WorldWideScience

Sample records for program experience reflect

  1. A Three-Year Reflective Writing Program as Part of Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Jessica; Kerr, Kevin; Zielenski, Christopher; Toppel, Brianna; Johnson, Lauren; McCauley, Patrina; Turner, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To implement and evaluate a 3-year reflective writing program incorporated into introductory pharmacy practice experiences (IPPEs) in the first- through third-year of a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) program. Design. Reflective writing was integrated into 6 IPPE courses to develop students’ lifelong learning skills. In their writing, students were required to self-assess their performance in patient care activities, identify and describe how they would incorporate learning opportunities, and then evaluate their progress. Practitioners, faculty members, and fourth-year PharmD students served as writing preceptors. Assessment. The success of the writing program was assessed by reviewing class performance and surveying writing preceptor’s opinions regarding the student’s achievement of program objectives. Class pass rates averaged greater than 99% over the 8 years of the program and the large majority of the writing preceptors reported that student learning objectives were met. A support pool of 99 writing preceptors was created. Conclusions. A 3-year reflective writing program improved pharmacy students’ reflection and reflective writing skills. PMID:23788811

  2. Experiences of a critical reflection program for mid-career nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyamada, Kyoko

    2012-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the experiences of Japanese nurses who participated in a critical reflection program for mid-career nurses. Critical reflection is one method that is appropriate for the professional development of mid-career nurses. However, its implementation is difficult because of the need for educational resources. Of the numerous reports on critical reflection outcomes, few delineate the underlying process and none relates to Japanese nurses. A program was developed, based on Mezirow's transformation theory, to facilitate nurses' critical reflection. The program was implemented at three hospitals in Japan with 14 mid-career nurses. The data-collection period was from 2006 to 2007. The grounded theory approach was used to describe the results. Two participants experienced a transformation in their frame of reference after undergoing critical reflection during the program. One participant's viewpoint began to change and the other's "habit of mind" (social norms and personality characteristics that provide one with a general orientation) changed. Both participants met the conditions that were necessary for transformation, such as having an open attitude toward change, and compared to the other participants, their critical reflection progressed markedly on the worksheets that were designed to promote critical reflection. The process of change in the frame of reference that was experienced by the two participants followed eight of the ten phases of Mezirow's transformation theory. The characteristics of the experiences of the two participants who underwent changes in their frame of reference were described and discussed. The conditions for such transformation and the effects of critical reflection on the participants were consistent with those reported by previous studies. © 2011 The Author. Japan Journal of Nursing Science © 2011 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  3. Exploring science and mathematics teaching experiences in Thailand using reflective journals of an internship program between Vietnamese and Thai students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruekpramool, Chaninan; Kanyaprasith, Kamonwan; Phonphok, Nason; Diem, Huynh Thi Thuy

    2018-01-01

    An internship program between Vietnamese student teachers from Cantho University and Thai graduate students from Srinakharinwirot University has occurred in June 2016. There were six Vietnamese student teachers and four Thai graduate students participated in this program with the help of science teachers from two schools in Sa Kaeo and Chachoengsao Provinces of Thailand. To explore Vietnamese and Thai students' life experiences and their perceptions in science and Mathematics teaching, reflective journals were used to record their progress as team teaching in primary and lower secondary classrooms in the form of the online format via social media in English language. The data were collected from 54 reflective journals from their eight days experiences at the schools. The data were analyzed qualitatively using Van Manen's level of reflectivity which composed of three levels; 1) Technical Rationality (TR), 2) Practical Action (PA) and 3) Critical Reflection (CR). The results explicitly revealed that the three levels of reflectivity have appeared in the reflective journals. Besides, Vietnamese and Thai students have learned more from each other and can exchange their educational experiences and culture. Certainly, this was the first time for them to teach science and mathematics in English to Thai students. Moreover, they have shared their impressions toward schools, teachers and also students in the schools in their reflective journal as well.

  4. Trainee Teachers' Experience of Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Liz

    2015-01-01

    This article reports an investigation of trainee teachers' experience of reflection whilst undertaking a teaching qualification for the post-compulsory sector. The study used a sequential, mixed-methods design, employing a structured questionnaire and a semi-structured interview; 127 individuals completed the questionnaire about their experience…

  5. Reflections on the Teaching of Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    -line tutorials, object-oriented programming and Java, the BlueJ environment to introduce programming, model-driven programming as opposed to the prevailing language-driven approach, teaching software engineering, testing, extreme programming, frameworks, feedback and assessment, active learning, technology...... general challenge of  teaching software engineering. The primary issues covered in this part are testing,  extreme programming, and frameworks. These are all issues that are typically covered  in later courses.  Part IV, the last part of the book, consists of two chapters addressing innovative  approaches......This state-of-the-art survey, reflecting on the teaching of programming, has been written by a group of primarily Scandinavian researchers and educators with special interest and experience in the subject of programming. The 14 chapters - contributed by 24 authors - present practical experience...

  6. Teachers' Reflective Practice in Lifelong Learning Programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Annie Aarup; Thomassen, Anja Overgaard

    2018-01-01

    This chapter explores teachers' reflective practice in lifelong learning programs based on a qualitative study of five teachers representing three part-time Master's programs. The theoretical framework for analysis of the interview data is Ellström's (1996) model for categorizing levels of action......, knowledge and learning, activity theory (Engeström, 1987) and expansive learning (Engeström & Sannino, 2010). The results show a divergence between what the teachers perceive as the Master students' learning goals and the teachers' goals and objectives. This is highlighted through the teachers' experience...... with the students' understandings of the theories they are introduced to and how they apply them in relation to their practice context. The insights and the issues raised by the study are relevant for teachers in Higher Education....

  7. Reflecting on BCMP Students' Experiences of Professionalism ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method: Hatem's definition of professionalism was the stimulus that guided 25 final year BCMP students' reflections on their experiences of professionalism ... a process that was influenced by individuals and a competency that was determined by the extent to which the team pulled together for the benefit of the patients and ...

  8. Reflections on the Teaching of Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    of experiences from the Nordic countries. The 14 chapters of the book have been carefully written and edited to present 4 coherent units on issues in introductory programming courses, object-oriented programming, teaching software engineering issues, and assessment. Each of these individual parts has its own......-based individual feedback, and mini project programming exams. The book you are holding is the result of the cooperation of a number of computing  educators passionate about programming and teaching and is aimed at programming  education practitioners in secondary and tertiary education and at computing education......  researchers.  The book is written by a group of primarily Scandinavian researchers and  educators with special interest and experience in programming education. There are  contributions from 24 authors about practical experience gathered in the process of  teaching programming ⎯for most of the authors...

  9. NAVIGATING LIVED EXPERIENCE: REFLECTIONS FROM THE FIELD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah Farrall

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article I use an autoethnographic approach to reflect on my experiences in Egypt—in which I came to live alongside converts to Islam and interact with adherents to militant salafist belief systems, as well as those who had disengaged from them. I outline how I came to have these lived experiences before explaining how they caused me to reexamine my understanding of radicalization and deradicalization in the militant salafist context, and to consider radicalization as a form of conversion.

  10. Reflection and Hyper-Programming in Persistent Programming Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Graham

    2010-06-01

    The work presented in this thesis seeks to improve programmer productivity in the following ways: - by reducing the amount of code that has to be written to construct an application; - by increasing the reliability of the code written; and - by improving the programmer's understanding of the persistent environment in which applications are constructed. Two programming techniques that may be used to pursue these goals in a persistent environment are type-safe linguistic reflection and hyper-programming. The first provides a mechanism by which the programmer can write generators that, when executed, produce new program representations. This allows the specification of programs that are highly generic yet depend in non-trivial ways on the types of the data on which they operate. Genericity promotes software reuse which in turn reduces the amount of new code that has to be written. Hyper-programming allows a source program to contain links to data items in the persistent store. This improves program reliability by allowing certain program checking to be performed earlier than is otherwise possible. It also reduces the amount of code written by permitting direct links to data in the place of textual descriptions. Both techniques contribute to the understanding of the persistent environment through supporting the implementation of store browsing tools and allowing source representations to be associated with all executable programs in the persistent store. This thesis describes in detail the structure of type-safe linguistic reflection and hyper-programming, their benefits in the persistent context, and a suite of programming tools that support reflective programming and hyper-programming. These tools may be used in conjunction to allow reflection over hyper-program representations. The implementation of the tools is described.

  11. Lessons from experience: ESL student teachers' reflection during practicum through reflective journals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Intan Safinas Mohd Ariff Albakri

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Reflection is a prospective alternative in exploring student teachers’ thinking during practicum. The data gained from student teachers’ reflection are significant in informing teacher education programs on how to equip pre-service teachers to become quality teachers. It is also crucial in addressing issues and conflicts highlighted by student teachers when they interact with the real context. This study is conducted with six semester seven student teachers undergoing their Bachelor in Education with honors Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL program. The student teachers were asked to write reflective journal entries throughout the 14 weeks of their teaching practicum experience. The aim of the study is to identify the focus of the student teachers’ reflection and the challenges faced by them during practicum. Data were gathered using the reflective journal entries and semi-structured interviews with all the participants. The data were analyzed according to emerging themes. The findings indicated that the student teachers focus on three main themes in their reflections, which are managing learning, pedagogy and teacher attributes. While the challenges highlighted were difficulty in socializing with members of the institution, lack of professional support and lack of ability to manage a classroom.

  12. Metaphor-reflection in my healthcare experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JASNA K. SCHWIND

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available By exploring personal narratives through metaphoric images, students and nurses increase their understanding of who they are as persons and how that self-knowledge impacts their professional relationships with those in their care. In this article I share how I use metaphor-reflection in various aspects of my healthcare involvement. As a patient many years ago, metaphors helped me apprehend the meaning of cancer in my life. Today, as a nurse-teacher and researcher, I guide students through professional self-discovery using narrative reflective process that incorporates metaphors. In clinical practice I work with nurses as they explore how narrative reflection informs their caregiver-carereceiver interactions. With expanded self-awareness nurses have the potential to further assist their patients in exploring the meaning of their illness events through metaphors, thus enhancing the integration of that traumatic event into their respective lives. By working reflectively with metaphoric images, my hope for this writing is that my own engagement in narrative metaphor-reflection encourages the readers to story their own world in a more meaningful way.

  13. Emotion, Spiritual Experience and Education: A Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Ron

    2011-01-01

    This paper, informed especially by the work of the philosopher John Macmurray, focuses on two personal anecdotes in order to explore the relationship and distinctions between emotional and spiritual experience. Despite being unique to the individual, emotional experience requires relationship, and thus appreciation of the feelings of others is…

  14. The Skylab experiment program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, W. C.; Green, W. D., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Description of planned Skylab experiments in the general fields of life sciences, solar physics, earth observations, astrophysics, engineering, and technology. Each experiment is outlined in terms of its specific purpose, supporting hardware, relevant functions to be performed by an astronaut, and data recovery measures. Major support facilities described include the scientific airlock, the articulated mirror system, the extendable boom, and the film vault.

  15. Students' and teachers' experiences of participating in the reflection process "THiNK".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Hellen; Eriksen, Kristin Ådnøy

    2016-01-01

    Reflective journal writing in clinical practice is used as a tool in bachelor programs in nursing. The reflection process THiNK was developed to enhance students' reflection processes. It was tailored to the needs of a nursing programme (in Norway) as former studies showed that many students had superficial level of reflection in their reflective journals, few students applied knowledge to their reflections and some met unprepared in the guided reflection groups. The teachers had inconsistent focus on the importance of reflection as a way of learning. This study aimed to describe students' and teachers' experiences of participation in reflection processes. The development of THiNK is inspired by educational design research. This study used focus groups to gain insight into students' and teachers' experiences of the reflection processes. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The empirical sample included 5 focus groups with 28 students and 7 teachers in a bachelor nursing program at a University College in Norway. The themes were as follows: stop and verbalise the experiences, stimulate and support the reflection processes and develop a conscious attitude. The students became aware of themselves and their own execution. The teachers and reflection groups were crucial in order to learn to see the complexity of a given situation and helped draw connection between the situation and the theoretical knowledge. Enhancing students' professional development requires attention to facilitation skills as well as other contextual factors. Readiness in the culture can be ensured by tailoring frameworks of reflection that replies to students' and teachers' requests. Participating in reflection processes facilitates integration of modes of thinking when dealing with clinical situations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. AAAS Communicating Science Program: Reflections on Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braha, J.

    2015-12-01

    The AAAS Center for Public Engagement (Center) with science builds capacity for scientists to engage public audiences by fostering collaboration among natural or physical scientists, communication researchers, and public engagement practitioners. The recently launched Leshner Leadership Institute empowers cohorts of mid-career scientists to lead public engagement by supporting their networks of scientists, researchers, and practitioners. The Center works closely with social scientists whose research addresses science communication and public engagement with science to ensure that the Communicating Science training program builds on empirical evidence to inform best practices. Researchers ( Besley, Dudo, & Storkdieck 2015) have helped Center staff and an external evaluator develop pan instrument that measures progress towards goals that are suggested by the researcher, including internal efficacy (increasing scientists' communication skills and confidence in their ability to engage with the public) and external efficacy (scientists' confidence in engagement methods). Evaluation results from one year of the Communicating Science program suggest that the model of training yields positive results that support scientists in the area that should lead to greater engagement. This talk will explore the model for training, which provides a context for strategic communication, as well as the practical factors, such as time, access to public engagement practitioners, and technical skill, that seems to contribute to increased willingness to engage with public audiences. The evaluation program results suggest willingness by training participants to engage directly or to take preliminary steps towards engagement. In the evaluation results, 38% of trained scientists reported time as a barrier to engagement; 35% reported concern that engagement would distract from their work as a barrier. AAAS works to improve practitioner-researcher-scientist networks to overcome such barriers.

  17. Lessons from experience: ESL student teachers' reflection during practicum through reflective journals

    OpenAIRE

    Intan Safinas Mohd Ariff Albakri; Mohd Hassan Abdullah; Ahmad Jazimin Jusoh

    2017-01-01

    Reflection is a prospective alternative in exploring student teachers’ thinking during practicum. The data gained from student teachers’ reflection are significant in informing teacher education programs on how to equip pre-service teachers to become quality teachers. It is also crucial in addressing issues and conflicts highlighted by student teachers when they interact with the real context. This study is conducted with six semester seven student teachers undergoing their Bachelor in Educat...

  18. Scaffolded project work as staff development: Critical reflections on two capacity building programs in India

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McKenney, Susan; Thijs, Annette

    2010-01-01

    This article reflects on the strengths and limitations of two capacity building programs framed around the analysis, design, implementation and evaluation phases of project work. It is based on experiences from two tailor-made programs, both of which aimed to strengthen institutional and individual

  19. [Reflective writing in nursing education: background, experiences and methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagna, Licia; Benaglio, Carla; Zannini, Lucia

    2010-01-01

    In the nursing field, writing one's own educational/professional experience has been utilized for a long time, to develop reflection and therefore learning. Reflective writing has been fostered to sustain the development of nurses' clinical, relational and ethical competence, and to promote self knowledge. To de scribe reflective writing experiences published in the literature, focussing on the educational contexts and the writing strategies used in the nursing field. Method. Narrative analysis of the international literature, based on the MedLine and Cinahl data sources. Reflective writing is used in undergraduate, post-graduate and continuing nursing education, to develop clinical learning or a professional and/or personal growth. In the former, short written assignments (also starting from scenarios) are given, while diaries and journals, with prompts focalizing on specific aspects of the experience, support a more global growth of the student/professional. These prompts are useful with individuals not used to write. Critical incidents or meaningful episodes from the clinical practice are also used. Many papers underline the importance of sharing writings with peers and/or a teacher/facilitator. Nursing students/professionals can be effectively supported by reflective writing in their experiential learning. However, their attitude to reflective writing should be considered with care and a feedback by peers and/or a facilitator must be provided. Since giving feedback requires adequate human resources, the implementation of writing activities in the nursing training should be carefully evaluated.

  20. A Qualitative Inquiry into Nursing Students' Experience of Facilitating Reflection in Clinical Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Shahnaz; Haghani, Fariba; Yamani, Nikoo; Najafi Kalyani, Majid

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aim. Reflection is known as a skill that is central to nursing students' professional development. Due to the importance and the role of reflection in clinical areas of nursing, it is important to know how to achieve it. However, nursing trainers face the challenge of how to help their students to improve reflection in clinical settings. The aim of this study was to investigate the nursing students' experiences of facilitating reflection during clinical practice. This qualitative study was conducted by qualitative content analysis approach. Twenty nursing students during the second to eighth semester of their educational program were selected for participation using purposive sampling. Data were collected through in-depth semistructured interviews. The interview was transcribed verbatim, and qualitative content analysis was used to analyze the data. From the data analysis, four main themes were extracted. Motivation to reflect, complex experiences, efficient trainer, and effective relations were four main themes obtained from study that, in interaction with each other, had facilitating roles in students' reflective process on experiences. The findings revealed that the nursing students' reflection in clinical settings is effective in personal and professional level. Reflection of nursing students depends on motivational and educational factors and these factors increase the quality of care in patients. Furthermore, nursing educators need to create nurturing climate as well as supporting reflective behaviors of nursing students.

  1. A Qualitative Inquiry into Nursing Students’ Experience of Facilitating Reflection in Clinical Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahnaz Karimi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim. Reflection is known as a skill that is central to nursing students’ professional development. Due to the importance and the role of reflection in clinical areas of nursing, it is important to know how to achieve it. However, nursing trainers face the challenge of how to help their students to improve reflection in clinical settings. The aim of this study was to investigate the nursing students’ experiences of facilitating reflection during clinical practice. This qualitative study was conducted by qualitative content analysis approach. Twenty nursing students during the second to eighth semester of their educational program were selected for participation using purposive sampling. Data were collected through in-depth semistructured interviews. The interview was transcribed verbatim, and qualitative content analysis was used to analyze the data. From the data analysis, four main themes were extracted. Motivation to reflect, complex experiences, efficient trainer, and effective relations were four main themes obtained from study that, in interaction with each other, had facilitating roles in students’ reflective process on experiences. The findings revealed that the nursing students’ reflection in clinical settings is effective in personal and professional level. Reflection of nursing students depends on motivational and educational factors and these factors increase the quality of care in patients. Furthermore, nursing educators need to create nurturing climate as well as supporting reflective behaviors of nursing students.

  2. Are Psychotic Experiences Related to Poorer Reflective Reasoning?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin J. Mækelæ

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cognitive biases play an important role in the formation and maintenance of delusions. These biases are indicators of a weak reflective mind, or reduced engaging in reflective and deliberate reasoning. In three experiments, we tested whether a bias to accept non-sense statements as profound, treat metaphorical statements as literal, and suppress intuitive responses is related to psychotic-like experiences.Methods: We tested deliberate reasoning and psychotic-like experiences in the general population and in patients with a former psychotic episode. Deliberate reasoning was assessed with the bullshit receptivity scale, the ontological confabulation scale and the cognitive reflection test (CRT. We also measured algorithmic performance with the Berlin numeracy test and the wordsum test. Psychotic-like experiences were measured with the Community Assessment of Psychic Experience (CAPE-42 scale.Results: Psychotic-like experiences were positively correlated with a larger receptivity toward bullshit, more ontological confabulations, and also a lower score on the CRT but not with algorithmic task performance. In the patient group higher psychotic-like experiences significantly correlated with higher bullshit receptivity.Conclusion: Reduced deliberate reasoning may contribute to the formation of delusions, and be a general thinking bias largely independent of a person's general intelligence. Acceptance of bullshit may be facilitated the more positive symptoms a patient has, contributing to the maintenance of the delusions.

  3. Collecting International Merchant Seafarer Oral Histories: Experiences and Reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyok, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Investigating highly mobile labor populations presents researchers with unique challenges and opportunities. In this paper, I share my experiences and reflections in collecting international merchant seafarers' oral histories and propose to move the dialogue forward regarding the use of hybrid qualitative research practices. Seafarers are…

  4. Nursing in Saudi Arabia: Reflections on the experiences of South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of the study was to describe and reflect on the lived experiences of the South African nurses residing and working in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual design with a phenomenological approach was adopted. Data were collected by means of individual ...

  5. Conceptualizing reflection in experience-based workplace learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lundgren, H.; Bang, April; Justice, Sean; Marsick, Victoria; Poell, R.F.; Yorks, Lyle; Clark, Molly; Sung, SeoYoon

    2017-01-01

    This paper seeks to understand key dimensions of reflection in experience-based workplace learning for research being collaboratively undertaken by scholars in Dutch and US research institutions. We systematically explore and compare Tara Fenwick’s analysis of five perspectives on cognition to

  6. Shared Negative Experiences Lead to Identity Fusion via Personal Reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jong, Jonathan; Whitehouse, Harvey; Kavanagh, Christopher; Lane, Justin

    2015-01-01

    Across three studies, we examined the role of shared negative experiences in the formation of strong social bonds--identity fusion--previously associated with individuals' willingness to self-sacrifice for the sake of their groups. Studies 1 and 2 were correlational studies conducted on two different populations. In Study 1, we found that the extent to which Northern Irish Republicans and Unionists experienced shared negative experiences was associated with levels of identity fusion, and that this relationship was mediated by their reflection on these experiences. In Study 2, we replicated this finding among Bostonians, looking at their experiences of the 2013 Boston Marathon Bombings. These correlational studies provide initial evidence for the plausibility of our causal model; however, an experiment was required for a more direct test. Thus, in Study 3, we experimentally manipulated the salience of the Boston Marathon Bombings, and found that this increased state levels of identity fusion among those who experienced it negatively. Taken together, these three studies provide evidence that shared negative experience leads to identity fusion, and that this process involves personal reflection.

  7. Supragingival plaque microbial analysis in reflection to caries experience

    OpenAIRE

    Mannaa Alaa; Carlén Anette; Campus Guglielmo; Lingström Peter

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Dental caries develops as a result of the metabolism of carbohydrates by cariogenic bacteria present in a complex biofilm. The present study aimed to examine if bacteria in pooled supragingival plaque samples quantified using a “checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization” based panel of caries-related bacteria, could reflect the caries experience in a manner similar to saliva samples analysed using a chair-side method in a previous investigation. Methods A total of 86 mothers and ...

  8. Reflective Peer Mentoring: Evolution of a Professional Development Program for Academic Librarians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet L. Goosney

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available For librarians engaged in teaching and learning, reflection has the potential to create opportunities to examine one’s instructional practice, identify and address challenges, and find new instructional pathways. It can also lead to a deeper understanding of one’s teaching. As valuable as it is, it can be challenging for librarians to find time to deeply contemplate instruction experiences. In the fast-paced environment of academic libraries, reflection is too often passed over as we rush from one teaching experience to the next. Recognizing the value of reflective practice, a team of academic librarians at Memorial University created a peer mentoring program for librarians involved in information literacy and other forms of teaching. The goal was to create an inviting and collaborative environment for exploring and developing instructional self-awareness by working with librarian colleagues. The resulting Reflective Peer Mentoring (RPM program requires minimal librarian time yet offers satisfying opportunities for brainstorming, problem solving, and reflection by bringing colleagues together into small co-mentored learning communities. This paper explores the successful evolution of this peer-based, collegial approach to reflection. It describes the inspiration and experimentation that led to the eventual creation of the RPM model, including Reflective Teaching & Observation (RTO, an earlier program founded on peer observation and collaborative exploration. It also describes the foundational principles that form the basis for the RPM program as well as the three-step framework on which it is structured. Finally, the article examines the information gathered and lessons learned from assessment of the program during the first year of implementation.

  9. Challenging Thoughts, Changing Minds: Preservice Teachers' Reflections on Their Experience Working in an Alternative School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blevins, Brooke; Moore, Brandon; Dexter Torti, Cameron

    2017-01-01

    This study was designed to use critical reflective journaling practices to explore the experiences of preservice teachers working in a juvenile justice education program called the Reach Academy. Using a qualitative case study design, the researchers explored how 48 preservice teachers utilized critical reflective journaling to examine their own…

  10. MODELING AN IMPROVED METHOD FOR DOUBLE MODULATION PHOTO REFLECTANCE EXPERIMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hernández

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an improved method to be used in double modulation photo reflectance experiments, inorder to reduce the influence of parasitic effects in the useful signal. The method uses the inner and outer sectionsof a single chopper disk to modulate the monochromator and the laser beam, eliminating the need of complexelectronic filters, and two additional PIN photodiodes for scattered light compensation. The method has beennumerically simulated using LabVIEW in order to investigate the influence of the modulator finite switching timeand the finite resolution of the digital acquisition system. Results show that a relative error less than 1% can beachieved.

  11. Do Scaffolding Tools Improve Reflective Writing in Professional Portfolios? A Content Analysis of Reflective Writing in an Advanced Preparation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Cynthia R.

    2016-01-01

    Reflective practice is an important skill that teachers must develop to be able to assess the effectiveness of their teaching and modify their instructional behavior. In many education programs reflective narratives, which are often part of teaching portfolios, are intended to assess students' abilities in these areas. Research on reflectivity in…

  12. Implementation of solar-reflective surfaces: Materials and utility programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bretz, S.; Akbari, H.; Rosenfeld, A.; Taha, H.

    1992-06-01

    This report focuses on implementation issues for using solar-reflective surfaces to cool urban heat islands, with specific examples for Sacramento, California. Advantages of solar-reflective surfaces for reducing energy use are: (1) they are cost-effective if albedo is increased during routine maintenance; (2) the energy savings coincide with peak demand for power; (3) there are positive effects on environmental quality; and (4) the white materials have a long service life. Important considerations when choosing materials for mitigating heat islands are identified as albedo, emissivity, durability, cost, pollution and appearance. There is a potential for increasing urban albedo in Sacramento by an additional 18%. Of residential roofs, we estimate that asphalt shingle and modified bitumen cover the largest area, and that built-up roofing and modified bitumen cover the largest area of commercial buildings. For all of these roof types, albedo may be increased at the time of re-roofing without any additional cost. When a roof is repaired, a solar-reflective roof coating may be applied to significantly increase albedo and extend the life of the root Although a coating may be cost-effective if applied to a new roof following installation or to an older roof following repair, it is not cost-effective if the coating is applied only to save energy. Solar-reflective pavement may be cost-effective if the albedo change is included in the routine resurfacing schedule. Cost-effective options for producing light-colored pavement may include: (1) asphalt concrete, if white aggregate is locally available; (2) concrete overlays; and (3) newly developed white binders and aggregate. Another option may be hot-rolled asphalt, with white chippings. Utilities could promote solar-reflective surfaces through advertisement, educational programs and cost-sharing of road resurfacing.

  13. Looking Back Across the Years: Alumni Reflections on a Community Design Service Learning Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo Christopher Plein

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the perceptions of alumni on a service learning experience they engaged in as graduate students. As students, they were enrolled in West Virginia University’s Master of Public Administration program and participated in the West Virginia Community Design Team. Since 1997, the Community Design Team (CDT program has engaged the state’s rural communities through volunteer teams of faculty, professionals, and students who assist in community efforts to assess and envision their futures. Through a curricular-based approach of integration and reflection, students are able to incorporate their CDT experiences into their overall graduate education. After briefly describing how integration and reflection are pursued through portfolio and capstone requirements, the paper then focuses on alumni recollections of how they encountered small rural communities, their lasting lessons gained from the experience, their evaluations of the place of service learning in graduate education, and their advice to others seeking to engage communities through university outreach and service projects. Data was gathered for this paper through in-depth interviews with alumni who participated in the CDT program as students. The results also suggests that alumni perspective is important not only in assessing service learning experiences but in reinforcing lessons learned by revisiting the experience years later. The research also seeks to add to our understanding of service learning in graduate education. KEYWORDSservice learning; graduate education; community engagement

  14. A professional experience learning community for secondary mathematics: developing pre-service teachers' reflective practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Michael; McMaster, Heather

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports on the reflective practice of a group of nine secondary mathematics pre-service teachers. The pre-service teachers participated in a year-long, school-based professional experience program which focussed on observing, co-teaching and reflecting on a series of problem-solving lessons in two junior secondary school mathematics classrooms. The study used a mixed methods approach to consider the impact of shared pedagogical conversations on pre-service teachers' written reflections. It also examined whether there were differences in the focus of reflections depending on whether the lesson was taught by an experienced mathematics teacher, or taught by a pair of their peers, or co-taught by themselves with a peer. Results suggest that after participants have observed lessons taught by an experienced teacher and reflected collaboratively on those lessons, they continue to reflect on lessons taught by their peers and on their own lessons when co-teaching, rather than just describe or evaluate them. However, their written reflections across all contexts continued to focus primarily on teacher actions and classroom management rather than on student learning.

  15. Supragingival plaque microbial analysis in reflection to caries experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mannaa Alaa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dental caries develops as a result of the metabolism of carbohydrates by cariogenic bacteria present in a complex biofilm. The present study aimed to examine if bacteria in pooled supragingival plaque samples quantified using a “checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization” based panel of caries-related bacteria, could reflect the caries experience in a manner similar to saliva samples analysed using a chair-side method in a previous investigation. Methods A total of 86 mothers and their children aged 4–6 years and 12–16 years old participated. Caries experience (DMFT/dmft; Decayed, Missing and Filled Teeth for permanent and primary teeth was registered clinically and radiographically. Caries was recorded at the D3 level (caries into dentine. The D/d component was divided into three categories. A pooled supragingival plaque sample per participant was obtained from posterior approximal sites. Analyses of 15 bacterial species were performed using the checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridisation technique. Results No significant relationships were found between the bacterial scores and DMFT/dmft nor D/d groups. Conclusions Unlike the saliva samples and the chair-side method, interproximal pooled plaque samples analysed using the “checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique” did not reveal any significant relations between the bacterial counts and the caries experience.

  16. Supragingival plaque microbial analysis in reflection to caries experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannaa, Alaa; Carlén, Anette; Campus, Guglielmo; Lingström, Peter

    2013-01-08

    Dental caries develops as a result of the metabolism of carbohydrates by cariogenic bacteria present in a complex biofilm. The present study aimed to examine if bacteria in pooled supragingival plaque samples quantified using a "checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization" based panel of caries-related bacteria, could reflect the caries experience in a manner similar to saliva samples analysed using a chair-side method in a previous investigation. A total of 86 mothers and their children aged 4-6 years and 12-16 years old participated. Caries experience (DMFT/dmft; Decayed, Missing and Filled Teeth for permanent and primary teeth) was registered clinically and radiographically. Caries was recorded at the D3 level (caries into dentine). The D/d component was divided into three categories. A pooled supragingival plaque sample per participant was obtained from posterior approximal sites. Analyses of 15 bacterial species were performed using the checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridisation technique. No significant relationships were found between the bacterial scores and DMFT/dmft nor D/d groups. Unlike the saliva samples and the chair-side method, interproximal pooled plaque samples analysed using the "checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique" did not reveal any significant relations between the bacterial counts and the caries experience.

  17. Feminist research experiences: reflections and proposals on methodologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz Mª Martínez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This text means to be an introduction to the monograph named “Feminist research experiences: reflections and proposals on methodologies”. We aim to express the main concerns and motivations that led us to elaborate it, as well as the process of working with feminist research methodologies in the frame of SIMReF. We try and express the difficulties we met when aiming to produce non-androcentric forms of knowledge in academia. At the same time we underline our interest on  working with and forward methods to transverse gender analysis in different disciplines. We also draw on the opportunity to elaborate guides or methodological reference texts on the implementation of feminist epistemologies in our research and, specially, advocate the idea of giving account about practical decisions taken during the research processes, revealing the “back room”within them. Finally, we provide a short description of the articles included in the monograph.

  18. The Importance of Reflection within the Academic Assignments of Study Abroad Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Plaza, Raymond Vidal

    2016-01-01

    Today, almost 305,000 U.S. college students are taking advantage of study abroad opportunities throughout the world. While study abroad experiences have has been increasing in number and scope, there continue to be questions about the importance and value of study abroad on the students�[BULLET] growth and development. This study highlights a summer study abroad program at Virginia Tech from 2008 �" 2012. Reflection and transformative learning serve as the primary theoretical frameworks...

  19. Exploring the Use of Critical Reflective Inquiry With Nursing Students Participating in an International Service-Learning Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, Alicia J; Martins, Diane C; Schwartz-Barcott, Donna; DiMaria, Lisa Adorno; Ogando, Béliga Milagros Soler

    2015-09-01

    Increasing interest in providing international educational experiences for nursing students has led to a variety of short-term international service-learning experiences. However, the impact of these experiences has not been clearly articulated. In this qualitative descriptive research study, Kim's critical reflective inquiry model was used to help guide students in reflecting on and identifying the impact of an international service-learning program in the Dominican Republic. The model was helpful in promoting in-depth description and reflection on the students' underlying assumptions and values, as well as identifying beginning strategies for emancipation in specific patient care situations. Providing a group process for critical reflection may optimize the perspective transformations in meeting the goals and objectives of the experience. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Random Experiment Program Resource Impact (REPRI) program: User's manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pease, W. T.; Alford, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    A complete user and programmer guide for the REPRI program is presented. This program was developed to perform mission concept, subsystem capability, and experiment support compatibility studies for a space station. The program utilizes Monte Carlo techniques to randomly schedule events in discrete intervals. Resources, logistics, cost, and space station volume are considered.

  1. Reflections on High School and Doctoral Student Attrition Experiences in Argentina. Closing Modes, and Individual and Institutional Constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Bartolini, Ana María; Universidad Autónoma de Entre Ríos (UADER) Universidad Nacionalde Entre Ríos (UNER); Gerlo, Graciela; Universidad Autónoma de Entre Ríos (UADER) Universidad Católica Argentina Santa María de los Buenos Aires (UCA)

    2016-01-01

    The article reflects critically on school attrition, comparing high school and doctoral dropout rates in Argentina. The theoretical perspective integrates the categories of voluntary attrition and academic exclusion of Tinto (1989) with the concepts of habitus and symbolic violence of Bourdieu (Bourdieu and Passeron, 1981). The reflections arise from the interpretative analysis of attrition experiences in high schools and doctoral programs. This was done by rereading, and making a new coding ...

  2. Reflective impressions of a precepted clinical experience caring for people with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, Renee; McGuigan, Denise; Withiam-Leitch, Matthew L; Akl, Elie A; Symons, Andrew B

    2013-08-01

    There is evidence that early and frequent encounters with people with disabilities can improve medical students' knowledge, skills, and attitudes about disability. As part of a 4-year integrated curriculum in caring for patients with disabilities, third-year medical students (n = 144) in a Family Medicine clerkship participated in a day-long precepted clinical experience at a medical facility serving people with disabilities, predominantly developmental disabilities, where they met patients and worked with clinicians. At the conclusion of the program, students completed a reflective survey about their experience. These data were analyzed qualitatively using a constructivist grounded-theory approach. Students' responses indicated that the experience improved their comfort levels in working with people with disabilities and increased their awareness of attitudinal factors that influence patient care. Responses also demonstrated that students achieved an awareness of technical accommodations and organizational adaptations that improve patient care.

  3. Learning from clinical placement experience: Analysing nursing students' final reflections in a digital storytelling activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paliadelis, Penny; Wood, Pamela

    2016-09-01

    This paper reports on the learning potential of a reflective activity undertaken by final year nursing students, in which they were asked to recount two meaningful events that occurred during their clinical placements over the duration of their 3-year nursing degree program and reflect on how these events contributed to their learning to become beginning level Registered Nurses (RNs). This descriptive qualitative study gathered narratives from 92 students as individual postings in an online forum created within the University's learning management system. An analysis of the students' reflections are the focus of this paper particularly in relation to the value of reflecting on the identified events. Four themes emerged that clearly highlight the way in which these students interpreted and learned from both positive and negative clinical experiences, their strong desire to fit into their new role and their ability to re-imagine how they might respond to clinical events when they become Registered Nurses. The findings of this study may contribute to developing nursing curricula that better prepares final year students for the realities of practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Experiments Program for NASA's Space Communications Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelmins, David; Reinhart, Richard

    2012-01-01

    NASA developed a testbed for communications and navigation that was launched to the International Space Station in 2012. The testbed promotes new software defined radio (SDR) technologies and addresses associated operational concepts for space-based SDRs, enabled by this first flight of NASA's Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) architecture standard. The experiments program consists of a mix of in-house and external experiments from partners in industry, academia, and government. The experiments will investigate key challenges in communications, networking, and global positioning system navigation both on the ground and on orbit. This presentation will discuss some of the key opportunities and challenges for the testbed experiments program.

  5. Reporting or Reconstructing? The Zine as a Medium for Reflecting on Research Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Vong

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In a research-based course, undergraduate third year students were asked to submit their reflections on their research experience in the zine medium. While the literature shows that the zine medium can encourage students to reflect meaningfully about their experiences, evaluating the medium, which is a mix of text and visuals, can be challenging for the instructor. This paper explores the value of zines as a medium for reflection using the 4R Reflection Scale as a framework. The 4R Scale by Ryan and Ryan (2015 outlines four levels, reporting and responding, relating, reasoning and reconstructing, to determine the depth of thinking in the reflection. The zines analyzed using the 4R Reflection Scale show that students were likely to report and respond on their research experience (lowest level on the reflection scale rather than reconstruct (highest level on the reflection scale.

  6. Collaborative Reflection Under the Microscope: Using Conversation Analysis to Study the Transition From Case Presentation to Discussion in GP Residents' Experience Sharing Sessions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, Mario; de la Croix, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Phenomenon: In higher education, reflection sessions are often used when participants learn in the workplace. In the Netherlands, all General Practitioner training programs include regular meetings called Exchange of Experiences, in which General Practitioner trainees are expected to learn

  7. Collaborative Reflection Under the Microscope: Using Conversation Analysis to Study the Transition From Case Presentation to Discussion in GP Residents' Experience Sharing Sessions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Veen (Mario); A. de la Croix (Anne)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstract_Phenomenon:_ In higher education, reflection sessions are often used when participants learn in the workplace. In the Netherlands, all General Practitioner training programs include regular meetings called Exchange of Experiences, in which General Practitioner trainees are expected

  8. Reflective Practice in Nigeria: Teachers' Voices and Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyacinth, Timi; Mann, Steve

    2014-01-01

    This article presents data collected in a qualitative study of Nigerian English language teachers working in Nigeria. Many of these Nigerian teachers have not had a formal introduction to reflective practice. Most of them work in conditions of constraint and challenge, experiencing a lack of resources, support and often working with large classes.…

  9. Reflections on evaluative practice in higher education: an experience collaborative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suênya Marley Mourão Batista

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to reflect on the evaluation practice of higher education teachers generated from research conducted as part of a private higher education institution. The objective of this study is to characterize the assessment practices of teachers who work in higher education and collaborate in order to facilitate the expansion of dynamic assessment practices were used as theoretical and methodological support the studies of Vygotsky (2007, Liberali (2008, Ibiapina (2007, 2008, Meier (2007, Campione (2002 and Hoffmann (2011. Field research was conducted in a qualitative approach to collaborative type with 3 (three in higher education using the reflective interview as data collection tool to promote critical thinking about assessment practices to develop. The results showed the prevalence of use of traditional assessment practices by teachers and the possibility of performing dynamic assessment practices from the understanding of these nurtured by the research and training process.

  10. Student Teachers' Reflections on Prior Experiences of Learning Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Anne M.; Waldron, Fionnuala; Pike, Susan; Greenwood, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Primary geography education is an important part of initial teacher education. The importance of prior experiences in the development of student teachers has long been recognised and there is growing evidence of the nature of those experiences in areas such as geography. This paper reports the findings of research conducted with one cohort of…

  11. Reflections

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    REFLECTIONS. A freer life and independent work made of the quiet, dreamy boy a happy, outgoing, universally liked young man. He also began to familiarize himself with classical German literature. Though at first he was acquainted only with Milan and Pavia, Italy made a great impression on him even with this limitation.

  12. Developing a Career Development Program for Medical Sciences Students: Reflecting "In" and "On" Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocodia, Ebinepre A.

    2014-01-01

    Using a reflective practice approach this paper provides an outline of the development of a new career development and counselling program for students within a medical sciences off-campus precinct. Drawing on Schön's (1983) reflective practice framework the aim included reflecting "in" and "on" action during the development…

  13. The Effect of a Self-Reflection and Insight Program on the Nursing Competence of Nursing Students: A Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Hsiang-Chu

    2015-01-01

    Nurses have to solve complex problems for their patients and their families, and as such, nursing care capability has become a focus of attention. The aim of this longitudinal study was to develop a self-reflection practice exercise program for nursing students to be used during clinical practice and to evaluate the effects of this program empirically and longitudinally on change in students' clinical competence, self-reflection, stress, and perceived teaching quality. An additional aim was to determine the predictors important to nursing competence. We sampled 260 nursing students from a total of 377 practicum students to participate in this study. A total of 245 students nurse completed 4 questionnaires, Holistic Nursing Competence Scale, Self-Reflection and Insight Scale, Perceived Stress Scale, and Clinical Teaching Quality Scale, at 2, 4, and 6 months after clinical practice experience. Generalized estimating equation models were used to examine the change in scores on each of the questionnaires. The findings showed that, at 6 months after clinical practice, nursing competence was significantly higher than at 2 and 4 months, was positively related to self-reflection and insight, and was negatively related to practice stress. Nursing students' competence at each time period was positively related to clinical teachers' instructional quality at 4 and 6 months. These results indicate that a clinical practice program with self-reflection learning exercise improves nursing students' clinical competence and that nursing students' self-reflection and perceived practice stress affect their nursing competence. Nursing core competencies are enhanced with a self-reflection program, which helps nursing students to improve self-awareness and decrease stress that may interfere with learning. Further, clinical practice experience, self-reflection and insight, and practice stress are predictors of nursing students' clinical competence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All

  14. INTERFACING INFANT MENTAL HEALTH KNOWLEDGE SYSTEMS: REFLECTIONS ON THE NARRATIVES OF LAY HOME VISITORS' EXPERIENCES OF LEARNING AND APPLYING RELATIONAL CONCEPTS OF DEVELOPMENT IN A SOUTH AFRICAN INTERVENTION PROGRAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baradon, Tessa; Bain, Katherine

    2016-07-01

    The question of interfacing research and clinically generated knowledge in the field of infant mental health (IMH) with local cultural knowledge and belief systems has provoked extended discussion in recent years. This article explores convergences and divergences between current research-based, relational IMH mental health models and "community" knowledge held by a group of South African lay home visitors from a socioeconomically deprived township. These women were trained in a psychoanalytic and attachment-informed infant mental health program that promotes a relational model of infant development. They provide an intervention that supports high risk mother-infant relationships in the same locality. A two-tiered approach was taken to the analysis of the home visitor interviews and focused on the home visitors' constructed narratives of infant development posttraining as well as the personal impact of the training and work on the home visitors themselves. The study found that psychoanalytic and attachment-informed thinking about development makes sense to those operating within the local South African cultural context, but that the accommodation of this knowledge is a complex and challenging process. © 2016 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  15. Reflective Journal Writing and the First-Year Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Michele C.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, great emphasis has been placed on student success and retention in higher education. To address this issue, many universities' strategic retention programs include first-year seminars. A variety of pedagogical strategies have been employed in these seminars to help students succeed personally, socially and academically. This…

  16. Reflexiones sobre la estrategia de rehabilitación basada en la comunidad (RBC: la experiencia de un programa de RBC en Bolivia Reflections on community-based rehabilitation strategy (CBR: the experience of a CBR program in Bolivia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urko Díaz-Aristizabal

    2012-01-01

    -cultural context may determine whether CBR programs succeed or fail.

  17. Factors associated with reflection among students after an advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallman, Andy; Lindblad, Asa Kettis; Gustavsson, Maria; Ring, Lena

    2009-10-01

    To identify individual and social factors associated with pharmacy students' level of reflection in an advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE). A postal questionnaire, including a reflective assignment, was sent to all pharmacy interns (n=262) at Uppsala University, Sweden, for 4 semesters in 2005-2007. In a univariate analysis, 7 factors were found to be associated with students' level of reflection. After controlling for covariates, 3 social factors were found to be independently associated with reflection: having a formal preceptor (OR=5.3), being at a small pharmacy (OR=19.8), and students' perception of the importance of discussing critical thinking with the preceptor (OR=1.2). No correlation could be observed between level of reflection and critical thinking, nor learning style. Social components seem to be of higher importance than individual components in students' reflective levels after pharmacy internship experience. Trained preceptors are important to foster reflection skills.

  18. Factors Associated With Reflection Among Students After an Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE) in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindblad, Åsa Kettis; Gustavsson, Maria; Ring, Lena

    2009-01-01

    Objective To identify individual and social factors associated with pharmacy students' level of reflection in an advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE). Methods A postal questionnaire, including a reflective assignment, was sent to all pharmacy interns (n=262) at Uppsala University, Sweden, for 4 semesters in 2005-2007. Results In a univariate analysis, 7 factors were found to be associated with students' level of reflection. After controlling for covariates, 3 social factors were found to be independently associated with reflection: having a formal preceptor (OR=5.3), being at a small pharmacy (OR=19.8), and students' perception of the importance of discussing critical thinking with the preceptor (OR=1.2). No correlation could be observed between level of reflection and critical thinking, nor learning style. Conclusion Social components seem to be of higher importance than individual components in students' reflective levels after pharmacy internship experience. Trained preceptors are important to foster reflection skills. PMID:19885076

  19. REFLECTIONS ON THE EXPERIENCE OF PENSION SYSTEMS REFORM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simion CERTAN

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The appearance of the new socio-economic system which is open to the world, , the triggering the process of join of efforts with the international community, the economic integration in the EU, the structural changes in population demographics require undoubtedly significant changes not only in form, but also in background, the national pension system. Obviously, an important role in developing and implementing effective pension system lies within the study practice accumulated over the world. In the article the authors reflect on what change occurred in pension systems in different regions of the world, pursuing their operation practice and come up with some proposals that would change the situation in the national pension system for the better, would accelerate its adaptation to the requirements of European Union social policy.

  20. Preservice Science Teachers Reflect on Their Practicum Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koc, Isil

    2012-01-01

    The practicum provides an opportunity for preservice teachers to apply knowledge and skills in actual classroom settings. Thus, it serves as a central component of virtually all teacher education programmes. This study focused the views of 16 preservice science teachers on their practicum experiences. Individual interviews were made to construct a…

  1. Reflections

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The following article by Norbert Wiener makes two points - the first explains the possibility of making computer programs 'human like' by building in learning and adaptfvity in them; the second cautions us on the danger that may arise due to the large difference in time constant between human thinking and action and ...

  2. Beginning the Program. Project DEEP (Diversified Educational Experiences Program).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connett, Jane; And Others

    Project DEEP (Diversified Educational Experience Program) was developed to improve the behavior and attitudes of secondary students in schools where dropouts, absenteeism, and poor attitudes are existing problems. The open classroom with student involvement and participation in goal setting, presentation, and evaluation is the basic concept of…

  3. Wilderness Experience Program. Final Evaluation Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, Richard Owen

    The Wilderness Experience is an innovative, experiential program under New Mexico's Statewide Forensic Treatment System for mentally disordered first offenders and those soon to be released on parole or probation. Developed from the concepts of Outward Bound, criminal offenders undergo an intensive 17-21 day confrontation with their physical,…

  4. Factors Associated With Reflection Among Students After an Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE) in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Wallman, A.; Lindblad, A.K.; Gustavsson, Maria; Ring, L

    2009-01-01

    Objective. To identify individual and social factors associated with pharmacy students level of reflection in an advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE). Methods. A postal questionnaire, including a reflective assignment, was sent to all pharmacy interns (n=262) at Uppsala University, Sweden, for 4 semesters in 2005-2007. Results. In a univariate analysis, 7 factors were found to be associated with students level of reflection. After controlling for covariates, 3 social factors were foun...

  5. A Q-Methodology approach to investigating the relationship between level of reflection and typologies among prospective teachers in the physics learning assistant program at Florida International University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Geraldine L.

    The purpose of this mixed methods study was to understand physics Learning Assistants' (LAs) views on reflective teaching, expertise in teaching, and LA program teaching experience and to determine if views predicted level of reflection evident in writing. Interviews were conducted in Phase One, Q methodology was used in Phase Two, and level of reflection in participants' writing was assessed using a rubric based on Hatton and Smith's (1995) "Criteria for the Recognition of Evidence for Different Types of Reflective Writing" in Phase Three. Interview analysis revealed varying perspectives on content knowledge, pedagogical knowledge, and experience in relation to expertise in teaching. Participants revealed that they engaged in reflection on their teaching, believed reflection helps teachers improve, and found peer reflection beneficial. Participants believed teaching experience in the LA program provided preparation for teaching, but that more preparation was needed to teach. Three typologies emerged in Phase Two. Type One LAs found participation in the LA program rewarding and believed expertise in teaching does not require expertise in content or pedagogy, but it develops over time from reflection. Type Two LAs valued reflection, but not writing reflections, felt the LA program teaching experience helped them decide on non-teaching careers and helped them confront gaps in their physics knowledge. Type Three LAs valued reflection, believed expertise in content and pedagogy are necessary for expert teaching, and felt LA program teaching experience increased their likelihood of becoming teachers, but did not prepare them for teaching. Writing assignments submitted in Phase Three were categorized as 19% descriptive writing, 60% descriptive reflections, and 21% dialogic reflections. No assignments were categorized as critical reflection. Using ordinal logistic regression, typologies that emerged in Phase Two were not found to be predictors for the level of reflection

  6. Reflections of Program Faculty on NIA-Supported Research Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia-Laver, Debra L.

    2006-01-01

    From the program faculty of St. Scholastica's National Institute on Aging Summer Institute on the Psychology of Aging, 7 members responded to a series of questions posed to them in individual telephone interviews. They represented a wide range of disciplinary interests and institutions. Their motivation for participation, their advice for both…

  7. Special Education Voucher Programs, Reflective Judgment, and Future Legislative Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bon, Susan C.; Decker, Janet R.; Strassfeld, Natasha

    2016-01-01

    As of 2015, 17 special education voucher programs (SVPs) existed in 13 states and proposals continue to emerge. Eligible parents utilize these vouchers to enroll their children in private schools and thereby relinquish special education services and protections provided under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Using a…

  8. Sport as an object of reflection and as personal experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Markič

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The philosophy of sport is traditionally concerned with three topics: the problem of finding appropriate definitions of the main concepts (e.g. sport, game, play and rules, ethical problems (e.g. values, fair-play and performance enhancement, and the aesthetic characteristics of sport. The author briefly presents the influential Suits’ analysis of the notion of game, but her main interest lies in connecting sport with cognitive science, particularly cognitive philosophy. She contrasts classical cognitivism with the so-called embodied and situated cognition approach. She argues that sport is a good laboratory for testing different approaches and ideas in cognitive science, and stresses two major points. First, sport is an activity where skills are of the utmost importance which helps to shed light on the weaknesses of classical cognitivism. Second, the personal experiences and feelings of athletes play an important role and cannot be dismissed. Both features emphasize the need to treat mental processes as embodied and situated in the environment. The author concludes that we have to broaden the philosophy of sport with topics borrowed from the philosophy of cognitive science and phenomenology of sport.

  9. The Laser Communications Relay Demonstration Experiment Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, David J.; Edwards, Bernard L.; Moores, John D.; Piazzolla, Sabino; Merritt, Scott

    2017-01-01

    This paper elaborates on the Laser Communications Relay Demonstration (LCRD) Experiment Program, which will engage in a number of pre-determined experiments and also call upon a wide variety of experimenters to test new laser communications technology and techniques, and to gather valuable data. LCRD is a joint project between NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratory (MIT LL). LCRD will test the functionality in various settings and scenarios of optical communications links from a GEO (Geosynchronous Earth Orbit) payload to ground stations in Southern California and Hawaii over a two-year period following launch in 2019. The LCRD investigator team will execute numerous experiments to test critical aspects of laser communications activities over real links and systems, collecting data on the effects of atmospheric turbulence and weather on performance and communications availability. LCRD will also incorporate emulations of target scenarios, including direct-to-Earth (DTE) links from user spacecraft and optical relay providers supporting user spacecraft. To supplement and expand upon the results of these experiments, the project also includes a Guest Experimenters Program, which encourages individuals and groups from government agencies, academia and industry to propose diverse experiment ideas.

  10. OpenFIRE - A Web GIS Service for Distributing the Finnish Reflection Experiment Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Väkevä, Sakari; Aalto, Aleksi; Heinonen, Aku; Heikkinen, Pekka; Korja, Annakaisa

    2017-04-01

    The Finnish Reflection Experiment (FIRE) is a land-based deep seismic reflection survey conducted between 2001 and 2003 by a research consortium of the Universities of Helsinki and Oulu, the Geological Survey of Finland, and a Russian state-owned enterprise SpetsGeofysika. The dataset consists of 2100 kilometers of high-resolution profiles across the Archaean and Proterozoic nuclei of the Fennoscandian Shield. Although FIRE data have been available on request since 2009, the data have remained underused outside the original research consortium. The original FIRE data have been quality-controlled. The shot gathers have been cross-checked and comprehensive errata has been created. The brute stacks provided by the Russian seismic contractor have been reprocessed into seismic sections and replotted. A complete documentation of the intermediate processing steps is provided together with guidelines for setting up a computing environment and plotting the data. An open access web service "OpenFIRE" for the visualization and the downloading of FIRE data has been created. The service includes a mobile-responsive map application capable of enriching seismic sections with data from other sources such as open data from the National Land Survey and the Geological Survey of Finland. The AVAA team of the Finnish Open Science and Research Initiative has provided a tailored Liferay portal with necessary web components such as an API (Application Programming Interface) for download requests. INSPIRE (Infrastructure for Spatial Information in Europe) -compliant discovery metadata have been produced and geospatial data will be exposed as Open Geospatial Consortium standard services. The technical guidelines of the European Plate Observing System have been followed and the service could be considered as a reference application for sharing reflection seismic data. The OpenFIRE web service is available at www.seismo.helsinki.fi/openfire

  11. Developing a pedagogical problem solving view for mathematics teachers with two reflection programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bracha Karamarski

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated the effects of two reflection support programs on elementary school mathematics teachers’ pedagogical problem solving view. Sixty-two teachers participated in a professional development program. Thirty teachers were assigned to the self-questioning (S_Q training and thirty two teachers were assigned to the reflection discourse (R_D training. The S_Q program was based on the IMPROVE self-questioning approach which emphasizes systematic discussion along the phases of mathematical or pedagogical problem solving as student and teacher. The R_D program emphasized discussion of standard based teaching and learning principles. Findings indicated that systematic reflection support (S_Q is effective for developing mathematics PCK, and strengthening metacognitive knowledge of mathematics teachers, more than reflection discourse (R_D. No differences were found between the groups in developing beliefs about teaching mathematics in using problem solving view.

  12. Bidirectional Reflectance Round-Robin in Support of the Earth Observing System Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Early, E.; Barnes, P.; Johnson, B.; Butler, J.; Bruegge, C.; Biggar, S.; Spyak, P.; Pavlov, M.

    1999-01-01

    Laboratory measurements of the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDRF) of diffuse reflectors are required to support calibration in the Earth Observing System (EOS) program of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  13. Developing virtual REU cohorts: Reflections from the IRIS Undergraduate Internship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubenthal, M.; Taber, J.; Aster, R.; Frassetto, A.

    2007-12-01

    Beginning in 2006, the IRIS Education and Outreach program received funding from the National Science Foundation (EAR-0453427) to explore a novel approach to the traditional Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) model. This model blends the spirit of an REU program, which traditionally hosts participants in one location with successful prior IRIS experience hosting students at widely separated institutions to participate in summer research. A unique feature the IRIS Undergraduate Internship Program is that throughout the summer, interns form and sustain a virtual community, offering assistance, sharing ideas, asking questions, and relaying life experiences while conducting their research at diverse institutions. Key to IRIS's REU model is a combination of: one-on-one mentoring by researchers at IRIS institutions across the US, developing a strong unity among interns through both face-to-face and on-line interactions, participation of an IRIS REU alumni mentor to provide both group and intern-specific guidance developing interns' abilities to self-evaluate and work independently, through carefully designed web-based tools, and increasing interns' awareness of the IRIS and broader Earth Science community; demonstrating the role they will play in this larger community. Virtual interaction is facilitated by 1) bringing students together for face-to-face contact, through a week long orientation held annually at the IRIS PASSCAL Instrument Center on the campus of the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, and 2) the community enabling web infrastructure at http://www.iris.edu/internship/. During the orientation students engage in classes in geophysics basics, career preparation, as well as training to communicate virtually. Our experiences and evaluations from the 2006 and 2007 field seasons have:shown the increasing demand for electronic advertising of REU programs, provided support for several assumptions of the model including the key role of both the

  14. A Collective Self-Study to Improve Program Coherence of Clinical Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaras, Anastasia P.; Frank, Toya Jones; Williams, Monique Apollon; Christopher, Emily; Rodick, William Harry, III.

    2016-01-01

    Student feedback collected through program evaluation of secondary education licensure and Master's program clinical experiences prompted us to conduct a collective self-study. We used a reflective framework for analysis and discussion of the shifts students in our courses made as they progressed from observers to practicing teachers. Along with…

  15. Communication skills program in the first semester: An experience report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela Liberali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 2001, Brazilian Guidelines for undergraduate medical education highlighted the need to include communication skills (CS in the curriculum. At the Federal University of Santa Catarina (South Brazil, CS were taught in the third year in theoretical classes as an overview of physician-patient relationships, and in a nonsystematic way in practical classes. In 2013, theory and practice were aligned, mediated by reflection, by adding three classes: CS overview; responding to strong emotions; and giving bad news. Two Portuguese translation of modules from DocCom, a web-based audiovisual learning resource on CS in Healthcare (AACH, DUCOM, 2005- 2015, were used. In 2015, we started to teach CS to the 53 students registered in the first semester of our medical course. We report on the program in the first semester of the course and students’ perceptions of it. The CS program consisted of seven 1.5-hr face-to-face sessions with all students, co-taught by the authors, a PhD student and a medical school professor. The content included CS overview and importance in healthcare; relationship-centered care, building relationships and gathering information; students’ experiences in the medical course; and Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI. To encourage continuous reflection and align theory with practice, before or after theoretical brief presentations, additional resources were used: exercises to raise awareness of verbal and nonverbal communication, drawings on medical students’ life experiences, reflections about the poem “After a While” by Veronica Shoffstall and after listening to Bach’s Brandenburg concerto #1; DocCom modules #6 “Build a relationship” and #8 “Gather information” (viewed online to prepare for class followed by face-toface small group discussions (6-7 students in each about CS learned and theirs practice in role-play; peers’ and patients’ interviews; students’ MBTI identification (at distance and group dynamics

  16. Electronic reflective student portfolios to demonstrate achievement of ability-based outcomes during advanced pharmacy practice experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briceland, Laurie L; Hamilton, Robert A

    2010-06-15

    To demonstrate achievement of ability-based outcomes through a structured review of electronic student portfolios in an advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) program. One hundred thirty-eight students produced electronic portfolios containing select work products from APPEs, including a self-assessment reflective essay that demonstrated achievement of course manual-specified ability-based outcomes. Through portfolio submissions, all students demonstrated the achievement of ability-based outcomes for providing pharmaceutical care, evaluating the literature, and managing the medication use system with patient case reports most frequently submitted. The rubric review of self-reflective essays addressed student learning through APPEs and continuing professional development plans. The electronic portfolio with reflective essay proved to be a useful vehicle to demonstrate achievement of ability-based outcomes.

  17. Wilderness experience programs: A state-of-the-knowledge summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chad P. Dawson; Keith C. Russell

    2012-01-01

    One of the defining characteristics of Wilderness Experience Programs (WEPs) is the centrality of wilderness - settings, conditions, and characteristics - to the delivery of the program and the client or visitor experience. Wilderness Experience Programs have been classified into three types based on their primary program aim: education, personal growth, and therapy...

  18. Status of Pharmacy Practice Experience Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eccles, Dayl; Kwasnik, Abigail; Craddick, Karen; Heinz, Andrew K.; Harralson, Arthur F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To assess financial, personnel, and curricular characteristics of US pharmacy practice experiential education programs and follow-up on results of a similar survey conducted in 2001. Methods. Experiential education directors at 118 accredited US pharmacy colleges and schools were invited to participate in a blinded, Web-based survey in 2011. Aggregate responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics and combined with data obtained from the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy to assess program demographics, faculty and administrative organizational structure, and financial support. Results. The number of advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) sites had increased by 24% for medium, 50% for large, and 55% for very large colleges and schools. Introductory pharmacy practice experience (IPPE) sites outnumbered APPEs twofold. The average experiential education team included an assistant/associate dean (0.4 full-time equivalent [FTE]), a director (1.0 FTE), assistant/associate director (0.5 FTE), coordinator (0.9 FTE), and multiple administrative assistants (1.3 FTE). Most faculty members (63%-75%) were nontenure track and most coordinators (66%) were staff members. Estimated costs to operate an experiential education program represented a small percentage of the overall expense budget of pharmacy colleges and schools. Conclusion. To match enrollment growth, pharmacy practice experiential education administrators have expanded their teams, reorganized responsibilities, and found methods to improve cost efficiency. These benchmarks will assist experiential education administrators to plan strategically for future changes. PMID:24850934

  19. Non-Reflective Thinkers Are Predisposed to Attribute Supernatural Causation to Uncanny Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvet, Romain; Bonnefon, Jean-François

    2015-07-01

    For unknown reasons, individuals who are confident in their intuitions are more likely to hold supernatural beliefs. How does an intuitive cognitive style lead one to believe in faith healing, astrology, or extrasensory perception (ESP)? We hypothesize that cognitive style is critically important after one experiences an uncanny event that seems to invite a supernatural explanation. In three studies, we show that irrespective of their prior beliefs in the supernatural, non-reflective thinkers are more likely than reflective thinkers to accept supernatural causation after an uncanny encounter with astrology and ESP. This is the first time that controlled experiments demonstrate the negative dynamics of reflection and supernatural causality attribution. We consider the possible generalization of our findings to religious beliefs and their implications for the social vulnerability of non-reflective individuals. © 2015 by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc.

  20. Critical experiments on single-unit spherical plutonium geometries reflected and moderated by oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothe, R.E.

    1997-05-01

    Experimental critical configurations are reported for several dozen spherical and hemispherical single-unit assemblies of plutonium metal. Most were solid but many were hollow-centered, thick, shell-like geometries. All were constructed of nested plutonium (mostly {sup 2139}Pu) metal hemispherical shells. Three kinds of critical configurations are reported. Two required interpolation and/or extrapolation of data to obtain the critical mass because reflector conditions were essentially infinite. The first finds the plutonium essentially fully reflected by a hydrogen-rich oil; the second is essentially unreflected. The third kind reports the critical oil reflector height above a large plutonium metal assembly of accurately known mass (no interpolation required) when that mass was too great to permit full oil reflection. Some configurations had thicknesses of mild steel just outside the plutonium metal, separating it from the oil. These experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory in the late 1960s. They have not been published in a form suitable for benchmark-quality comparisons against state-of-the-art computational techniques until this paper. The age of the data and other factors lead to some difficulty in reconstructing aspects of the program and may, in turn, decrease confidence in certain details. Whenever this is true, the point is acknowledged. The plutonium metal was alpha-phase {sup 239}Pu containing 5.9 wt-% {sup 240}Pu. All assemblies were formed by nesting 1.667-mm-thick (nominal) bare plutonium metal hemispherical shells, also called hemishells, until the desired configuration was achieved. Very small tolerance gaps machined into radial dimensions reduced the effective density a small amount in all cases. Steel components were also nested hemispherical shells; but these were nominally 3.333-mm thick. Oil was used as the reflector because of its chemical compatibility with plutonium metal.

  1. THE EFFECTS OF REFLECTIVE TEACHING ON AN INTENSIVE TEACHER TRAINING PROGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Hua Lan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The preliminary case study was conducted to understand the effects of reflective teaching approach on English teachers' teaching performances in a short-term intensive teacher training program, and to know the participating English teachers’ feedback to the program. Totally 13 English teachers, who had taught English for 1 to 5 years, participated in this program for 3 weeks with 54 instruction hours. During the intensive program, teachers were asked to design lesson plans and demonstrate their lessons, while their peers, other experienced teachers, provided them with constructive feedback. In addition, the presenters self-assessed and reflected on their own teaching. Through several cycles of teaching demonstrations, peer-assessments, self-assessments and reflections, most teachers indicated that the reflective teaching approach was beneficial for sharpening their teaching skills, equipping them with additional teaching strategies and class management skills, and raising their awareness of the needs for examinations of their teaching reflectively in the future, and the importance of reflection of their own teaching for improvements. To give the teachers more inputs and inspirations, experienced teachers with creative teaching ideas were invited as guest speakers, and positive feedback to the guest speeches was also drawn. The findings of this study were expected to provide some pedagogical inspirations for the related fields, especially English teacher training in EFL contexts.

  2. Facilitating Dental Student Reflections: Using Mentor Groups to Discuss Clinical Experiences and Personal Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koole, Sebastiaan; Christiaens, Veronique; Cosyn, Jan; De Bruyn, Hugo

    2016-10-01

    Despite the consensus on the importance of reflection for dental professionals, a lack of understanding remains about how students and clinicians should develop their ability to reflect. The aim of this study was to investigate dental students' and mentors' perceptions of mentor groups as an instructional method to facilitate students' reflection in terms of the strategy's learning potential, role of the mentor, group dynamics, and feasibility. At Ghent University in Belgium, third- and fourth-year dental students were encouraged to reflect on their clinical experiences and personal development in three reflective mentor sessions. No preparation or reports afterwards were required; students needed only to participate in the sessions. Sessions were guided by trained mentors to establish a safe environment, frame clinical discussions, and stimulate reflection. Students' and mentors' perceptions of the experience were assessed with a 17-statement questionnaire with response options on a five-point Likert scale (1=totally disagree to 5=totally agree). A total of 50 students and eight mentors completed the questionnaire (response rates 81% and 89%, respectively). Both students and mentors had neutral to positive perceptions concerning the learning potential, role of the mentor, group dynamics, and feasibility. The mean ideal total time for sessions in a year was 99 minutes (third-year students), 111 minutes (fourth-year students), and 147 minutes (mentors). Reported reflective topics related to patient management, frustrations, and practice of dentistry. Overall mean appreciation for the experience ranged from 14.50 to 15.14 on the 20-point scale. These findings about students' and mentors' positive perceptions of the experience suggest that mentor groups may be a potentially valuable strategy to promote dental students' reflection.

  3. Deep Crustal Seismic Reflection Experiment Across the Sothern Karoo Basin, South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    A. S. Lindeque; Trond Ryberg; Jacek Stankiewicz; Michael Weber; M. J. de Wit

    2007-01-01

    A controlled source Near Vertical Reflection (NVR) Seismic experiment along a ~ 100 km profile yields the first high quality seismic image of the crust and Moho across the southern Karoo Basin in South Africa. The highly reflective crust comprises upper, middle and lower layers. In the upper crust, folded and gently south-dipping continuous reflectors up to the Escarpment, represent the bedding of the Karoo and Cape Supergroups respectively. Décollement structures occur locally along carbona...

  4. The Implementation of One-Week-One-Article Program in a Reading Class: A Reflective Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudi Rahmatullah

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This article presents my reflections on the implementation of one-week-one-article program. Fifty-three students participated in this program. Every week they presented the article they had read. I found that the majority of students actively participated in this program, showing seriousness in understanding the content of the article, the pronunciation of difficult words, and the flow of the presentation. This program at least promoted three aspects: students’ motivation, cooperative learning, and their critical thinking. Even though this program was conducted for university students, it is likely to be working with students of junior and senior secondary school with some modification

  5. STUDENTS’ PERCEPTIONS OF THEIR REFLECTIVE ESSAY WRITING EXPERIENCE AND TEACHER FEEDBACK COMMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asiah Mohd Sharif

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Reflection which encompasses critical and analytical capabilities is a critical 21st century skill for students to develop. To ensure students are equipped with this skill, reflective writing has been identified as a possible tool. Teacher feedback on students’ written output therefore plays a role in developing students’ reflective skills. This study asks two questions: How do students perceive their experience writing reflective essays? What is the nature of the teacher’s feedback comments on students’ reflective essays and how do students perceive them? To answer these questions, nineteen ESL students in an entry-level Medical programme completed a questionnaire concerning their experiences writing reflective essays and perceptions of teacher feedback on these essays. Interviews were conducted with two students to follow-up on questionnaire responses. The content analysis showed that the students believed reflective writing played a small contribution to their language learning. Further investigation into the students’ perspectives of their teachers’ feedback comments suggests that even though the teachers’ feedback was positive, the students also referred to the comments as inadequate and ineffective. Pedagogical implications and suggestions for future research are discussed.

  6. The utility of reflective writing after a palliative care experience: can we assess medical students' professionalism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Ursula K; Gill, Anne C; Teal, Cayla R; Morrison, Laura J

    2013-11-01

    Medical education leaders have called for a curriculum that proactively teaches knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for professional practice and have identified professionalism as a competency domain for medical students. Exposure to palliative care (PC), an often deeply moving clinical experience, is an optimal trigger for rich student reflection, and students' reflective writings can be explored for professional attitudes. Our aim was to evaluate the merit of using student reflective writing about a PC clinical experience to teach and assess professionalism. After a PC patient visit, students wrote a brief reflective essay. We explored qualitatively if/how evidence of students' professionalism was reflected in their writing. Five essays were randomly chosen to develop a preliminary thematic structure, which then guided analysis of 30 additional, randomly chosen essays. Analysts coded transcripts independently, then collaboratively, developed thematic categories, and selected illustrative quotes for each theme and subtheme. Essays revealed content reflecting more rich information about students' progress toward achieving two professionalism competencies (demonstrating awareness of one's own perspectives and biases; demonstrating caring, compassion, empathy, and respect) than two others (displaying self-awareness of performance; recognizing and taking actions to correct deficiencies in one's own behavior, knowledge, and skill). Professional attitudes were evident in all essays. The essays had limited use for formal summative assessment of professionalism competencies. However, given the increasing presence of PC clinical experiences at medical schools nationwide, we believe this assessment strategy for professionalism has merit and deserves further investigation.

  7. Manifestation of Trauma: The Effect of Early Traumatic Experiences and Adult Attachment on Parental Reflective Functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Cristobal, Pamela; Santelices, Maria P; Miranda Fuenzalida, Daniel A

    2017-01-01

    There are many risk factors that make the transition to parenthood difficult, even in the best of circumstances. One such risk factor is the experience of parental childhood trauma, which has the potential to affect the parent/child relationship, both in terms of attachment style parental reflective functioning. This study aims to expand on the line of research concerned with the effects that trauma has once that child transitions into adulthood and into parenthood by looking at the role that the experience of trauma and adult attachment has in relation to parental reflective functioning. This study assessed mothers (N = 125) by using the CTQ (childhood experience of trauma), ECR (adult attachment), and the PRFQ (parental RF). Our study found that in the presence of physical neglect, insecure attachment had a particularly deleterious effect on maternal reflective functioning. This relationship was not as strong in the absence of physical neglect.

  8. [Pneumonia: Regional experience with prevention programs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuchalin, A G; Onishchenko, G G; Kolosov, V P; Kurganova, O P; Tezikov, N L; Manakov, L G; Gulevich, M P; Perelman, Yu M

    to generalize the regional experience in implementing a package of organizational and methodical and antiepidemic measures for preventing pneumococcal infections. How the prevention programs were implemented using the materials and methods of the epidemiological and statistical monitoring of the incidence of pneumonia in the Amur Region was analyzed. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (Prevenar-13) and influenza vaccines were used for immunoprophylaxis against acute respiratory viral and pneumococcal infections. Information on the incidence of acute respiratory viral infections and pneumonia over time in the period 2010 to 2015 must be taken into account. Indicators and special criteria are used to evaluate the efficiency of vaccination. The comparative statistical analysis revealed the high efficiency of regional programs using the methods for immunoprophylaxis against pneumococcal infections: the vaccination prophylactic efficiency index in terms of the incidence of pneumonia might be as high as 75-100%. Pneumonia morbidity rates became 2.3 times lower in the vaccinated population of the region. The results of the investigation suggest that the Program for the clinical and epidemiological monitoring and prevention of community-acquired pneumonias, by using the vaccine against pneumococcal infection in the Amur Region, has a high medical and socioeconomic efficiency.

  9. Hawaii Ocean Mixing Experiment: Program Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Richard D.; Chao, Benjamin F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    It is becoming apparent that insufficient mixing occurs in the pelagic ocean to maintain the large scale thermohaline circulation. Observed mixing rates fall a factor of ten short of classical indices such as Munk's "Abyssal Recipe." The growing suspicion is that most of the mixing in the sea occurs near topography. Exciting recent observations by Polzin et al., among others, fuel this speculation. If topographic mixing is indeed important, it must be acknowledged that its geographic distribution, both laterally and vertically, is presently unknown. The vertical distribution of mixing plays a critical role in the Stommel Arons model of the ocean interior circulation. In recent numerical studies, Samelson demonstrates the extreme sensitivity of flow in the abyssal ocean to the spatial distribution of mixing. We propose to study the topographic mixing problem through an integrated program of modeling and observation. We focus on tidally forced mixing as the global energetics of this process have received (and are receiving) considerable study. Also, the well defined frequency of the forcing and the unique geometry of tidal scattering serve to focus the experiment design. The Hawaiian Ridge is selected as a study site. Strong interaction between the barotropic tide and the Ridge is known to take place. The goals of the Hawaiian Ocean Mixing Experiment (HOME) are to quantify the rate of tidal energy loss to mixing at the Ridge and to identify the mechanisms by which energy is lost and mixing generated. We are challenged to develop a sufficiently comprehensive picture that results can be generalized from Hawaii to the global ocean. To achieve these goals, investigators from five institutions have designed HOME, a program of historic data analysis, modeling and field observation. The Analysis and Modeling efforts support the design of the field experiments. As the program progresses, a global model of the barotropic (depth independent) tide, and two models of the

  10. Lecturers' experiences of facilitating guided group reflection with pre-registration BSc Nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mc Carthy, Jane; Cassidy, Irene; Tuohy, Dympna

    2013-01-01

    The development of reflective practitioners is integral to undergraduate nursing degree programmes. This study reports on lecturers' experiences of facilitating guided group reflection with pre-registration BSc Nursing students.The research purposively sampled lecturers (n=7) working in a department of nursing and midwifery at a third level institute in Ireland, all of whom were registered nurses. Using a qualitative research approach, data was collected through audio-taped semi-structured individual interviews. The data were thematically analysed using guidelines developed by Braun and Clarke (2006). Tripartite researcher discussion and further analysis of these initial individual analyses led to consensus regarding the three themes arising from the study. These were: Being a facilitator; Facilitating reflective learning and Creating structure. The discussion centred on: having knowledge and experience to effectively facilitate guided group reflection; the influence of the facilitator's personal philosophy on reflection and adult learning on group facilitation; and finally concerns regarding professional responsibility in response to students' reflective practice accounts. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Dental students' reflections about long-term care experiences through an existing model of oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brondani, Mario; Pattanaporn, Komkham

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore students' reflective thinking about long-term care experiences from the perspective of a model of oral health. A total of 186 reflections from 193 second-year undergraduate dental students enrolled between 2011/12 and 2014/15 at the University of British Columbia were explored qualitatively. Reflections had a word limit of 300, and students were asked to relate an existing model of oral health to their long-term care experiences. We have identified the main ideas via a thematic analysis related to the geriatric dentistry experience in long-term care. The thematic analysis revealed that students attempted to demystify their pre-conceived ideas about older people and long-term care facilities, to think outside the box, for example away from a typical dental office, and to consider caring for elderly people from an interprofessional lens. According to some students, not all domains from the existing model of oral health were directly relevant to their geriatric experience while other domains, including interprofessionalism and cognition, were missing. While some participants had a positive attitude towards caring for this cohort of the population, others did not take this educational activity as a constructive experience. The nature of most students' reflective thinking within a long-term care experience showed to be related to an existing model of oral health. This model can help to give meaning to the dental geriatric experience of an undergraduate curriculum. Such experience has been instrumental in overcoming potential misconceptions about long-term care and geriatric dentistry. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Emotion and Education: Reflecting on the Emotional Experience Emotion and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortari, Luigina

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents an educative experience organized in a postgraduate course in a faculty of education with the aim of facilitating students' "affective self-understanding". Affective self-understanding is a reflective practice that allows people to comprehend their own emotions in order to gain awareness of them. Students were…

  13. Transborder Tourism, Borderless Classroom: Reflections on a Hawaii-Singapore Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, T.C.

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses a virtual or borderless classroom exercise conducted by the National University of Singapore (NUS) and the University of Hawaii, Manoa (UHM). By reflecting on the experiences and views of the NUS participants, the article explores the possibility of virtual explorations as a substitute for conventional fieldtrips and…

  14. Understanding the Friendship Processes of Individuals with Asperger's Syndrome: A Phenomenological Study of Reflective College Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kammie Bohlken

    2010-01-01

    This phenomenological study shed light on the reflective college experiences of 11 individuals with Asperger's Syndrome and High Functioning Autism from a competence rather than a deficit model of disability (Biklen, 2005). Using Goleman's model of Social Intelligence (2006) as a theoretical framework, the cognitive, behavioral, and affective…

  15. Systemic Family Therapy Using the Reflecting Team: The Experiences of Adults with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anslow, Katharine

    2014-01-01

    This research aimed to illuminate the experiences of adults with learning disabilities of the reflecting team, in the context of their systemic family therapy. Five adults with learning disabilities were recruited from one community learning disability team. A qualitative design using interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) was appropriate…

  16. Nursing students' reflections on the learning experience of a unique mental health clinical placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Christopher; Moxham, Lorna; Brighton, Renee; Taylor, Ellie; Sumskis, Susan; Perlman, Dana; Heffernan, Tim; Hadfield, Louise

    2016-11-01

    There exists a need for innovative thinking to identify new clinical placement opportunities for nursing students. Recovery-based clinical placements for mental health nurse students remain unique and require investigation. To examine the learning experience of Bachelor of Nursing students who undertook an innovative mental health clinical placement known as Recovery Camp. This study incorporated qualitative analysis of written reflections. Using Braun and Clarke's (2006) six phases of thematic analysis the corpus of student reflections were reviewed by three members of the research team independent to each other. Four themes emerged. The theme of Pre-placement Expectations incorporates participant foci on pre-conceptions of Recovery Camp. The theme of Student Learning incorporates the ways in which participants recognised the experience of Recovery Camp influenced learning. Reflections themed under the title Placement Setting include discussion of the Recovery Camp as a clinical placement. The theme of Future Practice incorporates students' reflections on how they plan to practice as nurses as a result the learning experiences of Recovery Camp. An immersive clinical placement such as Recovery Camp can influence students' perceptions of people with mental illness, have a positive impact on student learning and influence students' decisions about future practice. The learning experience of nursing students whom attend unique, recovery-orientated clinical placements can be both positive and educative. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Documenting Student Engagement Using an Intention/Reflection Exercise during an Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierke, Kerry K.; Lepp, Gardner A.

    2015-01-01

    The article shares the outcomes of a practice called Intention/Reflection (I/R) when applied to a group of ten students in a five-week course involving an international advanced pharmacy practice experience. Developed by the authors and founded on a combination of theoretical principles, this practice is unique because of the blend of formative…

  18. Researching the Reintegration of Formerly Abducted Children in Northern Uganda through Action Research : Experiences and Reflections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Angucia, Margaret; Zeelen, Jacques; de Jong, Gideon

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents experiences and reflections on the use of a participatory research methodology under the difficult conditions of a war situation in northern Uganda. We draw from two complimentary approaches in action research to explain our methodology while doing research on the reintegration

  19. Prospective Secondary Mathematics Teachers' Reflections on Teaching after Their First Teaching Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazgan-Sag, Gönül; Emre-Akdogan, Elçin; Argün, Ziya

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our study was to examine prospective secondary mathematics teachers' reflections about teaching after their first teaching experience. We carried out five interviews during the two semesters with four Turkish prospective secondary mathematics teachers. The data analysis suggests that prospective secondary mathematics teachers'…

  20. Health Education Field Experience Stories: A Reflective, Digital, Performance-Based Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyde, Adrian R.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a reflective, systematic, performance-based project resulting in the development of a digital story about a community health education field experience. The project is designed for preservice health education students at the college/university level. The primary benefit of the project is that it challenges students to engage…

  1. Reflecting on the Challenges of Informal Contexts: Early Field Experiences with Technology in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lux, Nick; Obery, Amanda; Cornish, Jamie; Grimberg, Bruna Irene; Hartshorn, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Early field experiences, or those that come early in a teacher's preparation before more formalized opportunities like practicum and student teaching, can provide a venue for pre service teachers to practice technology-specific instructional decision-making and reflective practice. Although research exists on the potential roles of field…

  2. Reflections and Experiences of Student Paramedics Undertaking International Work-Integrated Learning Placements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Paul; Thyer, Liz; Van Nugteren, Ben; Mitchell, Glen; Werner, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    International work-integrated learning (WIL) is increasingly common in health-related programs in Australian universities. Paramedicine programs are beginning to explore international WIL in line with the globalization of paramedicine as a profession and the national higher education emphasis on outward bound learning experiences. Using…

  3. Site Characterization of the Source Physics Experiment Phase II Location Using Seismic Reflection Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, E. A.; Snelson, C. M.; Chipman, V.; Emer, D. F.; White, R. L.; Emmitt, R.; Wright, A. A.; Drellack, S.; Huckins-Gang, H.; Mercadante, J.; Floyd, M.; McGowin, C.; Cothrun, C.; Bonal, N.

    2013-12-01

    processed using Seismic Processing Workshop in a standard reflection processing flow. The results from this vibroseis survey will contribute to the characterization of the location for Phase II of the SPE in order to appropriately execute the experiment. This work was done by National Security Technologies, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25946 with the U.S. Department of Energy. DOE/NV/25946--1836. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  4. Five-Year Experience: Reflective Writing in a Preclinical End-of-Life Care Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Marcy E; Ferguson, Kristi J; Broderick, Ann

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the use of reflective writing in a preclinical end-of-life curriculum including comparison of the role and outcomes of out-of-class (OC) versus in-class (IC) writing. Learners were required to complete one-page essays on their experiences and concerns about death and dying after attending a series of end-of-life care lectures. From 2002-2005, essays were completed OC and in 2006 and 2007 essays were completed during the first ten minutes of small group discussion sessions. Essays were collected and analyzed for salient themes. Between 2002-2007, reflection essays were gathered from 829 learners, including 522 OC essays and 307 IC essays. Essay analysis identified four major themes of student concerns related to caring for dying patients, as well as student reactions to specific curricular components and to the use of reflection. IC essays were shorter and less polished than OC essays but utilized a wider variety of formats including poems and bulleted lists. IC essays tended to react to lecture content immediately preceding the writing exercise whereas OC varied in curricular components upon which they focused. OC essays have the advantage of giving learners more time to choose subject matter, whereas IC essays provide a structured time in which to actively reflect. Both formats served as catalysts for small group discussions. Writing exercises can effectively provide an important opportunity and motivation for learners to reflect on past experiences and future expectations related to providing end-of-life care.

  5. Engaging Military Fathers in a Reflective Parenting Program: Lessons from Strong Families Strong Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVoe, Ellen R.; Paris, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Through Strong Families Strong Forces, a reflective parenting program for military families with young children, we were privileged to work with contemporary military fathers who served in the post-9/11 conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. Due to this work, the authors gained valuable insight into the complexity of fathering during wartime, the…

  6. Medical students as hospice volunteers: reflections on an early experiential training program in end-of-life care education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, Melissa L; Gorawara-Bhat, Rita; Marschke, Michael; Levine, Stacie

    2014-06-01

    Despite an increase in the content of palliative medicine curricula in medical schools, students are rarely exposed to end-of-life (EOL) care through real-patient experiences during their preclinical education. To evaluate the utility and impact of exposure to EOL care for first year medical students (MS-1s) through a hospice volunteer experience. Patients and Families First (PFF), a hospice volunteer training program in EOL care, was piloted on three cohorts of MS-1s as an elective. Fifty-five students received 3 hours of volunteer training, and were then required to conduct at least two consecutive hospice visits on assigned patients to obtain course credit. Students' reflective essays on their experiences were analyzed using qualitative methodology and salient themes were extracted by two investigators independently and then collaboratively. The following five themes were identified from students' reflective essays: perceptions regarding hospice patients; reactions regarding self; normalcy of EOL care at home; impact of witnessing death and dying; and suggestions for improving EOL care education for medical students. Hospice volunteering during preclinical years may provide valuable experiential training for MS-1s in caring for seriously ill patients and their families by fostering personal reflection and empathic skills, thereby providing a foundation for future patient encounters during clinical training.

  7. "I will never forget": what we learned from medical student reflections on a palliative care experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Barbara A; Earnshaw, Lori A; Greenberg, Ruth B; Morehead, Robert C; Pfeifer, Mark P; Shaw, Monica Ann

    2012-05-01

    To use reflective writing to evaluate a new required palliative care experience for third year medical students. The authors used a constant comparison method based on grounded theory to conduct a thematic analysis of reflective writings produced by third-year medical students completing a mandatory week-long clinical rotation in palliative care during academic year 2010 at the University of Louisville. Two broad thematic categories were identified: what the students learned and what the students experienced. Student writings revealed learning about palliative care (pain management, family meetings, goals of care, patient-family centered care, timing of palliative care, and delivering bad news); being a doctor (knowledge, communication, presence, empathy, not giving false hope, and person-focused care); the patient (importance of family, the experience of dying, and the uniqueness of each patient); and themselves (need to be non-judgmental, ability to do palliative care, self-limitations, becoming a better physician, and dealing with death). Student reflections centered on encounters with patients and families, internal emotional responses, and self-transformation. Systematic analysis of reflective writing provides educators with valuable data about students' learning experiences. These results may inform the design and modification of the curriculum.

  8. Perceptions of Skill Development in a Living-Learning First-Year Experience Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kerri Anna

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of students and faculty involved in a living-learning first-year experience program at a small, liberal arts institution about developing skills for life-long learning including critical thinking, written communication, and reflection and engagement across disciplines. The researcher…

  9. Blended Learning: Reflections on Teaching Experiences across the Pharmacy Education Continuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa J. Schindel

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Experiences with online learning in higher education have grown due to advancements in technology, technological savviness of students, changes in student expectations, and evolution of teaching approaches in higher education. Blended learning, the thoughtful fusion of face-to-face instruction with online learning, can enhance student learning and provide rewarding teaching experiences for faculty members. Pharmacy educators are beginning to employ blended learning across the continuum of professional education from entry-to-practice programs to continuing professional education programs. The objectives of this paper are to describe our early experiences with blended learning and how it has enhanced our teaching experiences. Possibilities for blended learning are considered as new curricula for pharmacy programs are developed at our institution.

  10. Workforce Education Models for K-12 STEM Education Programs: Reflections On, and Implications For, the NSF ITEST Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reider, David; Knestis, Kirk; Malyn-Smith, Joyce

    2016-01-01

    This article proposes a STEM workforce education logic model, tailored to the particular context of the National Science Foundation's Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) program. This model aims to help program designers and researchers address challenges particular to designing, implementing, and studying education…

  11. A Reflection on Musical Experience as Existential Experience: An Ontological Turn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pio, Frederik; Varkoy, Oivind

    2012-01-01

    In the current world of education, politics and public opinion, musical experience is increasingly threatened. It is designated ever more as an expendable luxury. This kind of general trend has hardly left the thinking in the field of music and music education untouched. Inspiration comes from the technical rationality of our time. This…

  12. A Cultural Approach to Understanding Professional Experiences of Foreign-Born Faculty in U.S. Educational Leadership Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrabrova, Iryna; Sanzo, Karen L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the professional experiences of foreign-born faculty members serving in U.S. educational leadership preparation programs, utilizing a cultural approach to discern their lived experiences related to professional life. Cultural values were explored as reflected in professional life experiences. The…

  13. Vascular Trauma Operative Experience is Inadequate in General Surgery Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Huan; Maximus, Steven; Koopmann, Matthew; Keeley, Jessica; Smith, Brian; Virgilio, Christian de; Kim, Dennis Y

    2016-05-01

    Vascular injuries may be challenging, particularly for surgeons who have not received formal vascular surgery fellowship training. Lack of experience and improper technique can result in significant complications. The objective of this study was to examine changes in resident experience with operative vascular trauma over time. A retrospective review was performed using Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) case logs of general surgery residents graduating between 2004 and 2014 at 2 academic, university-affiliated institutions associated with level 1 trauma centers. The primary outcome was number of reported vascular trauma operations, stratified by year of graduation and institution. A total of 112 residents graduated in the study period with a median 7 (interquartile range 4.5-13.5) vascular trauma cases per resident. Fasciotomy and exposure and/or repair of peripheral vessels constituted the bulk of the operative volume. Linear regression showed no significant trend in cases with respect to year of graduation (P = 0.266). Residents from program A (n = 53) reported a significantly higher number of vascular trauma cases when compared with program B (n = 59): 12.0 vs. 5.0 cases, respectively (P < 0.001). Level 1 trauma center verification does not guarantee sufficient exposure to vascular trauma. The operative exposure in program B is reflective of the national average of 4.0 cases per resident as reported by the ACGME, and this trend is unlikely to change in the near future. Fellowship training may be critical for surgeons who plan to work in a trauma setting, particularly in areas lacking vascular surgeons. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Medical students' reflective writing about a task-based learning experience on public health communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Yang Huang; Wong, Mee Lian; Lee, Jeanette Jen-Mai

    2014-02-01

    Medical educators constantly face the challenge of preparing students for public health practice. This study aimed to analyze students' reflections to gain insight into their task-based experiences in the public health communication selective. We have also examined their self-reported learning outcomes and benefits with regard to application of public health communication. Each student wrote a semi-structured reflective journal about his or her experiences leading to the delivery of a public health talk by the group. Records from 41 students were content-analyzed for recurring themes and sub-themes. Students reported a wide range of personal and professional issues. Their writings were characterized by a deep sense of self-awareness and social relatedness such as increased self-worth, communications skills, and collaborative learning. The learning encounter challenged assumptions, and enhanced awareness of the complexity of behaviour change Students also wrote about learning being more enjoyable and how the selective had forced them to adopt a more thoughtful stance towards knowledge acquisition and assimilation. Task-based learning combined with a process for reflection holds promise as an educational strategy for teaching public health communication, and cultivating the habits of reflective practice.

  15. Robotic experiment with a force reflecting handcontroller onboard MIR space station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpech, M.; Matzakis, Y.

    1994-01-01

    During the French CASSIOPEE mission that will fly onboard MIR space station in 1996, ergonomic evaluations of a force reflecting handcontroller will be performed on a simulated robotic task. This handcontroller is a part of the COGNILAB payload that will be used also for experiments in neurophysiology. The purpose of the robotic experiment is the validation of a new control and design concept that would enhance the task performances for telemanipulating space robots. Besides the handcontroller and its control unit, the experimental system includes a simulator of the slave robot dynamics for both free and constrained motions, a flat display screen and a seat with special fixtures for holding the astronaut.

  16. Graphical programming for pulse automated NMR experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belmonte, S.B. [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Oliveira, I.S.; Guimaraes, A.P. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1999-01-01

    We describe a software program designed to control a broadband pulse Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectrometer used in zero-field NMR studies of magnetic metals. The software is written in the graphical language LabVIEW. This type of programming allows modifications and the inclusion of new routines to be easily made by the non-specialist, without changing the basic structure of the program. The program corrects for differences in the gain of the two acquisition channels [U (phase) and V (quadrature)], and automatic baseline subtraction. We present examples of measurements of NMR spectra, spin-echo decay (T{sub 2}), and quadrupolar oscillations, performed in magnetic intermetallic compounds. (author)

  17. Reflections on the prospects for evaluation and qualified production of graduate programs in Environmental Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo dos Santos Targa

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this editorial, we reflect on the evaluation criteria that is under discussion to be adopted for the assessment of CAPES (Brazilian Federal Agency for the Support and Evaluation of Graduate Education Environmental Sciences area – CACiamb. This criteria aims to increase qualified production by simulating CAPES quality strata A1, A2, B1 and B2 production of Academic Master Degree Programs with 12 permanent professors based on the criteria established by the Interdisciplinary Area Committee – CAInter in 2007. As well as expectations for the adoption of periodic assessment of free access bases, along with fostering the use of scientific journals published online by Graduate Programs.

  18. Reflections on the Ethical Content of the IT Honours Program Project Module

    OpenAIRE

    Drevin, Lynette; Drevin, Günther

    2015-01-01

    Part 4: Syllabus Design; International audience; Honours programs in South African universities must include a research project module. There are external pressures from professional bodies and government that influences the nature of the project module. This paper presents a reflection on the process of managing the project module at a South African university taking into account internal and external demands. The focus for this paper is on the ethical content of the projects. Examples of pr...

  19. SEISPRHO: An interactive computer program for processing and interpretation of high-resolution seismic reflection profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasperini, Luca; Stanghellini, Giuseppe

    2009-07-01

    SEISPRHO is an interactive computer program for processing and interpreting high-resolution seismic reflection profiles developed using the Delphi/Kylix multiplatform programming environment. For this reason, it is available under Windows™ and Linux™ operating systems. The program allows the users to handle SEG-Y data files (and other non-standard formats) carrying out a processing sequence over the data to obtain, as a final result, bitmap images of seismic sections. Some basic algorithms are implemented, including filtering and deconvolution. However, the main feature of SEISPRHO is its interactive graphic interface, which provides the user with several tools for interpreting the data, such as reflector picking and map digitizing. Moreover, the program allows importing and geo-referencing maps and seismic profiles in the form of digital images. Trace-by-trace analysis of seismic signal and sea-bottom reflectivity is also implemented, as well as other special functions such as compilation of time-slice maps from close-spaced grids of seismic lines. SEISPRHO is distributed as public domain software for non-commercial purposes by the Marine Geology division of the Istituto di Scienze Marine ( ISMAR-CNR). This paper is an introduction to the program and a preliminary guide to the users.

  20. Alternative utility conservation program designs: an evaluation based on case study program experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreitler, V.

    1985-01-01

    Utilities around the nation are promoting residential conservation through a variety of program activities, ranging from customer education programs to financial incentive programs to direct installation programs. This report was undertaken to evaluate some of these alternative program designs, to compare their achievements against those of the RCS program, and to suggest program planning directions that seem most promising. Interviews with program managers were used to elucidate the rationale behind the alternative programs and to discuss program effectiveness. The experiences of nine utilities and one nonutility organization are reviewed. Program managers' opinions about RCS and their experiences with thirteen other programs are summarized. The effectiveness of the alternative program designs are compared and some implications for conservation program planning and implementation are highlighted.

  1. Does reflective web-based discussion strengthen nursing students' learning experiences during clinical training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettiäinen, Sari; Vähämaa, Kristiina

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this research was to study how a web-based discussion forum can be used as a supervision tool during nursing students' clinical training. The study emphasises peer support and its importance for the students. The empirical research was carried out at a Finnish university of applied sciences. 25 nursing students took part in web-based discussion during their eight-week clinical training period. All in all, 395 comments were submitted. The material was analysed by using categorisation and a thematic analysis process. Finally, the results were reported using a modified Salmon's (2002) 5-stage model of Teaching and Learning On-line and Mezirow's (1981) levels of reflection. The students motivated each other by sharing their feelings and experiences. They noticed the value of peer support and started to learn from each other as well. By reflecting on their experiences, the students progressed in their learning process and at the same time advanced their reflective thinking process. This combination of theoretical knowledge and practice, based on the students' needs and interests, could lead to a deeper understanding which could also result in better clinical skills. This method offers the lecturers the possibility to support and follow the professional growth process in a new evidence-based manner. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. UniEdge: A first year transition program and its continued evolution through a reflective approach. A Practice Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Lefroy

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Phillipa Sturgess 14.00 800x600 The shift in Australian higher education policy to widen participation and ensure equity across all student cohorts has led to the need for specific, structured transition programs. The First Year Advisor Network at Murdoch University in Perth, Australia has designed and implemented a transition program for commencing students called UniEdge. The aims of the program are: (1 to help foster a sense of community for first year students; (2 to  make new students aware of the support services available; and (3 to improve the confidence and preparedness of new students. The program has received high praise from students, but rates of attendance have been problematic. By reflecting on student and staff feedback, the program has been adapted over multiple semesters, resulting in increased student attendance and therefore a greater impact on the first year experience at Murdoch University. Normal 0 false false false EN-AU X-NONE X-NONE

  3. The 2014 Shanghai Open University International Student Exchange : Experiences and Reflection of a Participant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizing, Bert

    2014-01-01

    This document gives a presentation of the experiences during the Immersion Hub 2014: Shanghai Open University Student Exchange program from 18 - 29 August 2014. Topics of discussion are – firstly –the concept of Immersion. Secondly, the Chinese language and culture and – finally – my conclusions and

  4. California Student Counselors Reflect on a Study Abroad Experience in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslade, John; Douglass, Amy; Echeverria, Korina; Garcia, Joanna; Howard, Krystal; Lillard, Dorry; Stephens, Samantha; Zacarias, Stefany

    2015-01-01

    Seven counseling and guidance students from California participated in a study abroad program in which they were placed in a high school in Auckland, New Zealand, for one month. Their comments on the experience in response to researchers' questions form the basis of this paper. They suggest that the participants benefited from being immersed in a…

  5. International Teacher Professional Development: Teacher Reflections of Authentic Teaching and Learning Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaro, Cristina; Quezada, Reyes L.

    2010-01-01

    The article examines 21 biliteracy teachers who studied and taught in schools through an eight-week in-service professional development program with indigenous children in the state of Altacomulco, Mexico. In the process of documenting their international teaching experiences, a study was conducted to ascertain biliteracy teachers' development of…

  6. The Apprentice to Master Journey: Exploring Tertiary Music Instrument Teachers’ Reflections on Their Experiences as Learner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Many students worldwide engage in lessons on a music instrument; the most common format for this type of learning isthe one-to-one or studio lesson where the master guides the apprentice. At the same time, the one-to-one or studio lesson is an isolated area of practice, given that it takes place behind closed doors. In addition, while the literature for classroom music teachers is substantial with regard to investigating how they describe their own previous teaching experiences or the general characteristics of effective teachers, in comparison there are few studies that explore what music instrument teachers believe are effective characteristics and attributes of their previous teachers and lessons. In order to address this problem, this exploratory article focuses on the reflections of current higher education performing arts teachers; specifically music instrument teachers and their experiences of teachers and lessons. Survey data were obtained from 171 practitioners from nine nations. The respondents were asked to reflect on their initial, pre-tertiary and tertiary lesson experiences and teachers, and to identify the most significant influences on their learning. The data reveal a number of findings, such as the dominance of the master-apprentice social and learning relationship, the characteristics and attributes of inspiring teachers and/or learning experiences, and the fact that some respondents do not have any positive reflections on some periods of their learning.  The data also point towards the cyclical nature of music instrument learning and teaching, with masters guiding apprentices who then become the masters.

  7. First experience of programming a court decision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey B. Polyakov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective Consideration of the computer program model for making a lawful and wellgrounded judicial act in order to reduce the times for making the court decision. Methods universal dialecticmaterialistic method which removes the contradictions of the professional training of judges and procedural controls the formal legal method for transferring the requirements of the law and jurisprudence for the lawenforcement activity into programs for judges and case participants the objectoriented modeling objectoriented programming methodology. Results a computer program was created that allows to adjudicate in a civil case if the claim is recognized by the defendant. The program does not resolve the judge from the decisionmaking process but creates conditions to move along the stages of lawenforcement procedure and legal reasoning in accordance with the requirements of the law and of legal science. Therefore filling forms manually in the trial should be simultaneous with writing the decision judgment sentence assessment. The program includes the following sections preparation of forms common to certain types of proceedings certain categories of cases courts in the above forms determination of the order to establish the actual circumstances the burden of proof distribution types of evidence methods of law interpretation characteristics of collisions and gaps in legislation and ways to overcome them the standard wording in the judicial act templates and in the forms mandatory and optional information in the form. Based on the above the article concludes that by analogy with the presented program it is possible to create software for making a lawful wellgrounded and fair judicial act for other categories of cases and as a consequence to reduce the period of making judicial decisions. Scientific novelty the first computer program is created for rendering and production of judicial decisions. Practical significance the model is made to create a mass tool of

  8. NASA physics and chemistry experiments in-space program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabris, E. A.

    1981-01-01

    The Physics and Chemistry Experiments Program (PACE) is part of the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology (OAST) research and technology effort in understanding the fundamental characteristics of physics and chemical phenomena. This program seeks to increase the basic knowledge in these areas by well-planned research efforts which include in-space experiments when the limitations of ground-based activities precludes or restricts the achievement of research goals. Overview study areas are concerned with molecular beam experiments for Space Shuttle, experiments on drops and bubbles in a manned earth-orbiting laboratory, the study of combustion experiments in space, combustion experiments in orbiting spacecraft, gravitation experiments in space, and fluid physics, thermodynamics, and heat-transfer experiments. Procedures for the study program have four phases. An overview study was conducted in the area of materials science.

  9. Research Experience in Psychiatry Residency Programs Across Canada: Current Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugalingam, Arany; Ferreria, Sharon G; Norman, Ross M G; Vasudev, Kamini

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the current status of research experience in psychiatry residency programs across Canada. Method: Coordinators of Psychiatric Education (COPE) resident representatives from all 17 psychiatry residency programs in Canada were asked to complete a survey regarding research training requirements in their programs. Results: Among the 17 COPE representatives, 15 completed the survey, representing 88% of the Canadian medical schools that have a psychiatry residency program. Among the 15 programs, 11 (73%) require residents to conduct a scholarly activity to complete residency. Some of these programs incorporated such a requirement in the past 5 years. Ten respondents (67%) reported availability of official policy and (or) guidelines on resident research requirements. Among the 11 programs that have a research requirement, 10 (91%) require residents to complete 1 scholarly activity; 1 requires completion of 2 scholarly activities. Eight (53%) residency programs reported having a separate research track. All of the programs have a research coordinator and 14 (93%) programs provide protected time to residents for conducting research. The 3 most common types of scholarly activities that qualify for the mandatory research requirement are a full independent project (10 programs), a quality improvement project (8 programs), and assisting in a faculty project (8 programs). Six programs expect their residents to present their final work in a departmental forum. None of the residency programs require publication of residents’ final work. Conclusions: The current status of the research experience during psychiatry residency in Canada is encouraging but there is heterogeneity across the programs. PMID:25565474

  10. Global engineering education programs: More than just international experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeill, Nathan J.

    Engineers in both industry and academia recognize the global nature of the profession. This has lead to calls for engineering students to develop knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for success within a global profession. Many institutions are developing globally oriented programs specifically for their engineering students and are eager to know if these programs are helping their students to develop attributes that meet their program objectives, accreditation requirements, and the needs and desires of prospective employers. Administrators of such programs currently lack research data to support the learning objectives they are setting for their programs. This study documented the individual experiences and learning outcomes of students involved in three global education programs for engineering students. The first program provided a portfolio of experiences including foreign language instruction, one semester of study abroad, internships in the U.S. and abroad, and a two-semester global team design project. The second program was a one semester study abroad program in China, and the third was a global service project whose purpose was to design an irrigation system for two small farms in Rwanda. The research questions guiding this study were: 1. What specific knowledge, skills, and attitudes are students gaining from participation in their respective global engineering programs? 2. What kinds of experiences are resulting in these learning outcomes? Interviews were used to elicit the experiences and learning outcomes of participants in this study. Program administrators were also interviewed for their perspectives on the experiences and learning outcomes of participants for the purpose of triangulation. The study identified more than 50 outcomes that resulted from students' experiences in these three programs. The most prevalent outcomes across all three programs included knowledge of culture, openness to new experiences and other cultures, and communication

  11. Reflections on E. E. Just, Black Apollo of Science, and the experiences of African American scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Kenneth R

    2009-10-01

    The text below is a transcript of the keynote address Kenneth Manning gave at the symposium honoring E. E. Just that was held on the campus of Howard University on November 21, 2008. In his talk, Manning reflects on his experiences researching and writing Black Apollo of Science: The Life of Ernest Everett Just, his prize-winning biography published in 1983. In the process, he retells the fascinating story of the life of E. E. Just. Manning also discusses a number of other topics, including Just's legacy, the role of African Americans in science, and the importance of having minority representation on college campuses. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. From experienced to novice: a reflective account on the changing role of front-line implementer to program trainer in Project P.A.T.H.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Florence K Y; Shek, Daniel T L

    2012-01-14

    Although training plays an important role in the successful implementation of positive youth development programs, research on training and trainers in this field is grossly neglected. In this paper, a trainer of a positive youth development program in Hong Kong (Project P.A.T.H.S.; Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programmes) reflected about her transition from the role of a teacher (and program implementer) to the role of a trainer. Based on the reflection, the transformations involved, including self-perception, teaching role and teaching strategies, were highlighted. The issue of how previous experience influenced training in the context of positive youth development was also discussed. It is suggested that involvement of front-line practitioners in the training of positive youth development programs is workable, although systematic training for the novice trainers may be needed.

  13. Critical Reflections and contributions to a Physical Education Specialist Students practice’s program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucio Martínez Alvarez

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This work is part of a bigger strategy of participative investigation-action focused on critical reflection and improvement of a Practicum program for Physical Education specialist teachers. We liked to know which were the worries expressed by the student teachers before entering the school settings, with the intention of reflecting on how the program recognizes, integrates and answers to the emotional dimension of the Practicum.In that way, there were categorized and analyzed the writings and questionnaires the students (N 54 elaborated in the preparatory phase of the Practicum of the course 08-09. Later, we contrasted these with the intentions, actions, and strategies the programmed had planned for attending the emotional dimension that arises in this stage of the practicum.In doing so, we were in better disposition to check the coherence of the programme, the principles sustaining it, and the degree which it responds to the human and social context where it is developed, so we were able to fine tune the programme, aware of the emotional dimension of the Practicum.

  14. Verbal definitions of familiar objects in blind children reflect their peculiar perceptual experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinter, A; Fernandes, V; Orlandi, O; Morgan, P

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine to what extent the verbal definitions of familiar objects produced by blind children reflect their peculiar perceptual experience and, in consequence, differ from those produced by sighted children. Ninety-six visually impaired children, aged between 6 and 14 years, and 32 age-matched sighted children had to define 10 words denoting concrete animate or inanimate familiar objects. The blind children evoked the tactile and auditory characteristics of objects and expressed personal perceptual experiences in their definitions. The sighted children relied on visual perception, and produced more visually oriented verbalism. In contrast, no differences were observed between children in their propensity to include functional attributes in their verbal definitions. The results are discussed in line with embodied views of cognition that postulate mandatory perceptuomotor processing of words during access to their meaning. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Widely Assumed but Thinly Tested: Do Employee Volunteers' Self-Reported Skill Improvements Reflect the Nature of Their Volunteering Experiences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, David A.

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of companies use corporate volunteering programs (CVPs) to support and coordinate their employees' efforts to serve their communities. Among the most frequently touted benefits of such programs to sponsoring companies and employee volunteers alike is the opportunities for employees to develop tangible work-related skills through their volunteering activities. Evidence for skill development through volunteering, however, is mostly limited to the expressed beliefs of corporate leaders and employee volunteers. This study was designed to contribute to this largely anecdotal literature by testing hypotheses about the extent to which employee volunteers' self-reported skill development reflects the characteristics of the volunteers and their volunteering experiences. Study participants were 74 employee volunteers who completed a service apprenticeship managed by a U.S.-based nonprofit called Citizen Schools that partners with middle schools to extend the learning day with a combination of academic support, enrichment, and youth development activities. Data were obtained via the nonprofit's records, and surveys completed by employee volunteers before and after their service experience, including measures used to assess self-reported improvements in each of 10 work-related skills: communicating performance expectations, leadership, mentorship, motivating others, project management, providing performance feedback, public speaking and presenting, speaking clearly, teamwork, and time management. Support was found for several hypothesized effects suggesting that employees who practiced specific skills more often during their volunteering experience reported greater improvements in those skills. Improvements in some skills were higher among employee volunteers who completed a greater number of pre-volunteering preparation courses, and the effects of preparation courses were moderated by the employee volunteers' self-efficacy about improving their work

  16. Widely Assumed but Thinly Tested: Do Employee Volunteers' Self-Reported Skill Improvements Reflect the Nature of Their Volunteering Experiences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, David A

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of companies use corporate volunteering programs (CVPs) to support and coordinate their employees' efforts to serve their communities. Among the most frequently touted benefits of such programs to sponsoring companies and employee volunteers alike is the opportunities for employees to develop tangible work-related skills through their volunteering activities. Evidence for skill development through volunteering, however, is mostly limited to the expressed beliefs of corporate leaders and employee volunteers. This study was designed to contribute to this largely anecdotal literature by testing hypotheses about the extent to which employee volunteers' self-reported skill development reflects the characteristics of the volunteers and their volunteering experiences. Study participants were 74 employee volunteers who completed a service apprenticeship managed by a U.S.-based nonprofit called Citizen Schools that partners with middle schools to extend the learning day with a combination of academic support, enrichment, and youth development activities. Data were obtained via the nonprofit's records, and surveys completed by employee volunteers before and after their service experience, including measures used to assess self-reported improvements in each of 10 work-related skills: communicating performance expectations, leadership, mentorship, motivating others, project management, providing performance feedback, public speaking and presenting, speaking clearly, teamwork, and time management. Support was found for several hypothesized effects suggesting that employees who practiced specific skills more often during their volunteering experience reported greater improvements in those skills. Improvements in some skills were higher among employee volunteers who completed a greater number of pre-volunteering preparation courses, and the effects of preparation courses were moderated by the employee volunteers' self-efficacy about improving their work

  17. A first W7-X experiment program editor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spring, A.; Lewerentz, M.; Bluhm, T.; Hennig, C.; Kuhner, G.; Laqua, H.; Riemann, H.; Schacht, J.; Werner, A. [Max-Planck-Institute for Plasmaphysics, Teilinstitut Greifswald (Germany); Heimann, P.; Kroiss, H.; Maier, J.; Zilker, M. [Max-Planck-Institute for Plasmaphysics, Garching (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    This document is composed of a poster and its abstract. The long Wendelstein 7-X experiment programs will be segmented into arbitrary time slices. For each of these segments the planned behaviour is stored in a configuration database - and that for every component within the W7X hierarchical layout. Up to now we have an editor to set up these segments for each single component. But generating the compound program description out of the components' segments is still time-consuming experts' hand work. It is planned to implement a top-down program editor which is able to break down a high level physics program proposal to component segments while observing all the physical and technical constraints - a quite ambitious intention. This poster describes the first step to an experiment program editor: The 'express program editor' will be able to modify parameters of a single, a subset, or all segments within a given program, thus adapting its behaviour in an easy way. A graphical program structure overview has been implemented giving fast access to program parameters for comparison and editing. Appropriate parameter editors regard type and constraints as known from the single-segment editor. In a single transaction all changes are saved, the resulting experiment program is re-generated and the involved components are triggered to reload the changed program. Even though changing the program's structure is not supported in this version, the express program editor will serve as a tool for quick program adaptations in the daily experiment routine. Furthermore this implementation will be used as a design and usage study for the later high-end W7-X program editor. (authors)

  18. Why national eHealth programs need dead philosophers: Wittgensteinian reflections on policymakers' reluctance to learn from history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhalgh, Trisha; Russell, Jill; Ashcroft, Richard E; Parsons, Wayne

    2011-12-01

    Policymakers seeking to introduce expensive national eHealth programs would be advised to study lessons from elsewhere. But these lessons are unclear, partly because a paradigm war (controlled experiment versus interpretive case study) is raging. England's $20.6 billion National Programme for Information Technology (NPfIT) ran from 2003 to 2010, but its overall success was limited. Although case study evaluations were published, policymakers appeared to overlook many of their recommendations and persisted with some of the NPfIT's most criticized components and implementation methods. In this reflective analysis, illustrated by a case fragment from the NPfIT, we apply ideas from Ludwig Wittgenstein's postanalytic philosophy to justify the place of the "n of 1" case study and consider why those in charge of national eHealth programs appear reluctant to learn from such studies. National eHealth programs unfold as they do partly because no one fully understands what is going on. They fail when this lack of understanding becomes critical to the programs' mission. Detailed analyses of the fortunes of individual programs, articulated in such a way as to illuminate the contextualized talk and action ("language games") of multiple stakeholders, offer unique and important insights. Such accounts, portrayals rather than models, deliver neither statistical generalization (as with experiments) nor theoretical generalization (as with multisite case comparisons or realist evaluations). But they do provide the facility for heuristic generalization (i.e., to achieve a clearer understanding of what is going on), thereby enabling more productive debate about eHealth programs' complex, interdependent social practices. A national eHealth program is best conceptualized not as a blueprint and implementation plan for a state-of-the-art technical system but as a series of overlapping, conflicting, and mutually misunderstood language games that combine to produce a situation of ambiguity

  19. Promoting Media Literacy’ as Practicing “Media Reform”: Reflecting on Personal Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Ju Tsai

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper assesses conceptions and practices in critical media literacy. In particular, it focuses on teaching experience and the processes which combine the educator’s reflection of theories of the ‘public sphere’, ‘media literacy’, and ‘communication civil rights’. The paper is divided into three main parts. The first of four sections will briefly cover the history of media reform and the relationship between the media reform movement and critical media literacy lessons in community colleges. It will connect this to the idea of ‘turn to the public’. The meaning and position of ‘media literacy’ in the broad media reform movement will also be analyzed. Following this, in the second section, conceptualizations of the ‘public sphere’, ‘public pedagogy’, and ‘critical media literacy pedagogy’ will be developed. Finally, three stages of the lesson design and practical interactions will be examined dialectically. In particular, the community college field research on my teaching experience will be described in the third section, and the suggestions, reflections and conclusions from the research will be examined in the last section.

  20. Reflective oxygen saturation monitoring at hypothenar and its validation by human hypoxia experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tao; Cao, Zhengtao; Zhang, Zhengbo; Li, Deyu; Yu, Mengsun

    2015-08-05

    Pulse oxygen saturation (SpO2) is an important parameter for healthcare, and wearable sensors and systems for SpO2 monitoring have become increasingly popular. The aim of this paper is to develop a novel SpO2 monitoring system, which detects photoplethysmographic (PPG) signals at hypothenar with a reflection-mode sensor embedded into a glove. A special photo-detector section was designed with two photodiodes arranged symmetrically to the red and infrared light-emitting diodes (LED) to enhance the signal quality. The reflective sensor was placed in a soft silicon substrate sewn in a glove to fit the surface of the hypothenar. To lower the power consumption, the LED driving current was reduced and energy-efficient electronic components were applied. The performance for PPG signal detection and SpO2 monitoring was evaluated by human hypoxia experiments. Accelerometer-based adaptive noise cancellation (ANC) methods applying the least mean squares (LMS) and recursive least squares (RLS) algorithms were studied to suppress motion artifact. A total of 20 subjects participated in the hypoxia experiment. The degree of comfort for wearing this system was accepted by them. The PPG signals were detected effectively at SpO2 levels from about 100-70%. The experiment validated the accuracy of the system was 2.34%, compared to the invasive measurements. Both the LMS and RLS algorithms improved the performance during motion. The total current consumed by the system was only 8 mA. It is feasible to detect PPG signal and monitor SpO2 at the location of hypothenar. This novel system can achieve reliable SpO2 measurements at different SpO2 levels and on different individuals. The system is light-weighted, easy to wear and power-saving. It has the potential to be a solution for wearable monitoring, although more work should be conducted to improve the motion-resistant performance significantly.

  1. Pen Branch fault program: Interim report on the High Resolution, Shallow Seismic Reflection surveys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stieve, A.L. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States))

    1991-01-31

    The Pen Branch fault was identified in the subsurface at the Savannah River Site in 1989 based upon the interpretation of earlier seismic reflection surveys and other geologic investigations. A program was initiated at that time to further define the fault in terms of its capability to release seismic energy. The High-Resolution, Shallow Seismic Reflection survey recently completed at SRS was initiated to determine the shallowest extent of the fault and to demonstrate the presence of flat-lying sediments in the top 300 feet of sediments. Conclusions at this time are based upon this shallow seismic survey and the Conoco deep seismic survey (1988--1989). Deformation related to the Pen Branch fault is at least 200 milliseconds beneath the surface in the Conoco data and at least 150 milliseconds in the shallow seismic reflection data. This corresponds to approximately 300 feet below the surface. Sediments at that depth are lower Tertiary (Danian stage) or over 60 million years old. This indicates that the fault is not capable.

  2. Programming the iPhone User Experience

    CERN Document Server

    Boudreaux, Toby

    2009-01-01

    Apple's iPhone and iPod Touch not only feature the world's most powerful mobile operating system, they also usher in a new standard of human-computer interaction through gestural interfaces and multi-touch navigation. This book provides you with a hands-on, example-driven tour of UIKit, Apple's user interface toolkit, and includes common design patterns to help you create new iPhone and iPod Touch user experiences. Using Apple's Cocoa Touch framework, you'll learn how to build applications that respond in unique ways when users tap, slide, swipe, tilt, shake, or pinch the screen. Programmin

  3. Self-practice and self-reflection in cognitive behaviour therapy training: what factors influence trainees' engagement and experience of benefit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett-Levy, James; Lee, Nicole K

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies of self-practice/self-reflection (SP/SR) CBT training have found that trainees report significant benefits from practising CBT techniques on themselves (self-practice) and reflecting on their experience (self-reflection) as a formal part of their CBT training. However, not all trainees experience the same level of benefit from SP/SR and not all types of training course produce benefits to the same extent. This paper examines the question: What factors influence trainees' reported benefit from SP/SR? The aim was to develop a model to maximize the value of SP/SR training. The authors used a grounded theory analysis of four SP/SR training courses, varying along several dimensions, to derive a model that could account for the data. A model was derived comprising of seven elements: Two outcomes - "Experience of Benefit" and "Engagement with the Process" - that mutually influence one another; and five other influencing factors - "Course Structure and Requirements", "Expectation of Benefit", "Feeling of Safety with the Process", "Group Process", and "Available Personal Resources" - that mediate the impact on Engagement with the Process and Experience of Benefit from SP/SR. A model that provides guidance about the best ways to set up and develop SP/SR programs has been developed. This model may now be subject to empirical testing by trainers and researchers. Implications and recommendations for the design and development of future SP/SR programs are discussed.

  4. Complementing a Rural Pharmacy Course with CAM: Reflections from a Decade of Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maree Simpson

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Substantial complementary medicines (CAM use is reported worldwide. Australian consumers use CAM for health maintenance, minor self-limiting disease states, and also for chronic conditions. The increasing use of CAM has required pharmacists to become increasingly more knowledgeable about CAM and the ethics of CAM recommendation. When the first Australian non-metropolitan pharmacy program was started at Charles Sturt University, in 1997, it was decided to incorporate two innovative courses to assist rurally educated students to engage with health consumers who expect pharmacists to be able to assist them with CAM. This discussion traces and reflects on the development, implementation and current situation of the Complementary Medicines for Pharmacy course. Over time, this course has evolved from a final year elective with a focus on familiarization to a mandated course with a phytomedicine focus to an integrated topic in final year with a focus on evidence, quality of evidence and professional decision-making demonstrated in a reflective professional portfolio. Of potentially greater importance, however, has been the introduction of complementary medicines as a topic in every year of the course with the goal of facilitating effective professional engagement with health consumers.

  5. Teaching Critical Thinking Using Reflective Journaling in a Nursing Fellowship Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zori, Susan

    2016-07-01

    Critical thinking (CT) is considered to be foundational for the development of RN clinical reasoning. Reflective journaling has been used as an educational strategy to support the development of CT. This project's purpose was to explore how using reflective journaling about CT dispositions with RNs in a fellowship program might influence RN's use of CT dispositions. This descriptive, qualitative study used content analysis as the method to analyze journal entries focused on seven CT dispositions: inquisitiveness, systematicity, open mindedness, analyticity, truth seeking, CT maturity, and CT confidence written by RNs in the first 7 weeks of their fellowship program. Based on the content analysis of journal entries, two major descriptive themes emerged: Development of Critical Thinking Is a Process That Develops During a Period of Time, and Purposefully Engaging Critical Thinking Dispositions May Help Prevent Negative Patient Outcomes. The purposeful use of CT dispositions as described in the journal entries also helped to guide the RN's individual learning. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2016;47(7):321-329. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Research Experience for Undergraduates: an International Program Enhancing Interdisciplinary Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfiffner, S. M.; Davis, K. L.; Phelps, T. J.; Kieft, T. L.; Gihring, T. M.; Onstott, T. C.; Nthangeni, B.; Piater, L.; van Heerden, E.

    2004-12-01

    This NSF-funded research experience for undergraduates (REU) took place in South Africa, where gold mines provided outstanding field sites to investigate biogeochemical processes in deep subsurface environments. Underrepresented minorities were encouraged to participate. Cross-disciplinary training was a major ambition for this REU Site: Biogeochemical Educational Experiences - South Africa. Students were selected from diverse academic disciplines (biology, chemistry, and geology) to participate in this interdisciplinary research program. Research projects included characterizing microbial communities with molecular and biochemical techniques, cultivating microorganisms, utilizing geochemical and isotopic parameters to constrain nutrient cycling in groundwater, investigating extreme enzymes and examining functional genes. During the REU, students collected biofilms and fissure water emanating from gas-rich boreholes in 2-3 km deep mines and performed laboratory research in teams under joint mentorship of U.S. and South African scientists. Research teams consisted of three to five students with at least one student from each country and at least two of the disciplines represented. Team membership reflected students' ranking of their choices among mentor-proposed projects. The REU encouraged students to increase scientific knowledge across disciplines, improve oral and written communication skills, and explore cultural and international challenges for scientific research in the global community. Each research team presented oral progress reports to the other research teams to provide communication skill development and to provide a forum for data exchange and interpretation among the various disciplines. Oral communication training culminated in a public presentation by each team at a university/industry science symposium. Mentors reviewed students' writing skills as they prepared text on experimental design, research findings, data interpretation, and literature

  7. The experience of being a member of the Student International Community of Practice: a collaborative reflection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brighide M. Lynch

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: In 2010 a community of practice was set up for and by doctoral students engaged in person-centred and practitioner research. After three years, this community became part of a larger international community of practice. Aims and objectives: Captured under the stanzas of a poem and supported by the literature, this paper uses member narratives and creative expressions in a critical reflection on the experience of being a member of the Student International Community of Practice. Conclusions: Membership in the community of practice was experienced as beneficial, providing both support and challenge to enrich the doctoral students’ development as person-centred researchers. Retaining connectivity across an international landscape and finding effective ways to integrate new members into the community presented the greatest challenges. Implications for practice development: • The theoretical foundation and experiential knowledge could assist others considering support structures for the development of person-centred practices • Shared learning and co-creation of knowledge add value to the experience of being a doctoral researcher • Membership fluctuations present challenges to continuity of learning and the maintenance of a safe space with communities of practice. Such fluctuations, however, create chances for community members to experience diverse roles within the group and encourage explicit attention to person-centredness

  8. Experiments in Program Verification using Event-B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallerstede, Stefan; Leuschel, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The Event-B method can be used to model all sorts of discrete event systems, among them sequential programs. In this article we describe our experiences with using Event-B by way of two examples. We present a simple model of a factorial program, explaining the method, and a more intricate model...

  9. New accreditation program: university health network's experience with Qmentum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepfers, Anita; Hruska, Christa; Stone, Justin; Moser, Jane

    2009-01-01

    In 2008, University Health Network was surveyed using Accreditation Canada's new Qmentum program. The following article describes UHN's experience rolling out the program to over 12,000 staff, physicians and volunteers. The article also outlines key challenges and lessons learned by the multi-site organization, with a focus on staff engagement, on-site survey preparation and sustainability moving forward. Staff feedback on the Qmentum program was extremely positive, and forecast results from Accreditation Canada were excellent.

  10. Maintaining a stationary laser footprint during angular scan in internal-reflection experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Eduardo; Cavalcanti, Gustavo Oliveira

    2013-11-10

    In internal-reflection metrology using prisms, the prism is usually mounted on a rotation/translation stage to enable adjusting angle and location of the laser footprint on the surface. If a visual inspection method is used to find the laser footprint, the task becomes impossible if invisible radiation in the near infrared is employed. In addition, it may be desirable to perform angular scan experiments with a stationary footprint on the surface during scans, or even to automatically probe specific points on an extended prism face for predetermined incidence angles. In this paper, a formulation is developed to determine the required translation along the prism face to allow maintaining the laser footprint stationary under a given rotation. A web-based app developed under the scope of this work demonstrates the applicability of the approach for silica, BK7 and SF2 glasses, in the wavelength range from 500 to 1500 nm and for an arbitrary geometry of the glass prism.

  11. Linking Experiences and Outcomes within a Postsecondary Leadership Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strawn, Kellie; McKim, Aaron J.; Velez, Jonathan J.

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the leadership development outcomes associated with specific experiences in a one-year, intensive leadership development program at a large northwest research university. Students highlighted three programmatic experiences for their effectiveness: (a) faculty mentoring, (b) participation in a weekly seminar, and (c)…

  12. Watching Teacher Candidates Watch Themselves: Reflections on a Practicum Program in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akcan Sumru

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the findings of a study that investigates pre-service English teachers’ reflections on their teaching performance after watching their videotaped lessons in company with their university supervisor. This study, conducted during the spring semester practicum program in the 2007-2008 academic year, examines how the teacher candidates felt about their teaching while watching a video of a real lesson taught in a classroom. The findings of this study suggest that after the teacher candidates watched their own teaching with the supervisor, they made specific comments about teacher talk and about students’ participation and interest in the lesson. The findings also show that the use of video recording in the practicum program provided opportunities for reflection and helped teacher candidates evaluate their performance more critically. Key words: Non-native speaker pre-service English teachers, practicum, reflective teaching, videobased reflection sessions Este artículo presenta los hallazgos de un estudio que investiga las reflexiones de futuros profesores de inglés respecto a su desempeño docente después de haber visto con su asesor de práctica de la universidad las grabaciones de sus propias clases. Este estudio, realizado durante la práctica semestral de primavera en el periodo académico 2007-2008, examina cómo se sintieron los practicantes respecto a su forma de enseñar cuando veían un video de una clase dictada en un salón de clase real. Los hallazgos del estudio sugieren que después de que los practicantes o futuros docentes observaron en compañía de su supervisor su forma de enseñar, hicieron comentarios relacionados especialmente con la forma de hablar de los profesores y con la participación e interés de los estudiantes en la clase. Los hallazgos también muestran que la grabación en video en el programa de práctica docente generó oportunidades para reflexionar y ayudó a los

  13. Narratives reflecting the lived experiences of people with brain disorders: common psychosocial difficulties and determinants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally Hartley

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: People with brain disorders - defined as both, mental disorders and neurological disorders experience a wide range of psychosocial difficulties (PSDs (e.g., concentrating, maintaining energy levels, and maintaining relationships. Research evidence is required to show that these PSDs are common across brain disorders. OBJECTIVES: To explore and gain deeper understanding of the experiences of people with seven brain disorders (alcohol dependency, depression, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, stroke. It examines the common PSDs and their influencing factors. METHODS: Seventy seven qualitative studies identified in a systematic literature review and qualitative data derived from six focus groups are used to generate first-person narratives representing seven brain disorders. A theory-driven thematic analysis of these narratives identifies the PSDs and their influencing factors for comparison between the seven disorders. RESULTS: First-person narratives illustrate realities for people with brain disorders facilitating a deeper understanding of their every-day life experiences. Thematic analysis serves to highlight the commonalities, both of PSDs, such as loneliness, anger, uncertainty about the future and problems with work activities, and their determinants, such as work opportunities, trusting relationships and access to self-help groups. CONCLUSIONS: The strength of the methodology and the narratives is that they provide the opportunity for the reader to empathise with people with brain disorders and facilitate deeper levels of understanding of the complexity of the relationship of PSDs, determinants and facilitators. The latter reflect positive aspects of the lives of people with brain disorders. The result that many PSDs and their influencing factors are common to people with different brain disorders opens up the door to the possibility of using cross-cutting interventions involving different sectors

  14. Undergraduate Students' Experiences in Programming: Difficulties and Obstacles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Büşra Özmen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Programming courses become prominent as one of the courses in which undergraduate students are unsuccessful especially in departments which offer computer education. Students often state that these courses are quite difficult compared to other courses. Therefore, a qualitative phenomenological approach was used to reveal the reasons of the failures of the undergraduate students in programming courses and to examine the difficulties they confronted with programming. In this scope, the laboratory practices of the Internet Programming course were observed in fall term of the 2013-2014 academic year in a university at central Anatolia. Interviews were made with 12 undergraduate students taking this course. Finally, the difficulties students experienced in the programming were determined as programming knowledge, programming skills, understanding semantics of the program, and debugging. Students emphasized that the biggest causes of failure in programming languages are lack of practice, not using algorithms and lack of knowledge. In addition, it was seen that the students who had high programming experience possess higher programming success and self-efficacy related to programming

  15. "They're Just a Good Time and Move On": Fraternity Men Reflect on Their Hookup Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinson, Rebecca D.; Levy, Lauren B.; Alt, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Hookups have largely replaced heterosexual dating on campus, but literature suggests men and women may ascribe different motivations and meanings to hookup experiences. This study, utilizing Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis, makes sense of the responses of three fraternity members reflecting upon their sexual and dating experiences. Four…

  16. Reflecting on the State of U.S. Doctoral PETE Programs . . . "Houston, We've Had a Problem."

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Mars, Hans

    2011-01-01

    This theme issue of "Journal of Teaching in Physical Education" constitutes the first concentrated effort to reflect on critical dimensions and issues related to the quality of doctoral programs in Sport Pedagogy/Physical Education Teacher Education (PETE) in the United States (hereafter referred to as D-PETE programs). For a number of years now,…

  17. An Arduino-Based Experiment Designed to Clarify the Transition to Total Internal Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkin, Keith

    2018-01-01

    The topic of refraction and reflection of light at the boundary of transparent media is a fundamentally important one. The special case of total internal reflection is however commonly misrepresented in elementary textbooks. This paper addresses the problem and describes an experimental procedure for measuring and displaying reflected and…

  18. Broadening cultural sensitivity at the end of life: an interprofessional education program incorporating critical reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halm, Margo A; Evans, Rhonda; Wittenberg, Amie; Wilgus, Edward

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND/PROBLEM: End-of-life beliefs and practices are as varied as one's culture. Little is known about what interventions are effective in developing clinician's skills to deliver culturally sensitive end-of-life care. Using a pre-post design, this pilot study aimed to evaluate the impact of a 2-stage educational program on enhancing clinician's knowledge and comfort in addressing and honoring diverse end-of-life care beliefs, as well as developing higher levels of cultural competence. Twenty-four interprofessional team members practicing on a combined medical-surgical oncology unit attended an in-service session on the end-of-life care beliefs, practices, and preferences of the Latino, Russian, and Micronesian cultures and then participated in critical reflection sessions where culturally specific end-of-life care cases were discussed using a structured dialogue guide. Outcomes measured were cultural competence using the Intercultural Development Inventory, Frommelt Attitudes Toward Caring of the Dying, knowledge of cultural beliefs/traditions, and self-perceived comfort in providing culturally sensitive end-of-life care. Collectively, the Intercultural Development Inventory showed that the team's perceived cultural competence was at the level of "acceptance" whereas team's developmental orientation was "minimization," meaning that the team overestimated its cultural competence. The t tests showed no significant differences between pre-post attitude and knowledge scores (P > .05). Despite these findings, staffs' perceived level of understanding of end-of-life care beliefs, preferences, and practices of the Latino, Russian, and Micronesian cultures, as well as comfort and effectiveness in providing culturally sensitive end-of-life care, were higher after the in-service and critical reflection sessions (P intercultural development continuum, nor did it significantly change knowledge and attitudes, likely due to the small sample and that maturity in cultural

  19. [International academic mobility program in nursing experience report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Mariana Gonçalves; Pagliuca, Lorita Marlena Freitag

    2012-03-01

    An experience of studying abroad or of academic exchange, really adds value to the professional and personal development of exchange students. This report aims to describe a student's experience in an international academic mobility program. It was developed from 2008 to 2009 in Brazil and Spain. The experiences, observations and activities of the student were emphasized believing that the training of students and researchers is not only restricted to the university and the students' home country, and that it is important to have possibilities of new experiences and differentiated knowledge. The conclusion is that this opportunity promoted a profound effect on psychological, cultural social and scientific development of the exchange student.

  20. Widely Assumed but Thinly Tested: Do Employee Volunteers’ Self-Reported Skill Improvements Reflect the Nature of their Volunteering Experience?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Allen Jones

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of companies use corporate volunteering programs (CVPs to support and coordinate their employees’ efforts to serve their communities. Among the most frequently touted benefits of such programs to sponsoring companies and employee volunteers alike is the opportunities they provide for employees to develop tangible work-related skills through their volunteering activities. Evidence for skill development through volunteering, however, is mostly limited to the expressed beliefs of corporate leaders and employee volunteers. This study was designed to contribute to this largely anecdotal literature by testing hypotheses about the extent to which employee volunteers’ self-reported skill development reflects the characteristics of the volunteers and their volunteering experience. Study participants were 74 employees who volunteered a few hours of their time once a week for ten weeks in a service apprenticeship managed by a U.S.-based nonprofit called Citizen Schools that partners with middle schools to extend the learning day with a combination of academic support, enrichment, and youth development activities. Data were obtained via the nonprofit’s records, and surveys completed by employee volunteers before and after their service experience, including measures used to assess self-reported improvements in each of ten work-related skills: communicating performance expectations, leadership, mentorship, motivating others, project management, providing performance feedback, public speaking and presenting, speaking clearly, teamwork, and time management. Support was found for several hypothesized effects suggesting that employees who practiced specific skills more often during their volunteering experience reported greater improvements in those skills. Improvements in some skills were higher among employee volunteers who completed a greater number of pre-volunteering preparation courses, and the effects of preparation courses were

  1. How one teacher research experience program is transforming STEM education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warburton, J.; Fahnestock, J.; Larson, A.

    2016-12-01

    Celebrating over 10 years of success, the PolarTREC-Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating program, administered by the Arctic Research Consortium of the United States, is a unique professional development program for United States educators and polar researchers. Through an innovative teacher research experience, utilizing field-based experiences in the polar regions, PolarTREC provides teachers the content knowledge, pedagogical tools, confidence, understanding of science in the broader society, and experiences with scientific inquiry they need to promote authentic scientific research in their classroom. The program evaluation objectives were 1) to better understand the immediate impacts of the program on participating teachers, their students, and the researchers with whom they partnered; and 2) to explore the long-term impacts of the PolarTREC experiences on participating teachers' professional experiences, and in particular their use of authentic scientific research with their students and ongoing relationships with researcher team members and other PolarTREC teachers. In this presentation, we will share our data on how the PolarTREC model is transforming STEM educators not only how they teach science in their classroom but also how they both perceive science, a paradigm shift, that defines their careers.

  2. Reflecting about gender violence and african american women: The experience of the NGO Maria Mulher - Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luisa Pereira Oliveira

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The African American women's socioeconomic, political and cultural conditions are unstable; many of these women face social exclusion situations and have no access to public policies. The experience of the NGO Maria Mulher has considered racial discrimination in relation to African American women as a fact which empowers gender violence and causes damage to life quality and to health. This research tried to understand the effects of racial discrimination to the identities construction and to the subjectivation modes of African American women attended by the SOS Racism program. The women showed intense emotional suffering due to discrimination and racism they have faced. In the group process new meanings for the violence were produced, transforming the personal narrative into a public report. 

  3. Instructional Experiences of Graduate Assistants Implementing Explicit and Reflective Introductory Biology Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uludag Bautista, Nazan; Schussler, Elisabeth E.; Rybczynski, Stephen M.

    2014-05-01

    Science education reform documents identify nature of science (NOS) as a critical component of scientific literacy and call for universities, colleges, and K-12 schools to explicitly integrate NOS learning into science curricula. In response to these calls, this study investigated the classroom practices of nine graduate assistants (GAs) who taught expository and inquiry laboratories that implemented an explicit and reflective (ER) pedagogy to teach NOS. The purpose of this qualitative study was to better understand the experiences that enabled or inhibited GA implementation of an ER strategy in a college setting. The findings revealed that achieving quality implementation in this setting was very difficult. Factors such as GAs' ability to foster meaningful classroom discussions, laboratory logistics (e.g. lack of time and supplies), and the value undergraduates and GAs saw in learning about NOS were identified by GAs and observed by the researchers as barriers to the technique maximizing its potential. Thus, for meaningful infusion of NOS into science curricula, pedagogical support for GAs to manage meaningful classroom discussions in support of NOS or other complex topics is recommended for an ER approach to NOS learning to be successful in college settings.

  4. The discourse of ethics in nursing education: experience and reflections of Brazilian teachers - case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Flávia Regina Souza; de Pires, Denise Elvira Pires; Brehmer, Laura Cavalcanti de Farias; Gelbcke, Francine Lima; Schmoeller, Soraia Dornelles; Lorenzetti, Jorge

    2013-10-01

    From a scenario of political and technological changes in work and health education, the purpose of this study was to understand the ethics discourse in nurses' education process in Brazilian nursing schools. A research was performed with a qualitative approach, characterized as a case study, involving six schools of a region in the south of Brazil. The data were collected by focal groups involving 50 teachers. The results were organized in three categories: (1) experience and motivation to teach ethics and bioethics, (2) indicators of change identified in global and local contexts and (3) challenges in the education of ethics, values and related themes. The teachers have highlighted complex elements related to scientific, educational and professional contexts, and pointed out the need for a critical perspective on the professional scenario and on their own situations as nurses and educators. The analyzed discourse brings to light the topic of ethics, seen as peculiar to the present day and in intimate connection with the daily routine of clinical, pedagogical and political professional practices. The findings suggest that the reflections on nurses' ethics education should not be limited to discussing content and pedagogical strategies but should be extended to include a commitment to the adoption of values in professional practice and to the process of the construction of a professional identity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Broadband Anti-reflection Coated Extended Hemispherical Silicon Lenses for Polarbear-2 Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siritanasak, P.; Aleman, C.; Arnold, K.; Cukierman, A.; Hazumi, M.; Kazemzadeh, K.; Keating, B.; Matsumura, T.; Lee, A. T.; Lee, C.; Quealy, E.; Rosen, D.; Stebor, N.; Suzuki, A.

    2016-08-01

    Polarbear-2 (PB-2) is a next-generation receiver that is part of the Simons Array cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization experiment which is located in the Atacama desert in Northern Chile. The primary scientific goals of the Simons Array are a deep search for the CMB B-mode signature of gravitational waves from inflation and the characterization of large-scale structure using its effect on CMB polarization. The PB-2 receiver will deploy with 1897 dual-polarization sinuous antenna-coupled pixels, each with a directly contacting extended hemispherical silicon lens. Every pixel has dual polarization sensitivity in two spectral bands centered at 95 and 150 GHz, for a total of 7588 transition edge sensor bolometers operating at 270 mK. To achieve the PB-2 detector requirements, we developed a broadband anti-reflection (AR) coating for the extended hemispherical lenses that uses two molds to apply two layers of epoxy, Stycast 1090 and Stycast 2850FT. Our measurements of the absorption loss from the AR coating on a flat surface at cryogenic temperatures show less than 1 % absorption, and the coating has survived multiple thermal cycles. We can control the diameter of the coating within 25 {\\upmu }m and translation errors are within 25 {\\upmu }m in all directions, which results in less than 1 % decrease in transmittance. We also find the performance of the AR-coated lens matches very well with simulations.

  6. Intraoperative imaging during Mohs surgery with reflectance confocal microscopy: initial clinical experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Eileen S.; Cordova, Miguel; Kose, Kivanc; Phillips, William; Rossi, Anthony; Nehal, Kishwer; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2015-06-01

    Mohs surgery for the removal of nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) is performed in stages, while being guided by the examination for residual tumor with frozen pathology. However, preparation of frozen pathology at each stage is time consuming and labor intensive. Real-time intraoperative reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM), combined with video mosaicking, may enable rapid detection of residual tumor directly in the surgical wounds on patients. We report our initial experience on 25 patients, using aluminum chloride for nuclear contrast. Imaging was performed in quadrants in the wound to simulate the Mohs surgeon's examination of pathology. Images and videos of the epidermal and dermal margins were found to be of clinically acceptable quality. Bright nuclear morphology was identified at the epidermal margin and detectable in residual NMSC tumors. The presence of residual tumor and normal skin features could be detected in the peripheral and deep dermal margins. Intraoperative RCM imaging may enable detection of residual tumor directly on patients during Mohs surgery, and may serve as an adjunct for frozen pathology. Ultimately, for routine clinical utility, a stronger tumor-to-dermis contrast may be necessary, and also a smaller microscope with an automated approach for imaging in the entire wound in a rapid and controlled manner.

  7. Reflections of Low Income, Second Generation Latinas about Experiences in Depression Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilemann, MarySue V.; Pieters, Huibrie C.; Dornig, Katrina

    2016-01-01

    Depression is higher among second generation Latinas compared to immigrants but mental health treatment is stigmatized. Therefore, second generation Latinas were interviewed after completing an eight-session depression treatment program to gain insight on what they found valuable about their therapy experiences. Constructivist Grounded Theory guided data collection and analysis which showed that women valued treatment more when they recognized their needs were being met, the therapist was a worthy co-pilot, and the program’s structure had flexibility. Four processes were considered important to their work in therapy: understanding feelings about past events, seeing patterns, accepting self, and changing family patterns but still being “family”. Post therapy, women valued their enhanced confidence and a “toolbelt” of techniques they gained for self-treatment. These findings have implications for designing future depression treatment programs that are more likely to be desirable and effective for the growing subgroup of underserved second generation Latinas in the U.S. PMID:26825479

  8. An optics education program designed around experiments with small telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompea, Stephen M.; Sparks, Robert T.; Walker, Constance E.; Dokter, Erin F. C.

    2010-08-01

    The National Optical Astronomy Observatory has led the development of a new telescope kit for kids as part of a strategic plan to interest young children in science. This telescope has been assembled by tens of thousands of children nationwide, who are now using this high-quality telescope to conduct optics experiments and to make astronomical observations. The Galileoscope telescope kit and its associated educational program are an outgrowth of the NSF sponsored "Hands-On Optics" (HOO) project, a collaboration of the SPIE, the Optical Society of America, and NOAO. This project developed optics kits and activities for upper elementary students and has reached over 20,000 middle school kids in afterschool programs. HOO is a highly flexible educational program and was featured as an exemplary informal science program by the National Science Teachers Association. Our new "Teaching with Telescopes" program builds on HOO, the Galileoscope and other successful optical education projects.

  9. Nursing in Saudi Arabia: Reflections on the experiences of South African nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colette D. Telford-Smith

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to describe and reflect on the lived experiences of the South African nurses residing and working in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual design with a phenomenological approach was adopted. Data were collected by means of individual interviews and the personal journals of the nurses who met the sampling criteria. The data analysis was done according to Tesch’s descriptive method (in Creswell 1994. The main theme that emerged was one of ‘cultural diversity’. Sub-themes related to the nurses’ religious/spiritual, environmental, emotional/psychological and professional experiences were also identified. A literature control was undertaken to verify the results. Limitations were highlighted, conclusions were drawn and recommendations relating to nursing research, education and practice were made.

    Opsomming

    Die doel van die studie was om die lewenservarings van Suid-Afrikaanse verpleegkundiges wat in die Koningkryk van Saoedi-Arabië werksaam en woonagtig is, te beskryf en daaroor te besin. 'n Kwalitatiewe, verkennende, beskrywende en kontekstuele navorsingsontwerp of strategie van ondersoek, vanuit 'n fenomenologiese benadering, is vir die doel ingespan. Data is ingesamel aan die hand van individuele onderhoude met deelnemers wat aan die kriteria vir insluiting by die steekproef voldoen het en persoonlike joernale wat deur hierdie deelnemers bygehou is. Data- ontleding is volgens die beskrywende metode van Tesch (in Creswell 1994 gedoen. Die hooftema voortspruitend uit die navorsing was dié van ‘kulturele diversiteit’. Verdere temas ten opsigte van verpleegkundiges se godsdienstige/geestelike, omgewings-, emosionele/psigiese en professionele ervarings is ook geïdentifseer. 'n Literatuurkontrole is onderneem om die navorsingsbevindinge te verifieer. Beperkings is uitgelig, en gevolgtrekkings en aanbevelings gerig op verpleegkundige

  10. My Program Is Ok--Am I? Computing Freshmen's Experiences of Doing Programming Assignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnunen, Paivi; Simon, Beth

    2012-01-01

    This article provides insight into how computing majors experience the process of doing programming assignments in their first programming course. This grounded theory study sheds light on the various processes and contexts through which students constantly assess their self-efficacy as a programmer. The data consists of a series of four…

  11. Community based clinical program: the Medunsa physiotherapy students` experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. Taukobong

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Backgound: The aim of community based clinical training is tproduce graduates who are responsive to the health needs of their communit It is envisaged that upon completion of training graduates would go back an serve their respective communities following exposure to community need Program evaluation should therefore allow students to express the inadequacie and strengths of the program.Aim: To evaluate the community-based clinical program through student's experiences.Methodology: A qualitative research design was used. End of block students reports for both third (8 and fourth (15 year physiotherapy students (n = 23 were used to collect the data. Responses in the reports were grouped into the following categories for purpose of data analysis: feeling about the block, suggestion/s and supervision.Results: The students described the community based clinical program as an unique learning experience which equipped them with the understanding of life within communities. Sixty five percent (65% expressed satisfaction with the supervision given. The main complaints were amounts of paper work involved and clinical workload.Conclusion: The student's experiences indicated that the community-based clinical program within the MEDUNSA physiotherapy department realizes the goal of community-based clinical training as determined by WHO, except for inclusion of some multi-professional approaches and adaptation of the supervision provided.

  12. Mandatory Parent Education Programs Can Create Positive Youth Sport Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christofferson, Jennifer; Strand, Bradford

    2016-01-01

    Youth sport leaders must not ignore the influence parents have on creating a positive developmental experience for young athletes. Therefore, expectations involving parental involvement and conduct must be addressed prior to athletes' participation. This article aims to examine the importance of creating mandatory parental training programs for…

  13. External quality control program: Experience in the department of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To share experiences and lessons learned from 2002 National External Quality Assessment Schemes for Leukocyte Immunophenotyping (UK NEQAS) and College of American Pathologists (CAP) proficiency testing (PT) panels received and tested as part of External Quality Control Program Setting: Department ...

  14. Raft River well stimulation experiments: geothermal reservoir well stimulation program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-08-01

    The Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP) performed two field experiments at the Raft River KGRA in 1979. Wells RRGP-4 and RRGP-5 were selected for the hydraulic fracture stimulation treatments. The well selection process, fracture treatment design, field execution, stimulation results, and pre- and post-job evaluations are presented.

  15. Capstone Experiences in Small MPA Programs in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Younhee

    2017-01-01

    A capstone experience, as an exit degree requirement, allows Master of Public Administration (MPA) students to build quasi-experimental practices by applying learned knowledge and skills throughout their curriculum in the United States. Accredited MPA programs have implemented their capstone courses differently to achieve required standards. Small…

  16. Mothers' Adverse Childhood Experiences and Negative Parenting Behaviors: Connecting Mothers' Difficult Pasts to Present Parenting Behavior via Reflective Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolomeyer, Ellen; Renk, Kimberly; Cunningham, Annelise; Lowell, Amanda; Khan, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have supported a connection between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and negative outcomes in adulthood. Fewer studies have examined the connection between ACEs and parenting behaviors, however. The study described in this article examined the relationships among ACEs, reflective functioning, and negative parenting behaviors…

  17. What to Wear to a Severance Party: A Former Corporate Executive Reflects on Her Own Downsizing Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumberland, Denise M.

    2013-01-01

    A corporate executive provides an amusing and reflective account on her experience of being downsized. This "day in the life" perspective documents the feelings of an individual who found herself served with "divorce papers" from a job that had, in many ways, defined her identity. Her personal story shines the spotlight on…

  18. Designated-driver programs: college students' experiences and opinions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glascoff, M A; Knight, S M; Jenkins, L K

    1994-09-01

    We investigated the experiences and opinions of college students regarding the use of designated drivers. Although using designated drivers appeared to be common, results indicated that in many instances the designated driver did not abstain from drinking alcoholic beverages. The opinions of the participants indicated that the nondrivers in a drinking group may in fact drink more when there is a designated driver. Our findings lead us to question the overall value of currently practiced designated-driver programs for college student drinkers. Developing programs on how to be a designated driver are among our recommendations.

  19. Implementing NICU critical thinking programs: one unit's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Denise; Pilcher, Jobeth

    2008-01-01

    Critical thinking is the hallmark of today's nursing practice environment. Nowhere is this more critical than in the high-tech environment of the NICU. Despite the importance of critical thinking in nursing practice, there is limited information on the process of teaching new NICU nurses to think critically. Based on the principles of adult education, orientation and continuing education for NICU nurses should be goal directed, build on the learner's prior experience, and build in opportunities for active participation, reflection, and experiential learning. This article reviews the principles of adult education and their application to the process of teaching critical thinking in the NICU. One unit's experience of critical thinking education is used to provide concrete examples of how NICU education can be transformed from a traditional didactic methodology to a more dynamic experiential approach.

  20. Seismic imaging of sandbox experiments – laboratory hardware setup and first reflection seismic sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Krawczyk

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available With the study and technical development introduced here, we combine analogue sandbox simulation techniques with seismic physical modelling of sandbox models. For that purpose, we designed and developed a new mini-seismic facility for laboratory use, comprising a seismic tank, a PC-driven control unit, a positioning system, and piezoelectric transducers used here for the first time in an array mode. To assess the possibilities and limits of seismic imaging of small-scale structures in sandbox models, different geometry setups were tested in the first 2-D experiments that also tested the proper functioning of the device and studied the seismo-elastic properties of the granular media used. Simple two-layer models of different materials and layer thicknesses as well as a more complex model comprising channels and shear zones were tested using different acquisition geometries and signal properties. We suggest using well sorted and well rounded grains with little surface roughness (glass beads. Source receiver-offsets less than 14 cm for imaging structures as small as 2.0–1.5 mm size have proven feasible. This is the best compromise between wide beam and high energy output, and is applicable with a consistent waveform. Resolution of the interfaces of layers of granular materials depends on the interface preparation rather than on the material itself. Flat grading of interfaces and powder coverage yields the clearest interface reflections. Finally, sandbox seismic sections provide images of high quality showing constant thickness layers as well as predefined channel structures and indications of the fault traces from shear zones. Since these were artificially introduced in our test models, they can be regarded as zones of disturbance rather than tectonic shear zones characterized by decompaction. The multiple-offset surveying introduced here, improves the quality with respect to S / N ratio and source signature even more; the maximum depth

  1. Building Computer-Based Experiments in Psychology without Programming Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruisoto, Pablo; Bellido, Alberto; Ruiz, Javier; Juanes, Juan A

    2016-06-01

    Research in Psychology usually requires to build and run experiments. However, although this task has required scripting, recent computer tools based on graphical interfaces offer new opportunities in this field for researchers with non-programming skills. The purpose of this study is to illustrate and provide a comparative overview of two of the main free open source "point and click" software packages for building and running experiments in Psychology: PsychoPy and OpenSesame. Recommendations for their potential use are further discussed.

  2. Ship, Captain, and Crew in Education: Reflections on a Psychedelic Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marland, S. P., Jr.

    This paper discusses the U.S. Office of Education's attempt to stimulate drug education, and a few exemplary programs amongst those it supports. President Nixon's 1970 National Action Committee on Drug Education set up a program for training classroom teachers, and formulated guidelines for programs to educate people in schools, communities, and…

  3. The SUPER Program: A Research-based Undergraduate Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernakovich, J. G.; Boone, R. B.; Boot, C. M.; Denef, K.; Lavallee, J. M.; Moore, J. C.; Wallenstein, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    Producing undergraduates capable of broad, independent thinking is one of the grand challenges in science education. Experience-based learning, specifically hands-on research, is one mechanism for increasing students' ability to think critically. With this in mind, we created a two-semester long research program called SUPER (Skills for Undergraduate Participation in Ecological Research) aimed at teaching students to think like scientists and enhancing the student research experience through instruction and active-learning about the scientific method. Our aim was for students to gain knowledge, skills, and experience, and to conduct their own research. In the first semester, we hosted active-learning workshops on "Forming Hypotheses", "Experimental Design", "Collecting and Managing Data", "Analysis of Data", "Communicating to a Scientific Audience", "Reading Literature Effectively", and "Ethical Approaches". Each lesson was taught by different scientists from one of many ecological disciplines so that students were exposed to the variation in approach that scientists have. In the second semester, students paired with a scientific mentor and began doing research. To ensure the continued growth of the undergraduate researcher, we continued the active-learning workshops and the students attended meetings with their mentors. Thus, the students gained technical and cognitive skills in parallel, enabling them to understand both "the how" and "the why" of what they were doing in their research. The program culminated with a research poster session presented by the students. The interest in the program has grown beyond our expectations, and we have now run the program successfully for two years. Many of the students have gone on to campus research jobs, internships and graduate school, and have attributed part of their success in obtaining their positions to their experience with the SUPER program. Although common in other sciences, undergraduate research experiences are

  4. Java decaffeinated: experiences building a programming language from components

    OpenAIRE

    Dobson, Simon; Farragher, Linda

    2000-01-01

    non-peer-reviewed Most modern programming languages are complex and feature rich. Whilst this is (sometimes) an advantage for industrial-strength applications, it complicates both language teaching and language research. We describe our experiences in the design of a reduced sub-set of the Java language and its implementation using the Vanilla language development framework. We argue that Vanilla???s component-based approach allows the language???s feature set to be varied quickly and simp...

  5. Geriatric palliative care: do medical students' narrative reflections after a hospice clinical experience link to geriatric competencies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Amy M; True, Gala; Charles, Natasha; Margo, Katherine L

    2013-01-01

    Since the Association of American Medical Colleges geriatric competencies were released, educators are striving to incorporate them into medical student curricula. The purpose of this study is to examine medical students' reflections after an interdisciplinary, hospice staff-precepted clinical experience, and whether these reflections relate to the geriatric competencies which focus on palliative care. From July 2010 to June 2011, 155 2nd- and 3rd-year medical students participated in a required, half-day hospice experience, with 120 (77%) submitting narrative reflections for analysis. The narratives were analyzed using the constant comparative method associated with grounded theory, followed by consensus-building in an iterative process, to identify themes. Six themes were identified from the analysis of student narratives: demonstrating a new or expanded knowledge of hospice care (79%, 95/120), developing new insights about self and others (74%, 89/120), changing attitudes toward hospice care (63%, 76/120), linking patient needs with appropriate team members (43%, 52/120), understanding patient goals of care (43%, 51/120), and discussing palliative care as a treatment option (27%, 32/120). The authors conclude that a brief, interdisciplinary, hospice staff-precepted clinical experience is an effective model to inspire medical students to reflect on geriatric palliative care. Students clearly reflected on the geriatric palliative care competencies of symptom assessment and management, and gained insight into the role of the hospice team members and how hospice care can be a positive treatment option. Future educators should think about building on this type of high impact learning experience, and developing items to measure application of knowledge gained.

  6. Maximising intercultural learning in short term international placements: Findings associated with orientation programs, guided reflection and immersion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Campbell, Coral JL; Walta, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Short-term international practicum experience is now a feature of many university education programs in Australia in an attempt to engage students with the growing multi-cultural aspects of Australian life...

  7. Reflections on Case Management in Youth Support Using a Program Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Rosemary; Kennedy, Barry

    2010-01-01

    Using Moxley's (1997) program development framework as an agenda for a dialogue that juxtaposes an academic perspective with that of a seasoned youth program manager, this paper focuses on the relatively unexplored terrain of case management programs. In doing so, it exposes the convergences and divergences between academic and program manager…

  8. Formative Reflections of University Recreation Science Students in South Africa as Catalyst for an Adapted Service-Learning Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goslin, Anneliese; van der Klashorst, Engela; Kluka, Darlene A.; van Wyk, Johannes G. U.

    2016-01-01

    Community-university partnerships through service-learning have progressively developed as part of institutions of higher education's mission statements. This paper explores the qualitative reflections of 410 undergraduate students enrolled in an academic recreation science course on a first time service-learning experience in South Africa. The…

  9. Ion reflection from solids at sliding incidence - computer simulations versus analytical theories and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurnaev, V.A. E-mail: kurnaev@plasma.mephi.ru; Trifonov, N.N.; Urusov, V.A

    2003-12-01

    The experimental and theoretical data on energy distributions of reflected hydrogen atoms are compared with computer simulations based on BCA Monte Carlo code. It is shown that analytical theories fail to describe the dependence of energy spectra parameters on the angle of incidence for small angle scattering of the beam at the energy about few tens of keV. The computer simulations reasonably agree with experimental data. The restriction in computation of the maximum value of scattering angle in each collision results in good agreement of energy spectra of reflected particles with an analytical model.

  10. ESADA Plutonium Program Critical Experiments: Power Distribution Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akkurt, H.

    2001-06-12

    In 1967, a series of critical experiments were conducted at the Westinghouse Reactor Evaluation Center (WREC) using mixed-oxide (MOX) PuO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2} and/or UO{sub 2} fuels in various lattices and configurations. These experiments were performed under the joint sponsorship of Empire State Atomic Development Associates (ESADA) plutonium program and Westinghouse. The purpose of these experiments was to develop experimental data useful in validating analytical methods used in the design of plutonium-bearing replacement fuel for water reactors. Three different fuel types were used during the experimental program: two MOX fuels and a low-enriched UO{sub 2} fuel. The MOX fuels were distinguished by their {sup 240}Pu content: 8 wt % {sup 240}Pu and 24 wt % {sup 240}Pu. Both MOX fuels contained 2.0 wt % PuO{sub 2} in natural UO{sub 2}. The UO{sub 2} fuel with 2.72 wt % enrichment was used for comparison with the plutonium data and for use in multiregion experiments.

  11. Religious experience as narrative: reflections on the advantages of a narrative approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popp-Baier, U.; Budriūnaitė, A.

    2012-01-01

    Three authors have significantly shaped the social scientific study of religious experiences: William James devised the research agenda for primordial personal religion, Wayne Proudfoot demonstrated the theoretical inadequacy of an unmediated experience and introduced the methodological distinction

  12. "You Expect Them to Listen!": Immigrant Teachers' Reflections on Their Lived Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhagroo, Jyoti R.

    2016-01-01

    The stories shared by the immigrant teachers capture some of their personal and professional lived experiences in their new teaching environment. The hermeneutic narrative approach of the study of seven immigrant teachers' stories, as they compared their teaching experiences in their home country to their New Zealand teaching experience, offer…

  13. Evidence of Reflective Thinking across the Curriculum: College Experience versus Individual Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Carol Springer

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated how individual and course-level variables across the curriculum at a four-year college (college here refers to a higher education institution that offers undergraduate education but not graduate degrees) in the southeastern US impacted student reflective thinking as measured by Kember and colleagues' [2000. Development of a…

  14. Reflection after Teaching a Lesson: Experiences of Secondary School Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, Melissa A.

    2017-01-01

    Secondary science teachers spend most of their time planning, collaborating, and teaching, but spend little time reflecting after teaching a single lesson. The theoretical framework of the adult learning theory and the transformative learning theory was the basis of this study. This qualitative research study was conducted to understand the…

  15. A Bourdieusian Approach to Academic Reading: Reflections on a South African Teaching Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Lloyd; Meo, Analía Inés

    2015-01-01

    As in many other parts of the world, "academic literacy" has emerged as both a concern and a contested concept in South African universities. In this article we focus specifically on academic reading, which we argue is a relatively underemphasized aspect of academic literacy. This article is the product of reflections on academic reading…

  16. Reflection as Situated Practice: A Memory-Work Study of Lived Experience in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovens, Alan; Tinning, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to understand whether student teachers enact reflection differently as they encounter different situations within their teacher education programme. Group memory-work was used to generate and analyse five participants' memories of learning to teach. Three different discursive contexts were identified in the students'…

  17. Developing Communication Competence Using an Online Video Reflection System: Pre-Service Teachers' Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Matt; Cavanagh, Michael; Moloney, Robyn; Dao, MingMing

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on how the cognitive, behavioural and affective communication competencies of undergraduate students were developed using an online Video Reflection system. Pre-service teachers were provided with communication scenarios and asked to record short videos of one another making presentations. Students then uploaded their videos to…

  18. Maximising Intercultural Learning in Short Term International Placements: Findings Associated with Orientation Programs, Guided Reflection and Immersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Coral J. L.; Walta, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Short-term international practicum experience is now a feature of many university education programs in Australia in an attempt to engage students with the growing multi-cultural aspects of Australian life. The stated purposes of such practicum experiences generally highlight intercultural learning, which is associated with the development of…

  19. PandaEPL: a library for programming spatial navigation experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solway, Alec; Miller, Jonathan F; Kahana, Michael J

    2013-12-01

    Recent advances in neuroimaging and neural recording techniques have enabled researchers to make significant progress in understanding the neural mechanisms underlying human spatial navigation. Because these techniques generally require participants to remain stationary, computer-generated virtual environments are used. We introduce PandaEPL, a programming library for the Python language designed to simplify the creation of computer-controlled spatial-navigation experiments. PandaEPL is built on top of Panda3D, a modern open-source game engine. It allows users to construct three-dimensional environments that participants can navigate from a first-person perspective. Sound playback and recording and also joystick support are provided through the use of additional optional libraries. PandaEPL also handles many tasks common to all cognitive experiments, including managing configuration files, logging all internal and participant-generated events, and keeping track of the experiment state. We describe how PandaEPL compares with other software for building spatial-navigation experiments and walk the reader through the process of creating a fully functional experiment.

  20. Reflections on a Time-Limited Mother-Baby Yoga Program at the Wee Ones Nursery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickholtz, Naomi

    2012-01-01

    This brief article discusses a yoga program offered to mothers and babies who were participating in a prison nursery. The author describes the goals and the sometimes unexpected effects of the program.

  1. An exploration of the existential experiences of patients following curative treatment for cancer: reflections from a U.K. Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagerdahl, Anna S K; Moynihan, Manus; Stollery, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The existential experiences associated with cancer diagnosis and treatment are well researched, but the posttreatment phase is relatively underexplored. Using semistructured interviews and theory-led thematic analysis this qualitative study investigated the existential experiences of eight cancer survivors who had successfully completed curative treatment. Being in remission had led to deep existential reflections (i.e., death anxiety, freedom, isolation, and meaning making), and some participants faced considerable challenges that affected their emotional well-being. Understanding cancer survivors' existential challenges should enable health care professionals to engage with the emerging shift from the predominantly medically focused posttreatment care to a more holistic approach.

  2. Research Experience for Undergraduates Program in Multidisciplinary Environmental Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, M. S.

    2012-12-01

    During summers 2011 and 12 Montclair State University hosted a Research Experience for Undergraduates Program (REU) in transdisciplinary, hands-on, field-oriented research in environmental sciences. Participants were housed at the Montclair State University's field station situated in the middle of 30,000 acres of mature forest, mountain ridges and freshwater streams and lakes within the Kittatinny Mountains of Northwest New Jersey, Program emphases were placed on development of project planning skills, analytical skills, creativity, critical thinking and scientific report preparation. Ten students were recruited in spring with special focus on recruiting students from underrepresented groups and community colleges. Students were matched with their individual research interests including hydrology, erosion and sedimentation, environmental chemistry, and ecology. In addition to research activities, lectures, educational and recreational field trips, and discussion on environmental ethics and social justice played an important part of the program. The ultimate goal of the program is to facilitate participants' professional growth and to stimulate the participants' interests in pursuing Earth Science as the future career of the participants.

  3. Supporting student skill development in undergraduate research experiences through the development of a self-reflection guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubenthal, M.; Brudzinski, M.

    2016-12-01

    There has been an increased emphasis on documenting the benefits of participating in undergraduate research opportunities (URO) and developing an understanding of the factors that influence these benefits. While tools to effectively measure the behavior, attitude, skills, interest, and/or knowledge (BASIK) that result from UROs have matured, little focus has been placed on developing practical tools and strategies to support students and mentors as they work to develop the BASIK being measured. Viewed through the lens of constructivism, a URO can be examined as a cognitive apprenticeship (CA) where learning occurs through several key methods: modeling, coaching, scaffolding, articulation, reflection, and exploration. In a study of UROs as CA, Feldman et al., (2013) found reflection to be one of the least commonly initiated methods employed by interns and mentors, and concluded, "there is need for professors to be more proactive in helping their students gain intellectual proficiency". This work, in its pilot stages, seeks to address this gap through the development of an intern self-reflection guide and implementation plan to further increase students' skill development. The guide is being developed based on IRIS's existing self-reflection tool. However, it has recently been revised to bring its constructs and items into better alignment with those of the Undergraduate Research Student Self-Assessment (URSSA) tool. The URSSA was selected because it is designed to measure skills and has recently undergone a validation study. In addition, it serves as the basis for the development of a new tool, the NSF Biology REU CORE. The revised self-reflection guide and protocol were piloted this summer in IRIS Summer REU program. The alignment between the constructs of the URSSA and the self-reflection guide will be presented along with findings from the 2016 program evaluation. Future development of the intervention will include a validation of the items on the self-reflection

  4. Teaching as Improvisational Experience: Student Music Teachers' Reflections on Learning during an Intercultural Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerlund, Heidi; Partti, Heidi; Karlsen, Sidsel

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative instrumental case study explores Finnish student music teachers' experiences of teaching and learning as participants in an intercultural project in Cambodia. The Multicultural Music University project aimed at increasing master's level music education students' intercultural competencies by providing experiences of teaching and…

  5. Reflections on Transformative Experiences with Mathematical Inquiry: The Case of Christine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Alfinio; Phelps, Christine M.; Jansen, Amanda

    2017-01-01

    We present a first-hand, longer-term account of one student's (Christine's) experiences in and after a mathematics inquiry course. In this course, students actively posed problems, conducted their own mathematical explorations, and wrote journal entries about their experiences. During the course, Christine found that inquiry helped her develop…

  6. HBCUs as Critical Context for Identity Work: Reflections, Experiences, and Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, Derek F.; Innouvong, Tony; Aglugub, Richard Jay; Yusuf, Ismail A.

    2015-01-01

    Using narratives from a diverse group of students and staff in terms of race and religion, this chapter gives voice to these individuals' experiences with issues of diversity and inclusion at an HBCU. This chapter also discusses how these experiences helped to facilitate the authors' racial and cultural identity development.

  7. Teacher Candidates' Perceptions of Debriefing Circles to Facilitate Self-Reflection during a Cultural Immersion Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addleman, Rebecca A.; Brazo, Carol J.; Dixon, Kristin; Cevallos, Tatiana; Wortman, Shary

    2014-01-01

    This study followed 9 teacher candidates through a 3-week cultural immersion experience in which they volunteered in educational settings where they were not members of the majority culture. This learning experience was designed to help candidates better understand their culturally, ethnically, and linguistically diverse future students. A…

  8. Coffee Cups, Canoes, Airplanes and the Lived Experience: Reflections on the Works of Bertram (Chip) Bruce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haythornthwaite, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    A career spent in research, teaching, and engagement with community entails a lifetime of assemblage of meaning from people, resources, technologies and experience. In his work, Bertram (Chip) Bruce has long engaged with how we create such an assemblage of meaning from our formal and found learning, and from the "lived experience" of…

  9. [Peru's experience with a national blood banking program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribera Salcedo, José Fuentes; Roca Valencia, Oscar

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes Peru's experiences with its National Blood Banking Program. Until the mid-1990s, the country faced a host of problems, including the lack of a legal framework to regulate blood banks, a high maternal mortality rate due to a shortage of blood, virtually no voluntary donations, a high risk of infection from transfusions, the use of only whole blood for transfusion, serious disorganization in the blood banks, deficiencies in blood bank supervision and control, no training programs, indifference on the part of health officials, frequent selling of blood, and limited community awareness. Subsequently, a strategic plan was prepared that made it possible to solve many of those problems. Legal instruments were prepared; the rate of voluntary donations rose from 0% to 19.5%; the safety of the blood was improved through compulsory screening of all donated blood units for seven markers of infectious diseases, as well as by placing a national seal of quality on all screened units. The availability of blood doubled, thus meeting 70% of the need; sales of blood decreased; and the use of blood components was improved, with 80% of the blood being fractionated. In addition, supervisory control of 100% of the blood banks in the country was achieved, a national registry was established, the cost-benefit relationship for blood units was improved through centralized screening, internal and external quality control was made mandatory, and pro-donation campaigns led to commitments from civil society. While important, all these achievements represent just a first step. This is especially true given that developing the National Blood Banking Program required the participation of outside organizations, such as the Pan American Health Organization, whose support, together with the experience provided by other countries, was key. The Program is facing a number of new challenges, and the progress that has been achieved could be threatened if current activities stagnate or

  10. A cultural historical activity theory perspective to understand preservice science teachers' reflections on and tensions during a microteaching experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezen-Barrie, Asli; Tran, Minh-Dan; McDonald, Scott P.; Kelly, Gregory J.

    2014-09-01

    This study draws from cultural historical activity theory (CHAT) to analyze preservice teachers' reflections on a microteaching activity. Microteaching activities involved preservice educators teaching middle school students from local schools. The study was conducted with 23 preservice teachers enrolled in a large university's teacher education program. During this secondary science teaching methods course, every pair of preservice teachers engaged in 20 minute microteaching activity with 3-5 middle school students. The microteaching was videotaped, and the teachers subsequently provided voice-over reflections on a second audio track. Transcriptions of the microteaching events were analyzed through the formation of event maps showing the phases of activity and the organizational sequence of actions. Event maps were used to investigate the focus of preservice teachers' reflections. The results showed that while learning from their microteaching, preservice teachers focused primarily on the mediating artifacts and gave least attention to the larger teaching community surrounding these activities. Use of CHAT helped to identify challenges in different elements of the microteaching activity. The study contributes to how reflective practice can be enhanced through attention to the social and cultural dimensions of the teaching.

  11. Subjective Experiences of Clients in a Voluntary Money Management Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serowik, Kristin L; Bellamy, Chyrell D; Rowe, Michael; Rosen, Marc I

    2013-01-01

    A large proportion of people diagnosed with mental illnesses have difficulty managing their money, and therefore many psychiatric treatments involve providing money management assistance. However, little is known about the subjective experience of having a money manager, and extant literature is restricted to people forced to work with a representative payee or conservator. In this study, fifteen people were interviewed about their experience receiving a voluntary money management intervention designed to minimize substance use. Clients emphasized the importance of trusting the money manager, financial mindfulness (an enhanced awareness of the financial transactions in clients' day-to-day lives), agency over their own affairs, and addiction. In contrast to evaluations of people assigned representative payees and/or conservators, there was little mention of feeling coerced. These findings suggest that money management programs can address client concerns by building trust, relating budgeting to clients' day-to-day lives, and encouraging clients' control over their own affairs.

  12. Conscious sedation experiences in graduate pediatric dentistry programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, S; Farrell, K; Griffen, A; Coury, D

    2001-01-01

    Conscious sedation is a behavior modification adjunct taught in all postgraduate pediatric dental residency programs. It has been a decade since the last survey was done specifically related to didactic and clinical aspects of conscious sedation in postgraduate pediatric dental programs. The aim of the study was to determine the clinical and didactic experiences associated with conscious sedation in these programs and to compare some of the findings to those collected a decade ago. A 31-item survey similar to that of a decade ago was constructed and sent to all pediatric dentistry program directors of accredited postgraduate and residency programs in the United States. The items covered several didactics including didactic topics, sedative agents, monitoring, and emergency policy among others. A follow-up mailing was done involving those who had not responded 6 weeks following the initial mailing. Fifty-four of 58 (93%) program directors returned the 31-item survey. The following are highlighted findings. Conscious sedation among residency programs was achieved most commonly with a combination of sedative agents used with N2O. Midazolam was more popular than chloral hydrate. The oral route was the predominant route of administration. More lecture hours were spent on conscious sedation than 10 years ago. The pre-cordial stethoscope, pulse oximeter, and blood pressure cuff were the most commonly used monitors. Sedative agent and anticipated depth of sedation were the factors most often considered in choosing monitors used during the sedation of a patient. The capnograph was being used more frequently than it was 10 years ago. Programs did not report an increase in sedation emergencies but practiced emergency drills more often and had increased numbers of individuals certified in Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) or Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS). The percent of the total patient population which required sedation is about 1-20%, with most directors

  13. Seismic velocity structure and spatial distribution of reflection intensity off the Boso Peninsula, Central Japan, revealed by an ocean bottom seismographic experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Akihiro; Sato, Toshinori; Shinohara, Masanao; Mochizuki, Kimihiro; Yamada, Tomoaki; Uehira, Kenji; Shinbo, Takashi; Machida, Yuuya; Hino, Ryota; Azuma, Ryosuke

    2016-04-01

    Off the Boso Peninsula, central Japan, where the Sagami Trough is in the south and the Japan Trench is in the east, there is a triple junction where the Pacific plate (PAC), the Philippine Sea plate (PHS) and the Honshu island arc (HIA) meet each other. In this region, the PAC subducts beneath the PHS and the HIA, and the PHS subducts beneath the HIA. Due to the subduction of 2 oceanic plates, numerous seismic events took place in the past. In order to understand these events, it is important to image structure of these plates. Hence, many researchers attempted to reveal the substructure from natural earthquakes and seismic experiments. Because most of the seismometers are placed inland area and the regular seismicity off Boso is inactive, it is difficult to reveal the precise substructure off Boso area using only natural earthquakes. Although several marine seismic experiments using active sources were conducted, vast area remains unclear off Boso Peninsula. In order to improve the situation, a marine seismic experiment, using airgun as an active source, was conducted from 30th July to 4th of August, 2009. The survey line has 216 km length and 20 Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBSs) were placed on it. We estimated 2-D P-wave velocity structure from the airgun data using the PMDM (Progressive Model Development Method; Sato and Kenett, 2000) and the FAST (First Arrival Seismic Tomography ; Zelt and Barton, 1998). Furthermore, we identified the probable reflection phases from the data and estimated the location of reflectors using Travel time mapping method (Fujie et al. 2006). We found some reflection phases from the data, and the reflectors are located near the region where P-wave velocity is 5.0 km/s. We interpret that the reflectors indicate the plate boundary between the PHS and the HIA. The variation of the intensity of reflection along the upper surface of PHS seems to be consistent with the result from previous reflection seismic experiment conducted by Kimura et

  14. Physics program of P¯ANDA experiment at FAIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Dipanwita; P¯ANDA Collaboration

    2011-07-01

    The "antiProton ANnihilation at DArmstadt"-experiment, P¯ANDA, is one of the main experiments at FAIR, the future Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research at GSI, Darmstadt. It will be using the antiproton beam of unprecedented intensity and high momentum resolution in the momentum range between 1.5 - 15 GeV/c which will be available at the High Energy Storage Ring (HESR) at FAIR. The P¯ANDA experiment aims at high precision spectroscopy in order to address the properties of the strong interaction. The major physics research topics are: hadron spectroscopy, in-medium effects of hadronic particles, study of nucleon structure and precision gamma-ray spectroscopy of single- and double-Λ hypernuclei. To meet the physics objectives of P¯ANDA, a detector with a nearly complete solid angle coverage, an excellent particle identification of hadrons and leptons over a large momentum range and high resolution calorimetry for neutral particles is essential. An overview of the goals and the extensive physics programs, detector development as well as simulation aspects of the P¯ANDA experiment will be discussed.

  15. Experiment and theory in particle physics: Reflections on the discovery of the tau lepton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perl, M.L.

    1996-08-01

    This article is thoughts from the author on particle physics work from his perspective. It is not a summary of his work on the tau lepton, but rather a look at what makes good science, experimental and theoretical, from his experiences in the field. The section titles give a good summary on the topics the author chooses to touch upon. They are: the state of elementary particle physics; getting good ideas in experimental science; a difficult field; experiments and experimenting; 10% of the money and 30% of the time; the dictatorship of theory; technological dreams; last words.

  16. Providing Feedback, Orientation and Opportunities for Reflection as Key Elements for Successful Mentoring Programs: Reviewing a Program for Future Business Education Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Riebenbauer

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The introduction to teaching is critical for novice teachers. Near the end of their master’s program, students of Business Education and Development in Austria spend one semester at an assigned school. They are introduced to teaching, while being assisted by peer students, mentoring teachers, and a companion course. Mentors receive special training and preparation in advance, thus contributing to a high quality mentoring program. The program is organized threefold: (1 providing feedback, (2 opportunities for reflection and (3 career orientation. The purpose of this paper is to assess key elements of successful mentoring programs and to question which competences of mentors contribute most to the success of those programs. Between 2012 and 2015, 188 persons (student teachers and their mentors responded to an online survey at the end of their mentoring program. Additionally, data from a study (1,245 questionnaires regarding the student teachers’ perception of their own competence was utilized, allowing for a comparison of student teacher confidence in their abilities before and after the mentoring program. The present results provide insight into the key elements of successful mentoring programs; both from a student teacher’s and mentor’s perspective. During the semester, students showed an increase regarding their self-perception of their professional competences. It was found that students and mentoring teachers valued feedback after each lesson more than feedback in regular meetings. Opportunities for reflection (e.g. exchange with peer students, learning diaries were considered helpful. The mentoring program helped students to decide whether to become a teacher or not.

  17. Modelling and experiments of self-reflectivity under femtosecond ablation conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, H; Krol, D M; Dijkhuis, J I; van Oosten, D

    2014-01-01

    We present a numerical model which describes the propagation of a single femtosecond laser pulse in a medium of which the optical properties dynamically change within the duration of the pulse. We use a Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method to solve the Maxwell's equations coupled to equations describing the changes in the material properties. We use the model to simulate the self-reflectivity of strongly focused femtosecond laser pulses on silicon and gold under laser ablation condition. We compare the simulations to experimental results and find excellent agreement.

  18. Enhancing the Programming Experience for First-Year Engineering Students through Hands-On Integrated Computer Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Stephen L.; Ghafoor, Sheikh; Abdelrahman, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the redesign and implementation of the course, "Introduction to Programming for Engineers" using microcontroller (MCU) hardware as the programming target. The objective of this effort is to improve the programming competency for engineering students by more closely relating the initial programming experience to the student's…

  19. The Value of Reflection in Writing Courses in ELT Preservice Teacher Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikan, Arda

    2006-01-01

    Constructivist theory has brought significant momentum to all aspects of teacher education. Currently, personal growth of the individual in educational domains is so important that teacher candidates are asked to develop their reflective skills in many courses so that they grow by having internalized and problematized the issues under study by…

  20. Reflective Practice: Using Focus Groups to Determine Family Priorities and Guide Social Pragmatic Program Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theadore, Geraldine; Laurent, Amy; Kovarsky, Dana; Weiss, Amy L.

    2011-01-01

    Reflective practice requires that professionals carefully examine and integrate multiple sources of information when designing intervention and evaluating its effectiveness. This article describes the use of focus group discussion as a form of qualitative research for understanding parents' perspectives of a university-based intervention program…

  1. Forging Ahead! Teachers Reflect on the Early Adopter Program to Implement the Common Core State Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koning, Erin; Houghtby, Beth; Izard, Patrice; Schuler, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    This "water cooler" column features e-mail conversations between Erin Koning and three teachers--Beth, Jenna, and Patrice--and is a reflection of their participation in a Chicago Public School (CPS), professional development series designed to support the implementation of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) in grades K-12. At the…

  2. A Student-Led Global Health Education Initiative: Reflections on the Kenyan Village Medical Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Christopher; Asquith, Heidi; Wren, Tom; Mercuri, Stephanie; Brownlow, Sian

    2016-04-26

    The Kenyan Village Medical Education Program is a student-led global health initiative that seeks to improve health outcomes in rural Kenya through culturally appropriate health education. The month-long program, which is organised by the Melbourne University Health Initiative (Australia), is conducted each January in southern rural Kenya. Significance for public healthThe Kenyan Village Medical Education (KVME) Program is a student-led global health initiative that involves exploring well-established strategies for the prevention of disease through workshops that are conducted in southern rural Kenya. These workshops are tailored to the unique needs and circumstances of rural Kenyan communities, and are delivered to community leaders, as well as to adults and children within the wider community. Aside from the KVME Program's emphasis on reducing the burden of preventable disease through health education, the positive impact of the KVME Program on the Program's student volunteers also deserves consideration. Throughout the month-long KVME Program, student volunteers are presented with opportunities to develop their understanding of cultural competency, the social and economic determinants of health, as well as the unique challenges associated with working in resource-poor communities. Importantly, the KVME Program also represents an avenue through which global health leadership can be fostered amongst student volunteers.

  3. The Evolution of WebCT in a Baccalaureate Nursing Program: An Alice in Wonderland Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, Emily; Hudyma, Shirlene; Carter, Lorraine; Schroeder, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    The use of WebCT in the Laurentian University Bachelor of Science in Nursing program began in 2001 when faculty were eager to explore different modes of delivery for fourth-year courses. Since then, the use of WebCT within the baccalaureate program has increased substantively. This paper outlines the developmental growth of the use of this…

  4. Improving International Marketing Programs to Reflect Global Complexity and Risk: Curriculum Drivers and Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    This article looks at the curriculum redesign of a master's-level program in international marketing from a UK perspective. In order to ensure that the program would be more fit-for-purpose for future managers working under conditions of complexity, uncertainty, and within regimes often very different from the home market, the team began the…

  5. Reflections on the contributions of self-advocates to an interdisciplinary leadership development program for graduate students in health affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Angela; Zuver, Deborah; Kermon, McCafferty; Fernandez, Claudia; Margolis, Lewis H

    2017-09-14

    To advance equity and to enhance leadership skills, self-advocates with intellectual/developmental disabilities are now part of the cohort of trainees in the University of North Carolina LEND, which means that they fully participate in the Interdisciplinary Leadership Development Program, a collaboration among programs in public health, social work, and LEND, which meets monthly. Given this important new participation by self-advocates, this study analyzes the reflections of graduate students on the contributions of self-advocates to their leadership training. At the conclusion of the program each year, graduate students respond to a questionnaire about how self-advocates influenced the content and interactions/discussions of the monthly workshops and are asked to provide specific examples to explain their perceptions. The 12 MCH leadership competencies were used to guide the coding of the comments for this qualitative, directed content analysis. Forty-six of 58 students (79.3%) from two consecutive cohorts responded for this cross-sectional study. Interactions with self-advocates prompted comments on 8 of the 12 leadership competencies, including interdisciplinary team building (29% of the comments); developing others through teaching and mentoring (22%); and self-reflection (18%). The inclusion of self-advocates throughout an interdisciplinary leadership development program for graduate students in health affairs can strengthen MCH leadership competencies for all participants as they enter an increasingly interdisciplinary workforce. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The large-scale environmental impact experiment DISCOL—reflection and foresight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Hjalmar; Schriever, Gerd; Ahnert, Ahmed; Bluhm, Hartmut; Borowski, Christian; Vopel, Kay

    It is now accepted that environmental impact studies should accompany society's growing interest in exploiting deep-sea resources. A large-scale experiment, DISCOL ( Disturbance and re colonisation experiment in a manganese nodule area of the deep South Pacific) was conducted to evaluate potential impacts from mining on the deep-sea bed. DISCOL was the first of a series of projects aimed at better understanding impacts of industrial-scale mining of polymetallic nodules upon the seafloor and its biological community. A schedule of biological work, including a disturbance scheme and sampling patterns, for another 12-year period is described that builds on the DISCOL results, but is strictly valid only for this area. However, future experiments may use estimates from the DISCOL data as a first approximation in their planning phase, but will need to conduct site-specific sampling to establish a baseline.

  7. A Critical Reflection: Foster Care Youth Experiences at a Four Year Postsecondary Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Renada D.

    2016-01-01

    Foster care youth face significant challenges to postsecondary educational success, especially while enrolled at four-year institutions. Foster care youth are absent of family support that their non-foster peers receive throughout the college experience. Without family support, foster care youth encounter greater challenges to persevere through…

  8. Group Leader Reflections on Their Training and Experience: Implications for Group Counselor Educators and Supervisors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohrt, Jonathan H.; Ener, Elizabeth; Porter, Jessica; Young, Tabitha L.

    2014-01-01

    Effective group leaders possess specialized counseling skills and abilities; however, attention to group leadership training appears to be lagging behind that of individual counseling. In this phenomenological study we explored group leaders' perceptions of their training and experience. Twenty-two professional counselors participated in…

  9. The Honours Year--A Reflection on the Experience from Four Former Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kite, James; Russo, Stephanie; Couch, Philip; Bell, Lauren

    2012-01-01

    An honours year is an introduction to new relationships with supervisors, fellow students, research participants and, importantly, yourself. This paper is based upon the experiences of four former Australian honours students who felt there was a distinct lack of guidance for first-time researchers in the available academic literature. In this…

  10. Teacher-Student Relationship Quality and Children's Bullying Experiences with Peers: Reflecting on the Mesosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Karen L.; Smith, J. David

    2017-01-01

    Drawing from social-ecological systems theory, the authors argue that current research on childhood bullying would benefit from analyses that consider the mesosystem--specifically, how teacher-student relationships can influence children's bullying experiences. The authors provide two theoretical conceptions for how children's peer interactions…

  11. Embedding Blended Learning in a University's Teaching Culture: Experiences and Reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Hugh C.; Fill, Karen

    2007-01-01

    Blended learning, the combination of traditional face-to-face teaching methods with authentic online learning activities, has the potential to transform student-learning experiences and outcomes. In spite of this advantage, university teachers often find it difficult to adopt new online techniques, in part because institutional practices are still…

  12. Care-givers' reflections on an ethics education immersive simulation care experience: A series of epiphanous events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Ann; Peacock, Matthew; Zasada, Magdalena; Coucke, Trees; Cox, Anna; Janssens, Nele

    2017-07-01

    There has been little previous scholarship regarding the aims, options and impact of ethics education on residential care-givers. This manuscript details findings from a pragmatic cluster trial evaluating the impact of three different approaches to ethics education. The focus of the article is on one of the interventions, an immersive simulation experience. The simulation experience required residential care-givers to assume the profile of elderly care-recipients for a 24-hr period. The care-givers were student nurses. The project was reviewed favourably by a university ethics committee, and participants provided informed consent. Data from six postsimulation experience focus groups were analysed thematically and three themes were identified: the experience of vulnerability, dignity in care and the organisation of care. Findings suggest that the immersive simulation experience had a powerful immediate impact as participants described epiphanous insights relating to their care experiences. It is suggested that reflecting on and recording epiphanous events has the potential to sustain ethical care practices. Further research is required to evaluate the impact of different ethics education interventions in different cultural contexts. Exploration is also required regarding the meaning and significance of care epiphanies, those "most delicate and evanescent of moments," for the sustainability of ethical care. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. FUV Reflectance of Recently Prepared Al Protected with AlF3: COR Program Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quijada, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Astronomical observations in the Far Ultraviolet (FUV) spectral region are some of the more challenging due to the very distant and faint objects that are typically searched for in cosmic origin studies such as origin of large scale structure, the formation, evolution, and age of galaxies and the origin of stellar and planetary systems. These challenges are driving the need to improve the performance of optical coatings over a wide spectral range that would increase reflectance in mirrors and reduced absorption in dielectric filters used in optical telescope for FUV observations. This paper will present recent advances in reflectance performance for Al+AlF3 mirrors optimized for Lyman-alpha wavelength by performing the deposition of the AlF3 overcoat at elevated substrate temperatures.

  14. Evaluating a nursing erasmus exchange experience: Reflections on the use and value of the Nominal Group Technique for evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Sheila

    2017-09-01

    This paper discusses the use of Nominal Group Technique (NGT) for European nursing exchange evaluation at one university. The NGT is a semi-quantitative evaluation method derived from the Delphi method popular in the 1970s and 1980s. The NGT was modified from the traditional version retaining the structured cycles and but adding a broader group discussion. The NGT had been used for 2 successive years but required analysis and evaluation itself for credibility and 'fit' for purpose which is presented here. It aimed to explore nursing students' exchange experiences and aid programme development futures exchanges and closure from exchange. Results varied for the cohorts and students as participants enthusiastically engaged generating ample data which they ranked and categorised collectively. Evaluation of the NGT itself was two fold: by the programme team who considered purpose, audience, inclusivity, context and expertise. Secondly, students were asked for their thoughts using a graffiti board. Students avidly engaged with NGT but importantly also reported an effect from the process itself as an opportunity to reflect and share their experiences. The programme team concluded the NGT offered a credible evaluation tool which made use of authentic student voice and offered interactive group processes. Pedagogially, it enabled active reflection thus aiding reorientation back to the United Kingdom and awareness of 'transformative' consequences of their exchange experiences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Where Do We Stand? Language Program Direction as Reflected in the "MLA Job Information List."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glew, Ellen

    2000-01-01

    Compares information gleaned from the Modern Language Association's "MLA Job Information List" seeking language program directors in 1996 and provides an overview of changes in the profession during that time. (Author/VWL)

  16. The experiences of undergraduate nursing students and self-reflective accounts of first clinical rotation in pediatric oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirlashari, Jila; Warnock, Fay; Jahanbani, Jahanfar

    2017-07-01

    The clinical practicum is one of the most anticipated components of the nursing program for nursing students. However, the practicum can be anxiety producing for students, especially when it is their first placement in an emotional demanding setting like pediatric oncology unit. Taking care of children with cancer and who are facing the death trajectory is complex and demanding not only for students but also for the experienced nurse. In this qualitative research, the purpose was to explore senior student perceptions and self-reflective accounts of what it was like to care for children with cancer and their family throughout the course of their first practicum on a pediatric oncology unit that also provided children palliative care as needed. Data from the self-reflective journals and interviews were analyzed together using conventional content analysis. The three resultant categories that emerged: state of shock and getting lost, walking in to a mind shaking world and finding the way provided in-depth novel insight on the perceptions of senior undergraduate nursing students as they journey through their first time practicum on a pediatric oncology unit. The findings also confirmed the importance and benefit of reflective journaling to student integrated learning and adjustment in nursing practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Using Reflections of Recent Resident Graduates and their Pediatric Colleagues to Evaluate a Residency Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K. Kamei, M.D.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purposes: In response to the new Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME mandate for residency programs to use feedback to improve its educational program, we piloted a novel evaluation strategy of a residency program using structured interviews of resident graduates working in a primary care practice and their physician associates. Methods: A research assistant performed a structured telephone interview. Quantitative data assessing the graduate’s self-assessment and the graduate’s clinical practice by the associate were analyzed. In addition, we performed a qualitative analysis of the interviews. Results: Thirteen resident graduates in primary care practice and seven physician practice associates participated in the study. Graduate self-assessment revealed high satisfaction with their residency training and competency. The associates judged our graduates as highly competent and mentioned independent decision-making and strong interpersonal skills (such as teamwork and communication as important. They specifically cited the graduate’s skills in intensive care medicine and adolescent medicine as well as communication and teamwork skills as important contributions to their practice. Conclusions: The ACGME Outcomes Project, which increases the emphasis on educational outcomes in the accreditation of residency education programs, requires programs to provide evidence of its effectiveness in preparing residents for practice. Direct assessment of the competency of our physician graduates in practice using structured interviews of graduates and their practice associates provide useful feedback information to a residency program as part of a comprehensive evaluation plan of our program’s curriculum and can be used to direct future educational initiatives of our training program

  18. Does the MUNIX Method Reflect Clinical Dysfunction in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Practical Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawel, Malgorzata; Kuzma-Kozakiewicz, Magdalena

    2016-05-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the usefulness of the MUNIX method in reflecting the clinical dysfunction in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), as well as to assess an intra-rater reproducibility of MUNIX. The study group consisted of a total of 15 ALS patients. The mean age of symptoms onset was 55 years, and the mean disease duration was 10 months. The muscle strength and patients' functional status were assessed according to the Medical Research Council (MRC) and by ALS functional rating scale revised (ALSFRS-R), respectively. The MUNIX was performed in 6 muscles: abductor pollicis brevis (APB), abductor digiti minimi (ADM), biceps brachii (BB), tibial anterior (TA), extensor digitorum brevis (EDB), and abductor hallucis (AH), unilaterally, at a less affected side. Both muscle-specific and global MRC and MUNIX scores were calculated. In 11 patients, the study protocol was repeated at least twice every 3 months. An additional testing of the intra-rater reliability was performed at the first visit.There were no significant differences between MUNIX test and re-test values in the APB, ADM, BB, TA, EDB, and AH muscles (P >0.05). The highest variability of the test-retest values was found in the BB muscle (7.53%). Although there was a significant test-retest difference in the global MUNIX score (P = 0.02), the variability of the results was as low as 1.26%. The MUNIX value correlated with the muscle-specific MRC score in ABP, ADM, TA, EDB and AH (P <0.05), and the global MUNIX values correlated with global MRC scores (P <0.05). There was also a significant correlation between the global MUNIX score and the clinical dysfunction measured by the ALSFRS-R scale (P <0.05). The global MUNIX showed a higher monthly decline (4.3%) as compared with ALFRS-R (0.7%) and the MRC global score (0.5%).This study confirms that the MUNIX method is a sensitive, reliable, and accurate tool reflecting both motor dysfunction and disease progression in ALS

  19. Reflections on the labyrinth: Investigating Black and Minority Ethnic leaders’ career experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Wyatt, Madeleine; Silvester, Jo

    2015-01-01

    Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) employees appear to experience more difficulty reaching senior leadership positions than their white counterparts. Using Eagly and Carli’s (2007) metaphor of the labyrinth our aim was to give voice to black and minority ethnic managers who have successfully achieved senior management roles, and compare their leadership journeys with those of matched white managers. This paper used semi-structured interviews and attribution theory to examine how 20 black and min...

  20. The Lived Experience of Nurses Enrolled in the Regents College Nursing Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailey, Mary Ann

    1994-01-01

    Reflection by 15 nurses in the Regents College Nursing Program, an external degree program based on four criterion-referenced tests, uncovered motivations for selecting the program, clarified such needs as support networks and learning resources, and revealed a pervasive pattern of stress that affected exam preparation and performance. (SK)

  1. The dish-Rankine SCSTPE program (Engineering Experiment no. 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, R. L.; Grigsby, C. E.

    1980-05-01

    Activities planned for phase 2 Of the Small Community Solar Thermal Power Experiment (PFDR) program are summarized with emphasis on a dish-Rankine point focusing distributed receiver solar thermal electric system. Major design efforts include: (1) development of an advanced concept indirect-heated receiver;(2) development of hardware and software for a totally unmanned power plant control system; (3) implementation of a hybrid digital simulator which will validate plant operation prior to field testing; and (4) the acquisition of an efficient organic Rankine cycle power conversion unit. Preliminary performance analyses indicate that a mass-produced dish-Rankine PFDR system is potentially capable of producing electricity at a levelized busbar energy cost of 60 to 70 mills per KWh and with a capital cost of about $1300 per KW.

  2. What is a learning town? Reflections on the experience at Wirksworth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Wiltshier

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the legacy of regeneration project work and knowledge management and transfer as a result of intervention through a charity designed to support new business opportunities, specifically in arts and entertainment, tourism, skills development and training. As part of the University of Derby’s own work-related learning and problem-based learning, a project team was assigned to work alongside the charity ‘New Opportunities in Wirksworth!’ (NOW!. A participant observation, action research approach has been used to elicit and analyse the knowledge transfer, both explicit and implicit. Staff and students from the University of Derby have been contracted to research tourism development specifically in festival supply and demand, the attractiveness of the destination and its key features the market, mining heritage and volunteer railway. Staff and students also committed to an events strategy, marketing the destination and finance for start-ups. The University is engaged in tacit and explicit knowledge transfers. Key stakeholders have reflected on a decade of achievements and both fails and success stories. Agendas for the future have been identified and the project NOW! Has a legacy of both tacit and explicit knowledge for the benefit of other communities. There is an ongoing desire to explore how both public and private sectors can benefit from knowledge sharing and to benefit ongoing problem-based learning in education and training.

  3. TRAINING COURSE OF TEACHERS THROUGH THE PROGRAM SEXUAL EDUCATION IN DEBATE IN THE RADIO UDESC FM 100.1 FLORIANÓPOLIS: SOME REFLECTIONS ON THE PERCORRATED WAYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia de Freitas

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article brings up reflections on a collective creative process, which had as a final result the proposal of an extension course project, with the objective of being an alternative mean of awareness and broadening of knowledge and discussions about the subject of emancipatory sexual education. Through radio programs, the course will occupy a space that corresponds to four programs on UDESC Radio FM 100.1, in a weekly schedule that has been taking place for 8 years, called Debating Sex Education. The structure of these programs meets the presuppositions of the Sex Educators Formation Extension Program: interface with technologies – from the EDUSEX group -, which has the aim of providing to the hearers moments of awareness to the possibility of experiences of an emancipatory sex education. The course has the intent of reaching people interested in the subject of  sex education and is committed to discussing the differentiation between sex and sexuality, sex education under an emancipatory perspective, the declaration of sex rights as universal rights and the right to a comprehensive sex education during infancy and adolescence. To instigate and broaden these discussions are paths to be gone through in this project.

  4. Evaluating virtual STEM mentoring programs: The SAGANet.org experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Som, S. M.; Walker, S. I.; Miller, E.; Anbar, M.; Kacar, B.; Forrester, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Many school districts within the United States continue to seek new ways of engaging students within Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) disciplines. SAGANet.org, a web-based 501c3 Astrobiology outreach initiative, works with a number of schools, partnering K-12 students and their families with professional scientist mentors from around the world to teach and inspire students using virtual technology platforms. Current programs include two mentoring partnerships: pairing scientist-mentors with at-risk youth at the Pittsburg Community School in Pittsburg CA, and pairing scientist-mentors with families from the Kyrene del Cielo Elementary School in Chandler AZ. These programs represent two very different models for utilizing the virtual media platform provided by SAGANet.org to engage K-12 students and their families in STEM. For the former, scientists mentor the students of the Pittsburg School as part of the formal in-class curriculum. For the latter, scientists work with K-5 students and their families through Cielo's Science & Engineering Discovery Room to develop a science project as part of an informal learning experience that is independent of the formal curriculum. In this presentation, we (1) discuss the challenges and successes of engaging these two distinct audiences through virtual media, (2) present the results of how these two very-different mentoring partnership impact K-12 students science self-efficacy, interest in science, and STEM career awareness, and (3) share the impact of the mentoring experience on the mentor's confidence and self-efficacy with communicating science to the public.

  5. Reflectance confocal microscopy-guided laser ablation of basal cell carcinomas: initial clinical experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Heidy; Yélamos, Oriol; Cordova, Miguel; Chen, Chih-Shan Jason; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2017-08-01

    Laser ablation offers a procedure for precise, fast, and minimally invasive removal of superficial and early nodular basal cell carcinomas (BCCs). However, the lack of histopathological confirmation has been a limitation toward widespread use in the clinic. A reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) imaging-guided approach offers cellular-level histopathology-like feedback directly on the patient, which may then guide and help improve the efficacy of the ablation procedure. Following an ex vivo benchtop study (reported in our earlier papers), we performed an initial study on 44 BCCs on 21 patients in vivo, using a pulsed erbium:ytterbium aluminum garnet laser and a contrast agent (aluminum chloride). In 10 lesions on six patients, the RCM imaging-guided detection of either presence of residual tumor or complete clearance was immediately confirmed with histopathology. Additionally, 34 BCCs on 15 patients were treated with RCM imaging-guided laser ablation, with immediate confirmation for clearance of tumor (no histopathology), followed by longer-term monitoring, currently in progress, with follow-up imaging (again, no histopathology) at 3, 6, and 18 months. Thus far, the imaging resolution appears to be sufficient and consistent for monitoring efficacy of ablation in the wound, both immediately postablation and subsequently during recovery. The efficacy results appear to be promising, with observed clearance in 19 cases of 22 cases with follow-ups ranging from 6 to 21 months. An additional 12 cases with 1 to 3 months of follow-ups has shown clearance of tumor but a longer follow-up time is required to establish conclusive results. Further instrumentation development will be necessary to cover larger areas with a more automatically controlled instrument for more uniform, faster, and deeper imaging of margins.

  6. Community College First-Year Experience Programs: Examining Student Access, Experience, and Success from the Student Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo-Gil, Nancy; Zerquera, Desiree D.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter examines community college first-year experience programs using critical race theory and ecological theory. The study draws on diverse students' experiences with access, support, and long-term success within community colleges to assess how these programs foster student success, as told through the voices of student participants.

  7. Prevention of suicide among adolescents and young people: reflecting on the experience of Western models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.B. Bovina

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We analyze various preventive and proactive suicide programs, which operate in a number of Western countries. We consider various measures implemented under the auspices of the WHO, as well as in the framework of the European Alliance Against Depression. Following J. Henden, wediscuss three types of suicide prevention: primary, secondary and tertiary. Primary prevention covers the population as a whole – suicide prevention is to promote the value of health and life. This type of prevention is addressed to a wide audience, including teenagers and young adults groups. Secondary prevention is aimed at those who have attempted to commit suicide, because the presence of attempts is a significant feature that allows to predict next attempts. Tertiary prevention is addressed to suicider’s close circle, it aims at help the suicider’s relatives to survive this event, use the appropriate ways of coping with the tragic situation.

  8. The University of Kitakyushu-Tacoma Community College Semester Study Abroad Program: Overview, Goals and Reflections

    OpenAIRE

    Anne CRESCINI; Rodger WILLIAMSON

    2011-01-01

    Although declining in recent years, the number of Japanese students studying in the United States every year is still over 20,000. According to Open Doors International, in 2009, 24,264 Japanese students spent time studying for some length of time at an American university (2009). Many of these students participated in a program of a semester of less. Recent research (Dwyer, 2004) has shown that while perhaps longterm programs (a semester or more) have a more significant impact on language gr...

  9. Semantics-Driven Migration of Java Programs: a Practical Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artyom O. Aleksyuk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to demonstrate the feasibility of automated code migration to a new set of programming libraries. Code migration is a common task in modern software projects. For example, it may arise when a project should be ported to a more secure or feature-rich library, a new platform or a new version of an already used library. The developed method and tool are based on the previously created by the authors a formalism for describing libraries semantics. The formalism specifies a library behaviour by using a system of extended finite state machines (EFSM. This paper outlines the metamodel designed to specify library descriptions and proposes an easy to use domainspecific language (DSL, which can be used to define models for particular libraries. The mentioned metamodel directly forms the code migration procedure. A process of migration is split into five steps, and each step is also described in the paper. The procedure uses an algorithm based on the breadth- first search extended for the needs of the migration task. Models and algorithms were implemented in the prototype of an automated code migration tool. The prototype was tested by both artificial code examples and a real-world open source project. The article describes the experiments performed, the difficulties that have arisen in the process of migration of test samples, and how they are solved in the proposed procedure. The results of experiments indicate that code migration can be successfully automated. 

  10. Environmental disturbance confounds prenatal glucocorticoid programming experiments in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Regan, D; Kenyon, C J; Seckl, J R; Holmes, M C

    2010-07-01

    Low birth weight in humans is predictive of hypertension in adult life, and while the mechanisms underlying this link remain unknown, fetal overexposure to glucocorticoids has been implicated. We have previously shown that prenatal dexamethasone (DEX) exposure in the rat lowers birth weight and programmes adult hypertension. This current study aimed to unravel the molecular nature of this hypertension. However, unknowingly, post hoc investigations revealed that our animals had been subjected to environmental noise stresses from an adjacent construction site, which were sufficient to confound our prenatal DEX-programming experiments. This perinatal stress successfully established low birth weight, hypercorticosteronaemia, insulin resistance, hypertension and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysfunction in vehicle (VEH)-treated offspring, such that the typical distinctions between both treatment groups were ameliorated. The lack of an additional effect on DEX-treated offspring is suggestive of a maximal effect of perinatal stress and glucocorticoids, serving to prevent against the potentially detrimental effects of sustained glucocorticoid hyper-exposure. Finally, this paper serves to inform researchers of the potential detrimental effects of neighbouring construction sites to their experiments.

  11. The new spin physics program of the COMPASS experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Luís

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The COMPASS experiment, at CERN SPS, has been compiling for more than a decade successful and precise results on nucleon structure and hadron spectroscopy, leading to statistical errors much smaller than previously measured. The new COMPASS spin physics program, starting this year, aims to a rather complete nucleon structure description; this new representation goes beyond the collinear approximation by including the quark intrinsic transverse momentum distributions. The theoretical framework, for this new picture of the nucleon, is given by the Transverse Momentum Dependent distributions (TMDs and by the Generalised Parton Distributions (GPDs. The TMDs, in particular Sivers, Boer-Mulders, pretzelosity and transversity functions will be obtained through the polarised Drell-Yan process, for the first time. The results will be complementary to those already obtained via polarised Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering (SIDIS. Also unpolarised SIDIS will be studied, allowing the knowledge improvement of the strange quark PDF and the access to the kaon fragmentation functions (FFs. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS off an unpolarised hydrogen target will be used to study the GPDs, in a kinematic region not yet covered by any existing experiment.

  12. Students' needs reflected in the efl program: a small-scale evaluation of the methodologies proposed in an english program

    OpenAIRE

    Mora Acosta Lisbeth; Ramos Holguín Bertha

    2009-01-01

    In order to evaluate if there were discrepancies or not among the methodology proposed in the English program, students’ needs and what the teacher was actually doing in her classes, 13 ninth graders were asked to answer two questionnaires and they were also observed while they were in their English classes at the Institución Educativa Departamental El Vino (Cundinamarca, Colombia). The English teacher was also interviewed and a self- assessment questionnaire was given to her. The analysis of...

  13. Capturing the Experience: Reflections of Women With Breast Cancer Engaged in an Expressive Writing Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gripsrud, Birgitta Haga; Brassil, Kelly J; Summers, Barbara; Søiland, Håvard; Kronowitz, Steven; Lode, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Expressive writing has been shown to improve quality of life, fatigue, and posttraumatic stress among breast cancer patients across cultures. Understanding how and why the method may be beneficial to patients can increase awareness of the psychosocial impact of breast cancer and enhance interventional work within this population. Qualitative research on experiential aspects of interventions may inform the theoretical understanding and generate hypotheses for future studies. The aim of the study was to explore and describe the experience and feasibility of expressive writing among women with breast cancer following mastectomy and immediate or delayed reconstructive surgery. Seven participants enrolled to undertake 4 episodes of expressive writing at home, with semistructured interviews conducted afterward and analyzed using experiential thematic analysis. Three themes emerged through analysis: writing as process, writing as therapeutic, and writing as a means to help others. Findings illuminate experiential variations in expressive writing and how storytelling encourages a release of cognitive and emotional strains, surrendering these to reside in the text. The method was said to process feelings and capture experiences tied to a new and overwhelming illness situation, as impressions became expressions through writing. Expressive writing, therefore, is a valuable tool for healthcare providers to introduce into the plan of care for patients with breast cancer and potentially other cancer patient groups. This study augments existing evidence to support the appropriateness of expressive writing as an intervention after a breast cancer diagnosis. Further studies should evaluate its feasibility at different time points in survivorship.

  14. Contextualizing neuro-collaborations: reflections on a transdisciplinary fMRI lie detection experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlefield, Melissa M.; Fitzgerald, Des; Knudsen, Kasper; Tonks, James; Dietz, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent neuroscience initiatives (including the E.U.’s Human Brain Project and the U.S.’s BRAIN Initiative) have reinvigorated discussions about the possibilities for transdisciplinary collaboration between the neurosciences, the social sciences, and the humanities. As STS scholars have argued for decades, however, such inter- and transdisciplinary collaborations are potentially fraught with tensions between researchers. This essay build on such claims by arguing that the tensions of transdisciplinary research also exist within researchers’ own experiences of working between disciplines - a phenomenon that we call “disciplinary double consciousness” (DDC). Building on previous work that has characterized similar spaces (and especially on the Critical Neuroscience literature), we argue that “neuro-collaborations” inevitably engage researchers in DDC - a phenomenon that allows us to explore the useful dissonance that researchers can experience when working between a “home” discipline and a secondary discipline. Our case study is a five-year research project in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) lie detection involving a transdisciplinary research team made up of social scientists, a neuroscientist, and a humanist. In addition to theorizing neuro-collaborations from the inside-out, this essay presents practical suggestions for developing transdisciplinary infrastructures that could support future neuro-collaborations. PMID:24744713

  15. Contextualizing neuro-collaborations: reflections on a transdisciplinary fMRI lie detection experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlefield, Melissa M; Fitzgerald, Des; Knudsen, Kasper; Tonks, James; Dietz, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    Recent neuroscience initiatives (including the E.U.'s Human Brain Project and the U.S.'s BRAIN Initiative) have reinvigorated discussions about the possibilities for transdisciplinary collaboration between the neurosciences, the social sciences, and the humanities. As STS scholars have argued for decades, however, such inter- and transdisciplinary collaborations are potentially fraught with tensions between researchers. This essay build on such claims by arguing that the tensions of transdisciplinary research also exist within researchers' own experiences of working between disciplines - a phenomenon that we call "disciplinary double consciousness" (DDC). Building on previous work that has characterized similar spaces (and especially on the Critical Neuroscience literature), we argue that "neuro-collaborations" inevitably engage researchers in DDC - a phenomenon that allows us to explore the useful dissonance that researchers can experience when working between a "home" discipline and a secondary discipline. Our case study is a five-year research project in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) lie detection involving a transdisciplinary research team made up of social scientists, a neuroscientist, and a humanist. In addition to theorizing neuro-collaborations from the inside-out, this essay presents practical suggestions for developing transdisciplinary infrastructures that could support future neuro-collaborations.

  16. Contextualizing Neuro-Collaborations: Reflections on a Transdisciplinary fMRI Lie Detection Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa M. Littlefield

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent neuroscience initiatives (including the E.U.’s Human Brain Project and the U.S.’s BRAIN Initiative have reinvigorated discussions about the possibilities for transdisciplinary collaboration between the neurosciences, the social sciences, and the humanities. As STS scholars have argued for decades, however, such inter- and transdisciplinary collaborations are potentially fraught with tensions between researchers. This essay build on such claims by arguing that the tensions of transdisciplinary research also exist within researchers’ own experiences of working between disciplines – a phenomenon that we call ‘Disciplinary Double Consciousness’ (DDC. Building on previous work that has characterized similar spaces (and especially on the Critical Neuroscience literature, we argue that ‘neuro-collaborations’ inevitably engage researchers in DDC – a phenomenon that allows us to explore the useful dissonance that researchers can experience when working between a home discipline and a secondary discipline. Our case study is a five-year case study in fMRI lie detection involving a transdisciplinary research team made up of social scientists, a neuroscientist, and a humanist. In addition to theorizing neuro-collaborations from the inside-out, this essay presents practical suggestions for developing transdisciplinary infrastructures that could support future neuro-collaborations.

  17. Comparing Homeless Persons’ Care Experiences in Tailored Versus Nontailored Primary Care Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Cheryl L.; Steward, Jocelyn L.; Jones, Richard N.; Roth, David L.; Stringfellow, Erin; Gordon, Adam J.; Kim, Theresa W.; Austin, Erika L.; Henry, Stephen Randal; Kay Johnson, N.; Shanette Granstaff, U.; O’Connell, James J.; Golden, Joya F.; Young, Alexander S.; Davis, Lori L.; Pollio, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We compared homeless patients’ experiences of care in health care organizations that differed in their degree of primary care design service tailoring. Methods. We surveyed homeless-experienced patients (either recently or currently homeless) at 3 Veterans Affairs (VA) mainstream primary care settings in Pennsylvania and Alabama, a homeless-tailored VA clinic in California, and a highly tailored non-VA Health Care for the Homeless Program in Massachusetts (January 2011-March 2012). We developed a survey, the “Primary Care Quality-Homeless Survey," to reflect the concerns and aspirations of homeless patients. Results. Mean scores at the tailored non-VA site were superior to those from the 3 mainstream VA sites (P homelessness. PMID:24148052

  18. Comparing homeless persons' care experiences in tailored versus nontailored primary care programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertesz, Stefan G; Holt, Cheryl L; Steward, Jocelyn L; Jones, Richard N; Roth, David L; Stringfellow, Erin; Gordon, Adam J; Kim, Theresa W; Austin, Erika L; Henry, Stephen Randal; Kay Johnson, N; Shanette Granstaff, U; O'Connell, James J; Golden, Joya F; Young, Alexander S; Davis, Lori L; Pollio, David E

    2013-12-01

    We compared homeless patients' experiences of care in health care organizations that differed in their degree of primary care design service tailoring. We surveyed homeless-experienced patients (either recently or currently homeless) at 3 Veterans Affairs (VA) mainstream primary care settings in Pennsylvania and Alabama, a homeless-tailored VA clinic in California, and a highly tailored non-VA Health Care for the Homeless Program in Massachusetts (January 2011-March 2012). We developed a survey, the "Primary Care Quality-Homeless Survey," to reflect the concerns and aspirations of homeless patients. Mean scores at the tailored non-VA site were superior to those from the 3 mainstream VA sites (P homelessness.

  19. "Understanding my ALS". Experiences and reflections of persons with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and relatives on participation in peer group rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Louise Sofia; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Handberg, Charlotte

    2018-01-26

    The aim of this study was to gain insight into experiences and reflections of persons with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and relatives concerning the peer group rehabilitation programme "More Life - Less Illness". This qualitative study used the Interpretive Description methodology with Symbolic Interactionism as the analytical framework. Eighteen programme participants representing persons with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (n = 8) and relatives (n = 10) were included. Data consisted of individual interviews and participant observation. The analysis revealed two categorical themes, "Sense of Community Building" and "Understanding my ALS", which represented the participants' experiences and reflections on peer group rehabilitation. Through the analysis, it became apparent that "Sense of Community Building" gave rise to an increased and personalised understanding of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis among the participants. As a part of the continuous processing of the knowledge gained, "Facing Facts" and "Retaining Normality" appeared as subthemes regarding the participants' ability to live a less dependent and more meaningful life. This study of peer group rehabilitation for persons with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and relatives indicates that programme participation leads to positive experiences in terms of living a shared meaningful life despite severe disability. The findings may guide practice to develop longitudinal peer group rehabilitation programmes with joint inclusion of persons with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and relatives. Implications for Rehabilitation Peer group rehabilitation may facilitate an increased and personalised understanding of what it means to live with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. A programme design with six months of sequential sessions enables a continuous processing of shared experiences and gained knowledge. Joint participation of persons with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and their relatives supports both their internal

  20. Participant Trends in the Geosciences Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, C. K.; Patino, L. C.; Rom, E. L.; Adams, A. S.

    2016-12-01

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) supports programs for undergraduate students to gain experience in research. In 2016, there were nearly 60 active Research Experience for Undergraduate (REU) sites across the nation that provided research opportunities in Geosciences (GEO). At these REU sites, students carried out independent research projects and had the chance to present the information at national conferences. The participants often joined research groups that included other undergraduate and graduate students, postdoctoral scholars, and investigators. Between 2009 and 2016, there were over 26,000 applications to GEO REU sites and about 1,953 applicants were selected to participate. Data for GEO REU sites has been collected using two mechanisms, direct queries to the REU site managers (2009-2012, and 2016) and analysis of award progress reports (2014-2015). The information collected since 2009 has provided a temporal description of who is participating in the GEO REU sites (e.g. gender, demographics, academic level). The analysis of the trends in the REU sites has shown an increase of women participating in the research opportunities across all disciplines, to the point that in some sites there is need to increase the participation of men. The number of minority and underrepresented students has also increased. Throughout this period, the academic level of the participants in GEO REU sites has also changed; the number of students who have completed only the first or second year of college has increased. The trends in the data allow NSF to understand who is participating in the REUs and to incentivize the research community to engage students who will benefit from these experiences, but who are not currently participating.

  1. Python and Roles of Variables in Introductory Programming: Experiences from Three Educational Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikula, Uolevi; Sajaniemi, Jorma; Tedre, Matti; Wray, Stuart

    2007-01-01

    Students often find that learning to program is hard. Introductory programming courses have high drop-out rates and students do not learn to program well. This paper presents experiences from three educational institutions where introductory programming courses were improved by adopting Python as the first programming language and roles of…

  2. The statistical support in the research projects, university-community. Reflections of an Experience with Seedbeds of Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nubia Yaneth Gómez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Connect Academy with research , is one of the current demands of the University institutions and society. It is expected that the teaching and research are activities articulated , since when teachers are actively involved in it, it can induce students to a critical and reflective atmosphere, moreover, when research is carried out in your environment, student appropriates the reality that surrounds it. The article seeks to encourage the reflection of the importance of linking research projects at universities connected in a practical manner with the objectives of a sector of the community and where the seedbeds of researchmake an active part of the project, thus strengthens the triad University- Community - Research. The type of analysis is exploratory descriptive in order to characterize and understand issues of interest around the experiences of the seedbeds of researchand their experiences. Methodologically, the planning and development it is focused on three moments: information and documentation, statistical design of the proposal, development and application. This project enabled the breakdown of classical roles between teachers and students, generating greater confidence and dynamism to the proposed activities. Were strengthened processes of teaching and learning between the seedbeds, strengthening research, argumentative, communicative and social competences.

  3. Experiment for 3-component S-wave reflection survey. Part 3; Sanseibun S ha hanshaho no kiso jikken. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kano, N.; Yamaguchi, K.; Yokota, T.; Kiguchi, T. [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    Anisotropy has been investigated using S-wave as a technique for detecting fractures. In this study, fundamental experiments were carried out with slightly changing the measuring conditions at a place where anisotropy was expected. This paper describes the fundamental data acquisition of anisotropy analysis using S-wave, and a part of the results. The experiments were conducted on the agricultural road in Yamadera district, Matsuyama-machi, Yamagata Prefecture. Two flat unpaved roads meeting at right angles were used as traverse lines. In this place, several reflection surfaces were certainly detected by P-wave, and anisotropy of S-wave was confirmed from the velocity of refracted wave of S-wave. Data were processed for individual traverse lines meeting at right angles. Firstly, signal sweeping, correlation, and vertical superposition were made. Six kinds of data were prepared, i.e., three-component receiving records of data at 0{degree} of generating direction and three-component receiving records of data at 90{degree} of generating direction. Records of T-component at 0{degree} and R-component at 90{degree} were used for processing of the seismic reflection method. These records would be considered to be data of SH-wave and SV-wave, respectively. 4 figs.

  4. Developing Reading Partnerships between Parents and Children: A Reflection on the Reading Together Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhram, Diana Patricia; Hsu, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Early reading exposure is important in setting a foundation for students to acquire the basic literacy skills that set them up for school and life success. More importantly, parent involvement at an early age is a critical component of reading skills development. This report presents an overview of the Reading Together Program that introduced…

  5. A step towards functional integration : Reflection program case ‘Rotterdam roof park’

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, M.; Kothuis, Baukje; Kok, Matthijs

    2017-01-01

    Many functions are combined in the Rotterdam Roof Park project: It is a shopping mall, a parking garage, a park on the roof, and last but not least, a flood defense. The research in our program was done after the buildings and structures had been built. So the

  6. Treatment plans in psychiatric community housing programs : Do they reflect rehabilitation principles?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Heer-Wunderink, C.; Visser, E.S.; Caro-Nienhuis, A.; Sytema, S.; van Weeghel, J.; Wiersma, D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the extent to which treatment plans of service users of community housing programs measure up to rehabilitation principles according to the Choose-Get-Keep model of psychiatric rehabilitation. The study evaluates whether these plans correspond with service-user and

  7. Treatment Plans in Psychiatric Community Housing Programs : Do They Reflect Rehabilitation Principles?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Heer-Wunderink, Charlotte; Visser, Ellen; Caro-Nienhuis, Annemarie D.; van Weeghel, Jaap; Sytema, Sjoerd; Wiersma, Durk

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the extent to which treatment plans of service users of community housing programs measure up to rehabilitation principles according to the Choose-Get-Keep model of psychiatric rehabilitation. The study evaluates whether these plans correspond with service-user and

  8. Quality as Critique: Promoting Critical Reflection among Youth in Structured Encounter Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In this manuscript, I interrogate the concept of "quality" encounter programs for youth in conflict zones. I focus on two Israeli organizations implementing encounters for Jewish and Palestinian citizens, and draw upon narratives of former participants as articulated during life history narratives to illustrate divergent emphases in each…

  9. Site Characterization of the Source Physics Experiment Phase II Location Using Seismic Reflection Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sexton, Emily [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Snelson, Catherine M [NSTec; Chipman, Veraun D [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States); Emer, Dudley [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States); White, Bob [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States); Emmit, Ryan [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States); Wright, Al [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States); Drellack, Sigmund [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States); Huckins-Gang, Heather [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States); Mercadante, Jennifer [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States); Floyd, Michael [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States); McGowin, Chris [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States); Cothrun, Chris [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Bonal, Nedra [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2013-12-05

    An objective of the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is to identify low-yield nuclear explosions from a regional distance. Low-yield nuclear explosions can often be difficult to discriminate among the clutter of natural and man-made explosive events (e.g., earthquakes and mine blasts). The SPE is broken into three phases. Phase I has provided the first of the physics-based data to test the empirical models that have been used to discriminate nuclear events. The Phase I series of tests were placed within a highly fractured granite body. The evolution of the project has led to development of Phase II, to be placed within the opposite end member of geology, an alluvium environment, thereby increasing the database of waveforms to build upon in the discrimination models. Both the granite and alluvium sites have hosted nearby nuclear tests, which provide comparisons for the chemical test data. Phase III of the SPE is yet to be determined.

  10. SEMINAR ABOUT SERIOUS GAMES AND VIRTUAL WORLDS: An Experience of International Collaboration And Reflection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfram LAASER

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The educational possibilities of ICT, dizzying and exponentially growing every day, offer multiple alternatives of mediation for teaching, learning and communication.Thus, the inclusion of video games and virtual worlds into educational context represents a qualitative leap that claims to significantly boost ways of communication and knowledge representation of the scenarios involved. Aware of this reality, in the framework of the Master of Technology Enhanced Learning at the National University of Cordoba, Argentina, a virtual seminar was offered to students to address the issue on the basis of invited lectures of worldwide recognized experts. The format chosen for the seminar allowed the treatment of subjects not only through reading assignments and web quests to be discussed collaboratively but also included the state of the art experience of developers working in the field. The paper describes didactic design and technical solutions of the seminar format.

  11. REFLECTING ABOUT THE EXPERIENCE OF LIVED SPACE: THE PLACE IN CONSTRUCTION OF KNOWLEDGE GEOGRAPHIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helenize Carlos de Macêdo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The teaching of geography in schools of elementary education has as objective the citizenship training, that is, provide the spatial reading, understanding the socio-spatial relations derives from history and its implications in today's world, so that students have a critical view about their reality and to intervene on it. However, for the teaching of Geography reach your goals, it is necessary that teachers seek to incorporate methodologies that favor the construction of knowledge and suited to the reality of students. In this sense, the study of Geography from the place it seems appropriate, in order to approximate the daily knowledge and school knowledge, contributing to a significant learning. Thus, this paper discusses the importance of the study of place in Geography lessons, and relate an experience lived in the classroom with students of the 6th year of the Municipal School of Basic Education Severino Marinheiro, Juazeirinho - PB. Was used as methodology, literature review and analysis of the texts produced by the students. The results were satisfactory and demonstrated the importance of the study of the place, the experiences of students in the construction of geographical knowledge and on the theme environmental problems. O ensino de Geografia nas escolas da educação básica tem como objetivo a formação para a cidadania, ou seja, proporcionar a leitura espacial, entendendo as relações socioespaciais no decorrer da história e suas implicações no mundo atual, de forma que os discentes tenham uma visão crítica sobre sua realidade e possam intervir sobre ela. Porém, para que o ensino da Geografia alcance os seus objetivos, se faz necessário que os professores busquem incorporar metodologias que privilegiem a construção de conhecimentos, e que estes privilegiem a realidade dos alunos. Nesse sentido, o estudo da Geografia a partir do lugar se mostra oportuno, tendo em vista aproximar os saberes cotidianos e os saberes

  12. Boston Violence Intervention Advocacy Program: a qualitative study of client experiences and perceived effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Thea L; Bibi, Salma; Langlois, Breanne K; Dugan, Elizabeth; Mitchell, Patricia M

    2014-07-01

    This study intended to explore clients' experiences and provide a contextual basis for understanding their perceptions of the effectiveness of the Boston Medical Center (BMC) Violence Intervention Advocacy Program (VIAP). This was an exploratory, qualitative study conducted in an urban, Level I trauma center from July 1, 2011 to February 24, 2012. Emergency department (ED) patients older than 18 years with penetrating trauma, and who were enrolled in the VIAP, were eligible. Two trained, qualitative interviewers who were not part of the VIAP obtained consent and conducted in-depth, semistructured interviews. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, deidentified, coded, and analyzed. Thematic content analysis consistent with grounded theory was used to identify themes related to client experiences with VIAP, life circumstances, challenges to physical and emotional healing postinjury, services provided by VIAP, and perceptions of VIAP's effectiveness. Twenty subjects were interviewed. Most were male, African American, and younger than 30 years of age, reflecting the overall program's clientele. Most subjects perceived their advocates as caring adults in their lives and cited aspects of the peer support model that helped establish trusting relationships. Major challenges to healing were fear and safety, trust, isolation as a coping mechanism, bitterness, and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Every subject noted important services provided by VIAP advocates. Most subjects explicitly stated that they had positive experiences with the VIAP and perceived advocates' roles as a positive influence, providing client-centered advocacy, education, and support. This study provides insight into the lives of 20 BMC VIAP clients and contextualizes their unique challenges. Participants described positive, life-changing behaviors on their journey to healing through connections to caring, supportive adults. Information gained from this study will help the VIAP to

  13. Transporting ideas between marine and social sciences: experiences from interdisciplinary research programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy M. Turner

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The oceans comprise 70% of the surface area of our planet, contain some of the world’s richest natural resources and are one of the most significant drivers of global climate patterns. As the marine environment continues to increase in importance as both an essential resource reservoir and facilitator of global change, it is apparent that to find long-term sustainable solutions for our use of the sea and its resources and thus to engage in a sustainable blue economy, an integrated interdisciplinary approach is needed. As a result, interdisciplinary working is proliferating. We report here our experiences of forming interdisciplinary teams (marine ecologists, ecophysiologists, social scientists, environmental economists and environmental law specialists to answer questions pertaining to the effects of anthropogenic-driven global change on the sustainability of resource use from the marine environment, and thus to transport ideas outwards from disciplinary confines. We use a framework derived from the literature on interdisciplinarity to enable us to explore processes of knowledge integration in two ongoing research projects, based on analyses of the purpose, form and degree of knowledge integration within each project. These teams were initially focused around a graduate program, explicitly designed for interdisciplinary training across the natural and social sciences, at the Gothenburg Centre for Marine Research at the University of Gothenburg, thus allowing us to reflect on our own experiences within the context of other multi-national, interdisciplinary graduate training and associated research programs.

  14. [Development and Evaluation of a Self-Reflection Program for Intensive Care Unit Nurses Who Have Experienced the Death of Pediatric Patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun Ju; Bang, Kyung Sook

    2017-06-01

    This study aims to develop a self-reflection program for nurses who have experienced the death of pediatric patients in the intensive care unit and to evaluate its effectiveness. The self-reflection program was developed by means of the following four steps: establishment of the goal through investigation of an initial request, drawing up the program, preliminary research, and implementation and improvement of the program. The study employed a methodological triangulation to evaluate the effectiveness of the program. Participants were 38 nurses who had experienced the death of pediatric patients (experimental group=15, control group=23); they were recruited using convenience sampling. The self-reflection program was provided over 6 weeks (6 sessions). Data were collected from April to August, 2014 and analyzed using t-tests and content analysis. The quantitative results showed that changes in personal growth (t=-6.33, pburnout scores (z=-2.76, p=.005) were better in the experimental group compared to the control group. The qualitative results exhibited two themes, namely "personal growth" and "professional growth", and ten sub-themes. The self-reflection program developed by this study was effective in helping nurses who had experienced the death of pediatric patients to achieve personal growth through self-reflection, and it was confirmed that the program can be applied in a realistic clinical nursing setting. Furthermore, it can be recommended as an intervention program for clinical nurses.

  15. Drawing on Experience: How Domain Knowledge Is Reflected in Sketches of Scientific Structures and Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jee, Benjamin D.; Gentner, Dedre; Uttal, David H.; Sageman, Bradley; Forbus, Kenneth; Manduca, Cathryn A.; Ormand, Carol J.; Shipley, Thomas F.; Tikoff, Basil

    2014-12-01

    Capturing the nature of students' mental representations and how they change with learning is a primary goal in science education research. This can be challenging in spatially intense domains, such as geoscience, architecture, and engineering. In this research, we test whether sketching can be used to gauge level of expertise in geoscience, using new technology designed to facilitate this process. We asked participants with differing levels of geoscience experience to copy two kinds of geoscience images—photographs of rock formations and causal diagrams. To permit studying the process of sketching as well as the structure and content of the sketches, we used the CogSketch system (Forbus et al. 2011, Topics in Cognitive Science 3:648-666) to record the time course of sketching and analyze the sketches themselves. Relative to novices, geoscience students included more geological structures and relational symbols in their sketches of geoscience materials and were more likely to construct their sketches in a sequence consistent with the order of causal events. These differences appear to stem from differences in domain knowledge, because they did not show up in participants' sketches of materials from other fields. The findings and methods of this research suggest new ways to promote and assess science learning, which are well suited to the visual-spatial demands of many domains.

  16. My experience teaching English to young learners and teenagers: Some reflections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahecha Sánchez Rocío

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the harsh environment teachers from the official sector have had to work in, teaching English to children and young learners is a challenging, demanding, hard, but pleasant activity. I am going to write about my experience teaching primary and high school, the difficulties I have encountered, and also the satisfaction of doing my best in this profession. Key words: English-Teaching, Children Second Language Acquisition, Adolescents Second Language Acquisition, Teaching-Primary School, Teaching-High School A pesar de la difícil situación que han vivido los maestros del sector oficial, la enseñanza de la lengua inglesa a niños y adolescentes es una actividad desafiante, exigente y sumamente gratificante. En las siguientes líneas escribiré sobre mi experiencia en la escuela primaria y secundaria, las dificultades que he encontrado y además, la satisfacción de hacer lo mejor en mi profesión. Palabras claves: Inglés-Enseñanza, Adquisición de segundo lenguaje en niños, Adquisición de segundo lenguaje en adolescentes, Enseñanza-Escuela primaria, Enseñanza- Escuela secundaria

  17. Reflections on Developing an Employment Mentoring Program for College Students Who Are Blind

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mally, Jamie; Steverson, Anne

    2017-01-01

    In a competitive employment climate, college graduates with visual impairments (that is, those who are blind or have low vision) face challenges securing work. Employment barriers among visually impaired individuals include: limited early work experience, negative employer attitudes, transportation issues, lack of exposure to successful role…

  18. The Evolution of an Interprofessional Shared Decision-Making Research Program: Reflective Case Study of an Emerging Paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maman Joyce Dogba

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Healthcare research increasingly focuses on interprofessional collaboration and on shared decision making, but knowledge gaps remain about effective strategies for implementing interprofessional collaboration and shared decision-making together in clinical practice. We used Kuhn’s theory of scientific revolutions to reflect on how an integrated interprofessional shared decision-making approach was developed and implemented over time. Methods: In 2007, an interdisciplinary team initiated a new research program to promote the implementation of an interprofessional shared decision-making approach in clinical settings. For this reflective case study, two new team members analyzed the team’s four projects, six research publications, one unpublished and two published protocols and organized them into recognizable phases according to Kuhn’s theory. Results: The merging of two young disciplines led to challenges characteristic of emerging paradigms. Implementation of interprofessional shared-decision making was hindered by a lack of conceptual clarity, a dearth of theories and models, little methodological guidance, and insufficient evaluation instruments. The team developed a new model, identified new tools, and engaged knowledge users in a theory-based approach to implementation. However, several unresolved challenges remain. Discussion: This reflective case study sheds light on the evolution of interdisciplinary team science. It offers new approaches to implementing emerging knowledge in the clinical context.

  19. The Evolution of an Interprofessional Shared Decision-Making Research Program: Reflective Case Study of an Emerging Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menear, Matthew; Stacey, Dawn; Brière, Nathalie; Légaré, France

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Healthcare research increasingly focuses on interprofessional collaboration and on shared decision making, but knowledge gaps remain about effective strategies for implementing interprofessional collaboration and shared decision-making together in clinical practice. We used Kuhn’s theory of scientific revolutions to reflect on how an integrated interprofessional shared decision-making approach was developed and implemented over time. Methods: In 2007, an interdisciplinary team initiated a new research program to promote the implementation of an interprofessional shared decision-making approach in clinical settings. For this reflective case study, two new team members analyzed the team’s four projects, six research publications, one unpublished and two published protocols and organized them into recognizable phases according to Kuhn’s theory. Results: The merging of two young disciplines led to challenges characteristic of emerging paradigms. Implementation of interprofessional shared-decision making was hindered by a lack of conceptual clarity, a dearth of theories and models, little methodological guidance, and insufficient evaluation instruments. The team developed a new model, identified new tools, and engaged knowledge users in a theory-based approach to implementation. However, several unresolved challenges remain. Discussion: This reflective case study sheds light on the evolution of interdisciplinary team science. It offers new approaches to implementing emerging knowledge in the clinical context. PMID:28435417

  20. Finally, it became too much - experiences and reflections in the aftermath of attempted suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatne, May; Nåden, Dagfinn

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore the experiences of persons after suicidal crises or recently completed suicide attempts. The research question was 'What thoughts do suicidal patients have about the crises they have experienced?' Hermeneutic approach, inspired by Gadamer, has characterized the process of collection, analysis and interpretation of data. Data were collected using qualitative research interviews. Ten participants, six men, 25-52 years old, and four women, 21-45 years old, were informed and requested by specialists in psychology at emergency or subemergency psychiatric wards or by crisis resolution teams. Nine of the participants had experienced one or more suicide attempts. One person had been prevented in the attempt, by hospitalization in an emergency ward. This type of research requires sensitivity in the interview situation, where ethical responsibilities take precedence over research interests. Results obtained through a thematic analysis of six phases revealed five themes to be central: (i) Losing touch with the world, (ii) Relationship between the suicidal accident and life history, (iii) Struggling for death and life (iv) An open door as consolation and (v) Feeling shame and guilt. Being suicidal seems like a struggle in solitude, between longing to escape from suffering through death and longing for love, safety and dignity in life. Suicidal accidents happen when suffering becomes intolerable. Suicide rarely occurs without a struggle and consideration of moral conflicts. The thought of suicide can provide consolation and comfort to go on living. Shame seems to appear when a person cannot cope with her/his own life, and because of failed attempts, while guilt seems related to hurting other people. © 2011 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences © 2011 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  1. Qualitative Analysis of Teachers' Written Self-Reflections after Implementation of a Social-Emotional Learning Program in Latvia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinsone, Baiba; Damberga, Ilze

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze teachers' written self-reflections after implementation of a social-emotional learning program, which was recently developed specifically for the sociocultural context of Latvia. The goal of the analysis was to examine how teachers reflect upon their own strengths and weaknesses in implementing the…

  2. Evaluation of a Group-Based Trauma Recovery Program in Gaza: Students' Subjective Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Ian; Abdullah, Ghassan

    2012-01-01

    Internationally, evaluation of group-based trauma recovery programs has relied upon normative outcome measures, with no studies systematically analyzing children's subjective experience for program development. In contrast, the current study explored children's experience of a Gazan recovery program "in their own words." Twenty-four…

  3. Promising Practices for Making Recreation Programming Matter for People who Experience Mental Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Susan L; Fenton, Lara

    2017-08-31

    There is merit in understanding how recreation-oriented programs for adults living with mental illness address barriers to participation and how programming is structured to create safe and inclusive environments, resulting in programming that amplifies the benefits of recreation for mental well-being. Following an environmental scan of programs targeting adults living with mental illness in Canada, ten coordinators in community mental health settings were interviewed. Four themes were constructed to reflect characteristics deemed to be 'promising practices' related to recreation-oriented programming: (a) barriers and solutions to individual participation, (b) characteristics of welcoming and supportive environments, (c) leadership characteristics, and (d) program characteristics.

  4. Quantitative resonant soft x-ray reflectivity of ultrathin anisotropic organic layers: Simulation and experiment of PTCDA on Au.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capelli, R; Mahne, N; Koshmak, K; Giglia, A; Doyle, B P; Mukherjee, S; Nannarone, S; Pasquali, L

    2016-07-14

    Resonant soft X-ray reflectivity at the carbon K edge, with linearly polarized light, was used to derive quantitative information of film morphology, molecular arrangement, and electronic orbital anisotropies of an ultrathin 3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) film on Au(111). The experimental spectra were simulated by computing the propagation of the electromagnetic field in a trilayer system (vacuum/PTCDA/Au), where the organic film was treated as an anisotropic medium. Optical constants were derived from the calculated (through density functional theory) absorption cross sections of the single molecule along the three principal molecular axes. These were used to construct the dielectric tensor of the film, assuming the molecules to be lying flat with respect to the substrate and with a herringbone arrangement parallel to the substrate plane. Resonant soft X-ray reflectivity proved to be extremely sensitive to film thickness, down to the single molecular layer. The best agreement between simulation and experiment was found for a film of 1.6 nm, with flat laying configuration of the molecules. The high sensitivity to experimental geometries in terms of beam incidence and light polarization was also clarified through simulations. The optical anisotropies of the organic film were experimentally determined and through the comparison with calculations, it was possible to relate them to the orbital symmetry of the empty electronic states.

  5. A Reflective Approach to Teaching Practicum Debriefing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minott, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, the teaching profession has embraced the notion of the teacher as reflective practitioner, which has led to an increased emphasis on teacher education programs offering learning experiences that model and encourage reflective practice. This qualitative instrumental case study research explored the usefulness, benefits, and…

  6. An Analysis of NSF Geosciences Research Experience for Undergraduate Site Programs from 2009 to 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rom, E. L.; Patino, L. C.; Gonzales, J.; Weiler, C. S.; Antell, L.; Colon, Y.; Sanchez, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    The Research Experience for Undergraduate (REU) Program at the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) provides undergraduate students from across the nation the opportunity to conduct research at a different institution and in an area that may not be available at their home campus. REU Sites funded by the Directorate of Geosciences provide student research opportunities in earth, ocean, atmospheric and geospace research. This paper provides an overview of the Geosciences REU Site programs run from 2009 to 2012. Information was gathered from over 45 REU sites each year on recruitment methods, student demographics, enrichment activities, and fields of research. The internet is the most widely used mechanism to recruit participants. The admissions rate for REU Sites in Geosciences varies by discipline but averages between 6% to 18% each year, with the majority of participants being rising seniors and juniors. A few Sites include rising sophomores and freshmen. Most students attend PhD granting institutions. Among the participants, gender distribution depends on discipline, with atmospheric and geospace sciences having more male than female participants, but ocean and earth sciences having a majority of female participants. Regarding ethnic diversity, the REU Sites reflect the difficulty of attracting diverse students into Geosciences as a discipline; a large majority of the participants are Caucasian or Asian students. Furthermore, participants from minority-serving institutions or community colleges constitute a small percentage of those taking part in these research experiences. The enrichment activities are very similar across the REU Sites, and mimic well activities common to the scientific community, including intellectual exchange of ideas (lab meetings, seminars, and professional meetings), networking and social activities. Results from this study will be used to examine strengths in the REU Sites in the Geosciences and opportunities for improvement in the

  7. Three Alabama Teen Parent Programs: Perspectives from Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Cynthia Ivey

    2009-01-01

    Although there are many programs that concentrate on reducing the overall rate of teen pregnancy, there are few programs designed to assist teen parents. The purpose of this study was to determine how and to what extent three teen parenting programs in Alabama met the needs of teen parents with a positive environment and assisted them in…

  8. Evaluating the Application of Program Outcomes to Study Abroad Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Patricia Joanne; Mrozek, Lawrence J.

    2016-01-01

    A search through the 2015 annual conference program of the National Collegiate Honors Council (NCHC) turned up a dozen sessions focusing on the topic of study abroad, demonstrating that a growing number of honors programs and colleges are encouraging or requiring study abroad. Many programs now offer and support honors semesters abroad or…

  9. Experiences with Efficient Methodologies for Teaching Computer Programming to Geoscientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Christian T.; Gorman, Gerard J.; Rees, Huw E.; Craig, Lorraine E.

    2016-01-01

    Computer programming was once thought of as a skill required only by professional software developers. But today, given the ubiquitous nature of computation and data science it is quickly becoming necessary for all scientists and engineers to have at least a basic knowledge of how to program. Teaching how to program, particularly to those students…

  10. Breve reflexión sobre la experiencia y el cuerpo/Brief reflection on the experience and the body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raumar Giménez Rodríguez

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available El concepto de experiencia es, en principio, vasto en demasía como para proponerse un estudio profundo en poco tiempo. Por ello, en estas breves reflexiones que constituyen una de las trazas del recorrido iniciado a propósito de la relación cuerpo-lenguaje-enseñanza, la noción de experiencia es referida en primer lugar desde el texto homónimo escrito por Walter Benjamin en 1913 y luego desde las reflexiones que despliega Agamben en su “Infancia e historia”, escrito en 1978. A partir de allí, se presentan algunas ideas en las que se exploran las posibilidades que brinda la noción de experiencia para problematizar algunos rasgos específicos de la historia del cuerpo en la modernidad, su relación con una forma específica de producción de conocimiento (la ciencia moderna y los avatares de la experiencia corporal en la formación social capitalista. Para esta reflexión, se ha supuesto que para que acontezca algo del orden de lo educativo y de la enseñanza y que ello, a su vez, sea pensado desde la cuestión del cuerpo, es preciso una experiencia. El carácter exploratorio del trabajo tal vez no permitirá más que una delimitación rigurosa del problema de estudio. Para ello, se introducen tópicos teóricos de distinta procedencia que se ponen en juego a tales efectos. The concept of experience is, in itself, too vast to propose its deep study in a short period of time. That is the reason why, in these brief reflections that constitute one of the traces of the course initiated about the relation body-language-teaching, the notion of experience is referred to, in the first place, from the homonym text written by Walter Benjamin in 1913 and then from the reflections displayed by Agamben in his" Infancy and History ", written in 1978. From that point, some ideas are presented where the possibilities given by the notion of experience, to question some specific features of the history of the body in Modernity are explored, its

  11. Offspring Hormones Reflect the Maternal Prenatal Social Environment: Potential for Foetal Programming?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meise, Kristine; von Engelhardt, Nikolaus; Forcada, Jaume; Hoffman, Joseph Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Females of many species adaptively program their offspring to predictable environmental conditions, a process that is often mediated by hormones. Laboratory studies have shown, for instance, that social density affects levels of maternal cortisol and testosterone, leading to fitness-relevant changes in offspring physiology and behaviour. However, the effects of social density remain poorly understood in natural populations due to the difficulty of disentangling confounding influences such as climatic variation and food availability. Colonially breeding marine mammals offer a unique opportunity to study maternal effects in response to variable colony densities under similar ecological conditions. We therefore quantified maternal and offspring hormone levels in 84 Antarctic fur seals (Arctocephalus gazella) from two closely neighbouring colonies of contrasting density. Hair samples were used as they integrate hormone levels over several weeks or months and therefore represent in utero conditions during foetal development. We found significantly higher levels of cortisol and testosterone (both P hormonally mediated maternal effects may depend more strongly on the maternal regulation of androgen rather than cortisol levels. PMID:26761814

  12. Enabling at-homeness for residents living in a nursing home: Reflected experience of nursing home staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarnio, Lotta; Boström, Anne-Marie; Hedman, Ragnhild; Gustavsson, Petter; Öhlén, Joakim

    2017-12-01

    Older people are often living the last period of their lives in institutions such as nursing homes. Knowledge of this period, specifically related to at-homeness which can be described as wellbeing in spite of illness and has been regarded as one of the goals in palliative care, has been very little researched in the context of nursing homes and the experience of nursing home staff. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of nursing home staff of how to enable at-homeness for residents. Qualitative interpretive description methodology guided the design. The data generation was conducted in winter 2014-2015, when seven repetitive reflective group discussions with staff in a nursing home were held. The results show five patterns for how healthcare staff enabled at-homeness for the residents: Striving to know the resident, Showing respect for the resident's integrity, Creating and working in family-like relationships, Helping to find a new ordinariness and Preparing and making plans to ensure continuity. Nursing home staff seem to have collegial knowledge of how to enable at-homeness for the residents in a nursing home. Close relationships with respect for the resident's integrity stand out as enabling at-homeness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. On Developing Policies and Practices in Music Therapy: Personal Reflections from the Experience of Nordoff Robbins in London

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Etkin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Note from the interviewer: It is my pleasure to initiate the interview section of Approaches: Music Therapy & Special Music Education, by presenting here my interview with Pauline Etkin which was given at the Nordoff Robbins Centre in London, UK on the 5th of January 2009.Based on Etkin’s experience of being the Chief Executive Officer of Nordoff Robbins, in addition to her rich diverse experience in the field of music therapy on a practical and policy level; this interview focuses on the development of policies and practices in music therapy – an issue that will hopefully be of interest especially for countries, such as Greece, where music therapy is in its initial stage. The interview was recorded, transcribed verbatim and then edited. Some footnotes have also been added to the original text in order to provide some useful additional information and suggest some sources through which the reader can find further information with regards to the issues discussed in the interview.I would like to warmly thank Professor Helen Odell-Miller who, based on her personal major contribution to the development of music therapy in the UK, offered her support in the editing process of this interview.This interview will hopefully encourage further constructive dialogue and reflections on related topics, and inspire the conduction of interviews with other significant figures in music therapy both on national and international level.

  14. From recovery programs to recovery-oriented practice? A qualitative study of mental health professionals' experiences when facilitating a recovery-oriented rehabilitation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalum, Helle Stentoft; Pedersen, Inge Kryger; Cunningham, Harry; Eplov, Lene Falgaard

    2015-12-01

    The recovery model has influenced mental health services and fostered new standards for best practice. However, knowledge about how mental health care professionals (HCPs) experience recovery-oriented programs is sparse. This paper explores HCPs' experiences when facilitating a recovery-oriented rehabilitation program. The research question is how do HCPs experience a change in their attitude and practice when applying recovery-oriented programs? This paper draws on semi-structured in-depth qualitative interviews conducted with 16 HCPs experienced in facilitating a recovery-oriented rehabilitation program in either the USA or Denmark. Three themes emerged from the HCPs' reflections on changes in attitudes and practices: "Hopeful Attitude" captures a change in the HCPs' attitude toward a more positive view on the future for clients' living with mental illness; "A New Focus in the Dialogue With Clients" thematizes how the HCPs focus more on the individual's own goal for recovery rather than disease-induced goals in the dialog with clients; "A Person-Centered Role" comprises a shift in the professional role whereby the HCPs value the client's own ideas in addition to the professional's standards. This study supports the theory of the recovery model by its empirical findings and indications that when facilitating a recovery-oriented program, HCPs experience recovery-oriented changes in their attitude toward life with mental illness, and it alters their professional practice toward a stronger focus on client's own goals during treatment. More studies are needed to further clarify how changes in HCPs' attitudes translate into changes in mental health practices. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Women Treated for Breast Cancer Experiences of Chemotherapy-Induced Pain: Memories, Any Present Pain, and Future Reflections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellerstedt-Börjesson, Susanne; Nordin, Karin; Fjällskog, Marie-Louise; Holmström, Inger K; Arving, Cecilia

    Breast cancer survivors make up a growing population facing treatment that poses long-standing adverse effects including chemotherapy-related body function changes and/or pain. There is limited knowledge of patients' lived experiences of chemotherapy-induced pain (CHIP). The aim of this study was to explore CHIP and any long-standing pain experiences in the lifeworld of breast cancer survivors. Fifteen women participated in a follow-up interview a year after having experienced CHIP. They were interviewed from a lifeworld perspective; the interviews were analyzed through guided phenomenology reflection. A past perspective: CHIP is often described in metaphors, leads to changes in a patient's lifeworld, and impacts lived time. The women become entirely dependent on others but at the same time feel isolated and alone. Existential pain was experienced as increased vulnerability. Present perspective: Pain engages same parts of the body, but at a lower intensity than during CHIP. The pain creates time awareness. Expected normality in relationships/daily life has not yet been achieved, and a painful existence emerges in-between health and illness. Future perspective: There are expectations of pain continuing, and there is insecurity regarding whom to turn to in such cases. A painful awareness emerges about one's own and others' fragile existence. Experiencing CHIP can impact the lifeworld of women with a history of breast cancer. After CHIP, there are continued experiences of pain that trigger insecurity about whether one is healthy. Cancer survivors would likely benefit from communication and information about and evaluation of CHIP.

  16. Program Evolves from Basic CAD to Total Manufacturing Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassola, Joel

    2011-01-01

    Close to a decade ago, John Hersey High School (JHHS) in Arlington Heights, Illinois, made a transition from a traditional classroom-based pre-engineering program. The new program is geared towards helping students understand the entire manufacturing process. Previously, a JHHS student would design a project in computer-aided design (CAD) software…

  17. Poverty reduction strategies and programs: the Nigeria's experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reviews the poverty reduction strategies and programs in Nigeria using the historical research design. The paper concludes that poverty reduction programs in Nigeria have not been effective due to policy inconsistency and the lack of coordination between the federal government and the sub-national ...

  18. Friendship Experiences of Participants in a University Based Transition Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasr, Maya; Cranston-Gingras, Ann; Jang, Seung-Eun

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the nature of friendships of 14 students with intellectual and developmental disabilities participating in a university-based transition program in the United States. The transition program is a bridge between high school and adulthood, designed to foster students' self-esteem and self-confidence by providing them with training…

  19. Reflecting reflection in supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lystbæk, Christian Tang

    Reflection has moved from the margins to the mainstream in supervision. Notions of reflection have become well established since the late 1980s. These notions have provided useful framing devices to help conceptualize some important processes in guidance and counseling. However, some applications...... of reflection, rehabilitate them in order to capture broader connotations or move to new ways of regarding reflection that are more in keeping with not only reflective but also emotive, normative and formative views on supervision. The paper presents a critical perspective on supervision that challenge...

  20. A reflection on the application of grounded theory in the exploration of the experiences of informal carers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.D. Jeggels

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to reflect on the application of a qualitative research method that presents novice researchers with a variety of challenges. It is suggested that prospective users of the grounded theory method should seek guidance from experts in the field. However, to find these experts has proved to be quite challenging. The research topic lends itself to a qualitative study in general using the grounded theory method in particular. A qualitative approach was followed to describe the experiences of informal carers within their unique contexts. The guidelines of Strauss and Corbin (1990,1998 formed the basis for the development of the grounded theory. The challenges that will be described in a fair amount of detail in this paper include: an understanding of interpretive research paradigms, the philosophical underpinning of the method; its focus on social context; the inductive data analysis processes that allows for the emergence of a substantive theory from empirical data. Prospective scholars should also recognize that grounded theorists follow different approaches to the application of the method. Some subscribe to the traditions of the founders (Glaser & Strauss, 1967, while others choose the analytical rules and procedures proposed by the followers of the method (Strauss & Corbin, 1990,1998.In this paper I reflect on the application of the grounded theory method to explore the experiences of informal carers during the transition of the elderly from hospital to home. The research outcomes showed that informal carers were facilitating care during the transition of the elderly from hospital to home by revealing the link between facilitating care, the basic social process, and other categories associated with informal health care. These categories include: the prior relationship between the carer and the elderly, the traumatic incident, the need for role fitting, maintenance- and repair care, as well as, the consequences of

  1. Negotiating and Designing Public Space. Experiences with a new M.Sc. in Urban Design Program in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik Tieben

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This contribution reflects on first experiences made with a newly launched Master of Science in Urban Design program at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. As an important part of this program, students have to develop their design proposal in response to feedback of different stakeholders and community members. Thus the program responds to the growing aspiration of Hong Kong’s citizens to shape the urban development of their city and a lack of a meaningful participation process in the region. With its high density, protected country parks, efficient public transport and large scale housing program, generally, Hong Kong offers important lessons for contemporary urbanism. However, since the end of the British colonial rule and in face of increasing property prices, pollution and the disappearance of local heritage, intensive debates started about the regions future. Another central point of the recent discussion in Hong Kong – and key theme of the new urban design program - is the demand for the rights and qualities of public space. The paper presents the set-up of the design studio, which was closely linked to a course on “urban processes”. During the semester, students had to organize community forums and street exhibitions in a specific district, invite stakeholders and residents and discuss with them their ideas. Their projects, then, had to respond on the various feedbacks and integrate them in their design and policy proposals. The text reflects on the student projects and the lessons learned in the process. It addresses general questions such as the challenges in communicating with a diverse community (e.g. language barriers and culturally different ideas of public space. It addresses the question of the intended and unintended effects of a participatory design studio in the community, and possible follow-ups. And it reflects on the general role of design and designers in shaping community spaces.

  2. Going Domestic: Importing the Study Abroad Experience. The Development of a Multicultural New York City Study Away Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Susan Hayes; Huffman, Carolyn; Brackney, Dana E; Cuddy, Alyssa

    2017-07-01

    Significant off-campus domestic study away experiences have been shown to be a transformative active learning environment for students and achieve similar learning outcomes as study abroad programs. This manuscript describes the conception, development, and pedagogical approach of a faculty-led domestic study away experience in New York City for pre-licensure and post-licensure nursing students as an active learning strategy for developing cultural competence. Students participated in service-learning activities that illuminated the realities and challenges persons from other cultures face as they interact with health care in a culture that is not their own. In partnership with New York Cares©, students were immersed in well-established ongoing sustainable community-based projects. These experiences fostered reflective conversations between community members, student participants, and faculty regarding social factors, cultural issues and needs, and global issues and trends. Through the New York study away program, students were able to broaden their perspectives about social factors and culture beyond geographic or ethnic boundaries and apply these service experiences to their nursing practice. Study away programs are an excellent strategy for nursing educators to prepare students for care of multicultural populations and for proficiency in cultural competency within the globalization of the United States. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Remote programming of MED-EL cochlear implants: users' and professionals' evaluation of the remote programming experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzovkov, Vladislav; Yanov, Yuri; Levin, Sergey; Bovo, Roberto; Rosignoli, Monica; Eskilsson, Gunnar; Willbas, Staffan

    2014-07-01

    Remote programming is safe and is well received by health-care professionals and cochlear implant (CI) users. It can be adopted into clinic routine as an alternative to face-to-face programming. Telemedicine allows a patient to be treated anywhere in the world. Although it is a growing field, little research has been published on its application to CI programming. We examined hearing professionals' and CI users' subjective reactions to the remote programming experience, including the quality of the programming and the use of the relevant technology. Remote CI programming was performed in Italy, Sweden, and Russia. Programming sessions had three participants: a CI user, a local host, and a remote expert. After the session, each CI user, local host, and remote expert each completed a questionnaire on their experience. In all, 33 remote programming sessions were carried out, resulting in 99 completed questionnaires. The overwhelming majority of study participants responded positively to all aspects of remote programming. CI users were satisfied with the results in 96.9% of the programming sessions; 100% of participants would use remote programming again. Although technical problems were encountered, they did not cause the sessions to be considerably longer than face-to-face sessions.

  4. The UCAR SOARS Program: Strategies for Supplementing Undergraduate Research Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, R. E.

    2005-12-01

    Many REU programs have a goal of recruiting students to continue in the sciences. Undergraduate research is a successful strategy for engaging talented undergraduates to think about a career in science, encouraging them to purse graduate degrees, and for preparing them to succeed in graduate school. In the Significant Opportunities for Atmospheric Research (SOARS) program, we supplement undergraduate research with several strategies as part of an undergraduate-to-graduate bridge program aimed at broadening participation in the atmospheric and related sciences. In addition to a 10-week research program, SOARS also includes a formal mentoring program, writing workshop, vigorous learning community, and extensive professional development opportunities. Our presentation will describe these research-extending strategies in SOARS in more detail, with an eye toward how such strategies might be adapted for other programs. To do this, we will draw on the results of a major, independent evaluation of the SOARS program to determine the relative importance of these strategies in the overall success of the SOARS program. In the 10 yeas since SOARS creations, 98 students have participated in the program. Of those participants, 18 are still enrolled as undergraduates, and 55 have gone on to purse graduate school in the atmospheric sciences. Overall, this represents a graduate school placement rate of 69% and an overall retention rate of 82%. Of the 27 SOARS participants who have entered the workforce, 23 are in STEM related disciplines. Finally, 3 SOARS participants have already earned their PhD, and 32 have earned Master's. These numbers are especially significant given that SOARS participants come from groups that have been historically under-represented in the atmospheric sciences.

  5. Interactions between youth and mental health professionals: The Youth Aware of Mental health (YAM) program experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Camilla; Postuvan, Vita; Herta, Dana; Iosue, Miriam; Värnik, Peeter; Carli, Vladimir

    2018-01-01

    The Youth Aware of Mental health (YAM) experience Youth stand at the core of much mental health promotion, yet little is written about their experiences of such efforts. We aimed to take this on by interviewing youth after they participated in Youth Aware of Mental Health (YAM), a universal mental health promotion program. YAM has a non-anticipatory methodology that provides youth with a safe space for reflection, role-play, and discussion. Addressing everyday mental health, YAM invites the experiences and issues relevant to the youth present to influence the program in a slightly different direction every time. The YAM instructor guides the participants but does not present the youth with given formulas on how to solve their problems. Like any mental health promotion, YAM appeals to some more than others in its intended audience and individuals engage with the program in many different ways. We set out to learn more about these experiences. Conversations about mental health Thirty-two semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15–17 year olds in Estonia, Italy, Romania and Spain. In these interviews, the researchers made an effort to discuss mental health in terms relevant to youth. Still, wide-ranging levels of motivation, ease with engaging in dialogue with mental health professionals, and comfort with the format and content of YAM were detected. The youth were clustered in five different groups relating to their positioning vis-à-vis the researcher during the interview. The following evocative labels were used: “interested”, “foot in the door”, “respect for authority”, “careful”, and “not my topic”. Corresponding labels were devised for their YAM experience: “engaged”, “initially hesitant”, “cautious”, “eager to please”, or “disengaged”. We also observed that the researchers brought their own expectations and employed a variety of approaches that led to anticipating answers, stating the obvious, or getting along

  6. Federal Workplace Laws: Are Business Work Experience Programs in Compliance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, Martha H.; Kurth, Linda A.

    1999-01-01

    Reviews federal laws (Fair Labor Standard Act's child labor regulations, Occupational Safety and Health Act, Immigration Reform and Control Act) for their implications for cooperative education and school-to-work programs. (SK)

  7. Marketing Program Standardization: The Experience of TNCs in Poland

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sagan, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the rate of standardization of marketing programs in transnational corporations in the consumer goods market in Poland, which currently is one of the fastest...

  8. Myth and Misguided Faith? Women's Experiences in a Literacy Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumann, Susan Marie; Chavez, Rudolfo Chavez

    2001-01-01

    Inductive analysis of the stories of five Mexican-American women in a literacy program resulted in a framework of myths or misperceptions that proceeds through stages of consciousness from magical to naive to critical. (Contains 41 references.) (SK)

  9. Phenomenological Experiences of International Students in Marriage, Couple, and Family Counseling Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Mohd Khairul Anuar

    2017-01-01

    This phenomenological study explored the experiences of international students in CACREP-accredited marriage, couple, and family counseling programs. Seven former international students from the program who have practiced counseling in their home country were interviewed to understand their learning experiences, adaptation process and counseling…

  10. An Experiment on the Short-Term Effects of Engagement and Representation in Program Animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevalainen, Seppo; Sajaniemi, Jorma

    2008-01-01

    When visualization tools utilized in computer programming education have been evaluated empirically, the results have remained controversial. To address this problem, we have developed a model of short-term effects of program animation, and used it in a series of experiments. In the current experiment, we varied visual representation of an…

  11. Instructional Technology in an Innovative Program of Preservice and In-Service Laboratory Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971

    Northeast Missouri State College developed a Teaching Skills Center providing a program of early professional laboratory experiences for all elementary and secondary education majors. The program includes four components: audiovisual utilization, instructional materials preparation, microteaching, and actual school experience. Each training…

  12. Integrated population-development program performance: the Malaysian Felda experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, C O

    1985-01-01

    Program performance of the Malaysian Felda program, an integrated population development program, is examined in this report. It also evaluates the relationship of the performance of this program with its organizational, integrational, and community support factors. Starting in 1956, Felda had, by the end of 1981, developed 308 land schemes covering an area of 1.4 million acres planted predominantly with oil palm (59.4%) and rubber (31.6%). The land schemes have settled a total of 70,600 families or over 400,000 people. The integrated programs existing in the Felda schmes are the focus of analysis for this study. Out of the universe of 308 Felda schemes, 26 schemes were randomly selected for the study. In each scheme, 2 surveys were conducted: first, the staff surveys to gather information on the organizational factors and extent of integration in existence in the scheme and then household surveys to gather information on the extent of community support for the integrated program and the performance of the program. In the case of the performance variables, the information gathered from the household survey was supplemented by the records from the Felda scheme office. In the sample of 26 schemes, a total of 1641 settler households were selected for the household survey and 363 staff were selected for the staff survey. The surveys were conducted in the 1st quarter of 1982. The results indicate that the Felda mode of delivering population and community development services has been very effective. Over 55.2% of the eligible women were found to be practicing family planning (compared to about 35.5% for the national rural average), while over 78.9% of the eligible women utilized postnatal health care facilities. About 1 in 3 of the eligible children in Felda schemes attend kindergarten classes, while over 46.9% of the Felda households are involved in some form of extramural income generating activities. The more integrated the program in a particular community, the more

  13. An Analysis of NSF Geosciences Research Experience for Undergraduate Site Programs from 2009 through 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rom, E. L.; Patino, L. C.; Weiler, S.; Sanchez, S. C.; Colon, Y.; Antell, L.

    2011-12-01

    The Research Experience for Undergraduate (REU) Program at the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) provides U.S. undergraduate students from any college or university the opportunity to conduct research at a different institution and gain a better understanding of research career pathways. The Geosciences REU Sites foster research opportunities in areas closely aligned with geoscience programs, particularly those related to earth, atmospheric and ocean sciences. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the Geosciences REU Site programs run in 2009 through 2011. A survey requesting information on recruitment methods, student demographics, enrichment activities, and fields of research was sent to the Principal Investigators of each of the active REU Sites. Over 70% of the surveys were returned with the requested information from about 50 to 60 sites each year. The internet is the most widely used mechanism to recruit participants, with personal communication as the second most important recruiting tool. The admissions rate for REU Sites in Geosciences varies from less than 10% to 50%, with the majority of participants being rising seniors and juniors. Many of the participants come from non-PhD granting institutions. Among the participants, gender distribution varies by discipline, with ocean sciences having a large majority of women and earth sciences having a majority of men. Regarding ethnic diversity, the REU Sites reflect the difficulty of attracting diverse students into Geosciences as a discipline; a large majority of participants are Caucasian and Asian students. Furthermore, participants from minority-serving institutions and community colleges constitute a small percentage of those taking part in these research experiences. The enrichment activities are very similar across the REU Sites, and mimic activities common to the scientific community, including intellectual exchange of ideas (lab meetings, seminars, and professional meetings

  14. "To be taken seriously" : women's reflections on how migration and resettlement experiences influence their healthcare needs during childbearing in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Eva K

    2015-06-01

    To use an intersectional approach to analyze women's reflections on how their migration and resettlement experiences to Sweden influenced their health and healthcare needs during childbearing. Focus-group discussions, pair interviews and individual interviews were conducted in southern Sweden between 2006 and 2009, with 25 women originating from 17 different countries with heterogeneous backgrounds that had experienced childbirth in Sweden. Qualitative content analysis was used with an intersectional approach, taking into consideration intersections of ethnicity, socio-economic status (SES) and gender. The hardships of migration, resettlement, and constraints in the daily life made the women feel overstrained, tense, and disembodied. Being treated as a stranger and ignored or rejected in healthcare encounters was devaluing and discriminating. The women stressed that they felt stronger and had fewer complications during pregnancy and labor when they were "taken seriously" and felt that they had a confident, caring relationship with caregivers/midwives. This, therefore, enabled the women to boost their sense of self, and to recognize their capabilities, as well as their "embodied knowledge". Caregivers/midwives should be aware of the hardships the women face. Hardships stem from experiences of migration and resettlement as well as from structural constraints such as the "triple jeopardy" of ethnicity, SES and gender, which increase women's needs of support in childbearing. Such awareness is necessary when promoting health and reducing the unnecessary suffering and victimization of women, their children, and their families. It is a matter of patient safety and equity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. "I just have to move on": Women's coping experiences and reflections following their first year after primary breast cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drageset, Sigrunn; Lindstrøm, Torill Christine; Underlid, Kjell

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this qualitative follow-up study was to describe women's individual coping experiences and reflections following their first year after primary breast cancer surgery. Using a qualitative descriptive design, we collected data through individual interviews with ten women at a Norwegian university hospital between August 2007 and April 2008. We employed Kvale's method of qualitative meaning condensation analysis. Themes identified were: existential concerns and finding meaning, ways of thinking and feeling about the disease, taking action, and returning to normal life. Most women experienced an increased appreciation of life and greater confidence in themselves, were more caring and compassionate towards others, and focused more on their life priorities. Their family and close relationships became more important. They accepted their situation and made the best of it. Positive thinking, physical activity, self-care, nature, hobbies and work helped. Generally, they were optimistic despite a fear of cancer recurrence and uncertainty about their future. The women wanted to return to a "normal" and healthy life by distancing themselves from both the cancer environment and information about cancer. Uncertainty and anxiety about a potential future cancer relapse was a major undercurrent one year following surgery. Our findings emphasize the richness in these women's coping strategies, their different coping profiles and different needs, as well as some general adaptive strategies, which all fluctuated over time. Not all managed to cope equally well. Through awareness of these women's individual experiences and coping strategies, healthcare professionals can enhance these women's coping endeavours. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. New-old discourses on immigration and its lived experience reflect of racism, xenophobia and xenophile in nowadays immigrant Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª Ángeles Cea D’Ancona

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article we deal with the first results of the qualitative phase of the MEXEES 3 Project that aims at the improvement of xenophobia measurement via survey. The more comprehensive research has been oriented by four specific objectives: 1. To develop more efficient indicators for registering the forms of xenophobia (and xenophile; 2. To analyze the factors affecting its manifestation or concealment; 3. To inquire about the main experiential axes of today’s xenophobic discourse and its correspondence with theoretical knowledge, 4. To test which survey design favors the declaration of xenophobic attitudes or attitudes against immigration. Although the qualitative study has provided some relevant materials for the first three objectives, here we focus mainly on the third. Together with the reflection over our methodological design and implementation, we highlight some of the concrete experiences of xenophobia and xenophile that arose whilst qualitatively interviewing natives and foreigners. Both the prevalence and actualization of the dimensions underlined in the literature are detected (the one of national-cultural identity, the one of competence for limited resources, and the one related with citizen security; to these is added the emergence of some variants related to the pre sent context of high immigration visibility in Spain, in daily life, in political discourses and the media

  17. Supervised Agricultural Experience Instruction in Agricultural Teacher Education Programs: A National Descriptive Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rank, Bryan D.; Retallick, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    Faculty in agricultural teacher education programs are responsible for preparing future teachers to lead effective school-based agricultural education programs. However, agriculture teachers are having difficulty implementing supervised agricultural experience (SAE), even though they value it conceptually as a program component. In an effort to…

  18. Children Learning Computer Programming: Experiments with Languages, Curricula and Programmable Devices. Technical Report No. 250.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyer, S. A.; Cannara, A. B.

    An experiment was conducted to study how children, aged 10-15 years, learn concepts relevant to computer programing and how they learn modern programing languages. The implicit educational goal was to teach thinking strategies through the medium of programing concepts and their applications. The computer languages Simper and Logo were chosen…

  19. Reflections on attitudes, experiences, and vulnerability of intimate partner violence among Southeast Asian college women living in United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongpriwan, Vipavee; Buseh, Aaron; Arunothong, Wachiraporn

    2015-12-01

    To provide culturally sensitive intimate partner violence (IPV) prevention programs for ethnic groups, a basic foundational understanding of Southeast Asian (SEA) women living in the United States is vital. The purpose of this study was to describe SEA college women's perceptions of IPV and how the women recognize their vulnerability to such violent situations. Qualitative methods using focus group discussions were employed to elicit participants' perceptions. Participants included 18 SEA college women, ages 18-34 (Mean=22; SD=7.22). Transcriptions were analyzed using a content analysis approach. Five themes emerged: recognition of IPV; perception of individual vulnerability to IPV; experience and responses to IPV; help seeking and support system; and strategies used for prevention of IPV. Findings yielded an understanding of intertwined issues of cultural norms associated with IPV, social and economic disparities, and challenges for IPV prevention in SEA communities. Culturally sensitive prevention programs will be more effective by reforming cultural values, while at the same time promoting non-violent relationships and increasing access to services. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Blogging as a tool to promote reflection among dietetic and physical therapy students during a multidisciplinary international service-learning experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Lauri; Lundy, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Service-learning is a guided, structured learning experience that engages students in service to a community for the mutual benefit of the student and community. There is a growing trend in healthcare to include international service-learning experiences in the training curriculum to promote cultural competence. A critical element of service-learning is reflection. There have been many research studies examining how best to support and facilitate the reflective thinking process in students. The purpose of this study was to assess the development of reflective thinking among graduate allied health students during an interdisciplinary international service-learning experience using a web-based collaborative blog. Twelve graduate students-six dietetic interns and six physical therapy doctoral students-traveled to Belize for 6 days to provide primary healthcare screenings and intervention to a community. Group blogging was found to be an effective tool to promote reflection in allied health student and short duration service-learning experience developed reflective thinking.

  1. A 5-year experience with an elective scholarly concentrations program

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Paul; Green, Emily P.; Park, Yoon S.; Gruppuso, Philip A.

    2015-01-01

    Problem Programs that encourage scholarly activities beyond the core curriculum and traditional biomedical research are now commonplace among US medical schools. Few studies have generated outcome data for these programs. The goal of the present study was to address this gap. Intervention The Scholarly Concentration (SC) Program, established in 2006 at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, is a 4-year elective program that not only encourages students to pursue scholarly work that may include traditional biomedical research but also seeks to broaden students’ focus to include less traditional areas. We compared characteristics and academic performance of SC students and non-SC students for the graduating classes of 2010–2014. Context Approximately one-third of our students opt to complete an SC during their 4-year undergraduate medical education. Because this program is additional to the regular MD curriculum, we sought to investigate whether SC students sustained the academic achievement of non-SC students while at the same time producing scholarly work as part of the program. Outcome Over 5 years, 35% of students elected to enter the program and approximately 81% of these students completed the program. The parameters that were similar for both SC and non-SC students were age at matriculation, admission route, proportion of undergraduate science majors, and number of undergraduate science courses. Most academic indicators, including United States Medical Licensing Examinations scores, were similar for the two groups; however, SC students achieved more honors in the six core clerkships and were more likely to be inducted into the medical school's two honor societies. Residency specialties selected by graduates in the two groups were similar. SC students published an average of 1.3 peer-reviewed manuscripts per student, higher than the 0.8 manuscripts per non-SC student (p=0.013). Conclusions An elective, interdisciplinary scholarly program with

  2. Implementing Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training Programs in High Schools: Iowa's Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyme, Derek B; Atkins, Dianne L

    2017-02-01

    To understand perceived barriers to providing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) education, implementation processes, and practices in high schools. Iowa has required CPR as a graduation requirement since 2011 as an unfunded mandate. A cross-sectional study was performed through multiple choice surveys sent to Iowa high schools to collect data about school demographics, details of CPR programs, cost, logistics, and barriers to implementation, as well as automated external defibrillator training and availability. Eighty-four schools responded (26%), with the most frequently reported school size of 100-500 students and faculty size of 25-50. When the law took effect, 51% of schools had training programs already in place; at the time of the study, 96% had successfully implemented CPR training. Perceived barriers to implementation were staffing, time commitment, equipment availability, and cost. The average estimated startup cost was CPR training programs can be implemented with reasonable resource and time allocations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The US DV Visa Lottery Program and the African experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article discusses the pros and cons of the US State Department-sponsored DV Visa lottery Program (DLVP) for the poor countries and its role in shaping perceptions of Black African immigrants in the US territory (the cultural potpourri). Using the brain drain, assimilation and ethnic hegemonic models and sporadic ...

  4. Development of a Breast Cancer Treatment Program in Port-au-Prince, Haiti: Experiences From the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libby, Rachel; Patberg, Elizabeth; Gabriel, Dieudina; Al-Quran, Samer; Kasher, Matthew; Heldermon, Coy; Daily, Karen; Auguste, Joseph R.; Suprien, Valery C.; Hurley, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The nonprofit Project Medishare launched a breast cancer treatment program in Port-au-Prince in July 2013 to address the demand for breast cancer care in Haiti. We outline the development of the program, highlight specific challenges, and discuss key considerations for others working in global oncology. Methods We reflected on our experiences in the key areas of developing partnerships, building laboratory capacity, conducting medical training, using treatment algorithms, and ensuring access to safe, low-cost chemotherapy drugs. We also critically reviewed our costs and quality measures. Results The program has treated a total of 139 patients with breast cancer with strong adherence to treatment regimens in 85% of patients. In 273 chemotherapy administrations, no serious exposure or adverse safety events were reported by staff. The mortality rate for 94 patients for whom we have complete data was 24% with a median survival time of 53 months. Our outcome data were likely influenced by stage at presentation, with more than half of patients presenting more than 12 months after first noticing a tumor. Future efforts will therefore focus on continuing to improve the level of care, while working with local partners to spread awareness, increase screening, and get more women into care earlier in the course of their disease. Conclusion Our experiences may inform others working to implement protocol-based cancer treatment programs in resource-poor settings and can provide valuable lessons learned for future global oncology efforts. PMID:28717677

  5. Onboarding for Pathology Residency Programs-The Montefiore Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébert, Tiffany Michele; Szymanski, James; Mantilla, Jose; McLemore, Lauren; Walsh, Ronald; Vasovic, Ljiljana; Steinberg, Jacob J; Prystowsky, Michael B

    2016-01-01

    Onboarding is a system frequently used in the corporate world as a means of orienting incoming employees to their duties and inculcating the workplace values. The program aims to facilitate transition into new work roles and improve employee retention rates. At Montefiore, we have instituted an onboarding curriculum that is given to new anatomic and clinical pathology residents about a month prior to the start of residency. The program includes an introductory video series of basic histology and a series of anatomic and clinical case studies illustrating basic laboratory principles. This didactic content is tagged to learning objectives and short self-assessment modules. In addition, content related to the work ethos at Montefiore and the role of the core competencies and milestones in residency education are included. Finally, a broader component of the onboarding gives the incoming residents a social welcome to our area, including key information about living in the area surrounding Montefiore. The program has been well received by our residents for whom the content has helped to boost confidence when starting. We feel that the program is helpful in ensuring that all incoming residents start having received the same baseline didactic content. Transmitting this didactic content via onboarding allows our residents to begin the work of learning pathology immediately, rather than spending the first weeks of residency covering remedial content such as basic histology. Such a program may be useful to other pathology residencies, most of whom have residents from a range of backgrounds and whose prior exposure to pathology may be limited.

  6. Global Explorers Journaling and Reflection Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Bennion

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Research suggests that journaling will increase reflection and improve program outcomes (Bain, et al, 1999; Duerden, et al, 2012 This study involved a partnership with a non-profit, Global Explorers (GEx, which provides international immersion experiences for youth. Their programs are designed to teach youth participants principles of leadership, environmental awareness, service, and science. This study, which tested whether teaching journaling techniques to youth program facilitators would have a positive impact on participant outcomes, addressed the following hypotheses: 1 Greater training in reflective thinking among participants would be associated with higher outcome scores, and 2 Participants in the intervention group (facilitators trained in journaling pedagogy would show greater increases in reflective thinking than comparison group members. Results based on participant self-assessment were significant in testing the first hypothesis; reflective thinking is positively associated with outcome measures, but the intervention group did not show increases in reflective thinking.

  7. On Experience in using the remote acoustic method of partial reflections in studies of the lower troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perepelkin, V. G.; Kulichkov, S. N.; Chunchuzov, I. P.; Kuznetsov, R. D.

    2011-02-01

    Using the phenomenon of the partial reflection of acoustic waves from anisotropic wind-velocity and temperature inhomogeneities in the lower troposphere is justified in determining the structure of these inhomogeneities. The data (obtained with the method of bistatic acoustic sounding) on signals reflected from stratified inhomogeneities in the lower 600-m layer of the troposphere are given. A detonation-type pulsed acoustic source was used. The methods of isolating a small (in amplitude) reflected signal against the background of noise and determining the reflecting-layer height and the partial-reflection coefficient from the measured parameters (time delay and amplitude) of a reflected signal are presented. The method of estimating the vertical gradients of the effective sound speed and the squared acoustic refractive index from the partial-reflection coefficient previously calculated is described on the basis of an Epstein transition-layer model. The indicated parameters are experimentally estimated for concrete cases of recording reflected signals. A comparison of our estimates with independent analogous data simultaneously obtained for the same parameters with monitoring instruments (a sodar and a temperature profiler) has yielded satisfactory results.

  8. Using a "Small Moments" Writing Strategy to Help Undergraduate Students Reflect on Their Service-Learning Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleicher, Robert E.; Correia, Manuel G.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines a "small moments" writing strategy to nurture reflection in undergraduate college students participating in a course-based service-learning activity. Using grounded theory methodology to analyze reflection journal entries, the authors identified themes that indicate that, by writing "small moments"…

  9. An Analysis of NSF Geosciences 2009 Research Experience for Undergraduate Site Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, S. C.; Patino, L. C.; Rom, E. L.; Weiler, S. C.

    2009-12-01

    The Research Experience for Undergraduate (REU) Program at the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) provides undergraduate students the opportunity to conduct research at different institutions and in areas that may not be available in their home campuses. The Geosciences REU Sites foster research opportunities in areas closely aligned with undergraduate majors and facilitates discovery of the multidisciplinary nature of the Geosciences. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the Geosciences REU Site programs run in 2009. A survey requesting information on recruitment methods, student demographics, enrichment activities, and fields of research was sent to the Principal Investigators of each of the 50 active REU Sites; over 70% of the surveys were returned with the requested information. The internet is the most widely used mechanism to recruit participants, but the survey did not distinguish among different tools like websites, emails, social networks, etc. The admissions rate for REU Sites in Geosciences varies from less than 10% to 50%, with the majority of participants being rising seniors and juniors. A few Sites include rising sophomores. At least 40% of the participants come from non-PhD granting institutions. Among the participants, gender distribution is balanced, with a slightly larger number of female participants. Regarding ethnic diversity, the REU Sites reflect the difficulty of attracting diverse students into Geosciences as a discipline; more than 75% of the participants are Caucasian and Asian students. Furthermore, participants from minority-serving institutions constitute a small percentage of those taking part in these research experiences. The enrichment activities are very similar across the REU Sites, and mimic well activities common to the scientific community, including intellectual exchange of ideas (lab meetings, seminars, and professional meetings), networking and social activities. There are some clear similarities among

  10. ESRO study program for a space experiment on gravitation theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, G. M.

    1971-01-01

    ESRO is considering a space experiment which is the definition phase. A more complete utilization of space techniques, leading to highly accurate acceleration measurements in a heliocentric spacecraft, together with an improved laser signal propagation method (using a space-borne atomic clock), could substantially increase the validity of the gravitational time delay test during solar conjunction. Preliminary investigations of the primary required techniques were carried out. These studies included an orbit analysis, investigation of drag-free techniques, and studies of the time measuring instrument. These studies were used to define the framework of a space experiment on gravitation theories. A preliminary feasibility study of the mission is being undertaken.

  11. Teaching Humanities in Medicine: The University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Hugh; Shields, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Humanities in medicine (HIM) is an important aspect of medical education intended to help preserve humanism and a focus on patients. At the University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program, we have been expanding our HIM curriculum for our residents including orientation, home visit reflective writing, didactics and a department-wide…

  12. A Monumental Experience: The Undergraduate Program in Washington, DC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betsock, Lori

    2009-08-01

    All undergraduate chemical science students are invited to attend the Undergraduate Program at the 238th ACS National Meeting in Washington, DC on August 16-17, 2009. This educational and career-oriented program is designed to increase our understanding of the world with chemistry. Symposia will focus on the chemistry of our oceans and atmosphere. Nobel Laureate Susan Solomon will be the featured Eminent Scientist speaker. Attend the Graduate School Reality Check and graduate school networking events to meet and talk with graduate school recruiters. All events will take place in the Capital Hilton (1001 16th Street NW), except for the Undergraduate Poster Session and Sci-Mix, which will be held in the Walter E. Washington Convention Center, located between 7th and 9th Streets and N Street and Mt. Vernon Place (approximately K Street).

  13. The Persint visualization program for the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Pomarède, D

    2003-01-01

    The Persint program is designed for the three-dimensional representation of objects and for the interfacing and access to a variety of independent applications, in a fully interactive way. Facilities are provided for the spatial navigation and the definition of the visualization properties, in order to interactively set the viewing and viewed points, and to obtain the desired perspective. In parallel, applications may be launched through the use of dedicated interfaces, such as the interactive reconstruction and display of physics events. Recent developments have focalized on the interfacing to the XML ATLAS General Detector Description AGDD, making it a widely used tool for XML developers. The graphics capabilities of this program were exploited in the context of the ATLAS 2002 Muon Testbeam where it was used as an online event display, integrated in the online software framework and participating in the commissioning and debug of the detector system.

  14. Measuring, Reporting and Verifying Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions. Reflecting experiences under the Mitigation Momentum Project. Discussion paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Vit, C.; Roeser, F.; Fekete, H.; Hoehne, N.; Wartmann, S.; Van Tilburg, X.; Larkin, J.; Escalante, D.; Haensel, G.; Veum, K.; Cameron, L.; Halcomb, J.

    2013-06-15

    The Mitigation Momentum project aims to support the development of Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs). It contributes to the concrete design of NAMA proposals in five countries (Peru, Chile, Indonesia, Tunisia and Kenya). A further aim is to foster cooperation and knowledge exchange within the NAMA community while advancing the international climate policy debate on mitigation and related issues, including approaches for the Measurement, Reporting and Verification (MRV) of NAMAs. MRV enables the assessment of the effectiveness of both internationally supported NAMAs (supported NAMAs) and domestically supported NAMAs (unilateral NAMAs) by tracking NAMA impacts including greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reductions and non-GHG related impacts such as sustainable development benefits. MRV also supports improved policy design and decision making through systematic progress reporting and is a key tool to ensure accountability of NAMA stakeholders. Both host countries and funders share the common interest of having strong, implementable MRV systems in place. From both perspectives, this raises a number of questions, as well as potential challenges, on how to adapt the MRV approach to the specific circumstances of each NAMA. The objective of this paper is to identify open issues for the MRV of impacts of NAMAs, understood here as implementable actions, i.e. a project, a policy, a programme or a strategy. It pays particular attention to NAMAs with a supported component and reflects relevant initial experiences with developing NAMA proposals in the five Mitigation Momentum countries (i.e. using country examples where appropriate). As MRV systems for these NAMAs are still under development or at their preliminary stage, we hope to share further lessons learned in a subsequent discussion paper. Key challenges analysed in this paper include: How to design a MRV system that satisfies both the host country's and funder's expectations while complying with

  15. Urgent lung transplantation national program: the Italian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretagostini, R; Peritore, D; Rizzato, L; Stabile, D; D'Alessandro, F; Michelangeli, G; Vespasiano, F; Costa, A Nanni

    2013-09-01

    An urgent lung transplantation national program in Italy was developed over the past three years. Indispensable conditions that were included in the program were invasive respiratory support and/or extracorporeal vascular device (DECAP excluded). The aim of this study was to test the effectiveness of the program. We analyzed urgent lung requests received between 2009 and 2011 taking into account primary pathology, request outcome, average waiting time, and organ origin. Taking as reference the same period of time, we also examined the ordinary waiting list, waiting list mortality, and number of transplantations performed and we have compared them with another three-year period prior to the activation of the program. The total number of urgent requests was 43. Primary pathologies with the highest incidence proportion were cystic fibrosis (40%) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (26.6%). A total of 34 requests (79%) were successfully dealt with and 9 of them were suspended because of worsening conditions. The average waiting time was 17.9 days. During the same period of time 340 lung transplantations were performed and there were 499, 524, and 564 wait-listed patients in 2009, 2010, and 2011, respectively. The mortality rate was 21.3%. Over the previous three-year period 295 transplantations were performed and there were 457, 476, and 464 wait-listed patients in 2006, 2007, and 2008, respectively. Also the mortality rate was 25.3%. Urgent lung transplantations can provide patients in an imminent life-threatening situation with adequate care without affecting the mortality rate of patients on the ordinary waiting list. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Narratives of Iraqi Adult Learners: Experiences of Spoken Register in English for Academic Purposes Programs at an Australian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Hamdany, Hayder; Picard, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the perceptions of Iraqi students of three different English Programs (a general English for academic purposes program, a pre-enrolment English program and the English component of a disciplinary bridging program) at an Australian University as reflected in their language learning narratives. It focuses specifically on the…

  17. Designing fractional factorial split-plot experiments using integer programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capehart, Shay R.; Keha, Ahmet; Kulahci, Murat

    2011-01-01

    Split-plot designs are commonly used in industrial experiments when there are hard-to-change and easy-to-change factors. Due to the number of factors and resource limitations, it is more practical to run a fractional factorial split-plot (FFSP) design. These designs are variations of the fraction...

  18. Experiences of Bridging Program Students at a Regional Satellite Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsom, Sandra; Greenaway, Ruth; Marshman, Margaret

    2017-01-01

    The benefits of higher education to individuals and to society are acknowledged both in Australia and internationally. Increased access to higher education means that greatly diverse students are beginning their tertiary learning journey. We investigate the experiences of a group of non-traditional students undertaking a tertiary preparation…

  19. The Teacher as Co-Creator of Drama: A Phenomenological Study of the Experiences and Reflections of Irish Primary School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonagh, Fiona; Finneran, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Classroom drama in the Irish primary school context remains a relatively new endeavour and is largely under-researched. The knowledge base for all aspects of teacher education should be informed by rigorous reflection on teachers' experiences in the classroom. This paper reports on a phenomenological study conducted with seven Irish primary school…

  20. Students' Reflections on the Relationships between Safe Learning Environments, Learning Challenge and Positive Experiences of Learning in a Simulated GP Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, J. E.; Williamson, M. I.; Egan, T. G.

    2016-01-01

    Learning environments are a significant determinant of student behaviour, achievement and satisfaction. In this article we use students' reflective essays to identify key features of the learning environment that contributed to positive and transformative learning experiences. We explore the relationships between these features, the students'…

  1. Laboratory spectroscopy experiment : Spectral reflectance of beach sand as function of surface moisture content with sample of beach sand collected from the Sand Motor, the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nolet, C.; Roosjen, P.P.J.

    2015-01-01

    Spectral reflectance of beach sand (350-2500 nm) under different moisture conditions at 1 nm interval, obtained by a laboratory spectroscopy experiment. Optical remote sensing has the potential to measure surface moisture at a high spatio-temporal resolution. It is based on the principle that wet

  2. Use of borehole radar reflection logging to monitor steam-enhanced remediation in fractured limestone-results of numerical modelling and a field experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregoire, C.; Joesten, P.K.; Lane, J.W.

    2006-01-01

    increased substantially during the steam injection experiment shows an increase in attenuation and a decrease in reflectivity in the vicinity of the borehole. Results of applying the reflection amplitude analysis method developed for this study indicate that steam did not totally replace the water in most of the fractures. The observed decreases in reflectivity were consistent with an increase in fracture-water temperature, rather than the presence of steam. A limiting assumption of the reflection amplitude analysis method is the requirement for complete displacement of water in a fracture by steam. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Marginal Ice Zone (MIZ) Program: Science and Experiment Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    followed by a Fram Strait ice edge component called SIZEX (Seasonal Ice Zone Experiment) (Johannessen and Sandven, 1989) in early spring 1989. The focus...from the Arctic Basin through Fram Strait as sea ice (about 105 m3 s −1) is roughly comparable to the total continental runoff entering the basin. In...summer. A project timeline (Figure 3) provides an overview of field operations. The flexible nature of ice- mounted and mobile, autonomous oceanographic

  4. Optimizing the Effectiveness of CME Program: NAMS Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuldeep Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available purposeful learning require strong basis of principles of adult learning along with a sound knowledge and requisite skills in both psychology as well as technology of medical education. Assessing effectiveness of a CME program is as important as the organization of learning activities and delivery of academic program as these may provide further directions for enhancing the efficacy of the CME delivery system.Objective: (i The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of well planned and conducted CME program in terms of enhancing knowledge and competence of the participants. (ii To explore if the gain in knowledge and competence, if any, can be attributed to the interactive design of the educational process.Methods: The study was conducted during NAMS-AIIMS Regional Symposium on Sleep Medicine at AIIMS, Jodhpur as part of NAMSCON 2013. After explaining the objectives of the study to the participants and assurance of confidentiality, a validated and pre-tested questionnaire consisting of 30 multiple choice, single response questions, was administered to 103 participants. Following intervention consisting of didactic lectures by experts in different aspects of sleep medicine, interactive sessions and problem triggered sessions consisting of clinical data, participants were re-administered post test questions which were, however, different from pre-test but had similar difficulty level.Result: The response rate of participants was 89%. Pre-intervention scores were 11.76 ± 4.4, with only 26 % of participants achieving an arbitrary pass score of 50 %. Comparison of paired score of participants who attempted both pre and post tests (n=59 showed improvement from 12.1 ±4.6 to 18.3 ± 3.8 which was significant (p <0.05. 84.7 % of participants secured above pre decided 50% score. The mean increase in the score was 6.2 with 95% CIs 4.8; 7.5 (P <0.001. Higher gain in knowledge and competencies is attributed to intense interactive

  5. A European Acid Rain Program based on the US experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, U. Steiner; Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    2000-01-01

    The paper shows that cost-effective involvement of the source location involves utmost difficulty in practice. Based on the RAINS model, it is recommended that source location should be ignored in a European market for SO2, as is the case in the US Acid Rain Program. Based on the political target...... levels in the Second Sulfur Protocol from 1994, free trade will, compared to Command-And-Control, lead to 37% cost-savings and 2% environmental degradation. To mitigate this 2% environmental degradation, we recommend that some of the large cost-savings should be reallocated in further overall reduction...

  6. Swedish nursing students' experience of aspects important for their learning process and their ability to handle the complexity of the nursing degree program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Petra Lilja; Edberg, Anna-Karin

    2012-05-01

    The aim of the study was to explore nursing students' experiences of aspects important for their learning process and their ability to handle the complexity of the nursing degree program. The study was longitudinal and qualitative based on interviews with nursing students, six women and two men aged 20-36, during their three years of education. In all, seven patterns were found embracing aspects of importance for the students' learning: Having a clear goal, being able to re-evaluate one's ideas, being acknowledged, when the abstract becomes tangible, using one's own experiences as a tool for learning, hovering between closeness and distance regarding one's future profession and handling theory and practice in relation to one another. The results show the importance of providing clinical courses, strongly connected to the theoretical parts of the program and to use reflection and experience-based learning in the nursing program. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Thoughts on Reflection (Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Koufogiannakis

    2010-06-01

    Evidence in Practice section uses a standardized format enabling practitioners to share their experience of integrating research evidence into their practice. The final section of these brief articles asks the writers to reflect on their experience. Although it is not research, the individual reflection allies with what Schön (1983 called “reflection on action” and such reflections over time form a practical, tacit knowledge that we use to inform our work. Within this section of the journal, we hope readers will become more aware of how different types of evidence can be integrated into real‐world decision making. Not everything requires a full blown research study, and this section allows readers to see what other practitioners are doing, and in turn it should enable them to reflect upon what they are doing in their own practice. Being aware of situations where things may or may not have worked, and reflecting on the reasons why, brings together our sense of critical thought and practical experience that go a long way in filling the “librarian observed” and “professional judgements” parts of the EBLIP definition (Booth and Brice 2004. Acquiring professional knowledge does not end when we complete a graduate program, or have a certain number of years experience under our belts. It needs to be continually and consciously cultivated via reflection on our practice, our research, and simply what works and why. Research knowledge only takes us so far. People often ask me, “What do I do when there is no evidence? Or when the research evidence is weak?” Does this stop us from moving ahead? No. A decision still needs to be made. Evidence based practice is not only about acting when there is good evidence. Enhancing our professional judgments via a career built on analytical reflection, will provide knowledge that goes a long way towards making difficult decisions a little bit easier; even (or perhaps, especially in the cases when there is already a large body of

  8. Development of interactive and reflective learning among Malaysian online distant learners: An ESL instructor’s experience

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Murugaiah, Puvaneswary; Thang, Siew Ming

    2010-01-01

    .... This paper describes an English as a Second Language (ESL) instructor’s attempt to foster interactive and reflective learning among distance learners at a public university in Malaysia, working within the framework proposed by Salmon (2004...

  9. [The accreditation program in hospitals: Clalit Health Services experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Ratson, Edna; Dreiher, Jacob; Wirtheim, Eytan; Perlman, Lily; Gruzman, Carlos; Rosenbaum, Ziv; Davidson, Ehud

    2011-04-01

    Accreditation is a process for assessing the healthcare organization, to determine if it meets a set of requirements designed to improve quality of care. White research regarding the benefits of accreditation is lacking, accreditation has been shown to be associated with promoting quality. Accreditation differs from licensing and quality assurance audits such as ISO. In various countries, the accreditation processes have been in operation in heaLthcare organization for decades. In the U.S.A., the Leading organization for accreditation of healthcare organizations is the Joint Commission. Accreditation Canada is the leading authority for accreditation in Canada. The Australian Council for Healthcare Standards and the King's Fund in the United Kingdom are other noted authorities for accreditation. Several European countries have initiated accreditation programs and some are in the process of implementing such programs. In Israel, no national accreditation system exists, although the Ministry of Health conducts audits on specific issues, and for relicensing of hospitals, and the Scientific Council of the Israel Medical Association conducts audits for recognizing a department as suitable for residency. Clalit Health Services is the first healthcare organization in Israel to gain Joint Commission International (JCI) accreditation. Three hospitals run by Clalit (Ha'emek, Meir and Soroka) have been accredited by JCI, and another four are in the process of accreditation by JCI. An organized national accreditation scheme in Israel is a challenging process, yet it appears to be a central act for promoting the quality of care in hospitals.

  10. Role of Mecp2 in Experience-Dependent Epigenetic Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph A. Zimmermann

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the X-linked gene MECP2, the founding member of a family of proteins recognizing and binding to methylated DNA, are the genetic cause of a devastating neurodevelopmental disorder in humans, called Rett syndrome. Available evidence suggests that MECP2 protein has a critical role in activity-dependent neuronal plasticity and transcription during brain development. Moreover, recent studies in mice show that various posttranslational modifications, notably phosphorylation, regulate Mecp2’s functions in learning and memory, drug addiction, depression-like behavior, and the response to antidepressant treatment. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis drives the stress response and its deregulation increases the risk for a variety of mental disorders. Early-life stress (ELS typically results in sustained HPA-axis deregulation and is a major risk factor for stress related diseases, in particular major depression. Interestingly, Mecp2 protein has been shown to contribute to ELS-dependent epigenetic programming of Crh, Avp, and Pomc, all of these genes enhance HPA-axis activity. Hereby ELS regulates Mecp2 phosphorylation, DNA binding, and transcriptional activities in a tissue-specific and temporospatial manner. Overall, these findings suggest MECP2 proteins are so far underestimated and have a more dynamic role in the mediation of the gene-environment dialog and epigenetic programming of the neuroendocrine stress system in health and disease.

  11. Methods for reducing singly reflected rays on the Wolter-I focusing mirrors of the FOXSI rocket experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buitrago-Casas, Juan Camilo; Elsner, Ronald; Glesener, Lindsay; Christe, Steven; Ramsey, Brian; Courtade, Sasha; Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke; Narukage, Noriyuki; Turin, Paul; Vievering, Juliana; Athiray, P. S.; Musset, Sophie; Krucker, Säm.

    2017-08-01

    In high energy solar astrophysics, imaging hard X-rays by direct focusing offers higher dynamic range and greater sensitivity compared to past techniques that used indirect imaging. The Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) is a sounding rocket payload that uses seven sets of nested Wolter-I figured mirrors together with seven high-sensitivity semiconductor detectors to observe the Sun in hard X-rays through direct focusing. The FOXSI rocket has successfully flown twice and is funded to fly a third time in summer 2018. The Wolter-I geometry consists of two consecutive mirrors, one paraboloid and one hyperboloid, that reflect photons at grazing angles. Correctly focused X-rays reflect once per mirror segment. For extended sources, like the Sun, off-axis photons at certain incident angles can reflect on only one mirror and still reach the focal plane, generating a background pattern of singly reflected rays (i.e., ghost rays) that can limit the sensitivity of the observation to faint, focused sources. Understanding and mitigating the impact of the singly reflected rays on the FOXSI optical modules will maximize the instruments' sensitivity to background-limited sources. We present an analysis of the FOXSI singly reflected rays based on ray-tracing simulations and laboratory measurements, as well as the effectiveness of different physical strategies to reduce them.

  12. International Experience with Key Program Elements of IndustrialEnergy Efficiency or Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Target-SettingPrograms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Kramer, Klaas Jan

    2008-02-02

    Target-setting agreements, also known as voluntary ornegotiated agreements, have been used by a number of governments as amechanism for promoting energy efficiency within the industrial sector. Arecent survey of such target-setting agreement programs identified 23energy efficiency or GHG emissions reduction voluntary agreement programsin 18 countries. International best practice related to target-settingagreement programs calls for establishment of a coordinated set ofpolicies that provide strong economic incentives as well as technical andfinancial support to participating industries. The key program elementsof a target-setting program are the target-setting process,identification of energy-saving technologies and measures usingenergy-energy efficiency guidebooks and benchmarking as well as byconducting energy-efficiency audits, development of an energy-savingsaction plan, development and implementation of energy managementprotocols, development of incentives and supporting policies, monitoringprogress toward targets, and program evaluation. This report firstprovides a description of three key target-setting agreement programs andthen describes international experience with the key program elementsthat comprise such programs using information from the three keytarget-setting programs as well as from other international programsrelated to industrial energy efficiency or GHG emissionsreductions.

  13. Teaching and learning curriculum programs: recommendations for postgraduate pharmacy experiences in education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Eric A; Brown, Bonnie; Gettig, Jacob; Martello, Jay L; McClendon, Katie S; Smith, Kelly M; Teeters, Janet; Ulbrich, Timothy R; Wegrzyn, Nicole; Bradley-Baker, Lynette R

    2014-08-01

    Recommendations for the development and support of teaching and learning curriculum (TLC) experiences within postgraduate pharmacy training programs are discussed. Recent attention has turned toward meeting teaching- and learning-related educational outcomes through a programmatic process during the first or second year of postgraduate education. These programs are usually coordinated by schools and colleges of pharmacy and often referred to as "teaching certificate programs," though no national standards or regulation of these programs currently exists. In an effort to describe the landscape of these programs and to develop a framework for their basic design and content, the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Pharmacy Practice Section's Task Force on Student Engagement and Involvement, with input from the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, reviewed evidence from the literature and conference proceedings and considered author experience and expertise over a two-year period. The members of the task force created and reached consensus on a policy statement and 12 recommendations to guide the development of best practices of TLC programs. The recommendations address topics such as the value of TLC programs, program content, teaching and learning experiences, feedback for participants, the development of a teaching portfolio, the provision of adequate resources for TLC programs, programmatic assessment and improvement, program transparency, and accreditation. TLC programs provide postgraduate participants with valuable knowledge and skills in teaching applicable to the practitioner and academician. Postgraduate programs should be transparent to candidates and seek to ensure the best experiences for participants through systematic program implementation and assessments. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. EPA-RTP STEM Outreach Program recognized for Excellence in Volunteer Experience and Mobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA-RTP’s Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) Outreach Program was recently awarded two US2020 STEM Mentoring Awards – one for Excellence in Volunteer Experience, and a second for Volunteer Mobilization.

  15. Mucho camino: the experiences of two undocumented Mexican mothers participating in their child's early intervention program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alvarado, M Irma

    2004-01-01

    This study describes the experiences of two mothers of Mexican origin who are immigrants living under undocumented status in the United States and who participated in their children's early intervention programs...

  16. COMPARING SEARCHING AND SORTING ALGORITHMS EFFICIENCY IN IMPLEMENTING COMPUTATIONAL EXPERIMENT IN PROGRAMMING ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sagan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This article considers different aspects which allow defining correctness of choosing sorting algorithms. Also some algorithms, needed for computational experiments for certain class of programs, are compared.

  17. International Encounters: Experiences of Visitors and Hosts in a Cross-Cultural Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranz, Rebecca; Nuttman-Shwartz, Orit; Thachil, Githa

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to gain further insights into how visiting international social work students and their hosts from different cultures learn about each others' social services, culture, and personal values. Six Israeli students and 8 Indian students have written narratives and reflections on their experiences in the international encounter…

  18. Successes and Challenges in the SAGE (Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience) REU Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braile, L. W.; Baldridge, W. S.; Pellerin, L.; Ferguson, J. F.; Bedrosian, P.; Biehler, S.; Jiracek, G. R.; Snelson, C. M.; Kelley, S.; McPhee, D.

    2014-12-01

    The SAGE program was initiated in 1983 to provide an applied geophysics research and education experience for students. Since 1983, 820 students have completed the SAGE summer program. Beginning in 1992, with funding from the NSF, SAGE has included an REU (Research Experience for Undergraduates) experience for selected undergraduate students from U.S. colleges and universities. Since 1992, 380 undergraduate REU students have completed the SAGE program. The four week, intensive, summer program is based in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and involves students in learning geophysical theory and applications; collection of geophysical field data in the northern Rio Grande Rift area; data processing, modeling and interpretation; and presentation (oral and written) of results of each student's research results. Students (undergraduates, graduates and professionals) and faculty are together on a school campus for the summer program. Successful strategies (developed over the years) of the program include teamwork experience, mentoring of REUs (by faculty and more senior students), cultural interchange due to students from many campuses across the U.S. and international graduate students, including industry visitors who work with the students and provide networking, a capstone experience of the summer program that includes all students making a "professional-meeting" style presentation of their research and submitting a written report, a follow-up workshop for the REU students to enhance and broaden their experience, and providing professional development for the REUs through oral or poster presentations and attendance at a professional meeting. Program challenges include obtaining funding from multiple sources; significant time investment in program management, reporting, and maintaining contact with our many funding sources and industry affiliates; and, despite significant efforts, limited success in recruiting racial and ethnic minority students to the program.

  19. The Impact of Parental Involvement on a Structured Youth Program Experience: A Qualitative Inquiry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mat D. Duerden

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Parental involvement is an often proposed, but rarely researched, key element of youth programs. Questions remain regarding the impact of parental involvement on program processes and outcomes. Qualitative data were collected over a one-year period with youth participants (n=46, parents (n=26, and teachers (n=5 associated with an international immersion/service learning program for adolescents. Three main research questions guided the data analysis: (1 what role does parental involvement play in the youths’ experience in the program; (2 how does parental involvement in the program influence the parent/child relationship; and (3 what role does parental involvement play in terms of the program’s long-term impact on the youth participants? Findings suggest a relationship between parental involvement in youth programs and improved parent/child communication, bonding, and perceptions of one another. Findings also suggest that having a common ground experience prolonged the experience’s positive post-participation effects.

  20. Does Prior RN Clinical Experience Predict Academic Success in Graduate Nurse Practitioner Programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Banna, Majeda M; Briggs, Linda A; Leslie, Mayri Sagady; Athey, Erin K; Pericak, Arlene; Falk, Nancy L; Greene, Jessica

    2015-05-01

    There is limited evidence on whether prior RN clinical experience is predictive of academic success in graduate nurse practitioner (NP) programs. The purpose of this study was to explore whether the frequently held assumption that more prior clinical experience is associated with better academic success in The George Washington University online NP programs. Applications (n = 106) for clinical NP students entering from 2008-2010 were examined along with data on academic performance. No relationship was found between years of prior RN clinical experience and three educational outcome variables (cumulative grade point average [GPA], clinical course GPA, and having failed any courses or been put on probation). However, students with the most prior RN clinical experience were less likely to graduate in 4 years, compared with those with the least experience. These findings serve as a building block of empirical evidence for admissions committees as they consider entry requirements for NP programs. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Design Strategies and Knowledge in Object-Oriented Programming: Effects of Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detienne, Francoise

    1995-01-01

    Presents research findings from an empirical study of design strategies and knowledge used in object-oriented (OO) software design by programmers both experienced and not experienced with OO programming. Results indicated that levels of experience with OO programming affect the design process. (Author/JKP)

  2. Does Teaching Experience Matter? Examining Biology Teachers' Prior Knowledge for Teaching in an Alternative Certification Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrichsen, Patricia J.; Abell, Sandra K.; Pareja, Enrique M.; Brown, Patrick L.; Lankford, Deanna M.; Volkmann, Mark J.

    2009-01-01

    Alternative certification programs (ACPs) have been proposed as a viable way to address teacher shortages, yet we know little about how teacher knowledge develops within such programs. The purpose of this study was to investigate prior knowledge for teaching among students entering an ACP, comparing individuals with teaching experience to those…

  3. The Effects of Honors Program Participation on Experiences of Good Practices and Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Tricia A.; Pascarella, Ernest T.; Colangelo, Nicholas; Assouline, Susan G.

    2007-01-01

    Using multi-institution data and a longitudinal, pretest-posttest design, this study investigated the impact of honors programs on student experiences of good practices in undergraduate education as well as cognitive development in the first year of college. We found students in honors programs advantaged in terms of the good practice measures…

  4. Teaching for Transformative Educational Experience in a Sport for Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Paul M.; Jacobs, Jenn M.; Ressler, James D.; Jung, Jinhong

    2016-01-01

    Despite the assumption that Sport for Development and Peace programs can foster social change, many fail to provide intentional educational experiences. This limits the attainment and sustainability of positive outcomes for participants and communities. The literature calls for such programs to use sport as an educational tool that shifts power to…

  5. Experiences and Outcomes of a Women's Leadership Development Program: A Phenomenological Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brue, Krystal L.; Brue, Shawn A.

    2016-01-01

    Women's leadership training programs provide organizations opportunities to value women leaders as organizational resources. This qualitative research utilized phenomenological methodology to examine lived experiences of seven alumni of a women's-only leadership program. We conducted semi-structured interviews to clarify what learning elements…

  6. The effect of a science work experience program for teachers on the classroom environment: A qualitative program evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Wendy Michelle

    Science Work Experience Programs for Teachers (SWEPTs) provide an opportunity for science and math teachers to work in research laboratories during the summer to experience science as it is practiced in the laboratory-setting. Through the use of interviews with teachers and students, classroom observations, and an analysis of printed student sheets and student work, the lived experience of a cohort of program participants in Columbia University's Summer Research Program for Secondary School Science Teachers was recorded in an effort to describe the effect of experience in a SWEPT on the classroom environment of teacher participants and student outcomes. Relying on Social Learning Theory and science education reform documentation as a theoretical framework the following dimensions of the classroom were examined: (1) emergent themes that include the participants' perceptions of the importance of technology in the classroom, (2) interpersonal relationships with the teachers at the participants' schools, fellow program participants, research scientists, and students, and (3) changes in epistemological structure, curriculum, instructional strategies, and classroom practices. Methodological and theoretical implications are addressed with respect to future studies, and suggestions for refinement of SWEPTs are provided.

  7. Supporting the whole student: Inclusive program design for making undergraduate research experiences accessible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haacker-Santos, R.; Allen, L.; Batchelor, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    As undergraduate research experiences have become an unofficial pre-requisite to enter graduate school programs in the sciences, we have to make sure that these experiences are inclusive and accessible to all students. Program managers who make a conscious effort to recruit students from traditionally under-represented groups, including veterans, non-traditional students or students with disabilities, are often unaware of the financial and program implications these students require, and discover that their current program design might inadvertently exclude or not fully support these students. The SOARS Program, an undergraduate-to-graduate bridge program in the atmospheric sciences, has supported this group of students for over 15 years. We have found that we needed to adjust some program elements and secure extra funding sources to holistically support our students in their research experience, however, the program and the students have reaped tremendous benefits. Involving non-traditional students or veterans in our program has raised the maturity level and problem solving skills of the group, and having students with disabilities participate has been a vehicle for broadening perspective and diverse knowledge into the field of study, e.g. researching weather and climate beyond what you can 'see'. This presentation will highlight some of the findings from the SOARS program experience, and will share practices for recruitment and holistic support to ensure student success. We will share resources and tips on inclusive program design, including working with students with family commitments or physical disabilities, and will report on the enormous program benefits and peer learning these students have brought to the student cohorts and research labs they are working in.

  8. Mothers’ experiences in the Nurse-Family Partnership program: a qualitative case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landy Christine

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few studies have explored the experiences of low income mothers participating in nurse home visiting programs. Our study explores and describes mothers' experiences participating in the Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP Program, an intensive home visiting program with demonstrated effectiveness, from the time of program entry before 29 weeks gestation until their infant's first birthday. Methods A qualitative case study approach was implemented. A purposeful sample of 18 low income, young first time mothers participating in a pilot study of the NFP program in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada partook in one to two face to face in-depth interviews exploring their experiences in the program. All interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. Conventional content analysis procedures were used to analyze all interviews. Data collection and initial analysis were implemented concurrently. Results The mothers participating in the NFP program were very positive about their experiences in the program. Three overarching themes emerged from the data: 1. Getting into the NFP program; 2. The NFP nurse is an expert, but also like a friend providing support; and 3. Participating in the NFP program is making me a better parent. Conclusions Our findings provide vital information to home visiting nurses and to planners of home visiting programs about mothers' perspectives on what is important to them in their relationships with their nurses, how nurses and women are able to develop positive therapeutic relationships, and how nurses respond to mothers' unique life situations while home visiting within the NFP Program. In addition our findings offer insights into why and under what circumstances low income mothers will engage in nurse home visiting and how they expect to benefit from their participation.

  9. Methods for Reducing Singly Reflected Rays on the Wolter-I Focusing Figures of the FOXSI Rocket Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buitrago-Casas, Juan Camilo; Glesener, Lindsay; Christe, Steven; Elsner, Ronald; Ramsey, Brian; Courtade, Sasha; Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke; Narukage, Noriyuki; Vievering, Juliana; Subramania, Athiray; hide

    2017-01-01

    In high energy solar astrophysics, imaging hard X-rays by direct focusing offers higher dynamic range and greater sensitivity compared to past techniques that used indirect imaging. The Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) is a sounding rocket payload which uses seven sets of nested Wolter-I figured mirrors that, together with seven high-sensitivity semiconductor detectors, observes the Sun in hard X-rays by direct focusing. The FOXSI rocket has successfully flown twice and is funded to fly a third time in Summer 2018. The Wolter-I geometry consists of two consecutive mirrors, one paraboloid, and one hyperboloid, that reflect photons at grazing angles. Correctly focused X-rays reflect twice, once per mirror segment. For extended sources, like the Sun, off-axis photons at certain incident angles can reflect on only one mirror and still reach the focal plane, generating a pattern of single-bounce photons that can limit the sensitivity of the observation of faint focused X-rays. Understanding and cutting down the singly reflected rays on the FOXSI optics will maximize the instrument's sensitivity of the faintest solar sources for future flights. We present an analysis of the FOXSI singly reflected rays based on ray-tracing simulations, as well as the effectiveness of different physical strategies to reduce them.

  10. PROGRAM OF PALLIATIVE CANCER CARE – OUR EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Slánská

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Annually more than 27,000 persons die of cancer in the Czech Republic and the overall incidence of malignancies is still increasing. These data shows the need for affordable and good follow-up care especially for patients without any cancer treatment due to irreversible progression of tumor. Currently the outpatient palliative cancer care gets more into the forefront. Prerequisite for a well working outpatient palliative care is cooperation with general practitioners and home health care agencies. The purpose of the so called program of palliative cancer care is to guide a patient in palliative cancer care and to improve the cooperation among health care providers. Methods: During the period from January 2008 to October 2010 we evaluated in patient without any oncology treatment due to irreversible progression of tumor. Results: In palliative outpatient clinic we treated 446 patients, 119 of them received home care services with average length of 27.8 days. 77 patients died at home, 51 in health facilities and 41 in inpatient hospice care. Conclusion: We present pilot study focusing on outpatient palliative cancer care which shows the real benefit from early indication of palliative cancer care. This type of care allows patients to stay as long as possible at home among their close relatives.

  11. Marketing Program Standardization: The Experience of TNCs in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Sagan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine the rate of standardization of marketing programs in transnational corporations in the consumer goods market in Poland, which currently is one of the fastest growing markets in the world. An important research objective was to observe how Polish consumers adopt the marketing patterns and related lifestyles from countries of Western Europe and the USA. The empirical tests and data, collected in a sample survey of 35 transnational corporations and their 140 products, and using varied methods of statistical inference, allowed to formulate the following conclusions. The analyzed TNC’s adopted a clear standardization strategy in the Polish market. Among the analyzed products, 2/3 of them have been entirely transferred from foreign markets into the Polish market. A detailed analysis has indicated that the standardization rate of product and its items in the FMCG market in Poland is high and very high, and significantly higher than the pricing and advertising strategy standardization rates. The product standardization rate in the Polish market has been slightly higher than the rate in the developed countries, yet the pricing standardization has been significantly lower. The standardization of advertising strategies showed similar features.

  12. The reflective learning continuum: reflecting on reflection

    OpenAIRE

    Peltier, J; Hay, A.; Drago, W

    2005-01-01

    The importance of reflection to marketing educators is increasingly recognized. However, there is a lack of empirical research which considers reflection within the context of both the marketing and general business education literature. This paper describes the use of an instrument which can be used to measure four identified levels of a reflection hierarchy: habitual action, understanding, reflection and intensive reflection and two conditions for reflection: instructor to student interacti...

  13. Teachers' Attitudes towards Reflective Teaching: Evidences in a Professional Development Program (PDP Actitudes de los profesores hacia la enseñanza reflexiva: evidencias en un programa de desarrollo profesional (PDP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Jerez Rodríguez

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Reflective teaching is a paradigm that dominates teacher education around the world and most professional development programs include it as a way to improve teachers' practice. As a teacher educator I am aware of the importance reflective teaching (RT has on teachers' professional development. This article reports a research experience with two in-service teachers of English enrolled in a professional development program at a public university in Bogotá who initiated a reflective teaching process through the development of reflective thinking skills. Data were gathered through interviews, observation, videotaping, questionnaires and a diary. Findings showed some teachers' attitudes towards RT, the possible factors that might have stimulated and lessened reflection, and some of the changes observed in their teaching practice.La enseñanza reflexiva es un paradigma que domina la educación de docentes en el mundo y la mayoría de programas de desarrollo profesional (PDP la incluyen como una manera de mejorar la práctica de los docentes. Como docente educadora, soy consciente de su importancia en el desarrollo profesional. Este artículo describe una experiencia investigativa con dos profesores de inglés participantes en un PDP en una universidad pública en Bogotá, quienes iniciaron un proceso de reflexión sobre su práctica docente mediante el desarrollo de habilidades de pensamiento reflexivo. Los datos se recolectaron mediante entrevistas, observación, video grabación, cuestionarios y un diario. Los resultados mostraron algunas actitudes de los docentes hacia la enseñanza reflexiva, los posibles factores que pudieron estimular e inhibir la reflexión y algunos cambios en su práctica docente.

  14. Early Experience with a Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Quality Improvement Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Derek; Edmiston, Rachel; Bijoor, Pooja; Deshpande, Rahul; de'Liguori Carino, Nicola; Ammori, Basil; Sherlock, David J

    2014-01-01

    This project aims to assess the impact of the introduction of a hepatobiliary and pancreatic (HPB) Quality Improvement Program (QIP) on postoperative complications following liver, biliary and pancreatic surgery. A prospective analysis of postoperative complications over a six month period was performed. Complications were analysed and graded according to internationally agreed definitions. Justification was sought and errors identified. Weekly meetings were performed to review each complication enabling an action plan to be created to prevent future recurrence. Rates were compared with previously audited and published results, using the chi-square test. A total of 326 procedures were performed over the six months including 30 pancreatectomies, 45 liver resections and 251 other procedures. 37 patients developed complications (11.3%) with 47 complications in total including two deaths. Using the ISGPS grading, eight complications were identified; two grade A, four grade B and two grade C. There were three grade A ISGLS complications and one grade B. 30 complications were justified as unavoidable, 16 as avoidable and one as indeterminate. Action plans included continued monitoring (n=41), formulation of new policy (n=3), individual counselling (n=4), educational offering (n=4). When compared with 2010 complication rates, 114 complications occurred in 233 liver operations during the baseline period, compared with 17 complications in 45 liver operations during the QIP period, OR=0.63 (95% CI: 0.33 to 1.22), p=0.17 and 86 complications occurred in 99 pancreatic resections during the baseline period, compared with 20 complications in 30 pancreatic resections during the QIP period OR=0.30 (95% CI: 0.12 to 0.79), p=0.01 The HPB QIP is a rigorous approach to grade every complication and death. A statistically significant reduction in pancreas related complications has already been obtained. Further work is required to determine the persistence and magnitude of this quality

  15. A simple method of measuring profiles of thin liquid films for microfluidics experiments by means of interference reflection microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Berejnov, V

    2010-01-01

    A simple method was developed to observe the interference patterns of the light reflected by the interfaces of thin liquid films. Employing a fluorescent microscope with epi-illumination, we collected the 2D patterns of interference fringes containing information of the liquid film topography at microscale. To demonstrate the utility of the proposed visualization method we developed a framework for reconstructing the profiles of liquid films by analysing the reflected interferograms numerically. Both the visualization and reconstruction methods should be useful for variety of microfluidic applications involving the flows with droplets and bubbles in which the knowledge of the topography of the interfacial liquid film is critical.

  16. Instructor-Led Engagement and Immersion Programs: Transformative Experiences of Study Abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Natalie; Crawford, Pat

    2012-01-01

    Study abroad is associated with transformative experiences--that is, events that lead to a change in how a person sees the world. In this study the authors sought to ascertain whether there are common themes of transformative experiences and whether these transformations are related to particular types of study abroad programs. Principles guiding…

  17. Online Student Evaluation Improves Course Experience Questionnaire Results in a Physiotherapy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Beatrice; Jones, Sue; Straker, Leon

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports the use of an online student evaluation system, Course Experience on the Web (CEW), in a physiotherapy program to improve their Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ) results. CEW comprises a course survey instrument modeled on the CEQ and a tailored unit survey instrument. Closure of the feedback loop is integral in the CEW…

  18. Suggestions for Implementing First Year Experience Learning Communities in Teacher Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintz, Kathryn; Genareo, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    This article describes the creation of a First Year Experience learning community in a teacher education program. The First Year Experience model was adopted by the university because of declining enrollment, retention, and graduation rates and has been generally successful in the education department. With little information available for teacher…

  19. Integrating Clinical Experiences in a TESOL Teacher Education Program: Curriculum Mapping as Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baecher, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Across all certification areas, teacher education is being challenged to better integrate clinical experiences with coursework. This article describes the process of curriculum mapping and its impact on the organization of clinical experiences in a master's TESOL program over a 1-year redesign process. Although curriculum mapping has been employed…

  20. 'Do I develop intercultural competence from study abroad program in China?': An analysis of CFL student experiences at one Danish University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Chun

    Intercultural competence is one of the hot topics on study abroad program in European countries. Much is yet to be known about how students develop their intercultural competence through study abroad program. In this talk, I explore how Chinese as foreign language (CFL) students at one Danish...... university perceived their experiences on the ’cultural trips ( 文化之旅)’, in which it aimed for developing and enhancing intercultural competence during a six-month stay in China. Drawing on an analysis of students’ reflective reports, my study shows that the development of intercultural competence...

  1. Faculty Experiences of Merger and Organizational Change in a Social Work Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adedoyin, A Christson; Miller, Monte; Jackson, Mary S; Dodor, Bernice; Hall, Kristen

    2016-01-01

    Social work programs are experiencing unprecedented organizational changes due to budget cuts, dwindling resources, global, and technological challenges. However, there is limited information in the literature about the merger experiences of faculty in social work programs. On one hand undergoing merger and reorganization provides the opportunity to reorganize, reprioritize, re-assess, develop strategies, and explore previously untapped opportunities for social work programs. Conversely, merger experiences have caused frustration, intention to quit, confusion, and loss of professional identity for social work faculty. In this article the authors utilize a journaling method and sense-making approach of the merger experiences of some of the faculty members of a social work program in the United States. The authors suggest a framework to understand how the faculty confronted the challenges, overcame the pitfalls, and maximized the opportunities offered during the merger and organizational change process.

  2. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN GENDER AND STUDENTS’ ATTITUDE AND EXPERIENCE of USING A MATHEMATICAL SOFTWARE PROGRAM (MATLAB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet A. OCAK

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This correlation study examined the relationship between gender and the students’ attitude and prior knowledge of using one of the mathematical software programs (MATLAB. Participants were selected from one community college, one state university and one private college. Students were volunteers from three Calculus I classrooms (one class from each school in which MATLAB was used extensively. A survey regarding students’ attitude and experience on using the MATLAB program was administered to classes. The findings of the study indicated that gender differences are not related to students’ attitude and experience on the program. The results revealed slightly positive correlation between and students’ attitude and experience on the program. The implications of this study shows that teachers who use MATLAB in their instruction and classroom practices must pay attention on how much students use it, the obstacles students had to overcome to succeed in its use, and their general issues and concerns regarding MATLAB use.

  3. Online public health preparedness training programs: an evaluation of user experience with the technological environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambisan, Priya

    2010-01-01

    Several public health education programs and government agencies across the country have started offering virtual or online training programs in emergency preparedness for people who are likely to be involved in managing or responding to different types of emergency situations such as natural disasters, epidemics, bioterrorism, etc. While such online training programs are more convenient and cost-effective than traditional classroom-based programs, their success depends to a great extent on the underlying technological environment. Specifically, in an online technological environment, different types of user experiences come in to play-users' utilitarian or pragmatic experience, their fun or hedonic experience, their social experience, and most importantly, their usability experience-and these different user experiences critically shape the program outcomes, including course completion rates. This study adopts a multi-disciplinary approach and draws on theories in human computer interaction, distance learning theories, usability research, and online consumer behavior to evaluate users' experience with the technological environment of an online emergency preparedness training program and discusses its implications for the design of effective online training programs. . Data was collected using a questionnaire from 377 subjects who had registered for and participated in online public health preparedness training courses offered by a large public university in the Northeast. Analysis of the data indicates that as predicted, participants had higher levels of pragmatic and usability experiences compared to their hedonic and sociability experiences. Results also indicate that people who experienced higher levels of pragmatic, hedonic, sociability and usability experiences were more likely to complete the course(s) they registered for compared to those who reported lower levels. The study findings hold important implications for the design of effective online emergency

  4. “Sacred Work”: Reflections on the Professional and Personal Impact of an Interdisciplinary Palliative Oncology Clinical Experience by Social Work Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyssa A. Middleton

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the impact of an oncology palliative care clinical experience with older adults on social work learners. A three-member research team conducted a qualitative content analysis of reflective writings. 27 Master of Science in Social Work students enrolled in an interprofessional palliative oncology curriculum and completed a reflective writing assignment to summarize the clinical scenario, analyze the patient/family care provided, and describe the impact of the experience. Using a constant comparison approach based on grounded theory, the research team analyzed the reflections to come to consensus related to the overall impact of the experience. Two overarching themes (professional and personal impact and 11 subthemes (appreciation of interdisciplinary teams, recognition of clinical skills of other disciplines, insight into clinical skills of the social worker, perception of palliative care, embracing palliative care principles, centrality of communication, importance of social support, family as the unit of care, countertransference, conflict between personal values and patient/family values, and emotional reactions were identified. Experiential learning opportunities for social work learners in interprofessional palliative care build appreciation for and skills in applying palliative care principles including teamwork, symptom control, and advanced care planning along with a commitment to embrace these principles in future practice.

  5. Southern Federal University in Relation to Teacher Education Modernization Project: Strategic Reflection of the Testing Results of Integrative Modules of the “Cultural-Historical Psychology and Activity Approach in Education” Research Master’s Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernaya A. V.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the experience of a strategic reflection of the Southern Federal University participation in the project of modernization of teacher education. It analyses how theoretical, methodological and organizational-activity basis of “Cultural-Historical Psychology and Activity Approach in Education” research master’s program designed by Moscow State University of Psychology & Education relates to the strategic objectives of Southern Federal University. Priorities and forward-looking statements in the strategy for the training of specialists in education based on action-competence approach, integrative principle of educational modules construction, network forms of cooperation of educational institutions are shown. Basic methodological ideas of culturalhistorical psychology and activity theory and their applicability to the needs of modern education objectified in the draft are specially considered. The article presents the preliminary test results of integrative modules of research master’s program for Southern Federal University

  6. 'The divorce program': gendered experiences of HIV positive mothers enrolled in PMTCT programs - the case of rural Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blystad Astrid

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For HIV infected mothers in developing countries, choosing to enroll in a prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTCT of HIV program is supposed to represent the first step towards protecting their child from possible transmission of HIV from mother to child. Counseling and testing enable HIV infected mothers to learn about their status and to obtain the benefits of a PMTCT package. The study on which this article is based explored experiences of HIV positive women and their partners linked to Prevention of Mother to Child Transmission of HIV (PMTCT programs in Chiradzulu district, Southern Malawi. Methods A qualitative study using in-depth interviews (IDIs, focus group discussion (FGDs and case studies was carried at two PMTCT sites. IDIs and FGDs were recorded and transcribed. The case studies involved a deeper inquiry into the past, present and situational factors of selected participants. Results In a context of customary matrilineal kinship, matrilocal residence patterns and complete male absence from the PMTCT program, the demand by the PMTCT program for partner disclosure played up fears of rejection among men given accusations of infidelity by the wives' relatives. This situation led many men to abandon their families. Mothers enrolled in PMTCT programs hence faced not only the fear of transmitting the virus to their infants, but also the loss of income and support associated with a departed husband and the social disgrace of a ruined family. Community members referred to the PMTCT program as 'the divorce program' Conclusions PMTCT programs may vary in effectiveness in different contexts unless they fundamentally respond to socio-cultural factors as lived out in communities they intend to serve. The PMTCT program in rural southern Malawi is a case in point.

  7. 'The divorce program': gendered experiences of HIV positive mothers enrolled in PMTCT programs - the case of rural Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njunga, John; Blystad, Astrid

    2010-10-26

    For HIV infected mothers in developing countries, choosing to enroll in a prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV program is supposed to represent the first step towards protecting their child from possible transmission of HIV from mother to child. Counseling and testing enable HIV infected mothers to learn about their status and to obtain the benefits of a PMTCT package. The study on which this article is based explored experiences of HIV positive women and their partners linked to Prevention of Mother to Child Transmission of HIV (PMTCT) programs in Chiradzulu district, Southern Malawi. A qualitative study using in-depth interviews (IDIs), focus group discussion (FGDs) and case studies was carried at two PMTCT sites. IDIs and FGDs were recorded and transcribed. The case studies involved a deeper inquiry into the past, present and situational factors of selected participants. In a context of customary matrilineal kinship, matrilocal residence patterns and complete male absence from the PMTCT program, the demand by the PMTCT program for partner disclosure played up fears of rejection among men given accusations of infidelity by the wives' relatives. This situation led many men to abandon their families. Mothers enrolled in PMTCT programs hence faced not only the fear of transmitting the virus to their infants, but also the loss of income and support associated with a departed husband and the social disgrace of a ruined family. Community members referred to the PMTCT program as 'the divorce program' PMTCT programs may vary in effectiveness in different contexts unless they fundamentally respond to socio-cultural factors as lived out in communities they intend to serve. The PMTCT program in rural southern Malawi is a case in point.

  8. Development of Interactive and Reflective Learning among Malaysian Online Distant Learners: An ESL Instructor’s Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puvaneswary Murugaiah

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Technology has brought tremendous advancements in online education, spurring transformations in online pedagogical practices. Online learning in the past was passive, using the traditional teacher-centred approach. However, with the tools available today, it can be active, collaborative, and meaningful. A well-developed task can impel learners to observe, to reflect, to strategize, and to plan their own learning. This paper describes an English as a Second Language (ESL instructor’s attempt to foster interactive and reflective learning among distance learners at a public university in Malaysia, working within the framework proposed by Salmon (2004. The authors found that proper planning and close monitoring of a writing activity that incorporates interactive and reflective learning helped to raise the students’ awareness of their own learning process and consequently helped them to be more responsible for their learning. The students acquired significant cognitive benefits and also valuable practical learning skills through the online discussions. However, there were challenges in carrying out the writing task to promote this form of learning, including students’ professional and family commitments and cultural attitudes as well as communication barriers in the online environment. To address these challenges, the authors recommend the following: ensure tutor guidance, enforce compulsory participation, address technical problems quickly, commence strategic training prior to the beginning of a task, and implement team teaching with each instructor taking on certain roles.

  9. Programming experience promotes higher STEM motivation among first-grade girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Master, Allison; Cheryan, Sapna; Moscatelli, Adriana; Meltzoff, Andrew N

    2017-08-01

    The gender gap in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) engagement is large and persistent. This gap is significantly larger in technological fields such as computer science and engineering than in math and science. Gender gaps begin early; young girls report less interest and self-efficacy in technology compared with boys in elementary school. In the current study (N=96), we assessed 6-year-old children's stereotypes about STEM fields and tested an intervention to develop girls' STEM motivation despite these stereotypes. First-grade children held stereotypes that boys were better than girls at robotics and programming but did not hold these stereotypes about math and science. Girls with stronger stereotypes about robotics and programming reported lower interest and self-efficacy in these domains. We experimentally tested whether positive experience with programming robots would lead to greater interest and self-efficacy among girls despite these stereotypes. Children were randomly assigned either to a treatment group that was given experience in programming a robot using a smartphone or to control groups (no activity or other activity). Girls given programming experience reported higher technology interest and self-efficacy compared with girls without this experience and did not exhibit a significant gender gap relative to boys' interest and self-efficacy. These findings show that children's views mirror current American cultural messages about who excels at computer science and engineering and show the benefit of providing young girls with chances to experience technological activities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Multilevel approach to mentoring in the Research Experiences for Undergraduates programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonine, K. E.; Dontsova, K.; Pavao-Zuckerman, M.; Paavo, B.; Hogan, D.; Oberg, E.; Gay, J.

    2015-12-01

    This presentation focuses on different types of mentoring for students participating in Research Experiences for Undergraduates programs with examples, including some new approaches, from The Environmental and Earth Systems Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program at Biosphere 2. While traditional faculty mentors play essential role in students' development as researchers and professionals, other formal and informal mentoring can be important component of the REU program and student experiences. Students receive mentoring from program directors, coordinators, and on site undergraduate advisors. While working on their research projects, REU students receive essential support and mentoring from undergraduate and graduate students and postdoctoral scientists in the research groups of their primary mentors. Cohort living and group activities give multiple opportunities for peer mentoring where each student brings their own strengths and experiences to the group. Biosphere 2 REU program puts strong emphasis on teaching students to effectively communicate their research to public. In order to help REUs learn needed skills the outreach personnel at Biosphere 2 mentor and advise students both in groups and individually, in lecture format and by personal example, on best outreach approaches in general and on individual outreach projects students develop. To further enhance and strengthen outreach mentoring we used a novel approach of blending cohort of REU students with the Cal Poly STAR (STEM Teacher And Researcher) Program fellows, future K-12 STEM teachers who are gaining research experience at Biosphere 2. STAR fellows live together with the REU students and participate with them in professional development activities, as well as perform research side by side. Educational background and experiences gives these students a different view and better preparation and tools to effectively communicate and adapt science to lay audiences, a challenge commonly facing

  11. MPH program at Manipal University, India-experiences, challenges, and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Hattangadi Vinod; Kamath, Ramachandra; Arunkumar, Govindakarnavar; Delzell, Elizabeth; Tipre, Meghan; Upadhyay, Divvy Kant; Sathiakumar, Nalini

    2013-01-01

    The UAB-ITREOH program has initiated a skill-based MPH program at Manipal University (MU), India, in 2009, to address the critical need for trained public health professionals and build institutional public health training capacity in the country. Funds from Fogarty have supported the curriculum development and specialized training of MU faculty to teach in the MPH program. The program has been successfully launched and is gaining momentum. The lessons learned from our experiences as well as several challenges faced from the initialization to execution of the program are described in the article. Government support is crucial for raising the profile of this program by accreditation, creating job opportunities and by recognizing these professionals as leaders in the public health sector. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. 5 years of experience with a large-scale mentoring program for medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinilla, Severin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present our 5-year-experience with a large-scale mentoring program for undergraduate medical students at the Ludwig Maximilians-Universität Munich (LMU. We implemented a two-tiered program with a peer-mentoring concept for preclinical students and a 1:1-mentoring concept for clinical students aided by a fully automated online-based matching algorithm. Approximately 20-30% of each student cohort participates in our voluntary mentoring program. Defining ideal program evaluation strategies, recruiting mentors from beyond the academic environment and accounting for the mentoring network reality remain challenging. We conclude that a two-tiered program is well accepted by students and faculty. In addition the online-based matching seems to be effective for large-scale mentoring programs.

  13. 5 years of experience with a large-scale mentoring program for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinilla, Severin; Pander, Tanja; von der Borch, Philip; Fischer, Martin R; Dimitriadis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present our 5-year-experience with a large-scale mentoring program for undergraduate medical students at the Ludwig Maximilians-Universität Munich (LMU). We implemented a two-tiered program with a peer-mentoring concept for preclinical students and a 1:1-mentoring concept for clinical students aided by a fully automated online-based matching algorithm. Approximately 20-30% of each student cohort participates in our voluntary mentoring program. Defining ideal program evaluation strategies, recruiting mentors from beyond the academic environment and accounting for the mentoring network reality remain challenging. We conclude that a two-tiered program is well accepted by students and faculty. In addition the online-based matching seems to be effective for large-scale mentoring programs.

  14. An Enlightenment "Experience" and Plato's Parable of the Cave: Reflections on a Vision-Quest Gone Awry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Kerry

    2011-01-01

    This essay was conceived as an experiment that was brought about by an unpredictable set of circumstances. The author found himself being challenged by a student within his classroom to go on what the student called a "vision-quest." He accepted the challenge. This essay presents an account of both this experience and his attempt to impose…

  15. An Initial Model for Generative Design Research: Bringing Together Generative Focus Group (GFG) and Experience Reflection Modelling (ERM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakirlioglu, Yekta; Ogur, Dilruba; Dogan, Cagla; Turhan, Senem

    2016-01-01

    Understanding people's experiences and the context of use of a product at the earliest stages of the design process has in the last decade become an important aspect of both the design profession and design education. Generative design research helps designers understand user experiences, while also throwing light on their current needs,…

  16. Black Male Graduates' Reflections on Their College Experiences at a Private, Faith-Based, Predominantly White Institution of Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayworth, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    This study takes an in-depth look at the experiences of 12 Black males who graduated between 2001 and 2012 from a private, faith-based, predominantly White institution of higher education, with a purpose to better understand the essence of their collegiate experiences. Most research on minority college enrollment has focused on reasons why…

  17. Using a modified Learning Potential Assessment Device and Mediated Learning Experiences to Assess Minority Student Progress and Program Goals in an Undergraduate Research Based Geoscience Program Serving American Indians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, L. W.

    2002-12-01

    During the initiation of a new program at the University of North Dakota designed to promote American Indians to engage in geoscience research and complete geoscience related degrees, an evaluation procedure utilizing a modified Learning Potential Assessment Device (LPAD) and Mediated Learning Experiences (MLE) to assess minority student progress was implemented. The program, called Indians Into Geosciences (INGEOS), utilized a modified form of the Learning Potential Assessment Device first to assess cultural factors, determination, and other baseline information, and second, utilized a series of Mediated Learning Experiences to enhance minority students' opportunities in a culturally appropriate, culturally diverse, and scientifically challenging manner in an effort to prepare students for competitive research careers in the geosciences. All of the LPADs and MLEs corresponded directly to the three goals or eight objectives of INGEOS. The three goals of the INGEOS program are: 1) increasing the number of American Indians earning degrees at all levels, 2) engaging American Indians in challenging and technically based scientific research, and 3) preparing American Indians for successful geoscience careers through multicultural community involvement. The eight objectives of the INGEOS program, called the Eight Points of Success, are: 1) spiritual health, 2) social health, 3) physical health, 4) mental health, 5) financial management, 6) research involvement, 7) technical exposure, and 8) multicultural community education. The INGEOS program goals were evaluated strictly quantitatively utilizing a variety of data sources such as grade point averages, number of credits earned, research project information, and developed products. The INGEOS Program goals reflected a combined quantitative score of all participants, whereas the objectives reflected qualitative measures and are specific for each INGEOS participant. Initial results indicate that those participants which

  18. When practice precedes theory - A mixed methods evaluation of students' learning experiences in an undergraduate study program in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Kristin; Falk, Hanna; Jakobsson Ung, Eva

    2016-01-01

    A key area for consideration is determining how optimal conditions for learning can be created. Higher education in nursing aims to prepare students to develop their capabilities to become independent professionals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of sequencing clinical practice prior to theoretical studies on student's experiences of self-directed learning readiness and students' approach to learning in the second year of a three-year undergraduate study program in nursing. 123 nursing students was included in the study and divided in two groups. In group A (n = 60) clinical practice preceded theoretical studies. In group (n = 63) theoretical studies preceded clinical practice. Learning readiness was measured using the Directed Learning Readiness Scale for Nursing Education (SDLRSNE), and learning process was measured using the revised two-factor version of the Study Process Questionnaire (R-SPQ-2F). Students were also asked to write down their personal reflections throughout the course. By using a mixed method design, the qualitative component focused on the students' personal experiences in relation to the sequencing of theoretical studies and clinical practice. The quantitative component provided information about learning readiness before and after the intervention. Our findings confirm that students are sensitive and adaptable to their learning contexts, and that the sequencing of courses is subordinate to a pedagogical style enhancing students' deep learning approaches, which needs to be incorporated in the development of undergraduate nursing programs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Curriculum development for an advanced regional anesthesia education program: one institution's experience from apprenticeship to comprehensive teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouanes, Jean-Pierre P; Schwengel, Deborah; Mathur, Vineesh; Ahmed, Omar I; Hanna, Marie N

    2014-02-01

    Results of recent attitude survey studies suggest that most practicing physicians are inadequately treating postoperative pain. Residents in anesthesia are confident in performing lumbar epidural and spinal anesthesia, but many are not confident in performing the blocks with which they have the least exposure. Changes need to be made in the training processes to a comprehensive model that prepares residents to perform a wider array of blocks in postgraduate practice. Here, we describe one institution's approach to creating a standardized, advanced regional anesthesia curriculum for residents that follows the six core competencies of the ACGME. Residents received training in anatomy dissection, ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia, traditional nerve stimulation techniques, problem-based learning and simulation sessions, oral board presentation sessions, and journal club sessions. Residents kept a detailed log for their use of peripheral nerve block procedures. We have now redesigned and implemented an advanced regional anesthesia program within our institution to provide residents with experience in regional anesthesia at a competent level. Resident's knowledge in regional anesthesia did improve after the first year of implementation as reflected in improvements between the pre- and post-tests. As the advanced regional anesthesia education program continues to improve, we hope to demonstrate levels of validity, reliability, and usability by other programs.

  20. X-ray absorption and reflection as probes of the GaN conduction bands: Theory and experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambrecht, W.R.L.; Rashkeev, S.N.; Segall, B. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    X-ray absorption measurements are a well-known probe of the unoccupied states in a material. The same information can be obtained by using glancing angle X-ray reflectivity. In spite of several existing band structure calculations of the group III nitrides and previous optical studies in UV range, a direct probe of their conduction band densities of states is of interest. The authors performed a joint experimental and theoretical investigation using both of these experimental techniques for wurtzite GaN.

  1. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN GENDER AND STUDENTS’ ATTITUDE AND EXPERIENCE of USING A MATHEMATICAL SOFTWARE PROGRAM (MATLAB)

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet A. OCAK

    2006-01-01

    This correlation study examined the relationship between gender and the students’ attitude and prior knowledge of using one of the mathematical software programs (MATLAB). Participants were selected from one community college, one state university and one private college. Students were volunteers from three Calculus I classrooms (one class from each school) in which MATLAB was used extensively. A survey regarding students’ attitude and experience on using the MATLAB program was administered t...

  2. Reflective Writing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrenkiel Jørgensen, Andriette

    2016-01-01

    a contribution to the discussions about the role of reflection in design work and in learning situations at large. By engaging with the dialogic reflection, which is one of the four essential types of reflection, (the three others being descriptive writing, descriptive reflection and critical reflection...

  3. Fostering transformative learning: a phenomenological study into the lived experience of reflection and transformation in adventure education

    OpenAIRE

    Yeong, Poh Kiaw

    2017-01-01

    This phenomenological and interpretive study presents stories of the lived teaching and learning experiences of participants on adventure programmes in Singapore. Although learning in adventure education has been said to be transformational and that outdoor leaders play a crucial role in promoting such learning, there has been little empirical research into the lived experiences of leaders and learners that might provide pedagogical insights into how these transformations take place. The proc...

  4. An exploration of participants' experience of an intensive care nursing transition to specialty practice program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhuvu, Auxillia E; Plummer, Virginia; Morphet, Julia

    2017-09-26

    Transition to specialty practice programs were developed to support, educate and facilitate recruitment and retention of nurses in specialised areas of practice. The intensive care nursing transition to specialty practice program in this study was implemented in 2000. To date, in Australia there are no published studies which focus on intensive care nursing transition to specialty practice programs. The study aimed to explore the effects of an intensive care nursing transition to specialty practice program offered in two intensive care units in a single Australian health service. A cross-sectional survey design was used. Quantitative data were collected from nurses who participated in the transition to specialty practice program from 2005 to 2015 using an anonymous online survey. Summary statistics and Chi-square tests were used to analyse the data. The response rate was 51.8% (n=86). Most of the transition to specialty practice program participants had medical nursing experience (n=35, 40.7%) or surgical nursing experience (n=35, 40.7%) prior to enrolling into the program. More than half (n=46, 53.5%) of the participants had worked in the intensive care units for more than two years post program. The majority of the participants (n=60, 69.8%) undertook post graduate education after the transition to specialty practice program. Significant numbers of experienced nurses undertook transition to specialty practice program into intensive care and majority of the participants reported positive results of the program. Copyright © 2017 Australian College of Critical Care Nurses Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. IMPROVING EXPERIMENT DESIGN SKILLS: USING THE JOKO TINGKIR PROGRAM AS A LEARNING TOOL OF TSUNAMI TOPIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madlazim

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Students are rarely given an opportunity to think deeply about experimental design or asked to develop experimental skills on their own. Without participating in these endeavors, they are often unaware of the many decisions necessary to construct a precise methodology. This article describes the Joko Tingkir Program as an Early Warning Tsunami, and how we have used this program as a learning tool for physics teacher candidates to improve their experimental design skills. The Joko Tingkir computer program has implemented a Tsunami Faulting Model (TFM. The TFM uses the principle that the tsunami is affected by the length and width of earthquake rupture. Both can be represented by the duration of rupture (Tdur or Exceed 50 second duration (T50Ex and the dominant period (Td. The TFM has been implemented by the Joko Tingkir computer program. When students are given a simple method using the Joko Tingkir program - such as the tutorial, observation of seismic station distribution, seismograms of the earthquake, equipment and software for this experiment, measurement of P time onset and determination of Tdur, Td and T50Ex - it allows them to focus exclusively on improving experiment design skills as indicated by significantly improved gain scores. Based on the gain analysis it can be inferred that the experiment design skills can be improved by implementation of Joko Tingkir Program as a Learning Tool of Tsunami Warning in the learning process

  6. Reflections on a career and on the history of genetic toxicity testing in the National Toxicology Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiger, Errol

    2017-07-01

    One of the highly visible aspects of the U.S. National Toxicology Program (NTP) has been its genetic toxicity testing program, which has been responsible for testing, and making publicly available, in vitro and in vivo test data on thousands of chemicals since 1979. What is less well known, however, is that this NTP program had its origin in two separate testing programs that were initiated independently at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) before the NTP was established. The NCI program was in response to the 1971 National Cancer Act which dramatically increased the NCI budget. In contrast, the NIEHS testing program can be traced back to a publication by Bruce Ames, not the one describing the mutagenicity assay he developed that became known as the Ames test, but because in 1975 he published an article showing that hair dyes were mutagenic. The protocols developed for these NCI contracts became the basis for the NTP Salmonella testing contracts that were awarded a few years later. These protocols, with their supporting NTP data, strongly influenced the initial in vitro OECD Test Guidelines. The background and evolution of the NTP genetic toxicity testing program is described, along with some of the more significant milestone discoveries and accomplishments from this program. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Understanding Student Experiences in a Near-Peer Resident Shadowing Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon R. Turner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The preparation of medical students for clerkship has been criticized, both in terms of students’ ability to understand their new role as clinical trainees and in their ability to carry out that role. To begin to address this gap, this paper reports the experiences of students in a shadowing program aimed at enhancing the preparedness of medical students for clinical training. The study examined a novel program, the Resident-Medical Student Shadowing Program, in which first-year medical students at the University of Alberta shadowed a first-year resident during clinical duties over the course of eight months. Methods. A study was conducted to assess the experiences of 83 first-year medical student participants who shadowed a first-year resident intermittently for one year. Student and resident participants’ experiences were explored using semistructured interviews. Results. Students and residents experiences indicate that participation increased students’ understanding of the clinical environment and their role within it and introduced them to skills and knowledge needed to perform that role. Students reported that a close relationship with their resident enhanced their learning experience. Conclusion. This study demonstrates that a low-cost program in which first-year students shadow residents may be a useful tool for helping prepare students for clerkship.

  8. A comparison of two programs for the control of behavioral experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, W Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    Two of the most widely used programs for the control of behavioral experiments are Med Associates' MedState Notation and Coulbourn Instruments' Graphic State 2. The two systems vary considerably in their approach to programming and data recording, with Graphic State 2 using a point-and-click interface that appeals to non-programmers while MedState Notation requires the typing of programming code. Graphic State 2 provides many data analysis routines, while MedState Notation allows the user to embed simple data analysis within the behavioral protocol. Graphic State 2 is simpler to use, but MedState Notation is more versatile.

  9. A Comparison of Two Programs for the Control of Behavioral Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, W. Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    Two of the most widely used programs for the control of behavioral experiments are Med Associates? MedState Notation and Coulbourn Instruments? Graphic State 2. The two systems vary considerably in their approach to programming and data recording, with Graphic State 2 using a point-and-click interface that appeals to non-programmers while MedState Notation requires the typing of programming code. Graphic State 2 provides many data analysis routines, while MedState Notation allows the user to ...

  10. [OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE FOR THE PROGRAM FOR THE FORMATION OF HEALTHY LIFESTYLE SKILLS AMONG SCHOOLCHILDREN].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, A V; Tafeeva, E A; Vasilev, V V

    2015-01-01

    In the paper there are presented data concerning the experience of the implementation of educational programs for schoolchildren "Being healthy is fashionable ". The program has been tested in the territory of the Penza Region. The awareness of students about the factors affecting health was shown to increase by 15,8% over three years of the realization of the program. The number of students taking systematic participation in sports competitions has increased by 3.8%, going in for various sports and physical exercises in sports sections and circles has increased by 2.6%. The prevalence of regular smoking among schoolchildren decreased by 4.1%.

  11. [Computer simulation programs as an alternative for classical nerve, muscle and heart experiments using frog tissues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breves, G; Schröder, B

    2000-03-01

    Courses in Physiology include different methodical approaches such as exercises with living animals, experiments using organs or tissues from killed or slaughtered animals, application of diagnostic techniques in humans and theoretical seminars. In addition to these classical approaches computer programs for multimedia simulation of nerve, muscle and heart physiology are now a regular component of courses in Physiology at the School of Veterinary Medicine in Hannover. It is the aim of the present paper to give the first experiences about these new components.

  12. Complementarity of technical skills with art and culture: theoretical reflections, the Talent Show Project experiment at IFRJ – campus Realengo and a proposal for its expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Célia Dantas Pollig

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the theoretical basis I have used to better understand the dimension of the task I intend to accomplish. As Educational Advisor at the Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology of Rio de Janeiro (IFRJ, campus Realengo, my plan is to develop and expand the so called Talent Show Project, by complementing technical training, and providing opportunities for artistic and cultural expression. The study also presents several reflections for achieving the expansion of the scope of the Project intervention, which can become an institutional program developed at IFRJ.

  13. Programming Basics for Beginners. Experience of the Institute of Informatics at Tallinn University of Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Mironova

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The present paper demonstrates the teaching approach in programming basics course for novices: schoolchildren of different ages and schoolteachers. This programming course was developed at the Institute of Informatics at Tallinn University of Technology in Tallinn, Estonia and it based on many years experience in teaching programming for non-IT first year students. The main aim of the chosen teaching approach in the course is to raise the motivation and keep the learners’ interest in programming field on the high level. The idea of developed teaching technique is the implementation of the visual programming before a serious textual coding. Furthermore, authors suggest readers some ways and methods to overcome learners’ difficulties in the first stage in a textual coding.

  14. No departure to "Pandora"? Using critical phenomenology to differentiate "naive" from "reflective" experience in psychiatry and psychosomatic medicine (a comment on Schwartz and Wiggins, 2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlimme, Jann E; Bonnemann, Catharina; Mishara, Aaron L

    2010-10-31

    The mind-body problem lies at the heart of the clinical practice of both psychiatry and psychosomatic medicine. In their recent publication, Schwartz and Wiggins address the question of how to understand life as central to the mind-body problem. Drawing on their own use of the phenomenological method, we propose that the mind-body problem is not resolved by a general, evocative appeal to an all encompassing life-concept, but rather falters precisely at the insurmountable difference between "natural" and a "reflective" experience built into phenomenological method itself. Drawing on the works of phenomenologically oriented thinkers, we describe life as inherently "teleological" without collapsing life with our subjective perspective, or stepping over our epistemological limits. From the phenomenology it can be demonstrated that the hypothetical teleological qualities are a reflective reconstruction modelled on human behavioural structure.

  15. No departure to "Pandora"? Using critical phenomenology to differentiate "naive" from "reflective" experience in psychiatry and psychosomatic medicine (A comment on Schwartz and Wiggins, 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnemann Catharina

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The mind-body problem lies at the heart of the clinical practice of both psychiatry and psychosomatic medicine. In their recent publication, Schwartz and Wiggins address the question of how to understand life as central to the mind-body problem. Drawing on their own use of the phenomenological method, we propose that the mind-body problem is not resolved by a general, evocative appeal to an all encompassing life-concept, but rather falters precisely at the insurmountable difference between "natural" and a "reflective" experience built into phenomenological method itself. Drawing on the works of phenomenologically oriented thinkers, we describe life as inherently "teleological" without collapsing life with our subjective perspective, or stepping over our epistemological limits. From the phenomenology it can be demonstrated that the hypothetical teleological qualities are a reflective reconstruction modelled on human behavioural structure.

  16. No departure to "Pandora"? Using critical phenomenology to differentiate "naive" from "reflective" experience in psychiatry and psychosomatic medicine (A comment on Schwartz and Wiggins, 2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The mind-body problem lies at the heart of the clinical practice of both psychiatry and psychosomatic medicine. In their recent publication, Schwartz and Wiggins address the question of how to understand life as central to the mind-body problem. Drawing on their own use of the phenomenological method, we propose that the mind-body problem is not resolved by a general, evocative appeal to an all encompassing life-concept, but rather falters precisely at the insurmountable difference between "natural" and a "reflective" experience built into phenomenological method itself. Drawing on the works of phenomenologically oriented thinkers, we describe life as inherently "teleological" without collapsing life with our subjective perspective, or stepping over our epistemological limits. From the phenomenology it can be demonstrated that the hypothetical teleological qualities are a reflective reconstruction modelled on human behavioural structure. PMID:21040525

  17. Teaching Explicitly and Reflecting on Elements of Nature of Science: a Discourse-Focused Professional Development Program with Four Fifth-Grade Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piliouras, Panagiotis; Plakitsi, Katerina; Seroglou, Fanny; Papantoniou, Georgia

    2017-06-01

    The nature of science (NOS) has become a central goal of science education in many countries. This study refers to a developmental work research program, in which four fifth-grade elementary in-service teachers participated. It aimed to improve their understandings of NOS and their abilities to teach it effectively to their students. The 1-year-long, 2012-2013, program consisted of a series of activities to support teachers to develop their pedagogical content knowledge of NOS. In order to accomplish our goal, we enabled teacher-researchers to analyze their own discourse practices and to trace evidence of effective NOS teaching. Many studies indicate the importance of examining teachers' discussions about science in the classroom, since it is teachers' understanding of NOS reflected in these discussions that will have a vital impact on students' learning. Our proposal is based on the assumption that reflecting on the ways people form meanings enables us to examine and seek alternative ways to communicate aspects of NOS during science lessons. The analysis of discourse data, which has been carried out with the teacher-researchers' active participation, indicated that initially only a few aspects of NOS were implicitly incorporated in teacher-researchers' instruction. As the program evolved, all teacher-researchers presented more informed views on targeted NOS aspects. On the whole, our discourse-focused professional development program with its participatory, explicit, and reflective character indicated the importance of involving teacher-researchers in analyzing their own talk. It is this involvement that results in obtaining a valuable awareness of aspects concerning pedagogical content knowledge of NOS teaching.

  18. Best-Worst scaling…reflections on presentation, analysis, and lessons learnt from case 3 BWS experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adamsen, Jannie Mia; Rundle-Thiele, Sharyn; Whitty, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Surveys based on Likert scales and similar ratings-based scales continue to dominate market research practice despite their many and well-documented limitations. Key issues of concern for Likert scales include over- or under-reporting depending on the context, and variation in responses based...... on cultural background. Alternatives exist to overcome the inherent weaknesses of these scales. This paper reflects on the Best Worst (BW) Scaling method that we have recently used in eight online studies. In these studies, we employed a novel pictorial approach to capture product preferences for over 3...... do believe the BWS method has a significant potential to improve predictability in market research – the response rate and positive participant feedback speaks for itself....

  19. The influence of specialty training, experience, discussion and reflection on decision making in modern restorative treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alani, A; Bishop, K; Djemal, S

    2011-02-26

    This study was designed to determine the effect of reflection and discussion of a group of dentists with differing backgrounds and qualifications in the management of failed endodontic treatment. During the Dental Pan-Society plenary session (16-17 November 2007) delegates (n = 393) were asked a series of questions on the management of a case with failed endodontic treatment of four maxillary incisors restored with linked crowns in a patient with a high smile line. The case had been previously posted on the conference website in addition to being presented on the day of the forum. Responses of delegates to predetermined questions and options on the management of the case were recorded using closed-circuit devices for each individual delegate. The questions were repeated after the case was opened up for discussion by the delegates in conjunction with a panel of leading experts. The discussion topics included the factors affecting the outcome of secondary root canal treatment, post-extraction changes and the options for prosthetic replacement including the provision of implants in the aesthetic zone. The initial response of the majority (58%) of delegates favoured extraction and prosthetic rehabilitation over endodontic retreatment of the affected teeth. Following the discussion this figure reduced to 50%. In respect to those individuals who were specialists, extraction was again the preferred option before the discussion for periodontists (74%), prosthodontists (64%) and restorative dentists (65%). This was in contrast to endodontists who preferred endodontic retreatment, with only 30% identifying extraction as the treatment of choice. Following the discussion, the number of periodontists and endodontists who favoured extraction reduced by 3% and 5% respectively, whereas the number of prosthodontists and restorative dentistry specialists who preferred extraction increased by 2% and 4% respectively. Reflection and discussion can make individuals reconsider their

  20. Summary of: the influence of specialty training, experience, discussion and reflection on decision making in modern restorative treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngson, C

    2011-02-26

    This study was designed to determine the effect of reflection and discussion of a group of dentists with differing backgrounds and qualifications in the management of failed endodontic treatment. During the Dental Pan-Society plenary session (16-17 November 2007) delegates (n = 393) were asked a series of questions on the management of a case with failed endodontic treatment of four maxillary incisors restored with linked crowns in a patient with a high smile line. The case had been previously posted on the conference website in addition to being presented on the day of the forum. Responses of delegates to predetermined questions and options on the management of the case were recorded using closed-circuit devices for each individual delegate. The questions were repeated after the case was opened up for discussion by the delegates in conjunction with a panel of leading experts. The discussion topics included the factors affecting the outcome of secondary root canal treatment, post-extraction changes and the options for prosthetic replacement including the provision of implants in the aesthetic zone. The initial response of the majority (58%) of delegates favoured extraction and prosthetic rehabilitation over endodontic retreatment of the affected teeth. Following the discussion this figure reduced to 50%. In respect to those individuals who were specialists, extraction was again the preferred option before the discussion for periodontists (74%), prosthodontists (64%) and restorative dentists (65%). This was in contrast to endodontists who preferred endodontic retreatment, with only 30% identifying extraction as the treatment of choice. Following the discussion, the number of periodontists and endodontists who favoured extraction reduced by 3% and 5% respectively, whereas the number of prosthodontists and restorative dentistry specialists who preferred extraction increased by 2% and 4% respectively. Reflection and discussion can make individuals reconsider their

  1. Representation and Student Engagement in Higher Education: A Reflection on the Views and Experiences of Course Representatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Student engagement is increasingly part of higher education rhetoric. It is seen as a means for universities to understand and enhance the student experience. This has been prompted by a number of potentially conflicting factors. These include growing consumerism in higher education, the rise of user involvement and the notion of students as…

  2. Reflecting on Collaborative Research into the Sustainability of Mediterranean Agriculture: A Case Study Using a Systematization of Experiences Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Helena; Fonseca, Cecília; Gonzalez, Carla; Pinto-Correia, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    This article describes how a research institute went about reviewing the relationship between its members and external research partners in engaging in collaborative research. A systematization of experiences (SE) process was implemented to enable such review and draw implications for the institute's strategy regarding research into the…

  3. Hispanic First-Generation Commuter Students at a Private College Reflect on Their Experience through the First Year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurvey, Phyllis C.

    2011-01-01

    A volunteer sample of 16 Hispanic first-generation commuter college students, 9 women and 7 men, 18-30 years of age, attending a private college in the Northeast, were interviewed about their first-year college experience, with an emphasis on issues related to cultural capital and habitus. Five aspects of cultural capital were of interest:…

  4. Integrating scientific knowledge into large-scale restoration programs: the CALFED Bay-Delta Program experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, K.A.; Short, A.

    2009-01-01

    Integrating science into resource management activities is a goal of the CALFED Bay-Delta Program, a multi-agency effort to address water supply reliability, ecological condition, drinking water quality, and levees in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of northern California. Under CALFED, many different strategies were used to integrate science, including interaction between the research and management communities, public dialogues about scientific work, and peer review. This paper explores ways science was (and was not) integrated into CALFED's management actions and decision systems through three narratives describing different patterns of scientific integration and application in CALFED. Though a collaborative process and certain organizational conditions may be necessary for developing new understandings of the system of interest, we find that those factors are not sufficient for translating that knowledge into management actions and decision systems. We suggest that the application of knowledge may be facilitated or hindered by (1) differences in the objectives, approaches, and cultures of scientists operating in the research community and those operating in the management community and (2) other factors external to the collaborative process and organization.

  5. Iowa's public health-based infant oral health program: a decade of experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber-Gasparoni, Karin; Kanellis, Michael J; Qian, Fang

    2010-04-01

    The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends that children have their first dental visit no later than age one. However, not all dental schools have made hands-on infant oral health programs a reality in their predoctoral programs. To target high-caries risk infants/toddlers and provide dental students more hands-on experience with this age group, the University of Iowa Department of Pediatric Dentistry established an Infant Oral Health Program (IOHP) affiliated with the local Special Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) clinic. This article reports the IOHP activities and describes how this program is integrated into a dental school curriculum. Most of the children served were around age one, from racial and ethnic minority groups, and had never been to the dentist. More than 600 fourth-year dental students received hands-on experience providing preventive dental care for infants and toddlers. A 2004 survey of dentists who graduated from the University of Iowa suggested that those who rotated at the IOHP while in dental school were more willing to see very young children when compared to dentists who did not rotate at the IOHP. These findings suggest that community-based IOHPs can provide an important community resource for preventive dental care for high-caries risk young children, while complementing the pediatric dental experience in a dental school curriculum.

  6. Does personal experience affect choice-based preferences for wildfire protection programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armando González-Cabán; Thomas P. Holmes; John B. Loomis; José J. Sánchez

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate homeowner preferences and willingness to pay for wildfire protection programs using a choice experiment with three attributes: risk, loss, and cost. A phone-mail-phone survey was used to collect data from homeowners predominantly living in medium and high wildfire risk communities in Florida. We tested three hypotheses: (1) homeowner...

  7. Learning by Experience in a Standardized Testing Culture: Investigation of a Middle School Experiential Learning Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scogin, Stephen C.; Kruger, Christopher J.; Jekkals, Regan E.; Steinfeldt, Chelsea

    2017-01-01

    Standardized testing pressure sometimes discourages schools from broadly implementing experiential learning opportunities. However, some K-12 schools are challenging the trend with greater commitment to learning by experience. STREAM (science, technology, reading, engineering, arts, mathematics) school is a project-based program providing students…

  8. The Impact of Programming Experience on Successfully Learning Systems Analysis and Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wang-chan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the author reports the results of an empirical study on the relationship between a student's programming experience and their success in a traditional Systems Analysis and Design (SA&D) class where technical skills such as dataflow analysis and entity relationship data modeling are covered. While it is possible to teach these…

  9. Disciplinary Enculturation Experiences of Three Korean Students in U.S.-Based MATESOL Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seonhee

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the disciplinary enculturation experiences of three Korean students in U.S.-based Master of Arts in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (MATESOL) programs. Guided by theories of situated learning (Lave & Wenger, 1991; Wenger, 1998) and social identities (Block, 2007; Clarke, 2008; Norton, 2009), and largely drawn…

  10. Perceptions and Lived Experiences of Illinois Parents as Teachers Program Leaders While Managing a Multigenerational Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhe Marsh, Linda

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative narrative inquiry was to explore the perceptions and lived experiences of Illinois Parents as Teachers (PAT) program leaders managing a multigenerational workforce. Supervisors state that leading a multigenerational staff possesses challenges that affect overall productivity (Bell, 2008). PAT stakeholders including…

  11. Student Experiences of High-Stakes Testing for Progression in One Undergraduate Nursing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClenny, Tammy

    2016-01-01

    High-stakes testing in undergraduate nursing education are those assessments used to make critical decisions for student progression and graduation. The purpose of this study was to explore the different ways students experience multiple high-stakes tests for progression in one undergraduate BSN program. Research participants were prelicensure…

  12. The Effectiveness of an Embedded Approach to Practicum Experiences in Educational Leadership: Program Candidates' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Mary; Chan, Tak Cheung; Jiang, Binbin

    2013-01-01

    This study examined how effective an embedded practicum experience in an educational leadership program in a Southeastern University is in serving the purpose of preparing educational leaders to meet future challenges. Findings of this study confirm practicum areas that met the educational demands and highlight areas that need improvement to…

  13. A Guide for Implementing Project DEEP (Diversified Educational Experiences Program). Administrator's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connett, Jane; Swanson, Monty

    The guide is designed to provide the building level administrator a step by step model for implementing Project DEEP's (Diversified Educational Experiences Program) alternative classroom management system for secondary academic classrooms with disaffected (attendance problems, discipline problems, potential dropouts), average, and gifted and…

  14. Frail older adults' experiences with a proactive, nurse-led primary care program: a qualitative study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleijenberg, N.; Boeije, H.R.; Onderwater, A.T.; Schuurmans, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to explore frail older adults' perceptions and experiences with a proactive, integrated nurse-led primary care program. A qualitative study nested within a randomized trial in primary care was conducted. In total, 11 semistructured interviews were conducted in a

  15. MyCrystals - a simple visual data management program for laboratory-scale crystallization experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvgreen, Monika Nøhr; Løvgreen, Mikkel; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager

    2009-01-01

    MyCrystals is designed as a user-friendly program to display crystal images and list crystallization conditions. The crystallization conditions entry fields can be customized to suit the experiments. MyCrystals is also able to sort the images by the entered crystallization conditions, which...

  16. Creation of the selection list for the Experiment Scheduling Program (ESP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deuermeyer, B. L.; Shannon, R. E.; Underbrink, A. J., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The efforts to develop a procedure to construct selection groups to augment the Experiment Scheduling Program (ESP) are summarized. Included is a User's Guide and a sample scenario to guide in the use of the software system that implements the developed procedures.

  17. Introducing Ethics to Chemistry Students in a "Research Experiences for Undergraduates" (REU) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    A three-day ethics seminar introduced ethics to undergraduate environmental chemistry students in the Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program. The seminar helped students become sensitive to and understand the ethical and values dimensions of their work as researchers. It utilized a variety of resources to supplement lectures and…

  18. Blended Learning Experience of Students Participating Pedagogical Formation Program: Advantages and Limitation of Blended Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltan, Fatih

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the learning experience of students studying pedagogic formation in blended design with regard to attendance, self confidence, and attitudes toward both Pedagogic Formation Program (PFP) and the teaching profession. In order to achieve this aim, a qualitative case study approach was carried out. The…

  19. The Experiences of International Nursing Students in a Baccalaureate Nursing Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanner, Susan; Wilson, Astrid H.; Samson, Linda F.

    2002-01-01

    Eight female Nigerians studying nursing in the United States experienced social isolation, became resolved to acceptance of antagonistic attitudes encountered in the program, and persisted in spite of obstacles. From their experiences, recommendations for the adjustment of international students were developed. (Contains 20 references.) (SK)

  20. A W7-X experiment program editor--A usage driven development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spring, Anett, E-mail: anett.spring@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Teilinstitut Greifswald, Wendelsteinstrasse 1, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Lewerentz, Marc; Bluhm, Torsten [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Teilinstitut Greifswald, Wendelsteinstrasse 1, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Heimann, Peter [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Hennig, Christine; Kuehner, Georg [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Teilinstitut Greifswald, Wendelsteinstrasse 1, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Kroiss, Hugo [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Krom, Johannes G.; Laqua, Heike [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Teilinstitut Greifswald, Wendelsteinstrasse 1, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Maier, Josef [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Riemann, Heike; Schacht, Joerg; Werner, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Teilinstitut Greifswald, Wendelsteinstrasse 1, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Zilker, Manfred [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    The set-up of experiment programs for the complex fusion device Wendelstein 7-X has to define a multitude of parameters which have to obey large number of rules arising from physics and technical constraints. Since this is hard to automate as long as the dependencies are not known sufficiently, the W7-X CoDaC team decided to implement an editor following a constructive approach: starting from an established experiment program the user is able to modify parts of it - thus complying the usual workflow of experimenters. Already the very first implementation has been deployed at the W7-X CoDaC prototype, the WEGA stellarator. Driven by agile programming principles the weighting of the requirements has been influenced by the editor usage in the daily experiment routine, thus ensuring client-oriented development steps and short release cycles. At present, a stable program editor implementation with graphical preview, immediate feedback on user actions and instantaneous warnings about incorrect settings is under continuous operation at the CoDaC prototype. It has potential to improve together with growing knowledge about the physical and technical constraints. The experiences gained give certainty that the editor is suitable for future use during the start-up phase and the first years of W7-X operation.

  1. Understanding the Experience of Women in Undergraduate Engineering Programs at Public Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Jessica Ohanian

    2017-01-01

    Women earn bachelor's degrees in engineering at a rate of less than 17% at public universities in California. The purpose of this study was to understand how women experience undergraduate engineering programs at public universities. To understand this lack of attainment, a qualitative methodology and Feminist Poststructuralist perspective were…

  2. The effect of personal experience on choice-based preferences for wildfire protection programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tom Holmes; Armando Gonzalez-Caban; John Loomis; Jose Sanchez

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate homeowner preferences and willingness to pay for wildfire protection programs using a choice experiment with three attributes: risk, loss and cost. Preference heterogeneity among survey respondents was examined using three econometric models and risk preferences were evaluated by comparing willingness to pay for wildfire protection...

  3. POBE: A Computer Program for Optimal Design of Multi-Subject Blocked fMRI Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bärbel Maus

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI studies, researchers can use multi-subject blocked designs to identify active brain regions for a certain stimulus type of interest. Before performing such an experiment, careful planning is necessary to obtain efficient stimulus effect estimators within the available financial resources. The optimal number of subjects and the optimal scanning time for a multi-subject blocked design with fixed experimental costs can be determined using optimal design methods. In this paper, the user-friendly computer program POBE 1.2 (program for optimal design of blocked experiments, version 1.2 is presented. POBE provides a graphical user interface for fMRI researchers to easily and efficiently design their experiments. The computer program POBE calculates the optimal number of subjects and the optimal scanning time for user specified experimental factors and model parameters so that the statistical efficiency is maximised for a given study budget. POBE can also be used to determine the minimum budget for a given power. Furthermore, a maximin design can be determined as efficient design for a possible range of values for the unknown model parameters. In this paper, the computer program is described and illustrated with typical experimental factors for a blocked fMRI experiment.

  4. Schools' Responses to Voucher Policy: Participation Decisions and Early Implementation Experiences in the Indiana Choice Scholarship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Megan J.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the supply side of voucher programs, despite schools' central role in program effectiveness. Using survey and interview data on the Indiana Choice Scholarship Program (ICSP), I analyze schools' participation decisions and early implementation experiences to understand better how schools respond to program regulations. I find…

  5. Development and feasibility of a mobile experience sampling application for tracking program implementation in youth well-being programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, TanChyuan; Rickard, Nikki S; Vella-Brodrick, Dianne A

    Well-being program evaluations mostly focus on identifying effective outcomes rather than measuring the actual extent to which program participants may apply learned skills in subsequent everyday lives. This study examined the feasibility of using a newly developed mobile experience sampling app called Wuzzup to study program implementation in young people participating in well-being programs. Ninety-six participants (60 females; 36 males) between the ages of 13 and 15 years (M = 13.87, SD = 0.71) were recruited to respond to two random prompts each day, for 7 days, at each of the three data collection time-points. Responses from 69 participants (72 % of initial sample) that met study criteria were retained for analysis. The average response rate was 92.89 %, with an average of 85.92 s to complete each ESM survey. Significant associations between first and second halves of the ESM week, and their respective positive affect and negative affect survey responses, demonstrate internal reliability and construct validity of the Wuzzup app to capture momentary affect and activation states of young people. This study also demonstrated the feasibility and practical utility of the Wuzzup app to profile and track an individual's learning over time.

  6. Conceptual Reflections on Ethics for International Research Collaborations in Disaster Impacted Areas from the Experiences in Indonesia, New Zealand and Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Gomez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The present contribution is by no means a first attempt at considering the ethics in human activities, interactions in disaster impacted areas, but it is more the case of looking at 'international research' that present a very particular difficulty for ethics: the notion of trans-boundary, multi-dimensional idea of one group not really belonging within another, but which will perform functions inside this second group and eventually alter, modify some of the original organs. This paper explain the reflections of the ethical consideration of international research collaboration in disaster impacted areas which are emerged from the experiences in Indonesia, New Zealand and Japan.

  7. MCTP Summer Research Internship Program. Research Presentation Day: Experience Mathematics and Science in the Real World

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the summaries of the MCTP Summer Research Internship Program. Technological areas discussed include: Mathematical curriculum development for real world problems; Rain effects on air-water gas exchange; multi-ring impact basins on mars; developing an interactive multimedia educational cd-rom on remote sensing; a pilot of an activity for for the globe program; fossils in maryland; developing children's programming for the american horticultural society at river farm; children's learning, educational programs of the national park service; a study of climate and student satisfaction in two summer programs for disadvantaged students interested in careers in mathematics and science; the maryland governor's academy, integrating technology into the classroom; stream sampling with the maryland biological stream survey (MBSS); the imaging system inspection software technology, the preparation and detection of nominal and faulted steel ingots; event-based science, the development of real-world science units; correlation between anxiety and past experiences; environmental education through summer nature camp; enhancing learning opportunities at the Salisbury zoo; plant growth experiment, a module for the middle school classroom; the effects of proxisome proliferators in Japanese medaka embryos; development of a chapter on birth control and contraceptive methodologies as part of an interactive computer-based education module on hiv and aids; excretion of gentamicin in toadfish and goldfish; the renaissance summer program; and Are field trips important to the regional math science center?

  8. Early Experience with a Brief, Multimodal, Multidisciplinary Treatment Program for Fibromyalgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Ann; Whipple, Mary O.; Oh, Terry H.; Guderian, Janet A.; Barton, Debra L.; Luedtke, Connie A.

    2014-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a complex, heterogeneous disorder for which a multidisciplinary individualized approach is currently advocated. We executed a 1 week multidisciplinary fibromyalgia clinical program with 7 patients, based on our previous experience with our existing 1.5 day multidisciplinary fibromyalgia program that has demonstrated both short- and long-term benefits. The current expanded program was not designed as a clinical study, but rather as a clinical feasibility assessment and was multidisciplinary in nature, with cognitive behavioral therapy, activity pacing and graded exercise therapy as major components. We assessed changes in individual patients at 1 week and 3 months following the program utilizing validated self-report measures of pain, fatigue, and self-efficacy. All patients indicated at least small improvements in pain and physical symptoms both at 1 week and 3 months and all but one patient showed improvement in self-efficacy at 1 week and 3 months. Similar trends were observed for fatigue. Based on our early clinical experience, we conclude that the 1 week multidisciplinary fibromyalgia program is logistically feasible and has potential for clinical efficacy. Further research is needed and is planned to test the clinical efficacy of this program and compare it with other interventions. PMID:24315246

  9. "Understanding my ALS". Experiences and reflections of persons with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and relatives on participation in peer group rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Louise Sofia; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Handberg, Charlotte

    2018-01-01

    rehabilitation for persons with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and relatives indicates that programme participation leads to positive experiences in terms of living a shared meaningful life despite severe disability. The findings may guide practice to develop longitudinal peer group rehabilitation programmes...... with joint inclusion of persons with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and relatives. Implications for Rehabilitation Peer group rehabilitation may facilitate an increased and personalised understanding of what it means to live with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. A programme design with six months of sequential...

  10. Informed Practice: Students' Clinical Experiences in the Undergraduate Phase of an Accelerated Physician Assistant Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereczyk, Amy; DeWitt, Rachel

    2016-06-01

    This qualitative study explored the clinical experiences of students in an accelerated physician assistant (PA) program. The participants were either certified nursing assistants (CNAs) or emergency medical technicians-basic (EMTs-B). The study was designed to elicit (1) how the participants perceived their older patients and (2) how the participants' experiences might affect their own future communications, bedside manner, and clinical preparedness as PAs. This study used a focus group to explore students' clinical experiences before the graduate phase of their accelerated PA program. Five female and 2 male PA students (N = 7) participated in the study. All participants were 23 years old and worked as either a CNA or an EMT-B. Results fell into 2 basic themes: informing practice and forming relationships. Regarding the first theme, participants felt that their experience as entry-level health care providers allowed them to improve their communication skills and bedside manner and to provide greater comfort to patients. Regarding the second theme, participants gained appreciation for older people and began to recognize the knowledge deficits and learning needs of their patients. The results suggested that a student's clinical experience as a CNA or an EMT-B before entering a PA program has a positive effect on the student's personal and professional development. The participants acquired greater appreciation and respect for older patients and members of the health care team.

  11. Three Women’s Educational Doctoral Program Experiences: A Case Study of Performances and Journeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Goodykoontz

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Three academic women joined to write this piece to explore individual doctoral program experiences and to establish common understandings. They collectively analyzed their experiences using the conceptual approach of doctoral program performances and journeys. This case study shares their experiences within the conceptual approach through emerging themes. The common understandings developed herein about doctoral education based on these themes are also shared. The broader contributions of the three women’s work are two-fold. First, the entire case study provides a way to view, discuss, and consider women’s doctoral education pluralistically. Secondly, perhaps readers of this piece will recognize that individual and common understandings with others are a way to develop professional knowledge as academics. Further, readers of this piece might be able to relate more deeply to their own and others’ unique doctoral program experiences through the lens of performances or journeys. Some of these connections might be based on the overarching framework, while others might be specific to the shared women’s experiences.

  12. Consciousness across Sleep and Wake: Discontinuity and Continuity of Memory Experiences As a Reflection of Consolidation Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline L. Horton

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The continuity hypothesis (1 posits that there is continuity, of some form, between waking and dreaming mentation. A recent body of work has provided convincing evidence for different aspects of continuity, for instance that some salient experiences from waking life seem to feature in dreams over others, with a particular role for emotional arousal as accompanying these experiences, both during waking and while asleep. However, discontinuities have been somewhat dismissed as being either a product of activation-synthesis, an error within the consciousness binding process during sleep, a methodological anomaly, or simply as yet unexplained. This paper presents an overview of discontinuity within dreaming and waking cognition, arguing that disruptions of consciousness are as common a feature of waking cognition as of dreaming cognition, and that processes of sleep-dependent memory consolidation of autobiographical experiences can in part account for some of the discontinuities of sleeping cognition in a functional way. By drawing upon evidence of the incorporation, fragmentation, and reorganization of memories within dreams, this paper proposes a model of discontinuity whereby the fragmentation of autobiographical and episodic memories during sleep, as part of the consolidation process, render salient aspects of those memories subsequently available for retrieval in isolation from their contextual features. As such discontinuity of consciousness in sleep is functional and normal.

  13. Non-Constant Learning Rates in Retrospective Experience Curve Analyses and their Correlation to Deployment Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Max [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Smith, Sarah J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sohn, Michael D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-07-16

    A key challenge for policy-makers and technology market forecasters is to estimate future technology costs and in particular the rate of cost reduction versus production volume. A related, critical question is what role should state and federal governments have in advancing energy efficient and renewable energy technologies? This work provides retrospective experience curves and learning rates for several energy-related technologies, each of which have a known history of federal and state deployment programs. We derive learning rates for eight technologies including energy efficient lighting technologies, stationary fuel cell systems, and residential solar photovoltaics, and provide an overview and timeline of historical deployment programs such as state and federal standards and state and national incentive programs for each technology. Piecewise linear regimes are observed in a range of technology experience curves, and public investments or deployment programs are found to be strongly correlated to an increase in learning rate across multiple technologies. A downward bend in the experience curve is found in 5 out of the 8 energy-related technologies presented here (electronic ballasts, magnetic ballasts, compact fluorescent lighting, general service fluorescent lighting, and the installed cost of solar PV). In each of the five downward-bending experience curves, we believe that an increase in the learning rate can be linked to deployment programs to some degree. This work sheds light on the endogenous versus exogenous contributions to technological innovation and highlights the impact of exogenous government sponsored deployment programs. This work can inform future policy investment direction and can shed light on market transformation and technology learning behavior.

  14. Space Shuttle Program (SSP) Shock Test and Specification Experience for Reusable Flight Hardware Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Curtis E.

    2012-01-01

    As commercial companies are nearing a preliminary design review level of design maturity, several companies are identifying the process for qualifying their multi-use electrical and mechanical components for various shock environments, including pyrotechnic, mortar firing, and water impact. The experience in quantifying the environments consists primarily of recommendations from Military Standard-1540, Product Verification Requirement for Launch, Upper Stage, and Space Vehicles. Therefore, the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) formed a team of NASA shock experts to share the NASA experience with qualifying hardware for the Space Shuttle Program (SSP) and other applicable programs and projects. Several team teleconferences were held to discuss past experience and to share ideas of possible methods for qualifying components for multiple missions. This document contains the information compiled from the discussions

  15. A sociodrama: an innovative program engaging college students to learn and self-reflect about alcohol use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haleem, Diane M; Winters, Justin

    2011-08-01

    A sociodrama addressing college drinking.   This article reports on the development, production, and evaluation of an innovative sociodrama addressing college drinking mental health professionals caring for students who drink at levels that cause negative consequences can use techniques addressed in the sociodrama to help students self-reflect on their alcohol use. The goal is to help students make healthy choices to decrease the negative consequences as a result of drinking. A script for the sociodrama was developed and five students acted out the sociodrama. A facilitator engaged the audience of college students, at scripted pauses, during the production to reflect on the scenes presented. The purpose of the sociodrama is to foster a discussion, to aid in student understanding concerning college drinking, to have students consider and commit to use harm reduction techniques, to access resources, and to correct misperceptions about drinking. The sociodrama format can help address communication challenges, problem solving, and self-awareness. Pre- and post-surveys were administered to test commitment to use harm reduction techniques, assess the perception of a student's own drinking pattern to the perception of their fellow student colleague drinking, assess the student use of resources, and assess the effectiveness of the sociodrama as a means of learning. This research was Institutional Review Board approved. Over 41% of students reported not consuming alcohol the last time they partied or socialized yet reported only 3.8% of their students colleagues did not consume alcohol. Most students (94%) reported that drinking five or more drinks would place them at risk as opposed to estimating that the same amount would put fewer students at risk (75%). Students significantly increased their commitment to use harm reduction techniques. A sociodrama is an effective method of involving students in discussions about college drinking and engaging them in conversation and

  16. Experience of health-system pharmacy administration residents in a longitudinal human resource management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amerine, Lindsey B Poppe; Granko, Robert P; Savage, Scott W; Daniels, Rowell; Eckel, Stephen F

    2014-12-15

    The experience of health-system pharmacy administration (HSPA) residents in a longitudinal human resource (HR) management program is described. The subsequent benefits to the residents, department, and profession are also discussed. Postgraduate year 2 HSPA residents at an academic medical center desired more responsibility for managing an operational area. To this end, a program was created in which these residents directly manage a small group of pharmacy technicians and report to a clinical manager or assistant director with oversight responsibility. These "resident managers" are responsible, under the direction of the area's clinical manager, for the personnel, schedule, time and attendance, and HR activities of the area. Resident managers have led and sustained operational improvement projects in their areas. In addition to providing learning experiences to residents, the HSPA residency program has also improved the operations of the areas in which these residents work. Benefits to the residents include conducting annual performance evaluations for employees with whom they have a relationship as it is a task every administrator completes. Resident managers at UNC have consistently stated that this longitudinal HR experience is one of the most rewarding and most challenging experiences offered in the two-year HSPA residency. The involvement of HSPA residents in longitudinal management responsibilities furthers residents' leadership success by providing trained managers who are ready to immerse themselves into practice postresidency, having employee engagement and HR skills as well as experiences with leading operational improvements. A longitudinal HR management experience was successfully incorporated into an HSPA residency combined Master of Science degree program. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Providing International Research Experiences in Water Resources Through a Distributed REU Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, J.; Sahrawat, K.; Mylavarapu, R.

    2012-12-01

    Research experiences for undergraduates offer training in problem solving and critical thinking via hands-on projects. The goal of the distributed Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) Program in the Agricultural and Biological Engineering Department (ABE) at the University of Florida (UF) is to provide undergraduate students a unique opportunity to conduct research in water resources using interdisciplinary approaches, integrating research and extension, while the cohort is not co-located. The eight-week REU Program utilizes the extensive infrastructure of UF - Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) through the Research and Education Centers (RECs). To provide international research and extension experience, two students were located at the International Crop Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), in India. Prior to the beginning of the Program, the students worked closely with their research mentors at University of Florida and ICRISAT to develop a project plan for understanding the water quality issues in two watersheds. The students were co-located during the Orientation week at the University of Florida. During the Program, they achieved an enriching cohort experience through social networking, daily blogs, and weekly video conferences to share their research and other REU experiences. The group meetings and guest lectures are conducted via synchronously through video conferencing. The students who were distributed across Florida benefited from the research experiences of the students who were located in India, as their project progressed. They described their challenges and achievements during the group meetings and in the blogs. This model of providing integrated research and extension opportunities in hydrology where not all the REU participants are physically co-located, is unique and can be extended to other disciplines.

  18. Grounding Adult Education Research in Rural Areas : Reflections on the Development of a Research Program at the University of Limpopo in South Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeelen, Jacques; Rampedi, Makgwana; van der Linden, Josje

    Mission statements of universities in developing countries usually include serving the surrounding communities. Often this service does not reach beyond lip service. This article puts into context the experience of developing an adult education research program responding to the needs of the

  19. Students' reflections on the relationships between safe learning environments, learning challenge and positive experiences of learning in a simulated GP clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, J E; Williamson, M I; Egan, T G

    2016-03-01

    Learning environments are a significant determinant of student behaviour, achievement and satisfaction. In this article we use students' reflective essays to identify key features of the learning environment that contributed to positive and transformative learning experiences. We explore the relationships between these features, the students' sense of safety in the learning environment (LE), the resulting learning challenge with which they could cope and their positive reports of the experience itself. Our students worked in a unique simulation of General Practice, the Safe and Effective Clinical Outcomes clinic, where they consistently reported positive experiences of learning. We analysed 77 essays from 2011 and 2012 using an immersion/crystallisation framework. Half of the students referred to the safety of the learning environment spontaneously. Students described deep learning experiences in their simulated consultations. Students valued features of the LE which contributed to a psychologically safe environment. Together with the provision of constructive support and immediate, individualised feedback this feeling of safety assisted students to find their own way through clinical dilemmas. These factors combine to make students feel relaxed and able to take on challenges that otherwise would have been overwhelming. Errors became learning opportunities and students could practice purposefully. We draw on literature from medical education, educational psychology and sociology to interpret our findings. Our results demonstrate relationships between safe learning environments, learning challenge and powerful learning experiences, justifying close attention to the construction of learning environments to promote student learning, confidence and motivation.

  20. [Social cohesion as a basis for health-equity- oriented public policies: reflections from the EUROsociAL program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrelli, Rita Maria

    2015-10-01

    EUROsociAL is a European Union program for social cohesion in Latin America. The main objective of this essay is to present the conceptual elements underpinning the activities of the EUROsociAL program in the health thematic area, with special attention to their equity aspects. It considers the concepts of social cohesion, equity in health, and the relationship between the two in EUROsociAL, and addresses monitoring of equity in health as a basis of action toward improvement focusing on social determinants of health.

  1. PyGaze: An open-source, cross-platform toolbox for minimal-effort programming of eyetracking experiments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dalmaijer, Edwin S; Mathôt, Sebastiaan; Van der Stigchel, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    .... It is designed for creating eyetracking experiments in Python syntax with the least possible effort, and it offers programming ease and script readability without constraining functionality and flexibility...

  2. A human papillomavirus public vaccination program in Taiwan: The Kinmen County experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Chih Lee

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In Taiwan, cervical cancer is ranked sixth among all causes of death in women. With the goal of reducing the incidence of cervical cancer, the Kinmen County Health Bureau planned to implement a pilot human papillomavirus (HPV vaccination program in 2007. The Bureau established a committee to promote public awareness, coordinate with the schools, arrange for the administration of the vaccine, establish a vaccination registry, and develop a plan for follow-up and assessment. Vaccination for female residents aged 16–18 began through a school-based program in 2008. A total of 1633 girls completed the vaccination protocol within 3 years, and vaccine uptake rates of over 90% were achieved by 2010. No serious adverse events were reported among those who were vaccinated. The experience gained from the Kinmen County HPV vaccination program has helped and will continue to help establish an operational model for similar programs throughout the country.

  3. Towards program theory validation: Crowdsourcing the qualitative analysis of participant experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harman, Elena; Azzam, Tarek

    2018-02-01

    This exploratory study examines a novel tool for validating program theory through crowdsourced qualitative analysis. It combines a quantitative pattern matching framework traditionally used in theory-driven evaluation with crowdsourcing to analyze qualitative interview data. A sample of crowdsourced participants are asked to read an interview transcript and identify whether program theory components (Activities and Outcomes) are discussed and to highlight the most relevant passage about that component. The findings indicate that using crowdsourcing to analyze qualitative data can differentiate between program theory components that are supported by a participant's experience and those that are not. This approach expands the range of tools available to validate program theory using qualitative data, thus strengthening the theory-driven approach. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Assessment of a Multinational Online Faculty Development Program on Online Teaching: Reflections of Candidate E-Tutors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnan, Muge; Kalelioglu, Filiz; Gulbahar, Yasemin

    2017-01-01

    Teaching online requires different skills, roles and competencies for online instructors compared to teaching in traditional learning environments. Universities should offer ongoing support in various forms to help academic staff through their online journey. This paper provides insights into a multinational faculty development program for…

  5. Pre-Service Teachers' Reflections: The Influence of School 1:1 Laptop Programs on Their Developing Teaching Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackley, Susan; Walker, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    Throughout Australia, many government and non-government schools have implemented a one-laptop-per-student (1:1) policy. Whilst there was initial interest in the implementation of these programs, little has been done to track the uptake of digital learning technologies afforded by access to the laptops. This study examined pre-service teachers'…

  6. ASSESSMENT OF A MULTINATIONAL ONLINE FACULTY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM ON ONLINE TEACHING: REFLECTIONS OF CANDIDATE E-TUTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muge ADNAN

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Teaching online requires different skills, roles and competencies for online instructors compared to teaching in traditional learning environments. Universities should offer ongoing support in various forms to help academic staff through their online journey. This paper provides insights into a multinational faculty development program for teaching online, elaborating on results of expectancy and satisfaction surveys. From a local program to a subproject within the Swiss National Science Foundation Project Scopes, e-Tutor aimed at expanding competencies in online lecturing and providing OER material for training colleagues. Designed in the form of a descriptive case study, this research was conducted with 34 attendees of e-Tutor. Data was collected using an e-learning readiness and expectancy questionnaire, and open-ended questions after the program to measure satisfaction. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the survey data and content analysis for open-ended data. Participants considered e-Tutor a well-planned and targeted program with good theoretical and practical balance. Duration of such courses, opportunities for adaptation to real-life situations, and localization of the content are areas to be explored further. For future studies, it would also be interesting to see whether participants can apply their newly acquired knowledge and skills to create efficient online learning environments.

  7. A phenomenographic study of students' experiences with transition from pre-college engineering programs to first-year engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzman, Noah

    Recent national dialogues on the importance of preparing more students for careers in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics has driven the development of formal and informal learning opportunities for children and adolescents to explore engineering. Despite the growth of these programs, relatively little research exists on how participation in these programs affects students who choose to pursue further study in engineering. The present study addressed this gap through an exploration of the different ways that First-Year Engineering students experience the transition from pre-college engineering to undergraduate engineering studies. Given the focus of this research on students' experiences, phenomenography was chosen to explore the phenomenon of transition from pre-college to first-year engineering at a large, public Midwestern university. This facilitated understanding the range of variation in the ways that students experienced this transition. Twenty-two students with different amounts of participation in a variety of different engineering programs were selected to be interviewed using a purposeful maximum variation sampling strategy. The interviews were guided by a semi-structured interview protocol that encouraged the participants to reflect on their pre-college engineering experiences, their experiences in First-Year Engineering, and the transition between the two domains. The interviews were analyzed using phenomenographic methods to develop an outcome space consisting of five qualitatively different but related ways of experiencing the transition from pre-college to First-Year Engineering. These categories of description included Foreclosure, Frustration, Tedium, Connection, and Engaging Others. With the exception of the first category which was characterized by a lack of passion and commitment to engineering, the remaining four categories formed a hierarchical relationship representing increasing integration in First-Year Engineering. The

  8. Do case-generic measures of queue performance for bypass surgery accurately reflect the waiting-list experiences of those most urgent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burstein, Jason; Lee, Douglas S; Alter, David A

    2006-02-01

    Queue performance is typically assessed using generic measures, which capture the queue in aggregate. The objective of this study was to examine whether case-generic measures of queue performance appropriately reflected the waiting-list experiences of those patients with greatest disease severity. We examined the queue for isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) in Ontario between April 1993 and March 2000 using data obtained from the Cardiac Care Network. Our primary measure of queue performance was the proportion of patients who received their bypass surgery within their recommended maximum waiting times (%RMWTs) in any given month. We compared case-generic measures of queue performance to case-specific measures of queue performance stratified by urgency level. The queue was largely comprised of elective cases ranging from 73% (1993) to 57%(1999). Urgent patients comprised the minority of the queue ranging from 14% (1993) to 20% (1999). Case-generic month-to-month variations in the percentage of cases completed within RMWTs (an aggregated waiting list measure encompassing the characteristics of all patients in the queue) closely resembled the experiences of elective patients (R2 = 0.81), but conversely, bore little relationship to the waiting-list experiences of those most urgent (R2 = 0.15). Case-generic measures of queue performance for bypass surgery in Ontario were not reflective of the waiting-list experiences of those most urgent. Our results reinforce the concept that urgency-specific waiting list monitoring systems are required to best evaluate and appropriately respond to fluctuations in queue performance.

  9. Immigrant patients' experiences and reflections pertaining to the consultation: a study on patients from Chile, Iran and Turkey in primary health care in Stockholm, Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiking, Eivor; Saleh-Stattin, Nuha; Johansson, Sven-Erik; Sundquist, Jan

    2009-06-01

    Our knowledge of the immigrant patient's experiences and reflections regarding consultations in primary health care where interpreters are used is limited. Thus, the primary aim was to explore these experiences and reflections. The second aim was to study whether demographic and migration-related factors are associated with the patient's satisfaction with the consultation and feeling of consolation given by the general practitioner (GP). The third aim was to analyse whether these feelings are related to the time from the booking to the consultation, to self-reported health, symptoms and the patient's experiences. A questionnaire was distributed to 78 consecutive immigrant patients from Chile, Iran and Turkey at 12 primary healthcare centres around Stockholm. The respondents were asked about their background and health status, while open-ended questions focused on their experiences and comments regarding the consultation and cross-cultural communication in general. Ethical approval was obtained. The respondents consisted of 52 patients, 16 from Chile, nine from Iran and 27 from Turkey. Most of the answers concerned communication problems because of language and cultural differences between the GP and the patient and the GP's ability to listen. Therefore, the importance of having a competent interpreter for a satisfactory consultation was stressed. Many of the respondents also felt that the GP's ability to listen to them and understand them is crucial in the consultation. Background facts, including demographic and migration-related factors, health status and factors related to the consultation, did not seem to be associated with the patient's satisfaction and the feeling of consolation. One limitation is that the sample is small and not equally distributed. The use of authorized interpreters during the consultation is essential. The consultation must be based on a patient-centred strategy and adjusted to the patient's educational level. Cultural competence is needed

  10. Strengthening participation by young women sex workers in HIV programs: reflections on a study from Bangkok, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, Cath; Modderman, Kristel; Nayar, Shoba

    2017-01-01

    Participation is an accepted means of increasing the effectiveness of public health programs, and as such, it is considered an important component of HIV interventions targeting at-risk youth. The situation of young women sex workers in Thailand is alarming on many fronts, including that of HIV risk. As a result, HIV programs in Thailand are the key interventions undertaken in relation to young women sex workers' health. A small-scale study used semistructured interviews to explore the participation reports of five young women sex workers, as well as the related views of two community support workers, who lived and worked in Bangkok, Thailand. This study is considered in the light of current research on - as well as new opportunities and challenges offered for - participation by vulnerable groups in the context of digital society. Thematic analysis of the interview data identified barriers to participation, including the illegality of sex work, fear, and lack of trust of the authorities, as well as widespread social stigma. Such barriers resulted in young women seeking anonymity. Yet, promisingly, young women positioned themselves as experts; they are involved in peer education and are supportive of greater involvement in HIV programs, such as further educational initiatives and collective actions. There is a need for a more empowerment-oriented participation practice positioning young women sex workers as expert educators and codecision makers within a model of participation that is also accountable, such as including young women as members of program boards. Beyond current norms, there are new opportunities emerging because of the increasing availability of smartphone/Internet technology. These can support activist and codesign participation by young women sex workers in HIV programs. However, any developments in participation must maximize opportunities carefully, taking into consideration the difficult social environment faced by young women sex workers as well

  11. Theoretical Perspectives on Critical Thinking Teaching: Reflections from Field Experiences from a Norwegian Lower Secondary School in Comparison to Tanzanian Secondary School Teaching Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leatitia Gabriel Mashaza

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the theoretical perspectives relevant to critical thinking as my topic of research during my teaching practice period which was conducted from 12th -28th October 2015 at Eidsvag secondary school in Bergen, Norway. As a requirement for Masters’ degree in social science education, all master students were required to engage in teaching practice in different Norwegian primary and secondary schools. Importantly, every student teacher was given a topic of concentration as a mini-research for the whole teaching practice period. My topic of research focused at exploring and gaining the theoretical and practical perspectives on critical thinking teaching by drawing some experiences from a Norwegian lower secondary school (Eidsvag skole in reflection to secondary school teaching practice experiences in Tanzania. Therefore, in this paper, my reflections with regard to the conditions favoring the possibility for critical thinking teaching and how it was enhanced by teachers at my practice school will be discussed. Further to that, I will also present the observed challenges of which, in my view, in way or another intervened the possibility for effective critical thinking teaching to take place.

  12. Authentic Astronomy Research Experiences for Teachers: The NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program (NITARP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebull, L. M.; Gorjian, V.; Squires, G.; Nitarp Team

    2012-08-01

    How many times have you gotten a question from the general public, or read a news story, and concluded that "they just don't understand how real science works?" One really good way to get the word out about how science works is to have more people experience the process of scientific research. Since 2004, the way we have chosen to do this is to provide authentic research experiences for teachers using real data (the program used to be called the Spitzer Teacher Program for Teachers and Students, which in 2009 was rechristened the NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program, or NITARP). We partner small groups of teachers with a mentor astronomer, they do research as a team, write up a poster, and present it at an American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting. The teachers incorporate this experience into their classroom, and their experiences color their teaching for years to come, influencing hundreds of students per teacher. This program differs from other similar programs in several important ways. First, each team works on an original, unique project. There are no canned labs here! Second, each team presents their results in posters at the AAS, in science sessions (not outreach sessions). The posters are distributed throughout the meeting, in amongst other researchers' work; the participants are not "given a free pass" because they are teachers. Finally, the "product" of this project is the scientific result, not any sort of curriculum packet. The teachers adapt their project to their classroom environment, and we change the way they think about science and scientists.

  13. Family carers’ experiences of attending a multicomponent psychosocial intervention program for carers and persons with dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannessen, Aud; Bruvik, Frøydis Kristine; Hauge, Solveig

    2015-01-01

    Background Psychosocial interventions for persons with dementia and their primary family carers are promising approaches to reducing the challenges associated with care, but, obtaining significant outcomes may be difficult. Even though carers in general are satisfied with such interventions, few studies have evaluated the interventions by means of qualitative methods. Aim The objective of the study reported here was to investigate family carers’ experiences of a multicomponent psychosocial intervention program, and also to offer advice on how to develop the intervention program. Methods Content analyses were taken from individual qualitative interviews conducted in 2012 with 20 carers (aged 50–82 years) who participated in a psychosocial intervention program that included education, individual and family counseling, and parallel group sessions for carers and persons with dementia. Results Two main categories emerged: 1) benefits of the intervention program, which sets out the informants’ experiences for the benefits of participation, described in the subcategories “importance of content and group organization” and “importance of social support”; and 2) missing content in the intervention program, which details the informants’ suggestions for future interventions, contained in the subcategories “need for extended content” and “need for new group organization”. Conclusion The carers found the interventions useful. The importance of even earlier and more flexible interventions for the family carers, the extended family, and the persons with dementia was underscored. PMID:25709469

  14. Family carers' experiences of attending a multicomponent psychosocial intervention program for carers and persons with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannessen, Aud; Bruvik, Frøydis Kristine; Hauge, Solveig

    2015-01-01

    Psychosocial interventions for persons with dementia and their primary family carers are promising approaches to reducing the challenges associated with care, but, obtaining significant outcomes may be difficult. Even though carers in general are satisfied with such interventions, few studies have evaluated the interventions by means of qualitative methods. The objective of the study reported here was to investigate family carers' experiences of a multicomponent psychosocial intervention program, and also to offer advice on how to develop the intervention program. Content analyses were taken from individual qualitative interviews conducted in 2012 with 20 carers (aged 50-82 years) who participated in a psychosocial intervention program that included education, individual and family counseling, and parallel group sessions for carers and persons with dementia. Two main categories emerged: 1) benefits of the intervention program, which sets out the informants' experiences for the benefits of participation, described in the subcategories "importance of content and group organization" and "importance of social support"; and 2) missing content in the intervention program, which details the informants' suggestions for future interventions, contained in the subcategories "need for extended content" and "need for new group organization". The carers found the interventions useful. The importance of even earlier and more flexible interventions for the family carers, the extended family, and the persons with dementia was underscored.

  15. From the board of the bank: sorne experiences and reflections En la Junta del Banco: algunas experiencias y reflexiones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flórez Enciso Luis Bernardo

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents some interesting and polemical reflections about the Central Bank, the degree of credibility of its policies, the setting of goals in matters of monetary and exchange rate policy, the use of available instruments, and the trade-off between inflation and unemployment. For the author, autonomy is a necessary but not sufficient condition for achieving a lower rate of inflation. The struggle against inflation requires a large degree of social support, coordination between all the economic institutions of the State, and the responsibility of private institutions. The problem of dynamic inconsistency between credibility and results would be resolved when there is recogni tion of the superiori ty of an adjustable rule, in which credibility would be the result of a dynamic process of mutual teaching and learning between economic agents and the Central Bank, and in which economic policy instruments achieve a greater stability beca use a short term vision is transcended.En este artículo se presentan interesantes y polémicas reflexiones sobre la autonomía del Banco Central, el grado de credibilidad de sus políticas, la fijación de metas en materia de de política monetaria y cambiaria, el uso de instrumentos disponibles y el trade-off entre la inflación y el desempleo. Para el autor, la autonomía es una condición necesaria pero no suficiente para lograr una menor tasa de inflación. La lucha contra la inflación requiere de un gran respaldo social, de la coordinación entre todas las instituciones económicas del Estado y la responsabilidad de las entidades privadas. El problema de la inconsistencia dinámica entre credibilidad y resultados se resolvería cuando se reconozca la superioridad de una regla ajustable en donde la credibilidad sea el resultado de un proceso dinámico de aprendizaje y enseñanza mutua entre los agentes económicos y el Banco Central, y donde los instrumentos de política económica logren una mayor

  16. An Action Research into International Masters Program in Practicing Management (IMPM: Suggesting Refraction to Complement Reflection for Management Learning in the Global Knowledge Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tunc D. MEDENI

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available International Masters Program in Practicing Management (IMPM is a collaborative effort by major business schools and corporations around the world, balancing practical and academic issues within pedagogy of “experienced reflection”. This action research into the IMPM aims to explain the IMPM and its importance for the global knowledge economy, as well as identify and improve the current limitations of the program. As a result, we hope to provide specific suggestions for the IMPM practice and general guidelines for business education. Our suggestions are based upon a framework of “refraction” that follows a methodology of action research and pluralistic knowledge science epistemology, a critique of management learning, and a literature review on (critical reflection, as well as our findings about the IMPM practice. Also, critically reviewing Mintzberg and other authors’ ideas on management learning and IMPM specifically supports our discussion in this paper.

  17. Experiences of using life histories with health workers in post-conflict and crisis settings: methodological reflections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witter, Sophie; Namakula, Justine; Alonso-Garbayo, Alvaro; Wurie, Haja; Theobald, Sally; Mashange, Wilson; Ros, Bandeth; Buzuzi, Stephen; Mangwi, Richard; Martineau, Tim

    2017-05-01

    Life history is a research tool which has been used primarily in sociology and anthropology to document experiences of marginalized individuals and communities. It has been less explored in relation to health system research. In this paper, we examine our experience of using life histories to explore health system trajectories coming out of conflict through the eyes of health workers. Life histories were used in four inter-related projects looking at health worker incentives, the impact of Ebola on health workers, deployment policies, and gender and leadership in the health sector. In total 244 health workers of various cadres were interviewed in Uganda, Sierra Leone, Zimbabwe and Cambodia. The life histories were one element within mixed methods research. We examine the challenges faced and how these were managed. They arose in relation to gaining access, data gathering, and analysing and presenting findings from life histories. Access challenges included lack of familiarity with the method, reluctance to expose very personal information and sentiments, lack of trust in confidentiality, particularly given the traumatized contexts, and, in some cases, cynicism about research and its potential to improve working lives. In relation to data gathering, there was variable willingness to draw lifelines, and some reluctance to broach sensitive topics, particularly in contexts where policy-related issues and legitimacy are commonly still contested. Presentation of lifeline data without compromising confidentiality is also an ethical challenge. We discuss how these challenges were (to a large extent) surmounted and conclude that life histories with health staff can be a very powerful tool, particularly in contexts where routine data sources are absent or weak, and where health workers constitute a marginalized community (as is often the case for mid-level cadres, those serving in remote areas, and staff who have lived through conflict and crisis).

  18. ‘Women’: Privileged Targets for the Early 21th Century Social ProgramsReflections from a Critical Gender Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Anzorena

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Since the late ’90s, social programs to ameliorate the poverty conditions provoked by the neoliberal model have been applied in Argentina and in Latin America. These processes particularly affect women, as they are the privileged ‘target’ of those measures. This essay explores the ways in which the New Economics of the Family (NEF, in 90’s social programs, promotes the naturalization of women’s responsibility as homemakers, and defines them as functional to the objectives of palliative social policies. Such a vision profits from supposed natural ‘motherly virtues’, and far from promoting more egalitarian relations between women and men, reproduces gender and class discrimination by reinforcing the supposedly natural sexual division of labor.

  19. The promises and limitations of gender-transformative health programming with men: critical reflections from the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworkin, Shari L; Fleming, Paul J; Colvin, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development, researchers and practitioners have engaged in a series of efforts to shift health programming with men from being gender-neutral to being more gender-sensitive and gender-transformative. Efforts in this latter category have been increasingly utilised, particularly in the last decade, and attempt to transform gender relations to be more equitable in the name of improved health outcomes for both women and men. We begin by assessing the conceptual progression of social science contributions to gender-transformative health programming with men. Next, we briefly assess the empirical evidence from gender-transformative health interventions with men. Finally, we examine some of the challenges and limitations of gender-transformative health programmes and make recommendations for future work in this thriving interdisciplinary area of study.

  20. The meaning of early intervention: A parent's experience and reflection on interactions with professionals using a phenomenological ethnographic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon H. Lee

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to describe how a parent's partnership with professionals progresses and evolves throughout the service provisioning process. Using a phenomenological ethnographic approach, the lived reality of a family is depicted as the parent walks through different stages of the Individualized Family Service Plan process over a 6-month period. Data concerning parent–professional interactions were obtained via observation notes and document reviews whereas data regarding parent perceptions were collected through multiple individual interviews. Overall, the parent conveyed her satisfaction with actual services especially regarding the professionals’ knowledge and parental advocacy. However, the parent also indicated frustration with the early intervention planning process and “obligated” partnerships with providers. In particular, the providers’ lack of sensitivity was noted, and greater emotional and psychological support was suggested. The overall process of developing partnerships with professionals can be excessively intrusive to the family's lives. Future research directions are offered as a contribution for the development of improved policies for early intervention programs regarding family-centered practice, utilizing the perspectives of families.

  1. Implementing Health-Promoting Leadership in Municipal Organizations: Managers’ Experiences with a Leadership Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Larsson

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze how line and middle managers experience and describe barriers and enablers in the implementation of a health-promoting leadership program in municipal organizations. A qualitative case study design was applied to examine the leadership program in a case involving implementation of an organizational health intervention. Data were mainly collected using semi-structured interviews with line and middle managers participating in the leadership program. Interviews with senior managers, notes from meetings/workshops, and written action plans were used as complementary data. The interview data were analyzed using a thematic analysis, and the complementary data using a summative content analysis. The findings show that the interviewed line and middle managers experienced this leadership program as a new approach in leadership training because it is based primarily on employee participation. Involvement and commitment of the employees was considered a crucial enabler in the implementation of the leadership program. Other enablers identified include action plans with specific goals, earlier experiences of organizational change, and integration of the program content into regular routines and structures. The line and middle managers described several barriers in the implementation process, and they described various organizational conditions, such as high workload, lack of senior management support, politically initiated projects, and organizational change, as challenges that limited the opportunities to be drivers of change. Taken together, these barriers interfered with the leadership program and its implementation. The study contributes to the understanding of how organizational-level health interventions are implemented in public sector workplaces.

  2. An evaluation system for postgraduate pediatric residency programs: report of a 3-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Dalt, Liviana; Anselmi, Pasquale; Furlan, Sara; Carraro, Silvia; Baraldi, Eugenio; Robusto, Egidio; Perilongo, Giorgio

    2017-09-01

    The way a postgraduate medical training program is organized and the capacity of faculty members to function as tutors and to organize effective professional experiences are among the elements that affect the quality of training. An evaluation system designed to target these elements has been implemented within the framework of the Pediatric Residency Program of the University of Padua (Italy). The aim of this report is to describe some aspects of the experience gained in the first 3 years of implementation of the system (2013-2015). Data were collected using four validated questionnaires: the "Resident Assessment Questionnaire", the "Tutor-Assessment Questionnaire", the "Rotation-Assessment Questionnaire", and the "Resident Affairs Committee-Assessment Questionnaire". The response rate was 72% for the "Resident Assessment Questionnaires"; 78% for the "Tutor-/Rotation-Assessment Questionnaires" and 84% for the "Resident Affair Committee-Assessment Questionnaires". The scores collected were validated by psychometric tests. The high rates of completed questionnaires returned and the psychometric validation of the results collected indicate that the evaluation system reported herein can be effectively implemented. Efforts should be made to refine this system and, more importantly, to document its impact in improving the Pediatric Residency Program. What is known: • The elements that influence the quality of postgraduate training programs and the knowledge, performance, and competences of residents must be regularly assessed. • Comprehensive evaluation systems for postgraduate residency programs are not universally implemented also because quite often common guidelines and rules, well-equipped infrastructures, and financial resources are missing. What is new: • We show the feasibility of implementing an evaluation system that targets some of the key elements of a postgraduate medical training program in Italy, a European country in which the regulations

  3. Improving Undergraduate Research Experiences With An Intentional Mentoring Program: Lessons Learned Through Assessment of Keck Geology Consortium Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, K. R.; Garver, J. I.; Greer, L.; Pollock, M.; Varga, R. J.; Davidson, C. M.; Frey, H. M.; Hubbard, D. K.; Peck, W. H.; Wobus, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Keck Geology Consortium, with support from the National Science Foundation (REU Program) and ExxonMobil, is a collaborative effort by 18 colleges to improve geoscience education through high-quality research experiences. Since its inception in 1987 more than 1350 undergraduate students and 145 faculty have been involved in 189 yearlong research projects. This non-traditional REU model offers exceptional opportunities for students to address research questions at a deep level, to learn and utilize sophisticated analytical methods, and to engage in authentic collaborative research that culminates in an undergraduate research symposium and published abstracts volume. The large numbers of student and faculty participants in Keck projects also affords a unique opportunity to study the impacts of program design on undergraduate research experiences in the geosciences. Students who participate in Keck projects generally report significant gains in personal and professional dimensions, as well as in clarification of educational and career goals. Survey data from student participants, project directors, and campus advisors identify mentoring as one of the most critical and challenging elements of successful undergraduate research experiences. Additional challenges arise from the distributed nature of Keck projects (i.e., participants, project directors, advisors, and other collaborators are at different institutions) and across the span of yearlong projects. In an endeavor to improve student learning about the nature and process of science, and to make mentoring practices more intentional, the Consortium has developed workshops and materials to support both project directors and campus research advisors (e.g., best practices for mentoring, teaching ethical professional conduct, benchmarks for progress, activities to support students during research process). The Consortium continues to evolve its practices to better support students from underrepresented groups.

  4. Strengthening participation by young women sex workers in HIV programs: reflections on a study from Bangkok, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conn C

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cath Conn, Kristel Modderman, Shoba Nayar School of Public Health and Psychosocial Studies, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand Background: Participation is an accepted means of increasing the effectiveness of public health programs, and as such, it is considered an important component of HIV interventions targeting at-risk youth. The situation of young women sex workers in Thailand is alarming on many fronts, including that of HIV risk. As a result, HIV programs in Thailand are the key interventions undertaken in relation to young women sex workers’ health. A small-scale study used semistructured interviews to explore the participation reports of five young women sex workers, as well as the related views of two community support workers, who lived and worked in Bangkok, Thailand.Discussion: This study is considered in the light of current research on – as well as new opportunities and challenges offered for – participation by vulnerable groups in the context of digital society. Thematic analysis of the interview data identified barriers to participation, including the illegality of sex work, fear, and lack of trust of the authorities, as well as widespread social stigma. Such barriers resulted in young women seeking anonymity. Yet, promisingly, young women positioned themselves as experts; they are involved in peer education and are supportive of greater involvement in HIV programs, such as further educational initiatives and collective actions.Conclusion: There is a need for a more empowerment-oriented participation practice positioning young women sex workers as expert educators and codecision makers within a model of participation that is also accountable, such as including young women as members of program boards. Beyond current norms, there are new opportunities emerging because of the increasing availability of smartphone/Internet technology. These can support activist and codesign participation by young women

  5. Retrospective North American CFL Experience Curve Analysis and Correlation to Deployment Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Sarah J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wei, Max [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sohn, Michael D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Retrospective experience curves are a useful tool for understanding historic technology development, and can contribute to investment program analysis and future cost estimation efforts. This work documents our development of an analysis approach for deriving retrospective experience curves with a variable learning rate, and its application to develop an experience curve for compact fluorescent lamps for the global and North American markets over the years 1990-2007. Uncertainties and assumptions involved in interpreting data for our experience curve development are discussed, including the processing and transformation of empirical data, the selection of system boundaries, and the identification of historical changes in the learning rate over the course of 15 years. In the results that follow, we find that that the learning rate has changed at least once from 1990-2007. We also explore if, and to what degree, public deployment programs may have contributed to an increased technology learning rate in North America. We observe correlations between the changes in the learning rate and the initiation of new policies, abrupt technological advances, including improvements to ballast technology, and economic and political events such as trade tariffs and electricity prices. Finally, we discuss how the findings of this work (1) support the use of segmented experience curves for retrospective and prospective analysis and (2) may imply that investments in technological research and development have contributed to a change in market adoption and penetration.

  6. Nephrology elective experience during medical residency: a national survey of US nephrology fellowship training program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Hitesh H; Adams, Nancy Day; Mattana, Joseph; Kadiyala, Aditya; Jhaveri, Kenar D

    2015-07-01

    Interest in nephrology careers continues to decline in the United States. The reasons for this declining interest are not fully understood but it is plausible that inadequate exposure to the full spectrum of what a career in nephrology encompasses may be part of the explanation. Inpatient-based nephrology electives have been a common venue for residents to gain exposure to nephrology but little is known regarding the details of such electives and how often they include outpatient experiences. We carried out a national survey of nephrology fellowship training program directors to obtain data on the content of nephrology elective experiences as well as their ideas on how to promote interest in the field. The survey revealed the majority of elective experiences to be either exclusively or heavily inpatient based, with only a small percentage having a substantial outpatient component, particularly in outpatient dialysis or transplantation. Training program directors felt that providing greater outpatient experiences to residents during elective rotations would be an effective means to promote interest in nephrology, along with structured faculty mentoring. Our findings suggest that current approaches to the nephrology elective experience are heavily inpatient-based and might benefit from incorporating much more of the rich spectrum of activities a career in nephrology entails. Hopefully such efforts can create and enhance interest in careers in nephrology and potentially begin a sustained reversal of an unfortunate and serious decline in interest.

  7. Reflecting on Earlier Experiences with Unsolicited Findings: Points to Consider for Next-Generation Sequencing and Informed Consent in Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigter, Tessel; Henneman, Lidewij; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Hall, Alison; Yntema, Helger G; Borry, Pascal; Tönnies, Holger; Waisfisz, Quinten; Elting, Mariet W; Dondorp, Wybo J; Cornel, Martina C

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput nucleotide sequencing (often referred to as next-generation sequencing; NGS) is increasingly being chosen as a diagnostic tool for cases of expected but unresolved genetic origin. When exploring a higher number of genetic variants, there is a higher chance of detecting unsolicited findings. The consequential increased need for decisions on disclosure of these unsolicited findings poses a challenge for the informed consent procedure. This article discusses the ethical and practical dilemmas encountered when contemplating informed consent for NGS in diagnostics from a multidisciplinary point of view. By exploring recent similar experiences with unsolicited findings in other settings, an attempt is made to describe what can be learned so far for implementing NGS in standard genetic diagnostics. The article concludes with a set of points to consider in order to guide decision-making on the extent of return of results in relation to the mode of informed consent. We hereby aim to provide a sound basis for developing guidelines for optimizing the informed consent procedure. PMID:23784691

  8. A natural experiment on the condition-dependence of achromatic plumage reflectance in black-capped chickadees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana D'Alba

    Full Text Available Honest advertisement models posit that only individuals in good health can produce and/or maintain ornamental traits. Even though disease has profound effects on condition, few studies have experimentally tested its effects on trait expression and even fewer have identified a mechanistic basis for these effects. Recent evidence suggests that black and white, but not grey, plumage colors of black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus are sexually selected. We therefore hypothesized that birds afflicted with avian keratin disorder, a condition that affects the beak and other keratinized tissues, would show reduced expression of black and white, but not grey, color. UV-vis spectrometry of black-capped chickadees affected and unaffected by avian keratin disorder revealed spectral differences between them consistent with this hypothesis. To elucidate the mechanistic bases of these differences, we used scanning electron microscopy (SEM, electron-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX and a feather cleaning experiment. SEM showed extreme feather soiling in affected birds, and EDX revealed that this was most likely from external sources. Experimentally cleaning the feathers increased color expression of ornamental feathers of affected, but not unaffected, birds. These data provide strong evidence that black and white color is an honest indicator in chickadees, and that variation in feather dirtiness, likely due to differences in preening behavior is a mechanism for this association.

  9. A natural experiment on the condition-dependence of achromatic plumage reflectance in black-capped chickadees

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alba, L.; Van Hemert, C.; Handel, C.M.; Shawkey, M.D.

    2011-01-01

    Honest advertisement models posit that only individuals in good health can produce and/or maintain ornamental traits. Even though disease has profound effects on condition, few studies have experimentally tested its effects on trait expression and even fewer have identified a mechanistic basis for these effects. Recent evidence suggests that black and white, but not grey, plumage colors of black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus) are sexually selected. We therefore hypothesized that birds afflicted with avian keratin disorder, a condition that affects the beak and other keratinized tissues, would show reduced expression of black and white, but not grey, color. UV-vis spectrometry of black-capped chickadees affected and unaffected by avian keratin disorder revealed spectral differences between them consistent with this hypothesis. To elucidate the mechanistic bases of these differences, we used scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and a feather cleaning experiment. SEM showed extreme feather soiling in affected birds, and EDX revealed that this was most likely from external sources. Experimentally cleaning the feathers increased color expression of ornamental feathers of affected, but not unaffected, birds. These data provide strong evidence that black and white color is an honest indicator in chickadees, and that variation in feather dirtiness, likely due to differences in preening behavior is a mechanism for this association.

  10. Negotiating cultural differences in urban science education: an overview of teacher's first-hand experience reflection of cogen journey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shady, Ashraf

    2014-03-01

    Classrooms across the United States increasingly find immigrant science teachers paired with urban minority students, but few of these teachers are prepared for the challenges such cultural assimilation presents. This is particularly true in secondary science education. Identifying potential prospects for culturally adaptive pedagogy in science education is important for students and teachers alike because it provides means for increasing marginalized students' access to science fields. In this autoethnography, I document my experience as an immigrant science teacher in an urban intermediate school in New York City. Although I possessed the content knowledge highly valued by the current neoliberal agenda, I lacked the cultural adaptivity necessary to foster a successful learning environment. I utilized cogenerative dialogue (cogen) as a tool to ameliorate instances of cultural misalignments and improve teaching and learning in my classroom. The results of the study show that the interstitial culture produced through the implementation of the different forms of cogen became a reference point to draw upon in improving the overall learning environment.

  11. “Let’s not forget we are language teachers!”: investigating Critical Teaching and Critical Reflection in the practicum of an English undergraduate program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo da Silva

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on the need for Teacher Education programs to promote the development of critical language teachers, this study aimed at unveiling to what extent the practicum at an undergraduate program fosters critical reflection. Two student-teachers and their practicum supervisor answered a questionnaire and an interview about their views as regards the roles of adittional language teaching, the language teacher, and the supervised practicum. From the analysis, we could observe that critical reflection and critical teaching are principles of the course according to its syllabus. For the supervisor professor, teaching a language is a political act that cannot be seen as separate from the surrounding social context. On the other hand, both student-teachers seem to regard language as a communicative tool, and to view critical development as detached from language teaching. Such an understanding from the student-teachers might be related to the very nature of the practicum, and to the lack of opportunities student-teachers have (or had for the critical development of their thinking on language teaching.

  12. Communications experiment for the Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokulic, Robert S.; Gatsonis, Nikolaos A.; Bythrow, Peter F.; Mauk, Barry H.

    1993-06-01

    A planned experiment for characterizing RF/plume interaction effects on the Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP) is described. The NEPSTP spacecraft will use a Russian Topaz II nuclear reactor to power a suite of electric thrusters on-orbit. Transmission of signals through the thruster plumes at S-band (2 GHz) will be characterized over a wide range of viewing angles by controlling the spacecraft attitude as it passes by the ground station. Planned measurements include signal strength, bit error count, scintillation, phase transient effects, and radio frequency interference. Possible future augmentations to the experiment, including a UHF transmitter and a measurement of total election content, are also described.

  13. Participant experiences of a community-based maintenance program post-pulmonary rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desveaux, Laura; Rolfe, Debbie; Beauchamp, Marla; Goldstein, Roger; Brooks, Dina

    2014-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the perspectives of individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who participated in a minimally supervised maintenance exercise intervention and identify the barriers and facilitators associated with participation. The intervention was delivered in a community center and was designed to maintain exercise capacity and quality of life following discharge from pulmonary rehabilitation. This study utilized qualitative focus groups (FGs) involving individuals with COPD (n = 12) who had been attending the maintenance community program for at least 6 months. All individuals who met the inclusion criteria for the FGs consented to participate. Four themes were identified: (1) issues around attendance; (2) perceived benefits of the program; (3) perceived burdens of the program; and (4) recommendations for program improvement. Participants expressed more benefits than barriers, stating that their experience of improved function and quality of life facilitated their attendance. Barriers included exacerbations, fatigue, access to transportation, and weather. Participants endorsed the benefits of a community-based maintenance exercise program after pulmonary rehabilitation. Minimally supervised community-based programs with access to a case manager may provide a useful approach to enhancing adherence to exercise.

  14. Distributed Solar Incentive Programs: Recent Experience and Best Practices for Design and Implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, L.; Reger, A.; Heeter, J.

    2012-12-01

    Based on lessons from recent program experience, this report explores best practices for designing and implementing incentives for small and mid-sized residential and commercial distributed solar energy projects. The findings of this paper are relevant to both new incentive programs as well as those undergoing modifications. The report covers factors to consider in setting and modifying incentive levels over time, differentiating incentives to encourage various market segments, administrative issues such as providing equitable access to incentives and customer protection. It also explores how incentive programs can be designed to respond to changing market conditions while attempting to provide a longer-term and stable environment for the solar industry. The findings are based on interviews with program administrators, regulators, and industry representatives as well as data from numerous incentive programs nationally, particularly the largest and longest-running programs. These best practices consider the perspectives of various stakeholders and the broad objectives of reducing solar costs, encouraging long-term market viability, minimizing ratepayer costs, and protecting consumers.

  15. Weld-metal property optimization from flux ingredients through mixture experiments and mathematical programming approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ademola David Adeyeye

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new methodology for weld-metal properties optimization from welding flux ingredients. The methodology integrates statistical design of mixture experiment with mathematical programming optimization technique. The mixture experiment is responsible for the modeling of the weld-metal properties as a function of welding flux levels while mathematical programming optimizes the model. Data and confirmed models from the literature were used to perform optimization on the responses. The maximum values possible with the prevailing conditions for acicular ferrite, charpy impact toughness and silicon transfer are 51.2%, 29 J and 0.231% respectively while the minimum oxygen content possible is 249 ppm. The new methodology is able to eliminate the limitations associated with the traditional experimental optimization methodology for flux formulation.

  16. Reflections on two years after establishing an orthogeriatric unit: a focus group study of healthcare professionals' expectations and experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamsen, C; Nørgaard, B; Draborg, E; Nielsen, D

    2017-08-25

    For decades hospitals have been "vertically" organized, with the risk that specialization leads to fragmented and one-sided views of patient care and treatment that may cause poor communication and coordination of care and treatment. Two years after the introduction of an orthogeriatric unit for elderly patients admitted with fragility fractures, we studied the involved healthcare professionals' perspectives and experiences with working in an interprofessional organization. We performed four focus groups interviews with 19 healthcare workers representing different professions. The interviews were analysed using systematic text condensation (STC). Three themes were identified: 1) A patient-centred approach, 2) An opportunity for professional growth and 3) The benefits of interprofessional collaboration. The interviewees emphasized in particular the systematic and frequent face-to-face communication enabled by the interprofessional team meetings as essential to their feeling of enhanced collegial solidarity. All groups expressed their respect for other groups' competences and their vital contributions to good orthogeriatric care. However, collaboration was challenged by the groups' divergent views of the patients and of the relevance of the information given in the weekly meetings. Heavy workloads were also mentioned. The opportunity for professional growth was also felt to be imperilled by some professionals. All participants indicated their view that the orthogeriatric organization had improved the quality of care and treatment. Furthermore, good communication, mutual respect for other professional competences and shared goals were found to have enhanced interprofessional collaboration and improved the sense of having a shared mission. However, differences in approaches and expectations continued to challenge the orthogeriatric model after 2 years. Neither did all professionals find orthogeriatric care professionally challenging.

  17. Evaluating Improvements to the Student Learning Experience in an Honours Earth and Environmental Sciences Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyles, C. H.; Vajoczki, S.; Zobel, G.

    2002-12-01

    The School of Geography and Geology (SGG) at McMaster University recently received funding for a three-year project to apply new teaching strategies to enhance the undergraduate learning experience. A major focus of this project is to develop multiple opportunities for inquiry-based and experiential learning in the four-year Honours B.Sc program in Earth and Environmental Sciences. A second aim of the project is to enhance systematic personal transferable skills development in all students enrolled in this program. The aims of the SGG educational project are being met through progressive revision and refinement of instructional methodologies and the introduction of increased opportunities for experimental lab work, fieldwork, co-op and volunteer placements. Introductory level laboratory assignments are now up to 70% inquiry-based and fieldwork opportunities exist for all students within the program. A major hurdle to assessing the success of the project is evaluation of the effectiveness of the educational changes made in the programs. To date, a number of evaluation tools have been used to assess improvements to the learning experience including formative and summative student feedback (both informal and formal), student performance evaluations (pre- and post-course), and surveys of program alumni and potential employers. A system for the evaluation of personal transferable skills development is currently being developed using a skills attainment grid. By comparing future student attainment and feedback with that documented in a `baseline' survey carried out at the beginning of the project, it is hoped that assessment of improvements to the student learning experience can be made.

  18. Students' experiences of embedded academic literacy support in a graduate entry nursing program: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramjan, Lucie M; Maneze, Della; Everett, Bronwyn; Glew, Paul; Trajkovski, Suza; Lynch, Joan; Salamonson, Yenna

    2018-01-01

    Graduate entry nursing (GEN) programs were designed to address the predicted nursing shortfall. In Australia, although these programs attract students from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds, the workload is compounded by cultural differences and a new academic learning environment which presents additional challenges. This qualitative descriptive study explored the experiences of GEN students enrolled in the introductory unit of their nursing program with embedded academic literacy support in Sydney, Australia. Twenty-four commencing GEN students were interviewed in January 2016. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed. Three main themes emerged which illustrated that GEN students were 'diamonds in the rough'. They possessed a raw natural beauty that required some shaping and polishing to ensure academic needs were met. To ensure retention is high, institutions need to evaluate how best to support and harness the potential of these unique students. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Economic implications of cardiovascular disease management programs: moving beyond one-off experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maru, Shoko; Byrnes, Joshua; Carrington, Melinda J; Stewart, Simon; Scuffham, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    Substantial variation in economic analyses of cardiovascular disease management programs hinders not only the proper assessment of cost-effectiveness but also the identification of heterogeneity of interest such as patient characteristics. The authors discuss the impact of reporting and methodological variation on the cost-effectiveness of cardiovascular disease management programs by introducing issues that could lead to different policy or clinical decisions, followed by the challenges associated with net intervention effects and generalizability. The authors conclude with practical suggestions to mitigate the identified issues. Improved transparency through standardized reporting practice is the first step to advance beyond one-off experiments (limited applicability outside the study itself). Transparent reporting is a prerequisite for rigorous cost-effectiveness analyses that provide unambiguous implications for practice: what type of program works for whom and how.

  20. Program to enrich science and mathematics experiences of high school students through interactive museum internships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reif, R.J. [State Univ. of New York, New Paltz, NY (United States); Lock, C.R. [Univ. of North Carolina, Charlotte, NC (United States)

    1998-11-01

    This project addressed the problem of female and minority representation in science and mathematics education and in related fields. It was designed to recruit high school students from under-represented groups into a program that provided significant, meaningful experiences to encourage those young people to pursue careers in science and science teaching. It provided role models for those students. It provided experiences outside of the normal school environment, experiences that put the participants in the position to serve as role models themselves for disadvantaged young people. It also provided encouragement to pursue careers in science and mathematics teaching and related careers. In these respects, it complemented other successful programs to encourage participation in science. And, it differed in that it provided incentives at a crucial time, when career decisions are being made during the high school years. Further, it encouraged the pursuit of careers in science teaching. The objectives of this project were to: (1) provide enrichment instruction in basic concepts in the life, earth, space, physical sciences and mathematics to selected high school students participating in the program; (2) provide instruction in teaching methods or processes, including verbal communication skills and the use of questioning; (3) provide opportunities for participants, as paid student interns, to transfer knowledge to other peers and adults; (4) encourage minority and female students with high academic potential to pursue careers in science teaching.