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Sample records for program family day

  1. 78 FR 59048 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Family Self-Sufficiency Program (FSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-25

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Family Self- Sufficiency Program..., 2013. A. Overview of Information Collection Title of Information Collection: Family Self-Sufficiency... toward economic independence and self-sufficiency. Public Housing Agencies consult with local officials...

  2. The Child Care Food Program and Family Day Care: A How-To Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Estelle; Travis, Nancy

    This manual explains what is involved in sponsoring a Child Care Food Program (CCFP) for family day care providers. It draws on the experience of Save the Children's Southern States Office in sponsoring the "Child Care Food Umbrella," a CCFP program serving over 1,000 providers, which Save the Children has operated for 6 years. Chapter 1…

  3. A Family Day program enhances knowledge about medical school culture and necessary supports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cushing Herbert E

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A Family Day program was implemented at Indiana University School of Medicine to educate the families and friends of in-coming medical students about the rigors of medical school and the factors that contribute to stress. Methods Surveys that assessed knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes about medical school were administered to participants before and after the program. Results After the program, participants showed a significant improvement in their understanding of medical school culture and the importance of support systems for medical students. Post-test scores improved by an average of 29% (P Conclusions The inclusion of family members and other loved ones in pre-matriculation educational programs may serve to mitigate the stress associated with medical school by enhancing the students' social support systems.

  4. Improving the Knowledge and Attitude on 'Standard Days Method' of Family Planning Through a Promotional Program Among Indian Postgraduate Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menachery, Philby Babu; Noronha, Judith Angelitta; Fernanades, Sweety

    2017-08-01

    The 'Standard Days Method' is a fertility awareness-based method of family planning that identifies day 8 through day 19 of the menstrual cycle as fertile days during which a woman is likely to conceive with unprotected intercourse. The study was aimed to determine the effectiveness of a promotional program on the 'Standard Days Method' in terms of improving the knowledge scores and attitude scores. A pre-experimental one-group pretest-posttest research design was adopted. The samples included 365 female postgraduate students from selected colleges of Udupi Taluk, Karnataka. The data was collected using self-administered questionnaires. The plan for the promotional program was also established. The findings of the study were analyzed using the descriptive and inferential statistics. The mean pretest and posttest knowledge scores were computed, and it was found that there was an increase in the mean knowledge score from 8.96 ± 3.84 to 32.64 ± 5.59, respectively. It was observed that the promotional program on 'Standard Days Method' was effective in improving the knowledge (p improving the knowledge and attitude of the postgraduate female students. This will enable the women to adopt this method and plan their pregnancies naturally and reduce the side effects of using oral contraceptives.

  5. An extended day program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ševkušić-Mandić Slavica G.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of a pilot project evaluation, carried out as an action investigation whose aim was to provide a better quality extended day for primary school students. The project included the training of teachers involved in extended day program, designing of special activities performed by teachers with children once a week as well as changes and equipping of premises where children stay. The aims of the program were conception and performance of activities in a less formal way than during regular instructional days, linking of learning at school and acquired knowledge to everyday experiences, and work on contents contributing to the development of child's interests and creativity. The program was accomplished in a Belgrade primary school during the 2001/2002 academic year, comprising students of 1st and 2nd grades (N=77. The effects of the program were monitored throughout the academic year (observation and teachers' reports on accomplished workshops and at the end of the academic year (teachers and students' opinions of the program, academic achievement and creativity of students attending the extended day program compared with students not attending it. Findings about positive effects of the program on students' broadening of interests and willingness to express themselves creatively, indicate unequivocally that there is a need for developing special extended day programs. The extended day program is an opportunity for school to exert greater educational influence that has yet to be tapped.

  6. Days La Familia community drug and alcohol prevention program: Family-centered model for working with inner-city Hispanic families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, L P; Lucero, E

    1996-03-01

    Substance abuse among Hispanics is on the increase despite national efforts toward reducing it. Researchers and service providers have recognized the specific need for better prevention models that address the issues of poor Hispanics. La Familia is a community-based ATOD prevention program that targets Hispanic families with high-risk youth from 6 to 11 years old, and attempts to reduce identified risk factors while building on culturally relevant protective factors. During the 2 years, the program has enrolled 219 youth and their families utilizing existing community networks and aggressive outreach. The program resulted in a 92% retention rate and over 80% attendance per session. As a result of the program, families became more willing to discuss ATOD issues openly and made positive steps toward empowerment.

  7. A family-based eating disorder day treatment program for youth: examining the clinical and statistical significance of short-term treatment outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Katherine; Buchholz, Annick; Obeid, Nicole; Mossiere, Annik; Maras, Danijela; Norris, Mark; Harrison, Megan; Feder, Stephen; Spettigue, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    This article describes an innovative family-based day treatment program (DTP) for youth with moderate to severe eating disorders. A sample of 65 youth completed a battery of psychological measures pre- and post-treatment and 6 months after program completion. Treatment outcomes were assessed in three main domains: (a) medical stabilization, (b) normalization of eating behavior, and (c) improved psychological functioning. Overall, patients demonstrated statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvements on all outcome measures. Findings indicate that a comprehensive DTP can successfully facilitate positive outcomes in youth with eating disorders and that these improvements can be maintained 6 months post-treatment.

  8. Familial dysautonomy (Riley-Day syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward R. Tonholo Silva

    1994-03-01

    Full Text Available Familial dysautonomia, also known as Riley-Day syndrome, is a disorder of autonomic nervous system with an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Reduction and/or loss of unmyelinated and small myelinated fibers is found, as reduction of dopamine beta-hydroxylase in blood. The diagnosis is based on clinical features: diminished lacrimation, insensitivity to pain, poor temperature control, abolished deep tendon reflexes, postural hypotension, vomiting attacks, poor motor coordenation, and mental retardation. The treatment is symptomatic and many children die during the first years of life, usually as a result of repeated aspiration pneumonia. We report the case of a 1 year-old child with familial dysautonomia.

  9. The Family Startup Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trillingsgaard, Tea; Maimburg, Rikke Damkjær; Simonsen, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    . However, little is known about effect of universal approaches to parenting support during the transition to parenthood. This protocol describes and experimental evaluation of group based parenting support, the Family Startup Program (FSP), currently implemented large scale in Denmark. Methods....../design: Participants will be approximately 2500 pregnant women and partners. Inclusion criteria are parental age above 18 and the mother expecting first child. Families are recruited when attending routine pregnancy scans provided as a part of the publicly available prenatal care program at Aarhus University Hospital...... and community resources. The program consists of twelve group sessions, with nine families in each group, continuing from pregnancy until the child is 15 months old. TAU is the publicly available pre- and postnatal care available to families in both conditions. Analyses will employ survey data, administrative...

  10. Adult Day Care for Alzheimer's Patients and Their Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, Dan; Suzuki, Thelma

    1983-01-01

    Harbor Area Adult Day Care Center has operated for two years with a primary purpose of providing respite care to families caring for a relative with Alzheimer's disease or related disorders. The rationale, history, program, staffing, funding, and experience for the first two years of the project are provided. (Author/RC)

  11. Implementing a State Wide Family Day Care Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiren, Alice; Crawley, Margaret

    Guidelines for implementing a family day care conference are provided in this document. Contents range from the problem of selecting the conference location (including the city and the facility), to setting conference fees, promoting attendance, developing a conference program, and evaluating the conference. (Author/RH)

  12. Outcome in psychoeducational day school programs: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baenen, Randall S; Stephens, Mary Ann Parris; Glenwick, David S

    1986-04-01

    Psychoeducational day schools provide clinical and special education services to children with severe behavior disorders. Outcome studies indicate that treated children tend to improve in behavioral, academic, and family functioning but warrant continued intervention. Family therapy, development of academic skills, and coordination of aftercare services appear critical to long-term program success.

  13. Family interactions in bulimia nervosa. I: Study design, comparisons to established population norms, and changes over the course of an intensive day hospital treatment program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodside, D B; Shekter-Wolfson, L; Garfinkel, P E; Olmsted, M P; Kaplan, A S; Maddocks, S E

    1995-03-01

    This paper presents the results of a study examining self-reported family functioning by patients with bulimia nervosa (BN) and their parents before and after treatment for the eating symptoms of BN. Ratings of family functioning improved significantly over the course of treatment. There was no evidence of excessive denial or social desirability in the families.

  14. 75 FR 60563 - Family Day, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-30

    ... children and warn them against the perils of drug use. Simple daily activities such as sharing a meal, a... of America A Proclamation Committed families shape and guide our children, preparing them for every... critical role in teaching our young people positive and healthy behaviors. Parents across America balance...

  15. VMRCVM observes 25th Anniversary "College Family Day" celebration

    OpenAIRE

    Douglas, Jeffrey S.

    2004-01-01

    More than 600 Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine faculty, staff, students, and family members recently gathered for a 25th Anniversary "College Family Day Celebration" on Virginia Tech's campus.

  16. 75 FR 60283 - Gold Star Mother's and Families' Day, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-29

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8569 of September 24, 2010 Gold Star Mother's and Families' Day, 2010 By the... those who share in that ultimate sacrifice: America's Gold Star Mothers and Families. For those in our... never be filled, yet the legacy of our fallen heroes lives on in the people they loved. Their...

  17. Raspberry Pi programming day | 12 April

    CERN Multimedia

    William Bell

    2014-01-01

    CERN is hosting a Raspberry Pi programming day on 12 April 2014 (see here).   The event includes a hands-on workshop and a series of presentations of different projects with the Raspberry Pi. The presentations and workshop provide an ideal introduction for beginners and information for those with more advanced computer programming skills. Basic programming techniques will be discussed using Scratch, Python and C, through a set of worked examples and additional electronics. The electronics examples will include a LEGO NXT interface, other expansion boards and a variety of basic I/O components and sensors. This event is free, but it is necessary to sign up to be able to attend. If you would like to present a project or bring your Raspberry Pi project to discuss in the tutorial session, please also email raspberry.pi@cern.ch with the details of your presentation or project.

  18. Introducing the Standard Days Method: Expanding Family Planning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Standard Days Method is a simple fertility awareness—based method of family planning that helps women ... Rwanda remains one of the poorest countries in ... Community health workers affihatedvfith the sites were üained to mobilize and refer clients to clinics. Behavior change communication activities, including.

  19. Exceptional Family Member Program EFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    patient facilities. e6 Points of Contact for the Exceptional Family Member Program ’ American Cleft Palate National Association for Foundation Alzheimer’s 1...area, D 0 Contact the Easter Seal Society regarding the Early Intervention Program for infants with special needs. 3 0 "!i I . . Other’Resources...800-24- CLEFT - (412) 481-1370 1-800-272-3900 -- (312) 335-8700 American Liver Foundation National Cancer Institute 1-800-223-0171) - (201) 256-2550 1

  20. Expanded adult day program as a transition option from hospital to home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Katherine R; Tullai-McGuinness, Susan; Dolansky, Mary; Farag, Amany; Krivanek, Mary Jo; Matthews, Laura

    2011-02-01

    This article describes a pilot program for provision of postacute care (PAC) in an established adult day program. Demographic, clinical, utilization, and satisfaction data were abstracted retrospectively from program records; postdischarge readmission and emergency department visit data were obtained from the electronic health record. Comparative data were obtained from the health records of patients who were offered but declined the adult day program. Between 2005 and 2008, 78 patients requiring PAC were approached by the RN coordinator; 33 selected the adult day program, and 45 selected alternative destinations. The majority of patients had a neurological diagnosis, most commonly stroke. Participants and their family caregivers were highly satisfied with the program. The 30-day readmission rate for adult day program participants was significantly lower than that for nonparticipants. An expanded adult day program may represent a viable Transitional Care Model for selected patients and a feasible alternative to skilled nursing facility and home health care for PAC.

  1. Evaluation of the Extended Day Kindergarten Program, 1984-1985.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Ruth

    The extended day kindergarten (EDK) program in Detroit's 87 Chapter 1 schools in the 1984-85 school year was designed to serve children "least ready" for kindergarten, by providing a full day program 4 days per week. The fifth day of each week was reserved for inservicing teachers, school service assistants, and parents. Parents were…

  2. Is Full-Day Kindergarten Worth It? an Academic Comparison of Full-Day and Half-Day Kindergarten Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romines, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to answer this question: Which is academically superior for young children, full-or half-day kindergarten? This inquiry-oriented case study was designed to compare and contrast students who attended half-day versus full-day kindergarten programs in a suburban public school district. The study is necessary because the…

  3. Evaluation of an Extended-Day Kindergarten Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, Heidi L.

    2011-01-01

    Following a model for an extended-day kindergarten program that had been in operation in select schools for nearly 20 years, a southeastern Virginia school division expanded the Extended-Day Kindergarten (EDK) Program with an additional 40 classes in 39 schools during the 2006-2007 school year. The EDK Program supplemented the traditional half-day…

  4. Using Family Science Day Events to Inspire Future Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevik, Corinne

    2015-04-01

    Dickinson State University organizes four Family Science Day events each fall to increase student engagement in the sciences. Offered on Saturday afternoons, each event focuses on a different science-related theme. Families can attend these events free of charge, and the kids participate in a large-variety of hands-on activities which center around the event's theme. Previous themes include The Amazing Telescope, Night of the Titanic, Dinosaur Prophecy, and Space Exploration. These events are amazing opportunities to show young children how much fun science can be. Many of the kids come from schools where science is neither interactive nor engaging. The activities help the children learn that science is a process of discovery that helps us better understand the world around us. University students staff all of the activity booths at these events, and this has proven to be a very valuable experience for them as well. Some of the students who help are majoring in a science field, and for them, the experience teaches public communication. They learn to break complicated concepts down into simpler terms that young kids can understand. Other students who help with these events are not science majors but may be taking a science course as part of their college curriculum. For these students, the experience reinforces various concepts that they are learning in their science class. For many of them, it also opens their eyes to the idea that science can be engaging. Some of them even discover that they have a true gift for teaching.

  5. Morning Report in Family Medicine Residency Programs: A Descriptive Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuncharapu, Indumathi; Cass, Alvah R.; Carlson, Carol A.; Scott, Jack R.

    Morning Report (MR) is a frequently held case conference in most Family Medicine (FM) residency programs among medical learners who discuss recent inpatient admissions before the day's care of patients. This study conducted a national survey of FM residency program directors to describe the roles of faculty and residents in facilitating MR.…

  6. Recommendation for full-day kindergarten for children of low-income and racial/ethnic-minority families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Community Preventive Services Task Force

    2014-03-01

    The Community Preventive Services Task Force recommends full-day kindergarten programs to improve the health prospects of minority children and children from low-income families, based on strong evidence that, compared with half-day kindergarten or full-day kindergarten on alternating days, full-day programs substantially improve reading and mathematics achievement-determinants of long-term academic and health-related outcomes (e.g., reduced teen pregnancy and risk behaviors). The achievement gains apparent at the beginning of first grade do not, themselves, guarantee academic achievement in later years. Ongoing school environments that support learning and development are essential. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. 3 CFR 8424 - Proclamation 8424 of September 28, 2009. Family Day, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... decisions. By coming together as a family and discussing the events of the day, parents can foster open... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Proclamation 8424 of September 28, 2009. Family Day..., 2009 Proc. 8424 Family Day, 2009By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Our...

  8. Family Day Care: Out of the Shadows and into the Limelight. Research Monograph, Volume 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontos, Susan

    Because of the increased attention to family day care resulting from several state and national initiatives to improve quality, there is a need for a solid knowledge base about family day care. This book examines recent research on family day care. The book is divided into six chapters according to focus. Chapter 1 examines the ecology of family…

  9. 76 FR 60355 - Gold Star Mother's and Family's Day, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-28

    ... of our Armed Forces have demonstrated the courage and heroism that have come to define America... the pride that comes with exemplary service to America. On this day, and every day, we offer them our...

  10. 78 FR 60179 - Gold Star Mother's and Family's Day, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    ... that define our Armed Forces and fortify our Union. The families of the fallen embody that same... on with pride and resolve despite unthinkable loss. We recall our sacred obligation to those who gave...

  11. Developing programs for african families, by african families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halliday, Jennifer A; Green, Julie; Mellor, David

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is an emerging problem for African migrants in Australia, but few prevention programs incorporate their cultural beliefs and values. This study reports on the application of community capacity-building and empowerment principles in 4 workshops with Sudanese families in Australia. Workshop...... effects of physical activity and nutrition to improve health within communities while reducing intergenerational and gender role family conflicts....... participants prioritized health behaviors, skill and knowledge gaps, and environments for change to identify culturally centered approaches to health promotion. The workshops highlighted a need for culturally and age-appropriate interventions that build whole-of-family skills and knowledge around the positive...

  12. Effects of television programs about Family Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vagner Ferreira do Nascimento

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This is an observational study, which sought to reflect on the impact of television programs on family health. Thus, from February to July 2011, a Family Health Unit of Barra do Garças - Mato Grosso, the researcher observed the behavior of customers, through spontaneous expressions which referred to the materials or articles about health programs. At the end of the study, it wasfound that such programs stimulated and generated new behaviors, especially in women. But to do so, health professionals must engage with this media education and participate in the conduct of learned information in accordance with the need of the viewer.

  13. Neonatal family care for 24 hours per day: effects on maternal confidence and breast-feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wataker, Heidi; Meberg, Alf; Nestaas, Eirik

    2012-01-01

    In family care (FC) program for neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), parents are encouraged to reside together with their infant for 24 hours a day to actively be involved in the care. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of FC on maternal confidence and breast-feeding. Maternal confidence and rate of breast-feeding were assessed in 31 mothers offered FC that included special family rooms in the NICU, and in 30 mothers from a comparable NICU providing traditional care without such facilities. One week prior to hospital discharge, mothers in the FC group felt better informed regarding nursing issues and had more confidence in interpretation of the infants regarding feeding issues and in caregiving without staff attendance (P care.

  14. Where is family in the family nurse practitioner program? Results of a U.S. family nurse practitioner program survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyirati, Christina M; Denham, Sharon A; Raffle, Holly; Ware, Lezlee

    2012-08-01

    Though recent progress in family nursing science can serve the family nurse practitioner (FNP) to intervene in the regulation of family health, whether those advances are taught to FNP students has been unclear. All 266 FNP programs in the United States were invited to participate in a survey to assess the content and clinical application of family nursing theories in the curriculum. The majority of FNP programs frame family as the context of care for the individual. Though FNP students receive a foundation in family nursing theory in core courses, they are not usually expected to use family assessment methods in clinical practicum courses or to plan interventions for the family as the unit of care. The authors challenge educators to consider family nursing science as an essential component of the FNP program as the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) evolves and becomes requisite for entry into advanced practice.

  15. Family Day Care Educators' Knowledge, Confidence and Skills in Promoting Children's Social and Emotional Wellbeing: Baseline Data from Thrive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Elise; Corr, Lara; Ummer-Christian, Rahila; Gilson, Kim-Michelle; Waters, Elizabeth; Mihalopoulos, Cathrine; Marshall, Bernie; Cook, Kay; Herman, Helen; Mackinnon, Andrew; Harrsion, Linda; Sims, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents baseline data from Thrive, a capacity-building program for family day care educators. Educators completed a self-report survey assessing knowledge and confidence in promoting children's social and emotional wellbeing. An in-home observation was used to assess care quality. Twenty-four educators responded to the survey (40 per…

  16. Relationship between family quality of life and day occupations of young people with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Kitty-Rose; Girdler, Sonya; Downs, Jenny; Jacoby, Peter; Bourke, Jenny; Lennox, Nick; Einfeld, Stewart; Llewellyn, Gwynnyth; Parmenter, Trevor R; Leonard, Helen

    2014-09-01

    To explore relationships between family quality of life, day occupations and activities of daily living (ADL) of young persons with Down syndrome. Data were collected from 150 families with a young person with Down syndrome aged 16-30 years participating in the Down syndrome "Needs Opinions Wishes" database. Data described the young person's characteristics (including functional abilities, behaviour and day occupations) and family characteristics (including income, family and community supports and quality of life). Compared to families of young people attending open employment, families of young people participating in sheltered employment tended to report poorer family quality of life, after adjusting for personal characteristics, behaviour and income (coeff -6.78, 95 % CI -14.38, 0.81). Family supports reduced this relationship (coeff -6.00, 95 % CI -12.76, 0.76). Families of young people with greater functioning in ADL reported better family quality of life regardless of personal and environmental factors (coeff 0.45, 95 % CI 0.05, 0.85) and inclusion of family factors such as family supports reduced this association (coeff 0.29, 95 % CI -0.10, 0.67). Participation of young people with Down syndrome in open employment may positively influence family quality of life. Services that facilitate functioning in ADL and assist the families in accessing suitable family supports have the potential to positively influence family quality of life.

  17. Teaching-skills training programs for family medicine residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacasse, Miriam; Ratnapalan, Savithiri

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To review the literature on teaching-skills training programs for family medicine residents and to identify formats and content of these programs and their effects. DATA SOURCES Ovid MEDLINE (1950 to mid-July 2008) and the Education Resources Information Center database (pre-1966 to mid-July 2008) were searched using and combining the MeSH terms teaching, internship and residency, and family practice; and teaching, graduate medical education, and family practice. STUDY SELECTION The initial MEDLINE and Education Resources Information Center database searches identified 362 and 33 references, respectively. Titles and abstracts were reviewed and studies were included if they described the format or content of a teaching-skills program or if they were primary studies of the effects of a teaching-skills program for family medicine residents or family medicine and other specialty trainees. The bibliographies of those articles were reviewed for unidentified studies. A total of 8 articles were identified for systematic review. Selection was limited to articles published in English. SYNTHESIS Teaching-skills training programs for family medicine residents vary from half-day curricula to a few months of training. Their content includes leadership skills, effective clinical teaching skills, technical teaching skills, as well as feedback and evaluation skills. Evaluations mainly assessed the programs’ effects on teaching behaviour, which was generally found to improve following participation in the programs. Evaluations of learner reactions and learning outcomes also suggested that the programs have positive effects. CONCLUSION Family medicine residency training programs differ from all other residency training programs in their shorter duration, usually 2 years, and the broader scope of learning within those 2 years. Few studies on teaching-skills training, however, were designed specifically for family medicine residents. Further studies assessing the

  18. Work-Family Balance and Energy: A Day-Level Study on Recovery Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Vergel, Ana Isabel; Demerouti, Evangelia; Moreno-Jimenez, Bernardo; Mayo, Margarita

    2010-01-01

    The present study examines whether daily recovery inhibiting and enhancing conditions predict day-levels of work-family conflict (WFC), work-family facilitation (WFF), exhaustion and vigor. Forty-nine individuals from various professional backgrounds in Spain provided questionnaire and daily survey measures over a period of five working days.…

  19. Recursos/Resources: A Bibliography of Spanish-Language Family Day Care Training Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Child Care Resource and Referral Network, San Francisco.

    This bibliography provides descriptions and contact information regarding resources produced by American and Canadian family day care training projects and other educational organizations for agencies working with Spanish-speaking family day care providers. Included are resources in the following areas: (1) "Recruitment Resources"; (2)…

  20. 78 FR 38996 - Proposed Collection; 60-Day Comment Request; Family Life, Activity, Sun, Health, and Eating...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Proposed Collection; 60-Day Comment Request; Family Life... days of the date of this publication. Proposed Collection: Family Life, Activity, Sun, Health, and...

  1. An investigation of scale effects in family substance abuse treatment programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee A James

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This short report investigates scale effects in family substance abuse treatment programs. In Massachusetts, the family substance abuse treatment programs were much more costly than other adult residential treatment models. State officials were concerned that the "scale" or size of these programs (averaging just eight families was too small to be economical. Although the sample size (just nine programs was too small to permit reliable inference, the data clearly signalled the importance of "scale effects" in these family substance abuse treatment programs. To further investigate scale effects in family substance abuse treatment programs, data from the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment's (CSAT's Residential Women and Children and Pregnant and Postpartum Women (RWC-PPW Demonstration were re-analyzed, focusing on the relationship between cost per family-day and the estimated average family census. This analysis indicates strong economies of scale up until an average family census of about 14, and less apparent scale effects beyond that point. In consideration of these and other study findings, a multidisciplinary interagency team redesigned the Massachusetts' family treatment program model. The new programs are larger than the former family treatment programs, with each new program having capacity to treat 11 to 15 families depending on family makeup.

  2. A Dutch day treatment program for anorexia and bulimia nervosa in comparison with internationally described programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammers, M W; Exterkate, C C; De Jong, C A J

    2007-03-01

    A Dutch day treatment program for patients with anorexia and bulimia nervosa is described and compared to intensive day treatment programs for patients with eating disorders outlined in international literature. The 5-day program is described in terms of its general characteristics, intended outcome and specific treatment interventions. Along these parameters it is compared to the programs found in a systematic literature search of day hospitalization programs for eating disorders. Global inspection shows a lot of similarities between all the programs. Looking more closely, also many important differences exist (concerning, e.g. treatment duration, intensity of treatment, theoretical orientation, goals of treatment and weight gain regime). Because of the differences, it is hard to compare outcome data between centres. Besides, on many of these dimensions, the literature does not yet tell us unambiguously what is best for our patients. Therefore, it is necessary to keep the dialogue between treatment centres going. 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association

  3. Exceptional Family Transitional Training Program (EFTTP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Stilwell Drive Fort Monroe, VA 23651 O: 1-757-788-3535 F: 1-757-788-3713 FORT MYER, VA ACS-EFMP 201 Custer Road Fort Myer, VA 22211 O: 1-703-696-8467 F...1895-61-6323 US NSGA RAF MENWITH HILL Commanding Officer US NSGA RAF Menwith Hill PSC 45 Unit 8470 APO AE 09468 O: 011-44-1423-846717 DSN: 314-262-6717...Program 151 Bernard Road Fort Monroe, VA 23651 Telephone: 757-788-3878 Army Community Service Exceptional Family Member Program Building 201, Custer

  4. BEHAVIOR OF FAMILY IN PRACTICE HEPATITIS B IMMUNIZATION AT BABY 0-7 DAYS OLD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusnanto Kusnanto

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Result of coverage hepatitis B immunization  at 0-7 days old babies in Puskesmas Banjarbaru Banjarbaru city South Kalimantan until year 2008 was under 40%. The cause of unsuccessfully of giving hepatitis B immunization  at 0-7 days old babies was the behavior of the family. This research aimed to explain family behavior in execution immunization at 0-7 days old babies in region of Puskesmas Banjarbaru. Method: The design used in this research was analytic design. total sample were 30 respondents. Variable in this research were behavior of family in practice hepatitis B immunization  at baby 0-7 days old, which covers  knowledge, attitude and practice in hepatitis B immunization  at baby 0-7 day old. The data was collected by questionnaire and analyzed by using statistical test chi-square with level of significance α≤0.05. Result: The result showed a correlation between knowledge and attitude about hepatitis B immunization  at 0-7 days old babies (x2=0.000. Discussion: There was correlation between knowledge and hepatitis B immunization performed by the family to the  baby ages  0-7 days old (x2=0.015. A correlation between attitude with family practice with giving hepatitis B immunization  at baby ages 0-7 days old (x2=0.000.

  5. 3 CFR 8422 - Proclamation 8422 of September 25, 2009. Gold Star Mother's and Families' Day, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Proclamation 8422 of September 25, 2009. Gold Star... 8422 of September 25, 2009 Proc. 8422 Gold Star Mother's and Families' Day, 2009By the President of the... and sorrow of the family members they leave behind. Few know the honor of service and the costs of war...

  6. Symbolic Game Semantics for Model Checking Program Families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimovski, Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    Program families can produce a (potentially huge) number of related programs from a common code base. Many such programs are safety critical. However, most verification techniques are designed to work on the level of single programs, and thus are too costly to apply to the entire program family. ...

  7. Treatment Priorities in a Family-Oriented Alcoholism Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nace, Edgar P.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Recommends that family therapists be aware of the dynamics of the malfunctioning family which affects the process of alcoholism. Describes a family program which is part of a comprehensive alcoholism treatment program. Individual and group intervention address the family problems set in motion by alcoholism. (Author/JAC)

  8. Books, children, dogs, artists: library programs for the entire family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haver, Mary Katherine

    2014-01-01

    The promotion of library resources and services is a continuous process for all libraries, especially hospital family resource center libraries. Like public libraries, a family resource center can utilize programs as a pathway for connecting with and developing awareness of library resources and services available to patient families. This column describes the programs currently offered for All Children's Hospital Johns Hopkins Medicine patient families, marketing initiatives to promote these programs, and utilization of grant funding to supplement a program.

  9. From crisis to success. Turning around a family practice residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mace, K C; Holm, C E; Lipsky, M S; Bartscht, K G

    1995-01-01

    On Match Day in 1991, Broadlawns Medical Center in Des Moines, Iowa, learned that no residents had matched for the family practice residency program. In the 1992 match, the medical center filled all its residency positions, and repeated the success in the 1993 and 1994 matches. Broadlawns affected this impressively rapid turnaround through a strong commitment to bring its program to a level competitive with leading family practice residency programs, substantive changes to the structure and curriculum of the program, and significant expenditures of time, resources and personal energy. The Broadlawns' case illustrates the need for family practice residency programs to position themselves as strong competitors in the residency market.

  10. Symbolic Game Semantics for Model Checking Program Families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimovski, Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    represent program families with infinite integers as so-called (finite-state) featured symbolic automata. Specifically designed model checking algorithms are then employed to verify safety of all programs from a family at once and pinpoint those programs that are unsafe (respectively, safe). We present......Program families can produce a (potentially huge) number of related programs from a common code base. Many such programs are safety critical. However, most verification techniques are designed to work on the level of single programs, and thus are too costly to apply to the entire program family....... In this paper, we propose an efficient game semantics based approach for verifying open program families, i.e. program families with free (undefined) identifiers. We use symbolic representation of algorithmic game semantics, where concrete values are replaced with symbolic ones. In this way, we can compactly...

  11. 75 FR 24514 - Supportive Services for Veteran Families Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-05

    ... eligible homeless veterans, such as the Health Care for Homeless Veterans (HCHV) Program, the Grant and Per... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 62 RIN 2900-AN53 Supportive Services for Veteran Families Program AGENCY: Department... concerning the Supportive Services for Veteran Families Program (SSVF Program) of the Department of Veterans...

  12. Characteristics of Combined Family Practice-Psychiatry Residency Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachal, James; Lacy, Timothy J.; Warner, Christopher H.; Whelchel, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate how family practice-psychiatry residency programs meet the challenges of rigorous accreditation demands, clinical supervision, and boundaries of practice. Method: A 54-question survey of program directors of family practice-psychiatry residency programs outlining program demographic data, curricula, coordination, resident…

  13. The pediatrician's role in family support and family support programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Children's social, emotional, and physical health; their developmental trajectory; and the neurocircuits that are being created and reinforced in their developing brains are all directly influenced by their relationships during early childhood. The stresses associated with contemporary American life can challenge families' abilities to promote successful developmental outcomes and emotional health for their children. Pediatricians are positioned to serve as partners with families and other community providers in supporting the well-being of children and their families. The structure and support of families involve forces that are often outside the agenda of the usual pediatric health supervision visits. Pediatricians must ensure that their medical home efforts promote a holistically healthy family environment for all children. This statement recommends opportunities for pediatricians to develop their expertise in assessing the strengths and stresses in families, in counseling families about strategies and resources, and in collaborating with others in their communities to support family relationships.

  14. Short day transcriptomic programming during induction of dormancy in grapevine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennell, Anne Y.; Schlauch, Karen A.; Gouthu, Satyanarayana; Deluc, Laurent G.; Khadka, Vedbar; Sreekantan, Lekha; Grimplet, Jerome; Cramer, Grant R.; Mathiason, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Bud dormancy in grapevine is an adaptive strategy for the survival of drought, high and low temperatures and freeze dehydration stress that limit the range of cultivar adaptation. Therefore, development of a comprehensive understanding of the biological mechanisms involved in bud dormancy is needed to promote advances in selection and breeding, and to develop improved cultural practices for existing grape cultivars. The seasonally indeterminate grapevine, which continuously develops compound axillary buds during the growing season, provides an excellent system for dissecting dormancy, because the grapevine does not transition through terminal bud development prior to dormancy. This study used gene expression patterns and targeted metabolite analysis of two grapevine genotypes that are short photoperiod responsive (Vitis riparia) and non-responsive (V. hybrid, Seyval) for dormancy development to determine differences between bud maturation and dormancy commitment. Grapevine gene expression and metabolites were monitored at seven time points under long (LD, 15 h) and short (SD, 13 h) day treatments. The use of age-matched buds and a small (2 h) photoperiod difference minimized developmental differences and allowed us to separate general photoperiod from dormancy specific gene responses. Gene expression profiles indicated three distinct phases (perception, induction and dormancy) in SD-induced dormancy development in V. riparia. Different genes from the NAC DOMAIN CONTAINING PROTEIN 19 and WRKY families of transcription factors were differentially expressed in each phase of dormancy. Metabolite and transcriptome analyses indicated ABA, trehalose, raffinose and resveratrol compounds have a potential role in dormancy commitment. Finally, a comparison between V. riparia compound axillary bud dormancy and dormancy responses in other species emphasized the relationship between dormancy and the expression of RESVERATROL SYNTHASE and genes associated with C3HC4-TYPE RING

  15. Short day transcriptomic programming during induction of dormancy in grapevine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennell, Anne Y; Schlauch, Karen A; Gouthu, Satyanarayana; Deluc, Laurent G; Khadka, Vedbar; Sreekantan, Lekha; Grimplet, Jerome; Cramer, Grant R; Mathiason, Katherine L

    2015-01-01

    Bud dormancy in grapevine is an adaptive strategy for the survival of drought, high and low temperatures and freeze dehydration stress that limit the range of cultivar adaptation. Therefore, development of a comprehensive understanding of the biological mechanisms involved in bud dormancy is needed to promote advances in selection and breeding, and to develop improved cultural practices for existing grape cultivars. The seasonally indeterminate grapevine, which continuously develops compound axillary buds during the growing season, provides an excellent system for dissecting dormancy, because the grapevine does not transition through terminal bud development prior to dormancy. This study used gene expression patterns and targeted metabolite analysis of two grapevine genotypes that are short photoperiod responsive (Vitis riparia) and non-responsive (V. hybrid, Seyval) for dormancy development to determine differences between bud maturation and dormancy commitment. Grapevine gene expression and metabolites were monitored at seven time points under long (LD, 15 h) and short (SD, 13 h) day treatments. The use of age-matched buds and a small (2 h) photoperiod difference minimized developmental differences and allowed us to separate general photoperiod from dormancy specific gene responses. Gene expression profiles indicated three distinct phases (perception, induction and dormancy) in SD-induced dormancy development in V. riparia. Different genes from the NAC DOMAIN CONTAINING PROTEIN 19 and WRKY families of transcription factors were differentially expressed in each phase of dormancy. Metabolite and transcriptome analyses indicated ABA, trehalose, raffinose and resveratrol compounds have a potential role in dormancy commitment. Finally, a comparison between V. riparia compound axillary bud dormancy and dormancy responses in other species emphasized the relationship between dormancy and the expression of RESVERATROL SYNTHASE and genes associated with C3HC4-TYPE RING

  16. Parenting after Divorce: Evaluation of Preventive Programs for Divorcing Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Nancy J.; And Others

    Preventive educational programs are potentially useful in reducing the effects of divorce on children and families. Parenting After Divorce is an ongoing study designed to evaluate preventive programs. Divorcing families with children aged 7-12 are identified from court records and contacted to participate. Families are randomly assigned to one of…

  17. 45 CFR 1306.35 - Family child care program option.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... availability of family child care homes capable of serving children and families with disabilities affecting... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Family child care program option. 1306.35 Section... SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, HEAD...

  18. Information-Seeking in Family Day Care: Access, Quality and Personal Cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corr, L.; Davis, E.; Cook, K.; Mackinnon, A.; Sims, M.; Herrman, H.

    2014-01-01

    Family day-care (FDC) educators work autonomously to provide care and education for children of mixed ages, backgrounds and abilities. To meet the demands and opportunities of their work and regulatory requirements, educators need access to context-relevant and high quality information. No previous research has examined how and where these workers…

  19. Child, Program, and Family Ecological Variables in Early Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfo, Kofi; And Others

    This study examined child developmental, program, family ecological, and demographic variables from 200 families with mentally retarded or developmentally delayed toddlers, to identify predictors of child developmental progress and parental satisfaction following participation in early intervention. Child developmental progress correlated…

  20. Head Start Participants, Programs, Families and Staff in 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Head Start programs provide poor children and their families with comprehensive early education and support services. Each year, programs are required to submit a Program Information Report (PIR) to the Office of Head Start on participating children, pregnant women, and families, as well as the staff serving the Head Start population. In 2013, the…

  1. Developing Online Family Life Prevention and Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Robert, Jr.; Bowers, Jill R.; Mitchell, Elissa Thomann; Curtiss, Sarah; Ebata, Aaron T.

    2012-01-01

    Although numerous online family life education programs have been developed over the past few years, there has been little discussion about best practices in the development of these programs. This article presents a framework to assist family life educators in the development and improvement of online programs from the initial problem analysis…

  2. Researching family through the everyday lives of children across home and day care in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kousholt, Dorte

    2011-01-01

    The article investigates family as a conflictual community with a specific starting point in exploring children's lives across day-care institution and home. Children's development is theorised in relation to taking part in different communities across different contexts. The article draws...... on an ethnographically inspired research project with 6 families living in a small town in Denmark. The analysis points to how the children's possibilities of participation are created across their different life contexts and that the social interplay and conflicts between the children in the day-care institution have...... impacts on the relation and interaction between parents and children. Parenting in that way reaches far beyond the family and includes taking into account various issues in the other places where the children spend their time. The children's developmental possibilities are shaped by the relations...

  3. SMART Optimization of a Parenting Program for Active Duty Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Parenting Tools (ADAPT) is a family resilience program which helps parents to be their children’s best teachers by providing them with effective...Lane County, Oregon. Families are immigrant families ; we will assess 120 Latino students, about 210 Latino parents, and about 50 teachers and...Contribution: Collaboration and networking, facilities, marketing consultation and product Organization: Fort Bragg, Family Advocacy Program and USASOC

  4. Tektite 2 habitability research program: Day-to-day life in the habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowlis, D. P.

    1972-01-01

    Because it is widely agreed that the field of environmental psychology is quite young, it was determined that a sample of recorded observations from a representative mission should be included in the report on Tektite to give the professional reader a better feeling of normal day-to-day life in the isolated habitat. Names of the crew members have been replaced with numbers and some off-color words have been replaced by more acceptable slang; some remarks have been omitted that might lead to easy identification of the subjects. Otherwise, the following pages are exactly as transcribed during the late afternoons and the evenings of the mission.

  5. It is "too late" or is it? Bereaved family member perceptions of hospice referral when their family member was on hospice for seven days or less.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teno, Joan M; Casarett, David; Spence, Carol; Connor, Stephen

    2012-04-01

    Many family members of patients enrolled in hospice for less than seven days state that the hospice referral was made "at the right time." To examine bereaved family members' perceptions of the timing of hospice referral to identify aspects of the referral process that can be improved. Open-ended interviews were conducted in seven hospice programs, interviewing bereaved family members of hospice patients who died within the first week of hospice enrollment. Of the 100 narrative interviews, 99 respondents stated that their family member was either referred "too late" (n=41) or "at the right time" (n=58) to hospice services. When families stated that referral was "at the right time," their perceptions were based on the patient having refused earlier referral (n=8), a rapid decline in the patient's condition resulting in the late referral (n=20), or a belief in all things coming together as they were meant to (n=11). In contrast, when families stated that referral was "too late," their reasons were centered on concerns with the health care providers' role in decision making (n=24), with the leading concerns being inadequate physician communication (n=7), not recognizing the patient as dying (n=11), or problematic hospice delays in referral from the nursing home or home health agency (n=4). Despite the patient refusing an earlier hospice referral, five family members believed the referral was "too late." Whereas family members identified expected concerns with communication, more than one in three stated an earlier hospice referral was not possible. Copyright © 2012 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Teaching-skills training programs for family medicine residents: systematic review of formats, content, and effects of existing programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacasse, Miriam; Ratnapalan, Savithiri

    2009-09-01

    To review the literature on teaching-skills training programs for family medicine residents and to identify formats and content of these programs and their effects. Ovid MEDLINE (1950 to mid-July 2008) and the Education Resources Information Center database (pre-1966 to mid-July 2008) were searched using and combining the MeSH terms teaching, internship and residency, and family practice; and teaching, graduate medical education, and family practice. The initial MEDLINE and Education Resources Information Center database searches identified 362 and 33 references, respectively. Titles and abstracts were reviewed and studies were included if they described the format or content of a teaching-skills program or if they were primary studies of the effects of a teaching-skills program for family medicine residents or family medicine and other specialty trainees. The bibliographies of those articles were reviewed for unidentified studies. A total of 8 articles were identified for systematic review. Selection was limited to articles published in English. Teaching-skills training programs for family medicine residents vary from half-day curricula to a few months of training. Their content includes leadership skills, effective clinical teaching skills, technical teaching skills, as well as feedback and evaluation skills. Evaluations mainly assessed the programs' effects on teaching behaviour, which was generally found to improve following participation in the programs. Evaluations of learner reactions and learning outcomes also suggested that the programs have positive effects. Family medicine residency training programs differ from all other residency training programs in their shorter duration, usually 2 years, and the broader scope of learning within those 2 years. Few studies on teaching-skills training, however, were designed specifically for family medicine residents. Further studies assessing the effects of teaching-skills training in family medicine residents are

  7. Daily stressors and adult day service use by family caregivers: effects on depressive symptoms, positive mood, and dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarit, Steven H; Whetzel, Courtney A; Kim, Kyungmin; Femia, Elia E; Almeida, David M; Rovine, Michael J; Klein, Laura Cousino

    2014-12-01

    This study examines effects of daily use of adult day service (ADS) programs by caregivers of individuals with dementia (IWD) on a salivary biomarker of stress reactivity, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEA-S), and whether these effects on DHEA-S are associated with daily variability in positive mood and depressive symptoms. We used a daily diary design of 8 consecutive days with alternation of intervention (ADS) and nonintervention days to evaluate within- and between-person effects of the intervention. Family caregivers (N = 151) of IWD who were using ADS were interviewed daily by telephone at home. Saliva samples were collected from caregivers five times a day for 8 consecutive days and were assayed for DHEA-S. Daily telephone interviews assessed daily stressors and mood. DHEA-S levels were significantly higher on days after ADS use. Daily DHEA-S levels covaried significantly with daily positive mood but not with depressive symptoms. These results demonstrate an association of ADS use by family caregivers and higher DHEA-S levels on the next day. Prior research has found that higher DHEA-S levels are protective against the physiologic damaging effects of stressor exposure and may reduce risks of illness. Regular use of ADS may help reduce depletion of DHEA-S and allow the body to mount a protective and restorative response to the physiologic demands of caregiving. To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine DHEA-S levels across the day in connection with an intervention that affected daily exposure to stressors. Copyright © 2014 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Family environment, coping, and mental health in adolescents attending therapeutic day schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Erin M; Donenberg, Geri R; Emerson, Erin; Wilson, Helen W; Brown, Larry K; Houck, Christopher

    2014-10-01

    This study examined associations among family environment, coping, and emotional and conduct problems in adolescents attending therapeutic day schools due to mental health problems. Adolescents (N = 417; 30.2% female) ages 13-20 (M = 15.25) reported on their family environment (affective involvement and functioning), coping (emotion-focused support-seeking, cognitive restructuring, avoidant actions), and emotional and conduct problems. Poorer family environment was associated with less emotion-focused support-seeking and cognitive restructuring, and more emotional and conduct problems. Emotional problems were negatively associated with cognitive restructuring, and conduct problems were negatively associated with all coping strategies. Cognitive restructuring accounted for the relationship between family environment and emotional problems. Cognitive restructuring and emotion-focused support-seeking each partially accounted for the relationship between family functioning and conduct problems, but not the relationship between family affective involvement and conduct problems. Findings implicate the role of coping in the relationship between family environment and adolescent mental health. Copyright © 2014 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. THE MODERN-DAY IMPACT OF CULTURAL AND RELIGIOUS DIVERSITY: "MANAGING FAMILY JUSTICE IN DIVERSE SOCIETIES"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christa Rautenbach

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This contribution deals with the modern-day impact of cultural and religious diversity and comments on some of the viewpoints to be found in Managing Family Justice in Diverse Societies.1 The topics dealt with in this publication create a greater awareness of the challenges family diversity presents, and illustrate that an attempt to adopt a single definite strategy to manage diversity would not be the right approach; rather that each and every situation should be managed according to its unique context.

  10. Cyesis Program Addresses Teenage Pregnancy and Family Well-Being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Ginny A.; Tripple, Patricia A.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a model program to address the problems of pregnant teens. Services include education, health care assistance, economic self-support assistance, prevention of child abuse, family preservation, coordination of helping programs, and counseling on options. (CH)

  11. Family Therapy Training in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellowship Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rait, Douglas Samuel

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study describes the current state of family therapy training in a sample of child and adolescent psychiatry fellowship programs. Method: Child and adolescent psychiatry fellows (N = 66) from seven training programs completed a questionnaire assessing demographics, family therapy training experiences, common models of treatment and…

  12. [Evaluation of Treatment of Mothers at the Family Day Hospital in Münster, Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liwinski, Timur; Romer, Georg; Müller, Jörg Michael

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of Treatment of Mothers at the Family Day Hospital in Münster, Germany. Mothers of preschool children have limited access to mental health treatment services. The Family Day Hospital for Preschool Children at the University Hospital Münster, Germany, offers therefore a specialized treatment for mothers with their preschool children. The therapy outcome of mothers is evaluated in effectiveness study by a pre-post-design. For mothers, therapy was composed of individual session and couple sessions with the partner, video-based parent-child-interaction therapy, and parent group sessions. We evaluated the psychiatric symptom burden of N = 103 mothers at admission and discharge with the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R) above the clinical cut-off ≥ 0.57. After treatment the mothers showed significant improvement on the global severity index (GSI) with an average Cohen's d = 1.64 (p0.001). We identified the following positively associated moderator variables of maternal improvement by a multiple regression analysis: the initial symptom burden, the educational level of the mother, not restricted housing conditions, and the age of the child. We conclude that especially distressed parents benefit from the treatment in the Family Day Hospital for Preschool Children.

  13. Rainy Days: Program Ideas That Make a Splash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayson, Randall

    1996-01-01

    Stresses the importance of planning ahead for rainy day activities at camp. Suggested outdoor activities include learning to build a fire in the rain, dam building, canoe puzzles, and holey garbage-can fill; indoor activities include crafts, pass the present, human game pieces, and opportunities for cabin groups to plan and host a fun activity.…

  14. Telehealth for underserved families: an evidence-based parenting program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Robert J; Slone, Norah C; Soares, Neelkamal; Sprang, Rob

    2012-08-01

    Families with a child diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder completed an 8-session parenting program, the Group Triple P Positive Parenting Program, provided by videoconferencing technology. Families reported improved child behavior (effect size of d = -1.23) and decreased parent distress (d = -0.34). Parent training implemented with videoconferencing technology can be an effective way of delivering evidence-based services to families with specialized needs. (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  15. Physical Activity Programs in Long Day Care and Family Day Care Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawlis, Tanya; Mikhailovich, Katja; Morrison, Paul

    2008-01-01

    In the past 10 years the prevalence of childhood obesity has increased considerably and there is growing recognition of the need to establish positive attitudes to healthy lifestyle practices from an early age if this trend is to be reversed. Childcare centres provide ideal environments from which to develop these positive attitudes. A literature…

  16. Executing Military Family Programs in the New Fiscal Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Office has four primary missions. First, it provides family support policies and programs in such areas as family center operations, child care...deployment  family- centered – children need to be assessed, monitored, and treated in the context of their family and its support structure...because installation facilities serve only half of military school children, services must also be provided in daycare and other facilities 9

  17. Family Matters: An Investigation of Family Coursework in School Counseling Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joe, J. Richelle; Harris, Pamela N.

    2016-01-01

    School counselors are expected to form collaborative relationships with the families of students. Yet, school counselors have limited knowledge about families to form these partnerships, as a descriptive content analysis of the family coursework requirements in CACREP-accredited school counseling programs in the southern region revealed that most…

  18. The Impact of a Collaborative Family Involvement Program on Latino Families and Children's Educational Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Julie; Kirkner, Sandra L.

    2014-01-01

    Latino families highly value education and are committed to their children's educational success; however, Latino students often experience educational challenges. Well-designed family involvement programs can encourage Latino families, especially new immigrants or monolingual Spanish-speakers, to increase their involvement resulting in positive…

  19. Exploring the Literacy Practices of Refugee Families Enrolled in a Book Distribution Program and an Intergenerational Family Literacy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sunita; Sylvia, Monica R.; Ridzi, Frank

    2015-01-01

    This ethnographic study presents findings of the literacy practices of Burmese refugee families and their interaction with a book distribution program paired with an intergenerational family literacy program. The project was organized at the level of Bronfenbrenner's exosystem (in "Ecology of human development". Cambridge, Harvard…

  20. Making program evaluation activities family-centered: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Katherine A; Cousins, J Bradley

    2014-01-01

    This study explored ways in which program evaluation activities in pediatric rehabilitation settings can become congruent with family-centered service (FCS) philosophy. Two Canadian pediatric rehabilitation centers participated in this study, which included focus groups with staff members and interviews with parents. Participants identified seven ways in which program evaluation practices could be made congruent with FCS. Suggestions included: (a) the inclusion of a diverse group of program recipients, (b) the use of processes that facilitate family involvement, (c) the recruitment of family champions, (d) the involvement of families in program development, (e) the establishment of evaluations that are relevant to families (f) the development of center-wide statements about family involvement in evaluation and (g) the compensation of families for their active participation in evaluation. For program evaluation practices to be useful and relevant, they should be improved and made consistent with FCS philosophy. Those evaluating pediatric rehabilitation programs need to use approaches and activities that respect the needs, characteristics, cultures and diversity of the program recipients. Such actions will help to improve the quality of care provided, the nature of program evaluation activities, as well as the overall level of FCS in pediatric rehabilitation settings.

  1. Linking Family Life and Health Professionals, Volunteers, and Family Life Students in a Community Hospice Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruit, Dorothy

    This paper describes the Portage County, Ohio community hospice program, emphasizing the linkages between family life specialists, health professionals, volunteers, and students. Hospice service is defined as a specialized, home-based program for the management of pain and other symptoms of terminal illness, with the family as the unit of care.…

  2. [Transference Focused Psychotherapy for Borderline-Adolescents in a Day Clinic Treatment Program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krischer, Maya; Ponton-Rodriguez, Tamara; Gooran, Ghazal Rostami; Bender, Stephan

    2017-07-01

    Transference Focused Psychotherapy for Borderline-Adolescents in a Day Clinic Treatment Program This paper focuses on the concept of transference focused psychotherapy (TFP) modified for juvenile borderline patients. Adolescents with borderline developmental personality disorder (bpd) have an essential deficit in their personality structure that leads to oscillations in their self-esteem and in a "split" perception of the world. They suffer from a variety of symptoms and severe impairments on their own and their families' quality of life. Their fragmented perception of themselves and others make relationships almost unbearable for them. Relationships are mostly marked by severe anxiety of resentment and rejection. For these patients this causes intolerable trouble at school where every day conflicts take place. Self-mutilation and suicidal thoughts often seem the only way out. By now, there is an agreement that an early specialized assessment and treatment is necessary in order to stop the typical consequences of their self-mutilative and dysfunctional behavior. Still, in contrast to adult age, empirical evidence is missing which proves the effectiveness of treating adolescent borderline patients. In this paper we present a research project on the effectiveness of transference focused psychotherapy with adolescent borderline patients (TFP-A) in a day clinic setting, combining TFP with group skills training as known from dialectic behavior therapy (DBT). Furthermore, we give first results on analyzing the effectiveness of our day clinic treatment program based on TFP-A, focusing on improving core symptoms such as affective problems, aggressive behavior against self and others and interpersonal problems.

  3. Miniaturized day/night sight in Soldato Futuro program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landini, Alberto; Cocchi, Alessandro; Bardazzi, Riccardo; Sardelli, Mauro; Puntri, Stefano

    2013-06-01

    The market of the sights for the 5.56 mm assault rifles is dominated by mainly three types of systems: TWS (Thermal Weapon Sight), the Pocket Scope with Weapon Mount and the Clip-on. The latter are designed primarily for special forces and snipers use, while the TWS design is triggered mainly by the DRI (Detection, Recognition, Identification) requirements. The Pocket Scope design is focused on respecting the SWaP (Size, Weight and Power dissipation) requirements. Compared to the TWS systems, for the last two years there was a significant technological growth of the Pocket Scope/Weapon Mount solutions, concentrated on the compression of the overall dimensions. The trend for the assault rifles is the use of small size/light weight (SWaP) IR sights, suitable mainly for close combat operations but also for extraordinary use as pocket scopes - handheld or helmet mounted. The latest developments made by Selex ES S.p.A. are responding precisely to the above-mentioned trend, through a miniaturized Day/Night sight embedding state-of-the art sensors and using standard protocols (USB 2.0, Bluetooth 4.0) for interfacing with PDAs, Wearable computers, etc., while maintaining the "shoot around the corner" capability. Indeed, inside the miniaturized Day/Night sight architecture, a wireless link using Bluetooth technology has been implemented to transmit the video streaming of the rifle sight to an helmet mounted display. The video of the rifle sight is transmitted only to the eye-piece of the soldier shouldering the rifle.

  4. Efficacy of a new method of family planning: the Standard Days Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arévalo, Marcos; Jennings, Victoria; Sinai, Irit

    2002-05-01

    The Standard Days Method is a fertility awareness-based method of family planning in which users avoid unprotected intercourse during cycle Days 8 through 19. A prospective multi-center efficacy trial was conducted to test, in a heterogeneous population, the contraceptive efficacy of the Standard Days Method. A total of 478 women, age 18-39 years, in Bolivia, Peru, and the Philippines, with self-reported cycles of 26-32 days, desiring to delay pregnancy at least one year were admitted to the study. A single decrement multi-censoring life table analysis of the data indicate a cumulative probability of pregnancy of 4.75% over 13 cycles of correct use of the method, and a 11.96% probability of pregnancy under typical use. This article describes the study and the results. Results suggest that despite its requirement that couples modify their sexual behavior when the woman is fertile, the Standard Days Method provides significant protection from unplanned pregnancy and is acceptable to couples in a wide range of settings.

  5. The FOCUS Family Resilience Program: An Innovative Family Intervention for Trauma and Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltzman, William R

    2016-12-01

    This article describes the core principles and components of the FOCUS Program, a brief intervention for families contending with single or multiple trauma or loss events. It has been administered nationally to thousands of military family members since 2008 and has been implemented in a wide range of civilian community, medical, clinical, and school settings. Developed by a team from the UCLA and Harvard Medical Schools, the FOCUS Program provides a structured approach for joining with traditional and nontraditional families, crafting shared goals, and then working with parents, children, and the entire family to build communication, make meaning out of traumatic experiences, and practice specific skills that support family resilience. Through a narrative sharing process, each family member tells his or her story and constructs a timeline that graphically captures the experience and provides a platform for family discussions on points of convergence and divergence. This narrative sharing process is first done with the parents and then the children and then the family as a whole. The aim is to build perspective-taking skills and mutual understanding, to reduce distortions and misattributions, and to bridge estrangement between family members. Previous studies have confirmed that families participating in this brief program report reductions in distress and symptomatic behaviors for both parents and children and increases in child pro-social behaviors and family resilient processes. © 2016 Family Process Institute.

  6. The Kintun program for families with dementia: From novel experiment to national policy (innovative practice).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajardo, Jean; Aravena, José M; Budinich, Marilú; Larraín, Alberto; Fuentes, Patricio; Gitlin, Laura N

    2017-01-01

    The Kintun program is the first public health strategy specifically designed for dementia care in Chile. It was launched in 2013 in the city of Santiago with support from the National Service for the Elderly and the Municipality of Peñalolén. Using an interdisciplinary team, the program seeks to promote community integration and better support for persons with dementia and their caregivers. The multicomponent program includes: an activity-based day care center, training and education of family caregivers, home visits, and community outreach to increase dementia awareness. Case management helps to monitor ongoing needs and link families to resources. To date, 259 dyads (persons with dementia and their families) have been enrolled in the program. Due to its success in 2015, the Kintun program received funding from the Ministry of Health. This has led to the integration of previously disparate initiatives, better consistency across services, and the development of a comprehensive national dementia plan for Chile.

  7. Continuing Day Treatment Programs Promote Recovery in Schizophrenia: A Case-based Study

    OpenAIRE

    Handa, Kamna; Grace, Jeffery; Trigoboff, Eileen; Olympia, Josie L.; Annalett, Diane; Watson, Thomas; Poulose, Mon C.; Muzaffar, Tufail; Noyes, Frank L.; Kabatt, Anne; Cushman, Sharon; Antonelli, Maryann; Baxter-Banks, Ginger; Newcomer, David

    2009-01-01

    Continuing day treatment programs focus on community stabilization through comprehensive individualized rehabilitation. They promote recovery through a variety of practical clinical therapeutic interventions. This empirically based report describes a continuing day treatment program’s rehabilitation of four clients with schizophrenia, chronic type in a western New York mental health clinic who were in each of the specialty services: a two-phase program, a program for seniors, and a program fo...

  8. Cuidado de ninos con necesidades especiales en el hogar: Manual de referencia para las personas que cuidan ninos en sus hogares (Children with Special Needs in Family Day Care Homes: A Handbook for Family Day Care Home Providers).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Brosse, Beatrice

    The Spanish translation of this guide offers information to Spanish-speaking family day care providers who desire to expand their knowledge of early childhood development in order to work with infants and young children with special needs in their day care settings. The first of four chapters answers common questions and concerns of day care…

  9. A Community-Based Intervention Program to Enhance Family Communication and Family Well-being: The Learning Families Project in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chen; Wan, Alice; Kwok, Lit Tung; Pang, Sally; Wang, Xin; Stewart, Sunita M; Lam, Tai Hing; Chan, Sophia Siu Chee

    2017-01-01

    Family communication is important to maintain family relationships and family well-being. To enhance family communication and family well-being, a community-based "Learning Families Project," based on the social ecological model was developed in Kwun Tong in Hong Kong, a district with high prevalence of family problems. This quasi-experimental study included two nearby government subsidized low-rent housing estates separated by busy main roads, as the intervention [Tsui Ping (South) Estate] and control (Shun Tin Estate) estate. The main intervention was resident training programs, such as talks, day camps, and thematic activities. No program was implemented in the control estate. Participants in the intervention group received assessments before the intervention (T1), immediately after the intervention (T2), and 6 weeks after the intervention (T3). Control group participants were assessed at baseline (March to April 2011) and follow-up (December 2011 to March 2012). Assessments of family communication (time and perceived adequacy) and family well-being (harmony, happiness, and health) at T1 and T3 were obtained in the intervention group to examine within-group changes. In addition, these differences in outcomes in the intervention group were compared with those in the control group to examine the effectiveness of the intervention. Family communication time and perceived communication adequacy increased significantly in the intervention group ( n  = 515) with a small effect size (Cohen effect d : 0.10 and 0.24, respectively). Compared with the control group ( n  = 476), the improvements in family communication time and perceived communication adequacy (Cohen effect d : 0.13 and 0.14, respectively), and perceived family harmony and happiness (Cohen effect d : 0.12 and 0.12, respectively) were significantly greater in the intervention group, adjusting for age and education, suggesting the intervention was effective in improving family communication and

  10. Designing a New Program in Family Relations and Applied Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Sharon Mayne; Daly, Kerry; Lero, Donna; MacMartin, Clare

    2007-01-01

    Family Relations and Applied Nutrition, which is offered at the University of Guelph, is an interdisciplinary department that previously offered three undergraduate majors: child, youth, and family; applied human nutrition; and gerontology; as well as graduate programs at the master's and doctoral levels. Several factors have precipitated a review…

  11. The Family-Environment Connection: Filling a Nationwide Program Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Anthony; Franz, Nancy; Christoffel, Rebecca; Cooper, Kristi; Schmitt, Brenda

    2013-01-01

    Since its inception, Extension has focused on helping individuals, families, and communities change economic, environmental, and social conditions. Over the organization's history, environmental condition change programming has been mostly the purview of natural resource educators and less often conducted by family and consumer science…

  12. Family, School, and Community Partnerships: Practical Strategies for Afterschool Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn-Stevenson, Matia

    2014-01-01

    Much attention is given today to the importance of forging family, school, and community partnerships. Growing numbers of schools, many of them with afterschool programs, are dedicating resources to support and sustain relationships with families and community-based organizations. And, among government agencies and the philanthropic sector, there…

  13. Using a Family Science Day Event to Engage Youth in Climate Change Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevik, C.; Brevik, E. C.

    2015-12-01

    Each fall, Dickinson State University organizes four Family Science Day events for elementary-aged children to increase their engagement in the sciences. Offered on Saturday afternoons, each event focuses on a different science-related theme. Families can attend these events free of charge, and the kids participate in a large variety of hands-on activities which center around the event's theme. This year, the November event focused on climate change and the roles soil plays in the climate system. The timing of this topic was carefully chosen. 2015 has been declared the International Year of Soil by the United Nations, and the Soil Science Society of America theme for the month of November was Soils and Climate. This public outreach event was an amazing opportunity to help the youth in our community learn about climate change and soil in a fun, interactive environment. The activities also helped the children learn how science is a process of discovery that allows them to better understand the world they live in. In addition to the hands-on activities, a planetarium show focusing on climate change was also offered during the event. The fully immersive, 360-degree show allowed the kids and their parents to personally observe phenomena that are otherwise difficult to visualize. All of the activities at the Family Science Day event were staffed by university students, and this proved to be a very valuable experience for them as well. Some of the students who helped are majoring in a science field, and for them, the experience taught public communication. They learned to break complicated concepts down into simpler terms that young kids can understand. Education majors who participated practiced communicating science concepts to children, and students in other majors who helped with this event gained experiences that reinforced various concepts they had learned in their general education science courses.

  14. The Family of Concurrent Logic Programming Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-01

    concurrent logic programming can be found in [162]. Procs pipes: linear press networks The following program is a parallel implementation of the Sieve of... Eratosthenes [163]. It consists of a process generating all integers in the desired range, and a set of filter proceses, one per prime number found...computation terminates or deadlocks. To improve upon this the guard sake~o(L) can be added to the other clauses of the meta-interpreter. This ensures that

  15. Families experiencing housing instability: the effects of housing programs on family routines and rituals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayberry, Lindsay Satterwhite; Shinn, Marybeth; Benton, Jessica Gibbons; Wise, Jasmine

    2014-01-01

    Maintenance of family processes can protect parents, children, and families from the detrimental effects of extreme stressors, such as homelessness. When families cannot maintain routines and rituals, the stressors of poverty and homelessness can be compounded for both caregivers and children. However, characteristics of living situations common among families experiencing homelessness present barriers to the maintenance of family routines and rituals. We analyzed 80 in-depth interviews with parents who were experiencing or had recently experienced an instance of homelessness. We compared their assessments of challenges to family schedules, routines, and rituals across various living situations, including shelter, transitional housing programs, doubled-up (i.e., living temporarily with family or friends), and independent housing. Rules common across shelters and transitional housing programs impeded family processes, and parents felt surveilled and threatened with child protective service involvement in these settings. In doubled-up living situations, parents reported adapting their routines to those of the household and having parenting interrupted by opinions of friends and family members. Families used several strategies to maintain family routines and rituals in these living situations and ensure consistency and stability for their children during an otherwise unstable time. (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  16. Centering the Voices of International Students in Family Studies and Family Therapy Graduate Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Teresa; Fang, Shi-Ruei; Kosutic, Iva; Griggs, Julie

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we report the results of a survey that accessed the perceptions of family studies and family therapy international master's and doctoral students across the United States. Our goals included giving collective voice to the experience of international students and gathering their suggestions for improving programs. Themes that…

  17. A meta-analysis of intensive family preservation programs: placement prevention and improvement of family functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al, C.M.W.; Stams, G.J.J.M.; Bek, M.S.; Damen, E.M.; Asscher, J.J.; van der Laan, P.H.

    2012-01-01

    The aims of the present study were, first, to establish the effect of brief, in-home intensive family preservation programs on prevention of out-of-home placement, family functioning, child behavior problems and social support and, second, to study moderators of these effects. The results of this

  18. A family-based program of care for women with recurrent breast cancer and their family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northouse, Laurel L; Walker, Julie; Schafenacker, Ann; Mood, Darlene; Mellon, Suzanne; Galvin, Elizabeth; Harden, Janet; Freeman-Gibb, Laurie

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the FOCUS Program (family involvement, optimistic attitude, coping effectiveness, uncertainty reduction, and symptom management), a family-based program of care for women with recurrent breast cancer and their family caregivers. Randomized clinical trial. Midwest region of the United States. The family-based program of care consisted of five components: family involvement, optimistic attitude, coping effectiveness, uncertainty reduction, and symptom management. The program was delivered in three home visits and two follow-up phone calls over a five-month period of time. Patients with recurrent breast cancer and their family members reported high satisfaction with the FOCUS Program. Although the FOCUS Program had a number of strengths, limitations of the program also were identified that need to be addressed in future family-based interventions. A need exists for family-based programs of care that enable both patients and their family members to manage the multiple demands associated with recurrent breast cancer.

  19. Head Start Participants, Programs, Families, and Staff in 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Anitha; Walker, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Since 1965, the Head Start program has served low-income 3- and 4-year-old children and their families with comprehensive early education and support services. Programs provide services focused on the "whole child," including early education addressing cognitive, developmental, and socio-emotional needs; medical and dental screenings and…

  20. Head Start Participants, Programs, Families and Staff in 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmit, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Since 1965, the Head Start program has served low-income 3- and 4-year-old children and their families with comprehensive early education and support services. Programs provide services focused on the "whole child," including early education addressing cognitive, developmental, and socio-emotional needs; medical and dental screenings and…

  1. The Adolescent Family Life Program and Adoption Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kring, Thomas C.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the Adolescent Family Life Program, which develops and tests approaches that encourage adoption as an alternative to abortion for pregnant teens. Notes that both abortion and adoption rates have dropped since the program was instituted in 1981; maintains that additional research is needed into factors associated with adoption. Discusses…

  2. Gender and Poverty Fight: the Family Donation Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Aparecida Mariano

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian social assistance policy is guided by the perspective of poverty fight efforts, which prioritize the conditioned income transfer. These programs privilege the income transfer to women and involve them in a net of obligations and conditions, as it is done in the Family Donation Program. The practice within Family Donation Program highlights some contradictions between the State actions and the feminist demands, especially those concerning the motherhood problem. This is thus a core question for the dialogue between the feminism and the social policies sponsored by the State.

  3. Emotions, Ideas and Experiences of Caregivers of Patients With Schizophrenia About "Family to Family Support Program".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bademli, Kerime; Duman, Zekiye Çetinkaya

    2016-06-01

    "Family to Family Support Program" is a significant intervention program to assist families by informing them about treatment procedures and coping strategies, increasing their functionality, helping them to overcome the challenges of the disease. This study was particularly designed to investigate the emotions, thoughts, and experiences of caregivers of schizophrenia patients who participated in "Family to Family Support Program." The study was conducted with one of the qualitative research methods, phenomenological method. The study sample included caregivers who care for schizophrenia patients and participated in the "Family to Family Support Program". Twenty caregivers were included in the sample. The study was carried out in İzmir Schizophrenia Support Association. The study data were collected with four open ended questions. The average age of the participants was 56,77 ± 72,89, 10 male caregivers and 10 female caregivers, 9 caregivers were fathers, 6 caregivers were mothers, and 5 of them were siblings. The thematic analysis indicated that the emotions, thoughts and experiences of caregivers can be categorized in four groups: "I learned to deal with my problems", "I am conscious in my interaction with the patient and I know and I am not alone", "I feel much better", and "Schizophrenia is not the end of the road, knowledge sorts things out." Caregivers who participated in "Family to Family Support Program" expressed their satisfaction that they were benefited from the program, their coping skills were improved, they experienced less challenges when providing care, they understood the disease better, and it felt comfortable. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Early Intervention Readiness Program (EIRP): A Post-ASD Diagnosis Family Support Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolmie, Rhiannon S.; Bruck, Susan; Kerslake, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    A child's diagnosis with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can be an extremely stressful time for families. Researchers suggest that the period immediately following ASD diagnosis is a key time for professionals to guide families by providing appropriate information about support options. This article describes a family support program, developed by…

  5. Are people in Tehran prepared for the family physician program?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Majidi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Upon successful experiences of family physician program in the rural regions, Iranian Ministry of Health and Medical Education (MOHME made a decision to expand this program to urban areas. For this reason a pilot program were designated and some cities have been selected to determine dos and don′ts of performing family physician program in the cities. Various studies were published during this period demonstrating the advantages and disadvantages of family physicians′ care in these cities. After this process in 2012 and 2013 MOHME announced implementation of family physician program in Tehran. Our study investigated public attitudes, knowledge and practice about the newly introduced program. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed in Tehran during November to December 2012. A telephone survey was carried out using the Random Digit Dialing (RDD method and data was gathered by a researcher designed questionnaire. A total of 386 residents aged 18 years and over participated in the study. To compare the differences between various groups′ knowledge scores data were analyzed performing Chi-square test, t-test, ANOVA, and logistic regression by SPSS software version 17, to find factors that affected individuals′ agreement with the program. Results: Among all samples 214(57.4% knew about the program and almost 120(85.1% of these aware people were planning to participate in the program. Television and Radio were the major information resources. After adjusting for Educational status, Access to Internet and Socio Economic Status(SES those people who didn′t have any kind of health coverage systems(Health insurance were most likely to accept the program and agree with that[OR= 2.38(1.05-5.38 ]. Conclusions: The fact that despite low levels of information, most of aware people intend to enroll in the new program reveals that expanding informative programs would bring more participation and involvement among community.

  6. Implementation fidelity in adolescent family-based prevention programs: relationship to family engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, Hilary F; Miller, Brenda A; Aalborg, Annette E; Plasencia, Ana V; Keagy, Carolyn D

    2010-08-01

    Reliability and validity of intervention studies are impossible without adequate program fidelity, as it ensures that the intervention was implemented as designed and allows for accurate conclusions about effectiveness (Bellg AJ, Borrelli B, Resnick B et al. Enhancing treatment fidelity in health behavior change studies: best practices and recommendations from the NIH behavior change consortium. Health Psychol 2004; 23: 443-51). This study examines the relation between program fidelity with family engagement (i.e. satisfaction and participation) in family-based prevention programs for adolescent alcohol, tobacco or other drug use. Families (n = 381) were those with an 11- to 12-year-old child enrolled in Kaiser Permanente in the San Francisco area. Families participated in one of two programs: Strengthening Families Program: For Parents and Youth 10-14 (SFP) (Spoth R, Redmond C, Lepper H. Alcohol initiation outcomes of universal family-focused preventive interventions: one- and two-year follow-ups of a controlled study. J Stud Alcohol Suppl 1999; 13: 103-11) or Family Matters (FM) (Bauman KE, Ennett ST. On the importance of peer influence for adolescent drug use: commonly neglected considerations. Addiction 1996; 91: 185-98). Fidelity was assessed by: (i) adherence to the program manual and (ii) quality of implementation. No relationships were found for FM, a self-directed program. For SFP, higher quality scores were related to higher parent satisfaction. Higher adherence scores were related to higher satisfaction for youth, yet surprisingly to lower satisfaction for parents. Parent sessions involve much discussion, and to obtain high adherence scores, health educators were often required to limit this to implement all program activities. Findings highlight a delivery challenge in covering all activities while allowing parents to engage in mutually supportive behavior.

  7. Engaging Youth in Climate Change Issues with Family Science Day Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevik, Corinne E.; Brevik, Eric C.; Steffan, Joshua J.

    2016-04-01

    Dickinson State University organizes four Family Science Day events each fall during the months of September, October, November, and December. Activities are geared toward elementary-aged children to increase student engagement in the sciences. Offered on Saturday afternoons, each event focuses on a different science-related theme. Families can attend these events free of charge, and the kids participate in a large variety of hands-on activities that center around the event's theme. This year, the November event focused on climate change, including an emphasis on the roles soil plays in the climate system. The timing of this topic was carefully chosen. 2015 has been declared the International Year of Soil by the United Nations, and the Soil Science Society of America theme for the month of November was Soils and Climate. This public outreach event was an amazing opportunity to help the youth in our community learn about climate change in a fun, interactive environment. Climate changes in the past, present, and future were emphasized. Activities including the Farming Game, painting with soils, taking Jello "cores", creating a cloud in a jar, and making a glacier in a bag helped children learn how science is a process of discovery that allows them to better understand the world they live in. In addition to the hands-on activities, a planetarium show focused on climate change was also offered during the event, surrounding the kids and their parents in a fully immersive, 360-degree show that allowed them to personally observe phenomena that are otherwise difficult to visualize. All of the activities at the Family Science Day event were staffed by university students, and this proved to be a very valuable experience for them as well. Some of the students who helped are majoring in a science field, and for them, the experience taught public communication. They learned to break complicated concepts down into simpler terms that young kids could understand. Education

  8. Providence school asthma partnership: school-based asthma program for inner-city families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePue, Judith D; McQuaid, Elizabeth L; Koinis-Mitchell, Daphne; Camillo, Christopher; Alario, Anthony; Klein, Robert B

    2007-01-01

    Over 3 years, 972 families participated in an after-school asthma program at their child's school. Parents and children attended concurrent 2(1/2)-hour workshops. Parents were 74% Latino; 45% non-English speaking, with 77% of children on Medicaid. Asthma symptoms were significantly reduced, from multiple times per week to less than once per week on average. Oral steroid use decreased to one third of baseline use. Hospital days decreased from 11% to 2%; emergency visits decreased 35% to 4%; and school days missed decreased 48% to 20%. This program has now become sustainable with both private and Medicaid insurance coverage.

  9. Implementing psychiatric day treatment for infants, toddlers, preschoolers and their families: a study from a clinical and organizational perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furniss, Tilman; Müller, Jörg M; Achtergarde, Sandra; Wessing, Ida; Averbeck-Holocher, Marlies; Postert, Christian

    2013-04-20

    An increasing number of empirical studies indicate that infants, toddlers and preschoolers may suffer from non-transient mental illnesses featuring developmental psychopathology. A few innovative child psychiatric approaches have been developed to treat infants, toddlers and preschoolers and their families, but have not yet been conceptually presented and discussed in the framework of different healthcare systems. The organizational and clinical experience gained while developing specific approaches may be important across disciplines and guide future developments in psychiatric treatment of infants, toddlers, preschoolers and their families. This article introduces the Preschool Family Day Hospital for Infants, Toddlers and Preschoolers and their Families at Münster University Hospital, Germany. This hospital is unique in the German healthcare system with regard to its social-service institution division of labor. Specifically, it uses an intermittent treatment approach and an integrated interactional family psychiatric approach to treat children and their parents as separate patients. This multidisciplinary, developmentally and family-oriented approach includes components of group treatments with children and separate treatments with parents. Specific techniques include video-assisted treatments of the parent-child interaction, psychiatric and psychotherapeutic treatments for parents, and conjoint family therapies that include both parents and siblings. The Family Day Hospital for infants, toddlers and preschoolers and their families offers innovative family-oriented treatments for those who suffer from a wide range of severe child psychiatric disorders that cannot be sufficiently treated in outpatient settings. Treatment is based on the need for family-oriented approaches to the early psychiatric treatment of infants, toddlers and preschoolers. Family day hospitals are an innovative approach to preschool child psychiatry that requires further evaluation.

  10. Results of the 2009 National Resident Matching Program: family medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugno, Perry A; McGaha, Amy L; Schmittling, Gordon T; DeVilbiss, Ashley D; Ostergaard, Daniel J

    2009-09-01

    The results of the 2009 National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) reflect a persistently low level of student interest in family medicine residency training in the United States. Compared with the 2008 Match, 70 fewer positions (with 89 fewer US seniors) were filled in family medicine residency programs through the NRMP in 2009, at the same time that 18 fewer positions were filled in primary care internal medicine (11 fewer US seniors), one more position was filled in pediatrics-primary care (three more US seniors), and 13 more positions were filled in internal medicine-pediatrics programs (but with seven fewer US seniors). Multiple forces, including student perspectives of the demands, rewards and prestige of the specialty, the turbulence and uncertainty of the health care and economic environments, lifestyle issues, the advice of deans, and the impact of faculty role models, continue to influence medical student career choices. A total of 152 more positions (28 fewer US seniors) were filled in categorical internal medicine. Thirty-one more positions (72 more US seniors) were filled in categorical pediatrics programs. The 2009 NRMP results suggest that while interest in family medicine experienced a slight increase in the number of students choosing the specialty last year, overall interest in primary care careers continues to decline. With the nation continuing to call for the roles and services of family physicians, family medicine still matched too few graduates through the 2009 NRMP to effectively address the nation's needs for primary care physicians.

  11. Results of the 2008 National Resident Matching Program: family medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugno, Perry A; McGaha, Amy L; Schmittling, Gordon T; DeVilbiss, Ashley D; Ostergaard, Daniel J

    2008-09-01

    The results of the 2008 National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) reflect a currently stable level of student interest in family medicine residency training in the United States. Compared with the 2007 Match, 91 more positions (with 65 more US seniors) were filled in family medicine residency programs through the NRMP in 2008, at the same time as 10 fewer (one fewer US senior) in primary care internal medicine, eight fewer positions were filled in pediatrics-primary care (10 fewer US seniors), and 19 fewer (27 fewer US seniors) in internal medicine-pediatrics programs. Multiple forces, including student perspectives of the demands, rewards, and prestige of the specialty, the turbulence and uncertainty of the health care environment, lifestyle issues, and the impact of faculty role models, continue to influence medical student career choices. Thirty-one more positions (20 fewer US seniors) were filled in categorical internal medicine. Thirty more positions (84 fewer US seniors) were filled in categorical pediatrics programs. The 2008 NRMP results suggest that while interest in family medicine experienced a slight increase in the number of students choosing the specialty, interest in other primary care careers continues to decline. With the needs of the nation calling for the roles and services of family physicians, family medicine still matched too few graduates through the 2008 NRMP to meet the nation's needs for primary care physicians.

  12. Interview Day Environment May Influence Applicant Selection of Emergency Medicine Residency Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis, Jason

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure of the interview day affects applicant interactions with faculty and residents, which can influence the applicant’s rank list decision. We aimed to determine if there was a difference in matched residents between those interviewing on a day on which didactics were held and had increased resident and faculty presence (didactic day versus an interview day with less availability for applicant interactions with residents and faculty (non-didactic day. This was a retrospective study reviewing interview dates of matched residents from 2009-2015. Forty-two (61.8% matched residents interviewed on a didactic day with increased faculty and resident presence versus 26 (38.2% on a non-didactic interview day with less availability for applicant interactions (p = 0.04. There is an association between interviewing on a didactic day with increased faculty and resident presence and matching in our program.

  13. 78 FR 70090 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: PEPFAR Program Expenditures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: PEPFAR Program Expenditures ACTION: Notice of request for... to allow 30 days for public comment. DATES: Submit comments directly to the Office of Management and...

  14. The effectiveness of extended day programs : Evidence from a randomized field experiment in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyer, Erik; Van Klaveren, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Policies that aim at improving student achievement frequently increase instructional time, for example by means of an extended day program. There is, however, hardly any evidence that these programs are effective, and the few studies that allow causal inference indicate that we should expect neutral

  15. Extended Day Kindergarten Program. Longitudinal Study: 1983-84 through 1985-86.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevigny, Karen

    This longitudinal study, which is second in a series of reports on the Detroit Public Schools' Extended Day Kindergarten (EDK) Program, investigated effects of the program on students as they went through elementary school. Participants were randomly selected groups of students who were provided EDK experiences and, for comparison purposes,…

  16. Stockholm's Cafe 84: A Unique Day Program for Jewish Survivors of Concentration Camps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Hedi; Waxman, Howard M.

    1988-01-01

    Describes Cafe 84, a day program in Sweden for survivors of German concentration camps, which offers organized but informal activities so that members can socialize and discuss current feelings and memories. Claims large membership as well as reports of reduced symptoms and increased well-being are evidence of program's success. (Author/ABL)

  17. Building the capacity of family day care educators to promote children's social and emotional wellbeing: an exploratory cluster randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sims Margaret

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Childhood mental health problems are highly prevalent, experienced by one in five children living in socioeconomically disadvantaged families. Although childcare settings, including family day care are ideal to promote children's social and emotional wellbeing at a population level in a sustainable way, family day care educators receive limited training in promoting children's mental health. This study is an exploratory wait-list control cluster randomised controlled trial to test the appropriateness, acceptability, cost, and effectiveness of "Thrive," an intervention program to build the capacity of family day care educators to promote children's social and emotional wellbeing. Thrive aims to increase educators' knowledge, confidence and skills in promoting children's social and emotional wellbeing. Methods/Design This study involves one family day care organisation based in a low socioeconomic area of Melbourne. All family day care educators (term used for registered carers who provide care for children for financial reimbursement in the carers own home are eligible to participate in the study. The clusters for randomisation will be the fieldworkers (n = 5 who each supervise 10-15 educators. The intervention group (field workers and educators will participate in a variety of intervention activities over 12 months, including workshops; activity exchanges with other educators; and focused discussion about children's social and emotional wellbeing during field worker visits. The control group will continue with their normal work practice. The intervention will be delivered to the intervention group and then to the control group after a time delay of 15 months post intervention commencement. A baseline survey will be conducted with all consenting educators and field workers (n = ~70 assessing outcomes at the cluster and individual level. The survey will also be administered at one month, six months and 12 months post

  18. Developing programs for African families, by African families: engaging African migrant families in Melbourne in health promotion interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, Jennifer A; Green, Julie; Mellor, David; Mutowo, Mutsa P; de Courten, Maximilian; Renzaho, André M N

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is an emerging problem for African migrants in Australia, but few prevention programs incorporate their cultural beliefs and values. This study reports on the application of community capacity-building and empowerment principles in 4 workshops with Sudanese families in Australia. Workshop participants prioritized health behaviors, skill and knowledge gaps, and environments for change to identify culturally centered approaches to health promotion. The workshops highlighted a need for culturally and age-appropriate interventions that build whole-of-family skills and knowledge around the positive effects of physical activity and nutrition to improve health within communities while reducing intergenerational and gender role family conflicts.

  19. LateNight Penn State Alcohol-Free Programming: Students Drink Less on Days They Participate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Megan E.; Maggs, Jennifer L.; Osgood, D. Wayne

    2011-01-01

    Despite the public health importance of alcohol-free social programs for college students, the majority of existing campus strategies have not been empirically evaluated. This study utilized repeated daily reports to examine the association between attendance at campus-led alcohol-free programming and alcohol use on specific days while controlling for individuals' typical rates of use. The current study assessed students' participation in the Late-Night Penn State (LNPS) alcohol-free programming and amount of alcohol use at a daily level, in order to determine whether students consumed less alcohol on days they attended LNPS compared to weekend days they did not attend. First-year college students reported their daily social activity involvement and alcohol use via 14 consecutive daily web-based surveys. Multilevel regression analyses modeled variation in alcohol use on weekend days (N=3,350) nested within people (N=689 people, 51% women). Analyses focused on within-individual differences between nights attending and not attending LNPS, thereby controlling for stable individual differences, measured and unmeasured. Results indicated that students drank less on days they attended LNPS and on days they stayed in (rather than going to bars/parties, other campus events, or entertainment), both especially among women. These results suggest that alcohol-free social programs may be an effective strategy for decreasing alcohol use on days when students attend alcohol-free events rather than going to other events or gatherings. PMID:20020210

  20. Breastfeeding Curricular Content of Family Nurse Practitioner Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Elaine; Serowoky, Mary

    Health care provider support is essential for breastfeeding success. Family Nurse Practitioners (FNP) are in a unique position to promote and manage breastfeeding. There is a gap in the literature regarding the amount and type of breastfeeding curricular content in FNP programs. An online survey of FNP programs was conducted. Data collection included program descriptors, didactic breastfeeding coursework, and clinical breastfeeding opportunities available to students. No programs offered courses specific to breastfeeding: 82% of programs devoted 1 to 2 hours of didactic lactation content. More than three quarters of the programs offered students breastfeeding counseling opportunities; no programs, however, identified specific breastfeeding clinical competencies. FNPs can play an integral role in breastfeeding promotion and counseling. There appears to be a lack of education provided to FNPs regarding breastfeeding management. Creative approaches that incorporate lactation education into FNP programs may increase FNPs' breastfeeding knowledge and enhance their ability to provide support to breastfeeding families. Copyright © 2016 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Is Full Day Better than Half Day? A Propensity Score Analysis of the Association between Head Start Program Intensity and Children's School Performance in Kindergarten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leow, Christine; Wen, Xiaoli

    2017-01-01

    Research Findings: This study used data from a national sample to examine differences in school outcomes at the end of kindergarten between Head Start children who attended full-day and half-day programs. Propensity scores were used to match children who experienced different intensities of the program on a series of demographic characteristics in…

  2. 75 FR 68975 - Supportive Services for Veteran Families Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-10

    ..., National Center for Homelessness Among Veterans, Supportive Services for Veteran Families Program Office... services pursuant to payments from the grantee be State-licensed because ``home run daycare and other... some jurisdictions, may include home run daycares. The commenter also requested that VA consider...

  3. Managing Personal Income: Teacher Guide. Family Financial Education Program 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Continental Illinois National Bank and Trust Co., Chicago.

    The teacher's guide is for a high school unit on personal income management, part of a family financial education program which also includes a unit on accepting credit responsibility. It can be used by teachers of any subject attempting to develop in students habits and attitudes in the area of earning, saving, and spending. The unit is based on…

  4. Early Head Start Participants, Programs, Families, and Staff in 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Anitha; Walker, Christina

    2016-01-01

    In 1994, the federal Early Head Start (EHS) program was created to address the comprehensive needs of low-income pregnant women and children under age 3. EHS was launched almost 30 years after Head Start was established in 1965 to serve low-income 3- and 4-year-old children and their families with comprehensive early education and support…

  5. Integrating Research into an Undergraduate Family Sciences Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khelifa, Maher; Sonleitner, Nancy; Wooldridge, Deborah; Mayers, Gloysis

    2004-01-01

    The authors report the outcomes of introducing undergraduate research to family science majors at Zayed University, United Arab Emirates. The program has enriched students' educational experiences and has had tangible benefits. In addition to acquiring research skills, students improved in critical analysis, originality, independent learning,…

  6. 75 FR 27949 - Single Family Housing Guaranteed Loan Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-19

    ... efficiency in managing the SFHGLP. The proposed changes are in accordance with the recommendations of the... Housing Service proposes two changes to its Single Family Housing Guaranteed Loan Program (SFHGLP...-quarter of 1 percent. The first proposed rule change would eliminate the lender's published VA rate for...

  7. Archeology as Family Recreation: The Passport in Time Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Brian F.

    Passport in Time (PIT), a volunteer program of the United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service, is an excellent recreational learning experience. Families work side-by-side with professional archaeologists and historians to excavate, record, and restore historic and prehistoric sites across the United States. In addition, families…

  8. Genetic Programming for Medicinal Plant Family Identification System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indra Laksmana

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Information about medicinal plants that is available in text documents is generally quite easy to access, however, one needs some efforts to use it. This research was aimed at utilizing crucial information taken from a text document to identify the family of several species of medicinal plants using a heuristic approach, i.e. genetic programming. Each of the species has its unique features. The genetic program puts the characteristics or special features of each family into a tree form. There are a number of processes involved in the investigated method, i.e. data acquisition, booleanization, grouping of training and test data, evaluation, and analysis. The genetic program uses a training process to select the best individual, initializes a generate-rule process to create several individuals and then executes a fitness evaluation. The next procedure is a genetic operation process, which consists of tournament selection to choose the best individual based on a fitness value, the crossover operation and the mutation operation. These operations have the purpose of complementing the individual. The best individual acquired is the expected solution, which is a rule for classifying medicinal plants. This process produced three rules, one for each plant family, displaying a feature structure that distinguishes each of the families from each other. The genetic program then used these rules to identify the medicinal plants, achieving an average accuracy of 86.47%.

  9. Planning for Impact: A Guide to Planning Effective Family Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, James M.

    A document intended to provide program planning guidelines for Young Men's Christian Associations (YMCAs) desirous of working with families, recommends adherence to eight principles and following of five steps. The principles involve planning before action, fact finding and analysis, clear delineation of operational objectives, planning at all…

  10. Results of the 2010 national resident matching program: family medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugno, Perry A; McGaha, Amy L; Schmittling, Gordon T; DeVilbiss Bieck, Ashley D; Crosley, Philip W; Ostergaard, Daniel J

    2010-09-01

    The results of the 2010 National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) reflect a small but promising increased level of student interest in family medicine residency training in the United States. Compared with the 2009 Match, 75 more positions (with 101 more US seniors) were filled in family medicine residency programs through the NRMP in 2010, at the same time that seven more positions were filled in primary care internal medicine (one more US senior), 14 fewer positions were filled in pediatrics-primary care (16 fewer US seniors), and 16 more positions were filled in internal medicine-pediatrics programs (58 more US seniors). Multiple forces including student perspectives of the demands, rewards, and prestige of the specialty; national dialogue about health care reform; turbulence in the economic environment; lifestyle issues; the advice of deans; and the impact of faculty role models continue to influence medical student career choices. Ninety-four more positions (90 more US seniors) were filled in categorical internal medicine. Fifty-seven more positions (29 more US seniors) were filled in categorical pediatrics programs. The 2010 NRMP results suggest that there is a small increase in primary care careers; however, students continue to show an overall preference for subspecialty careers. Despite matching the highest number of US seniors into family medicine residencies since 2004, in 2010 the production of family physicians remains insufficient to meet the current and anticipated need to support the nation's primary care infrastructure.

  11. A family planning program that pays for itself.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-07-01

    In Japan, the condom is the method of choice of 82% of all contraceptive users. The Japan Family Planning Association covers about 3% of the total condom market through a well-organized social marketing scheme. Mobile guidance teams, equipped with a vehicle, supply contraceptives to health centers, independent midwives, and maternity hospitals in 17 prefectures and collect payment for condoms distributed after their previous visit. As an incentive, organizations and health institutions receive a commission for the condoms they supply. Japan's largest condom manufacturer provides supplies to the Family Planning Association at a very low price. The contraceptive social marketing program pays for its own promotion, and the Family Planning Association is able to support its other activities from the income it earns. The program was designed to complement rather than compete with commercial marketing channels such as pharmacies, which supply 60% of the 660 million condoms purchased in Japan each year.

  12. An Extended Day Program on the Tohono O'odham Nation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Robert T.; Garmany, C. D.; Pompea, S. M.; Walker, C. E.

    2013-01-01

    The National Optical Astronomy Observatory’s Education and Public Outreach (EPO) group has partnered with the Baboquivari Unified School District (BUSD) on the Tohono O’odham Nation as part of the BUSD Extended Day Program. The Extended Day Program is part of BUSD’s school improvement program designed to improve the academic performance of its students. The Extended Day Program started in January of 2012 and is continuing in the fall of 2012. We are working with Indian Oasis Elementary School in Sells, Arizona. Our audience consists of third through fifth grade students. NOAO has committed to delivering science education sessions one day a week for the duration of the program (a variety of other community groups provide sessions on a wide variety of topics on other days). NOAO’s science education sessions have covered a variety of topics including light, color, states of matter, dark skies, the Sun, the planets and the scale of the solar system to fourth and fifth grade students. We will discuss our experience working with Tohono O’odham students in a remote location, the activities we have used with the students and our experiences working with students, teachers and school officials from a different cultural background.

  13. Cultural Adaptation of the Strengthening Families Program 10-14 to Italian Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Enrique; Giannotta, Fabrizia; Latina, Delia; Ciairano, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Background: The family context has proven to be a useful target in which to apply prevention efforts aimed at child and adolescent health risk behaviors. There are currently a variety of cultural adaptation models that serve to guide the international adaptation of intervention programs. Objective: The cultural adaptation process and program…

  14. Strengthening Families in Illinois: Increasing Family Engagement in Early Childhood Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jor'dan, Jamilah R.; Wolf, Kathy Goetz; Douglass, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Strengthening Families is a relationship-based child abuse and neglect prevention initiative started nationally in 2001 through a partnership between the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation and the Center for the Study of Social Policy (CSSP) in Washington, DC. Thirty-five states and several thousand early childhood programs nationwide implement…

  15. Results of the 2011 National Resident Matching Program: family medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, Wendy S; Bieck, Ashley D; Pugno, Perry A; Crosley, Philip W

    2011-10-01

    The results of the 2011 National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) reflect another small but promising increased level of student interest in family medicine residency training in the United States. Compared with the 2010 Match, family medicine residency programs filled 172 more positions (with 133 more US seniors) through the NRMP in 2011. In other primary care fields, 26 more primary care internal medicine positions filled (10 more US seniors), one more position in pediatrics-primary care (two fewer US seniors), and seven more positions in internal medicine-pediatrics programs (10 more US seniors). The 2011 NRMP results suggest a small increase in choosing primary care careers for the second year in a row; however, students continue to show an overall preference for subspecialty careers. Multiple forces continue to influence medical student career choices. Despite matching the highest number of US seniors into family medicine residencies since 2002, the production of family physicians remains insufficient to meet the current and anticipated need to support the nation's primary care infrastructure.

  16. A Community-Based Intervention Program to Enhance Family Communication and Family Well-being: The Learning Families Project in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Shen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundFamily communication is important to maintain family relationships and family well-being. To enhance family communication and family well-being, a community-based “Learning Families Project,” based on the social ecological model was developed in Kwun Tong in Hong Kong, a district with high prevalence of family problems.MethodsThis quasi-experimental study included two nearby government subsidized low-rent housing estates separated by busy main roads, as the intervention [Tsui Ping (South Estate] and control (Shun Tin Estate estate. The main intervention was resident training programs, such as talks, day camps, and thematic activities. No program was implemented in the control estate. Participants in the intervention group received assessments before the intervention (T1, immediately after the intervention (T2, and 6 weeks after the intervention (T3. Control group participants were assessed at baseline (March to April 2011 and follow-up (December 2011 to March 2012. Assessments of family communication (time and perceived adequacy and family well-being (harmony, happiness, and health at T1 and T3 were obtained in the intervention group to examine within-group changes. In addition, these differences in outcomes in the intervention group were compared with those in the control group to examine the effectiveness of the intervention.ResultsFamily communication time and perceived communication adequacy increased significantly in the intervention group (n = 515 with a small effect size (Cohen effect d: 0.10 and 0.24, respectively. Compared with the control group (n = 476, the improvements in family communication time and perceived communication adequacy (Cohen effect d: 0.13 and 0.14, respectively, and perceived family harmony and happiness (Cohen effect d: 0.12 and 0.12, respectively were significantly greater in the intervention group, adjusting for age and education, suggesting the intervention was effective in improving

  17. The effects of adult day services on family caregivers' daily stress, affect, and health: outcomes from the Daily Stress and Health (DaSH) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarit, Steven H; Kim, Kyungmin; Femia, Elia E; Almeida, David M; Klein, Laura C

    2014-08-01

    We examine the effects of use of adult day service (ADS) by caregivers of individuals with dementia (IWD) on daily stressors, affect, and health symptoms. Participants were interviewed for 8 consecutive days. On some days, the IWD attended an ADS program and on the other days caregivers provide most or all of the care at home. Participants were 173 family caregivers of IWDs using an ADS program. Daily telephone interviews assessed care-related stressors, noncare stressors, positive events, affect, and health symptoms. Multilevel models with data nested within persons were used to examine effects of ADS use on daily stressor exposure, affect, and health symptoms. Caregivers had lower exposure to care-related stressors on ADS days, more positive experiences, and more noncare stressors. ADS use lowered anger and reduced the impact of noncare stressors on depressive symptoms. The findings demonstrate that stressors on caregivers are partly lowered, and affect is improved on ADS days, which may provide protection against the effects of chronic stress associated with caregiving. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. 100 Day Kit for Newly Diagnosed Families of School Age Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... into strengths given the proper support, a little creativity and a shift in perspective. In order to ... practices. TEACCH programs are usually conducted in a classroom setting. TEACCH-based home programs are also available ...

  19. Introduction of handheld computing to a family practice residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Goutham

    2002-01-01

    Handheld computers are valuable practice tools. It is important for residency programs to introduce their trainees and faculty to this technology. This article describes a formal strategy to introduce handheld computing to a family practice residency program. Objectives were selected for the handheld computer training program that reflected skills physicians would find useful in practice. TRGpro handheld computers preloaded with a suite of medical reference programs, a medical calculator, and a database program were supplied to participants. Training consisted of four 1-hour modules each with a written evaluation quiz. Participants completed a self-assessment questionnaire after the program to determine their ability to meet each objective. Sixty of the 62 participants successfully completed the training program. The mean composite score on quizzes was 36 of 40 (90%), with no significant differences by level of residency training. The mean self-ratings of participants across all objectives was 3.31 of 4.00. Third-year residents had higher mean self-ratings than others (mean of group, 3.62). Participants were very comfortable with practical skills, such as using drug reference software, and less comfortable with theory, such as knowing the different types of handheld computers available. Structured training is a successful strategy for introducing handheld computing to a residency program.

  20. FAMILY HEALTH PROGRAM: CHALLENGES AND POTENTIALITIES REGARDING DRUGS USE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelle Aparecida de Barros

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Epidemiological studies on drugs use point towards this phenomenon as a public health problem. Nowadays, the Family Health Program (FHP is presented by the Health Ministry as a model to restructure primary health care and aims to offer family-centered care, permeated by integrality, problem solving and community bonds. This article aims to discuss action possibilities of Family Health Care professionals involving drugs patients. It is evident that, as opposed to other actions already developed by FHP professionals in other health care areas, which has appeared clearly and objectively. This fact is observed in the daily activities of FHP professionals, which give little attention to drugs-related problems. However, research emphasizes that there exists a broad range of action possibilities for FHP professionals. Although other studies evidence this team’s fragilities in terms of care for drugs users, these can be overcome by investing in the training and valuation of these professionals. KEY WORDS: Family Health Program; Street drugs; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice.

  1. Programs Needed for 2017 Take Your Child to Work Day | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    On Wednesday, June 28, the NCI grounds will be filled with the chatter and laughter of children for the 21st annual Take Your Child to Work Day event. Every year, the event aims to spark children’s interest in science through a variety of programs and activities.

  2. Extended Day Kindergarten Program. Longitudinal Study: 1983-84 through 1986-87.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevigny, Karen

    Third in a series investigating the effects of the Detroit Public Schools' Extended Day Kindergarten (EDK) Program on students as they progress through elementary school, this report presents longitudinal data on randomly selected experimental (EDK) and control (traditional kindergarten) groups who were in kindergarten during 1983-84, 1984-85, and…

  3. Mainstreaming a Blind Child--Problems Perceived in a Preschool Day Care Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Pearl E.; Wolfgang, Charles

    1984-01-01

    Aims to (1) identify and define problems faced by preschool day care personnel as they attempted to mainstream one totally blind child into their program and (2) rank problems according to the degree of concern involved adults felt about the problems. (RH)

  4. [Basic family health program in Magdalena Medio y Bajo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murad, R

    1992-12-01

    The Program of Information, Education, and Services for Basic Family Health Care in Magdalena Medio and Bajo was designed to increase knowledge and use of contraception and to improve basic health practices and nutrition in the region, which includes municipios belonging to 9 different departments and a total population of 1,720,000. Poverty levels in the area are high. During the 1st year of the project, which was underway from February 1988-May 1991, home visits were made to inform each family about basic family health, to weigh and measure children under 5 not receiving health care elsewhere, and to refer families to the nearest health services. Talks were presented to small groups on family planning, intestinal parasites, sexually transmitted diseases, nutrition, vaccination, cancer prevention, malaria, acute diarrhea, and acute respiratory infection. Community workshops were presented in the 2nd year. Community distribution posts were created for contraceptive and other health product distribution. Information and communication materials from PROFAMILIA were used, and other materials were specially designed for the project by the Foundation for Development of Health Education in Colombia. PROFAMILIA's system of service statistics was used for quantitative evaluation of the information and education activities and sales of contraceptives, antiparasitics, and oral rehydration packets of each instructor. In the 3 years of the program, 89.086 cycles of pills, 398,772 condoms, 29,080 vaginal tablets, 209.791 antiparasitics, and 49,305 oral rehydration packets were sold. 9295 talks were presented to 143,227 residents of the region. 22,000 children were enrolled in the growth monitoring program, and almost 40,000 women were referred for prenatal care and cytology. The instructors gave 900 talks to distributors of contraceptives, antiparasitics, and oral rehydration packets. Surveys of women aged 15-49 residing in the municipios covered by the project were conducted

  5. A descriptive analysis of abortion training in family medicine residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahmi, Dalia; Dehlendorf, Christine; Engel, David; Grumbach, Kevin; Joffe, Carole; Gold, Marji

    2007-06-01

    Access to abortion services in the United States is declining. While family physicians are well suited to provide this care, limited training in abortion occurs in family medicine residency programs. This study was designed to describe the structure of currently available training and the experience of residents participating in these programs. E-mail questionnaires were sent to key faculty members and third-year residents in nine programs that have required abortion training. These faculty members and a sample of residents also completed semi-structured interviews. Residency programs varied in the amount of time dedicated to the procedural aspects of abortion training, ranging from 2 to 8 days, and also in non-procedural aspects of training such as values clarification and didactics. Themes that emerged from interviews with residents included the benefit of training with respect to technical skills and continuity of care. In addition, residents valued discussion of the emotional aspects of abortion care and issues relating to performing abortions after graduation from residency. While the details of the curricula vary, residents in programs with required abortion training generally felt positively about their experiences and felt that abortion was an appropriate procedure for family physicians to provide. Residents emphasized the importance of both non-procedural and technical aspects of training.

  6. Smoke free families: a tobacco control program for pregnant women and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletsch, Pamela K; Morgan, Sarah

    2002-01-01

    Tobacco use during pregnancy continues to cause health problems for women and children. Nurses can facilitate smoking cessation during pregnancy through the use of tobacco control guidelines and counseling tailored to pregnant women. In this article, the Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence: Clinical Practice Guideline is reviewed; the Smoke Free Families program, which is tailored for pregnancy, stage matched, and includes second-hand smoke control assistance, is described; and two models for integrating smoking cessation counseling into prenatal services are offered.

  7. Youth for Astronomy & Engineering Program: Engaging Local Families and Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Tania

    2017-01-01

    Youth for Astronomy and Engineering (YAE) is a program in the Space Telescope Science Institute's Office of Communication and Public Outreach designed to engage the local community in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). This is accomplished through a series of yearly events such as astronomy and engineering clubs for students, family nights, and star parties. These events leverage our mission science to expose participants to the latest science discoveries (Hubble), new developments in space technology (James Webb), STEM career information, and activities that are representative of the work done by individuals in the astronomical and engineering fields. The YAE program helps provide a progression of opportunities for audiences by attracting and identifying highly-engaged individuals for participation in more intensive experiences. It also helps increase our impact by creating a network for piloting educational outreach initiatives at the local level before nationwide release. This poster will highlight the YAE program.

  8. California Family Planning Health Care Providers' Challenges to Same-Day Long-Acting Reversible Contraception Provision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, M Antonia; Harper, Cynthia C; Brindis, Claire D

    2015-08-01

    To assess the extent to which practices offering family planning services are able to offer intrauterine devices (IUDs) and implants in one visit and to identify the reasons why multiple visits may be required. In the fall of 2011, 1,000 California family planning providers were asked about their long-acting reversible contraception delivery practices in a probability survey. We used multivariable logistic regression to examine practice characteristics associated with same-day provision of IUDs and implants. Among the 636 responding practices, 67% offered an IUD and 40% offered a contraceptive implant onsite. Among those with onsite provision, the majority required two or more visits to place an IUD (58%); almost half required two visits to place an implant (47%). Nearly all Planned Parenthood practices could place an IUD (95%) or implant (95%) at the initial visit, whereas the majority of all other practice types could not. The main reasons for delaying IUD and contraceptive implant provision included the need to screen and wait for test results (68% and 24%, respectively) and clinic flow and scheduling issues (50% and 64%, respectively). Multivariable analyses indicated that Planned Parenthood practices were significantly more likely than private practices to have same-day insertion protocols. Most of the family planning providers surveyed have not adopted same-day long-acting reversible contraception insertion protocols and face barriers to same-day provision. III.

  9. The present day relevance of Paul's advice to the family in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Man is a social animal, he needs other human beings in order to survive, develop and achieve anything. The human family is one institution which provides an avenue for man to obtain these benefits from close relations. It affects every person and influences the society. Many people and organizations have made several ...

  10. Phase III Executive Summary. Evaluation of the Child and Family Resource Program (CFRP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauta, Marrit J.

    The Child and Family Resource Program (CFRP) is a family-oriented child development program initiated by the Administration for Children, Youth and Families to provide support services to low-income families and their children. This report summarizes preliminary findings based on the first year and a half of CFRP evalution. Following the brief…

  11. Efficient mixed integer programming models for family scheduling problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Ye Lin

    Full Text Available This paper proposes several mixed integer programming models which incorporate optimal sequence properties into the models, to solve single machine family scheduling problems. The objectives are total weighted completion time and maximum lateness, respectively. Experiment results indicate that there are remarkable improvements in computational efficiency when optimal sequence properties are included in the models. For the total weighted completion time problems, the best model solves all of the problems up to 30-jobs within 5 s, all 50-job problems within 4 min and about 1/3 of the 75-job to 100-job problems within 1 h. For maximum lateness problems, the best model solves almost all the problems up to 30-jobs within 11 min and around half of the 50-job to 100-job problems within 1 h. Keywords: Family scheduling, Sequence independent setup, Total weighted completion time, Maximum lateness

  12. Effectiveness of a Culturally Adapted Strengthening Families Program 12-16-Years for High-Risk Irish Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumpfer, Karol L.; Xie, Jing; O'Driscoll, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Background: Evidence-based programs (EBPs) targeting effective family skills are the most cost effective for improving adolescent behavioural health. Cochrane Reviews have found the "Strengthening Families Program" (SFP) to be the most effective substance abuse prevention intervention. Standardized cultural adaptation processes resulted…

  13. Home Visiting Family Support Programs: Benefits of the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program. Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Home Visiting Campaign, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The federally funded, locally administered Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program sponsors family support programs that are often called "home visiting" because they take place in the homes of at-risk families. These families often lack support, experience, and knowledge of basic parenting skills. Because children…

  14. Partnerships at Work: Lessons Learned from Programs and Practices of Families, Professionals and Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Kathleen Kirk, Ed.; Taylor, Mary Skidmore, Ed.; Arango, Polly, Ed.

    Designed to celebrate family/interprofessional collaborative partnerships, this publication describes high-quality examples of how families and professionals at the family, community, state, and national levels have worked together to create programs and practices that are family-friendly and responsive to what families have said they want and…

  15. Day treatment for disruptive behaviour disorders: can a short-term program be effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerrott, Susan; Clark, Sharon E; Fearon, Isabel

    2010-05-01

    The present study investigates the effectiveness of a short-term day treatment program for children with a primary diagnosis of a Disruptive Behaviour Disorder (DBD) using best-practice treatment strategies. This study, using a wait list control, compared children's admission and discharge test scores on standardized measures of behaviour and functioning, as rated by parents. A repeated measures MANOVA was used to evaluate symptom change. The treatment group was found to have improved significantly more than the waitlist group on parent reports of externalizing behaviour, aggression, social problems, hyperactivity and parent stress. Children with DBD who attended a short-term day treatment program using best-practice treatment strategies showed significant improvement in their behaviour at home. The current study lends support to the idea that severe DBD can be treated using multi-modal, intensive and evidence-based treatment techniques.

  16. Family-Based HIV Preventive Intervention: Child Level Results from the CHAMP Family Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Cami K.; Baptiste, Donna; Traube, Dorian; Paikoff, Roberta L.; Madison-Boyd, Sybil; Coleman, Doris; Bell, Carl C.; Coleman, Ida; McKay, Mary M.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Social indicators suggest that African American adolescents are in the highest risk categories of those contracting HIV/AIDS (CDC, 2001). The dramatic impact of HIV/AIDS on urban African American youth have influenced community leaders and policy makers to place high priority on programming that can prevent youth’s exposure to the virus (Pequegnat & Szapocznik, 2000). Program developers are encouraged to design programs that reflect the developmental ecology of urban youth (Tolan, Gorman-Smith, & Henry, 2003). This often translates into three concrete programmatic features: (1) Contextual relevance; (2) Developmental-groundedness; and (3) Systemic Delivery. Because families are considered to be urban youth’s best hope to grow up and survive multiple-dangers in urban neighborhoods (Pequegnat & Szapocznik, 2000), centering prevention within families may ensure that youth receive ongoing support, education, and messages that can increase their capacity to negotiate peer situations involving sex. This paper will present preliminary data from an HIV/AIDS prevention program that is contextually relevant, developmentally grounded and systematically-delivered. The collaborative HIV/AIDS Adolescent Mental Health Project (CHAMP) is aimed at decreasing HIV/AIDS risk exposure among a sample of African American youth living in a poverty-stricken, inner-city community in Chicago. This study describes results from this family-based HIV preventive intervention and involves 88 African American pre-adolescents and their primary caregivers. We present results for the intervention group at baseline and post intervention. We compare post test results to a community comparison group of youth. Suggestions for future research are provided. PMID:20852742

  17. Staff perspectives: What is the function of adult mental health day hospital programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taube-Schiff, Marlene; Ruhig, Megan; Mehak, Adrienne; Deathe van Dyk, Melanie; Cassin, Stephanie E; Ungar, Thomas; Koczerginski, David; Sockalingam, Sanjeev

    2017-10-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Psychiatric day hospital (DH) treatment has been offered since the 1930s and is appropriate for individuals experiencing intense psychiatric symptoms without requiring 24-hour inpatient care. No empirical research has examined the specific purpose of DH treatment from the perspectives of healthcare providers within these programs. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: This study was the first to address the question of the purpose and function of DH treatment from the outlook of frontline workers within this setting, and confirmed anecdotal observations that DH treatment provides an alternative to intensive psychiatric care, and also operates as "bridge" between these intensive services and purely outpatient treatment. Additional information emerged, such as the importance of the name of DH programs avoiding connotations of illness, the benefits and skills that draw patients to these programs, and challenges that staff and patients experience within DH programs (e.g. short length of treatment, barriers to treatment access). WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: This information can enhance curriculum development within these settings. For example, given the importance of skill building, it is essential to integrate the provision of skill building and coping strategies within these settings. In addition, given that the name of the setting can impact staff (and perhaps service users as well), ensuring that the name of such program highlight wellness and recovery may enable a different type of therapeutic community to develop within these settings. Introduction Despite the benefits of psychiatric day hospitals (DH), research has not addressed staff perspectives of these programs' effectiveness and barriers. Aim To elucidate staff perceptions of Adult Mental Health DH programs at two hospitals in Canada, allowing for improved programming, enhanced structure and increased understanding of DH settings within the continuum of care

  18. Hey! Somebody Read to Me! Ten Easy Ways to Include Reading Every Day. Family Ties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmen, Marie Christine

    2005-01-01

    If a child does not learn to read in the early grades, there are few opportunities for them to catch up. Therefore, the extent of a child's exposure to reading before the early school years is not only important, but critical. In this column, the author suggests ten easy ways to make reading a part of every young child's day: (1) Read and reread…

  19. Psychological health of military children: Longitudinal evaluation of a family-centered prevention program to enhance family resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Patricia; Stein, Judith A.; Saltzman, William; Woodward, Kirsten; MacDermid, Shelley W.; Milburn, Norweeta; Mogil, Catherine; Beardslee, William

    2014-01-01

    Family-centered preventive interventions have been proposed as relevant to mitigating psychological health risk and promoting resilience in military families facing wartime deployment and reintegration. This study evaluates the impact of a family-centered prevention program, Families OverComing Under Stress Family Resilience Training (FOCUS), on the psychological adjustment of military children. Two primary goals include: 1) Understanding the relationships of distress among family members using a longitudinal path model to assess relations at the child and family level, and 2) Determining pathways of program impact on child adjustment. Multilevel data analysis using structural equation modeling was conducted with de-identified service delivery data from 280 families (505 children ages 3-17) in two follow-up assessments. Standardized measures included Service Member and Civilian parental distress (Brief Symptom Inventory, PTSD Checklist – Military), child adjustment (Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire), and family functioning (McMaster Family Assessment Device). Distress was significantly related among the service member parent, civilian parent and children. FOCUS improved family functioning, which in turn significantly reduced child distress at follow-up. Salient components of improved family functioning in reducing child distress mirrored resilience processes targeted by FOCUS. These findings underscore the public health potential of family-centered prevention for military families, and suggest areas for future research. PMID:23929043

  20. Psychological health of military children: longitudinal evaluation of a family-centered prevention program to enhance family resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Patricia; Stein, Judith A; Saltzman, William; Woodward, Kirsten; MacDermid, Shelley W; Milburn, Norweeta; Mogil, Catherine; Beardslee, William

    2013-08-01

    Family-centered preventive interventions have been proposed as relevant to mitigating psychological health risk and promoting resilience in military families facing wartime deployment and reintegration. This study evaluates the impact of a family-centered prevention program, Families OverComing Under Stress Family Resilience Training (FOCUS), on the psychological adjustment of military children. Two primary goals include (1) understanding the relationships of distress among family members using a longitudinal path model to assess relations at the child and family level and (2) determining pathways of program impact on child adjustment. Multilevel data analysis using structural equation modeling was conducted with deidentified service delivery data from 280 families (505 children aged 3-17) in two follow-up assessments. Standardized measures included service member and civilian parental distress (Brief Symptom Inventory, PTSD Checklist-Military), child adjustment (Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire), and family functioning (McMaster Family Assessment Device). Distress was significantly related among the service member parent, civilian parent, and children. FOCUS improved family functioning, which in turn significantly reduced child distress at follow-up. Salient components of improved family functioning in reducing child distress mirrored resilience processes targeted by FOCUS. These findings underscore the public health potential of family-centered prevention for military families and suggest areas for future research. Reprint & Copyright © 2013 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  1. Health benefits achieved through the Seventh-Day Adventist Wellness Challenge program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamieneski, R; Brown, C M; Mitchell, C; Perrin, K M; Dindial, K

    2000-11-01

    The Wellness Challenge program introduces the philosophy of the healing power of God and stresses the importance of developing a sense of spirituality in conjunction with the promotion of good health. To employ scientific rigor to the outcome measures of the Seventh-Day Adventist Wellness Challenge program. A 2-tailed, paired sample t test. East Pasco Medical Center in Zephyrhills, Fla. 165 participants. Presurvey, 21-day outpatient wellness intervention; postsurvey, 6 weeks after completion of the program. Changes in behaviors related to cigarette smoking, alcohol use, eating patterns, exercise, water consumption, rest, relaxation, and time spent outdoors, as well as demographic data. Statistically significant differences were found between the pre- and postprogram clinical and laboratory test results for the participants' blood pressure, weight, glucose levels, and cholesterol at .05 alpha. Furthermore, self-health improvements measured by a pre- and postsurvey response confirmed statistically significant improvement in participants' willingness to improve their lifestyle behaviors for a potentially greater quality of life. The Wellness Challenge program offers ways to reduce risk factors related to chronic disease while improving the quality of life within an adult population by allowing people to slowly incorporate newly acquired tools into their everyday life.

  2. [Encouragement of the national family planning program in Rwanda].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, P

    1987-12-01

    Pronatalist attitudes are traditional in Rwanda, a country in which more than 90% of the population lives by peasant agriculture and the Catholic church is strong. A rapid change in thinking will be inevitable if the country is to attain its goal of food self-sufficiency and to improve the health of its mothers and infants. Population densities were already high in Rwanda in the early 20th century, and they have become much higher. The total population increased from an estimated 2 million around 1940 to 4 million in 1970 and about 6 million in 1984. If the current rate of growth of 3.7% is maintained, the population will exceed 10 million before the year 2000. Already the size of the average farm is only .4 hectare. The health situation is equally alarming. Infant and child mortality rates are each about 125/1000 live births. The high death rate among mothers is partly due to too many births, too closely spaced. At age 49 a Rwandan woman will have given birth to an average of 8.5 children. Prematurity, malnutrition, and diarrhea and other diseases take their toll on the children of chronically exhausted mothers. Family planning alone will not solve the problems; better prenatal care, medical surveillance of infants and young children, improved obstetrical facilities, vaccination programs, oral rehydration programs and a range of other services are needed. The government of Rwanda created the Scientific Consultative Council for Sociodemographic Problems in 1974 and the National Office of Population (ONAPO) in 1981. ONAPO is responsible for promotion and provision of family planning services. A project to increase acceptance of family planning in the 2 prefectures of Butare and Gikongoro and to integrate family planning into maternal-child health services has received support from the German government since 1986. The 1st phase of the project, in 1986-87, involved informing the population and political-administrative authorities of Gikongoro of the benefits of

  3. Mediating effect of Adult Day Health Care (ADHC) and family network on Quality of Life among low-income older Korean immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bum Jung

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the direct and indirect effects of Adult Day Health Care (ADHC) and family network on Quality of Life (QOL) for low-income older Korean immigrants in Los Angeles County, CA. A cross-sectional survey of low-income older Korean immigrants who use ADHC programs was conducted. Self-reported measures included sociocultural characteristics, acculturation, cognitive function, family network, utilization of ADHC, and QOL. The study found that for QOL, two variables had only direct effects: years in ADHC and acculturation. Family network was directly associated with QOL and indirectly associated with it through the variable "years in ADHC." Our findings indicate that a strong family network is positively associated with more years of attendance in ADHC, and with higher QOL scores. Thus, policy makers and practitioners should be aware of the positive association among social networks, attendance in ADHC, and higher QOL among low-income older Korean immigrants. © The Author(s) 2013.

  4. Efficacy of a day-care program in the treatment of psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junling; Adam, David N; Stebbing, Elaine; Gerbrandt, Judith; Lui, Harvey; Shapiro, Jerry; Zhou, Youwen

    2008-01-01

    Few data exist documenting the effectiveness of psoriasis day-care treatment programs (PDTPs) using standardized efficacy measurements. We sought to analyze the efficacy of a PDTP using the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI). A retrospective review was performed on 132 patients treated at our PDTP. Sufficient data existed to permit PASI analysis using a simplified method for a representative subgroup of 64 patients, who formed the study population. Patients received phototherapy and topical treatments over 2 weeks. The outcome measures included a baseline and day 11 PASI, a physician global assessment (PGA), and adverse events reported by the patients. Mean baseline PASI was 13.6 (N = 64), with a 59.6% reduction by day 11. A PASI reduction of > or = 50% was seen in 75% of patients, with 30% of patients achieving > or = 75% reduction of PASI. Day 11 PGA demonstrated a 69.9% improvement. With a reduction in PASI of 59.6% at 11 days, our PDTP, with phototherapy and topical agents, seems to be a rapid and effective therapy for psoriasis.

  5. Family Violence: Effects of a Film Program for Alcohol Dependent Persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Robert J.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Compared film programs on family violence and alcoholism, in an alcohol rehabilitation program. Patients (N=77) were evaluated for their reactions to the two film programs. A majority of patients rated the film program on family violence very highly, indicating a need for such interventions in alcohol rehabilitation. (JAC)

  6. Construction of a Family Quality of Life Support Program for families of young and adults with intellectual disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natxo MARTÍNEZ RUEDA

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper is grounded on current conceptions on Family Quality of Life (FQoL and family-centered intervention. It describes a part of the building process of a ‘Program for Supporting Family Quality of Life’, within the SAIOA-BBK frame a Gorabide’s information, guidance and support service for people with intellectual disability and their families. A major goal of this project is making proposals for professionals to fit the link between FQoL assessment and its improvement. The program was developed, constructed and tested through collaborative methods between professionals and university researchers, aiming to an increase of FQoL of families with sons or daughters among the youth and adulthood period. Program features, and how it was experimented in a pilot sample of families (n = 5 is presented.

  7. Clinical Pharmacists as Educators in Family Medicine Residency Programs: A CERA Study of Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, Jennie B; Lounsbery, Jody L; D'Amico, Frank; Dickerson, Lori M; Franko, John; Nagle, John; Seehusen, Dean A; Wilson, Stephen A

    2016-03-01

    The clinical pharmacist's role within family medicine residency programs (FMRPs) is well established. However, there is limited information regarding perceptions of program directors (PDs) about clinical pharmacy educators. The study objectives were (1) to estimate the prevalence of clinical pharmacists within FMRPs and (2) to determine barriers and motivations for incorporation of clinical pharmacists as educators. The Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance (CERA) distributed an electronic survey to PDs. Questions addressed formalized pharmacotherapy education, clinical pharmacists in educator roles, and barriers and benefits of clinical pharmacists in FMRPs. The overall response rate was 50% (224/451). Seventy-six percent (170/224) of the responding PDs reported that clinical pharmacists provide pharmacotherapy education in their FMRPs, and 57% (97/170) consider clinical pharmacists as faculty members. In programs with clinical pharmacists, 72% (83/116) of PDs reported having a systematic approach for teaching pharmacotherapy versus 22% (21/95) in programs without. In programs without clinical pharmacists, the top barrier to incorporation was limited ability to bill for clinical services 48% (43/89) versus 29% (32/112) in programs with clinical pharmacists. In both programs with and without clinical pharmacists, the top benefit of having clinical pharmacists was providing a collaborative approach to pharmacotherapy education for residents (35% and 36%, respectively). Less than half of FMRPs incorporate clinical pharmacists as faculty members. Despite providing collaborative approaches to pharmacotherapy education, their limited ability to bill for services is a major barrier.

  8. An open trial of an intensive summer day treatment program for severely overweight adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotler, L A; Etu, S Fischer; Davies, M; Devlin, M J; Attia, E; Walsh, B T

    2006-12-01

    This open trial examined the feasibility and usefulness of treating adolescents with a body mass index (BMI) > or =95th percentile in a 6-week day treatment program within a psychiatric outpatient setting. Sixteen adolescents, ages 12-15, attended a 6-week multidisciplinary summer day treatment program. Outcome measures include pre- and post-program assessments of BMI, body fat, laboratory measures, nutritional status, physical activity, mood and eating disorder symptoms, motivation, self-esteem and quality of life. BMI, waist/hip circumferences, blood pressure, heart rate, and body fat did not change significantly from baseline to week 6. Fasting glucose decreased significantly from baseline to week 6, but there were no significant changes in other laboratory measures. The teen-rated feelings subscale of the Peds Quality of Life Scale improved. Self-esteem, as measured by the Rosenberg Self- Esteem Scale, indicated a strong trend towards improvement, and motivation measures also showed a trend for improvement. These findings suggest that a brief, intensive intervention for overweight adolescents may yield meaningful changes in quality of life, self-esteem, and motivation, even in the absence of significant weight loss.

  9. [Family planning programs and birth control in the third world].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlschlagl, H

    1991-01-01

    The population explosion has been abating since the 2nd half of the 1960s. The birth rate of the 3rd World dropped from 45/1000 during 1950-55 to 31/1000 during 1985-90. From the 1st half of the 1960s to the 1st half of the 1980s the total fertility of such countries dropped from 6.1 to 4.2 children/woman. In Taiwan, Singapore, Hong Kong, South Korea, and Malaysia living standards improved as a result of industrialization, and fertility decreased significantly. In Sri Lanka, China, North Vietnam, and Thailand the drop of fertility is explained by cultural and religious factors. In 1982 about 78% of the population of developing countries lived in 39 states that followed an official policy aimed at reducing the population. Another 16% lived in countries supporting the concept of a desired family size. However, World Bank data showed that in the mid-1980s in 27 developing countries no state family planning (FP) programs existed. India adopted an official FP program in 1952, Pakistan followed suit in 1960, South Korea in 1961, and China in 1962. In Latin America a split policy manifested itself: in Brazil birth control was rejected, only Colombia had a FP policy. In 1986 the governments of 68 of 131 developing countries representing 3.1 billion people considered the number of children per woman too high. 31 of these countries followed concrete population control policies. On the other hand, in 1986 24 countries of Africa with 40% of the continent's population took no measures to influence population growth. In Latin America and the Caribbean 18 of 33 countries were idle, except for Mexico that had a massive state FP program. These programs also improve maternal and child health with birth spacing of at least 2 years, and the prevention of pregnancies of too young women or those over 40. The evaluation of rapidly spreading FP programs in the 1970s was carried out by the World Fertility Survey in 41 countries. The impact of FP programs was more substantial than

  10. Family Coaching as a delivery modality for evidence-based prevention programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Swendeman, Dallas; Rotheram-Fuller, Erin; Youssef, Maryann K

    2017-08-01

    Family Coaching is proposed as a new delivery format for evidence-based prevention programs (EBPPs). Three recent developments in health promotion support the potential efficacy of Family Coaching: (1) renewed interest in integrated prevention programs for multiple risk factors and behavior changes, (2) broad and long-term impacts of family-based interventions, and (3) popular acceptance of "coaching" as a nonstigmatizing, goal-focused intervention strategy. Family coaches are community members and paraprofessionals trained in common elements of EBPP. Family Coaching has specific goals, is short term, and has definable outcomes. Coaches frame the program's goals to be consistent with the family's values, normalize the family's experience, assess their strengths, and help the family set goals and develop skills and routines to problem solve challenging situations. Broad dissemination of EBPP will be facilitated with delivery formats that are flexible to meet families' priorities and providers' desires and capacities to tailor programs to local contexts.

  11. A Model for Reintegrating Couples and Family Therapy Training in Psychiatric Residency Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rait, Douglas; Glick, Ira

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors propose a family-systems training model for general residency training programs in psychiatry based on the couples and family therapy training program in Stanford's Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. Methods: The authors review key elements in couples and family therapy training. Examples are drawn from the…

  12. Perspectives of family and veterans on family programs to support reintegration of returning veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Ellen P; Sherman, Michelle D; McSweeney, Jean C; Pyne, Jeffrey M; Owen, Richard R; Dixon, Lisa B

    2015-08-01

    Combat deployment and reintegration are challenging for service members and their families. Although family involvement in mental health care is increasing in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) system, little is known about family members' preferences for services. This study elicited the perspectives of returning Afghanistan and Iraq war veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder and their families regarding family involvement in veterans' mental health care. Semistructured qualitative interviews were conducted with 47 veterans receiving care for posttraumatic stress disorder at the Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System or Oklahoma City VA Medical Center and 36 veteran-designated family members. Interviews addressed perceived needs related to veterans' readjustment to civilian life, interest in family involvement in joint veteran/family programs, and desired family program content. Interview data were analyzed using content analysis and constant comparison. Both groups strongly supported inclusion of family members in programs to facilitate veterans' postdeployment readjustment and reintegration into civilian life. Both desired program content focused on information, practical skills, support, and gaining perspective on the other's experience. Although family and veteran perspectives were similar, family members placed greater emphasis on parenting-related issues and the kinds of support they and their children needed during and after deployment. To our knowledge, this is the first published report on preferences regarding VA postdeployment reintegration support that incorporates the perspectives of returning male and female veterans and those of their families. Findings will help VA and community providers working with returning veterans tailor services to the needs and preferences of this important-to-engage population. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Evaluation of a Family-based Substance Abuse Prevention Program Targeted for the Middle School Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbey, Antonia; Pilgrim, Colleen; Hendrickson, Peggy; Buresl, Sue

    2000-01-01

    Evaluates family-based substance abuse prevention program implemented in a rural community for families with middle school students. In comparison with nonparticipants, students had higher family cohesion, less family fighting, greater school attachment, higher self-esteem, and believed alcohol should be consumed at an older age, at one-year…

  14. 78 FR 67385 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: FHA PowerSaver Pilot Program (Title I Property...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-12

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: FHA PowerSaver Pilot Program (Title... with the Paperwork Reduction Act. The purpose of this notice is to allow for an additional 30 days of... information collection for a period of 60 days was published on August 9, 2013. A. Overview of Information...

  15. Day-to-day living with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: towards a family-based approach to the illness impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Raquel; Figueiredo, Daniela; Jácome, Cristina; Cruz, Joana; Marques, Alda

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the perspectives of both patients and family members regarding the impact of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in their family life. An exploratory qualitative study was conducted with patients and their family members in the chronic phase of COPD. Individual interviews were performed to explore participants' perspectives and submitted to thematic analysis. Six major themes emerged from patients' perspective: (1) impact of COPD symptoms on personal and family daily life; (2) (over)protective family support; (3) difficulties in couple communication; (4) sense of identity loss; (5) fear of COPD progression; and (6) coping resources. Five main themes emerged from the family members' perspective: (1) restrictions in family's social life; (2) emotional distress related to COPD exacerbations; (3) tension in couple relationship; (4) financial strain of COPD; and (5) coping resources. The overall findings illustrate the complex interaction between the experience of living with COPD and communication patterns, emotional states, social support and social roles within the family. The results highlight the need to develop family-based interventions to facilitate a functional adjustment to COPD. However, these interventions in COPD remain undeveloped and empirical evidence is needed.

  16. Family Assessment/Treatment/Evaluation Methods Integrated for Helping Teen Suicide Attempters/Families in Short Term Psychiatric Hospitalization Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Suzanne

    The assessment process can be integrated with treatment and evaluation for helping teenage suicide attempters and families in short term psychiatric hospitalization programs. The method is an extremely efficient way for the therapist to work within a given time constraint. During family assessment sufficient information can be gathered to…

  17. A descriptive analysis of abortion training in family medicine residency programs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brahmi, Dalia; Dehlendorf, Christine; Engel, David; Grumbach, Kevin; Joffe, Carole; Gold, Marji

    2007-01-01

    Access to abortion services in the United States is declining. While family physicians are well suited to provide this care, limited training in abortion occurs in family medicine residency programs...

  18. 75 FR 55588 - Family-to-Family Health Information Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Family-to-Family Health Information Center... Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will be transferring the Florida Family-to-Family Health... parent-to-parent support for families with children and youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN) in...

  19. 75 FR 55587 - Family-to-Family Health Information Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Family-to-Family Health Information Center... Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will be transferring the Vermont Family-to-Family Health... support for families with children and youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN) in the state of...

  20. [Effectiveness of lifestyle intervention program in persons with obesity treated in a day hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carral San Laureano, F; Cabo Navarro, D; Ayala Ortega, C; Gómez Rodríguez, F; Piñero Zaldivar, A; Prieto Ferrón, M; Jiménez Millán, A I; Sanz Sanz, A; García Calzado, C

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic disease that affects approximately 25% of the Spanish population, causing high morbidity and associated healthcare costs. To evaluate the effectiveness of an intervention program on lifestyles in obese patients treated in a day hospital scheme. A prospective non- controlled intervention study was conducted on obese patients treated in the Endocrinology and Nutrition day hospital, Puerto Real University Hospital, and included in program of lifestyle modification to achieve a weight loss of ≥ 5% minimum. We studied 262 patients with a mean age of 44.6±16.0 years (71% women) with an initial weight, body mass index and waist circumference of 110.4±21.1kg, 41.6±6.6Kg/m(2) and 120.5±13.2cm, respectively. Patients who continued in the study lost an average of 4.8±4.8kg (n=165) and 7.0±6.2kg (n=48) at three and six months, respectively, with 51.5% (n=135) patients reaching the weight loss goal of ≥ 5%. There were no statistically differences in weight loss between any clinical or follow-up variables analysed. 43.5% of patients voluntarily left the study without reaching the weight loss goal. The intervention on lifestyles in obese patients treated in a day hospital achieves moderate weight loss in the medium term, with half of patients achieving a weight loss ≥5%. Copyright © 2013 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Assessment of preclinical students' academic motivation before and after a three-day academic affair program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, Myo Nyein; Somboonwong, Juraiporn; Jaroonvanichkul, Vorapol; Wannakrairot, Pongsak

    2015-01-01

    Medical students' motivation is an important driving factor for academic performance, and therefore medical teachers and educators are often highly interested in this topic. This study evaluated the impact of an academic affair program upon preclinical year medical students' motivation to study. An intervention study was conducted using a pretest-posttest study design. A total of 296 preclinical year medical students who had just passed their first year and were about to attend their second year at the Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand, participated in the study. The intervention comprised of dialogues for personality development, pictorial expression in groups, as well as small group lectures delivered by senior students giving information on how to prepare for the forthcoming classes. Students' academic motivation was measured before and after the intervention program, applying the transculturally translated Academic Motivation Scale (AMS). Cronbach's alpha of Thai version AMS was 0.8992. The average scores in seven scales of AMS were compared between the pre- and posttest results, using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The differences were confirmed by using the multivariate analysis of variance. Students' academic motivation increased after participation in the three-day academic program. There was also a significant increase in introjected extrinsic motivation, which can enhance the students' self-esteem and feeling of self-worth (Pmotivation toward accomplishment increased significantly (Pacademic milestones, and a step ahead of autonomous motivation. Amotivation level declined significantly (Pacademic motivational constructs before and after the intervention was altogether significant (P=0.036, multivariate analysis of variance). After experiencing a three-day intervention, the new students' motivation advanced along the continuum of self-determination toward autonomous motivation. Therefore, it is considered to be worthwhile

  2. Assessing the effects of Families for Safe Dates, a family-based teen dating abuse prevention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foshee, Vangie A; McNaughton Reyes, Heath Luz; Ennett, Susan T; Cance, Jessica D; Bauman, Karl E; Bowling, J Michael

    2012-10-01

    To examine the effects of a family-based teen dating abuse prevention program, Families for Safe Dates, primarily on outcomes related to testing the conceptual underpinnings of the program including (1) factors motivating and facilitating caregiver engagement in teen dating abuse prevention activities, and 2) risk factors for teen dating abuse, and secondarily on dating abuse behaviors. Families were recruited nationwide using listed telephone numbers. Caregivers and teens completed baseline and 3-month follow-up telephone interviews (n = 324). Families randomly allocated to treatment condition received the Families for Safe Dates program including six mailed activity booklets followed-up by health educator telephone calls. There were significant (teen dating abuse prevention activities including caregiver perceived severity of dating abuse, response efficacy for preventing dating abuse, self-efficacy for talking about dating abuse, knowledge of dating abuse, acceptance of dating abuse, communication skills with the teen, and belief in the importance of involvement in their male (but not female) teen's dating. The latter effect was the only one moderated by sex of the teen. The targeted risk factor affected by the program was teen acceptance of dating abuse. Treatment was also significantly associated with less physical dating abuse victimization. Modifications to the program are warranted, but overall, the findings are very favorable for the first family-based teen dating abuse prevention program to be evaluated. Copyright © 2012 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Integration of a Family Systems Approach for Understanding Youth Obesity, Physical Activity, and Dietary Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Kitzman-Ulrich, Heather; Wilson, Dawn K.; St. George, Sara M.; Lawman, Hannah; Segal, Michelle; Fairchild, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    Rates of overweight in youth have reached epidemic proportions and are associated with adverse health outcomes. Family-based programs have been widely used to treat overweight in youth. However, few programs incorporate a theoretical framework for studying a family systems approach in relation to youth health behavior change. Therefore, this review provides a family systems theory framework for evaluating family-level variables in weight loss, physical activity, and dietary approaches in yout...

  4. Why Women Chose to Participate in a Family Literacy Program and Factors That Contributed to the Program's Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaffe, Diane; Williams, Cheri Lynn

    1998-01-01

    Finds that the supportive environment of "women helping women" was the hallmark characteristic of a local Even Start family literacy program and that participants were not consciously thinking about family literacy but joined the program for themselves and gave no indication of seeing the connection between the adult literacy component…

  5. Action-oriented evaluation of an in-home family therapy program for families at risk for foster care placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWey, Lenore M; Humphreys, Julie; Pazdera, Andrea L

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct an action-oriented evaluation of an in-home family therapy program serving families deemed at risk for the placement of children in foster care. In this study, feedback was solicited from both clients and therapists. Results indicate "duality" associated with several aspects of in-home family therapy, including the opportunity to observe families in their own homes versus the vulnerability some families feel when therapy is conducted in-home; therapists suggesting that sufficient training is required for in-home family therapy to be effective versus clients' opinions that therapists' lived experiences are more relevant; and the importance of the therapeutic alliance versus feelings of abandonment upon termination. Implications for researchers and practitioners are discussed. © 2009 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.

  6. Home Visitation Programs for At-risk Young Families: A Systematic Literature Review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    J.E. Drummond; A.E. Weir; G.M. Kysela

    2002-01-01

    ... home visitation for at-risk young families as the major delivery method. Objectives: To describe the program components, practices, outcomes, and reliability of the evaluation approaches. Methods...

  7. Families Experiencing Housing Instability: The Effects of Housing Programs on Family Routines and Rituals

    OpenAIRE

    Mayberry, Lindsay S.; Shinn, Marybeth; Benton, Jessica Gibbons; Wise, Jasmine

    2014-01-01

    Maintenance of family processes can protect parents, children, and families from the detrimental effects of extreme stressors, such as homelessness. When families cannot maintain routines and rituals, the stressors of poverty and homelessness can be compounded for both caregivers and children. However, characteristics of living situations common among families experiencing homelessness present barriers to the maintenance of family routines and rituals. We analyzed 80 in-depth interviews with ...

  8. Nutrition in early life and the programming of adult disease: the first 1000 days

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Villares, José Manuel

    2016-07-12

    Development during fetal life and infancy is characterized by rapid growth as well as the maturation of organs and systems. Changes, both in quality and quality, in nutrients during these periods may permanently infl uence the way these organs mature and function. These effects are termed as “programming” and play an important role in the presence of non-transmissible diseases through the lifespan. Specially cardiovascular disease, metabolic disorders and carbohydrate intolerance. Nutritional deficits during pregnancy, leading to intrauterine growth restriction, are associated to a higher risk of type 2 diabetes, and coronary disease among the offspring. This infl uence does not stop with the delivery but early nutrition in infancy, type of lactation, and the way and time solid foods are introduced, does play a role in this programming. Nutritional and non-nutritional factors alter the expression of some genes, resulting in effective remodeling of tissue structure and functionality. These epigenetic modifications can be transmitted to further generations, adding evidence that hereditable epigenetic modifications play a critical role in nutritional programming. But, at the same time, it opens a window of opportunity to decrease the burden of non-transmissible disease by a clever advise on nutrition during pregnancy and across the first 2 years of life (the so-called 1000 days strategy).

  9. Family Programming for Incarcerated Parents: A Needs Assessment among Inmates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazura, Kerry

    2001-01-01

    Investigates the needs, as perceived by the offender, of families with incarcerated individuals. Seeks to determine inmates' family and parenting issues and concerns, and to assess their interest in formal and informal family services. Results demonstrate that although male and female inmates have different concerns, both seem to value their…

  10. Assessment of preclinical students’ academic motivation before and after a three-day academic affair program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aung MN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Myo Nyein Aung,1 Juraiporn Somboonwong,2 Vorapol Jaroonvanichkul,1 Pongsak Wannakrairot3 1Medical Education Unit, 2Quality Management Division and Department of Physiology, 3Academic Affairs Division, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, ThailandBackground: Medical students’ motivation is an important driving factor for academic performance, and therefore medical teachers and educators are often highly interested in this topic. This study evaluated the impact of an academic affair program upon preclinical year medical students’ motivation to study.Design and methods: An intervention study was conducted using a pretest-posttest study design. A total of 296 preclinical year medical students who had just passed their first year and were about to attend their second year at the Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand, participated in the study. The intervention comprised of dialogues for personality development, pictorial expression in groups, as well as small group lectures delivered by senior students giving information on how to prepare for the forthcoming classes. Students’ academic motivation was measured before and after the intervention program, applying the transculturally translated Academic Motivation Scale (AMS. Cronbach’s alpha of Thai version AMS was 0.8992. The average scores in seven scales of AMS were compared between the pre- and posttest results, using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The differences were confirmed by using the multivariate analysis of variance.Results: Students’ academic motivation increased after participation in the three-day academic program. There was also a significant increase in introjected extrinsic motivation, which can enhance the students’ self-esteem and feeling of self-worth (P<0.001. Moreover, intrinsic motivation toward accomplishment increased significantly (P<0.001. This is related to the enjoyment of passing academic milestones, and a step

  11. Assessment of preclinical students’ academic motivation before and after a three-day academic affair program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, Myo Nyein; Somboonwong, Juraiporn; Jaroonvanichkul, Vorapol; Wannakrairot, Pongsak

    2015-01-01

    Background Medical students’ motivation is an important driving factor for academic performance, and therefore medical teachers and educators are often highly interested in this topic. This study evaluated the impact of an academic affair program upon preclinical year medical students’ motivation to study. Design and methods An intervention study was conducted using a pretest-posttest study design. A total of 296 preclinical year medical students who had just passed their first year and were about to attend their second year at the Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand, participated in the study. The intervention comprised of dialogues for personality development, pictorial expression in groups, as well as small group lectures delivered by senior students giving information on how to prepare for the forthcoming classes. Students’ academic motivation was measured before and after the intervention program, applying the transculturally translated Academic Motivation Scale (AMS). Cronbach’s alpha of Thai version AMS was 0.8992. The average scores in seven scales of AMS were compared between the pre- and posttest results, using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The differences were confirmed by using the multivariate analysis of variance. Results Students’ academic motivation increased after participation in the three-day academic program. There was also a significant increase in introjected extrinsic motivation, which can enhance the students’ self-esteem and feeling of self-worth (Pmotivation toward accomplishment increased significantly (Pacademic milestones, and a step ahead of autonomous motivation. Amotivation level declined significantly (Pacademic motivational constructs before and after the intervention was altogether significant (P=0.036, multivariate analysis of variance). Conclusion After experiencing a three-day intervention, the new students’ motivation advanced along the continuum of self-determination toward

  12. Family health program user: knowledge and satisfaction about user embracement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saulo Lacerda Borges de Sá

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the knowledge and satisfaction of users of a Basic Health Unit about the strategy of embracement. Methods: Descriptive study with qualitative approach, carried out in a Basic Health Unit, Fortaleza, Brazil, where practical activities of the Education Program of Work for Health of the University of Fortaleza were performed. Fifty eight service users were involved, following inclusion criteria: being present during the data collection, age over 18, regardless of sex, and voluntary participation. Data collection occurred in December 2009, through semi-structured interview. The data associated with the identification of users were processed in Microsoft Office Excel 2007, being organizedstatistically in table. Data related to qualitative aspects were analyzed according to the technique of content analysis. Results: 56 (97% were women, with ages ranging between 21 and 40 years, 34 (59% were married and 53 (91% are literate. On family income, 55 (95%received less than two minimum salaries per month. In order to facilitate understanding the speech of users, these were evaluated from the perspective of two categories: knowledge about embracement and satisfaction with embracement. Conclusion: Users have a limited view of the significance and magnitude of the embracement to provide the care. Although satisfied with the service, respondents report as negative aspects: the shortage of professionals, the professional relationship with user impaired due to constant delays of the professional, and the dehumanization of care.

  13. The family-oriented home visiting program: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, S W; Ruttle, K

    1980-11-01

    Designed and tested a home-based intervention program for low-income mothers with toddler and at least one other child under five. Sex of toddlers and race (black or white) about equally divided. Nine months of weekly home visits were specifically planned for each mother to enhance her effectiveness as an educational change agent. Treatment was planned to promote skills and understandings applicable over range of ages. Pretests, immediate posttests, and posttests one and two years later were administered to 27 experimental families and to a randomly assigned control group of 20. At .05 level of significance or beyond, experimentals excelled controls on receptive language test (toddler), on the Caldwell HOME (mother was indirectly rated as an educational change agent), and on a measure of teaching style (mother). They were also significantly superior on the Binet (toddler) at second posttest. No differences found with older siblings on Slosson Intelligence Test. Differences at third posttest were at least as great as earlier ones on mother measures. Relationships among child and mother measures are discussed.

  14. The Effects of a Family Support Program Including Respite Care on Parenting Stress and Family Quality of Life Perceived by Primary Caregivers of Children with Disabilities in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Minjung; Park, Jiyeon

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a family support program was carried out for primary caregivers of children with disabilities. The program included respite care, recreation programs, counseling, and social support coordination based on individual needs of each family. In order to verify the intervention effects, parenting stress and family quality of life were…

  15. Health and Safety in Family Day Care Homes: Association Between Regulatory Non-compliance and Lower Median Income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Marjorie S; Jeon, Sangchoon; Crowley, Angela A

    2016-05-01

    To determine frequency of non-compliance with child care regulations among family day care homes (FDCH) and identify the role of income in compliance. We analyzed non-compliance in 746 routine, unannounced inspection and re-inspection reports of FDCH collected by the Connecticut Department of Public Health licensing specialists in 2007-2008 and linked results to median income of zip code data. We grouped the 83 state regulations into 12 regulation categories, analyzed 11 categories, and used latent class analysis to classify each FDCH as high or low compliance for each category. We used logistic regression analysis to estimate the odds ratios of low compliance. Among the 746 FDCH inspections (594 first inspections and 152 re-inspections), we found high rates of non-compliance in inspection regulations in immunizations (32.9 %), water temperature (35.6 %) and hazards (30.0 %). Among the 11 regulation categories, 4 categories (indoor safety, emergency preparedness, child/family/staff documentation, and qualifications of provider) had regulations with high non-compliance. Median household income of FDCH zip code was lower for re-inspection sites than for inspection sites ($34,715 vs. $57,118, p non-compliance issues in inspections and re-inspections and there are income-based inequities that place children at higher risk who are already at high risk for suboptimal health outcomes.

  16. Impact of the application of neurolinguistic programming to mothers of children enrolled in a day care center of a shantytown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Miranda, C T; de Paula, C S; Palma, D; da Silva, E M; Martin, D; de Nóbrega, F J

    1999-03-04

    Of the members of a family, the mother is without doubt the most important one, which provides justification for including an evaluation of her mental health as one of the variables to be considered as determining factors in each child's level of development. To assess the impact of the application of Neurolinguistic Programming (NLP) on child development, home environment and maternal mental health. Randomised controlled trial. The study included children enrolled in the municipal day care center of a shantytown in the City of São Paulo. 45 pairs of mothers and respective children between 18 and 36 months of age. Children's development (Bayley scales); home environment variation (HOME); and maternal mental health (SRQ). Comparison between before and after the intervention was made in terms of children's psychomotor development, home environment and maternal mental health. Application of the NLP technique to the experimental group and comparison with a control group. 1--Experimental (EG), consisting of 23 children submitted to intervention by NLP; and 2--Control (CG), with 22 children with no intervention. Length of intervention: 15 sessions of NLP. 37 children remained in the study (EG = 10, CG = 27). Variations in mental development (OR 1.21, IC 95% 0.0 to 23.08) in their home environment (Wilcoxon): p = 0.96 (before) and p = 0.09 (after); in maternal mental health: p = 0.26, 2 df. There was a trend that indicated positive effects on the home environment from the intervention.

  17. Improvement in Vision Parameters for Participants Treated With Alternative Therapies in a 3-day Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrot, Edward C

    2015-01-01

    Eye conditions that are considered progressive and degenerative and for which the causation is generally poorly understood or not understood within conventional medicine can respond to natural therapeutic interventions that result in arrest and/or improvement of morbidity, with enhanced functional results. Because many of the treated conditions are age related, a delay of disease progression for 5 or even 10 y can mean an additional decade of independence for seniors. The 11 included ocular conditions are ordinarily considered incurable by any method except surgery and, even with surgery, the outcomes can be variable and/or transient. The research intended to demonstrate the effectiveness of alternative modalities-intravenous (IV) nutrition, oxidative therapy, microcurrent stimulation, and syntonic light therapy-in improving vision in chronic eye conditions, even when administered for a short period. The study was a retrospective, open-label, single-group design. All participants in the 3-d conference during the period covered were selected. The setting was ophthalmologist Edward Kondrot's Healing the Eye and Wellness Center near Tampa, FL, USA. The participants in this study were all patients attending 1 of 11 CAM treatment events at the author's center within 2 y. Each session lasted 3 d and the number of participants in each session ranged from 5-15 (mean = 13). The cohort numbered 152 patients who were diagnosed with ≥1 of 11 types of eye disease. Seventy-eight percent of the patients had either age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) or glaucoma, which, taken together, are the leading cause of blindness in persons >65 y. Each of 4 alternative modalities was provided at least once to each participant: (1) IV nutrition, (2) oxidative therapy, (3) microcurrent stimulation, and (4) syntonic light therapy. On the first day, a detailed treatment plan for each participant was developed. Each day consisted of 2 therapeutic eye programs, a stress reduction program

  18. Evaluation of a Sleep Education Program for Low-Income Preschool Children and Their Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Katherine E.; Miller, Alison L.; Bonuck, Karen; Lumeng, Julie C.; Chervin, Ronald D.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate a novel sleep education program for low-income preschool children and their families. Design: Randomized trial of an educational intervention. Setting: Community-based. Participants: Head Start preschool families (n = 152) in greater Lansing and Detroit, Michigan. Interventions: Classrooms or Head Start sites were randomized to an intervention group (prompt intervention) versus a control group (delayed intervention). Parents attended a one-time, 45-min sleep education program and preschoolers received 2 w (320 total min) of classroom sleep curriculum. Measurements: Parent knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy, and beliefs were assessed as the primary outcomes just before the 45-min sleep intervention, immediately postintervention, and approximately 1 mo postintervention. Parents reported their child's bedtimes and wake times on 7-day sleep diaries at baseline and at 1-mo follow-up. Average weeknight sleep durations and bedtimes served as secondary outcomes. Results: Linear mixed models showed a time × treatment effect for parents' knowledge, attitudes, and self-efficacy (each P sleep duration at 1-mo follow-up by 30 min (11.0 ± 0.9 h vs. 10.5 ± 1.0 hours at baseline) compared to controls (10.4 ± 0.9 h versus 10.5 ± 0.9 h at baseline) (P = 0.04 for difference between groups). Children did not show statistically significant improvements in bedtime. Conclusions: Educational interventions in early childhood can have an effect on parents' sleep knowledge, attitudes, and self-efficacy, and on children's sleep behavior. However, repeated exposure to the new information may be important for parents as well as their children. Citation: Wilson KE, Miller AL, Bonuck K, Lumeng JC, Chervin RD. Evaluation of a sleep education program for low-income preschool children and their families. SLEEP 2014;37(6):1117-1125. PMID:24882907

  19. 75 FR 38999 - Federal Perkins Loan Program: Federal Family Education Loan Program and William D. Ford Federal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Federal Perkins Loan Program: Federal Family Education Loan Program and William D. Ford Federal Direct... (FFEL), and William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct Loan) program loans repaid by the Secretary...

  20. Transitioning Together: A Multi-Family Group Psychoeducation Program for Adolescents with ASD and Their Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    DaWalt, Leann Smith; Greenberg, Jan S.; Mailick, Marsha R.

    2018-01-01

    Currently there are few evidence-based programs available for families of individuals with ASD during the transition to adulthood. The present study provided a preliminary evaluation of a multi-family group psychoeducation intervention using a randomized waitlist control design (n = 41). Families in the intervention condition participated in…

  1. Evaluation of Family Impairment Following an Integrative Treatment Program for Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Ashley Nehrt

    2012-01-01

    Research has shown that behaviors associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are a consistent source of stress on the family unit. Given the increased amount of stress that families endure and the importance of the family unit to the child with ASD, treatment programs should not only take the child with ASD's needs into account, but also the…

  2. A programme evaluation of the Family Crisis Intervention Program (FCIP): relating programme characteristics to change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al, C.M.W.; Stams, G.J.J.M.; Asscher, J.J.; van der Laan, P.H.

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the Family Crisis Intervention Program (FCIP), focusing on crisis, child safety, family functioning and child behaviour problems. Questionnaires were completed by 183 families in crisis and their FCIP worker. After FCIP, the crisis had decreased and child safety had increased.

  3. Residency Training in Family Medicine: A History of Innovation and Program Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carek, Peter J; Anim, Tanya; Conry, Colleen; Cullison, Sam; Kozakowski, Stan; Ostergaard, Dan; Potts, Stacy; Pugno, Perry A

    2017-04-01

    Residency programs have been integral to the development, expansion and progression of family medicine as a discipline. Three reports formed the foundation for graduate medical education in family medicine: Meeting the Challenge of Family Practice, The Graduate Education of Physicians, and Health is a Community Affair. In addition, the original core concepts of comprehensiveness, coordination, continuity, and patient centeredness continue to serve as the foundation for residency training in family medicine. While the Residency Review Committee for Family Medicine of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has provided the requirements for training throughout the years, key organizations including the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine, the American Academy of Family Physicians, the Association of Family Medicine Residency Directors, and the American Board of Family Medicine have provided resources for and supported innovation in programs. Residency Program Solutions, National Institute for Program Director Development, and Family Medicine Residency Curriculum Resource are several of the resources developed by these organizations. The future of family medicine residency training should continue the emphasis on innovation and development of resources to enhance the training of residents. Areas for further development include leadership and health care systems training that allows residents to assume leadership of multidisciplinary health care teams and increase focus on the family medicine practice population as the main unit for resident education.

  4. The Effect of the Family Training Program on Married Women's Couple-Burnout Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirin, Hatice Deveci; Deniz, M. Engin

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of Modules 2 and 3 of the Family Communication Section of the Family Training Program as prepared by the Ministry of Family and Social Policies on married women's couple-burnout levels. The study group consists of 40 married women in total: 20 constituting the experimental group and the remaining 20…

  5. Family Support in Prevention Programs for Children at Risk for Emotional/Behavioral Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaleri, Mary A.; Olin, S. Serene; Kim, Annie; Hoagwood, Kimberly E.; Burns, Barbara J.

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a review of empirically based prevention programs to identify prevalence and types of family support services within these programs. A total of 238 articles published between 1990 and 2011 that included a family support component were identified; 37 met criteria for inclusion. Following the Institute of Medicine's typology, prevention…

  6. The Integration of a Family Systems Approach for Understanding Youth Obesity, Physical Activity, and Dietary Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitzman-Ulrich, Heather; Wilson, Dawn K.; St. George, Sara M.; Lawman, Hannah; Segal, Michelle; Fairchild, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    Rates of overweight in youth have reached epidemic proportions and are associated with adverse health outcomes. Family-based programs have been widely used to treat overweight in youth. However, few programs incorporate a theoretical framework for studying a family systems approach in relation to youth health behavior change. Therefore, this…

  7. Student Impairment and Remediation in Accredited Marriage and Family Therapy Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusell, Candyce S.; Peterson, Colleen M.

    2003-01-01

    This research addresses the extent of student impairment in Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy Education (COAMFTE) accredited marriage and family therapy programs, indicators of impairment used by program directors, faculty time devoted to impaired students, and the frequency of student dismissal. The data come from a…

  8. 75 FR 39035 - Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) Family Self-Sufficiency (FSS) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-07

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) Family Self-Sufficiency (FSS) Program AGENCY: Office of... independence and self- sufficiency. Housing agencies consult with local officials to develop an Action Plan... Title of Proposal: Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) Family Self- Sufficiency (FSS) Program. OMB Approval...

  9. The Army Family Team Building Program: Facilitating a Transformative Learning Process--An Intrinsic Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gall, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    This study sought to understand how the Army Family Team Building program influences self-reliance and self-sufficiency in Army spouses as they integrate into the Army community. The purpose of the Army Family Team Building program is to empower Army spouses with knowledge and skills, which foster well-being and improve quality of life. The…

  10. 34 CFR 682.100 - The Federal Family Education Loan programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false The Federal Family Education Loan programs. 682.100 Section 682.100 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FEDERAL FAMILY EDUCATION LOAN (FFEL) PROGRAM Purpose and Scope...

  11. Family Connections: The Importance of Prison Reading Programs for Incarcerated Parents and Their Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumberg, Daniel M.; Griffin, Dawn A.

    2013-01-01

    This article introduces a successful reading program, Family Connections, for incarcerated parents and their children. A comprehensive review of the literature supports the need to implement prison programs from an ecological perspective, in which the needs of inmates and their families are considered. More specifically, the benefits of directing…

  12. Healthy Kids, Healthy Families: A Collaborative Program to Address Childhood Overweight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen B. Jager

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Healthy Kids, Healthy Families is a program of outreach and research that has been developed to address treatment and prevention of the childhood obesity epidemic through a family-centered, multidisciplinary approach. The American Dietetic Association recommends community-based and environmental interventions as the most feasible methods to support healthful lifestyles for the greatest numbers of children and families (Ritchie, Crawford, Hoelscher, & Sothern, 2006. Healthy Kids, Healthy Families was developed as an innovative, collaborative program to help children and families maintain healthy weight, through impacting the systemic medical and psychosocial aspects of overweight in children. The program involves in-home, family-based intervention followed by multi-family group education and community outreach.

  13. 75 FR 41793 - Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-19

    ... Food and Nutrition Service Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service Payment Rates, and Administrative Reimbursement Rates for Sponsoring Organizations of Day Care Homes for the Period July 1, 2010 Through June 30, 2011 AGENCY: Food and Nutrition Service...

  14. 78 FR 45176 - Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-26

    ... Food and Nutrition Service Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service Payment Rates, and Administrative Reimbursement Rates for Sponsoring Organizations of Day Care Homes for the Period July 1, 2013 Through June 30, 2014 AGENCY: Food and Nutrition Service...

  15. 76 FR 44573 - Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-26

    ... Food and Nutrition Service Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service Payment Rates, and Administrative Reimbursement Rates for Sponsoring Organizations of Day Care Homes for the Period July 1, 2011 Through June 30, 2012 Correction In notice document 2011...

  16. A community based intervention program to enhance neighborhood cohesion: The Learning Families Project in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chen; Wan, Alice; Kwok, Lit Tung; Pang, Sally; Wang, Xin; Stewart, Sunita M; Lam, Tai Hing; Chan, Sophia S

    2017-01-01

    Neighborhood cohesion, which refers to the extent of the connectedness and solidarity among residents in a community or neighborhood, is an important determinant of human health. To enhance neighborhood cohesion, the "Learning Families Project" was developed with a series of intervention programs in Kwun Tong in Hong Kong, a district with low neighborhood cohesion. This project, based on the social ecological model, provided a platform for neighbors to learn, communicate and interact with each other. This quasi-experimental study included two nearby government subsidized low rent housing estates separated by busy main roads. One served as the intervention (Tsui Ping (South) Estate) and one as the control (Shun Tin Estate) estate. The intervention included promotion, resident training and learning programs, embodied by a series of community activities such as talks, day camp, thematic activities and horticulture class. Baseline (before the programs) and follow-up (one year after the programs) surveys were conducted both in the intervention and control estate to assess the impact of the programs on neighborhood cohesion. The number of residents who completed both the baseline and follow-up surveys was 502 in the intervention estate and 476 in the control estate. Neighborhood cohesion significantly improved in the intervention group after the programs (Cohen effect size d: 0.15). Compared with the control group, the improvements in closeness of the neighborhood and trust in neighbors were significantly greater in the intervention group (Cohen effect size d: 0.13 and 0.14, respectively). This brief intervention program using a quasi-experimental study design increased neighborhood cohesion in a low rent housing estate. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02851667.

  17. Evaluation of a sleep education program for low-income preschool children and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Katherine E; Miller, Alison L; Bonuck, Karen; Lumeng, Julie C; Chervin, Ronald D

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate a novel sleep education program for low-income preschool children and their families. Randomized trial of an educational intervention. Community-based. Head Start preschool families (n = 152) in greater Lansing and Detroit, Michigan. Classrooms or Head Start sites were randomized to an intervention group (prompt intervention) versus a control group (delayed intervention). Parents attended a one-time, 45-min sleep education program and preschoolers received 2 w (320 total min) of classroom sleep curriculum. Parent knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy, and beliefs were assessed as the primary outcomes just before the 45-min sleep intervention, immediately postintervention, and approximately 1 mo postintervention. Parents reported their child's bedtimes and wake times on 7-day sleep diaries at baseline and at 1-mo follow-up. Average weeknight sleep durations and bedtimes served as secondary outcomes. Linear mixed models showed a time × treatment effect for parents' knowledge, attitudes, and self-efficacy (each P Educational interventions in early childhood can have an effect on parents' sleep knowledge, attitudes, and self-efficacy, and on children's sleep behavior. However, repeated exposure to the new information may be important for parents as well as their children.

  18. 78 FR 52962 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Housing Finance Agency Risk-Sharing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-27

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Housing Finance Agency Risk-Sharing... Collection Title of Information Collection: Housing Finance Agency Risk- Sharing Program. OMB Approval Number... housing finance agencies (HFAs). Under this program, HUD provides full mortgage insurance on multifamily...

  19. 78 FR 65696 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Housing Finance Agency Risk-Sharing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Housing Finance Agency Risk-Sharing... Collection Title of Information Collection: Housing Finance Agency Risk- Sharing Program. OMB Approval Number... with State and local housing finance agencies (HFAs). Under this program, HUD provides full mortgage...

  20. Do microfinance programs help families insure consumption against illness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gertler, Paul; Levine, David I; Moretti, Enrico

    2009-03-01

    Families in developing countries face enormous financial risks from major illness both in terms of the cost of medical care and the loss in income associated with reduced labor supply and productivity. We test whether access to microfinancial savings and lending institutions helps Indonesian families smooth consumption after declines in adult health. In general, results support the importance of these institutions in helping families to self-insure consumption against health shocks.

  1. Quality Assurance Audit of Technique Failure and 90-Day Mortality after Program Discharge in a Canadian Home Hemodialysis Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Nikhil; Reintjes, Frances; Courtney, Mark; Klarenbach, Scott W; Ye, Feng; Schick-Makaroff, Kara; Jindal, Kailash; Pauly, Robert P

    2017-07-24

    Little is known about patients exiting home hemodialysis. We sought to characterize the reasons, clinical characteristics, and pre-exit health care team interactions of patients on home hemodialysis who died or underwent modality conversion (negative disposition) compared with prevalent patients and those who were transplanted (positive disposition). We conducted an audit of all consecutive patients incident to home hemodialysis from January of 2010 to December of 2014 as part of ongoing quality assurance. Records were reviewed for the 6 months before exit, and vital statistics were assessed up to 90 days postexit. Ninety-four patients completed training; 25 (27%) received a transplant, 11 (12%) died, and 23 (25%) were transferred to in-center hemodialysis. Compared with the positive disposition group, patients in the negative disposition group had a longer mean dialysis vintage (3.15 [SD=4.98] versus 1.06 [SD=1.16] years; P=0.003) and were performing conventional versus a more intensive hemodialysis prescription (23 of 34 versus 23 of 60; Pday mortality among patients undergoing modality conversion was 26%. Over a 6-year period, approximately one third of patients exited the program due to death or modality conversion. Patients who die or transfer to another modality have significantly higher health care resource utilization (e.g., hospitalization, respite treatments, nursing time, etc.). Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  2. Marriage and Family Therapy and Traditional Counselor Education Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beamish, Patricia; Navin, Sally

    This document presents a review of the literature on salient ethical issues in marriage and family counseling. Issues addressed in the paper include: (1) defining the client and the welfare and rights of individuals versus those of the family system; (2) issues of informed consent and manipulative therapeutic interventions; (3) issues related to…

  3. Analysis of Army Family Research Program Measures of Individual Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-01

    appointment) ............... 0 . 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 IN f, To take care of persona( or SO family business (for example. 100 financial matters or housing WI...000 0 C 0 00 0 f. To take care of persona, r family business (for exanle. financua matmer or housing problems) 0 0000 C 0 g

  4. A Yoga and Compassion Meditation Program Reduces Stress in Familial Caregivers of Alzheimer's Disease Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Danucalov, M. A. D.; Kozasa, E. H.; Ribas, K. T.; Galdur?z, J. C. F.; Garcia, M. C.; Verreschi, I. T. N.; Oliveira, K. C.; Romani de Oliveira, L.; Leite, J. R.

    2013-01-01

    Familial caregivers of patients with Alzheimer's disease exhibit reduced quality of life and increased stress levels. the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of an 8-week yoga and compassion meditation program on the perceived stress, anxiety, depression, and salivary cortisol levels in familial caregivers. A total of 46 volunteers were randomly assigned to participate in a stress-reduction program for a 2-month period (yoga and compassion meditation program-YCMP group) (n = 25) ...

  5. [Evaluation of the program "Strong families: love and limits" in families with teenagers aged 10 to 14 years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corea V, M Loreto; Zubarew G, Tamara; Valenzuela M, M Teresa; Salas P, Francisca

    2012-06-01

    "Strong Families" is a family program aimed at preventing risk behaviors in adolescents from 10 to 14 years of age. It has been developed by the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO/WHO) and is based on the Iowa Strengthening Families Program. This program has been certified and has been proven to effectively prevent adolescent drug and alcohol abuse in several countries around the globe. To evaluate the Strong Families Program toward adjusting current parenting styles, aiming to decrease risk behaviors in Chilean adolescents. A quasi-experimental study involving 120 families, selected from 6 schools within the Metropolitan Region of Santiago, Chile. A group of 129 adolescents and 124 parents were chosen by convenience to be intervened. A control group of 223 adolescents and 165 parents were not intervened. The families that underwent intervention attended to 7 educational sessions. The intervened and control groups were evaluated before intervention as well as 6 months after intervention, by means of self-administered evaluation tools. The intervened parents showed significant parenting changes six months after intervention, which resulted in less yelling (p = 0.007), insults (p = 0.002) and lack of control when their children misbehaved (p = 0.008). Regarding the risk behaviors in the intervened and control adolescents, no changes were observed in terms of the consumption rate of tobacco, alcohol or illegal drug use, or in sexual risk behaviors. After six months of intervention, the Program proved to be effective in modifying parenting styles. However, no changes were observed in risk behaviors among adolescents, which could occur within a longer period of time, as reported in other studies.

  6. Evaluation of a Childhood Obesity Prevention Online Training Certificate Program for Community Family Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eck, Kaitlyn; Alleman, Gayle Povis; Quick, Virginia; Martin-Biggers, Jennifer; Hongu, Nobuko; Byrd-Bredbenner, Carol

    2016-12-01

    Community family educators have the opportunity to incorporate childhood obesity prevention concepts in their programming with families of young children, but often lack formal health and nutrition education. The purpose of this feasibility study was to create an online training certificate program for community family educators and assess the program's effectiveness at improving participant's knowledge, attitudes, and intended and actual behaviors related to healthy lifestyles. Community family educators (n = 68) completed an online pretest, viewed 13 brief videos (8-15 min) focused on childhood obesity related topics and took mini-knowledge self-checks after each video followed by an online posttest. At posttest, paired t tests showed participants' childhood obesity prevention related knowledge (i.e., nutrition, physical activity, screen time and sleep) improved significantly (p family meals, physical activity, screen time control and parent modeling significantly (p family educators' knowledge, attitudes, and intentions for obesity-prevention related parenting practices.

  7. Effects of a Support Program on Nurses' Communication with Hospitalized Children's Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Hiroko

    2017-09-01

    More than a few pediatric nurses experience difficulty in communicating with children's family members. However, effective means of providing communication support for pediatric nurses have not been examined sufficiently. This study aimed to develop and implement a communication support program for nurses to facilitate improved communication with families of hospitalized children, and to clarify changes in nurses' recognition and behavior toward communication with families in clinical settings. The program lasted 6 months and consisted of lectures, role-play, 4 communication models in which nurses experienced difficulty communicating with family members, and continued individual support. The effects of the program were evaluated qualitatively and descriptively using semi-structured interviews. A total of 7 nurses with less than 5 years of pediatric nursing experience completed the program. Subsequent to program completion, nurses' awareness of careful communication with families increased, and they began to approach families actively using thoughtful words. Furthermore, as nurses received favorable reactions from families, they realized that communication was interactive and recognized that their perception of their communication skills as poor had changed. This program could contribute in reducing nurses' difficulty in communicating with families and encourage them to improve their communication.

  8. Bipolar disorder and family communication: effects of a psychoeducational treatment program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoneau, T L; Miklowitz, D J; Richards, J A; Saleem, R; George, E L

    1999-11-01

    Family psychoeducational programs are efficacious adjuncts to pharmacotherapy for patients with schizophrenic and bipolar disorders, but little is known about what these programs change about families. The authors assessed changes in face-to-face interactional behavior over 1 year among families of bipolar patients who received a 9-month family-focused psychoeducational therapy (FFT; n = 22) or crisis management with naturalistic follow-up (CMNF; n = 22), both administered with maintenance pharmacotherapy. Members of families who received FFT showed more positive nonverbal interactional behavior during a 1-year posttreatment problem-solving assessment than families who received CMNF, although no corresponding decreases were seen in negative interactional behaviors. The positive effect of family treatment on patients' symptom trajectories over 1 year was partially mediated by increases in patients' positive nonverbal interactional behaviors during this same interval.

  9. International Population Assistance and Family Planning Programs: Issues for Congress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blanchfield, Luisa

    2008-01-01

    ...." The Mexico City policy denies U.S. funds to foreign nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) that perform or promote abortion as a method of family planning -- even if the activities are undertaken with non-U.S. funds...

  10. The Prevention Education Program (PEP) Nuremberg: design and baseline data of a family oriented intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohrig, E; Geiss, H C; Haas, G M; Schwandt, P

    2001-05-01

    We describe the design and baseline data of the Prevention Education Program (PEP), a home-based and family oriented intervention program, aimed to assess and improve cardiovascular risk factors in school children and their families during an intervention period of 10 y. At study entry all participants were randomized either to an intervention group (screening and intervention program) or to a control group (risk screening, general advice). Cardiovascular risk factors (hypertension, elevated lipids, smoking, obesity) as well as dietary behaviour are evaluated yearly using structured interview, physical examination, laboratory analysis, and seven-day dietary protocol. During the years 1993-1998, 3547 adults (age 36.2+/-7 y) and 3495 children (age 6.5+/-2 y) were recruited. Adults show a high prevalence of risk factors: hypertension 21%; active smoking 39%, elevated LDL-cholesterol 19%; and obesity 42%. Children exhibit these risk factors in comparable frequency: hypertension 20%; passive smoking 44%; elevated LDL-cholesterol 17%; and obesity 19%. The analysis of the dietary protocols (1926 adults, 1569 children) shows that both generations adhere to a diet exceeding the recommended fat intake (adults 38% of total energy, children 38%), while carbohydrate intake (adults 43% of total energy intake, children 50%) is reduced compared to NCEP-(step I)-guidelines. The finding, that children show a prevalence of risk factors which is comparable to that found in adults, supports the need for an early beginning of intervention. Since both generations adhere to an unhealthy diet which contributes to cardiovascular risk, dietary intervention may be a promising method in primary prevention of cardiovascular risk.

  11. Dealing with Moms and Dads: Family Dilemmas Encountered by Youth Program Leaders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisha Griffith

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The leaders of youth programs encounter a range of challenging situations that involve youth’s parents or families. This qualitative study obtained data on the variety and nature of these family-related “dilemmas of practice.” Longitudinal interviews with leaders of 10 high quality programs for high-school-aged youth yielded narrative information on a sample of 32 family dilemmas that they had encountered. Grounded theory analysis identified four categories of family dilemmas: 1 problems at home that become a concern to the leader, 2 parents’ expectations are incongruent with program norms or functioning, 3 parents do not support youth’s participation in the program or an aspect of the program, and 4 communicating with parents on sensitive matters. Each of these categories of dilemmas entailed distinct considerations and underlying issues that effective leaders need to be able to understand.

  12. Strong Military Families Program: A Multifamily Group Approach to Strengthening Family Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Kate; Muzik, Maria; Waddell, Rachel; Thompson, Stephanie; Rosenberg, Lauren; Masini, Gabriella; Smith, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Military families frequently display remarkable resilience in the face of significant challenges, and yet deployment and parental separation are significant stressors for parents, particularly those with infants and young children. The Strong Military Families preventive intervention is a multifamily parenting and self-care skills group that aims…

  13. The influence of financial incentive programs in promoting sustainable forestry on the nation's family forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael A. Kilgore; John L. Greene; Michael G. Jacobson; Thomas J. Straka; Steven E. Daniels

    2007-01-01

    Financial incentive programs were evaluated to assess their contribution to promoting sustainable forestry practices on the nation’s family forests. The evaluation consisted of an extensive review of the literature on financial incentive programs, a mail survey of the lead administrator of financial incentive programs in each state forestry agency, and focus groups...

  14. "Growing Better Beginnings": An Evaluation of a Family Literacy Program for Pre-Schoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barratt-Pugh, Caroline; Maloney, Carmel

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the implementation and outcomes of "Growing Better Beginnings": a family literacy program for four and five year olds. The program builds on "Better Beginnings: Birth to Three" launched in 2005. Parents, teachers and librarians were surveyed and interviewed to ascertain their perceptions of the program.…

  15. Impact of the application of neurolinguistic programming to mothers of children enrolled in a day care center of a shantytown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Torres de Miranda

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Of the members of a family, the mother is without doubt the most important one, which provides justification for including an evaluation of her mental health as one of the variables to be considered as determining factors in each child’s level of development. OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of the application of Neurolinguistic Programming (NLP on child development, home environment and maternal mental health. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial. SETTING: The study included children enrolled in the municipal day care center of a shantytown in the City of São Paulo. PARTICIPANTS: 45 pairs of mothers and respective children between 18 and 36 months of age. MAIN MEASUREMENTS: Children’s development (Bayley scales; home environment variation (HOME; and maternal mental health (SRQ. Comparison between before and after the intervention was made in terms of children’s psychomotor development, home environment and maternal mental health. INTERVENTION: Application of the NLP technique to the experimental group and comparison with a control group. 1 - Experimental (EG, consisting of 23 children submitted to intervention by NLP; and 2 - Control (CG, with 22 children with no intervention. Length of intervention: 15 sessions of NLP. RESULTS: 37 children remained in the study (EG = 10, CG = 27. Variations in mental development (OR 1.21, IC 95% 0.0 to 23.08 in their home environment (Wilcoxon: p = 0.96 (before and p = 0.09 (after; in maternal mental health: p = 0.26, 2 df. CONCLUSIONS: There was a trend that indicated positive effects on the home environment from the intervention.

  16. A Multisite Program Evaluation of Families and Schools Together (FAST): Continued Evidence of a Successful Multifamily Community-Based Prevention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crozier, Mary; Rokutani, Laurie; Russett, Jill L.; Godwin, Emilie; Banks, George E.

    2010-01-01

    Strong school and family ties have long shown success in influencing positive child development and lasting academic success. While a multitude of programs exist to help facilitate the school-family connection, one program in particular, Families and Schools Together, or FAST, stands out as an effective prevention program that is suitable for a…

  17. Measuring Outcomes of an Intensive Care Unit Family Diary Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Truong-Giang; Covalesky, Miranda; Sinclair, Samantha; Gunter, Heather; Norton, Tamara; Chen, Alice; Yi, Cassia

    2017-01-01

    Patients discharged from intensive care units are at risk of short- and long-term physical, cognitive, and emotional symptoms known as post-intensive care syndrome. Family members of intensive care unit patients are at risk of similar symptoms known as post-intensive care syndrome-family. Both syndromes are common, and strategies to reduce risk factors should be employed. An intensive care unit diary project to help reduce these syndromes was implemented in 2 intensive care units using an evidence-based framework. The effects of these diaries were studied using the Family Satisfaction with Care in the Intensive Care Unit survey. Rates of referrals to a postintensive care unit recovery clinic were also observed in relation to the diaries. Although preliminary data did not reveal a significant increase in family satisfaction, the surveys provided important staff feedback. The diaries fostered feelings of compassion and caring as well as built trust between staff and family members of intensive care unit patients. The diaries increased referrals to the postintensive care unit recovery clinic. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  18. A Family of Tools for Supporting the Learning of Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Rößling

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Both learning how to program and understanding algorithms or data structures are often difficult. This paper presents three complementary approaches that we employ to help our students in learning to program, especially during the first term of their study. We use a web-based programming task database as an easy and risk-free environment for taking the first steps in programming Java. The Animal algorithm visualization system is used to visualize the dynamic behavior of algorithms and data structures. We complement both approaches with tutorial videos on using the Eclipse IDE. We also report on the experiences with this combined approach.

  19. Positive effects of a cognitive-behavioral intervention program for family caregivers of demented elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Paes Araujo Fialho

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: It was to examine the effects of a Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT program administered to family caregivers of dementia patients. METHODS: Forty family caregivers were enrolled in a CBT intervention across eight weekly sessions. Cognitive, functional and behavioral status of patients were evaluated, as well as their own and their family caregivers' perceptions of quality of life. Specific instruments were also applied to evaluate caregiver stress level, coping, anxiety and depression. RESULTS: At the end of the program, family caregivers reported fewer neuropsychiatric symptoms among patients and an improvement in patients' quality of life. In addition, caregivers changed their coping strategies, whereas a significant decrease was observed in their anxiety levels. CONCLUSION: The CBT program employed appears to be a promising and useful tool for clinical practice, displaying positive effects on quality of life and neuropsychiatric symptoms of dementia, as well as proving beneficial for alleviating anxiety and stress in family caregivers.

  20. Moving from reclusion to partial freedom: the experience of family caregivers for disabled elderly persons assisted in a day care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocchi, Silvia Cristina Mangini; Cano, Karen Cristina Urtado; Baltieri, Lilian; Godoy, Daniele Cristina; Spiri, Wilza Carla; Juliani, Carmen Maria Casquel Monti

    2010-09-01

    This study aimed at understanding the interactional experience between family caregivers and disabled elderly persons supported in a Day Care Center according to the caregiver's perspective. It also aimed at developing a representative theoretical model for the events experienced by such caregiver. The Grounded Theory was used as methodological framework whereas Interactional Symbolism served as the theoretical framework. Observation and interviews were used for data collection. The following phenomenon arose from the results: feeling of support by the Day Care Center, by the strength of the bond with the elderly and by spirituality in order to continue playing the challenging role of a family caregiver for a disabled elderly person. The study made possible to understand that, among these three supporting cornerstones for coping with the burden generated by the family caregiver role, the care model promoted by the Day Care Center was the intervenient variable in the process of improving the quality of life of the family caregiver-disabled elderly person binomial. This allowed the identification of the main category--moving from reclusion to partial freedom: the experience of family caregivers for disabled elderly persons assisted in a Day Care Center.

  1. The Army Family Research Program: Origin, Purpose, and Accomplishments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-04-01

    programs and services such as career planning, employment skills training, or premarital counseling in addition to crisis management programs and...of officers fits a different pattern depending on the sex of the officer and their marital status at entry (Rakoff and Doherty, 1989). AFRP

  2. A psychoeducational program for families of affectively ill children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brent, D A; Poling, K; McKain, B; Baugher, M

    1993-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the acceptability, feasibility, and efficacy of a family psychoeducational program for the parents of affectively ill adolescents. Sixty-two parents of 34 affectively ill adolescents received one 2-hour psychoeducational session that covered information about the diagnosis, course, and treatment of affective illness. Methods of coping with an affectively ill family member also were discussed. The view of depression as a chronic and recurrent illness was strongly emphasized. Participants showed improvement in knowledge about depression and in modification of dysfunctional beliefs about depression and its treatment. Almost all participants found the program both useful and interesting. These findings support the feasibility, acceptability, and to a modest degree, the efficacy of a family psychoeducational program for parents of affectively ill adolescents. Additional studies should address the impact of such programs on compliance with treatment, clinical outcome, and family life.

  3. Measurement and evaluation of national family planning programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauldin, W P

    1967-03-01

    ) segura de traducir las estadísticas de servicio en práticas y tal vez aún datos sobre suministro comercial en datos sabre tasas de natalidad. Esto incluye, par ejemplo, los esfuerzos para consolidar observaciones coma "cinco años-mujer de usa de IUD, a 400 condones equivalen a la prevención de un nacimiento," y esfuerzos como los de Pakistán de calcular tasas coma "años de protección de una pareja contra el embarazo."In the belief that a decrease in the rate of population growth will increase economic development, more than ten countries have inaugurated family planning programs in the past fifteen years. To provide a model for measuring the immediate, intermediate, and long-term effects of any such program, the authors use the Taiwan evaluation.The model suggests that a good system of evaluation should include monthly statistics on (1) participants, who are grouped by characteristics; (2) the distribution of supplies, reported at first by the characteristics of recipients, but after by gross volume only; (3) family planning activities of private physicians to measure the catalytic effect on the private sector; (4) new contacts and amount of advertising in mass media; (5) costs broken down by areas and by cost categories; and (6) distribution of commercial supplies. In addition, the program should conduct 300-400 interviews every 6-12 months to learn the rates of continuation and the rates and reasons for discontinuation. Finally, a KAP survey should be conducted every two years.The administration of the evaluation should be close to the director for policy decisions and for the ultimate work of evaluation-the finding of new ways to measure the main goal of change in fertility by the translation of statistics on Services provided and commercial supplies into birth rate data.

  4. The Impact of Materialism on the Familial Ties in Post-War American Society: A Study of Saul Bellow's Seize the Day

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Sabbar Abdulbaqi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Saul Bellow (1915 –2005 is an American novelist and the winner of Nobel and Pulitzer Prizes for literature (1976. He is known for his critique of Post-II World War American society. The research discusses Saul Bellow's Seize the Day (1956 in regard of materialism and its impact on the familial ties not only in terms of monetary considerations but also the maltreatment of family members among themselves. It reviews the materialistic relationship between the father and son on the one hand and the husband and wife on the other hand. The study aims to recognize to what extent materialism represents a dispersed element for the family unit.

  5. [Domestic violence against children and prospects for intervention of the Family Health Program: the experience of the Family Doctor Program/Niterói (RJ, Brazil)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Pedro Carlos Xavier da; Moraes, Claudia Leite

    2011-07-01

    This study seeks to estimate the prevalence of psychological and physical violence practiced against children in the family environment among clients of the Family Medical Program in Niterói (RJ). It also discloses some potential opportunities for action in the prevention, early detection and monitoring of families experiencing violence. This population-based survey was conducted with face-to-face interviews with parents or legal sponsors of 278 children registered in 27 teams of the Family Health Program. The population studied was randomly selected among children up to ten years of age. The Brazilian version of Parent-Child Conflict Tactics Scales - CTSPC was employed to assess the occurrence of this type of violence. Psychological aggression occurred in 96.7% (CI 95%: 94.7-98.8) of the households, and corporal punishment occurred in 93.8% (CI 95%: 92.0-96.7). Minor physical violence was reported by 51.4% (CI 95%: 45.5-57.3) of the respondents, and severe physical maltreatment by 19.8% (CI 95%: 15.1-24.5) of them. Although the mother was the foremost perpetrator of all kinds of maltreatment, most of the children were abused by both parents. In view of these results, domestic violence against children should be seen as a main concern for the Family Health Program.

  6. Adapting the 'family wellbeing' empowerment program to the needs of remote indigenous school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsey, Komla; Whiteside, Mary; Daly, Sathyabhama; Deemal, Audrey; Gibson, Teresa; Cadet-James, Yvonne; Wilson, Andrew; Santhanam, Radhika; Haswell-Elkins, Melissa R

    2005-04-01

    To adapt the Family Wellbeing empowerment program, which was initially designed to support adults to take greater control and responsibility for their decisions and lives, to the needs of Indigenous school children living in remote communities. At the request of two schools in remote Indigenous communities in far north Queensland, a pilot personal development and empowerment program based on the adult Family Wellbeing principles was developed, conducted and evaluated in the schools. The main aims of the program were to build personal identity and to encourage students to recognise their future potential and be more aware of their place in the community and wider society. Participation in the program resulted in significant social and emotional growth for the students. Outcomes described by participating students and teachers included increased analytical and reflective skills, greater ability to think for oneself and set goals, less teasing and bullying in the school environment, and an enhanced sense of identity, friendship and 'social relatedness'. This pilot implementation of the Family Wellbeing Program adapted for schools demonstrated the program's potential to enhance Indigenous young people's personal growth and development. Challenges remain in increasing parental/ family involvement and ensuring the program's sustainability and transferability. The team has been working with relevant stakeholders to further develop and package the School-based Family Wellbeing program for Education Queensland's New Basics curriculum framework.

  7. Effects of Family Functioning and Parenting Style on Early Entrants' Academic Performance and Program Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huey, Erron L.; Sayler, Michael F.; Rinn, Anne N.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the predictive nature of parenting style and overall family environment on the academic performance and program completion of early college entrants. Furthermore, gender and family form were examined as possible moderators to these relationships. A total of 88 early college entrants participated in…

  8. The Effects of Incentives on Families' Long-Term Outcome in a Parenting Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrichs, Nina; Jensen-Doss, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    To examine the impact of paying for participation in a preventive parenting program on treatment outcomes, 197 families with preschool-aged children were randomized to paid or unpaid conditions. Although both groups improved on nearly all measures, paid families showed less improvement on 3 of 10 variables, including father-reported child…

  9. Engaging Military Fathers in a Reflective Parenting Program: Lessons from Strong Families Strong Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVoe, Ellen R.; Paris, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Through Strong Families Strong Forces, a reflective parenting program for military families with young children, we were privileged to work with contemporary military fathers who served in the post-9/11 conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. Due to this work, the authors gained valuable insight into the complexity of fathering during wartime, the…

  10. 77 FR 65244 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Smart Traveler Enrollment Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-25

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Smart Traveler Enrollment Program ACTION: Notice of request... 1995, we are requesting comments on this collection from all interested individuals and organizations...: Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) OMB Control Number: 1405-0152 Type of Request: Extension...

  11. 78 FR 1916 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Smart Traveler Enrollment Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-09

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Smart Traveler Enrollment Program ACTION: Notice of request... comments on this collection from all interested individuals and organizations. The purpose of this Notice... Information Collection: Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP). OMB Control Number: 1405-0152. Type of...

  12. 78 FR 31999 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Iran Democracy Program Grants Vetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-28

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Iran Democracy Program Grants Vetting ACTION: Notice of...: Iran Program Grants Vetting. OMB Control Number: 1405-0176. Type of Request: Extension. ] Originating... conduct this vetting, the Department collects information from grantees and sub-grantees regarding the...

  13. 75 FR 25307 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: DS-4100, Iran Program Grants Vetting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-07

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collection: DS-4100, Iran Program Grants Vetting, Information Collection... Department conduct a vetting of potential Iran programs grantees and sub-grantees for counter-terrorism purposes. To conduct this vetting the Department envisions collecting information from grantees and sub...

  14. 78 FR 15798 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Iran Democracy Program Grants Vetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-12

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Iran Democracy Program Grants Vetting ACTION: Notice of... to conduct vetting of potential Iran ] program grantees and sub-grantees for counter-terrorism purposes. To conduct this vetting, the Department collects information from grantees and sub-grantees...

  15. 75 FR 2181 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: DS-4100, Iran Program Grants Vetting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-14

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collection: DS-4100, Iran Program Grants Vetting, Information Collection... Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) mandates that the Department conduct a vetting of potential Iran programs grantees and sub-grantees for counter-terrorism purposes. To conduct this vetting the Department envisions...

  16. Swim Free. A 10 Day Program of Aquatic Exercises Adapted from Life in the Waterworld.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, Lorraine; Sanborn, Laura

    The completely waterproof book contains instructions for an alternative form of swimming exercises based on the movements of 19 water creatures. The exercises can be used by groups or individuals to enhance training programs, to serve as part of a structured synchronized swimming program, or to supplement recreational activities. The book provides…

  17. Marin City Families First: Three Case Studies. Ruby and James: A Second Chance. Eleanor: Standing on My Own. Freda: The Value of Family. Child and Family Studies Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    WestEd, San Francisco, CA.

    Marin City is an isolated African American community located in mostly affluent Marin County, California. Thirty-six percent of households in Marin City fall below the poverty line. This report provides three case studies from the Marin City Families First (MCFF) program, an intervention that aims to develop a model comprehensive child and family…

  18. [Results in short term of educational program "parents' school" about family environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuño-Gutiérrez, Bertha Lidia; Alvarez-Nemegyei, José; Madrigal-de León, Eduardo; Martínez-Becerra, Bertha Alicia; Miranda-Moreno, Rosaura

    2006-01-01

    Evaluation of effect in short term of the parents school program (PSP) about the family environment and the different results between participating and non-participating parents. A cohort study was performed on 112 parents of students from the High School 5 (University of Guadalajara) during six months, 61 parents received the program (intervention group, IG) and 51 were the control group (CG). The program was made in 17 weekly interactive meetings, where the topics were: adolescent psychology and sexuality; parent-children relationship; family communication; self esteem; and addiction prevention. All of these topics were discussed. To evaluate family relationship the key word used was: How is your family relationship? There were found at baseline, a smaller family, and lesser family income in the IG. On the other hand, the CG showed higher scores on satisfaction with the academic and work performance; participation and problem solving; power, money and sex; and life satisfaction. At the end of the program, only 4% subjects of the IG and 59% of the CG were available for assessment. At this point we found that all differences have disappeared except life satisfaction, In addition new differences appeared as: in the control group there was a higher score for children's problems, and satisfaction with life. On the other hand, the IG showed an increased score on professional support searching, a lower score in parent-children communication. Our findings suggest that parents who voluntary received the PSP came from vulnerable families. The program improves the search for Professional support.

  19. Community Alternatives for Love and Limits (CALL): A community-based family strengthening multi-family intervention program to respond to adolescents at risk

    OpenAIRE

    David Wilkerson; Philip M. Ouellette

    2005-01-01

    Family strengthening has become a source of growing interest, research, and program design in the fields of prevention and treatment for problems of youth delinquency, school failure, alcohol, tobacco and other drug abuse (ATOD). Despite many studies that illustrate the positive outcomes of family strengthening programs and family-focused interventions, their use in communities has not advanced commensurate with their promise. This article offers a rationale for why programming efforts shou...

  20. Coping with problematic drug use in the family: An evaluation of the Stepping Stones program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gethin, Anni; Trimingham, Tony; Chang, Theo; Farrell, Michael; Ross, Joanne

    2016-07-01

    Problematic substance use by an individual is often highly destructive to their family, creating emotional turmoil and destroying healthy family functioning. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of participation in the Stepping Stones family support program on the coping capacity of family members affected by another's substance use. A pre and post study of the Stepping Stones intervention for families was conducted, involving 108 participants recruited from March 2013 to March 2014. Significant improvement in coping across all domains was observed post course and at follow up on both outcome measures (Coping Questionnaire and the Family Drug Support Questionnaire). Improvements for participants were either increased or sustained at 3 months follow up. Participants recorded high satisfaction ratings. The findings from this study demonstrate that participation in the Stepping Stones program assists family members to cope better with problematic substance use of a family member, as indicated by reductions in negative coping strategies, such as over-engagement, making excuses for the drug user or hopelessly tolerating the problem, and improvements in positive coping strategies such as self-care and engagement with their own activities and interests. [Gethin A, Trimingham T, Chang T, Farrell M, Ross J. Coping with problematic drug use in the family: An evaluation of the Stepping Stones program. Drug Alcohol Rev 2016;35:470-476]. © 2015 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  1. Integrating an internet-mediated walking program into family medicine clinical practice: a pilot feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, David E; Buis, Lorraine R; Janney, Adrienne W; Ditty, Megan D; Krause, Christine W; Zheng, Kai; Sen, Ananda; Strecher, Victor J; Hess, Michael L; Piette, John D; Richardson, Caroline R

    2011-06-24

    Regular participation in physical activity can prevent many chronic health conditions. Computerized self-management programs are effective clinical tools to support patient participation in physical activity. This pilot study sought to develop and evaluate an online interface for primary care providers to refer patients to an Internet-mediated walking program called Stepping Up to Health (SUH) and to monitor participant progress in the program. In Phase I of the study, we recruited six pairs of physicians and medical assistants from two family practice clinics to assist with the design of a clinical interface. During Phase II, providers used the developed interface to refer patients to a six-week pilot intervention. Provider perspectives were assessed regarding the feasibility of integrating the program into routine care. Assessment tools included quantitative and qualitative data gathered from semi-structured interviews, surveys, and online usage logs. In Phase I, 13 providers used SUH and participated in two interviews. Providers emphasized the need for alerts flagging patients who were not doing well and the ability to review participant progress. Additionally, providers asked for summary views of data across all enrolled clinic patients as well as advertising materials for intervention recruitment. In response to this input, an interface was developed containing three pages: 1) a recruitment page, 2) a summary page, and 3) a detailed patient page. In Phase II, providers used the interface to refer 139 patients to SUH and 37 (27%) enrolled in the intervention. Providers rarely used the interface to monitor enrolled patients. Barriers to regular use of the intervention included lack of integration with the medical record system, competing priorities, patient disinterest, and physician unease with exercise referrals. Intention-to-treat analyses showed that patients increased walking by an average of 1493 steps/day from pre- to post-intervention (t = (36) = 4.13, p

  2. Programming parallel architectures: The BLAZE family of languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, Piyush

    1988-01-01

    Programming multiprocessor architectures is a critical research issue. An overview is given of the various approaches to programming these architectures that are currently being explored. It is argued that two of these approaches, interactive programming environments and functional parallel languages, are particularly attractive since they remove much of the burden of exploiting parallel architectures from the user. Also described is recent work by the author in the design of parallel languages. Research on languages for both shared and nonshared memory multiprocessors is described, as well as the relations of this work to other current language research projects.

  3. 78 FR 52008 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Multifamily Housing Service Coordinator Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Multifamily Housing Service..., 2012. A. Overview of Information Collection Title of Information Collection: Multifamily Housing...

  4. Challenges of Family Physician Program in Urban Areas: A Qualitative Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabet Sarvestani, Raheleh; Najafi Kalyani, Majid; Alizadeh, Fariba; Askari, Alireza; Ronaghy, Hossain; Bahramali, Ehsan

    2017-07-01

    Family physicians play an essential role and act as a communicational bridge between people and the healthcare system in providing healthcare services efficiently and equitably. This study aimed at exploring the challenges of the family physician program in urban areas in Iran in 2015. This research had a descriptive exploratory design with a qualitative content analysis approach. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews between 2014 and 2015. Seventeen physicians enrolling in family physician program for at least two years were selected through purposeful sampling. Conventional content analysis was used to analyze the data. Coding and analysis of the interview data generated two categories and seven subcategories related to the challenges of the family physician program. The categories were poor infrastructure and poor incentive mechanism. Our findings captured a good picture of family physician program in urban areas to better clarify the challenges of the program and provide a foundation to plan and implement appropriate changes. Thus, our findings will give policymakers a deeper perception to confront the challenges of the family physician program in urban areas.

  5. Feasibility of Recruiting Families into a Heart Disease Prevention Program Based on Dietary Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy L. Schumacher

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Offspring of parents with a history of cardiovascular disease (CVD inherit a similar genetic profile and share diet and lifestyle behaviors. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of recruiting families at risk of CVD to a dietary prevention program, determine the changes in diet achieved, and program acceptability. Families were recruited into a pilot parallel group randomized controlled trial consisting of a three month evidence-based dietary intervention, based on the Mediterranean and Portfolio diets. Feasibility was assessed by recruitment and retention rates, change in diet by food frequency questionnaire, and program acceptability by qualitative interviews and program evaluation. Twenty one families were enrolled over 16 months, with fourteen families (n = 42 individuals completing the study. Post-program dietary changes in the intervention group included small daily increases in vegetable serves (0.8 ± 1.3 and reduced usage of full-fat milk (−21%, cheese (−12% and meat products (−17%. Qualitative interviews highlighted beneficial changes in food purchasing habits. Future studies need more effective methods of recruitment to engage families in the intervention. Once engaged, families made small incremental improvements in their diets. Evaluation indicated that feedback on diet and CVD risk factors, dietetic counselling and the resources provided were appropriate for a program of this type.

  6. The pullout program Day a Week School for Gifted Children: Effects on social-emotional and academic functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meulen, R.T.; van der Bruggen, C.O.; Spilt, J.L.; Verouden, J.; Berkhout, M.; Bögels, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Gifted children learn differently compared to their peers in several ways. However, their educational needs are often not met in regular schools, which may result in underachievement and social-emotional and behavioral problems. A pullout program, the "Day a Week School" (DWS), was

  7. A Longitudinal Comparison of Day Program Services and Outcomes of People Who Left Institutions and Those Who Stayed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stancliffe, Roger J.; Lakin, K. Charlie

    1999-01-01

    This study provides longitudinal analysis of day program and work activities of 61 individuals leaving Minnesota state institutions and a comparison group of 71 people remaining institutionalized. Only 13% of movers experienced integrated employment. As a group, the people who remained institutionalized actually earned more money. (Author/CR)

  8. 76 FR 43254 - Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-20

    ... national average payment rates for centers reflect a 2.18 percent increase during the 12-month period, May... Food and Nutrition Service Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service Payment Rates, and Administrative Reimbursement Rates for Sponsoring Organizations of...

  9. A Study in Child Care (Case Study from Volume II-A): "Tacos and Tulips." Day Care Programs Reprint Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Farrell, Brigid

    The Holland Day Care Center in Michigan serves a diverse community of Anglo children of Dutch ancestry and children of former migrant workers of Chicano, Black, Puerto Rican and Cuban origins who have settled in the area. Located in two churches which are about three blocks apart, the program divides children by ability and age into five…

  10. 78 FR 64145 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Housing Finance Agency Risk-Sharing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Housing Finance Agency Risk-Sharing..., 2013. A. Overview of Information Collection Title of Information Collection: Housing Finance Agency... Secretary to implement risk sharing with State and local housing finance agencies (HFAs). Under this program...

  11. The pullout program day a week school for gifted children: Effects on social–emotional and academic functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meulen, R.T.; van der Bruggen, C.O.; Spilt, J.L.; Verouden, J; Berkhout, M; Bögels, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Gifted children learn differently compared to their peers in several ways. However, their educational needs are often not met in regular schools, which may result in underachievement and social-emotional and behavioral problems. A pullout program, the "Day a Week School" (DWS), was

  12. 78 FR 65582 - Single Family Housing Direct Loan Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    .... USDA Nondiscrimination Statement The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination... origin, age, disability, sex, gender identity, religion, reprisal, and where applicable, political... complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form (PDF), found online at...

  13. 78 FR 52460 - Single Family Housing Direct Loan Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-23

    ... Agency oversight or minimum competency standards. This proposed rule will impose experience, training... Agency's housing program, increasing specialized support available to them to complete the application..., ensure those packagers are qualified and trained, perform quality assurance reviews to prevent the...

  14. ‘All the days of their lives’, Women, business and family in eighteenth-century Scotland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonton, Deborah

    2018-01-01

    the period when husbands were alive. In all three cases, the evidence is largely tangential, but the glimpses these women give us into the past demonstrates women's position in these families and how they exploited their skills, acumen and abilities to be full partners in eighteenth-century urban family...... the businesses as widows, their role during their husbands' lives was more obscured, but there is little doubt that they had been active partners in the bakery, printing and innkeeping family enterprises. Otherwise they could not have operated with such confidence as widows. Through business families...... such as Morice’s, we can see how the business altered as the family grew, how they utilised apprenticeship and other strategies to promote it and how they created and sustained a place in the commercial community. Wives' activities and strategies as widows also shed light on how they probably operated during...

  15. Programming parallel architectures - The BLAZE family of languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, Piyush

    1989-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the various approaches to programming multiprocessor architectures that are currently being explored. It is argued that two of these approaches, interactive programming environments and functional parallel languages, are particularly attractive, since they remove much of the burden of exploiting parallel architectures from the user. This paper also describes recent work in the design of parallel languages. Research on languages for both shared and nonshared memory multiprocessors is described.

  16. Developing and adapting a family-based diabetes program at the U.S.-Mexico border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teufel-Shone, Nicolette I; Drummond, Rebecca; Rawiel, Ulrike

    2005-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes among Hispanics is more than twice that of non-Hispanic whites in communities along the U.S.-Mexico border. The University of Arizona and two community health agencies on the Arizona border, Campesinos Sin Fronteras and Mariposa Community Health Center, collaborated to design, pilot and assess the feasibility of a lay health-outreach worker- (promotora-) delivered diabetes education program for families. La Diabetes y La Unión Familiar was developed to build family support for patients with diabetes and to teach primary prevention behaviors to family members. Community and university partners designed a culturally appropriate program addressing family food choices and physical activity, behavior change, communication, and support behaviors. The program offers educational content and activities that can be presented in home visits or multifamily group sessions. Community partners led the implementation, and university partners guided the evaluation. Seventy-two families (249 total participants) including children and grandchildren participated. Preintervention and postintervention questionnaires completed by adults (n = 116) indicate a significant increase in knowledge of eight diabetes risk factors (P values for eight factors range from < 001 to .006) and a significant increase in family efficacy to change food (P < .001) and activity behaviors (P < .001). Interviews with participants highlight the program's positive psychosocial impact. Community and university collaboration involved building upon the promotoras' expertise in engaging the community and the university's expertise in program design and evaluation. A promotora-delivered family-based diabetes prevention program that emphasizes family support, communication, and health behaviors is feasible and can yield change in family knowledge, attitude, and behavior relative to diabetes risk factors.

  17. Military Stress-Busting Program for Family Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-20

    specific aim, research or study questions, and/or hypothesis : The purpose of the MSBP was to improve the quality of life of military family caregivers by...adopting a healthier lifestyle through healthier eating, meditating , and in exercising. Cognitive changes involved an improved ability to...subjective). Improvement was shown by 97.4% of caregivers who participated in the study with 61% showing improvement on all measures tested .” The

  18. The Rise in Cortisol in Family Day Care: Associations with Aspects of Care Quality, Child Behavior, and Child Sex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnar, Megan R.; Kryzer, Erin; Van Ryzin, Mark J.; Phillips, Deborah A.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the increase in salivary cortisol from midmorning to midafternoon in 151 children (3.0-4.5 years) in full-time home-based day care. Compared to cortisol levels at home, increases were noted in the majority of children (63%) at day care, with 40% classified as a stress response. Observations at day care revealed that intrusive,…

  19. MCTP Summer Research Internship Program. Research Presentation Day: Experience Mathematics and Science in the Real World

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the summaries of the MCTP Summer Research Internship Program. Technological areas discussed include: Mathematical curriculum development for real world problems; Rain effects on air-water gas exchange; multi-ring impact basins on mars; developing an interactive multimedia educational cd-rom on remote sensing; a pilot of an activity for for the globe program; fossils in maryland; developing children's programming for the american horticultural society at river farm; children's learning, educational programs of the national park service; a study of climate and student satisfaction in two summer programs for disadvantaged students interested in careers in mathematics and science; the maryland governor's academy, integrating technology into the classroom; stream sampling with the maryland biological stream survey (MBSS); the imaging system inspection software technology, the preparation and detection of nominal and faulted steel ingots; event-based science, the development of real-world science units; correlation between anxiety and past experiences; environmental education through summer nature camp; enhancing learning opportunities at the Salisbury zoo; plant growth experiment, a module for the middle school classroom; the effects of proxisome proliferators in Japanese medaka embryos; development of a chapter on birth control and contraceptive methodologies as part of an interactive computer-based education module on hiv and aids; excretion of gentamicin in toadfish and goldfish; the renaissance summer program; and Are field trips important to the regional math science center?

  20. A Qualitative Examination of Parent Engagement in a Family-Based Childhood Obesity Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmied, Emily A; Chuang, Emmeline; Madanat, Hala; Moody, Jamie; Ibarra, Leticia; Ortiz, Kenia; Macias, Karla; Ayala, Guadalupe X

    2018-02-01

    Low parent engagement is frequently identified as a barrier to effective implementation of family-based childhood obesity prevention and control programs. A more nuanced understanding of factors affecting parent engagement is important for improving implementation and, ultimately, program efficacy. This qualitative study examined factors influencing parent engagement in a family-based childhood obesity prevention and control program. Semistructured interviews informed by the health belief model and the transtheoretical model were conducted with 22 predominantly Latina mothers following the scheduled conclusion of program activities. Spanish- and English-language interviews were transcribed, translated into English (if Spanish), coded, and summarized using established protocols. Differences between parents who attended at least two thirds of program activities and those who did not were examined. There were no significant demographic differences between parents who did and did not complete two thirds of program activities. Findings indicated that differences in parent engagement may be at least partially explained by differences in parental motivations for participating and in barriers and facilitators, such as children's level of support and enthusiasm for the program. Parents were highly satisfied with the program content and the community health workers who delivered the program. This study adds to emergent literature regarding parents' experiences in family-based childhood obesity prevention and control programs. Potential targets for improving program engagement are discussed.

  1. [The odysseys of Ulysses. A study of tales in a normal working day of the family doctor in Paraguay, Mexico, Peru, and Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Báez-Montiel, Brenda Beatriz; Gutiérrez-Islas, Elizabeth; Bolaños-Maldonado, Margarita; Samarín, Elena; Turabián, José Luis

    2014-02-01

    To examine the professional profile of the family doctor in different countries and the social welfare context where their work is carried out. Qualitative Methodology of production of field diaries of a normal day. Primary Heath Care of Toledo and Tenerife in Spain, and Paraguay, Mexico, and Peru. Non-random sampling, intentional, followed by snowball sample until data saturation. Participants wrote a diary of a typical day's work, their circumstances and socio-health context, and were studied by content analysis. Techniques to control the biases were used the check the participants and the triangulation between the obtained results and the existing bibliography, and data found on the Internet daily. We performed a mental map to transcribe the results graphically and in a comprehensive form. A total of 24 diaries of a normal day were obtained (9 doctors in Spain, 7 in Mexico, 4 in Paraguay, and 4 in Peru). We found some similarities, but many differences between countries. In contexts of humble but spirited, rural, with traditional roots and undemanding, there was a wider range of tasks of the family doctor, the coexistence of public and private work, and modern and traditional medicine, with greater presence of family and community care, more physician satisfaction and better patient-physician relationship. The professional profile of the family doctor is diverse and a context-dependent variable, and is not derived directly from external theory of family medicine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  2. [The family as the focus of nursing care in the hospital environment: an educational program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Maria Manuela; Fernandes, Carla Sílvia; Gonçalves, Lucia Hisako Takase

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports an educational program experience for nurses on caring for the family, at the hospital environment. The objective was to train nurses for the care of the family. The strategies adopted for teaching/learning focused on the Calgary Model of Assessment and Family Intervention, with a group of nurses from a general hospital located in the north of Portugal. In the subjective evaluation of the participants, the pedagogic experience was useful because they could recognize the need for a change on nursing care, and move towards an integrated approach to the family attention.

  3. Family Life and the Impact of Previous and Present Residential and Day Care Support for Children with Major Cognitive and Behavioural Challenges: A Dilemma for Services and Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R. I.; Geider, S.; Primrose, A.; Jokinen, N. S.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Since the development of inclusion and integration, parents have increasingly become the major, and sometimes the only, carers of their children with disabilities. Many families speak of stress and frustration with service and community support, and some have turned to residential and specialised day care services to overcome…

  4. Admission to day stay early parenting program is associated with improvements in mental health and infant behaviour: A prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowe Heather

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Australia’s Early Parenting Services support families and intervene early in mental health problems in parents. The Victorian Early Parenting Strategy, a platform for government policy recommended a stronger evidence base for early parenting services. Tweddle Child and Family Health Service (TCFHS is a not-for-profit public sector early parenting centre, which provides residential, day stay, home visiting and outreach programs. This study aimed i to examine the health, social circumstances and presenting needs of clients attending the Tweddle Day Stay Program (DSP with infants under 12 months old and ii to assess the parent mental health and infant behaviour outcomes and the factors associated with program success. Methods A cohort of clients was recruited prior to admission and followed-up 8 weeks after discharge. Data were collected using standardised measures in a study specific questionnaire at baseline, participant’s Tweddle records and a follow-up telephone interview. Health, social circumstances and presenting needs of clients were described. Changes in parents’ symptoms of depression and infants’ sleep and settling between admission and follow-up were calculated. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to examine factors associated with changes in primary outcomes. Results Of the total 162 clients who were eligible and invited to participate, 115 (72% were recruited. Parents admitted to the DSP had worse general self-reported physical and mental health than community samples. Infants of DSP participants were no more likely to be premature or have low birth weight, but significantly more unsettled than other community samples. Participants’ mental health and their infants’ behaviours were significantly improved after DSP admission. In multivariate analysis, higher depression score at baseline and greater educational attainment were significantly associated with improvements in parents’ mental

  5. Gender and Diversity Topics Taught in Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, Ebony Joy; Piercy, Fred P.

    2010-01-01

    This article explores how the topics of gender and diversity are being taught and defined in accredited marriage and family therapy programs through syllabi content analysis and interviews with selected faculty. We examined findings by program (master's and doctoral) and type of training (those that taught specific gender and culture courses and…

  6. The Caregiver Education and Training Project: A Comprehensive Training Program for Family Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmont District Hospital, La Mesa, CA.

    This demonstration program was designed to impart specific nursing, psychosocial, and community knowledge skills to caregivers, particularly those who themselves were older adults and were caring for a family member at home. Begun in October 1986, this program featured basic home nursing instruction and an orientation to the demands and rewards of…

  7. 4-H Night at the Movies: A Program for Adolescents and Their Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurich, Anthony P.; Collins, Olivia P.

    1996-01-01

    Evaluates a program designed to improve self-esteem in adolescents. Used commercial movies about teenagers to enhance adolescents' interest and understanding of their world. Findings indicated significant increases in measures of self concept, self satisfaction, family self, and social self over the course of the program. (RJM)

  8. Impact of Government Benefit Programs Declines, Adds to Number of Poor Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, Washington, DC.

    The paper summarizes the results of an analysis of recently issued Census data. Examining the anti-poverty effectiveness of cash and non-cash benefit programs from 1979 to 1986, the analysis focuses on the impacts of those programs on families with children, the group whose poverty rate has risen most rapidly since 1979. The data reveal that…

  9. 77 FR 65448 - Funding Availability Under Supportive Services for Veteran Families Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-26

    ... housing. Only families with children under the age of 18 may receive such assistance; individuals are not... homeless persons. The Housing First approach is based on the concept that a homeless individual or...'s program concept must be generally consistent with the program concept of the grantee's current...

  10. Phenomenological Experiences of International Students in Marriage, Couple, and Family Counseling Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Mohd Khairul Anuar

    2017-01-01

    This phenomenological study explored the experiences of international students in CACREP-accredited marriage, couple, and family counseling programs. Seven former international students from the program who have practiced counseling in their home country were interviewed to understand their learning experiences, adaptation process and counseling…

  11. Factors Influencing Student Selection of Marriage and Family Therapy Graduate Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertlein, Katherine M.; Lambert-Shute, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    To understand which factors students consider most important in choosing a marriage and family therapy (MFT) graduate program and how programs met or did not meet these expectations of students over the course of graduate study, we conducted an online mixed-method investigation. One hundred twelve graduate students in Commission on Accreditation…

  12. A Qualitative Evaluation of a Program to Support Family, Friend, and Neighbor Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Erin J.; Kelly, Jean F.; Scarpa, Juliet P.

    2008-01-01

    The early care and education field lacks an evidence base of effective programs to support caregiving quality among family, friend, and neighbor, or unlicensed, caregivers. This article presents the results of a qualitative evaluation of a program implemented with 20 primarily low-income English- and Spanish-speaking grandparents providing…

  13. Applying Coaching Strategies to Support Youth- and Family-Focused Extension Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Jonathan R.; Hawkey, Kyle R.; Smith, Burgess; Perkins, Daniel F.; Borden, Lynne M.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we describe how a peer-coaching model has been applied to support community-based Extension programming through the Children, Youth, and Families at Risk (CYFAR) initiative. We describe the general approaches to coaching that have been used to help with CYFAR program implementation, evaluation, and sustainability efforts; we…

  14. Promoting Positive Family Interactions: Evaluating a Free Early Childhood Book Distribution Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funge, Simon P.; Sullivan, Dana J.; Tarter, Kirsten

    2017-01-01

    The Dolly Parton Imagination Library (DPIL) program encourages reading among families of preschool children by mailing age-appropriate books, once per month, until the child reaches the age of five. An evaluation of a DPIL program in a southern state in the U.S. was conducted to assess the impact on enrolled children. Focus groups were conducted…

  15. Schools Inquiring About Seven-Day School Rerecording of Public and Instructional Television Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Eleanor

    A statement of policy outlines the method to be used by all schools, colleges, and universities that desire to take advantage of a seven-day rerecording privilege to record televised material transmitted by public television stations. The policy has been jointly agreed upon by the Public Broadcasting Service, the Great Plains National…

  16. Teaching program development and evaluation through a service learning project in community-based adult day services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaber, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT This paper examines an instructional methodology, service learning, as a method for teaching program development and evaluation in adult day service centers. Adult day service, an emerging practice area, provides an opportunity for students to learn program development while they explore and meet the occupational needs of elders living in the community. Students learn to design and implement day service activities to benefit both the agencies and people they are serving. In this study, 39 students were surveyed before and after a service learning experience to determine if they perceived service learning as effective in increasing knowledge and confidence to develop, implement, and evaluate an adult day services program module. In an evaluation of the service learning project, students reported that their knowledge and confidence increased significantly in assessing organizations and populations, designing and carrying out an activity with well elderly, and creating an evaluation measure. Furthermore, students reported a high level of comfort in working with elderly populations before and after the service learning experience.

  17. Family and Community Perceptions of Quality in Juvenile Justice Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selber, Katherine; Streeter, Calvin

    2004-01-01

    The conceptualization and empirical assessment of service quality in juvenile justice remains limited. There are few reports on programmatic attempts to assess satisfaction in juvenile justice programs or attempts to include what constitutes quality of service from multiple customer perspectives. This article describes a potential model, the Gap…

  18. The Nurturing Parenting Programs. Family Strengthening Series. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavolek, Stephen J.

    This bulletin describes how parenting patterns are learned and how the Nurturing Parenting Programs, a group- and home-based intervention effort begun with the support of the National Institute of Mental Health, help stop generational cycles of abuse and neglect by building nurturing parenting skills. Section 1 examines the need for effective…

  19. 78 FR 73927 - Single Family Housing Guaranteed Loan Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-09

    ... compared to non-metropolitan rural homeowners indicates the guaranteed program has a positive impact in... in pursuing homeownership. The impacts of changes to the rule are positive to the federal budget... divorces, the wife gets the home if she desires, and can thus argue for custody of the children because the...

  20. Integrating an internet-mediated walking program into family medicine clinical practice: a pilot feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Ananda

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regular participation in physical activity can prevent many chronic health conditions. Computerized self-management programs are effective clinical tools to support patient participation in physical activity. This pilot study sought to develop and evaluate an online interface for primary care providers to refer patients to an Internet-mediated walking program called Stepping Up to Health (SUH and to monitor participant progress in the program. Methods In Phase I of the study, we recruited six pairs of physicians and medical assistants from two family practice clinics to assist with the design of a clinical interface. During Phase II, providers used the developed interface to refer patients to a six-week pilot intervention. Provider perspectives were assessed regarding the feasibility of integrating the program into routine care. Assessment tools included quantitative and qualitative data gathered from semi-structured interviews, surveys, and online usage logs. Results In Phase I, 13 providers used SUH and participated in two interviews. Providers emphasized the need for alerts flagging patients who were not doing well and the ability to review participant progress. Additionally, providers asked for summary views of data across all enrolled clinic patients as well as advertising materials for intervention recruitment. In response to this input, an interface was developed containing three pages: 1 a recruitment page, 2 a summary page, and 3 a detailed patient page. In Phase II, providers used the interface to refer 139 patients to SUH and 37 (27% enrolled in the intervention. Providers rarely used the interface to monitor enrolled patients. Barriers to regular use of the intervention included lack of integration with the medical record system, competing priorities, patient disinterest, and physician unease with exercise referrals. Intention-to-treat analyses showed that patients increased walking by an average of 1493 steps/day

  1. [Medium-term results of a Day Hospital insulin therapy program for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirós, Carmen; Amor, Antonio J; de Hollanda, Ana M; Yago, Gemma; Ara, Pilar; Conget, Ignacio

    2014-03-20

    The profile of the patient with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) who requires insulin therapy is very diverse as are the results of this intervention and short/middle-term patient management. We evaluated the midterm results of an outpatient program starting insulin therapy with≥2 insulin injections/day in terms of metabolic control in different groups of patients. We analyzed prospectively 131 patients with DM2, without previous insulin treatment, who were prescribed treatment with≥2 insulin injections/day and who were enrolled in a specific ambulatory program in order to start insulin therapy in a Day Hospital for 6 months. The initial glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) was 11.3 (2.3) % and decreased to 6.3 (1.4) % in 6 months, with HbA1c2.5% of them. The group of recently diagnosed patients (2 [12.1] years; P2.1 [1.8] vs 10.5 [2.5] %; P2 groups at study ends according to the final treatment scheme. Counselling patients with DM2 to start insulin with more than one injection per day in Day Hospital setting achieves and maintains a good metabolic control in the medium term in different patient profiles. Among symptomatic and recently diagnosed patients, insulin therapy can be stopped in 50% of them at the medium term. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  2. A yoga and compassion meditation program reduces stress in familial caregivers of Alzheimer's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danucalov, M A D; Kozasa, E H; Ribas, K T; Galduróz, J C F; Garcia, M C; Verreschi, I T N; Oliveira, K C; Romani de Oliveira, L; Leite, J R

    2013-01-01

    Familial caregivers of patients with Alzheimer's disease exhibit reduced quality of life and increased stress levels. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of an 8-week yoga and compassion meditation program on the perceived stress, anxiety, depression, and salivary cortisol levels in familial caregivers. A total of 46 volunteers were randomly assigned to participate in a stress-reduction program for a 2-month period (yoga and compassion meditation program-YCMP group) (n = 25) or an untreated group for the same period of time (control group) (n = 21). The levels of stress, anxiety, depression, and morning salivary cortisol of the participants were measured before and after intervention. The groups were initially homogeneous; however, after intervention, the groups diverged significantly. The YCMP group exhibited a reduction of the stress (P anxiety (P meditation program may offer an effective intervention for reducing perceived stress, anxiety, depression, and salivary cortisol in familial caregivers.

  3. 76 FR 19902 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Decision and Order Granting 180-Day Extension...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-11

    .... Brenda Edwards, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building...; Correction AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Decision.... Raymond, U.S. Department of Energy, Building Technologies Program, Mail Stop EE-2J, 1000 Independence...

  4. An Apple a Day and at Night: A Distance Tutoring Program for At-Risk Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Steven M.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Describes a program of distance tutoring developed by Apple Computer, Inc., Memphis City Schools, and Memphis State University for at-risk minority students. The electronic bulletin board system (BBS) used is described; types of distance learning systems are explained; and research outcomes are discussed, including tutor roles and writing skills.…

  5. Comprehensive School Physical Activity Programs: Helping All Students Achieve 60 Minutes of Physical Activity Each Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, Eloise; Erwin, Heather; Hall, Tina; Heidorn, Brent

    2013-01-01

    The American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance recommends that all schools implement a comprehensive school physical activity program. Physical activity is important to the overall health and well-being of everyone, including all school age children. The benefits of physical activity are well documented and include the…

  6. Satisfaction and Dissatisfaction Toward Urban Family Physician Program: A Population Based Study in Shiraz, Southern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honarvar, Behnam; Lankarani, Kamran Bagheri; Ghahramani, Sulmaz; Akbari, Maryam; Tabrizi, Reza; Bagheri, Zahra; Poostforoushfard, Sima

    2016-01-01

    A national project of extending a family physician program to urban areas has been started since May 2013 in Iran. The present study aimed to detect correlates of people's satisfaction and dissatisfaction about urban family physician program. This cross-sectional and population-based study was conducted in Shiraz, Southern Iran. Multistage and proportional to size random sampling were used. Different items about satisfaction and dissatisfaction toward urban family physician program were queried. Single variable and then multiple variable analyses of data were done using SPSS software (Chicago, IL. USA). Mean age of 1257 participants in the study was 38.1 ± 13.2 years. Respondents included men (634; 50.4%), married (882; 70.2%), those who were educated at universities (529; 42%) and self-employed groups (405; 32.2%). One thousand fifty-eight (84.1%) were covered by the family physician program. Mean of referral times to a family physician was 2.2 ± 2.9 during the year before the study. Satisfaction toward urban family physician program was high in 198 (15.8%), moderate in 394 (31.3%), and low in 391 (31.1%). Dissatisfaction about this program was more among younger than 51-year-old groups (for 31-50 years odds ratio [OR] =2.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.4-3.7, P < 0.001 and for 18-30 years OR = 2, 95% CI = 1.2-3.4, P = 0.005), less knowledgeable ones (OR = 2.2, 95% CI = 1.3-3.6, P = 0.001), singles (OR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.2-3.4, P = 0.003), and those with more than 4 of family members (OR = 1.3, 95% CI = 1-1.7, P = 0.05). Overall, the majority of the people are not very satisfied with the urban family physician program. This shows the need for a multi-disciplinary approach including training, improvement of infrastructures and referral system, continuous supervision, and frequent monitoring of user's and provider's feedback about this program. According the results, the family physician program should be improved prior to extending this program to other

  7. Satisfaction and dissatisfaction toward urban family physician program: A population based study in Shiraz, Southern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnam Honarvar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A national project of extending a family physician program to urban areas has been started since May 2013 in Iran. The present study aimed to detect correlates of people′s satisfaction and dissatisfaction about urban family physician program. Methods: This cross-sectional and population-based study was conducted in Shiraz, Southern Iran. Multistage and proportional to size random sampling were used. Different items about satisfaction and dissatisfaction toward urban family physician program were queried. Single variable and then multiple variable analyses of data were done using SPSS software (Chicago, IL. USA. Results: Mean age of 1257 participants in the study was 38.1 ± 13.2 years. Respondents included men (634; 50.4%, married (882; 70.2%, those who were educated at universities (529; 42% and self-employed groups (405; 32.2%. One thousand fifty-eight (84.1% were covered by the family physician program. Mean of referral times to a family physician was 2.2 ± 2.9 during the year before the study. Satisfaction toward urban family physician program was high in 198 (15.8%, moderate in 394 (31.3%, and low in 391 (31.1%. Dissatisfaction about this program was more among younger than 51-year-old groups (for 31-50 years odds ratio [OR] =2.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.4-3.7, P < 0.001 and for 18-30 years OR = 2, 95% CI = 1.2-3.4, P = 0.005, less knowledgeable ones (OR = 2.2, 95% CI = 1.3-3.6, P = 0.001, singles (OR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.2-3.4, P = 0.003, and those with more than 4 of family members (OR = 1.3, 95% CI = 1-1.7, P = 0.05. Conclusions: Overall, the majority of the people are not very satisfied with the urban family physician program. This shows the need for a multi-disciplinary approach including training, improvement of infrastructures and referral system, continuous supervision, and frequent monitoring of user′s and provider′s feedback about this program. According the results, the family physician program should be

  8. The impact of stratifying by family history in colorectal cancer screening programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goede, Simon Lucas; Rabeneck, Linda; Lansdorp-Vogelaar, Iris; Zauber, Ann G; Paszat, Lawrence F; Hoch, Jeffrey S; Yong, Jean H E; van Hees, Frank; Tinmouth, Jill; van Ballegooijen, Marjolein

    2015-09-01

    In the province-wide colorectal cancer (CRC) screening program in Ontario, Canada, individuals with a family history of CRC are offered colonoscopy screening and those without are offered guaiac fecal occult blood testing (gFOBT, Hemoccult II). We used microsimulation modeling to estimate the cumulative number of CRC deaths prevented and colonoscopies performed between 2008 and 2038 with this family history-based screening program, compared to a regular gFOBT program. In both programs, we assumed screening uptake increased from 30% (participation level in 2008 before the program was launched) to 60%. We assumed that 11% of the population had a family history, defined as having at least one first-degree relative diagnosed with CRC. The programs offered screening between age 50 and 74 years, every two years for gFOBT, and every ten years for colonoscopy. Compared to opportunistic screening (2008 participation level kept constant at 30%), the gFOBT program cumulatively prevented 6,700 more CRC deaths and required 570,000 additional colonoscopies by 2038. The family history-based screening program increased these numbers to 9,300 and 1,100,000, a 40% and 93% increase, respectively. If biennial gFOBT was replaced with biennial fecal immunochemical test (FIT), annual Hemoccult Sensa or five-yearly sigmoidoscopy screening, both the added benefits and colonoscopies required would decrease. A biennial gFOBT screening program that identifies individuals with a family history of CRC and recommends them to undergo colonoscopy screening would prevent 40% (range in sensitivity analyses: 20-51%) additional deaths while requiring 93% (range: 43-116%) additional colonoscopies, compared to a regular gFOBT screening program. © 2015 UICC.

  9. A Pilot Telerehabilitation Program: Delivering Early Intervention Services to Rural Families

    OpenAIRE

    Cason, Jana

    2009-01-01

    The enTECH Telerehabilitation Program explored the use of telerehabilitation as an alternative service delivery model for early intervention therapy services. Utilizing the Kentucky Telehealth Network, two families living in rural Kentucky received occupational therapy services over a 12-week period. Following program implementation, qualitative data was collected using participant journals and interviews. Data analysis identified three thematic categories related to the program: benefits/str...

  10. Helping families change: The adoption of the Triple P - Positive Parenting Program in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    de Graaf, I.M.

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis the implementation of the evidence-based Triple P Positive Parenting Program in the Netherlands was examined. Because parenting is associated with the wellbeing of children, parenting programs are developed to address the child problems. Among all developed parenting programs, the Behavioral Family Interventions (BFI) have the strongest empirical evidence. The aim of Triple P is to prevent and offer treatment for mild and severe behavioral, emotional and developmental problems ...

  11. COPE Method Implementation Program to Reduce Communication Apprehension Level in Full Day Yunior High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasetyo, A. R.

    2017-02-01

    This study was aimed to explore the effect of COPE method to reduce communication apprehension level of students in Early Adolescence who become Full Day Junior High School students. Full Day Junior High School students, especially in Surabaya coastal area, have more demands to develop the communication aspects such as group discussions and presentations and extracurricular activities. Higher demands to develop such aspects of communication may cause them to experience communication apprehension. The subject was Full Day School students totaling 31 students. The design of the research was experimental design. The experimental method used was a non-randomized pretest posttest control group design and purposive sampling was also used. COPE method is a process that consists of four main stages where people are trying to deal with and control of stressful situations as a result of the problem being faced by conducting cognitive and behavioral changes. Four main stages COPE method is Calming the nervous system, Originating an imaginative plan, Persisting in the face of obstacles and failure, and Evaluating and adjusting the plan. Results of quantitative analysis based on U-Mann Whitney Test shows significant effect on the COPE Method to decrease anxiety levels of communication (0.000 <0.005).

  12. Family Advocacy Program Standards and Self-Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-01

    A facility designated for temporary, emergency housing for victims of abuse. Its use is normally limited to female victims of spouse abuse and her...sexual activity such as pornography cr prostitution in which the offender does not have direct physical contact with the child. 3. Rape and Intercourse...Support Groups. 8. Parent and/or Teen Groups. 4-10 Educationally-based programs are those whose intent is to convey informa- tion and awareness to the

  13. Navy Family Advocacy Program. Appendix. Analysis of Central Registry Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    2/76) 2 Suspected Abuzso/Malect/Sexua1 Assault an ae2404 65.) "Suspected Abuso /Neglect/ Sexual Assault and Rape Report" 2226 60.5 NAVMED 6320/15A...ANALYSIS OF SEXUAL ASSAULT REPORTS ........... 50 HAPTER V: SUMAY ANALYSIS Or rAMILY ADVOCACY PROGRAM REPORTS . 56 APPENDIX...cont’d)I PAGE CHAPTER IV: SEXUAL ASSAULT TV-1 Fore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 IV-2 Type of Maltreatment ............... 53 IV-3

  14. Attitudes of Family Medicine Program Directors Toward Osteopathic Residents Under the Single Accreditation System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempstead, Laura K; Shaffer, Todd D; Williams, Karen B; Arnold, Lt Col James

    2017-04-01

    Between 2015 and 2020, residency programs accredited through the American Osteopathic Association (AOA) are preparing the single graduate medical education (GME) system through the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). (1) To assess the attitudes of family medicine program directors in programs accredited dually by the AOA and ACGME (AOA/ACGME) or ACGME only toward the clinical and academic preparedness of osteopathic residency candidates and (2) to determine program director attitudes toward the perceived value of osteopathic-focused education, including osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) curricula. A survey was sent to program directors of AOA/ACGME and ACGME-only accredited family medicine residency programs. Items concerned program directors' perception of the academic and clinical strength of osteopathic residents at the onset of residency, the presence of osteopathic faculty and residents currently in the program, and the presence of formal curricula for teaching OMT. The perceived value of osteopathic focus was obtained through a composite score of 5 items. A total of 38 AOA/ACGME family medicine residency program directors (17%) and 211 ACGME family medicine residency program directors (45.6%) completed the survey (N=249). No difference was found in the ranking of the perceived clinical preparation of osteopathic residents vs allopathic residents in programs with and without OMT curricula (P=.054). Directors of programs with OMT curricula perceived the academic preparation of their osteopathic residents vs allopathic residents more highly than those without OMT curricula (P=.039). Directors of AOA/ACGME programs perceived both the academic preparation and clinical preparation of their osteopathic residents more highly than those at ACGME-only programs (P=.004 and P=.002, respectively). Directors of AOA/ACGME programs, as well as those whose programs have an osteopathic focus in curricular offerings, were more likely to rank the

  15. Lessons learned in developing family medicine residency training programs in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitamura Kazuya

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While family medicine is not well established as a discipline in Japan, a growing number of Japanese medical schools and training hospitals have recently started sougoushinryoubu (general medicine departments. Some of these departments are incorporating a family medicine approach to residency training. We sought to learn from family medicine pioneers of these programs lessons for developing residency training. Methods This qualitative project utilized a long interview research design. Questions focused on four topics: 1 circumstances when becoming chair/faculty member; 2 approach to starting the program; 3 how Western ideas of family medicine were incorporated; and 4 future directions. We analyzed the data using immersion/crystallization to identify recurring themes. From the transcribed data, we selected representative quotations to illustrate them. We verified the findings by emailing the participants and obtaining feedback. Results Participants included: five chairpersons, two program directors, and three faculty members. We identified five lessons: 1 few people understand the basic concepts of family medicine; 2 developing a core curriculum is difficult; 3 start with undergraduates; 4 emphasize clinical skills; and 5 train in the community. Conclusion While organizational change is difficult, the identified lessons suggest issues that merit consideration when developing a family medicine training program. Lessons from complexity science could inform application of these insights in other countries and settings newly developing residency training.

  16. 24 CFR 5.657 - Section 8 project-based assistance programs: Reexamination of family income and composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... programs: Reexamination of family income and composition. 5.657 Section 5.657 Housing and Urban Development...: Reexamination of family income and composition. (a) Applicability. This section states requirements for reexamination of family income and composition in the Section 8 project-based assistance programs, except for...

  17. Effects of a Modified Conditional Cash Transfer Program in Two American Cities: Findings from Family Rewards 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Cynthia; Miller, Rhiannon; Verma, Nandita; Dechausay, Nadine; Yang, Edith; Rudd, Timothy; Rodriguez, Jonathan; Honig, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Family Rewards was an innovative approach to poverty reduction in the United States that was modeled on the conditional cash transfer (CCT) programs common in lower- and middle-income countries. The program offered cash assistance to low-income families, provided that they met certain conditions related to family health care, children's education,…

  18. Implementing a Conditional Cash Transfer Program in Two American Cities: Early Lessons from Family Rewards 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dechausay, Nadine; Miller, Cynthia; Quiroz-Becerra, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    In 2007, New York City launched the first test of a conditional cash transfer program in the United States. Called Family Rewards, the program sought to break the intergenerational cycle of poverty by offering cash assistance to poor families to reduce immediate hardship, but conditioned this assistance on families' efforts to improve their…

  19. Family Income, Parent Education, and Perceived Constraints as Predictors of Observed Program Quality and Parent Rated Program Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torquati, Julia C.; Raikes, Helen H.; Huddleston-Casas, Catherine A.; Bovaird, James A.; Harris, Beatrice A.

    2011-01-01

    Observed child care quality and parent perceptions of child care quality received by children in poor (below Federal Poverty Line, FPL), low-income (between FPL and 200% of FPL), and non-low-income families were examined. Observations were completed in 359 center- and home-based child care programs in four Midwestern states and surveys were…

  20. Family leader empowerment program using participatory learning process for dengue vector control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pengvanich, Veerapong

    2011-02-01

    Assess the performance of the empowerment program using participatory learning process for the control of Dengue vector The program focuses on using the leaders of families as the main executer of the vector control protocol. This quasi-experimental research utilized the two-group pretest-posttest design. The sample group consisted of 120 family leaders from two communities in Mueang Municipality, Chachoengsao Province. The research was conducted during an 8-week period between April and June 2010. The data were collected and analyzed based on frequency, percentage, mean, paired t-test, and independent t-test. The result was evaluated by comparing the difference between the mean prevalence index of mosquito larvae before and after the process implementation in terms of the container index (CI) and the house index (HI). After spending eight weeks in the empowerment program, the family leader's behavior in the aspect of Dengue vector control has improved. The Container Index and the House Index were found to decrease with p = 0.05 statistical significance. The reduction of CI and HI suggested that the program worked well in the selected communities. The success of the Dengue vector control program depended on cooperation and participation of many groups, especially the families in the community When the family leaders have good attitude and are capable of carrying out the vector control protocol, the risk factor leading to the incidence of Dengue rims infection can be reduced.

  1. Electrocardiography teaching in Canadian family medicine residency programs: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Baldeep; Baranchuk, Adrian

    2011-04-01

    Electrocardiography (ECG) interpretation is an essential skill for a family physician. Teaching and learning electrocardiography is a difficult task, in part due to the erosion of knowledge when interpretation is not part of a daily activity. The objective of this study was to assess the current status of electrocardiography teaching in Canadian family medicine residency programs. A national survey was designed to specifically address the status of the ECG teaching curricula. This national survey was electronically sent to the family medicine program directors of all 17 Canadian accredited medical schools. Approximately 75% of the schools responded to the survey. There was a great variance among Canadian family medicine residency programs with respect to the time allotment, ECG training location, training faculty, and teaching methods utilized. The goals of each respective program are also quite wide-ranging. Family medicine residency programs across Canada are quite diverse regarding ECG training curricula and its goals. The need for a homogeneous way of teaching and evaluating has been identified.

  2. Effect of a family psychoeducational program on relatives of schizophrenia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sota, Satoko; Shimodera, Shinji; Kii, Masaru; Okamura, Kayoko; Suto, Koichirou; Suwaki, Mitsuru; Fujita, Hirokazu; Fujito, Ryosuke; Inoue, Shimpei

    2008-08-01

    Family psychoeducational programs have been shown to be effective in terms of knowledge acquirement and relapse prevention, but few studies have looked at whether one mode of educational method is more effective than another. The aim of the present study was to compare several modes of educational approaches and to elucidate which mode of education is more effective. A total of 110 relatives of 95 patients with schizophrenia received three types of family psychoeducational programs between January 1995 and September 2003: a small group with two sessions (P1), a large group with nine sessions (P2), and a large group with five sessions (P3). In addition to the demographic data, acquired knowledge was measured using the modified Knowledge About Schizophrenia Interview (KASI), family expressed emotion (EE), and relapse episodes. Overall there were significant increases in many KASI subcategory scores after the three programs, in mothers in particular. The change in KASI scores indicated that the low EE group was able to be highly educated and that the relatives of non-relapsers were more effectively educated. As for the mode of the family psychoeducational program, the P1 and P2 groups surpassed the P3 in terms of knowledge acquired. Effects of family psychoeducation may depend not on the number of members or sessions but on the time spent on the program per member.

  3. Family carers’ experiences of attending a multicomponent psychosocial intervention program for carers and persons with dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannessen, Aud; Bruvik, Frøydis Kristine; Hauge, Solveig

    2015-01-01

    Background Psychosocial interventions for persons with dementia and their primary family carers are promising approaches to reducing the challenges associated with care, but, obtaining significant outcomes may be difficult. Even though carers in general are satisfied with such interventions, few studies have evaluated the interventions by means of qualitative methods. Aim The objective of the study reported here was to investigate family carers’ experiences of a multicomponent psychosocial intervention program, and also to offer advice on how to develop the intervention program. Methods Content analyses were taken from individual qualitative interviews conducted in 2012 with 20 carers (aged 50–82 years) who participated in a psychosocial intervention program that included education, individual and family counseling, and parallel group sessions for carers and persons with dementia. Results Two main categories emerged: 1) benefits of the intervention program, which sets out the informants’ experiences for the benefits of participation, described in the subcategories “importance of content and group organization” and “importance of social support”; and 2) missing content in the intervention program, which details the informants’ suggestions for future interventions, contained in the subcategories “need for extended content” and “need for new group organization”. Conclusion The carers found the interventions useful. The importance of even earlier and more flexible interventions for the family carers, the extended family, and the persons with dementia was underscored. PMID:25709469

  4. Family carers' experiences of attending a multicomponent psychosocial intervention program for carers and persons with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannessen, Aud; Bruvik, Frøydis Kristine; Hauge, Solveig

    2015-01-01

    Psychosocial interventions for persons with dementia and their primary family carers are promising approaches to reducing the challenges associated with care, but, obtaining significant outcomes may be difficult. Even though carers in general are satisfied with such interventions, few studies have evaluated the interventions by means of qualitative methods. The objective of the study reported here was to investigate family carers' experiences of a multicomponent psychosocial intervention program, and also to offer advice on how to develop the intervention program. Content analyses were taken from individual qualitative interviews conducted in 2012 with 20 carers (aged 50-82 years) who participated in a psychosocial intervention program that included education, individual and family counseling, and parallel group sessions for carers and persons with dementia. Two main categories emerged: 1) benefits of the intervention program, which sets out the informants' experiences for the benefits of participation, described in the subcategories "importance of content and group organization" and "importance of social support"; and 2) missing content in the intervention program, which details the informants' suggestions for future interventions, contained in the subcategories "need for extended content" and "need for new group organization". The carers found the interventions useful. The importance of even earlier and more flexible interventions for the family carers, the extended family, and the persons with dementia was underscored.

  5. Key informants' perspectives on development of family medicine training programs in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gossa W

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Weyinshet Gossa,1,2 Dawit Wondimagegn,3 Demeke Mekonnen,4 Wondwossen Eshetu,5 Zerihun Abebe,6 Michael D Fetters2 1Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; 2Department of Family Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; 3Department of Psychiatry, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, 4Department of Pediatrics, Jimma University, Jimma, 5Federal Ministry of Health, 6St Paul's Hospital Millennium Medical College, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Abstract: As a very low-income country, Ethiopia faces significant development challenges, though there is great aspiration to dramatically improve health care in the country. Family medicine has recently been recognized through national policy as one potential contributor in addressing Ethiopia's health care challenges. Family medicine is a new specialty in Ethiopia emerging in the context of family medicine development in Sub-Saharan Africa. The Addis Ababa University family medicine residency program started in 2013 and is the first and the only family medicine program in the country as of March 2016. Stakeholders on the ground feel that family medicine is off to a good start and have great enthusiasm and optimism for its success. While the Ministry of Health has a vision for the development of family medicine and a plan for rapid upscaling of family medicine across the country, significant challenges remain. Continuing discussion about the potential roles of family medicine specialists in Ethiopia and policy-level strategic planning to place family medicine at the core of primary health care delivery in the country is needed. In addition, the health care-tier system needs to be restructured to include the family medicine specialists along with appropriately equipped health care facilities for training and practice. Key stakeholders are optimistic that family medicine expansion can be successful in Ethiopia through a coordinated effort by

  6. Teaching and evaluation of ethics and professionalism: in Canadian family medicine residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauls, Merril A

    2012-12-01

    To document the scope of the teaching and evaluation of ethics and professionalism in Canadian family medicine postgraduate training programs, and to identify barriers to the teaching and evaluation of ethics and professionalism. A survey was developed in collaboration with the Committee on Ethics of the College of Family Physicians of Canada. The data are reported descriptively and in aggregate. Canadian postgraduate family medicine training programs. Between June and December of 2008, all 17 Canadian postgraduate family medicine training programs were invited to participate. The first part of the survey explored the structure, resources, methods, scheduled hours, and barriers to teaching ethics and professionalism. The second section focused on end-of-rotation evaluations, other evaluation strategies, and barriers related to the evaluation of ethics and professionalism. Eighty-eight percent of programs completed the survey. Most respondents (87%) had learning objectives specifically for ethics and professionalism, and 87% had family doctors with training or interest in the area leading their efforts. Two-thirds of responding programs had less than 10 hours of scheduled instruction per year, and the most common barriers to effective teaching were the need for faculty development, competing learning needs, and lack of resident interest. Ninety-three percent of respondents assessed ethics and professionalism on their end-of-rotation evaluations, with 86% assessing specific domains. The most common barriers to evaluation were a lack of suitable tools and a lack of faculty comfort and interest. By far most Canadian family medicine postgraduate training programs had learning objectives and designated faculty leads in ethics and professionalism, yet there was little curricular time dedicated to these areas and a perceived lack of resident interest and faculty expertise. Most programs evaluated ethics and professionalism as part of their end-of-rotation evaluations, but

  7. Meaning in family caregiving for people with dementia: a narrative study about relationships, values, and motivation, and how day care influences these factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tretteteig S

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Signe Tretteteig,1,2 Solfrid Vatne,3 Anne Marie Mork Rokstad1,3 1Norwegian National Advisory Unit on Ageing and Health, Vestfold Hospital Trust, Tønsberg, Norway; 2Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo; Oslo, Norway; 3Faculty of Health Sciences and Social Care, Molde University College, Molde, Norway Background: In addition to care-related burdens, most caregivers of a person with dementia perceive a variety of positive and satisfying experiences, such as feeling needed and useful in their family caregiving role. “Meaning-focused coping” describes both positive and negative emotions in periods with high levels of stress. Day care service may have the potential to increase caregivers’ positive experiences and meaning-focused coping, and positively influence interpersonal relationships between those giving care and those receiving care. The aim of this study was to gain knowledge about family caregivers’ experiences of meaning in their caring role. Additionally, the influence of day care services on caregivers’ experiences and motivation in their caregiving role is explored. Methods: A qualitative design based on individual interviews was used. The interviews were analyzed using a narrative method and a case study approach. Findings: Family caregivers’ roles and coping strategies were related to their relational ties. Caregivers had to make decisions about whether to enhance, maintain, or let go of emotional ties to find a good balance between meeting their own needs and the needs of the person with dementia. Family caregivers reported that day care positively influenced their “relationship-oriented coping” and experience of meaning. Conclusion: Finding meaning in the role of a family caregiver for persons with dementia is closely connected to the caregivers’ own values and goals. Finding a balance between attending to their own needs and the needs of the person with dementia is crucial. Day care has the potential to increase

  8. Nutritional and metabolic programming during the first thousand days of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosti, Massimo; Tandoi, Francesco; Morlacchi, Laura; Bossi, Angela

    2017-06-28

    The latest scientific acquisitions are demonstrating what has already been hypothesized for more than twenty years about the development of the state of health/illness of individuals. Indeed, certain stimuli, if applied to a sensible phase of development, are able to modify, through epigenetic mechanisms, gene expression of DNA, resulting in adaptive modifications of phenotype to the environment, which may reflect negatively on the health of every individual. This concept, applied to nutrition, has opened up important prospects for research in this area. The nutritional history of an individual, linked to the development of a healthy state, would begin very early. In fact, since the pregnancy and for the next two years (for a total of about 1000 days), the maternal eating habits, the type of breastfeeding and then the main stages of nutrition in the evolutionary phase represent those sensitive moments, essential for the development of important endocrine, metabolic, immunological alterations, better known as metabolic syndrome. This condition would represent the physiopathogenetic basis for explaining a series of disorders, known as non communicable diseases (NCDs) such as obesity, diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascolar disease and all those conditions that today affect the health of most industrialized countries and through the years are emerging especially in developing countries (South America, Asia), where new environmental conditions and increased food availability are changing food habits, with far-reaching public health impacts. This paper analyzes these new nutritional perspectives and the main implications of what has been termed the 1000-day theory.

  9. Nutritional and metabolic programming during the first thousand days of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Agosti

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The latest scientific acquisitions are demonstrating what has already been hypothesized for more than twenty years about the development of the state of health/illness of individuals. Indeed, certain stimuli, if applied to a sensible phase of development, are able to modify, through epigenetic mechanisms, gene expression of DNA, resulting in adaptive modifications of phenotype to the environment, which may reflect negatively on the health of every individual. This concept, applied to nutrition, has opened up important prospects for research in this area. The nutritional history of an individual, linked to the development of a healthy state, would begin very early. In fact, since the pregnancy and for the next two years (for a total of about 1000 days, the maternal eating habits, the type of breastfeeding and then the main stages of nutrition in the evolutionary phase represent those sensitive moments, essential for the development of important endocrine, metabolic, immunological alterations, better known as metabolic syndrome. This condition would represent the physiopathogenetic basis for explaining a series of disorders, known as non communicable diseases (NCDs such as obesity, diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascolar disease and all those conditions that today affect the health of most industrialized countries and through the years are emerging especially in developing countries (South America, Asia, where new environmental conditions and increased food availability are changing food habits, with far-reaching public health impacts. This paper analyzes these new nutritional perspectives and the main implications of what has been termed the 1000-day theory.

  10. The Savvy Caregiver Program: Developing and Testing a Transportable Dementia Family Caregiver Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepburn, Kenneth W.; Lewis, Marsha; Sherman, Carey Wexler; Tornatore, Jane

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: This article reports on the development and field testing of the Savvy Caregiver Program, the transformation of a successful, academic-based caregiver psychoeducational program into a self-contained program that can be adopted in other locations. Design and Methods: Program development began with a prototype of a 12-hr course with the…

  11. [Fertility decline in China and family planning programs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notkola, V; Nieminen, M

    1995-01-01

    "The article looks in detail at the population development in China since the 1950s, highlighting some dramatic changes. In the late 1950s the country was hit by widespread famine, which resulted in increased mortality and decreased fertility. Infant mortality climbed to almost 300/1,000. During the 1960s fertility began to increase again and mortality declined. From the beginning of the 1970s fertility started to decline, dropping from about six to just over two children per woman in the late 1980s. Today, fertility is thought to be below replacement level. The main reason for this fertility decline lies in the highly efficient family planning programmes implemented in China since the 1950s and particularly since the 1970s. The decline in infant mortality and the favourable socio-economic development have also been important factors in the decline in fertility. Although fertility in China is currently at a low level, the country's population is still set to grow." (SUMMARY IN ENG) excerpt

  12. Female inmates, family caregivers, and young children's adjustment: A research agenda and implications for corrections programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecil, Dawn K.; McHale, James; Strozier, Anne; Pietsch, Joel

    2008-01-01

    Attendant to the exponential increase in rates of incarceration of mothers with young children in the United States, programming has been established to help mothers attend to parenting skills and other family concerns while incarcerated. Unfortunately, most programs overlook the important, ongoing relationship between incarcerated mothers and family members caring for their children—most often, the inmates' own mothers. Research reveals that children's behavior problems escalate when different co-caregivers fail to coordinate parenting efforts and interventions, work in opposition, or disparage or undermine one another. This article presents relevant research on co-caregiving and child adjustment, highlights major knowledge gaps in need of study to better understand incarcerated mothers and their families, and proposes that existing interventions with such mothers can be strengthened through targeting and cultivating functional coparenting alliances in families. PMID:19884977

  13. A survey of formal training in the care of children in family practice residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldor, R A; Luckmann, R

    1992-08-01

    Declining hospitalization rates for children and an increased emphasis on ambulatory care may be affecting the way family practice residency programs train their residents in the care of children. We surveyed all US family practice residency program directors to determine the nature of the child care training that programs currently provide to residents. Responses were received from 78% of the programs. Residencies required a mean of 5.2 months of formal pediatric training (range: 1 to 11 months). Thirty percent of programs noted a declining inpatient census on inpatient pediatric teaching services, but since 1978, the mean duration of inpatient pediatric training increased by 0.4 months to a required mean of 2.7 months of general pediatric inpatient training (range: 0 to 6 months). The mean time devoted to structured outpatient pediatric training was only 1.6 months (range: 0 to 6 months). Nine percent of responding programs required no formal pediatric outpatient training other than family health center experience. Despite declining inpatient census and increased emphasis on comprehensive ambulatory care, family practice residencies require more formal inpatient pediatric training than formal outpatient training.

  14. Longitudinal Evaluation of the Tupange Urban Family Planning Program in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Aimee; Calhoun, Lisa M; Corroon, Meghan; Lance, Peter; O'Hara, Rick; Otsola, John; Speizer, Ilene S; Winston, Jennifer

    2017-06-01

    Levels of fertility and contraceptive use have long fluctuated in Kenya. The multicomponent Tupange program, part of the Urban Reproductive Health Initiative, was initiated in 2011 to increase use of modern family planning methods. Women aged 15-49 in the five Kenyan cities where Tupange was implemented were interviewed in 2010 and reinterviewed in 2014 to obtain information on their contraceptive use and exposure to components of the Tupange program. Fixed-effects models were estimated to identify associations between program exposure and use of modern family planning methods. Analyses were performed to determine the relative cost-effectiveness of program components. During the four-year follow-up period, the proportion of women using modern contraceptives increased from 45% to 52%, and the proportion of users who were using long-acting or permanent methods rose from 6% to 19%. The fixed-effects model indicated that modern method use was associated with having heard Tupange-related local radio programming and marginally associated with having discussed family planning with a community health worker (CHW); among women who were unmarried or did not give birth during the study period, modern method use was associated with living near program facilities. Local radio programming was the most cost-effective program component, followed by proximity to Tupange facilities and discussions with CHWs. Urban reproductive health programs seeking to increase use of modern family planning methods in Kenya and other Sub-Saharan African settings should consider multicomponent approaches that include CHW activities, local radio programming and improvements to the supply environment.

  15. Migration: Dangers and Opportunities for the Family in the Light of John Paul II’s Messages for World Migrant Day

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ireneusz Stolarczyk

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of migration has become a subject of numerous sociological, economic and political analyses. It has also become an issue of interest for Catholic Social Teaching. The complexity of this subject, its topicality and a need for a diagnosis in the light of ethical and social rules are contained within the consecutive messages for the World Migrant Day by the Holy Father John Paul II. A particularly interesting dimension of the discussion of the phenomenon of migration is the analysis of this problem in terms of its influence on the modern family. John Paul II notices that owing to the dignity of the family and its significant role in the process of upbringing of the young generation, the decision to migrate by members of a family or entire families must be well thought ‑out and carefully considered in the context of a necessity to undertake such steps. The necessity condition is related to a wide array of threats, which a family would have to face if they chose to take the migration path. The Pope also points out that migration is, at the same time, a justifiable opportunity for the development of a family, which should be provided ample assistance by the Church and state in a new environment.

  16. Evaluating the effectiveness of a family empowerment program on family function and pulmonary function of children with asthma: A randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Hsiu-Ying; Ma, Wei-Fen; Huang, Jing-Long; Hsueh, Kai-Chung; Chiang, Li-Chi

    2016-08-01

    Empowerment can be an effective strategy for changing an individual's health behaviours. However, how to empower whole families to manage their children's asthma is a challenge that requires innovative nursing intervention based on family-centred care. To evaluate the effectiveness of a family empowerment program on family function and pulmonary function of children with asthma compared to those receiving traditional self-management only. A randomized control trial. Sixty-five families were recruited from one asthma clinic in a medical centre in Taiwan. After random assignment, 34 families in the experimental group received the family empowerment program consisting of four counselling dialogues with the child and its family. We empowered the family caregiver's ability to manage their child's asthma problems through finding the problems in the family, discovery and discussion about the way to solve problems, and enabling the family's cooperation and asthma management. The other 31 families received the traditional care in asthma clinics. The Parental Stress Index and Family Environment Scale of family caregivers, and pulmonary function, and asthma signs of children with asthma were collected at pre-test, 3-month post-test, and one-year follow-up. We utilized the linear mixed model in SPSS (18.0) to analyze the effects between groups, across time, and the interaction between group and time. The family empowerment program decreased parental stress (F=13.993, pfamily function (cohesion, expression, conflict solving, and independence) (F=19.848, pfamily caregiver's observations. We empowered families by listening, dialogues, reflection, and taking action based on Freire's empowerment theory. Nurses could initiate the families' life changes and assist children to solve the problems by themselves, which could yield positive health outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. THE INTEGRATION ARTICULATION BETWEEN THE EDUCATION AND HEALTH ACTIONS IN THE FAMILY HEALTH PROGRAM – PSF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Cavalcanti da Silva

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The article discusses the practical actions of a team of the Family Health Program-PSF in a city of the Northeastern Brazilian region and, it reveals the lack of integration/articulation of those actions with the educational dimension. The disarticulation of the team members’ knowledge of health on the theoretical, methodological and philosophical principles of PSF is pointed as one of the determinant of the little involvement of the team work with the educational area. the analysis of the collected data was accomplished through the technique of the critical Analysis of the speeches that led to the empiric category: contradiction theoretical x practice in the actions of the health teams of the Family Health Program. KEY WORDS: Health Education, Family Health Program; Public Health Nursing.

  18. 34 CFR 206.1 - What are the special educational programs for students whose families are engaged in migrant and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... whose families are engaged in migrant and other seasonal farmwork? 206.1 Section 206.1 Education..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS FOR STUDENTS WHOSE FAMILIES ARE ENGAGED IN MIGRANT AND OTHER SEASONAL FARMWORK-HIGH SCHOOL EQUIVALENCY PROGRAM AND COLLEGE ASSISTANCE MIGRANT PROGRAM General...

  19. Brief Report: The Feasibility and Effectiveness of an Advocacy Program for Latino Families of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Meghan M.; Magaña, Sandra; Garcia, Marlene; Mello, Maria P.

    2016-01-01

    Latino, Spanish-speaking families of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) face unique barriers in special education advocacy. Although advocacy programs are becoming more common in the United States, none of these programs target Latino families. This is a pilot study to examine the feasibility and effectiveness of an advocacy program for…

  20. Contraceptive method-mix and family planning program in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardjanti, K

    1995-01-01

    In Vietnam between 1989 and 1993, the modern contraceptive prevalence rate stopped at 38%. In 1984, the government implemented economic renovation (Doi Moi). This closed agricultural cooperatives which had supported commune health centers. Health workers received either low or no wages, resulting in low morale, absenteeism, and moving to the private sector or agriculture. Most women began using the IUD because it was low cost and easy to monitor, provided long-term protection against pregnancy, and there was a limited supply of oral contraceptives (OCs) and condoms. Condom use fell from 13% in 1984 to 1.4% in 1993. More than 80% of contraceptive users used the IUD. The IUD is not appropriate for many women because of health problems: 60-70% of pregnant women and 80% of parturient women have anemia, 40-60% of women have reproductive tract infections, and sexually transmitted diseases are rising. Vietnam's Prime Minister and the Communist Party are committed to expanding the range of the contraceptive method-mix and choice. Limited method choice is especially a problem in rural areas. It increases the abortion rate. About 38% of abortions supplant modern and traditional family planning methods. Improper counseling, insufficient knowledge, and low promotion of OCs account for the low use of OCs. Inferior quality, aversion by couples, and inaccessibility in most rural areas limit condom use. Women's fear and husband's objection outweigh the government's promotion of sterilization. Providers have limited comprehensive accurate and current knowledge of contraceptives. Health service facilities are concentrated in urban and semiurban areas. The quality of care in rural areas, where there is no clean water supply, is inferior. An annual target used to forecast contraceptive needs risks contraceptive stocks expiring during storage and/or disruptions in supply of users. Consecutive actions to eliminate constraints to use of other methods, developing a community level service

  1. A Multi-Family Group Intervention for Adolescent Depression: The BEST MOOD Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Lucinda A; Lewis, Andrew J; Toumbourou, John W; Knight, Tess; Bertino, Melanie D; Pryor, Reima

    2017-06-01

    Depression is the most common mental disorder for young people, and it is associated with educational underachievement, self-harm, and suicidality. Current psychological therapies for adolescent depression are usually focused only on individual-level change and often neglect family or contextual influences. The efficacy of interventions may be enhanced with a broader therapeutic focus on family factors such as communication, conflict, support, and cohesion. This article describes a structured multi-family group approach to the treatment of adolescent depression: Behaviour Exchange Systems Therapy for adolescent depression (BEST MOOD). BEST MOOD is a manualized intervention that is designed to address both individual and family factors in the treatment of adolescent depression. BEST MOOD adopts a family systems approach that also incorporates psychoeducation and elements of attachment theories. The program consists of eight multifamily group therapy sessions delivered over 2 hours per week, where parents attend the first four sessions and young people and siblings join from week 5. The program design is specifically aimed to engage youth who are initially resistant to treatment and to optimize youth and family mental health outcomes. This article presents an overview of the theoretical model, session content, and evaluations to date, and provides a case study to illustrate the approach. © 2016 Family Process Institute.

  2. Impact of family remittances and the Prospera program on high school students in Choix, Sinaloa, Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Pintor Sandoval, Renato; Peraza Noriega, Brianda Elena; Heredia Trasviña, Karen Olivia

    2017-01-01

    Objective: to establish the impact of family remittances from the United States and the "Prospera" welfare program for the high school student population in a community with high social exclusion and poverty in Sinaloa.Methodology: first, the population, economic and work activities in the community of Choix, Sinaloa were described. Then, the discussion on remittances and the beneficiary families of the Prospera program were characterized; finally, a survey was designed and applied to 114 hig...

  3. Helping concerned family members of individuals with substance use and concurrent disorders: An evaluation of a family member-oriented treatment program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denomme, William James; Benhanoh, Orry

    2017-08-01

    There is a growing body of research demonstrating that families of individuals with substance use and concurrent disorders (SUCD) experience a wide range of biopsychosocial problems that significantly impedes their quality of life and health. However, there has been a relative lack of treatment programs primarily focused on improving the well-being and quality of life of these family members. The current study assessed the efficacy of such a program at reducing stress, increasing perceived social support from family and friends, and increasing general, dyadic, and self-rated family functioning within these concerned family members. A sample of 125 family members of individuals with SUCDs was recruited, of which 97 participated in the treatment program and 28 were used as the comparison group. Results indicated that the treatment program significantly reduced stress, increased perceived social support from family and friends, and increased general, dyadic and self-rated family functioning. A perceived personal benefits questionnaire demonstrated that participants had a better understanding of SUCDs, better coping capabilities in regard to emotional difficulties, adopted stronger coping methods, participated in more leisure activities, and improved their relationship with the individual with a SUCD. The results of the current study further demonstrate the need to implement more of these family-member oriented psycho-educational treatment programs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. National impacts of the Weatherization Assistance Program in single-family and small multifamily dwellings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.A.; Berry, L.G.; Balzer, R.A.; Faby, E.

    1993-05-01

    Since 1976, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has operated one of the largest energy conservation programs in the nation -- the low-income Weatherization Assistance Program. The program strives to increase the energy efficiency of dwellings occupied by low-income persons in order to reduce their energy consumption, lower their fuel bills, increase the comfort of their homes, and safeguard their health. It targets vulnerable groups including the elderly, people with disabilities, and families with children. The most recent national evaluation of the impacts of the Program was completed in 1984 based on energy consumption data for households weatherized in 1981. DOE Program regulations and operations have changed substantially since then: new funding sources, management principles, diagnostic procedures, and weatherization technologies have been incorporated. Many of these new features have been studied in isolation or at a local level; however, no recent evaluation has assessed their combined, nationwide impacts to date or their potential for the future. In 1990, DOE initiated such an evaluation. This evaluation is comprised of three ``impact`` studies (the Single-Family Study, High-Density Multifamily Study, and Fuel-Oil Study) and two ``policy`` studies. Altogether, these five studies will provide a comprehensive national assessment of the Weatherization Assistance Program as it existed in the 1989 Program Year (PY 1989). This report presents the results of the first phase of the Single-Family Study. It evaluates the energy savings and cost effectiveness of the Program as it has been applied to the largest portion of its client base -- low-income households that occupy single-family dwellings, mobile homes, and small (2- to 4-unit) multifamily dwellings. It is based upon a representative national sample that covers the full range of conditions under which the program was implemented in PY 1989.

  5. A Pilot Telerehabilitation Program: Delivering Early Intervention Services to Rural Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Cason

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The enTECH Telerehabilitation Program explored the use of telerehabilitation as an alternative service delivery model for early intervention therapy services. Utilizing the Kentucky Telehealth Network, two families living in rural Kentucky received occupational therapy services over a 12-week period. Following program implementation, qualitative data was collected using participant journals and interviews. Data analysis identified three thematic categories related to the program: benefits/strengths, challenges/weaknesses, and recommendations for program improvement. Results of the program evaluation indicated that telerehabilitation has the potential to cost-effectively meet the therapeutic needs of children living in rural areas where provider shortages exist. The enTECH Telerehabilitation Program serves as a model for how telerehabilitation can be used to deliver early intervention services to ameliorate health disparities and improve access to rehabilitation services. Keywords: Telerehabilitation, Occupational Therapy, Rural, Early Intervention, Children, Program Evaluation, Cost Analysis

  6. Training unemployed women for adult day care in Izmir, Turkey: a program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Shereen; Oğlak, Sema

    2014-01-01

    The proportion of older people in Turkey is increasing steadily with a subsequent growth of long-term care (LTC) needs. There is a scarcity of formal care provisions for residential and particularly nonresidential settings. Thus, formal caregiving is not meeting LTC needs nor attracting workers as a labor option. The authors examine the hypothesis that LTC may offer work opportunities for women unfamiliar with caregiving as an occupation, and also examine the need and acceptance of different types of LTC beyond residential care. The authors evaluate an innovative project introducing these two elements to 76 women in İzmir, Turkey, using an analysis framework that incorporates factors related to applications and progression; management assessment; trainees' self-assessment reflecting on their views on aging; and older people's perception of the experience and its impact on their well-being. Trainees reported a major positive shift in their attitudes toward working in LTC and toward the aging process. Users reported discovering a new dimension to care, which directly affected their quality of life. Overall, this community-based initiative appeared effective in enhancing the awareness of the concept of adult day centers providing a social model of care, and appears promising in addressing the growing need for formal LTC in Turkey.

  7. Changes in Families' Caregiving Experiences through Involvement as Participants then Facilitators in a Family Peer-Education Program for Mental Disorders in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageyama, Masako; Yokoyama, Keiko; Nakamura, Yukako; Kobayashi, Sayaka

    2017-06-01

    A family peer-education program for mental disorders was developed in Japan, similar to existing programs in the United States and Hong Kong. Families that serve as facilitators in such programs may enhance their caregiving processes and, thereby, their well-being. This study's aim was to describe how families' caregiving experiences change, beginning with the onset of a family member's mental illness, through their involvement in a family group or peer-education program as participants then facilitators. Thus, this study was conducted in a family peer-education program for mental disorders in Japan. Group interviews were conducted with 27 facilitators from seven program sites about their experiences before, during, and after becoming facilitators. Interview data were coded and categorized into five stages of caregiving processes: (1) withdrawing and suppressing negative experiences with difficulty and regret; (2) finding comfort through being listened to about negative experiences; (3) supporting participants' sharing as facilitators; (4) understanding and affirming oneself through repeated sharing of experiences; and (5) finding value and social roles in one's experiences. The third, fourth, and fifth stages were experienced by the facilitators. The value that the facilitators placed on their caregiving experiences changed from negative to positive, which participants regarded as helpful and supportive. We conclude that serving as facilitators may improve families' caregiving processes. © 2015 Family Process Institute.

  8. The relationship between satisfaction and knowledge about family-doctor program in Shahr-e-Kord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Alidoosti

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Attention to the satisfaction of recipients of medical services is an important issue. This cross-sectional study was carried out to determine the relationship between satisfaction and awareness of villagers about family-doctor program. Materials and Method: In this study, 1100 persons who were covered with the family-doctor program in rural area in Shahr-e-Kord. We used a self-made questionnaire and multi-stage sampling method. Data analyzed using chi-squared and Spearman correlation coefficient tests and p-value less than 0.05 was considered significant.Results: Awareness to family-doctor program was weak in 37.6% of peoples and 48.1 percent of them were fairly satisfied. There was a significant correlation between the knowledge of people and their satisfaction (p= 0.04.Conclusion: Informing people about the main goals of family-doctor program will help to promote the quality of program and increase people satisfaction

  9. 75 FR 16493 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the Public and Indian Housing Family Self-Sufficiency Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...-Sufficiency Program Under the Resident Opportunity and Self-Sufficiency (ROSS) Program for Fiscal Year 2009...-Sufficiency Program under the Resident Opportunity and Self-Sufficiency (ROSS) Program for Fiscal Year 2009...: For questions concerning the FY 2009 Public and Indian Housing Family Self-Sufficiency Program under...

  10. Is the Balanced School Day Truly Balanced? A Review of the Impacts on Children, Families, and School Food Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Theresa F.; Macaskill, Lesley A.; Salvadori, Marina I.; Dworatzek, Paula D. N.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Balanced School Day (BSD) is a scheduling policy that has the potential to impact children's food behaviors because students are provided with two 20-minute eating opportunities versus the traditional 20-minute lunch. Methods: We aim to raise awareness of this grassroots academic policy and its potential consequences to inform…

  11. Assessing parent education programs for families involved with child welfare services: evidence and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Michelle; Stone, Susan; Lou, Christine; Ling, Jennifer; Claassen, Jennette; Austin, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    Parent education programs may be offered or mandated at various stages of the child welfare services continuum. However, little is known regarding their efficacy in addressing the parenting problems that bring families to the attention of child welfare services. This article synthesizes outcome data generated from 58 parenting programs with families determined to be at-risk of child maltreatment and/or abusive or neglectful. It places parent education programs within the broader context of research on effective parenting as well as the leading etiological models of child maltreatment to assess the evaluations of these programs with regard to methodological rigor as well as theoretical salience. Practical and theoretical implications are presented along with recommendations for future research.

  12. Out-of-home day care for families living in a disadvantaged area of London: economic evaluation alongside a RCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujica Mota, R; Lorgelly, P K; Mugford, M; Toroyan, T; Oakley, A; Laing, G; Roberts, I

    2006-05-01

    Children born into poverty have lifelong disadvantages compared with those more fortunate; social interventions seek to break this cycle of poverty and deprivation. Early Years Centres are one such intervention. These were established in deprived areas in the UK to provide high quality out-of-home day care. This paper reports the results of an economic evaluation conducted alongside a randomized controlled trial of one of these centres in the Borough of Hackney, London. Participants were randomized to receive either high quality day care as provided by the centre or to other child care that they secured for themselves where they chose to do so. Information on resource use (early years education and care, as well as health and social care) was collected over an 18-month period; this was valued using appropriate unit costs. The cost of education, social and health care together with the value of productivity gains and out-of-pocket costs were then compared with the effectiveness of the intervention, increased labour force participant in mothers. From the societal perspective, the value of employment outweighs the costs of health and social services used, and in both groups there are cost savings. These are greater in the intervention group, therefore Early Years day care is an efficient use of resources. However, there is a net cost to the public sector of providing the intervention. The cost of achieving an additional mother in the labour force at 18 months is pound38 550 (85% CI of -pound1273, pound416 172). From the societal perspective, over an 18-month period, all child care is cost saving, but high quality day care provided by the Early Years Centre is a cost-effective alternative to day care provided by other local services in Hackney. The public sector, however, incurs added expense from this intervention.

  13. Development and feasibility of need-based yoga program for family caregivers of in-patients with schizophrenia in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarti Jagannathan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context and Aim: Yoga has been found to be effective in the management of stress. This paper describes the development of a yoga program aimed to reduce burden and improve coping of family caregivers of inpatients with schizophrenia in India. Materials and Methods: Based on the assessment of caregiver needs, literature review, and expert opinion, a ten-day group yoga program was initially developed using the qualitative inductive method of inquiry. Each day′s program included warm-up exercises, yogic asanas, pranayama, and satsang. A structured questionnaire eliciting comments on each day′s contents was given independently to ten experienced yoga professionals working in the field of health for validation. The final version of the program was pilot-tested on a group of six caregivers of in-patients with schizophrenia admitted at NIMHANS, Bangalore. Results: On the question of whether the program would help reduce the burden of caregivers, six of the ten experts (60% gave a rank of four of five (very much useful. Based on comments of the experts, several changes were made to the program. In the pilot-testing stage, more than 60% of the caregivers assigned a score of four and above (on a five-point Likert scale, five being extremely useful for the overall program, handouts distributed, and performance of the trainer. Qualitative feedback of the caregivers further endorsed the feasibility and usefulness of the program. Conclusion: The developed yoga program was found to be acceptable to caregivers of in-patients with schizophrenia.

  14. Rural After-School Programs: Meeting the Needs of At-Risk Youth and Their Families

    OpenAIRE

    Bethany L. Letiecq; Sandra J. Bailey; Julie A. Keller

    2007-01-01

    Extant research has focused on out-of-school time among urban and suburban youth, yet there remains scant information on rural low-income youth and their families. This study examines the salience of after-school programs for rural youth. Using an ecological framework, we assess changes in youth behavior and skill acquisition based on reports from 47 youth attending after-school programs in two rural communities, along with their primary caregivers and teachers. Results indicate enhanced life...

  15. Implementation of a community-based family-centered program in Portugal: a multiple case study evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Melo, Ana Teixeira de; Alarcão, Madalena

    2012-01-01

    Family-centered, community-based programs are particularly suited to support families with at-risk children or maltreated children and achieve family preservation or reunification. In these child protection and child welfare cases, assessment is of great importance to inform decision making. But the implementation of services to support the families change and its evaluation in real settings is not without challenges. The Integrated Family Assessment and Intervention Model (IFAIM) was designe...

  16. 78 FR 12032 - U.S. Department of Agriculture Multi-Family Housing Program 2013 Industry Forums-Open...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-21

    ..., parental status, religion, sexual orientation, political beliefs, genetic information reprisal, or because... Housing Service (RHS) staff Enhance RHS' awareness of issues that impact the Multi- Family Housing Program...

  17. Family meals can help children reach their 5 a day: a cross-sectional survey of children's dietary intake from London primary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Meaghan S; Evans, Charlotte E L; Hancock, Neil; Nykjaer, Camilla; Cade, Janet E

    2013-04-01

    This study aims to explore how the home food environment and parental attitudes and values affect children's fruit and vegetable (F&V) intake. The sample consists of 2383 children with a mean age of 8.3 years (95% CI 8.2 to 8.3) attending 52 primary schools in London. These children are taking part in two randomised controlled trials to evaluate a school gardening programme. Diet was assessed using a validated 24-h food tick list, the Child And Diet Evaluation Tool (CADET). The CADET tool found that children consumed on average 293 g F&V (95% CI 287 to 303) per day. Clustered (by school) multilevel regression models with total F&V as the primary outcome were conducted to explore how the home environment affects children's F&V intake. Children of families who reported 'always' eating a family meal together at a table had 125 g (95% CI 92 to 157; p=families who never ate a meal together. Daily consumption of F&V by parents was associated with higher F&V (88 g, 95% CI 37 to 138) intake in children compared with rarely/never consumption of F&V by parents. Cutting up fruit and vegetables for children was associated with higher consumption. Families who reported always cutting up F&V for their children had 44 g (95% CI 18 to 71) more F&V than families who never cut up F&V. This study identified that cutting up F&V and family consumption of F&V facilitates children's intake. Eating a family meal together regularly could increase children's F&V intake and help them achieve the recommended intake. ISRCTN11396528.

  18. A 1 year comparison of a Community Based Exercise Program versus a Day-Hospital based exercise program on Quality of Life and Mental Health in Severely Burned Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Raquel; Suman, Oscar E; Rosenberg, Marta; Andersen, Clark R; Herndon, David N; Meyer, Walter J

    2017-11-25

    To compare the effects of long term psychosocial functioning and mental health of a "Day-Hospital" Based Exercise Program (DAYEX) versus a Community Based Exercise Program (COMBEX). This was a prospective design that consisted of two groups (DAYEX and COMBEX). A children's hospital specialized in burn care (Shriner's Hospitals for Children, Inc., Galveston, Texas) PARTICIPANTS: A total of 18 patients, (n=9 DAYEX and n=9 COMBEX) were assessed at Intensive Care Unit (ICU) discharge and up to 1 year post burn. The Child Health Questionnaires (CHQ-Child/CF87 and Parent/PF28) were used to assess changes in quality of life from discharge to 1 year post-burn. CHQ-PF28 and CHQ-CF87 RESULTS: Demographic and TBSA were similar in both groups. Length of hospital stay was significant in the COMBEX group. CHQ-CF87 and CHQ-PF28 document significant improvements in both groups between discharge and 1 year. Significance was evident in Physical Functioning, Bodily Pain, Self Esteem, Change in Health, and Family Activities. CHQ-CF87 showed improvement in Family Cohesion in COMBEX more than DAYEX. CHQ-PF28 showed improvement in Role/Social Limitations - Emotional, Bodily Pain, and Family Activities in COMBEX more than DAYEX. The proposed COMBEX program shows to be feasible and beneficial physically, psychosocially, and mentally. The results show some improvements in the COMBEX group in optimizing function and health in severely burned children. The COMBEX group performed at least as well as the DAYEX group. Larger scale studies are needed to validate current findings. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Teaching family carers about home-based palliative care: final results from a group education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Peter; Thomas, Tina; Quinn, Karen; Cockayne, Mark; Braithwaite, Maxine

    2009-08-01

    Without the considerable support provided by family carers, many patients receiving palliative care would be unable to remain at home. However, family carers typically lack the required information and skills to prepare them for such a role. Pilot work has demonstrated that group education programs for family carers can be readily developed; they are feasible, accessible, and useful. This project sought to build on our pilot research to further examine the effectiveness of a group education program by evaluating the outcomes with a larger number of participants. The program aimed to prepare primary family carers for the role of supporting a relative with advanced, noncurative cancer at home. The psycho-educational program consisted of three consecutive weekly sessions presented in a group format, conducted at six home-based palliative care services across metropolitan and regional Victoria, Australia. The following dependent variables were measured at three time points: carer competence, preparedness, rewards, and information needs. The three time points were: commencement of the program (Time 1), upon completion (Time 2), and two weeks later (Time 3). A total of 156 participants (including the pilot phase) completed Time 1 questionnaires and 96 completed all three time periods (62%). Between Time 1 and Time 2, the intervention had a statistically significant positive effect on preparedness, competence, rewards, and having informational needs met. Outcomes were maintained at Time 3. There was no difference in the effectiveness of the intervention for participants in regional areas compared to participants in metropolitan areas. This study demonstrated that a group education program to prepare family carers for the role of supporting a dying relative at home was effective. Implications for further research and practice are outlined.

  20. Five-a-day, a price to pay: an evaluation of the UK program impact accounting for market forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capacci, Sara; Mazzocchi, Mario

    2011-01-01

    We provide an ex-post assessment of the UK 5-a-day information campaign, where the positive effects of information are disentangled from potentially conflicting price dynamics. Using 4 years of data from the Expenditure and Food Survey between 2002 and 2006, we estimate that the 5-a-day program has lifted fruit and vegetable consumption by 0.3 portions, on average. We also provide quantitative evidence of a differentiated impact by income group, ranging from 0.2 to 0.7 portions. All impacts are larger than those observed by simply comparing pre-policy and post-policy intakes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The Family Startup Program: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial of a universal group-based parenting support program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trillingsgaard, Tea; Maimburg, Rikke Damkjær; Simonsen, Marianne

    2015-04-21

    Inadequate parenting is an important public health problem with possible severe and long-term consequences related to child development. We have solid theoretical and political arguments in favor of efforts enhancing the quality of the early family environment in the population at large. However, little is known about effect of universal approaches to parenting support during the transition to parenthood. This protocol describes an experimental evaluation of group based parenting support, the Family Startup Program (FSP), currently implemented large scale in Denmark. Participants will be approximately 2500 pregnant women and partners. Inclusion criteria are parental age above 18 and the mother expecting first child. Families are recruited when attending routine pregnancy scans provided as a part of the publicly available prenatal care program at Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby. Families are randomized within four geographically defined strata to one of two conditions a) participation in FSP or b) Treatment As Usual (TAU). FSP aims to prepare new families for their roles as parents and enhance parental access to informal sources of support, i.e. social network and community resources. The program consists of twelve group sessions, with nine families in each group, continuing from pregnancy until the child is 15 months old. TAU is the publicly available pre- and postnatal care available to families in both conditions. Analyses will employ survey data, administrative data from health visitors, and administrative register based data from Statistics Denmark. All data sources will be linked via the unique Danish Civil Registration Register (CPR) identifier. Data will be obtained at four time points, during pregnancy, when the child is nine months, 18 months and seven years. The primary study outcome is measured by the Parenting Sense of Competence scale (PSOC) J Clin Child Psychol 18:167-75, 1989. Other outcomes include parenting and couple relationship quality

  2. Programmed flowering of the F1 long-day strawberry cultivar ‘Elan’ with nitrogen and daylength manipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward F. Durner

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Consumer demand for locally grown, high quality strawberries is increasing even though California, Florida and Mexico provide a year-round source of strawberries for the world market. In most of the US, locally grown strawberries are only available for a short time in late spring from seasonal fruiting short-day cultivars thus off-season strawberry production is an attractive option for growers. Seed propagated hybrids such as ‘Elan’ are becoming more widely available and offer an alternative to often low yielding cultivars used for off-season production. To determine whether or not ‘Elan’ could be programmed to flower with photoperiod or nitrogen, seedlings were fertilized with either 100 or 800 ppm nitrogen for 4 weeks in September beginning one week after exposure to either short days, the natural photoperiod, or long days, the natural photoperiod supplemented with 24 hours of incandescent radiation. Plants were then greenhouse forced under both photoperiods and floral phenology evaluated. Elevated nitrogen during floral initiation in September enhanced and accelerated flowering and plants receiving elevated nitrogen during initiation under long days flowered more than any other treatment. To determine whether or not flowering could be enhanced a second time in the same plants, another 4 week period of elevated nitrogen was provided in December and plant phenology evaluated through mid-January. Elevated nitrogen (800 ppm in December enhanced December and January flowering. Seedlings were conditioned with elevated nitrogen for a third time in late spring then field planted (early summer on raised beds with white or black plastic mulch. Elevated nitrogen in late spring enhanced yield in field production. No effects of mulch color, initiation photoperiod or interaction of considered factors were detected. Flowering differences detected in greenhouse studies translated into differences observed in the production field suggesting

  3. A Pilot Telerehabilitation Program: Delivering Early Intervention Services to Rural Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, Jana

    2009-01-01

    The enTECH Telerehabilitation Program explored the use of telerehabilitation as an alternative service delivery model for early intervention therapy services. Utilizing the Kentucky Telehealth Network, two families living in rural Kentucky received occupational therapy services over a 12-week period. Following program implementation, qualitative data was collected using participant journals and interviews. Data analysis identified three thematic categories related to the program: benefits/strengths, challenges/weaknesses, and recommendations for program improvement. Results of the program evaluation indicated that telerehabilitation has the potential to cost-effectively meet the therapeutic needs of children living in rural areas where provider shortages exist. The enTECH Telerehabilitation Program serves as a model for how telerehabilitation can be used to deliver early intervention services to ameliorate health disparities and improve access to rehabilitation services. PMID:25945160

  4. A pilot telerehabilitation program: delivering early intervention services to rural families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, Jana

    2009-01-01

    The enTECH Telerehabilitation Program explored the use of telerehabilitation as an alternative service delivery model for early intervention therapy services. Utilizing the Kentucky Telehealth Network, two families living in rural Kentucky received occupational therapy services over a 12-week period. Following program implementation, qualitative data was collected using participant journals and interviews. Data analysis identified three thematic categories related to the program: benefits/strengths, challenges/weaknesses, and recommendations for program improvement. Results of the program evaluation indicated that telerehabilitation has the potential to cost-effectively meet the therapeutic needs of children living in rural areas where provider shortages exist. The enTECH Telerehabilitation Program serves as a model for how telerehabilitation can be used to deliver early intervention services to ameliorate health disparities and improve access to rehabilitation services.

  5. Incentive-based demand response programs designed by asset-light retail electricity providers for the day-ahead market

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fotouhi Ghazvini, Mohammad Ali; Faria, Pedro; Ramos, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Following the deregulation experience of retail electricity markets in most countries, the majority of the new entrants of the liberalized retail market were pure REP (retail electricity providers). These entities were subject to financial risks because of the unexpected price variations, price...... to hedge the financial losses in the market. A two-stage stochastic programming problem is formulated. It aims to establish the financial incentive-based DR programs and the optimal dispatch of the DG units and ESSs. The uncertainty of the forecasted day-ahead load demand and electricity price is also...... taken into account with a scenario-based approach. The principal advantage of this model for REPs is reducing the risk of financial losses in DAMs, and the main benefit for the whole system is market power mitigation by virtually increasing the price elasticity of demand and reducing the peak demand....

  6. Reintegrating Family Therapy Training in Psychiatric Residency Programs: Making the Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rait, Douglas; Glick, Ira

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Given the marginalization of couples and family therapy in psychiatric residency programs over the past two decades, the authors propose a rationale for the reintegration of these important psychosocial treatments into the mainstream of general psychiatric residency education. Methods: After reviewing recent trends in the field that…

  7. Weatherization and Indoor Air Quality: Measured Impacts in Single Family Homes Under the Weatherization Assistance Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pigg, Scott [Energy Center of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Cautley, Dan [Energy Center of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Francisco, Paul [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Hawkins, Beth A [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brennan, Terry M [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This report summarizes findings from a national field study of indoor air quality parameters in homes treated under the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP). The study involved testing and monitoring in 514 single-family homes (including mobile homes) located in 35 states and served by 88 local weatherization agencies.

  8. Program of Adaptation Assistance in Foster Families and Particular Features of Its Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakirova, Venera G.; Gaysina, Guzel I.; Zhumabaeva, Asia

    2015-01-01

    Relevance of the problem stated in the article, conditioned by the fact that the successful adaptation of orphans in a foster family requires specialized knowledge and skills, as well as the need of professional support. Therefore, this article aims at substantiation of the effectiveness of the developed pilot program psycho-pedagogical support of…

  9. Reaching At-Risk Families through Mobile Phones: Successes from the Text4baby Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushar, Jessica; Pirretti, Amy

    2017-01-01

    Reaching at-risk families with health and development information and connecting them to resources during pregnancy and throughout early infanthood remains a challenge for many health and early learning and development initiatives. This article showcases strategies used by Text4baby--a free mobile health program for pregnant women and mothers--to…

  10. Supporting Parents and Young Children: Minnesota Early Childhood Family Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Nancy; Billman, Jean

    1987-01-01

    Describes the Minnesota Early Childhood Family Education Program, which is designed to offer support and information for all parents and their children from birth to kindergarten-enrollment age, and to provide a good early childhood education experience for young children. (Author/PCB)

  11. Feasibility of recruiting families into a heart disease prevention program based on dietary patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offspring of parents with a history of cardiovascular disease (CVD) inherit a similar genetic profile and share diet and lifestyle behaviors. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of recruiting families at risk of CVD to a dietary prevention program, determine the changes in diet achieved, an...

  12. Development of a Unique, Culturally Focused Family Science Program in the UAE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooldridge, Deborah; Keino, Leah; Mayers, Gloysis

    2006-01-01

    Empowering women and allowing them to provide community leadership in a rapidly changing and increasingly complex society is essential. Offering a sound family science curriculum is one way to facilitate empowerment of women in a developing country. Conceptualizing, planning, and developing strong programs became an opportunity to review existing…

  13. Process Evaluation of a Parenting Program for Low-Income Families in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachman, Jamie M.; Kelly, Jane; Cluver, Lucie; Ward, Catherine L.; Hutchings, Judy; Gardner, Frances

    2018-01-01

    Objective: This mixed-methods process evaluation examined the feasibility of a parenting program delivered by community facilitators to reduce the risk of child maltreatment in low-income families with children aged 3-8 years in Cape Town, South Africa (N = 68). Method: Quantitative measures included attendance registers, fidelity checklists,…

  14. Long-Term Effects of the Strong African American Families Program on Youths' Alcohol Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Gene H.; Chen, Yi-Fu; Kogan, Steven M.; Murry, Velma McBride; Brown, Anita C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective:This report extends earlier accounts by addressing the effects of the Strong African American Families (SAAF) program across 65 months. Two hypotheses were tested: (a) Rural African American youths randomly assigned to participate in SAAF would demonstrate lower rates of alcohol use than would control youths more than 5 years later, and…

  15. Early Intervention for Families Exposed to Chronic Stress and Trauma: The Attachment Vitamins Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulette, Annmarie C.; Dunham, Mackenzie; Davis, Mindy; Gortney, Jason; Lieberman, Alicia F.

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the Attachment Vitamins program, a trauma-informed parent group intervention for families with young children. Attachment Vitamins is a relational psychoeducational intervention based on the principles of Child-Parent Psychotherapy (CPP). Its goal is to repair the impact of chronic stress and trauma through strengthening the…

  16. Evaluation of an Urban Farm-to-Preschool and Families Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Elena T; DiFulvio, Gloria T; Susi, Toni; Nelson-Peterman, Jerusha; Lowbridge-Sisley, Joan; Collins, Jessica

    2016-04-01

    Over the past 30 years, the rate of childhood obesity has risen dramatically. Despite recent declines in prevalence among preschool-aged children, child obesity is still a significant public health concern. Healthy People 2020 objectives include increasing fruit and vegetable consumption among children over 2 years of age and increasing the number of schools that offer access to fresh fruits and vegetables. To reach these objectives, farm-to-school programs are being implemented across the United States. The purpose of this evaluation was to: (a) identify factors that facilitate adoption of the Farm-to-Preschool and Families program in Springfield, MA, specifically; and (b) provide recommendations and guidelines for successful implementation of Farm-to-Preschool and Families programs generally. Using a combination of classroom observations of preschoolers, teacher and food service interviews, and administrator surveys, the findings suggest that having a strong programmatic infrastructure, administrative support, and external support from families is important to sustain a Farm-to-Preschool and Families program. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Pilot Evaluation of Parent and Child Enhancement Program for Disadvantaged Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Cynthia; Tsang, Sandra; Leung, Iona

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The present study was a pilot evaluation of the effectiveness of the Parent and Child Enhancement (PACE) program in enhancing child development for disadvantaged families with children aged 2 to 3. Method: Participants included 23 parent-child dyads who attended 2-hr sessions twice weekly for 20 weeks. Parents and children were assessed…

  18. Studies of the Maintenance of Subsidized Foster Placements in the Casey Family Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, James A.; Walsh, Roberta A.

    1990-01-01

    Studies placements and placement outcomes in a large voluntary foster care agency system, the Casey Family Program. Focuses on prediction of maintenance of foster placement when foster children have been matched with foster parents in what is intended to be a long-term, stable relationship. (BB)

  19. Teaching Humanities in Medicine: The University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Hugh; Shields, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Humanities in medicine (HIM) is an important aspect of medical education intended to help preserve humanism and a focus on patients. At the University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program, we have been expanding our HIM curriculum for our residents including orientation, home visit reflective writing, didactics and a department-wide…

  20. Customer response to day-ahead wholesale market electricity prices: Case study of RTP program experience in New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, C.; Hopper, N.; Sezgen, O.; Moezzi, M.; Bharvirkar, R.; Neenan, B.; Boisvert, R.; Cappers, P.; Pratt, D.

    2004-07-01

    There is growing interest in policies, programs and tariffs that encourage customer loads to provide demand response (DR) to help discipline wholesale electricity markets. Proposals at the retail level range from eliminating fixed rate tariffs as the default service for some or all customer groups to reinstituting utility-sponsored load management programs with market-based inducements to curtail. Alternative rate designs include time-of-use (TOU), day-ahead real-time pricing (RTP), critical peak pricing, and even pricing usage at real-time market balancing prices. Some Independent System Operators (ISOs) have implemented their own DR programs whereby load curtailment capabilities are treated as a system resource and are paid an equivalent value. The resulting load reductions from these tariffs and programs provide a variety of benefits, including limiting the ability of suppliers to increase spot and long-term market-clearing prices above competitive levels (Neenan et al., 2002; Boren stein, 2002; Ruff, 2002). Unfortunately, there is little information in the public domain to characterize and quantify how customers actually respond to these alternative dynamic pricing schemes. A few empirical studies of large customer RTP response have shown modest results for most customers, with a few very price-responsive customers providing most of the aggregate response (Herriges et al., 1993; Schwarz et al., 2002). However, these studies examined response to voluntary, two-part RTP programs implemented by utilities in states without retail competition.1 Furthermore, the researchers had limited information on customer characteristics so they were unable to identify the drivers to price response. In the absence of a compelling characterization of why customers join RTP programs and how they respond to prices, many initiatives to modernize retail electricity rates seem to be stymied.

  1. Brucellosis Prevention Program: Applying “Child to Family Health Education” Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Allahverdipour

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Pupils have efficient potential to increase community awareness and promoting community health through participating in the health education programs. Child to family health education program is one of the communicative strategies that was applied in this field trial study. Because of high prevalence of Brucellosis in Hamadan province, Iran, the aim of this study was promoting families’ knowledge and preventive behaviors about Brucellosis in the rural areas by using child to family health education method.Materials & Methods: In this nonequivalent control group design study three rural schools were chosen (one as intervention and two others as control. At first knowledge and behavior of families about Brucellosis were determined using a designed questionnaire. Then the families were educated through “child to family” procedure. At this stage the students gained information. Then they were instructed to teach their parents what they had learned. After 3 months following the last session of education, the level of knowledge and behavior changes of the families about Brucellosis were determined and analyzed by paired t-test.Results: The results showed significant improvement in the knowledge of the mothers. The knowledge of the mothers about the signs of Brucellosis disease in human increased from 1.81 to 3.79 ( t:-21.64 , sig:0.000 , and also the knowledge on the signs of Brucellosis in animals increased from 1.48 to 2.82 ( t:-10.60 , sig:0.000. Conclusion: Child to family health education program is one of the effective and available methods, which would be useful and effective in most communities, and also Students potential would be effective for applying in the health promotion programs.

  2. Community Alternatives for Love and Limits (CALL: A community-based family strengthening multi-family intervention program to respond to adolescents at risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Wilkerson

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Family strengthening has become a source of growing interest, research, and program design in the fields of prevention and treatment for problems of youth delinquency, school failure, alcohol, tobacco and other drug abuse (ATOD. Despite many studies that illustrate the positive outcomes of family strengthening programs and family-focused interventions, their use in communities has not advanced commensurate with their promise. This article offers a rationale for why programming efforts should continue to be directed towards family strengthening efforts as opposed to youth-focused only interventions. In addition, a community-based, family-strengthening alternative is described that addresses issues of youth delinquency while reducing barriers associated with availability, accessibility, and cost.

  3. Restructuring federalism: the impact of Reagan policies on the family planning program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, D R; Meier, K J

    1993-01-01

    Through fiscal cutbacks and structural changes, Reagan's federalism assaulted the ethos of public health. In assessing the effects of Reagan policies on a basic public health program, family planning services, we find a substantial decrease in spending for this program, a reduction in the numbers of patients served, and increased variation among the states in the provision of services to low-income women. These effects are comparable with findings from other studies on the impact of Reagan's federalism upon social programs and have manifold implications for public health.

  4. Rural After-School Programs: Meeting the Needs of At-Risk Youth and Their Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethany L. Letiecq

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Extant research has focused on out-of-school time among urban and suburban youth, yet there remains scant information on rural low-income youth and their families. This study examines the salience of after-school programs for rural youth. Using an ecological framework, we assess changes in youth behavior and skill acquisition based on reports from 47 youth attending after-school programs in two rural communities, along with their primary caregivers and teachers. Results indicate enhanced life skills and social behaviors among youth attendees. Implications for future research, programming, and policymaking are discussed.

  5. FamSeq: a variant calling program for family-based sequencing data using graphics processing units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Gang; Fan, Yu; Wang, Wenyi

    2014-10-01

    Various algorithms have been developed for variant calling using next-generation sequencing data, and various methods have been applied to reduce the associated false positive and false negative rates. Few variant calling programs, however, utilize the pedigree information when the family-based sequencing data are available. Here, we present a program, FamSeq, which reduces both false positive and false negative rates by incorporating the pedigree information from the Mendelian genetic model into variant calling. To accommodate variations in data complexity, FamSeq consists of four distinct implementations of the Mendelian genetic model: the Bayesian network algorithm, a graphics processing unit version of the Bayesian network algorithm, the Elston-Stewart algorithm and the Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm. To make the software efficient and applicable to large families, we parallelized the Bayesian network algorithm that copes with pedigrees with inbreeding loops without losing calculation precision on an NVIDIA graphics processing unit. In order to compare the difference in the four methods, we applied FamSeq to pedigree sequencing data with family sizes that varied from 7 to 12. When there is no inbreeding loop in the pedigree, the Elston-Stewart algorithm gives analytical results in a short time. If there are inbreeding loops in the pedigree, we recommend the Bayesian network method, which provides exact answers. To improve the computing speed of the Bayesian network method, we parallelized the computation on a graphics processing unit. This allowed the Bayesian network method to process the whole genome sequencing data of a family of 12 individuals within two days, which was a 10-fold time reduction compared to the time required for this computation on a central processing unit.

  6. Investigation of administrative obstacles to family physician program in urban areas of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Javan noughabi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Health is regarded as one of the basic rights of each person in society; so governments are obligated to provide it equally for everyone. The best way to achieve this goal is the establishment of health insurance with the orientation of family physician and the strategic referral system. Yet, such programs will not be successful without encouraging people to participate and changing social behaviors. The aim of the present study was to investigate the administrative obstacles and problems to family physician program in urban areas of Iran. This study was a qualitative research conducted. A purposive sampling method was employed and the data were gathered via semi-structured interview with open-ended questions and document examination. All the interviews were recorded digitally and immediately transcribed verbatim. They were finally analyzed based on framework analysis. The participants' detailed descriptions showed that systemic, environmental, and human related factors were the main obstacles to the implementation of family physician plan. Since the success and performance of each program effectively cannot be obtained without people’s acceptance and collaboration, the necessity of training and giving information rapidly and timely to the residents in urban areas is felt more than ever. Also, making authorities aware of the obstacles expressed by people can be helpful in harmonizing the program with people’s requests; and can result in overcoming the challenges and obstacles facing the program.

  7. The effectiveness of online, family-based media literacy education for substance abuse prevention in elementary school children: Study of the Media Detective Family program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scull, Tracy M; Kupersmidt, Janis B; Weatherholt, Tara N

    2017-08-01

    The present study investigates the effectiveness of a family-based, online media literacy education (MLE) program for substance abuse prevention in children from rural areas. A total of 83 families were randomly assigned to receive Media Detective Family (MDF) (n = 47) or a control computer program (n = 36) between pre- and posttest questionnaires. Fifty-one percent (N=42) completed a three-month follow-up questionnaire. Children receiving MDF reported a significant reduction in their use of substances over time compared to children in the control group (d = -.80). Parents receiving MDF reported that the program was convenient and engaging. The current study showed that an online substance use prevention program using MLE and designed for families is an effective intervention method for reducing children's substance use.

  8. Pathways of Risk and Resilience: Impact of a Family Resilience Program on Active-Duty Military Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltzman, William R; Lester, Patricia; Milburn, Norweeta; Woodward, Kirsten; Stein, Judith

    2016-12-01

    Over the past decade, studies into the impact of wartime deployment and related adversities on service members and their families have offered empirical support for systemic models of family functioning and a more nuanced understanding of the mechanisms by which stress and trauma reverberate across family and partner relationships. They have also advanced our understanding of the ways in which families may contribute to the resilience of children and parents contending with the stressors of serial deployments and parental physical and psychological injuries. This study is the latest in a series designed to further clarify the systemic functioning of military families and to explicate the role of resilient family processes in reducing symptoms of distress and poor adaptation among family members. Drawing upon the implementation of the Families Overcoming Under Stress (FOCUS) Family Resilience Program at 14 active-duty military installations across the United States, structural equation modeling was conducted with data from 434 marine and navy active-duty families who participated in the FOCUS program. The goal was to better understand the ways in which parental distress reverberates across military family systems and, through longitudinal path analytic modeling, determine the pathways of program impact on parental distress. The findings indicated significant cross-influence of distress between the military and civilian parents within families, families with more distressed military parents were more likely to sustain participation in the program, and reductions in distress among both military and civilian parents were significantly mediated by improvements in resilient family processes. These results are consistent with family systemic and resilient models that support preventive interventions designed to enhance family resilient processes as an important part of comprehensive services for distressed military families. © 2016 Family Process Institute.

  9. Cuidado de Ninos con Necesidades Especiales en el Hogar: Manual de Estrategias y Actividades para Proveedores que Cuidan Ninos en Sus Hogares (Children with Special Needs in Family Day Care Homes: A Handbook of Approaches and Activities for Family Day Care Home Providers).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Brosse, Beatrice

    Practical information and sample teaching activities for child caregivers who work with young developmentally disabled children in family day care settings are provided in this manual. Each chapter shares a typical experience a caregiver may have with a particular child. Chapter 1 focuses on getting to know a new child, initial expectations, and…

  10. Emotion-Focused Family Therapy for Eating Disorders Across the Lifespan: A Pilot Study of a 2-Day Transdiagnostic Intervention for Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafrance Robinson, Adèle; Dolhanty, Joanne; Stillar, Amanda; Henderson, Katherine; Mayman, Shari

    2016-01-01

    Emotion-focused family therapy is a transdiagnostic approach that affords parents and caregivers a significant role in their loved one's recovery from an eating disorder. A 2-day intervention was developed on the basis of emotion-focused family therapy principles and delivered to 33 parents of adolescent and adult children. Data were collected pre- and post-intervention. Through education and skills practice, parents were taught strategies with respect to meal support and symptom interruption as well as emotion coaching. Parents were also supported to identify and work through their own emotional blocks that could interfere with their supportive efforts. Analyses revealed a significant increase in parental self-efficacy, a positive shift in parents' attitudes regarding their role as emotion coach and a reduction in the fears associated with their involvement in treatment, including a decrease in self-blame. Overall, this broad-based, low-cost intervention shows promise, and future research is warranted. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. A low-cost, intensive emotion-focused family therapy intervention shows promise for parents of individuals with an eating disorder, regardless of their loved one's age, symptom profile or involvement in treatment. Working with parents' emotions and emotional reactions to their child's struggles has the potential to improve supportive efforts. An emotion-focused family therapy intervention for parents yields high satisfaction rates, improves parental self-efficacy and reduces fears regarding their involvement, including self-blame. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. "A room full of strangers every day": the psychosocial impact of developmental prosopagnosia on children and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalrymple, Kirsten A; Fletcher, Kimberley; Corrow, Sherryse; das Nair, Roshan; Barton, Jason J S; Yonas, Albert; Duchaine, Brad

    2014-08-01

    Individuals with developmental prosopagnosia ('face blindness') have severe face recognition difficulties due to a failure to develop the necessary visual mechanisms for recognizing faces. These difficulties occur in the absence of brain damage and despite normal low-level vision and intellect. Adults with developmental prosopagnosia report serious personal and emotional consequences from their inability to recognize faces, but little is known about the psychosocial consequences in childhood. Given the importance of face recognition in daily life, and the potential for unique social consequences of impaired face recognition in childhood, we sought to evaluate the impact of developmental prosopagnosia on children and their families. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 8 children with developmental prosopagnosia and their parents. A battery of face recognition tests was used to confirm the face recognition impairment reported by the parents of each child. We used thematic analysis to develop common themes among the psychosocial experiences of the children and their parents. Three themes were developed from the child reports: 1) awareness of their difficulties, 2) coping strategies, such as using non-facial cues to identify others, and 3) social implications, such as discomfort in, and avoidance of, social situations. These themes were paralleled by the parent reports and highlight the unique social and practical challenges associated with childhood developmental prosopagnosia. Our findings indicate a need for increased awareness and treatment of developmental prosopagnosia to help these children manage their face recognition difficulties and to promote their social and emotional wellbeing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Ayudando a los Ninos a Amarse a Si Mismos y a Otros: Una guia profesional para el cuidado infantil en el hogar (Helping Children Love Themselves and Others: A Professional Handbook for Family Day Care).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellert, Sandra; And Others

    This Spanish-language guide presents an anti-bias, multicultural approach to family day care. Part A provides a rationale for such an approach. Subsections of this part concern: (1) family day care as a site for the transmission of bias; (2) characteristics of an anti-bias, multicultural approach; (3) language and stereotypes; (4) developmental…

  13. Seminars for Parents: Family Living/Sex Education Program. Final Evaluation Report, September 1, 1980-June 30, 1981.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Office of Educational Evaluation.

    The New York City Board of Education's Family Living/Sex Education Program consisted of seminars and workshops which involved parents and teachers in open discussions about adolescent sexuality. Discussion topics included parent-child relations, family conflict resolution, psychosexual development, parents as educators, family size, and children…

  14. Implementation of a Community-Based Family-Centered Program in Portugal: A Multiple Case Study Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira de Melo, Ana; Alarcao, Madalena

    2012-01-01

    Family-centered, community-based programs are particularly suited to support families with at-risk children or maltreated children and achieve family preservation or reunification. In these child protection and child welfare cases, assessment is of great importance to inform decision making. But the implementation of services to support the…

  15. Project SKI*HI Outreach Programming for Hearing Impaired Infants and Families: Recertification Statement, Questions, Responses, and Approval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Carol J.; Clark, Thomas C.

    This program evaluation report presents information on Project SKI*HI, a home-based program for infants and young children with hearing impairments and their families. The program's major goals are early identification of hearing-impaired infants and a home program to facilitate child development. A parent advisor makes weekly home visits to each…

  16. Effectiveness of hand-washing teaching programs for families of children in paediatric intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong-Chuan; Chiang, Li-Chi

    2007-06-01

    The authors developed a video-centred teaching program based on social learning principles to demonstrate hand-washing technique. A comparison was made between families who viewed the video and families who were taught the same techniques with the aid of an illustrated poster in terms of compliance and improvement in hand-washing skills. Nosocomial infections are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in paediatric intensive care unit patients. Hand hygiene is considered the most important preventive action against hospital-acquired infections. A number of studies have shown that increased compliance with hand-washing guidelines for health-care workers leads to decreases in nosocomial infection rates. Furthermore, recommendations have been made to ensure that parents who visit their children in intensive care units wash their hands first. Quasi-experimental time series. Compliance and accuracy measurements were collected during one to five visits following the initial teaching intervention. A total of 123 families, who visited paediatric intensive care units, were recruited and assigned to two groups - one experimental (61 families) and the other a comparison group (62). Participants in the comparison group were taught hand-washing skills using simple illustrations. A 20-item hand-washing checklist was used to examine hand-washing compliance and accuracy. No significant differences were noted in terms of demographics between the two groups. Results from a general estimated equation analysis showed that families in the experimental group had higher compliance and accuracy scores at statistically significant levels. The video-based teaching program was effective in increasing compliance and accuracy with a hand-washing policy among families with children in intensive care units. The education program is a simple, low-cost, low technology intervention for substantially reducing the incidence of nosocomial infection.

  17. Encouraging Family and Parent Education: Program Development and Evaluation in the Federal State of Baden-Württemberg, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landhäusser, Sandra; Faas, Stefan; Treptow, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Against the background of a European-wide strategy of governance aimed at improving support for parents and families, the following report details the conceptualization and evaluation of a federal state program in Baden-Württemberg (Germany) which was launched in 2008 to encourage family and parent education. Two program components, a voucher…

  18. Building bridges between the parole officer and the families of serious juvenile offenders: a preliminary report on a family-based parole program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavazzi, Stephen M; Yarcheck, Courtney M; Rhine, Edward E; Partridge, Charles R

    2003-06-01

    Responding to a model of juvenile offender case supervision that called for a new intervention paradigm to guide the work of probation and parole officers, the present article reports on the use of a family-based parole initiative known as the Growing Up FAST program. Developed in part as a tool for use within this new intervention paradigm, the Growing Up FAST parole program targets serious youthful offenders who have been released from juvenile correctional facilities and their families. Based on elements contained within the "what works" literature and the Balanced and Restorative Justice model, this program recognizes the central role that field staff can play in rehabilitation efforts. Demographic information and formative data regarding the first set of families to participate in this program are presented, then program limitations and lessons learned as part of the initial offering of this parole initiative are discussed.

  19. Identification and characterization of the CONSTANS-like gene family in the short-day plant Chrysanthemum lavandulifolium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jianxin; Yang, Liwen; Dai, Silan

    2015-06-01

    The CONSTANS (CO) and CONSTANS-like (COL) genes play key roles in the photoperiodic flowering pathways, and studying their functions can elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying flowering control in photoperiod-regulated plants. We identified eleven COL genes (ClCOL1-ClCOL11) in Chrysanthemum lavandulifolium and divided them into three groups that are conserved among the flowering plants based on phylogenetic analysis. Most of the ClCOL genes are primarily expressed in the leaf and shoot apices, except for ClCOL6-ClCOL9, which belong to Group II. The expression levels of ClCOL4-ClCOL5 and ClCOL7-ClCOL8 are up-regulated under inductive short-day (SD) conditions, whereas ClCOL6 is down-regulated under inductive SD conditions. The ClCOL genes exhibit four different diurnal rhythm expressions (Type I-Type IV). The Type I genes (ClCOL4-ClCOL5) are highly transcribed under light. The Type II genes (ClCOL1-ClCOL2, ClCOL10) display increased expression in darkness and are rapidly suppressed under light. Transcripts of ClCOL6-ClCOL9 and ClCOL11, belonging to Type III, are abundant in the late light period or at the beginning of the dark period. ClCOL3 belongs to Type IV, with high expression in the early light period and dark period. The peak expression levels of ClCOL4-ClCOL6 are decreased and postponed in the non-inductive night break (NB) and under long-day (LD) conditions, indicating that those genes may play an essential role in the flowering regulation of C. lavandulifolium. The overexpression of ClCOL5 promotes the flowering of Arabidopsis grown under LD conditions, suggesting that ClCOL5 may function as a flowering enhancer in C. lavandulifolium. This study will be useful not only for the study of the C. lavandulifolium photoperiod-dependent flowering process but also for the genetic manipulation of flowering time-related genes to change the flowering time in the chrysanthemum.

  20. A recipe for success: ingredients for a successful family planning program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, J

    1992-09-01

    The basic elements of a successful family planning (FP) program are variable between countries. Providing better access to modern contraceptives, access to general and reproductive health care, and increasing economic and educational opportunities contribute to reducing fertility rates. Effective distribution is constrained by rural, isolated populations and cultural attitudes. Indonesia has used floating clinics located on boats to reach inaccessible areas; Norplant and hormonal injection availability also contribute to the 53% contraceptive prevalence rate. The Japanese Organization for International Cooperation in Family Planning has shipped bicycles to developing countries. The result has been improved status among peers and greater program success. Contraceptive social marketing programs (CSM) have been successful in some countries to distribute contraceptives through local channels such as shops and stalls; people seem willing to pay also. CSM has been successful in Egypt in increasing condom sales. IUD use increased from 11% to 42% between 1975-88 with CSM. Multimedia promotion that is carefully researched and targeted is another way to increase contraceptive prevalence (CP) rates. A Brazilian multimedia vasectomy campaign led to an 80% monthly increase in Pro-Pater male health clinics. 240,000 women in Turkey were encouraged through multimedia efforts to switch to modern methods. In Zimbabwe, men have been the target of efforts to educate them about the advantages of small families. Women are recruited to implement FP services in INdia and in poor neighborhoods; an increase from 12% to 61% was achieved. Highly motivated workers with a respect for the community's values is essential to any successful FP program as is government support. China's policy has drawn criticism; China has welcomed a UN program which provides financial motivation. Thailand has been successful due to the commitment between public and private sectors; in 17 years CP rose from 10% to

  1. Parental marital satisfaction in a family-based partial hospitalization program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rienecke, Renee D

    2017-06-01

    In family-based treatment, parents are initially put in charge of the weight restoration process, requiring parents to work closely together to help their child recover, possibly putting a strain on the marital relationship. The purpose of the current study was to examine marital satisfaction in families before and after treatment in a family-based program and to determine whether marital satisfaction is related to patient outcome. Parents of 53 adolescent patients participated in the study. Almost half of mothers and a third of fathers reported a decrease in marital satisfaction over the course of treatment. Descriptive analyses revealed that patients whose parents reported a decrease in marital satisfaction scored worse on a measure of eating disorder psychopathology. Further research is needed to determine the direction of causality.

  2. Mothers’ experiences in the Nurse-Family Partnership program: a qualitative case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landy Christine

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few studies have explored the experiences of low income mothers participating in nurse home visiting programs. Our study explores and describes mothers' experiences participating in the Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP Program, an intensive home visiting program with demonstrated effectiveness, from the time of program entry before 29 weeks gestation until their infant's first birthday. Methods A qualitative case study approach was implemented. A purposeful sample of 18 low income, young first time mothers participating in a pilot study of the NFP program in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada partook in one to two face to face in-depth interviews exploring their experiences in the program. All interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. Conventional content analysis procedures were used to analyze all interviews. Data collection and initial analysis were implemented concurrently. Results The mothers participating in the NFP program were very positive about their experiences in the program. Three overarching themes emerged from the data: 1. Getting into the NFP program; 2. The NFP nurse is an expert, but also like a friend providing support; and 3. Participating in the NFP program is making me a better parent. Conclusions Our findings provide vital information to home visiting nurses and to planners of home visiting programs about mothers' perspectives on what is important to them in their relationships with their nurses, how nurses and women are able to develop positive therapeutic relationships, and how nurses respond to mothers' unique life situations while home visiting within the NFP Program. In addition our findings offer insights into why and under what circumstances low income mothers will engage in nurse home visiting and how they expect to benefit from their participation.

  3. A family nurse practitioner program for primary health care in the eastern Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, H

    1983-01-01

    In 1980, under the sponsorship of 7 Commonwealth Caribbean governments, a program to train family nurse practitioners was initiated on St. Vincent and the Grenadines. Trainees from Antigua/Barbuda, Dominica, Grenada, St. Kitts/Nevis, Montserrat, Saint Lucia, and St. Vincent and the Grenadines were admitted to the program; these trainees were already district nurse/midwives in their home countries. The program's aim was to provide a mixture of classroom and clinical experience that would prepare the trainees for assuming an expanded role in the delivery of primary health care--a role including certain types of work traditionally performed by physicians. In all, the program provided 10 months of training on St. Vincent and the Grenadines followed by a 6-month internship period in the trainee's home country. As of July 1983, a total of 35 students had successfully completed the prescribed program of 10 months training, and all but 2 had been assigned to primary care settings in their home countries. Most of these graduated found that the job of interpreting their new roles to their communities and other health team members proved a challenge. However, the general level of their acceptance tended to improve once the internship phase terminated, so that by now a majority of the new family nurse practitioners have been well integrated into their countries' health systems. Indeed, it seems clear that the family nurse practitioner training program, designed to help with the improvement of primary health care services in the Commonwealth Caribbean, has come to play a key role in that important undertaking.

  4. Evaluation of Saudi family medicine training program: the application of CIPP evaluation format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khathami, Abdullah Dukhail

    2012-01-01

    The Saudi Diploma in Family Medicine (SDFM) was enacted in 2007 to fulfill the needs of qualified Primary Health Care providers in Saudi Arabia. Evaluation is not only an integral process for designing educational training programs, but an effective evaluation strategy that helps achieve program objectives and enhances the quality of learning objectives: (1) Construct a self-administered questionnaire based on Context, input, process and product (CIPP) format to seek trainees' perceptions about the SDFM program; (2) identify the strengths and weaknesses of the SDFM program in relation to the learning outcomes; and (3) define the main obstacles to achieve the outcomes. A self-administered questionnaire was designed based on the CIPP evaluation format after. its validity and reliability were tested through piloting. Then, all the SDFM program trainees were included. The study response rate was 91.2%. More than 77% of the trainees stated that they had achieved the program objectives; a significant difference was found among Saudis and non-Saudis (p = 0.002). The training period was reported by 84% as a main barrier to achieve the program objectives, particularly the hospital rotation period. Results indicate an overall satisfaction with the training objectives and the teaching methods used. These findings can be useful for the policy makers to implement the suggested recommendations and deal with obstacles to improve the SDFM program in order to provide effective and efficient primary care services.

  5. National program for family planning and primary health care Pakistan: a SWOT analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wazir, Mohammad Salim; Shaikh, Babar Tasneem; Ahmed, Ashfaq

    2013-11-22

    The National Program for Family Planning and Primary Healthcare was launched in 1994. It is one of the largest community based programs in the world, providing primary healthcare services to about 80 million people, most of which is rural poor. The program has been instrumental in improving health related indicators of maternal and child health in the last two decades. SWOT analysis was used by making recourse to the structure and dynamics of the program as well as searching the literature. Strengths of the program include: comprehensive design of planning, implementation and supervision mechanisms aided by an MIS, selection and recruitments processes and evidence created through improving health impact indicators. Weaknesses identified are slow progress, poor integration of the program with health services at local levels including MIS, and de-motivational factors such as job insecurity and non-payment of salaries in time. Opportunities include further widening the coverage of services, its potential contribution to health system research, and its use in areas other than health like women empowerment and poverty alleviation. Threats the program may face are: political interference, lack of funds, social threats and implications for professional malpractices. Strengthening of the program will necessitate a strong political commitment, sustained funding and a just remuneration to this bare foot doctor of Pakistan, the Lady Health Worker.

  6. Evaluation of Continuing Professional Development Program for Family Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Syed Irfan; Irfan, Farhana; Qureshi, Riaz; Naeem, Naghma; Alfaris, Eiad Abdel Mohsen

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the King Saud University Continuing Professional Development (CPD) Program for Family Physicians in relation to the Convenience, Relevance, Individualization, Self-Assessment, Interest, Speculation and Systematic (CRISIS) criteria. A descriptive study was conducted at King Saud University (KSU) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The authors used the six strategies of Convenience, Relevance, Individualization, Self-Assessment, Interest, Speculation and Systematic (CRISIS) for evaluation. The program was independently analyzed by the three authors using CRISIS framework. The results were synthesized. The suggestions were discussed and agreed upon and documented. The results indicate that KSU-CPD program meets the CRISIS criteria for effective continuing professional development and offers a useful approach to learning. The course content covers specific areas of practice, but some shortcomings were found that need to be improved like self assessment area and individual learning needs analysis. This program is suitable for Family Physicians, as it is well planned and utilizes most of the principles of CRISIS, but there is still room for improvement. Designing a program for general practitioners using hybrid model that offers a blend of e-learning as well as face-to-face learning opportunities would be an ideal solution.

  7. Intelligence and all-cause mortality in the 6-Day Sample of the Scottish Mental Survey 1947 and their siblings: testing the contribution of family background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iveson, Matthew H; Cukic, Iva; Der, Geoff; Batty, G David; Deary, Ian J

    2017-08-21

    Higher early-life intelligence is associated with a reduced risk of mortality in adulthood, though this association is apparently hardly attenuated when accounting for early-life socio-economic status (SES). However, the use of proxy measures of SES means that residual confounding may underestimate this attenuation. In the present study, the potential confounding effect of early-life SES was instead accounted for by examining the intelligence-mortality association within families. The association between early-life intelligence and mortality in adulthood was assessed in 727 members of the 6-Day Sample of the Scottish Mental Survey 1947 and, for the first time, 1580 of their younger siblings. These individuals were born between 1936 and 1958, and were followed up into later life, with deaths recorded up to 2015. Cox regression was used to estimate the relative risk of mortality associated with higher IQ scores after adjusting for shared family factors. A standard-deviation advantage in IQ score was associated with a significantly reduced mortality risk [hazard ratio = 0.76, p  mortality association arising from the use of proxy measures of early-life SES. The present study demonstrates that the longevity associated with higher early-life intelligence cannot be explained by early-life SES or within-family factors.

  8. [Epidemiologic survey of teniasis in Health and Family Program in Uberaba, MG].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Flavia Maria; Silva-Vergara, Mario León; Carvalho, Angela C F Banzatto de

    2005-01-01

    An epidemiologic survey was carried out on 110,144 people from the Health Family Program to evaluate some Epidemiologic aspects of teniasis. Previous history of passing proglottides was registered in 185 (0.2%) of them, and 112 (60.5%) received praziquantel. After this 97 (86.6%) passed proglottides characterized as Taenia Saginata and Taenia Solium in 36 (37.1%) and 4 (4.1%) respectively.

  9. [Educational intervention on breastfeeding promotion to the Family Health Program team].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldeira, Antônio Prates; Fagundes, Gizele Carmem; de Aguiar, Gabriel Nobre

    2008-12-01

    Breastfeeding Friendly Primary Care Initiative comprises educational activities focused on primary care units. The To evaluate the effectiveness of a strategy on breastfeeding promotion to the Family Health Program team. A controlled intervention study was performed with 20 family health care teams randomly selected into intervention and control group in Montes Claros, Southeastern Brazil, in 2006. The teams randomly selected into intervention and control group, and the intervention group took part in a 24-hour training program on breastfeeding promotion for health providers, modeled on the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative. It was emphasized health provider's support for breastfeeding and management of major lactation problems. The control group received routine breastfeeding training. Mothers of all children under two cared by the teams were interviewed at home before (n=1,423) and 12 months after the intervention (n=1,491) and answered questions about breastfeeding practices. Survival curves of breastfeeding were plotted and compared for both time points studied using the log rank test. There was a significant increase in exclusive breastfeeding after the educational activities for the Family Health Program teams. Survival curves of exclusive breastfeeding at the fi rst time point studied showed no statistical significance difference between the groups by log rank test (p=0.502). After the intervention, survival curves of exclusive breastfeeding were significantly different by the log rank test (p=0.001). The training of Family Health Program teams as proposed by the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative proved to be an effective, low-cost strategy for raising awareness among health providers, providing consistent information, and assuring the required support to mothers with breastfeeding issues.

  10. Human papillomavirus detection in cervical scrapes from women attended in the Family Health Program

    OpenAIRE

    Everton Faccini Augusto; Larissa Silva dos Santos; Ledy do Horto dos Santos Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: to survey the prevalence of human papillomavirus, associated risk factors and genotype distribution in women who were referred to cervical cancer screening when attended in a Family Health Program. METHOD: we conducted a cross-sectional survey, investigating 351 women. Polymerase chain reaction for DNA amplification and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis were used to detect and typify the papillomavirus. RESULTS: virus infection was detected in 8.8% of the ...

  11. Expansion of the residential conservation service program to multi-family and small commercial buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-11-01

    Alternative regulatory provisions are considered which might permit achievement of the building energy conservation regulatory goals at a lower cost. Major issues, regulatory and legislative options, and cost-benefit analyses are discussed for multi-family and commercial buildings. The following are presented: related government programs, urban and community impact analysis, institutional impacts, energy cost, Residential Conservation Service coverage, methods of analysis, and regional studies. (MHR)

  12. Selective prevention programs for children from substance-affected families: a comprehensive systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bröning Sonja

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Children from substance-affected families show an elevated risk for developing own substance-related or other mental disorders. Therefore, they are an important target group for preventive efforts. So far, such programs for children of substance-involved parents have not been reviewed together. We conducted a comprehensive systematic review to identify and summarize evaluations of selective preventive interventions in childhood and adolescence targeted at this specific group. From the overall search result of 375 articles, 339 were excluded, 36 full texts were reviewed. From these, nine eligible programs documented in 13 studies were identified comprising four school-based interventions (study 1–6, one community-based intervention (study 7–8, and four family-based interventions (study 9–13. Studies’ levels of evidence were rated in accordance with the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN methodology, and their quality was ranked according to a score adapted from the area of meta-analytic family therapy research and consisting of 15 study design quality criteria. Studies varied in program format, structure, content, and participants. They also varied in outcome measures, results, and study design quality. We found seven RCT’s, two well designed controlled or quasi-experimental studies, three well-designed descriptive studies, and one qualitative study. There was preliminary evidence for the effectiveness of the programs, especially when their duration was longer than ten weeks and when they involved children’s, parenting, and family skills training components. Outcomes proximal to the intervention, such as program-related knowledge, coping-skills, and family relations, showed better results than more distal outcomes such as self-worth and substance use initiation, the latter due to the comparably young age of participants and sparse longitudinal data. However, because of the small overall number of studies found

  13. Intra-Day Trading System Design Based on the Integrated Model of Wavelet De-Noise and Genetic Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongguang Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Technical analysis has been proved to be capable of exploiting short-term fluctuations in financial markets. Recent results indicate that the market timing approach beats many traditional buy-and-hold approaches in most of the short-term trading periods. Genetic programming (GP was used to generate short-term trade rules on the stock markets during the last few decades. However, few of the related studies on the analysis of financial time series with genetic programming considered the non-stationary and noisy characteristics of the time series. In this paper, to de-noise the original financial time series and to search profitable trading rules, an integrated method is proposed based on the Wavelet Threshold (WT method and GP. Since relevant information that affects the movement of the time series is assumed to be fully digested during the market closed periods, to avoid the jumping points of the daily or monthly data, in this paper, intra-day high-frequency time series are used to fully exploit the short-term forecasting advantage of technical analysis. To validate the proposed integrated approach, an empirical study is conducted based on the China Securities Index (CSI 300 futures in the emerging China Financial Futures Exchange (CFFEX market. The analysis outcomes show that the wavelet de-noise approach outperforms many comparative models.

  14. Health and Functioning of Families of Children With Special Health Care Needs Cared for in Home Care, Long-term Care, and Medical Day Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caicedo, Carmen

    2015-06-01

    To examine and compare child and parent or guardian physical and mental health outcomes in families with children with special health care needs who have medically complex technology-dependent needs in home care, long-term care (LTC), and medical day care (MDC) settings. The number of children requiring medically complex technology-dependent care has grown exponentially. In this study, options for their care are home care, LTC, or MDC. Comparison of child and parent/guardian health outcomes is unknown. Using repeated measures data were collected from 84 dyads (parent/guardian, medically complex technology-dependent child) for 5 months using Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory Generic Core Module 4.0 and Family Impact Module Data analysis: χ(2), RM-ANCOVA. There were no significant differences in overall physical health, mental health, and functioning of children by care setting. Most severely disabled children were in home care; moderately disabled in MDC; children in vegetative state LTC; however, parents perceived children's health across care setting as good to excellent. Parents/guardians from home care reported the poorest physical health including being tired during the day, too tired to do the things they like to do, feeling physically weak, or feeling sick and had cognitive difficulties, difficulties with worry, communication, and daily activities. Parents/guardians from LTC reported the best physical health with time and energy for a social life and employment. Trends in health care policy indicate a movement away from LTC care to care in the family home where data indicate these parents/guardians are already mentally and functionally challenged.

  15. Examining the Effectiveness of a Case Management Program for Custodial Grandparent Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenora Campbell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Researchers have identified complex needs of custodial grandparent families and lack of access to needed resources such as housing, financial and legal assistance, and health care. Case management links these families with needed services while helping them develop skills to promote their health and well-being. This paper describes a case management program for custodial grandparent families using a nurse-social worker case management team. data were collected from 50 grandparents and 33 children using surveys and semi-structured instruments. Physical and mental health outcomes were measured using Short Form-12 Health Survey (SF 12 to measure the perceived quality of health for grandparents and the Child Behavior Checklist to measure the emotional and behavioral functioning of grandchildren. Grandparents more positively perceived their mental health after participating in the program. Perceptions about physical health were generally the same before and after the program. Grandparents' reported that many grandchildren had emotional and behavioral problems in the clinical range. These findings highlight the need for further research on the mental health needs of children being parented by grandparents as well as determining effective models and interventions to minimize adverse effects of parenting on grandparents.

  16. A Yoga and Compassion Meditation Program Reduces Stress in Familial Caregivers of Alzheimer's Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. D. Danucalov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Familial caregivers of patients with Alzheimer's disease exhibit reduced quality of life and increased stress levels. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of an 8-week yoga and compassion meditation program on the perceived stress, anxiety, depression, and salivary cortisol levels in familial caregivers. A total of 46 volunteers were randomly assigned to participate in a stress-reduction program for a 2-month period (yoga and compassion meditation program—YCMP group (n=25 or an untreated group for the same period of time (control group (n=21. The levels of stress, anxiety, depression, and morning salivary cortisol of the participants were measured before and after intervention. The groups were initially homogeneous; however, after intervention, the groups diverged significantly. The YCMP group exhibited a reduction of the stress (P<0.05, anxiety (P<0.000001, and depression (P<0.00001 levels, as well as a reduction in the concentration of salivary cortisol (P<0.05. Our study suggests that an 8-week yoga and compassion meditation program may offer an effective intervention for reducing perceived stress, anxiety, depression, and salivary cortisol in familial caregivers.

  17. Is the Families First Home Visiting Program Effective in Reducing Child Maltreatment and Improving Child Development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, Mariette J; Brownell, Marni D; Isaac, Michael R; Chateau, Dan; Nickel, Nathan C; Katz, Alan; Sarkar, Joykrishna; Hu, Milton; Taylor, Carole

    2017-05-01

    While home visiting programs are among the most widespread interventions to support at-risk families, there is a paucity of research investigating these programs under real-world conditions. The effectiveness of Families First home visiting (FFHV) was examined for decreasing rates of being in care of child welfare, decreasing hospitalizations for maltreatment-related injuries, and improving child development at school entry. Data for 4,562 children from home visiting and 5,184 comparison children were linked to deidentified administrative health, social services, and education data. FFHV was associated with lower rates of being in care by child's first, second, and third birthday (adjusted risk ratio [aRR] = 0.75, 0.79, and 0.81, respectively) and lower rates of hospitalization for maltreatment-related injuries by third birthday (aRR = 0.59). No differences were found in child development at kindergarten. FFHV should be offered to at-risk families to decrease child maltreatment. Program enhancements are required to improve child development at school entry.

  18. [Panorama of purchasing food products from family farmers for the Brazilian School Nutrition Program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva, Elisa Braga; da Silva, Ana Paula Ferreira; de Sousa, Anete Araújo; Cerqueira, Gabrielle Fernandes; Chagas, Carolina Martins dos Santos; Toral, Natacha

    2013-04-01

    This article seeks to describe the viewpoint of purchasing food products from family farmers, analyzing their performance within the new guidelines of the Brazilian School Nutrition Program (PNAE). It is a critical assessment based on a review of the literature and the official data provided by the National Fund for the Development of Education/Ministry of Education relating to 2010. The program budget in 2010 was approximately R$2.5 billion and attended 45.6 million children, adolescents and adults. From the total amount, R$150,397,052.68 was allocated for the purchase of agricultural products from family farmers. In Brazil, 47.4% of the local councils acquired food products from family farmers for the Brazilian School Nutrition Program and the purchase percentage was, on average, 22.7%. Given the nature of recent legislation, other aspects should be explored in order to strengthen the compliance with the regulations in different Brazilian contexts and thus contribute both to local economic development and the provision of school meals which fulfill the principles of a healthy and adequate diet.

  19. Evaluating a brief prevention program for improving marital conflict in community families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, E Mark; Faircloth, W Brad; Mitchell, Patricia M; Cummings, Jennifer S; Schermerhorn, Alice C

    2008-04-01

    Marital conflict is related to well-being in children and adults (E. M. Cummings & P. T. Davies, 2002). Marital conflict is likely most effectively ameliorated before it becomes clinically significant. However, families without significant problems may be unwilling to participate in couples therapies or other lengthy or intensive interventions. Responding to this gap, the authors developed a 4-session psychoeducational program about marital conflict for community families. Couples with children 4-8 years of age were randomly blocked into 1 of 3 groups: (1) a parent-only group (n = 24), (2) a parent-child group (n = 33), or (3) a self-study group (n = 33). Pre- and posttest and 6-month and 1-year assessments were conducted. This report evaluates (a) whether participation in a psychoeducational program for parents improved marital conflict, especially concerning ways of expressing disagreements, and (b) whether changes in marital conflict subsequently improved marital satisfaction, parenting, and child adjustment. Greater constructive and less destructive marital conflict was observed at all assessments for treatment groups, and these changes were linked with improvements in other family processes. The findings support the promise of brief, psychoeducational programs for improving marital conflict for community samples. (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved.

  20. Implementing a care coordination program for children with special healthcare needs: partnering with families and providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, April; Lizzi, Michele; Marx, Alison; Chilkatowsky, Maryann; Trachtenberg, Symme W; Ogle, Sue

    2013-01-01

    Care coordination has been a key theme in national forums on healthcare quality, design, and improvement. This article describes the characteristics of a care coordination program aimed at supporting families in building care coordination competencies and providers in the coordination of care across multiple specialties. The program included implementation of a Care Coordination Counselor (CC Counselor) and several supporting tools-Care Binders, Complex Scheduling, Community Resources for Families Database, and a Care Coordination Network. Patients were referred by a healthcare provider to receive services from the CC Counselor or to receive a Care Binder organizational tool. To assess the impact of the counselor role, we compared patient experience survey results from patients receiving CC Counselor services to those receiving only the Care Binder. Our analysis found that patients supported by the CC Counselor reported greater agreement with accessing care coordination resources and identifying a key point person for coordination. Seventy-five percent of CC Counselor patients have graduated from the program. Our findings suggest that implementation of a CC Counselor role and supporting tools offers an integrative way to connect patients, families, and providers with services and resources to support coordinated, continuous care. © 2012 National Association for Healthcare Quality.

  1. Is the Families First Home Visiting Program Effective in Reducing Child Maltreatment and Improving Child Development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownell, Marni D.; Isaac, Michael R.; Chateau, Dan; Nickel, Nathan C.; Katz, Alan; Sarkar, Joykrishna; Hu, Milton; Taylor, Carole

    2017-01-01

    While home visiting programs are among the most widespread interventions to support at-risk families, there is a paucity of research investigating these programs under real-world conditions. The effectiveness of Families First home visiting (FFHV) was examined for decreasing rates of being in care of child welfare, decreasing hospitalizations for maltreatment-related injuries, and improving child development at school entry. Data for 4,562 children from home visiting and 5,184 comparison children were linked to deidentified administrative health, social services, and education data. FFHV was associated with lower rates of being in care by child’s first, second, and third birthday (adjusted risk ratio [aRR] = 0.75, 0.79, and 0.81, respectively) and lower rates of hospitalization for maltreatment-related injuries by third birthday (aRR = 0.59). No differences were found in child development at kindergarten. FFHV should be offered to at-risk families to decrease child maltreatment. Program enhancements are required to improve child development at school entry. PMID:28413917

  2. How can we improve targeting of frail elderly patients to a geriatric day-hospital rehabilitation program?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Allen R

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The optimal patient selection of frail elderly persons undergoing rehabilitation in Geriatric Day Hospital (GDH programs remains uncertain. This study was done to identify potential predictors of rehabilitation outcomes for these patients. Methods This study is a retrospective cohort analysis of patients admitted to the rehabilitation program of our GDH, in Montreal, Canada, over a five year period. The measures considered were: Barthel Index, Older Americans Resources and Services, Folstein Mini Mental Status Exam, Timed Up & Go (TUG, 6-minute walk test (6 MWT, Gait speed, Berg Balance, grip strength and the European Quality of life - 5 Dimensions. Successful improvement with rehabilitation was defined as improvement in three or more tests of physical function. Logistic regression analysis using the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC was employed to select the optimal model for making predictions of rehabilitation success. Results A total of 335 patients were studied, but only 233 patients had a complete data set suitable for the predictive model. Average age was 81 years and patients attended the GDH an average of 24 visits. Significant changes were found in several measures of physical performance for many patients ranging from improved gait speed in 21.3% to improved TUG in 62.7% of the cohort. Fifty-eight percent of patients attained successful improvement with rehabilitation by our criteria. This group was characterized by lower test scores on admission. Using BIC, the best predictor model was the 6 MWT [OR: 0.994 per meter walked (95% CI: 0.990-0.997]. Conclusions The GDH rehabilitation program is effective in improving patients' physical performance. Although no single measure was found to be sufficiently predictive to help target candidates appropriately, the 6 MWT showed a trend to significance. Further research will be done to elucidate the utility of a composite 'rehab appropriateness index' and the role of

  3. Cost-effectiveness of surveillance programs for families at high and moderate risk of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose Olsen, Kim; Bojesen, Stig E; Gerdes, Anne-Marie M

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Surveillance programs are recommended to both families at high risk (Amsterdam-positive families with known- and unknown mutation) and moderate risk (families not fulfilling all Amsterdam criteria) of colorectal cancer (CRC). Cost-effectiveness has so far only been estimated for the g......OBJECTIVES: Surveillance programs are recommended to both families at high risk (Amsterdam-positive families with known- and unknown mutation) and moderate risk (families not fulfilling all Amsterdam criteria) of colorectal cancer (CRC). Cost-effectiveness has so far only been estimated...... for the group at high risk. The aim of the present study is to determine cost-effectiveness of surveillance programs where families at both high and moderate risk of HNPCC participate. METHODS: A decision analytic model (Markov model) is developed to assess surveillance programs where families at high...... and moderate risk of HNPCC are offered surveillance from age 25 and age 45, respectively. The model includes costs for all families referred to genetic counseling, including genetic risk assessment, mutation analysis, and surveillance in relevant families with or without known mutation, plus the costs related...

  4. Women's impressions of their inpatient birth care as provided by family physicians in the Shizuoka Family Medicine Training Program in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Mariko; Tsunawaki, Shinji; Narumoto, Keiichiro; Fetters, Michael D

    2013-05-22

    Even though Japan faces serious challenges in women's health care such as a rapidly aging population, attrition of obstetrical providers, and a harsh legal climate, few family medicine residency training programs in Japan include training in obstetrics, and the literature lacks research on women's views of intra-partum pregnancy care by family physicians. In this exploratory study, we conducted semi-structured qualitative interviews with five women who received their admission, intrapartum, delivery and discharge care from family medicine residents in the obstetrics ward of a community training hospital. Four women had vaginal births, and one had a Cesarean section. Three were primiparous, and two multiparous. Their ages ranged from 22-33. They found value in family physician medical knowledge and easy communication style, though despite explanation, some had trouble understanding the family physician's scope of work. These women identified negative aspects of the hospital environment, and wanted more anticipatory guidance about what to expect physically after birth, but were enthusiastic about seeing a family doctor after discharge. These results demonstrate the feasibility of family medicine residents providing inpatient birth care in a community hospital, and that patients are receptive to family physicians providing that care as well after discharge. Women's primary concerns relate mostly to hospital environment issues, and better understanding the care family physicians provide. This illustrates-areas for family physicians to work for improvements.

  5. A Process Evaluation of the Alaska Native Colorectal Cancer Family Outreach Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redwood, Diana; Provost, Ellen; Lopez, Ellen D S; Skewes, Monica; Johnson, Rhonda; Christensen, Claudia; Sacco, Frank; Haverkamp, Donald

    2016-02-01

    This article presents the results of a process evaluation of the Alaska Native (AN) Colorectal Cancer (CRC) Family Outreach Program, which encourages CRC screening among AN first-degree relatives (i.e., parents, siblings, adult children; hereafter referred to as relatives) of CRC patients. Among AN people incidence and death rates from CRC are the highest of any ethnic/racial group in the United States. Relatives of CRC patients are at increased risk; however, CRC can be prevented and detected early through screening. The evaluation included key informant interviews (August to November 2012) with AN and non-AN stakeholders and program document review. Five key process evaluation components were identified: program formation, evolution, outreach responses, strengths, and barriers and challenges. Key themes included an incremental approach that led to a fully formed program and the need for dedicated, culturally competent patient navigation. Challenges included differing relatives' responses to screening outreach, health system data access and coordination, and the program impact of reliance on grant funding. This program evaluation indicated a need for more research into motivating patient screening behaviors, electronic medical records systems quality improvement projects, improved data-sharing protocols, and program sustainability planning to continue the dedicated efforts to promote screening in this increased risk population. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  6. Family-Based Psychoeducation Programs for Prevention of Depression in Adolescents with Depressed Parents: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceyda Basogul

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This review examines the effects of family-based psychoeducation programs to the prevention depression for children of depressed parents and investigates participant, intervention, provider, and research designs. Family-based psychoeducation programs described by articles in several national and international databases were reviewed. Five studies were identified using this approach and are included in this review. The adolescents who participated in Family-Based Psychoeducation programs reported a significant decrease in symptoms of depression, internalizing and externalizing symptoms and increase in secondary control coping. Moreover, it was noted that there was an increase in positive parental skills and a moderate effect for episodes of depression of the parents who participated in the programs. Studies evaluating effects of family-based psychoeducation programs have indicated positive results to the prevention depression for children of depressed parents. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2015; 7(3.000: 265-279

  7. Factors Affecting Leave out of General Practitioners from Rural Family Physician Program: A Case of Kerman, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Amiresmaili

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Physician retention in family physician program is faced with serious doubts due to different reasons. The success of the program is endangered because of the pivotal role of human resources. Hence, the revision of human resources policies of the program seems necessary in order to reduce physicians leave out and improving its effectiveness.

  8. Fertility differences among developing countries: are they still related to family planning program efforts and social settings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Anrudh K; Ross, John A

    2012-03-01

    In many developing countries, fertility has declined steadily in recent decades, while the average strength of family planning programs has increased and social conditions have improved. However, it is unclear whether the synergistic effect of family planning programs and social settings on fertility, first identified in the 1970s, still holds. Data from 40 developing countries in which Demographic and Health Surveys were conducted in 2003-2010 were used to examine associations among socioeconomic conditions, family planning program effort strength and fertility. Cross-tabulations and multiple regression analyses were conducted. Variation among countries in scores on the Family Planning Program Effort Index, but not on the Human Development Index, has diminished since the 1970s. On average, fertility levels were lower among countries with better social settings or stronger family planning programs than among those with poorer settings or weaker programs; they were lowest in the presence of both good social settings and strong programs. In addition, fertility was positively associated with infant mortality and negatively associated with female education, but not associated with poverty. About half of the 2.3-birth difference in fertility between countries in Sub-Saharan Africa and those elsewhere can be attributed to differences in program efforts and social settings. Policies focused on improving levels of female education, reducing infant mortality and improving family planning services can be expected to have mutually reinforcing effects on fertility decline.

  9. Effects of a Family-Based Childhood Obesity Treatment Program on Parental Weight Status.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cæcilie Trier

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of overweight/obesity among parents of children entering childhood obesity treatment and to evaluate changes in the parents' weight statuses during their child's treatment.The study included parents of 1,125 children and adolescents aged 3-22 years, who were enrolled in a multidisciplinary childhood obesity treatment program. At baseline, weight and height of the parents were obtained by self-reported information and parental body mass index (BMI was calculated. Weight and height of the children were measured in the clinic and BMI standard deviation scores were calculated. Furthermore, anthropometric data from parents of 664 children were obtained by telephone interview after a mean of 2.5 years of treatment (ranging 16 days to 7 years, and changes in parental BMI were analyzed.Data on changes in BMI were available in 606 mothers and 479 fathers. At baseline, the median BMI of the mothers was 28.1 kg/m2 (range: 16.9-66.6, and the median BMI of the fathers was 28.9 kg/m2 (range: 17.2-48.1. Seventy percent of the mothers and 80% of the fathers were overweight or obese at the time of their child's treatment initiation. Both the mothers and fathers lost weight during their child's treatment with a mean decrease in BMI in the mothers of 0.5 (95% CI: 0.2-0.8, p = 0.0006 and in the fathers of 0.4 (95% CI: 0.2-0.6, p = 0.0007. Of the overweight/obese parents, 60% of the mothers and 58% of the fathers lost weight during their child's treatment.There is a high prevalence of overweight/obesity among parents of children entering childhood obesity treatment. Family-based childhood obesity treatment with a focus on the child has a positive effect on parental BMI with both mothers and fathers losing weight.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00928473.

  10. Effects of a Family-Based Childhood Obesity Treatment Program on Parental Weight Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trier, Cæcilie; Dahl, Maria; Stjernholm, Theresa; Nielsen, Tenna R H; Bøjsøe, Christine; Fonvig, Cilius E; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben; Holm, Jens-Christian

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of overweight/obesity among parents of children entering childhood obesity treatment and to evaluate changes in the parents' weight statuses during their child's treatment. The study included parents of 1,125 children and adolescents aged 3-22 years, who were enrolled in a multidisciplinary childhood obesity treatment program. At baseline, weight and height of the parents were obtained by self-reported information and parental body mass index (BMI) was calculated. Weight and height of the children were measured in the clinic and BMI standard deviation scores were calculated. Furthermore, anthropometric data from parents of 664 children were obtained by telephone interview after a mean of 2.5 years of treatment (ranging 16 days to 7 years), and changes in parental BMI were analyzed. Data on changes in BMI were available in 606 mothers and 479 fathers. At baseline, the median BMI of the mothers was 28.1 kg/m2 (range: 16.9-66.6), and the median BMI of the fathers was 28.9 kg/m2 (range: 17.2-48.1). Seventy percent of the mothers and 80% of the fathers were overweight or obese at the time of their child's treatment initiation. Both the mothers and fathers lost weight during their child's treatment with a mean decrease in BMI in the mothers of 0.5 (95% CI: 0.2-0.8, p = 0.0006) and in the fathers of 0.4 (95% CI: 0.2-0.6, p = 0.0007). Of the overweight/obese parents, 60% of the mothers and 58% of the fathers lost weight during their child's treatment. There is a high prevalence of overweight/obesity among parents of children entering childhood obesity treatment. Family-based childhood obesity treatment with a focus on the child has a positive effect on parental BMI with both mothers and fathers losing weight. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00928473.

  11. Mechanisms of Risk and Resilience in Military Families: Theoretical and Empirical Basis of a Family-Focused Resilience Enhancement Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltzman, William R.; Lester, Patricia; Beardslee, William R.; Layne, Christopher M.; Woodward, Kirsten; Nash, William P.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have confirmed that repeated wartime deployment of a parent exacts a toll on military children and families and that the quality and functionality of familial relations is linked to force preservation and readiness. As a result, family-centered care has increasingly become a priority across the military health system. FOCUS…

  12. Preparing Future Teachers to Collaborate with Families: Contributions of Family Systems Counselors to a Teacher Preparation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amatea, Ellen S.; Mixon, Kacy; McCarthy, Shannon

    2013-01-01

    Systemically trained counselors have a distinctive set of skills that make them well suited to prepare teachers to work with students' families. In this article, we discuss our experiences as family counselors in developing and teaching a required course in family-school collaboration to elementary teachers in training. We first describe the…

  13. A Comprehensive Nutrition-Focused Quality Improvement Program Reduces 30-Day Readmissions and Length of Stay in Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriram, Krishnan; Sulo, Suela; VanDerBosch, Gretchen; Partridge, Jamie; Feldstein, Josh; Hegazi, Refaat A; Summerfelt, Wm Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Although screening patients for malnutrition risk on hospital admission is standard of care, nutrition shortfalls are undertreated. Nutrition interventions can improve outcomes. We tested effects of a nutrition-focused quality improvement program (QIP) on hospital readmission and length of stay (LOS). QIP included malnutrition risk screening at admission, prompt initiation of oral nutrition supplements (ONS) for at-risk patients, and nutrition support. A 2-group, pre-post design of malnourished adults with any diagnosis was conducted at 4 hospitals: QIP-basic (QIPb) and QIP-enhanced (QIPe). Comparator patients had a malnutrition diagnosis and ONS orders. For QIPb, nurses screened all patients on admission using an electronic medical record (EMR)-cued Malnutrition Screening Tool (MST); ONS was provided to patients with MST scores ≥2 within 24-48 hours. QIPe had ONS within 24 hours, postdischarge nutrition instructions, telephone calls, and ONS coupons. Primary outcome was 30-day unplanned readmission. We used baseline (January 1-December 31, 2013) and validation cohorts (October 13, 2013-April 2, 2014) for comparison. Patients (n = 1269) were enrolled in QIPb (n = 769) and QIPe (n = 500). Analysis included baseline (n = 4611) and validation (n = 1319) comparator patients. Compared with a 20% baseline readmission rate, post-QIP relative reductions were 19.5% for all QIP, 18% for QIPb, and 22% for QIPe, respectively. Compared with a 22.1% validation readmission rate, relative reductions were 27.1%, 25.8%, and 29.4%, respectively. Similar reductions were noted for LOS. Thirty-day readmissions and LOS were significantly lowered for malnourished inpatients by use of an EMR-cued MST, prompt provision of ONS, patient/caregiver education, and sustained nutrition support.

  14. After Deployment, Adaptive Parenting Tools: 1-Year Outcomes of an Evidence-Based Parenting Program for Military Families Following Deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gewirtz, Abigail H; DeGarmo, David S; Zamir, Osnat

    2017-09-15

    Despite significant stressors facing military families over the past 15 years of wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, no parenting programs adapted or developed for military families with school-aged children have been rigorously tested. We present outcome data from the first randomized controlled trial of a behavioral parent training program for families with a parent deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan. In the present study, 336 primarily National Guard and Reserve families with 4-12-year-old children were recruited from a Midwestern state. At least one parent in each family had deployed to the recent conflicts: Operations Iraqi or Enduring Freedom, or New Dawn (OIF/OEF/OND). Families were randomized to a group-based parenting program (After Deployment, Adaptive Parenting Tools (ADAPT)) or web and print resources-as-usual. Using a social interaction learning framework, we hypothesized an indirect effects model: that the intervention would improve parenting, which, in turn, would be associated with improvements in child outcomes. Applying intent-to-treat analyses, we examined the program's effect on observed parenting, and children's adjustment at 12-months post baseline. Controlling for demographic (marital status, length, child gender), deployment variables (number of deployments), and baseline values, families randomized to the ADAPT intervention showed significantly improved observed parenting compared to those in the comparison group. Observed parenting, in turn, was associated with significant improvements in child adjustment. These findings present the first evidence for the effectiveness of a parenting program for deployed military families with school-aged children.

  15. A Controlled Comparison of Psychiatric Day Treatment and Inpatient Hospitalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Stephen; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Seriously ill female psychiatric patients (N=59) were randomly assigned to an inpatient or day service. Data indicate the day treatment is, on the whole, superior to inpatient treatment in subjective distress, community functioning, family burden, total hospital cost, and days of attachment to the hospital program. (Author)

  16. O cotidiano das famílias de crianças e adolescentes portadores de anemia falciforme The day-to-day life of families with children and adolescents with sickle cell anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania M. R. Guimarães

    2009-02-01

    study aims at describing the day-to-day life of families with children and adolescents with sickle cell anemia. This was a descriptive, exploratory, qualitative investigation. Data collection was achieved by recording semi-structured interviews with relatives of ten under 18-year-old patients with sickle cell anemia attended in the Hemope Clinic in October 2006. The selection criteria of interviewees were that they lived with and were first degree relatives of the patient. The exclusion criterion was that the patient was at risk of death. The sample size followed the criteria of saturation discussed by Mynaio. The technique of "Analysis of Content" described by Bardin was used in the evaluation. The interviews were completely transcribed and grouped according to their similarities, searching for relevant feelings originating from codes and themes: 1. Theme: Involvement of the family (Exclusiveness of attention; codes: overprotection, relinquishing other roles, overload of mother, learning with the illness; 2: Theme: Impact of the illness (chronic illness affecting family; codes: non-acceptance, fear of death; 3. Theme: Facing challenges (Support networks, Healthcare services; codes: spiritual, professional, and family support; hospital structure. We verified difficulties in the acceptance of the illness by the family and the burden of the mother with necessary patient care. In conclusion, healthcare assistance models should allow the family to act as a co-participant in the care of the patient in order to facilitate the patient's adaptation to the disease.

  17. Male leaders participate in Mrs. Ndere's family planning program. Case scenarios for training and group discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    A case scenario for training of family planning (FP) managers in developing countries and for group discussion follows. A clinic director had learned that two FP programs in another part of the country worked with community members to promote their goals. In one, a manager of a food processing company organized weekly discussions about FP and reproductive health during lunch. The number of factory workers using contraception increased from 12-25%. The director returned to her clinic with plans to recruit influential male community leaders. If she could use male volunteers, she would not need to worry about resources to recruit, hire, and train new people for IEC activities. In her region, awareness of and access to FP were among the lowest countrywide. Less than 50% of men knew about condoms in her region, while more women knew about FP methods. She thought that if males knew more about the benefits of FP, they would support their wives' interest in FP. Increased FP knowledge would likely result in better reproductive health practices and prevention of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), which are prevalent in her region. She invited 8 male leaders to a meeting with 2 IEC outreach workers. The first meeting revolved around the benefits their participation would bestow on the program and community. The men were quite interested. During the second meeting, they examined the objectives of the FP program and produced their own goals. To help the program increase use of family planning methods 5%, the men aimed to increase knowledge of FP and STDs among males and to increase the number of condoms distributed through the program 2-fold in the first year. They wanted to involve other community males. The Ministry would provide condoms if a condom distribution system could be set up and some men suggested that males be trained to distribute condoms. Case discussion questions follow the scenario: e.g., How can community participation benefit the community and the FP

  18. Using Facebook to Recruit Parents to Participate in a Family Program to Prevent Teen Drug Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oesterle, Sabrina; Epstein, Marina; Haggerty, Kevin P; Moreno, Megan A

    2017-11-07

    Despite strong evidence that family programs are effective in preventing adolescent substance use, recruiting parents to participate in such programs remains a persistent challenge. This study explored the feasibility of using Facebook to recruit parents of middle school students to a self-directed family program to prevent adolescent drug use. The study used paid Facebook ads aiming to recruit 100 parents in Washington and Colorado using marijuana- or parenting-focused messages. All ad-recruited parents were also invited to refer others in order to compare Facebook recruitment to web-based respondent-driven sampling. Despite offering a $15 incentive for each successfully referred participant, the majority of the screened (70.4%) and eligible (65.1%) parents were recruited through Facebook ads. Yet, eligibility and consent rates were significantly higher among referred (76.6 and 57.3%, respectively) than Facebook-recruited parents (60.0 and 36.6%, respectively). Click-through rates on Facebook were higher for marijuana-focused than parenting-focused ads (0.72 and 0.65%, respectively). The final sample (54% Facebook-recruited) consisted of 103 demographically homogeneous parents (female, educated, non-Hispanic White, and mostly from Washington). Although Facebook was an effective and efficient method to recruit parents to a study with equal to better cost-effectiveness than traditional recruitment strategies, the promise of social media to reach a diverse population was not realized. Additional approaches to Facebook recruitment are needed to reach diverse samples in real-world settings and increase public health impact of family programs.

  19. Practices of Family Health Professionals Regarding Chronic Disease Control and Prevention Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esma Kabasakal

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chronic diseases are of the utmost importance, due to their impact on high death rates, excessive increases in health expenses, and sustainability of health services. Further, it is recommended for individuals, and society at large, to decrease exposure to modifiable risk factors, like tobacco use, malnutrition, and lack of physical activity, and to encourage a lifestyle that supports the fight against chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to determine the practices of health professionals in terms of preventing chronic diseases and improving health. Methods: Health professionals from family health centers participated in this survey study. The data collection tool was developed by the researcher, by considering the nationwide health programs applied in Turkey, namely the Tobacco Control Program, Healthy Nutrition and Active Life Program, Turkey Diabetes Prevention and Control Program, and Cancer Control Programs. Results: Those who received training on health promotion had higher rates of involvement in tobacco cessation guidance, directing individuals to smoking cessation centers, giving trainings to cancer patients and others at risk, following up on individuals with a risk of obesity, raising awareness of healthy individuals concerning obesity, and training patients/patient relatives on diabetes. Discussion: The level of training that health professionals offer to patients and their relatives is higher than the level of training given to healthy individuals in all control programs. This inclination is an indicator of a treatment-oriented service approach to health. The capacity of health professionals should be directed more towards preventive medicine and health improving practices.

  20. Early Care and Education--What It Costs. Volume 2. Budget Series: Full-Day, Year-Round Early Childhood Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child Care, Inc., 2007

    2007-01-01

    The research on early childhood education is clear: Programs must be of high quality to produce positive outcomes for children. This policy brief is the second in our series aimed at identifying the core components of successful early childhood programs and the costs associated with each component. In this case, we examine the costs of full-day,…

  1. Randomized Trial of a Family-based, Automated, Conversational Obesity Treatment Program for Underserved Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, J. A.; Phillips, B.D.; Watson, B.L.; Newby, P.K.; Norman, G. J.; Adams, W.G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the acceptability and feasibility of a scalable obesity treatment program integrated with pediatric primary care and delivered using interactive voice technology (IVR) to families from underserved populations. Design and Methods Fifty parent-child dyads (child 9–12 yrs, BMI >95th percentile) were recruited from a pediatric primary care clinic and randomized to either an IVR or a wait-list control (WLC) group. The majority were lower-income, African-American (72%) families. Dyads received IVR calls for 12 weeks. Call content was informed by two evidenced-based interventions. Anthropometric and behavioral variables were assessed at baseline and 3 mo follow-up. Results Forty-three dyads completed the study. IVR parents ate 1 cup more fruit than WLC (p 75% agreed that the calls were useful, made for people like them, credible, and helped them eat healthy foods. Conclusion An obesity treatment program delivered via IVR may be an acceptable and feasible resource for families from underserved populations. PMID:23512915

  2. Effects of a prevention program for divorced families on youth cortisol reactivity 15 years later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luecken, Linda J; Hagan, Melissa J; Mahrer, Nicole E; Wolchik, Sharlene A; Sandler, Irwin N; Tein, Jenn-Yun

    2015-01-01

    We examined whether an empirically based, randomised controlled trial of a preventive intervention for divorced mothers and children had a long-term impact on offspring cortisol regulation. Divorced mothers and children (age 9-12) were randomly assigned to a literature control condition or the 11-week New Beginnings Program, a family-focused group preventive intervention for mothers and children in newly divorced families. Fifteen years after the trial, offspring salivary cortisol (n = 161) was measured before and after a social stress task. Multilevel mixed models were used to predict cortisol from internalizing symptoms, externalizing symptoms, group assignment and potential moderators of intervention effects. Across the sample, higher externalizing symptoms were associated with lower cortisol reactivity. There was a significant group-by-age interaction such that older offspring in the control group had higher reactivity relative to the intervention group, and younger offspring in the control group exhibited a decline across the task relative to younger offspring in the intervention group. Preventive interventions for youth from divorced families may have a long-term impact on cortisol reactivity to stress. Results highlight the importance of examining moderators of program effects.

  3. Effects of a Telephone- and Web-based Coping Skills Training Program Compared to an Education Program for Survivors of Critical Illness and Their Family Members: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Christopher E; Hough, Catherine L; Carson, Shannon S; White, Douglas B; Kahn, Jeremy M; Olsen, Maren K; Jones, Derek M; Somers, Tamara J; Kelleher, Sarah A; Porter, Laura S

    2017-09-05

    Many survivors of critical illness and their family members experience significant psychological distress after discharge. To compare effects of a coping skills training (CST) program with an education program on patient and family psychological distress. In this 5-center clinical trial, adult patients who received mechanical ventilation >48 hours and one family member of each patient were randomized to six weekly CST telephone sessions plus access to a study website or a critical illness education program. The primary outcome was the patient Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) at 3 months. Secondary outcomes included 3- and 6-month HADS subscales and the Impact of Events Scale-Revised. Among the 175 patients randomized to CST (n=86) or education (n=89), there was no significant difference between CST and education in either 3-month HADS scores (difference 1.3 [95% CI: -0.9, 3.4], p=0.24) or secondary patient and family outcomes. In pre-specified analyses, among patients with high baseline distress (n=60), CST recipients had greater improvement in 6-month HADS score (difference -4.6, [95% CI: -8.6, -0.6], p=0.02) than education. Among patients ventilated >7 days (n=47), education recipients had greater improvement in 3-month HADS score (difference -4.0 [95% CI: -8.1,-0.05] p=0.047) than CST. CST did not improve psychological distress symptoms compared to an education program. However, CST improved symptoms of distress at 6 months among patients with high baseline distress while the education program improved distress at 3 months among those ventilated for >7 days. Future efforts to address psychological distress among critical illness survivors should target high-risk populations. Clinical trial registration available at www.clinicaltrials.gov, ID NCT0198325.

  4. Guidelines for a Comprehensive Care Program to Ostomized Patients and Families: a Nursing proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Alvarenga de Figueiredo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: describe care needs and demands that mark the discursive practices of ostomized clients and family members and discuss guidelines for a comprehensive care program to ostomized clients and their families, organized by macrosociological categories. Method: Creative and Sensitive, involving 17 ostomized subjects and family members at a municipal outpatient clinic. The ethical aspects were complied with. A characterization form was used, as well as Creativity and Sensitivity Dynamics: "speaking map", "body-knowledge" and "calendar". Critical Discourse Analysis was applied. Results: the health needs and care demands of the ostomized patients and their family members, in their multiple dimensions, were constituted in the home and community, outpatient and social context, implying new orientations for nursing care. The unveiling of the data brought elements that constituted guidelines, in a macrosociological approach, to achieve the expanded integrality of nursing care. Conclusion: the ostomized clients are unique in their genre/peculiar from Latin sui generis, calling for strategies that respond to and distinguish their specificities. Elaborating a Public Health Policy that improves and reorganizes the care demands, taking into account these individual biopsychosocial and spiritual aspects, is a possible and irrevocable target in the attempt to achieve better conditions of health and wellbeing.

  5. Background and elements of the linkage between the Brazilian school feeding program and family farming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartzman, Flavia; Mora, Claudia Andrea Rodriguez; Bogus, Claudia Maria; Villar, Betzabeth Slater

    2017-12-18

    Since 2009, legislation of the National School Feeding Program of Brazil (PNAE) institutionalizes its linkage with family farming as it establishes the requirement that at least 30% out of the total financial resources allocated by the federal government to the states and municipalities for school feeding must be used in the purchase of products directly from this sector. This study analyzes the process of drafting this legislation, focusing on the elements related to the procurement from family farming, through a historical contextualization, and it also presents a graphical representation with the main elements of this linkage: its objectives, target population, actions implemented and expected results. Actors involved with the drafting of the legislation were interviewed. The analyses show that the procurement from family farming is a far-reaching initiative in terms of the concept, execution and results. It has also showed that a strong articulation between the actors and institutions of the different sectors involved is critical to its success. The education, agriculture, planning, procurement and civil society sectors should work articulately at national, state and local level. The results of this study demonstrate that initiatives like this, of institutional procurement from family farming, which are currently being implemented in several countries, constitute as an important strategy of food and nutrition security, for the fulfillment of the human right to adequate food and the promotion of long-term sustainable development.

  6. Guidelines for a Comprehensive Care Program to Ostomized Patients and Families: a Nursing proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Figueiredo, Paula Alvarenga; Alvim, Neide Aparecida Titonelli

    2016-01-01

    describe care needs and demands that mark the discursive practices of ostomized clients and family members and discuss guidelines for a comprehensive care program to ostomized clients and their families, organized by macrosociological categories. Creative and Sensitive, involving 17 ostomized subjects and family members at a municipal outpatient clinic. The ethical aspects were complied with. A characterization form was used, as well as Creativity and Sensitivity Dynamics: "speaking map", "body-knowledge" and "calendar". Critical Discourse Analysis was applied. the health needs and care demands of the ostomized patients and their family members, in their multiple dimensions, were constituted in the home and community, outpatient and social context, implying new orientations for nursing care. The unveiling of the data brought elements that constituted guidelines, in a macrosociological approach, to achieve the expanded integrality of nursing care. the ostomized clients are unique in their genre/peculiar from Latin sui generis, calling for strategies that respond to and distinguish their specificities. Elaborating a Public Health Policy that improves and reorganizes the care demands, taking into account these individual biopsychosocial and spiritual aspects, is a possible and irrevocable target in the attempt to achieve better conditions of health and wellbeing.

  7. Guidelines for a Comprehensive Care Program to Ostomized Patients and Families: a Nursing proposal1

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Figueiredo, Paula Alvarenga; Alvim, Neide Aparecida Titonelli

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: describe care needs and demands that mark the discursive practices of ostomized clients and family members and discuss guidelines for a comprehensive care program to ostomized clients and their families, organized by macrosociological categories. Method: Creative and Sensitive, involving 17 ostomized subjects and family members at a municipal outpatient clinic. The ethical aspects were complied with. A characterization form was used, as well as Creativity and Sensitivity Dynamics: "speaking map", "body-knowledge" and "calendar". Critical Discourse Analysis was applied. Results: the health needs and care demands of the ostomized patients and their family members, in their multiple dimensions, were constituted in the home and community, outpatient and social context, implying new orientations for nursing care. The unveiling of the data brought elements that constituted guidelines, in a macrosociological approach, to achieve the expanded integrality of nursing care. Conclusion: the ostomized clients are unique in their genre/peculiar from Latin sui generis, calling for strategies that respond to and distinguish their specificities. Elaborating a Public Health Policy that improves and reorganizes the care demands, taking into account these individual biopsychosocial and spiritual aspects, is a possible and irrevocable target in the attempt to achieve better conditions of health and wellbeing. PMID:27192418

  8. The 60 Days of PVE Campaign: Lessons on Organizing an Online, Peer-to-Peer, Counter-radicalization Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Wilner

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Combatting violent extremism can involve organizing Peer-to-Peer (P2P preventing violent extremism (PVE programs and social media campaigns. While hundreds of PVE campaigns have been launched around the world in recent months and years, very few of these campaigns have actually been reviewed, analyzed, or assessed in any systematic way. Metrics of success and failure have yet to be fully developed, and very little is publically known as to what might differentiate a great and successful P2P campaign from a mediocre one. This article will provide first-hand insight on orchestrating a publically funded, university-based, online, peer-to-peer PVE campaign – 60 Days of PVE – based on the experience of a group of Canadian graduate students. The article provides an account of the group’s approach to PVE. It highlights the entirety of the group’s campaign, from theory and conceptualization to branding, media strategy, and evaluation, and describes the campaign’s core objectives and implementation. The article also analyzes the campaign’s digital footprint and reach using data gleamed from social media. Finally, the article discusses the challenges and difficulties the group faced in running their campaign, lessons that are pertinent for others contemplating a similar endeavour.

  9. Cost-effectiveness analysis of family planning programs in rural Bangladesh: evidence from Matlab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, G B; Balk, D; Faiz, K K

    1991-01-01

    The Family Planning Health Services Project in Matlab is often seen as more expensive than similar activities carried out by the government of Bangladesh. At the same time, it as been observed that the project is much more effective. The alleged high cost of the project is said to make it difficult to replicate throughout the nation. Previously, the true costs of the project had not been documented. This study systemically examines the cost of the project and assesses its cost-effectiveness. An experimental design framework is used as a basis for understanding the cost-effectiveness of the project, although a sensitivity analysis lends further support to the relative efficiency of the approach undertaken in Matlab. Although in the aggregate, the Matlab Project is more expensive than the government's family planning program, it is also more effective, generating enough output to offset the extra costs of the intensified delivery system.

  10. Developing a culturally appropriate family planning program for the Navrongo experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazzar, A; Adongo, P B; Binka, F N; Phillips, J F; Debpuur, C

    1995-01-01

    This article describes the first six months of the strategic planning process to develop a culturally appropriate community health and family planning program for a traditional community in a district of northern Ghana, served by the Navrongo Health Research Centre. To explain the context within which fertility decisions are made, this article describes the district's severe ecological, social, economic, and health constraints to family planning. It discusses related programmatic obstacles and presents the strategies developed to respond to them. A system of care has been developed that is closely coordinated with traditional leaders and communication networks. Management systems support outreach workers by emphasizing the importance of peer leadership, supervisory support, and community liaison in the implementation of village-based services. A large-scale experiment will be fielded to test the demographic impact of this approach.

  11. From Project to Program: Tupange's Experience with Scaling Up Family Planning Interventions in Urban Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyonzo, Nelson; Nyachae, Paul; Kagwe, Peter; Kilonzo, Margaret; Mumba, Feddis; Owino, Kenneth; Kichamu, George; Kigen, Bartilol; Fajans, Peter; Ghiron, Laura; Simmons, Ruth

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes how the Urban Reproductive Health Initiative in Kenya, the Tupange Project (2010-2015), successfully applied the ExpandNet approach to sustainably scale up family planning interventions, first in Machakos and Kakamega, and subsequently also in its three core cities, Nairobi, Kisumu and Mombasa. This new focus meant shifting from a "project" to a "program" approach, which required paying attention to government leadership and ownership, limiting external inputs, institutionalizing interventions in existing structures and emphasizing sustainability. The paper also highlights the project's efforts to prepare for the future scale up of Tupange's interventions in other counties to support continuing and improved access to family planning services in the new context of devolution (decentralization) in Kenya. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. NON-MUSCULOSKELETAL SPORTS MEDICINE LEARNING IN FAMILY MEDICINE RESIDENCY PROGRAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasqualino Caputo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite the increasing popularity of primary care sports medicine fellowships, as evidenced by the more than two-fold increase in family medicine sports medicine fellowships from a total of 31 accredited programs during the 1998/1999 academic year (ACGME, 1998 to 63 during the 2003/2004 academic year (ACGME, 2006, there are few empirical studies to support the efficacy of such programs. To the best of our knowledge, no studies have been conducted to assess the impact of primary care sports medicine fellowships on family medicine residents' learning of non-musculoskeletal sports medicine topics. Rigorous evaluations of the outcomes of such programs are helpful to document the value of such programs to both the lay public and interested medical residents. In order to evaluate such programs, it is helpful to apply the same objective standards to residents trained across multiple programs. Hence, we would like to know if there is a learning effect with respect to non-musculoskeletal sports medicine topics identified on yearly administered American Board of Family Medicine (ABFM in-training exams (ITE to family medicine residents in family medicine residency programs in the United States with and without primary care sports medicine fellowship programs. Review and approval for the research proposal was granted by the ABFM, who also allowed access to the required data. Permission to study and report only non-musculoskeletal sports medicine topics excluding musculoskeletal topics was granted at the time due to other ongoing projects at the ABFM involving musculoskeletal topics. ABFM allowed us access to examinations from 1998 to 2003. We were given copies of each exam and records of responses to each item (correct or incorrect by each examinee (examinees were anonymous for each year.For each year, each examinee was classified by the ABFM as either (a belonging to a program that contained a sports medicine fellowship, or (b not belonging to a program

  13. Using a CBT-Based Therapeutic Community Program to Facilitate Healthy Relationships among Military Veterans and Their Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush-Ossenbeck, Marilyn; West-Olatunji, Cirecie

    2014-01-01

    The authors propose a CBT-based Therapeutic Community (TC) program designed to facilitate healthy relationships between military veterans and their families. In many military veteran families, there is a struggle to maintain a healthy and balanced life both outside and inside the household. This struggle affects both spouses and children and is…

  14. The Effect of Alaska's Home Visitation Program for High-Risk Families on Trends in Abuse and Neglect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessner, Bradford D.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: At 6 sites serving 21 communities, Alaska implemented Healthy Families Alaska, a home visitation program using paraprofessionals designed to decrease child abuse and neglect. The primary study objective was to compare changes over time in Child Protective Services outcomes by Healthy Families Alaska enrollment status. Methods:…

  15. 24 CFR 1000.110 - Under what conditions may non low-income Indian families participate in the program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... participate in the program? (a) A family who is purchasing housing under a lease purchase agreement and who was low income at the time the lease was signed is eligible without further conditions. (b) A... payments under a lease purchase agreement) to be paid by a non low-income Indian family cannot be less than...

  16. A family-based education program for obesity: a three-year study

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    Marcolongo Renzo

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The epidemic of obesity is increasing in all countries. However, the number of controlled studies focusing on childhood obesity, with a long follow-up is still limited. Even though Behavioral Therapy shows some efficacy, it requires a prolonged teamwork that is not always available in public health settings. In addition, Behavioral Therapy is not always accepted. We describe a new intensive and sustainable family-based, Therapeutic Education program for childhood obesity. Methods Controlled clinical study: a family-based Therapeutic Education program without dietetic prescription involving overweight and obese children/adolescents, without evident psychological troubles, and their families. The program consisted of three clinical and therapeutic education sessions, carried out by a single physician. Further sessions were carried out every six months in the first year and then every year. Study population: 190 overweight children, 85 treated with a therapeutic education program (45 males and 40 females, mean age of 10.43 ± 3 with an average BMI% of 154.72 ± 19.6% and 105 matched children, treated with traditional dietary approach. Children's Body Mass Index (BMI % and BMI Standard Deviation Score measured at baseline and after a three year-follow-up, were compared. Statistical tests: ANOVA-RM (repeated measures controlled for distribution by Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Bartlett's test or correspondent non-parametric procedures, X2 tests or Fisher's exact test and simple linear regression. Results After a follow-up of 2.7 ± 1.1 years, 72.9% of the children who followed the Therapeutic Education Program obtained a BMI% reduction, compared to 42.8% of children who followed the traditional dietary treatment. Weight reduction was good in moderately obese children and in the severely obese. In addition, a smaller proportion of children treated with therapeutic education had negative results (BMI increase of >10% compared to those treated

  17. Using Technology to Expand and Enhance Applied Behavioral Analysis Programs for Children with Autism in Military Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    C. T. (2007). Predictors of depressive symptoms in primary caregivers of young children with or at risk for developmental delay. Journal of...Applied Behavioral Analysis Programs for Children with Autism in Military Families PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Wayne Fisher, Ph.D... Autism in Military Families 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0444 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Wayne W. Fisher

  18. Effectiveness of a Formal Mentorship Program in Family Medicine Residency: The Residents’ Perspective

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    Marie Andrades

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Mentoring is a recognized form of teaching learning strategy in postgraduate medical education. This paper describes the effectiveness of a formal mentorship program from the residents’ perspective after a year of implementation. Methods. The Aga Khan University Family Medicine Residency Program is the first program in Pakistan to our knowledge to implement formal mentorship for all four years of residency. A mentorship program was developed, implemented, and evaluated a year later using a rating scale. The 10-point Likert scale consisted of questions on academics, clinical work, research, administrative issues, and personal/social issues. Results. The response rate was 95% (. Eighty percent ( were women. Satisfaction level in seeking help was the highest for academics (75%. Residents scored mentorship as low in helping to tackle their personal problems (20%. Barriers reported in rapport building with mentor were time constraints and gender difference. The most useful attributes of the mentor which helped rapport building were accessibility, active listening, support for emotional needs, and trustworthiness. Conclusion. Mentoring has a role in trainees’ personal and professional growth especially when their needs are addressed. The effectiveness of the mentorship program in residency can improve if the residents are allowed to choose their own mentors.

  19. Infrastructures Required for the Expansion of Family Physician Program to Urban Settings in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshmangir, Leila; Bazyar, Mohammad; Doshmangir, Parinaz; Mostafavi, Hakimeh; Takian, Amirhossein

    2017-09-01

    Following the implementation of Family Physician (FP) Program in rural areas and cities with populations under 20000 in 2005, the Iranian Ministry of Health and Medical Education in 2012 decided to implement urban FP in large cities with populations more than 20000. Along with the development and implementation of urban FP in Iran, local websites and newspapers reflected the viewpoints of experts in various levels of health system regarding the various stages of Family Medicine (FM) development (from agenda setting to initial stages of implementation). This study aimed to explore the major infrastructures perceived to be required to achieve desirable implementation of urban FP through analyzing experts' viewpoints reflected in the media and interviews. In a qualitative study, we analyzed the contents of health related national websites as well as transcribed interviews with key informants. Documents were collected from December 2011 to January 2014 and interviews were conducted from February 2014 to June 2015. We used mixed thematic approach (inductive and deductive) for analysis that was assisted by MAXQDA 12 software. Infrastructures needed for the implementation of FP were categorized in five main themes and 23 subthemes. The themes are: 'Stewardship/governance', 'Actors and stakeholders', 'structural infrastructure', 'technical infrastructure and needed resources', and 'information and communication infrastructure'. Expansion of FP program to urban settings needs appropriate attention to the principles of policy implementation as well as provision of robust infrastructures. Well-defined stewardship, revised approach to financial regulation and payment system, stakeholder's commitment to collaboration, policy for conflict resolution, and universal insurance coverage are pivotal for the expansion of family physician program to the urban settings in Iran.

  20. Patients' and physicians' satisfaction with a pharmacist managed anticoagulation program in a family medicine clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Lisa; Young, Stephanie; Twells, Laurie; Dillon, Carla; Hawboldt, John

    2015-06-09

    A pharmacist managed anticoagulation service was initiated in a multi-physician family medicine clinic in December 2006. In order to determine the patient and physician satisfaction with the service, a study was designed to describe the patients' satisfaction with the warfarin education and management they received from the pharmacist, and to describe the physicians' satisfaction with the level of care provided by the pharmacist for patients taking warfarin. A self-administered survey was completed by both eligible patients receiving warfarin and physicians prescribing warfarin between December 2006 and May 2008. The patient survey collected information on patient demographics, satisfaction with warfarin education and daily warfarin management. The physician survey collected data about the satisfaction with patient education and daily anticoagulation management by the pharmacist. Seventy-six of 94 (81%) patients completed the survey. Fifty-nine percent were male with a mean age of 65 years (range 24-90). Ninety-six percent agreed/strongly agreed the pharmacist did a good job teaching the importance of warfarin adherence, the necessity of INR testing and the risks of bleeding. Eighty-five percent agreed/strongly agreed the risk of blood clots was well explained, 79% felt the pharmacist did a good job teaching about dietary considerations and 77% agreed/strongly agreed the pharmacist explained when to see a doctor. All patients felt the pharmacist gave clear instructions on warfarin dosing and INR testing. Four of nine physicians (44%) completed the survey. All agreed/strongly agreed the pharmacist was competent in the care provided, were confident in the care their patients received, would like the pharmacist to continue the service, and would recommend this program to other clinics. Patients and family physicians were satisfied with the pharmacist managed anticoagulation program and recommended continuation of the program. These results support the role of the

  1. Usages of Computers and Smartphones to Develop Dementia Care Education Program for Asian American Family Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Ah; Nguyen, Hannah; Park, Joan; Tran, Linh; Nguyen, Trang; Huynh, Yen

    2017-10-01

    Families of ethnic minority persons with dementia often seek help at later stages of the disease. Little is known about the effectiveness of various methods in supporting ethnic minority dementia patients' caregivers. The objective of the study was to identify smartphone and computer usage among family caregivers of dementia patients (i.e., Korean and Vietnamese Americans) to develop dementia-care education programs for them. Participants were asked various questions related to their computer or smartphone usage in conjunction with needs-assessment interviews. Flyers were distributed at two ethnic minority community centers in Southern California. Snowball recruitment was also utilized to reach out to the families of dementia patients dwelling in the community. Thirty-five family caregivers, including 20 Vietnamese and 15 Korean individuals, participated in this survey. Thirty participants (30 of 35, 85.7%) were computer users. Among those, 76.7% (23 of 30) reported daily usage and 53% (16 of 30) claimed to use social media. A majority of the participants (31 of 35, 88.6%) reported that they owned smartphones. More than half of smartphone users (18 of 29, 62%) claimed to use social media applications. Many participants claimed that they could not attend in-class education due to caregiving and/or transportation issues. Most family caregivers of dementia patients use smartphones more often than computers, and more than half of those caregivers communicate with others through social media apps. A smartphone-app-based caregiver intervention may serve as a more effective approach compared to the conventional in-class method. Multiple modalities for the development of caregiver interventions should be considered.

  2. Profile of elderly people with high blood pressure in a family physical activity program

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    Luzia Wilma Santana da Silva

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A quantitative and descriptive study, aimed at analyzing the socioeconomic and behavioral profile of elderly people with hypertension interested in participating in a regular physical activity program with their families. The results showed people that mainly belong to the C class, which adopt physically active behavior to the routines of housework in their daily lives. The findings, allows to infer that for specific health promotion arises as necessary regular physical activity as a commitment to add to the home daily demands to health potential.  

  3. Exploratory Evaluation and Initial Adaptation of a Parent Training Program for Hispanic Families of Children with Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzhardt, Jay; Rusinko, Lisa; Heitzman-Powell, Linda; Trevino-Maack, Sylvia; McGrath, Ashley

    2016-03-01

    The present paper takes a translational approach in applying the themes of the current special section to prevention and intervention science in Latino families. The paper reviews the current literature on cultural processes in prevention and intervention research with Latino families. Overall, many prevention and intervention programs have either been developed specifically for Latino families or have been modified for Latino families with great attention paid to the socio-cultural needs of these families. Nevertheless, few studies have tested the role of cultural values or acculturation processes on outcomes. We make recommendations based on findings within basic science and in particular this special section on the incorporation of these values and processes into prevention and intervention science with Latino families. © 2015 Family Process Institute.

  4. 78 FR 70958 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Recordkeeping for HUD's Continuum of Care Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-27

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Recordkeeping for HUD's Continuum of... allow for an additional 30 days of public comment. DATES: Comments Due Date: December 27, 2013... solicited public comment on the information collection for a period of 60 days was published on March 25...

  5. Cost-Effectiveness of a Family Planning Voucher Program in Rural Pakistan

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    Edward Ivor Broughton

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThis study reports on the effectiveness and efficiency from the program funder’s perspective of the Suraj Social Franchise (SSF voucher program in which private health-care providers in remote rural areas were identified, trained, upgraded, and certified to deliver family planning services to underserved women of reproductive age in 29 districts of Sindh and 3 districts of Punjab province, Pakistan between October 2013 and June 2016.MethodA decision tree compared the cost of implementing SSF to the program funder and its effects of providing additional couple years of protection (CYPs to targeted women, compared to business-as-usual. Costs included vouchers given to women to receive a free contraceptive method of their choice from the SSF provider. The vouchers were then reimbursed to the SSF provider by the program.ResultsA total of 168,206 married women of reproductive age (MWRA received SSF vouchers between October 2013 and June 2016, costing $3,278,000 ($19.50/recipient. The average effectiveness of the program per voucher recipient was an additional 1.66 CYPs, giving an incremental cost-effectiveness of the program of $4.28 per CYP compared to not having the program (95% CI: $3.62–5.31.ConclusionThe result compares favorably to other interventions with similar objectives and appears affordable for the Pakistan national health-care system. It is therefore recommended to help address the unmet need for contraception among MWRA in these areas of Pakistan and is worthy of trial implementation in the country more widely.

  6. 'Only systems thinking can improve family planning program in Pakistan': A descriptive qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Saira; Shaikh, Babar Tasneem

    2014-12-01

    Family Planning (FP) program in Pakistan has been struggling to achieve the desired indicators. Despite a well-timed initiation of the program in late 50s, fertility decline has been sparingly slow. As a result, rapid population growth is impeding economic development in the country. A high population growth rate, the current fertility rate, a stagnant contraceptive prevalence rate and high unmet need remain challenging targets for population policies and FP programs. To accelerate the pace of FP programs and targets concerned, it is imperative to develop and adopt a holistic approach and strategy for plugging the gaps in various components of the health system: service delivery, information systems, drugs-supplies, technology and logistics, Human Resources (HRs), financing, and governance. Hence, World Health Organization (WHO) health systems building blocks present a practical framework for overall health system strengthening. This descriptive qualitative study, through 23 in-depth interviews, explored the factors related to the health system, and those responsible for a disappointing FP program in Pakistan. Provincial representatives from Population Welfare and Health departments, donor agencies and non-governmental organizations involved with FP programs were included in the study to document the perspective of all stakeholders. Content analysis was done manually to generate nodes, sub-nodes and themes. Performance of FP programs is not satisfactory as shown by the indicators, and these programs have not been able to deliver the desired outcomes. Interviewees agreed that inadequate prioritization given to the FP program by successive governments has led to this situation. There are issues with all health system areas, including governance, strategies, funding, financial management, service delivery systems, HRs, technology and logistic systems, and Management Information System (MIS); these have encumbered the pace of success of the program. All stakeholders

  7. ‘Only Systems Thinking Can Improve Family Planning Program in Pakistan’: A Descriptive Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saira Zafar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Family Planning (FP program in Pakistan has been struggling to achieve the desired indicators. Despite a well-timed initiation of the program in late 50s, fertility decline has been sparingly slow. As a result, rapid population growth is impeding economic development in the country. A high population growth rate, the current fertility rate, a stagnant contraceptive prevalence rate and high unmet need remain challenging targets for population policies and FP programs. To accelerate the pace of FP programs and targets concerned, it is imperative to develop and adopt a holistic approach and strategy for plugging the gaps in various components of the health system: service delivery, information systems, drugs-supplies, technology and logistics, Human Resources (HRs, financing, and governance. Hence, World Health Organization (WHO health systems building blocks present a practical framework for overall health system strengthening. Methods This descriptive qualitative study, through 23 in-depth interviews, explored the factors related to the health system, and those responsible for a disappointing FP program in Pakistan. Provincial representatives from Population Welfare and Health departments, donor agencies and non-governmental organizations involved with FP programs were included in the study to document the perspective of all stakeholders. Content analysis was done manually to generate nodes, sub-nodes and themes. Results Performance of FP programs is not satisfactory as shown by the indicators, and these programs have not been able to deliver the desired outcomes. Interviewees agreed that inadequate prioritization given to the FP program by successive governments has led to this situation. There are issues with all health system areas, including governance, strategies, funding, financial management, service delivery systems, HRs, technology and logistic systems, and Management Information System (MIS; these have encumbered the pace of

  8. Day to day with COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    COPD - day to day; Chronic obstructive airways disease - day to day; Chronic obstructive lung disease - day to ... Having COPD can sap your energy. These simple changes can make your days easier and preserve your strength. Ask ...

  9. Graduate survey of the South Carolina Area Health Education Consortium family practice residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carek, P J; Abercrombie, S; Baughman, O; Buehler, J; Goforth, G; Hester, W; Lammie, J; Snape, P

    2001-06-01

    The results of this study demonstrate several interesting characteristics of the graduates of the SC AHEC associated family medicine residency programs: 45 percent practice in South Carolina, 63 percent live further than 120 miles from their residency program, 96 percent are satisfied with their specialty choice, and 56 percent are involved in teaching medical students and residents. Furthermore, these graduates have the following tendencies: to practice in the traditional solo or group practice; to practice in a suburban community, town or rural community and a setting size less than a population of 100,000 persons; to care for the aging adult and geriatric population; to provide nursing home care; and to utilize house calls to provide patient care). As the current health care system continues to be redesigned, this information will be essential for assessment and planning purposes.

  10. Family well-being in a participant-directed autism waiver program: the role of relational coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warfield, M E; Chiri, G; Leutz, W N; Timberlake, M

    2014-12-01

    Massachusetts is one of a very limited number of states exclusively employing participant-direction to deliver autism waiver services to children. A crucial element of this waiver program is the work conducted by the state's Department of Developmental Services (DDS) staff and state-approved providers with waiver families to facilitate the implementation of the participant-direction model. Our study investigates the effect of the collaboration between state providers and family caregivers on family well-being. We conducted a survey of 74 families who have been utilising waiver services for at least 6 months. Participants were asked to rate the coordination with providers as well as to report on parenting stress and impact of waiver services on family functioning. Data from in-home child and family assessments conducted by the state were also abstracted from program records. After controlling for a host of variables hypothesised to affect the outcomes of interest, we found that the family's view of how well they coordinated with formal providers is significantly associated all of the outcomes. Families who reported greater coordination with state providers experienced lower parenting stress and reported a more positive impact on family functioning. Child externalising behavioural problems and caregiver's health rating also contributed to parenting stress and family functioning. Our findings highlight the importance of establishing a collaborative partnership with waiver families in promoting family well-being. These results suggest that training and/or resources that foster team building and communication can positively impact family functioning among families with young children with autism. © 2013 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Starting and resourcing family and internal medicine residency programs as integral mission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen P Merry

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Graduate medical education is an excellent means of building the capacity of health care systems in low and middle Income Countries (LMIC and a growing way for physicians in the U.S to get involved in integral mission – the proclamation and demonstration of the Gospel. This white paper purposes to provide a “best practices” recommendations on family and internal medicine (“medical” residency program development in majority world settings. An expert panel of residency educators convened in November 2015 at the Global Missions Health Conference (GMHC in Louisville, Kentucky and through an iterative process identified themes that were then further defined and clarified by medical residency faculty unable to be present. Participants largely agreed that integration and cooperation with the country’s Ministry of Health (MOH is essential for sustainable residency development. Recognition of family medicine as a specialty will enable graduates to succeed in the country’s physician job market and health systems leadership. Recognition by the national church of the unique needs of their mission hospitals’ educational programs to control their revenue in order to fund their programs’ growth and development exemplifies the common wisdom to provide authority and resources where responsibility for good outcomes is expected. Co-training of general surgeons and medical residents who can provide essential surgical call coverage may lead to on-going synergies. Teaching by medical and surgical subspecialists is essential in medical residencies to provide the depth of instruction residents need to develop as excellent clinicians. Dependable scheduling of their specialty instruction allows residency program directors to assure inclusion of their content in the residency curriculum. In summary, participants agreed that teaching in medical residency programs in LMIC present excellent opportunities for national and expat Christian physician educators

  12. Families and Futures 2000. A Resource for Planning Comprehensive Home and Family Life Education Programs. Working Papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington Office of the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Olympia.

    This curriculum guide is the first step in a total home and family life curriculum revision in the state of Washington aimed at helping students solve problems and study issues that have an impact on home and family life. The guide contains two model, nonsequential, comprehensive courses that may be adopted or adapted by school districts. The…

  13. Current Directions in Family Nurse Practitioner Curricula. Proceedings of a National Conference of Representatives from Family Nurse Practitioner Programs (Chapel Hill, North Carolina, January 29-31, 1976)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickard, C. Glenn, Jr., Ed.; Watkins, Julia D., Ed.

    The conference reported here was held for nurse faculty and physicians from twenty-five family nurse practitioner (FNP) programs based in twenty-one states to provide the participants with an opportunity to consider their common curriculum problems and successes in FNP education. The first half of this booklet contains five paper presentations…

  14. The Strengthening Families Initiative and Child Care Quality Improvement: How Strengthening Families Influenced Change in Child Care Programs in One State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, Anne; Klerman, Lorraine

    2012-01-01

    Research Findings: This study investigated how the Strengthening Families through Early Care and Education initiative in Illinois (SFI) influenced change in 4 child care programs. Findings indicate that SFI influenced quality improvements through 4 primary pathways: (a) Learning Networks, (b) the quality of training, (c) the engagement of program…

  15. In their own words: learning from families attending a multidisciplinary pediatric weight management program at the YMCA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallinen, Bethany J; Schaffer, Sarah; Woolford, Susan J

    2013-06-01

    A family-based multidisciplinary weight management program for obese children 7-11 years old was implemented by a pediatric weight management center and local YMCA. The purpose of this study was to explore parents' and children's perceptions of the program to gain insight about factors that may enhance engagement and retention of families in weight management treatment. Families were invited to participate in a telephone interview after their participation in the program. The interviews assessed satisfaction with program components, acceptability of the intervention, barriers to treatment participation, and suggestions for improvement. A total of 34 semistructured telephone interviews were performed, including 19 parents and 15 children. The majority of children (mean age=9.2±1.5 years) interviewed were female (74%) and recipients of Medicaid (79%). The population was racially diverse (63% black, 26% white, 11% other). Results suggest families were generally very positive about the program and viewed the major components of the program as helpful (i.e., nutrition, exercise, behavior). Families particularly enjoyed exercise and cooking demonstrations, whereas self-monitoring activities and learning about behavior change strategies were less enjoyable. Parents noted that increasing the length of individual sessions would likely be beneficial. Families who did not complete the program cited factors such as transportation barriers (e.g., gas money, distance), scheduling conflicts, and unmet expectations as contributing to their decision to discontinue participation. This study may have implications for how to enhance family-based pediatric weight management programs for children ages 7-11 years.

  16. Win/win: creating collaborative training opportunities for behavioral health providers within family medicine residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddy, Nancy Breen; Borresen, Dorothy; Myerholtz, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Integrating behavioral health into primary healthcare offers multiple advantages for patients and health professionals. This model requires a new skill set for all healthcare professionals that is not emphasized in current educational models. The new skills include interprofessional team-based care competencies and expanded patient care competencies. Health professionals must learn new ways to efficiently and effectively address health behavior change, and manage behavioral health issues such as depression and anxiety. Learning environments that co-train mental health and primary care professionals facilitate acquisition of both teamwork and patient care competencies for mental health and primary care professional trainees. Family Medicine Residency programs provide an excellent opportunity for co-training. This article serves as a "how to" guide for residency programs interested in developing a co-training program. Necessary steps to establish and maintain a program are reviewed, as well as goals and objectives for a co-training curriculum and strategies to overcome barriers and challenges in co-training models.

  17. Human papillomavirus detection in cervical scrapes from women attended in the Family Health Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everton Faccini Augusto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to survey the prevalence of human papillomavirus, associated risk factors and genotype distribution in women who were referred to cervical cancer screening when attended in a Family Health Program. METHOD: we conducted a cross-sectional survey, investigating 351 women. Polymerase chain reaction for DNA amplification and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis were used to detect and typify the papillomavirus. RESULTS: virus infection was detected in 8.8% of the samples. Among the 21 different genotypes identified in this study, 14 were high risk for cervical cancer, and the type 16 was the most prevalent type. The infection was associated with women who had non-stable sexual partners. Low risk types were associated with younger women, while the high risk group was linked to altered cytology. CONCLUSION: in this sample attended a Family Health Program, we found a low rate of papillomavirus infection. Virus frequency was associated to sexual behavior. However, the broad range of genotypes detected deserves attention regarding the vaccine coverage, which includes only HPV prevalent types.

  18. Family-Based Intervention Program for Parents of Substance-Abusing Youth and Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Bisetto Pons

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of drugs among adolescents/youth often results in a high degree of distress for the family members who live with them. This in turn can lead to a deterioration of mental (psychological health, hindering any attempt to successfully cope with the situation. The goal of our research was to study the effect of the Community Reinforcement and Family Training (CRAFT program on parents of adolescents/young adult drug users. Study volunteers (n=50 were parents from Valencia (Spain that were divided into two groups. The experimental group (n=25 was made up of parents whose sons and daughters exhibited problems with drug use and the constructed noncausal baseline group (n=25 was made up of parents whose sons and daughters did not show any substance abuse problems. For both groups, self-esteem (Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, depression (BDI-II, anxiety (STAI, and anger (STAXI-II were evaluated before and after the application of the CRAFT program. Results show a significant improvement in the experimental group’s self-esteem, depression, and anger state and a decrease in negative moods. These changes in parents produce a positive effect on their substance-using sons and daughters: of the 25 participants, 15 contacted specialized addiction treatment resources for the first time.

  19. Trends in Health Insurance Coverage of Title X Family Planning Program Clients, 2005-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Emily J; Ahrens, Katherine A; Fowler, Christina I; Carter, Marion; Gavin, Loretta; Moskosky, Susan

    2017-12-13

    The federal Title X Family Planning Program supports the delivery of family planning services and related preventive care to 4 million individuals annually in the United States. The implementation of the 2010 Affordable Care Act's (ACA's) Medicaid expansion and provisions expanding access to health insurance, which took effect in January 2014, resulted in higher rates of health insurance coverage in the U.S. population; the ACA's impact on individuals served by the Title X program has not yet been evaluated. Using administrative data we examined changes in health insurance coverage among Title X clinic patients during 2005-2015. We found that the percentage of clients without health insurance decreased from 60% in 2005 to 48% in 2015, with the greatest annual decrease occurring between 2013 and 2014 (63% to 54%). Meanwhile, between 2005 and 2015, the percentage of clients with Medicaid or other public health insurance increased from 20% to 35% and the percentage of clients with private health insurance increased from 8% to 15%. Although clients attending Title X clinics remained uninsured at substantially higher rates compared with the national average, the increase in clients with health insurance coverage aligns with the implementation of ACA-related provisions to expand access to affordable health insurance.

  20. Family health nurse project--an education program of the World Health Organization: the University of Stirling experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Ian

    2008-11-01

    This article outlines the delivery of the Family Health Nurse Education Programme of the World Health Organization (WHO) at the University of Stirling, Scotland, from 2001 to 2005. The program was part of the WHO European Family Health Nurse pilot project. The curriculum outlined by the WHO Curriculum Planning Group detailed the broad thrust of the Family Health Nurse Education Programme and was modified to be responsive to the context in which it was delivered, while staying faithful to general principles and precepts. The Family Health Nurse Education Programme is described in its evolving format over the two phases of the project; the remote and rural context occurred from 2001 to 2003, and the modification of the program for the urban phase of the project occurred during 2004 and 2005. The conceptual framework that was foundational to the development of the curriculum to prepare family health nurses will be described.

  1. [Community center for human development: program for African-Colombian families based on the participatory action research approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto-Zorza, Yenny M; Velasquez-Gutierrez, Vilma F

    2016-01-01

    To describe the process of construction of a program of Primary Health Care (PHC) for African-Colombian families in Guapi, Cauca. Participatory action research (PAR). The PHC program is a collective construction between the IAP Group and the Commission for Support and Follow-up (CAS), carried out in four phases: 1. Field preparation; 2. Approximation to the universe of the African-Colombian families of Guapi; 3. Building the program "Center for Human Development: with strength, joy and love we go 'pa'lante' families"; and 4. Evaluation and socialization of results. The collective construction of the program was conducted from the perspective of PHC, PAR and the cultural context, where the experts are the community, health professionals and institutions who have the ability to examine, reflect and participate in the transformation of reality based on their everyday life and view of the world. The starting point involves planning, developing and evaluating actions in healthy environments, relating not only to the physical space, but also to the work with families and community, taking into account needs, perceptions, beliefs, and actions towards health. The "Human Development Center Community" program allows a process of community participation towards achieving healthy environments to improve the health of the African-Colombian population, through the active participation of families, community, institutions and health professionals who, based on reality and knowledge exchange, generate actions directed to health of the large families of Guapi.

  2. Pilot study comparing multi-family therapy to single family therapy for adults with anorexia nervosa in an intensive eating disorder program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitropoulos, Gina; Farquhar, Jamie C; Freeman, Victoria Emily; Colton, Patricia Anne; Olmsted, Marion Patricia

    2015-07-01

    Multi-family therapy (MFT) has yet to be evaluated in families of adults with anorexia nervosa (AN). The study aims were: (i) assess the feasibility of MFT for AN; and, (ii) assess whether MFT is associated with improved outcomes for families compared with single-family therapy (SFT). Adult patients with AN consecutively referred to an eating disorder treatment program were assigned (non-randomly) to receive eight sessions of SFT or MFT. Assessment occurred pre-therapy, immediately post-therapy, and at 3-month follow-up. A total of 37 female patients (13 SFT, 24 MFT) and 45 family members (16 SFT, 29 MFT) completed treatment. There were significant time effects for patients' BMI, eating disorder-related psychopathology and multiple family outcome measures. There were no differences between MFT and SFT on family outcome measures at end of treatment and 3 months post treatment. MFT is a feasible intervention that can be used in adult intensive treatment for those with AN. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  3. Differences Between the Family-Centered "COPCA" Program and Traditional Infant Physical Therapy Based on Neurodevelopmental Treatment Principles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirks, Tineke; Blauw-Hospers, Cornill H.; Hulshof, Lily J.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    Background. Evidence for effectiveness of pediatric physical therapy in infants at high risk for developmental motor disorders is limited. Therefore, "Coping With and Caring for Infants With Special Needs" (COPCA), a family-centered, early intervention program, was developed. The COPCA program is

  4. Analysis of the Dynamics among Tutors in an After-School Tutoring Program in a Homeless Shelter for Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGillivray, Laurie; Goode, Gretchen S.

    2016-01-01

    Researchers of after-school tutoring primarily focus on educational outcomes with little attention to the social dynamics of such programs. In our qualitative case study, we examined the nature of interactions among tutors in a tutoring program at a homeless shelter for families. Employing Bourdieu's concepts of "social capital" and…

  5. Afterschool Programs: Making a Difference in America's Communities by Improving Academic Achievement, Keeping Kids Safe and Helping Working Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afterschool Alliance, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This 2-page resource describes the benefits of afterschool programs for children, youth, and families, including evidence of improved school attendance and engagement learning, improved test scores and grades, and students at greatest risk showing the greatest gains. Additional benefits of afterschool programs include keeping kids safe, healthy,…

  6. 24 CFR 906.15 - Requirements applicable to a family purchasing a property under a homeownership program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... activities; (2) Criminal activity; (3) Participation in homeownership counseling programs; and (4) Evidence... program must be a low-income family, as defined in section 3 of the 1937 Act (42 U.S.C. 1437a), at the... association fees) will not exceed the sum of: (i) 35 percent of the applicant's adjusted income as defined in...

  7. Delivering high-quality family planning services in crisis-affected settings I: program implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Dora Ward; Rattan, Jesse; Nzau, Jean Jose; Giri, Kamlesh

    2015-02-04

    In 2012, about 43 million women of reproductive age experienced the effects of conflict. Provision of basic sexual and reproductive health services, including family planning, is a recognized right and need of refugees and internally displaced people, but funding and services for family planning have been inadequate. This article describes lessons learned during the first 2.5 years of implementing the ongoing Supporting Access to Family Planning and Post-Abortion Care in Emergencies (SAFPAC) initiative, led by CARE, which supports government health systems to deliver family planning services in 5 crisis-affected settings (Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Mali, and Pakistan). SAFPAC's strategy focuses on 4 broad interventions drawn from public health best practices in more stable settings: competency-based training for providers, improved supply chain management, regular supervision, and community mobilization to influence attitudes and norms related to family planning. Between July 2011 and December 2013, the initiative reached 52,616 new users of modern contraceptive methods across the 5 countries (catchment population of 698,053 women of reproductive age), 61% of whom chose long-acting methods of implants or intrauterine devices. Prudent use of data to inform decision making has been an underpinning to the project's approach. A key approach to ensuring sustained ability to train and supervise new providers has been to build capacity in clinical skills training and supervision by establishing in-country training centers. In addition, monthly supervision using simple checklists has improved program and service quality, particularly with infection prevention procedures and stock management. We have generally instituted a "pull" system to manage commodities and other supplies, whereby health facilities place resupply orders as needed based on actual consumption patterns and stock-alert thresholds. Finally, reaching the community with mobilization

  8. A Multi-Component Day-Camp Weight-Loss Program Is Effective in Reducing BMI in Children after One Year

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kristian Traberg; Huang, Tao; Ried-Larsen, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a one-year multi-component immersive day-camp weight-loss intervention for children with overweight and obesity. The study design was a parallel-group randomized controlled trial. One hundred fifteen 11-13-year-old children...... with overweight and obesity were randomized into either: A six-week day-camp intervention arm focusing on increased physical activity, and healthy diet followed by a subsequent one-year family-based intervention, or a standard intervention arm consisting of one weekly exercise session for six weeks. Body mass...

  9. 78 FR 70064 - Submission for OMB Review; 30-day Comment Request: Generic Clearance To Support Programs and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-22

    ... respondents responses (in hours) Individuals, Households, Private Sector, 20,000 1 50/60 16,667 State... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Submission for OMB Review; 30-day Comment Request: Generic... previously published in the Federal Register on May 23, 2013, Volume 78, p. 30930 and allowed 60-days for...

  10. Obesity prevention in the family day care setting: impact of the Romp & Chomp intervention on opportunities for children's physical activity and healthy eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Silva-Sanigorski, A; Elea, D; Bell, C; Kremer, P; Carpenter, L; Nichols, M; Smith, M; Sharp, S; Boak, R; Swinburn, B

    2011-05-01

    The Romp & Chomp intervention reduced the prevalence of overweight/obesity in pre-school children in Geelong, Victoria, Australia through an intervention promoting healthy eating and active play in early childhood settings. This study aims to determine if the intervention successfully created more health promoting family day care (FDC) environments. The evaluation had a cross-sectional, quasi-experimental design with the intervention FDC service in Geelong and a comparison sample from 17 FDC services across Victoria. A 45-item questionnaire capturing nutrition- and physical activity-related aspects of the policy, socio-cultural and physical environments of the FDC service was completed by FDC care providers (in 2008) in the intervention (n= 28) and comparison (n= 223) samples. Select results showed intervention children spent less time in screen-based activities (P= 0.03), organized active play (P comparison children. There were more rules related to healthy eating (P investment to increase children's physical activity within the setting and improving the capacity and health literacy of care providers is required to extend and sustain the improvements. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. The VUKA family program: piloting a family-based psychosocial intervention to promote health and mental health among HIV infected early adolescents in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhana, Arvin; Mellins, Claude A; Petersen, Inge; Alicea, Stacey; Myeza, Nonhlahla; Holst, Helga; Abrams, Elaine; John, Sally; Chhagan, Meera; Nestadt, Danielle F; Leu, Cheng-Shiun; McKay, Mary

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of adolescents born with HIV in South Africa are on antiretroviral treatment and have to confront complex issues related to coping with a chronic, stigmatizing and transmittable illness. Very few evidence-based mental health and health promotion programs for this population exist in South Africa. This study builds on a previous collaboratively designed and developmentally timed family-based intervention for early adolescents (CHAMP). The study uses community-based participatory approach as part of formative research to evaluate a pilot randomized control trial at two hospitals. The paper reports on the development, feasibility, and acceptability of the VUKA family-based program and its short-term impact on a range of psychosocial variables for HIV + preadolescents and their caregivers. A 10-session intervention of approximately 3-month duration was delivered to 65 preadolescents aged 10-13 years and their families. VUKA participants were noted to improve on all dimensions, including mental health, youth behavior, HIV treatment knowledge, stigma, communication, and adherence to medication. VUKA shows promise as a family-based mental and HIV prevention program for HIV + preadolescents and which could be delivered by trained lay staff.

  12. The Lidcombe Program of early stuttering intervention for Malaysian families: Four case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vong, Etain; Wilson, Linda; Lincoln, Michelle

    2016-09-01

    This study investigated the outcomes of implementing the Lidcombe Program, an evidence-based early intervention for stuttering, with four preschool children in Malaysia. Early stuttering intervention is currently underdeveloped in Malaysia, where stuttering treatment is often more assertion-based than evidence-based. Therefore, introducing an evidence-based early stuttering intervention is an important milestone for Malaysian preschoolers who stutter. The participants ranged from 3 years 3 months to 4 years 9 months at the start of the study. Beyond-clinic speech samples were obtained at 1 month and 1 week pretreatment and immediately post-Stage 1, and at 1 month, 3 months, 6 months and 12 months post-Stage 1. Two participants, who were bilingual, achieved near-zero levels of stuttering at 12 months posttreatment. Near zero levels of stuttering were also present in their untreated languages. One participant withdrew due to reasons not connected with the research or treatment. The remaining participant, who presented with severe stuttering, completed Stage 1 but had some relapse in Stage 2 and demonstrated mild stuttering 12 months post-Stage 1. The outcomes were achieved without the need to significantly adapt Lidcombe Program procedures to Malaysian culture. Further research to continue evaluation of the Lidcombe Program with Malaysian families and to estimate proportion of those who will respond is warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Intent to Build Hepatitis C Treatment Capacity Within Family Medicine Residencies: A Nationwide Survey of Program Directors: A CERA Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camminati, Camille Webb; Simha, Aditya; Kolb, N Randall; Prasad, Ramakrishna

    2016-09-01

    In the current interferon-free era, family medicine is in a unique position to deliver hepatitis C (HCV) treatment with adequate training. Little is known about attitudes of family medicine program directors (PDs) toward capacity building within their residency programs. We report the results of a nationwide survey of family medicine PDs to examine these attitudes. This study was part of a CERA (Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance) omnibus survey administered to family medicine PDs between February 2015 and March 2015. Attitudes were assessed using a Likert scale ranging from 1=strongly disagree to 6=strongly agree. We surveyed 452 physicians, with 273 responses (response rate 61%). The majority of PDs (78%) believed that chronic HCV represented a significant problem for primary care, and 61.9% believed their program should take steps to build capacity in HCV treatment. There was no effect of regional HCV prevalence, residency program context, or PD characteristics on intent to build capacity. This is the first report to examine PDs intent to build capacity in HCV treatment in this interferon-free, direct antiviral era. Our findings highlight a historic opportunity to train family physicians and position them on the frontline as HCV treatment providers.

  14. 76 FR 77581 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Form DS-3097, Exchange Visitor Program Annual...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-13

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Form DS-3097, Exchange Visitor Program Annual Report, and OMB... of 1995. Title of Information Collection: Exchange Visitor Program Annual Report. OMB Control Number... the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS) and then printed and signed by a sponsor...

  15. The effect of a supportive educational program based on COPE model on caring burden and quality of life in family caregivers of women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Masoud; Farzi, Saba

    2014-03-01

    The family caregivers of the people with cancer such as breast cancer experience a decrease in their quality of life and an increase of their caring burden. In most of the cases, the researchers consider the quality of life and physical and psychological problems in patients with cancer and pay less attention to the family caregivers. To reduce the caring burden imposed to the caregivers and improve their quality of life, supportive strategies such as problem solving can be used. These interventions may have benefits for the caregivers although the research results are contradictory. The aim of this research was to determine the effect of a supportive educational program, based on COPE model, which focuses on creativity, optimism, planning, and expert information on individuals, on the caring burden and quality of life in the family caregivers of women with breast cancer. The present study is a clinical trial, which was conducted in Seyed-Al-Shohada Hospital of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences and a private center of chemotherapy in 2012. In this study, researchers investigated the effect of a supportive educational program based on COPE model on the caring burden and quality of life in the family caregivers of women with breast cancer. This supportive educational program included two hospital visits and two telephone sessions based on COPE model for 9 days. A total of 64 patients were selected based on the inclusion criteria and randomly assigned into two groups. Data were collected by use of Caregiver Quality of Life Index-Cancer (CQOL-C), World Health Organization Quality of Life - Bref(WHOQOL-Bref)_, and Zarit caring burden at the beginning of the intervention and a month after the intervention. The results showed that in the experimental group, the mean score of physical, mental, spiritual, environmental domains and overall quality of life in the family caregivers was significantly increased compared to the control group, but there was no change in the

  16. From theory to application: using performance measures for contraceptive care in the Title X family planning program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyola Briceno, Ana Carolina; Kawatu, Jennifer; Saul, Katie; DeAngelis, Katie; Frederiksen, Brittni; Moskosky, Susan B; Gavin, Lorrie

    2017-09-01

    The objective was to describe a Performance Measure Learning Collaborative (PMLC) designed to help Title X family planning grantees use new clinical performance measures for contraceptive care. Twelve Title X grantee-service site teams participated in an 8-month PMLC from November 2015 to June 2016; baseline was assessed in October 2015. Each team documented their selected best practices and strategies to improve performance, and calculated the contraceptive care performance measures at baseline and for each of the subsequent 8 months. PMLC sites implemented a mix of best practices: (a) ensuring access to a broad range of methods (n=7 sites), (b) supporting women through client-centered counseling and reproductive life planning (n=8 sites), (c) developing systems for same-day provision of all methods (n=10 sites) and (d) utilizing diverse payment options to reduce cost as a barrier (n=4 sites). Ten sites (83%) observed an increase in the clinical performance measures focused on most and moderately effective methods (MME), with a median percent change of 6% for MME (from a median of 73% at baseline to 77% post-PMLC). Evidence suggests that the PMLC model is an approach that can be used to improve the quality of contraceptive care offered to clients in some settings. Further replication of the PMLC among other groups and beyond the Title X network will help strengthen the current model through lessons learned. Using the performance measures in the context of a learning collaborative may be a useful strategy for other programs (e.g., Federally Qualified Health Centers, Medicaid, private health plans) that provide contraceptive care. Expanded use of the measures may help increase access to contraceptive care to achieve national goals for family planning. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Study of the Effect of Time-Based Rate Demand Response Programs on Stochastic Day-Ahead Energy and Reserve Scheduling in Islanded Residential Microgrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vahedipour-Dahraie, Mostafa; Najafi, Hamid Reza; Anvari-Moghaddam, Amjad

    2017-01-01

    to energy price changes and get incentives in return. In this paper, we study the effect of various time-based rate (TBR) programs on the stochastic day-ahead energy and reserve scheduling in residential islanded microgrids (MGs). An effective approach is presented to schedule both energy and reserve...

  18. Cohesion to the Group and Its Association with Attendance and Early Treatment Response in an Adult Day-Hospital Program for Eating Disorders: A Preliminary Clinical Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crino, Natalie; Djokvucic, Ivana

    2010-01-01

    Treatment outcome studies demonstrate that day-hospital programs are effective in the treatment of eating disorders. Few descriptions are available on the specifics of treatment, particularly the process of therapy. The group therapy modality is thought to provide important therapeutic benefits. The present study aimed to examine the association…

  19. A Retrospective Chart Review of Dietary Diversity and Feeding Behavior of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder before and after Admission to a Day-Treatment Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, William G.; Jaquess, David L.; Morton, Jane F.; Miles, Aida G.

    2011-01-01

    The nutritional status and mealtime performance among a group of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) were examined before and after admission to an intensive feeding day-treatment program. Treatment involved escape extinction, reinforcement, and stimulus fading procedures. Outcomes focused on dietary diversity and mealtime performance,…

  20. Parent Engagement in Youth Drug Prevention in Chinese Families: Advancement in Program Development and Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra K. M. Tsang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The escalating youth drug abuse problem in Hong Kong has attracted intense attention from the government, schools, and youth service professionals. Most preventive efforts have focused directly on positive youth development, very often through school programs delivered to secondary school students. There have been limited efforts to engage parents even though it is obvious that the family is actually the primary context of children and youth development. This paper will assert the importance of parental engagement in youth drug-prevention work, discuss some barriers in such parental involvement, present some promising local attempts and their strengths and limitations, and propose that sustained efforts are needed to build up theory-driven and evidence-based resources for Chinese communities on the subject.