    2017-08-01

    The transition towards a more sustainable energy scenario calls for both medium-to-long and short term interventions, with CO2 reduction and fossil fuel saving as main goals for all the Countries in the World. Among all others, one way to support these efforts is the setting-up of immaterial markets able to regulate, in the form of purchase and sales quotas, CO2 emissions avoided and fossil fuels not consumed. As a consequence, the upgrade of those sectors, characterized by high energy impact, is currently more than an option due to the related achievable financial advantage on the afore mentioned markets. Being responsible for about 10% electricity consumption in Industry, the compressed air sector is currently addressed as extremely appealing, when CO2 emissions and burned fossil fuels saving are in question. In the paper, once a standard is defined for compressors performances, based on data from the Compressed Air and Gas Institute and PNEUROP, the achievable energy saving is evaluated along with the effect in terms of CO2 emissions: with reference to those contexts in which mature intangible markets are established, an estimation of the financial benefit from savings sale on correspondent markets is possible, in terms of both avoided CO2 and fossil fuels not burned. The approach adopted allows to extend the analysis results to every context of interest, by applying the appropriate emission factor to the datum on compressor specific consumption.

  8. Short-term versus long-term market opportunities and financial constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, Angelo

    1999-01-01

    This presentation discusses gas developments in Europe, the European Gas Directive, short term vs. long term, and Snam's new challenges. The European gas market is characterized by (1) The role of gas in meeting the demand for energy, which varies greatly from one country to another, (2) A growing market, (3) Decreasing role of domestic production, and (4) Increasing imports. Within the European Union, the Gas Directive aims to transform single national markets into one integrated European market by introducing third party access to the network for eligible clients as a means of increasing the competition between operators. The Gas Directive would appear to modify the form of the market rather than its size, and in particular the sharing of responsibility and risk among operators. The market in the future will offer operators the possibility to exploit opportunities deriving mainly from demands for increased flexibility. Opportunities linked to entrepreneurial initiatives require long-term investments characteristic of the gas business. Risks and opportunities must be balanced evenly between different operators. If everyone takes on their own risks and responsibilities, this means a wider distribution of the risks of long-term vs. short-term, currently borne by the gas companies that are integrated, into a market that tends to favour the short-term. A gradual liberalization process should allow incumbent operators to gradually diversify their activities in new gas market areas or enter new business activities. They could move beyond their local and European boundaries in pursuit of an international dimension. The market will have to make the transition from the national to the European dimension: as an example, Snam covers 90% of the Italian market, but its share of an integrated European market will be about 15%

  9. Audit Guide: Audits of Federal Student Financial Assistance Programs at Participating Institutions and Institution Servicers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Inspector General (ED), Washington, DC.

    All institutions participating in the Federal Student Financial Assistance Programs must have an annual financial aid compliance audit performed by an independent auditor. This guide is effective for fiscal years ending December 31, 1999, and thereafter, for institutions preparing for their yearly audit. The purpose of the document is to assist…

  10. A review of financial-literacy education programs for children and adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amagir, Aisa; Groot, Wim; Maassen van den Brink, Henriëtte; Wilschut, Arie

    In this systematic literature review, we evaluate the effectiveness of financial-literacy education programs and interventions for children and adolescents. Furthermore, the key characteristics of the design of a successful financial-education curriculum are described. The evidence shows that

  11. Outdoor Education Opportunities for Middle School Students: Academic and Social Impacts of Adventure Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    This study examines components of outdoor adventure programs for middle school students, using a school with a successful program as a model. Outdoor education is often left out of these years for financial and safety reasons, however the benefits of adventure programs are both measurable and profound to self-concept, confidence, identity growth,…

  12. New Global Financial Order and Promotion of Asian Infrastructural Investment Bank (AIIB: Opportunities and Challenges for Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Olufemi Fatile

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to examine the effect of Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB on infrastructural development in developing countries with specific reference to Africa. The paper argues that availability of infrastructure has become one of the major problems in the process of economic development generally in the Global South. Given the need for hugecapital infrastructure in the region and thepresence of the financing gap in infrastructure financing, China initiated the establishment of the AIIB, therefore, heralding a new chapter in the international finance system. The study uses the “New Model Development Finance” lens to discuss Global Governance of Finance with a historical overview of GlobalFinancial Institutions such as the International Monetary Fund (IMF and World Bank that have been in existence for close to seven decades. It identifies the majorchallenges which emerging economies have with existing international financial institutions as well as some opportunities and challenges for African countries. It observes that the establishment of AIIB is a major diplomatic victory for China and a foreign policy fiasco for the United States. It argues further that the new bank is a parallel project to the existing international financial institutions and may accidentally lead to a reform of the Bretton Woods system. The paper recommends among others that AIIB should find a way to work hand-in-hand with other existing Multilateral Development Banks (MDBs since cooperation with such development agencies can engender positive image and goodwill for the new bank. It concludes that the establishment and development of AIIB need support from all over the world because AIIB is designed to provide financing methods for infrastructure in developing countries across the globe including African nations.

  13. A Seasonal Time-Series Model Based on Gene Expression Programming for Predicting Financial Distress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Hsue Cheng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The issue of financial distress prediction plays an important and challenging research topic in the financial field. Currently, there have been many methods for predicting firm bankruptcy and financial crisis, including the artificial intelligence and the traditional statistical methods, and the past studies have shown that the prediction result of the artificial intelligence method is better than the traditional statistical method. Financial statements are quarterly reports; hence, the financial crisis of companies is seasonal time-series data, and the attribute data affecting the financial distress of companies is nonlinear and nonstationary time-series data with fluctuations. Therefore, this study employed the nonlinear attribute selection method to build a nonlinear financial distress prediction model: that is, this paper proposed a novel seasonal time-series gene expression programming model for predicting the financial distress of companies. The proposed model has several advantages including the following: (i the proposed model is different from the previous models lacking the concept of time series; (ii the proposed integrated attribute selection method can find the core attributes and reduce high dimensional data; and (iii the proposed model can generate the rules and mathematical formulas of financial distress for providing references to the investors and decision makers. The result shows that the proposed method is better than the listing classifiers under three criteria; hence, the proposed model has competitive advantages in predicting the financial distress of companies.

  14. A Seasonal Time-Series Model Based on Gene Expression Programming for Predicting Financial Distress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    The issue of financial distress prediction plays an important and challenging research topic in the financial field. Currently, there have been many methods for predicting firm bankruptcy and financial crisis, including the artificial intelligence and the traditional statistical methods, and the past studies have shown that the prediction result of the artificial intelligence method is better than the traditional statistical method. Financial statements are quarterly reports; hence, the financial crisis of companies is seasonal time-series data, and the attribute data affecting the financial distress of companies is nonlinear and nonstationary time-series data with fluctuations. Therefore, this study employed the nonlinear attribute selection method to build a nonlinear financial distress prediction model: that is, this paper proposed a novel seasonal time-series gene expression programming model for predicting the financial distress of companies. The proposed model has several advantages including the following: (i) the proposed model is different from the previous models lacking the concept of time series; (ii) the proposed integrated attribute selection method can find the core attributes and reduce high dimensional data; and (iii) the proposed model can generate the rules and mathematical formulas of financial distress for providing references to the investors and decision makers. The result shows that the proposed method is better than the listing classifiers under three criteria; hence, the proposed model has competitive advantages in predicting the financial distress of companies. PMID:29765399

  15. A Seasonal Time-Series Model Based on Gene Expression Programming for Predicting Financial Distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ching-Hsue; Chan, Chia-Pang; Yang, Jun-He

    2018-01-01

    The issue of financial distress prediction plays an important and challenging research topic in the financial field. Currently, there have been many methods for predicting firm bankruptcy and financial crisis, including the artificial intelligence and the traditional statistical methods, and the past studies have shown that the prediction result of the artificial intelligence method is better than the traditional statistical method. Financial statements are quarterly reports; hence, the financial crisis of companies is seasonal time-series data, and the attribute data affecting the financial distress of companies is nonlinear and nonstationary time-series data with fluctuations. Therefore, this study employed the nonlinear attribute selection method to build a nonlinear financial distress prediction model: that is, this paper proposed a novel seasonal time-series gene expression programming model for predicting the financial distress of companies. The proposed model has several advantages including the following: (i) the proposed model is different from the previous models lacking the concept of time series; (ii) the proposed integrated attribute selection method can find the core attributes and reduce high dimensional data; and (iii) the proposed model can generate the rules and mathematical formulas of financial distress for providing references to the investors and decision makers. The result shows that the proposed method is better than the listing classifiers under three criteria; hence, the proposed model has competitive advantages in predicting the financial distress of companies.

  16. e-Learning Programs as Loyalty Investments for Financial Corporations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvanitis, Spyridon

    2010-01-01

    Although e-learning has been thoroughly presented and analysed in recent years, this paper aims to present a new concept, about web-based learning used as a tool to provide "products' education" for customers, and the ways enterprises of the financial sector, may use it in order to promote their brand name and services by affecting crucial factors…

  17. Administrator Responses to Financial Incentives: Insights from a TIF Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    King Rice, Jennifer; Malen, Betty; Jackson, Cara; Hoyer, Kathleen Mulvaney

    2017-01-01

    This article provides evidence and generates insights about the power of financial rewards to motivate school administrators and the design features that influence their motivational potency. The multi-year mixed-methods study is grounded in expectancy and goal setting theories that suggest (a) awards must be salient and sizable enough to appeal…

  18. 75 FR 76677 - Financial Crimes Enforcement Network: Anti-Money Laundering Program and Suspicious Activity...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-09

    ...: Anti-Money Laundering Program and Suspicious Activity Report Filing Requirements for Residential... loan or finance companies for the purpose of requiring them to establish anti-money laundering programs...-money laundering program requirements on financial institutions.\\3\\ The authority of the Secretary to...

  19. Equal Opportunity Program Management for the Army Medical Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-09

    applies to someone who has the physical, cultural, or linguistic characteristics of a national group. Personal Racism , Sexism , or Bigotry: The ...Management and Army Demographics and Statistics Departments. LTC Horrell arranged my VIP trip to the Defense Equal Opportunity Management Institute (DEOMI...harassment in the organization. Organizational productivity is maximized when illegal discrimination is eradicated. One theory of why discrimination

  20. Nuclear waste: Department of Energy's program for financial assistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The Department of Energy's existing grant guidelines for financial assistance to first and second repository states do not clearly establish a basis for determining who is funded, what activities are funded, and how much funding is provided each activity. Because the guidelines do not cover all funding circumstances, DOE has interpreted them differently when making both mandatory and discretionary grant decisions. In addition, DOE has not considered state and Indian tribe needs in establishing its budget request for grant awards. Instead, the requests are based on the amounts of grants awarded in prior years and DOE planned activities. Finally, both grantee compliance with certain reporting requirements of DOE's financial assistance regulations and DOE's enforcement of them has been inconsistent

  1. A Self-Instructional Course in Student Financial Aid Administration. Module 5: Title IV Institutional and Program Eligibility. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington Consulting Group, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The fifth module in a 17-module self-instructional course on student financial aid administration teaches novice student financial aid administrators and other personnel about Title IV institutional and program eligibility. This introduction to management of federal financial aid programs authorized by the Higher Education Act Title IV, discusses…

  2. Opportunities to Improve Air Quality through Transportation Pricing Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document is intended to give state and local air quality and transportation planners,elected government officials, and other interested parties background information on transportation pricing programs.

  3. Accreditation of Biomedical Engineering Programs in Europe - Challenge and Opportunity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nagel, Joachim

    2001-01-01

    Today, more than 100 universities and polytechnic schools in Europe offer educational programs in Biomedical Engineering at all academic levels, but without any international coordination of contents...

  4. Expanding Access and Opportunity: The Impact of the Gates Millennium Scholars Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    In 1999, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation began an innovative scholarship program that provides full financial support to low-income minority students across the United States. The Gates Millennium Scholars (GMS) program has already awarded more than 10,000 scholarships to exceptional students, with the ultimate goal of funding at least…

  5. A Financial Analysis Program That Will PASS the Farm Manager “Interest Testâ€

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Christine; Bernard, Freddie; Boehlje, Michael

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses a farm financial analysis program, along with four features of the program that have facilitated its use by farm managers. The four features that appear to increase farm manager interest in the program are Performancebased, Accrual-adjusted income statement, System of financial analysis, and Simple to use. We illustrate this program with application to a farm firm case study.

  6. Workplace Financial Wellness Programs Help Employees Manage Health Care Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Cynthia; Smith, Michael C

    Employers and employees are navigating major changes in health insurance benefits, including the move to high-deductible health plans in conjunction with health savings accounts (HSAs). The HSA offers unique benefits that could prove instrumental in helping workers both navigate current health care expenses and build a nest egg for much larger health care costs in retirement. Yet employees often don't understand the HSA and how to best use it. How can employers help employees make wise benefits choices that work for their personal financial circumstances?

  7. 76 FR 55946 - Comment Request for Information Collection for the Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-09

    ... Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) Program: Extension With Non-Substantive Revisions AGENCY: Employment and..., ``Certification Workload and Characteristics of Certified Individuals, Work Opportunity Tax Credit'' and provided... submit this report using the Internet-based Tax Credit Reporting System of the Enterprise Business...

  8. The US planetary exploration program opportunities for international cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    Opportunities for international participation in US-sponsored interplanetary missions are discussed on the basis of the recommendations of the Committee on Planetary and Lunar Exploration of the National Academy of Sciences Space Science Board. The initial core missions suggested are a Venus radar mapper, a Mars geoscience/climatology orbiter, a comet-rendezvous/asteroid-flyby mission, and a Titan probe/radar mapper. Subsequent core missions are listed, and the need for cooperation in planning and development stages to facilitate international participation is indicated.

  9. Understanding the Long-Term Benefits of a Latino Financial Literacy Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meraz, Antonio Alba; Petersen, Cindy M.; Marczak, Mary S.; Brown, Arthur; Rajasekar, Neeraj

    2013-01-01

    The long-term impact of a Latino financial literacy program was evaluated with a sample of relatively recent immigrant populations in southern Minnesota. Telephone and face-to-face interviews were conducted with participants 6 months post program completion. Results indicate that improvements in knowledge and skills were retained and that these…

  10. 34 CFR 668.47 - Report on athletic program participation rates and financial support data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... program participation rates and financial support data. (a) Applicability. This section applies to a co-educational institution of higher education that— (1) Participates in any title IV, HEA program; and (2) Has... expenses, salaries and benefits, supplies, travel, and any other expenses attributable to intercollegiate...

  11. 77 FR 38066 - Medicare Program; Announcement of a New Opportunity for Participation in the Advance Payment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-26

    ...This notice announces a new opportunity for participation in the Advance Payment Model for certain accountable care organizations participating in the Medicare Shared Savings Program scheduled to begin in January 2013.

  12. Financial services FY 1995 site support program plan WBS 6.10.4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vodney, E.P.

    1994-09-01

    This is the signed Financial Service fiscal year 1995 Site Support Program Plan, Work Breakdown Structure 6.10.4, for the Hanford site. This plan is intended to enable the contractor to accomplish the following: ensure financial integrity in all Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) operation while supporting the programmatic activities of WHC, the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, and other Hanford contractors; provide efficient and effective financial services, and value added audits and review that enable management to enhance future operational results.

  13. Terminating the Audit of the National Flood Insurance Program’s Fiscal 1980 Financial Statements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-21

    7 AD-A107 188 GENERAL ACCOUNTING OFFICE WASHINGTON DC ACCOUNTING A ETC F/G 5/1 TERMINATING THE AUDIT OF THE NATIONAL FLOOD INSURANCE PROGRAN S-,-ETC...Management Agency Dear Mr. Giuffrida: A Subject: Terminating the Audit of the National Floodr .) Insurance Program’s Fiscal 1980 Financial...objective of the audit was to express an opinion on the NFIP’s < fiscal 1980 financial statements. We will not meet this objec- tive, however, because

  14. Nigeria; Publication of Financial Sector Assessment Program Documentation––Technical Note on Stress Testing

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2013-01-01

    To assess the financial stability in Nigeria, various stress tests and analytic processes were undertaken jointly by the Nigerian authorities and the Financial Sector Assessment Program (FSAP) team. The exercise included macroeconomic scenario analysis and its transmission into a range of single- and multifactor shocks. The tests covered the entire Nigerian banking system and looked at the short-term horizon, in part because of data constraints. Sensitivity stress tests estimated the impact o...

  15. Report of the State Auditor. State Colleges in Colorado. Financial, State-Funded Student Financial Assistance Programs, and NCAA Audits. Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1995.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba, J. David

    The results of a Colorado State audit of the consolidated financial statements are reported, along with the statements of appropriations, expenditures, transfers and reversions for state-funded Student Financial Assistance Programs for the four State Colleges in Colorado for the year ended June 30, 1995. Specific recommendations are given for each…

  16. The use of a break-even analysis: financial analysis of a fast-track program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saywell, R M; Cordell, W H; Nyhuis, A W; Giles, B K; Culler, S D; Woods, J R; Chu, D K; McKinzie, J P; Rodman, G H

    1995-08-01

    To calculate the financial break-even point and illustrate how changes in third-party reimbursement and eligibility could affect a program's fiscal standing. Demographic, clinical, and financial data were collected retrospectively for 446 patients treated in a fast-track program during June 1993. The fast-track program is located within the confines of the emergency medicine and trauma center at a 1,050-bed tertiary care Midwestern teaching hospital and provides urgent treatment to minimally ill patients. A financial break-even analysis was performed to determine the point where the program generated enough revenue to cover its total variable and fixed costs, both direct and indirect. Given the relatively low average collection rate (62%) and high percentage of uninsured patients (31%), the analysis showed that the program's revenues covered its direct costs but not all of the indirect costs. Examining collection rates or payer class mix without examining both costs and revenues may lead to an erroneous conclusion about a program's fiscal viability. Sensitivity analysis also shows that relatively small changes in third-party coverage or eligibility (income) requirements can have a large impact on the program's financial solvency and break-even volumes.

  17. Financial incentives and accountability for integrated medical care in Department of Veterans Affairs mental health programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, Amy M; Greenwald, Devra E; Hermann, Richard C; Charns, Martin P; McCarthy, John F; Yano, Elizabeth M

    2010-01-01

    This study assessed the extent to which mental health leaders perceive their programs as being primarily accountable for monitoring general medical conditions among patients with serious mental illness, and it assessed associations with modifiable health system factors. As part of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) 2007 national Mental Health Program Survey, 108 mental health program directors were queried regarding program characteristics. Perceived accountability was defined as whether their providers, as opposed to external general medical providers, were primarily responsible for specific clinical tasks related to serious mental illness treatment or high-risk behaviors. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine whether financial incentives or other system factors were associated with accountability. Thirty-six percent of programs reported primary accountability for monitoring diabetes and cardiovascular risk after prescription of second-generation antipsychotics, 10% for hepatitis C screening, and 17% for obesity screening and weight management. In addition, 18% and 27% of program leaders, respectively, received financial bonuses for high performance for screening for risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease and for alcohol misuse. Financial bonuses for diabetes and cardiovascular screening were associated with primary accountability for such screening (odds ratio=5.01, pFinancial incentives to improve quality performance may promote accountability in monitoring diabetes and cardiovascular risk assessment within mental health programs. Integrated care strategies (co-location) might be needed to promote management of high-risk behaviors among patients with serious mental illness.

  18. Research opportunities in photochemical sciences for the DOE Hydrogen Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padro, C.E.G. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-09-01

    For several decades, interest in hydrogen has ebbed and flowed. With the OPEC oil embargo of the 1970`s and the promise of inexpensive nuclear power, hydrogen research focused on fuel applications. The economics and the realities of nuclear power shifted the emphasis to hydrogen as an energy carrier. Environmental benefits took center stage as scientists and politicians agreed on the potential threat of carbon dioxide emissions to global climate change. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Utility Technologies manages the National Hydrogen Program. In this role, the DOE provides national leadership and acts as a catalyst through partnerships with industry. These partnerships are needed to assist in the transition of sustainable hydrogen systems from a government-supported research and development phase to commercial successes in the marketplace. The outcome of the Program is expected to be the orderly phase-out of fossil fuels as a result of market-driven technology advances, with a least-cost, environmentally benign energy delivery system. The program seeks to maintain its balance of high-risk, long-term research in renewable based technologies that address the environmental benefits, with nearer-term, fossil based technologies that address infrastructure and market issues. National laboratories, universities, and industry are encouraged to participate, cooperate, and collaborate in the program. The U.S. Hydrogen Program is poised to overcome the technical and economic challenges that currently limit the impact of hydrogen on our energy picture, through cooperative research, development, and demonstrations.

  19. [A SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats) analysis of the current immunization program in Zhejiang Province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Han-Qing; Ling, Luo-Ya; Xu, Xu-Qing

    2009-02-01

    To know the status of Immunization program in Zhejiang Province. The investigation on immunization program in zhejiang province was conducted, and the SWOT analysis was corducted to make a comprehensive evaluation. 11 cities, 22 counties and 44 towns were investigated in this study, and the current immunization program in Zhejiang province were explored by SWOT analysis. The SWOT Matrix, includes SO (strength-opportunity), ST (strength-threat), WO (weakness-opportunity) and WT (weakness-threat) can apply to make optimal strategy for the development of expanded program on immunization.

  20. Developing a Culturally Appropriate Depression Prevention Program: Opportunities and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardemil, Esteban V.; Kim, Saeromi; Davidson, Tatiana; Sarmiento, Ingrid A.; Ishikawa, Rachel Zack; Sanchez, Monica; Torres, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the experiences of the first author and his colleagues in the development and implementation of a depression prevention program that specifically targets Latina mothers. Building on the earlier papers that highlight the underutilization of mental health services by Latinos in general, this paper will make the case that the…

  1. Introduction: financial geographies: the credit crisis as an opportunity to catch economic geography’s next boat?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelen, E.; Faulconbridge, J.

    2009-01-01

    The story of the financial turmoil that swept the world in 2007 and 2008 has proven to be geographical to the bone. In this introduction to the special issue on ‘financial geographies’ we express concerns that the financial crisis and all it has showcased is going to be economic geography's ‘next

  2. Meeting the Needs of Children and Families: Opportunities and Challenges for School Psychology Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Michael J.; Batsche, George M.

    1991-01-01

    Notes that graduate training programs face challenges, as well as opportunities, in fulfillment of their responsibilities to prepare school psychologists for entry into professional practice. Examines nature and origins of potential changes facing school psychology and discusses adequacy of current training programs. Discusses future implications…

  3. Efficiency improvement opportunities in TVs: Implications for market transformation programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Won Young; Phadke, Amol; Shah, Nihar; Letschert, Virginie

    2013-01-01

    Televisions (TVs) account for a significant portion of residential electricity consumption and global TV shipments are expected to continue to increase. We assess the market trends in the energy efficiency of TVs that are likely to occur without any additional policy intervention and estimate that TV efficiency will likely improve by over 60% by 2015 with savings potential of 45 terawatt-hours [TW h] per year in 2015, compared to today’s technology. We discuss various energy-efficiency improvement options and evaluate the cost effectiveness of three of them. At least one of these options improves efficiency by at least 20% cost effectively beyond ongoing market trends. We provide insights for policies and programs that can be used to accelerate the adoption of efficient technologies to further capture global energy savings potential from TVs which we estimate to be up to 23 TW h per year in 2015. - Highlights: • We analyze the impact of the recent TV market transition on TV energy consumption. • We review TV technology options that could be realized in the near future. • We assess the cost-effectiveness of selected energy-efficiency improvement options. • We estimate global electricity savings potential in selected scenarios. • We discuss possible directions of market transformation programs

  4. INTEGRATION OPPORTUNITIES OF MIGRANTS, WITH ESPECIAL REGARDS TO SENSITIZATION PROGRAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krisztina DAJNOKI

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available As a result of the migration wave appearing in summer 2015, the issue of immigrant integration has more often become conspicuous. Although a significant decline has been recorded in the number of immigrants, social-economic-labor market integration is still a challenge for experts and a task to be resolved. In our opinion, the key to the success of migration strategies and integration-aimed programs depends on the attitude and awareness of society (public opinion and – on the organizational level – the manager and future colleagues as well as on the organizational culture and the approach of a proper human resource expert. Besides adequate information, the recognition of international ‘best practices’ and the adaptation of operational diversity-management, one of the possible methods of facilitating integration is the utilization of sensitization trainings. The article introduces partial results of a questionnaire survey involving 220 employees with respect to attributes associated with migrants and emphasizing the peculiarity and significance of sensitization trainings.

  5. A budget model to determine the financial health of nursing education programs in academic institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Gloria

    2005-01-01

    In the allocation of resources in academic settings, hierarchies of tradition and status often supersede documented need. Nursing programs sometimes have difficulty in getting what they need to maintain quality programs and to grow. The budget is the crucial tool in documenting nursing program needs and its contributions to the entire academic enterprise. Most nursing programs administrators see only an operating expense budget that may grow or shrink by a rubric that may not fit the reality of the situation. A budget is a quantitative expression of how well a unit is managed. Educational administrators should be paying as much attention to analyzing financial outcomes as they do curricular outcomes. This article describes the development of a model for tracking revenue and expense and a simple rubric for analyzing the relationship between the two. It also discusses how to use financial data to improve the fiscal performance of nursing units and to leverage support during times of growth.

  6. Financial reporting for the Powersmart programs of British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, A.T.

    1990-01-01

    The Powersmart program at British Columbia Hydro seeks to minimize the short- and long-term energy costs to customers through the efficient or avoided use of electricity. In determining the overall financial reporting of Powersmart, four areas were reviewed in depth. The question of deferral or expensing of expenditures was examined with reference to accounting principles and industry practice in Canada and the USA. Discussion is provided on the costs that would be deferred, the amortization period of deferred expenses, and financial statement presentation. Deferral and amortization appear appropriate if the costs incurred are recoverable under future rates. The design, development, and implementation of power saving programs are outlined as well as the criteria for selection of an amortization period. At British Columbia Hydro, all Powersmart programs are treated as one type of expense and an amortization period of 7 years has been selected for all programs to simplify the accounting

  7. 12 CFR 7.1021 - National bank participation in financial literacy programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false National bank participation in financial literacy programs. 7.1021 Section 7.1021 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE... at a facility used by, a school. The school premises or facility will not be considered a branch of...

  8. Time to Pay Up: Analyzing the Motivational Potential of Financial Awards in a TIF Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Jennifer King; Malen, Betty; Jackson, Cara; Hoyer, Kathleen Mulvaney

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of educator incentive programs rests on the assumption that the potential rewards for participants will motivate them to behave in certain ways (e.g., choose certain jobs, expend greater effort, engage in capacity-building professional development). Some researchers have examined the impact of financial incentives on teacher…

  9. College Financial Aid and the Employee Tuition Benefit Programs of the Fortune 500 Companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Joseph P.

    Ways are discussed that internal changes in pricing, tuition collection, and cash-flow management might be sources of financial aid for college students ineligible for state and federal assistance programs. The experiences described are the result of two FIPSE (Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education) projects, one dealing with…

  10. Financial Reporting and Cost Analysis Manual for Day Care Centers, Head Start, and Other Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedger, Jean E.; And Others

    This manual is designed to provide fundamental directions for systematic financial reporting and cost analysis for the administrators, accountants, bookkeepers, and staff of day care, Project Head Start, and other programs. The major aims of the manual are to induce day care directors to adopt uniform bookkeeping procedures and to analyze costs…

  11. A Primer on the Financial Management of Experiential Learning Assessment Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacTaggart, Terrence

    1983-01-01

    The success and failure of experiential learning assessment programs rests not only on their academic quality, but also on their financial management. Types of cost and the meaning of cost-effectiveness are discussed. Break-even analysis, cost-reduction activities, and revenue-enhancement techniques are described. (Author/MLW)

  12. Financial Sector Assessment Program : Nigeria - Basel Core Principles for Effective Banking Supervision

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund; World Bank

    2013-01-01

    The assessment of the current state of the implementation of the Basel Core Principles (BCP) for effective banking supervision in Nigeria, against the BCP methodology issued by the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (BCBS) in October 2006, was completed between August 27 and September 19, 2012, as part of a Financial Sector Assessment Program (FSAP) update, undertaken jointly by the Fu...

  13. An Educational Program to Assist Clinicians in Identifying Elder Investment Fraud and Financial Exploitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Whitney L.; Roush, Robert E.; Moye, Jennifer; Kunik, Mark E.; Wilson, Nancy L.; Taffet, George E.; Naik, Aanand D.

    2012-01-01

    Due to age-related factors and illnesses, older adults may become vulnerable to elder investment fraud and financial exploitation (EIFFE). The authors describe the development and preliminary evaluation of an educational program to raise awareness and assist clinicians in identifying older adults at risk. Participants (n = 127) gave high ratings…

  14. Financial inclusion impementation program for the development in the area of South Tangerang, Banten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewi, Etika; Heykal, Mohamad

    2018-03-01

    The research objective aims to evaluate the problems about the implementation of financial inclusion for the economic development especially in the area of South Tangerang and find solutions for the development financial inclusion. The research is qualitative research that using primary data and the data collection methods is in the questionnaires, interviews, and observations through the official website and Annual Report. The object of this research is OJK of Financial Services Authority as the regulator, five conventional banks are BRI, Mandiri, BNI, BCA and CIMB Niaga as supply side, and the micro and small category of Small Medium Enterprise in Tangerang Selatan area as the demand side. Using testing questionnaire data with validity and reliability test. The conclusion of the research is the OJK and banks have done enough support to improve the financial inclusion program to the micro and small category of SMEs. The majority of services and facilities available have been by the needs of SMEs, but there are still obstacles in marketing (marketing exclusion). Thus, an efficient solution is to educate and socialize more evenly and more vigorously, and invite other banks to participate in supporting OJK programs in increasing financial inclusion.

  15. 12 CFR 303.46 - Financial education programs that include the provision of bank products and services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Financial education programs that include the provision of bank products and services. 303.46 Section 303.46 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE... Branches and Offices § 303.46 Financial education programs that include the provision of bank products and...

  16. Review of financial incentive, low-income, elderly and multifamily residential conservation programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, L.; Hubbard, M.; White, D.

    1986-09-01

    This report describes thirty-nine utility-sponsored residential conservation programs for four types of markets. The program types considered are: (1) financial incentive programs for the general residential market, (2) programs for low-income households, (3) programs for the elderly, and (4) programs for the multifamily market. Each program description contains information on incentive terms, eligibility, conservation measures, program history, design and marketing, and the utility/agency motivation for operating the program. The names, addresses and phone numbers of contact persons also are included. Two methods were used to select the programs to be described. First, nominations of successful programs of each type were solicited from experts on residential energy conservation. Second, managers of the programs on this initial list were asked to describe their programs and to suggest other successful programs that should be included in the sample. Because of the selection process used, this report covers mainly the best known and most frequently studied programs that are aimed at the four market types.

  17. Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for Sandia National Laboratories/California recycling programs.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wrons, Ralph Jordan; Vetter, Douglas Walter

    2007-07-01

    This Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (PPOA) was conducted for the Sandia National Laboratories/California (SNL/CA) Environmental Management Department between May 2006 and March 2007, to evaluate the current site-wide recycling program for potential opportunities to improve the efficiency of the program. This report contains a summary of the information collected and analyses performed with recommended options for implementation. The SNL/NM Pollution Prevention (P2) staff worked with the SNL/CA P2 Staff to arrive at these options.

  18. LINKING ADMINISTRATORS ROLES IN CAREER PROGRAMS TO PROACTIVE BEHAVIOR AS A DETERMINANT OF EMPLOYEES PROMOTION OPPORTUNITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azman Ismail

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This research examines the relationship between administrators roles in career programs, proactive behavior and employees promotion opportunities. Self-administered questionnaires were collected from employees who work in an established private oil and gas firm in West Coast of Peninsular Malaysia. The outcomes of SmartPLS path model analysis demonstrate that the ability of administrators to plan and managecareer programs have strongly invoked employees proactive behavior. As a result, this situation may lead to an enhance employees promotion opportunities in the organizational sample. Further, this study offers discussion, implications and conclusion.

  19. The European platform for financial education as incentive for the national efforts in implementing financial literacy programs: The case of the Association of Serbian Banks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sredojević Slađana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A sustainable financial system relies on two pillars: the functional and healthy financial institutions, as well as the financially competent customers-investors-entrepreneurs. The responsibility for the implementation of training programs and preparation for the well-informed choice does not lie only with the natural persons and legal entities. This is a shared responsibility of different stakeholders: individuals, families, small and medium enterprises, public administration, the Ministry of Education, the financial services sector, employers and representatives of trade unions and consumer protection organizations as well as other civil society initiatives. A prime example of such an integrated approach towards the same goal is the European Platform for Financial Education, an initiative launched by the European Banking Federation, the European Banking Training Network and other institutions (professional associations, in February 2017 in Brussels as an incentive for the national level efforts in implementing the respective financial literacy programs. In this paper we analyzed the importance and role of the European Platform for Financial Education in the case of the Serbian banking sector through the activities of the Association of Serbian Banks. These activities will be implemented by the Association of Banks of Serbia continuously throughout the year, and after the celebration of the European Money Week on 27-31 March 2017.

  20. Impact of financial incentives on behavior change program participation and risk reduction in worksite health promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingerich, Stefan B; Anderson, David R; Koland, Heidi

    2012-01-01

    To examine the impact of financial incentives on behavior change program registration, completion, and risk improvement rates. Retrospective cohort study conducted to observe the relationship between financial incentives and behavior change program registration, completion, and risk improvement rates. Large public- or private-sector employers. Twenty-four organizations (n = 511,060 eligible employees) that offered comprehensive worksite health promotion (WHP) programs. Financial incentives offered for completion of a behavior change program as part of a WHP program. Behavior change program registration and completion data were obtained from standard reports. Company-level risk change was calculated from the average per-person number of risks on baseline and follow-up health risk assessments. Incentive design was determined from questionnaires completed by WHP program managers. Average registration rates, program completion rates, and risk improvement rates were compared using t-tests for companies that did versus did not offer incentives. Comparisons were also made between companies with incentives of less than $100 and those with incentives of $100 or more. Correlations between incentive value and outcome variables were assessed using Pearson correlations. Companies that offered incentives had significantly higher health coaching completion rates than companies not offering an incentive (82.9% vs. 76.4%, respectively, p = .017) but there was no significant association with registration (p = .384) or risk improvement rates (p = .242). Incentive values were not significantly associated with risk improvement rates (p = .240). Offering incentives for completing behavior change programs may increase completion rates, but increased health improvement does not necessarily follow.

  1. OPPORTUNITIES AND THREATS FOR DEVELOPMENT OF HUMAN CAPITAL IN THE FIELD OF EDUCATION IN RURAL AREAS IN POLAND UNDER THE MULTIANNUAL FINANCIAL FRAMEWORK 2014–2020

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Kowalska

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Investment in human capital is a key determinant of socio-economic development in the twenty-fi rst century. These investments in rural areas require well-planned interventions in the fi eld of education. The necessary funds for this purpose will be available under the multiannual fi nancial framework EU 2014–2020. Interventions in this area in Poland are planned mainly under the Operational Programme Knowledge Education Development POWER and the Regional Operational Programmes (RPO. It should therefore be valuable to preliminarily assess the opportunities and threats connected with the development of human capital in rural areas in Poland in the fi eld of education in 2014–2020. The aim of this article is, thus, an attempt to make such an assessment, taking into account the following aspects: scope of the EU support; procedures for obtaining fi nancial support; available funds and financial instruments. The article verifi es the following hypothesis: based on program POWER establishments and RPO 2014–2020 in the section on education potential chances of the HRD in rural areas mainly result from wide range scope of this suport; while the main threats stem from a very limited scale of prioritization in the procedure of obtaining fi nancial support and the use of non-repayable fi nancial instruments (grants. The article draws upon the analysis of regulations of the European Commission and national legislative sources, as well as literature on development of human capital in rural areas and the absorption of EU funds for social projects.

  2. Financial performance among adult day centers: results of a national demonstration program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reifler, B V; Henry, R S; Rushing, J; Yates, M K; Cox, N J; Bradham, D D; McFarlane, M

    1997-02-01

    This paper describes the financial performance (defined as percent of total expenses covered by net operating revenue) of 16 adult day centers participating in a national demonstration program on day services for people with dementia, including examination of possible predictors of financial performance. Participating sites submitted quarterly financial and utilization reports to the National Program Office. Descriptive statistics summarize the factors believed to influence financial performance. Sites averaged meeting 35% of expenses from self-pay and 29% from government (mainly Medicaid) revenue, totaling 64% of all (cash plus in-kind) expenses met by operating revenue. Examination of center characteristics suggests that factors related to meeting consumer needs, such as being open a full day (i.e., 7:30 am to 6:00 pm) rather than shorter hours, and providing transportation, may be related to improved utilization and, thus, improved financial performance. Higher fees were not related to lower enrollment, census, or revenue. Adult day centers are able to achieve financial viability through a combination of operating (i.e., fee-for-service) and non-operating revenue. Operating revenue is enhanced by placing emphasis on consumer responsiveness, such as being open a full day. Because higher fees were not related to lower utilization, centers should set fees to reflect actual costs. The figure of 64% of expenses met by operating revenue is conservative inasmuch as sites included in-kind revenue as expenses in their budgeting calculations, and percent of cash expenses met by operating revenue would be higher (approximately 75% for this group of centers).

  3. Addressing maternal healthcare through demand side financial incentives: experience of Janani Suraksha Yojana program in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalan, Saji S; Durairaj, Varatharajan

    2012-09-15

    Demand side financing (DSF) is a widely employed strategy to enhance utilization of healthcare. The impact of DSF on health care seeking in general and that of maternal care in particular is already known. Yet, its effect on financial access to care, out-of-pocket spending (OOPS) and provider motivations is not considerably established. Without such evidence, DSFs may not be recommendable to build up any sustainable healthcare delivery approach. This study explores the above aspects on India's Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSY) program. This study employed design and was conducted in three districts of Orissa, selected through a three-stage stratified sampling. The quantitative method was used to review the Health Management Information System (HMIS). The qualitative methods included focus groups discussions with beneficiaries (n = 19) and community intermediaries (n = 9), and interviews (n = 7) with Ministry of Health officials. HMIS data enabled to review maternal healthcare utilization. Group discussions and interviews explored the perceived impact of JSY on in-facility delivery, OOPS, healthcare costs, quality of care and performance motivation of community health workers. The number of institutional deliveries, ante-and post-natal care visits increased after the introduction of JSY with an annual net growth of 18.1%, 3.6% and 5% respectively. The financial incentive provided partial financial risk-protection as it could cover only 25.5% of the maternal healthcare cost of the beneficiaries in rural areas and 14.3% in urban areas. The incentive induced fresh out-of-pocket spending for some mothers and it could not address maternal care requirements comprehensively. An activity-based community worker model was encouraging to augment maternal healthcare consumption. However, the existing level of financial incentives and systemic support were inadequate to motivate the volunteers optimally on their performance. Demand side financial incentive could enhance financial

  4. Addressing maternal healthcare through demand side financial incentives: experience of Janani Suraksha Yojana program in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopalan Saji S

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Demand side financing (DSF is a widely employed strategy to enhance utilization of healthcare. The impact of DSF on health care seeking in general and that of maternal care in particular is already known. Yet, its effect on financial access to care, out-of-pocket spending (OOPS and provider motivations is not considerably established. Without such evidence, DSFs may not be recommendable to build up any sustainable healthcare delivery approach. This study explores the above aspects on India’s Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSY program. Methods This study employed design and was conducted in three districts of Orissa, selected through a three-stage stratified sampling. The quantitative method was used to review the Health Management Information System (HMIS. The qualitative methods included focus groups discussions with beneficiaries (n = 19 and community intermediaries (n = 9, and interviews (n = 7 with Ministry of Health officials. HMIS data enabled to review maternal healthcare utilization. Group discussions and interviews explored the perceived impact of JSY on in-facility delivery, OOPS, healthcare costs, quality of care and performance motivation of community health workers. Results The number of institutional deliveries, ante-and post-natal care visits increased after the introduction of JSY with an annual net growth of 18.1%, 3.6% and 5% respectively. The financial incentive provided partial financial risk-protection as it could cover only 25.5% of the maternal healthcare cost of the beneficiaries in rural areas and 14.3% in urban areas. The incentive induced fresh out-of-pocket spending for some mothers and it could not address maternal care requirements comprehensively. An activity-based community worker model was encouraging to augment maternal healthcare consumption. However, the existing level of financial incentives and systemic support were inadequate to motivate the volunteers optimally on their

  5. Global governance and transnational financial crime: opportunities and tensions in the global anti-money laundering regime

    OpenAIRE

    Tsingou, Eleni

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the global anti-money laundering regime, assesses its purpose and draws some conclusions with regards to its effectiveness as a tool for targeting transnational financial crime. The paper shows that targeting money laundering is presented as a means of strengthening the integrity of the financial system and tackling organised crime through a global approach, and contrasts official policies with actual (and potential) results in practice. The paper explains that at the core...

  6. Innovative Molecular Analysis Technologies Program Funding Opportunities | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI is very pleased to announce that the Innovative Molecular Analysis Technologies (IMAT) program funding opportunity announcements have been posted for calendar year (CY) 2013. Please visit this website for more information on these announcements. For your convenience, a link to each solicitation is provided below with associated submission deadlines for new applications and resubmissions. Please contact the NCI IMAT program director, Dr.

  7. Financial Incentives, Workplace Wellness Program Participation, and Utilization of Health Care Services and Spending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fronstin, Paul; Roebuck, M Christopher

    2015-08-01

    This paper analyzes data from a large employer that enhanced financial incentives to encourage participation in its workplace wellness programs. It examines, first, the effect of financial incentives on wellness program participation, and second, it estimates the impact of wellness program participation on utilization of health care services and spending. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (PPACA) allows employers to provide financial incentives of as much as 30 percent of the total cost of coverage when tied to participation in a wellness program. Participation in health risk assessments (HRAs) increased by 50 percentage points among members of unions that bargained in the incentive, and increased 22 percentage points among non-union employees. Participation in the biometric screening program increased 55 percentage points when financial incentives were provided. Biometric screenings led to an average increase of 0.31 annual prescription drug fills, with related spending higher by $56 per member per year. Otherwise, no significant effects of participation in HRAs or biometric screenings on utilization of health care services and spending were found. The largest increase in medication utilization as a result of biometric screening was for statins, which are widely used to treat high cholesterol. This therapeutic class accounted for one-sixth of the overall increase in prescription drug utilization. Second were antidepressants, followed by ACE inhibitors (for hypertension), and thyroid hormones (for hypothyroidism). Biometric screening also led to significantly higher utilization of biologic response modifiers and immunosuppressants. These specialty medications are used to treat autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis, and are relatively expensive compared with non-specialty medications. The added spending associated with the combined increase in fills of 0.02 was $27 per member per year--about one-half of the

  8. Physician practice responses to financial incentive programs: exploring the concept of implementation mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Genna R; Erb, Natalie; Lemak, Christy Harris

    2012-01-01

    To develop a framework for studying financial incentive program implementation mechanisms, the means by which physician practices and physicians translate incentive program goals into their specific office setting. Understanding how new financial incentives fit with the structure of physician practices and individual providers' work may shed some insight on the variable effects of physician incentives documented in numerous reviews and meta-analyses. Reviewing select articles on pay-for-performance evaluations to identify and characterize the presence of implementation mechanisms for designing, communicating, implementing, and maintaining financial incentive programs as well as recognizing participants' success and effects on patient care. Although uncommonly included in evaluations, evidence from 26 articles reveals financial incentive program sponsors and participants utilized a variety of strategies to facilitate communication about program goals and intentions, to provide feedback about participants' progress, and to assist-practices in providing recommended services. Despite diversity in programs' geographic locations, clinical targets, scope, and market context, sponsors and participants deployed common strategies. While these methods largely pertained to communication between program sponsors and participants and the provision of information about performance through reports and registries, they also included other activities such as efforts to engage patients and ways to change staff roles. This review covers a limited body of research to develop a conceptual framework for future research; it did not exhaustively search for new articles and cannot definitively link particular implementation mechanisms to outcomes. Our results underscore the effects implementation mechanisms may have on how practices incorporate new programs into existing systems of care which implicates both the potential rewards from small changes as well as the resources which may be

  9. Do heart failure disease management programs make financial sense under a bundled payment system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eapen, Zubin J; Reed, Shelby D; Curtis, Lesley H; Hernandez, Adrian F; Peterson, Eric D

    2011-05-01

    Policy makers have proposed bundling payments for all heart failure (HF) care within 30 days of an HF hospitalization in an effort to reduce costs. Disease management (DM) programs can reduce costly HF readmissions but have not been economically attractive for caregivers under existing fee-for-service payment. Whether a bundled payment approach can address the negative financial impact of DM programs is unknown. Our study determined the cost-neutral point for the typical DM program and examined whether published HF DM programs can be cost saving under bundled payment programs. We used a decision analytic model using data from retrospective cohort studies, meta-analyses, 5 randomized trials evaluating DM programs, and inpatient claims for all Medicare beneficiaries discharged with an HF diagnosis from 2001 to 2004. We determined the costs of DM programs and inpatient care over 30 and 180 days. With a baseline readmission rate of 22.9%, the average cost for readmissions over 30 days was $2,272 per patient. Under base-case assumptions, a DM program that reduced readmissions by 21% would need to cost $477 per patient to be cost neutral. Among evaluated published DM programs, 2 of the 5 would increase provider costs (+$15 to $283 per patient), whereas 3 programs would be cost saving (-$241 to $347 per patient). If bundled payments were broadened to include care over 180 days, then program saving estimates would increase, ranging from $419 to $1,706 per patient. Proposed bundled payments for HF admissions provide hospitals with a potential financial incentive to implement DM programs that efficiently reduce readmissions. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. 75 FR 53007 - Gulf Opportunity Pilot Loan Program (GO Loan Pilot)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-30

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Gulf Opportunity Pilot Loan Program (GO Loan Pilot) AGENCY: U.S...'s GO Loan Pilot until September 30, 2011. Due to the scope and magnitude of the devastation to... streamlined and centralized loan processing available through the GO Loan Pilot to small businesses in the...

  11. 76 FR 60960 - Gulf Opportunity Pilot Loan Program (GO Loan Pilot)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Gulf Opportunity Pilot Loan Program (GO Loan Pilot) AGENCY: U.S.... SUMMARY: This notice announces the extension of SBA's GO Loan Pilot, with modifications, until December 31... processing available through the GO Loan Pilot to small businesses in the eligible parishes/counties through...

  12. 77 FR 71609 - Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program (SHOP) Grant Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-03

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT [Docket No. FR-5603-N-89] Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program (SHOP) Grant Monitoring AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information Officer, HUD. ACTION... electronic submission of responses. This notice also lists the following information: Title of Proposed: Self...

  13. 78 FR 32663 - Medicare Program; Notification of Closure of Teaching Hospitals and Opportunity To Apply for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-31

    ...] Medicare Program; Notification of Closure of Teaching Hospitals and Opportunity To Apply for Available... announces the closure of two teaching hospitals and the initiation of an application process where hospitals... modifying language at section 1886(d)(5)(B)(v) of the Act, to instruct the Secretary to establish a process...

  14. Isotope Production and Distribution Program. Financial statements, September 30, 1994 and 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marwick, P.

    1994-11-30

    The attached report presents the results of the independent certified public accountants` audit of the Isotope Production and Distribution (IP&D) Program`s financial statements as of September 30, 1994. The auditors have expressed an unqualified opinion on IP&D`s 1994 statements. Their reports on IP&D`s internal control structure and on compliance with laws,and regulations are also provided. The charter of the Isotope Program covers the production and sale of radioactive and stable isotopes, byproducts, and related isotope services. Prior to October 1, 1989, the Program was subsidized by the Department of Energy through a combination of appropriated funds and isotope sales revenue. The Fiscal Year 1990 Appropriations Act, Public Law 101-101, authorized a separate Isotope Revolving Fund account for the Program, which was to support itself solely from the proceeds of isotope sales. The initial capitalization was about $16 million plus the value of the isotope assets in inventory or on loan for research and the unexpended appropriation available at the close of FY 1989. During late FY 1994, Public Law 103--316 restructured the Program to provide for supplemental appropriations to cover costs which are impractical to incorporate into the selling price of isotopes. Additional information about the Program is provided in the notes to the financial statements.

  15. Defense Health Program Financial Reporting of General Property, Plant, and Equipment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lane, F

    2000-01-01

    .... The DoD Agency Wide financial statements include financial statements for a reporting entity called "Other Defense Organizations," a consolidation of financial information from various Defense...

  16. Financial analysis of ELETROPAULO slump income program, Sao Paulo State, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franca, Carlos Roberto Almeida; Bermann, Celio

    1999-01-01

    The central issue of debate was the need to align the energy sector's options and organization with changing global patterns of economic and social development, characterized by the increasing role played by the private sector, greater integration in the world economy, and new economic and social priorities such as efficiency, decentralization, deregulation, and a closer attention to environmental issues. The aim of the work was to present financial analysis of slump income program considering a Brazilian electric utility case study

  17. Switzerland; Financial Sector Assessment Program: Factual Update: Basel Core Principles for Effective Banking Supervision

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2007-01-01

    This technical note presents a factual update of the 2001 assessment of Switzerland’s compliance with the 1997 Basel Core Principles for Effective Banking Supervision (BCP), including a follow-up on implementation of the 2001 BCP assessment, undertaken in the context of the original Financial Sector Assessment Program in 2001. The note discusses that the Swiss Federal Banking Commission (SFBC) has made impressive progress both organizationally and to its supervisory practices to strengthen Sw...

  18. Financial incentives for generic drugs: case study on a reimbursement program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Inocencio

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To discuss the use of financial incentives in choice of medication and to assess the economic results concerning the use of financial incentives to promote the use of genetic medication in lieu of reference drugs in a company with a reimbursement program. Methods: A case study was carried out in a large supermarket. The data was obtained in the company responsible for managing medication. The study reached 83,625 users between August 2005 and July 2007. The data was submitted to regressions in order to analyze trends and hypothesis tests to assess differences in medication consumption. The results were compared with general data regarding medication consumption of five other organizations and also with data about the national consumption of generic medication in Brazil. Results: The use of financial incentives to replace brand medications for generics, in the company studied, increased the consumption of generic drugs without reducing the company expenses with the reimbursement programs. Conclusions: This study show the occurrence of unplanned results (increase in the consumption of medications and the positive consequences of the reimbursement program concerning access to medication.

  19. An observational study of emergency department utilization among enrollees of Minnesota Health Care Programs: financial and non-financial barriers have different associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shippee, Nathan D; Shippee, Tetyana P; Hess, Erik P; Beebe, Timothy J

    2014-02-08

    Emergency department (ED) use is costly, and especially frequent among publicly insured populations in the US, who also disproportionately encounter financial (cost/coverage-related) and non-financial/practical barriers to care. The present study examines the distinct associations financial and non-financial barriers to care have with patterns of ED use among a publicly insured population. This observational study uses linked administrative-survey data for enrollees of Minnesota Health Care Programs to examine patterns in ED use-specifically, enrollee self-report of the ED as usual source of care, and past-year count of 0, 1, or 2+ ED visits from administrative data. Main independent variables included a count of seven enrollee-reported financial concerns about healthcare costs and coverage, and a count of seven enrollee-reported non-financial, practical barriers to access (e.g., limited office hours, problems with childcare). Covariates included health, health care, and demographic measures. In multivariate regression models, only financial concerns were positively associated with reporting ED as usual source of care, but only non-financial barriers were significantly associated with greater ED visits. Regression-adjusted values indicated notable differences in ED visits by number of non-financial barriers: zero non-financial barriers meant an adjusted 78% chance of having zero ED visits (95% C.I.: 70.5%-85.5%), 15.9% chance of 1(95% C.I.: 10.4%-21.3%), and 6.2% chance (95% C.I.: 3.5%-8.8%) of 2+ visits, whereas having all seven non-financial barriers meant a 48.2% adjusted chance of zero visits (95% C.I.: 30.9%-65.6%), 31.8% chance of 1 visit (95% C.I.: 24.2%-39.5%), and 20% chance (95% C.I.: 8.4%-31.6%) of 2+ visits. Financial barriers were associated with identifying the ED as one's usual source of care but non-financial barriers were associated with actual ED visits. Outreach/literacy efforts may help reduce reliance on/perception of ED as usual source of care

  20. Opportunities for Small Satellites in NASA's Earth System Science Pathfinder (ESSP) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peri, Frank; Law, Richard C.; Wells, James E.

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Earth Venture class (EV) of missions are competitively selected, Principal Investigator (PI) led, relatively low cost and narrowly focused in scientific scope. Investigations address a full spectrum of earth science objectives, including studies of the atmosphere, oceans, land surface, polar ice regions, and solid Earth. EV has three program elements: EV-Suborbital (EVS) are suborbital/airborne investigations; EV-Mission (EVM) element comprises small complete spaceborne missions; and EV-Instrument (EVI) element develops spaceborne instruments for flight as Missions-of-Opportunity (MoO). To ensure the success of EV, frequent opportunities for selecting missions has been established in NASA's Earth Science budget. This paper will describe those opportunities and how the management approach of each element is tailored according to the specific needs of the element.

  1. DOE Low-Level Waste Management Program perspective on technology transfer: opportunities and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large, D.E.

    1982-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Low-Level Waste Management Program (DOE LLWMP) perspective in regard to transfer of LLWMP technology to current and potential users in both the commercial and defense sectors is discussed. Past, present, and future opportunities and challenges for the whole nuclear waste management are indicated. Elements considered include: historical and evolutionary events and activities; the purpose of the Program and its inherent opportunities and challenges; achievements and expected accomplishments; supporters and interactors; packaging and delivering technology; implementing and serving potential users; determining and meeting users' needs; and identifying and responding to opportunities and challenges. The low-level waste management effort to improve shallow land burial technology began in FY 1977 and has expanded to include waste treatment and alternative disposal methods. Milestones have been established and are used as principal management control items. This technology, the Program Product, is described and is made available. This year, the Program has drafted criteria for inclusion in a DOE order for radioactive waste management operations at DOE sites

  2. Investigating Customers' Experiences with Their Financial Services Customer Education Programs as It Impacts Customer Loyalty to the Financial Firm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Kaliym A.

    2017-01-01

    The problem addressed in this study was that customer education programs are intended to strengthen customer loyalty; however, research on the effects of customer education on customer loyalty remains insufficient. This phenomenological study investigated how the lived experiences of customers' participating in financial services' customer…

  3. The Howard University Program in Atmospheric Sciences (HUPAS): A Program Exemplifying Diversity and Opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Vernon R.; Joseph, Everette; Smith, Sonya; Yu, Tsann-wang

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses experiences and lessons learned from developing an interdisciplinary graduate program (IDP) during the last 10 y: The Howard University Graduate Program in Atmospheric Sciences (HUPAS). HUPAS is the first advanced degree program in the atmospheric sciences, or related fields such as meteorology and earth system sciences,…

  4. 76 FR 67759 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program (SHOP) for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-02

    ... required. The SHOP funds together with the sweat equity and volunteer labor contributions significantly... Awards for the Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program (SHOP) for Fiscal Year 2011 AGENCY: Office of... Opportunity Program (SHOP). This announcement contains the consolidated names and addresses of this year's...

  5. 76 FR 48876 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program (SHOP) for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-09

    ... labor is also required. The SHOP funds together with the sweat equity and volunteer labor contributions... Awards for the Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program (SHOP) for Fiscal Year 2010 AGENCY: Office of... Opportunity Program (SHOP). This announcement contains the consolidated names and addresses of this year's...

  6. 45 CFR 86.7 - Effect of employment opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Introduction § 86.7 Effect of employment opportunities. The obligation to comply with this part is not obviated...

  7. 40 CFR 5.130 - Effect of employment opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Introduction § 5.130 Effect of employment opportunities. The obligation to comply with these Title IX...

  8. Integrated Economic and Financial Analysis of China’s Sponge City Program for Water-resilient Urban Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Liang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available To improve Chinese cities’ resilience to climate change, the Sponge City Program, which was designed to tackle water pollution, storm water management, and flooding, was initiated in 2014. Being a major policy initiative, the Sponge City Program raises heated discussions among Chinese academics; however, no relevant extensive economic or financial analysis has been conducted. The research carries out an integrated economic and financial analysis on the Sponge City Program from the perspectives of two stakeholders: the government and the project manager. Different stakeholders have unique perspectives on the management of water projects. This study has two parts: economic analysis and financial analysis. The economic analysis is from the government perspective, and considers all the economic, environmental, and social effects. The financial analysis is from the project manager’s perspective, and judges the financial feasibility of projects. Changde city, one of the demo cities of Sponge City Program, is chosen for the research. The results show that from the perspective of the government, the Sponge City Program should be promoted, because most water projects are economically feasible. From the perspective of the project manager, the program should not be invested in, because the water projects are financially infeasible. A more comprehensive and integrated plan for developing and managing the water projects of the Sponge City Program is required. Otherwise, the private sector may not be interested in investing in the water projects, and the water projects may not be operational in the long term.

  9. BREEDER: a microcomputer program for financial analysis of a large-scale prototype breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giese, R.F.

    1984-04-01

    This report describes a microcomputer-based, single-project financial analysis program: BREEDER. BREEDER is a user-friendly model designed to facilitate frequent and rapid analyses of the financial implications associated with alternative design and financing strategies for electric generating plants and large-scale prototype breeder (LSPB) reactors in particular. The model has proved to be a useful tool in establishing cost goals for LSPB reactors. The program is available on floppy disks for use on an IBM personal computer (or IBM look-a-like) running under PC-DOS or a Kaypro II transportable computer running under CP/M (and many other CP/M machines). The report documents version 1.5 of BREEDER and contains a user's guide. The report also includes a general overview of BREEDER, a summary of hardware requirements, a definition of all required program inputs, a description of all algorithms used in performing the construction-period and operation-period analyses, and a summary of all available reports. The appendixes contain a complete source-code listing, a cross-reference table, a sample interactive session, several sample runs, and additional documentation of the net-equity program option

  10. Annual Report on State Financial Aid Programs: 2007-08 Accounting, 2008-09 Estimates, and Notable Events and Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington Higher Education Coordinating Board, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The state of Washington has a long-standing commitment to postsecondary education opportunities for all students, regardless of income. The purpose of this report is to provide the members of the Higher Education Coordinating Board with: (1) An overview of state, federal, and institutional financial aid in Washington; (2) A description of notable…

  11. Grading Prediction of Enterprise Financial Crisis Based on Nonlinear Programming Evaluation: A Case Study of Chinese Transportation Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-yuan Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As the core of the effective financial crisis prevention, enterprise finance crisis prediction has been the focal attention of both theorists and businessmen. Financial crisis predictions need to apply a variety of financial and operating indicators for its analysis. Therefore, a new evaluation model based on nonlinear programming is established, the nature of the model is proved, the detailed solution steps of the model are given, and the significance and algorithm of the model are thoroughly discussed in this study. The proposed model can deal with the case of missing data, and has the good isotonic property and profound theoretical background. In the empirical analysis to predict the financial crisis and through the comparison of the analysis of historical data and the real enterprises with financial crisis, we find that the results are in accordance with the real enterprise financial conditions and the proposed model has a good predictive ability.

  12. Implementation of a financially incentivized weight loss competition into an already established employee wellness program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M. Schramm

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess improvement in clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction of a financially incentivized weight loss competition adjunct to a currently established pharmacist-directed employee wellness program. Design: Retrospective, cohort, pilot study Setting: 6 independent community pharmacy chain locations, two long-term care pharmacies, and a pharmacy corporate office in northwest and central Missouri, from January 2013 to April 2013. Participants: 24 benefit-eligible patients employed by the self- insured pharmacy chain. Intervention: A financially incentivized weight loss competition focusing on healthy lifestyle practices was implemented at nine pharmacy locations over an eight week period. Main outcome measure(s: Change from baseline in mean total cholesterol, serum triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP, weight, and body mass index (BMI. Patient satisfaction was also assessed after completion. Results:24 patients completed the competition. The average weight loss among all participants was 10 ± 7.3 pounds. A mean decrease in serum triglycerides was significant at 36.9 mg/dL per participant (p Conclusion: The implementation of a financially incentivized weight loss competition provided significant short-term weight loss to a patient population that was already enrolled in an established pharmacist-directed employee wellness program and had not shown clinical improvement prior to the intervention. Overall the patients were satisfied, felt healthier, and agreed to continue following the recommendations of the program.   Type: Original Research

  13. Financial mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Jothi, A Lenin

    2009-01-01

    Financial services, particularly banking and insurance services is the prominent sector for the development of a nation. After the liberalisation of financial sector in India, the scope of getting career opportunities has been widened. It is heartening to note that various universities in India have introduced professional courses on banking and insurance. A new field of applied mathematics has come into prominence under the name of Financial Mathematics. Financial mathematics has attained much importance in the recent years because of the role played by mathematical concepts in decision - m

  14. Financial "risk-sharing" or refund programs in assisted reproduction: an Ethics Committee opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Financial "risk-sharing" fee structures in assisted reproduction programs charge patients a higher initial fee but provide reduced fees for subsequent cycles and often a partial or complete refund if treatment fails. This opinion of the ASRM Ethics Committee analyzes the ethical issues raised by these fee structures, including patient selection criteria, conflicts of interest, success rate transparency, and patient informed consent. This document replaces the document of the same name, last published in 2013 (Fertil Steril 2013;100:334-6). Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Defense Health Program Financial Reporting of General Property, Plant, and Equipment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lane, F

    2000-01-01

    We performed this audit in response to the Chief Financial Officers Act of 1990, as amended by the Federal Financial Management Act of 1994, which requires DoD to prepare annual audited financial statements...

  16. 77 FR 43428 - Financial Management Service; Proposed Collection of Information: Minority Bank Deposit Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Fiscal Service Financial Management Service; Proposed Collection of... Management Service, Fiscal Service, Treasury. ACTION: Notice and Request for comments. SUMMARY: The Financial... collection. By this notice, the Financial Management Service solicits comments concerning form FMS 3144...

  17. Medical student service learning program teaches secondary students about career opportunities in health and medical fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpa, Kelly; Vakharia, Kavita; Caruso, Catherine A; Vechery, Colin; Sipple, Lanette; Wang, Adrian

    2015-12-01

    Engagement of academic medical centers in community outreach provides the public with a better understanding of basic terms and concepts used in biomedical sciences and increases awareness of important health information. Medical students at one academic medical center initiated an educational outreach program, called PULSE, that targets secondary students to foster their interest in healthcare and medicine. High school student participants are engaged in a semester-long course that relies on interactive lectures, problem-based learning sessions, mentoring relationships with medical students, and opportunities for shadowing healthcare providers. To date, the curriculum has been offered for 7 consecutive years. To determine the impact that participation in the curriculum has had on college/career choices and to identify areas for improvement, an electronic questionnaire was sent to former participants. Based on a 32% response rate, 81% of former participants indicated that participation in the course influenced their decision to pursue a medical/science-related career. More than half (67%) of respondents indicated intent to pursue a MD/PhD or other postgraduate degree. Based on responses obtained, additional opportunities to incorporate laboratory-based research and simulation sessions should be explored. In addition, a more formalized mentoring component has been added to the course to enhance communication between medical students and mentees. Health/medicine-related educational outreach programs targeting high school students may serve as a pipeline to introduce or reinforce career opportunities in healthcare and related sciences. Copyright © 2015 The American Physiological Society.

  18. Policy, environment, and worksite fitness program participation among financial enterprise employees in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sheu-Jen; Hung, Wen-Chi

    2016-06-01

    This study explored the intertwined effects between the policies and regulations of the companies and personal background on participation in the physical fitness programs and leisure-time activities in financial enterprises. A total of 823 employees were selected as the sample with the multilevel stratification random-sampling technique. The response rate was 52.0%. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics and hierarchical linear logistic regression. Thirty-two percent and 39% of the employees participated in the physical fitness programs and leisure-time activities, respectively. The factors affecting participation were categorized into intrapersonal factors, interpersonal processes, and primary groups, as well as institutional factors. In the interpersonal processes and primary groups level, higher family social support, more equipment in health promotion was associated with more participation in the programs. With the influence from the institutional level, it was found that health promotion policy amplified the relationship between employees' age and participation, but attenuated the relationship between education level and participation. Health promotion equipment in the institutes attenuated the relationship between colleague social support, family social support, and education level with program participation. Physical activity equipment in the community attenuated the relationship between family social support and program participation. The influential factors of social support and worksite environment could predict the employees' participation in the physical fitness programs and leisure-time physical activities. Health promotion policy and equipment attenuated the negative effects of nonparticipation as well as amplified the positive effects of participation.

  19. Education projects: an opportunity for student fieldwork in global health academic programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyfe, Molly V

    2012-01-01

    Universities, especially in higher-income countries, increasingly offer programs in global health. These programs provide different types of fieldwork projects, at home and abroad, including: epidemiological research, community health, and clinical electives. I illustrate how and why education projects offer distinct learning opportunities for global health program fieldwork. As University of California students, we partnered in Tanzania with students from Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Science (MUHAS) to assist MUHAS faculty with a curricular project. We attended classes, clinical rounds, and community outreach sessions together, where we observed teaching, materials used, and the learning environment; and interviewed and gathered data from current students, alumni, and health professionals during a nationwide survey. We learned together about education of health professionals and health systems in our respective institutions. On the basis of this experience, I suggest some factors that contribute to the productivity of educational projects as global health fieldwork.

  20. US Department of Energy Environmental Cleanup Technology Development program: Business and research opportunities guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) is charged with overseeing a multi-billion dollar environmental cleanup effort. EM leads an aggressive national research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation program to provide environmental restoration and waste management technologies to DOE sites, and to manage DOE-generated waste. DOE is firmly committed to working with industry to effectuate this cleanup effort. We recognize that private industry, university, and other research and development programs are valuable sources of technology innovation. The primary purpose of this document is to provide you with information on potential business opportunities in the following technical program areas: Remediation of High-Level Waste Tanks; Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal of Mixed Waste; Migration of Contaminants; Containment of Existing Landfills; Decommissioning and Final Disposition, and Robotics.

  1. Scientific Programs and Funding Opportunities at the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Richard

    2006-03-01

    The mission of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) is to improve human health by promoting the development and translation of emerging technologies in biomedical imaging and bioengineering. To this end, NIBIB supports a coordinated agenda of research programs in advanced imaging technologies and engineering methods that enable fundamental biomedical discoveries across a broad spectrum of biological processes, disorders, and diseases and have significant potential for direct medical application. These research programs dramatically advance the Nation's healthcare by improving the detection, management and, ultimately, the prevention of disease. The research promoted and supported by NIBIB also is strongly synergistic with other NIH Institutes and Centers as well as across government agencies. This presentation will provide an overview of the scientific programs and funding opportunities supported by NIBIB, highlighting those that are of particular important to the field of medical physics.

  2. A work-site weight control program using financial incentives collected through payroll deduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, J L; Jeffery, R W; Sullivan, S; Snell, M K

    1985-11-01

    In a work-site weight control program using a self-motivational program of financial incentives implemented through payroll deduction, 131 university employees chose weight loss goals (0 to 60 lb) and incentives (+5 to +30) to be deducted from each paycheck for six months. Return of incentive money was contingent on progress toward weight goals. Participants were assigned randomly to one of four protocols, involving group educational sessions v self-instruction only and required v optional attendance at weigh-ins and sessions. Overall, dropout rates (21.4%) and mean weight loss (12.2 lb) were encouraging, especially compared with those of other work-site programs. Weight loss was positively associated with attendance at weigh-ins and educational sessions. However, requiring attendance did not increase program effectiveness and seemed also to discourage enrollment among men. The weight control program was equally effective when offered with professionally led educational sessions or when accompanied by self-instructional materials only.

  3. Is the Juice Worth the Squeeze? A Benefit/Cost Analysis of the District of Columbia Opportunity Scholarship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Patrick J.; McShane, Michael

    2013-01-01

    School voucher programs have become a prominent aspect of the education policy landscape in the United States. The DC Opportunity Scholarship Program is the only federally funded voucher program in the United States. Since 2004 it has offered publicly funded private school vouchers to nearly four thousand students to attend any of seventy-three…

  4. A Simulation Modeling Framework to Optimize Programs Using Financial Incentives to Motivate Health Behavior Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sanjay; Kiernan, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    While increasingly popular among mid- to large-size employers, using financial incentives to induce health behavior change among employees has been controversial, in part due to poor quality and generalizability of studies to date. Thus, fundamental questions have been left unanswered: To generate positive economic returns on investment, what level of incentive should be offered for any given type of incentive program and among which employees? We constructed a novel modeling framework that systematically identifies how to optimize marginal return on investment from programs incentivizing behavior change by integrating commonly collected data on health behaviors and associated costs. We integrated "demand curves" capturing individual differences in response to any given incentive with employee demographic and risk factor data. We also estimated the degree of self-selection that could be tolerated: that is, the maximum percentage of already-healthy employees who could enroll in a wellness program while still maintaining positive absolute return on investment. In a demonstration analysis, the modeling framework was applied to data from 3000 worksite physical activity programs across the nation. For physical activity programs, the incentive levels that would optimize marginal return on investment ($367/employee/year) were higher than average incentive levels currently offered ($143/employee/year). Yet a high degree of self-selection could undermine the economic benefits of the program; if more than 17% of participants came from the top 10% of the physical activity distribution, the cost of the program would be expected to always be greater than its benefits. Our generalizable framework integrates individual differences in behavior and risk to systematically estimate the incentive level that optimizes marginal return on investment. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. SWOT analysis: strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of the Israeli Smallpox Revaccination Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta, Michael; Balicer, Ran D; Leventhal, Alex

    2003-01-01

    During September 2002, Israel began its current revaccination program against smallpox, targeting previously vaccinated "first responders" among medical and emergency workers. In order to identify the potential strengths and weaknesses of this program and the conditions under which critical decisions were reached, we conducted a SWOT analysis of the current Israeli revaccination program, designed to identify its intrinsic strengths and weaknesses, as well as opportunities for its success and threats against it. SWOT analysis--a practical tool for the study of public health policy decisions and the social and political contexts in which they are reached--revealed clear and substantial strengths and weaknesses of the current smallpox revaccination program, intrinsic to the vaccine itself. A number of threats were identified that may jeopardize the success of the current program, chief among them the appearance of severe complications of vaccination. Our finding of a lack of a generation of knowledge on smallpox vaccination highlights the need for improved physician education and dissipation of misconceptions that are prevalent in the public today.

  6. Federally Funded Programs Related to Building Energy Use: Overlaps, Challenges, and Opportunities for Collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cort, Katherine A.; Butner, Ryan S.; Hostick, Donna J.

    2010-10-01

    As energy efficiency in buildings continues to move from discreet technology development to an integrated systems approach, the need to understand and integrate complementary goals and targets becomes more pronounced. Whether within Department of Energy’s (DOE) Building Technologies Program (BTP), across the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), or throughout DOE and the Federal government, mutual gains and collaboration synergies exist that are not easily achieved because of organizational and time constraints. There also cases where federal agencies may be addressing similar issues, but with different (and sometimes conflicting) outcomes in mind. This report conducts a comprehensive inventory across all EERE and other relevant Federal agencies of potential activities with synergistic benefits. A taxonomy of activities with potential interdependencies is presented. The report identifies a number of federal program objectives, products, and plans related to building energy efficiency and characterizes the current structure and interactions related to these plans and programs. Areas where overlap occurs are identified as are the challenges of addressing issues related to overlapping goals and programs. Based on the input gathered from various sources, including 20 separate interviews with federal agency staff and contractor staff supporting buildings programs, this study identifies a number of synergistic opportunities and makes recommends a number of areas where further collaboration could be beneficial.

  7. Ensuring childhood vaccination among slums dwellers under the National Immunization Program in India - Challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sanjeev; Sahu, Damodar; Agrawal, Ashish; Vashi, Meeta Dhaval

    2018-04-04

    Almost, one third of the world's urban population resides in slums and the number would double by 2030. Slums denotes collection of people from various communities having a meagre income and living in unhygienic conditions thus making themselves most vulnerable for outbreaks of communicable diseases. India contributes substantially to the global disease burden and under-five mortality rates i.e. 20% attributable to vaccine preventable diseases. Immunization plays a crucial role in combating high childhood mortality rates attributable to vaccine preventable diseases across the globe. This systematic review, provides insights on immunization status in slums, identifies various factors influencing it thus, exploring opportunities that may be available to improve vaccination coverage under the National Immunization Program. Taking into account the above aspects, a review of literature was undertaken in various databases that included studies published between 2006 and 2017. In India, ~33% of the urban population lives in slums with suboptimal vaccination coverage ranging from 14% to upto 90%. Few of the important causes for low coverage included socioeconomic factors such as poor community participation, lack of awareness, frequent migration, and loss of daily income. Hence, mere presence of vaccines in the National Immunization Program doesn't do the job, there is a definite unmet need to emphasize upon the importance of immunization among slums dwellers and take necessary steps. For instance, delivering immunization services at the doorstep (e.g. pulse polio program), community-based education, text messaging as reminders and incentivized immunization services are some of the opportunities that can be explored and implemented to improve immunization status in the slums. Thus, in addition to inclusion of more and more vaccines in the National Immunization Program, there is a definite need to focus on people living in high risk areas in order to improve coverage and

  8. District of Columbia Opportunity Scholarship Program: Additional Policies and Procedures Would Improve Internal Controls and Program Operations. Report to Congressional Requesters. GAO-08-9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, Cornelia M.; Franzel, Jeanette M.

    2007-01-01

    The D.C. School Choice Incentive Act created the first private kindergarten-through-grade-12 school-choice program supported by federal funds. The program was named the D.C. Opportunity Scholarship Program (OSP). The United States Government Accountability Office (GAO) was asked to assess the (1) accountability mechanisms governing the use of…

  9. An overview of federal government financial involvement in the Canadian nuclear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, T.W.

    1981-01-01

    The government of Canada has had a financial involvement with the nuclear industry in four areas: nuclear power development, including expenditures for research and development, prototype reactors, and regulation; uranium industry support, including the operations of Eldorado Nuclear Ltd. and the uranium stockpiling program; the financing of nuclear reactors, activities in which the federal government has acted as a banker for the sale of reactors; and heavy water production. Up to 1978-79 total federal expenditures of around $3.4 billion in current collars had been invested. Of this amount, about 56 percent was associated with nuclear power development, 2 percent with uranium industry support, 22 percent with heavy water, and 22 percent with financing reactor sales

  10. Selected achievements, science directions, and new opportunities for the WEBB small watershed research program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, Pierre D.; Larsen, Matthew C.; Greene, Earl A.; Buss, Heather L.; Clow, David W.; Hunt, Randall J.; Mast, M. Alisa; Murphy, Sheila F.; Peters, Norman E.; Sebestyen, Stephen D.; Shanley, James B.; Walker, John F.

    2009-01-01

    Over nearly two decades, the Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Budgets (WEBB) small watershed research program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has documented how water and solute fluxes, nutrient, carbon, and mercury dynamics, and weathering and sediment transport respond to natural and humancaused drivers, including climate, climate change, and atmospheric deposition. Together with a continued and increasing focus on the effects of climate change, more investigations are needed that examine ecological effects (e.g., evapotranspiration, nutrient uptake) and responses (e.g., species abundances, biodiversity) that are coupled with the physical and chemical processes historically observed in the WEBB program. Greater use of remote sensing, geographic modeling, and habitat/watershed modeling tools is needed, as is closer integration with the USGS-led National Phenology Network. Better understanding of process and system response times is needed. The analysis and observation of land-use and climate change effects over time should be improved by pooling data obtained by the WEBB program during the last two decades with data obtained earlier and (or) concurrently from other research and monitoring studies conducted at or near the five WEBB watershed sites. These data can be supplemented with historical and paleo-environmental information, such as could be obtained from tree rings and lake cores. Because of the relatively pristine nature and small size of its watersheds, the WEBB program could provide process understanding and basic data to better characterize and quantify ecosystem services and to develop and apply indicators of ecosystem health. In collaboration with other Federal and State watershed research programs, the WEBB program has an opportunity to contribute to tracking the short-term dynamics and long-term evolution of ecosystem services and health indicators at a multiplicity of scales across the landscape. 

  11. 75 FR 13329 - Implications of Financial Accounting System (FAS) 166 on SBA Guaranteed Loan Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-19

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Docket No. SBA-2010-0005] Implications of Financial Accounting... from the public on: (1) The effect that the accounting changes mandated by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) in Financial Accounting Standard (FAS) 166 have on SBA Lender and investor...

  12. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Banking & Finance Technology (Program CIP: 52.0803--Banking and Related Financial Programs, Other). Postsecondary Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the banking and finance technology program. Presented in the introduction are a program description and suggested course sequence. Section I is a curriculum guide consisting of outlines for…

  13. On Common Constitutional Ground: How Georgia's Scholarship Tax Credits Mirror Other State Programs and Expand Educational Opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Dick M., II.; Erickson, Angela C.

    2016-01-01

    In 2008, Georgia launched a tax-credit scholarship program to expand educational opportunities for the state's pre-K through 12th-grade students by providing them scholarships to attend private schools. Georgia's scholarship tax credit program will help over 13,000 children get the best education for their needs at secular and religious private…

  14. Recent progress of NSTX lithium program and opportunities for magnetic fusion research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, M., E-mail: mono@pppl.gov [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, PO Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Bell, M.G.; Kaita, R.; Kugel, H.W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, PO Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Ahn, J.-W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Allain, J.P.; Battaglia, D. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Bell, R.E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, PO Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Canik, J.M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Ding, S. [Academy of Science Institute of Plasma Physics, Hefei (China); Gerhardt, S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, PO Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Gray, T.K. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Guttenfelder, W.; Hosea, J.; Jaworski, M.A.; Kallman, J.; Kaye, S.; LeBlanc, B.P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, PO Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Maingi, R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Mansfield, D.K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, PO Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); and others

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In this paper, we review the recent progress on the NSTX lithium research. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We summarize positive features of lithium effects on plasma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We also point out unresolved issues and unanswered questions on the lithium research. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We describe a possible closed liquid lithium divertor tray concept. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We note opportunities and challenges of lithium applications for magnetic fusion. - Abstract: Lithium wall coating techniques have been experimentally explored on National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) for the last six years. The lithium experimentation on NSTX started with a few milligrams of lithium injected into the plasma as pellets and it has evolved to a dual lithium evaporation system which can evaporate up to {approx}160 g of lithium onto the lower divertor plates between re-loadings. The unique feature of the NSTX lithium research program is that it can investigate the effects of lithium coated plasma-facing components in H-mode divertor plasmas. This lithium evaporation system has produced many intriguing and potentially important results. In 2010, the NSTX lithium program has focused on the effects of liquid lithium divertor (LLD) surfaces including the divertor heat load, deuterium pumping, impurity control, electron thermal confinement, H-mode pedestal physics, and enhanced plasma performance. To fill the LLD with lithium, 1300 g of lithium was evaporated into the NSTX vacuum vessel during the 2010 operations. The routine use of lithium in 2010 has significantly improved the plasma shot availability resulting in a record number of plasma shots in any given year. In this paper, as a follow-on paper from the 1st lithium symposium [1], we review the recent progress toward developing fundamental understanding of the NSTX lithium experimental observations as well as the opportunities and associated R and D required

  15. Parental Preferences for the Organization of Preschool Vaccination Programs Including Financial Incentives: A Discrete Choice Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren Flynn PhD

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To establish preferences of parents and guardians of preschool children for the organization of preschool vaccination services, including financial incentives. Design: An online discrete choice experiment. Participants: Parents and guardians of preschool children (up to age 5 years who were (n = 259 and were not (n = 262 classified as at high risk of incompletely vaccinating their children. High risk of incomplete vaccination was defined as any of the following: aged less than 20 years, single parents, living in one of the 20% most deprived areas in England, had a preschool child with a disability, or had more than three children. Main Outcome Measures: Participant preferences expressed as positive (utility or negative (disutility on eight attributes and levels describing the organization of preschool vaccination programs. Results: There was no difference in preference for parental financial incentives compared to no incentive in parents “not at high risk” of incomplete vaccination. Parents who were “at high risk” expressed utility for cash incentives. Parents “at high risk” of incomplete vaccination expressed utility for information on the risks and benefits of vaccinations to be provided as numbers rather than charts or pictures. Both groups preferred universally available, rather than targeted, incentives. Utility was identified for shorter waiting times, and there were variable preferences for who delivered vaccinations. Conclusions: Cash incentives for preschool vaccinations in England would be welcomed by parents who are “at high risk” of incompletely vaccinating their children. Further work is required on the optimal mode and form of presenting probabilistic information on vaccination to parents/guardians, including preferences on mandatory vaccination schemes.

  16. The Blue Book. Accounting, Recordkeeping, and Reporting by Postsecondary Educational Institutions for Federally Funded Student Financial Aid Programs. [1999 Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Education, Washington, DC.

    This guide is intended to provide guidance to college and university business office personnel who handle recordkeeping, accounting, and other fiscal reporting functions for federal Title IV financial aid programs, as authorized by the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended. This edition emphasizes the benefits and challenges of electronic…

  17. The Blue Book: Accounting, Recordkeeping, and Reporting by Postsecondary Educational Institutions for Federally Funded Student Financial Aid Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Education, Washington, DC.

    This book provides guidance to school business office personnel who handle fiscal recordkeeping, accounting, and reporting functions for federal Title IV student financial aid programs authorized by the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended. It provides a technical resource for Title IV management responsibilities that are shared among various…

  18. Who Does Not Benefit from Federal and State Financial Aid Programs? Information Brief. Volume 7, Issue 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida Board of Governors, State University System, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This brief presents statistics showing that many students from middle-income and lower-income Florida families do not qualify for federal or state grants and scholarships, and that nearly half of state university system middle- and lower-income families do not receive benefits from federal or state financial aid programs. (Contains technical…

  19. Do youth mentoring programs change the perspectives and improve the life opportunities of at-risk youth?

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez-Planas, Núria

    2014-01-01

    Mentoring programs such as Big Brothers Big Sisters of America have been providing positive role models and building social skills for more than a century. However, most formal mentoring programs are relatively novel and researchers have only recently begun to rigorously evaluate their impact on changing at-risk youth’s perspectives and providing opportunities for them to achieve better life outcomes. While a variety of mentoring and counseling programs have emerged around the world in recent...

  20. A Self-Instructional Course in Student Financial Aid Administration. Module 17--Evaluation of Student Aid Management: Self-Evaluation, Audit, and Program Review. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington Consulting Group, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The 17th module in the 17-module self-instructional course on student financial aid administration discusses the evaluation of student aid management in terms of self-evaluation, audit, and program review. The full course offers a systematic introduction to the management of federal financial aid programs authorized by Title IV of the Higher…

  1. The Publications Tracking and Metrics Program at NOAO: Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Sharon

    2015-08-01

    The National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) is the U.S. national research and development center for ground-based nighttime astronomy. The NOAO librarian manages the organization’s publications tracking and metrics program, which consists of three components: identifying publications, organizing citation data, and disseminating publications information. We are developing methods to streamline these tasks, better organize our data, provide greater accessibility to publications data, and add value to our services.Our publications tracking process is complex, as we track refereed publications citing data from several sources: NOAO telescopes at two observatory sites, telescopes of consortia in which NOAO participates, the NOAO Science Archive, and NOAO-granted community-access time on non-NOAO telescopes. We also identify and document our scientific staff publications. In addition, several individuals contribute publications data.In the past year, we made several changes in our publications tracking and metrics program. To better organize our data and streamline the creation of reports and metrics, we created a MySQL publications database. When designing this relational database, we considered ease of use, the ability to incorporate data from various sources, efficiency in data inputting and sorting, and potential for growth. We also considered the types of metrics we wished to generate from our publications data based on our target audiences and the messages we wanted to convey. To increase accessibility and dissemination of publications information, we developed a publications section on the library’s website, with citation lists, acknowledgements guidelines, and metrics. We are now developing a searchable online database for our website using PHP.The publications tracking and metrics program has provided many opportunities for the library to market its services and contribute to the organization’s mission. As we make decisions on collecting, organizing

  2. Modeling the Value of Micro Solutions in Air Force Financial Management

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Hare, Scott M; Krott, James E

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this MBA Project was to develop a model that would estimate the value of applying available spreadsheet programming tools to automation opportunities in Air Force Financial Management (FM...

  3. A paperless course on structural engineering programming: investing in educational technology in the times of the Greek financial recession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sextos, Anastasios G.

    2014-01-01

    timely during economic recession, where the academic priorities are rapidly changing. In the light of this unfavourable and unstable financial environment, a critical overview of the strengths, the weaknesses, the opportunities and the threats of this effort is presented herein, hopefully contributing to the discussion on the future of higher education in the time of crisis.

  4. 76 FR 34639 - Funding Opportunity Title: Risk Management Education and Outreach Partnerships Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-14

    ... Succession Planning; Marketing: Marketing Strategies; Farm Products Branding; Farmers Markets; Financial: Financial Tools and Planning; Farm Management Strategies; Human: Farm Labor; Farm Safety; Food Safety, Risk... plans and strategies; and 4. Assist producers, farmers and ranchers in deciding on and implementing a...

  5. Technical and financial feasibility of an inferior vena cava filter retrieval program at a level one trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton-Ouw, Kristofer M; Leake, Samuel S; Sola, Cristina N; Sandhu, Harleen K; Albarado, Rondel; Holcomb, John B; Miller, Charles C; Safi, Hazim J; Azizzadeh, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Considering new guidelines for retrievable inferior vena cava filters (IVCFs), we examine our initial experience after establishing a comprehensive filter removal program in our level 1 trauma center. We evaluated the technical and financial feasibility of this program and barriers to IVCF retrieval, including insurance status and costs, in trauma patients. Trauma patients receiving IVCFs from May 2011 to 2013 were consented and prospectively enrolled in the study program. Retrieval rates were assessed for the years before study initiation. Primary outcome was IVCF retrieval. Hospital financial data for retrieval were examined and univariate analysis performed. Hospital cost-to-charge and payment-to-charge ratios were assessed. Before study initiation from April 2009 to 2011, 66 IVCFs were placed in trauma patients with only 2 retrievals in 2 years. During the study period, 247 trauma patients had IVCF placement of which 111 (45%) were enrolled. The main reason for nonenrollment was lack of referral by the implanting team. Retrieval was attempted in 100 outpatients with success in 85 (85%). Patients enrolled in the program were more likely to have their filters removed (73% vs. 18%; odds ratio, 12.6; 95% confidence interval, 6.6-24.3; P financially feasible without loss to the health care system even in regions with high rates of uninsured. A major barrier to successful filter retrieval was lack of patient referral into the program by implanting physicians. Hospital administration and physician outreach are important determinants of successful IVCF retrieval in trauma patients. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Assessing College Student Subjective and Objective Knowledge in an Online Financial Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Charity

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This purpose of this correlational study using Joo's (2008) financial wellness framework was to determine the impact of an online financial literacy workshop on student subjective knowledge, dependent on indicators of stress, behavior, and objective knowledge, when controlling for demographic differences at a large public university.…

  7. Marketing Need-Based Financial Aid Programs: An Institutional Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Mary Beth

    2010-01-01

    Colleges and universities represent one of the most utilized sources of need-based financial aid information for students and families, and yet most research in access marketing is focused at the national and state levels. There is sparse published information about the effects of financial aid marketing observed through quantitative analysis, in…

  8. "Poverty is the big thing": exploring financial, transportation, and opportunity costs associated with fistula management and repair in Nigeria and Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keya, Kaji Tamanna; Sripad, Pooja; Nwala, Emmanuel; Warren, Charlotte E

    2018-06-01

    Women living with obstetric fistula often live in poverty and in remote areas far from hospitals offering surgical repair. These women and their families face a range of costs while accessing fistula repair, some of which include: management of their condition, lost productivity and time, and transport to facilities. This study explores, through women's, communities', and providers' perspectives, the financial, transport, and opportunity cost barriers and enabling factors for seeking repair services. A qualitative approach was applied in Kano and Ebonyi in Nigeria and Hoima and Masaka in Uganda. Between June and December 2015, the study team conducted in-depth interviews (IDIs) with women affected by fistula (n = 52) - including those awaiting repair, living with fistula, and after repair, and their spouses and other family members (n = 17), along with health service providers involved in fistula repair and counseling (n = 38). Focus group discussions (FGDs) with male and female community stakeholders (n = 8) and post-repair clients (n = 6) were also conducted. Women's experiences indicate the obstetric fistula results in a combined set of costs associated with delivery, repair, transportation, lost income, and companion expenses that are often limiting. Medical and non-medical ancillary costs such as food, medications, and water are not borne evenly among all fistula care centers or camps due to funding shortages. In Uganda, experienced transport costs indicate that women spend Ugandan Shilling (UGX) 10,000 to 90,000 (US$3.00-US$25.00) for two people for a single trip to a camp (client and her caregiver), while Nigerian women (Kano) spent Naira 250 to 2000 (US$0.80-US$6.41) for transportation. Factors that influence women's and families' ability to cover costs of fistula care access include education and vocational skills, community savings mechanisms, available resources in repair centers, client counseling, and subsidized care and

  9. Blood pressure kiosks for medication therapy management programs: business opportunity for pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houle, Sherilyn K D; Chuck, Anderson W; Tsuyuki, Ross T

    2012-01-01

    To develop an economic model based on the use of pharmacy-based blood pressure kiosks for case finding of remunerable medication therapy management (MTM) opportunities. Descriptive, exploratory, nonexperimental study. Ontario, Canada, between January 2010 and September 2011. More than 7.5 million blood pressure kiosk readings were taken from 341 pharmacies. A model was developed to estimate revenues achievable by using blood pressure kiosks for 1 month to identify a cohort of patients with blood pressure of 130/80 mm Hg or more and caring for those patients during 1 year. Revenue generated from MTM programs. Pharmacies could generate an average of $12,270 (range $4,523-24,420) annually in revenue from billing for MTM services. Blood pressure kiosks can be used to identify patients with elevated blood pressure who may benefit from reimbursable pharmacist cognitive services. Revenue can be reinvested to purchase automated dispensing technology or offset pharmacy technician costs to free pharmacists to provide pharmaceutical care. Improved patient outcomes, increased patient loyalty, and improved adherence are additional potential benefits.

  10. Opportunities and challenges of interdisciplinary research career development: implementation of a women's health research training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domino, Steven E; Smith, Yolanda R; Johnson, Timothy R B

    2007-03-01

    A key component of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Roadmap for Medical Research is the development of interdisciplinary research teams. How best to teach and foster interdisciplinary research skills has not been determined. An effort at promoting interdisciplinary research was initiated by the Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH) at NIH in 1999. The following year, 12 academic centers were funded to support 56 scholar positions for 2-5 years under Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women's Health (BIRCWH). A second cohort of 12 centers, called BIRCWH II, was funded in 2002. In this paper, we present the experience of the University of Michigan BIRCWH program, including a practical approach to dealing with the challenges and opportunities of interdisciplinary research training. Scholars are mentored not only by their primary research advisor but also by a three-person mentor team as well as by their peers. All scholars and a core of supportive faculty meet regularly to discuss interdisciplinary research career development and approaches to apply knowledge in new ways. Of the original cohort of 10 scholars at the University of Michigan, 7 have achieved independent research funding. Challenges include arranging times to meet, developing a common language and knowledge base, dealing proactively with expectations and misunderstandings, focusing on a conceptual model, and providing timely feedback.

  11. Training for Leadership Roles in Academic Medicine: Opportunities for Psychologists in the AAMC LEAD Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPaglia, Donna; Thompson, Britta; Hafler, Janet; Chauvin, Sheila

    2017-06-01

    Psychologists' roles within academic medicine have expanded well beyond research and scholarship. They are active as providers of patient care, medical education, and clinical supervision. Although the number of psychologists in academic health centers continues to grow, they represent a small portion of total medical school faculties. However, with the movement toward collaborative care models, emphasis on interprofessional teams, and increased emphasis on psychological science topics in medical curricula, psychologists are well-positioned to make further contributions. Another path through which psychologists can further increase their contributions and value within academic health centers is to aspire to leadership roles. This article describes the first author's reflections on her experiences in a two-year, cohort-based, educational leadership development certificate program in academic medicine. The cohort was comprised largely of physicians and basic scientists, and a small number of non-physician participants of which the first author was the only clinical psychologist. The insights gained from this experience provide recommendations for psychologists interested in leadership opportunities in academic medicine.

  12. The opportunities and rewards of distance learning programs offered by the university of Newcastle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyall, D.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The University of Newcastle offers, via the distance learning mode of study, three innovative postgraduate programs designed for Nuclear Medicine Scientists and Practitioners. The Graduate Diploma in Nuclear Medicine is designed for Nuclear Medicine Scientists who have been absent from the work force for an extended period of time or have completed a qualification in medical imaging, who are currently working as a Nuclear Medicine Scientist. The Graduate Diploma fosters and encourages a greater depth of knowledge of Nuclear Medicine through the understanding and application of clinical skills. The Master of Nuclear Medicine is designed to develop within Nuclear Medicine Scientists and Practitioners a greater depth of knowledge of Nuclear Medicine through the acquisition and application of research skills. The Master of Applied Management (Health) is designed for Nuclear Medicine Scientists, practitioners, health managers and administrators who desire to acquire essential management skills while expanding their clinical skills. Graduates of the Graduate Diploma are eligible to sit the certification examination for the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board in the United States of America. They may also eligible to apply to the Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Accreditation Board for interim accreditation. Graduates of the Masters of Nuclear Medicine enjoy the same opportunities as per the Graduate Diploma. They also enjoy a greater success with promotion and have the skills necessary to develop a rewarding career in research. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  13. FOSTER-Flight Opportunities for Science Teacher EnRichment, A New IDEA Program From NASA Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devore, E.; Gillespie, C.; Hull, G.; Koch, D.

    1993-05-01

    Flight Opportunities for Science Teacher EnRichment (FOSTER) is a new educational program from the Imitative to Develop Education through Astronomy in the Astrophysics Division at NASA Headquarters. Now in its first year of the pilot program, the FOSTER project brings eleven Bay Area teaaaachers to NASA Ames to participate in a year-long program of workshops, educational programs at their schools and the opportunity to fly aboard the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) on research missions. As science and math educators, FOSTER teachers get a close-up look at science in action and have the opportunity to interact with the entire team of scientists, aviators and engineers that support the research abord the KAO. In June, a second group of FOSTER teachers will participate in a week-long workshop at ASes to prepare for flights during the 1993-94 school year. In addition, the FOSTER project trains teachers to use e-mail for ongoing communication with scientists and the KAO team, develops educational materials and supports opportunities for scientists to become directly involved in local schools. FOSTER is supported by a NASA grant (NAGW 3291).

  14. Residential immersive life skills programs for youth with physical disabilities: A pilot study of program opportunities, intervention strategies, and youth experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Gillian; Kingsnorth, Shauna; McPherson, Amy; Jones-Galley, Kimberlea; Pinto, Madhu; Fellin, Melissa; Timbrell, Natalie; Savage, Diane

    2016-08-01

    A pilot study was conducted to assess correspondence among measures of program characteristics (opportunities and intervention strategies) and youth experiences in a range of activity settings in a residential immersive life skills (RILS) program. Opportunities and intervention strategies were assessed in 18 activity settings in the 21-day program. On two occasions each, four youth completed a measure of experiences and took part in onsite interviews. There was good convergence between observed program opportunities and the use of socially-mediated, teaching/learning, and non-intrusive strategies. Youth experiences of social interaction, choice, and personal growth were further informed by interview information. There was substantial convergence between program characteristics and youth experiences, indicating the program was provided and experienced as intended. This pilot study indicated the fidelity of the program and the feasibility of using the measures in a future study. The preliminary findings suggest that RILS programs may provide a favorable environment for developmental experiences concerning social interaction, autonomy, and personal growth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Limiting the financial risks of electricity generation capital investments under carbon constraints: Applications and opportunities for public policies and private investments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomer, Adam

    Increasing demand for electricity and an aging fleet of generators are the principal drivers behind an increasing need for a large amount of capital investments in the US electric power sector in the near term. The decisions (or lack thereof) by firms, regulators and policy makers in response to this challenge have long lasting consequences, incur large economic and environmental risks, and must be made despite large uncertainties about the future operating and business environment. Capital investment decisions are complex: rates of return are not guaranteed; significant uncertainties about future environmental legislation and regulations exist at both the state and national levels---particularly about carbon dioxide emissions; there is an increasing number of shareholder mandates requiring public utilities to reduce their exposure to potentially large losses from stricter environmental regulations; and there are significant concerns about electricity and fuel price levels, supplies, and security. Large scale, low carbon electricity generation facilities using coal, such as integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) facilities coupled with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technologies, have been technically proven but are unprofitable in the current regulatory and business environment where there is no explicit or implicit price on carbon dioxide emissions. The paper examines two separate scenarios that are actively discussed by policy and decision makers at corporate, state and national levels: a future US electricity system where coal plays a role; and one where the role of coal is limited or nonexistent. The thesis intends to provide guidance for firms and policy makers and outline applications and opportunities for public policies and for private investment decisions to limit financial risks of electricity generation capital investments under carbon constraints.

  16. 78 FR 34313 - Funding Opportunity Title: Risk Management Education Partnerships Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-07

    ... accordance with USDA procedures or recognized good farming practices applicable specific crop and regions... College Students who are preparing careers in agriculture; Record Keeping practices; Farm Benchmarking for production and financial management; Commodity Contracting and Hedging methods; Marketing Strategies to...

  17. 75 FR 27109 - FY 2010 Discretionary Funding Opportunity: Paul S. Sarbanes Transit in Parks Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-13

    ... financial sustainability portion of the proposal. The SAFETEA-LU legislation includes language allowing... Avenue, Suite 3142, Seattle, WA 98174- 1002, Tel. 206-220-7954. States served: Illinois, Indiana, States...

  18. Time and financial costs of programs for live trapping feral cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutter, Felicia B; Stoskopf, Michael K; Levine, Jay F

    2004-11-01

    To determine the time and financial costs of programs for live trapping feral cats and determine whether allowing cats to become acclimated to the traps improved trapping effectiveness. Prospective cohort study. 107 feral cats in 9 colonies. 15 traps were set at each colony for 5 consecutive nights, and 5 traps were then set per night until trapping was complete. In 4 colonies, traps were immediately baited and set; in the remaining 5 colonies, traps were left open and cats were fed in the traps for 3 days prior to the initiation of trapping. Costs for bait and labor were calculated, and trapping effort and efficiency were assessed. Mean +/- SD overall trapping effort (ie, number of trap-nights until at least 90% of the cats in the colony had been captured or until no more than 1 cat remained untrapped) was 8.9 +/- 3.9 trap-nights per cat captured. Mean overall trapping efficiency (ie, percentage of cats captured per colony) was 98.0 +/- 4.0%. There were no significant differences in trapping effort or efficiency between colonies that were provided an acclimation period and colonies that were not. Overall trapping costs were significantly higher for colonies provided an acclimation period. Results suggest that these live-trapping protocols were effective. Feeding cats their regular diets in the traps for 3 days prior to the initiation of trapping did not have a significant effect on trapping effort or efficiency in the present study but was associated with significant increases in trapping costs.

  19. Expanding the Navy’s Managers Internal Control Program’s (MICP) Capability to Prepare for External Financial Audits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    omissions due to fraud, illegal acts, and corruption; and the risk of management override ( COSO , 2013d). Effective internal controls are an important...the Department is well managed . In 2013, The Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission ( COSO ) added 17 principles to the five...Commission’s ( COSO ) 17 Principles, Office of Financial Operations (FMO), Managers ’ Internal Control Program, Managers ’ Internal Control Manual. 15. NUMBER OF

  20. Nigeria; Publication of Financial Sector Assessment Program Documentation––Detailed Assessment of Observance of Insurance Core Principles

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2013-01-01

    Nigeria undertook a Financial Sector Assessment Program (FSAP), which included a review of the structure of Nigeria’s insurance market and the supervisory framework. The assessment was benchmarked against the Insurance Core Principles (ICPs) issued by the International Association of Insurance Supervisors (IAISs). It is advised that the National Insurance Commission (NAICOM) of Nigeria can expand the objective to include the creation of a fair, safe, and stable insurance sector for the benefi...

  1. Canada; Financial Sector Assessment Program-Intensity and Effectiveness of Federal Bank Supervision in Canada-Technical Note

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2014-01-01

    This paper evaluates Financial Sector Assessment Program (FSAP) intensity and effectiveness of Federal Bank supervision in Canada. The IMF report highlights that a key element of effective supervision is a willingness to increase supervisory pressure promptly when a supervisor identifies weaknesses in an institution. The IMF funding for Canadian banks is primarily through deposits and lending focuses on traditional bank products in Canada in the personal and commercial sectors. It also highli...

  2. Sweden; Financial Sector Assessment Program Update: Technical Note on Contingency Planning, Crisis Management and Bank Resolution

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2011-01-01

    This abstract reviews the recommendations made in the FSAP Update for Sweden in the areas of contingency planning, crisis management, and bank resolution. Although Sweden crisis management fared well during the global financial crisis, its authorities are reviewing the framework for managing financial crises to incorporate crisis lessons. They recommend a domestic institutional framework, an effective cross-border cooperation, an emergency liquidity assistance (ELA), a deposit guarantee schem...

  3. An observational study of emergency department utilization among enrollees of Minnesota Health Care Programs: financial and non-financial barriers have different associations

    OpenAIRE

    Shippee, Nathan D; Shippee, Tetyana P; Hess, Erik P; Beebe, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    Background Emergency department (ED) use is costly, and especially frequent among publicly insured populations in the US, who also disproportionately encounter financial (cost/coverage-related) and non-financial/practical barriers to care. The present study examines the distinct associations financial and non-financial barriers to care have with patterns of ED use among a publicly insured population. Methods This observational study uses linked administrative-survey data for enrollees of Minn...

  4. The impact of an m-Health financial incentives program on the physical activity and diet of Australian truck drivers

    OpenAIRE

    Gilson, Nicholas D.; Pavey, Toby G; Wright, Olivia RL; Vandelanotte, Corneel; Duncan, Mitch J; Gomersall, Sjaan; Trost, Stewart G.; Brown, Wendy J.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Chronic diseases are high in truck drivers and have been linked to work routines that promote inactivity and poor diets. This feasibility study examined the extent to which an m-Health financial incentives program facilitated physical activity and healthy dietary choices in Australian truck drivers. Methods Nineteen men (mean [SD] age = 47.5 [9.8] years; BMI = 31.2 [4.6] kg/m2) completed the 20-week program, and used an activity tracker and smartphone application (Jawbone ...

  5. Instruction in teaching and teaching opportunities for residents in US dermatology programs: Results of a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgin, Susan; Homayounfar, Gelareh; Newman, Lori R; Sullivan, Amy

    2017-04-01

    Dermatology residents routinely teach junior co-residents and medical students. Despite the importance of teaching skills for a successful academic career, no formal teaching instruction programs for dermatology residents have been described to our knowledge, and the extent of teaching opportunities for dermatology residents is unknown. We sought to describe the range of teaching opportunities and instruction available to dermatology residents and to assess the need for additional teaching training from the perspective of dermatology residency program directors nationwide. A questionnaire was administered to 113 US dermatology residency program directors or their designees. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze questionnaire item responses. The response rate was 55% (62/113). All program directors reported that their residents teach; 59% (33/56) reported offering trainees teaching instruction; 11% (7/62) of programs offered a short-term series of formal sessions on teaching; and 7% (4/62) offered ongoing, longitudinal training. Most program directors (74%, 40/54) believed that their residents would benefit from more teaching instruction. Response rate and responder bias are potential limitations. Dermatology residents teach in a broad range of settings, over half receive some teaching instruction, and most dermatology residency program directors perceive a need for additional training for residents as teachers. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Motivation for Participating in a Weight Loss Program and Financial Incentives: An Analysis from a Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Melissa M.; Tate, Deborah F.; Finkelstein, Eric A.; Linnan, Laura A.

    2012-01-01

    This analysis investigated if changes in autonomous or controlled motivation for participation in a weight loss program differed between individuals offered a financial incentive for weight loss compared to individuals not offered an incentive. Additionally, the same relationships were tested among those who lost weight and either received or did not receive an incentive. This analysis used data from a year-long randomized worksite weight loss program that randomly assigned employees in each worksite to either a low-intensity weight loss program or the same program plus small financial incentives for weight loss ($5.00 per percentage of initial weight lost). There were no differences in changes between groups on motivation during the study, however, increases in autonomous motivation were consistently associated with greater weight losses. This suggests that the small incentives used in this program did not lead to increases in controlled motivation nor did they undermine autonomous motivation. Future studies are needed to evaluate the magnitude and timing of incentives to more fully understand the relationship between incentives and motivation. PMID:22577524

  7. Problems and Opportunities of an International Financial Reporting Standard for Small and Medium-sized Entities. The EAA FRSC's Comment on the IASB's Discussion Paper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thinggaard, Frank; Evans, Lisa; Gebhardt, Günther

    2005-01-01

    and questions arising from this. This paper briefly introduces the background to the publication of the Discussion Paper. This is followed by a review of prior litterature on SME financial reporting implications, prepared by the European Accountin Association's Financial Reporting Standards Committee...

  8. 75 FR 39953 - Modification to the Basic Center Program Funding Opportunity Announcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-13

    .... Announcement Type: Modification. Funding Opportunity Number: HHS-2010-ACF-ACYF-CY-0002. CFDA Number: 93.623... points. Margins less than \\1/2\\ inch: Deduction of 3 points. Font is not at least 12-point size or Times...

  9. Analysis of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats in the development of a health technology assessment program in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahveci, Rabia; Meads, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    The Turkish healthcare system is currently undergoing reform, and efficient use of resources has become a key factor in determining the allocation of resources. The objective of this study was to analyze strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) in the development of a health technology assessment (HTA) program in Turkey. A SWOT analysis was performed using a literature review and interviews with key people in the Turkish Ministry of Health and Ministry of Labor and Social Security. Regarding recent reforms in health care, investments for information network and databank are the strengths, but the traditional "expert-based" decision making, poor availability of data, and poor quality of data could be seen as some of the weaknesses. Another major weakness is lack of general awareness of HTA. Increasing demand for transparency in decision making, demand for evidence, and demand for credibility by decision makers are some of the opportunities, and current healthcare reforms, i.e., restructuring of healthcare and general health insurance, could also be seen as major opportunities. These opportunities unfortunately could be threatened by lack of funding, and resources are challenged by large, recent national investments. There is a good opportunity for Turkey to use the skills in HTA currently being developed through activities in Europe and the Americas to assist in the development of a much more cost-effective and transparent healthcare system in Turkey.

  10. Inspector General, DoD, Oversight of the Army Audit Agency Audit of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Civil Works Program, FY 1996 Financial Statements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lane, F

    1997-01-01

    The audit objective was to determine the accuracy and completeness of the audit of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Civil Works Program, FY 1996, financial statements conducted by the Army Audit Agency...

  11. Colorado geothermal commercialization program. Geothermal energy opportunities at four Colorado towns: Durango, Glenwood Springs, Idaho Springs, Ouray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coe, B.A.; Zimmerman, J.

    1981-01-01

    The potential of four prospective geothermal development sites in Colorado was analyzed and hypothetical plans prepared for their development. Several broad areas were investigated for each site. The first area of investigation was the site itself: its geographic, population, economic, energy demand characteristics and the attitudes of its residents relative to geothermal development potential. Secondly, the resource potential was described, to the extent it was known, along with information concerning any exploration or development that has been conducted. The third item investigated was the process required for development. There are financial, institutional, environmental, technological and economic criteria for development that must be known in order to realistically gauge the possible development. Using that information, the next concern, the geothermal energy potential, was then addressed. Planned, proposed and potential development are all described, along with a possible schedule for that development. An assessment of the development opportunities and constraints are included. Technical methodologies are described in the Appendix. (MHR)

  12. Financial incentives: only one piece of the workplace wellness puzzle comment on "corporate wellness programs: implementation challenges in the modern american workplace".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busum, Kristin Van; Mattke, Soeren

    2013-11-01

    In this commentary, we argue that financial incentives are only one of many key components that employers should consider when designing and implementing a workplace wellness program. Strategies such as social encouragement and providing token rewards may also be effective in improving awareness and engagement. Should employers choose to utilize financial incentives, they should tailor them to the goals for the program as well as the targeted behaviors and health outcomes.

  13. Financial Incentives: Only One Piece of the Workplace Wellness Puzzle; Comment on “Corporate Wellness Programs: Implementation Challenges in the Modern American Workplace”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Van Busum

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this commentary, we argue that financial incentives are only one of many key components that employers should consider when designing and implementing a workplace wellness program. Strategies such as social encouragement and providing token rewards may also be effective in improving awareness and engagement. Should employers choose to utilize financial incentives, they should tailor them to the goals for the program as well as the targeted behaviors and health outcomes.

  14. The Development of the Financial Literacy Program at the Community College of Baltimore County

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reams-Johnson, Ansa; Delker, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Student debt has increasingly become an important topic in higher education. Many students, particularly low-income and first-generation college students, do not have a solid understanding of managing personal finances. This becomes further compounded upon entering college, as these students lack the financial acumen to understand the long-term…

  15. Como preparar un programa de informacion sobre la asistencia economica (Planning a Financial Aid Awareness Program).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Education, Washington, DC.

    This booklet, written in Spanish, is intended to be used with a set of slides as part of a presentation to students on "How To Apply for Federal Student Aid" ("Como Solicitar la Asistencia Economica Federal para Estudiantes"). The first part of the book is a script based on the slides. After the script is a guide to hosting a financial aid…

  16. A Model for Considering the Financial Sustainability of Learning and Teaching Programs: Concepts and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bellis, David

    2012-01-01

    The expansion of tertiary education, an intensity of focus on accountability and performance, and the emergence of new governance and management structures drives an economic fiscal perspective of the value of learning and teaching. Accurate and meaningful models defining financial sustainability are therefore proposed as an imperative for…

  17. FCS Academic Programs and Financial Planning Industry: Partnering to Meet Growing Demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytton, Ruth H.; Grable, John E.

    2004-01-01

    Since the turn of the 20th century and the coalescence of home economics, the use of money within the household has been an issue of study. Now known as family and consumer sciences (FCS), the profession can boast of a century of financial education of youth and adults in a variety of formal and informal settings. In recent decades, financial…

  18. Application of the opportunities of tool system 'CUDA' for graphic processors programming in scientific and technical calculation tasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudnik, V.A.; Kudryavtsev, V.I.; Sereda, T.M.; Us, S.A.; Shestakov, M.V.

    2009-01-01

    The opportunities of technology CUDA (Compute Unified Device Architecture - the unified hardware-software decision for parallel calculations on GPU)of the company NVIDIA were described. The basic differences of the programming language 'C' for GPU from 'usual' language 'C' were selected. The examples of CUDA usage for acceleration of development of applications and realization of algorithms of scientific and technical calculations were given which are carried out by the means of graphic processors (GPGPU) of accelerators GeForce of the eighth generation. The recommendations on optimization of the programs using GPU were resulted.

  19. An evaluation of the Well at Dell health management program: health risk change and financial return on investment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musich, Shirley; McCalister, Tre'; Wang, Sara; Hawkins, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of the Well at Dell comprehensive health management program in delivering health care and productivity cost savings relative to program investment (i.e., return on investment). A quasi-experimental design was used to quantify the financial impact of the program and nonexperimental pre-post design to evaluate change in health risks. Ongoing worksite health management program implemented across multiple U.S. locations. Subjects were 24,651 employees with continuous medical enrollment in 2010-2011 who were eligible for 2011 health management programming. Incentive-driven, outcomes-based multicomponent corporate health management program including health risk appraisal (HRA)/wellness, lifestyle management, and disease management coaching programs. Medical, pharmacy, and short-term disability pre/post expenditure trends adjusted for demographics, health status, and baseline costs. Self-reported health risks from repeat HRA completers. Analysis: Propensity score-weighted and multivariate regression-adjusted comparison of baseline to post trends in health care expenditures and productivity costs for program participants and nonparticipants (i.e., difference in difference) relative to programmatic investment. The Well at Dell program achieved an overall return on investment of 2.48 in 2011. Most of the savings were realized from the HRA/wellness component of the program. Cost savings were supported with high participation and significant health risk improvement. An incentive-driven, well-managed comprehensive corporate health management program can continue to achieve significant health improvement while promoting health care and productivity cost savings in an employee population.

  20. Perceptions of Professional and Educational Skills Learning Opportunities Made Available through K-12 Robotics Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakke, Christine K.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine whether participation in robotics provides opportunities for educational and professional skill development, significant enough to merit the recommendation of robotics courses as a part of mainstream curriculum offerings in K-12 schools. This non-experimental, mixed methods study examined current junior high…

  1. Building Collaborative Research Opportunities into Study Abroad Programs: A Case Study from Panama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solís, Patricia; Price, Marie; Adames de Newbill, María

    2015-01-01

    As universities increase their international study opportunities, enormous potential exists to create geography field courses that provide undergraduates and graduate students with primary research experience and intercultural collaboration. This paper draws from our experience leading a two-week collaborative field course in Panama. We outline…

  2. Building a National Security Program at a Small School: Identifying Opportunities and Overcoming Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Michael; Schortgen, Francis

    2016-01-01

    This article offers insights into the overall program development process and--institutional obstacles and constraints notwithstanding--successful introduction of a new national security program at a small liberal arts university at a time of growing institutional prioritization of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) programs.…

  3. Mexico; Financial Sector Assessment Program Update: Technical Note: Derivatives Market: Overview and Potential Vulnerabilities

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2007-01-01

    This technical note provides an overview of Mexico’s derivatives markets, and describes concisely the derivatives regulatory framework and risk management practices in financial institutions active in these markets. The most important derivatives market in Mexico is the over-the-counter (OTC) derivatives market, which is fully integrated with the global derivatives market. The origin of the OTC derivatives market can be traced back to the 1994 Mexican crisis that forced Mexico to abandon its ...

  4. Financialization and financial profit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Guillén

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This article starts from the critical review of the concept of financial capital. I consider it is necessary not to confuse this category with of financialization, which has acquired a certificate of naturalization from the rise of neoliberalism. Although financial monopoly-financial capital is the hegemonic segment of the bourgeoisie in the major capitalist countries, their dominance does not imply, a fortiori, financialization of economic activity, since it depends of the conditions of the process reproduction of capital. The emergence of joint stock companies modified the formation of the average rate of profit. The "promoter profit" becomes one of the main forms of income of monopoly-financial capital. It is postulated that financial profit is a kind of "extraordinary surplus-value" which is appropriated by monopoly-financial capital by means of the monopolistic control it exerts on the issue and circulation of fictitious capital.

  5. A contractor report to the Department of Energy on environmental management baseline programs and integration opportunities (discussion draft)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-05-01

    In July 1996, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management (EM) chartered a government contractor led effort to develop a suite of technically defensible, integrated alternatives which meet the EM mission. The contractor team was challenged to ''think outside-the-box'' for solutions that cross traditional site boundaries and enable the programs to get the job done at an earlier date and at a lower cost. This report documents baseline programs current plans for material disposition and presents the opportunities for additional acceleration of cleanup and cost savings. A graphical depiction of the disposition of EM-owned waste and material from current state to final disposition is shown as disposition maps in Attachments 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, and 11. These disposition maps detail the material disposition at eleven major DOE sites as planned in the current discussion draft plan, Accelerating Cleanup: Focus on 2006. Maps reflecting material disposition at additional sites will be added in the future. Opportunities to further accelerate the cleanup of DOE-EM sites and reduce the overall cost of cleanup are depicted in the alternative disposition maps shown in Attachments 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12. These integration opportunities bring nation-wide resources to bear on common problems facing the DOE sites

  6. Providing Feedback, Orientation and Opportunities for Reflection as Key Elements for Successful Mentoring Programs: Reviewing a Program for Future Business Education Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Riebenbauer

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The introduction to teaching is critical for novice teachers. Near the end of their master’s program, students of Business Education and Development in Austria spend one semester at an assigned school. They are introduced to teaching, while being assisted by peer students, mentoring teachers, and a companion course. Mentors receive special training and preparation in advance, thus contributing to a high quality mentoring program. The program is organized threefold: (1 providing feedback, (2 opportunities for reflection and (3 career orientation. The purpose of this paper is to assess key elements of successful mentoring programs and to question which competences of mentors contribute most to the success of those programs. Between 2012 and 2015, 188 persons (student teachers and their mentors responded to an online survey at the end of their mentoring program. Additionally, data from a study (1,245 questionnaires regarding the student teachers’ perception of their own competence was utilized, allowing for a comparison of student teacher confidence in their abilities before and after the mentoring program. The present results provide insight into the key elements of successful mentoring programs; both from a student teacher’s and mentor’s perspective. During the semester, students showed an increase regarding their self-perception of their professional competences. It was found that students and mentoring teachers valued feedback after each lesson more than feedback in regular meetings. Opportunities for reflection (e.g. exchange with peer students, learning diaries were considered helpful. The mentoring program helped students to decide whether to become a teacher or not.

  7. 43 CFR 12.920 - Purpose of financial and program management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATIVE AND AUDIT REQUIREMENTS AND COST PRINCIPLES FOR ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS Uniform Administrative... for: satisfying cost sharing and matching requirements, accounting for program income, budget revision approvals, making audits, determining allowability of cost, and establishing fund availability. ...

  8. 31 CFR 103.170 - Exempted anti-money laundering programs for certain financial institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exempted anti-money laundering... TRANSACTIONS Anti-Money Laundering Programs Anti-Money Laundering Programs § 103.170 Exempted anti-money... establishment of anti-money laundering programs: (1) An agency of the United States Government, or of a State or...

  9. The impact of an m-Health financial incentives program on the physical activity and diet of Australian truck drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilson, Nicholas D; Pavey, Toby G; Wright, Olivia Rl; Vandelanotte, Corneel; Duncan, Mitch J; Gomersall, Sjaan; Trost, Stewart G; Brown, Wendy J

    2017-05-18

    Chronic diseases are high in truck drivers and have been linked to work routines that promote inactivity and poor diets. This feasibility study examined the extent to which an m-Health financial incentives program facilitated physical activity and healthy dietary choices in Australian truck drivers. Nineteen men (mean [SD] age = 47.5 [9.8] years; BMI = 31.2 [4.6] kg/m 2 ) completed the 20-week program, and used an activity tracker and smartphone application (Jawbone UP™) to regulate small positive changes in occupational physical activity, and fruit, vegetable, saturated fat and processed/refined sugar food/beverage choices. Measures (baseline, end-program, 2-months follow-up; April-December 2014) were accelerometer-determined proportions of work time spent physically active, and a workday dietary questionnaire. Statistical (repeated measures ANOVA) and thematic (interviews) analyses assessed program impact. Non-significant increases in the mean proportions of work time spent physically active were found at end-program and follow-up (+1%; 7 mins/day). Fruit (p = 0.023) and vegetable (p = 0.024) consumption significantly increased by one serve/day at end-program. Non-significant improvements in saturated fat (5%) and processed/refined sugar (1%) food/beverage choices were found at end-program and follow-up. Overall, 65% (n = 11) of drivers demonstrated positive changes in physical activity, and at least one dietary choice (e.g. saturated fat) at follow-up. Drivers found the financial incentives component of the program to be a less effective facilitator of change than the activity tracker and smartphone application, although this technology was easier to use for monitoring of physical activity than healthy dietary choices. Not all drivers benefitted from the program. However, positive changes for different health behaviours were observed in the majority of participants. Outcomes from this feasibility study inform future intervention development for

  10. The impact of an m-Health financial incentives program on the physical activity and diet of Australian truck drivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas D. Gilson

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic diseases are high in truck drivers and have been linked to work routines that promote inactivity and poor diets. This feasibility study examined the extent to which an m-Health financial incentives program facilitated physical activity and healthy dietary choices in Australian truck drivers. Methods Nineteen men (mean [SD] age = 47.5 [9.8] years; BMI = 31.2 [4.6] kg/m2 completed the 20-week program, and used an activity tracker and smartphone application (Jawbone UP™ to regulate small positive changes in occupational physical activity, and fruit, vegetable, saturated fat and processed/refined sugar food/beverage choices. Measures (baseline, end-program, 2-months follow-up; April–December 2014 were accelerometer-determined proportions of work time spent physically active, and a workday dietary questionnaire. Statistical (repeated measures ANOVA and thematic (interviews analyses assessed program impact. Results Non-significant increases in the mean proportions of work time spent physically active were found at end-program and follow-up (+1%; 7 mins/day. Fruit (p = 0.023 and vegetable (p = 0.024 consumption significantly increased by one serve/day at end-program. Non-significant improvements in saturated fat (5% and processed/refined sugar (1% food/beverage choices were found at end-program and follow-up. Overall, 65% (n = 11 of drivers demonstrated positive changes in physical activity, and at least one dietary choice (e.g. saturated fat at follow-up. Drivers found the financial incentives component of the program to be a less effective facilitator of change than the activity tracker and smartphone application, although this technology was easier to use for monitoring of physical activity than healthy dietary choices. Conclusions Not all drivers benefitted from the program. However, positive changes for different health behaviours were observed in the majority of participants. Outcomes from this

  11. Opportunities in the Fusion Energy Sciences Program [Includes Appendix C: Topical Areas Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1999-06-01

    Recent years have brought dramatic advances in the scientific understanding of fusion plasmas and in the generation of fusion power in the laboratory. Today, there is little doubt that fusion energy production is feasible. The challenge is to make fusion energy practical. As a result of the advances of the last few years, there are now exciting opportunities to optimize fusion systems so that an attractive new energy source will be available when it may be needed in the middle of the next century. The risk of conflicts arising from energy shortages and supply cutoffs, as well as the risk of severe environmental impacts from existing methods of energy production, are among the reasons to pursue these opportunities.

  12. Opportunities in the Fusion Energy Sciences Program. Appendix C: Topical Areas Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1999-06-30

    Recent years have brought dramatic advances in the scientific understanding of fusion plasmas and in the generation of fusion power in the laboratory. Today, there is little doubt that fusion energy production is feasible. The challenge is to make fusion energy practical. As a result of the advances of the last few years, there are now exciting opportunities to optimize fusion systems so that an attractive new energy source will be available when it may be needed in the middle of the next century. The risk of conflicts arising from energy shortages and supply cutoffs, as well as the risk of severe environmental impacts from existing methods of energy production, are among the reasons to pursue these opportunities.

  13. Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Wells of Opportunity Program final contract report, 1980-1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    The geopressured-geothermal candidates for the Wells of Opportunity program were located by the screening of published information on oil industry activity and through direct contact with the oil and gas operators. This process resulted in the recommendation to the DOE of 33 candidate wells for the program. Seven of the 33 recommended wells were accepted for testing. Of these seven wells, six were actually tested. The first well, the No. 1 Kennedy, was acquired but not tested. The seventh well, the No. 1 Godchaux, was abandoned due to mechanical problems during re-entry. The well search activities, which culminated in the acceptance by the DOE of 7 recommended wells, were substantial. A total of 90,270 well reports were reviewed, leading to 1990 wells selected for thorough geological analysis. All of the reservoirs tested in this program have been restricted by one or more faults or permeability barriers. A comprehensive discussion of test results is presented.

  14. Impact of entrepreneurship policies on opportunity to startup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Davari

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available During the previous decades, policy makers have formulated policies for developing entrepreneurship in different countries in order to decrease unemployment and poverty toward sustainable development. Some of these policies include encouraging people to be an entrepreneur, opportunity creation, educating new skills to entrepreneurs and so on. In recent years an appropriate context has been formed for entrepreneurship development in Iran and some programs have been executed. Therefore, formulating appropriate frameworks to guide Iranian government in this way is a necessity. This paper evaluates the impact of entrepreneurship policies on opportunity to startup in Iran. The results of path analysis indicate that supportive financial and non-financial actions influence positively on opportunity to startup. In addition, education and culture also influence positively on opportunity to startup. Finally, legislation also positively influences on opportunity to startup.

  15. Financial Performance of Hospitals in the Mississippi Delta Region Under the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program and Hospital Value-based Purchasing Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsueh-Fen; Karim, Saleema; Wan, Fei; Nevola, Adrienne; Morris, Michael E; Bird, T Mac; Tilford, J Mick

    2017-11-01

    Previous studies showed that the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program (HRRP) and the Hospital Value-based Purchasing Program (HVBP) disproportionately penalized hospitals caring for the poor. The Mississippi Delta Region (Delta Region) is among the most socioeconomically disadvantaged areas in the United States. The financial performance of hospitals in the Delta Region under both HRRP and HVBP remains unclear. To compare the differences in financial performance under both HRRP and HVBP between hospitals in the Delta Region (Delta hospitals) and others in the nation (non-Delta hospitals). We used a 7-year panel dataset and applied difference-in-difference models to examine operating and total margin between Delta and non-Delta hospitals in 3 time periods: preperiod (2008-2010); postperiod 1 (2011-2012); and postperiod 2 (2013-2014). The Delta hospitals had a 0.89% and 4.24% reduction in operating margin in postperiods 1 and 2, respectively, whereas the non-Delta hospitals had 1.13% and 1% increases in operating margin in postperiods 1 and 2, respectively. The disparity in total margins also widened as Delta hospitals had a 1.98% increase in postperiod 1, but a 0.30% reduction in postperiod 2, whereas non-Delta hospitals had 1.27% and 2.28% increases in postperiods 1 and 2, respectively. The gap in financial performance between Delta and non-Delta hospitals widened following the implementation of HRRP and HVBP. Policy makers should modify these 2 programs to ensure that resources are not moved from the communities that need them most.

  16. A Ten-Year Retrospective Look at the NSF/GEO Opportunities for Enhancing Diversity in the Geosciences (OEDG) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsten, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    The Opportunities for Enhancing Diversity in the Geosciences (OEDG) program - established in 2002 by the National Science Foundation's Directorate for Geosciences (GEO) - has been a mainstay in GEO's efforts to broaden participation of traditionally underrepresented minorities in the geosciences. The primary goal of the OEDG program has been to engage a diverse population of students in learning about - and pursuing advanced degrees and careers in - the geosciences. Raising public awareness of the importance and relevance of the geosciences among diverse audiences has been a secondary goal. During the past decade, the OEDG program has supported a variety of planning grants, proof-of-concept projects, and larger full-scale implementation efforts across the U.S. These projects have contributed a rich array of culturally-tailored resources for learning about geoscience career pathways and opportunities to participate in geoscience research experiences. OEDG has also developed networking and mentoring programs tailored for diverse student audiences, as well as the educators who work with them, and has helped to build capacity in the geosciences at minority-serving institutions. Perhaps the most important legacy of the OEDG program has been the establishment of an enthusiastic and effective community of educators, administrators, students and organizations dedicated to increasing diversity in the geosciences. Evaluation data collected for individual OEDG projects has helped to improve the impact of specific projects and increase our understanding of which approaches are more successful in achieving OEDG program goals. In addition, GEO has supported a decade-long, program-wide evaluation of the OEDG portfolio through a contract to the American Institutes for Research (AIR). Synthesis of results from both the project- and program-level evaluation activities has identified evidence-based 'best practices' that are essential for achieving success in broadening participation

  17. Corporate Investments in Asian Emerging Markets: Financial Conditions, Financial Development, and Financial Constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jianxin; Gochoco-Bautista, Maria Socorro; Sotocinal, Noli

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by the literature on the finance–growth nexus, this paper explores the mechanisms through which finance affects corporate investments and capital accumulation. We separate the effects of financial conditions from those of financial development. Based on a sample of firms from five Asian emerging economies, we find that (1) financial conditions and financial development affect corporate investments through different channels. Financial conditions affect firms' growth opportunities an...

  18. Community-Based Programming: An Opportunity and Imperative for the Community College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Edgar J.

    1992-01-01

    Defines community-based programing as a cooperative process in which the community college serves as leader and catalyst in effecting collaboration among community members, leaders, and groups. Recommends 15 tasks for community college leaders involved in community-based programing, including environmental scanning and coalition building. (DMM)

  19. 77 FR 47399 - Funding Opportunity: Tribal Self-Governance Program; Planning Cooperative Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-08

    ... first and then access the CCR online registration through the CCR home page at https://www.bpn.gov/ccr... Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Number: 93.444. Announcement Type: New--Limited Competition. Key...-Governance Program (TSGP). This program is authorized under Public Law (Pub. L.) 106-260, the Tribal Self...

  20. 77 FR 47405 - Funding Opportunity: Tribal Self-Governance Program; Negotiation Cooperative Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-08

    ... first and then access the CCR online registration through the CCR home page at https://www.bpn.gov/ccr... Agreement Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Number: 93.444. Announcement Type: New--Limited Competition... Self-Governance Program (TSGP). This program is authorized under Public Law (Pub. L.) 106-260, the...

  1. DCP Leading NIH Glycoscience Common Fund Program; Funding Opportunities Open | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI's Division of Cancer Prevention is a leading participant for a key initiative in the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Glycoscience Common Fund program. This program supports development of accessible and affordable new tools and technologies for studying the role complex carbohydrates in health and disease. |

  2. Opportunities for the LWR ATF materials development program to contribute to the LBE-cooled ADS materials qualification program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Xing, E-mail: gongxingzfl@hotmail.com [Department of ATF R& D, Nuclear Fuel Research and Development Center, China Nuclear Power Technology Research Institute Co., Ltd., China General Nuclear Power Corporation (CGN), Shenzhen, 518026 (China); Li, Rui, E-mail: li-rui@cgnpc.com.cn [Department of ATF R& D, Nuclear Fuel Research and Development Center, China Nuclear Power Technology Research Institute Co., Ltd., China General Nuclear Power Corporation (CGN), Shenzhen, 518026 (China); Sun, Maozhou; Ren, Qisen [Department of ATF R& D, Nuclear Fuel Research and Development Center, China Nuclear Power Technology Research Institute Co., Ltd., China General Nuclear Power Corporation (CGN), Shenzhen, 518026 (China); Liu, Tong, E-mail: liutong@cgnpc.com.cn [Department of ATF R& D, Nuclear Fuel Research and Development Center, China Nuclear Power Technology Research Institute Co., Ltd., China General Nuclear Power Corporation (CGN), Shenzhen, 518026 (China); Short, Michael P., E-mail: hereiam@mit.edu [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA, 02139 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Accelerator-driven systems (ADS) are a promising approach for nuclear waste disposal. Nevertheless, the principal candidate materials proposed for ADS construction, such as the ferritic/martensitic steel, T91, and austenitic stainless steels, 316L and 15-15Ti, are not fully compatible with the liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) coolant. Under some operating conditions, liquid metal embrittlement (LME) or liquid metal corrosion (LMC) may occur in these steels when exposed to LBE. These environmentally-induced material degradation effects pose a threat to ADS reactor safety, as failure of the materials could initiate a severe accident, in which fission products are released into the coolant. Meanwhile, parallel efforts to develop accident-tolerant fuels (ATF) in light water reactors (LWRs) could provide both general materials design philosophies and specific material solutions to the ADS program. In this paper, the potential contributions of the ATF materials development program to the ADS materials qualification program are evaluated and discussed in terms of service conditions and materials performance requirements. Several specific areas where coordinated development may benefit both programs, including composite materials and selected coatings, are discussed. - Highlights: • ATF materials developed for LWRs could be candidate materials for the LBE-cooled ADS program. • Similar material design and protection philosophies are utilized in both programs. • Unique challenges of LBE-cooled ADS systems could possibly be addressed by LWR ATF materials. • More coordinated testing should be performed between the ATF and ADS programs.

  3. Program of financial support of civil society organizations in Tijuana: Building a relationship between civil society and municipal government from a political change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Delhumeau Rivera

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available This document analyzes the relations between society and government that took place with the Financial Aid to Civil Society Organizations Program in Tijuana. The decentralization process of social policy in Mexico is revised as the context in which new programs and initiatives are developed promoting a stronger participation of the society in the policy process. The reflection on the social policy of the National Action Party in Baja California since 1989, has lead us to see the new challenges that the Financial Aid to Civil Society Organizations Program presents to the local and state government and the social organizations.

  4. Confronting barriers and recognizing opportunities: Developing effective community-based environmental monitoring programs to meet the needs of Aboriginal communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKay, Ariana J.; Johnson, Chris J.

    2017-01-01

    Aboriginal communities can be negatively affected by resource development, but often they do not have a full opportunity to participate in project review and the resulting monitoring and mitigation activities. Cumulative impacts of resource development are also typically neglected in monitoring protocols that focus on a limited number of environmental values, rather than adopting a long-term, holistic view of development over time and space. Community-based environmental monitoring (CBEM) is emerging as a way to meaningfully include local Aboriginal citizens in the decision-making process as well as the assessment of the long-term impacts of the development of natural resources. We explored opportunities and barriers for developing CBEM programs that meet the needs of small and rural Aboriginal communities that are faced with the rapid and wide-spread development of natural resources. We conducted interviews with a local Aboriginal community, and natural resource management practitioners who could provide perspectives on the application of CBEM to resource management in north-central British Columbia, Canada. Results demonstrate that CBEM offers a locally adapted and culturally appropriate approach to facilitate the participation of Aboriginal communities in natural resource decision making and management. The interpretation of the specific role and purpose of CBEM differed among participants, depending on their objectives for and concerns about natural resource development. However, all parties were consistent in viewing CBEM as an effective method for engaging in dialogue, cooperation, and tracking environmental change. The development or improvement of CBEM programs should consider the efficacy of monitoring protocols, social cohesion and relationships, ability to inform decision-making, and effectiveness of CBEM for the members of the community. - Highlights: • We explored how to develop effective CBEM with a focus on Aboriginal communities. • We identified

  5. Survival prediction algorithms miss significant opportunities for improvement if used for case selection in trauma quality improvement programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, Catherine; Cole, Elaine; West, Anita; Tai, Nigel; Brohi, Karim

    2016-09-01

    Quality improvement (QI) programs have shown to reduce preventable mortality in trauma care. Detailed review of all trauma deaths is a time and resource consuming process and calculated probability of survival (Ps) has been proposed as audit filter. Review is limited on deaths that were 'expected to survive'. However no Ps-based algorithm has been validated and no study has examined elements of preventability associated with deaths classified as 'expected'. The objective of this study was to examine whether trauma performance review can be streamlined using existing mortality prediction tools without missing important areas for improvement. We conducted a retrospective study of all trauma deaths reviewed by our trauma QI program. Deaths were classified into non-preventable, possibly preventable, probably preventable or preventable. Opportunities for improvement (OPIs) involve failure in the process of care and were classified into clinical and system deviations from standards of care. TRISS and PS were used for calculation of probability of survival. Peer-review charts were reviewed by a single investigator. Over 8 years, 626 patients were included. One third showed elements of preventability and 4% were preventable. Preventability occurred across the entire range of the calculated Ps band. Limiting review to unexpected deaths would have missed over 50% of all preventability issues and a third of preventable deaths. 37% of patients showed opportunities for improvement (OPIs). Neither TRISS nor PS allowed for reliable identification of OPIs and limiting peer-review to patients with unexpected deaths would have missed close to 60% of all issues in care. TRISS and PS fail to identify a significant proportion of avoidable deaths and miss important opportunities for process and system improvement. Based on this, all trauma deaths should be subjected to expert panel review in order to aim at a maximal output of performance improvement programs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier

  6. Confronting barriers and recognizing opportunities: Developing effective community-based environmental monitoring programs to meet the needs of Aboriginal communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKay, Ariana J., E-mail: ariana.mckay@outlook.com; Johnson, Chris J., E-mail: chris.johnson@unbc.ca

    2017-05-15

    Aboriginal communities can be negatively affected by resource development, but often they do not have a full opportunity to participate in project review and the resulting monitoring and mitigation activities. Cumulative impacts of resource development are also typically neglected in monitoring protocols that focus on a limited number of environmental values, rather than adopting a long-term, holistic view of development over time and space. Community-based environmental monitoring (CBEM) is emerging as a way to meaningfully include local Aboriginal citizens in the decision-making process as well as the assessment of the long-term impacts of the development of natural resources. We explored opportunities and barriers for developing CBEM programs that meet the needs of small and rural Aboriginal communities that are faced with the rapid and wide-spread development of natural resources. We conducted interviews with a local Aboriginal community, and natural resource management practitioners who could provide perspectives on the application of CBEM to resource management in north-central British Columbia, Canada. Results demonstrate that CBEM offers a locally adapted and culturally appropriate approach to facilitate the participation of Aboriginal communities in natural resource decision making and management. The interpretation of the specific role and purpose of CBEM differed among participants, depending on their objectives for and concerns about natural resource development. However, all parties were consistent in viewing CBEM as an effective method for engaging in dialogue, cooperation, and tracking environmental change. The development or improvement of CBEM programs should consider the efficacy of monitoring protocols, social cohesion and relationships, ability to inform decision-making, and effectiveness of CBEM for the members of the community. - Highlights: • We explored how to develop effective CBEM with a focus on Aboriginal communities. • We identified

  7. Financial incentives, quality improvement programs, and the adoption of clinical information technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, James C; Casalino, Lawrence P; Gillies, Robin R; Rittenhouse, Diane R; Shortell, Stephen S; Fernandes-Taylor, Sara

    2009-04-01

    Physician use of clinical information technology (CIT) is important for the management of chronic illness, but has lagged behind expectations. We studied the role of health insurers' financial incentives (including pay-for-performance) and quality improvement initiatives in accelerating adoption of CIT in large physician practices. National survey of all medical groups and independent practice association (IPA) physician organizations with 20 or more physicians in the United States in 2006 to 2007. The response rate was 60.3%. Use of 19 CIT capabilities was measured. Multivariate statistical analysis of financial and organizational factors associated with adoption and use of CIT. Use of information technology varied across physician organizations, including electronic access to laboratory test results (medical groups, 49.3%; IPAs, 19.6%), alerts for potential drug interactions (medical groups, 33.9%; IPAs, 9.5%), electronic drug prescribing (medical groups, 41.9%; IPAs, 25.1%), and physician use of e-mail with patients (medical groups, 34.2%; IPAs, 29.1%). Adoption of CIT was stronger for physician organizations evaluated by external entities for pay-for-performance and public reporting purposes (P = 0.042) and for those participating in quality improvement initiatives (P < 0.001). External incentives and participation in quality improvement initiatives are associated with greater use of CIT by large physician practices.

  8. Defense Health Program Financial Reporting of General Property, Plant, and Equipment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lane, F

    2000-01-01

    .... The Defense Health Program funds the operations of the Military Departments' medical treatment facilities, the development of DoD medical systems software, and congressionally directed research...

  9. Opportunities for technology-based HIV prevention programming among high school students in Cape Town, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ybarra, Michele L; Mwaba, Kelvin; Prescott, Tonya L; Roman, Nicolette V; Rooi, Bronwyn; Bull, Sheana

    2014-01-01

    One in three new cases of HIV in South Africa is among adolescents. Given that adolescents are particularly affected, scalable, and cost-effective prevention programs are urgently needed. This study aims to identify opportunities to integrate technology into youth HIV prevention efforts. In 2012, 1107 8th-11th graders completed a paper-and-pencil survey. Respondents were enrolled in one of three public high schools in Langa, a lower income community in Cape Town, South Africa. Eighty-nine percent of respondents have used text messaging (SMS) and 86% have gone online. If an HIV prevention program was offered online, 66% of youth would be somewhat or extremely likely to access it; slightly fewer (55%) felt the same about SMS-based programming. In comparison, 85% said they would be somewhat or extremely likely to access a school-based HIV prevention program. Interest in Internet- (60%) and SMS-based (54%) HIV prevention programming was similar for youth who had a self-appraised risk of HIV compared to youth who appraised their risk to be lower, as it was for youth who were tired of hearing messages about HIV prevention. Technology use is common - even among high school students who live in lower income communities. At the same time, these data reveal that it is not uncommon for youth to be tired of hearing messages about HIV prevention, and many of the typical topics key to HIV prevention have low interest levels among youth. HIV prevention researchers need to be mindful of the extent of existing programming that youth are exposed to. Technology-based programming may be especially amenable to meeting these requirements because of its novelty especially in developing countries, and because interactive functionality can be easily integrated into the program design. Given the preference for school- and Internet-based programming, it seems that a hybrid approach is likely feasible and acceptable.

  10. Financial Statement Audit: U.S. Department of Education, Federal Direct Student Loan Program for the Year Ended September 30, 1994. Audit Control Number 17-48320.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Inspector General (ED), Washington, DC.

    An independent audit was done of the principal financial statements of the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program of the Department of Education for the year ending September 30, 1994. In planning and performing the review the auditors considered the internal control structure of the program in order to determine auditing procedures. The…

  11. Fiscal Fitness for Non-Profits: Project Puts Chicago After-School Programs and Funders through a Financial Workout. Stories from the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Strengthening after-school programming for city youngsters has long been an objective of The Wallace Foundation, a national philanthropy based in New York City. In its work over the years, Wallace has found that weak financial management of the nonprofits running many high-quality programs hampers their ability to improve and expand. In 2009,…

  12. Beyond Access and Supply: Youth-Led Strategies to Captivate Young People's Interest in and Demand for Youth Programs and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Rebecca N.

    2006-01-01

    Most people would probably agree that participation in quality youth programs and neighborhood-based, informal relationships and opportunities is a good thing for young people. The problem is that not nearly enough children and youth are engaged in these growth-enhancing opportunities. What can educators learn from young people about designing…

  13. The American Geological Institute Minority Participation Program (MPP): Thirty Years of Improving Access to Opportunities in the Geosciences Through Undergraduate and Graduate Scholarships for Underrepresented Minorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, C. N.; Byerly, G. R.; Smith, M. J.

    2001-05-01

    Since 1971, the American Geological Institute (AGI) Minority Participation Program (MPP) has supported scholarships for underrepresented minorities in the geosciences at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Some of our MPP scholars have gone on to hugely successful careers in the geosciences. MPP scholars include corporate leaders, university professors, a NASA scientist-astronaut and a National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER awardee. Yet as ethnic minorities continue to be underrepresented in the geosciences, AGI plans to expand its efforts beyond its traditional undergraduate and graduate scholarships to include diversity programs for secondary school geoscience teacher internships, undergraduate research travel support, and doctoral research fellowships. AGI promotes its MPP efforts primarily through its web pages, which are very successful in attracting visitors; through its publications, especially Geotimes; and through its Corporate Associates and Member Societies. Funding for the MPP has come from multiple sources over the past 30 years. Industry, non-profit organizations, and individuals have been the primary source of funding for graduate scholarships. The NSF has regularly funded the undergraduate scholarships. AGI Corporate Associates have contributed to both scholarship programs. The MPP Advisory Committee selects scholarship recipients based upon student academic performance, financial need, and potential for success as a geoscience professional. AGI currently has 29 MPP scholars, including 11 undergraduate and 18 graduate students. Undergraduate scholarships range from \\1000 to \\5000, with an average award of approximately \\2500. Graduate scholarships range from \\500 to \\4000, with an average award of approximately \\1300. In addition to financial assistance, every MPP scholar is assigned a professional geoscientist as a mentor. The mentor is responsible for regular personal contacts with MPP scholars, and with writing evaluation reports that

  14. Nigeria; Publication of Financial Sector Assessment Program Documentation––Detailed Assessment of Implementation of IOSCO Objectives and Principles of Securities Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2013-01-01

    An assessment of the level of implementation of the International Organization of Securities Commissions (IOSCO) Principles in Nigeria was conducted as part of the International Monetary Fund (IMF)-World Bank Financial Sector Assessment Program (FSAP). The ongoing global financial crisis has reinforced the need for assessors to make a judgment about supervisory practices and to determine whether they are sufficiently effective. The assessment methodology provides a set of assessment criteria ...

  15. 31 CFR 103.176 - Due diligence programs for correspondent accounts for foreign financial institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... TRANSACTIONS Anti-Money Laundering Programs Special Due Diligence for Correspondent Accounts and Private... an ongoing basis, any known or suspected money laundering activity conducted through or involving any... section shall be a part of the anti-money laundering program otherwise required by this subpart. Such...

  16. The Philosopher's Stone: How Basic Skills Programs Fare in Troubled Financial Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Thomas P.

    2012-01-01

    This mixed methods study examined the relative position of basic skills programs with transfer and career technical programs in a large suburban community college in California during the three-year period of budget reductions from 2009-2010 through 2011-2012. The budget line dedicated to part-time or non-contract instruction was analyzed along…

  17. 41 CFR 101-4.130 - Effect of employment opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Introduction § 101-4.130 Effect of... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Effect of employment opportunities. 101-4.130 Section 101-4.130 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management...

  18. 76 FR 68499 - Draft WaterSMART Cooperative Watershed Management Program Funding Opportunity Announcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-04

    ... watershed needs. Through this program, we provide Federal leadership and assistance on; Efficient use of... availability and quality issues within the relevant watershed; and Otherwise meet the definition of a...

  19. 77 FR 14340 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Broadband Technology Opportunities Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-09

    ..., broadband service by public safety agencies; and (5) To stimulate the demand for broadband, economic growth, and job creation. OMB also requires agencies administering grant programs to [[Page 14341

  20. University courses and opportunity for a European Master Program in Marine Renewable Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Margheritini, Lucia; Tetu, Amélie; Frigaard, Peter Bak

    This document presents an overview of the existing European educational programmes in the field of marine renewable energy. It also includes suggestion for a transnational European master program in marine renewable energy.......This document presents an overview of the existing European educational programmes in the field of marine renewable energy. It also includes suggestion for a transnational European master program in marine renewable energy....

  1. Continuous quality improvement programs provide new opportunities to drive value innovation initiatives in hospital-based radiology practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Joseph R; Schomer, Don F

    2009-07-01

    Imaging services constitute a huge portion of the of the total dollar investment within the health care enterprise. Accordingly, this generates competition among medical specialties organized along service lines for their pieces of the pie and increased scrutiny from third-party payers and government regulators. These market and political forces create challenge and opportunity for a hospital-based radiology practice. Clearly, change that creates or builds greater value for patients also creates sustainable competitive advantage for a radiology practice. The somewhat amorphous concept of quality constitutes a significant value driver for innovation in this scenario. Quality initiatives and programs seek to define and manage this amorphous concept and provide tools for a radiology practice to create or build more value. Leadership and the early adoption of these inevitable programs by a radiology practice strengthens relationships with hospital partners and slows the attrition of imaging service lines to competitors.

  2. US Department of Energy Integrated Resource Planning Program: Accomplishments and opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, D.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Mihlmester, P.E. [Aspen Systems Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1993-12-17

    The US Department of Energy Integrated Resource Planning Program supports many activities and projects that enhance the process by which utilities assess demand and supply options and, subsequently, evaluate and select resources. The US Department of Energy program coordinates integrated resource planning in risk and regulatory analysis; utility and regional planning; evaluation and verification; information transfer/technological assistance; and demand-side management. Professional staff from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, and Pacific Northwest Laboratories collaborate with peers and stakeholders, in particular, the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners, and conduct research and activities for the US Department of Energy. Twelve integrated resource planning activities and projects are summarized in this report. The summaries reflect the diversity of planning and research activities supported by the Department. The summaries also reflect the high levels of collaboration and teaming that are required by the Program and practiced by the researchers. It is concluded that the Program is achieving its objectives by encouraging innovation and improving planning and decision making. Furthermore, as the Department continues to implement planned improvements in the Program, the Department is effectively positioned to attain its ambitious goals.

  3. A Comparative Analysis of the Financial Incentives of Two Distinct Experience-Rating Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompa, Emile; McLeod, Chris; Mustard, Cam

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the association between insurance premium incentives and claim outcomes in two different workers' compensation programs. Regression models were run for claim outcomes using data from two Canadian jurisdictions with different experience-rating programs-one with prospective (British Columbia) and another with retrospective (Ontario) adjustment of premiums. Key explanatory variables were past premium adjustments. For both programs, past premium adjustments were significantly associated with claim outcomes, suggesting adjustments provided incentives for claims reduction. The magnitudes of effects in the prospective program were smaller than the retrospective one, though relative persistence of effects over time was larger. Having large and immediate employer responses to incentives may appear desirable, but insurers should consider the time required for employers to improve and sustain good practices, and create incentives that parallel such time lines.

  4. 13 CFR 121.301 - What size standards are applicable to financial assistance programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) and (b)(2)(ii) of this section. (c) For the Small Business Investment Company (SBIC) program, an... Trends in Employment and Unemployment.” [61 FR 3286, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 66 FR 30648, June 7...

  5. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholars Program: An opportunity for junior nurse faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffman, Maren J.; Goodman, Janice H.; Thomas, Tami L.; Roberson, Donna

    2014-01-01

    The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholars program provides promising junior faculty extramural funding, expert mentoring, and the training needed to be successful in the academic role. The Nurse Faculty Scholars program, which admitted its first cohort in 2008, is designed to address the nursing faculty shortage by enhancing leadership, educational, and research skills in junior nursing faculty. This article provides an overview of the program, its purpose, and its eligibility requirements. The authors give strategies for selecting mentors, developing the written application, and preparing for an oral interview. Finally, the authors provide an analysis of funded institutions, research design and methods from current and recently funded projects, and rank and positions held by nursing mentors. PMID:22818282

  6. Supporting Family Carers Through Telephone-Mediated Group Programs: Opportunities For Gerontological Social Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanley, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Telephone-mediated group programs are an important but under-utilized medium for reaching frail or disabled older persons' family carers who are in need of support. The primary purpose and style of group programs can range across a broad spectrum–encompassing educational, supportive and therapeutic types. Gerontological social workers are the members of the multidisciplinary care team whose training, experience and supervision makes them most suitable for facilitating this broad range of group types. Drawing on the experience of training a number of group facilitators, this article provides suggestions for social workers contemplating the use of telephone-mediated groups and highlights groupwork skills peculiar to conducting group programs via the telephone.

  7. [Simulation-based learning and internal medicine: Opportunities and current perspectives for a national harmonized program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galland, J; Abbara, S; Terrier, B; Samson, M; Tesnières, A; Fournier, J P; Braun, M

    2018-03-13

    Simulation-based learning (SBL) is developing rapidly in France and the question of its use in the teaching of internal medicine (IM) is essential. While HAS encourages its integration into medical education, French Young Internists (AJI) set up a working group to reflect on the added-value of this tool in our specialty. Different sorts of SBL exist: human, synthetic and electronic. It enables student to acquire and evaluate technical skills (strengths, invasive procedures, etc.) and non-technical skills (relational, reasoning…). The debriefing that follows the simulation session is an essential time in pedagogical terms. It enables the acquisition of knowledge by encouraging the students' reflection to reshape their reasoning patterns by self-correcting. IM interns are supportive of its use. The simulation would allow young internists to acquire skills specific to our specialty such as certain gestures, complex consulting management, the synthesis of difficult clinical cases. SBL remains confronted with human and financial cost issues. The budgets allocated to the development and maintenance of simulation centres are uneven, making the supply of training unequal on the territory. Simulation sessions are time-consuming and require teacher training. Are faculties ready to train and invest their time in simulation, even though the studies do not allow us to conclude on its pedagogical validity? Copyright © 2018 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluating a Financial Assessment Tool: The Financial Checkup

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Alena C.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate The Financial Checkup program. The program consisted of a booklet called The Financial Checkup and a 1-1 y, hour workshop explaining the booklet. The booklet helps individuals evaluate their financial situation on an annual basis. It includes a net worth statement, an income and expense statement, financial ratios, a revolving savings worksheet, a retirement worksheet, a life insurance worksheet, a financial goals worksheet, and a budget worksheet. Th...

  9. Private industry opportunity and challenge: Participation in the DOE/NWPA transportation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, L.H.

    1986-01-01

    The program within the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) of the DOE has been structured so as to tap all of our resources and the author briefly describes in this paper how it does so. Then, he describes one of the greatest challenges of obtaining a certificate of compliance from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for innovative cask designs. The program consists of four major elements: Cask system acquisition; institutional planning and coordination; environmental and economic analyses; and operations. The purpose of this paper is to describe system acquisition and its technical aspects

  10. 77 FR 36557 - Office of Urban Indian Health Programs Funding Opportunity: Title V HIV/AIDS Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-19

    ... health program HIV/AIDS activities is necessary to reduce the incidence of HIV/AIDS in the urban Indian communities by increasing access to HIV related services, reducing stigma, and making testing routine. Purpose..., Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Health Resource and Services Administration, and...

  11. The Effect of Financial Leverage, Employee Stock Ownership Program and Firm Size on Firm Performance of Companies Listed in Indonesia Stock Exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurainun Bangun

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to examine and to obtain affected empirical evidence of financial leverage, firm size and employee stock ownership program (ESOP to firm performance in manufacturing company in Indonesian Stock Exchange on 2013-2015. Independent variables in this research are Financial Leverage (DER, Firm Size and Employee Stock Ownership Program (ESOP. Dependent variables in this research are Return on Assets (ROA and Return On Equity (ROE. The results Showed that the simultaneous test of three independent variables Significantly afftected to the ROA and ROE. The partial tests of Financial Leverage (proxy DER and Firm Size Significantly affected to ROA and ROE. But, the results Showed that the Employee Stock Ownership Program (ESOP did not Affect to ROA and ROE.

  12. Financial Analysis of an Intensive Pediatric Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, E Brooks; Fieldston, Evan S; Xanthopoulos, Melissa S; Beck, Suzanne E; Menello, Mary Kate; Matthews, Edward; Marcus, Carole L

    2017-02-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is effective in treating obstructive sleep apnea in children, but adherence to therapy is low. Our center created an intensive program that aimed to improve adherence. Our objective was to estimate the program's efficacy, cost, revenue and break-even point in a generalizable manner relative to a standard approach. The intensive program included device consignment, behavioral psychology counseling, and follow-up telephone calls. Economic modeling considered the costs, revenue and break-even point. Costs were derived from national salary reports and the Pediatric Health Information System. The 2015 Medicare reimbursement schedule provided revenue estimates. Prior to the intensive CPAP program, only 67.6% of 244 patients initially prescribed CPAP appeared for follow-up visits and only 38.1% had titration polysomnograms. In contrast, 81.4% of 275 patients in the intensive program appeared for follow-up visits (p break-even points would need to be 1.29-2.08 times higher to cover the costs. An intensive CPAP program leads to substantially higher follow-up and CPAP titration rates, but costs are higher. While affordable at our institution due to the local payer mix and revenue, Medicare reimbursement levels would not cover estimated costs. This study highlights the need for enhanced funding for pediatric CPAP programs, due to the special needs of this population and the long-term health risks of suboptimally treated obstructive sleep apnea. © Sleep Research Society 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Teaching Group Processes through Multiple Group Leadership Opportunities in a Masters Level Counselor Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, Marc B.; Winters, Ryan C.; Esters, Irvin E.

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing an experiential component in group work training is a prominent feature in Counselor Education programs. Although numerous models have been proposed, the vast majority offer limited explanations of incorporating the number of hours of group participation and observation recommended by the Professional Standards for the Training of Group…

  14. Opportunity Knocks: Pipeline Programs Offer Minority Students a Path to Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauteux, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Minority students have traditionally been underrepresented in dental schools, which is why enrichment and pipeline programs aimed at helping minority students are necessary. That reality is reflected in their woeful underrepresentation among practicing dentists. Hispanics made up only 5.8 percent of practicing dentists in 2011, according to the…

  15. 75 FR 30100 - FY 2010 Discretionary Livability Funding Opportunity: Alternatives Analysis Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-28

    ... to support a limited number of alternatives analyses, or technical work conducted as part of on-going... limited number of alternatives analyses, or technical work conducted as part of proposed or on-going... Projects Alternatives analyses must be documented in the Unified Planning Work Program of the metropolitan...

  16. Breaking Barriers to Educational Opportunities: A Comparative Analysis of Adolescent Intervention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Rachael Mae

    2010-01-01

    While access to education may be increasing, equity still eludes the U.S. education system, specifically for low socioeconomic status students. Using both educational and deviance theoretical frames, this study examines the effectiveness of adolescent intervention programs with respect to educational attainment and deviant behaviors. The Education…

  17. A National Program to Expand Educational Opportunity in Hospital and Health Care Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association of Univ. Programs in Health Administration, Washington, DC.

    This report, prepared by the Association of University Programs in Hospital Administration (AUPHA), presents recommendations for increasing the representation of minorities in hospital and health-care administration careers on a nationwide basis. A short-term objective is to increase the representation of minorities in graduate degree programs…

  18. 76 FR 34953 - Funding Opportunity Title: Risk Management Education in Targeted States (Targeted States Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-15

    ... Availability C. Location and Target Audience D. Maximum Award E. Project Period F. Description of Agreement..., 2011. C. Location and Target Audience The RMA Regional Offices that service the Targeted States are... marketing systems to pursue new markets. D. Purpose The purpose of the Targeted States Program is to provide...

  19. 77 FR 21067 - Funding Opportunity Title: Risk Management Education and Outreach Partnerships Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-09

    ..., crop insurance, marketing contracts, and other existing and emerging risk management tools.'' For the... Management or other similar topics. Legal: Legal and Succession Planning or other similar topics; Marketing... Management Education and Outreach Partnerships Program Announcement Type: Announcement of Availability of...

  20. 23 CFR Appendix A to Subpart C of... - State Highway Agency Equal Employment Opportunity Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...: indicate total number, name, (home address and phone number) recall date, sex, and racial/ethnic... (part II), including the organizational structure of the SHA total EEO Program (internal and external... of total show cause and followup activities—findings and achievements.) B. Consolidated compliance...

  1. Undergraduate Program Review Processes: A Case Study in Opportunity for Academic Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costella, John; Adam, Tom; Gray, Fran; Nolan, Nicole; Wilkins, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    How can an academic library most effectively participate and expand its contributions to program reviews at the institutional level? By becoming involved in undergraduate reviews, college and university libraries can articulate new and enhanced roles for themselves on campus. Academic libraries have always contributed to a variety of institutional…

  2. Community-Based Programming: An Opportunity and Imperative for the Community College. Institutes & Workshops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Edgar J.

    Community-based programming (CBP) is a cooperative process in which a community college serves as the leader and catalyst in effecting collaboration among the people, leaders and community organizations in its service area. This report discusses the changing role of the community college, the nature of CBP, and expected outcomes of the process,…

  3. Selected achievements, science directions, and new opportunities for the WEBB Small Watershed Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre D. Glynn; Matthew C. Larsen; Earl A. Greene; Heather L. Buss; David W. Clow; Randall J. Hunt; M. Alisa Mast; Sheila F. Murphy; Norman E. Peters; Stephen D. Sebestyen; James B. Shanley; John F. Walker

    2009-01-01

    Over nearly two decades, the Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Budgets (WEBB) small watershed research program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has documented how water and solute fluxes, nutrient, carbon, and mercury dynamics, and weathering and sediment transport respond to natural and humancaused drivers, including climate, climate change, and atmospheric...

  4. Converging Streams of Opportunity for Prison Nursery Programs in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goshin, Lorie Smith; Byrne, Mary Woods

    2009-01-01

    Prison nursery programs allow departments of correction to positively intervene in the lives of both incarcerated mothers and their infant children. The number of prison nurseries in the United States has risen dramatically in the past decade, yet there remains a significant gap between predominant correctional policy in this area and what is…

  5. Opportunities for research program development at LANSCE (Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, C.D.

    1989-01-01

    The availability of intense neutron beams from facilities associated with the Proton Storage Ring and LANSCE has stimulated the development of neutron research well beyond the mainstream of neutron scattering. A description of this extended program is given along with prospects for further growth. 23 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs

  6. Gender, Interest, and Prior Experience Shape Opportunities to Learn Programming in Robotics Competitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witherspoon, Eben B.; Schunn, Christian D.; Higashi, Ross M.; Baehr, Emily C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Robotics competitions are increasingly popular and potentially provide an on-ramp to computer science, which is currently highly gender imbalanced. However, within competitive robotics teams, student participation in programming is not universal. This study gathered surveys from over 500 elementary, middle, and high school robotics…

  7. From Dignity to Employment - Newly arrived immigrants and refugees’ interpretations of opportunities to improve labor market participation through the Introduction Program

    OpenAIRE

    Ediassen, Tora

    2016-01-01

    Master i International Social Welfare and Health Policy The aim of this thesis is to explore how newly arrived immigrants and refugees interpret their opportunities to improve labor market participation through the Introduction Program. The thesis is based on qualitative interviews with six former participants of the program situated in Oslo, Norway. The Introduction Program is an activation program designed to qualify newly arrived immigrants and refugees for economic indep...

  8. Can conditional cash transfer programs generate equality of opportunity in highly unequal societies? Evidence from Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Bohn

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This article examines whether the state, through conditional cash transfer programs (CCT, can reduce the poverty and extremely poverty in societies marred by high levels of income concentration. We focus on one of the most unequal countries in the globe, Brazil, and analyze the extent to which this country's CCT program - Bolsa Família (BF, Family Grant program - is able to improve the life chances of extremely poor beneficiaries, through the three major goals of PBF: First, to immediately end hunger; second, to create basic social rights related to healthcare and education; finally, considering also complementary policies, to integrate adults into the job market. The analysis relies on a quantitative survey with 4,000 beneficiaries and a qualitative survey comprised of in-depth interviews with 38 program's participants from all the regions of the country in 2008, it means that this study is about the five first years of the PBF. In order to answer the research questions, we ran four probit analyses related: a the determinants of the realization of prenatal care; b the determinants of food security among BF beneficiaries, c the determinants that adult BF recipients will return to school, d the determinants that a BF beneficiary will obtain a job. Important results from the study are: First, those who before their participation on PBF were at the margins have now been able to access healthcare services on a more regular basis. Thus, the women at the margins who were systematically excluded - black women, poorly educated and from the North - now, after their participation in the CCT program, have more access to prenatal care and can now count with more availability of public healthcare network. Second, before entering the Bolsa Família program, 50.3% of the participants faced severe food insecurity. This number went down to 36.8% in very five years. Men are more likely than women; non-blacks more likely than blacks; and South and Centre

  9. CAREER opportunities at the Condensed Matter Physics Program, NSF/DMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durakiewicz, Tomasz

    The Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program is a Foundation-wide activity, offering prestigious awards in support of junior faculty. Awards are expected to build the careers of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research. Condensed Matter Physics Program receives between 35 and 45 CAREER proposals each year, in areas related to fundamental research of phenomena exhibited by condensed matter systems. Proposal processing, merit review process, funding levels and success rates will be discussed in the presentation. NSF encourages submission of CAREER proposals from junior faculty members from CAREER-eligible organizations and encourages women, members of underrepresented minority groups, and persons with disabilities to apply. NSF/DMR/CMP homepage: https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=5666

  10. Does the Constellation Program Offer Opportunities to Achieve Space Science Goals in Space?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thronson, Harley A.; Lester, Daniel F.; Dissel, Adam F.; Folta, David C.; Stevens, John; Budinoff, Jason G.

    2008-01-01

    Future space science missions developed to achieve the most ambitious goals are likely to be complex, large, publicly and professionally very important, and at the limit of affordability. Consequently, it may be valuable if such missions can be upgraded, repaired, and/or deployed in space, either with robots or with astronauts. In response to a Request for Information from the US National Research Council panel on Science Opportunities Enabled by NASA's Constellation System, we developed a concept for astronaut-based in-space servicing at the Earth-Moon L1,2 locations that may be implemented by using elements of NASA's Constellation architecture. This libration point jobsite could be of great value for major heliospheric and astronomy missions operating at Earth-Sun Lagrange points. We explored five alternative servicing options that plausibly would be available within about a decade. We highlight one that we believe is both the least costly and most efficiently uses Constellation hardware that appears to be available by mid-next decade: the Ares I launch vehicle, Orion/Crew Exploration Vehicle, Centaur vehicle, and an airlock/servicing node developed for lunar surface operations. Our concept may be considered similar to the Apollo 8 mission: a valuable exercise before descent by astronauts to the lunar surface.

  11. Child Sexual Abuse Prevention Opportunities: Parenting, Programs, and the Reduction of Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Julia; Zimmer-Gembeck, Melanie J; Shanley, Dianne C; Hawkins, Russell

    2018-02-01

    To date, child sexual abuse (CSA) prevention has relied largely on child-focused education, teaching children how to identify, avoid, and disclose sexual abuse. The purpose of this article is to explore how prevention opportunities can include parents in new and innovative ways. We propose that parents can play a significant role as protectors of their children via two pathways: (i) directly, through the strong external barriers afforded by parent supervision, monitoring, and involvement; and (ii) indirectly, by promoting their children's self-efficacy, competence, well-being, and self-esteem, which the balance of evidence suggests will help them become less likely targets for abuse and more able to respond appropriately and disclose abuse if it occurs. In this article, we first describe why teaching young children about CSA protective behaviors might not be sufficient for prevention. We then narratively review the existing research on parents and prevention and the parenting and family circumstances that may increase a child's risk of experiencing sexual abuse. Finally, we make a number of recommendations for future approaches to prevention that may better inform and involve parents and other adult protectors in preventing CSA.

  12. An assessment of opportunities and challenges for public sector involvement in the maternal health voucher program in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okal, Jerry; Kanya, Lucy; Obare, Francis; Njuki, Rebecca; Abuya, Timothy; Bange, Teresah; Warren, Charlotte; Askew, Ian; Bellows, Ben

    2013-10-18

    Continued inequities in coverage, low quality of care, and high out-of-pocket expenses for health services threaten attainment of Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5 in many sub-Saharan African countries. Existing health systems largely rely on input-based supply mechanisms that have a poor track record meeting the reproductive health needs of low-income and underserved segments of national populations. As a result, there is increased interest in and experimentation with results-based mechanisms like supply-side performance incentives to providers and demand-side vouchers that place purchasing power in the hands of low-income consumers to improve uptake of facility services and reduce the burden of out-of-pocket expenditures. This paper describes a reproductive health voucher program that contracts private facilities in Uganda and explores the policy and implementation issues associated with expansion of the program to include public sector facilities. Data presented here describes the results of interviews of six district health officers and four health facility managers purposefully selected from seven districts with the voucher program in southwestern Uganda. Interviews were transcribed and organized thematically, barriers to seeking RH care were identified, and how to address the barriers in a context where voucher coverage is incomplete as well as opportunities and challenges for expanding the program by involving public sector facilities were investigated. The findings show that access to sexual and reproductive health services in southwestern Uganda is constrained by both facility and individual level factors which can be addressed by inclusion of the public facilities in the program. This will widen the geographical reach of facilities for potential clients, effectively addressing distance related barriers to access of health care services. Further, intensifying ongoing health education, continuous monitoring and evaluation, and integrating the voucher

  13. Home visitation programs: An untapped opportunity for the delivery of early childhood obesity prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvy, Sarah-Jeanne; de la Haye, Kayla; Galama, Titus; Goran, Michael I.

    2016-01-01

    Background Extant obesity efforts have had limited impact among low-income underserved children, in part because of limitations inherent to existing programs: 1) short duration and low intensity; 2) late timing of implementation, when children are already overweight or obese; 3) intervention delivery limiting their accessibility and sustainability; and 4) failure to address barriers such as a lack of culturally competent services, poverty and housing instability, which interfere with healthy lifestyle changes. Objective This concept paper proposes an innovative model of obesity prevention implemented in infancy and sustained throughout early childhood to address the limitations of current obesity prevention efforts. Specifically, we propose to integrate sustained, weekly, in-home obesity prevention as part of the services already delivered by ongoing Home Visitation Programs, which currently do not target obesity prevention. Conclusion The home visiting structure represents an ideal model for impactful obesity prevention as home visitation programs: (1) already provide comprehensive services to diverse low-income infants and families who are most at risk for obesity and poor health due to socio-economic and structural conditions; (2) services are initiated in infancy and sustained throughout critical developmental periods for the formation of healthy/unhealthy behaviors; and (3) have been in place for more than 40 years, with a widespread presence across the United States and nationwide, which is critical for the scalability and sustainability of obesity prevention. PMID:27911984

  14. Home visitation programs: an untapped opportunity for the delivery of early childhood obesity prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvy, S-J; de la Haye, K; Galama, T; Goran, M I

    2017-02-01

    Extant obesity efforts have had limited impact among low-income underserved children, in part because of limitations inherent to existing programs: (i) short duration and low intensity; (ii) late timing of implementation, when children are already overweight or obese; (iii) intervention delivery limiting their accessibility and sustainability; and (iv) failure to address barriers such as a lack of culturally competent services, poverty and housing instability, which interfere with healthy lifestyle changes. This concept paper proposes an innovative model of obesity prevention implemented in infancy and sustained throughout early childhood to address the limitations of current obesity prevention efforts. Specifically, we propose to integrate sustained, weekly, in-home obesity prevention as part of the services already delivered by ongoing Home Visitation Programs, which currently do not target obesity prevention. The home visiting structure represents an ideal model for impactful obesity prevention as home visitation programs: (i) already provide comprehensive services to diverse low-income infants and families who are most at risk for obesity and poor health because of socio-economic and structural conditions; (ii) services are initiated in infancy and sustained throughout critical developmental periods for the formation of healthy/unhealthy behaviors; and (iii) have been in place for more than 40 years, with a widespread presence across the United States and nationwide, which is critical for the scalability and sustainability of obesity prevention. © 2016 World Obesity Federation.

  15. Routine programs of health care systems as an opportunity toward communication skills training for family physicians: A randomized field trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Ahmad Reza; Motamedi, Narges; Farajzadegan, Ziba

    2015-01-01

    To have high-quality primary health care services, an adequate doctor-patient communication is necessary. Because of time restrictions and limited budget in health system, an effective, feasible, and continuous training approach is important. The aim of this study is to assess the appropriateness of a communication skills training program simultaneously with routine programs of health care system. It was a randomized field trial in two health network settings during 2013. Twenty-eight family physicians through simple random sampling and 140 patients through convenience sampling participated as intervention and control group. The physicians in the intervention group (n = 14) attended six educational sessions, simultaneous organization meeting, with case discussion and peer education method. In both the groups, physicians completed communication skills knowledge and attitude questionnaires, and patients completed patient satisfaction of medical interview questionnaire at baseline, immediately after intervention, and four months postintervention. Physicians and health network administrators (stakeholders), completed a set of program evaluation forms. Descriptive statistics and Chi-square test, t-test, and repeated measure analysis of variance were used to analyze the data. Use of routine program as a strategy of training was rated by stakeholders highly on "feasibility" (80.5%), "acceptability" (93.5%), "educational content and method appropriateness" (80.75%), and "ability to integrating in the health system programs" (approximate 60%). Significant improvements were found in physicians' knowledge (P Communication skills training program, simultaneous organization meeting was successfully implemented and well received by stakeholders, without considering extra time and manpower. Therefore it can be a valuable opportunity toward communication skills training.

  16. 76 FR 66169 - Office of Advocacy and Outreach Federal Financial Assistance Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-26

    ... and program income on the same accounting basis (i.e., cash or accrual) that it uses in its normal... monitoring is the minimum, basic monitoring that will take place on an ongoing basis throughout the lifetime...), as amended, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, or national origin, and 7 CFR...

  17. Training of Unskilled Child Care Providers: An In-House Program to Overcome Management's Financial Constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Brian

    An in-house staff development program was designed and implemented for unskilled child caregivers employed at Tiny Tots Educare Academies, Inc., a privately owned and operated child care center located in Ellenton, Florida. Employees had little knowledge of child development and other topics related to early childhood education and, therefore,…

  18. The financial impact of multidisciplinary cleft care: an analysis of hospital revenue to advance program development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deleyiannis, Frederic W-B; TeBockhorst, Seth; Castro, Darren A

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the financial impact of cleft care on the hospital and to evaluate trends in reimbursement over the past 6 years. Medical and accounting records of 327 consecutive infants undergoing cleft repair between 2005 and 2011 were reviewed. Charges, payments, and direct cost data were analyzed to illustrate hospital revenue and margins. Hospital payments for all inpatient services (cleft and noncleft) during the first 24 months of life were $9,483,168. Mean hospital payment varied from $5525 (Medicaid) to $10,274 (managed care) for a cleft lip repair (p < 0.0001) and from $6573 (Medicaid) to $12,933 (managed care) for a cleft palate repair (p < 0.0001). Hospital charges for a definitive lip or palate repair to both Medicaid and managed care more than doubled between 2005 and 2011 (p < 0.0001). Overall, mean hospital margins were $3904 and $3520, respectively, for a cleft lip repair and cleft palate repair. Medicaid physician payments for cleft lip and palate were, respectively, $588 and $646. From 2005 to 2006, 2007 to 2008, and 2009 to 2010, 41 percent, 43 percent, and 63 percent of patients, respectively, were enrolled in Medicaid. Cleft care generates substantial revenue for the hospital. For their mutual benefit, hospitals should join with their cleft teams to provide administrative support. Bolstered reimbursement figures, based on the overall value of cleft care to the hospital system, would better attract and retain skilled clinicians dedicated to cleft care. This may become particularly important if Medicaid enrollment continues to increase.

  19. Challenges and Opportunities in Launching New Nuclear Power Programs in Developing Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hak-Gyun

    2011-01-01

    As a consequence of the 1st and 2nd oil shock during the 1970's, nuclear power generation was considered as the most economical energy source. After that, new nuclear power programs began showing a downward trend due to public opinion against nuclear power as a result of large-scale accidents such as the Three Mile Island accident of 1979, the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, and antinuclear power generation movements by environmental organizations. However, according to a recent IAEA report, 300 more nuclear power plants will be constructed worldwide by 2030. In the case of the U.S.A., the construction permits for 26 new nuclear power plants have been filed from 2007. It is considered the green light for 'The Golden Years of Nuclear Energy.' There are various requirements for the development of a country, and among them one of the most important elements is securing economical and good quality energy sources. Securing economical energy sources concerns mankind itself, setting aside matters of individual countries. Especially for developing countries striving for economic development, securing stable and economical energy sources is on their top priority list in order to realize sustainable economic development. Contrary to the fact that developed countries such as the U.S.A, England, Germany, France, Russia, Japan and Korea have advanced nuclear technology, developing countries are heavily dependent on energy sources with unstable supply, high prices, and great environmental pollution such as coal and oil. In 1959 when the national per capita income was between 70 and 80 dollars, the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute was opened and within 50 years Korea has become the world's 6th largest nuclear power generating country. I will suggest solutions to the problems of introducing new nuclear power programs in developing countries with the basis of Korea's experience on exemplary nuclear power programs development.

  20. Needle and syringe programs in Yunnan, China yield health and financial return

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xun Zhuang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a harm reduction strategy in response to HIV epidemics needle and syringes programs (NSPs were initiated throughout China in 2002. The effectiveness of NSPs in reducing the spread of infection in such an established epidemic is unknown. In this study we use data from Yunnan province, the province most affected by HIV in China, to (1 estimate the population benefits in terms of infections prevented due to the programs; (2 calculate the cost-effectiveness of NSPs. Methods We developed a mathematical transmission model, informed by detailed behavioral and program data, which accurately reflected the unique HIV epidemiology among Yunnan injecting drug users (IDUs in the presence of NSPs. We then used the model to estimate the likely epidemiological and clinical outcomes without NSPs and conducted a health economics analysis to determine the cost-effectiveness of the program. Results It is estimated that NSPs in Yunnan have averted approximately 16-20% (5,200-7,500 infections of the expected HIV cases since 2002 and led to gains of 1,300-1,900 DALYs. The total $1.04 million spending on NSPs from 2002 to 2008 has resulted in an estimated cost-saving over this period of $1.38-$1.97 million due to the prevention of HIV and the associated costs of care and management. Conclusion NSPs are not only cost-effective but cost-saving in Yunnan. Significant scale-up of NSPs interventions across China and removal of the societal and political barriers that compromise the effects of NSPs should be a health priority of the Chinese government.

  1. Impact of the Extended Learning Opportunities Summer Adventures in Learning (ELO SAIL) Program on Student Academic Performance: Part 1, Results from Fall 2012 to Fall 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper-Martin, Elizabeth; Wolanin, Natalie; Jang, Seong; Modarresi, Shahpar; Zhao, Huafang

    2016-01-01

    Extended Learning Opportunities Summer Adventures in Learning (ELO SAIL) is a Montgomery County Public Schools summer program for students in all Title I elementary schools; it targets students who will be in kindergarten-Grade 2 in the fall following the program. This report analyzed demographic characteristics of attendees and the impact of the…

  2. Evaluation of a Pilot Medication-Assisted Therapy Program in Kazakhstan: Successes, Challenges, and Opportunities for Scaleup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azizbek A. Boltaev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Study Aims. Evaluate the quality and effectiveness of the medication-assisted therapy (MAT pilot in Kazakhstan and review implementation context and related challenges. Methods. We performed a desk review of MAT policy and program documents and reviewed medical records at three MAT sites in Kazakhstan. MAT patients (n=93 were interviewed to assess their perceptions of the program and its impact on their health, criminal, drug use, and HIV risk related behaviors as well as expenditures on nonprescribed psychoactive drugs. Persons injecting drugs who are not in treatment, MAT program staff, and other stakeholders were interviewed to obtain their perspectives on MAT. Results. Legislation supports introducing MAT as a standard of care for treatment of opioid dependence; however, its progress has been hampered by active opposition. Inadequate access and coverage, insufficient supply management, scarce infrastructure of narcological facilities, limited opportunities for staff development, and restrictive methadone dispensing policies compromise the quality of the intervention and limit its potential benefits. There were significant reductions in criminal, drug use, and HIV risk related behaviors in patients receiving MAT. Conclusions. The MAT pilot in Kazakhstan demonstrated its feasibility and effectiveness in the local context and is recommended for scaleup throughout the country.

  3. Decreasing Depression and Anxiety in College Youth Using the Creating Opportunities for Personal Empowerment Program (COPE) [Formula: see text].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart Abney, Beverly G; Lusk, Pamela; Hovermale, Rachael; Melnyk, Bernadette Mazurek

    2018-06-01

    College is a time of major transition in the lives of many young adults. Roughly 30% of college students have reported that anxiety and depressive symptoms negatively affect their lives and academic functioning. Currently, anxiety has surpassed depression as the reason college students seek help at counseling centers. Unfortunately, only one third of students receive treatment for anxiety and only 25% of students receive treatment for their depression. The objectives of this pilot project were to (a) assess levels of depression and anxiety in identified "at risk" college students who present to the college Student Health Services (Primary Care), (b) implement a new cognitive behavioral therapy-based intervention titled "Creating Opportunities for Personal Empowerment" (COPE), and (c) evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention on students' levels of depression and anxiety as well as satisfaction with the intervention. A one group pre- and post-test design was used. Students who received COPE demonstrated clinically meaningful improvement in depressive and anxiety symptoms as measured by the Beck Depression Inventory-II and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. COPE is an effective brief program for reducing depression and anxiety in college-age youth. Implementation of evidenced-based programs into the college experience could lead to less severe depression and anxiety and better academic performance, ultimately increasing the likelihood of students successfully completing their academic programs.

  4. Opportunity Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Louise Møller; Lassen, Astrid Heidemann; Tollestrup, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Creating and growing new businesses is basically about turning an entrepreneurial opportunity into future business. In literature the emergence of opportunities is often described as opportunity recognition or opportunity discovery, which points to the understanding that opportunities are out the...

  5. Financial history and financial economics

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, John D.

    2014-01-01

    This essay looks at the bidirectional relationship between financial history and financial economics. It begins by giving a brief history of financial economics by outlining the main topics of interest to financial economists. It then documents and explains the increasing influence of financial economics upon financial history, and warns of the dangers of applying financial economics unthinkingly to the study of financial history. The essay proceeds to highlight the many insights that financi...

  6. Social Services programs for social inclusion through employment: facing challenges of transverslity, multidimensionality and creation of job opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Martínez-Virto

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In a context without employment and with high labour precarity it is necessary to rethink the activation commitments linked to the inclusion policies of social services. The main goal of this paper is to debate about the limitations, potentialities and differences in terms of inclusion capacity, about 9 socio labour programs of social services. The analysis identifies three key outcomes: the need of collaboration between social services and employment departments, the importance of creating employment opportunities for people at risk of social exclusion and guaranty the multidimensionality of the intervention. Especially in a context of high unemployment and low quality jobs. These results highlight the need to reconsider the care system that, in line of European recommendations, must focus on social investment policies.

  7. Medicare and Medicaid programs; physicians' referrals to health care entities with which they have financial relationships: partial delay of effective date. Interim final rule with comment period; partial delay in effective date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-12-03

    This interim final rule with comment period delays for 1 year the effective date of the last sentence of 42 CFR 411.354(d)(1). Section 411.354(d)(1) was promulgated in the final rule entitled "Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Physicians' Referrals to Health Care Entities With Which They Have Financial Relationships," published in the Federal Register on January 4, 2001 (66 FR 856). A 1-year delay in the effective date of the last sentence in Section 411.354(d)(1) will give Department officials the opportunity to reconsider the definition of compensation that is "set in advance" as it relates to percentage compensation methodologies in order to avoid unnecessarily disrupting existing contractual arrangements for physician services. Accordingly, the last sentence of Section 411.354(d)(1), which would have become effective January 4, 2002, will not become effective until January 6,2003.

  8. Barriers and opportunities: A review of selected successful energy-efficiency programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn

    2001-01-01

    In industry, barriers may exist at various points in the decision making process, and in the implementation and management of measures to improve energy efficiency. Barriers may take many forms, and are determined by the business environment and include decision-making processes, energy prices, lack of information, a lack of confidence in the information, or high transaction costs for obtaining reliable information, as well as limited capital availability. Other barriers are the ''invisibility'' of energy efficiency measures and the difficulty of quantifying the impacts, and slow diffusion of innovative technology into markets while firms typically under-invest in R and D, despite the high pay-backs. Various programs try to reduce the barriers to improve the uptake of innovative technologies. A wide array of policies has been used and tested in the industrial sector in industrialized countries, with varying success rates. We review some new approaches to industrial energy efficiency improvement in industrialized countries, focusing on voluntary agreements

  9. Post discharge issues identified by a call-back program: identifying improvement opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Patricia I; Kara, Areeba

    2017-12-01

    The period following discharge from the hospital is one of heightened vulnerability. Discharge instructions serve as a guide during this transition. Yet, clinicians receive little feedback on the quality of this document that ties into the patients' experience. We reviewed the issues voiced by discharged patients via a call-back program and compared them to the discharge instructions they had received. At our institution, patients receive an automated call forty-eight hours following discharge inquiring about progress. If indicated by the response to the call, they are directed to a nurse who assists with problem solving. We reviewed the nursing documentation of these encounters for a period of nine months. The issues voiced were grouped into five categories: communication, medications, durable medical equipment/therapies, follow up and new or ongoing symptoms. The discharge instructions given to each patient were reviewed. We retrieved data on the number of discharges from each specialty from the hospital over the same period. A total of 592 patients voiced 685 issues. The numbers of patients discharged from medical or surgical services identified as having issues via the call-back line paralleled the proportions discharged from medical and surgical services from the hospital during the same period. Nearly a quarter of the issues discussed had been addressed in the discharge instructions. The most common category of issues was related to communication deficits including missing or incomplete information which made it difficult for the patient to enact or understand the plan of care. Medication prescription related issues were the next most common. Resource barriers and questions surrounding medications were often unaddressed. Post discharge issues affect patients discharged from all services equally. Data from call back programs may provide actionable targets for improvement, identify the inpatient team's 'blind spots' and be used to provide feedback to clinicians.

  10. Integration of Professional Certification Examinations with the Financial Planning Curriculum: Increasing Efficiency, Motivation, and Professional Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Joseph W.; Zhu, Dandan; Hampton, Vickie L.; Chatterjee, Swarn; Salter, John

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a theoretical-based rationale and plan of action for educational programs to encourage and create opportunities for the integration of course study with professional exam preparation, while highlighting the complementary benefits for students, academic programs, and the financial services profession. Serving primarily as a…

  11. Opportunities for Enhanced Strategic Use of Surveys, Medical Records, and Program Data for HIV Surveillance of Key Populations: Scoping Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baral, Stefan D; Edwards, Jessie K; Zadrozny, Sabrina; Hargreaves, James; Zhao, Jinkou; Sabin, Keith

    2018-01-01

    Background Normative guidelines from the World Health Organization recommend tracking strategic information indicators among key populations. Monitoring progress in the global response to the HIV epidemic uses indicators put forward by the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS. These include the 90-90-90 targets that require a realignment of surveillance data, routinely collected program data, and medical record data, which historically have developed separately. Objective The aim of this study was to describe current challenges for monitoring HIV-related strategic information indicators among key populations ((men who have sex with men [MSM], people in prisons and other closed settings, people who inject drugs, sex workers, and transgender people) and identify future opportunities to enhance the use of surveillance data, programmatic data, and medical record data to describe the HIV epidemic among key populations and measure the coverage of HIV prevention, care, and treatment programs. Methods To provide a historical perspective, we completed a scoping review of the expansion of HIV surveillance among key populations over the past three decades. To describe current efforts, we conducted a review of the literature to identify published examples of SI indicator estimates among key populations. To describe anticipated challenges and future opportunities to improve measurement of strategic information indicators, particularly from routine program and health data, we consulted participants of the Third Global HIV Surveillance Meeting in Bangkok, where the 2015 World Health Organization strategic information guidelines were launched. Results There remains suboptimal alignment of surveillance and programmatic data, as well as routinely collected medical records to facilitate the reporting of the 90-90-90 indicators for HIV among key populations. Studies (n=3) with estimates of all three 90-90-90 indicators rely on cross-sectional survey data. Programmatic data and

  12. The COMET° Program: Empowering Faculty via Environmental Science Education Resources and Training Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abshire, W. E.; Spangler, T. C.; Page, E. M.

    2011-12-01

    For 20+ years, the COMET Program has provided education to a wide spectrum of users in the atmospheric and related sciences, including faculty and students. COMET's training covers many areas including: climate science; tropical meteorology; marine, coastal, aviation and fire weather; satellite and mesoscale meteorology; numerical weather prediction; hydrometeorology; observational systems; and emergency management and societal impacts. The majority of the training is delivered as self-paced web modules. The entry point to 600+ hours of material is COMET's http://meted.ucar.edu website. This site hosts >400 training modules. Included in these courses are ~100 lessons which have been translated into primarily Spanish and French. Simple, free registration is required. As of summer 2011, there were 200,000 registered users of the site from 200 countries who are taking advantage of this free education and training. Over 9000 of the users are faculty and another 38,000+ are college students. Besides using and re-purposing the high quality multimedia training, faculty often choose to use the registration and assessment system that allows users to take quizzes with each lesson to receive a certificate of completion. With the student's permission, then results can also be e-mailed to an instructor. Another relevant initiative is the creation of a free online, peer reviewed Textbook, "Introduction to Tropical Meteorology" (http://www.meted.ucar.edu/tropical/textbook/). This multimedia textbook is intended for undergraduate and early graduate students, forecasters, and others interested in the impacts of tropical weather and climate. Lastly, with funding from the NOAA/NESDIS/GOES-R Program, COMET recently offered a course for faculty entitled, "Integrating Satellite Data and Products into Geoscience Courses with Emphasis on Advances in Geostationary Satellite Systems." Twenty-four faculty from across the US and the Caribbean participated. Via lectures, lab exercises, and

  13. Efficiency improvement opportunities for personal computer monitors. Implications for market transformation programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Won Young; Phadke, Amol; Shah, Nihar [Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Displays account for a significant portion of electricity consumed in personal computer (PC) use, and global PC monitor shipments are expected to continue to increase. We assess the market trends in the energy efficiency of PC monitors that are likely to occur without any additional policy intervention and estimate that PC monitor efficiency will likely improve by over 40 % by 2015 with saving potential of 4.5 TWh per year in 2015, compared to today's technology. We discuss various energy-efficiency improvement options and evaluate the cost-effectiveness of three of them, at least one of which improves efficiency by at least 20 % cost effectively beyond the ongoing market trends. We assess the potential for further improving efficiency taking into account the recent development of universal serial bus-powered liquid crystal display monitors and find that the current technology available and deployed in them has the potential to deeply and cost effectively reduce energy consumption by as much as 50 %. We provide insights for policies and programs that can be used to accelerate the adoption of efficient technologies to further capture global energy saving potential from PC monitors which we estimate to be 9.2 TWh per year in 2015.

  14. Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for Personal Computer Monitors. Implications for Market Transformation Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Won Young [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Phadke, Amol [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Shah, Nihar [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-06-29

    Displays account for a significant portion of electricity consumed in personal computer (PC) use, and global PC monitor shipments are expected to continue to increase. We assess the market trends in the energy efficiency of PC monitors that are likely to occur without any additional policy intervention and estimate that display efficiency will likely improve by over 40% by 2015 compared to today’s technology. We evaluate the cost effectiveness of a key technology which further improves efficiency beyond this level by at least 20% and find that its adoption is cost effective. We assess the potential for further improving efficiency taking into account the recent development of universal serial bus (USB) powered liquid crystal display (LCD) monitors and find that the current technology available and deployed in USB powered monitors has the potential to deeply reduce energy consumption by as much as 50%. We provide insights for policies and programs that can be used to accelerate the adoption of efficient technologies to capture global energy saving potential from PC monitors which we estimate to be 9.2 terawatt-hours [TWh] per year in 2015.

  15. Responding to the Affordable Care Act: a leadership opportunity for social workers in employee assistance programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frauenholtz, Susan

    2014-08-01

    Until recently, estimates indicated that more than half of Americans obtain health insurance through their employers. Yet the employer-based system leaves many vulnerable populations, such as low-wage and part-time workers, without coverage. The changes authorized by the Affordable Care Act (2010), and in particular the Health Insurance Marketplace (also known as health insurance exchanges), which became operational in 2014, are projected to have a substantial impact on the provision of employer-based health care coverage. Because health insurance is so intricately woven with employment, social workers in employee assistance programs (EAPs) are positioned to assume an active leadership role in guiding and developing the needed changes to employer-based health care that will occur as the result of health care reform. This article describes the key features and functions of the Health Insurance Marketplace and proposes an innovative role for EAP social workers in implementing the exchanges within their respective workplaces and communities. How EAP social workers can act as educators, advocates, and brokers of the exchanges, and the challenges they may face in their new roles, are discussed, and the next steps EAP social workers can take to prepare for health reform-related workplace changes are delineated.

  16. FY 2014 Continuation of Solicitation for the Office of Science Financial Assistance Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saundry, Peter [National Council for Science and the Environment, Washington, DC (United States)

    2014-04-01

    On January 28-30, 2014, the National Council for Science and the Environment (NCSE) hosted its 14th National Confrerence and Global Forum on Science, Policy and the Environment: Building Climate Solutions. The conference was held at the Hyatt Regency Crystal City near the Washington, DC National Airport. The conference engaged over 1,100 key individuals from a variety of fields, including natural and social sciences, humanities and engineering and government and policy, as well as business and civil society. They developed actionable partnerships, strategies and tactics that advanced solutions minimizing the impacts of anthropogenic climate change. The conference was organized around the two major areas where climate actions are necessary: [1] The Built Environment; and, [2] Agriculture and Natural Resources. This “multi-sector approach” of the conference enables participants to work across traditional boundaries of discipline, science, policy and application by engaging a diverse team of scientists, public- and private-sector program managers, and policy-makers. The confernce was two and a half days long. During this time, over 200 speakers presented in 8 keynote addresses, 7 plenary roundtable discussions, 30 symposia and 23 workshops. The goal of the workshops was to generate additional action through development of improved strategies, tools, and partnerships. During the workshops, participants developed actionable outcomes, committed to further collaboration and implementation, and outlined follow-up activities for post-conference. A list of recommendations from the workshop follows this summary. NCSE’s annual conference has become a signature event for the organization, recognized for its notable presenters, innovative programming, and outcome-oriented approach. Each year, over 1,100 participants attend the event, representing federal agencies, higher education institutions, state and local governments, non-governmental and civic organizations

  17. Text4baby program: an opportunity to reach underserved pregnant and postpartum women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazmararian, Julie A; Elon, Lisa; Yang, Baiyu; Graham, Megan; Parker, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Text4baby was launched in 2010 to promote healthy pregnancies and babies by the use of text messaging. The primary objective of this study was to assess factors related to the enrollment process and reception of text4baby. A prospective cohort study was conducted in two Women, Infant and Children clinics in Atlanta (April 2010-July 2011). Randomly selected pregnant and postpartum women (n = 468) were queried on cell phone use and instructed on text4baby enrollment. Self-enrollment issues were assessed at one-week follow-up (n = 351, 75.0 %), and message reception and reading patterns at two-month follow-up (n = 209, 44.7 %). Forty-two percent of the women had some college education and 82 % had household income education (80 % with some college vs. 62 % with less education), with household income above $10,000 (61 %  $20,000), and among women living in smaller households (77 % 1-3 members vs. 58 % > 3 members) (all p 90 % reported uninterrupted reception and regular reading of messages, and 88 % planned to continue using text4baby. Results also suggested that respondents who were younger (educated and had lower health literacy skills were more likely to have interrupted messages. Despite substantial interest in the text4baby program in an underserved population, innovative ways to help women with significant disadvantages enroll and receive uninterrupted messages are needed.

  18. Global Fiducials Program Imagery: New Opportunities for Geospatial Research, Outreach, and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, S. D.

    2012-12-01

    MOLNIA, Bruce F., PRICE, Susan D. and, KING, Stephen E., U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), 562 National Center, Reston, VA 20192, sprice@usgs.gov The Civil Applications Committee (CAC), operated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), is the Federal interagency committee that facilitates Federal civil agency access to U.S. National Systems space-based electro-optical (EO) imagery for natural disaster response; global change investigations; ecosystem monitoring; mapping, charting, and geodesy; and related topics. The CAC's Global Fiducials Program (GFP) has overseen the systematic collection of high-resolution imagery to provide geospatial data time series spanning a decade or more at carefully selected sites to study and monitor changes, and to facilitate a comprehensive understanding of dynamic and sensitive areas of our planet. Since 2008, more than 4,500 one-meter resolution EO images which comprise time series from 85 GFP sites have been released for unrestricted public use. Initial site selections were made by Federal and academic scientists based on each site's unique history, susceptibility, or environmental value. For each site, collection strategies were carefully defined to maximize information extraction capabilities. This consistency enhances our ability to understand Earth's dynamic processes and long-term trends. Individual time series focus on Arctic sea ice change; temperate glacier behavior; mid-continent wetland dynamics; barrier island response to hurricanes; coastline evolution; wildland fire recovery; Long-Term Ecological Resource (LTER) site processes; and many other topics. The images are available from a USGS website at no cost, in an orthorectified GeoTIFF format with supporting metadata, making them ideal for use in Earth science education and GIS projects. New on-line tools provide enhanced analysis of these time-series imagery. For additional information go to http://gfp.usgs.gov or http://gfl.usgs.gov.Bering Glacier is the largest and

  19. Southeastern Federal Power Program. Combined financial statements, September 30, 1996 and 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    The Southeastern Federal Power Program (SEFPP) consists of all activities associated with the production, transmission and disposition of Federal power marketed under Section 5 of the Flood Control Act of 1944 from projects in the ten southeastern states. The ten states are: Virginia, West Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Tennessee, and Kentucky. Power is marketed to customers in 11 states - the above ten plus Illinois. SEFPP includes the accounts of two separate Federal government agencies- the Southeastern Power Administration (Southeastern) of the Department of Energy and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps). Southeastern purchases, transmits, and markets power within four separate power systems (each including one or more Corps generating projects for which rates are set). Specific and joint-use costs allocated to power are included in the attached statements of assets. Federal investment and liabilities under utility plant and cash. The accounts of SEFPP are maintained in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles and the Uniform System of Accounts prescribed for electric utilities by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). SEFPP`s accounting policies also reflect requirements of specific legislation and executive directives issued by the applicable government agencies. Southeastern and Corps properties and income are exempt from taxation. Southeastern and the Corps receive Congressional appropriations through the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Department of Defense to finance their operations. The Corps also receives Congressional appropriations to finance construction of its hydroelectric projects.

  20. Innovating for quality and value: Utilizing national quality improvement programs to identify opportunities for responsible surgical innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Russell K; Skarsgard, Erik D

    2015-06-01

    Innovation in surgical techniques, technology, and care processes are essential for improving the care and outcomes of surgical patients, including children. The time and cost associated with surgical innovation can be significant, and unless it leads to improvements in outcome at equivalent or lower costs, it adds little or no value from the perspective of the patients, and decreases the overall resources available to our already financially constrained healthcare system. The emergence of a safety and quality mandate in surgery, and the development of the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) allow needs-based surgical care innovation which leads to value-based improvement in care. In addition to general and procedure-specific clinical outcomes, surgeons should consider the measurement of quality from the patients' perspective. To this end, the integration of validated Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) into actionable, benchmarked institutional outcomes reporting has the potential to facilitate quality improvement in process, treatment and technology that optimizes value for our patients and health system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Morocco; Financial System Stability Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2003-01-01

    The Financial System Stability Assessment of Morocco reviews the reform program that is aimed at establishing a modern, market-oriented financial system that optimizes the mobilization of savings and the allocation of financial resources. It reviews the modernization of the banking sector and the development of competition within the sector, development of financial markets, and removal of constraints on financial system activity. It also provides reports on the Observance of Standards and Co...

  2. Financial Literacy Education for Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarecke, Jodi; Taylor, Edward W.; Hira, Tahira K.

    2014-01-01

    Exploring the pedagogical approaches of four women's financial literacy education programs, this chapter provides an overview of trends and needs in financial education for women and offers pedagogical strategies for teaching women about finance.

  3. Students win national financial planning contest

    OpenAIRE

    Sutphin, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    Three Virginia Tech students studying financial planning have won the 2007 Ameriprise Financial Planning Invitational, bringing home $10,000 in scholarship money to support the financial planning program in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.

  4. Financial Sector Assessment : Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2007-01-01

    A joint International Monetary Fund-World Bank team conducted an assessment of Turkey's financial system in connection with the Financial Sector Assessment Program (FSAP) through missions in April, August-September 2006 and March, 2007. This report provides a summary of the main findings of the assessment and the policy priorities identified. The main objective of the FSAP is to assist the...

  5. Environmental considerations for inclusion in program opportunity notices, requests for proposals, and environmental reports: fossil energy demonstration plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salk, M.S.; Baird, J.N.; Barnthouse, L.W.; Berry, L.G.; Roop, R.D.; Sanders, F.S.

    1978-01-01

    This document was prepared for the Department of Energy, Division of Coal Conversion, for use in developing Program Opportunity Notices (PON), Requests for Proposals (RFP), and Environmental Reports (ER). Environmental considerations to be addressed by Offerors and Contractors are divided into three parts that correspond to the separate stages of project development: (1) the Offeror's response to the PON or RFP; (2) the Contractor's performance of baseline data collection and environmental impact assessment that results in an Environmental Report (ER) for use by DOE in the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS); and (3) the Contractor's continuance of environmental monitoring and assessment during construction and operation. Environmental analysis and environmental protection are an integral part of the Offeror's or Contractor's performance under contract to DOE. Consideration should be given to the health and socioeconomic status of man as well as to the physical and biological environment. The Offeror's or Contractor's consideration of and commitment to avoiding adverse environmental impacts must be demonstrated at every stage of the process from planning through construction and operation.

  6. Brazilian residential sector demand administration programs: opportunities, costs and barriers; Programas de administracao da demanda para o setor residencial brasileiro: oportunidades, custos e barreiras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jannuzzi, Gilberto de Martino [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica; Santos, Vanice Ferreira dos; Ugaya, Cassia Maria Lie; Madureira, Ronaldo Goncalves; Salcedo, Marco Vinicio Yanez [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    1995-12-31

    This work aims to present some results and discussions concerning the implementation of demand side management projects for the Brazilian residential sector. The economic advantages of these programs for the electric power utilities is presented as well as the barriers and problems. The opportunities for the application of such programs in a national level are presented and the expected difficulties discussed. A case study is presented 3 tabs., 3 refs.

  7. Trading fund opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    The paper concerns the operation of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) as a trading fund. The changes and anticipated effects of this role are discussed, including the financial arrangements, UKAEA skills, customers, Department of Energy sponsorship and new business opportunities. (U.K.)

  8. Radiology applications of financial accounting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibenhaut, Mark H

    2005-03-01

    A basic knowledge of financial accounting can help radiologists analyze business opportunities and examine the potential impacts of new technology or predict the adverse consequences of new competitors entering their service area. The income statement, balance sheet, and cash flow statement are the three basic financial statements that document the current financial position of the radiology practice and allow managers to monitor the ongoing financial operations of the enterprise. Pro forma, or hypothetical, financial statements can be generated to predict the financial impact of specific business decisions or investments on the profitability of the practice. Sensitivity analysis, or what-if scenarios, can be performed to determine the potential impact of changing key revenue, investment, operating cost or financial assumptions. By viewing radiology as both a profession and a business, radiologists can optimize their use of scarce economic resources and maximize the return on their financial investments.

  9. Domesticizing Financial Economies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deville, Joe; Lazarus, Jeanne; Luzzi, Mariana

    show. Third, the “domestication of financial economies”: financial literacy programs developed by governmental bodies, international organizations, and banks have become a ubiquitous layer attached to the assemblage of financial economies in many countries. And last but not least, “domesticizing social...... practices as well as the precise way financial providers are evaluating, sorting and targeting their consumers. We believe these diverse trends are starting to converge, and the ambitions of this paper are both to organize scattered literature and to reflect upon the consequences of the new field...

  10. Pension Plan Types and Financial Literacy in Later Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Burr, Jeffrey A; Miller, Edward Alan

    2017-09-09

    The ongoing shift from defined benefit (DB) to defined contribution (DC) pension plans means that middle-aged and older adults are increasingly being called upon to manage their own fiscal security in retirement. Yet, half of older Americans are financially illiterate, lacking the knowledge and skills to manage financial resources. This study investigates whether pension plan types are associated with varying levels of financial literacy among older Americans. Cross-sectional analyses of the 2010 Health and Retirement Study (HRS) (n = 1,281) using logistic and linear regression models were employed to investigate the association between different pension plans and multiple indicators of financial literacy. The potential moderating effect of gender was also examined. Respondents with DC plans, with or without additional DB plans, were more likely to correctly answer various financial literacy questions, in comparison with respondents with DB plans only. Men with both DC and DB plans scored significantly higher on the financial literacy index than women with both types of plans, relative to respondents with DB plans only. Middle-aged and older adults, who are incentivized by participation in DC plans to manage financial resources and decide where to invest pension funds, tend to self-educate to improve financial knowledge and skills, thereby resulting in greater financial literacy. This finding suggests that traditional financial education programs may not be the only means of achieving financial literacy. Further consideration should be given to providing older adults with continued, long-term exposure to financial decision-making opportunities. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Financial Audit. Federal Family Education Loan Program's Financial Statements for Fiscal Years 1993 and 1992. Report to the Congress and the Secretary of Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    This report presents findings of an audit of the Principal Statements of the Department of Education's (ED) Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP) and its internal controls and compliance with laws and regulations for the fiscal years ending September 30, 1993, and September 30, 1992. The audit investigated whether the Principal Statements…

  12. Financial Policies and the Prevention of Financial Crises in Emerging Market Economies

    OpenAIRE

    Mishkin, Frederic S.

    2001-01-01

    The author defines a financial crisis as a disruption in financial markets in which adverse selection and moral hazard problems become much worse, so that financial markets are unable to efficiently channel funds to those who have the most productive investment opportunities. As financial markets become unable to function efficiently, economic activity sharply contracts. Factors that promote ...

  13. The Development of a Course in Financial Statement Analysis for the Dowling College M.B.A. Program. Curriculum and Program Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, James F.

    In the development of a course in financial statement analysis, the following procedures were implemented: analysis of new accounting pronouncements, new textbooks, and articles on the topic of financial statement analysis; establishment of goals and objectives for the course; and selection of text and content of the course. The course was…

  14. Financial Management: Implementation of the Data Quality Management Control Program for the Military Health System (D-2002-141)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2002-01-01

    DoD health care managers should read this report. Military health care data is used for a variety of critical purposes, including managing patient care, determining the optimal health care system, and for financial management...

  15. United States Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy, Isotope Production and Distribution Program financial statements, September 30, 1996 and 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    The charter of the Department of Energy (DOE) Isotope Production and Distribution Program (Isotope Program) covers the production and sale of radioactive and stable isotopes, associated byproducts, surplus materials such as lithium, and related isotope services. Service provided include, but are not limited to, irradiation services, target preparation and processing, source encapsulation and other special preparations, analyses, chemical separations, and leasing of stable isotopes for research purposes. Isotope Program products and services are sold worldwide for use in a wide variety of research, development, biomedical, and industrial applications. This report presents the results of the independent certified public accountants` audit of the Isotope Production and Distribution Program`s (Isotope) financial statements as of September 30, 1996.

  16. Nigeria; Publication of Financial Sector Assessment Program Documentation––Technical Note on Crisis Management and Crisis Preparedness Frameworks

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2013-01-01

    The Nigerian financial system underwent a banking crisis in 2008–09, owing to the global financial crisis and domestic events. The decisive crisis response effectively stabilized the banking system, but the challenge now is to devise a credible exit strategy. The Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) has a broad resolution toolkit, which was put to use during the crisis to resolve the intervened banks. The Nigerian authorities set up the Asset Management Corporation of Nigeria (AMCON) to purchase non...

  17. The Impact of Financial Disclosure on Attendee Assessment of Objectivity in Continuing Medical Education Programs in Psychiatry: A Randomized, Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jibson, Michael D; Cobourn, Lisa A; Seibert, Jennifer K

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of financial conflict of interest disclosures by speakers at continuing medical education (CME) programs is to assist attendees in their assessment of the objectivity of the information presented. This empirical study was undertaken to determine what level of disclosure is optimal to achieve this goal. Attendees at five CME programs were randomly assigned to receive either a standard financial disclosure, an intermediate level that included whether speakers received more or less than 5% of their income from each company they disclosed, or a high level of disclosure that included the percent of their income derived from each company. A total of 169 attendees (85.4% response rate) completed a questionnaire regarding the objectivity of the CME presentation they attended. Attendees receiving the highest level of disclosure came significantly closer to the ratings of speaker bias made by peer reviewers than did attendees receiving medium or low levels of disclosure (p = 0.03; effect size 0.31). Among the minority of attendees who received the highest level of disclosure but whose assessment of bias differed from that of peer reviewers, however, there was a tendency to underestimate bias (5.9 vs 31.4%; p financial disclosure than are currently required for CME programs.

  18. Opportunities for market-based programs worldwide that reduce greenhouse gas emissions: Initial Observations from Missions to the Philippines, South Africa, and Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanton-Hoyle, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    Globally, governments and industries are implementing innovative voluntary programs to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Often these programs encourage groups to use cost effective technologies that capture market-based forces. These programs are successful because they capitalize on existing opportunities where both the environment and the participants can benefit (i.e., win-win opportunities). This paper documents efforts to investigate these kinds of win-win opportunities in three developing countries: the Philippines, South Africa, and Mexico. Initial observations are provided as fresh information from the field, drawing on six missions during the last nine months. Utility costs, interest rates, and overall economic health appear to critically affect opportunities in each country. By contrast, details of heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) design and local climate were often important differences between countries. These affect opportunities, for example, to achieve significant savings from cooling systems or not. Looking at the success of ESCOs was somewhat surprising. One might expect to see the most successful ESCO activity where utility costs are high and upgrade opportunities are plentiful (such as in the Philippines). This was not the case, however, as research in the Philippines did not reveal even one active ESCO contract yet. Design practices for new construction were in need of the same thing that helps US design teams do a better job of energy-efficient design, better communications between design team members. Finally, industrial firms were doing a variety of EE upgrades in each country, but this level of activity was relatively small compared to what should be cost effective

  19. Financial Planners: Educating Widows in Personal Financial Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korb, Brian R.

    2010-01-01

    Widows constitute a growing segment of the U.S. population; however, very little has been done to educate them on the basics of personal financial planning. The creation and implementation of financial planning education programs for widows can help them become more financially literate and free them from anxiety and fear. Interviews with eight…

  20. Leadership training for radiologists: a survey of opportunities and participants in MBA and MPH programs by medical students, residents, and current chairpersons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Stephen; Daginawala, Naznin

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine opportunities for students and trainees to obtain an MPH or MBA degree during either medical school or radiology residency and to determine the prevalence of such degree possession by chairpersons in radiology. All allopathic medical schools in the United States were surveyed to chart the number of MD/MPH and MD/MBA degree programs available to students. Program directors were contacted to assess the number of MPH or MBA courses of study administratively related to their residencies. Also, an e-mail survey was sent to all members of the Society of Chairs of Academic Radiology Departments inquiring whether each chairperson had earned an additional degree. Currently, 81 allopathic medical schools in the United States offer MD/MPH degrees, and 52 offer MD/MBA degrees. Six residencies provide access to MPH programs, and 3 residencies provide the opportunity to pursue an MBA in conjunction with residency. Of these, only 1 MPH program and no MBA programs had trainees enrolled at present. Twenty-six percent of the chairpersons surveyed possessed advanced degrees other than MDs. There has been rapid growth in the number of MD/MPH and MD/MBA programs available to medical students. However, there is a scarcity of similar programs accessible to trainees during or just after residency training. To assist motivated radiologists interested in leading our profession, opportunities should expand both in formal degree-granting programs and through certificate-sanctioned course series to address relevant issues of leadership and management pertinent to our specialty. Copyright © 2011 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Financial Sector Assessment Update : Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2005-01-01

    A joint International Monetary Fund-World Bank team conducted an assessment update of Uganda's financial system in connection with the Financial Sector Assessment Program (FSAP) in November, 2004. The purpose of the mission was to help the Ugandan authorities identify financial system strengths and weaknesses with a view to implementing an action plan to increase the system's contribution ...

  2. So, You Want to Move out?!--An Awareness Program of the Real Costs of Moving Away from Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Steven L.; Hansen, Lyle; Falen, Christi

    2011-01-01

    The So, You Want To Move Out?! program was developed to help teens explore the financial realities of moving away from home. This 3-day camp program allows youth the opportunity to interview for a job, work, earn a paycheck, and pay financial obligations. After paying expenses and trying to put some money away in savings, the participants begin to…

  3. Financial Capability and Sociodemographic Factors among Survivors of Human Trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okech, David; McGarity, Stephen Vandiver; Hansen, Nathan; Burns, Abigail C; Howard, Waylon

    2018-01-01

    Improving the economic well-being of the girls and women is a key to reducing re-trafficking and in providing stability that survivors can use to rebuild their lives. The study looks at how various sociodemographic traits affected the financial capability of n = 144 women and girls who received intervention at a residential care facility in Ghana, West Africa. Three domain of financial capability are assessed in this, i.e., financial risk, financial planning, and financial saving. A scaled likelihood ratio test (chi-square difference test) was used to evaluate the significance of each direct covariate effect(%). Each of the overall goodness-of-fit indices suggested that the initial CFA model fit the data well, χ 2 (19, N = 144)  = 31.45, p = 0.04, RMSEA = 0.067 (90% CI: 0.017-0.108), TLI = 0.923, CFI = 0.948. Older women reported lower levels of financial savings than younger women. We found that women with secondary school education or higher reported significantly higher financial risk than women with less education. Women with children reported lower levels of financial saving than women without children. Married women indicated significantly more financial saving than single women. There was a significant negative effect of time spent in trafficking conditions on financial saving, indicating the highest average level of financial savings at intervention and decreased thereafter. Programs and policies in resource-scarce contexts that aim to assist trafficking survivors must go beyond providing psychosocial counseling and focus also on economic development opportunities.

  4. Financial Statements

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Financial Statements and accompanying notes provided on .... to good governance principles. there is the risk that ...... responsibilities of the centre's internal auditor includes reviewing internal controls, including accounting and financial.

  5. 31 CFR 103.120 - Anti-money laundering program requirements for financial institutions regulated by a Federal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Anti-money laundering program... Laundering Programs Anti-Money Laundering Programs § 103.120 Anti-money laundering program requirements for... anti-money laundering program that complies with the requirements of §§ 103.176 and 103.178 and the...

  6. Financial Derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Janečková, Alena

    2011-01-01

    1 Abstract/ Financial derivatives The purpose of this thesis is to provide an introduction to financial derivatives which has been, from the legal perspective, described in a not satisfactory manner as quite little literature that can be found about this topic. The main objectives of this thesis are to define the term "financial derivatives" and its particular types and to analyse legal nature of these financial instruments. The last objective is to try to draft future law regulation of finan...

  7. Opportunities Matter: Exploring Youth’s Perspectives on Their Long-Term Participation in an Urban 4-H Youth Development Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa M. Ferrari

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This article highlights a study which explored youths’ perspectives on their long-term involvement at Adventure Central, a comprehensive 4-H youth development program based at an urban park facility. We conducted four focus groups with 16 youth between the ages of 12 and 16 who had participated in the program between three and seven years. The youth experienced a wide range of opportunities including nature-related activities, jobs at park facilities, and travel. They spoke positively of their experiences and described how they benefited from their participation. Novelty, challenge, and leadership were key features of these opportunities. The youth noted the connection between learning and fun. In the process, they learned new skills, such as teamwork and public speaking, and developed personal qualities, such as responsibility, that helped them as they were growing up, transferred to other settings, and would benefit them in the future. Findings from this study suggest some clear implications for youth development professionals.

  8. Asymmetric Demography and Global Financial Governance | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Different countries are at different stages of demographic change. These differences ("asymmetries") can create opportunities for mutually beneficial financial cooperation between them. However, flaws in the current international financial architecture and weak financial institutions in the developing world may constrain the ...

  9. Making "Good" or "Critical" Citizens: From Social Justice to Financial Literacy in the Québec Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefrançois, David; Ethier, Marc-André; Cambron-Prémont, Amélie

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The Québec Ministry of Education has introduced--as of September 2017--a new mandatory course focusing on financial literacy and addressing such issues as credit scores, loans, taxes and budgets. This announcement has created intense educational debate on the "raison d'être" and content of the course. This article will summarise…

  10. Guernsey; Financial System Stability Assessment-Update

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2011-01-01

    Guernsey is a leading international insurance center in Europe. Its economy purely depends on the performance of the financial sector. As per the 2003 assessment under the Offshore Financial Center (OFC) program, it is found that the Guernsey Financial Services Commission (GFSC)’s powers have been strengthened in recent years and many recommendations of the 2003 Financial Sector Assessment Program (FSAP) have been implemented. The GFSC has developed a strategy for addressing banks' financial ...

  11. Perspectives of the Evolution of Romanian Financial Market in the Context of Global Financial Market

    OpenAIRE

    Dalia SIMION; Daniel TOBA

    2008-01-01

    Economical financial reality proves that, in time, globalisation has an impact not only on commodities economy but also on all financial domains, leading to remodelling of financial arrangement, increase of business opportunities but as well competition between financial institutions. Due to the expansion of financial markets, the consequences of globalisation processes converge to an efficiency of economic systems, through an increase of financing capacity and quick transformation of investm...

  12. End-Stage Renal Disease Outcomes among the Kaiser Permanente Southern California Creatinine Safety Program (Creatinine SureNet): Opportunities to Reflect and Improve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, John J; Batech, Michael; Danforth, Kim N; Rutkowski, Mark P; Jacobsen, Steven J; Kanter, Michael H

    2017-01-01

    The Kaiser Permanente Southern California (KPSC) creatinine safety program (Creatinine SureNet) identifies and outreaches to thousands of people annually who may have had a missed diagnosis for chronic kidney disease (CKD). We sought to determine the value of this outpatient program and evaluate opportunities for improvement. Longitudinal cohort study (February 2010 through December 2015) of KPSC members captured into the creatinine safety program who were characterized using demographics, laboratory results, and different estimations of glomerular filtration rate. Age- and sex-adjusted rates of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) were compared with those in the overall KPSC population. Among 12,394 individuals, 83 (0.7%) reached ESRD. The age- and sex-adjusted relative risk of ESRD was 2.7 times higher compared with the KPSC general population during the same period (94.7 vs 35.4 per 100,000 person-years; p creatinine measurements, only 13% had a urine study performed (32% among patients with confirmed CKD). Our study found a higher incidence of ESRD among individuals captured into the KPSC creatinine safety program. If the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation were used, fewer people would have been captured while improving the accuracy for diagnosing CKD. Urine testing was low even among patients with confirmed CKD. Our findings demonstrate the importance of a creatinine safety net program in an integrated health system but also suggest opportunities to improve CKD care and screening.

  13. A Survey of State and Local PV Program Response to Financial Innovation and Disparate Federal Tax Treatment in the Residential PV Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolinger, Mark [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Holt, Edward [Ed Holt & Associates, Inc., Harpswell, ME (United States)

    2015-06-01

    High up-front costs and a lack of financing options have historically been the primary barriers to the adoption of photovoltaics (PV) in the residential sector. State clean energy funds, which emerged in a number of states from the restructuring of the electricity industry in the mid-to-late 1990s, have for many years attempted to overcome these barriers through PV rebate and, in some cases, loan programs. While these programs (rebate programs in particular) have been popular, the residential PV market in the United States only started to achieve significant scale in the last five years – driven in large part by an initial wave of financial innovation that led to the rise of third-party ownership.

  14. Financial Literacy and Financial Behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sayinzoga, Aussi; Bulte, Erwin H.; Lensink, Robert

    2016-01-01

    We organise a field experiment with smallholder farmers in Rwanda to measure the impact of financial literacy training on financial knowledge and behaviour. The training increased financial literacy of participants, changed their savings and borrowing behaviour and had a positive effect on the

  15. EPIVAC International Conference on Financial Sustainability of Immunization Programs in sub-Saharan Africa, February 16-18, 2012, Ouidah, Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drach, Marcel; Le Gargasson, Jean-Bernard; Mathonnat, Jacky; Da Silva, Alfred; Kaddar, Miloud; Colombini, Anaïs

    2013-09-23

    The introduction of new vaccines with much higher prices than traditional vaccines results in increasing budgetary pressure on immunization programs in GAVI-eligible countries, increasing the need to ensure their financial sustainability. In this context, the third EPIVAC (Epidemiology and Vaccinology) technical conference was held from February 16 to 18, 2012 at the Regional Institute of Public Health in Ouidah, Benin. Managers of ministries of health and finance from 11 West African countries (GAVI eligible countries), as well as former EPIVAC students and European experts, shared their knowledge and best practices on immunization financing at district and country level. The conference concluded by stressing five major priorities for the financial sustainability of national immunization programs (NIPs) in GAVI-eligible countries. - Strengthen public financing by increasing resources and fiscal space, improving budget processes, increasing contribution of local governments and strengthen efficiency of budget spending. - Promote equitable community financing which was recognized as a significant and essential contribution to the continuity of EPI operations. - Widen private funding by exploring prospects offered by sponsorship through foundations dedicated to immunization and by corporate social responsibility programs. - Contain the potential crowding-out effect of GAVI co-financing and ensure that decisions on new vaccine introductions are evidence-based. - Seek out innovative financing mechanisms such as taxes on food products or a national solidarity fund. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Financial Planning with Fractional Goals

    OpenAIRE

    Goedhart, Marc; Spronk, Jaap

    1995-01-01

    textabstractWhen solving financial planning problems with multiple goals by means of multiple objective programming, the presence of fractional goals leads to technical difficulties. In this paper we present a straightforward interactive approach for solving such linear fractional programs with multiple goal variables. The approach is illustrated by means of an example in financial planning.

  17. Teaching OOP with Financial Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongwei

    2011-01-01

    Students lose interest in learning programming when the materials are not related to their lives. A challenge facing most students is that they lack the financial literacy necessary to manage their debts. An approach is developed to integrate financial literacy into an object-oriented programming (OOP) course. The approach is effective in…

  18. Assessing the Financial Value of Human Resource Management Programs and Employee Behaviors: A Critical Tool Still Coming of Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aharon Tziner

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper highlights investigations into several aspects of the field of economic assessment of human resource management strategies and worker organizational behaviors, both classic and recent. We present the reader with both an historical overview and a review of conceptual and practical developments in this field. It is important to emphasize the influence of the early studies since later financial assessment models were built on the earlier paradigms. The basic thrust of this effort is to encourage the greater employment by managers of quantitative models that allow decision makers to generate all the factors needed to estimate real financial gains and/or losses before any intervention strategy is implemented in the workplace. As indicated, the use of these quantitative models to estimate the net financial gains of using particular intervention strategies or the value of certain types of worker behaviors, can ultimately save companies from making gross tactical errors and, more positively, can assist management in promoting the organization’s long-term economic goals with all the incumbent rewards.

  19. 7 CFR 3016.61 - Financial reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Financial reporting. 3016.61 Section 3016.61... AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Entitlement § 3016.61 Financial reporting. The financial reporting provisions... Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations. The financial reporting requirements for these...

  20. The Growth Opportunity Channel of Debt Structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giambona, E.; Golec, J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies the importance of growth opportunities for debt structure decisions. High growth firms use more unsecured debt to preserve financial flexibility (in the form of untapped secured debt capacity) in connection with future growth opportunities: the growth opportunity channel of debt

  1. Department of Education Information on Consolidation Opportunities and Student Aid. Testimony before the Subcommittee on Human Resources and the Intergovernmental Relations Committee on Government Reform and Oversight, House of Representatives. Statement of Cornelia M. Blanchette, Associate Director, Education and Employment Issues, Health, Education, and Human Services Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchette, Cornelia M.

    This report evaluates Department of Education opportunities to consolidate overlapping education programs, to find cost savings, and to strengthen its "gatekeeping" over schools' participation in student financial aid programs. It notes that, besides already proposed program consolidation, other programs that could be streamlined include…

  2. Challenges and opportunities in building a sustainable rural primary care workforce in alignment with the Affordable Care Act: the WWAMI program as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Suzanne M; Ballweg, Ruth A; Cosgrove, Ellen M; Engle, Kellie A; Robinson, Lawrence R; Rosenblatt, Roger A; Skillman, Susan M; Wenrich, Marjorie D

    2013-12-01

    The authors examine the potential impact of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) on a large medical education program in the Northwest United States that builds the primary care workforce for its largely rural region. The 42-year-old Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho (WWAMI) program, hosted by the University of Washington School of Medicine, is one of the nation's most successful models for rural health training. The program has expanded training and retention of primary care health professionals for the region through medical school education, graduate medical education, a physician assistant training program, and support for practicing health professionals.The ACA and resulting accountable care organizations (ACOs) present potential challenges for rural settings and health training programs like WWAMI that focus on building the health workforce for rural and underserved populations. As more Americans acquire health coverage, more health professionals will be needed, especially in primary care. Rural locations may face increased competition for these professionals. Medical schools are expanding their positions to meet the need, but limits on graduate medical education expansion may result in a bottleneck, with insufficient residency positions for graduating students. The development of ACOs may further challenge building a rural workforce by limiting training opportunities for health professionals because of competing demands and concerns about cost, efficiency, and safety associated with training. Medical education programs like WWAMI will need to increase efforts to train primary care physicians and increase their advocacy for student programs and additional graduate medical education for rural constituents.

  3. Narratives of Participants in National Career Development Programs for Women in Academic Medicine: Identifying the Opportunities for Strategic Investment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helitzer, Deborah L; Newbill, Sharon L; Cardinali, Gina; Morahan, Page S; Chang, Shine; Magrane, Diane

    2016-04-01

    Academic medicine has initiated changes in policy, practice, and programs over the past several decades to address persistent gender disparity and other issues pertinent to its sociocultural context. Three career development programs were implemented to prepare women faculty to succeed in academic medicine: two sponsored by the Association of American Medical Colleges, which began a professional development program for early career women faculty in 1988. By 1995, it had evolved into two programs one for early career women and another for mid-career women. By 2012, more than 4000 women faculty from medical schools across the U.S and Canada had participated in these intensive 3-day programs. The third national program, the Hedwig van Ameringen Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine(®) (ELAM) program for women, was developed in 1995 at the Drexel University College of Medicine. Narratives from telephone interviews representing reflections on 78 career development seminars between 1988 and 2010 describe the dynamic relationships between individual, institutional, and sociocultural influences on participants' career advancement. The narratives illuminate the pathway from participating in a career development program to self-defined success in academic medicine in revealing a host of influences that promoted and/or hindered program attendance and participants' ability to benefit after the program in both individual and institutional systems. The context for understanding the importance of these career development programs to women's advancement is nestled in the sociocultural environment, which includes both the gender-related influences and the current status of institutional practices that support women faculty. The findings contribute to the growing evidence that career development programs, concurrent with strategic, intentional support of institutional leaders, are necessary to achieve gender equity and diversity inclusion.

  4. Financial incentives and purchase restrictions in a food benefit program affect the types of foods and beverages purchased: results from a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Simone A; Rydell, Sarah A; Mitchell, Nathan R; Michael Oakes, J; Elbel, Brian; Harnack, Lisa

    2017-09-16

    This research evaluated the effects of financial incentives and purchase restrictions on food purchasing in a food benefit program for low income people. Participants (n=279) were randomized to groups: 1) Incentive- 30% financial incentive for fruits and vegetables purchased with food benefits; 2) Restriction- no purchase of sugar-sweetened beverages, sweet baked goods, or candies with food benefits; 3) Incentive plus Restriction; or 4) Control- no incentive or restrictions. Participants received a study-specific debit card where funds were added monthly for 12-weeks. Food purchase receipts were collected over 16 weeks. Total dollars spent on grocery purchases and by targeted food categories were computed from receipts. Group differences were examined using general linear models. Weekly purchases of fruit significantly increased in the Incentive plus Restriction ($4.8) compared to the Restriction ($1.7) and Control ($2.1) groups (p beverage purchases significantly decreased in the Incentive plus Restriction (-$0.8 per week) and Restriction ($-1.4 per week) groups compared to the Control group (+$1.5; pfoods and beverages purchased with food program funds may support more healthful food purchases compared to no incentives or restrictions. Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT02643576 .

  5. FINANCIAL SUPPORT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAMS: PRACTICE OF IMPLEMENTATION IN THE REGION AND POSSIBILITIES OF ITS STUDY IN THE PROCESS OF PROFESSIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Kozachek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim is to consider the structure and practice of funding environmental projects, its implementation in the region as well as the prospects for studying the characteristics of financial support for environmental programs in the course of vocational environmental training in regional universities.Methodology. We propose the method of quantitative research for statistical documents and the method of qualitative analysis that can be used to clarify the structure of environmental financing in the regions.Results. We identified the basic quantitative parameters and made a structure of financing the regional environmental programs. The analysis showed that this structure includes the federal budget, the budget of the Russian Federation, local budgets, extra-budgetary sources. Thus, the example of the Tambov region illustrates that the main financial burden is on the enterprises, and local governments involved in such financing make up the minority. It is proved that the study of the peculiarities of financing the regional environmental programs is important for students of different specialties. We propose a list of didactic units and issues to be included in the content of professional environmental training.Main conclusions. We recommend using the structure of funding the regional ecological projects analyzed on the example of the Tambov region for other regions of Russia as well. At the same time, putting into practice the basic principles of sustainable development, it is necessary to ensure the inclusion of the study of the characteristics and structure of the financing regional environmental programs as didactic units in the process of professional environmental training.

  6. Can opportunities be enhanced for vaccinating children in home visiting programs? A population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Michael R; Chartier, Mariette; Brownell, Marni; Chateau, Dan; Nickel, Nathan C; Martens, Patricia; Katz, Alan; Sarkar, Joykrishna; Hu, Milton; Burland, Elaine; Goh, ChunYan; Taylor, Carole

    2015-07-07

    Home visiting programs focused on improving early childhood environments are commonplace in North America. A goal of many of these programs is to improve the overall health of children, including promotion of age appropriate vaccination. In this study, population-based data are used to examine the effect of a home visiting program on vaccination rates in children. Home visiting program data from Manitoba, Canada were linked to several databases, including a provincial vaccination registry to examine vaccination rates in a cohort of children born between 2003 and 2009. Propensity score weights were used to balance potential confounders between a group of children enrolled in the program (n = 4,562) and those who were eligible but not enrolled (n = 5,184). Complete and partial vaccination rates for one and two year old children were compared between groups, including stratification into area-level income quintiles. Complete vaccination rates from birth to age 1 and 2 were higher for those enrolled in the Families First program [Average Treatment Effect Risk Ratio (ATE RR) 1.06 (95 % CI 1.03-1.08) and 1.10 (95 % CI 1.05-1.15) respectively]. No significant differences were found between groups having at least one vaccination at age 1 or 2 [ATE RR 1.01 (95 % CI 1.00-1.02) and 1.00 (95 % CI 1.00-1.01) respectively). The interaction between program and income quintiles was not statistically significant suggesting that the program effect did not differ by income quintile. Home visiting programs have the potential to increase vaccination rates for children enrolled, despite limited program content directed towards this end. Evidence-based program enhancements have the potential to increase these rates further, however more research is needed to inform policy makers of optimal approaches in this regard, especially with respect to cost-effectiveness.

  7. Financial Liberalization and Financial Fragility

    OpenAIRE

    Enrica Detragiache; Asli Demirgüç-Kunt

    1998-01-01

    The authors study the empirical relationship between banking crises and financial liberalization using a panel of data for 53 countries for 1980-95. They find that banking crises are more likely to occur in liberalized financial systems. But financial liberalization's impact on a fragile banking sector is weaker where the institutional environment is strong--especially where there is respect for the rule of law, a low level of corruption, and good contract enforcement. They examine evidence o...

  8. Geothermal Program Review X: proceedings. Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market -- the Opportunities and Challenges for Expanding Geothermal Energy in a Competitive Supply Market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    Each year the Geothermal Division of the US Department of Energy conducts an in-depth review of its entire geothermal R&D program. The conference serves several purposes: a status report on current R&D activities, an assessment of progress and problems, a review of management issues, and a technology transfer opportunity between DOE and the US geothermal city. This year`s conference, Program Review X, was held in San Francisco on March 24--26, 1992. The theme of the review, ``Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market -- The Opportunities and Challenges for Expanding Geothermal Energy in a Competitive Supply Market,`` focused on the needs of the electric utility sector. Geothermal energy, with its power capacity potential of 10 GWe by the year 2010, can provide reliable, enviromentally clean electricity which can help offset the projected increase in demand. Program Review X consisted of seven sessions including an opening session with presentations by Mr. Vikram Budhraja, Vice President of System Planning and Operations, Southern California Edison Company, and Mr. Richard Jaros, President and Chief Operating Officer, California Energy Company. The six technical sessions included presentations by the relevant field researchers covering DOE-sponsored R&D in hydrothermal, hot dry rock, and geopressured energy. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

  9. Financial Statements

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    users make on the basis of the financial information. .... IDRC's brand and reputation could impact partner- .... building and to provide internal services in support of the ...... maintains books of accounts, information systems, and financial and management controls that .... The significant accounting policies of the Centre are: a.

  10. International oil opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hares, T.N.D.; Mann, D.W.

    1995-01-01

    Some of the key issues to be addressed when selecting international opportunities, were discussed. The ideal opportunity should have the following characteristics: (1) large, low risk (2) high percentage of rent available to the investor, (3) low cost and low technical requirements, (4) low country risk, (5) low competition, (6) easy to access, and (7) favorable environment in which to work. Entering an international opportunity can be achieved by competitive bidding, direct negotiation, partnership, corporate and/or asset acquisition, and long-term relationships. Key success factors were identified as (1) applying technical financial and commercial skills in the international environment, (2) speedy response, (3) excellent relationships in the foreign country, (4) understanding the local culture, and (5) keeping a good track record. 6 figs

  11. 75 FR 2546 - Opportunity for Co-Sponsorship of the President's Challenge Physical Activity and Fitness Awards...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-15

    ...The President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports published a document in the Federal Register of December 28, 2009, concerning the opportunity for non-Federal entities to co-sponsor and administer a series of financially self-sustaining activities related to the President's Challenge Physical Activity and Fitness Awards Program. The document contained incorrect addresses and contact information.

  12. 7 CFR 247.27 - Financial management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Financial management. 247.27 Section 247.27... AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS COMMODITY SUPPLEMENTAL FOOD PROGRAM § 247.27 Financial management. (a) What are the Federal requirements for State and local agencies with regard to financial management...

  13. Measuring financial performance: an overview of financial statements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalsted, N L

    1995-07-01

    Financial management has emerged as a critical component in the long-term viability of today's ranches and farms. Proper and timely financial reporting and analysis of financial statements are valuable tools that agricultural producers can use to monitor, coordinate, and plan their operational production and marketing schemes and strategies. A side note to preparation of financial statements. With the concerns over lender liability issues associated with statements either assisted with or prepared by a lending officer, agricultural producers will be responsible for preparing their own statements. The lending institutions may prepare their own statements in their assessment of the financial condition of a business and or individual, but, ultimately, the responsibility of financial statements is the borrower's. Some of the material presented in this article provides important input for use in such analytical programs as the National Cattlemen's Association, Integrated Resource Committees, and Standard Performance Analysis (SPA). SPA techniques and associated software have been or currently are under development for cow-calf, stocker, seedstock, and sheep enterprises. Critical to the analysis is having complete and correct financial statements. These analytical programs build on the financial statements. These analytical programs build on the financial statements as recommended by the FFSTF. Proper financial reporting is critical not only to a SPA assessment but also to the overall financial management of today's farms and ranches. Recognizing the importance of financial management in production agriculture is not enough, taking a proactive stance in one's financial plan is paramount to success. Failure to do so will only enhance the exit rates of producers from production agriculture.

  14. Financial Literacy, Financial Education, and Economic Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Justine S.; Madrian, Brigitte C.; Skimmyhorn, William L.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we review the literature on financial literacy, financial education, and consumer financial outcomes. We consider how financial literacy is measured in the current literature and examine how well the existing literature addresses whether financial education improves financial literacy or personal financial outcomes. We discuss the…

  15. Sugar daddy. Most Americans know Medicare as the health insurance program for the elderly, but to providers, it's a jobs program, a capital financier and a safety net.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallam, K; Gardner, J

    1999-11-08

    Most Americans know Medicare as the health insurance program that covers the elderly. But to providers it's much more that. The program pays for medical education, finances capital projects and subsidizes care for the indigent. Should Medicare continue making those add-on payments? Is that the program's mission? The debate is intensifying.

  16. Training of masters on the program “Information technologies in education” in MGPU — a new direction, new opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Сергей Георгиевич Григорьев

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In article features of preparation of masters of pedagogical education according to the new program connected with the theory and practice of informatization of education are described.

  17. 75 FR 62849 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program (SHOP) for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-13

    ... program provides grants to national and regional nonprofit organizations and consortia that have....gov/library/bookshelf12/supernofa/nofa09/grpshop.cfm . The amount appropriated in FY 2009 to fund the...

  18. The Intelligent Transportation Systems Public Safety Program : opportunities for technological advancement in detecting, responding, and recovering from community emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    During the summer and fall of 2000, a group of high level public safety and transportation officials was brought together by the US Department of Transportations (USDOT) Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) Program to consider the interaction bet...

  19. Public health financial management competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honoré, Peggy A; Costich, Julia F

    2009-01-01

    The absence of appropriate financial management competencies has impeded progress in advancing the field of public health finance. It also inhibits the ability to professionalize this sector of the workforce. Financial managers should play a critical role by providing information relevant to decision making. The lack of fundamental financial management knowledge and skills is a barrier to fulfilling this role. A national expert committee was convened to examine this issue. The committee reviewed standards related to financial and business management practices within public health and closely related areas. Alignments were made with national standards such as those established for government chief financial officers. On the basis of this analysis, a comprehensive set of public health financial management competencies was identified and examined further by a review panel. At a minimum, the competencies can be used to define job descriptions, assess job performance, identify critical gaps in financial analysis, create career paths, and design educational programs.

  20. Application of MOOCs for borrowers’ financial education in microfinance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Abul Kalam Siddike

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this research was to explore current borrowers’ financial education in microfinance and determine the possibilities of adopting massive open online courses (MOOCs for such individuals. We adopted a semi-structured interview research strategy. A total of 25 employees and borrowers in BRAC’s (Bangladesh Rehabilitation Assistance Committee and then Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee, currently, BRAC does not represent an acronym microfinance program were interviewed and the data were analyzed qualitatively. The results show that BRAC’s microfinance program provides borrowers’ financial education in terms of a pre-disbursement orientation and four-day training through the creation of a new role of customer service assistant. The results also reveal that edu-entertainment, easy understanding, and more borrower participation are the main possible opportunities for adopting MOOCs for borrowers’ financial education. We identified infrastructure, Internet connection, and funding as possible hindrances to adopting MOOCs for financial education. Finally, we propose a framework for adopting MOOCs for borrowers’ financial education in microfinance.

  1. Financial Stress, Financial Literacy, Counselling and the Risk of Homelessness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Steen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Poor financial literacy may lead to poor life choices. These life choices can create or contribute to financial stress with adverse consequences - not the least of which may be homelessness. These issues are relatively well understood, but there is limited research on the link between financial stress, financial literacy and counselling, and homelessness. Specifically, there has been little research on how improved financial literacy and appropriate financial counselling might help to prevent homelessness. This paper synthesises existing literature on this topic and considers these issues using the ABCX family stress model of Hill (1958 using data from an Australian program aimed at alleviating family homelessness, the Home Advice Program. We provide evidence that suggests that case management and support which incorporates financial counselling and financial literacy can assist in moderating the impact of financial stress and help those at risk of homelessness. The findings have implications for public policy in the areas of financial education, consumer finance, and social services provision.

  2. Clinical Informatics Fellowship Programs: In Search of a Viable Financial Model: An open letter to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, C U; Longhurst, C A; Hersh, W; Mohan, V; Levy, B P; Embi, P J; Finnell, J T; Turner, A M; Martin, R; Williamson, J; Munger, B

    2015-01-01

    In the US, the new subspecialty of Clinical Informatics focuses on systems-level improvements in care delivery through the use of health information technology (HIT), data analytics, clinical decision support, data visualization and related tools. Clinical informatics is one of the first subspecialties in medicine open to physicians trained in any primary specialty. Clinical Informatics benefits patients and payers such as Medicare and Medicaid through its potential to reduce errors, increase safety, reduce costs, and improve care coordination and efficiency. Even though Clinical Informatics benefits patients and payers, because GME funding from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has not grown at the same rate as training programs, the majority of the cost of training new Clinical Informaticians is currently paid by academic health science centers, which is unsustainable. To maintain the value of HIT investments by the government and health care organizations, we must train sufficient leaders in Clinical Informatics. In the best interest of patients, payers, and the US society, it is therefore critical to find viable financial models for Clinical Informatics fellowship programs. To support the development of adequate training programs in Clinical Informatics, we request that the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issue clarifying guidance that would allow accredited ACGME institutions to bill for clinical services delivered by fellows at the fellowship program site within their primary specialty.

  3. Isotope production and distribution Programs Fiscal Year (FY) 1995 Financial Statement Audit (ER-FC-96-01)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-12

    The charter of the Department of Energy (DOE) Isotope Production and Distribution Program (Isotope Program) covers the production and sale of radioactive and stable isotopes, associated byproducts, surplus materials such as lithium and deuterium, and related isotope services. Services provided include, but are not limited to, irradiation services, target preparation and processing, source encapsulation and other special preparations, analyses, chemical separations, and leasing of stable isotopes for research purposes. Isotope Program products and services are sold worldwide for use in a wide variety of research, development, biomedical, and industrial applications. The Isotope Program reports to the Director of the Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology. The Isotope Program operates under a revolving fund, as established by the Fiscal Year 1990 Energy and Water Appropriations Act (Public Law 101-101). The Fiscal Year 1995 Appropriations Act (Public Law 103-316) modified predecessor acts to allow prices charged for Isotope Program products and services to be based on production costs, market value, the needs of the research community, and other factors. Prices set for small-volume, high-cost isotopes that are needed for research may not achieve full-cost recovery. Isotope Program costs are financed by revenues from the sale of isotopes and associated services and through payments from the isotope support decision unit, which was established in the DOE fiscal year 1995 Energy, Supply, Research, and Development appropriation. The isotope decision unit finances the production and processing of unprofitable isotopes that are vital to the national interest.

  4. Using the 4 pillars™ practice transformation program to increase adult influenza vaccination and reduce missed opportunities in a randomized cluster trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chyongchiou J. Lin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An evidence-based, step-by-step guide, the 4 Pillars™ Practice Transformation Program, was the foundation of an intervention to increase adult immunizations in primary care and was tested in a randomized controlled cluster trial. The purpose of this study is to report changes in influenza immunization rates and on factors related to receipt of influenza vaccine. Methods Twenty five primary care practices were recruited in 2013, stratified by city (Houston, Pittsburgh, location (rural, urban, suburban and type (family medicine, internal medicine, and randomized to the intervention (n = 13 or control (n = 12 in Year 1 (2013-14. A follow-up intervention occurred in Year 2 (2014-15. Demographic and vaccination data were derived from de-identified electronic medical record extractions. Results A cohort of 70,549 adults seen in their respective practices (n = 24 with 1 drop out at least once each year was followed. Baseline mean age was 55.1 years, 35 % were men, 21 % were non-white and 35 % were Hispanic. After one year, both intervention and control arms significantly (P < 0.001 increased influenza vaccination, with average increases of 2.7 to 6.5 percentage points. In regression analyses, likelihood of influenza vaccination was significantly higher in sites with lower percentages of patients with missed opportunities (P < 0.001 and, after adjusting for missed opportunities, the intervention further improved vaccination rates in Houston (lower baseline rates but not Pittsburgh (higher baseline rates. In the follow-up intervention, the likelihood of vaccination increased for both intervention sites and those that reduced missed opportunities (P < 0.005. Conclusions Reducing missed opportunities across the practice increases likelihood of influenza vaccination of adults. The 4 Pillars™ Practice Transformation Program provides strategies for reducing missed opportunities to vaccinate adults. Trial

  5. Using the 4 pillars™ practice transformation program to increase adult influenza vaccination and reduce missed opportunities in a randomized cluster trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chyongchiou J; Nowalk, Mary Patricia; Pavlik, Valory N; Brown, Anthony E; Zhang, Song; Raviotta, Jonathan M; Moehling, Krissy K; Hawk, Mary; Ricci, Edmund M; Middleton, Donald B; Patel, Suchita; South-Paul, Jeannette E; Zimmerman, Richard K

    2016-11-03

    An evidence-based, step-by-step guide, the 4 Pillars™ Practice Transformation Program, was the foundation of an intervention to increase adult immunizations in primary care and was tested in a randomized controlled cluster trial. The purpose of this study is to report changes in influenza immunization rates and on factors related to receipt of influenza vaccine. Twenty five primary care practices were recruited in 2013, stratified by city (Houston, Pittsburgh), location (rural, urban, suburban) and type (family medicine, internal medicine), and randomized to the intervention (n = 13) or control (n = 12) in Year 1 (2013-14). A follow-up intervention occurred in Year 2 (2014-15). Demographic and vaccination data were derived from de-identified electronic medical record extractions. A cohort of 70,549 adults seen in their respective practices (n = 24 with 1 drop out) at least once each year was followed. Baseline mean age was 55.1 years, 35 % were men, 21 % were non-white and 35 % were Hispanic. After one year, both intervention and control arms significantly (P < 0.001) increased influenza vaccination, with average increases of 2.7 to 6.5 percentage points. In regression analyses, likelihood of influenza vaccination was significantly higher in sites with lower percentages of patients with missed opportunities (P < 0.001) and, after adjusting for missed opportunities, the intervention further improved vaccination rates in Houston (lower baseline rates) but not Pittsburgh (higher baseline rates). In the follow-up intervention, the likelihood of vaccination increased for both intervention sites and those that reduced missed opportunities (P < 0.005). Reducing missed opportunities across the practice increases likelihood of influenza vaccination of adults. The 4 Pillars™ Practice Transformation Program provides strategies for reducing missed opportunities to vaccinate adults. This study was registered as a clinical trial on 03/20/2013 at

  6. 77 FR 34127 - Financial Management Service; Proposed Collection of Information: Electronic Transfer Account...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    ... Information: Electronic Transfer Account (ETA) Financial Agency Agreement AGENCY: Financial Management Service... of information described below: Title: Electronic Transfer Account (ETA) Financial Agency Agreement... public and other Federal agencies to take this opportunity to comment on a continuing information...

  7. Examination of a Museum Program for Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Shelley; Rais, Paula; Steele-Driscoll, Jacqueline; Townsend, Samantha

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a children's museum program designed to support young children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and their families. The program offers specialized materials, financial incentives, an exclusive time, and trained volunteers to increase the comfort level, enjoyment, and learning opportunities of attendees.…

  8. 10 CFR 5.400 - Education programs or activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs or... other sex. Such opportunities may be derived from either domestic or foreign sources. (d) Aids, benefits...

  9. 24 CFR 3.400 - Education programs or activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Urban Development NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs or Activities... other sex. Such opportunities may be derived from either domestic or foreign sources. (d) Aids, benefits...

  10. Application of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats analysis in the development of a health technology assessment program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibis, B; Artiles, J; Corabian, P; Meiesaar, K; Koppel, A; Jacobs, P; Serrano, P; Menon, D

    2001-10-01

    There has been recent interest in developing a health technology assessment (HTA) function in Estonia. A group of individuals knowledgeable about HTA in Canada, Germany, Romania and Spain, along with representatives of the University of Tartu, Estonia, was convened by the Institute of Health Economics in Edmonton, Canada, to consider options for such a function. In a one-day workshop strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) analyses of HTA were conducted, first at a 'global' level, and then of the Estonian situation. The 'global' SWOT analysis yielded a large number of items that pertain to institutionalized HTA in a generic sense, i.e. not based on any individual HTA agency. The 'Estonian' SWOT yielded a subset of items, which pertain to development of HTA in that country. Ten actionable steps were then developed on the basis of this subset, which could be used to initiate the creation of an HTA body in Estonia.

  11. Financial Planning and Financial Instruments: 2013 in Review, 2014 in Prospect

    OpenAIRE

    Mark Brimble; Ciorstan Smark

    2013-01-01

    The Global Financial Crisis (GFC); changes in regulation; issues in public perception and trust have contributed to a troubled 2013 for financial planners. As financial planning and wealth management providers seek to bolster their professional status, the Financial Planning Education Council’s National Curriculum and Accreditation Framework and ASIC’s minimum training requirements are also a space to watch. In prospect, 2014 will offer opportunities and challenges in the form of ...

  12. Opportunity Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løwe Nielsen, Suna; Lassen, Astrid Heidemann; Nielsen, Louise Møller

    2013-01-01

    design”. The framework explains how opportunities intentionally and pro-actively can be designed from methods and processes of moving-in and moving-out. An illustrative case of opportunity design within the area of sustainable energy and electric cars is presented to link the theoretical discussion...

  13. Business opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory Search Site submit About Mission Business Newsroom Publications Los : Environmental Documents, Reports LANL Home Calendar Search Contacts Business » Short- and long-term opportunities Business opportunities Setting new standards and developing small business initiatives within NNSA

  14. Review of Family Financial Decision Making: Suggestions for Future Research and Implications for Financial Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinhee; Gutter, Michael S.; Spangler, Taylor

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews the theories and literature in intrahousehold financial decisions, spousal partners and financial decision making, family system and financial decision process, children, and financial decisions. The article draws conclusions from the literature review and discusses directions for future research and educational programs. Most…

  15. Increasing Financial Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    Earning, spending, saving and investing, and using credit are important aspects of money management that teens need to understand as they move into adulthood. Family and consumer sciences (FCS) professionals have a long history of addressing this important life skill. This brief article describes the High School Financial Planning Program (HSFPP),…

  16. Building America's Job Skills with Effective Workforce Programs: A Training Strategy to Raise Wages and Increase Work Opportunities. Strategy Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenstone, Michael; Looney, Adam

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the importance of effective training and workforce development programs as part of a broader strategy to increase the competitiveness of American workers. Although rapid technological change and increasing global competition have delivered great economic benefits to the U.S. economy overall, the development of new and more…

  17. The Iowa Disinfection Cleaning Project: Opportunities, Successes, and Challenges of a Structured Intervention Program in 56 Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carling, Philip; Herwaldt, Loreen A

    2017-08-01

    OBJECTIVE A diverse group of hospitals in Iowa implemented a program to objectively evaluate and improve the thoroughness of disinfection cleaning of near-patient surfaces. Administrative benefits of, challenges of, and impediments to the program were also evaluated. METHODS We conducted a prospective, quasi-experimental pre-/postintervention trial to improve the thoroughness of terminal room disinfection cleaning. Infection preventionists utilized an objective cleaning performance monitoring system (DAZO) to evaluate the thoroughness of disinfection cleaning (TDC) expressed as a proportion of objects confirmed to have been cleaned (numerator) to objects to be cleaned per hospital policy (denominator)×100. Data analysis, educational interventions, and objective performance feedback were modeled on previously published studies using the same monitoring tool. Programmatic analysis utilized unstructured and structured information from participants irrespective of whether they participated in the process improvement aspects to the program. RESULTS Initially, the overall TDC was 61% in 56 hospitals. Hospitals completing 1 or 2 feedback cycles improved their TDC percentages significantly (P90% for at least 38 months. A survey of infection preventionists found that lack of time and staff turnover were the most common reasons for terminating the study early. CONCLUSION The study confirmed that hospitals using this program can improve their TDC percentages significantly. Hospitals must invest resources to improve cleaning and to sustain their gains. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:960-965.

  18. Lessons Learned From Transitioning PEPFAR Track 1.0 Care and Treatment Programs: Case Studies in Financial Management Capacity Building in Zambia and Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, Chuck; Tidwell, George; Vhugen, Jann; Sharma, Anjali

    2015-01-01

    In 2008, the United States government mandated transition of internationally managed HIV care and treatment programs to local country ownership. Three case studies illustrate the US Health Resources Services Administration's fiscal assessment and technical assistance (TA) processes to strengthen local organizations' capabilities to absorb and manage United States government funding. Review of initial, TA and follow-up reports reveal that the 1 Botswanan and 2 Zambian organizations closed 10 of 17 financial capacity gaps, with Health Resources Services Administration assisting on 2. Zambian organizations requested and absorbed targeted TA on the basis of the consultant's desk review, their finance staff revised fiscal policies and procedures, and accordingly trained other staff. In Botswana, delays in integrating recommendations necessitated on-site TA for knowledge building and role modeling. Organizational maturity may explain differences in responsiveness, ownership, and required TA approaches. Clarifying expectations of capacity building, funding agreement, and nonmonetary donor involvement can help new organizations determine and act on intervening actions.

  19. Financial assurances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paton, R.F.

    1990-01-01

    US Ecology is a full service waste management company. The company operates two of the nation's three existing low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) disposal facilities and has prepared and submitted license applications for two new LLRW disposal facilities in California and Nebraska. The issue of financial assurances is an important aspect of site development and operation. Proper financial assurances help to insure that uninterrupted operation, closure and monitoring of a facility will be maintained throughout the project's life. Unfortunately, this aspect of licensing is not like others where you can gauge acceptance by examining approved computer codes, site performance standards or applying specific technical formulas. There is not a standard financial assurance plan. Each site should develop its requirements based upon the conditions of the site, type of design, existing state or federal controls, and realistic assessments of future financial needs. Financial assurances at U.S. Ecology's existing sites in Richland, Washington, and Beatty, Nevada, have been in place for several years and are accomplished in a variety of ways by the use of corporate guarantees, corporate capital funds, third party liability insurance, and post closure/long-term care funds. In addressing financial assurances, one can divide the issue into three areas: Site development/operations, third party damages, and long-term care/cleanup

  20. Bulgaria : Country Financial Accountability Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2003-01-01

    Bulgaria's ambitious program of reforms in several areas, including public financial management (PFM), focuses greatly on its entry into the European Union (EU). Thus, the country has a well developed system, and structure of financial management, that relies heavily on information technology (such as in the area of cash management), and has independent external audits, and parliamentary o...

  1. Framework for Financial Ratio Analysis of Audited Federal Financial Reports

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brady, Richard

    1999-01-01

    .... The disclosure of this type of information, it was believed, would enable decision-makers to understand the financial implications of budgetary, policy and program issues and provide an analytical...

  2. 32 CFR 56.9 - Ensuring compliance with this part in Federal financial assistance programs and activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) in accordance with Executive Order 12067. (2) The ASD(MRA&L), or designee, and DoD Components shall... the form of the assurances that must be executed pursuant to paragraph (b) of this section, and sample... summaries of pertinent documents. (iii) A reference to at least one program or activity conducted by the...

  3. Report: South Carolina Drinking Water State Revolving Fund Program Financial Statements with Independent Auditor’s Report, June 30, 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #2003-1-00138, September 17, 2003. We have audited the balance sheet of the SCDWSRF Program as of June 30, 2002, the related statement of revenues, expenses, and changes in fund equity, and the statement of cash flows for the year then ended.

  4. Routine Immunization Service Delivery Through the Basic Package of Health Services Program in Afghanistan: Gaps, Challenges, and Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbaeyi, Chukwuma; Kamawal, Noor Shah; Porter, Kimberly A; Azizi, Adam Khan; Sadaat, Iftekhar; Hadler, Stephen; Ehrhardt, Derek

    2017-07-01

    The Basic Package of Health Services (BPHS) program has increased access to immunization services for children living in rural Afghanistan. However, multiple surveys have indicated persistent immunization coverage gaps. Hence, to identify gaps in implementation, an assessment of the BPHS program was undertaken, with specific focus on the routine immunization (RI) component. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2014 on a representative sample drawn from a sampling frame of 1858 BPHS health facilities. Basic descriptive analysis was performed, capturing general characteristics of survey respondents and assessing specific RI components, and χ2 tests were used to evaluate possible differences in service delivery by type of health facility. Of 447 survey respondents, 27% were health subcenters (HSCs), 30% were basic health centers, 32% were comprehensive health centers, and 12% were district hospitals. Eighty-seven percent of all respondents offered RI services, though only 61% of HSCs did so. Compared with other facility types, HSCs were less likely to have adequate stock of vaccines, essential cold-chain equipment, or proper documentation of vaccination activities. There is an urgent need to address manpower and infrastructural deficits in RI service delivery through the BPHS program, especially at the HSC level. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  5. 10 CFR 420.3 - Administration of financial assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... procedures which DOE may from time to time prescribe for the administration of financial assistance under... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Administration of financial assistance. 420.3 Section 420... Energy Program Financial Assistance § 420.3 Administration of financial assistance. (a) Financial...

  6. Inspector General, DOD, Oversight of the Army Audit Agency Audit of the FY 2000 U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Civil Works Program, Financial Statements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    .... Office of Management and Budget Bulletin No. 01-02, "Audit Requirements for Federal Financial Statements," dated October 16, 2000, establishes the minimum requirements for audits of these financial statements...

  7. Opportunities for administrators to promote disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kash, Bita A; Gamm, Larry D; Bolin, Jane Nelson; Peck, B Mitchell

    2005-01-01

    Studies of disease management (DM) have shown that patients who participate in such programs achieve better health status and make fewer emergency room visits. Private and government payers have recently increased their efforts to promote DM initiatives through financial incentives to healthcare providers. This article explores opportunities for administrators of health services organizations (HSO) to promote DM in the current political and economic environment. Our survey of professionals (DM leaders, physicians, and DM nurses) in six DM programs reveals these professionals' assessments of the key players and resources that they deem important to their respective DM programs. They view DM programs as heavily dependent on the support of physicians, nurses, and health plan leaders but relatively less so on the support of HSO administrators- a situation that may suggest opportunities for administrators to take on greater leadership in moving the HSO toward developing DM programs. Survey results also indicate a strong need for the integration of resources such as communication systems, electronic medical records, and DM reporting. Taken collectively, these needs suggest a number of strategies for the administrator to play a larger role in supporting the adoption and effective implementation of DM. In the article, we propose that DM programs can benefit substantially from an administrator who can demonstrate a thorough knowledge of DM-related government and private-payer initiatives and who has the ability to provide leadership to develop and implement viable DM programs. Valued contributions that the administrator should bring to the table include support of standardized DM processes, use of practice guidelines, and provision of pertinent information systems.

  8. Implementing a Fee-for-Service Cervical Cancer Screening and Treatment Program in Cameroon: Challenges and Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGregorio, Geneva; Manga, Simon; Kiyang, Edith; Manjuh, Florence; Bradford, Leslie; Cholli, Preetam; Wamai, Richard; Ogembo, Rebecca; Sando, Zacharie; Liu, Yuxin; Sheldon, Lisa Kennedy; Nulah, Kathleen; Welty, Thomas; Welty, Edith; Ogembo, Javier Gordon

    2017-07-01

    Cervical cancer screening is one of the most effective cancer prevention strategies, but most women in Africa have never been screened. In 2007, the Cameroon Baptist Convention Health Services, a large faith-based health care system in Cameroon, initiated the Women's Health Program (WHP) to address this disparity. The WHP provides fee-for-service cervical cancer screening using visual inspection with acetic acid enhanced by digital cervicography (VIA-DC), prioritizing care for women living with HIV/AIDS. They also provide clinical breast examination, family planning (FP) services, and treatment for reproductive tract infection (RTI). Here, we document the strengths and challenges of the WHP screening program and the unique aspects of the WHP model, including a fee-for-service payment system and the provision of other women's health services. We retrospectively reviewed WHP medical records from women who presented for cervical cancer screening from 2007-2014. In 8 years, WHP nurses screened 44,979 women for cervical cancer. The number of women screened increased nearly every year. The WHP is sustained primarily on fees-for-service, with external funding totaling about $20,000 annually. In 2014, of 12,191 women screened for cervical cancer, 99% received clinical breast exams, 19% received FP services, and 4.7% received treatment for RTIs. We document successes, challenges, solutions implemented, and recommendations for optimizing this screening model. The WHP's experience using a fee-for-service model for cervical cancer screening demonstrates that in Cameroon VIA-DC is acceptable, feasible, and scalable and can be nearly self-sustaining. Integrating other women's health services enabled women to address additional health care needs. The Cameroon Baptist Convention Health Services Women's Health Program successfully implemented a nurse-led, fee-for-service cervical cancer screening program using visual inspection with acetic acid-enhanced by digital cervicography in

  9. Developing a financial inclusion index and inclusive growth in India

    OpenAIRE

    Susanta Kumar SETHY

    2016-01-01

    Financial inclusion is one of the systems through which Inclusive Growth can be achieved in developing countries like India where large sections are unable or hopeless to contribute in the financial system. An inclusive financial system mobilizes more resources for productive purposes leading to higher economic growth, better opportunities and reduction of poverty. This study, proposed an Index of financial inclusion – a multidimensional measure. The Financial Inclusion Index c...

  10. Using an ounce of prevention: does it reduce health care expenditures and reap pounds of profits? A study of the financial impact of wellness and health risk screening programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Janet F

    2009-01-01

    As we are all well aware, health care expenditures in the United States are out of control and growing at epic proportions. Since private industry shoulders a significant burden of paying these rising health care costs, the huge and ever increasing sum paid by these corporations continues to impact the US economy translating into higher prices of services and manufactured goods and reduced job opportunities when companies outsource jobs or locate manufacturing facilities to avoid paying health care benefits for workers. As a result, health care expenditures have become a centerpiece of an enormous public policy debate as Congress is currently working on several versions of a bill to completely revise health care from the ground up. This research project was accomplished to examine the effectiveness of one approach to control rising health care costs and contain corporate financial responsibility--the establishment of wellness and health risk screening programs to improve the health of employees. Total health care cost per insured individual was gathered through an online survey directly from health care benefit administrators. The survey also asked information about wellness and health risk screening programs and the related responses were used to determine if there were a relationship between health care costs and health prevention programs. While statistical analysis was hampered in the current study because of the small sample size, some valid conclusions were reached. The study was successful in identifying a benchmark of Average Total Health Care Cost per Individual from $5,100 to $5,800 for 2005 through 2007. This is especially interesting in light of the fact that an average of $7,026 was spent on health care per person in 2006 in the United States. The study was also able to contribute an estimate of the increase realized in these expenditures of 6 percent in 2007 over 2006, and 4 percent in 2006 over 2005, which were in fact similar to the national average

  11. Professional Development Opportunities for Two-Year College Geoscience Faculty: Issues, Opportunities, and Successes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, E. M.; Macdonald, H.; McDaris, J. R.; Granshaw, F. D.; Wenner, J. M.; Hodder, J.; van der Hoeven Kraft, K.; Filson, R. H.; Guertin, L. A.; Wiese, K.

    2011-12-01

    Two-year colleges (2YCs) play a critical role in geoscience education in the United States. Nearly half of the undergraduate students who take introductory geoscience do so at a 2YC. With awide reach and diverse student populations, 2YCs may be key to producing a well-trained, diverse and sufficiently large geoscience workforce. However, faculty at 2YCs often face many barriers to professional development including lack of financial resources, heavy and inflexible teaching loads, lack of awareness of opportunities, and few professional development resources/events targeted at their needs. As an example, at the 2009 GSA meeting in Portland, fewer than 80 of the 6500 attendees were from community colleges, although this was more than twice the 2YC faculty attendance the previous year. Other issues include the isolation described by many 2YC geoscience faculty who may be the only full time geoscientist on a campus and challenges faced by adjunct faculty who may have even fewer opportunities for professional development and networking with other geoscience faculty. Over the past three years we have convened several workshops and events for 2YC geoscience faculty including technical sessions and a workshop on funding opportunities for 2YC faculty at GSA annual meetings, a field trip and networking event at the fall AGU meeting, a planning workshop that examined the role of 2YCs in geoscience education and in broadening participation in the geosciences, two workshops supporting use of the 'Math You Need, When You Need It' educational materials that included a majority of 2YC faculty, and marine science summer institutes offered by COSEE-Pacific Partnerships for 2YC faculty. Our experience indicates that 2YC faculty desire professional development opportunities when the experience is tailored to the needs and character of their students, programs, and institutions. The content of the professional development opportunity must be useful to 2YC faculty -workshops and

  12. Vaccination Week in the Americas, 2011: an opportunity to assess the routine vaccination program in the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Daniel; Sodha, Samir V; Kurtis, Hannah J; Ghisays, Gladys; Wannemuehler, Kathleen A; Danovaro-Holliday, M Carolina; Ropero-Álvarez, Alba María

    2015-04-17

    Vaccination Week in the Americas (VWA) is an annual initiative in countries and territories of the Americas every April to highlight the work of national expanded programs on immunization (EPI) and increase access to vaccination services for high-risk population groups. In 2011, as part of VWA, Venezuela targeted children aged less than 6 years in 25 priority border municipalities using social mobilization to increase institution-based vaccination. Implementation of social communication activities was decentralized to the local level. We conducted a survey in one border municipality of Venezuela to evaluate the outcome of VWA 2011 and provide a snapshot of the overall performance of the routine EPI at that level. We conducted a coverage survey, using stratified cluster sampling, in the Venezuelan municipality of Bolivar (bordering Colombia) in August 2011. We collected information for children aged 85%, with a few exceptions. Low levels of VWA awareness among caregivers probably contributed to the limited vaccination of eligible children during the VWA activities in Bolivar in 2011. However, vaccine coverage for most EPI vaccines was high. Additionally, high vaccination card availability and high participation in VWA among those caregivers aware of it in 2011 suggest public trust in the EPI program in the municipality. Health authorities have used survey findings to inform changes to the routine EPI and better VWA implementation in subsequent years.

  13. Tablet and Face-to-Face Hybrid Professional Development: Providing Earth Systems Science Educators Authentic Research Opportunities through The GLOBE Program at Purdue University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, K.; Branch, B. D.; Smith, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    The Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) program is a worldwide hands-on, primary and secondary school-based science and education program (www.globe.gov). GLOBE's vision promotes and supports students, teachers and scientists to collaborate on inquiry-based authentic science investigations of the environment and the Earth system working in close partnership with NASA, NOAA and NSF Earth System Science Projects (ESSP's) in study and research about the dynamics of Earth's environment. GLOBE Partners conduct face-to-face Professional Development in more than 110 countries, providing authentic scientific research experience in five investigation areas: atmosphere, earth as a system, hydrology, land cover, and soil. This presentation will provide a sample for a new framework of Professional Development that was implemented in July 2013 at Purdue University lead by Mr. Steven Smith who has tested GLOBE training materials for future training. The presentation will demonstrate how institutions can provide educators authentic scientific research opportunities through various components, including: - Carrying out authentic research investigations - Learning how to enter their authentic research data into the GLOBE database and visualize it on the GLOBE website - Learn how to access to NASA's Earth System Science resources via GLOBE's new online 'e-Training Program' - Exploring the connections of their soil protocol measurements and the history of the soil in their area through iPad soils app - LIDAR data exposure, Hydrology data exposure

  14. Challenges and opportunities from a combined research study and community groundwater testing program for residents living near hydraulic fracturing sites in Appalachian Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend-Small, A.

    2017-12-01

    People living in rural areas of the United States often depend on groundwater as the only domestic and agricultural water resource. Hydraulic fracturing (or "fracking") has led to widespread fears of groundwater contamination, and many people lack resources for monitoring their water. To help in this effort, I led a three-year free groundwater monitoring program for residents of parts of the Utica Shale drilling region of Ohio from early 2012 to early 2015. Our team took samples and made laboratory measurements of species meant to act as indicators of the presence of natural gas or fracking fluid in groundwater. All data were made available to participants, and all participation was voluntary. The project team also made several presentations about our findings at community meetings. In this presentation, I will discuss challenges associated with obtaining funding and communicating results with the media, the oil and gas industry, Congress, and my university. However, opportunities have arisen from this work as well, beyond the obvious opportunity for public service, including recruitment of undergraduate and graduate students to the project team; generation of scientific data in an emerging area of research; and a better understanding of policy needs for rural residents in Appalachia.

  15. Providing Feedback, Orientation and Opportunities for Reflection as Key Elements for Successful Mentoring Programs: Reviewing a Program for Future Business Education Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riebenbauer, Elisabeth; Dreisiebner, Gernot; Stock, Michaela

    2017-01-01

    The introduction to teaching is critical for novice teachers. Near the end of their master's program, students of Business Education and Development in Austria spend one semester at an assigned school. They are introduced to teaching, while being assisted by peer students, mentoring teachers, and a companion course. Mentors receive special…

  16. Opportunities for Russian Nuclear Weapons Institute developing computer-aided design programs for pharmaceutical drug discovery. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-23

    The goal of this study is to determine whether physicists at the Russian Nuclear Weapons Institute can profitably service the need for computer aided drug design (CADD) programs. The Russian physicists` primary competitive advantage is their ability to write particularly efficient code able to work with limited computing power; a history of working with very large, complex modeling systems; an extensive knowledge of physics and mathematics, and price competitiveness. Their primary competitive disadvantage is their lack of biology, and cultural and geographic issues. The first phase of the study focused on defining the competitive landscape, primarily through interviews with and literature searches on the key providers of CADD software. The second phase focused on users of CADD technology to determine deficiencies in the current product offerings, to understand what product they most desired, and to define the potential demand for such a product.

  17. New common program requirements for the resident physician workforce and the omission of strategic napping: A missed opportunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shnayder, Michelle M; St Onge, Joan E; Caban-Martinez, Alberto J

    2017-09-01

    Napping has known benefits for fatigue mitigation and improved alertness. However the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) New Common Program Requirements recently removed the 16 h work limit for PGY1 residents and removed any suggestions of napping. We utilized a cross-sectional study design to administer a 44-item questionnaire in June 2016 to 858 residents and fellows at one large urban academic medical center. We assessed: 1) resident physician sentiment of work environment supportiveness for napping at work; and 2) agreement with 2011 ACGME guidelines on workweek hour limitations and strategic napping recommendations. While 89% of residents reported access to an on-call room at work, only 20% felt their work environment supported a culture of napping while at work. Over 76% expressed agreement with the 2011 ACGME work-hour restrictions. Strategies to support napping and well-being within the resident physician workforce and organizational setting are warranted. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Valuing Financial Literacy : Evidence from Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Bilal Zia

    2009-01-01

    The fifth in impact series presents results on a careful evaluation of a financial literacy program in Indonesia. Despite the recent hype of the benefits of financial literacy programs in both the media and policy-making circles, this research is the first systematic and scientific evaluation of one such program.

  19. State Student Financial Aid. Report and Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Postsecondary Education Planning Commission, Tallahassee.

    This report presents the results of a review of all state student financial aid programs in Florida and presents recommendations concerning program consolidation. The review was designed to address a variety of aid-related issues, including unexpended financial aid resources, program consolidation, budget request and aid distribution procedures,…

  20. Calculations of Financial Incentives for Providers in a Pay-for-Performance Program: Manual Review Versus Data From Structured Fields in Electronic Health Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urech, Tracy H; Woodard, LeChauncy D; Virani, Salim S; Dudley, R Adams; Lutschg, Meghan Z; Petersen, Laura A

    2015-10-01

    Hospital report cards and financial incentives linked to performance require clinical data that are reliable, appropriate, timely, and cost-effective to process. Pay-for-performance plans are transitioning to automated electronic health record (EHR) data as an efficient method to generate data needed for these programs. To determine how well data from automated processing of structured fields in the electronic health record (AP-EHR) reflect data from manual chart review and the impact of these data on performance rewards. Cross-sectional analysis of performance measures used in a cluster randomized trial assessing the impact of financial incentives on guideline-recommended care for hypertension. A total of 2840 patients with hypertension assigned to participating physicians at 12 Veterans Affairs hospital-based outpatient clinics. Fifty-two physicians and 33 primary care personnel received incentive payments. Overall, positive and negative agreement indices and Cohen's kappa were calculated for assessments of guideline-recommended antihypertensive medication use, blood pressure (BP) control, and appropriate response to uncontrolled BP. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to assess how similar participants' calculated earnings were between the data sources. By manual chart review data, 72.3% of patients were considered to have received guideline-recommended antihypertensive medications compared with 65.0% by AP-EHR review (κ=0.51). Manual review indicated 69.5% of patients had controlled BP compared with 66.8% by AP-EHR review (κ=0.87). Compared with 52.2% of patients per the manual review, 39.8% received an appropriate response by AP-EHR review (κ=0.28). Participants' incentive payments calculated using the 2 methods were highly correlated (r≥0.98). Using the AP-EHR data to calculate earnings, participants' payment changes ranged from a decrease of $91.00 (-30.3%) to an increase of $18.20 (+7.4%) for medication use (interquartile range, -14.4% to 0

  1. Pros and cons of the health transformation program in Iran: evidence from financial outcomes at the household level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homaie Rad, Enayatollah; Yazdi-Feyzabad, Vahid; Yousefzadeh-Chabok, Shahrokh; Afkar, Abolhasan; Naghibzadeh, Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    The health transformation program was a recent reform in the health system of Iran that was implemented in early 2014. Some of the program's important goals were to improve the equity of payments and to reduce out-of-pocket (OOP) payments and catastrophic health expenditures (CHE). In this study, these goals were evaluated using a before-and-after analysis. Data on household income and expenditures in Guilan Province were gathered for the years 2013 and 2015. OOP payments for outpatient, inpatient, and drug services were calculated, and the results were compared using the propensity score matching technique after adjusting for confounding variables. Concentration indices and curves were added to quantify changes in inequity before and after the reform. The incidence of catastrophic expenditures was then calculated. Overall and outpatient service OOP payments increased by approximately 10 dollars, while for other types of services, no significant changes were found. Inequity and utilization of services did not change after the reform. However, a significant reduction was observed in CHE incidence (5.75 to 3.82%). The reform was successful in decreasing the incidence of CHE, but not in reducing the monetary amount of OOP payments or affecting the frequency of health service utilization.

  2. Expanding the generation and use of economic and financial data to improve HIV program planning and efficiency: a global perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Charles B; Atun, Rifat; Avila, Carlos; Blandford, John M

    2011-08-01

    Cost information is needed at multiple levels of health care systems to inform the public health response to HIV. To date, most attention has been paid to identifying the cost drivers of providing antiretroviral treatment, and these data have driven interventions that have been successful in reducing drug and human resource costs. The need for further cost information, especially for less well-studied areas such as HIV prevention, is particularly acute given global budget constraints and ongoing efforts to extract the greatest possible value from money spent on the response. Cost information can be collected from multiple perspectives and levels of the health care system (site, program, and national levels), and it is critical to choose the appropriate methodology in order to generate the appropriate information for decision-making. Organizations such as United States President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria, and other organizations are working together to bridge the divide between the fields of economics and HIV program implementation by accelerating the collection of cost data and building further local demand and capacity for their use.

  3. PROGRAM GOALS MANAGEMENT OF THE ENTITIES: OPPORTUNITIES AND PROSPECTS OF ADAPTATION TO CONDITIONS OF THE TRANSITIONAL ECONOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitalii A. Vernikov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject / topic. The relevance of this study is due to the fact that the current strategic goal of Economic Development is to create conditions that will ensure high and stable economic growth of the country and its socio-economic systems. One of the most effective tools for achieving the above goal should be the process of implementation-oriented management in the social and economic systems of the national economy, as they are a key factor in increasing the competitive advantages such as cost reduction, quality improvement, development of new markets, improve the country's image. This article discusses the features of the application program and target planning to company management, is an example of implementing and using techniques "Lean Production" in one of the domestic enterprises using program-target method.The purpose / objectives. The purpose of this article is to justify the strategic priorities of sustainable economic growth and social and economic systems of the national economy.Methodology. Methodological basis of this article are the comparative and economic-statistical methods of analysis.The Results. As part of the presentation of the article the author has been found that in the current climate of uncertainty and risk for Russian business to the fore issues that previously were not so relevant: how to be built business processes; which represent the optimal organizational structure; how to create a functioning system of quality management; what must be done to reduce the unit costs of production without compromising the quality of the products; how to motivate employees to achieve their goals. All of the above it is the projection of the same problem the effective development and implementation of the planned development strategy based on Management by Objectives.Conclusions / significance. Management of enterprises in the real sector of the economy in modern conditions should be based on synergies methodological principles

  4. 7 CFR 634.40 - Financial management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Financial management. 634.40 Section 634.40..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL CLEAN WATER PROGRAM Financial Management § 634.40 Financial management. (a)(1) Finance and accounting will be in conformance with Office of Management...

  5. 24 CFR 886.314 - Financial default.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Financial default. 886.314 Section... Program for the Disposition of HUD-Owned Projects § 886.314 Financial default. In the event of a financial default under the project mortgage, HUD shall have the right to make subsequent housing assistance...

  6. 7 CFR 4280.140 - Financial statements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Financial statements. 4280.140 Section 4280.140... Efficiency Improvements Program Section B. Guaranteed Loans § 4280.140 Financial statements. (a) The... financial statements, at its sole discretion when the Agency is concerned about the applicant's credit risk. ...

  7. Kingdom of Morocco : Financial Sector Assessment Update

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2008-01-01

    A joint World Bank and International Monetary Fund team visited Morocco in November 2007 at the request of the authorities to update the analysis and recommendations made in the framework of the Financial Sector Assessment Program (FSAP) in 2002 and to assist the authorities in preparing their medium-term strategy for modernizing financial intermediation in Morocco. This Financial Sector A...

  8. Sex work, syphilis, and seeking treatment: an opportunity for intervention in HIV prevention programming in Karnataka, South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sharmistha; Moses, Stephen; Hanumaiah, Prakash K; Washington, Reynold; Alary, Michel; Ramesh, B M; Isac, Shajy; Blanchard, James F

    2009-03-01

    To measure the determinants of syphilis among female sex workers (FSWs) in the state of Karnataka, South India. During 2004-2006, cross-sectional surveys were administered to 2312 FSWs across 5 districts in the state, in the context of a large-scale HIV preventive intervention program. Demographic and behavioral information, and serum (for syphilis, HSV-2 and HIV) and urine specimens (for Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis) were obtained. The prevalences of lifetime (TPHA positive) and active (RPR and TPHA positive) syphilis were 25.3% and 9.6%, respectively. There was considerable variation in the prevalence between districts, ranging from 10.9% to 37.4% lifetime, and 3.4% to 24.9% active infection. Factors associated with lifetime syphilis were older age, longer duration of sex work, illiteracy, client volume, practising sex work in >1 city, and sex work typology (public solicitation followed by brothel or lodge-based sex). The same typology, client volume, illiteracy, and having been widowed, divorced or deserted, were predictive of active infection. Of the 976 women who had symptoms of an STI, 78.8% had sought medical treatment, behavior that was protective for both outcomes. HIV infection was strongly associated with lifetime (OR 2.0; 95% CI: 1.6-2.6) and active syphilis (OR 2.1; 95% CI: 1.5-2.9). Despite reasonable treatment-seeking behavior, the high prevalence of syphilis has necessitated enhanced outreach efforts for FSWs and acceleration of the implementation of syphilis screening. Mobilizing resources to enhance syphilis control will not only reduce the burden of syphilis morbidity, but should impact in reducing HIV transmission.

  9. Future opportunities in an unbundled market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    Deregulation of gas utilities requires a radical rethinking of the local distribution company's (LDC) business. Key strategies and immediate changes implemented at Bay State, an LDC in Massachusetts, were described, among them complete system unbundling, development of strategic relationships with retail energy companies, accelerated information system implementation, performance-based rate implementation to provide financial incentives for lowering costs and improving customer service, and aggressive growth of the energy products and services business. Five immediate changes made at Bay State to accelerate growth opportunities were: (1) introducing a company-wide restructuring, (2) initiating the first natural gas residential choice pilot program in New England, (3) aggressively expanding the energy products and services business, (4) selling Bay State's interest in the Massachusetts Power cogeneration facility

  10. No-arbitrage bounds for financial scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geyer, Alois; Hanke, Michael; Weissensteiner, Alex

    2014-01-01

    We derive no-arbitrage bounds for expected excess returns to generate scenarios used in financial applications. The bounds allow to distinguish three regions: one where arbitrage opportunities will never exist, a second where arbitrage may be present, and a third, where arbitrage opportunities...

  11. Pros and cons of the health transformation program in Iran: evidence from financial outcomes at the household level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enayatollah Homaie Rad

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES The health transformation program was a recent reform in the health system of Iran that was implemented in early 2014. Some of the program’s important goals were to improve the equity of payments and to reduce out-of-pocket (OOP payments and catastrophic health expenditures (CHE. In this study, these goals were evaluated using a before-and-after analysis. METHODS Data on household income and expenditures in Guilan Province were gathered for the years 2013 and 2015. OOP payments for outpatient, inpatient, and drug services were calculated, and the results were compared using the propensity score matching technique after adjusting for confounding variables. Concentration indices and curves were added to quantify changes in inequity before and after the reform. The incidence of catastrophic expenditures was then calculated. RESULTS Overall and outpatient service OOP payments increased by approximately 10 dollars, while for other types of services, no significant changes were found. Inequity and utilization of services did not change after the reform. However, a significant reduction was observed in CHE incidence (5.75 to 3.82%. CONCLUSIONS The reform was successful in decreasing the incidence of CHE, but not in reducing the monetary amount of OOP payments or affecting the frequency of health service utilization.

  12. It's All About the Money (For Some): Consequences of Financially Contingent Self-Worth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Lora E; Ward, Deborah E; Naragon-Gainey, Kristin

    2017-05-01

    Financial success is an important goal, yet striving for it is often associated with negative outcomes. One reason for this paradox is that financial pressures may be tied to basing self-worth on financial success. Studies 1a to 1c developed a measure of Financial Contingency of Self-Worth (Financial CSW), and found that it predicted more financial social comparisons, financial hassles, stress, anxiety, and less autonomy. In response to a financial (vs. academic) threat, higher Financial CSW participants experienced less autonomy, perceived financial problems more negatively, and disengaged from their financial problems (Study 2). When given an opportunity to self-affirm, however, Financial CSW participants did not show diminished autonomy in response to a financial (vs. academic) threat (Study 3). Finally, participants with higher Financial CSW were less likely to make extravagant spending decisions following a financial (vs. health) threat (Study 4). Together, these studies demonstrate the many consequences of staking self-worth on financial success.

  13. The Power of Programming and the EarlyNutrition project: opportunities for health promotion by nutrition during the first thousand days of life and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koletzko, Berthold; Brands, Brigitte; Chourdakis, Michael; Cramer, Simone; Grote, Veit; Hellmuth, Christian; Kirchberg, Franca; Prell, Christine; Rzehak, Peter; Uhl, Olaf; Weber, Martina

    2014-01-01

    At The Power of Programming 2014 Conference, researchers from multiple disciplines presented and discussed the effects of early nutrition and other environmental cues during the first thousand days of life and beyond on the lifelong risk of noncommunicable diseases. This paper aims to summarize the concepts and some of the first achievements of the EarlyNutrition research project that initiated the conference. The EarlyNutrition consortium is a multinational, multidisciplinary research collaboration of researchers from Europe, the USA, and Australia. A focus is placed on exploration of the developmental origins of obesity, adiposity, and related health outcomes. Here we report on the first findings of experimental approaches, cohort studies, randomized clinical trials, and systematic reviews of current information, as well as position papers, which have all been developed with the involvement of project partners. We conclude that the EarlyNutrition project has successfully established itself during the first 2 project years as a very strong platform for collaborative research on early programming effects. The first results, available already at this early stage of the project, point to great opportunities for health prevention strategies via the implementation of dietary and lifestyle modifications, with large effect sizes. Further results are expected which should support improved recommendations and related policies for optimized nutrition and lifestyle choices before and during pregnancy, in infancy, and in early childhood. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Financial sector taxation: Financial activities tax or financial transaction tax?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuše Nerudová

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent financial crises has revealed the need to improve and ensure the stability of the financial sector to reduce negative externalities, to ensure fair and substantial contribution of the financial sector to the public finances and the need to consolidate public finance. All those needs represent substantial arguments for the discussion about the introduction of financial sector taxation. There are discussed in the paper two possible schemes of financial sector taxation – financial transaction tax and financial activities tax. The aim of the paper is to research the possibility of the introduction of financial sector taxation, to discuss the pros and cons of two major candidates on financial sector taxation – financial transaction tax and financial activities tax and to suggest the possible candidate suitable for the implementation on the EU level. Financial transaction tax represents the tool suitable mainly on global level, for only in that case enables generate sufficient financial resources. From EU point of view is considered as less suitable, for it bears the risk of reallocation. Therefore the introduction of financial activities tax on EU level is considered as a better solution for the financial sector taxation in the EU, for financial sector is exempted from value added tax. With respect to the fact, that the implementation would represent the innovative approach to the financial sector taxation, there are no empirical proves and therefore this could be the subject of further research.

  15. Morocco; Financial System Stability Assessment: Update

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an update to the Financial System Stability Assessment on Morocco. Major reforms have been achieved since the 2002 Financial Sector Assessment Program (FSAP) within a policy of actively promoting economic and financial sector opening. The 2002 FSAP recommendations have been largely implemented. Although the financial system is stable and considerably more robust than in the past, the liberalization of capital flows and increased exchange rate flexibility present challenges...

  16. Financial crimes and financial misdemeanours

    OpenAIRE

    Bamford, Colin

    2007-01-01

    The author argues that undesirable behaviour in the financial markets has not been countered by appropriate controls. Article by Colin Bamford (Barrister, 3-4 South Square) published in Amicus Curiae - Journal of the Society for Advanced Legal Studies. The Journal is produced by the Society for Advanced Legal Studies at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, University of London.

  17. Financial Planning and Financial Instruments: 2013 in Review, 2014 in Prospect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Brimble

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The Global Financial Crisis (GFC; changes in regulation; issues in public perception and trust have contributed to a troubled 2013 for financial planners. As financial planning and wealth management providers seek to bolster their professional status, the Financial Planning Education Council’s National Curriculum and Accreditation Framework and ASIC’s minimum training requirements are also a space to watch. In prospect, 2014 will offer opportunities and challenges in the form of a changed government; regulatory changes; accreditation challenges and the hope of the recruitment of strong financial planning and wealth management professionals for the future.

  18. “We Routinely Borrow to Survive”: Exploring the Financial Capability of Income-Poor People in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Mahasweta M

    2016-10-01

    A lack of financial capability—financial opportunities and abilities—and poverty are highly interlinked. Over 65 percent of people in India are excluded from any financial services. This article explores income-poor Indians’ experiences with financial capability through a qualitative study. Purposive sampling was used to collect data from 658 individuals, through focus groups (n = 566) and face-to-face interviews (n = 92). Findings show that 97 percent of respondents had the opportunity to earn an income, and 55 percent earned through financial inclusion programs, but 87 percent of respondents earned less than U.S. $2 a day. Although almost all saved and needed to borrow, 46 percent were eligible for formal savings and only 23 percent for formal loans. Financial abilities or knowledge and skills related to income, savings, and loans were higher among the few who had a stable income or had medium and high income in relation to those who had unstable and low income. Respondents experienced many challenges with their financial capabilities, including borrowing to save, fearing formal loans, and lacking clarity about loan and interest rate; banks miscalculating interest rates; and political parties influencing access to loans. Implications for social policy and social work practice are discussed.

  19. The Community Mentorship Program: Providing Community-Engagement Opportunities for Early-Stage Clinical and Translational Scientists to Facilitate Research Translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patino, Cecilia M; Kubicek, Katrina; Robles, Marisela; Kiger, Holly; Dzekov, Jeanne

    2017-02-01

    A goal of the Southern California Clinical and Translational Science Institute (SC-CTSI) at the University of Southern California and Children's Hospital Los Angeles is to train early-stage clinical and translational scientists (CTSs) to conduct research that improves the health of diverse communities. This goal aligns well with the Institute of Medicine's recommendations emphasizing community engagement in biomedical research that facilitates research translation. The Community Mentorship Program (CMP), created to complement community-engaged research didactics, matches CTSs with community mentors who help them identify and complete community-engaged experiences that inform their research. The CMP was piloted in 2013-2015 by the SC-CTSI Workforce Development and Community Engagement cores. The CMP team matched three CTSs (assistant professors pursuing mentored career development awards) with mentors at community-based organizations (CBOs) aligned with their research interests. Each mentor-mentee pair signed a memorandum of understanding. The CMP team checked in regularly, monitoring progress and addressing challenges in CTSs' completion of their community-engaged experience. Each pair completed at least one community-engaged activity informing the CTS's research. In exit interviews, the CTSs and CBO mentors expressed satisfaction with the program and stated that they would continue to work together. The CTSs reported that the program provided opportunities to develop networks outside academia, build trust within the community, and receive feedback and learn from individuals in communities affected by their research. The CMP will be expanded to include all eligible early-career CTSs and promoted for use in similar settings outside the SC-CTSI.

  20. Financial Literacy. Snapshots. Volume 6, Issue 6, Article 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Sue

    2015-01-01

    Young people face financial issues at an earlier age than their parents. Decisions about higher education, the need to be able to manage online payment facilities or even mobile phone plans require a level of financial literacy. PISA 2012 offered an opportunity to collect information about the financial literacy of Australian 15-year-old students,…

  1. Financial Bubbles, Real Estate Bubbles, Derivative Bubbles, and the Financial and Economic Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sornette, Didier; Woodard, Ryan

    The financial crisis of 2008, which started with an initially well-defined epicenter focused on mortgage backed securities (MBS), has been cascading into a global economic recession, whose increasing severity and uncertain duration has led and is continuing to lead to massive losses and damage for billions of people. Heavy central bank interventions and government spending programs have been launched worldwide and especially in the USA and Europe, with the hope to unfreeze credit and bolster consumption. Here, we present evidence and articulate a general framework that allows one to diagnose the fundamental cause of the unfolding financial and economic crisis: the accumulation of several bubbles and their interplay and mutual reinforcement have led to an illusion of a "perpetual money machine" allowing financial institutions to extract wealth from an unsustainable artificial process. Taking stock of this diagnostic, we conclude that many of the interventions to address the so-called liquidity crisis and to encourage more consumption are ill-advised and even dangerous, given that precautionary reserves were not accumulated in the "good times" but that huge liabilities were. The most "interesting" present times constitute unique opportunities but also great challenges, for which we offer a few recommendations.

  2. Financial Evaluation Techniques, Institutions and Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howells, John

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews the relationship between financial evaluation and control techniques and innovative activity in a range of technological contexts. The relationship is broadly conceived to include both the financial techniques developed and deployed within the firm and theevaluative behaviour...... of financial institutions external to the firm such as venture capital and industrial investment banking. With innovative and investment opportunities tending to vary over time within an industry, it becomes apparent that there can be no permanent solution to the common problem of how to trade off financial...

  3. PV opportunities in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Jack L.; Ullal, Harin S.

    1996-01-01

    The growing middle class in India, coupled with a need for electricity to provide basic services to the masses, provides an opportunity to deploy photovoltaic systems in cost-effective applications ranging from grid-connected to isolated location requirements. This need is being satisfied by aggressive government programs, the availability of funds from agencies such as the World Bank, and the desire of Indian industries to form joint ventures for in-country manufacturing. The relaxed restrictions on doing business in India makes today's opportunities timely indeed.

  4. Systematic Development of the YouRAction program, a computer-tailored Physical Activity promotion intervention for Dutch adolescents, targeting personal motivations and environmental opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prins Richard G

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing physical activity (PA among adolescents is an important health promotion goal. PA has numerous positive health effects, but the majority of Dutch adolescents do not meet PA requirements. The present paper describes the systematic development of a theory-based computer-tailored intervention, YouRAction, which targets individual and environmental factors determining PA among adolescents. Design The intervention development was guided by the Intervention Mapping protocol, in order to define clear program objectives, theoretical methods and practical strategies, ensure systematic program planning and pilot-testing, and anticipate on implementation and evaluation. Two versions of YouRAction were developed: one that targets individual determinants and an extended version that also provides feedback on opportunities to be active in the neighbourhood. Key determinants that were targeted included: knowledge and awareness, attitudes, self-efficacy and subjective norms. The extended version also addressed perceived availability of neighbourhood PA facilities. Both versions aimed to increase levels of moderate-to-vigorous PA among adolescents. The intervention structure was based on self-regulation theory, comprising of five steps in the process of successful goal pursuit. Monitoring of PA behaviour and behavioural and normative feedback were used to increase awareness of PA behaviour; motivation was enhanced by targeting self-efficacy and attitudes, by means of various interactive strategies, such as web movies; the perceived environment was targeted by visualizing opportunities to be active in an interactive geographical map of the home environment; in the goal setting phase, the adolescents were guided in setting a goal and developing an action plan to achieve this goal; in the phase of active goal pursuit adolescents try to achieve their goal and in the evaluation phase the achievements are evaluated. Based on the results

  5. Cancer megafunds with in silico and in vitro validation: accelerating cancer drug discovery via financial engineering without financial crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xianjin; Debonneuil, Edouard; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Mishra, Bud

    2016-09-06

    Advances in financial engineering are radically reshaping the biomedical marketplace. For instance, new methods of pooling diversified drug development programs by placing them in a special purpose vehicle (SPV) have been proposed to create a securitized cancer megafund allowing for debt and equity participation. In this study, we perform theoretical and numerical simulations that highlight the role of empirical validation of the projects comprising a cancer megafund. We quantify the degree to which the deliberately designed structure of derivatives and investments is key to its liquidity. Research megafunds with comprehensive in silico and laboratory validation protocols and ability to issue both debt, and equity as well as hybrid financial products may enable conservative investors including pension funds and sovereign government funds to profit from unique securitization opportunities. Thus, while hedging investor's longevity risk, such well-validated megafunds will contribute to health, well being and longevity of the global population.

  6. Cancer megafunds with in silico and in vitro validation: Accelerating cancer drug discovery via financial engineering without financial crisis

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Xianjin

    2016-06-03

    Advances in financial engineering are radically reshaping the biomedical marketplace. For instance, new methods of pooling diversified drug development programs by placing them in a special purpose vehicle (SPV) have been proposed to create a securitized cancer megafund allowing for debt and equity participation. In this study, we perform theoretical and numerical simulations that highlight the role of empirical validation of the projects comprising a cancer megafund. We quantify the degree to which the deliberately designed structure of derivatives and investments is key to its liquidity. Research megafunds with comprehensive in silico and laboratory validation protocols and ability to issue both debt, and equity as well as hybrid financial products may enable conservative investors including pension funds and sovereign government funds to profit from unique securitization opportunities. Thus, while hedging investor\\'s longevity risk, such well-validated megafunds will contribute to health, well being and longevity of the global population.

  7. Methods of Financial Risk Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korzh Natalia

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The essence and nature of financial risks are investigated. Their classification is conducted. The features of financial risk management and the main methods of management are considered. The ways of risk compensation are identified. It is proved that the objective external risk basis is such market imperfections as externalities of enterprises and incomplete information about the operation of the business environment and internal objective basis risk – the objective function to maximise profits in a competitive environment. It is revealed that to compensate market imperfections business entities should develop a strategy that combines fill in missing information and neutralise or minimise externalities that tactically implemented in financial risk management programs.

  8. Financial Statements Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Tănase Alin-Eliodor

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on analyzing of a consolidated financial statements of a hypothetically SME. The interpretation of the financial position and performances is based on the more than 40 financial key ratios computed by using financial data from consolidated income statement, consolidated financial position and cash flow. However additional data from notes to financial statements are provided.

  9. Integrating physical and financial approaches to manage environmental financial risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Characklis, Gregory; Meyer, Eliot; Foster, Benjamin

    2017-04-01

    Physical and/or engineered solutions have long been used to manage risks associated with adverse environmental events. Examples include reservoirs as a tool for mitigating drought-related supply risk, levees for managing flood risk and dredging of inland waterways to ensure navigability during low flow periods. These measures can reduce many types of risk (e.g., loss of life), but are often employed as a means of protecting against financial losses. When the focus is on managing environmental financial risk, physical solutions can be effective, but also costly. In many cases, non-physical tools can provide a less expensive means of managing financial risk, with these often taking the form of financial instruments such as hedging contracts, contingency funds or insurance. Some of these instruments, such as flood insurance, are widely available, but historically many environmental financial risks have been managed primarily (or solely) via physical solutions without much consideration of alternatives, thereby opening opportunities for innovation in developing financial solutions. Recent research has demonstrated that financial instruments can play a significant role in managing drought-related financial risk in sectors as diverse as water utilities, energy generation and inland navigation. Nonetheless, this work has largely considered the use of these instruments within systems in which physical solutions are already in place (but failing to achieve desired performance). The next step in the evolution of managing environmental financial risk involves developing methods for designing risk management strategies that do not assume an established physical system. Here the goal is to identify the relative role that physical solutions and financial instruments should play as they are integrated into a comprehensive risk management strategy. This is not a straightforward challenge as one approach reduces the risk of financial losses and the other redistributes those losses

  10. Nationwide expansion of a financial incentive program on fruit and vegetable purchases among Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program participants: A cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Ruopeng

    2015-12-01

    High prices remain a formidable barrier for many people, especially those of low socioeconomic status, to adopt a healthier diet. The Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 mandated the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to conduct a pilot study to assess the impact of making fruits and vegetables more affordable for households in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). Based on the USDA final report of the Healthy Incentives Pilot (HIP), a large-scale randomized trial in 2011-2012 that provided 30% rebate on targeted fruits and vegetables to 7500 study participants enrolled in the SNAP, we constructed a decision model to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of an expansion of the HIP to all SNAP households nationwide. The estimated life-time per capita costs of the HIP to the Federal government is $1323 in 2012 U.S. dollars, and the average gains in quality-adjusted life expectancy to a SNAP participant is 0.082 quality-adjusted life year (QALY), resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $16,172 per QALY gained. Sensitivity analysis using Monte Carlo simulations indicates a 94.4% and 99.6% probability that the estimated ICER would be lower than the cost-effective threshold of $50,000 and $100,000 per QALY gained, respectively. Moreover, the estimated ICER of the HIP expansion tends to be competitive in comparison to other interventions that aimed at promoting fruit/vegetable intake among adult population. Findings from this study suggest that a nationwide expansion of the HIP is likely to nudge SNAP households towards purchasing and consuming more targeted fruits and vegetables. However, diet behavior modification is proportional to price change. When people's actual eating behaviors and what dietary guidelines recommend differ by several folds, even a 30% rebate closes just a small fraction of that gap and has limited beneficial impact on participants' weight management, disease prevention, and health-related quality of life

  11. Understanding Financial Statements. Financial Matters. Board Basics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, John H.; Turner, Robert M.

    1998-01-01

    This booklet for trustees of higher education institutions offers guidelines to help trustees understand the institution's financial statements. Individual sections describe the three major financial statements and cover topics such as: (1) standards of the Financial Accounting Standards Board; (2) the "statement of financial position,"…

  12. Measuring the Impacts of Financial Literacy: Challenges for Community-Based Financial Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, J. Michael; Holden, Karen C.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter addresses financial education across the lifespan, which has the potential to enhance adult financial capability, yet methodological barriers and a lack of robust measures have hampered the ability to identify and measure the effects of educational programs on financial decisions and behavior.

  13. The role of professional economists in the financial markets

    OpenAIRE

    Porzecanski, Arturo C.

    2006-01-01

    Economists have always been interested in the workings of the financial markets, but most of them neither seek nor get the opportunity to work in a financial institution as a professional economist. Here we detail how (a minority of) economists became involved in the financial markets, and what that professional involvement has entailed, in order to come up with implications for economists who are considering working in the financial markets as well as for the universities that provide train...

  14. 7 CFR 1980.445 - Periodic financial statements and audits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Periodic financial statements and audits. 1980.445... Program § 1980.445 Periodic financial statements and audits. All borrowers will be required to submit periodic financial statements to the lender. Lenders must forward copies of the financial statements and...

  15. 34 CFR 74.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 74.21... Requirements Financial and Program Management § 74.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a... practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide for the following: (1) Accurate...

  16. 20 CFR 435.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems... ORGANIZATIONS, AND COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 435.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Introduction. SSA requires recipients to relate financial...

  17. 32 CFR 34.11 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 34... ORGANIZATIONS Post-award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 34.11 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients shall be allowed and encouraged to use existing financial management...

  18. 22 CFR 226.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 226... AWARDS TO U.S. NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS Post-award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 226.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) Recipients shall relate financial data to...

  19. 22 CFR 145.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 145... Financial and Program Management § 145.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) The Department... whenever practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide for the following. (1...

  20. 29 CFR 95.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Standards for financial management systems. 95.21 Section 95... Requirements Financial and Program Management § 95.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a... practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide for the following: (1) Accurate...