WorldWideScience

Sample records for program executive director

  1. Non-executive directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-31

    A new professional networking site has been created for the NHS Alliance's non-executive director network (NEDNET). The website uses OnMedica's professional networking platform to provide a secure online environment in which NEDNET members can share information and best practice. The network aims to help non-executive directors find theirpeers, learn from each other and learn about the latest developments. The website can be found at www.medefero.com/nednet.

  2. 75 FR 57973 - National Protection and Programs Directorate; Sector-Specific Agency Executive Management Office...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-23

    ... SECURITY National Protection and Programs Directorate; Sector-Specific Agency Executive Management Office... partners, both public and private. An SSA is responsible for leading a unified public-private sector effort... resiliency of the Nation by leading the unified public-private sector effort to ensure its assigned CIKR are...

  3. 45 CFR 1700.5 - Executive Director.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Executive Director. 1700.5 Section 1700.5 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL COMMISSION ON LIBRARIES AND INFORMATION SCIENCE ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS § 1700.5 Executive Director. (a) The Executive Director serves...

  4. The effectiveness of services marketing: perceptions of executive directors of gerontological programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, L W

    1994-01-01

    Interest in marketing services, as opposed to products, has gained considerable momentum in recent years. The author conducted a survey of human service executives in six metropolitan areas to gauge the current status and efficacy of marketing efforts in programs for the aged. Findings confirm that the majority of health and social service organizations now employ marketing strategies of some kind, although somewhat insensitive and inadequate. The most common indicator of marketing success has been increments in the number of clients served. Health organizations are significantly more likely to measure the effectiveness of marketing efforts than social service agencies. Agencies commonly employ multiple marketing strategies, with face-to-face approaches proving to be the most effective. Least effective are public service messages and commercials on television/radio. The author suggests recommendations for mounting more efficacious and sensitive marketing programs in the human services.

  5. 45 beacon: Keith Seitter, Deputy Executive Director

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rachel Thomas-Medwid

    2003-01-01

    ... should be open to exploring them. Such an opportunity presented itself to Seitter a little over a decade ago when Richard Hallgren, then executive director of the AMS, asked Seitter to take a leave of absence from his faculty...

  6. Derivatives and the non-executive director

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Nat, M.; Buckley, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    Do non-executive directors have the wherewithal to overview a corporation's integrity, quality of performance and management in the area of derivatives policy? In a survey of the understanding and monitoring of derivatives in a small sample of quoted companies, we found disturbing levels of

  7. A Conversation with AATE's Executive Director, Barbara Salisbury Wills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldana, Johnny

    1997-01-01

    Presents an interview with the American Alliance for Theatre and Education's executive director Barbara Salisbury Wills. Discusses her interaction with the Goals 2000 Commission, development of the "National Standards for Arts Education," getting parents involved in theater education programs, working with state representatives, and…

  8. Object Oriented Programming in Director

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian DARDALA

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Director is one of the most popular authoring software. As software for developing multimedia applications, Director is an object oriented programming environment. A very important issue to develop multimedia applications is the designing of their own classes. This paper presents the particular aspects concerning the available facilities offered by Lingo to design classes and to generate objects.

  9. The relationship between the medical director and the executive director: guidelines for success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabel, Stewart

    2011-03-01

    The positional leadership of mental health care organizations commonly is in the hands of an executive director who has had administrative experience, but who may or may not have had clinical experience. The medical director of the mental health organization is a psychiatrist who reports to the executive director despite their different backgrounds and areas of expertise. The relationship between these two leaders is the responsibility of both, and is crucial to the success of the organization. This paper is concerned specifically with approaches that can be taken by the medical director to foster a successful working alignment with the executive director. The situation has some similarities (and significant differences) with that described by Gabarro and Kotter in "Managing Your Boss" (1993). A series of guidelines to enhance the potential success of the medical director in this supervisor/supervisee relationship is presented.

  10. Leadership development for program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bing-You, Robert; Wiltshire, Whitney; Skolfield, Jenny

    2010-12-01

    Residency program directors have increasingly challenging roles, but they may not be receiving adequate leadership development. To assess and facilitate program directors' leadership self-awareness and development at a workshop retreat. At our annual program director retreat, program directors and associate program directors from a variety of specialties completed the Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument (TKI), which evaluates an individual's behavior in conflict situations, and the Hersey-Blanchard Situational Leadership (HBSL) model, which measures individuals' preferred leadership style in working with followers. Participants received their results during the retreat and discussed their leadership style results in the context of conflict situations experienced in the past. An online survey was distributed 3 weeks after the retreat to assess participant satisfaction and to determine whether participants would make changes to their leadership styles. Seventeen program directors attended the retreat and completed the tools. On the TKI, 47% preferred the Compromising mode for handling conflict, while 18% preferred either the Avoiding or Accommodating modes. On the HBSL, 71% of program directors preferred a Coaching leadership style. Ninety-one percent of postretreat-survey respondents found the leadership tools helpful and also thought they had a better awareness of their conflict mode and leadership style preferences. Eighty-two percent committed to a change in their leadership behaviors in the 6 months following the retreat. Leadership tools may be beneficial for promoting the professional development of program directors. The TKI and HBSL can be used within a local retreat or workshop as we describe to facilitate positive leadership-behavior changes.

  11. Leadership Development for Program Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bing-You, Robert; Wiltshire, Whitney; Skolfield, Jenny

    2010-01-01

    Background Residency program directors have increasingly challenging roles, but they may not be receiving adequate leadership development. Objective To assess and facilitate program directors' leadership self-awareness and development at a workshop retreat. Methods At our annual program director retreat, program directors and associate program directors from a variety of specialties completed the Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument (TKI), which evaluates an individual's behavior in conflict situations, and the Hersey-Blanchard Situational Leadership (HBSL) model, which measures individuals' preferred leadership style in working with followers. Participants received their results during the retreat and discussed their leadership style results in the context of conflict situations experienced in the past. An online survey was distributed 3 weeks after the retreat to assess participant satisfaction and to determine whether participants would make changes to their leadership styles. Results Seventeen program directors attended the retreat and completed the tools. On the TKI, 47% preferred the Compromising mode for handling conflict, while 18% preferred either the Avoiding or Accommodating modes. On the HBSL, 71% of program directors preferred a Coaching leadership style. Ninety-one percent of postretreat-survey respondents found the leadership tools helpful and also thought they had a better awareness of their conflict mode and leadership style preferences. Eighty-two percent committed to a change in their leadership behaviors in the 6 months following the retreat. Conclusions Leadership tools may be beneficial for promoting the professional development of program directors. The TKI and HBSL can be used within a local retreat or workshop as we describe to facilitate positive leadership-behavior changes. PMID:22132267

  12. Operations Program Executive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fague, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    Ground Resource Operations Program executive (GROPE) is control program for binding system of programs into single, easily operated entity. It relieves user from complexity arising from decomposition of large application into number of interacting program units. System simplifies job control, data management, and recordkeeping for interacting programs.

  13. SME Non-Executive Directors: Having One and Being One

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Ian

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study reported here was to ascertain the impact on small and medium-sized enterprise (SME) owner-managers of simulating having and being a non-executive director (NED) within the GOLD programme at Lancaster University, the purpose of which is to help owner-managers of SMEs to become better strategic leaders of their companies.…

  14. Attracting non-executive directors to the board

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. de Jong (Abe); R.B.H. Hooghiemstra (Reggy); M. van Rinsum (Marcel)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractCompanies that are performing poorly from a commercial perspective and are struggling to tap into the advice and guidance of well-qualified non-executive directors need to consider new board members’ intrinsic motivations and the potential for enhancing their reputation if they are

  15. Evaluation of a clinical governance training programme for non-executive directors of NHS organisations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Greco M; Powell R; Jolliffe J; Sweeney K; Wyatt K

    2004-01-01

    Context Non-executive directors in the South West Region. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness of a oneday training programme for non-executive directors in critically appraising board clinical governance reports...

  16. 7 CFR 1220.607 - Farm Service Agency State Executive Director.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Farm Service Agency State Executive Director. 1220... § 1220.607 Farm Service Agency State Executive Director. Farm Service Agency State Executive Director... of the FSA State Committee and to be responsible for the day-to-day operation of the FSA State office...

  17. 7 CFR 1220.605 - Farm Service Agency County Executive Director.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Farm Service Agency County Executive Director. 1220... § 1220.605 Farm Service Agency County Executive Director. Farm Service Agency County Executive Director... policies of the FSA County Committee and to be responsible for the day-to-day operation of the FSA county...

  18. 7 CFR 1280.607 - Farm Service Agency County Executive Director.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Farm Service Agency County Executive Director. 1280....607 Farm Service Agency County Executive Director. Farm Service Agency County Executive Director, also... FSA County Committee and to be responsible for the day-to-day operation of the FSA county office, or...

  19. 7 CFR 1280.609 - Farm Service Agency State Executive Director.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Farm Service Agency State Executive Director. 1280... MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE....609 Farm Service Agency State Executive Director. Farm Service Agency State Executive Director, Farm...

  20. 7 CFR 1230.607 - Farm Service Agency County Executive Director.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Farm Service Agency County Executive Director. 1230... MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... § 1230.607 Farm Service Agency County Executive Director. The term Farm Service Agency County Executive...

  1. Boardroom dynamics of two-tier boards : How non-executive directors manage working relationships with executives.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gregory Maassen; Laura de Kruijs; dr. Stefan Peij; Pieter-Jan Bezemer

    2013-01-01

    This study explores how non-executive directors are challenged by management while they seek to improve the effectiveness of supervisory boards in the Netherlands. A combination of semi-structured interviews and a questionnaire among non-executive directors indicates that supervisory board members

  2. Interaction between non-executive and executive directors in English National Health Service trust boards: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheaff, Rod; Endacott, Ruth; Jones, Ray; Woodward, Val

    2015-10-15

    National Health Service (NHS) trusts, which provide the majority of hospital and community health services to the English NHS, are increasingly adopting a 'public firm' model with a board consisting of executive directors who are trust employees and external non-executives chosen for their experience in a range of areas such as finance, health care and management. In this paper we compare the non-executive directors' roles and interests in, and contributions to, NHS trust boards' governance activities with those of executive directors; and examine non-executive directors' approach to their role in board meetings. Non-participant observations of three successive trust board meetings in eight NHS trusts (primary care trusts, foundation trusts and self-governing (non-foundation) trusts) in England in 2008-9. The observational data were analysed inductively to yield categories of behaviour reflecting the perlocutionary types of intervention which non-executive directors made in trust meetings. The observational data revealed six main perlocutionary types of questioning tactic used by non-executive directors to executive directors: supportive; lesson-seeking; diagnostic; options assessment; strategy seeking; and requesting further work. Non-executive board members' behaviours in holding the executive team to account at board meetings were variable. Non-executive directors were likely to contribute to finance-related discussions which suggests that they did see financial challenge as a key component of their role. The pattern of behaviours was more indicative of an active, strategic approach to governance than of passive monitoring or 'rubber-stamping'. Nevertheless, additional means of maintaining public accountability of NHS trusts may also be required.

  3. Director of Program Area | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Job Summary The Director of a Program Area is accountable to the Vice President of the Program and Partnership Branch for providing strategic intelligence, intellectual leadership and the overall management of the Program Areas personnel (20-35 staff per Program Area).

  4. The independence paradox : (im)possibilities facing non-executive directors in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooghiemstra, Reginald; van Manen, J

    The paper adds to our knowledge of what non-executive directors do, knowledge which is still in its infancy. More specifically, it reports the findings of a survey among more than 250 Dutch non-executive directors regarding their roles and limitations. Although the majority agreed that monitoring is

  5. Leadership Attributes of Physician Assistant Program Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eifel, Raymond Leo

    2014-01-01

    Physician assistant (PA) program directors perform an essential role in the initiation, continuation, and development of PA education programs in the rapidly changing environments of both health care and higher education. However, only limited research exists on this academic leader. This study examined the leadership roles of PA program directors…

  6. Veterinary Technician Program Director Leadership Style and Program Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renda-Francis, Lori A.

    2012-01-01

    Program directors of American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) accredited veterinary technician programs may have little or no training in leadership. The need for program directors of AVMA-accredited veterinary technician programs to understand how leadership traits may have an impact on student success is often overlooked. The purpose of…

  7. What's Ahead for the NCAA? Schultz, New Executive Director, Gives His Views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Charles S.

    1987-01-01

    The National Collegiate Athletic Association's new executive director responds to questions about leadership style, the tightening academic standards, effects of cost containment, women's athletics, blacks in coaching and sports administration, institutional autonomy, and competition with the College Football Association. (MSE)

  8. On the record: Interview with Peter Tinsley, Executive Director of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    On the record: Interview with Peter Tinsley, Executive Director of the Institute for Justice Sector Development, Canada. ... South African Crime Quarterly ... As reported by Andrew Faull in the previous edition of SA Crime Quarterly (36), the Independent Police Investigative Directorate (IPID) Bill is expected to be promulgated ...

  9. 17 CFR 229.401 - (Item 401) Directors, executive officers, promoters and control persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Management and Certain Security Holders § 229.401 (Item 401) Directors, executive officers, promoters and... of directors, if the solicitation is made by persons other than management, information shall be... proxy or information statement, materials to which the omission relates, a description of the event and...

  10. 7 CFR 718.307 - Special relief approval authority for State Executive Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special relief approval authority for State Executive... SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FARM MARKETING QUOTAS, ACREAGE ALLOTMENTS, AND PRODUCTION... relief approval authority for State Executive Directors. (a) General nature of the special authority...

  11. On the record: Interview with Francois Beukman, Executive Director ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Independent Complaints Directorate (ICD) is South Africa's primary independent agency responsible for investigating complaints against the police. It was established in 1997 under Chapter 10 of the South African Police Service Act. The Act makes the ICD's sole compulsory mandate the investigation of deaths in ...

  12. Code of conduct for non-executive directors and supervisors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lückerath – Rovers, M.; Bos, de A.

    2011-01-01

    After the corporate scandals at the beginning of the new millennium, corporate governance codes were drafted and implemented in national laws and regulations. Unfortunately, due to an ongoing supply of new financial scandals and societal deceptions, our society increasingly distrusts executive

  13. Prof. John Wood, Chief Executive Designate, Dr Gordon Walker, Directorate, Chief Executive, Prof. Ken J. Peach, Head of the Particle Physics Department, CLRC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, United Kingdom

    CERN Document Server

    Patrice Loïez

    2001-01-01

    L. to. r.: Dr. Ian Wilson, CLIC Deputy Study Leader, Prof. Ken J. Peach, Head of the Particle Physics Department, Prof. John Wood, Chief Executive Designate, Dr. Gordon Walker, Directorate, Chief Executive

  14. Stress and resilience in a post-Francis world - a qualitative study of executive nurse directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Daniel; Lankshear, Annette; Jones, Aled

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the role stressors experienced by executive nurse directors and strategies employed to maintain resilience. Recent financial pressures on and care quality scandals in the UK NHS impact on the work of executive nurse directors. The short length of tenure and the high number of vacancies for these posts point to the exacting demands of the role and raise questions about the support mechanisms available for the most senior nurses in NHS organizations. A grounded constructivist study. Semi-structured telephone interviews conducted between February-July, 2014. Stressors were both chronic (workload, lack of corporate responsibility for quality, reductions in quality team staffing, tensions between financial solvency and care quality and personal vulnerability) and acute (dealing with complaints and major incidents). Resilience required the support of fellow executives, peers, family and mentors and could be enhanced by self-discipline, good preparation for the post and ongoing coaching. Recent fiscal austerity and scandals relating to quality of care have increased pressure on executive nurse directors. Increasing size of organizations, limited resources devoted to quality combined with poorly defined limits of responsibility are all major stressors and executive nurse directors, both in the United Kingdom and internationally, need clear strategies to maintain resilience. Repetitive demands for data by oversight organizations may detract from more important quality assurance strategies. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Sense-making by clinical and non-clinical executive directors within new governance arrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, John; Holti, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the various ways in which clinical executive directors and non-clinical executive directors are interpreting and responding to the extensive reforms and restructuring in the UK health service. The paper draws upon detailed research in two very large teaching hospital organizations in order to understand how actors crucial to the delivery of this vision are responding. Schedule-structured interviews with executive directors were conducted, recorded, transcribed and coded. The clinical and non-clinical directors of these organizations engaged in a process of active sense-making are found, which is leading to significant changes to the service and also changes to identity. The clinical directors are revealing a willingness to assume accountability for devolved profit centres in their service lines. The non-clinical directors are supportive of this idea in broad terms but are cautious about releasing "too much" central control. The paper is based on just two case studies and the analyses are made through the perspectives of the executive teams in each case. Changes to healthcare environments of this kind are occurring in many countries, but such is the extent and intensity of these changes in the UK that the government's aspiration is high--it sees this set of reforms leading to a peerless world class health service. The way in which the actors make sense of and navigate their way through the cross cutting principles and the layered reforms is a critical issue. There have been few systematic studies of the practical reality involved in the enactment of profit centre and service line management initiatives in acute hospital settings and the ways these are understood and negotiated at executive team level.

  16. 5 CFR 1650.63 - Executive Director's exception to the spousal notification requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Executive Director's exception to the..., checking with relatives and mutual friends or using telephone directories and directory assistance for the... must include the following certification: “I understand that a false statement or willful...

  17. 12 CFR 5.51 - Changes in directors and senior executive officers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... executive officers, and the OCC's authority to disapprove those notices. (c) Definitions—(1) Director means... where material issues arise regarding the competence, experience, character, or integrity of proposed...) Content of notice. A notice must contain the identity, personal history, business background, and...

  18. Meet Karen Dilka, Executive Director of the Council on Education of the Deaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Judy K.

    2008-01-01

    In April 2007, at the annual Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) Convention in Louisville, the author had the pleasure of meeting and then dining with Dr. Karen Dilka, executive director of the Council on Education of the Deaf (CED). Dilka also contributed as the on-site liaison and local arrangements chairperson for the Division for…

  19. 17 CFR 200.30-13 - Delegation of authority to Associate Executive Director of the Office of Financial Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Associate Executive Director of the Office of Financial Management. 200.30-13 Section 200.30-13 Commodity... authority to Associate Executive Director of the Office of Financial Management. Pursuant to the provisions... Financial Management, to be performed by him or her, or under his or her direction by such person or persons...

  20. Executive Education: Predicting Student Success in Executive MBA Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegert, Kara O.

    2008-01-01

    Applicants to executive education programs have increased over recent years. Previous researchers had not thoroughly examined admission procedures related to the selection of applicants. In this study, the author examined common admission requirements that researchers and educators have used to predict success in 22 unique executive education…

  1. Interview with Dr. Philip Stone, executive director of the Institute for Dark Tourism Research

    OpenAIRE

    BAILLARGEON, Taïka

    2016-01-01

    Dr. Philip Stone is the executive director of the Institute for Dark Tourism Research. Founded in 2012 and based at the University of Central Lancashire (UCLan), England, the iDTR largely contributes to scientific research on Dark Tourism while offering guidance to industry practitioners and collaborating with the media. In 2009, along with his colleague Richard Sharpley, Philip Stone published The Darker Side of Travel: The Theory and Practice of Dark Tourism. This book has become one of the...

  2. Usefulness of Executive Development Programs to Corporate Executives

    OpenAIRE

    Raval, Vishvesh; Vyas, Khyati; Raval, Brahmaghosh

    2013-01-01

    India has been in centre stage of developing economies and commends high respect in knowledge based industries India has opened it economy to international competition and Indian products now compete with best products of the world. Indian promoters have realized that human resource is basic for future success. Dynamic managements have started training their executives to best practices with view to improve system efficiencies. Executive Development Programs are backbone of such training and...

  3. Residency Program Directors' View on the Value of Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korte, Catherine; Smith, Andrew; Pace, Heather

    2016-08-01

    There is no standardization for teaching activities or a requirement for residency programs to offer specific teaching programs to pharmacy residents. This study will determine the perceived value of providing teaching opportunities to postgraduate year 1 (PGY-1) pharmacy residents in the perspective of the residency program director. The study will also identify the features, depth, and breadth of the teaching experiences afforded to PGY-1 pharmacy residents. A 20-question survey was distributed electronically to 868 American Society of Health-System Pharmacists-accredited PGY-1 residency program directors. The survey was completed by 322 program directors. Developing pharmacy educators was found to be highly valued by 57% of the program directors. Advertisement of teaching opportunities was found to be statistically significant when comparing program directors with a high perceived value for providing teaching opportunities to program demographics. Statistically significant differences were identified associating development of a teaching portfolio, evaluation of Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences students, and delivery of didactic lectures with program directors who highly value developing pharmacy educators. Future residency candidates interested in teaching or a career in academia may utilize these findings to identify programs that are more likely to value developing pharmacy educators. The implementation of a standardized teaching experience among all programs may be difficult. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Malaysia; 2010 Article IV Consultation-Staff Report; Staff Statement; Public Information Notice on the Executive Board Discussion; and Statement by the Executive Director for Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2010-01-01

    Strong fundamentals and countercyclical policies have helped Malaysia during the global financial crisis. Executive Directors welcomed the authorities' challenge to make progress toward economic growth and structural transformation. Directors welcomed the consolidation effort in the 2010 budget, and stressed that a sound and sustained fiscal adjustment is essential. Directors appreciated the monetary policy stance to sustain noninflation growth. They welcomed the new Central Bank Act, which r...

  5. OPTIMAL PRICING OF EXECUTIVE MBA PROGRAMS

    OpenAIRE

    Francis Petit

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to determine the most strategic tuition pricing strategy that can be utilized by senior management in Business Schools when pricing Executive MBA Programs. To determine this information, the state of the Executive MBA market and three pricing strategies were reviewed in detail and an analysis ensued on the viability and applicability of each strategy for pricing Executive MBA Programs. The main findings of this study indicate that the Value Based pricing model ...

  6. Program directors' criteria for selection into urology residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissbart, Steven J; Stock, Jeffrey A; Wein, Alan J

    2015-04-01

    To investigate urology residency program directors' criteria for resident selection. In 2014, the urology residency program directors were surveyed using an email questionnaire. The generated questionnaire included the following 3 components: (1) assessing the factors used in selecting applicants for interviewing and matching, (2) rating the factors resulting in a negative decision for applicants for interviewing and matching, and (3) investigating the factors that gave applicants special attention or consideration from program directors. Analysis of variance testing and post hoc Student t tests were used to assess for differences in the mean importance score of the factors. Urology reference letters and United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) scores were ranked as the most important factors for applicant selection. A USMLE Step 1 score ≤220 and a USMLE Step 2 score ≤220 were the most deleterious factors to applicants, with a previous match failure being no less deleterious to an applicant than a USMLE Step 1 or 2 score ≤220. Program directors gave special attention or consideration to gender (25%), minority status (36.8%), being from the same medical school as the program director (61.8%), completing an away rotation at the program director's institution (86.8%), being a child of an academic urologist (47.4%), and being a child of an academic nonurologic physician (15.8%). Although program directors consider a variety of factors during the residency selection process, USMLE performance, urology references, and completing an away rotation at the program directors' institution appear to be the most important factors to program directors during the residency selection process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. 8 May 2014 - W. Watson-Wright, Assistant Director General and Executive Secretary UNESCO Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission Assistant Director-General for the Natural Sciences Sector ad interim visiting the CMS cavern with CMS Collaboration Deputy Spkokesperson K. Borras. Adviser to the Director-General, in charge of Relations with International Organisations M. Bona present throughout.

    CERN Multimedia

    Brice, Maximilien

    2014-01-01

    Ms Wendy Watson-Wright Assistant Director General and Executive Secretary UNESCO Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission Assistant Director-General for the Natural Sciences Sector ad interim UNESCO

  8. A Case for Graduate Programs for Television News Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, James W.

    1994-01-01

    Surveys 308 television news directors. Finds that 83.4% of respondents would like some formal management training if they could afford the time. Discusses three fundamental elements that should be included in such graduate programs for midcareer professionals. (SR)

  9. Marketing the Masters of Executive Management program

    OpenAIRE

    Barrera, Mark A.; Karriker, Timothy W.

    2007-01-01

    MBA Professional Report The purpose of this MBA project was to review the current Masters of Executive Management education curriculum at NPS. An internal analysis of the current program was conducted to fully understand the strategic goals of the program and the existing curriculum. An environmental scan of current and potential military customers was conducted to assess requirements for junior executive education and determine whether the MEM program corresponds with these requiremen...

  10. Signature of the Collaboration Agreement between THE UNITED NATIONS INSTITUTE FOR TRAINING AND RESEARCH (UNITAR), by Mr Carlos Lopes (UN Assistant Secretary-General and Executive Director of UNITAR) and by the Director General of CERN, Mr Robert Aymar

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2008-01-01

    Signature of the Collaboration Agreement between THE UNITED NATIONS INSTITUTE FOR TRAINING AND RESEARCH (UNITAR), by Mr Carlos Lopes (UN Assistant Secretary-General and Executive Director of UNITAR) and by the Director General of CERN, Mr Robert Aymar

  11. Cyprus; 2011 Article IV Consultation: Staff Report; Supplement; Public Information Notice on the Executive Board Discussion; and Statement by the Executive Director for Cyprus

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2011-01-01

    The 2011 Article IV Consultation report discusses the Cypriot economy, which faces strong headwinds and downside risks owing to financial turbulence in the euro area and the large exposure of Cypriot banks to Greece. Executive Directors noted that Cyprus faces daunting economic challenges in the face of faltering external demand and worsening domestic financial conditions. Directors urged the authorities to act forcefully to restore sound public finances and safeguard the stability of the ban...

  12. Quality Improvement in Otolaryngology Residency: Survey of Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowe, Sarah N

    2016-02-01

    The Clinical Learning Environment Review focuses on the responsibility of the sponsoring institution for quality and patient safety. Very little information is known regarding the status of quality improvement (QI) education during otolaryngology training. The purpose of this survey is to evaluate the extent of resident and faculty participation in QI and identify opportunities for both resident curriculum and faculty development. Cross-sectional survey A 15-item survey was distributed to all 106 otolaryngology program directors. The survey was developed after an informal review of the literature regarding education in QI and patient safety. Questions were directed at the format and content of the QI curriculum, as well as barriers to implementation. There was a 39% response rate. Ninety percent of responding program directors considered education in QI important or very important to a resident's future success. Only 23% of responding programs contained an educational curriculum in QI, and only 33% monitored residents' individual outcome measures. Barriers to implementation of a QI program included inadequate number of faculty with expertise in QI (75%) and competing resident educational demands (90%). Every program director considered morbidity and mortality conferences as an integral component in QI education. Program directors recognize the importance of QI in otolaryngology practice. Unfortunately, this survey identifies a distinct lack of resources in support of these educational goals. The results highlight the need to generate a comprehensive and stepwise approach to QI for faculty development and resident instruction. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  13. Sexual Health Education in Massage Therapy Programs: A Survey of Program Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamboni, Brian D.; Healey, Dale K.

    2016-01-01

    Massage therapy program directors completed an online survey to explore sexual education in massage therapy programs. The overall data suggest that program directors are supportive of sexual health education in the training of massage therapists and that such education is integrated into several aspects of their training programs. To enhance…

  14. Safety in Riding Programs: A Director's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kpachavi, Teresa

    1996-01-01

    Camp riding programs should be examined regularly for liability and risk management issues. Elements of a basic safety assessment include requiring proper safety apparel, removing obstructions from riding rings, ensuring doors and gates are closed, requiring use of lead ropes, securing equine medications, banning smoking, posting written…

  15. 31 March 2016 - Qatar Foundation Research and Development Executive Vice President H. Al-Ibrahim signing a Cooperation Agreement with CERN Director-General F. Gianotti.

    CERN Multimedia

    Brice, Maximilien

    2016-01-01

    Dr Hamad Al-Ibrahim Executive Vice President, Qatar Foundation Research and Development. Were present: CERN International Relations Unit, Adviser for Qatar P. Fassnacht; CERN Director for Research and Computing E. Elsen; Texas A&M Professor of Physics A. Safonov ; CERN Director for International Relations C. Warakaulle; Professor of Physics, Qatar University I.Al-Qaradawi; Executive Vice President H. Al-Ibrahim; CERN Director-General F. Gianotti; Ambassador Faisal Bin Abdulla Al-Henzab to the UNOG; Director of Research Computing, Texas A&M, Qatar O. Bouhali; Vice Dean, Texas A&M, Qatar E. Massad; Executive Director, Research Coordination & Special Initiatives, Qatar Foundation R&D D. Khoury.

  16. Program Director Survey: Attitudes Regarding Child Neurology Training and Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Ignacio; Feist, Terri B; Gilbert, Donald L

    2016-04-01

    As a result of major clinical and scientific advances and changes in clinical practice, the role of adult neurology training for Child Neurology and Neurodevelopmental Disability (NDD) certification has become controversial. The most recently approved requirements for board eligibility for child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability residents still include 12 months in adult neurology rotations. The objective of this study was to assess United States child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability residency program directors' opinions regarding optimal residency training. The authors developed an 18-item questionnaire and contacted all 80 child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability program directors via e-mail, using SurveyMonkey. A total of 44 program directors responded (55%), representing programs that train 78 categorical and 94 total resident positions, approximately 70% of those filled in the match. Respondents identified multiple areas where child neurology residents need more training, including genetics and neuromuscular disease. A substantial majority (73%) believed child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability residents need less than 12 adult neurology training months; however, most (75%) also believed adult hospital service and man-power needs (55%) and finances (34%) would pose barriers to reducing adult neurology. Most (70%) believed reductions in adult neurology training should be program flexible. A majority believed the written initial certification examination should be modified with more child neurology and fewer basic neuroscience questions. Nearly all (91%) felt the views of child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability program directors are under-represented within the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Residency Review Committee. The requirement for 12 adult neurology months for Child Neurology and Neurodevelopmental Disability certification is not consistent with the views of the majority of program

  17. Program Director Participation in a Leadership and Management Skills Fellowship and Characteristics of Program Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carek, Peter J; Mims, Lisa D; Conry, Colleen M; Maxwell, Lisa; Greenwood, Vicki; Pugno, Perry A

    2015-01-01

    The association between a residency program director completing a leadership and management skills fellowship and characteristics of quality and innovation of his/her residency program has not been studied. Therefore, the aim of this study is to examine the association between a residency program director's completion of a specific fellowship addressing these skills (National Institute for Program Director Development or NIPDD) and characteristics of quality and innovation of the program they direct. Using information from the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP), National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) and FREIDA® program characteristics were obtained. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the data. The relationship between programs with a NIPDD graduate as director and program quality measures and indicators of innovation was analyzed using both chi square and logistic regression. Initial analyses showed significant associations between the NIPDD graduate status of a program director and regional location, mean years of program director tenure, and the program's 5-year aggregate ABFM board pass rate from 2007--2011. After grouping the programs into tertiles, the regression model showed significant positive associations with programs offering international experiences and being a NIPDD graduate. Program director participation in a fellowship addressing leadership and management skills (ie, NIPDD) was found to be associated with higher pass rates of new graduates on a Board certification examination and predictive of programs being in the upper tertile of programs in terms of Board pass rates.

  18. Non-executive directors in the profit and non-profit sector : A different approach towards governance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lückerath – Rovers, M.; Bos, de A.; Quadackers, L.M.

    2009-01-01

    After the recent scandals and the introduction of new corporate governance codes, non-executive directors (NED's) and supervisors have started playing an increasingly important role in providing the ‘checks and balances’ of organizations. Little is known about the way in which NED's fulfill their

  19. Investigating Leadership in Charter Schools: An Examination of the Leadership Traits of Executive Directors in Successful Charter Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    This study was a qualitative exploration of educational leadership within charter schools in an attempt to identify traits demonstrated by executive directors of successful charter schools. Because much research has been conducted to identify trends in educational leadership, but comparable little within the unique context of charter schools, and…

  20. Marketing Executive MBA Programs: A Comparison of Student and Sponsoring Organization Decision Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrel, Ann E.; Schoenbachler, Denise D.

    2001-01-01

    Surveyed students and supporting organizations about their decision considerations regarding enrolling in and supporting an executive master of business administration (EMBA) program. The findings from this studyprovide direction for EMBA directors in strengthening recruiting efforts toward both students and organization sponsors. (EV)

  1. Program Directors' Opinions on the Competency of Postdoctoral General Dentistry Program Graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassman, Paul; And Others

    1996-01-01

    A survey of 136 general practice dental residency directors and 52 advanced education in general dentistry program directors investigated the extent to which program graduates possessed 85 different competencies, and their need for those competencies at graduation. More agreement than disagreement was found, but with considerable variation…

  2. Program directors' perceptions of undergraduate athletic training student retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Thomas G; Hertel, Jay; Mazerolle, Stephanie M; Dodge, Thomas M; Wathington, Heather D

    2015-02-01

    The average retention rate for students enrolled in undergraduate athletic training programs (ATPs) nationwide has been reported to be 81%, and slightly more than half of program directors (PDs) have indicated that retention of athletic training students (ATSs) is a problem. However, why PDs do or do not believe ATS retention is problematic is unknown. To determine why PDs do or do not believe ATS retention is problematic. Qualitative study. Undergraduate ATPs. We obtained responses from 177 of the 343 PDs (51.6%). Using data saturation as a guide, we randomly selected 16 PDs from the survey responses to participate in follow-up telephone interviews; 8 believed retention was a problem and 8 did not. During audio-recorded telephone interviews, we asked PDs why they thought retention was or was not a problem for athletic training education. Following verbatim transcription, we used grounded theory to analyze the interview data and maintained trustworthiness by using intercoder agreement, member checks, and peer review. Program directors believed that retaining ATSs was a problem because students lack information regarding athletic training and the rigor of the ATP. Program directors were consistent in their perception that ATPs do not have a retention challenge because of the use of a secondary admissions process. This finding was likely based on personal use of a secondary admissions process in the ATPs these PDs lead. Program directors who lead ATPs that struggle to retain ATSs should consider using a secondary admissions process. During the preprofessional phase of the ATP, faculty and staff should work to socialize students to the demands of the ATP and the professional lives of athletic trainers.

  3. Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) in pediatric dentistry residency programs: a survey of program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kateeb, Elham; Warren, John; Damiano, Peter; Momany, Elizabeth; Kanellis, Michael; Weber-Gasparoni, Karin; Ansley, Tim

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent of clinical training on atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) among pediatric dentistry residency programs and assess program directors' attitudes toward ART. All U.S. Pediatric Dentistry residency programs' directors were asked to complete a web-based survey. Sixty-one of the 76 directors (80 percent) completed the survey, with no significant response bias. Eighty-nine percent of the responding programs provided clinical instruction on ART. Of these, 30 percent provided ART training often/very often. ART was used mostly in single-surface cavities (43 percent) and as an interim treatment in primary teeth (57 percent). Factors associated with ART clinical training included not placing amalgams in primary teeth (Ppediatric dentistry residency programs in the United States. Residency directors' attitudes were highly predictive of the amount of clinical training provided, suggesting that directors need to be better informed about the use of ART.

  4. 25 CFR 2.19 - Action by Area Directors and Education Programs officials on appeal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Action by Area Directors and Education Programs officials... Programs officials on appeal. (a) Area Directors, Area Education Programs Administrators, Agency...—Indian Affairs/Director (Indian Education Programs) shall render written decisions in all cases appealed...

  5. Factors used by program directors to select hand surgery fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nies, Matthew S; Bollinger, Alexander J; Cassidy, Charles; Jebson, Peter J L

    2014-11-01

    To identify factors and attributes hand surgery fellowship program directors consider important in selecting applicants for interview and ranking. A web-based questionnaire was sent to all hand fellowship program directors in the United States. The questionnaire was designed to identify the most important criteria in granting an interview, sources of letters of recommendation, the interview process, and factors used to rank a candidate. Each criterion was ranked in importance on a 1 to 5 Likert scale, with 1 being not important and 5 being critical. All responses were anonymous. The most important criterion for each section of the survey was determined by comparing the average Likert scores. Fifty-two of 76 program directors responded (68%). The criteria with the highest mean Likert scores for offering an applicant an interview were, in order, quality letters of recommendation from hand surgeons, completion of an orthopedic surgery residency, comments regarding the applicant's technical competence, applicant having an MD degree (as opposed to a DO degree), and residency program reputation. The letters of recommendation with the highest value were from the division chief of hand surgery and another hand surgeon in the division/department. The most important features of the interview were maturity of applicant, ability of applicant to articulate thoughts, ability to listen well, self-confidence, and relevant questions asked. The most important factors in ranking a candidate were applicant integrity, commitment to hard work, quality of letters of recommendation, quality of the interview, and ability to work well with other members of the hand surgery team. There are identifiable factors considered important by hand surgery fellowship directors when selecting and ranking an applicant. This information may be valuable to medical students and residents contemplating careers in hand surgery. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier

  6. Program Director Participation in a Leadership and Management Skills Fellowship and Characteristics of Program Quality

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carek, Peter J; Mims, Lisa D; Conry, Colleen M; Maxwell, Lisa; Greenwood, Vicki; Pugno, Perry A

    2015-01-01

    The association between a residency program director completing a leadership and management skills fellowship and characteristics of quality and innovation of his/her residency program has not been...

  7. Investigating the Development of the Internal and External Service Tasks of Non-executive Directors: The Case of the Netherlands (1997-2005)

    OpenAIRE

    Bezemer, Pieter-Jan; Maassen, Gregory; Bosch, Frans; Volberda, Henk

    2007-01-01

    textabstractDuring the last decade, globalization and liberalization of financial markets, changing societal expectations and corporate governance scandals have increased the attention for the fiduciary duties of non-executive directors. In this context, recent corporate governance reform initiatives have emphasized the control task and independence of non-executive directors. However, little attention has been paid to their impact on the external and internal service tasks of non-executive d...

  8. 75 FR 5608 - National Protection and Programs Directorate; Communications Unit Leader (COML) Prerequisite and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY National Protection and Programs Directorate; Communications Unit Leader (COML) Prerequisite and Evaluation AGENCY: National Protection and Programs Directorate, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: 60...

  9. Program directors in their role as leaders of teaching teams in residency training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slootweg, I.A.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der; Heineman, M.J.; Scherpbier, A.; Lombarts, K.M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Program directors have a formal leading position within a teaching team. It is not clear how program directors fulfill their leadership role in practice. In this interview study we aim to explore the role of the program director as strategic leader, based on the research-question: What

  10. Child Welfare Training in Child Psychiatry Residency: A Program Director Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Terry G.; Cox, Julia R.; Walker, Sarah C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study surveys child psychiatry residency program directors in order to 1) characterize child welfare training experiences for child psychiatry residents; 2) evaluate factors associated with the likelihood of program directors' endorsing the adequacy of their child welfare training; and 3) assess program directors'…

  11. Critical Care Pharmacist Market Perceptions: Comparison of Critical Care Program Directors and Directors of Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, David R; Persaud, Rosemary A; Naseman, Ryan W; Choudhary, Kavish; Carter, Kristen E; Hansen, Amanda

    2017-05-01

    Background: While hospital beds continue to decline as patients previously treated as inpatients are stabilized in ambulatory settings, the number of critical care beds available in the United States continues to rise. Growth in pharmacy student graduation, postgraduate year 2 critical care (PGY2 CC) residency programs, and positions has also increased. There is a perception that the critical care trained pharmacist market is saturated, yet this has not been evaluated since the rise in pharmacy graduates and residency programs. Purpose: To describe the current perception of critical care residency program directors (CC RPDs) and directors of pharmacy (DOPs) on the critical care pharmacist job market and to evaluate critical care postresidency placement and anticipated changes in PGY2 CC programs. Methods: Two electronic surveys were distributed from October 2015 to November 2015 through Vizient/University HealthSystem Consortium, American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP), Society of Critical Care Medicine, and American College of Clinical Pharmacy listservs to target 2 groups of respondents: CC RPDs and DOPs. Questions were based on the ASHP Pharmacy Forecast and the Pharmacy Workforce Center's Aggregate Demand Index and were intended to identify perceptions of the critical care market of the 2 groups. Results: Of 116 CC RPDs, there were 66 respondents (56.9% response rate). Respondents have observed an increase in applicants; however, they do not anticipate increasing the number of positions in the next 5 years. The overall perception is that there is a balance in supply and demand in the critical care trained pharmacist market. A total of 82 DOPs responded to the survey. Turnover of critical care pharmacists within respondent organizations is expected to be low. Although a majority of DOPs plan to expand residency training positions, only 9% expect to increase positions in critical care PGY2 training. Overall, DOP respondents indicated a balance of

  12. Cognitive programs: Software for attention's executive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John K Tsotsos

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available What are the computational tasks that an executive controller for visual attention must solve? This question is posed in the context of the Selective Tuning model of attention. The range of required computations go beyond top-down bias signals or region-of-interest determinations, and must deal with overt and covert fixations, process timing and synchronization, information routing, memory, matching control to task, spatial localization, priming, and coordination of bottom-up with top-down information. During task execution, results must be monitored to ensure the expected results. This description includes the kinds of elements that are common in the control of any kind of complex machine or system. We seek a mechanistic integration of the above, in other words, algorithms that accomplish control. Such algorithms operate on representations, transforming a representation of one kind into another, which then forms the input to yet another algorithm. Cognitive Programs (CPs are hypothesized to capture exactly such representational transformations via stepwise sequences of operations. CPs, an updated and modernized offspring of Ullman's Visual Routines, impose an algorithmic structure to the set of attentional functions and play a role in the overall shaping of attentional modulation of the visual system so that it provides its best performance. This requires that we consider the visual system as a dynamic, yet general-purpose processor tuned to the task and input of the moment. This differs dramatically from the almost universal cognitive and computational views, which regard vision as a passively observing module to which simple questions about percepts can be posed, regardless of task. Differing from Visual Routines, CPs explicitly involve the critical elements of Visual Task Executive, Visual Attention Executive, and Visual Working Memory. Cognitive Programs provide the software that directs the actions of the Selective Tuning model of visual

  13. The Dutch 'Female Board Index' 2008 : Feamle executive and non-executive directors on corporate boards of Dutch listed companies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Lückerath-Rovers (Mijntje)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe Dutch ‘Female Board Index 2008’ provides for the second year an overview of female representation on the Board of Directors and Supervisory Boards of 113 Dutch NV companies1 listed on Euronext Amsterdam. The companies were classified according to the percentage of women present on

  14. Investigating the Development of the Internal and External Service Tasks of Non-executive Directors: The Case of the Netherlands (1997-2005)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. Bezemer (Pieter-Jan); G.F. Maassen (Gregory); F.A.J. van den Bosch (Frans); H.W. Volberda (Henk)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractDuring the last decade, globalization and liberalization of financial markets, changing societal expectations and corporate governance scandals have increased the attention for the fiduciary duties of non-executive directors. In this context, recent corporate governance reform

  15. The Dutch 'Female Board Index 2009 : Female executive and non-executive directors on corporate boards of Dutch listed companies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lückerath – Rovers, M.

    2009-01-01

    The Dutch ‘Female Board Index 2009’ provides for the third year an overview of female representation on the Executive Boards and Supervisory Boards of 107 Dutch NV companies listed on Euronext Amsterdam. The study showed that in September 2009, 38 listed Dutch companies have one or more women on

  16. 76 FR 34732 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security/National Protection and Programs Directorate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-14

    ... and Programs Directorate--002 Chemical Facility Anti- Terrorism Standards Personnel Surety Program... Programs Directorate--002 Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards Personnel Surety Program System of...--002 Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards Personnel Surety Program System of Records.'' On...

  17. Does the Size of Board of Directors and Executives affect Firm Performance in Malaysian Listed Firms?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maziar Ghasemi; Nazrul Hisyam Ab Razak

    2016-01-01

    .... Based on GMM regressions on a sample of 267 companies listed on Bursa Malaysia during 2010-2013, it is found that the board size and executive ratio have a positive impact on the firm profitability...

  18. Program Director Perceptions of the General Surgery Milestones Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drolet, Brian C; Marwaha, Jayson S; Wasey, Abdul; Pallant, Adam

    As a result of the Milestones Project, all Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education accredited training programs now use an evaluation framework based on outcomes in 6 core competencies. Despite their widespread use, the Milestones have not been broadly evaluated. This study sought to examine program director (PD) perceptions of the Milestones Project. A national survey of general surgery PDs distributed between January and March of 2016. A total of 132 surgical PDs responded to the survey (60% response rate). Positive perceptions included value for education (55%) and evaluation of resident performance (58%), as well as ability of Milestones to provide unbiased feedback (55%) and to identify areas of resident deficiency (58%). Meanwhile, time input and the ability of Milestones to discriminate underperforming programs were less likely to be rated positively (25% and 21%, respectively). Half of PDs felt that the Milestones were an improvement over their previous evaluation system (55%). Using the Milestones as competency-based, developmental outcomes measures, surgical PDs reported perceived benefits for education and objectivity in the evaluation of resident performance. The overall response to the Milestones was generally favorable, and most PDs would not return to their previous evaluation systems. To improve future iterations of the Milestones, many PDs expressed a desire for customization of the Milestones' content and structure to allow for programmatic differences. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Accelerating medical education: a survey of deans and program directors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Cangiarella

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: A handful of medical schools in the U.S. are awarding medical degrees after three years. While the number of three-year pathway programs is slowly increasing there is little data on the opinions of medical education leaders on the need for shortening training. Purpose: To survey deans and program directors (PDs to understand the current status of 3-year medical degree programs and to elicit perceptions of the need for shortening medical school and the benefits and liabilities of 3-year pathway programs (3YPP. Methods: Online surveys were emailed to the academic deans of all U.S. medical schools and to a convenience sample of residency and fellowship PDs. Frequency distributions are reported for key survey items and content analysis was used to describe open-ended responses. Results: Of the respondents, 7% have a 3YPP, 4% were developing one, and 35% were considering development. In 2014, 47% of educational deans and 32% of PDs agreed that there may be a need to shorten medical school. From a list of benefits, both deans and PDs agreed that the greatest benefit to a 3YPP was debt reduction (68%. PDs and deans felt reduced readiness for independence, reduced exposure to complementary curricula regarding safety and quality improvement, premature commitment to a specialty, and burnout were all potential liabilities. From a list of concerns, PDs were concerned about depth of clinical exposure, direct patient care experience, ability to assume increased responsibility, level of maturity, and certainty regarding career choice. Conclusions: Over one-third of medical schools are considering the development of a 3YPP. While there may be benefits for a select group of students, concerns regarding maturity, depth of clinical exposure, and competency must be addressed for these programs to be well received.

  20. FEMA Grants Program Directorate - Preparedness (Non-Disaster) and Assistance to Firefighter Grants

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The Grant Programs Directorate (GPD) strategically and effectively administers and manages FEMA grants to ensure critical and measurable results for customers and...

  1. The Program Directors' Perspective on the Goals and Objectives of Advanced General Dentistry Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badner, Victor M.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A survey of 265 postgraduate general dentistry program directors and dental general practice residency directors found substantial agreement about the relative importance of various program goals and curriculum areas. The largest differences were found among site types (e.g., hospitals vs. dental schools) not program types. (MSE)

  2. Leadership Behaviour and Effectiveness of Academic Program Directors in Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilkinas, Tricia; Ladyshewsky, Richard K.

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on leadership behaviour and effectiveness of university academic program directors who have responsibility for managing a program or course of study. The leadership capabilities were assessed using the Integrated Competing Values Framework as its theoretical foundation. Data from 90 academic program directors and 710…

  3. Emergency medicine resident moonlighting: a survey of program directors. CORD Task Force on Resident Moonlighting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdorf, M I; Bearie, B; Ritter, M S; Ferkich, A

    1995-04-01

    1) To systematically describe emergency medicine (EM) program directors' perceptions of the benefits and risks of resident moonlighting. 2) To assess moonlighting policies of EM residencies, the degree of compliance with these policies, and the methods of dealing with residents who are out of compliance. A written survey was mailed or hand-delivered to all allopathic and osteopathic EM residency directors in the United States in 1992-93. Incomplete and ambiguous surveys were completed by phone. There was a 96% response rate (113/118). The average EM resident clinical workweek ranged from 38 to 50 hours while the resident was assigned to ED rotations. Most (90%) of the program directors believe moonlighting interferes with residency duties to some degree. Few (10%) programs prohibit moonlighting altogether, although 44% limit moonlighting to an average of 41.5 hours per month. Program directors believe residents moonlight primarily for financial reasons. Most (60%) of the program directors believe moonlighting offers experience not available in the residency, primarily related to autonomous practice. Fifteen programs reported residents who had been sued for malpractice while moonlighting, with one program director named along with the resident. One third of program directors have penalized residents for abuse of moonlighting privileges. EM residency directors are concerned about the effect of moonlighting on resident education. The directors' concerns regarding litigation, excessive work hours, and interference with residency duties are balanced by a general acceptance of the financial need to supplement residency income.

  4. Effects of Department of Defense Instruction 5000.02 on Joint Program Executive Office Chemical Biological Defense (JPEO-CBD) Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    under the guidance of the Army as the Executive Agent, to ensure that warfighters are properly prepared to respond to medical and non -medical CBD...JOINT PROGRAM EXECUTIVE OFFICE – CHEMICAL BIOLOGICAL DEFENSE (JPEO-CBD) EFFECTIVENESS September 2016 By: Emily C. Whaley Advisors...reducing this burden, to Washington headquarters Services, Directorate for Information Operations and Reports, 1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite

  5. Evaluating Market Orientation of an Executive MBA Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubas, Khalid M.; Ghani, Waqar I.; Davis, Stanley; Strong, James T.

    1998-01-01

    A study assessed the market orientation of the executive Master's in Business Administration (MBA) program at Saint Joseph's University (Pennsylvania) in terms of 12 skills and knowledge areas that reflect effective managerial performance and the student-executives' perceptions of program strengths and weaknesses in delivering these skills.…

  6. Academic productivity of directors of ACGME-accredited residency programs in surgery and anesthesiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culley, Deborah J; Fahy, Brenda G; Xie, Zhongcong; Lekowski, Robert; Buetler, Sascha; Liu, Xiaoxia; Cohen, Neal H; Crosby, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Scholarly activity is expected of program directors of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited residency training programs. Anesthesiology residency programs are cited more often than surgical programs for deficiencies in academic productivity. We hypothesized that this may in part reflect differences in scholarly activity between program directors of anesthesiology and surgical trainings programs. To test the hypothesis, we examined the career track record of current program directors of ACGME-accredited anesthesiology and surgical residency programs at the same institutions using PubMed citations and funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) as metrics of scholarly activity. Between November 1, 2011 and December 31, 2011, we obtained data from publicly available Web sites on program directors at 127 institutions that had ACGME-accredited programs in both anesthesiology and surgery. Information gathered on each individual included year of board certification, year first appointed program director, academic rank, history of NIH grant funding, and number of PubMed citations. We also calculated the h-index for a randomly selected subset of 25 institution-matched program directors. There were no differences between the groups in number of years since board certification (P = 0.42), academic rank (P = 0.38), or years as a program director (P = 0.22). However, program directors in anesthesiology had less prior or current NIH funding (P = 0.002), fewer total and education-related PubMed citations (both P < 0.001), and a lower h-index (P = 0.001) than surgery program directors. Multivariate analysis revealed that the publication rate for anesthesiology program directors was 43% (95% confidence interval, 0.31-0.58) that of the corresponding program directors of surgical residency programs, holding other variables constant. Program directors of anesthesiology residency programs have considerably less scholarly activity in terms of

  7. Nurturing a Generation of Leaders: The College Library Directors' Mentor Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardesty, Larry

    2017-01-01

    The College Library Directors' Mentor Program has operated for more than 20 years, during which a substantial portion of the target audience of first-year library directors of small colleges has participated. Through this article, the authors identify the purpose of the program, describe its evolution and current status, and examine the nature of…

  8. 75 FR 69693 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security National Protection and Programs Directorate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-15

    ...-0086] Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security National Protection and Programs Directorate...-2182), Privacy Officer, National Protection and Programs Directorate, Department of Homeland Security... Privacy Act protections to all individuals where systems of records maintain information on U.S. citizens...

  9. An Empirical Investigation of the Effectiveness of Executive Development Programs As Perceived by Participating Marketing and Sales Executives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trickett, Wilson L.

    A study of the effectiveness of executive development programs for marketing and sales executives tested three hypotheses: (1) participation in such programs results in identifiable benefits as perceived by the participants; (2) academically oriented executive development programs have significant advantages over company oriented programs as…

  10. [Expectations of nursing managers and assistants as to the managerial style of an executive director of a teaching hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beccaria, L M; Fávero, N

    2000-04-01

    The present study focussed the expectations of 13 nurses from a University hospital regarding to the executive director's managerial style. The Managerial Grid of BLAKE & MOUTON (1987) was used as a theoretical reference and a questionnaire was applied based on the Grid & Leadership in Nursing Instrument elaborated by TREVIZAN (1993). Results evidenced that the most expected style corresponds, considering the Managerial Grid, to "team management", or 9.9. The second style was the "management of men organization", or 5.5. Authors concluded that there are important expectations for these nurses related to a management that enhances values such as trust, respect, commitment, personal investment and team work in order to achieve the organization goals.

  11. Burnout and distress among internal medicine program directors: results of a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Colin P; Halvorsen, Andrew J; Swenson, Sara L; McDonald, Furman S

    2013-08-01

    Physician burnout and distress has been described in national studies of practicing physicians, internal medicine (IM) residents, IM clerkship directors, and medical school deans. However, no comparable national data exist for IM residency program directors. To assess burnout and distress among IM residency program directors, and to evaluate relationships of distress with personal and program characteristics and perceptions regarding implementation and consequences of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) regulations. The 2010 Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine (APDIM) Annual Survey, developed by the APDIM Survey Committee, was sent in August 2010 to the 377 program directors with APDIM membership, representing 99.0 % of the 381 United States categorical IM residency programs. The 2010 APDIM Annual Survey included validated items on well-being and distress, including questions addressing quality of life, satisfaction with work-life balance, and burnout. Questions addressing personal and program characteristics and perceptions regarding implementation and consequences of ACGME regulations were also included. Of 377 eligible program directors, 282 (74.8 %) completed surveys. Among respondents, 12.4 % and 28.8 % rated their quality of life and satisfaction with work-life balance negatively, respectively. Also, 27.0 % reported emotional exhaustion, 10.4 % reported depersonalization, and 28.7 % reported overall burnout. These rates were lower than those reported previously in national studies of medical students, IM residents, practicing physicians, IM clerkship directors, and medical school deans. Aspects of distress were more common among younger program directors, women, and those reporting greater weekly work hours. Work-home conflicts were common and associated with all domains of distress, especially if not resolved in a manner effectively balancing work and home responsibilities. Associations with program characteristics

  12. Teaching operative dictation. A survey of obstetrics/gynecology residency program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzin, Andrew W; Spitzer, Mark

    2003-11-01

    To assess current efforts to teach operative dictation in obstetrics and gynecology residency programs. A survey detailing the didactics of operative dictation was distributed in a single mailing to all program directors listed in the roster of the Council on Residency Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology. Of 274 surveys distributed, 115 (42%) were returned. Ten percent of program directors reported defined curricula related to operative dictation. Using a combination of lectures, personal instruction and review of previous notes, attendings and senior residents share the responsibility for teaching operative dictation in the majority (78%) of programs. Sixty percent of program directors were in favor of more formal guidelines for residency education in the technique of operative dictation, 34% were opposed, and 6% offered no opinion. Obstetrics and gynecology residency programs rarely have a structured curriculum for teaching operative dictation, and the majority of program directors support the institution of more formal guidelines.

  13. Silver Diamine Fluoride in Pediatric Dentistry Training Programs: Survey of Graduate Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Travis; Scott, Joanna M; Crystal, Yasmi O; Berg, Joel H; Milgrom, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate practice, teaching, and perceived barriers to the use of silver diamine fluoride and other caries control agents in U.S. pediatric dentistry residency programs. A 14-question survey regarding use and teaching of caries control agents was sent via email to residency program directors in 2015. Survey participants responded, using a web-based survey tool, by completing a paper and pencil survey instrument, or by interview. Surveys were completed by 74 directors or associate directors (87 percent adjusted response rate). More than a quarter (25.7 percent) reported use of silver diamine fluoride, with 68.9 percent expecting to increase use. The use of silver diamine fluoride was not associated with region or program type. Programs reported commonly used caries control agents of fluoride varnish (100 percent), acidulated phosphate fluoride foam (48.6 percent), silver nitrate (9.5 percent), and povidone iodine (1.3 percent). Most felt silver diamine fluoride should be used only with high-risk patients (89.2 percent), and the majority agreed it could be used in primary and permanent teeth. The most frequently reported barrier to use of silver diamine fluoride was parental acceptance (91.8 percent). Silver diamine fluoride is being rapidly adopted in graduate pediatric dentistry training programs, with the majority expecting to incorporate it into their teaching clinics and curricula.

  14. Benefits of externships with pediatric dentistry programs for potential residents: program directors' and current residents' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Ulrich; Storey, Bryan; Hanson, Peter D

    2014-03-01

    This study's goal was to understand the extent, framework, and benefits of externships with prospective residency programs undertaken by predoctoral dental students or dentists interested in applying for a residency program. In 2012, a questionnaire was sent to all pediatric dentistry residents and program directors in the United States (63 percent and 74 percent return rate, respectively). Externships were offered by fifty-seven of the seventy-six programs. Most program directors (95 percent) agreed that externships are beneficial and compensate at least partially for the lack of numerical National Board Dental Examination scores or class rankings. Among the responding residents, 61 percent were female. The top reasons given by residents for choosing to extern with a certain program were its location and perceived reputation. Of the 249 respondents who did an externship, 47 percent externed with their current program. The acceptance rate into the number one choice of program was similar among those who did an externship vs. those who did not (73 percent vs. 75 percent). No relationship was found between gender and externships among the 341 respondents who were accepted into their top choice. Most of the residents (98.8 percent) felt that completing an externship was beneficial, and 88 percent got an increased understanding for the differences between university- and non-university-based residency programs.

  15. 32 CFR 700.336 - The Director, Office of Program Appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false The Director, Office of Program Appraisal. 700.336 Section 700.336 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED... Secretary of the Navy The Office of the Secretary of the Navy/the Staff Assistants § 700.336 The Director...

  16. Pharmaceutical industry support and residency education: a survey of internal medicine program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loertscher, Laura L; Halvorsen, Andrew J; Beasley, Brent W; Holmboe, Eric S; Kolars, Joseph C; McDonald, Furman S

    2010-02-22

    Interactions with the pharmaceutical industry are known to affect the attitudes and behaviors of medical residents; however, to our knowledge, a nationally representative description of current practices has not been reported. The Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine surveyed 381 US internal medicine residency program directors in 2006-2007 regarding pharmaceutical industry support to their training programs. The primary outcome measure was program director report of pharmaceutical financial support to their residency. Demographic and performance variables were analyzed with regard to these responses. In all, 236 program directors (61.9%) responded to the survey. Of these, 132 (55.9%) reported accepting support from the pharmaceutical industry. One hundred seventy of the 236 program directors (72.0%) expressed the opinion that pharmaceutical support is not desirable. Residency programs were less likely to receive pharmaceutical support when the program director held the opinion that industry support was not acceptable (odds ratio [OR], 0.07; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.02-0.22). Programs located in the southern United States were more likely to accept pharmaceutical support (OR, 8.45; 95% CI, 1.95-36.57). The American Board of Internal Medicine pass rate was inversely associated with acceptance of industry support: each 1% decrease in the pass rate was associated with a 21% increase in the odds of accepting industry support (OR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.07-1.36). Although most of the program directors did not find pharmaceutical support desirable, more than half reported acceptance of industry support. Acceptance of pharmaceutical industry support was less prevalent among residency programs with a program director who considered support unacceptable and those with higher American Board of Internal Medicine pass rates.

  17. Programming real-time executives in higher order language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foudriat, E. C.

    1982-01-01

    Methods by which real-time executive programs can be implemented in a higher order language are discussed, using HAL/S and Path Pascal languages as program examples. Techniques are presented by which noncyclic tasks can readily be incorporated into the executive system. Situations are shown where the executive system can fail to meet its task scheduling and yet be able to recover either by rephasing the clock or stacking the information for later processing. The concept of deadline processing is shown to enable more effective mixing of time and information synchronized systems.

  18. Training directors have positive perceptions of a competency-based gastroenterology and transplant hepatology fellowship program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halegoua-De Marzio, Dina L; Herrine, Steven K

    2015-02-01

    In 2012, the American Board of Internal Medicine approved a pilot competency-based transplant hepatology (TH) training program. This program allows gastroenterology (GI) and TH fellowships to be completed in 3 years. We investigated the perceptions and beliefs of GI and TH division and fellowship program directors on the competency-based TH training program. All current GI and TH division and fellowship program directors from the 162 fellowship programs accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education were invited via e-mail to anonymously complete the online survey. The survey questioned their perceptions of the 3-year combined GI and TH training program. A total of 116 participants completed the survey (∼38% response rate). Most respondents were GI fellowship directors (61%); 15% were GI and hepatology division directors, 19% were TH fellowship directors, 14% were TH division directors, and 5% were GI division directors. Most of the respondents were in favor of the pilot program (85%). Only 63% of all respondents believed that graduates of the pilot program would achieve the same level of competency in GI as those who completed the traditional program. Overall, 71% believed incorporation of the 3-year training model would increase interest and participation in TH fellowships. Most of the academic GI and TH division and fellowship program directors embrace competency-based fellowship education and TH subspecialty training during the designated 3-year GI fellowship. Future studies will be needed to reevaluate these beliefs after several years. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Attitudes of Family Medicine Program Directors Toward Osteopathic Residents Under the Single Accreditation System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempstead, Laura K; Shaffer, Todd D; Williams, Karen B; Arnold, Lt Col James

    2017-04-01

    Between 2015 and 2020, residency programs accredited through the American Osteopathic Association (AOA) are preparing the single graduate medical education (GME) system through the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). (1) To assess the attitudes of family medicine program directors in programs accredited dually by the AOA and ACGME (AOA/ACGME) or ACGME only toward the clinical and academic preparedness of osteopathic residency candidates and (2) to determine program director attitudes toward the perceived value of osteopathic-focused education, including osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) curricula. A survey was sent to program directors of AOA/ACGME and ACGME-only accredited family medicine residency programs. Items concerned program directors' perception of the academic and clinical strength of osteopathic residents at the onset of residency, the presence of osteopathic faculty and residents currently in the program, and the presence of formal curricula for teaching OMT. The perceived value of osteopathic focus was obtained through a composite score of 5 items. A total of 38 AOA/ACGME family medicine residency program directors (17%) and 211 ACGME family medicine residency program directors (45.6%) completed the survey (N=249). No difference was found in the ranking of the perceived clinical preparation of osteopathic residents vs allopathic residents in programs with and without OMT curricula (P=.054). Directors of programs with OMT curricula perceived the academic preparation of their osteopathic residents vs allopathic residents more highly than those without OMT curricula (P=.039). Directors of AOA/ACGME programs perceived both the academic preparation and clinical preparation of their osteopathic residents more highly than those at ACGME-only programs (P=.004 and P=.002, respectively). Directors of AOA/ACGME programs, as well as those whose programs have an osteopathic focus in curricular offerings, were more likely to rank the

  20. Quality improvement educational practices in pediatric residency programs: survey of pediatric program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Keith J; Craig, Mark S; Moses, James M

    2014-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires residents to learn quality improvement (QI) methods to analyze, change, and improve their practice. Little is known about how pediatric residency programs design, implement, and evaluate QI curricula to achieve this goal. We sought to describe current QI educational practices, evaluation methods, and program director perceptions through a national survey. A survey of QI curricula was developed, pilot tested, approved by the Association of Pediatric Program Directors (APPD), and distributed to pediatric program directors. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. The response rate was 53% (104 of 197). Most respondents reported presence of a QI curriculum (85%, 88 of 104), including didactic sessions (83%) and resident QI projects (88%). Continuous process improvement was the most common methodology addressed (65%). The most frequent topics taught were "Making a Case for QI" (68%), "PDSA [plan-do-study-act] Cycles" (66%), and "Measurement in QI" (60%). Projects were most frequently designed to improve clinical care (90%), hospital operations (65%), and the residency (61%). Only 35% evaluated patient outcomes, and 17% had no formal evaluation. Programs had a mean of 6 faculty members (standard deviation 4.4, range 2-20) involved in teaching residents QI. Programs with more faculty involved were more likely to have had a resident submit an abstract to a professional meeting about their QI project (9, 92%; P = .003). Barriers to teaching QI included time (66%), funding constraints (39%), and absent local QI expertise (33%). Most PPDs (65%) believed that resident input in hospital QI was important, but only 24% reported resident involvement. Critical factors for success included an experiential component (56%) and faculty with QI expertise (50%). QI curricular practices vary greatly across pediatric residency programs. Although pediatric residency programs commit a fair number of resources to

  1. Advanced general dentistry program directors' attitudes on physician involvement in pediatric oral health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raybould, Ted P; Wrightson, A Stevens; Massey, Christi Sporl; Smith, Tim A; Skelton, Judith

    2009-01-01

    Childhood oral disease is a significant health problem, particularly for vulnerable populations. Since a major focus of General Dentistry Program directors is the management of vulnerable populations, we wanted to assess their attitudes regarding the inclusion of physicians in the prevention, assessment, and treatment of childhood oral disease. A survey was mailed to all General Practice Residency and Advanced Education in General Dentistry program directors (accessed through the ADA website) to gather data. Spearman's rho was used to determine correlation among variables due to nonnormal distributions. Overall, Advanced General Dentistry directors were supportive of physicians' involvement in basic aspects of oral health care for children, with the exception of applying fluoride varnish. The large majority of directors agreed with physicians' assessing children's oral health and counseling patients on the prevention of dental problems. Directors who treated larger numbers of children from vulnerable populations tended to strongly support physician assistance with early assessment and preventive counseling.

  2. 75 FR 82037 - National Protection and Programs Directorate; President's National Security Telecommunications...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-29

    ... Doc No: 2010-32709] DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY [Docket No. DHS-2010-0050] National Protection and Programs Directorate; President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee AGENCY: National... Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: The President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee (NSTAC...

  3. 75 FR 9607 - National Protection and Programs Directorate; Critical Infrastructure Partnership Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-03

    ... SECURITY National Protection and Programs Directorate; Critical Infrastructure Partnership Advisory Council... of owners and/or operators for each of the critical infrastructure and key resources (CIKR) sectors...; conducting operational activities related to critical infrastructure protection security measures, incident...

  4. Training internal medicine residents in outpatient HIV care: a survey of program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jennifer; Chacko, Karen; Guiton, Gretchen; Aagaard, Eva

    2010-09-01

    The care of patients with HIV is increasingly focused on outpatient chronic disease management. It is not known to what extent internal medicine residents in the US are currently being trained in or encouraged to provide primary care for this population of patients. To survey internal medicine residency program directors about their attitudes regarding training in outpatient HIV care and current program practices. Program directors were surveyed first by email. Non-responding programs were mailed up to two copies of the survey. All internal medicine residency program directors in the US. Program director attitudes and residency descriptions. Of the 372 program directors surveyed, 230 responded (61.8 %). Forty-two percent of program directors agreed that it is important to train residents to be primary care providers for patients with HIV. Teaching outpatient-based HIV curricula was a priority for 45.1%, and 56.5% reported that exposing residents to outpatient HIV clinical care was a high priority. Only 46.5% of programs offer a dedicated rotation in outpatient HIV care, and 50.5% of programs have curricula in place to teach about outpatient HIV care. Only 18.8% of program directors believed their graduates had the skills to be primary providers for patients with HIV, and 70.6% reported that residents interested in providing care for patients with HIV pursued ID fellowships. The strongest reasons cited for limited HIV training during residency were beliefs that patients with HIV prefer to be seen and receive better care in ID clinics compared to general medicine clinics. With a looming HIV workforce shortage, we believe that internal medicine programs should create educational experiences that will provide their residents with the skills and knowledge necessary to meet the healthcare needs of this population.

  5. Program director`s overview report for the Office of Health & Environmental Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, D. [ed.

    1994-02-01

    LBL performs basic and applied research and develops technologies in support of the Office of Health and Environmental Research`s mission to explore and mitigate the long-term health and environmental consequences of energy use and to advance solutions to major medical challenges. The ability of the Laboratory to engage in this mission depends upon the strength of its core competencies. In addition, there are several key capabilities that are cross-cutting, or underlie, many of the core competencies. Attention is focused on the following: Facilities and resources; research management practices; research in progress; program accomplishments and research highlights; program orientation; work for non-OHER organizations DOE; critical issues; and resource orientation.

  6. Use of social media by residency program directors for resident selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Jeff; Scott, Doneka R; Smith, Kelly

    2010-10-01

    Pharmacy residency program directors' attitudes and opinions regarding the use of social media in residency recruitment and selection were studied. A 24-item questionnaire was developed, pilot tested, revised, and sent to 996 residency program directors via SurveyMonkey.com. Demographic, social media usage, and opinions on social media data were collected and analyzed. A total of 454 residency program directors completed the study (response rate, 46.4%). The majority of respondents were women (58.8%), were members of Generation X (75.4%), and worked in a hospital or health system (80%). Most respondents (73%) rated themselves as either nonusers or novice users of social media. Twenty percent indicated that they had viewed a pharmacy residency applicant's social media information. More than half (52%) had encountered e-professionalism issues, including questionable photos and posts revealing unprofessional attitudes, and 89% strongly agreed or agreed that information voluntarily published online was fair game for judgments on character, attitudes, and professionalism. Only 4% of respondents had reviewed applicants' profiles for residency selection decisions. Of those respondents, 52% indicated that the content had no effect on resident selection. Over half of residency program directors were unsure whether they will use social media information for future residency selection decisions. Residency program directors from different generations had different views regarding social media information and its use in residency applicant selections. Residency program directors anticipated using social media information to aid in future decisions for resident selection and hiring.

  7. Case-Logging Practices in Otolaryngology Residency Training: National Survey of Residents and Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermody, Sarah M; Gao, William; McGinn, Johnathan D; Malekzadeh, Sonya

    2017-06-01

    Objective (1) Evaluate the consistency and manner in which otolaryngology residents log surgical cases. (2) Assess the extent of instruction and guidance provided by program directors on case-logging practices. Study Design Cross-sectional national survey. Setting Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education otolaryngology residency programs in the United States. Subjects and Methods US otolaryngology residents, postgraduate year 2 through graduating chiefs as of July 2016, were recruited to respond to an anonymous questionnaire designed to characterize surgical case-logging practices. Program directors of US otolaryngology residency programs were recruited to respond to an anonymous questionnaire to elucidate how residents are instructed to log cases. Results A total of 272 residents and 53 program directors completed the survey, yielding response rates of 40.6% and 49.5%, respectively. Perceived accuracy of case logs is low among residents and program directors. Nearly 40% of residents purposely choose not to log certain cases, and 65.1% of residents underreport cases performed. More than 80% of program directors advise residents to log procedures performed outside the operating room, yet only 16% of residents consistently log such cases. Conclusion Variability in surgical case-logging behaviors and differences in provided instruction highlight the need for methods to improve consistency of logging practices. It is imperative to standardize practices across otolaryngology residency programs for case logs to serve as an accurate measure of surgical competency. This study provides a foundation for reform efforts within residency programs and for the Resident Case Log System.

  8. Allergy education in otolaryngology residency: a survey of program directors and residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sarah E; Franzese, Christine; Lin, Sandra Y

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to survey program directors of the accredited otolaryngology residency programs and resident attendees of the 2013 American Academy of Otolaryngic Allergy (AAOA) Basic/MOC Course regarding resident education and participation as well as assessment of competency in otolaryngic allergy and immunotherapy. A multiple-choice questionnaire was sent to all accredited otolaryngology residency training programs in the United States as part of resident attendance at the 2013 AAOA CORE Basic/MOC Course. Following this, a similar multiple-choice survey was sent to all resident attendees from the programs that responded positively. Program directors reported that 73% of their academic institutions offer allergy testing and immunotherapy. More PDs than residents indicated that residents participate in allergy practice and perform/interpret skin testing and in vitro testing, and more residents (85%) than program directors (63%) reported inadequate or no allergy training. Program directors and residents equally indicated that residents do not calculate immunotherapy vial formulations or administer immunotherapy injections. The majority of program directors indicated that resident competency in allergy was assessed through direct observation, whereas residents more commonly perceived that no assessment of competency was being performed for any portion of allergy practice. This survey demonstrates a discrepancy between program directors and residents regarding resident involvement and adequacy of training in the allergy practice. Although the majority of otolaryngology residencies report offering otolaryngic allergy services and education, the vast majority of residents report inadequate allergy training and less participation in an allergy practice compared to the majority of program directors. © 2013 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  9. Programs director`s report for the Office of Health and Environmental Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    Since its establishment, the Department of Energy`s Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) has had responsibility for conducting biological research to develop the knowledge needed to identify, understand, and anticipate the long-term health consequences of energy use and development, including the potential health impacts of radiation. The Health Effects Research Program has established the basis for understanding the health consequences of radiation for humans, developed radiation dosimetry methodology, characterized and evaluated the health impacts of fossil fuels, and developed and conducted research to determine the health impacts of inhaled toxicants. The results of this research have provided input for setting genetic standards for radiation and chemical exposure.

  10. Director's Discretionary Research and Development Program: Annual Report, Fiscal Year 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-03-01

    The Director's Discretionary Research and Development Program, Annual Report Fiscal Year 2006 is an annual management report that summarizes research projects funded by the DDRD program. The NREL DDRD program comprises projects that strengthen NREL's four technical competencies: Integrated Systems, Renewable Electricity, Renewable Fuels, and Strategic Analysis.

  11. Program Directors' Perceptions of Reasons Professional Master's Athletic Training Students Persist and Depart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Pitney, William A.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Dodge, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Student retention is a key issue in higher education. With the increasing number of professional master's (PM) athletic training programs (ATPs), understanding student retention is necessary to maintain viable programs. Objective: Explore program directors' perceptions of the reasons athletic training students persist and depart from PM…

  12. A short executive function training program improves preschoolers’ working memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma eBlakey

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive training has been shown to improve executive functions in middle childhood and adulthood. However, fewer studies have targeted the preschool years – a time when executive functions undergo rapid development. The present study tested the effects of a short four session executive function training program in 54 four-year-olds. The training group significantly improved their working memory from pre-training relative to an active control group. Notably, this effect extended to a task sharing few surface features with the trained tasks, and continued to be apparent three months later. In addition, the benefits of training extended to a measure of mathematical reasoning three months later, indicating that training executive functions during the preschool years has the potential to convey benefits that are both long-lasting and wide-ranging.

  13. NPS Executive Education and Professional Development Programs Annual Report 2016

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) has strong executive education and professional development (EE/PD) programs that extend the reach of its graduate programs to mid- or senior-grade professionals who are unable to take the time out of their careers to attend degree programs, or who need targeted information at their locations on their time schedules. In addition to degree and certificate courses offered for credit, Schools, Centers, Departments, Institutes and other organizations of NPS pro...

  14. Marketing the Masters of Executive Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    utilized this example of product differentiation to capture a target market by restructuring their current model line up to include the new four door...managed using a product differentiation strategy to minimize the risks of cannibalization from its 18-month MBA program (Moses, 2005a). Discussion

  15. Leadership frames and perceptions of effectiveness among health information management program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasnett, Bonita; Ross, Thomas

    2007-10-04

    Leadership is important to health science education. For program effectiveness, directors should possess leadership skills to appropriately lead and manage their departments. Therefore, it is important to explore the leadership styles of programs' leaders as health science education is undergoing reform. Program directors of two and four-year health information management programs were surveyed to determine leadership styles. The study examined leadership styles or frames, the number of leadership frames employed by directors, and the relationship between leadership frames and their perceptions of their effectiveness as a manager and as a leader. The study shows that program directors are confident of their human resource and structural skills and less sure of the political and symbolic skills required of leaders. These skills in turn are correlated with their self-perceived effectiveness as managers and leaders. Findings from the study may assist program directors in their career development and expansion of health information management programs as a discipline within the health science field. As academic health centers receive greater pressure from the Institute of Medicine and accrediting agencies to reform health science education, the question of leadership arises. These centers have taken a leadership role in reforming health professional education by partnering with educational institutions to improve the health of communities. To achieve health education reform, health sciences educators must apply effective leadership skills.1 College and university leadership is challenged on how to best approach educational reform across health science fields. This article discusses leadership styles employed by program directors of one health science department, health information management, in directing programs for health science education reform.

  16. Goals of care conversation teaching in residency - a cross-sectional survey of postgraduate program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roze des Ordons, Amanda; Kassam, Aliya; Simon, Jessica

    2017-01-06

    Residents are commonly involved in establishing goals of care for hospitalized patients. While education can improve the quality of these conversations, whether and how postgraduate training programs integrate such teaching into their curricula is not well established. The objective of this study was to characterize perceptions of current teaching and assessment of goals of care conversations, and program director interest in associated curricular integration. An electronic survey was sent to all postgraduate program directors at the University of Calgary. Quantitative data was analyzed using descriptive statistics and qualitative comments were analyzed using thematic analysis. The survey response rate was 34% (22/64). Formal goals of care conversation teaching is incorporated into 63% of responding programs, and most commonly involves lectures. Informal teaching occurs in 86% of programs, involving discussion, direct observation and role modeling in the clinical setting. Seventy-three percent of programs assess goals of care conversation skills, mostly in the clinical setting through feedback. Program directors believe that over two-thirds of clinical faculty are prepared to teach goals of care conversations, and are interested in resources to teach and assess goals of care conversations. Themes that emerged include 1) general perceptions, 2) need for teaching, 3) ideas for teaching, and 4) assessment of goals of care conversations. The majority of residency training programs at the University of Calgary incorporate some goals of care conversation teaching and assessment into their curricula. Program directors are interested in resources to improve teaching and assessment of goals of care conversations.

  17. Faculty Development for Metro New York City Postdoctoral Dental Program Directors: Delphi Assessment and Program Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Marcie S; Millery, Mari; Edelstein, Burton L

    2017-03-01

    Faculty development for dental academicians is essential to cultivate a continuous faculty workforce, retain existing faculty members, enhance their teaching skill sets, and remain responsive to changing program requirements and curricular reforms. To maximize the utility of dental faculty development, it is important to systematically assess and address faculty members' perceived training needs. The aims of this study were to determine priority topics among one group of postdoctoral program directors and to translate those topics into faculty development programs as part of Columbia University's Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)-sponsored faculty training program for primary care educators. The study was conducted in 2013-16. A Delphi consensus technique was implemented with three sequential surveys of 26 New York City metropolitan area general, pediatric, and public health dentistry residency program directors. On the first survey, the five respondents (19% response rate) identified 31 topics. On the second survey, 17 respondents (response rate 65%) rated the 15 most important topics. In the third and final round, 19 respondents (73% response rate) ranked teaching research methods and teaching literature reviews as the topics of greatest interest. Overall, the responses highlighted needs for faculty development on teaching research methods, motivating trainees, trainee evaluation, and clinical care assessment. Based on these results, a series of six Faculty Forums was developed and implemented for dental educators in the metropolitan area, starting with the topic of teaching research methods. The process flow used for assessing training needs and developing and evaluating training can be applied to a variety of populations of educators.

  18. Clinical Pharmacists as Educators in Family Medicine Residency Programs: A CERA Study of Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, Jennie B; Lounsbery, Jody L; D'Amico, Frank; Dickerson, Lori M; Franko, John; Nagle, John; Seehusen, Dean A; Wilson, Stephen A

    2016-03-01

    The clinical pharmacist's role within family medicine residency programs (FMRPs) is well established. However, there is limited information regarding perceptions of program directors (PDs) about clinical pharmacy educators. The study objectives were (1) to estimate the prevalence of clinical pharmacists within FMRPs and (2) to determine barriers and motivations for incorporation of clinical pharmacists as educators. The Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance (CERA) distributed an electronic survey to PDs. Questions addressed formalized pharmacotherapy education, clinical pharmacists in educator roles, and barriers and benefits of clinical pharmacists in FMRPs. The overall response rate was 50% (224/451). Seventy-six percent (170/224) of the responding PDs reported that clinical pharmacists provide pharmacotherapy education in their FMRPs, and 57% (97/170) consider clinical pharmacists as faculty members. In programs with clinical pharmacists, 72% (83/116) of PDs reported having a systematic approach for teaching pharmacotherapy versus 22% (21/95) in programs without. In programs without clinical pharmacists, the top barrier to incorporation was limited ability to bill for clinical services 48% (43/89) versus 29% (32/112) in programs with clinical pharmacists. In both programs with and without clinical pharmacists, the top benefit of having clinical pharmacists was providing a collaborative approach to pharmacotherapy education for residents (35% and 36%, respectively). Less than half of FMRPs incorporate clinical pharmacists as faculty members. Despite providing collaborative approaches to pharmacotherapy education, their limited ability to bill for services is a major barrier.

  19. Association of General Surgery Resident Remediation and Program Director Attitudes With Resident Attrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwed, Alexander C; Lee, Steven L; Salcedo, Edgardo S; Reeves, Mark E; Inaba, Kenji; Sidwell, Richard A; Amersi, Farin; Are, Chandrakanth; Arnell, Tracey D; Damewood, Richard B; Dent, Daniel L; Donahue, Timothy; Gauvin, Jeffrey; Hartranft, Thomas; Jacobsen, Garth R; Jarman, Benjamin T; Melcher, Marc L; Mellinger, John D; Morris, Jon B; Nehler, Mark; Smith, Brian R; Wolfe, Mary; Kaji, Amy H; de Virgilio, Christian

    2017-12-01

    Previous studies of resident attrition have variably included preliminary residents and likely overestimated categorical resident attrition. Whether program director attitudes affect attrition has been unclear. To determine whether program director attitudes are associated with resident attrition and to measure the categorical resident attrition rate. This multicenter study surveyed 21 US program directors in general surgery about their opinions regarding resident education and attrition. Data on total resident complement, demographic information, and annual attrition were collected from the program directors for the study period of July 1, 2010, to June 30, 2015. The general surgery programs were chosen on the basis of their geographic location, previous collaboration with some coauthors, prior work in surgical education and research, or a program director willing to participate. Only categorical surgical residents were included in the study; thus, program directors were specifically instructed to exclude any preliminary residents in their responses. Five-year attrition rates (2010-2011 to 2014-2015 academic years) as well as first-time pass rates on the General Surgery Qualifying Examination and General Surgery Certifying Examination of the American Board of Surgery (ABS) were collected. High- and low-attrition programs were compared. The 21 programs represented different geographic locations and 12 university-based, 3 university-affiliated, and 6 independent program types. Programs had a median (interquartile range [IQR]) number of 30 (20-48) categorical residents, and few of those residents were women (median [IQR], 12 [5-17]). Overall, 85 of 966 residents (8.8%) left training during the study period: 15 (17.6%) left after postgraduate year 1, 34 (40.0%) after postgraduate year 2, and 36 (42.4%) after postgraduate year 3 or later. Forty-four residents (51.8%) left general surgery for another surgical discipline, 21 (24.7%) transferred to a different surgery

  20. Attitudes of Pulmonary and Critical Care Training Program Directors toward Quality Improvement Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feemster, Laura C.; Fruci, Carolyn M.; Hyzy, Robert C.; Savant, Adrienne P.; Siner, Jonathan M.; Weiss, Curtis H.; Patel, Bela

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Quality improvement (QI) is a required component of fellowship training in pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine. However, little is known about how training programs approach QI education. Objectives: We sought to understand the perceptions of pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine training program directors toward QI education. Methods: We developed and fielded an internet survey of pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine training program directors during 2013. Survey domains included program characteristics, the extent of trainee and faculty involvement in QI, attitudes toward QI education, and barriers to successful QI education in their programs. Measurements and Main Results: A total of 75 program directors completed the survey (response rate = 45.2%). Respondents represented both adult (n = 43, 57.3%) and pediatric (n = 32, 42.7%) programs. Although the majority of directors (n = 60, 80.0%) reported substantial fellow involvement in QI, only 19 (26.0%) reported having a formal QI education curriculum. QI education was primarily based around faculty mentoring (n = 46, 61.3%) and lectures (n = 38, 50.7%). Most directors agreed it is an important part of fellowship training (n = 63, 84.0%). However, fewer reported fellows were well integrated into ongoing QI activities (n = 45, 60.0%) or graduating fellows were capable of carrying out independent QI (n = 28, 50.7%). Key barriers to effective QI education included lack of qualified faculty, lack of interest among fellows, and lack of time. Conclusions: Training program directors in pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine value QI education but face substantial challenges to integrating it into fellowship training. PMID:25723649

  1. Evaluating a New and Aspiring County Extension Director Leadership Education Program: Determining Outcomes and Needed Improvements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaratne, K. S. U.; Owen, Mitchel; Jones, David

    2010-01-01

    This leadership education evaluation study explored the leadership development outcomes of potential county extension directors and the ways to improve the program. The leadership education program aimed to improve participants' leadership abilities in understanding self, building relationships and managing resources. The analysis of quantitative…

  2. Program Directors' Perceptions of Programmatic Attributes Contributing to Athletic Training Student Persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Dodge, Thomas M.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Graduates of athletic training programs (ATPs) have identified factors contributing to their persistence through professional education. However, program directors have yet to elaborate on programmatic attributes that might contribute to athletic training student retention in their respective ATPs. Objective: To determine program…

  3. Dermatology Residency Selection Criteria with an Emphasis on Program Characteristics: A National Program Director Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorouhi, Farzam; Alikhan, Ali; Rezaei, Arash; Fazel, Nasim

    2014-01-01

    Background. Dermatology residency programs are relatively diverse in their resident selection process. The authors investigated the importance of 25 dermatology residency selection criteria focusing on differences in program directors' (PDs') perception based on specific program demographics. Methods. This cross-sectional nationwide observational survey utilized a 41-item questionnaire that was developed by literature search, brainstorming sessions, and online expert reviews. The data were analyzed utilizing the reliability test, two-step clustering, and K-means methods as well as other methods. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the differences in PDs' perception regarding the importance of the selection criteria based on program demographics. Results. Ninety-five out of 114 PDs (83.3%) responded to the survey. The top five criteria for dermatology residency selection were interview, letters of recommendation, United States Medical Licensing Examination Step I scores, medical school transcripts, and clinical rotations. The following criteria were preferentially ranked based on different program characteristics: “advanced degrees,” “interest in academics,” “reputation of undergraduate and medical school,” “prior unsuccessful attempts to match,” and “number of publications.” Conclusions. Our survey provides up-to-date factual data on dermatology PDs' perception in this regard. Dermatology residency programs may find the reported data useful in further optimizing their residency selection process. PMID:24772165

  4. Program Director Opinions of Core Competencies in Hand Surgery Training: Analysis of Differences Between Plastic and Orthopedic Surgery Accredited Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Erika Davis; Larson, Bradley P.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to conduct a national survey of hand surgery fellowship program directors to determine differences of opinions of essential components of hand surgery training among program directors from plastic and orthopedic surgery programs. Methods We performed a web-based survey of 74 program directors from all ACGME accredited hand surgery fellowship programs to determine components that are essential for hand surgery training. The survey included assessment of 9 general areas of practice, 97 knowledge topics, and 172 procedures. 27 scales of related survey items were created to determine differences between specialty groups based on clinical themes. Results We had an 84% response rate, including 49 orthopedic and 12 plastic surgery program directors. There were significant differences in mean responses between the specialty groups in 11 of 27 scales. Only one scale, forearm fractures, contained items with a significantly stronger preference for essential rating among orthopedic surgeons. The other 10 scales contained items with a significantly higher preference for essential rating among plastic surgeons, most of which related to soft tissue injury and reconstruction. The burn scale had the greatest discrepancy in opinion of essential ratings between the groups, followed by pedicled and free tissue transfer, and amputation and fingertip injuries. Conclusions Despite being united under the subspecialty of hand surgery, program directors tend to emphasize clinical areas that are stressed in their respective primary disciplines. These differences promote the advantage of programs providing exposure to both plastic and orthopedic surgery trained hand surgeons. PMID:23446569

  5. The Event Coordination Notation: Execution Engine and Programming Framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kindler, Ekkart

    2012-01-01

    that was written manually. In this paper, we rephrase the main concepts of ECNO. The focus of this paper, however, is on the architecture of the ECNO execution engine and its programming framework. We will show how this framework allows us to integrate ECNO with object-oriented models, how it works without any...

  6. FWP executive summaries: Basic energy sciences materials sciences programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samara, G.A.

    1996-02-01

    This report provides an Executive Summary of the various elements of the Materials Sciences Program which is funded by the Division of Materials Sciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico.

  7. Clinical skills assessment of procedural and advanced communication skills: performance expectations of residency program directors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik E. Langenau

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: High stakes medical licensing programs are planning to augment and adapt current examinations to be relevant for a two-decision point model for licensure: entry into supervised practice and entry into unsupervised practice. Therefore, identifying which skills should be assessed at each decision point is critical for informing examination development, and gathering input from residency program directors is important. Methods: Using data from previously developed surveys and expert panels, a web-delivered survey was distributed to 3,443 residency program directors. For each of the 28 procedural and 18 advanced communication skills, program directors were asked which clinical skills should be assessed, by whom, when, and how. Descriptive statistics were collected, and Intraclass Correlations (ICC were conducted to determine consistency across different specialties. Results: Among 347 respondents, program directors reported that all advanced communication and some procedural tasks are important to assess. The following procedures were considered ‘important’ or ‘extremely important’ to assess: sterile technique (93.8%, advanced cardiovascular life support (ACLS (91.1%, basic life support (BLS (90.0%, interpretation of electrocardiogram (89.4% and blood gas (88.7%. Program directors reported that most clinical skills should be assessed at the end of the first year of residency (or later and not before graduation from medical school. A minority were considered important to assess prior to the start of residency training: demonstration of respectfulness (64%, sterile technique (67.2%, BLS (68.9%, ACLS (65.9% and phlebotomy (63.5%. Discussion: Results from this study support that assessing procedural skills such as cardiac resuscitation, sterile technique, and phlebotomy would be amenable to assessment at the end of medical school, but most procedural and advanced communications skills would be amenable to assessment at the end of the

  8. Clinical skills assessment of procedural and advanced communication skills: performance expectations of residency program directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenau, Erik E.; Zhang, Xiuyuan; Roberts, William L.; DeChamplain, Andre F.; Boulet, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Background High stakes medical licensing programs are planning to augment and adapt current examinations to be relevant for a two-decision point model for licensure: entry into supervised practice and entry into unsupervised practice. Therefore, identifying which skills should be assessed at each decision point is critical for informing examination development, and gathering input from residency program directors is important. Methods Using data from previously developed surveys and expert panels, a web-delivered survey was distributed to 3,443 residency program directors. For each of the 28 procedural and 18 advanced communication skills, program directors were asked which clinical skills should be assessed, by whom, when, and how. Descriptive statistics were collected, and Intraclass Correlations (ICC) were conducted to determine consistency across different specialties. Results Among 347 respondents, program directors reported that all advanced communication and some procedural tasks are important to assess. The following procedures were considered ‘important’ or ‘extremely important’ to assess: sterile technique (93.8%), advanced cardiovascular life support (ACLS) (91.1%), basic life support (BLS) (90.0%), interpretation of electrocardiogram (89.4%) and blood gas (88.7%). Program directors reported that most clinical skills should be assessed at the end of the first year of residency (or later) and not before graduation from medical school. A minority were considered important to assess prior to the start of residency training: demonstration of respectfulness (64%), sterile technique (67.2%), BLS (68.9%), ACLS (65.9%) and phlebotomy (63.5%). Discussion Results from this study support that assessing procedural skills such as cardiac resuscitation, sterile technique, and phlebotomy would be amenable to assessment at the end of medical school, but most procedural and advanced communications skills would be amenable to assessment at the end of the first

  9. Advanced general dentistry program directors' attitudes and behaviors regarding pediatric dental training for residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Christi Sporl; Raybould, Ted P; Skelton, Judith; Wrightson, A Stevens; Smith, Tim A

    2008-03-01

    The oral health of children became a more prominent concern with the U.S. surgeon general's report on oral health in America in 2000. The purpose of our study was 1) to assess General Practice Residency (GPR) and Advanced Education in General Dentistry (AEGD) (here jointly referred to as advanced general dentistry [AGD] programs) directors' current behaviors with regard to pediatric training of residents and 2) to assess their attitudes about which components of pediatric oral health training should be included in AGD programs. A twenty-one item survey was mailed to all GPR and AEGD programs accessed through the American Dental Association website. Seventy percent of directors (N=187) completed and returned the survey. Responses indicated that AGD residents receive adequate clinical exposure to pediatric patients and provide much-needed services to uninsured, underinsured, and underserved people. Although clinical training in pediatric treatment was high, didactic hours focused on pediatric treatment did not seem commensurate with clinical activity. Program directors indicated strong attitudinal support for teaching residents many components of pediatric oral health care, although most directors have concerns over increasing didactic hours spent on pediatric oral health due to already crowded curricula. Approximately 88 percent of directors said that they would implement a pediatric oral health module in their curricula if they had access to one.

  10. The Current State of Early Childhood Education Programs: How Early Childhood Center Directors Manage Their Human Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arend, Lauren E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Research in the field of early childhood education (ECE) demonstrated the association between skilled directors and high quality programs. Still, most state licensing requirements do not delineate the requisite knowledge or experience necessary to be an effective director. Many ECE directors advance to their position directly from the…

  11. Navy Executive Development Program, Navy Senior Leader Seminar (NSLS)

    OpenAIRE

    Williamson, Tyller

    2014-01-01

    Flyer for the Navy Senior Leader Seminar (NSLS) The Course: The Navy Senior Leader Seminar (NSLS) provides senior officers (O6/O5) and senior civilians (GS-15) with an intensive nine-day executive education program that introduces the latest "best practices" in strategic planning, goal setting, strategic communication, effects-based thinking, risk management, financial management, and innovation. The program provide participants with the knowledge and skills required to manage...

  12. Physician assistant program directors' attitudes, practices, and plans regarding financial compensation to clinical sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavaz, Gerald A; Alexander, Jeffrey L; Curtis, Denice; Eskes, Christy

    2014-01-01

    Some physician assistant (PA) program directors believe paying clinicians and administrators for clinical sites is fair and necessary, while others regard such practices as undermining traditional altruistic motivations for precepting. The purpose of this study was to assess PA program directors' attitudes on this topic and describe current practices and future plans regarding compensation to clinical sites. A cross-sectional descriptive survey was sent to directors of PA programs with continuing and provisional accreditation status in 2012. Seventy-eight (48%) of the 163 program directors surveyed participated in the study. Although most respondents indicated that paying for clinical sites was not an acceptable practice, almost half believed it would. be acceptable if there were standards and definitions for equitable and fair payments. Despite the finding that most respondents' programs do not pay for clinical sites, nearly half anticipate their programs will be paying for clinical sites in three years, and the cost of such payments will be passed on to students in the form of increased tuition or separate fees. Many indicated a concern that paying for clinical sites may result in monopolies and bidding wars. While paying clinical sites may be effective for recruitment and retention of clinical sites, most program directors are concerned about the expanded role economics will have for their program. Agreed-upon standards and definitions for fair and equitable payment practices may alleviate some of these concerns. However, the potential effects on students and programs identified in this study necessitate additional research to fully assess what implications this may have on PA education and the profession.

  13. Executive Summary: 30th Report on Physician Assistant Educational Programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lindsey M

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this executive summary was to provide an overview of key findings from By the Numbers: 30th Report on Physician Assistant Educational Programs in the United States. The 2014 Program Survey is a Web-based survey and is administered annually to all member physician assistant (PA) program directors. This executive summary will focus on 4 of the 7 sections of the survey instrument: general, financial, program personnel, and students. The typical PA program's sponsoring institution is private and in a nonacademic health center. Most PA programs (93.0%) offer a master's degree as the primary or highest credential. The average total program budget was $2,221,751 (SD=$2,426,852). The average total resident tuition was $64,961, and the average total nonresident tuition was $75,964. Overall, 181 programs reported 1843 program faculty. Of those, 1467 were identified as core faculty and 376 were identified as adjunct faculty. A typical first-year PA student is 26 years old (SD=2.51), female (70.3%, n=5898), non-Hispanic (89.3%, n=3631), White (79.9%, n=3712), and has an overall undergraduate and science grade point average (GPA) of 3.52 (SD=0.14) and 3.47 (SD=0.16), respectively. In 2014, there were approximately 7556 graduates from 164 responding programs. By gaining a better understanding of the characteristics of PA programs and their faculty and students, policy makers can be better informed. Physician assistant educators and stakeholders are encouraged to use this information to advance and advocate for the profession.

  14. Academic Productivity of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-Accredited Critical Care Fellowship Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahy, Brenda G; Vasilopoulos, Terrie; White, Peggy; Culley, Deborah J

    2016-12-01

    Academic productivity is an expectation for program directors of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited subspecialty programs in critical care medicine. Within the adult critical care Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited programs, we hypothesized that program director length of time from subspecialty critical care certification would correlate positively with academic productivity, and primary field would impact academic productivity. This study received Institutional Review Board exemption from the University of Florida. Data were obtained from public websites on program directors from all institutions that had surgery, anesthesiology, and pulmonary Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited subspecialty critical care training programs during calendar year 2012. Information gathered included year of board certification and appointment to program director, academic rank, National Institutes of Health funding history, and PubMed citations. Specialty area was significantly associated with total (all types of publications) (p = 0.0002), recent (p research publications (p accounting for academic rank, years certified, and as a program director. These differences were most prominent in full professors, with surgery full professors having more total, recent, last author, and original research publications than full professors in the other critical care specialties. This study demonstrates that one's specialty area in critical care is an independent predictor of academic productivity, with surgery having the highest productivity. For some metrics, such as total and last author publications, surgery had more publications than both anesthesiology and pulmonary, whereas there was no difference between the latter groups. This suggests that observed differences in academic productivity vary by specialty.

  15. Teaching geriatric fellows how to teach: a needs assessment targeting geriatrics fellowship program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Veronica; Yukawa, Michi; Aronson, Louise; Widera, Eric

    2014-12-01

    The entire healthcare workforce needs to be educated to better care for older adults. The purpose of this study was to determine whether fellows are being trained to teach, to assess the attitudes of fellowship directors toward training fellows to be teachers, and to understand how to facilitate this type of training for fellows. A nine-question survey adapted from a 2001 survey issued to residency program directors inquiring about residents-as-teachers curricula was developed and administered. The survey was issued electronically and sent out three times over a 6-week period. Of 144 ACGME-accredited geriatric fellowship directors from geriatric, internal medicine, and family medicine departments who were e-mailed the survey, 101 (70%) responded; 75% had an academic affiliation, 15% had a community affiliation, and 10% did not report. Academic and community programs required their fellows to teach, but just 55% of academic and 29% of community programs offered teaching skills instruction as part of their fellowship curriculum; 67% of academic programs and 79% of community programs felt that their fellows would benefit from more teaching skill instruction. Program directors listed fellow (39%) and faculty (46%) time constraints as obstacles to creation and implementation of a teaching curriculum. The majority of fellowship directors believe that it is important for geriatric fellows to become competent educators, but only approximately half of programs currently provide formal instruction in teaching skills. A reproducible, accessible curriculum on teaching to teach that includes a rigorous evaluation component should be created for geriatrics fellowship programs. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  16. Barriers to the implementation of competency-based education and assessment: a survey of otolaryngology program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laeeq, Kulsoom; Weatherly, Robert A; Masood, Hamid; Thompson, Richard E; Brown, David J; Cummings, Charles W; Bhatti, Nasir I

    2010-06-01

    To identify the barriers faced by otolaryngology program directors as they implement competency-based education and assessment and to identify preferred approaches to meet these challenges as suggested by program directors. A national survey of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery program directors. We developed a 20-item questionnaire that was distributed to 102 otolaryngology program directors through SurveyMonkey. Nonrespondents were reminded by follow-up email and phone calls. Results were analyzed by descriptive statistical analysis. A total of 88 (86%) program directors responded to the survey. There was a marked discrepancy between the income received and time spent performing the duties of the program director. Program director workload was recognized as the most important barrier to the implementation of competency-based education. Creating a practical clearinghouse of existing and emerging assessment tools was given the highest rating among the approaches to meet the challenges faced by program directors. Program directors in otolaryngology do not have sufficient financial support, protected time, and personnel to fulfill their administrative and educational responsibilities. They should be provided with additional institutional assistance to help them achieve the goals of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education outcome project.

  17. Eric Freed Named Deputy Director of HIV Drug Resistance Program | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Editor’s note: The text for this article was adapted from an e-mail announcement to the Center for Cancer Research community from Robert Wiltrout, Ph.D., on September 8, 2014. Robert Wiltrout, Ph.D., director, NCI Center for Cancer Research (CCR), recently announced the appointment of Eric Freed, Ph.D., as deputy director of the HIV Drug Resistance Program (HIV DRP). Freed will join Stephen Hughes, Ph.D., director of HIV DRP, in leading this CCR program that focuses on understanding HIV replication and pathogenesis, with the goal of developing more effective strategies for treating HIV infections, and also builds on the existing strength of HIV and retrovirus research within NCI.

  18. General and Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Resident Training in Integrated Care: a Survey of Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Claudia L; Bentman, Adrienne; Cowley, Deborah S; Dunaway, Kristen; Forstein, Marshall; Girgis, Christina; Han, Jaesu; Hung, Erick; Jones, Jeralyn; Keeble, Tanya; McCarron, Robert M; Varley, Christopher K

    2015-08-01

    Integrated care models are an evidence-based approach for integrating physical and behavioral health services. The American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training Integrated Care Task Force sought to describe current practices for providing training in integrated care to general and child and adolescent psychiatry residents. Directors of US general and child and adolescent psychiatric residency training programs were anonymously surveyed to examine current practices in educating their residents in integrated care. Based on themes that emerged from the survey, the authors make recommendations for integrated care education of general and child and adolescent psychiatry residents. Fifty-two of 197 (26%) general and 36 of 111 (32%) child and adolescent program directors responded. Results demonstrate that a majority of responding general psychiatry (78%) and child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP) (72%) training programs offer integrated care rotations, many of which are electives for senior residents. The Veterans Health Administration (VA) and Federally Qualified Health Centers are common venues for such rotations. Sustainable funding of these rotations is a concern. Fewer than half of programs offer integrated care didactics. This report is intended to help program directors consider options for starting or optimizing their own integrated care curricula. Future research should examine the educational value, and the overall value to health care systems, of training in the integrated care model.

  19. Dr Kathryn Beers, Assistant Director Physical Sciences and Engineering, Office of Science and Technology Policy Executive Office of the President United States of America visit the CMS experiment at point 5.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2007-01-01

    Dr Kathryn Beers, Assistant Director Physical Sciences and Engineering, Office of Science and Technology Policy Executive Office of the President United States of America visit the CMS experiment at point 5.

  20. Wolfsberg Executive Director P. Guptara at ATLAS experiment with ATLAS Resources Coordinator M. Nordberg, LHC machine Technical Coordination and Planning P. Proudlock and Information Technology Department Head W. von Rüden on 21 September 2006.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    Wolfsberg Executive Director P. Guptara at ATLAS experiment with ATLAS Resources Coordinator M. Nordberg, LHC machine Technical Coordination and Planning P. Proudlock and Information Technology Department Head W. von Rüden on 21 September 2006.

  1. Associate Program Directors in Surgery: A Select Group of Surgical Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amersi, Farin; Choi, Jennifer; Molkara, Afshin; Takanishi, Danny; Deveney, Karen; Tillou, Areti

    2017-09-26

    The role of the Associate Program Director (APD) within surgical education is not clearly defined or regulated by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, often leading to variations in the responsibilities among institutions. Required credentials are not specified and compensation and protected time are not regulated resulting in large discrepancies among institutions. APDs are brought into the fold of surgical education to parcel out the escalating responsibilities of program director (PD). The Association of Program Directors in Surgery, Associate Program Directors Committee sent a survey to all APDs to better understand the role of the APDs within the hierarchy of surgical education. A survey was sent to all 235 general surgery residency programs through the Association of Program Directors in Surgery list serve. The survey collected information on APD demographics, characteristics, and program information, qualifications of the APD, time commitment and compensation, administrative duties, and projected career track. General surgery residency programs within the United States. 108 Associate Program Directors in general surgery RESULTS: A total of 108 (46%) APDs responded to the survey. Seventy-three (70.2%) of the APD's were males. Most (77.8%) were in practice for more than 5 years, and 69% were at a university-based program. Most of the respondents felt that the administrative and curricular tasks were appropriately distributed between the APD and PD and many shared tasks with the PD. A total of 44.6% were on the path to become a future PD at their institution. An equal number of APDs (42.6%) were compensated above their base salary for being an APD vs no compensation at all; however, 16 (14.8%) had a reduced clinical load as part of their compensation for being an APD. This is the first study to describe the characteristics of APDs within the hierarchy of surgical education. Our data demonstrate that APDs have a substantial role in the

  2. Optical Neural Network Models Applied To Logic Program Execution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stormon, Charles D.

    1988-05-01

    Logic programming is being used extensively by Artificial Intelligence researchers to solve problems including natural language processing and expert systems. These languages, of which Prolog is the most widely used, promise to revolutionize software engineering, but much greater performance is needed. Researchers have demonstrated the applicability of neural network models to the solution of certain NP-complete problems, but these methods are not obviously applicable to the execution of logic programs. This paper outlines the use of neural networks in four aspects of the logic program execution cycle, and discusses results of a simulation of three of these. Four neural network functional units are described, called the substitution agent, the clause filter, the structure processor, and the heuristics generator, respectively. Simulation results suggest that the system described may provide several orders of magnitude improvement in execution speed for large logic programs. However, practical implementation of the proposed architecture will require the application of optical computing techniques due to the large number of neurons required, and the need for massive, adaptive connectivity.

  3. Space Technology Mission Directorate Game Changing Development Program FY2015 Annual Program Review: Advanced Manufacturing Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, John; Fikes, John

    2015-01-01

    The Advance Manufacturing Technology (AMT) Project supports multiple activities within the Administration's National Manufacturing Initiative. A key component of the Initiative is the Advanced Manufacturing National Program Office (AMNPO), which includes participation from all federal agencies involved in U.S. manufacturing. In support of the AMNPO the AMT Project supports building and Growing the National Network for Manufacturing Innovation through a public-private partnership designed to help the industrial community accelerate manufacturing innovation. Integration with other projects/programs and partnerships: STMD (Space Technology Mission Directorate), HEOMD, other Centers; Industry, Academia; OGA's (e.g., DOD, DOE, DOC, USDA, NASA, NSF); Office of Science and Technology Policy, NIST Advanced Manufacturing Program Office; Generate insight within NASA and cross-agency for technology development priorities and investments. Technology Infusion Plan: PC; Potential customer infusion (TDM, HEOMD, SMD, OGA, Industry); Leverage; Collaborate with other Agencies, Industry and Academia; NASA roadmap. Initiatives include: Advanced Near Net Shape Technology Integrally Stiffened Cylinder Process Development (launch vehicles, sounding rockets); Materials Genome; Low Cost Upper Stage-Class Propulsion; Additive Construction with Mobile Emplacement (ACME); National Center for Advanced Manufacturing.

  4. An overview of U.S. predoctoral dental implant programs and their directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barwacz, Christopher A; Avila-Ortiz, Gustavo; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush; Tamegnon, Monelle; Hoogeveen, Kaitlin

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to provide an overview of current predoctoral implant programs in the United States, including curricular characteristics and clinical practices regarding implant therapy education and program directors' characteristics. An electronic survey was sent to predoctoral implant program directors of all 64 accredited U.S. dental schools; 52 of the 60 eligible programs responded, for a response rate of 87%. The responding program directors were primarily affiliated with either prosthodontics departments (44%) or restorative dentistry departments (40%). Structurally, 80.8% of the responding schools integrate their implant programs into the third year of the curriculum. Clinical implant therapy exercises reported were simulation exercises without direct patient care (90.4% of responding schools) and direct patient care under supervision (94.2%). The most frequently taught restorative modalities are posterior single-tooth implant crown (96.2%), mandibular implant-retained overdenture (88.5%), and anterior implant-supported single crown (61.5%). A majority (74.5%) of responding programs utilize analog surgical guide planning, while 25.5% reported use of digital guided surgery planning software. All schools in the Northwest and 66.7% in the South Central regions utilize custom abutments as the primary abutment design, while a majority of schools in the North Central (62.5%), Northeast (53.8%), Southwest (66.7%), and Southeast (80%) regions use stock abutments (p=0.02). Regional differences were significant with regard to fixation modality, with all the Northwest programs using screw retention and 90% of Southeast and 87.5% of North Central programs using cement retention (p=0.002). This study demonstrated that while institutions share program director and curricular similarities, clinical practices and modalities vary significantly by region.

  5. Women’s Health Training in Gastroenterology Fellowship: A National Survey of Fellows and Program Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, Erica; Richie, Kelly; Lindstrom, Mary J.; Esposti, Silvia Degli; Wald, Arnold

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims The Gastroenterology Core Curriculum requires training in women’s digestive disorders; however, requirements do not necessarily produce knowledge and competence. Our study goals were: (1) to compare perceptions of education, fellow-reported levels of competence, and attitudes towards training in women’s gastrointestinal (GI) health issues during fellowship between gastroenterology fellows and program directors, and (2) to determine the barriers for meeting training requirements. Methods A national survey assessing four domains of training was conducted. All GI program directors in the United States (n = 153) and a random sample of gastroenterology fellows (n = 769) were mailed surveys. Mixed effects linear modeling was used to estimate all mean scores and to assess differences between the groups. Cronbach’s alpha was used to assess the consistency of the measures which make up the means. Results Responses were received from 61% of program directors and 31% of fellows. Mean scores in perceived didactic education, clinical experiences, and competence in women’s GI health were low and significantly differed between the groups (P < 0.0001). Fellows’ attitudes towards women’s GI health issues were more positive compared to program directors’ (P = 0.004). Barriers to training were: continuity clinic at a Veteran’s Administration hospital, low number of pregnant patients treated, low number of referrals from obstetrics and gynecology, and lack of faculty interest in women’s health. Conclusions (1) Fellows more so than program directors perceive training in women’s GI health issues to be low. (2) Program directors more so than fellows rate fellows to be competent in women’s GI health. (3) Multiple barriers to women’s health training exist. PMID:21267780

  6. 75 FR 18850 - National Protection and Programs Directorate; Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-13

    ... SECURITY National Protection and Programs Directorate; Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards Personnel... commercial or financial information, Chemical-terrorism Vulnerability Information (CVI), Sensitive Security... Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards (CFATS), 6 CFR part 27, require high-risk chemical facilities to submit...

  7. Searching for the Core of Journalism Education: Program Directors Disagree on Curriculum Priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Robin; Davenport, Lucinda D.

    2012-01-01

    To carry out their mission of preparing students to be successful journalism professionals, educators make important decisions on the core curriculum: the common courses that all journalism students must take to graduate, no matter their area of emphasis or academic constraints. This national study of U.S. journalism program directors shows they…

  8. 76 FR 67764 - Finance, Budget & Program Committee Board of Directors Meeting; Sunshine Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NEIGHBORHOOD REINVESTMENT CORPORATION Finance, Budget & Program Committee Board of Directors Meeting; Sunshine Act Time & Date: 10 a.m., Thursday, November 3, 2011. Place: 1325 G Street, NW., Suite 800, Boardroom, Washington, DC 20005. Status...

  9. 76 FR 55125 - Finance, Budget & Program Committee Meeting of the Board of Directors; Sunshine Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NEIGHBORHOOD REINVESTMENT CORPORATION Finance, Budget & Program Committee Meeting of the Board of Directors; Sunshine Act TIME AND DATE: 2 p.m., Wednesday, September 7, 2011 PLACE: 1325 G Street, NW., Suite 800, Boardroom, Washington, DC...

  10. 78 FR 65716 - Sunshine Act Meeting; Finance, Budget & Program Committee Meeting of the Board of Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NEIGHBORHOOD REINVESTMENT CORPORATION Sunshine Act Meeting; Finance, Budget & Program Committee Meeting of the Board of Directors TIME & DATE: 2:00 p.m., Thursday, November 7, 2013. PLACE: Telephonic Meeting. STATUS: Open. CONTACT PERSON...

  11. 77 FR 56238 - Finance, Budget & Program. Committee Meeting of the Board of Directors; Sunshine Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NEIGHBORHOOD REINVESTMENT CORPORATION Finance, Budget & Program. Committee Meeting of the Board of Directors; Sunshine Act TIME & DATE: 3 p.m., Thursday, September 20, 2012. PLACE: 1325 G Street NW., Suite 800, Boardroom, Washington, DC...

  12. 78 FR 24438 - Board of Directors Finance, Budget & Program Committee: Sunshine Act Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NEIGHBORHOOD REINVESTMENT CORPORATION Board of Directors Finance, Budget & Program Committee: Sunshine Act Meeting TIME AND DATE: 1:00 p.m., Thursday, May 2, 2013. PLACE: 1325 G Street NW., Suite 800, Boardroom, Washington, DC 20005...

  13. 78 FR 8193 - Sunshine Act Meeting; Finance, Budget & Program Committee Meeting of the Board of Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NEIGHBORHOOD REINVESTMENT CORPORATION Sunshine Act Meeting; Finance, Budget & Program Committee Meeting of the Board of Directors TIME & DATE: 2:00 p.m., Wednesday, February 13, 2013. PLACE: 1325 G Street NW., Suite 800, Boardroom...

  14. Report on a Survey of Program Directors Regarding Selection Factors in Graduate Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagoner, Norma E.; Gray, George T.

    1979-01-01

    A national sample of 25 percent of the graduate education program directors in internal medicine, family medicine, surgery, and pediatrics were asked to judge the importance of 31 variables in the selection of house staff. A rank-ordering of variables for all respondents placed interpersonal skills demonstrated in the interview as number one.…

  15. College Smoking Policies and Smoking Cessation Programs: Results of a Survey of College Health Center Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wechsler, Henry; Kelley, Kathleen; Seibring, Mark; Kuo, Meichun; Rigotti, Nancy A.

    2001-01-01

    Surveyed college health center directors about policies addressing smoking and availability of smoking cessation programs. Though 85 percent considered students' smoking a problem, only 81 percent of colleges prohibited smoking in all public areas, and only 27 percent banned smoking in all indoor areas. Though over half of the schools offered…

  16. Strategies for Highly Effective Athletic Training Education Program Directors: A Practical Approach to Interdependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, James E.; Gray, Kimberly A.

    2007-01-01

    Following "Seven Habits of Highly Effective People" by Stephen Covey, this article seeks to communicate effective strategies for athletic training education Program Directors (PDs) to follow. Commentary of Covey's work and practical strategies to integrate them into PD practice and responsibilities are provided. Background: Due to a lack…

  17. School Nutrition Directors' Perceptions of Technology Use in School Nutrition Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Peggy; Bednar, Carolyn; Kwon, Junehee

    2012-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: This study investigated the types of technology/software currently used by Southwest Region school nutrition directors (SNDs) and assessed their perceptions of barriers to purchasing new technology/software. In addition, the importance of future technology/software acquisitions in meeting school nutrition program (SNP) goals…

  18. Program Directors' Perceptions of Professional Bachelor's Athletic Training Student Decisions to Persist and Depart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Hertel, Jay; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Dodge, Thomas M.; Wathington, Heather D.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Recent literature has focused on reasons for athletic training student persistence and departure. However, accredited professional bachelor's athletic training program (ATP) directors' opinions regarding student retention have yet to be studied, to our knowledge. Objective: To determine reasons for athletic training student persistence…

  19. 75 FR 28034 - National Protection and Programs Directorate; Agency Information Collection Activities: United...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-19

    ... States Visitor and Immigrant Status Indicator Technology (US-VISIT) Biometric Data Collection at the Ports of Entry AGENCY: National Protection and Programs Directorate, DHS. ACTION: 30-Day notice and.... Chapter 35). NPPD is soliciting comments concerning this biometric data collection at the ports of entry...

  20. 76 FR 55693 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security National Protection and Programs Directorate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-08

    ... SECURITY Office of the Secretary Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security National Protection... contact: Emily Andrew (703-235-2182), Privacy Officer, National Protection and Programs Directorate... policy, DHS extends administrative Privacy Act protections to all individuals where systems of records...

  1. An Evaluation of the Mississippi Recipes for Success Program from the Perspective of Child Nutrition Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Chelsea; Lambert, Laurel; Chang, Yunhee; Carithers, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The Mississippi Recipes for Success (MRS), a customizable selective menu system resource, was developed for child nutrition program (CNP) directors to comply with USDA nutrition regulations. The resource is available in printed and online formats and includes recipes, menu matrixes, food safety, and training materials for meal…

  2. About Parallel Programming: Paradigms, Parallel Execution and Collaborative Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana MOCEAN

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, there were made efforts for delineation of a stabile and unitary frame, where the problems of logical parallel processing must find solutions at least at the level of imperative languages. The results obtained by now are not at the level of the made efforts. This paper wants to be a little contribution at these efforts. We propose an overview in parallel programming, parallel execution and collaborative systems.

  3. International electives in neurology training: a survey of US and Canadian program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Jennifer L; Coleman, Mary E; Engstrom, John W; Mateen, Farrah J

    2014-01-14

    To ascertain the current status of global health training and humanitarian relief opportunities in US and Canadian postgraduate neurology programs. There is a growing interest among North American trainees to pursue medical electives in low- and middle-income countries. Such training opportunities provide many educational and humanitarian benefits but also pose several challenges related to organization, human resources, funding, and trainee and patient safety. The current support and engagement of neurology postgraduate training programs for trainees to pursue international rotations is unknown. A survey was distributed to all program directors in the United States and Canada (December 2012-February 2013) through the American Academy of Neurology to assess the training opportunities, institutional partnerships, and support available for international neurology electives. Approximately half of responding programs (53%) allow residents to pursue global health-related electives, and 11% reported that at least 1 trainee participated in humanitarian relief during training (survey response rate 61%, 143/234 program directors). Canadian programs were more likely to allow residents to pursue international electives than US programs (10/11, 91% vs 65/129, 50%, p = 0.023). The number of trainees participating in international electives was low: 0%-9% of residents (55% of programs) and 10%-19% of residents (21% of programs). Lack of funding was the most commonly cited reason for residents not participating in global health electives. If funding was available, 93% of program directors stated there would be time for residents to participate. Most program directors (75%) were interested in further information on global health electives. In spite of high perceived interest, only half of US neurology training programs include international electives, mostly due to a reported lack of funding. By contrast, the majority of Canadian programs that responded allow international

  4. 76 FR 17658 - National Forum for State and Territorial Chief Executives (National Forum) Program Cooperative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration National Forum for State and Territorial Chief Executives (National Forum) Program Cooperative Agreement AGENCY: Health Resources and Services... Forum for State and Territorial Chief Executives (National Forum) Program Cooperative Agreement. SUMMARY...

  5. 2 March 2012 - US Google Management Team Executive Chairman E. Schmidt visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers and Head of Technology Department F. Bordry; signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    2 March 2012 - US Google Management Team Executive Chairman E. Schmidt visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers and Head of Technology Department F. Bordry; signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

  6. 31 Jannuary 2012 - Pakistan COMSATS Executive Director I. E. Qureshi visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 2 with ALICE Collaboration Spokesperson P. Giubellino and International Relations Adviser R. Voss; Exchange of gifts and signature of the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    31 Jannuary 2012 - Pakistan COMSATS Executive Director I. E. Qureshi visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 2 with ALICE Collaboration Spokesperson P. Giubellino and International Relations Adviser R. Voss; Exchange of gifts and signature of the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

  7. Chairman of the DELL Board of Directors and Chief Executive Officer Michael S. Dell with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and in front of the ATLAS detector (centre) with ATLAS Deputy Spokesperson A. Lankford (left) and Information Technology Department Head F. Hemmer on 26th January 2010.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    Chairman of the DELL Board of Directors and Chief Executive Officer Michael S. Dell with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and in front of the ATLAS detector (centre) with ATLAS Deputy Spokesperson A. Lankford (left) and Information Technology Department Head F. Hemmer on 26th January 2010.

  8. Stress and Burnout Among Residency Program Directors in United States Radiation Oncology Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aggarwal, Sonya [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States); Kusano, Aaron S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Carter, Justin Nathaniel; Gable, Laura [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States); Thomas, Charles R. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health and Sciences University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Chang, Daniel T., E-mail: dtchang@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate stressors among radiation oncology residency program directors (PDs) and determine the prevalence and indicators of burnout. Methods and Materials: An anonymous, online, cross-sectional survey was offered to PDs of US radiation oncology programs in the fall of 2014. Survey content examined individual and program demographics, perceptions surrounding the role of PD, and commonly encountered stressors. Burnout was assessed using the validated Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey. Results: In total, 47 of 88 PDs (53%) responded to the survey. Although 78% of respondents reported feeling “satisfied” or “highly satisfied” with their current role, 85% planned to remain as PD for <5 years. The most commonly cited stressors were satisfying Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education/Residency Review Committee requirements (47%), administrative duties (30%) and resident morale (28%). Three-quarters of respondents were satisfied that they became PDs. Overall, 11% of respondents met criteria for low burnout, 83% for moderate burnout, and 6% for high burnout. Not having served as a PD at a prior institution correlated with high depersonalization (OR 6.75, P=.04) and overall burnout (odds ratio [OR], 15.6; P=.04). Having more years on faculty prior to becoming PD correlated with less emotional exhaustion (OR, 0.44, P=.05) and depersonalization (OR, 0.20, P=.04). Finally, having dedicated time for PD duties correlated with less emotional exhaustion (OR, 0.27, P=.04). Conclusions: Moderate levels of burnout are common in U.S. radiation oncology PDs with regulatory stressors being common. Despite this, many PDs are fulfilled with their role. Longitudinal studies assessing dynamic external factors and their influence on PD burnout would be beneficial.

  9. Results of the 2014 Survey of the Association of Directors of Radiation Oncology Programs (ADROP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jani, Ashesh B; Marshall, David; Vapiwala, Neha; Davis, Sara Beth; Langer, Mark

    2015-01-01

    In 2014, the Association of Directors of Radiation Oncology Programs (ADROP) conducted an in-depth survey of program directors along several axes. We report the results of this survey and compare the major findings with those of the 2007 ADROP survey. The survey was written and approved by ADROP leadership in 2012, announced online through broadcasts throughout 2013 and early 2014, and closed in mid-2014. The results based on question groups related to (1) hours spent in activities, (2) budget and nonprogram resources, (3) physics/biology didactics, (4) mock exams/didactics/research, (5) electives, (6) students, and (7) resources/challenges were tabulated. Descriptive comparisons with the 2007 survey were performed. There was 26% participation (23/88 programs). Major areas of time commitment were faculty and site organization, maintenance, and corrections (70 hours/year) and didactics/conferences and rounds (200 hours/year). The median program director protected time was 23% (range 0%-50%). All responding programs (100%) had biology and physics courses and assigned directors, but only approximately 20% of respondents had a threshold grade in these courses for graduation. Major resources desired were templates of goals/objectives by disease site, competency evaluations by level, journal club repository, and software for contouring, oral examination preparation, grant writing, publication writing, oral presentation, and effective teaching. Major activity challenges were Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education external review and time commitment. Overall, the 2014 results are similar to those of the 2007 survey. The average time commitment remains considerably higher than the 10% minimum required in the current ACGME program requirements. The survey results may guide ADROP membership in centralizing some of the identified resources needed. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A survey study of sedation training in advanced pediatric dentistry programs: thoughts of program directors and students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Stephen; Nathan, John E

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to survey program directors and students of advanced pediatric dentistry training programs in the United States on sedation issues. Surveys were sent to the target audiences. Questions contained response categories ranging from fill-in-the-blank, Likert-order scale style, and categorical. The surveys resided on SurveyMonkey. A cover letter emphasizing such issues as anonymity of responses was sent via e-mail to participants using the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry listserv. The responses were downloaded and subsequently analyzed using SPSS statistical software. Data were obtained from 49% of program directors and 17% of students. Experience with different routes of sedative administration varied from "none" (even with the oral route) to "significant." Oral midazolam was the most-often used route and sedative. Restraint was reportedly used by the majority of programs. Strategies should be developed to strengthen consistency of competencies in sedation practices across academic training programs.

  11. Hardware-Assisted System for Program Execution Security of SOC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of embedded systems, the systems’ security has become more and more important. Most embedded systems are at the risk of series of software attacks, such as buffer overflow attack, Trojan virus. In addition, with the rapid growth in the number of embedded systems and wide application, followed embedded hardware attacks are also increasing. This paper presents a new hardware assisted security mechanism to protect the program’s code and data, monitoring its normal execution. The mechanism mainly monitors three types of information: the start/end address of the program of basic blocks; the lightweight hash value in basic blocks and address of the next basic block. These parameters are extracted through additional tools running on PC. The information will be stored in the security module. During normal program execution, the security module is designed to compare the real-time state of program with the information in the security module. If abnormal, it will trigger the appropriate security response, suspend the program and jump to the specified location. The module has been tested and validated on the SOPC with OR1200 processor. The experimental analysis shows that the proposed mechanism can defence a wide range of common software and physical attacks with low performance penalties and minimal overheads.

  12. HPV Vaccination and the Role of the Pediatric Dentist: Survey of Graduate Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosking, Yoshita Patel; Cappelli, David; Donly, Kevin; Redding, Spencer

    2017-09-15

    This study's purpose was to evaluate what is currently being taught in graduate pediatric dental programs regarding the human papillomavirus (HPV), the HPV vaccine, and risk factors associated with oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). A 42-question survey was administered via paper-and-pen survey instrument to attendees at the 2016 American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) annual meeting for graduate and associate program directors. The survey included questions evaluating attitudes/beliefs toward the HPV vaccine and current training in graduate pediatric dentistry programs and aimed to define whether the directors believe that the discussion of HPV vaccination and associated risk factors was within the scope of practice for pediatric dentists. Sixty-four of 71 attendees completed the survey; 77 percent of respondents believe they should be discussing the HPV vaccine with patients/parents. Increased age of respondent was correlated with the idea of discussion of sexual health and its link to OPC being within the scope of practice of pediatric dentistry (r equals 0.35, P=.005). A majority (77 percent) of graduate and associate program directors believe they should be discussing the human papillomavirus vaccine with patients and parents; however, only 25 percent of respondents currently include information about HPV and the vaccine in their curricula.

  13. Attributes of Candidates Passing the ABS Certifying Examination on the First Attempt-Program Directors׳ Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Mohd Raashid; Hulme, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The American Board of Surgery Certifying Examination (CE) is a pivotal event in a surgeon's career development, as it is the last challenge before achieving Board certification. First-time pass rate on the CE is one of the key metrics of surgery residency programs. The overall pass rate on the CE has declined significantly in recent years. The goal of this study was the identification of attributes of general surgery residents that are associated with passing the CE at the first attempt. The modified Delphi process was used to survey general surgery program directors. The study was conducted in 2 rounds in the interest of time available for surgical education research fellowship project. All 259 program directors were contacted in each round of surveys. In all, 49 (19%) responded to the first round and 54 (21%) responded to the second round of survey. The characteristics of a successful resident on CE include confidence, self-motivation, sound knowledge base, strong performance on the Board's training examination (American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination), and mock orals, and good communication skills. Postgraduate years 4 and 5 are the most likely resident levels at which failure could be predicted. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. What Are We Doing? A Survey of United States Nephrology Fellowship Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebman, Scott E; Moore, Catherine A; Monk, Rebeca D; Rizvi, Mahrukh S

    2017-03-07

    Interest in nephrology has been declining in recent years. Long work hours and a poor work/life balance may be partially responsible, and may also affect a fellowship's educational mission. We surveyed nephrology program directors using a web-based survey in order to define current clinical and educational practice patterns and identify areas for improvement. Our survey explored fellowship program demographics, fellows' workload, call structure, and education. Program directors were asked to estimate the average and maximum number of patients on each of their inpatient services, the number of patients seen by fellows in clinic, and to provide details regarding their overnight and weekend call. In addition, we asked about number of and composition of didactic conferences. Sixty-eight out of 148 program directors responded to the survey (46%). The average number of fellows per program was approximately seven. The busiest inpatient services had a mean of 21.5±5.9 patients on average and 33.8±10.7 at their maximum. The second busiest services had an average and maximum of 15.6±6.0 and 24.5±10.8 patients, respectively. Transplant-only services had fewer patients than other service compositions. A minority of services (14.5%) employed physician extenders. Fellows most commonly see patients during a single weekly continuity clinic, with a typical fellow-to-faculty ratio of 2:1. The majority of programs do not alter outpatient responsibilities during inpatient service time. Most programs (approximately 75%) divided overnight and weekend call responsibilities equally between first year and more senior fellows. Educational practices varied widely between programs. Our survey underscores the large variety in workload, practice patterns, and didactics at different institutions and provides a framework to help improve the service/education balance in nephrology fellowships. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  15. Preparedness of Entering Pediatric Dentistry Residents: Advanced Pediatric Program Directors' and First-Year Residents' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkauskas, John; Seale, N Sue; Casamassimo, Paul; Rutkauskas, John S

    2015-11-01

    For children to receive needed oral health care, adequate training at both the predoctoral and postdoctoral levels of dental education is required, but previous studies have found inadequacies in predoctoral education that lead to general dentists' unwillingness to treat certain young populations. As another way of assessing predoctoral preparation, the aim of this study was to determine the perspectives of first-year residents and pediatric program directors about residents' preparedness to enter advanced education programs in pediatric dentistry. Surveys were sent to all 74 U.S. program directors and 360 first-year residents. The survey focused on procedures related to prevention, behavior management, restorative procedures, pulp therapy, sedation, and surgery, as well as treating patients funded by Medicaid and with special health care needs. Among the first-year residents, 173 surveys were returned for a 48% response rate; 61 directors returned surveys for an 82% response rate. Only half of the residents (55%) reported feeling adequately prepared for their first year in residency; less than half cited adequate preparation to place stainless steel crowns (SSCs) (42%) and perform pulpotomies (45%). Far fewer felt adequately prepared to provide treatment for children six months to three years of age, including examinations (29%), infant oral exams (27%), and children with severe caries (37%). The program directors were even less positive about the adequacy of residents' preparation. Only 17% deemed them adequately prepared to place SSCs and 13% to perform pulpotomies. Approximately half reported their first-year residents were inadequately prepared to treat very young children and children with severe caries (55% each). This study found that the perceived inadequacy of predoctoral education in pediatric dentistry was consistent at both the learner and educator levels, supporting previous studies identifying inadequacies in this area.

  16. The Role of Program Directors in Treatment Practices: The Case of Methadone Dose Patterns in U.S. Outpatient Opioid Agonist Treatment Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frimpong, Jemima A; Shiu-Yee, Karen; D'Aunno, Thomas

    2017-10-01

    To describe changes in characteristics of directors of outpatient opioid agonist treatment (OAT) programs, and to examine the association between directors' characteristics and low methadone dosage. Repeated cross-sectional surveys of OAT programs in the United States from 1995 to 2011. We used generalized linear regression models to examine associations between directors' characteristics and methadone dose, adjusting for program and patient factors. Data were collected through telephone surveys of program directors. The proportion of OAT programs with an African American director declined over time, from 29 percent in 1995 to 16 percent in 2011. The median percentage of patients in each program receiving methadone doses than other programs. This association was even stronger in programs with an African American director who served populations with higher percentages of African American patients. Demographic characteristics of OAT program directors (e.g., their race) may play a key role in explaining variations in methadone dosage across programs and patients. Further research should investigate the causal pathways through which directors' characteristics affect treatment practices. This may lead to new, multifaceted managerial interventions to improve patient outcomes. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  17. Neurocritical care education during neurology residency: AAN survey of US program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, K N; Drogan, O; Manno, E; Geocadin, R G; Ziai, W

    2012-05-29

    Limited information is available regarding the current state of neurocritical care education for neurology residents. The goal of our survey was to assess the need and current state of neurocritical care training for neurology residents. A survey instrument was developed and, with the support of the American Academy of Neurology, distributed to residency program directors of 132 accredited neurology programs in the United States in 2011. A response rate of 74% (98 of 132) was achieved. A dedicated neuroscience intensive care unit (neuro-ICU) existed in 64%. Fifty-six percent of residency programs offer a dedicated rotation in the neuro-ICU, lasting 4 weeks on average. Where available, the neuro-ICU rotation was required in the vast majority (91%) of programs. Neurology residents' exposure to the fundamental principles of neurocritical care was obtained through a variety of mechanisms. Of program directors, 37% indicated that residents would be interested in performing away rotations in a neuro-ICU. From 2005 to 2010, the number of programs sending at least one resident into a neuro-ICU fellowship increased from 14% to 35%. Despite the expansion of neurocritical care, large proportions of US neurology residents have limited exposure to a neuro-ICU and neurointensivists. Formal training in the principles of neurocritical care may be highly variable. The results of this survey suggest a charge to address the variability of resident education and to develop standardized curricula in neurocritical care for neurology residents.

  18. Neurosurgical Resident Error: A Survey of U.S. Neurosurgery Residency Training Program Directors' Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Raghav; Moore, Justin M; Adeeb, Nimer; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Schneider, Anna M; Gandhi, Chirag D; Harsh, Griffith R; Thomas, Ajith J; Ogilvy, Christopher S

    2018-01-01

    Efforts to address resident errors and to enhance patient safety have included systemic reforms, such as the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's (ACGME's) mandated duty-hour restrictions, and specialty-specific initiatives such as the neurosurgery Milestone Project. However, there is currently little data describing the basis for these errors or outlining trends in neurosurgical resident error. An online questionnaire was distributed to program directors of 108 U.S. neurosurgery residency training programs to assess the frequency, most common forms and causes of resident error, the resulting patient outcomes, and the steps taken by residency programs to address these errors. Thirty-one (28.7%) responses were received. Procedural/surgical error was the most commonly observed type of error. Transient injury and no injury to the patient were perceived to be the 2 most frequent outcomes. Inexperience or resident mistake despite adequate training were cited as the most common causes of error. Twenty-three (74.2%) respondents stated that a lower post graduate year level correlated with an increased incidence of errors. There was a trend toward an association between an increased number of residents within a program and the number of errors attributable to a lack of supervision (r = 0.36; P = 0.06). Most (93.5%) program directors do not believe that mandated duty-hour restrictions reduce error frequency. Program directors believe that procedural error is the most commonly observed form of error, with post graduate year level believed to be an important predictor of error frequency. The perceived utility of systemic reforms that aim to reduce the incidence of resident error remains unclear. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. What Do They Want from Us? A Survey of EM Program Directors on EM Application Criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Kevin; Kass, Dara

    2017-01-01

    Although a relatively young specialty, emergency medicine (EM) is popular among medical students and is one of the most competitive large specialties. Consequently, students increasingly seek more opportunity to differentiate themselves from their colleagues by pursuing more clerkships at the cost of taking out additional loans: this despite the fact that those who match in EM typically do so in their top three choices. We sought to ascertain what factors EM program directors seek in their typical candidate. We recruited EM program directors via the Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors email listserv to participate in an anonymous survey regarding the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE), the number of standardized letters of evaluation (SLOE), and the number of EM rotations during the fourth year. 135 respondents completed the anonymous survey: 59% of respondents stated their program did not have a minimum USMLE Step 1 score, but 39% reported a minimum score of 210 or higher; 95% of programs do not require Step 2 to grant an interview, but 46% require it to place the student on the rank list; 80% require only one EM rotation to grant an interview and none require more than two; 95% of programs will accept two SLOEs for both application and rank list placement. For the typical EM applicant, there is likely little benefit to performing more than two rotations and obtaining more than two SLOEs. Students can defer USMLE Step 2 but must complete it by the time rank lists are due. Our study was limited by the anonymity of the survey, and comments by the respondents revealed the questions did not account for some nuances programs apply to their application review process.

  20. Ultrasonography training and utilization in surgical critical care fellowships: a program director's survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorkgitis, Brian K; Bryant, Elizabeth A; Brat, Gabriel A; Kelly, Edward; Askari, Reza; Ra, Jin H

    2017-10-01

    Intensivist-performed ultrasound (IPUS) is an adjunctive tool used to assist in resuscitation and management of critically ill patients. It allows clinicians real-time information through noninvasive methods. We aimed to evaluate the types of IPUS performed and the methods surgical critical care (SCC) fellows are trained along with challenges in training. One hundred SCC fellowship directors were successfully sent an email inviting them to participate in a short Web-based survey. We inquired about program characteristics including hospital type, fellowship size, faculty size and training, dedicated surgical critical care beds, and ultrasound equipment availability. The survey contained questions regarding the program directors' perception on importance on cost effectiveness of IPUS, types of IPUS examinations performed, fellows experience with IPUS, challenges to training, and presence and methods of quality assurance (QA) programs. A total of 38 (38.0%) program directors completed the survey. Using a 100-point Likert scale, the majority of the respondents indicated that IPUS is important to patient care in the SICU and is cost-effective (mean score 85.5 and 84.6, respectively). Most (34, 89.5%) utilize IPUS and conduct a mean of 5.1 different examination types with FAST being the most prevalent examination (33, 86.8%). Thirty-three (86.8%) programs include IPUS in their SCC training with varying amounts of time spent training. Of these programs, 19 (57.6%) have a specific curriculum. The most frequently used modalities for training fellows were informal bedside teaching (28, 84.8%), hands-on lectures (20, 60.6%) and formal lectures (19, 57.6%). The top three challenges program directors cited for IPUS education was time (23, 69.7%), followed by concerns for ongoing QA (19, 57.6%) and lack of faculty trained in IPUS (18, 53.9%). Only 20 (60.6%) programs review images as a part of QA/quality improvement. Utilization and training of IPUS is common in SCC fellowships

  1. Scaling Concolic Execution of Binary Programs for Security Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    execution. We also study unexplored applications of concolic execution in security-related problems such as malware genealogy and protocol model inference...tions of concolic execution. We also study unexplored applications of con- colic execution in security-related problems such as malware genealogy and...discovery and signature generation. We then study further unexplored uses of concolic execution in security-related problems such as malware genealogy

  2. Constellation Program: Lessons Learned. Volume 1; Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhatigan, Jennifer L. (Editor)

    2011-01-01

    This document (Volume I) provides an executive summary of the lessons learned from the Constellation Program. A companion Volume II provides more detailed analyses for those seeking further insight and information. In this volume, Section 1.0 introduces the approach in preparing and organizing the content to enable rapid assimilation of the lessons. Section 2.0 describes the contextual framework in which the Constellation Program was formulated and functioned that is necessary to understand most of the lessons. Context of a former program may seem irrelevant in the heady days of new program formulation. However, readers should take some time to understand the context. Many of the lessons would be different in a different context, so the reader should reflect on the similarities and differences in his or her current circumstances. Section 3.0 summarizes key findings developed from the significant lessons learned at the program level that appear in Section 4.0. Readers can use the key findings in Section 3.0 to peruse for particular topics, and will find more supporting detail and analyses in Section 4.0 in a topical format. Appendix A contains a white paper describing the Constellation Program formulation that may be of use to readers wanting more context or background information. The reader will no doubt recognize some very similar themes from previous lessons learned, blue-ribbon committee reviews, National Academy reviews, and advisory panel reviews for this and other large-scale human spaceflight programs; including Apollo, Space Shuttle, Shuttle/Mir, and the ISS. This could represent an inability to learn lessons from previous generations; however, it is more likely that similar challenges persist in the Agency structure and approach to program formulation, budget advocacy, and management. Perhaps the greatest value of these Constellation lessons learned can be found in viewing them in context with these previous efforts to guide and advise the Agency and its

  3. Opportunities to improve recruitment into medical genetics residency programs: survey results of program directors and medical genetics residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichon, Michelle; Feldman, Gerald L

    2014-05-01

    Approximately 50% of medical genetics residency positions remain unfilled each year. This study was designed to assess current recruitment strategies used by program directors, to identify factors that influenced trainees to choose medical genetics as a career, and to use these results as a foundation to develop a strategic plan to address the challenges of recruitment. Two surveys were created, one for program directors and one for current medical genetics residents, to evaluate current recruiting efforts and institutional support for programs and to identify factors that helped trainees choose genetics as a career. Program directors identified the most successful recruiting methods as "direct contact with residents or medical students" and "word of mouth" (80%). Residents listed having a mentor (50%), previous research in genetics (35%), and genetics coursework (33%) as the top reasons that influenced them to enter the field. Geneticists should become more proactive in providing resources to students to help them understand a career as a medical geneticist and mentor those students/residents who show true interest in the field. Results of these surveys spurred the development of the Task Force on Medical Genetics Education and Training of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics.

  4. E-learning in graduate medical education: survey of residency program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittich, Christopher M; Agrawal, Anoop; Cook, David A; Halvorsen, Andrew J; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Chaudhry, Saima; Dupras, Denise M; Oxentenko, Amy S; Beckman, Thomas J

    2017-07-11

    E-learning-the use of Internet technologies to enhance knowledge and performance-has become a widely accepted instructional approach. Little is known about the current use of e-learning in postgraduate medical education. To determine utilization of e-learning by United States internal medicine residency programs, program director (PD) perceptions of e-learning, and associations between e-learning use and residency program characteristics. We conducted a national survey in collaboration with the Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine of all United States internal medicine residency programs. Of the 368 PDs, 214 (58.2%) completed the e-learning survey. Use of synchronous e-learning at least sometimes, somewhat often, or very often was reported by 85 (39.7%); 153 programs (71.5%) use asynchronous e-learning at least sometimes, somewhat often, or very often. Most programs (168; 79%) do not have a budget to integrate e-learning. Mean (SD) scores for the PD perceptions of e-learning ranged from 3.01 (0.94) to 3.86 (0.72) on a 5-point scale. The odds of synchronous e-learning use were higher in programs with a budget for its implementation (odds ratio, 3.0 [95% CI, 1.04-8.7]; P = .04). Residency programs could be better resourced to integrate e-learning technologies. Asynchronous e-learning was used more than synchronous, which may be to accommodate busy resident schedules and duty-hour restrictions. PD perceptions of e-learning are relatively moderate and future research should determine whether PD reluctance to adopt e-learning is based on unawareness of the evidence, perceptions that e-learning is expensive, or judgments about value versus effectiveness.

  5. Effectiveness of Therapeutic Programs for Students with ADHD with Executive Function Deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaimaha, Napalai; Sriphetcharawut, Sarinya; Lersilp, Suchitporn; Chinchai, Supaporn

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of therapeutic programs, an executive function training program and a collaborative program, for students with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) with executive function deficits (EFDs), especially regarding working memory, planning, and monitoring. The participants were…

  6. Director's Discretionary Research and Development Program: Annual Report, Fiscal Year 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2005-12-01

    The Director's Discretionary Research and Development (DDRD) program is designed to encourage technical innovation and build new research and development capabilities at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Technical innovation is critical to the long-term viability of NREL (also referred to as the Laboratory) and to the success of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The strategic value of DDRD is being continuously enhanced by expanding the opportunities to propose and pursue innovative ideas for building new and enhanced capabilities.

  7. Preferred teaching and testing methods of athletic training students and program directors and the relationship to styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Trenton E; Caswell, Shane V

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was (1) to investigate differences between athletic training students' and program directors' preferences for teaching and testing methods and (2) to investigate the relationship between style and preferred teaching and testing methods using the Gregorc Style Delineator (GSD) and the Preferred Teaching and Testing Method Inventory (PTTMI). We cluster sampled 200 undergraduate students (100% return; 68 men, 132 women; mean age, 20.12 +/- 2.02 yrs) and simple random sampled 100 program directors (43% return; 22 men, 21 women; mean age, 40.05 +/- 9.30 yrs) from Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs-accredited athletic training education programs. We used a correlational research design to compare the preferred teaching and testing methods of undergraduate students and program directors. All subjects completed a demographic survey, the GSD, and the PTTMI. Our analyses included two separate 2 (role: student and program director) x 8 (method: teaching or testing techniques) and two separate 4 (style: concrete sequential, abstract sequential, abstract random, concrete random) x 8 (method: teaching and testing techniques) mixed-model analyses of variance. We found that athletic training students and program directors had significantly different preferences for teaching (p teaching or testing method. We recommend that athletic training and allied health educators consider implementing pedagogy that accentuates students' styles and consider self and students' preferences for preferred teaching and testing methods as time and topic permit.

  8. Nephrology elective experience during medical residency: a national survey of US nephrology fellowship training program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Hitesh H; Adams, Nancy Day; Mattana, Joseph; Kadiyala, Aditya; Jhaveri, Kenar D

    2015-07-01

    Interest in nephrology careers continues to decline in the United States. The reasons for this declining interest are not fully understood but it is plausible that inadequate exposure to the full spectrum of what a career in nephrology encompasses may be part of the explanation. Inpatient-based nephrology electives have been a common venue for residents to gain exposure to nephrology but little is known regarding the details of such electives and how often they include outpatient experiences. We carried out a national survey of nephrology fellowship training program directors to obtain data on the content of nephrology elective experiences as well as their ideas on how to promote interest in the field. The survey revealed the majority of elective experiences to be either exclusively or heavily inpatient based, with only a small percentage having a substantial outpatient component, particularly in outpatient dialysis or transplantation. Training program directors felt that providing greater outpatient experiences to residents during elective rotations would be an effective means to promote interest in nephrology, along with structured faculty mentoring. Our findings suggest that current approaches to the nephrology elective experience are heavily inpatient-based and might benefit from incorporating much more of the rich spectrum of activities a career in nephrology entails. Hopefully such efforts can create and enhance interest in careers in nephrology and potentially begin a sustained reversal of an unfortunate and serious decline in interest.

  9. Leadership styles and occupational stress among college athletic directors: the moderating effect of program goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryska, Todd A

    2002-03-01

    The interaction between an individual's abilities and the perceived demands of the workplace appears to make a unique contribution to job-related stress above and beyond that of dispositional or situational factors alone (R. S. Lazarus, 1990). In the present study, the author evaluated this contention among 245 male intercollegiate athletic directors by assessing the combined influence of leadership style and program goals on occupational stress. Regression analyses revealed the presence of both significant main effects and interaction effects of leadership style and program goals in the prediction of emotional exhaustion, daily job stress, and personal accomplishment. Findings are discussed in terms of person-environment fit theory (J. R. P. French, R. D. Caplan, & R. V. Harrison, 1982) and the notion of perceived control within the occupational setting.

  10. Trends in Urology Residents' Exposure to Operative Urotrauma: A Survey of Residency Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Daniel C; Kocher, Neil; Mydlo, Jack H; Simhan, Jay

    2016-01-01

    To determine longitudinal trends in resident exposure to urotrauma and to assess whether presence of Genitourinary Reconstructive Surgeon (GURS) faculty has impacted exposure and career choice. An identical, 31-question multiple-choice survey was sent to program directors of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited urology residency programs in 2006 and 2013. The areas of focus included program demographics, extent of urotrauma exposure, program director perceptions regarding educational value of urotrauma, and impact of GURS fellowship trained faculty. Responses were de-identified, compiled, and compared for differences. Response rates were 57% (64/112) and 43% (53/123) for the 2006 and 2013 survey, respectively (P = .03). Trauma Level 1 designation (56/64 [89%] vs 44/53 [88%], P = .84) and presence of GURS faculty (22/64 [34%] vs 22/53 [43%], P = .43) were similar between survey periods. Although survey respondents felt urotrauma volume had remained constant (34/64 [53%] vs 30/53 [56%], P = .71), more recent respondents reported that conservative management strategies negatively impacted resident exposure (14/64 [22%] vs 23/53 [43%], P = .01). Residencies with GURS faculty in 2013 (22/53, 42%) were positively associated with residents publishing urotrauma literature (9/22 [41%] vs 4/31 [13%], P = .02), the presence of multidisciplinary trauma and urology conferences (3/22 [14%] vs 0/31 [0%], P = .03), and residents matriculating to GURS fellowships (15/22 [68%] vs 10/31 [32%], P = .009). Many contemporary urology residencies report poor resident exposure to urotrauma during training. Although presence of GURS faculty may influence resident career choice, additional strategies may be warranted to expose residents to urotrauma during training. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. NIF Programs Directorate: Integrated Safety Management System Implementation Plan October 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, L

    2001-09-17

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed a work structure that serves to ensure work is performed safely and in compliance with applicable environment, safety, and health (ES&H) requirements. Safety begins and ends with the worker ''on the floor'' conducting the work activity. The primary focus of the NIF Programs Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) is to provide the worker with a sound work environment, necessary resources to perform the job, and adequate procedures and controls to ensure the work is performed safely. It is to this end that the ES&H roles, responsibilities, and authorities are developed and practiced. NIF Programs recognizes and understands the Department of Energy (DOE)/University of California (UC) Contract requirements for ISMS at LLNL and the opportunities and values of the system. NIF Programs understands and supports the DOE Integrated Safety Management (ISM) objective, guiding principles, core functions, and the institutional requirements contained in the LLNL ISMS Description document. NIF Programs is committed to implementing and utilizing ISMS in all of its programs, operations, facilities, and activities and to continuing to assess its successful implementation and use. NIF Programs ISMS has been developed consistent with the requirements of the ''LLNL Integrated Safety Management System Description'' document and specific ISMS implementation needs of NIF Programs. The purpose of this document is to define for NIF Programs' workers and communicate to both senior LLNL management and DOE how and where NIF Programs satisfies the institutional ISM requirements. This document consists of: (1) A NIF Programs document hierarchy that illustrates the flow of ES&H requirements from the directorate level to the worker. (2) A roles, responsibilities, and authorities section for ES&H management chain positions, (3) An ISM implementation matrix that references specific

  12. Report on Activities and Programs for Countering Proliferation and NBC Terrorism. Volume 1. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    improved CWMD targeting and planning. The Simu- lation Environment & Response Program Execution Nesting Tool ( SERPENT ), version 2.2, improved the...effects to support target analysis for conventional and agent defeat weapons ( SERPENT ); and neutralization effects of various environments on CB agents...WMD USSTRATCOM Center for Combating Weapons of Mass Destruction SERPENT Simulation Environment & Response Program Execution Nesting Tool SLD Second

  13. The role of librarians in teaching evidence-based medicine to pediatric residents: a survey of pediatric residency program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boykan, Rachel; Jacobson, Robert M

    2017-10-01

    The research sought to identify the general use of medical librarians in pediatric residency training, to define the role of medical librarians in teaching evidence-based medicine (EBM) to pediatric residents, and to describe strategies and curricula for teaching EBM used in pediatric residency training programs. We sent a 13-question web-based survey through the Association of Pediatric Program Directors to 200 pediatric residency program directors between August and December 2015. A total of 91 (46%) pediatric residency program directors responded. Most (76%) programs had formal EBM curricula, and more than 75% of curricula addressed question formation, searching, assessment of validity, generalizability, quantitative importance, statistical significance, and applicability. The venues for teaching EBM that program directors perceived to be most effective included journal clubs (84%), conferences (44%), and morning report (36%). While 80% of programs utilized medical librarians, most of these librarians assisted with scholarly or research projects (74%), addressed clinical questions (62%), and taught on any topic not necessarily EBM (58%). Only 17% of program directors stated that librarians were involved in teaching EBM on a regular basis. The use of a librarian was not associated with having an EBM curriculum but was significantly associated with the size of the program. Smaller programs were more likely to utilize librarians (100%) than were medium (71%) or large programs (75%). While most pediatric residency programs have an EBM curriculum and engage medical librarians in various ways, librarians' expertise in teaching EBM is underutilized. Programs should work to better integrate librarians' expertise, both in the didactic and clinical teaching of EBM.

  14. Leadership strategies for department chairs and program directors: a case study approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, Robert W; Haden, N Karl; Taylor, Robert L; Thomas, D Denee

    2002-04-01

    As a part of the 2000-01 American Dental Education Association (ADEA) Leadership Institute, the Leadership Institute Fellows conducted a faculty development workshop for department chairpersons and program directors during the 2001 ADEA Annual Session. A central premise of the workshop was that successful chairpersons and program directors are both effective leaders and effective managers and that leadership and management involve complementary activities. The workshop was case-based. The ADEA Leadership Institute Fellows developed the cases and led roundtable discussions of each case. A group facilitator led large group debriefings to apply management and leadership theory to each case. The purpose of this paper is to review leadership challenges and management concepts as they were applied in a case-based faculty development workshop. The program was structured to address leadership challenges relating to managing people, mission management, conflict recognition, and conflict management. The cases were developed to relate management theories to situations in academic administration. The situations were designed to encourage debate from numerous perspectives. Each case presented general dilemmas that could be addressed from the vantage point of the dean, chair, or individual faculty member. Reinforcing discussion followed and included identification of central issues, key management concepts, and action alternatives. Because of the breadth of possible discussion, group case analyses at the workshop and in the appended case reviews explore only one perspective. This overview article introduces concepts of leadership and management that provide the foundation for analysis of three case studies that follow. These cases address common leadership and management issues in academic dentistry through three typical cases: the frustrated faculty member (case 1), the misdirected faculty member (case 2), and the faculty member stuck in the middle (case 3).

  15. Sleep technologists educational needs assessment: a survey of polysomnography, electroneurodiagnostic technology, and respiratory therapy education program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Mary Ellen; Vaughn, Bradley V

    2013-10-15

    In this study, we assessed the community and educational needs for sleep technologists by surveying program directors of nationally accredited polysomnography, electroneurodiagnostic technology, and respiratory care educational programs. Currently, little is known about our educational capacity and the need for advanced degrees for sleep medicine technical support. A questionnaire was developed about current and future community and educational needs for sleep technologists. The questionnaire was sent to directors of CAAHEP-accredited polysomnography and electroneurodiagnostic technology programs (associate degree and certificate programs), and directors of CoARC-accredited respiratory therapy associate degree and bachelor degree programs (n = 358). Qualitative and quantitative data were collected via an internet survey tool. Data analysis was conducted with the IBM SPSS statistical package and included calculating means and standard deviations of the frequency of responses. Qualitative data was analyzed and classified based on emerging themes. One hundred seven of 408 program directors completed the survey. Seventy-four percent agreed that demand for qualified sleep technologists will increase, yet 50% of those surveyed believe there are not enough educational programs to meet the demand. Seventy-eight percent of those surveyed agreed that the educational requirements for sleep technologists will soon increase; 79% of those surveyed believe sleep centers have a need for technologists with advanced training or specialization. Our study shows educators of associate and certificate degree programs believe there is a need for a bachelor's degree in sleep science and technology.

  16. Sexual Assault Training in Emergency Medicine Residencies: A Survey of Program Directors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret K Sande

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is currently no standard forensic medicine training program for emergency medicine residents. In the advent of sexual assault nurse examiner (SANE programs aimed at improving the quality of care for sexual assault victims, it is also unclear how these programs impact emergency medicine (EM resident forensic medicine training. The purpose of this study was togather information on EM residency programs’ training in the care of sexual assault patients and determine what impact SANE programs may have on the experience of EM resident training from the perspective of residency program directors (PDs.Methods: This was a cross-sectional survey. The study cohort was all residency PDs from approved EM residency training programs who completed a closed-response self-administered survey electronically.Results: We sent surveys to 152 PDs, and 71 responded for an overall response rate of 47%. Twenty-two PDs (31% reported that their residency does not require procedural competency for the sexual assault exam, and 29 (41% reported their residents are required only to observe sexual assault exam completion to demonstrate competency. Residency PDs were asked how their programs established resident requirements for sexual assault exams. Thirty-seven PDs (52% did not know how their sexual assault exam requirement was established.Conclusion: More than half of residency PDs did not know how their sexual assault guidelines were established, and few were based upon recommendations from the literature. There is no clear consensus as to how PDs view the effect of SANE programs on resident competency with the sexual assault exam. This study highlights both a need for increased awareness of EM resident sexual assault education nationally and also a possible need for a training curriculum defining guidelines forEM residents performing sexual assault exams. [West J Emerg Med. 2013;14(5:461–466.

  17. Preparation in the business and practice of medicine: perspectives from recent gynecologic oncology graduates and program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlumbrecht, Matthew; Siemon, John; Morales, Guillermo; Huang, Marilyn; Slomovitz, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Preparation in the business of medicine is reported to be poor across a number of specialties. No data exist about such preparation in gynecologic oncology training programs. Our objectives were to evaluate current time dedicated to these initiatives, report recent graduate perceptions about personal preparedness, and assess areas where improvements in training can occur. Two separate surveys were created and distributed, one to 183 Society of Gynecologic Oncology candidate members and the other to 48 gynecologic oncology fellowship program directors. Candidate member surveys included questions about perceived preparedness for independent research, teaching, job-hunting, insurance, and billing. Program director surveys assessed current and desired time dedicated to the topics asked concurrently on the candidate survey. Statistical analysis was performed using Chi-squared (or Fisher's exact test if appropriate) and logistic regression. Survey response rates of candidate members and program directors were 28% and 40%, respectively. Candidate members wanted increased training in all measures except retrospective protocol writing. Female candidates wanted more training on writing letters of intent (LOI) (p = 0.01) and billing (p < 0.01). Compared to their current schedules, program directors desired more time to teach how to write an investigator initiated trial (p = 0.01). 94% of program directors reported having career goal discussions with their fellows, while only 72% of candidate members reported that this occurred (p = 0.05). Recent graduates want more preparation in the non-clinical aspects of their careers. Reconciling program director and fellow desires and increasing communication between the two may serve to achieve the educational goals of each.

  18. An Introduction to Intelligent Processing Programs Developed by the Air Force Manufacturing Technology Directorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Paul G.; Sny, Linda C.

    1992-01-01

    The Air Force has numerous on-going manufacturing and integration development programs (machine tools, composites, metals, assembly, and electronics) which are instrumental in improving productivity in the aerospace industry, but more importantly, have identified strategies and technologies required for the integration of advanced processing equipment. An introduction to four current Air Force Manufacturing Technology Directorate (ManTech) manufacturing areas is provided. Research is being carried out in the following areas: (1) machining initiatives for aerospace subcontractors which provide for advanced technology and innovative manufacturing strategies to increase the capabilities of small shops; (2) innovative approaches to advance machine tool products and manufacturing processes; (3) innovative approaches to advance sensors for process control in machine tools; and (4) efforts currently underway to develop, with the support of industry, the Next Generation Workstation/Machine Controller (Low-End Controller Task).

  19. Assessing and Promoting the Wellness of United States Ophthalmology Residents: A Survey of Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Elaine M; Scott, Ingrid U; Clark, Melissa A; Greenberg, Paul B

    To report on the status of residency-based wellness initiatives in ophthalmic graduate medical education and identify strategies for promoting ophthalmology resident wellness by surveying US ophthalmology program directors (PDs). The PDs were each sent an e-mail containing a link to an anonymous online 15-question survey. The PDs also received a letter with the survey link and a $1 incentive. After 2 weeks, nonresponders received 2 weekly reminder e-mails and phone calls. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the multiple choice responses and categorize the free response answers. National survey. All 111 US ophthalmology PDs were invited to participate. Of 111 PDs, 56 (50%) responded; 14 (26%) of 53 respondents reported that their programs faced an issue involving resident depression, burnout, or suicide within the last year; 25 (45%) of 56 reported that their department had a resident wellness program. Respondents without wellness programs reported a shortage of time (19/30; 63%) and lack of training and resources (19/30; 63%) as barriers to instituting these programs. Respondents reported that the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education could better promote resident wellness by providing training resources for burnout and depression screening (35/53; 66%), resilience skills building (38/53; 72%), and wellness program development (36/53; 68%). This survey suggests that there is a substantial burden of burnout and depression among residents in ophthalmic graduate medical education and that this burden can be addressed by promoting the training of educators to recognize the signs of burnout and depression, and providing resources to develop and expand formal wellness programs. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Interview. Maria Isabal Plata, executive director of Profamilia, talks to Caroline Sweetman about the work of the organisation in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweetman, C

    1996-06-01

    In this interview, Maria Isabal Plata discusses the work of the nongovernmental organization Profamilia in Colombia. Since its founding in 1965, Profamilia has assumed direct and indirect responsibility for nearly 70% of family planning (FP) and reproductive health activities in the country. These activities are complemented by a legal service program, an evaluation and research program, and a documentation center. In Colombia, women gained equal rights under the law in 1974 and a constitutional prohibition on discrimination in 1991, but sex stereotypes still dictate responsibility for family chores. When women realize their economic and social rights, poverty and inequalities will diminish. Thus, it is crucial to safeguard reproductive and sexual rights and ban violence against women. The traditional concept of family forces a disregard for the rights of family members and allows societies to oppose the interests of women. The aftermath of the UN Fourth Women's Conference in Colombia will be to work towards achieving full citizenship for women and democratic societies. The experience women's groups had at the conference has created a situation in which grassroots organizations can consider beginning to work with development organizations to achieve some of these goals.

  1. Antibiotic prophylaxis for children with sickle cell disease: a survey of pediatric dentistry residency program directors and pediatric hematologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Anupama Rao; Norris, Chelita Kaye; Minniti, Caterina P

    2006-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to: (1) investigate the current clinical practice regarding the use of antibiotic prophylaxis by pediatric dentistry residency program directors and pediatric hematologists for children with sickle cell disease (SCD) requiring dental treatment; and (2) evaluate the perceived relative risk of bacteremia following specific dental procedures, as defined by pediatric dentistry residency program directors and pediatric hematologists. A written survey depicting various clinical scenarios of SCD children requiring common dental procedures was mailed to directors of pediatric dental advanced education programs and distributed to pediatric hematologists attending the 2003 Annual Sickle Cell Disease Association of America conference in Washington, DC. Surveys were returned by 60% (N=34/57) of the pediatric dentistry residency program directors. The surveys were obtained from 51% of pediatric hematologists at the meeting (N=72/140). At least 50% of all respondents recommended prophylaxis for the following clinical situations: dental extractions, treatment under general anesthesia, and status post splenectomy. The perceived risk of infectious complication was highest for extractions, followed by restorative treatment and tooth polishing. Dental residency program directors were more likely (71%, N=24/34) to recommend additional antibiotic therapy for patients taking penicillin prophylaxis if they required an invasive oral surgical procedure. Conversely, only 38% (N=25/66) of pediatric hematologists recommended additional antibiotic therapy (P=.001). Eighty-six percent of dental residency program directors (N=25/29) chose amoxicillin for prophylaxis whereas only 62% of pediatric hematologists (N=36/58) recommended amoxicillin. (P<.05). There is a lack of consensus on the appropriate use of antibiotic prophylaxis in SCD children undergoing dental treatments. Further research and risk/benefit assessment is needed to create a unified approach.

  2. An analysis of National Health Service Trust websites on the occupational backgrounds of 'Non-Executive Directors' on England's Acute Trusts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Colin; Harding, Andrew Je

    2014-05-01

    To explore the occupational backgrounds of English Non-Executive Directors (NED) on Acute National Health Service (NHS) Trusts. Data extrapolated from Trust websites of NED' occupational backgrounds by gender and occupations, and inter-rater reliability test undertaken. Data were available on all but 24 of the 166 Acute Trusts' from all regions. Trust Chairs and NED were categorised by their dominant occupation. Differentiating NED with and without health or social care leadership experience. The ratings of NED' occupations positively correlated (p non-clinical Managerial backgrounds. Females made up 27% of NED. With a predominance of Chairs and NED without health or social care leadership experience, are current Boards equipped to avoid inadvertently 'doing the system's business' (Francis, 2013) rather than developing a more patient-centred, clinically led and integrated NHS? It is suggested that Boards need more NED with health and social care leadership experience and methods to identify the 'patient's agenda' to create 'a common culture' that places 'patients at the centre of everything we do' (Hunt, 2012). A key context for Trust Boards operations is funding, which Francis' terms of reference excluded, an issue that is briefly discussed.

  3. Localizing Bugs in Program Executions with Graphical Models

    OpenAIRE

    Dietz, Laura; Dallmeier, Valentin; Zeller, Andreas; Scheffer, Tobias

    2009-01-01

    We devise a graphical model that supports the process of debugging software by guiding developers to code that is likely to contain defects. The model is trained using execution traces of passing test runs; it reflects the distribution over transitional patterns of code positions. Given a failing test case, the model determines the least likely transitional pattern in the execution trace. The model is designed such that Bayesian inference has a closed-form solution. We...

  4. Flipped Classrooms in Graduate Medical Education: A National Survey of Residency Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittich, Christopher M; Agrawal, Anoop; Wang, Amy T; Halvorsen, Andrew J; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Chaudhry, Saima; Dupras, Denise M; Oxentenko, Amy S; Beckman, Thomas J

    2017-06-20

    To begin to quantify and understand the use of the flipped classroom (FC)-a progressive, effective, curricular model-in internal medicine (IM) education in relation to residency program and program director (PD) characteristics. The authors conducted a survey that included the Flipped Classroom Perception Instrument (FCPI) in 2015 regarding programs' use and PDs' perceptions of the FC model. Among the 368 IM residency programs, PDs at 227 (61.7%) responded to the survey and 206 (56.0%) completed the FCPI. Regarding how often programs used the FC model, 34 of the 206 PDs (16.5%) reported "never"; 44 (21.4%) reported "very rarely"; another 44 (21.4%) reported "somewhat rarely"; 59 (28.6%) reported "sometimes"; 16 (7.8%) reported "somewhat often"; and 9 (4.4%) reported "very often." The mean FCPI score (standard deviation [SD]) for the in-class application factor (4.11 [0.68]) was higher (i.e., more favorable) than for the preclass activity factor (3.94 [0.65]) (P 50 years, 3.94 [0.61]; P = .04) and women compared with men (4.28 [0.56] vs. 3.91 [0.62]; P < .001). PDs with better perceptions of FCs had higher odds of using FCs (odds ratio, 4.768; P < .001). Most IM programs use the FC model at least to some extent, and PDs prefer the interactive in-class components over the independent preclass activities. PDs who are women and younger perceived the model more favorably.

  5. Balancing education and service in graduate medical education: data from pediatric trainees and program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesselheim, Jennifer C; Sun, Pengling; Woolf, Alan D; London, Wendy B; Boyer, Debra

    2014-04-01

    To measure pediatric program directors' (PDs') and trainees' perceptions of and expectations for the balance of service and education in their training programs. In fall 2011, an electronic survey was sent to PDs and trainees at Boston Children's Hospital. Respondents described perceptions and expectations for service and education and rated the education and service inherent to 12 vignettes. Wilcoxon rank sum tests measured the agreement between PD and trainee perceptions and ratings of service and education assigned to each vignette. Responses were received from 28/39 PDs (78%) and 223/430 trainees (52%). Seventy-five (34%) trainees responded that their education had been compromised by excessive service obligations; only 1 (4%) PD agreed (P education, only 3 (11%) PDs agreed (P education and clinical demands compared with 2 PDs (7%) (P educational. Trainees scored 6 vignettes as having greater educational value (P ≤ .01) and 10 as having lower service content (P ≤ .04) than PDs did. Trainees and medical educators hold mismatched impressions of their training programs' balance of service and education. Trainees are more likely to report an overabundance of service. These data may impact the interpretation of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education survey results and should be incorporated into dialogue about future curricular design initiatives.

  6. From pilot project to annual success: creating an evidence-based leadership program for medical directors in long-term care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaloo, Tajudaullah; Mithani, Akber

    2008-01-01

    Engaging physicians in health care administration is critical. Within Canada, physician leadership programs have not been designed to meet the needs of medical directors in Long-Term Care (LTC). This article explains how a pilot program for medical directors in LTC was created to develop their leadership skills, and how it has now become an annual event. The program must evolve to enable medical directors to participate in system change and innovation within LTC.

  7. Teaching OM at an Action-based Learning Program for Top Executives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perunovic, Zoran; Staffensen, Lasse

    2013-01-01

    The paper discusses design and execution of OM module in an intensive program for top executives. The participants are working as consultants in six different host companies on developing growth strategies. The OM module is designed to enable the participants to develop operations strategy...... that supports corporate growth strategy....

  8. Palliative care and palliative radiation therapy education in radiation oncology: A survey of US radiation oncology program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Randy L; Colbert, Lauren E; Jones, Joshua; Racsa, Margarita; Kane, Gabrielle; Lutz, Steve; Vapiwala, Neha; Dharmarajan, Kavita V

    The purpose of this study was to assess the state of palliative and supportive care (PSC) and palliative radiation therapy (RT) educational curricula in radiation oncology residency programs in the United States. We surveyed 87 program directors of radiation oncology residency programs in the United States between September 2015 and November 2015. An electronic survey on PSC and palliative RT education during residency was sent to all program directors. The survey consisted of questions on (1) perceived relevance of PSC and palliative RT to radiation oncology training, (2) formal didactic sessions on domains of PSC and palliative RT, (3) effective teaching formats for PSC and palliative RT education, and (4) perceived barriers for integrating PSC and palliative RT into the residency curriculum. A total of 57 responses (63%) was received. Most program directors agreed or strongly agreed that PSC (93%) and palliative radiation therapy (99%) are important competencies for radiation oncology residents and fellows; however, only 67% of residency programs had formal educational activities in principles and practice of PSC. Most programs had 1 or more hours of formal didactics on management of pain (67%), management of neuropathic pain (65%), and management of nausea and vomiting (63%); however, only 35%, 33%, and 30% had dedicated lectures on initial management of fatigue, assessing role of spirituality, and discussing advance care directives, respectively. Last, 85% of programs reported having a formal curriculum on palliative RT. Programs were most likely to have education on palliative radiation to brain, bone, and spine, but less likely on visceral, or skin, metastasis. Residency program directors believe that PSC and palliative RT are important competencies for their trainees and support increasing education in these 2 educational domains. Many residency programs have structured curricula on PSC and palliative radiation education, but room for improvement exists in

  9. Palliative Care Exposure in Internal Medicine Residency Education: A Survey of ACGME Internal Medicine Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Asher; Nam, Samuel

    2018-01-01

    As the baby boomer generation ages, the need for palliative care services will be paramount and yet training for palliative care physicians is currently inadequate to meet the current palliative care needs. Nonspecialty-trained physicians will need to supplement the gap between supply and demand. Yet, no uniform guidelines exist for the training of internal medicine residents in palliative care. To our knowledge, no systematic study has been performed to evaluate how internal medicine residencies currently integrate palliative care into their training. In this study, we surveyed 338 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited internal medicine program directors. We queried how palliative care was integrated into their training programs. The vast majority of respondents felt that palliative care training was "very important" (87.5%) and 75.9% of respondents offered some kind of palliative care rotation, often with a multidisciplinary approach. Moving forward, we are hopeful that the data provided from our survey will act as a launching point for more formal investigations into palliative care education for internal medicine residents. Concurrently, policy makers should aid in palliative care instruction by formalizing required palliative care training for internal medicine residents.

  10. Faculty perceptions of occupational therapy program directors' leadership styles and outcomes of leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snodgrass, Jeff; Shachar, Mickey

    2008-01-01

    This research study investigated the relationship between faculty perceptions of occupational therapy program directors' leadership styles and outcomes of leadership and the effects of moderating demographic and institutional characteristics. Data for this study were collected utilizing the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire Form 5X and the self-designed Demographic and Institution Questionnaire. The study working sample included 184 graduate occupational therapy faculty members from 98 (65%) of all accredited academic occupational therapy programs in the United States for the 2005-06 academic year. Major findings from the study indicate that, in general, transformational leadership had a significant (p leadership outcomes whereas transactional leadership had a significant (p leadership attribute (although belonging to the transactional leadership construct) was found to be a positive predictor of leadership outcomes. Demographic and institutional characteristics did not have a significant (p > 0.01) influence on perceived leadership styles and leadership outcomes. The results of this research show that the most effective occupational therapy leaders in academia have been found to be those who adopt and utilize a full range of leadership styles that combine both transformational and transactional contingent reward leadership styles and suggest common effectiveness for other allied health fields.

  11. Execution time support for scientific programs on distributed memory machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, Harry; Saltz, Joel; Scroggs, Jeffrey

    1990-01-01

    Optimizations are considered that are required for efficient execution of code segments that consists of loops over distributed data structures. The PARTI (Parallel Automated Runtime Toolkit at ICASE) execution time primitives are designed to carry out these optimizations and can be used to implement a wide range of scientific algorithms on distributed memory machines. These primitives allow the user to control array mappings in a way that gives an appearance of shared memory. Computations can be based on a global index set. Primitives are used to carry out gather and scatter operations on distributed arrays. Communications patterns are derived at runtime, and the appropriate send and receive messages are automatically generated.

  12. 78 FR 53790 - Sunshine Act Meeting; Finance, Budget and Program Committee Meeting of the Board of Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NEIGHBORHOOD REINVESTMENT CORPORATION Sunshine Act Meeting; Finance, Budget and Program Committee Meeting of the Board of Directors TIME and DATE: 1:00 p.m., Monday, September 9, 2013. ] PLACE: 999 North Capitol St NE., Suite 900...

  13. 77 FR 68155 - Finance, Budget & Program Committee Meeting of the Board of Directors; Sunshine Act Meeting Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NEIGHBORHOOD REINVESTMENT CORPORATION Finance, Budget & Program Committee Meeting of the Board of Directors; Sunshine Act Meeting Notice TIME and DATE: 9:00 a.m., Tuesday, November 20, 2012. PLACE: 1325 G Street NW., Suite 800, Boardroom...

  14. 77 FR 24538 - Sunshine Act Meeting Notice; Finance, Budget & Program; Committee Meeting of the Board of Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NEIGHBORHOOD REINVESTMENT CORPORATION Sunshine Act Meeting Notice; Finance, Budget & Program; Committee Meeting of the Board of Directors TIME AND DATE: 2 p.m., Wednesday, May 2, 2012. PLACE: 1325 G Street NW., Suite 800, Boardroom...

  15. Exact and approximate probabilistic symbolic execution for nondeterministic programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luckow, Kasper Søe; Păsăreanu, Corina S.; Dwyer, Matthew B.

    2014-01-01

    introduce approximate algorithms to search for good schedulers, speeding up established random sampling and reinforcement learning results through the quantification of path probabilities based on symbolic execution. We implemented the techniques in Symbolic PathFinder and evaluated them on nondeterministic...

  16. Restructuring Symbolic Programs for Concurrent Execution on Multiprocessors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-01

    spastic kind. -Richard G. Gill, White Water and Black Magic Optin1ization of Concurrent Progran1s This chapter briefly describes some...the definition above can be strengthened by the additional constraint: 4. The execution of 5 1 and 5 2 is not mutually exclusive. Precisely

  17. Generating and executing programs for a floating point single instruction multiple data instruction set architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwind, Michael K

    2013-04-16

    Mechanisms for generating and executing programs for a floating point (FP) only single instruction multiple data (SIMD) instruction set architecture (ISA) are provided. A computer program product comprising a computer recordable medium having a computer readable program recorded thereon is provided. The computer readable program, when executed on a computing device, causes the computing device to receive one or more instructions and execute the one or more instructions using logic in an execution unit of the computing device. The logic implements a floating point (FP) only single instruction multiple data (SIMD) instruction set architecture (ISA), based on data stored in a vector register file of the computing device. The vector register file is configured to store both scalar and floating point values as vectors having a plurality of vector elements.

  18. Study on Displaying the Execution History for Java Programs Using JavaCC

    OpenAIRE

    竹下, 彰人; 片山, 徹郎

    2006-01-01

    Abstract ###Recently, Java programs are widely diffused to society. The improvement of the ###reliability of Java programs is needed. Detecting errors in programs leads to the im-###provement of the reliability. of the programs. In this research, the execution history for ###Java programs is displayed by using a syntax analyzer in order to improve the relia-###bility of the programs. The syntax analyzer which consists of statically analyzing part ###and probe embedding part is implemented. Ja...

  19. Leadership Training in Endocrinology Fellowship? A Survey of Program Directors and Recent Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folaron, Irene; Wardian, Jana L.; Colburn, Jeffrey A.; Sauerwein, Tom J.; Beckman, Darrick J.; Kluesner, Joseph K.; Tate, Joshua M.; Graybill, Sky D.; Davis, Richard P.; Paulus, Andrew O.; Carlsen, David R.; Lewi, Jack E.

    2017-01-01

    Context: There is growing recognition that more physician leaders are needed to navigate the next era of medicine. Objective: To determine current opinions about leadership training in endocrinology fellowship programs. Design/Participants: Twenty-seven-question survey addressing various aspects of leadership training to current nationwide fellowship program directors (PDs) and fellowship graduates since 2010. Intervention: In partnership with the Endocrine Society, the electronic survey was advertised primarily via direct e-mail. It was open from March through July 2016. Main Outcome Measures: The survey addressed leadership traits, importance of leadership training, preferred timing, and content of leadership training. Results: Forty-six of 138 PDs (33.3%) and 147 of 1769 graduates (8.3%) completed the survey. Among PDs and graduates, there was strong agreement (>95%) about important leadership characteristics, including job knowledge, character traits, team-builder focus, and professional skills. PDs (64.5%) and graduates (60.8%) favored teaching leadership skills during fellowship, with PDs favoring mentoring/coaching (75.0%), direct observation of staff clinicians (72.5%), and seminars (72.5%). Graduates favored a variety of approaches. Regarding topics to include in a leadership curriculum, PDs responded that communication skills (97.5%), team building (95.0%), professional skills (90.0%), clinic management (87.5%), strategies to impact the delivery of endocrinology care (85.0%), and personality skills (82.5%) were most important. Graduates responded similarly, with >80% agreement for each topic. Finally, most PDs (89%) expressed a desire to incorporate more leadership training into their programs. Conclusions: Our survey suggests a need for leadership training in endocrinology fellowships. More work is needed to determine how best to meet this need. PMID:29264475

  20. Leadership Training in Endocrinology Fellowship? A Survey of Program Directors and Recent Graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    True, Mark W; Folaron, Irene; Wardian, Jana L; Colburn, Jeffrey A; Sauerwein, Tom J; Beckman, Darrick J; Kluesner, Joseph K; Tate, Joshua M; Graybill, Sky D; Davis, Richard P; Paulus, Andrew O; Carlsen, David R; Lewi, Jack E

    2017-03-01

    There is growing recognition that more physician leaders are needed to navigate the next era of medicine. To determine current opinions about leadership training in endocrinology fellowship programs. Twenty-seven-question survey addressing various aspects of leadership training to current nationwide fellowship program directors (PDs) and fellowship graduates since 2010. In partnership with the Endocrine Society, the electronic survey was advertised primarily via direct e-mail. It was open from March through July 2016. The survey addressed leadership traits, importance of leadership training, preferred timing, and content of leadership training. Forty-six of 138 PDs (33.3%) and 147 of 1769 graduates (8.3%) completed the survey. Among PDs and graduates, there was strong agreement (>95%) about important leadership characteristics, including job knowledge, character traits, team-builder focus, and professional skills. PDs (64.5%) and graduates (60.8%) favored teaching leadership skills during fellowship, with PDs favoring mentoring/coaching (75.0%), direct observation of staff clinicians (72.5%), and seminars (72.5%). Graduates favored a variety of approaches. Regarding topics to include in a leadership curriculum, PDs responded that communication skills (97.5%), team building (95.0%), professional skills (90.0%), clinic management (87.5%), strategies to impact the delivery of endocrinology care (85.0%), and personality skills (82.5%) were most important. Graduates responded similarly, with >80% agreement for each topic. Finally, most PDs (89%) expressed a desire to incorporate more leadership training into their programs. Our survey suggests a need for leadership training in endocrinology fellowships. More work is needed to determine how best to meet this need.

  1. Perceptions of the Inpatient Training Experience: A Nationwide Survey of Gastroenterology Program Directors and Fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Navin L; Perencevich, Molly L; Trier, Jerry S

    2017-10-01

    Inpatient training is a key component of gastroenterology (GI) fellowship programs nationwide, yet little is known about perceptions of the inpatient training experience. To compare the content, objectives and quality of the inpatient training experience as perceived by program directors (PD) and fellows in US ACGME-accredited GI fellowship programs. We conducted a nationwide, online-based survey of GI PDs and fellows at the conclusion of the 2016 academic year. We queried participants about (1) the current models of inpatient training, (2) the content, objectives, and quality of the inpatient training experience, and (3) the frequency and quality of educational activities on the inpatient service. We analyzed five-point Likert items and rank assessments as continuous variables by an independent t test and compared proportions using the Chi-square test. Survey response rate was 48.4% (75/155) for PDs and a total of 194 fellows completed the survey, with both groups reporting the general GI consult team (>90%) as the primary model of inpatient training. PDs and fellows agreed on the ranking of all queried responsibilities of the inpatient fellow to develop during the inpatient service. However, fellows indicated that attendings spent less time teaching and provided less formal feedback than that perceived by PDs (p < 0.0001). PDs rated the overall quality of the inpatient training experience (p < 0.0001) and education on the wards (p = 0.0003) as better than overall ratings by fellows. Although GI fellows and PDs agree on the importance of specific fellow responsibilities on the inpatient service, fellows report experiencing less teaching and feedback from attendings than that perceived by PDs. Committing more time to education and assessment may improve fellows' perceptions of the inpatient training experience.

  2. Academic Executive Programs in Public Administration and Management: Some Variety across Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichard, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Universities and other higher education institutions in Europe offer a vast and increasing number of academic degree programs in the broad field of Public Administration. A subset of these programs is those offering postgraduate degrees to experienced students being already employed by public or private organisations. These executive programs are…

  3. Using Student Input to Develop a Marketing Strategy for an Executive MBA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, Gary L.

    2011-01-01

    Despite continued growth in the number of Executive MBA (EMBA) Programs in the U. S. and worldwide, previous research concerning the marketing of EMBA Programs has been very limited. Here, the author investigates ways to successfully market an EMBA Program at a southern U. S. university. Extensive exploratory research was conducted among current…

  4. Educational Gaps in Molecular Diagnostics, Genomics, and Personalized Medicine in Dermatopathology Training: A Survey of US Dermatopathology Fellowship Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre, Kristin; Russomanno, Kristen; Ferringer, Tammie; Elston, Dirk; Murphy, Michael J

    2017-05-02

    Molecular technologies offer clinicians the tools to provide high-quality, cost-effective patient care. We evaluated education focused on molecular diagnostics, genomics, and personalized medicine in dermatopathology fellowship. A 20-question online survey was emailed to all (n = 53) Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited dermatopathology training programs in the United States. Thirty-one of 53 program directors responded (response rate = 58%). Molecular training is undertaken in 74% of responding dermatopathology fellowships, with levels of instruction varying among dermatology-based and pathology-based programs. Education differed for dermatology- and pathology-trained fellows in approximately one-fifth (19%) of programs. Almost half (48%) of responding program directors believe that fellows are not currently receiving adequate molecular education although the majority (97%) expect to incorporate additional instruction in the next 2-5 years. Factors influencing the incorporation of relevant education include perceived clinical utility and Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education/residency review committee (RRC) requirements. Potential benefits of molecular education include increased medical knowledge, improved patient care, and promotion of effective communication with other healthcare professionals. More than two-thirds (68%) of responding program directors believe that instruction in molecular technologies should be required in dermatopathology fellowship training. Although all responding dermatopathology fellowship program directors agreed that molecular education is important, only a little over half of survey participants believe that their fellows receive adequate instruction. This represents an important educational gap. Discussion among those who oversee fellow education is necessary to best integrate and evaluate teaching of molecular dermatopathology.

  5. Toward an objective assessment of technical skills: a national survey of surgical program directors in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhayal, Abdullah; Aldhukair, Shahla; Alselaim, Nahar; Aldekhayel, Salah; Alhabdan, Sultan; Altaweel, Waleed; Magzoub, Mohi Elden; Zamakhshary, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    After almost a decade of implementing competency-based programs in postgraduate training programs, the assessment of technical skills remains more subjective than objective. National data on the assessment of technical skills during surgical training are lacking. We conducted this study to document the assessment tools for technical skills currently used in different surgical specialties, their relationship with remediation, the recommended tools from the program directors' perspective, and program directors' attitudes toward the available objective tools to assess technical skills. This study was a cross-sectional survey of surgical program directors (PDs). The survey was initially developed using a focus group and was then sent to 116 PDs. The survey contains demographic information about the program, the objective assessment tools used, and the reason for not using assessment tools. The last section discusses the recommended tools to be used from the PDs' perspective and the PDs' attitude and motivation to apply these tools in each program. The associations between the responses to the assessment questions and remediation were statistically evaluated. Seventy-one (61%) participants responded. Of the respondents, 59% mentioned using only nonstandardized, subjective, direct observation for technical skills assessment. Sixty percent use only summative evaluation, whereas 15% perform only formative evaluations of their residents, and the remaining 22% conduct both summative and formative evaluations of their residents' technical skills. Operative portfolios are kept by 53% of programs. The percentage of programs with mechanisms for remediation is 29% (19 of 65). The survey showed that surgical training programs use different tools to assess surgical skills competency. Having a clear remediation mechanism was highly associated with reporting remediation, which reflects the capability to detect struggling residents. Surgical training leadership should invest more in

  6. A national survey of program director opinions of core competencies and structure of hand surgery fellowship training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Erika Davis; Larson, Bradley P; Chung, Kevin C

    2012-10-01

    We assessed hand surgery program directors' opinions of essential components of hand surgery training and potential changes in the structure of hand surgery programs. We recruited all 74 program directors of Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education-accredited hand surgery fellowship programs to participate. We designed a web-based survey to assess program directors' support for changes in the structure of training programs and to assess opinions of components that are essential for graduates to be proficient. Respondents were asked to rate 9 general areas of practice, 97 knowledge topics, and 172 procedures. Each component was considered essential if 50% or more of respondents thought that graduates must be fully knowledgeable of the topic and be able to perform the procedure at the end of training. The response rate was 84% (n = 62). A minority of program directors (n = 15; 24%) supported creation of additional pathways for hand surgery training, and nearly three-quarters (n = 46; 74%) preferred a fellowship model to an integrated residency model. Most program directors (n = 40; 65%) thought that a 1-year fellowship was sufficient to train a competent hand surgeon. Wrist, distal radius/ulna, forearm, and peripheral nerve conditions were rated as essential areas of practice. Of the detailed components, 76 of 97 knowledge topics and 98 of 172 procedures were rated as essential. Only 48% respondents (n = 30) rated microsurgery as it relates to free tissue transfer as essential. However, small and large vessel laceration repairs were rated as essential by 92% (n = 57) and 77% (n = 48) of respondents, respectively. This study found resistance to prolonging the length of fellowship training and introduction of an integrated residency pathway. To train all hand surgeons in essential components of hand surgery, programs must individually evaluate exposure provided and find innovative ways to augment training when necessary. Studies of curriculum content in hand

  7. A program director's guide to the Medical Student Performance Evaluation (former dean's letter) with a database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidich, James B; Grimaldi, Gregory M; Lombardi, Pamela; Davis, Lawrence P; Naidich, Jason J

    2014-06-01

    The value of the Medical Student Performance Evaluation (MSPE) for a program director is in the information it contains comparing how a student performed in medical school relative to his or her classmates. The Association of American Medical Colleges has recommended that a student's class ranking be included in the summary paragraph of the MSPE and that this information be repeated in a supplementary appendix. The authors reviewed the MSPEs from 1,479 applications for residency training positions. The aim was to determine to what extent and in what manner individual schools reveal how their students perform relative to their peers. The authors then set out to create a database containing this information. Working from a list of 141 US members of the Association of American Medical Colleges, complete information for 107 schools (76%) and partial information for the remaining 34 schools (24%) was gathered. Only 12 schools (9%) included complete comparative information in the summary section in accordance with the guidelines of the Association of American Medical Colleges. Other schools were in partial compliance or did not comply at all. The database the authors constructed will inform users if comparative information is available, guide users to its location in the MSPE, and explain the meaning of the language different schools use to rank or classify their students. The authors recognize that this database is incomplete and that the individual institutions will alter their ranking system from time to time. But this database is offered in an open format so that it can be continuously updated by users. Copyright © 2014 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Do plastic surgery division heads and program directors have the necessary tools to provide effective leadership?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneja, Js; McInnes, Cw; Carr, Nj; Lennox, P; Hill, M; Petersen, R; Woodward, K; Skarlicki, D

    2014-01-01

    Effective leadership is imperative in a changing health care landscape driven by increasing expectations in a setting of rising fiscal pressures. Because evidence suggests that leadership abilities are not simply innate but, rather, effective leadership can be learned, it is prudent for plastic surgeons to evaluate the training and challenges of their leaders because there may be opportunities for further growth and support. To investigate the practice profiles, education/training, responsibilities and challenges of leaders within academic plastic surgery. Following research ethics board approval, an anonymous online survey was sent to division heads and program directors from all university-affiliated plastic surgery divisions in Canada. Survey themes included demographics, education/training, job responsibilities and challenges. A response rate of 74% was achieved. The majority of respondents were male (94%), promoted to their current position at a mean age of 48 years, did not have a leadership-focused degree (88%), directly manage 30 people (14 staff, 16 faculty) and were not provided with a job description (65%). Respondents worked an average of 65 h per week, of which 18% was devoted to their leadership role, 59% clinically and the remainder on teaching and research. A discrepancy existed between time spent on their leadership role (18%) and related compensation (10%). Time management (47%) and managing conflict (24%) were described as the greatest leadership challenges by respondents. Several gaps were identified among leaders in plastic surgery including predominance of male sex, limitations in formal leadership training and requisite skill set, as well as compensation and human resources management (emotional intelligence). Leadership and managerial skills are key core competencies, not only for trainees, but certainly for those in a position of leadership. The present study provides evidence that academic departments, universities and medical centres may

  9. Do plastic surgery division heads and program directors have the necessary tools to provide effective leadership?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneja, JS; McInnes, CW; Carr, NJ; Lennox, P; Hill, M; Petersen, R; Woodward, K; Skarlicki, D

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Effective leadership is imperative in a changing health care landscape driven by increasing expectations in a setting of rising fiscal pressures. Because evidence suggests that leadership abilities are not simply innate but, rather, effective leadership can be learned, it is prudent for plastic surgeons to evaluate the training and challenges of their leaders because there may be opportunities for further growth and support. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the practice profiles, education/training, responsibilities and challenges of leaders within academic plastic surgery. METHODS: Following research ethics board approval, an anonymous online survey was sent to division heads and program directors from all university-affiliated plastic surgery divisions in Canada. Survey themes included demographics, education/training, job responsibilities and challenges. RESULTS: A response rate of 74% was achieved. The majority of respondents were male (94%), promoted to their current position at a mean age of 48 years, did not have a leadership-focused degree (88%), directly manage 30 people (14 staff, 16 faculty) and were not provided with a job description (65%). Respondents worked an average of 65 h per week, of which 18% was devoted to their leadership role, 59% clinically and the remainder on teaching and research. A discrepancy existed between time spent on their leadership role (18%) and related compensation (10%). Time management (47%) and managing conflict (24%) were described as the greatest leadership challenges by respondents. CONCLUSIONS: Several gaps were identified among leaders in plastic surgery including predominance of male sex, limitations in formal leadership training and requisite skill set, as well as compensation and human resources management (emotional intelligence). Leadership and managerial skills are key core competencies, not only for trainees, but certainly for those in a position of leadership. The present study provides evidence that

  10. Building Management Information Systems to Coordinate Citywide Afterschool Programs: A Toolkit for Cities. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsley, Chris

    2012-01-01

    This executive summary describes highlights from the report, "Building Management Information Systems to Coordinate Citywide Afterschool Programs: A Toolkit for Cities." City-led efforts to build coordinated systems of afterschool programming are an important strategy for improving the health, safety and academic preparedness of children…

  11. A Profile of Academic Training Program Directors and Chairs in Radiation Oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Lynn D., E-mail: Lynn.wilson@yale.edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, Smilow Cancer Hospital, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Haffty, Bruce G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Smith, Benjamin D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, UMDNJ-RWJMS, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To identify objective characteristics and benchmarks for program leadership in academic radiation oncology. Methods and Materials: A study of the 87 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education radiation oncology training program directors (PD) and their chairs was performed. Variables included age, gender, original training department, highest degree, rank, endowed chair assignment, National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding, and Hirsch index (H-index). Data were gathered from online sources such as departmental websites, NIH RePORTER, and Scopus. Results: There were a total of 87 PD. The median age was 48, and 14 (16%) were MD/PhD. A total of 21 (24%) were female, and rank was relatively equally distributed above instructor. Of the 26 professors, at least 7 (27%) were female. At least 24 (28%) were working at the institution from which they had received their training. A total of 6 individuals held endowed chairs. Only 2 PD had active NIH funding in 2012. The median H-index was 12 (range, 0-51) but the index dropped to 9 (range, 0-38) when those who served as both PD and chair were removed from the group. A total of 76 chairs were identified at the time of the study. The median age was 55, and 9 (12%) were MD/PhD. A total of 7 (9%) of the chairs were female, and rank was professor for all with the exception of 1 who was listed as “Head” and was an associate professor. Of the 76 chairs, at least 10 (13%) were working at the institution from which they received their training. There were a total of 21 individuals with endowed chairs. A total of 13 (17%) had NIH funding in 2012. The median H-index was 29 (range, 3-60). Conclusions: These data provide benchmarks for individuals and departments evaluating leadership positions in the field of academic radiation oncology. Such data are useful for evaluating leadership trends over time and comparing academic radiation oncology with other specialties.

  12. Assessing the needs of residency program directors to meet the ACGME general competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heard, Jeanne K; Allen, Ruth M; Clardy, James

    2002-07-01

    New accreditation requirements for residency training programs require residents to have educational experiences that allow them to demonstrate competency in the following areas: (1) patient care, (2) medical knowledge, (3) practice-based learning and improvement, (4) interpersonal and communication skills, (5) professionalism, and (6) systems-based practice. Residents' competence must be assessed with dependable measures. Residency training program directors (PDs) need assistance in complying with these new requirements. Using a survey modified from Michigan State University, we asked PDs to rate their current understanding of and preparation for the general competencies and to provide written comments. PDs of the 47 ACGME-accredited programs received e-mailed instructions to complete the Web-based survey. Twenty-four PDs (51%) complied by the deadline. The mean ratings were calculated from a five-point scale (1 = strongly disagree, major impediment or least useful, 5 = strongly agree, not an impediment, or most useful). PDs felt they were informed (3.45) and understood (3.67) the requirements, but they were not well prepared to meet them (2.95). The perceived impediments to implementation included amount of PD time (2.27), amount of residents' protected time for the curriculum (2.30), amount of residency support staff (2.73), lack of expertise in curriculum development (2.73) and evaluation (2.41), and lack of funding for resources other than personnel (2.91). PDs rated types of assistance that would be helpful: developing workshops or presentations on curriculum development and evaluation techniques (3.82), developing curricula (4.14), providing one-on-one consultation (4.23), receiving examples of materials, methods, and ideas from other programs (4.41), and describing evaluation methods/instruments (4.50). Written comments stated that time to concentrate on the topic, release time from clinical responsibilities, and technical computer support would be helpful

  13. Conceptual Understanding of Computer Program Execution: Application to C++

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Fedaghi, Sabah

    2013-01-01

    A visual programming language uses pictorial tools such as diagrams to represent its structural units and control stream. It is useful for enhancing understanding, maintenance, verification, testing, and parallelism. This paper proposes a diagrammatic methodology that produces a conceptual representation of instructions for programming source codes. Without loss of generality in the potential for using the methodology in a wider range of applications, this paper focuses on using these diagram...

  14. 75 FR 4833 - National Protection and Programs Directorate; Assessment Questionnaire-Voluntary Chemical...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-29

    ... Directorate (NPPD), which supports the automation of sector-approved risk and vulnerability assessment... following information collection request (ICR) to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and...-day public comment period. No comments were received by DHS. The purpose of this notice is to allow an...

  15. Leadership Styles and Management Skills of Learning Assistance/Developmental Education Program Directors/Coordinators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Marie-Elaine Burns

    Leadership styles and management skills needed by directors and coordinators of learning assistance and developmental education were assessed. Based on a literature review, a questionnaire was constructed and then validated by a panel of experts in the field. The questionnaire was sent to 45 selected learning assistance/developmental education…

  16. Stepping up to the challenge: the development, implementation, and assessment of a statewide, regional, leadership program for school nutrition directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Jacqueline J; Briggs, Marilyn M; Beall, Deborah L; Curwood, Sandy; Gray, Pilar; Soiseth, Scott; Taylor, Rodney K; Zidenberg-Cherr, Sheri

    2015-01-01

    A statewide professional development program was developed and implemented throughout California for school nutrition directors with the goal of creating healthy school environments and regional networks for collaboration and healthy school environment sustainability. Needs of school nutrition directors were identified through a needs assessment questionnaire. Results of the needs assessment questionnaire (n = 256) identified (a) planning cost-effective menus; (b) reducing calories, sodium, saturated fat, and trans fat in menus; and (c) using U.S. Department of Agriculture foods cost-effectively as the most useful topics. Highest rated topics informed the content of the professional development program. A post-professional development questionnaire identified key "insights, inspirations, and strategies" as (a) marketing of school foods program, (b) expansion of salad bars, and (c) collaboration with community partners. A 6-month follow-up questionnaire identified that 86% of participants made progress toward implementing at least one of their five insights, inspirations, and strategies in their school districts. Most common areas that were implemented were marketing and branding (32%), revamping salad bars (18%), and motivating staff (16%). School and Community Actions for Nutrition survey analysis showed a significant increase in the use of marketing methods in school nutrition programs from baseline to 6-month post-program implementation (p = .024). © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  17. Executive Assistant - Vice-President, Programs and Partnerships ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    In collaboration with the Senior Programs Advisor , tracks Branch operational expenditures, reviews accounting reports, determines spending patterns, and plans for upcoming expenses. Coordinates the Branch annual intake of summer students, from calculating how many can be hired according to budget and office space ...

  18. Operations Management in the Design and Execution of MBA Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busing, Michael E.; Palocsay, Susan W.

    2016-01-01

    Master of business administration (MBA) programs are under intense pressure to improve efficiencies, lower tuition, and offer refreshed curriculum that is of high quality and regarded as relevant by the marketplace. In light of this environment, the authors propose a conceptual framework for effectively employing operations management (OM)…

  19. Executing Military Family Programs in the New Fiscal Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Office has four primary missions. First, it provides family support policies and programs in such areas as family center operations, child care...deployment  family- centered – children need to be assessed, monitored, and treated in the context of their family and its support structure...because installation facilities serve only half of military school children, services must also be provided in daycare and other facilities 9

  20. Geometric Modeling Applications Interface Program (GMAP). Volume 1. Executive Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-01

    342f CI FTR560240OOlU September 1989 SECTION 2 SCOPE OF GMAP GMAP focused on the generacion , control, and exchange of computer information to replace...embraced the idea of PDD and product models that had come out of the PDDI program. As part of the GMAP contract, it was necessay to establish the minimum... ideas and concepts that result from this research and be appropriately motivated to develop commercial products. 5.5 INTEGRATE PD WITH SUPPLIER BASE The

  1. National Program Plan Fuel Cells in Transportation. Executive Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-02-01

    Fuel cells are being developed for application in the transportation sector because they will convert hydrogen to electric power at high efficiencies with virtually no detrimental environmental impact. To realize these energy, environmental, and economic benefits, developers of FCVs need to (1) reduce the size and weight of current designs, (2) develop fuel cell propulsion systems with rapid start-up and greater load-following capability, (3) reduce system cost and/or improve performance, and (4) utilize alternative fuels to a large extent. This Plan addresses the FCV-related requirements of the Energy Act, describing a development program for light- and heavy-duty propulsion systems, a basic R&D program on fuel cell technology that is separate from, but feeds into, the system development activities, and supporting analyses. Implementation of the Program Plan by means of industry/government alliances will accelerate the commercialization of FCVs. In the long term, the successful deployment of large numbers of FCVs promises to eliminate the transportation sector as a major contributor to the nation`s environmental problems.

  2. IT governance guidelines for directors

    CERN Document Server

    Calder, Alan

    2005-01-01

    This important new book – 'IT Governance: Guidelines for Directors' provides directors, executives, managers and professional advisers with clear, pragmatic guidelines for ensuring that IT and the business work together for the same strategic objectives. 

  3. Funding and Strategic Alignment Guidance for Infusing Small Business Innovation Research Technology into NASA Programs Associated with the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2015-01-01

    This report is intended to help NASA program and project managers incorporate Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) technologies that have gone through Phase II of the SBIR program into NASA Aeronautics and Mission Directorate (ARMD) programs. Other Government and commercial program managers can also find this information useful.

  4. Balancing Privacy and Professionalism: A Survey of General Surgery Program Directors on Social Media and Surgical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenfeld, Sean J; Vargo, Daniel J; Schenarts, Paul J

    Unprofessional behavior is common among surgical residents and faculty surgeons on Facebook. Usage of social media outlets such as Facebook and Twitter is growing at exponential rates, so it is imperative that surgery program directors (PDs) focus on professionalism within social media, and develop guidelines for their trainees and surgical colleagues. Our study focuses on the surgery PDs current approach to online professionalism within surgical education. An online survey of general surgery PDs was conducted in October 2015 through the Association for Program Directors in Surgery listserv. Baseline PD demographics, usage and approach to popular social media outlets, existing institutional policies, and formal curricula were assessed. A total of 110 PDs responded to the survey (110/259, 42.5% response rate). Social media usage was high among PDs (Facebook 68% and Twitter 40%). PDs frequently viewed the social media profiles of students, residents, and faculty. Overall, 11% of PDs reported lowering the rank or completely removing a residency applicant from the rank order list because of online behavior, and 10% reported formal disciplinary action against a surgical resident because of online behavior. Overall, 68% of respondents agreed that online professionalism is important, and that residents should receive instruction on the safe use of social media. However, most programs did not have formal didactics or known institutional policies in place. Use of social media is high among PDs, and they often view the online behavior of residency applicants, surgical residents, and faculty surgeons. Within surgical education, there needs to be an increased focus on institutional policies and standardized curricula to help educate physicians on social media and online professionalism. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. From Errors Treatment to Exceptions Treatment Regarding the Execution Control over Visual Basic Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Raluca POPESCU

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to comply with the quality standards and with the best practices, the execution of the professional programs must be rigorously controlled so that to avoid occurrence of unpredictable situations that might generate anomalies and could lead to computer blockage, forced termination of the execution and data loss. In traditional programming languages, including Visual Basic 6, the concept of error is extremely evolved. It is considered as error any situation in which the program fails to execute correctly, regardless if such anomaly is generated by a software or hardware cause. Nowadays the modern platforms, including VB.NET have introduced a new concept: exception. Unfortunately, perhaps by mistake, exception is assimilated by many IT specialists as an exceptional (extraordinary situation or a rare situation.We agree with the opinion of those IT specialists asserting that error is strictly dependant on the programmer, when he/she fails in correctly generating the application’s structures, whilst exception is a situation not fitting in the usual natural execution or as desired by the programmer or user, without meaning that it occurs more often or more rarely.Designing robust programs implies for such not to terminate abnormally or block, not even upon receiving improper parameters. Two aspects are referred to: the behavior regarding low level errors (caused by the operation system, memory allocation, reading/writing in files or hardware malfunctions and the reaction to the user’s errors, such as providing incorrect input data or incorrect use of operations in respect with their sequences. Notwithstanding what platform is used in designing the programs and regardless the controversy between the specialists, in order for the execution to be terminated under the program’s control, the commands that might generate anomalies and interruptions should be strictly monitored. Implicitly, the execution control

  6. Implications of DOD Funds Execution Policy for Acquisition Program Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    E only 5 3 7 1 Procurement and RDT&E 8 1 5 4 Platform Mod C3 UAS Support Equipment Other 9 3 4 3 2 4 Program by Type 19 to distinguish causes and...2010, full-rate production decision scheduled for September 2012  Increment 2 failed IOT &E (Initial Operational Test and Evaluation)  September 2012...ADM provided only additional Low-Rate Initial Production (LRIP) quantities, pending completion of follow-on IOT &E  September 2013 ADM again only

  7. FWP executive summaries: basic energy sciences materials sciences and engineering program (SNL/NM).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samara, George A.; Simmons, Jerry A.

    2006-07-01

    This report presents an Executive Summary of the various elements of the Materials Sciences and Engineering Program which is funded by the Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico. A general programmatic overview is also presented.

  8. A Best Practice Modular Design of a Hybrid Course Delivery Structure for an Executive Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotz, Dorothy E.; Wright, Thomas A.

    2017-01-01

    This article highlights a best practice approach that showcases the highly successful deployment of a hybrid course delivery structure for an Operations core course in an Executive MBA Program. A key design element of the approach was the modular design of both the course itself and the learning materials. While other hybrid deployments may stress…

  9. 75 FR 11990 - Chicago Executive Airports Noise Exposure Map Approval and Noise Compatibility Program Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Chicago Executive Airports Noise Exposure Map Approval and Noise... Aviation Administration (FAA) announces its determination that the noise exposure maps submitted by the... noise exposure map, and that this program will be approved or disapproved on or before October 1, 2010...

  10. Variability in 2-year training programs in vascular surgery based on results of an Association of Program Directors in Vascular Surgery survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calligaro, Keith D; Pineda, Danielle M; Tyagi, Sam; Zheng, Hong; Troutman, Douglas A; Dougherty, Matthew J

    2017-06-01

    Although a great deal of attention has recently focused on 5-year integrated (0+5) training programs in vascular surgery, a paucity of data exists concerning variability of daily assignments in 2-year (5+2) vascular fellowships. We polled Association of Program Directors in Vascular Surgery members with 2-year vascular fellowships to determine the number of days in a 5-day work week that first- and second-year fellows were assigned to open vascular operations, endovascular procedures (hospital vs nonhospital facility), arterial clinic, venous clinic, noninvasive vascular laboratory (NIVL), and research. Of the 103 program directors from 5+2 vascular training programs, 102 (99%) responded. The most common schedule for both first- and second-year fellows was performing both open and endovascular procedures in the hospital on the same day 4 days of the week and spending time in combined artery and vein clinic 1 day of the week. Program directors developed different schedules for each year of the 2-year fellowship in about half (55% [56]) of the programs. A small minority of programs devoted days to only open surgical cases (13% [13]), a separate venous clinic (17% [17]), or a separate arterial clinic (11% [11]) and performed endovascular procedures in a nonhospital facility (15% [15]). All but three programs had mandatory time in clinic both years. Approximately one-third (30% [31]) of programs designated time devoted to research, whereas the others expected fellows to find time on their own. Although passing the Registered Physician in Vascular Interpretation examination is required, there was devoted time in the NIVL in only 60% (61) of programs. Training assignments in terms of time spent performing open and endovascular procedures and participating in clinic, the NIVL, and research varied widely among Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited 5+2 vascular fellowships and did not always fulfill Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical

  11. Enhancing skills for evidence-based healthcare leadership: the Executive Training for Research Application (EXTRA) program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicklin, Wendy; Stipich, Nina

    2005-01-01

    The Executive Training for Research Application (EXTRA) is a new training program that aims to increase the skills of health services executives and their organizations to use research evidence in healthcare management and decision-making. This paper describes the goals and rationale of the EXTRA program and its learning objectives and curriculum, and reports on some early baseline evaluative research. In particular, the authors address the opportunities that EXTRA offers to leaders in the nursing profession to transform the practice of nursing and patient care, and the unique opportunities that the program offers for collaboration across the healthcare professions and disciplines. While the EXTRA training program requires substantive investment of time and commitment by healthcare leaders and their organizations, it offers great potential for increasing research application in healthcare leadership decision-making. It is therefore a potential long-term lever of cultural decision-making change within healthcare organizations.

  12. Impacts of a prekindergarten program on children's mathematics, language, literacy, executive function, and emotional skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, Christina; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu

    2013-01-01

    Publicly funded prekindergarten programs have achieved small-to-large impacts on children's cognitive outcomes. The current study examined the impact of a prekindergarten program that implemented a coaching system and consistent literacy, language, and mathematics curricula on these and other nontargeted, essential components of school readiness, such as executive functioning. Participants included 2,018 four and five-year-old children. Findings indicated that the program had moderate-to-large impacts on children's language, literacy, numeracy and mathematics skills, and small impacts on children's executive functioning and a measure of emotion recognition. Some impacts were considerably larger for some subgroups. For urban public school districts, results inform important programmatic decisions. For policy makers, results confirm that prekindergarten programs can improve educationally vital outcomes for children in meaningful, important ways. © 2013 The Authors. Child Development © 2013 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  13. American Organization of Nurse Executives Care Innovation and Transformation program: improving care and practice environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberlies, Amanda Stefancyk

    2014-09-01

    The American Organization of Nurse Executives conducted an evaluation of the hospitals participating in the Care Innovation and Transformation (CIT) program. A total of 24 hospitals participated in the 2-year CIT program from 2012 to 2013. Reported outcomes include increased patient satisfaction, decreased falls, and reductions in nurse turnover and overtime. Nurses reported statistically significant improvements in 4 domains of the principles and elements of a healthful practice environment developed by the Nursing Organizations Alliance.

  14. Work with Apple's Rhapsody Operating System which Allows Simultaneous UNIX Program Development, UNIX Program Execution, and PC Application Execution

    CERN Document Server

    Summers, D; Cremaldi, L M; Sanders, D; Summers, Don; Riley, Chris; Cremaldi, Lucien; Sanders, David

    2001-01-01

    Over the past decade, UNIX workstations have provided a very powerful program development environment. However, workstations are more expensive than PCs and Macintoshes and require a system manager for day-to-day tasks such as disk backup, adding users, and setting up print queues. Native commercial software for system maintenance and "PC applications" has been lacking under UNIX. Apple's new Rhapsody operating system puts the current MacOS on a NeXT UNIX foundation and adds an enhanced NeXTSTEP object oriented development environment called Yellow Box. Rhapsody simultaneously runs UNIX and commercial Macintosh applications such as word processing or spreadsheets. Thus a UNIX detector Monte Carlo can run for days in the background at the same time as a commercial word processing program. And commercial programs such as Dantz Retrospect are being made available to make disk backup easy under Rhapsody. Apple has announced that in 1999 they intend to be running Rhapsody, or MacOS X as it will be called in the co...

  15. Worst-Case Execution Time Based Optimization of Real-Time Java Programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hepp, Stefan; Schoeberl, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Standard compilers optimize execution time for the average case. However, in hard real-time systems the worst-case execution time (WCET) is of primary importance. Therefore, a compiler for real-time systems shall include optimizations that aim to minimize the WCET. One effective compiler...... optimization is method in lining. It is especially important for languages, like Java, where small setter and getter methods are considered good programming style. In this paper we present and explore WCET driven in lining of Java methods. We use the WCET analysis tool for the Java processor JOP to guide...

  16. Quality in-training initiative--a solution to the need for education in quality improvement: results from a survey of program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelz, Rachel R; Sellers, Morgan M; Reinke, Caroline E; Medbery, Rachel L; Morris, Jon; Ko, Clifford

    2013-12-01

    The Next Accreditation System and the Clinical Learning Environment Review Program will emphasize practice-based learning and improvement and systems-based practice. We present the results of a survey of general surgery program directors to characterize the current state of quality improvement in graduate surgical education and introduce the Quality In-Training Initiative (QITI). In 2012, a 20-item survey was distributed to 118 surgical residency program directors from ACS NSQIP-affiliated hospitals. The survey content was developed in collaboration with the QITI to identify program director opinions regarding education in practice-based learning and improvement and systems-based practice, to investigate the status of quality improvement education in their respective programs, and to quantify the extent of resident participation in quality improvement. There was a 57% response rate. Eighty-five percent of program directors (n = 57) reported that education in quality improvement is essential to future professional work in the field of surgery. Only 28% (n = 18) of programs reported that at least 50% of their residents track and analyze their patient outcomes, compare them with norms/benchmarks/published standards, and identify opportunities to make practice improvements. Program directors recognize the importance of quality improvement efforts in surgical practice. Subpar participation in basic practice-based learning and improvement activities at the resident level reflects the need for support of these educational goals. The QITI will facilitate programmatic compliance with goals for quality improvement education. Copyright © 2013 American College of Surgeons. All rights reserved.

  17. Funding and Strategic Alignment Guidance for Infusing Small Business Innovation Research Technology into NASA Programs Associated with the Science Mission Directorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2015-01-01

    This report is intended to help NASA program and project managers incorporate Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) technologies that have gone through Phase II of the SBIR program into NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) programs. Other Government and commercial project managers can also find this information useful.

  18. Funding and Strategic Alignment Guidance for Infusing Small Business Innovation Research Technology Into NASA Programs Associated With the Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2015-01-01

    This report is intended to help NASA program and project managers incorporate Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) technologies that have gone through Phase II of the SBIR program into NASA Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD) programs. Other Government and commercial project managers can also find this information useful.

  19. BTSA Program Directors' Perceptions on the Relationship between Components of Mentor Assessment and Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maricich, Patricia Sheehan

    2014-01-01

    California's Beginning Teacher Support and Assessment program (BTSA) is a high stakes induction program; a new teacher's completion of a BTSA induction program leads to the California clear credential. The cornerstone of the BTSA induction program is the mentor, also known as a support provider. Mentors provide a variety of services to new…

  20. Views from the field: program directors' perceptions of teacher education and the education of students who are deaf or hard of hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teller, Henry; Harney, Jillian

    Arandom sample of directors of programs for the deaf in North America were surveyed to get their views about the skills that teacher education programs need to be teaching future teachers of students who are deaf or hard of hearing. The directors were queried about literacy practices, classroom management strategies, and communication strategies used in their programs, and were encouraged to comment freely on the questionnaire items presented to them. Program directors predicted a need for more itinerant and resource teachers. The survey also revealed that programs for the deaf are highly behaviorist (i.e., You do this and you'll get that) in the way they induce students to learn and in how they manage student behavior.

  1. Committee Opinion No. 715 Summary: Social Etiquette for Program Directors and Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Educators in obstetrics and gynecology work within a changing clinical learning environment. Ethnic, cultural, and social diversity among colleagues and learners have increased, and μethods of communication have expanded in ever more novel ways. Clerkship, residency, and fellowship directors, in partnership with chairs and senior faculty, are urged to take the lead in setting the tone for workplace etiquette, communication, and social behavior of faculty and trainees to promote a high standard of civility and citizenship. The Council on Resident Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology (CREOG) Education Committee has promulgated recommendations that can be used to help address professional relationships, professional appearance, and social media usage. These recommendations also address communications pertinent to educational processes such as interviewing, teaching, evaluation, and mentoring.

  2. Committee Opinion No. 715: Social Etiquette for Program Directors and Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Educators in obstetrics and gynecology work within a changing clinical learning environment. Ethnic, cultural, and social diversity among colleagues and learners have increased, and methods of communication have expanded in ever more novel ways. Clerkship, residency, and fellowship directors, in partnership with chairs and senior faculty, are urged to take the lead in setting the tone for workplace etiquette, communication, and social behavior of faculty and trainees to promote a high standard of civility and citizenship. The Council on Resident Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology (CREOG) Education Committee has promulgated recommendations that can be used to help address professional relationships, professional appearance, and social media usage. These recommendations also address communications pertinent to educational processes such as interviewing, teaching, evaluation, and mentoring.

  3. A survey of the pediatric surgery program directors: optimizing resident research to make pediatric surgery training more efficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markel, Troy A; Rescorla, Frederick J

    2015-06-01

    Resident Research (RR) has been a presumed requirement for pediatric surgery fellowship candidates. We hypothesized that: 1) pediatric surgery leaders would no longer feel that RR was necessary for fellowship candidates, 2) the type of study performed would not impact a program's opinion of candidates, and 3) the timing of RR could be altered for those interested in a research career. An anonymous survey was sent to pediatric surgery fellowship program directors (PDs). Sixty-three percent responded, and answers were compared via Chi square analysis with ppediatric surgery fellowship candidates. Seventy-five percent had no preference between one or two years of research (p=0.0005), 79% placed no heavier weight on basic or clinical research (psurgery may not be necessary. Pediatric surgery candidates who partake in RR are not penalized for their choice of study. Increasing efficiency of training is important in today's era of medical training. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. 7 CFR 2.30 - Director, Office of Budget and Program Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... and implementing USDA policies and programs. (6) Review and analyze legislation, regulations, and... budget. (7) Monitor ongoing studies with significant program or policy implications. (b) The following... financial plans. ...

  5. The American College of Surgeons/Association of Program Directors in Surgery National Skills Curriculum: adoption rate, challenges and strategies for effective implementation into surgical residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korndorffer, James R; Arora, Sonal; Sevdalis, Nick; Paige, John; McClusky, David A; Stefanidis, Dimitris

    2013-07-01

    The American College of Surgeons/Association of Program Directors in Surgery (ACS/APDS) National Skills Curriculum is a 3-phase program targeting technical and nontechnical skills development. Few data exist regarding the adoption of this curriculum by surgical residencies. This study attempted to determine the rate of uptake and identify implementation enablers/barriers. A web-based survey was developed by an international expert panel of surgical educators (5 surgeons and 1 psychologist). After piloting, the survey was sent to all general surgery program directors via email link. Descriptive statistics were used to determine the residency program characteristics and perceptions of the curriculum. Implementation rates for each phase and module were calculated. Adoption barriers were identified quantitatively and qualitatively using free text responses. Standardized qualitative methodology of emergent theme analysis was used to identify strategies for success and details of support required for implementation. Of the 238 program directors approached, 117 (49%) responded to the survey. Twenty-one percent (25/117) were unaware of the ACS/APDS curriculum. Implementation rates for were 36% for phase I, 19% for phase II, and 16% for phase III. The most common modules adopted were the suturing, knot-tying, and chest tube modules of phase I. Over 50% of respondents identified lack of faculty protected time, limited personnel, significant costs, and resident work-hour restrictions as major obstacles to implementation. Strategies for effective uptake included faculty incentives, adequate funding, administrative support, and dedicated time and resources. Despite the availability of a comprehensive curriculum, its diffusion into general surgery residency programs remains low. Obstacles related to successful implementation include personnel, learner, and administrative issues. Addressing these issues may improve the adoption rate of the curriculum. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc

  6. Perceived effects of attending physician workload in academic medical intensive care units: a national survey of training program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Nicholas S; Read, Richard; Afessa, Bekele; Kahn, Jeremy M

    2012-02-01

    Increases in the size and number of American intensive care units have not been accompanied by a comparable increase in the critical care physician workforce, raising concerns that intensivists are becoming overburdened by workload. This is especially concerning in academic intensive care units where attending physicians must couple teaching duties with patient care. We performed an in-person and electronic survey of the membership of the Association of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine Program Directors, soliciting information about patient workload, other hospital and medical education duties, and perceptions of the workplace and teaching environment of their intensive care units. Eighty-four out of a total 121 possible responses were received from program directors or their delegates, resulting in a response rate of 69%. The average daily (SD) census (as perceived by the respondents) was 18.8 ± 8.9 patients, and average (SD) maximum service size recalled was 24.1 ± 9.9 patients. Twenty-seven percent reported no policy setting an upper limit for the daily census. Twenty-eight percent of respondents felt the average census was "too many" and 71% felt the maximum size was "too many." The median (interquartile range) patient-to-attending physician ratio was 13 (10-16). When categorized according to this median, respondents from intensive care units with high patient/physician ratios (n = 31) perceived significantly more time constraints, more stress, and difficulties with teaching trainees than respondents with low patient/physician ratios (n = 40). The total number of non-nursing healthcare workers per patient was similar in both groups, suggesting that having more nonattending physician staff does not alleviate perceptions of overwork and stress in the attending physician. Academic intensive care unit physicians that direct fellowship programs frequently perceived being overburdened in the intensive care unit. Understaffing intensive care units with attending

  7. 7 CFR 656.2 - Archeological and historical laws and Executive orders applicable to NRCS-assisted programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Archeological and historical laws and Executive orders... PROCEDURES FOR THE PROTECTION OF ARCHEOLOGICAL AND HISTORICAL PROPERTIES ENCOUNTERED IN NRCS-ASSISTED PROGRAMS § 656.2 Archeological and historical laws and Executive orders applicable to NRCS-assisted...

  8. Intent to Build Hepatitis C Treatment Capacity Within Family Medicine Residencies: A Nationwide Survey of Program Directors: A CERA Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camminati, Camille Webb; Simha, Aditya; Kolb, N Randall; Prasad, Ramakrishna

    2016-09-01

    In the current interferon-free era, family medicine is in a unique position to deliver hepatitis C (HCV) treatment with adequate training. Little is known about attitudes of family medicine program directors (PDs) toward capacity building within their residency programs. We report the results of a nationwide survey of family medicine PDs to examine these attitudes. This study was part of a CERA (Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance) omnibus survey administered to family medicine PDs between February 2015 and March 2015. Attitudes were assessed using a Likert scale ranging from 1=strongly disagree to 6=strongly agree. We surveyed 452 physicians, with 273 responses (response rate 61%). The majority of PDs (78%) believed that chronic HCV represented a significant problem for primary care, and 61.9% believed their program should take steps to build capacity in HCV treatment. There was no effect of regional HCV prevalence, residency program context, or PD characteristics on intent to build capacity. This is the first report to examine PDs intent to build capacity in HCV treatment in this interferon-free, direct antiviral era. Our findings highlight a historic opportunity to train family physicians and position them on the frontline as HCV treatment providers.

  9. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Marshall Space Flight Center Space Transportation Directorate Risk Management Implementation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Luis Alberto; Kross, Denny (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The US civil aerospace program has been a great contributor to the creation and implementation of techniques and methods to identify, analyze, and confront risk. NASA has accomplished mission success in many instances, but also has had many failures. Anomalies have kept the Agency from achieving success on other occasions, as well. While NASA has mastered ways to prevent risks, and to quickly and effectively react and recover from anomalies or failures, it was not until few years ago that a comprehensive Risk Management process started being implemented in some of its programs and projects. A Continuous Risk Management (CRM) cycle process was developed and has been promoted and used successfully in programs and projects across the Agency.

  10. Perceptions of U.S. dermatology residency program directors regarding the adequacy of phototherapy training during residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Kavita; Nguyen, Michael O; Reynolds, Rachel V; Mostaghimi, Arash; Joyce, Cara; Cohen, Jeffrey M; Buzney, Elizabeth A

    2017-11-01

    Phototherapy utilization has declined over the last 20 years despite its efficacy and cost-effectiveness. Adequacy of phototherapy training in residency may be a contributing factor. The purpose of this study was to evaluate perceptions of U.S. dermatology residency program directors (PDs) regarding the effectiveness of their programs' phototherapy training and what constitutes adequate phototherapy education. A questionnaire was sent to PDs to assess phototherapy training within their program; aspects such as dedicated time, exposure to different modalities, and barriers to resident education were surveyed. We assessed the statistical association between these aspects and the perception by PDs that a program's training was adequate. Statistical testing was reported using Fisher's exact tests. A total of 42 PDs responded. Residency training in oral psoralen and ultraviolet A therapy (PUVA), home phototherapy, and excimer laser, respectively, is not provided in 19.0%, 31.0%, and 47.6% of programs. 38.1% of programs provide ≤5 hours of phototherapy training over 3 years of training. 59.5% of PDs cited lack of curriculum time as the most common barrier to phototherapy education. 19.0% of PDs reported completely adequate phototherapy training, which was significantly associated with inclusion of faculty-led didactics, assigned reading, or hands-on clinical training in the curriculum. There is a mismatch between the resources devoted to phototherapy education and the need for dedicated training reported by PDs. Limited time is allocated to phototherapy training during dermatology residency, and a large majority of PDs do not feel that the phototherapy training offered is completely adequate. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Teaching atraumatic restorative treatment in U.S. dental schools: a survey of predoctoral pediatric dentistry program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kateeb, Elham T; Warren, John J; Damiano, Peter; Momany, Elizabeth; Kanellis, Michael; Weber-Gasparoni, Karin; Ansley, Tim

    2013-10-01

    The International Dental Federation and World Health Organization have promoted the use of Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) in modern clinical settings worldwide. In the United States, the practice of ART is not believed to be widely used, which may be a result of little attention given to ART training in predoctoral pediatric dentistry curricula in U.S. dental schools. This study investigated the extent of clinical and didactic instruction on ART provided in U.S. dental schools by surveying the predoctoral pediatric dentistry programs in 2010. Of the fifty-seven directors asked to complete the survey, forty-four responded for a response rate of 77 percent. Of these forty-four programs, 66 percent reported providing clinical training on ART, though only 14 percent provide this training often or very often. The types of ART training provided often or very often included interim treatment (18 percent) and single-surface cavities (14 percent) in primary teeth. However, ART was said to be rarely taught as a definitive treatment in permanent teeth (2 percent). Attitude was a major predictor, for clinical training provided and using professional guidelines in treatment decisions were associated with a positive attitude towards ART. These predoctoral pediatric dentistry programs used ART mainly in primary, anterior, and single-surface cavities and as interim treatment. As ART increases access of children to dental care, the incorporation of the ART approach into the curricula of U.S. dental schools should be facilitated by professional organizations.

  12. The Professional Values of Program Directors and Head Athletic Trainers: The Impact of the Hidden Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peer, Kimberly S.; Schlabach, Gretchen A.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Athletic training education programs (ATEPs) promote the development of foundational behaviors of professional practice. Situated in the context of professional values, ATEPs are challenged to identify outcome measures for these behaviors. These values are tacitly reflected as part of the hidden curriculum. Objective: To ascertain the…

  13. Use of coolant for high-speed tooth preparation: a survey of pediatric dentistry residency program directors in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupietzky, Ari; Vargas, Karen G; Waggoner, William F; Fuks, Anna B

    2010-01-01

    To determine current teaching policies regarding the use of coolant type during tooth preparation with high-speed hand-pieces in pediatric dental residency programs in the US. A 17-question survey was electronically mailed to 63 program directors with one follow-up. Multiple-choice questions asked about school and program teaching of cavity preparation with or without water coolant, including hypothetical clinical situations. Fifty-two (83%) program directors returned the survey. Fifty-two percent taught both dry and water coolant methods, 6% taught dry cutting exclusively, and 42% did not teach the dry method and always used water coolant. Dry techniques were used primarily for special needs patients with poor swallow reflexes (50%) and for young children undergoing sedation (41%). Air coolant was taught more frequently in programs in the Midwest (77%) and South (85%) vs. the Northeast (32%) and West (50%) (P<.01). Forty-four percent of combined programs and 60% of hospital programs taught water spray use exclusively, while all university programs taught the dry cutting technique (P<.01). A majority of program directors teach the use of air coolant alone for high-speed preparation of teeth. University and combined programs were more likely to teach the method compared with hospital based ones.

  14. Computer Program Development Specification for IDAMST Operational Flight Programs. Addendum 1. Executive Software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-11-01

    establishes the requirements for performance and design of the Executive Software for the Integrated Diqital Avionics for a Medium Short Takeoff and Landing...system design . a. System Specification for IDAMST, Type A (S1-1010), June 1976. b. Prime Item Development Specification, IDAMST Processor, Type Bl (Sl...This bit shall be set to logic 1, in Master Mooc onjy, cafer receiving an excepted, valid status word associzeo witn a Remote device in Transmit Mooe

  15. Relationships between high-stakes clinical skills exam scores and program director global competency ratings of first-year pediatric residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenau, Erik E.; Pugliano, Gina; Roberts, William L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Responding to mandates from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and American Osteopathic Association (AOA), residency programs have developed competency-based assessment tools. One such tool is the American College of Osteopathic Pediatricians (ACOP) program directors’ annual report. High-stakes clinical skills licensing examinations, such as the Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing Examination Level 2-Performance Evaluation (COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE), also assess competency in several clinical domains. Objective The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationships between program director competency ratings of first-year osteopathic residents in pediatrics and COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE scores from 2005 to 2009. Methods The sample included all 94 pediatric first-year residents who took COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE and whose training was reviewed by the ACOP for approval of training between 2005 and 2009. Program director competency ratings and COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE scores (domain and component) were merged and analyzed for relationships. Results Biomedical/biomechanical domain scores were positively correlated with overall program director competency ratings. Humanistic domain scores were not significantly correlated with overall program director competency ratings, but did show moderate correlation with ratings for interpersonal and communication skills. The six ACGME or seven AOA competencies assessed empirically by the ACOP program directors’ annual report could not be recovered by principal component analysis; instead, three factors were identified, accounting for 86% of the variance between competency ratings. Discussion A few significant correlations were noted between COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE scores and program director competency ratings. Exploring relationships between different clinical skills assessments is inherently difficult because of the heterogeneity of tools used and overlap of constructs within the AOA

  16. Relationships between high-stakes clinical skills exam scores and program director global competency ratings of first-year pediatric residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik E. Langenau

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Responding to mandates from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME and American Osteopathic Association (AOA, residency programs have developed competency-based assessment tools. One such tool is the American College of Osteopathic Pediatricians (ACOP program directors’ annual report. High-stakes clinical skills licensing examinations, such as the Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing Examination Level 2-Performance Evaluation (COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE, also assess competency in several clinical domains.The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationships between program director competency ratings of first-year osteopathic residents in pediatrics and COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE scores from 2005 to 2009.The sample included all 94 pediatric first-year residents who took COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE and whose training was reviewed by the ACOP for approval of training between 2005 and 2009. Program director competency ratings and COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE scores (domain and component were merged and analyzed for relationships.Biomedical/biomechanical domain scores were positively correlated with overall program director competency ratings. Humanistic domain scores were not significantly correlated with overall program director competency ratings, but did show moderate correlation with ratings for interpersonal and communication skills. The six ACGME or seven AOA competencies assessed empirically by the ACOP program directors’ annual report could not be recovered by principal component analysis; instead, three factors were identified, accounting for 86% of the variance between competency ratings.A few significant correlations were noted between COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE scores and program director competency ratings. Exploring relationships between different clinical skills assessments is inherently difficult because of the heterogeneity of tools used and overlap of constructs within the AOA and ACGME core competencies.

  17. Shaking things up or business as usual? The influence of female corporate executives and board of directors on women's managerial representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaggs, Sheryl; Stainback, Kevin; Duncan, Phyllis

    2012-07-01

    Previous theory and research suggests that workplace gender composition at the highest organizational levels should play a crucial role in reducing gender linked inequalities in the workplace. In this article, we examine how the presence of women in top corporate positions influences female managerial representation at the establishment-level. Using a unique multi-level dataset of 5679 establishments nested within 81 Fortune 1000 corporations, we find that having more women on corporate boards, but not in executive positions, at the firm-level is associated with greater female managerial representation at the establishment-level. The results also show that women are more likely to be in management positions when employed in young, large, and managerially intensive workplaces, as well as those with a larger percentage of female non-managers. Implications for future research and policy implementation are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Case Management Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankston White, Cheri; Birmingham, Jackie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose and Objectives: Case management directors are in a dynamic position to affect the transition of care of patients across the continuum, work with all levels of providers, and support the financial well-being of a hospital. Most importantly, they can drive good patient outcomes. Although the position is critical on many different levels, there is little to help guide a new director in attending to all the “moving parts” of such a complex role. This is Part 2 of a two-part article written for case management directors, particularly new ones. Part 1 covered the first 4 of 7 tracks: (1) Staffing and Human Resources, (2) Compliance and Accreditation, (3) Discharge Planning and (4) Utilization Review and Revenue Cycle. Part 2 addresses (5) Internal Departmental Relationships (Organizational), (6) External Relationships (Community Agency), and (7) Quality and Program Outcomes. This article attempts to answer the following questions: Are case management directors prepared for an expanded role that affects departments and organizations outside of their own?How does a case management director manage the transition of care of patients while managing required relationships outside the department?How does the director manage program outcomes in such a complex department? Primary Practice Setting: The information is most meaningful to those case management directors who work in either stand-alone hospitals or integrated health systems and have frontline case managers (CMs) reporting to them. Findings/Conclusions: Part 1 found that case management directors would benefit from further research and documentation of “best practices” related to their role, particularly in the areas of leadership and management. The same conclusion applies to Part 2, which addresses the director's responsibilities outside her immediate department. Leadership and management skills apply as well to building strong, productive relationships across a broad spectrum of external organizations

  19. The influence of contract type in program execution/V-22 Osprey: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Danny Roy

    1989-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to look at the impact of a fixed price type contract on program execution of a major weapon system. The full scale development phase of the V-22 Osprey program was used as a case study. The focus of this thesis was to determine the affects of this contract type and identify the actions program management took to address it's influences. The predominant conclusion brought out by this research was that based on the political, historical, and economic circumstances of the period, the fixed price incentive fee contract was the best contractual instrument for the government to use. The major recommendations are: in future contracts, ensure an appropriate spread between ceiling and target price in order to adequately incentivize the contractor; in teaming arrangements, employ incentives to guarantee the appropriate transfer of technical information; and incentivize comprehensive production plans and Production Readiness Reviews.

  20. Improving surgical resident's performance in the American Board of Surgery in Training Examination (ABSITE)--do review courses help? The program directors' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taggarshe, Deepa; Mittal, Vijay

    2011-01-01

    The implementation of the 80-hour week compounded by the need for the current trainee to be well versed technically with the newer developments in surgery has resulted in limited time for didactic education. Commercial American Board of Surgery in Training examination (ABSITE) review courses are flourishing and may seem to be filling the gap in didactic education. This study ascertained the opinion of the general surgery program directors across the country on the role of the review courses in the ABSITE performance of a surgical resident. A questionnaire was designed and sent out to all program directors using online survey. Sixty-five of 242 program directors completed the questionnaire. Fifty-seven percent belonged to university-based surgical residency programs. Seventy-two percent used ABSITE performance as a measure while evaluating the resident for promotion. Although 60% agreed that review courses help the performance of the residents, 80% did not have any institutional or regional review courses. Ninety percent allowed their residents to attend commercial review courses but 60% did not reimburse them. Program directors do feel that ABSITE by itself is important in evaluating the progression of surgical residents and has a correlation with the boards' pass percentile. Due to the limited hours available for didactics in current surgical residency, intensive review course over a 2- to 3-day period may help the surgical residents to perform better. In the current economy, review courses offered by a consortium of programs geared toward improving ABSITE performance and conducted by the surgical faculty may be of essence. Copyright © 2011 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Current Status of Nutrition Training in Graduate Medical Education From a Survey of Residency Program Directors: A Formal Nutrition Education Course Is Necessary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Brian J; Cherry-Bukowiec, Jill; Van Way, Charles W; Collier, Bryan; Gramlich, Leah; McMahon, M Molly; McClave, Stephen A

    2016-01-01

    Nutrition leaders surmised graduate medical nutrition education was not well addressed because most medical and surgical specialties have insufficient resources to teach current nutrition practice. A needs assessment survey was constructed to determine resources and commitment for nutrition education from U.S. graduate medical educators to address this problem. An online survey of 36 questions was sent to 495 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Program Directors in anesthesia, family medicine, internal medicine, pediatrics, obstetrics/gynecology, and general surgery. Demographics, resources, and open-ended questions were included. There was a 14% response rate (72 programs), consistent with similar studies on the topic. Most (80%) of the program directors responding were from primary care programs, the rest surgical (17%) or anesthesia (3%). Program directors themselves lacked knowledge of nutrition. While some form of nutrition education was provided at 78% of programs, only 26% had a formal curriculum and physicians served as faculty at only 53%. Sixteen programs had no identifiable expert in nutrition and 10 programs stated that no nutrition training was provided. Training was variable, ranging from an hour of lecture to a month-long rotation. Seventy-seven percent of program directors stated that the required educational goals in nutrition were not met. The majority felt an advanced course in clinical nutrition should be required of residents now or in the future. Nutrition education in current graduate medical education is poor. Most programs lack the expertise or time commitment to teach a formal course but recognize the need to meet educational requirements. A broad-based, diverse universal program is needed for training in nutrition during residency. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  2. 16 CFR 1000.26 - Directorate for Epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Directorate for Epidemiology. 1000.26... AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.26 Directorate for Epidemiology. The Directorate for Epidemiology, managed by the Associate Executive Director for Epidemiology, is responsible for the collection and analysis of data on...

  3. An Analysis of the Air War College’s Executive Health and Fitness Assessment Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-05-01

    1.6335 60 1.7782 77 1.8865 (SOURC;E: Naval Health Research Center, San Diego, Calitornia) 30 BIBLIOGRAPHY 1. Castelli, W. P. " Epedemiology of Coronary...1% AIR WAR COLLEGE RESEARCH REPORT No. AU-AWC-85-057 0AN ANALYSIS OF THE AIR WAR COLLEGE’S EXECUTIVE HEALTH AND FITNESS ASSESSMENT PROGRAM In I...COVERED 14. DATE OF REPORT (Yr., Mo., Day) 15. PAGE COUNT Research FROM TO May 1985 132 16. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTATION S COSATI CODES 18. SUBJECT TERMS

  4. Student Preparation for PGY1 Residency Training by US Colleges of Pharmacy: Survey of the Residency Program Director Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutz, Alyssa B; Beyer, Jacob; Dickson, Whitney L; Gutman, Irina; Yucebay, Filiz; Lepkowsky, Marcie; Chan, Juliana; Carter, Kristen; Shaffer, Christopher L; Fuller, Patrick D

    2017-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate current residents' level of preparation by US colleges of pharmacy for postgraduate year 1 (PGY1) residency training from the perspective of residency program directors (RPDs). Methods: RPDs were asked in an electronic survey questionnaire to rate PGY1 pharmacy residents' abilities in 4 domains: communication, clinical knowledge, interpersonal/time-management skills, and professionalism/leadership. Results: One hundred ninety-seven RPDs of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP)-accredited PGY1 programs completed the survey. The majority of RPDs strongly agreed or agreed that residents were prepared as students to effectively communicate both verbally and nonverbally, were able to appropriately respond to drug inquiries using drug resources and literature searches, and consistently displayed professionalism. Respondents were more likely to disagree or give a neutral response when asked about residents' understanding of biostatistics and their ability to provide enteral and parenteral nutritional support for patients. Conclusion: Overall, RPDs agreed that residents were prepared to perform the majority of the tasks of each of the 4 domains assessed in this survey relating to PGY1 training. RPDs may use the results of this survey to provide additional support for their residents in the areas in which residents lack adequate preparation, while colleges of pharmacy may focus on incorporating more time in their curriculum for certain areas to better prepare their students for residency training.

  5. Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate Integrated Systems Research Program (ISRP) and UAS Integration in the NAS Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Jean

    2010-01-01

    Program Goal: Conduct research at an integrated system-level on promising concepts and technologies and explore, assess, or demonstrate the benefits in a relevant environment.Criteria for selection of projects for Integrated Systems Research: a) Technology has attained enough maturity in the foundational research program that they merit more in-depth evaluation at an integrated system level in a relevant environment. b) Technologies which systems analysis indicates have the most potential for contributing to the simultaneous attainment of goals. c) Technologies identified through stakeholder input as having potential for simultaneous attainment of goals. d) Research not being done by other government agencies and appropriate for NASA to conduct. e) Budget augmentation. Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project Explore and assess new vehicle concepts and enabling technologies through system-level experimentation to simultaneously reduce fuel burn, noise, and emissions Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Integration in the National Airspace System (NAS) Project Contribute capabilities that reduce technical barriers related to the safety and operational challenges associated with enabling routine UAS access to the NAS Innovative Concepts for Green Aviation (ICGA) Project Spur innovation by offering research opportunities to the broader aeronautics community through peer-reviewed proposals, with a focus on making aviation more eco-friendly. Establish incentive prizes similar to the Centennial Challenges and sponsor innovation demonstrations of selected technologies that show promise of reducing aviation s impact on the environment

  6. 13 February 2012 - World Economic Forum Founder and Executive Chairman K. Schwab and Chairperson and Co-Founder Schwab Foundation for Social Entrepreneurship H. Schwab (Mrs)in the ATLAS experimental area at LHC Point 1 with Collaboration Former Spokesperson P. Jenni; signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Head of International Relations F. Pauss.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2012-01-01

    13 February 2012 - World Economic Forum Founder and Executive Chairman K. Schwab and Chairperson and Co-Founder Schwab Foundation for Social Entrepreneurship H. Schwab (Mrs)in the ATLAS experimental area at LHC Point 1 with Collaboration Former Spokesperson P. Jenni; signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Head of International Relations F. Pauss.

  7. 23rd June 2010 - Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization Chief Executive Officer A. Paterson signing a Joint Statement of Intent and the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer; in the ATLAS visitor centre and control room with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    23rd June 2010 - Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization Chief Executive Officer A. Paterson signing a Joint Statement of Intent and the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer; in the ATLAS visitor centre and control room with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni.

  8. 15 January 2010 - Vice-Chancellor & Chief Executive C. Snowden, University of Surrey, United Kingdom and Mrs Snowden visiting ALICE exhibition and experimental undeground area with Collabortion Spokesperson J. Schukraft and Beams Department Head P. Collier; Signature of the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    15 January 2010 - Vice-Chancellor & Chief Executive C. Snowden, University of Surrey, United Kingdom and Mrs Snowden visiting ALICE exhibition and experimental undeground area with Collabortion Spokesperson J. Schukraft and Beams Department Head P. Collier; Signature of the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

  9. 18 December 2013 - P. Kron Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of ALSTOM signing the Guest Book with the Director-General R. Heuer and visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry. Accompanied by P. Fassnacht throughout.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    18 December 2013 - P. Kron Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of ALSTOM signing the Guest Book with the Director-General R. Heuer and visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry. Accompanied by P. Fassnacht throughout.

  10. Graduating Students' and Surgery Program Directors' Views of the Association of American Medical Colleges Core Entrustable Professional Activities for Entering Residency: Where are the Gaps?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindeman, Brenessa M; Sacks, Bethany C; Lipsett, Pamela A

    2015-01-01

    Residency program directors have increasingly expressed concern about the preparedness of some medical school graduates for residency training. The Association of American Medical Colleges recently defined 13 core entrustable professional activities (EPAs) for entering residency that residents should be able to perform without direct supervision on the first day of training. It is not known how students' perception of their competency with these activities compares with that of surgery program directors'. Cross-sectional survey. All surgery training programs in the United States. All program directors (PDs) in the Association of Program Directors in Surgery (APDS) database (n = 222) were invited to participate in an electronic survey, and 119 complete responses were received (53.6%). Among the respondents, 83% were men and 35.2% represented community hospital programs. PDs' responses were compared with questions asking students to rate their confidence in performance of each EPA from the Association of American Medical Colleges Graduation Questionnaire (95% response). PDs rated their confidence in residents' performance without direct supervision for every EPA significantly lower when compared with the rating by graduating students. Although PDs' ratings continued to be lower than students' ratings, PDs from academic programs (those associated with a medical school) gave higher ratings than those from community programs. PDs generally ranked all 13 EPAs as important to being a trustworthy physician. PDs from programs without preliminary residents gave higher ratings for confidence with EPA performance as compared with PDs with preliminary residents. Among PDs with preliminary residents, there were equal numbers of those who agreed and those who disagreed that there are no identifiable differences between categorical and preliminary residents (42.7% and 41.8%, respectively). A large gap exists between confidence in performance of the 13 core EPAs for entering

  11. Funding and Strategic Alignment Guidance for Infusing Small Business Innovation Research Technology Into Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate Programs and Projects for 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2016-01-01

    This report is intended to help NASA program and project managers incorporate Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR)/(STTR) technologies into NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) projects. Other Government and commercial projects managers can also find this useful.

  12. Trainers of School Psychologists and Council of Directors of School Psychology Programs: A New Chapter in the History of School Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Beeman N.

    1993-01-01

    Reviews history of Trainers of School Psychologists and Council of Directors of School Psychology Programs and presents critical assessment of their impact on the field of school psychology. Concludes that, as diversity and specialization within school psychology continues to increase, these organizations may be even more important. (Author/NB)

  13. Design and development of a computer program for the evaluation of the healthcare executive - biomed 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotti, Daniel; Bava, Michele; Delendi, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    According to the Italian law which regulates executive healthcare contracts, the professional evaluation is mandatory. The goal of the periodic evaluation is to enhance and motivate the professional involved. In addition this process should 1. increase the sense of duty towards the patients, 2. become aware of ones own professional growth and aspirations and 3. enhance the awareness of the healthcare executive regarding the companys strategies. To satisfy these requirements a data sheet has been modeled for every evaluated subject, divided in two sections. In the first part, the chief executive officer (CEO) scores: 1. behavioral characteristics, 2. multidisciplinary collaboration and involvement, 3. organizational skills, 4. professional quality and training, 5. relationships with the citizens. The scores for these fields are decided by the CEO. In the second part the CEO evaluates: 1. quantitative job dimension, 2.technology innovation, 3. scientific and educational activities. The value scores of these fields are decided by the CEO together with the professional under evaluation. A previously established correction coefficient can be used for all the scores. This evaluation system model has been constructed according to the enhancement quality approaches (Deming cycle) and a web-based software has been developed on a Linux platform using LAMP technology and php programming techniques. The program replicates all the evaluation process creating different profiles of authentications and authorizations which can then give to the evaluator the possibility to make lists of the professionals to evaluate, to upload documents regarding their activities and goals, to receive individual documents in automatically generated folders, to change the correction coefficients, to obtain year by year the individual scores. The advantages of using this web-based software include easy data consultation and update, the implementation of IT security issues, the easy portability and

  14. Teaching Residents to Teach: Do Program Directors and Trainees Agree on Format and Content?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Lacasse

    2010-03-01

    Methods: This needs assessment was an observational study with a cross-sectional design. Online or printed questionnaires were used to assess the preferred format and content for this curriculum among MS, residents from most postgraduate medical training programs, and PD from Faculté de médecine de l’Université Laval. Results: The questionnaires were completed by 26 PD (response rate 72.2%, 146 residents (response rate 21.9% and 154 MS (response rate 15.7%. Among the list of potential subjects that could be included in the curriculum, Learning styles, Working with students in difficulty and Self-directed learning were scored high by both residents and PD. MS favored Learning styles, Teaching in the ambulatory care setting, Teaching health promotion and prevention, Teaching with time constraints and Direct supervision strategies. PD also favored Teaching conflict management and Teaching professionalism, however these were both among the residents’ lower scores. The preferred formats were One half-day, One day and Online learning for PD and One day, Two consecutive days and A few one-day sessions over several months for residents. Conclusion: The PD and MS perception of the optimal format and content for residents’ teaching-skills training showed some discrepancies when compared with residents’ preferences. Since PD are largely involved in curriculum development for their respective specialties and since MS are also well positioned to assess residents’ teaching performance, we suggest that PD, residents and MS should all be consulted locally before organizing any intervention for teaching curricula.

  15. Taking Care of Our Own: A Multispecialty Study of Resident and Program Director Perspectives on Contributors to Burnout and Potential Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Emily G; Connolly, AnnaMarie; Putnam, Karen T; Penaskovic, Kenan M; Denniston, Clark R; Clark, Leslie H; Rubinow, David R; Meltzer-Brody, Samantha

    2017-04-01

    Rates of resident physician burnout range from 60 to 76 % and are rising. Consequently, there is an urgent need for academic medical centers to develop system-wide initiatives to combat burnout in physicians. Academic psychiatrists who advocate for or treat residents should be familiar with the scope of the problem and the contributors to burnout and potential interventions to mitigate it. We aimed to measure burnout in residents across a range of specialties and to describe resident- and program director-identified contributors and interventions. Residents across all specialties at a tertiary academic hospital completed surveys to assess symptoms of burnout and depression using the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, respectively. Residents and program directors identified contributors to burnout and interventions that might mitigate its risk. Residents were asked to identify barriers to treatment. There were 307 residents (response rate of 61 %) who completed at least one question on the survey; however, all residents did not respond to all questions, resulting in varying denominators across survey questions. In total, 190 of 276 residents (69 %) met criteria for burnout and 45 of 263 (17 %) screened positive for depression. Program directors underestimated rates of burnout, with only one program director estimating a rate of 50 % or higher. Overall residents and program directors agreed that lack of work-life balance and feeling unappreciated were major contributors. Forty-two percent of residents reported that inability to take time off from work was a significant barrier to seeking help, and 25 % incorrectly believed that burnout is a reportable condition to the medical board. Resident distress is common and most likely due to work-life imbalance and feeling unappreciated. However, residents are reluctant to seek help. Interventions that address work-life balance and increase access to support are urgently needed in academic

  16. 07051 Executive Summary -- Programming Paradigms for the Web: Web Programming and Web Services

    OpenAIRE

    Hull, Richard; Thiemann, Peter; Wadler, Philip

    2007-01-01

    The world-wide web raises a variety of new programming challenges. To name a few: programming at the level of the web browser, data-centric approaches, and attempts to automatically discover and compose web services. This seminar brought together researchers from the web programming and web services communities and strove to engage them in communication with each other. The seminar was held in an unusual style, in a mixture of short presentations and in-depth discussio...

  17. Starting a new residency program: a step-by-step guide for institutions, hospitals, and program directors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Barajaz

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Although our country faces a looming shortage of doctors, constraints of space, funding, and patient volume in many existing residency programs limit training opportunities for medical graduates. New residency programs need to be created for the expansion of graduate medical education training positions. Partnerships between existing academic institutions and community hospitals with a need for physicians can be a very successful means toward this end. Baylor College of Medicine and The Children's Hospital of San Antonio were affiliated in 2012, and subsequently, we developed and received accreditation for a new categorical pediatric residency program at that site in 2014. We share below a step-by-step guide through the process that includes building of the infrastructure, educational development, accreditation, marketing, and recruitment. It is our hope that the description of this process will help others to spur growth in graduate medical training positions.

  18. Unplugging Institutional Bottlenecks to Restore Growth: A Policy Discussion Paper Prepared for the 2013 Vietnam Executive Leadership Program (VELP)

    OpenAIRE

    Vu Thanh Tu Anh; David Dapice; Huynh The Du; Pham Duy Nghia; Dwight Perkins; Nguyen Xuan Thanh; Do Thien Anh Tuan; Ben Wilkinson

    2013-01-01

    This paper was prepared for the fourth annual Vietnam Executive Leadership Program (VELP), held at the Harvard Kennedy School from August 26 to 30, 2013. This paper aimed to provide participants, including Vietnamese government officials, scholars, and corporate executives, with a concise assessment of some of the key public policy challenges confronting Vietnam today. This paper is by no means comprehensive; it is not possible to offer an exhaustive analysis of every policy area in a brief s...

  19. The Impact of an Urban Universal Public Prekindergarten Program on Children's Early Numeracy, Language, Literacy, and Executive Function Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, Christina; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu

    2011-01-01

    The authors add to and extend the emerging evidence base of the effects of public preschool programs on child school readiness. Using a quasi-experimental, Regression Discontinuity (RD) design, they estimate the impacts of a universal preschool program on children's early numeracy, language, literacy, and executive function skills, both for the…

  20. National Science Foundation Assistant Director for Mathematics and Physical Sciences Tony Chan (USA) visiting CMS experiment on 23rd May 2007 with Spokesperson T. Virdee, Deputy Spokesperson R. Cousins, Advisor to CERN Director-General J. Ellis, US CMS Research Program Deputy Manager D. Marlow and FNAL D. Green

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2007-01-01

    National Science Foundation Assistant Director for Mathematics and Physical Sciences Tony Chan (USA) visiting CMS experiment on 23rd May 2007 with Spokesperson T. Virdee, Deputy Spokesperson R. Cousins, Advisor to CERN Director-General J. Ellis, US CMS Research Program Deputy Manager D. Marlow and FNAL D. Green

  1. Independent Directors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringe, Wolf-Georg

    2013-01-01

    that they did not prevent firms' excessive risk taking; further, these directors sometimes showed serious deficits in understanding the business they were supposed to control, and remained passive in addressing structural problems. A closer look reveals that under the surface of seemingly unanimous consensus......This paper re-evaluates the corporate governance concept of ‘board independence’ against the disappointing experiences during the 2007-08 financial crisis. Independent or outside directors had long been seen as an essential tool to improve the monitoring role of the board. Yet the crisis revealed...... about board independence in Western jurisdictions, a surprising disharmony prevails about the justification, extent and purpose of independence requirements. These considerations lead me to question the benefits of the current system. Instead, this paper proposes a new, ‘functional’ concept of board...

  2. Software enhancements and modifications to Program FDTD executable on the Cray X-MP computer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stringer, J.C.

    1987-09-04

    This report summarizes enhancements and modifications to PROGRAM FDTD executable on the Cray X-MP computer system. Specifically, the tasks defined and performed under this effort are revision of the material encoding/decoding scheme to allow material type specification on an individual cell basis; modification of the I/O buffering scheme to maximize the use of available central memory and minimize the number of physical I/O accesses; user interface enhancements. Provide enhanced input/output features for greater flexibility; increased modularity. Divide the code into additional modules for ease of maintenance and future enhancements; and assist in the conversion and testing of FDTD to Floating Point Systems scientific computers and associated peripheral devices.

  3. System of Budget Planning, Programming, Development and Execution and the Defence Resources Management Model (DRMM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davor Čutić

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The system of budget planning, programming, development and execution of the Ministry of Defence of the Republic of Croatia (henceforth: the Croatian acronym SPPIIP is the basic system for the strategic management of defence resources through which an effective and rational distribution of available resources is conducted, based on the goals of national security of the Republic of Croatia. This system sets the principles of transparency and democratic management of defence resources while respecting the specificities of the defence system. The SPPIIP allows for decision making based on complete information about alternatives and the choice of the most economical and most efficient way to reach the goal. It unites the strategic plan, program and budget. It consists of four continuous, independent and interconnected phases: planning, programming, development and the execution of the budget. The processes of the phases are dynamic and cyclic. In addition to the SPPIIP, the Defence Resources Management Model (DRMM, Croatian acronym: MURO has also been developed. This is an analytic tool which serves as a decision support system in the SPPIIP. The DRMM is a complex computer model showing graph and tabular overviews in a multi-year period. The model examines three areas: the strength of the forces, expenses and defence programs. The purpose of the model is cost and strength analysis and the analysis of compromise and feasibility, i.e. how sensitive the programs are to fiscal movements in the sphere of the MoD budget in the course of a multiyear cycle, until a certain project ends. The analysis results are an easily understandable basis for decision making. The SPPIIP and the DRMM are mutually independent systems, but they complement each other well. The SPPIIP uses the DRMM in designing and resource allocation based on the goals set. The quality of the DRMM depends on the amount and quality of data in its database. The DRMM can be used as a basis for

  4. 5 CFR 412.302 - Criteria for a Senior Executive Service candidate development program (SESCDP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS SUPERVISORY, MANAGEMENT, AND EXECUTIVE DEVELOPMENT Senior Executive... whether or not within the civil service. The number of expected SES vacancies must be considered as one... executive core qualifications (ECQs); (ii) Address Federal Government leadership challenges crucial to the...

  5. Radiology Resident' Satisfaction With Their Training and Education in the United States: Effect of Program Directors, Teaching Faculty, and Other Factors on Program Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Christopher Z; Nguyen, HaiThuy N; Ferguson, Emma C

    2016-05-01

    Radiology residency education must evolve to meet the growing demands of radiology training. Resident opinions are a major resource to identify needs. However, few published data are available on a national level investigating the radiology resident perspective on factors that influence the resident experience. Our study investigates factors that affect residents' satisfaction with their residency experience and education. A 67-item survey was sent to all radiology residency program directors and coordinators in the United States to be distributed at their discretion. Questions were multiple choice, free-text answer, or 5-point Likert scale. Statistical significance (p teaching opportunities (OR, 6.5; 95% CI, 3.1-13.8), research opportunities (OR, 5.1; 95% CI, 2.6-10.6), personal study (OR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.1-4.1), and compensation (OR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.0-3.7). Our study provides incremental data to the existing literature that offers insight into factors that contribute to a successful radiology residency program.

  6. 17 CFR 200.13 - Executive Director.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...; (2) Providing overall organizational management to improve agency performance; (3) Assisting the...-specific application of performance measures, procurement reforms, personnel reductions, financial.... (7) Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 (31 U.S.C. 1101 et seq.). (8) Recommendations of...

  7. Are registered dietitians adequately prepared to be hospital foodservice directors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregoire, Mary B; Sames, Karoline; Dowling, Rebecca A; Lafferty, Linda J

    2005-08-01

    To determine perceived importance of selected competencies for the role of hospital foodservice director and explore whether registered dietitians (RDs) are perceived competent in these areas. Data were collected through a mailed questionnaire. A random sample of 500 hospital foodservice directors and 500 hospital executives to whom the directors report. Chi2, Mann-Whitney, and Kruskall-Wallis tests were used to examine differences among ratings by and demographic characteristics of foodservice directors and the executives with whom they work. All competencies were perceived to be important for someone in the role of hospital foodservice director. RDs were perceived to be somewhat competent in all areas studied but were only perceived to be competent to expert in a few of the areas. Directors who were RDs and hospital executives who had worked with RDs rated the competence level of RDs higher than did non-RD directors and hospital executives who had not worked with RDs. Unique competencies appear to be important for those aspiring to become hospital foodservice directors. Hospital executives who had worked with RDs perceived the competency level of RDs to be higher than did executives who had not worked with RDs. Often, areas rated as most important for the role of hospital foodservice director were not areas in which RDs were perceived to be highly competent. Additional competency development may be needed to better prepare RDs to assume the role of hospital foodservice director.

  8. 41 CFR 102-38.360 - What must an executive agency do to implement the eFAS program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 38-SALE OF PERSONAL PROPERTY Implementation of the Federal Asset Sales Program § 102-38.360 What... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must an executive...

  9. The effect of remuneration committees, directors' shareholding and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Executive directors' remuneration of leading South African companies often attracts the attention of the press, shareholders and unions. The research on which this article is based investigated whether executive directors' remuneration of the Top 100 companies listed on the Johannesburg Securities Exchange (JSE) is infl ...

  10. Expectativas de gerentes e assessores de enfermagem quanto ao estilo gerencial do diretor executivo de um hospital de ensino Expectativas de gerentes y asesores de enfermería referente al estilo gerencial del director eyecutivo de un hospital escuela The managerial style of an executive director of a university hospital: perceptions and expectations of nursing managers and assistants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcia Marinilza Beccaria

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo focalizou as expectativas de 13 enfermeiros de um hospital de ensino, quanto ao estilo gerencial do diretor executivo. Utilizou-se o Grid Gerencial de BLAKE & MOUTON (1987, como referencial teórico e aplicou-se um questionário baseado no Instrumento Grid & Liderança em enfermagem, de TREVIZAN (1993. Os resultados evidenciaram que o estilo mais esperado corresponde, no Grid Gerencial, à "gerência em equipe", ou 9.9. O segundo estilo desejado foi a "gerência do homem organizacional, "ou 5.5. Concluiu-se que, para esses enfermeiros, existem expectativas significativas relacionadas à gerência que invista em valores como confiança, respeito, comprometimento, empenho pessoal e trabalho em equipe para o alcance dos objetivos organizacionais.Este estudio enfocó las expectativas de 13 enfermeros del hospital escuela, con relación al estilo directivo del director ejecutivo. El "grid" gerencial de BLAKE & MOUTON (1987, fue usado como referencial teórico y una encuesta se aplicó basada en el Instrumento Grid & Liderazgo en enfermería, de TREVIZAN (1993. Los resultados evidenciaron el estilo más esperado fue "la gerencia en equipo", o 9.9. EL segundo estilo fue la "gerencia organizacional del hombre," o 5.5. Se concluye que, para esos enfermeros existen expectativas significativas relacionadas con la dirección que invierte en valores como confianza, respeto, compromiso, empeño personal y trabajo en equipo para el alcance del objetivos organizacionales.The present study focussed the expectations of 13 nurses from a University hospital regarding to the executive director's managerial style. The Managerial Grid of BLAKE & MOUTON (1987 was used as a theoretical reference and a questionnaire was applied based on the Grid & Leadership in Nursing Instrument elaborated by TREVIZAN (1993. Results evidenced that the most expected style corresponds, considering the Managerial Grid, to "team management", or 9.9. The second style was the

  11. Internal Medicine Residency Program Directors' Views of the Core Entrustable Professional Activities for Entering Residency: An Opportunity to Enhance Communication of Competency Along the Continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, Steven V; Vu, T Robert; Willett, Lisa L; Call, Stephanie; Halvorsen, Andrew J; Chaudhry, Saima

    2017-06-01

    To examine internal medicine (IM) residency program directors' (PDs') perspectives on the Core Entrustable Professional Activities for Entering Residency (Core EPAs)-introduced into undergraduate medical education to further competency-based assessment-and on communicating competency-based information during transitions. A spring 2015 Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine survey asked PDs of U.S. IM residency programs for their perspectives on which Core EPAs new interns must or should possess on day 1, which are most essential, and which have the largest gap between expected and observed performance. Their views and preferences were also requested regarding communicating competency-based information at transitions from medical school to residency and residency to fellowship/employment. The response rate was 57% (204/361 programs). The majority of PDs felt new interns must/should possess 12 of the 13 Core EPAs. PDs' rankings of Core EPAs by relative importance were more varied than their rankings by the largest gaps in performance. Although preferred timing varied, most PDs (82%) considered it important for medical schools to communicate Core EPA-based information to PDs; nearly three-quarters (71%) would prefer a checklist format. Many (60%) would be willing to provide competency-based evaluations to fellowship directors/employers. Most (> 80%) agreed that there should be a bidirectional communication mechanism for programs/employers to provide feedback on competency assessments. The gaps identified in Core EPA performance may help guide medical schools' curricular and assessment tool design. Sharing competency-based information at transitions along the medical education continuum could help ensure production of competent, practice-ready physicians.

  12. Attitudes and practices of surgery residency program directors toward the use of social networking profiles to select residency candidates: a nationwide survey analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Pauline H; Klaassen, Zachary; Chamberlain, Ronald S

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether residency program directors (PDs) of general surgery and surgical subspecialties review social networking (SN) websites during resident selection. A 16-question survey was distributed via e-mail (Survey Monkey, Palo Alto, California) to 641 PDs of general surgery and surgical subspecialty residency programs accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). Institutions with ACGME-accredited general surgery and surgical subspecialty residency programs. PDs of ACGME-accredited general surgery and surgical subspecialty residency programs. Two hundred fifty (39%) PDs completed the survey. Seventeen percent (n = 43) of respondents reported visiting SN websites to gain more information about an applicant during the selection process, leading 14 PDs (33.3%) to rank an applicant lower after a review of their SN profile. PDs who use SN websites currently are likely to continue (69%), whereas those who do not use SN currently might do so in the future (yes 5.4%, undecided 44.6%). Online profiles displayed on SN websites provide surgery PDs with an additional avenue with which to evaluate highly competitive residency applicants. Applicants should be aware of the expansion of social media into the professional arena and the increasing use of these tools by PDs. SN profiles should reflect the professional standards to which physicians are held while highlighting an applicant's strengths and academic achievements. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Lowest Price, Technically Acceptable Evaluation Criteria Used in the November 2014 Request for Proposal for the Program Executive Office Soldier Systems Engineering and Technical Assistance (SETA) Contract

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    USED IN THE NOVEMBER 2014 REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL FOR THE PROGRAM EXECUTIVE OFFICE SOLDIER SYSTEMS ENGINEERING AND TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE (SETA) CONTRACT...NOVEMBER 2014 REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL FOR THE PROGRAM EXECUTIVE OFFICE SOLDIER SYSTEMS ENGINEERING AND TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE (SETA) CONTRACT 5. FUNDING...evaluation process for replies received in response to a request for proposal (RFP) for systems engineering and technical assistance (SETA) support

  14. Association of Program Directors in Vascular Surgery (APDVS) survey of program selection, knowledge acquisition, and education provided as viewed by vascular trainees from two different training paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalsing, Michael C; Makaroun, Michel S; Harris, Linda M; Mills, Joseph L; Eidt, John; Eckert, George J

    2012-02-01

    Methods of learning may differ between generations and even the level of training or the training paradigm, or both. To optimize education, it is important to optimize training designs, and the perspective of those being trained can aid in this quest. The Association of Program Directors in Vascular Surgery leadership sent a survey to all vascular surgical trainees (integrated [0/5], independent current and new graduates [5 + 2]) addressing various aspects of the educational experience. Of 412 surveys sent, 163 (∼40%) responded: 46 integrated, 96 fellows, and 21 graduates. The survey was completed by 52% of the integrated residents, 59% of the independent residents, and 20% of the graduates. When choosing a program for training, the integrated residents are most concerned with program atmosphere and the independent residents with total clinical volume. Concerns after training were thoracic and thoracoabdominal aneurysm procedures and business aspects: 40% to 50% integrated, and 60% fellows/graduates. Integrated trainees found periprocedural discussion the best feedback (79%), with 9% favoring written test review. Surgical training and vascular laboratory and venous training were judged "just right" by 87% and ∼71%, whereas business aspects needed more emphasis (65%-70%). Regarding the 80-hour workweek, 82% felt it prevented fatigue, and 24% thought it was detrimental to patient care. Independent program trainees also found periprocedural discussion the best feedback (71%), with 12% favoring written test review. Surgical training and vascular laboratory/venous training were "just right" by 87% and 60% to 70%, respectively, whereas business aspects needed more emphasis (∼65%-70%). Regarding the 80-hour workweek, 62% felt it was detrimental to patient care, and 42% felt it prevented fatigue. A supportive environment and adequate clinical volume will attract trainees to a program. For "an urgent need to know," the integrated trainees are especially turning to

  15. Surgical training, duty-hour restrictions, and implications for meeting the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies: views of surgical interns compared with program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiel, Ryan M; Van Arendonk, Kyle J; Reed, Darcy A; Terhune, Kyla P; Tarpley, John L; Porterfield, John R; Hall, Daniel E; Joyce, David L; Wightman, Sean C; Horvath, Karen D; Heller, Stephanie F; Farley, David R

    2012-06-01

    To describe the perspectives of surgical interns regarding the implications of the new Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) duty-hour regulations for their training. We compared responses of interns and surgery program directors on a survey about the proposed ACGME mandates. Eleven general surgery residency programs. Two hundred fifteen interns who were administered the survey during the summer of 2011 and a previously surveyed national sample of 134 surgery program directors. Perceptions of the implications of the new duty-hour restrictions on various aspects of surgical training, including the 6 ACGME core competencies of graduate medical education, measured using 3-point scales (increase, no change, or decrease). Of 215 eligible surgical interns, 179 (83.3%) completed the survey. Most interns believed that the new duty-hour regulations will decrease continuity with patients (80.3%), time spent operating (67.4%), and coordination of patient care (57.6%), while approximately half believed that the changes will decrease their acquisition of medical knowledge (48.0%), development of surgical skills (52.8%), and overall educational experience (51.1%). Most believed that the changes will improve or will not alter other aspects of training, and 61.5% believed that the new standards will decrease resident fatigue. Surgical interns were significantly less pessimistic than surgery program directors regarding the implications of the new duty-hour restrictions on all aspects of surgical training (P training under the new paradigm of duty-hour restrictions have significant concerns about the effect of these regulations on the quality of their training.

  16. Tabled Execution in Scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willcock, J J; Lumsdaine, A; Quinlan, D J

    2008-08-19

    Tabled execution is a generalization of memorization developed by the logic programming community. It not only saves results from tabled predicates, but also stores the set of currently active calls to them; tabled execution can thus provide meaningful semantics for programs that seemingly contain infinite recursions with the same arguments. In logic programming, tabled execution is used for many purposes, both for improving the efficiency of programs, and making tasks simpler and more direct to express than with normal logic programs. However, tabled execution is only infrequently applied in mainstream functional languages such as Scheme. We demonstrate an elegant implementation of tabled execution in Scheme, using a mix of continuation-passing style and mutable data. We also show the use of tabled execution in Scheme for a problem in formal language and automata theory, demonstrating that tabled execution can be a valuable tool for Scheme users.

  17. Why Army Program Managers Struggle As Life Cycle Managers: A Study of the PM’s Roles, Responsibilities, and Barriers In the Execution of Operations and Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    SUBTITLE WHY ARMY PROGRAM MANAGERS STRUGGLE AS LIFE CYCLE MANAGERS : A STUDY OF THE PM’S ROLES , RESPONSIBILITIES, AND BARRIERS IN THE EXECUTION OF...unlimited. WHY ARMY PROGRAM MANAGERS STRUGGLE AS LIFE CYCLE MANAGERS : A STUDY OF THE PM’S ROLES , RESPONSIBILITIES, AND BARRIERS IN THE EXECUTION OF...PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK v WHY ARMY PROGRAM MANAGERS STRUGGLE AS LIFE CYCLE MANAGERS : A STUDY OF THE PM’S ROLES , RESPONSIBILITIES, AND

  18. Successful implementation of the american college of surgeons/association of program directors in surgery surgical skills curriculum via a 4-week consecutive simulation rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Mayank Kumar; Dumon, Kristoffel R; Edelson, Paula Kaitlyn; Acero, Natalia Martinez; Hashimoto, Daniel; Danzer, Enrico; Selvan, Ben; Resnick, Andrew S; Morris, Jon B; Williams, Noel N

    2012-06-01

    Increased patient awareness, duty hour restrictions, escalating costs, and time constraints in the operating room have revolutionized surgery education. Although simulation and skills laboratories are emerging as promising alternatives for skills training, their integration into graduate surgical education is inconsistent, erratic, and often on a voluntary basis. We hypothesize that, by implementing the American College of Surgeons/Association of Program Directors in Surgery Surgical Skills Curriculum in a structured, inanimate setting, we can address some of these concerns. Sixty junior surgery residents were assigned to the Penn Surgical Simulation and Skills Rotation. The National Surgical Skills Curriculum was implemented using multiple educational tools under faculty supervision. Pretraining and posttraining assessments of technical skills were conducted using validated instruments. Trainee and faculty feedbacks were collected using a structured feedback form. Significant global performance improvement was demonstrated using Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills score for basic surgical skills (knot tying, wound closure, enterotomy closure, and vascular anastomosis) and Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery skills, P < 0.001. Six trainees were retested on an average of 13.5 months later (range, 8-16 months) and retained more than 75% of their basic surgical skills. The American College of Surgeons/Association of Program Directors in Surgery National Surgical Skills Curriculum can be implemented in its totality as a 4-week consecutive surgical simulation rotation in an inanimate setting, leading to global enhancement of junior surgical residents' technical skills and contributing to attainment of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competency.

  19. CAL--ERDA program manual. [Building Design Language; LOADS, SYSTEMS, PLANT, ECONOMICS, REPORT, EXECUTIVE, CAL-ERDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunn, B. D.; Diamond, S. C.; Bennett, G. A.; Tucker, E. F.; Roschke, M. A.

    1977-10-01

    A set of computer programs, called Cal-ERDA, is described that is capable of rapid and detailed analysis of energy consumption in buildings. A new user-oriented input language, named the Building Design Language (BDL), has been written to allow simplified manipulation of the many variables used to describe a building and its operation. This manual provides the user with information necessary to understand in detail the Cal-ERDA set of computer programs. The new computer programs described include: an EXECUTIVE Processor to create computer system control commands; a BDL Processor to analyze input instructions, execute computer system control commands, perform assignments and data retrieval, and control the operation of the LOADS, SYSTEMS, PLANT, ECONOMICS, and REPORT programs; a LOADS analysis program that calculates peak (design) zone and hourly loads and the effect of the ambient weather conditions, the internal occupancy, lighting, and equipment within the building, as well as variations in the size, location, orientation, construction, walls, roofs, floors, fenestrations, attachments (awnings, balconies), and shape of a building; a Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) SYSTEMS analysis program capable of modeling the operation of HVAC components including fans, coils, economizers, humidifiers, etc.; 16 standard configurations and operated according to various temperature and humidity control schedules. A plant equipment program models the operation of boilers, chillers, electrical generation equipment (diesel or turbines), heat storage apparatus (chilled or heated water), and solar heating and/or cooling systems. An ECONOMIC analysis program calculates life-cycle costs. A REPORT program produces tables of user-selected variables and arranges them according to user-specified formats. A set of WEATHER ANALYSIS programs manipulates, summarizes and plots weather data. Libraries of weather data, schedule data, and building data were prepared.

  20. Science and Science Education Go Hand-in-Hand: The Impact of the NASA Science Mission Directorate Education and Public Outreach Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. A.; Peticolas, L.; Schwerin, T.; Shipp, S.; Manning, J. G.

    2014-07-01

    For nearly two decades, NASA has embedded education and public outreach (EPO) in its Earth and space science missions and research programs on the principle that science education is most effective when educators and scientists work hand-in-hand. Four Science EPO Forums organize the respective NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Astrophysics, Earth Science, Heliophysics, and Planetary Science EPO programs into a coordinated, efficient, and effective nationwide effort. The NASA SMD EPO program evaluates EPO impacts that support NASA's policy of providing a direct return-on-investment for the American public, advances STEM education and literacy, and enables students and educators to participate in the practice of science as embodied in the 2013 Next Generation Science Standards. Leads of the four NASA SMD Science EPO Forums provided big-picture perspectives on NASA's effort to incorporate authentic science into the nation's STEM education and scientific literacy, highlighting examples of program effectiveness and impact. Attendees gained an increased awareness of the depth and breadth of NASA SMD's EPO programs and achievements, the magnitude of its impacts through representative examples, and the ways current and future EPO programs can build upon the work being done.

  1. 50 CFR 540.2 - Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Program. 540.2 Section 540.2 Wildlife and Fisheries MARINE MAMMAL COMMISSION INFORMATION SECURITY § 540.2 Program. The Executive Director is... programs and procedures. He acts as the recipient of questions, suggestions, and complaints regarding all...

  2. 78 FR 43925 - Solicitation for a Cooperative Agreement-Executive Excellence a Training and Development Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-22

    ... the NIC's Academy and Administrative Divisions. NIC Opportunity Number: 13AC11 This number should... your proposal, and in the right justified header of your proposal. Number of Awards and Funds Available...) for an Executive Excellence curriculum should be developed using NIC's Instructional Theory Into...

  3. The Impact of Outplacement Programs on Reemployment Criteria: A Longitudinal Study of Displaced Managers and Executives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westaby, James D.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine longitudinally the impact of outplacement support (e.g., counseling end psychological assessment) on several reemployment criteria. A sample of 1,880 managers and executives using the services of a large outplacement organization was examined. Controlling for past salary, severance, and demographics,…

  4. Energy surveys of army central heating and power plants. Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP). Fort Greely. Volume 1, executive summary. Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1986-04-01

    This is the Executive Summary of the energy survey and project documentation that resulted from the Energy Survey of the Central Heating and Power Plant at Fort Greely. It is a part of the continuing effort under the Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP). Similar energy surveys and reports have been developed for Fort Richardson and Fort Wainwright Central Heating and Power Plants concurrently. The Scope of Work of this program was developed by the Huntsville Division Corps of Engineers for use at all Army central heating and power plants. Representatives from the Huntsville Division of the Corps, U.S. Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) and John Graham Company, Architect-Engineer visited the Fort Greely power plant during the summer of 1984. At that time, a generic Scope of Work was reviewed. From it, a detailed scope was developed for Fort Greely. A complete Scope of Work can be found in Appendix H Volume 4 of this report. The purpose of this study is to review and study all potential energy conservation opportunities (ECOs) at the Fort Greely Central Heating and Power Plant (CHPP). These ECOs would then be developed to determine the economics and feasibility of implementation. The equipment at this plant is over 30 years old. The plant is meeting the requirements of providing steam for heating the base. It is a functional operating CHPP plant that will, with proper maintenance and repairs, continue to perform for many more years. With a heating plant of this age there was reason to believe that many energy conservation opportunities do exist. Section 4 describes the ECOs found and studied. The study also required that the condition and efficiency of the boilers and auxiliaries of the entire plant be evaluated.

  5. Effect of executive programs of infection control committees on the prevalence of nosocomial infections in Kermanshah's Hospitals (2010-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatankhah, Sodabe; Mokarami, Hamidreza; Karchani, Mohsen; Hosseini, Zahra; Izadi, Babak; Moradi, Farideh

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of executive programs of infection control committees on the incidence of nosocomial infections in hospitals affiliated with the Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences (Kermanshah, Iran) during 2010 and 2011. The numbers of patients admitted in 2010 and 2011 were 8084 and 7166, respectively, and the average prevalence of nosocomial infections in 2010 and 2011 was 0.8 and 1.9 infections per 100 patients, respectively. In 2010, the mean scores obtained by hospital for regular Infection Control Committee meetings, regular gatherings, registration of program information analysis, and regular follow-up meetings were 19, 31, 30.5, and 41.7 (out of 100), respectively. In 2011, they were 20.2, 36.4, 38.1, and 50, respectively. The results of this study indicated that executive programs of infection control committees had no effect on the incidence of nosocomial infections; therefore, the experts who assess hospitals should pay more attention to the systems that are used to conduct surveillance of nosocomial infection control programs.

  6. Climate change and local public health in the United States: preparedness, programs and perceptions of local public health department directors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward W Maibach

    Full Text Available While climate change is inherently a global problem, its public health impacts will be experienced most acutely at the local and regional level, with some jurisdictions likely to be more burdened than others. The public health infrastructure in the U.S. is organized largely as an interlocking set of public agencies at the federal, state and local level, with lead responsibility for each city or county often residing at the local level. To understand how directors of local public health departments view and are responding to climate change as a public health issue, we conducted a telephone survey with 133 randomly selected local health department directors, representing a 61% response rate. A majority of respondents perceived climate change to be a problem in their jurisdiction, a problem they viewed as likely to become more common or severe over the next 20 years. Only a small minority of respondents, however, had yet made climate change adaptation or prevention a top priority for their health department. This discrepancy between problem recognition and programmatic responses may be due, in part, to several factors: most respondents felt personnel in their health department--and other key stakeholders in their community--had a lack of knowledge about climate change; relatively few respondents felt their own health department, their state health department, or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention had the necessary expertise to help them create an effective mitigation or adaptation plan for their jurisdiction; and most respondents felt that their health department needed additional funding, staff and staff training to respond effectively to climate change. These data make clear that climate change adaptation and prevention are not currently major activities at most health departments, and that most, if not all, local health departments will require assistance in making this transition. We conclude by making the case that, through their

  7. An Analysis of Bilingual Education Programs and Directors in Texas Education Service Center Region Two School Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davila, Michelle Arevalo

    2013-01-01

    In this mixed methods research study, the researcher investigated the difference between additive and subtractive bilingual education programs and student achievement. The researcher examined types of bilingual education and special language programs currently utilized in school districts located within the Education Service Center Region Two…

  8. Executive Development Programs in the U.S. Air Force: Does Diversity Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-04-01

    Nanus . Leaders: The Strategies for Taking Charge. New York: Harper & Row, Publishers Inc., 1985. Bennis , Warren and Patricia Ward Biederman...Breaking Through: The Making of Minority Executives in Corporate America (Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 1999), 54. 12 Warren Bennis and Burt... Nanus , Leaders: The Strategies for Taking Charge (New York: Harper & Row, Publishers Inc., 1985), 112 and 118. 13 David A. Thomas and Robin J. Ely

  9. First AGU Board of Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhaden, Michael J.

    2010-08-01

    On 1 July 2010, the first AGU Board of Directors took office. The board is composed of the president, president-elect, immediate past president, general secretary, international secretary, development board chair, six members elected by the Union membership, vice chair of the AGU Council, and the executive director. Two additional members may be nominated by the AGU president and approved by the board. The creation of the board is a result of the new governance structure approved by the AGU membership in November 2009. The board is responsible for the business aspects of the Union, while an expanded AGU Council will focus on science issues. Council members will be introduced in a future issue of Eos.

  10. INTERFIRM COOPERATION AND INFORMATION SHARING THROUGH INTERLOCKING DIRECTORATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Belal UDDIN

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available When firms engage in cooperative efforts, interfirm relations get particular interest to be studied. A direct interlock occurs when an executive or director of one firm sits on the board of another firm, and an indirect interlock occurs when two firms have directors or executives who sit on the board of a third firm. The three commonly used theoretical models such as social network theory, learning theory, and theory of strategic choice are more relevant for the formation and management of interlocking directorates. Uncertainty, resource scarcity, mutual trust, dependency, etc. influence the formation of interlocking directorates. Consequently, interlocking directorates allow sharing of information and overall cooperation between partners through learning, collaboration, networking, and effective relationship, etc. Proper management of interlocking directorates requires communication and collaboration among partners that enhance exchange of knowledge and cooperation.

  11. BLENDED LEARNING (BL AS PEDAGOGICAL ALTERNATIVE TO TEACH BUSINESS COMMUNICATION COURSE: Case Study of UUM Executive Diploma Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisham DZAKIRIA

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Globally, blended learning (BL technologies have been increasingly applied in a variety of fields, both public and private sectors. In recent years, universities, public and private businesses and organizations are among those employing blended learning methods and technologies in training and re-training of professionals in the workforce. In Malaysia, the increasing use of blended learning to enhance learning and enriching of soft skills among professionals and individuals in the work place is evident. The advancement of technology is an onset to many new avenues and tool for learning and teaching, and it is the coalescing of these various technologies with particular pedagogy or andragogy has helped to popularize BL. However, when an institution makes the critical choice of delivery methods, it is pertinent that the university needs to consider various success factors. One in particular is student-centered approach that entails the need to understand the students as the beneficiary of learning, and the support system they need to help them learn. This qualitative study reports in detail the experience of a small group of students undertaking Executive Diplomas at Executive Development Centre (EDC, Universiti Utara Malaysia as they progress through their Executive program. This paper looks at learning experiences as described by the learners- it is their story, their experience, and their perspective. This study suggests that BL offered a comfortable middle ground, and has lots of potential in higher education in Malaysia. It is a pedagogical alternative that could play a significant role not only for teaching Business Communication, but has the potential to promote lifelong learning initiatives in Malaysia in a much meaningful and inviting way. Although this study shows that BL contributed a significant and meaningful learning particularly for adult learners, it needs more definitive studies. Such information can be used to guide policy makers

  12. Neurology Didactic Curricula for Psychiatry Residents: A Review of the Literature and a Survey of Program Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Claudia L.; Walaszek, Art

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Minimal literature exists on neurology didactic instruction offered to psychiatry residents, and there is no model neurology didactic curriculum offered for psychiatry residency programs. The authors sought to describe the current state of neurology didactic training in psychiatry residencies. Methods: The authors electronically…

  13. The Program Manager’s Support System (PMSS). An Executive Overview and Descriptions of Functional Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-01

    50 Program Office Organization and Staffing Module 50 Expert Systems for Acquisition Strategies 51 Procurement Document Generator Module 51...PC; Z-248 50 trade-off analysis Program Office Organization PROS Develop PMO organization Prototype IBM-PC; Z-248 50 and Staffing charts, on board...prototype moduie. It requires a color graphics card. Program Office Organization and Staffing (PROS) Module The Program Office Organization and Staffing

  14. Tutoring Executives Online

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bignoux, Stephane; Sund, Kristian J.

    2016-01-01

    Studies of learning and student satisfaction in the context of online university programs have largely neglected programs catering specifically to business executives. Such executives have typically been away from higher education for a number of years, and have collected substantial practical...... experience in the subject matters they are taught. Their expectations in terms of both content and delivery may therefore be different from non-executive students. We explore perceptions of the quality of tutoring in the context of an online executive MBA program through participant interviews. We find...... that in addition to some of the tutor behaviors already discussed in the literature, executive students look specifically for practical industry knowledge and experience in tutors, when judging how effective a tutor is. This has implications for both the recruitment and training of online executive MBA tutors....

  15. 75 FR 62591 - Performance Review Board, Senior Executive Service (SES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ... Diversity and Equal Opportunity, NASA Headquarters; Assistant Administrator for Human Capital Management...; Executive Secretary, Director, Workforce Management and Development Division, NASA Headquarters; Associate..., Deputy Administrator, NASA Headquarters; Chair, Executive Resources Board, NASA Headquarters; Chair, NASA...

  16. The State of Neurocritical Care Fellowship Training and Attitudes toward Accreditation and Certification: A Survey of Neurocritical Care Fellowship Program Directors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajat Dhar

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Neurocritical care as a recognized and distinct subspecialty of critical care has grown remarkably since its inception in the 1980s. As of 2016, there were 61 fellowship training programs accredited by the United Council for Neurologic Subspecialties (UCNS in the United States and more than 1,000 UCNS-certified neurointensivists from diverse medical backgrounds. In late 2015, the Program Accreditation, Physician Certification, and Fellowship Training (PACT Committee of the Neurocritical Care Society (NCS was convened to promote and support excellence in the training and certification of neurointensivists. One of the first tasks of the committee was to survey neurocritical care fellowship training program directors to ascertain the current state of fellowship training and attitudes regarding transition to Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME accreditation of training programs and American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS certification of physicians. First, the survey revealed significant heterogeneities in the manner of neurocritical care training and a lack of consistency in requirements for fellow procedural competency. Second, although a majority of the 33 respondents indicated that a move toward ACGME accreditation/ABMS certification would facilitate further growth and mainstreaming of training in neurocritical care, many programs do not currently meet administrative requirements and do not receive the level of institutional support that would be needed for such a transition. In summary, the results revealed that there is an opportunity for future harmonization of training standards and that a transition to ACGME accreditation/ABMS certification is preferred. While the results reflect the opinions of more than half of the survey respondents, they represent only a small sample of neurointensivists.

  17. The State of Neurocritical Care Fellowship Training and Attitudes toward Accreditation and Certification: A Survey of Neurocritical Care Fellowship Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Rajat; Rajajee, Venkatakrishna; Finley Caulfield, Anna; Maas, Matthew B; James, Michael L; Kumar, Avinash Bhargava; Figueroa, Stephen A; McDonagh, David; Ardelt, Agnieszka

    2017-01-01

    Neurocritical care as a recognized and distinct subspecialty of critical care has grown remarkably since its inception in the 1980s. As of 2016, there were 61 fellowship training programs accredited by the United Council for Neurologic Subspecialties (UCNS) in the United States and more than 1,000 UCNS-certified neurointensivists from diverse medical backgrounds. In late 2015, the Program Accreditation, Physician Certification, and Fellowship Training (PACT) Committee of the Neurocritical Care Society (NCS) was convened to promote and support excellence in the training and certification of neurointensivists. One of the first tasks of the committee was to survey neurocritical care fellowship training program directors to ascertain the current state of fellowship training and attitudes regarding transition to Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) accreditation of training programs and American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) certification of physicians. First, the survey revealed significant heterogeneities in the manner of neurocritical care training and a lack of consistency in requirements for fellow procedural competency. Second, although a majority of the 33 respondents indicated that a move toward ACGME accreditation/ABMS certification would facilitate further growth and mainstreaming of training in neurocritical care, many programs do not currently meet administrative requirements and do not receive the level of institutional support that would be needed for such a transition. In summary, the results revealed that there is an opportunity for future harmonization of training standards and that a transition to ACGME accreditation/ABMS certification is preferred. While the results reflect the opinions of more than half of the survey respondents, they represent only a small sample of neurointensivists.

  18. Effect of yoga program on executive functions of adolescents dwelling in an orphan home: A randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, Satya Prakash; Pradhan, Balaram

    2017-01-01

    Executive function (EF) is important for physical and mental health of children. Studies have shown that children with poverty and early life stress have reduced EF. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of Yoga program on the EF of orphan adolescents. Seventy two apparently healthy orphan adolescents randomized and allocated into two groups as Yoga group (n = 40; 14 girls, age = 12.69 ± 1.35 yrs) and Wait List Control (WLC) group (n = 32, 13 girls, age = 12.58 ± 1.52 yrs). Yoga group underwent three months of Yoga program in a schedule of 90 min per day, four days per week whereas the WLC group followed the routine activities. They were assessed by Stroop Color-Word Task, Digit Symbol Substitution Test (DSST), Digits Span Test and Trial Making Test (TMT) at the beginning and end of the program. The repeated measures ANOVA showed significant difference in time and group interactions (p < 0.05) for all subtests of Stroop Color-Word Task and Digit Span Test and part-A of TMT whereas there were no significant difference found in DSST and TMT (part-B). The post-hoc test with Bonferroni adjustment also showed significant improvements (p < 0.001) within the Yoga group in all test scores while in wrong score of DSST did not exhibit significant reduction. Whereas the WLC group, showed significant improvement (p < 0.05) in Stroop Color, Color-Word score, net score of DSST, Digit Span forward and Digit Span Total. Three months Yoga program was found useful for the young orphan adolescents in improving their executive functions.

  19. The History of the U.S. Coast Guard’s Deepwater Program and Evolution of the Acquisions Directorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-15

    1,3]. The intent was to supplement the Coast Guard’s patrol boat fleet until the new Fast Response Cutter’s ( FRC ) could be built to replace the...revamped acquisitions Coast Guard program reexamined and resolved the FRC project by soliciting a ship to be built on an existing, proven hull...design. This approach to the FRC production significantly accelerated FRC production and was extremely cost effective during development. Learning from

  20. Evaluating the Child Care Director: The Collaborative Professional Assessment Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Nancy K.; Brown, Mac H.

    2000-01-01

    Describes the Collaborative Professional Assessment Process (CPAP) to guide the evaluation of the director of early childhood programs. Examines the assumptions upon which the CPAP is based. Lists the management skills and leadership abilities of successful child care directors. Includes the Director Self-Evaluation form and a program evaluation…

  1. Power in the role of the medical director: what it is and how to get more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabel, Stewart

    2011-05-01

    The formal leadership of mental health care organizations commonly resides in an executive director, who may or may not have had clinical training. The medical director is a psychiatrist who reports to the executive director. For some, this arrangement suggests that the medical director lacks or has lost power in the organization. This paper examines more specifically the types of power available to the medical director using French & Raven (1959) and Raven (2008) bases of power framework. The executive director/medical director relationship can be thought of as a relationship between individuals holding formal and informal power, respectively. Although medical directors lack formal or positional power, they potentially have and can gain more informal power based on their recognized clinical/medical expertise, their personal presence and an assertive involvement and focus on the organizational mission.

  2. Joint Warfighting and Readiness: DoD Execution of the Warsaw Initiative Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Prinzbach, Robert F., II; Conway, Dennis L; Stanfield, Clara L; Pack, Tomasa; Stephenson, Susann L; Carvalho, Sharon L

    2005-01-01

    .... In January 1994, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) launched the Partnership for Peace program, which provides assistance to countries seeking cooperative military and peacekeeping relations with NATO...

  3. 3 CFR 13490 - Executive Order 13490 of January 21, 2009. Ethics Commitments by Executive Branch Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... official or non-career Senior Executive Service appointee for the remainder of the Administration. “6...-Presidential appointee, non-career appointee in the Senior Executive Service (or other SES-type system), and... of every executive agency shall, in consultation with the Director of the Office of Government Ethics...

  4. Phase III Executive Summary. Evaluation of the Child and Family Resource Program (CFRP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauta, Marrit J.

    The Child and Family Resource Program (CFRP) is a family-oriented child development program initiated by the Administration for Children, Youth and Families to provide support services to low-income families and their children. This report summarizes preliminary findings based on the first year and a half of CFRP evalution. Following the brief…

  5. 29 CFR 1608.5 - Affirmative action compliance programs under Executive Order No. 11246, as amended.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Commission will investigate to determine whether the affirmative action compliance program was adopted by a... Guidelines, or the Department of Labor approves the affirmative action compliance program, the Commission will issue a determination of no reasonable cause under § 1608.10(a). (b) Reliance on these guidelines...

  6. BlueJ Visual Debugger for Learning the Execution of Object-Oriented Programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennedsen, Jens; Schulte, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on an experiment undertaken in order to evaluate the effect of a program visualization tool for helping students to better understand the dynamics of object-oriented programs. The concrete tool used was BlueJ's debugger and object inspector. The study was done as a control-group experiment in an introductory programming…

  7. Deficiency in Lipoteichoic Acid Synthesis Causes a Failure in Executing the Colony Developmental Program in Bacillus subtilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gideon Mamou

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Colonies are an abundant form of bacterial multicellularity; however, relatively little is known about the initial stages of their construction. We have previously described that colony development of the soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis is a highly ordered process, typically initiating with the formation of extending cell chains arranged in a Y shape structure. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Y arm extension is a key for defining the size of the future colony. Here we conducted a genetic screen surveying for mutants deficient in these early developmental stages, and revealed LtaS, the major lipoteichoic acid (LTA synthase, to be crucial for execution of these events. We found that the ltaS mutant fails to produce proper Y shape structures, forming extremely elongated chains of cells with no evidence of chain breakage, necessary for Y shape formation. Furthermore, we show that frequent cell death at the tips of the cell chains is a major cause in limiting arm extension. Collectively, these perturbations lead to the production of a small sized colony by the mutant. Thus, deficiency in LTA synthesis causes a mechanical failure in executing the colony developmental program.

  8. C-Speak Aphasia Alternative Communication Program for People with Severe Aphasia: Importance of Executive Functioning and Semantic Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Marjorie; Sinotte, Michele P.; Helm-Estabrooks, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    Learning how to use a computer-based communication system can be challenging for people with severe aphasia even if the system is not word-based. This study explored cognitive and linguistic factors relative to how they affected individual patients’ ability to communicate expressively using C-Speak Aphasia, (CSA), an alternative communication computer program that is primarily picture-based. Ten individuals with severe non-fluent aphasia received at least six months of training with CSA. To assess carryover of training, untrained functional communication tasks (i.e., answering autobiographical questions, describing pictures, making telephone calls, describing a short video, and two writing tasks) were repeatedly probed in two conditions: 1) using CSA in addition to natural forms of communication, and 2) using only natural forms of communication, e.g., speaking, writing, gesturing, drawing. Four of the ten participants communicated more information on selected probe tasks using CSA than they did without the computer. Response to treatment also was examined in relation to baseline measures of non-linguistic executive function skills, pictorial semantic abilities, and auditory comprehension. Only nonlinguistic executive function skills were significantly correlated with treatment response. PMID:21506045

  9. Effects of a cognitive training program and sleep hygiene for executive functions and sleep quality in healthy elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Moraes de Almondes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: The aging process causes changes in the sleep-wake cycle and cognition, especially executive functions. Interventions are required to minimize the impact of the losses caused by the aging process. Objective: To evaluate the effects of a cognitive training program and psychoeducation on sleep hygiene techniques for executive functions and sleep quality in healthy elderly. Methods: The participants were 41 healthy elderly randomized into four groups ([CG] control group, cognitive training group [CTG], sleep hygiene group [SHG] and cognitive training and hygiene group [THG]. The study was conducted in three stages: 1st - assessment of cognition and sleep; 2nd - specific intervention for each group; 3rd - post-intervention assessment. Results: The results showed that the CTG had significant improvements in cognitive flexibility tasks, planning, verbal fluency and episodic memory, gains in sleep quality and decreased excessive daytime sleepiness. The SHG also had improved sleep quality, excessive daytime sleepiness and significant improvements in insights, planning, attention and episodic memory. The THG had significant gains in cognitive flexibility, problem solving, verbal fluency, attention and episodic memory. Conclusion: Cognitive training and sleep hygiene interventions were useful strategies for improving cognitive performance and sleep quality of healthy elderly, but there was no evidence that sessions combining cognitive training and psychoeducation on sleep hygiene enhanced the gains provided by these interventions applied individually.

  10. The Program Manager’s Support System (PMSS). An Executive Overview and System Description,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    process. The PMSS tool will, when completed, support the program management process in all stages of program nanagement; that is, birth of the...module, developed as a template on LOTUS 1-2-3, is an application of the Constructive Cost Model (COCOMO) developed by B. Boehm. The DSMC SWCE module, a...developed for a specific program office but can be modified for use by others. It is a "template" system designed to operate on a Zenith Z-150 using Lotus 1

  11. Report on Activities and Programs for Countering Proliferation and NBC Terrorism. Volume 1. Executive Summary

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2006-01-01

    This Report on Activities and Programs for Countering Proliferation and NBC Terrorism is submitted to the United States Congress as required by the 1994 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) (as amended...

  12. Report on Activities and Programs for Countering Proliferation and NBC Terrorism. Volume 1: Executive Summary

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2007-01-01

    This Report on Activities and Programs for Countering Proliferation and NBC Terrorism is submitted to the United States Congress as required by the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1994 (as amended...

  13. An Effectiveness Analysis of the U.S. Federal Government Executive Branch Ethics Policy and Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-06-01

    and unblushing frauds would have cost those who participated in them their heads under any system than our own (Mackenzie, 2002, p. 55). A reform...and responsibilities. • Employees shall disclose waste, fraud , abuse, and corruption to appropriate authorities. • Employees shall satisfy in good...the programs vary from company to company. A possible research study would involve comparing pre-Enron/ WorldCom business ethics programs to post

  14. A study on efficient work stealing based execution of parallel programs for multicore processors

    OpenAIRE

    Adnan

    2012-01-01

    This thesis presents a study of work stealing based techniques of parallel programming for modern shared memory parallel multicore processors. In this thesis, the objectives of the study are to explore e???cient techniques of work stealing strategy that fits on multicore and manycore as well. Work stealing by lazy task creation is a well known e???cient technique for parallel task programming. Work stealing also provides load-balancing capabilitiy. Work stealing enables fine grain task schedu...

  15. Who's the Boss at the Top? A Micro-Level Analysis of Director Expertise, Status and Conformity Within Boards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltrop, Dennis B.; Molleman, Eric; Hooghiemstra, Reggy B. H.; van Ees, Hans

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we address how director expertise impacts a director's social status and conformity within the board. Our results, derived from two unique multi-source datasets of peer ratings on director status and conformity of non-executive directors from Dutch organizations, indicate that

  16. Auditor’s Risk Assessment of Independent Directors in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salau Abdulmalik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to investigate the external auditor’s risk assessment of independent directors in Nigeria. The study utilized data from 94 non-financial listed companies on the Nigerian Stock Exchange for the periods 2008-2013. The study used cross-sectional time-series feasible generalized least square regression, which account for heteroscedasticity and autocorrelation to test the influence independent non-executive director on auditor pricing decision in Nigeria. Our result indicates that the proportion of independent non-executive director has a positive relationship with audit fees, suggesting that this class of directors is priced high by the Nigerian auditors. These findings have both policy and practical implication on corporate governance. For instance, future regulatory reforms could consider collaborative board model instead of the insistence on more independent director presence in the boardroom.

  17. The Teachers Academy for Mathematics and Science. Executive summary and program activities update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-01

    In his State of the Union address on January 31, 1990, President Bush set a goal for US students to be number one in the world in mathematics and science achievement by the year 2000. The Teachers Academy for Mathematics and Science in Chicago is an experiment of unprecedented boldness and scale that can provide a means to the President`s goal, both for the Chicago area and as a national model. This document covers organization and governance, program activities, future training goals, and evaluation programs.

  18. Supporting Museums--Serving Communities: An Evaluation of the Museums for America Program. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Institute of Museum and Library Services, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Museums for America (MFA) is the largest IMLS grant program for museums; it supports institutions by investing in high-priority, high-value activities that are clearly linked to the institution's strategic plan and enhance its value to its community. MFA grants situate projects within a framework of meeting three strategic goals: engaging…

  19. 1976 Inter-university symposium on renewable resource assessment and programming: executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billy G. Pemberton

    1977-01-01

    The Forest and Rangeland Renewable Resources Planning Act of 1974 directs the Secretary of Agriculture to prepare an assessment of the nation's renewable resources and a program that will assure an adequate future supply of these resources. Responsibility for this work is assigned to the Forest Service. An inter-university symposium was held in 1976 to evaluate...

  20. Executive Programs for Brazilian Mid-Career Public Managers: Pitfalls and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Regina Silvia; Franzese, Cibele

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the challenges of professional education for mid-career public managers at graduate level, pointing out pitfalls to avoid and obstacles to face. Analyzing the Brazilian case, the goal is to raise issues that may also be present in other cases. The main argument developed here is that the puzzle faced by graduate programs on…

  1. BlueJ Visual Debugger for Learning the Execution of Object-Oriented Programs?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennedsen, Jens B.; Schulte, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on an experiment undertaken in order to evaluate the effect of a program visualization tool for helping students to better understand the dynamics of object-orientedprograms. The concrete tool used was BlueJ?s debugger and object inspector. The study was done as a control...

  2. Effects of Structured Physical Activity Program on Chinese Young Children’s Executive Functions and Perceived Physical Competence in a Day Care Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanying Xiong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To examine the effects of a structured physical activity program on executive functions and perceived physical competence as compared to a traditional recess among preschool children. Methods. Participants were 40 preschool children aged 4-5 from an urban child care center in a southern Chinese metropolitan area. Prior to the intervention, baseline assessments of children’s executive functions and perceived physical competence were conducted. Children were then assigned to (1 intervention condition: a structured physical activity intervention group; (2 control condition: free-activity recess. The structured physical activity or recess programs were provided to the intervention and control groups 30 minutes daily for 3 months, respectively, followed by the identical postintervention measures. Results. Thirty-nine children (19 girls; mean age = 4.67 years old, BMI = 15.54±1.21 were included in the analysis. In general, children’s executive functions and perceived physical competence increased over time. Repeated measures analysis of variance revealed the intervention group had significant greater increases in executive functions compared to the control children (F(1, 37 = 4.20, p=0.04, η2=.10, yet there were no greater increases in perceived physical competence (F(1, 37 = 2.35, p=0.13, η2=.06. Conclusion. The intervention exerted significant greater increases in executive functions in preschool children. It is meaningful to offer structured physical activity programs in day care centers.

  3. Executive remuneration and company performance for South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is often believed that it is the role of the executive directors of a company to create value and profits for the company. The question arises: should directors then receive an increase and performancerelated remuneration if value is not created? This article examines the relationship between short-term executive ...

  4. Medical Knowledge Assessment by Hematology and Medical Oncology In-Training Examinations Are Better Than Program Director Assessments at Predicting Subspecialty Certification Examination Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collichio, Frances A; Hess, Brian J; Muchmore, Elaine A; Duhigg, Lauren; Lipner, Rebecca S; Haist, Steven; Hawley, Janine L; Morrison, Carol A; Clayton, Charles P; Raymond, Marilyn J; Kayoumi, Karen M; Gitlin, Scott D

    2017-09-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's Next Accreditation System requires training programs to demonstrate that fellows are achieving competence in medical knowledge (MK), as part of a global assessment of clinical competency. Passing American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) certification examinations is recognized as a metric of MK competency. This study examines several in-training MK assessment approaches and their ability to predict performance on the ABIM Hematology or Medical Oncology Certification Examinations. Results of a Hematology In-Service Examination (ISE) and an Oncology In-Training Examination (ITE), program director (PD) ratings, demographic variables, United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE), and ABIM Internal Medicine (IM) Certification Examination were compared. Stepwise multiple regression and logistic regression analyses evaluated these assessment approaches as predictors of performance on the Hematology or Medical Oncology Certification Examinations. Hematology ISE scores were the strongest predictor of Hematology Certification Examination scores (β = 0.41) (passing odds ratio [OR], 1.012; 95 % confidence interval [CI], 1.008-1.015), and the Oncology ITE scores were the strongest predictor of Medical Oncology Certification Examination scores (β = 0.45) (passing OR, 1.013; 95 % CI, 1.011-1.016). PD rating of MK was the weakest predictor of Medical Oncology Certification Examination scores (β = 0.07) and was not significantly predictive of Hematology Certification Examination scores. Hematology and Oncology ITEs are better predictors of certification examination performance than PD ratings of MK, reinforcing the effectiveness of ITEs for competency-based assessment of MK.

  5. Director`s series on proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, K.C.; Price, M.E. [eds.

    1994-12-27

    The Director`s Series on Proliferation is an occasional publication of essays on the topics of nuclear, chemical, biological, and missile proliferation. The seven papers presented in this issue cover the following topics: Should the Treaty on the Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) be amended?; NPT extension - Legal and procedural issues; An Indonesian view of NPT review conference issues; The treaty of Tlatelolco and the NPT - Tools for peace and development; Perspectives on cut-off, weapons dismantlement, and security assurances; Belarus and NPT challenges; A perspective on the chemical weapons convention - Lessons learned from the preparatory commission.

  6. Program review. Challenges and opportunities for training the next generation of biophysicists: perspectives of the directors of the Molecular Biophysics Training Program at Northwestern University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhaus, Francis; Widom, Jonathan; MacDonald, Robert; Jardetzky, Theodore; Radhakrishnan, Ishwar

    2008-04-01

    Molecular biophysics is a broad, diverse, and dynamic field that has presented a variety of unique challenges and opportunities for training future generations of investigators. Having been or currently being intimately associated with the Molecular Biophysics Training Program at Northwestern, we present our perspectives on various issues that we have encountered over the years. We propose no cookie-cutter solutions, as there is no consensus on what constitutes the "ideal" program. However, there is uniformity in opinion on some key issues that might be useful to those interested in establishing a biophysics training program.

  7. Navy Planning, Programming, Budgeting, and Execution: A Reference Guide for Senior Leaders, Managers, and Action Officers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    time—both because the vision may not be spelled out in detail or in one place and because how the CNO chooses to do business and make decisions may...The approach followed in writ - ing the guide was to first identify the historic reference documents that would provide authoritative sources for such...resource integrator. In other words , in the absence of a coherent capability or program-planning rationale for preferring one requirement over

  8. Effects of participation in the Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine (ELAM) program on women faculty's perceived leadership capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDade, Sharon A; Richman, Rosalyn C; Jackson, Gregg B; Morahan, Page S

    2004-04-01

    This study measured the impact of participation by women academics in the Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine (ELAM) program as part of a robust evaluation agenda. The design is a classic pre/post, within-group, self-report study. The survey elicits self-perception about leadership in ten constructs: knowledge of leadership, management, and organizational theory; environmental scanning; financial management; communication; networking and coalition building; conflict management; general leadership; assessment of strengths and weaknesses; acceptance of leadership demands; and career advancement sophistication. The post surveys inquire additionally about perceived program usefulness. Data were collected from 79 participants (1997-98, 1998-99, and 2000-01 classes). Response rates were nearly 100% (pre) and 69% to 76% (post). Statistically significant increases (p leadership capabilities were identified across all ten leadership constructs. Gains were large in knowledge of leadership and organizational theory, environmental scanning, financial management, and general leadership. Gains in career building knowledge were large to moderate. More modest were gains in communication, networking, and conflict management. There were significant correlations between each leadership construct and perceived usefulness of the program. Significant improvements were reported on all leadership constructs, even when participants viewed themselves as already skilled. While it cannot be concluded that participation in ELAM directly and solely caused all improvements, it seems unlikely that midcareer women faculty would improve on all ten constructs in 11 months after program completion by natural maturation alone. Future research will investigate whether the changes are due to ELAM or other factors, and assess whether participants show more rapid advancement into leadership than comparable women not participating in ELAM.

  9. Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP). Energy surveys of Army central heating and power plants. Volume I. Executive summary, Fort Wainwright

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1986-04-01

    This is the Executive Summary of the energy survey and project documentation that resulted from the Energy Survey of the Central Heating and Power Plant (CHPP) at Fort Wainwright. It is a part of the continuing effort under the Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP). Similar energy surveys and reports have been developed for Fort Richardson and Fort Greely Central Heating and Power Plants concurrently. The Scope of Work of this program was developed by the Huntsville Division Corps of Engineers for use at all Army central heating and power plants. The purpose of this study is to review and study all potential energy conservation opportunities (ECOs) at the Port Wainwright Central Heating and Power Plant (CHPP). These ECOs would then be developed to determine the economics and feasibility of implementation. The equipment at this plant is over 30 years old. The plant is meeting the requirements of providing steam for heating the base. It is a functional operating plant that will, with proper maintenance and repairs, continue to perform for many more years. With a heating plant of this age there was reason to believe that many energy conservation opportunities do exist. Section 4 describes the ECOs found and studied.

  10. Potential Beneficiaries of the Obama Administration’s Executive Action Programs Deeply Embedded in US Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Kerwin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Obama administration has developed two broad programs to defer immigration enforcement actions against undocumented persons living in the United States: (1 Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents (DAPA; and (2 Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA. The DACA program, which began in August 2012, was expanded on November 20, 2014. DAPA and the DACA expansion (hereinafter referred to as “DACA-plus” are currently under review by the US Supreme Court and subject to an active injunction.This paper offers a statistical portrait of the intended direct beneficiaries of DAPA, DACA, and DACA-plus. It finds that potential DAPA, DACA, and DACA-plus recipients are deeply embedded in US society, with high employment rates, extensive US family ties, long tenure, and substantial rates of English-language proficiency. The paper also notes various groups that would benefit indirectly from the full implementation of DAPA and DACA or, conversely, would suffer from the removal of potential beneficiaries of these programs. For example, all those who would rely on the retirement programs of the US government will benefit from the high employment rates and relative youth of the DACA population, while many US citizens who rely on the income of a DAPA-eligible parent would fall into poverty or extreme poverty should that parent be removed from the United States.This paper offers an analysis of potential DAPA and DACA beneficiaries. In an earlier study, the authors made the case for immigration reform based on long-term trends related to the US undocumented population, including potential DAPA and DACA beneficiaries (Warren and Kerwin 2015. By contrast, this paper details the degree to which these populations have become embedded in US society. It also compares persons eligible for the original DACA program with those eligible for DACA-plus.As stated, the great majority of potential DAPA and DACA recipients enjoy strong family

  11. Development and content validity of the CENA Program for Educational Training on the Neuropsychology of Learning, with an emphasis on executive functions and attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pureza, Janice R.; Fonseca, Rochele P.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The importance of executive functions (EF) in childhood development, and their role as indicators of health, well-being, professional and academic success have been demonstrated by several studies in the literature. FE are cognitive processes that aim to control and manage behavior to achieve specific goal and included skills planning, inhibition, cognitive flexibility, (executive) attention and the central executive component of working memory (WM). In the context of education, the EF are crucial for continued learning and efficient academic performance due to their involvement in several components of the educational process. Objective The aim of this article was to describe the development and content validity of the CENA Program for Educational Training on the Neuropsychology of Learning, with an emphasis on executive functions and attention. Methods The study involved seven specialists (four responsible for evaluating the program, and three involved in brainstorming), and was carried out in three stages: Background research: neuropsychology and education; Program development - author brainstorming and Evaluation by expert judges The goals, language and methods. Results CENA Program were considered adequate, attesting to its content validity as a school-based neuropsychological intervention. Conclusion Teacher training in school neuropsychology may be an important area for future investment and contribute to academic achievement and student development in the Brazilian education system. PMID:29213497

  12. OSG Director reports on grid progress

    CERN Multimedia

    Pordes, Ruth

    2006-01-01

    "In this Q&A from the Open Science Grid (OSG), executive director Ruth Prodes provides a brief history of the OSG, an overview of current projects and partners, and a glimpse at future plans, including how the recent $30 million award from the ODE's office of Science and the NSF will be employed. She also shares her thoughts of SC, saying the personal contacts are the best part."(4,5 pages)

  13. Symbolic Execution Over Native x86

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    approach for our symbolic execution is just-in-time execution, where there is no apriori knowledge of the program before execution, and calculations are...program would execute on a system. The omniscient view requires apriori knowledge which, in most cases for a given framework, are derived from a...execution engine does not have apriori knowledge of the binary code under test other than what it knows from loading the program into memory. From here

  14. FAR EAST TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS OF U.S. NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS (INCLUDING VOLUNTARY AGENCIES, MISSIONS, AND FOUNDATIONS), DIRECTORY - 1966.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BURGESS, MARY ELLEN, ED.

    PART 1 OF THIS PROGRAM GUIDE LISTS TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE AGENCIES AND OTHER ORGANIZATIONS FOR THE FAR EAST, TOGETHER WITH ADDRESSES, TELEPHONE NUMBERS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS, PROGRAM DIRECTORS, COUNTRIES SERVED, AND ESTIMATED COSTS. PART 2 GIVES PROGRAM DATA (ORGANIZATIONS, OPERATING AND SUPPORT PROGRAMS, TYPES OF ASSISTANCE, REGIONAL REPRESENTATIVES,…

  15. VMware vCloud director cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Langenhan, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    VMware vCloud Director Cookbook will adopt a Cookbook-based approach. Packed with illustrations and programming examples, this book explains the simple as well as the complex recipes in an easy-to-understand language.""VMware vCloud Director Cookbook"" is aimed at system administrators and technical architects moving from a virtualized environment to cloud environments. Familiarity with cloud computing platforms and some knowledge of virtualization and managing cloud environments is expected.

  16. Ideas for Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child Care Information Exchange, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Provides ideas for child care directors on such topics as: (1) increased productivity; (2) testimonial letters; (3) legal guidelines that prevent problems; (4) persuasion practices; (5) decision making; (6) common mistakes of nonprofit organizations; and (7) fundraising success stories. (RJC)

  17. Why so few Women on Boards of Directors?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Nina; Parrotta, Pierpaolo

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzes the determinants of women’s representation on boards of directors based on a panel of all privately owned or listed Danish firms with at least 50 employees observed during the period 1998–2010. We focus on the directors who are not elected by the employees and test three hypot...... suggests that an important way to increase the female proportion of non-employee-elected board members is that more women reach top executive positions....

  18. Execution of a participatory supportive return to work program within the Dutch social security sector: a qualitative evaluation of stakeholders’ perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lieke Lammerts

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A process evaluation of a participatory supportive return to work program, aimed at workers without a (permanent employment contract who are sick-listed due to a common mental disorder, revealed that this program was executed less successfully than similar programs evaluated in earlier studies. The program consisted of a participatory approach, integrated care and direct placement in competitive employment. Aim of this study was to get a better understanding of the execution of the program by evaluating stakeholders’ perceptions. In the absence of an employer, the program was applied by the Dutch Social Security Agency, in collaboration with vocational rehabilitation agencies. Together with the sick-listed workers, these were the main stakeholders. Our research questions involved stakeholders’ perceptions of the function(s of the program, and their perceptions of barriers and facilitators for a successful execution of the program within the Dutch social security sector. Methods Semi-structured interviews were held with five sick-listed workers, eight professionals of the Social Security Agency, and two case managers of vocational rehabilitation agencies. Interview topics were related to experiences with different components of the program. Selection of respondents was based on purposive sampling and continued until data saturation was reached. Content analysis was applied to identify patterns in the data. Two researchers developed a coding system, based on predefined topics and themes emerging from the data. Results Although perceived functions of some components of the program were as intended, all stakeholders stressed that the program often had not resulted in return to work. Perceived barriers for a successful execution were related to a poor collaboration between the Dutch Social Security Agency, vocational rehabilitation agencies and healthcare providers, the type of experienced (health problems, time constraints

  19. Statement of Ambassador Richard M. Russell, Associate Director and Deputy Director for Technology Office of Science and Technology Policy, Executive Office of the President, Before the Subcommittee on Science, Technology, and Innovation Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation United States Senate

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Russell, Richard M

    2008-01-01

    ... reauthorization of the program, in the context of the NNI's newly updated strategic plan. I also want to go into particular detail on nanotechnology-related environmental, health, and safety (EHS) issues...

  20. Relationship between increase in flexibility and improvement in the execution of daily actions by adults participating in supervised exercise program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Gil Soares de Araújo

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to relate flexibility improvements from a supervised exercise program (SEP attendance, to possible improvements in the execution of daily actions by adults. The sample consisted of 20 subjects, the majority of them cardiac patients, with an average age of 58 ± 9 years, actively participating in an SEP, selected intentionally. The Flexitest, was used to determine flexibility. In addition, the subjects answered an 11-question questionnaire, aiming to assess relative difficulty in daily actions. The questionnaire was completed between three and 18 months after beginning the program and assessed the subjects’ opinion on their improvements in daily actions since starting on the SEP. After the SEP, improvements were observed in the execution of 11 daily actions, global flexibility, and six individual movements on the Flexitest (p RESUMO Este estudo objetivou relacionar ganhos de flexibilidade decorrentes da participa��ão em programa de exercício supervisionado (PES com eventuais facilitações na execução de ações cotidianas em adultos. Vinte indivíduos, a maioria coronariopatas, com idade de 58 ± 9 anos, que estavam freqüentando um PES, foram selecionados intencionalmente. Para a avaliação da flexibilidade utilizou-se o Flexiteste. Em adendo, os indivíduos responderam um questionário com 11 perguntas para avaliar subjetivamente, a facilidade e/ou dificuldade de realizar ações cotidianas, no início do PES e no momento em que estavam respondendo o questionário. Após o PES, houve ganhos na facilidade de execução das 11 ações, na flexibilidade global passiva e em seis movimentos individuais do Flexiteste (p<0,05. Há correlação significativa entre as diferenças das respostas ao questionário e as variações na flexibilidade global (r=0,45; p<0,04. Existe relação inversa entre as variações de peso e de flexibilidade (r=-0,66; p<0,05. Concluiu-se que a facilitação na realização de a

  1. Fundamental Aeronautics Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Ajay

    2009-01-01

    The Overarching Mission of NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) is: To advance U.S. technological leadership in aeronautics in partnership with industry, academia, and other government agencies that conduct aeronautics-related research. ARMD supports the Agency's goal of developing a balanced overall program of science, exploration, and aeronautics, and ARMD's research plans also directly support the National Aeronautics R&D Policy and accompanying Executive Order 131419.

  2. Do programs designed to train working memory, other executive functions, and attention benefit children with ADHD? A meta-analytic review of cognitive, academic, and behavioral outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapport, Mark D; Orban, Sarah A; Kofler, Michael J; Friedman, Lauren M

    2013-12-01

    Children with ADHD are characterized frequently as possessing underdeveloped executive functions and sustained attentional abilities, and recent commercial claims suggest that computer-based cognitive training can remediate these impairments and provide significant and lasting improvement in their attention, impulse control, social functioning, academic performance, and complex reasoning skills. The present review critically evaluates these claims through meta-analysis of 25 studies of facilitative intervention training (i.e., cognitive training) for children with ADHD. Random effects models corrected for publication bias and sampling error revealed that studies training short-term memory alone resulted in moderate magnitude improvements in short-term memory (d=0.63), whereas training attention did not significantly improve attention and training mixed executive functions did not significantly improve the targeted executive functions (both nonsignificant: 95% confidence intervals include 0.0). Far transfer effects of cognitive training on academic functioning, blinded ratings of behavior (both nonsignificant), and cognitive tests (d=0.14) were nonsignificant or negligible. Unblinded raters (d=0.48) reported significantly larger benefits relative to blinded raters and objective tests (both peffects. Critical examination of training targets revealed incongruence with empirical evidence regarding the specific executive functions that are (a) most impaired in ADHD, and (b) functionally related to the behavioral and academic outcomes these training programs are intended to ameliorate. Collectively, meta-analytic results indicate that claims regarding the academic, behavioral, and cognitive benefits associated with extant cognitive training programs are unsupported in ADHD. The methodological limitations of the current evidence base, however, leave open the possibility that cognitive training techniques designed to improve empirically documented executive function

  3. High-performing physician executives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M; Larson, S R; McCool, B P

    1988-01-01

    Physician leadership extends beyond traditional clinical disciplines to hospital administration, group practice management, health policy making, management of managed care programs, and many business positions. What kind of person makes a good physician executive? What stands out as the most important motivations, attributes, and interests of high-performing physician executives? How does this compare with non-physician health care executives? Such questions have long been high on the agenda of executives in other industries. This article builds on existing formal assessments of leadership attributes of high-performing business, government, and educational executives and on closer examination of health care executives. Previous studies looked at the need for innovative, entrepreneurial, energetic, community-oriented leaders for positions throughout health care. Traits that distinguish excellence and leadership were described by Brown and McCool.* That study characterized successful leaders in terms of physical strengths (high energy, good health, and propensity for hard work), mental strengths (creativity, intuition, and innovation), and organizational strengths (mission orientation, vision, and entrepreneurial spirit). In this investigation, a subset of health care executives, including physician executives, was examined more closely. It was initially assumed that successful physician executives exhibit many of the same positive traits as do nonphysician executives. This assumption was tested with physician leaders in a range of administrative and managerial positions. We also set out to identify key differences between physician and nonphysician executives. Even with our limited exploration, it seems to us that physician executives probably do differ from nonphysician executives.

  4. Enhancing Child Care Quality by Director Training and Collegial Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Gillian; Ferguson, Tammy McCormick; Ressler, Glory; Lomotey, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Although considerable evidence confirms that a director with good leadership and administrative skills is vital for developing and sustaining a high quality child care program, many directors assume the role with little management experience or training. This paper reports on a training program in Canada that combined a formal curriculum to…

  5. Pla director de seguretat

    OpenAIRE

    Plarromaní Tarruella, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Realització d'un pla director de seguretat d'una organització, en aquest cas una botiga d'electrodomèstics. S'ha utilitzat la ISO/IEC 27001:2013 i la metodologia MAGERIT com a referència durant tot el treball. Realización de un plan director de seguridad de una organización, en este caso una tienda de electrodomésticos. Se ha utilizado la ISO/IEC 27001:2013 y la metodología MAGERIT como referencia durante todo el trabajo. The final project of the Master in Information and Communication ...

  6. Culham names new director

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "The United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) announced the appointment of Professor Sir Chris Llewellyn Smith FRS (Fellow of the Royal Society) as Director of Culham, responsible for developing and implementing the strategy for the UK's fusion research programme" (1 page).

  7. A randomised controlled trial of a web-based multi-modal therapy program to improve executive functioning in children and adolescents with acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piovesana, Adina; Ross, Stephanie; Lloyd, Owen; Whittingham, Koa; Ziviani, Jenny; Ware, Robert S; McKinlay, Lynne; Boyd, Roslyn N

    2017-10-01

    To examine the efficacy of a multi-modal web-based therapy program, Move it to improve it (Mitii™) delivered at home to improve Executive Functioning (EF) in children with an acquired brain injury (ABI). Randomised Waitlist controlled trial. Home environment. Sixty children with an ABI were matched in pairs by age and intelligence quotient then randomised to either 20-weeks of Mitii™ training or 20 weeks of Care As Usual (waitlist control; n=30; 17 males; mean age=11y, 11m (±2y, 6m); Full Scale IQ=76.24±17.84). Fifty-eight children completed baseline assessments (32 males; mean age=11.87±2.47; Full Scale IQ=75.21±16.76). Executive functioning was assessed on four domains: attentional control, cognitive flexibility, goal setting, and information processing using subtests from the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC-IV), Delis-Kaplan Executive Functioning System (D-KEFS), Comprehensive Trail Making Test (CTMT), Tower of London (TOL), and Test of Everyday Attention for Children (Tea-Ch). Executive functioning performance in everyday life was assessed via parent questionnaire (Behaviour Rating Inventory of Executive Functioning; BRIEF). No differences were observed at baseline measures. Groups were compared at 20-weeks using linear regression with no significant differences found between groups on all measures of EF. Out of a potential total dose of 60 hours, children in the Mitii™ group completed a mean of 17 hours of Mitii™ intervention. Results indicate no additional benefit to receiving Mitii™ compared to standard care. Mitii™, in its current form, was not shown to improve EF in children with ABI.

  8. Demystifying Data: Data Use in State and Local Public Health Nutrition Programs--Measuring Achievement of the 1990 Health Promotion/Disease Prevention Objectives for the Nation. Proceedings of the Continuing Education Conference for the Association of State and Territorial Public Health Nutrition Directors and Association of Faculties of Graduate Programs in Public Health Nutrition (Chapel Hill, North Carolina, May 21-24, 1985).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Mildred, Comp.

    This document contains the proceedings from the Conference of State and Territorial Public Health Nutrition Directors and Faculties of Graduate Programs in Public Health Nutrition designed to improve participants' proficiency in data management. It includes an introduction by Mildred Kaufman, a conference agenda, and the following presentations:…

  9. 5 CFR 412.301 - Obtaining approval to conduct a Senior Executive Service candidate development program (SESCDP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS SUPERVISORY, MANAGEMENT, AND EXECUTIVE... must seek OPM approval every five years thereafter, and must also consult OPM before implementing a... should be mindful of merit principles in carrying out their functions under this subpart. ...

  10. "Braingame Brian": Toward an Executive Function Training Program with Game Elements for Children with ADHD and Cognitive Control Problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, P.J.M.; ten Brink, E.; Dovis, S.; Ponsioen, A.; Geurts, H.M.; de Vries, M.; van der Oord, S.

    2013-01-01

    In the area of childhood attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, there is an urgent need for new, innovative, and child-focused treatments. A computerized executive functioning training with game elements aimed at enhancing self-control was developed. The first results are promising, and the next

  11. 75 FR 19426 - Sunshine Act Meetings of the Board of Directors; Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-14

    ... Aid, Tucson. c. Levon Henry, Executive Director, DNA Peoples Legal Services, Window Rock. 5. Staff... on summary of self assessment comments and goals from 2009 Board Self-Assessment cycle. 4. Staff...

  12. Prime Time Power: Women Producers, Writers and Directors on TV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenland, Sally

    This report analyzes the number of women working in the following six decision making jobs in prime time television: (1) executive producer; (2) supervising producer; (3) producer; (4) co-producer; (5) writer; and (6) director. The women who hold these positions are able to influence the portrayal of women on television as well as to improve the…

  13. Message from Fermilab Director

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    With this issue’s message, Fermilab Director Pier Oddone opens a new series of occasional exchanges between CERN and other laboratories world-wide. As part of this exchange, CERN Director-General Rolf Heuer, wrote a message in Tuesday’s edition of Fermilab TodayPerspectivesNothing is more important for our worldwide particle physics community than successfully turning on the LHC later this year. The promise for great discoveries is huge, and many of the plans for our future depend on LHC results. Those of us planning national programmes in anticipation of data from the LHC face formidable challenges to develop future facilities that are complementary to the LHC, whatever the physics discoveries may be. At Fermilab, this has led us to move forcefully with a programme at the intensity frontier, where experiments with neutrinos and rare decays open a complementary window into nature. Our ultimate goal for a unified picture of nat...

  14. Beam director design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Younger, F.C.

    1986-08-01

    A design and fabrication effort for a beam director is documented. The conceptual design provides for the beam to pass first through a bending and focusing system (or ''achromat''), through a second achromat, through an air-to-vacuum interface (the ''beam window''), and finally through the vernier steering system. Following an initial concept study for a beam director, a prototype permanent magnet 30/sup 0/ beam-bending achromat and prototype vernier steering magnet were designed and built. In volume II, copies are included of the funding instruments, requests for quotations, purchase orders, a complete set of as-built drawings, magnetic measurement reports, the concept design report, and the final report on the design and fabrication project. (LEW)

  15. Discussion with CERN Directorate

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Please note that the Discussion with CERN Directorate will be transmitted also in the following rooms: Council Chamber - 503-1-001 IT Amphitheatre - 31-3-004 Prevessin 774-R-013 Simultaneous interpreting into French and English will be available in the Main Auditorium. Une interprétation simultanée en français et en anglais sera disponible dans l'amphithéâtre principal.

  16. The role of non-executive directors in Dutch firms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Wolfswinkel (Michiel)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractAccording to recent research, the traditional belief that companies could suffer in performance terms if members of the supervisory board have too many commitments elsewhere needs to be revised.

  17. 16 CFR 1000.18 - Office of Executive Director.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... offices: the Office of Financial Management, Planning and Evaluation, the Office of Hazard Identification... Operations, the Office of Human Resources Management, the Office of Information and Technology Services, and...

  18. 16 CFR 0.10 - Office of the Executive Director.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., financial management, information technology, and human resources. ... Chairman, is the chief operating official who develops and implements management and administrative... on strategic planning and assessing the management and resource implications of any proposed action...

  19. 6 February 2017 - United Nations Office Director-General M. Møller and Heads of Agencies in the ATLAS cavern with Director for International Relations C. Warakaulle and Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni. O. Martin, in charge of relations with International Relations is also present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Bennett, Sophia Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Were present: M. Chungong, IPU Secretary General; S. de Mistura, Special Envoy – Syria; C. Friis Bach, UNECE Executive Secretary; F. Gianotti, CERN Director-General; A. González, ITC Executive Director; F. Gurry, WIPO Director General; V. Kuvshinov, ICDO Secretary-General; M. Møller, UNOG Director-General; N. Seth, UNITAR Secretary-General; E. A. Sy, IFRC Secretary-General; P. Taalas, WMO Secretary-General; G. Verburg, SUN - Coordinator of the Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN) Movement.

  20. 17 CFR 200.19a - Director of the Division of Trading and Markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Trading and Markets. 200.19a Section 200.19a Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE... General Organization § 200.19a Director of the Division of Trading and Markets. The Director of the Division of Trading and Markets is responsible to the Commission for the administration and execution of...

  1. Department of Energy's John O'Fallon Begins New Position; Robin Staffin Appointed Acting HEP Director

    CERN Multimedia

    Baggett, N

    2003-01-01

    Officials of the DOE's Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics have announced that after 15 years as Director of the Division of High Energy Physics, Dr. John R. O'Fallon has accepted the position of Executive Assistant for International and Interagency Planning, in the Office of the Associate Director for High Energy and Nuclear Physics, effective March 24, 2003 (1 page).

  2. "Braingame Brian": Toward an Executive Function Training Program with Game Elements for Children with ADHD and Cognitive Control Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, Pier J M; Brink, Esther Ten; Dovis, Sebastiaan; Ponsioen, Albert; Geurts, Hilde M; de Vries, Marieke; van der Oord, Saskia

    2013-02-01

    In the area of childhood attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, there is an urgent need for new, innovative, and child-focused treatments. A computerized executive functioning training with game elements aimed at enhancing self-control was developed. The first results are promising, and the next steps involve replication with larger samples, evaluating transfer of training effects to daily life, and enhancing motivation through more gaming elements.

  3. Computation Directorate Annual Report 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, D L; McGraw, J R; Ashby, S F; McCoy, M G; Michels, T C; Eltgroth, P G

    2004-03-12

    Big computers are icons: symbols of the culture, and of the larger computing infrastructure that exists at Lawrence Livermore. Through the collective effort of Laboratory personnel, they enable scientific discovery and engineering development on an unprecedented scale. For more than three decades, the Computation Directorate has supplied the big computers that enable the science necessary for Laboratory missions and programs. Livermore supercomputing is uniquely mission driven. The high-fidelity weapon simulation capabilities essential to the Stockpile Stewardship Program compel major advances in weapons codes and science, compute power, and computational infrastructure. Computation's activities align with this vital mission of the Department of Energy. Increasingly, non-weapons Laboratory programs also rely on computer simulation. World-class achievements have been accomplished by LLNL specialists working in multi-disciplinary research and development teams. In these teams, Computation personnel employ a wide array of skills, from desktop support expertise, to complex applications development, to advanced research. Computation's skilled professionals make the Directorate the success that it has become. These individuals know the importance of the work they do and the many ways it contributes to Laboratory missions. They make appropriate and timely decisions that move the entire organization forward. They make Computation a leader in helping LLNL achieve its programmatic milestones. I dedicate this inaugural Annual Report to the people of Computation in recognition of their continuing contributions. I am proud that we perform our work securely and safely. Despite increased cyber attacks on our computing infrastructure from the Internet, advanced cyber security practices ensure that our computing environment remains secure. Through Integrated Safety Management (ISM) and diligent oversight, we address safety issues promptly and aggressively. The safety of

  4. Directors Online: A New Answer to an Old Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster-Jorgensen, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Too often, when child care center directors turn their attention to enhancing management skills, or connecting with someone who understands the day-to-day demands of the job, they are pulled back to the immediate needs of running their programs. Directors, often masters of multitasking, are increasingly turning to web-based technology to manage…

  5. Black Athletic Directors Remain a Rarity in NCAA's Division I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naughton, Jim

    1998-01-01

    Of the black athletic directors in Division I of the National Collegiate Athletic Association, 20 work at historically black institutions. Black athletes, however, have a large presence overall in these programs. One black administrator sees significant challenges in both hiring black directors and performing crucial aspects of the job, such as…

  6. Plan director de seguridad de la información

    OpenAIRE

    Berlanga Fuentes, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Elaboración de un plan director de seguridad de la información para una empresa del sector financiero. Elaboració d'un pla director de seguretat de la informació per a una empresa del sector financer. Master thesis for the Computer science program on Computer security.

  7. The medical director and the use of power: limits, challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabel, Stewart

    2011-09-01

    The organizational leadership in mental health agencies frequently resides in executives who are not psychiatrists and who may or may not have clinical backgrounds. Psychiatrists who are medical directors (MDs) of organizations with this structure are responsible for the success of the clinical programs, but are subordinate to the executive director (ED). The MD/ED relationship therefore is an example of the complexities and challenges of a relationship in which supervisor and supervisee have different types of power, but are mutually dependent on each other for the organization's success. Clarity and differentiation of the types of power of the MD and ED can be helpful in determining appropriate boundaries and facilitating a cooperative relationship that allows the organizational mission to be well served. Raven's model of the bases of social power (French and Raven, Studies in Social Power, 1959; Raven, Analyses of Social Issues and Public Policy 8(1):1-22, 2008) provides a useful framework to explore this relationship and the challenges and opportunities inherent in it.

  8. Executive information system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitullo, M.; Winter, C.; Johnson, D.R.

    1984-07-01

    The Executive Information System (EIS) is a computer-based information handling system. The system has been designed and implemented for Energy Conversion and Utilization Technologies to allow program managers easy access and tracking of certain types of reporting at various levels of management interaction, to simplify the handling of program-related data, and to streamline the preparation of reporting documents and responses to requests for information from the program. The EIS is especially useful in assisting DOE program managers in the routine dissemination of reports and information. The characteristics of each component of the EIS are discussed. A user's guide to the EIS is included in this report.

  9. Directors General appointed

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    At a special session on 21 March, presided over by P. Levaux, the Council of the European Organization for Nuclear Research appointed J . B. Adams and L . Van Hove as Directors General of the Organization for a period of five years beginning 1 January 1976. Dr. Adams will be responsible for the administration of CERN, for the operation of the equipment and services and for the construction of buildings and major equipment. Professor Van Hove will be responsible for the research activities of the Organization.

  10. A guide to highly effective quality programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, John; Fifer, Joe

    2010-01-01

    To dramatically improve quality while decreasing costs, hospitals should: ensure all executives are vocal and visible supporters of quality improvement; focus the board of directors on quality as a strategic priority; strategically target quality resources to improve care for the majority of patients; use the finance system as the foundation for automated quality reporting; form a strong alliance between the CFO and chief quality officer, with each playing a leadership role in the quality program; rely on a well-executed quality program to improve efficiency and decrease the cost of care.

  11. 75 FR 51168 - Members of Senior Executive Service Performance Review Boards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ... names of those IRS employees who will serve as members on IRS' Fiscal Year 2010 Senior Executive Service... (MITS) Richard E. Byrd, Commissioner (W&I) Robin L. Canady, Director, Strategy and Finance (W&I) Susan W..., Director, Strategy and Finance (SB/SE) Michael D. Julianelle, Director, Employee Plans (TEGE) Gregory E...

  12. A Preliminary Study of the Effects of an Arts Education Program on Executive Function, Behavior, and Brain Structure in a Sample of Nonclinical School-Aged Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Subin; Lee, Jong-Min; Baik, Young; Kim, Kihyun; Yun, Hyuk Jin; Kwon, Hunki; Jung, Yeon-Kyung; Kim, Bung-Nyun

    2015-11-01

    The authors examined the effects of arts education on cognition, behavior, and brain of children. Twenty-nine nonclinical children participated in a 15-week arts education program that was composed of either creative movement or musical arts. Children completed the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, clinical scales, and brain magnetic resonance imaging before and after the intervention. Following program completion, performances on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, the Children's Depression Inventory scores, and conduct disorder scores were significantly improved. Furthermore, cortical thickness in the left postcentral gyrus and superior parietal lobule were increased, and the mean diffusivity values in the right posterior corona radiate and superior longitudinal fasciculus were decreased. Positive correlations between changes in cognitive measurements and changes in cortical thickness were observed. This preliminary study suggests a positive effect of arts education on executive functions in association with brain changes. However, these findings must be interpreted with caution due to the noncomparative study design. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Toward a Program That Makes a Difference: A Consultation with Prospective Clients of the Gabriel Dumont Institute Community Training Directorate. Aboriginal Peoples Collection. Corrections Branch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyer, Elizabeth Osbaldeston; Kelly, Patrice

    The Gabriel Dumont Community Training Residence (CTR) in Saskatoon (Saskatchewan, Canada) seeks to facilitate the transition of female offenders back into society. The residence will be the first of its type in Saskatchewan. The majority of women eligible for the program are Native Americans; thus the program will address the specific needs of…

  14. Survey of international regional anesthesia fellowship directors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lansdown AK

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Andrew K Lansdown,1,2 Paul G McHardy,1 Sanjiv C Patel,1,3 Catherine M Nix,1 Colin JL McCartney1 1Department of Anesthesia, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 2University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 3University College Hospital, London, UK Background: The scope of regional anesthesia fellowship programs has not been analyzed but may provide insights that could improve fellowship training and standards. Methods: Regional anesthesia fellowship directors across the world were asked to complete a comprehensive survey that detailed the range of educational and practical experience and attitudes as well as assessment procedures offered in their programs. Results: The survey response rate was 66% (45/68. Overall, the range of activities and the time and resources committed to education during fellowships is encouraging. A wide range of nerve block experience is reported with most programs also offering acute pain management, research, and teaching opportunities. Only two-thirds of fellowships provide formal feedback. This feedback is typically a formative assessment. Conclusion: This is the first survey of regional anesthesia fellowship directors, and it illustrates the international scope and continuing expansion of education and training in the field. The results should be of interest to program directors seeking to benchmark and improve their educational programs and to faculty involved in further curriculum development. Keywords: anesthesia, regional, fellowship, education

  15. 15th December 2010 - World Intellectual Property Organization Director-General F. Gurry signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer; visiting CMS control room, experimental cavern and LHC tunnel with Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson J. Incandela, accompanied by M. Bona.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    CERN-HI-1012325 36, from left to right: WIPO Arbitration and Mediation Center, Global Issues Sector Director E. Wilbers; CERN Adviser, Relations with International Organisations, M. Bona; CMS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson, University of California Santa Barbara J. Incandela; WIPO Deputy Director General, Global Issues Sector J. C. Wichard; WIPO Director-General F. Gurry; WIPO Executive Director and Chief of Staff, Office of the Director General N. Prasad.

  16. Board composition and performance in Spanish non-listed family firms: The influence of type of directors and CEO duality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª Katiuska Cabrera-Suárez

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the effect that certain characteristics of board of directors in Spanish non-listed family firms have on performance. The results of a hierarchical regression analysis on a database of 544 firms show a negative effect of a higher proportion of executive directors and a positive effect of CEO duality. No effects were found in relation to the diversity of family directors (executive or non-executive. In relation to the effect of outside boards, the influence on performance is negative except when this variable was considered in interaction with CEO duality. In this case, the effect on performance was positive.

  17. Essentials and guidelines for clinical medical physics residency training programs: executive summary of AAPM Report Number 249.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisciandaro, Joann I; Willis, Charles E; Burmeister, Jay W; Clarke, Geoffrey D; Das, Rupak K; Esthappan, Jacqueline; Gerbi, Bruce J; Harkness, Beth A; Patton, James A; Peck, Donald J; Pizzutiello, Robert J; Sandison, George A; White, Sharon L; Wichman, Brian D; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Both, Stefan

    2014-05-08

    There is a clear need for established standards for medical physics residency training. The complexity of techniques in imaging, nuclear medicine, and radiation oncology continues to increase with each passing year. It is therefore imperative that training requirements and competencies are routinely reviewed and updated to reflect the changing environment in hospitals and clinics across the country. In 2010, the AAPM Work Group on Periodic Review of Medical Physics Residency Training was formed and charged with updating AAPM Report Number 90. This work group includes AAPM members with extensive experience in clinical, professional, and educational aspects of medical physics. The resulting report, AAPM Report Number 249, concentrates on the clinical and professional knowledge needed to function independently as a practicing medical physicist in the areas of radiation oncology, imaging, and nuclear medicine, and constitutes a revision to AAPM Report Number 90. This manuscript presents an executive summary of AAPM Report Number 249.

  18. Magnetic heat pump flow director

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Frank S. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A fluid flow director is disclosed. The director comprises a handle body and combed-teeth extending from one side of the body. The body can be formed of a clear plastic such as acrylic. The director can be used with heat exchangers such as a magnetic heat pump and can minimize the undesired mixing of fluid flows. The types of heat exchangers can encompass both heat pumps and refrigerators. The director can adjust the fluid flow of liquid or gas along desired flow directions. A method of applying the flow director within a magnetic heat pump application is also disclosed where the comb-teeth portions of the director are inserted into the fluid flow paths of the heat pump.

  19. 5 CFR 412.401 - Continuing executive development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Continuing executive development. 412.401... SUPERVISORY, MANAGEMENT, AND EXECUTIVE DEVELOPMENT Executive Development § 412.401 Continuing executive development. (a) Each agency must establish a program or programs for the continuing development of its senior...

  20. Adventures in Creating an Outdoor Leadership Challenge Course for an Emba Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, William

    2005-01-01

    This article documents the evolution of an outdoor-based experiential leadership training event within an Executive MBA (EMBA) program. The purpose of this article is to encourage other EMBA faculty and directors to consider adding a similar event to their leadership development initiatives and to learn from our experiences. After 3 years of…

  1. 75 FR 70654 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Texas; System Cap Trading Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-18

    ... Trading (SCT) Program at Title 30 of the Texas Administrative Code, Chapter 101--General Air Quality Rules... is being taken under section 110 and parts C and D of the Federal Clean Air Act (the Act or CAA... Clean Air Act.\\1\\ In response, Mr. Mark Vickery, the TCEQ Executive Director, submitted a letter to EPA...

  2. Management Analysis of the Programming Process (MAPP). Phase I. RDTE Appropriation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-03-01

    phases. [Note: The Comptroller manages the budgeting and execution phases]. This broad charter requires a general knowledge of the’ programming processes...and Transportation SSN Standard Study Number T&E Test and Evaluation TP&M or TPM Directorate for Technology Planning and Management TRADOC US Amy

  3. Getting Ready for College: An Implementation and Early Impacts Study of Eight Texas Developmental Summer Bridge Programs. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wathington, Heather D.; Barnett, Elisabeth A.; Weissman, Evan; Teres, Jedediah; Pretlow, Joshua; Nakanishi, Aki

    2011-01-01

    In 2007, the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB) funded 22 colleges to establish developmental summer bridge programs. Aimed at providing an alternative to traditional developmental education, these programs involve intensive remedial instruction in math, reading, and/or writing and college preparation content for students entering…

  4. Kids on the Move: Afterschool Programs Promoting Healthy Eating and Physical Activity. America After 3PM Special Report. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afterschool Alliance, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Afterschool programs continue to make advances when it comes to providing students with nutritious foods, keeping them physically fit and promoting health. Such programs have great potential to help prevent obesity and instill lifelong healthy habits, serving more than 10 million children and youth across America, with more than 19 million more…

  5. The infant behavioral assessment and intervention program in very low birth weight infants; outcome on executive functioning, behaviour and cognition at preschool age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkerk, Gijs; Jeukens-Visser, Martine; Houtzager, Bregje; Koldewijn, Karen; van Wassenaer, Aleid; Nollet, Frans; Kok, Joke

    2012-08-01

    The Infant Behavioral Assessment and Intervention Program (IBAIP©) improved motor function at 24 months, and mental and behavioural development in high risk subgroups of very low birth weight (VLBW) infants. To determine IBAIP's effects on executive functioning, behaviour and cognition at preschool age. Follow-up of a randomised controlled trial (RCT). At 44 months corrected age, all 176 VLBW infants were invited for follow-up. Forty-one term born children were assessed for comparison. Visual Attention Task (VAT), Gift delay, Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test III-NL (PPVT), Visual motor integration tests and Miller assessment for preschoolers. Parents completed Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function-Preschool (BRIEF-P) and Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). At preschool age, 76 (88%) children of the intervention group and 75 (83%) children of the control group participated. There were no significant differences between the intervention and the control group. However, positive interaction effects between intervention and infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia, infants born at gestational agecognition. However, the most vulnerable children had a clinical relevant profit from IBAIP. VLBW children performed worse than the term born children. This study is a follow-up at preschool age of the multi-centre RCT of IBAIP versus usual care in VLBW infants. The RCT was performed in Amsterdam, The Netherlands (IBAIP). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Outplacement service for the nurse executive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangery, R; Freund, C M

    1984-01-01

    Outplacement service (OPS) is a human resource service provided by organizations to terminated executives. In addition to assisting organizations with the mechanics of the termination process, OPS helps terminated executives cope with the trauma of job loss and find new employment. Given the frequent involvement of nurse executives in termination decisions and the risk of termination inherent in their own positions, nurse executives have a vested interest in OPS policies and programs.

  7. Briefing Executives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    in order to move forward. You have to report some bad news. Or maybe it is just an information brief to someone with a reputation for asking hard...face value . He or she will undoubtedly have many questions for you to answer and clarify, and, in the end, the executive may decide on a different...misunderstanding, and we were able to move on. Getting up the nerve to push back wasn’t easy—Meyer had a reputation for gruffness and great technical

  8. 25 CFR 39.409 - How does the OIEP Director ensure accountability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How does the OIEP Director ensure accountability? 39.409... EQUALIZATION PROGRAM Accountability § 39.409 How does the OIEP Director ensure accountability? (a) The Director of OIEP must ensure accountability in student counts and student transportation by doing all of the...

  9. 7 CFR 1900.2 - National office staff and state directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false National office staff and state directors. 1900.2... AGRICULTURE PROGRAM REGULATIONS GENERAL Delegations of Authority § 1900.2 National office staff and state... Office; each Director and the Insured Loan Officer, Finance Office; the Directors for the Water and Waste...

  10. Integrating child dental care at Community Smiles: the director's goals fulfilled....

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaer, Paul J; Benjamin, Paul L; Lopez, Manuel G; Patterson, Chip

    2010-01-01

    Community Smiles/Dade County Dental Research Clinic provides dental care to the indigent population of Miami-Dade County. A local board of directors governs the organization, with dental procedures performed by volunteer professionals from the community. The research clinic partners with community organizations to obtain sustained funding from diverse sources. The clinic has a long-term commitment to the growth and development of children in the community. Certainly, changing the structure and focus of the clinic toward children's dental care and seeking community funding and resources to institute this program was an experiment. In his four years as clinic director and chief executive officer (CEO) at Community Smiles, the late Dr. Robert M. Wolf brought increased clinic productivity and organizational change that expanded community involvement. Dr. Wolf's tenure at Community Smiles brought general increases in patients care in terms of patients visits, new patients and number of procedures performed. However, the key to his administration as clinic director and CEO was the production and integration of a children's dentistry program into the mainstream activities of the clinic. Furthermore, he oversaw the successful corporate reorganization of Community Smiles as the clinic emerged under a non-profit corporate structure employing multi-faceted community resources. Emphasizing new dental programs for children in the community is culturally and socially competent--positively impacting the public health. Community Smiles became a venue where disparities were largely eliminated and access to dental treatment increased. Health care was promoted as Community Smiles became a place that helped build a healthier community.

  11. The Director's Work on Himself

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhlmann, Annelis

    2008-01-01

    A reading of Stanislavsky's major works about the actor's work on himself from the viewpoint of the director's work on himself.......A reading of Stanislavsky's major works about the actor's work on himself from the viewpoint of the director's work on himself....

  12. Veterinary herd health management programs on dairy farms in the Netherlands: Use, execution, and relations on farmers characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derks, M.; Werven, van T.; Hogeveen, H.; Kremer, W.D.J.

    2013-01-01

    Veterinary herd health management (VHHM) programs are of growing importance to the dairy industry; they support farmers in the shift from curative to preventive health management, caused by increased herd sizes and quality standards in dairy farming. Farmers participating in VHHM are visited every 4

  13. Preparing School Leaders for a Changing World: Lessons from Exemplary Leadership Development Programs. School Leadership Study. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling-Hammond, Linda; LaPointe, Michelle; Meyerson, Debra; Orr, Margaret Terry

    2007-01-01

    Contemporary school administrators play a daunting array of roles. They must be educational visionaries and change agents, instructional leaders, curriculum and assessment experts, budget analysts, facility managers, special program administrators, and community builders. New expectations for schools--that they successfully teach a broad range of…

  14. The medical director in integrated clinical care models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Thomas F; Aronoff, George R

    2015-07-07

    Integrated clinical care models, like Accountable Care Organizations and ESRD Seamless Care Organizations, present new opportunities for dialysis facility medical directors to affect changes in care that result in improved patient outcomes. Currently, there is little scholarly information on what role the medical director should play. In this opinion-based review, it is predicted that dialysis providers, the hospitals in which the medical director and staff physicians practice, and the payers with which they contract are going to insist that, as care becomes more integrated, dialysis facility medical directors participate in new ways to improve quality and decrease the costs of care. Six broad areas are proposed where dialysis unit medical directors can have the greatest effect on shifting the quality-care paradigm where integrated care models are used. The medical director will need to develop an awareness of the regional medical care delivery system, collect and analyze actionable data, determine patient outcomes to be targeted that are mutually agreed on by participating physicians and institutions, develop processes of care that result in improved patient outcomes, and lead and inform the medical staff. Three practical examples of patient-centered, quality-focused programs developed and implemented by dialysis unit medical directors and their practice partners that targeted dialysis access, modality choice, and fluid volume management are presented. Medical directors are encouraged to move beyond traditional roles and embrace responsibilities associated with integrated care. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  15. Executing Liveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soon, Winnie

    2018-01-01

    -actions this thesis examines the complexity of our current computational environment as evident in the increasing use of data queries, the instantaneous transmission of data streams and the seamless running of automated agents. By drawing together the methods of reflexive practice, close reading, iterative trials...... implications of the reading, writing, running and execution of code, which I refer to as ‘reflexive coding practice.’ This methodology provides an applied approach to computational processes, invisible architectures and a means to reflect on cultural issues through experimentation and practice. A materialist...... scales. The analysis and discussion contributes to a widening of critical attention to software (art) studies primarily in terms of its distinct focus on the live dimension of code. Furthermore, it expands the debate in media and performance studies, providing technical description and analysis...

  16. Assess, Coordinate, Execute: How to ACE an Executive Director Search. Issue Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Mollie

    2011-01-01

    This issue brief presents a meaningful strategy for how charter school boards can hire top-notch, well-suited leaders for their schools. Written by Mollie Mitchell, founder and president of The K12 Search Group, this brief is a how-to guide for managing the process of bringing on a new charter school leader. As Ms. Mitchell notes, the only thing…

  17. Problem-Based Learning in a Programming Context-Planning and Executing a Pilot Survey on Database Access in a Programming Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellström, Peter; Kilbrink, Nina

    In this chapter we describe a pilot survey on applying problem-based learning (PBL) in an undergraduate programming course. During the course the students have applied PBL as a complement to traditional teaching and learning techniques. The PBL problem in this survey combines both knowledge about programming and knowledge about databases. We argue that to handle programming the students have to learn programming according to the deep approach to learning in order to be able to apply their knowledge in new programming situations and contexts. The result from this pilot survey indicates from both a tutor and a student perspective that PBL could be one method to reach a deeper understanding on how to access databases in a programming language.

  18. Energy engineering analysis program Europe, Hohenfels Military Subcommunity Seventh Army Training Command, West Germany. Volume 1: Executive summary. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1983-02-01

    The objectives of this contract, as explained in detail in Schedule of Title I Services for Energy Engineering Analysis Program, Europe dated September 18, 1981, are as follows: (a) Develop a systematic plan of projects that will result in the reduction of energy consumption in compliance with the objectives set forth in the Army Facilities Energy Plan. (b) Use and incorporate applicable data and results of related studies, past and current, as feasible. (c) Develop a coordinated basewide energy study. (d) Prepare Program Development Brochures (PDB), DD Forms 1391, and supporting documentation for feasible energy conservation projects. (e) Include all methods of energy conservation which are practical (in so far as the state-of-the-art is reasonably firm) and economically feasible in accordance with guidance given. (f) List and prioritize all recommended energy conservation projects.

  19. Energy engineering analysis program Europe, Vilseck Military Subcommunity Seventh Army Training Command, West Germany. Volume I. Executive summary. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, A.; Advani, C.; North, R.; Pritkin, L.; Chiao, S.P.

    1983-02-01

    The Energy Engineering Analysis Program for the three U. S. Military Subcommunities of Vilseck, Hohenfels and Vilseck in West Germany, has been authorized by the Department of the Army European Division, Corps of Engineers under Contract No. DACA9O-80-C-0093 dated September 29, 1980, and subsequent Modifications: P00001 dated April 27, 1981, P00002 dated September 29, 1981, and P00003 dated September 30, 1981. The objectives of this contract, as explained in detail in Schedule of Title I Services for Energy Engineering Analysis Program, Europe dated September 18, 1981, are as follows: (a) Develop a systematic plan of projects that will result in the reduction of energy consumption in compliance with the objectives set forth in the Army Facilities Energy Plan. (b) Use and incorporate applicable data and results of related studies, past and current, as feasible. (c) Develop a coordinated basewide energy study. (d) Prepare Program Development Brochures (PDB), DD Forms 1391, and supporting documentation for feasible energy conservation projects. (e) Include all methods of energy conservation which are practical (in so far as the state-of-the-art is reasonably firm) and economically feasible in accordance with guidance given. (f) List and prioritize all recommended energy conservation projects.

  20. Another Phoenix VA director leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The Arizona Republic reports that the director at the Phoenix VA Medical Center, Deborah Amdur, will retire after only 9 months for health reasons (1. Amdur will be replaced by Barbara Fallen, director of the VA Loma Linda Healthcare System. Fallen will be interim director until a permanent replacement for Amdur can be found. This is the fifth hospital director since former Director Sharon Helman was removed in mid-2014 amid the nationwide veterans health-care scandal that was first exposed at the Phoenix VA. The Veterans Integrated Service Network (VISN in Gilbert, which oversees the VA Medical Center in Arizona, New Mexico and West Texas has also been through a series of 4 directors since Susan Bowers retired under pressure in the wake of the VA scandal. Marie Weldon, current acting regional director, also oversees the Los Angeles-based VA Desert Pacific Healthcare System. Weldon described Fallen as “an experienced leader who ...

  1. 2016 Science Mission Directorate Technology Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seablom, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    The role of the Science Mission Directorate (SMD) is to enable NASA to achieve its science goals in the context of the nation's science agenda. SMD's strategic decisions regarding future missions and scientific pursuits are guided by agency goals, input from the science community including the recommendations set forth in the National Research Council (NRC) decadal surveys and a commitment to preserve a balanced program across the major science disciplines. Toward this end, each of the four SMD science divisions -- Heliophysics, Earth Science, Planetary Science, and Astrophysics -- develops fundamental science questions upon which to base future research and mission programs.

  2. Waveforms and Sonic Boom Perception and Response (WSPR): Low-Boom Community Response Program Pilot Test Design, Execution, and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Juliet A.; Hodgdon, Kathleen K.; Krecker, Peg; Cowart, Robbie; Hobbs, Chris; Wilmer, Clif; Koening, Carrie; Holmes, Theresa; Gaugler, Trent; Shumway, Durland L.; hide

    2014-01-01

    The Waveforms and Sonic boom Perception and Response (WSPR) Program was designed to test and demonstrate the applicability and effectiveness of techniques to gather data relating human subjective response to multiple low-amplitude sonic booms. It was in essence a practice session for future wider scale testing on naive communities, using a purpose built low-boom demonstrator aircraft. The low-boom community response pilot experiment was conducted in California in November 2011. The WSPR team acquired sufficient data to assess and evaluate the effectiveness of the various physical and psychological data gathering techniques and analysis methods.

  3. 7 CFR 29.17 - Director.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Regulations Definitions § 29.17 Director. Director or Acting Director, Tobacco Division, Agricultural Marketing Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. ...

  4. BOARD OF DIRECTORS, AUDIT COMMITTEE CHARACTERISTICS AND THE PERFORMANCE OF SAUDI ARABIA LISTED COMPANIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya Ali Al-Matari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the relationship between the internal corporate governance mechanism related to the board of directors, the audit committee characteristics and the performance of the Saudi companies listed in the Saudi stock exchange (TADAWL in 2010, excluding financial companies. The statistical results of the study are not in line with the agency theory that board of directors and audit committee might mitigate agency problems leading to reduced agency cost by aligning the interests of controlling owners with those of the company. While audit Committee size (ACSIZE is found to have a significant relationship with firm performance (but in the opposite direction to expectation, other hypothesized variables, the proportion of non-executive directors (BODCOM, CEO Duality (DUAL, Board Size (BSIZE, Audit Committee Independence (ACIND, audit committee meeting (ACMEET were found to be as expected directions but insignificantly related to firm performance measure except the direction of the proportion of non-executive directors (BODCOM was opposite to the expectations.

  5. Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program Administration and Habitat Projects, Annual Progress Report, Project Period: Program Administration: January 1, 1997 - December 31, 1997 Habitat Projects: January 1, 1997 - March 31, 1998.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noyes, Cecilia; Kuchenbecker, Lyle; Perry, Patty

    1998-10-28

    This agreement provided funding for operation and administration of the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program including staffing of an Executive Director, Program Planner, and clerical personnel. The contract covers maintaining program services, project planning, subwatershed plans (CRMP's), public involvement and education, interagency coordination/clearing house, monitoring, and technical support activities that have taken place in the Grande Ronde basin. Cost-share has been received from the Bureau of Reclamation and the Governor's Watershed Enhancement Board.

  6. Energy and Environment Directorate Status Report March 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, J S

    2006-02-21

    The Energy and Environment Directorate (E& ED) is one of 13 directorates at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), which is operated by the University of California (UC) for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). We operate in the context of a national security laboratory and focus on meeting major national needs, especially from a long-term perspective. In the LLNL context, E&ED is a hybrid ''program'' and ''discipline'' directorate, combining the program development responsibilities in the national energy and environment arenas to the benefit of the entire Laboratory and also serving as the Laboratory's science base of atmospheric, earth, environmental, and energy science. This Status Report is part of the annual evaluation process required by the Department of Energy (DOE) as part of its contract with UC. The annual review typically will focus on about one third of the activities and programs of a directorate, so that the entire organization is evaluated over a three-year window. This year's review is focused on the basic science foundations for the directorate and two major program areas in the directorate, with an update from a third program. The programs for review are: (1) Earth System Science and Engineering; (2) Nuclear Systems Science and Engineering; and (3) NARAC/IMAAC update. Major questions to be addressed during this review include: (1) Are the programmatic directions appropriate? How can they be improved? (2) What actions can E&ED take to ensure success? How well poised for success are the current staff and facilities? What additions are needed? (3) What recommendations can be made to the Director and the University? This Status Report provides background information on the entire directorate including the parts of the directorate that are the focus of this year's review by the Energy and Environment Directorate Review Committee, to be held

  7. Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter Backlund; Anthony Janetos; David Schimel; J. Hatfield; M. Ryan; S. Archer; D. Lettenmaier

    2008-01-01

    This report is an assessment of the effects of climate change on U.S. land resources, water resources, agriculture, and biodiversity. It is one of a series of 21 Synthesis and Assessment Products being produced under the auspices of the U.S. Climate Change Science Program (CCSP), which coordinates the climate change research activities of U.S. government agencies. The...

  8. ADAMS executive and operating system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman, W. D.

    1981-01-01

    The ADAMS Executive and Operating System, a multitasking environment under which a variety of data reduction, display and utility programs are executed, a system which provides a high level of isolation between programs allowing them to be developed and modified independently, is described. The Airborne Data Analysis/Monitor System (ADAMS) was developed to provide a real time data monitoring and analysis capability onboard Boeing commercial airplanes during flight testing. It inputs sensor data from an airplane performance data by applying transforms to the collected sensor data, and presents this data to test personnel via various display media. Current utilization and future development are addressed.

  9. An Afterschool Director's Educational Leadership Strategies: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Tammy

    2014-01-01

    Afterschool programs linked to schools provide opportunities to keep children safe and engage them in enrichment activities that can support their growth and development. Often, these programs are led by afterschool directors with a background in youth development and no experience or education in leading in educational environments. These…

  10. HELP! Problems in executing a pragmatic, randomized, stepped wedge trial on the Hospital Elder Life Program to prevent delirium in older patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, Noor; van Stel, Henk F; Ettema, Roelof G; van der Mast, Roos C; Inouye, Sharon K; Schuurmans, Marieke J

    2017-05-17

    A pragmatic, stepped wedge trial design can be an appealing design to evaluate complex interventions in real-life settings. However, there are certain pitfalls that need to be considered. This paper reports on the experiences and lessons learned from the conduct of a cluster randomized, stepped wedge trial evaluating the effect of the Hospital Elder Life Program (HELP) in a Dutch hospital setting to prevent older patients from developing delirium. We evaluated our trial which was conducted in eight departments in two hospitals in hospitalized patients aged 70 years or older who were at risk for delirium by reflecting on the assumptions that we had and on what we intended to accomplish when we started, as compared to what we actually realized in the different phases of our study. Lessons learned on the design, the timeline, the enrollment of eligible patients and the use of routinely collected data are provided accompanied by recommendations to address challenges. The start of the trial was delayed which caused subsequent time schedule problems. The requirement for individual informed consent for a quality improvement project made the inclusion more prone to selection bias. Most units experienced major difficulties in including patients, leading to excluding two of the eight units from participation. This resulted in failing to include a similar number of patients in the control condition versus the intervention condition. Data on outcomes routinely collected in the electronic patient records were not accessible during the study, and appeared to be often missing during analyses. The stepped wedge, cluster randomized trial poses specific risks in the design and execution of research in real-life settings of which researchers should be aware to prevent negative consequences impacting the validity of their results. Valid conclusions on the effectiveness of the HELP in the Dutch hospital setting are hampered by the limited quantity and quality of routine clinical data

  11. Professional Socialisation of Valuers: Program Directors Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Geoff

    2007-01-01

    An examination of the professional socialisation process is critical in changing the way graduates are trained and how they are supported post graduation. This article summarises key mechanisms to facilitate socialisation from recent socialisation studies undertaken in the fields of medicine, physical therapy nursing, occupational therapy, and…

  12. 75 FR 60864 - Senior Executive Service Combined Performance Review Board (PRB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Engraving and Printing (BEP), Financial Management Service (FMS), Bureau of the Public Debt (BPD), United... Commissioner/Executive Director level in the Financial Management Service and Bureau of the Public Debt. The...

  13. An International Comparison of Corporate Governance Models: a study on the formal independence and governance of one-tier and two-tier corporate boards of directors in the United States of America, the United Kingdom and the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.F. Maassen (Gregory)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractAccording to Cochran and Wartick (1988), corporate governance is an umbrella term that covers many aspects related to concepts, theories and practices of boards of directors and their executive and non-executive directors. It is a field that concentrates on the relationship between

  14. Pathology Course Director Perspectives of a Recent LCME Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara E. C. Knollmann-Ritschel MD

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Preparation for a Liaison Committee of Medical Education (LCME accreditation site visit is a daunting task for any medical school, particularly for medical schools that have adopted integrated curricula. The LCME accreditation is the standard that all US and Canadian allopathic medical schools must meet in order for the school to award the degree of medical doctor. The Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU recently underwent a full-scale LCME accreditation visit that was conducted under the newly revised LCME standards and elements. The site visit occurred just 5 years after our school began implementing a totally revised, organ system-based curriculum. Preparing for a critical, high-stakes site visit shortly after transitioning to a totally revised, integrated module-based preclerkship curriculum presented an array of new challenges that required a major modification to the type of preparation, communication, and collaboration that traditionally occurs between course directors and departmental chairs. These included the need to ensure accurate, timely communication of curricular details to different levels of the academic administration, particularly as it related to the execution of self-directed learning (SDL. Preparation for our site visit, did, however, provide a novel opportunity to highlight the unique educational experiences associated with the study of pathology, as pathology traverses both clinical and basic sciences. Sharing these experiences may be useful to other programs that are either undergoing or who are preparing to undergo an accreditation visit and may also aid in a broader communication of the highlights or initiatives of educational activities.

  15. A Study and Analysis of the Attitudes and Perceptions of Marketing Executives and Training Managers Toward Public Two-Year College Marketing Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, John C.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the skills and knowledge that two groups of employers, marketing executives and training managers, felt two-year college marketing graduates should possess for initial employment. (Author/CT)

  16. 76 FR 52735 - Members of Senior Executive Service Performance Review Boards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-23

    ... Jenkins, Director, Office of Business Modernization (SB/ SE); Rebecca Mack Johnson, Director, Strategy and... Internal Revenue Service Members of Senior Executive Service Performance Review Boards AGENCY: Internal... Service (SES) Performance Review Boards. DATES: This notice is effective September 1, 2011. FOR FURTHER...

  17. The governance of director networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renneboog, L.D.R.; Zhou, Y.; Wright, M.; Siegel, D.; Keasey, K.; Filatotchev, I.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter studies director networks, which have gained increasing attention from sociology, finance, and management. It considers the argument that these networks have an interesting role in corporate governance and then reviews their rules in major developed countries. The chapter goes on to

  18. Promoting Corporate Enterprise: Marketing the Executive MBA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Doren, Doris C.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    More than 100 Executive Masters of Business Administration programs exist, and new ones are being developed. How these programs operate and where they fit in with the growth in business education are discussed. Program practices, screening applications, promotion, programs structure, understanding market changes, and providing a quality faculty…

  19. 2015 Science Mission Directorate Technology Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seablom, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    The role of the Science Mission Directorate (SMD) is to enable NASA to achieve its science goals in the context of the Nation's science agenda. SMD's strategic decisions regarding future missions and scientific pursuits are guided by Agency goals, input from the science community including the recommendations set forth in the National Research Council (NRC) decadal surveys and a commitment to preserve a balanced program across the major science disciplines. Toward this end, each of the four SMD science divisions -- Heliophysics, Earth Science, Planetary Science, and Astrophysics -- develops fundamental science questions upon which to base future research and mission programs. Often the breakthrough science required to answer these questions requires significant technological innovation, e.g., instruments or platforms with capabilities beyond the current state of the art. SMD's targeted technology investments fill technology gaps, enabling NASA to build the challenging and complex missions that accomplish groundbreaking science.

  20. Executive remuneration and company performance for South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    company to create value and profits for the company. The question arises: should directors then receive an increase and performance- related remuneration if value is not created? This article examines the relationship between short-term executive compensation and company performance for a sample of companies listed ...

  1. 40 CFR 68.155 - Executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) CHEMICAL ACCIDENT PREVENTION PROVISIONS Risk Management Plan § 68.155 Executive summary. The owner or... prevention program and chemical-specific prevention steps; (d) The five-year accident history; (e) The...

  2. Computation Directorate 2007 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henson, V E; Guse, J A

    2008-03-06

    If there is a single word that both characterized 2007 and dominated the thoughts and actions of many Laboratory employees throughout the year, it is transition. Transition refers to the major shift that took place on October 1, when the University of California relinquished management responsibility for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (LLNS), became the new Laboratory management contractor for the Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). In the 55 years under the University of California, LLNL amassed an extraordinary record of significant accomplishments, clever inventions, and momentous contributions in the service of protecting the nation. This legacy provides the new organization with a built-in history, a tradition of excellence, and a solid set of core competencies from which to build the future. I am proud to note that in the nearly seven years I have had the privilege of leading the Computation Directorate, our talented and dedicated staff has made far-reaching contributions to the legacy and tradition we passed on to LLNS. Our place among the world's leaders in high-performance computing, algorithmic research and development, applications, and information technology (IT) services and support is solid. I am especially gratified to report that through all the transition turmoil, and it has been considerable, the Computation Directorate continues to produce remarkable achievements. Our most important asset--the talented, skilled, and creative people who work in Computation--has continued a long-standing Laboratory tradition of delivering cutting-edge science even in the face of adversity. The scope of those achievements is breathtaking, and in 2007, our accomplishments span an amazing range of topics. From making an important contribution to a Nobel Prize-winning effort to creating tools that can detect malicious codes embedded in commercial

  3. 76 FR 58303 - Regular Board of Directors Meeting; Sunshine Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    ... PERSON FOR MORE INFORMATION: Erica Hall, Assistant Corporate Secretary, (202) 220-2376; [email protected] Special Board of Directors Minutes IV. Approval of the Corporate Administration Committee Minutes V. Approval of the Finance, Budget and Program Committee Minutes VI. Approval of the Audit Committee Minutes...

  4. 78 FR 6180 - Designation of Individuals Pursuant to Executive Order 13413

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-29

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Designation of Individuals Pursuant to Executive Order 13413 AGENCY... Foreign Assets Control (``OFAC'') is publishing the name of two individuals whose property and interests... designation by the Director of OFAC of the two individuals identified in this notice, pursuant to Executive...

  5. 75 FR 67166 - Designation of Two Individuals Pursuant to Executive Order 13224; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Designation of Two Individuals Pursuant to Executive Order 13224... designation of two individuals pursuant to Executive Order 13224 of September 23, 2001, ``Blocking Property..., correct the DATES caption to read: DATES: The designation by the Director of OFAC of the two individuals...

  6. 77 FR 54946 - Additional Designations of Individuals Pursuant to Executive Order 13581

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-06

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations of Individuals Pursuant to Executive Order 13581... Treasury 's Office of Foreign Assets Control (``OFAC'') is publishing the names of five individuals whose... Director of OFAC of the five individuals identified in this notice pursuant to Executive Order 13581 is...

  7. 78 FR 2722 - Designation of Individuals Pursuant to Executive Order 13413

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-14

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Designation of Individuals Pursuant to Executive Order 13413 AGENCY... Foreign Assets Control (``OFAC'') is publishing the name of two individuals whose property and interests... designation by the Director of OFAC of the two individuals identified in this notice, pursuant to Executive...

  8. 78 FR 148 - Additional Designations of Individuals Pursuant to Executive Order 13581

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-02

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations of Individuals Pursuant to Executive Order 13581... Treasury's Office of Foreign Assets Control (``OFAC'') is publishing the names of three individuals whose... Director of OFAC of the five individuals identified in this notice pursuant to Executive Order 13581 is...

  9. 76 FR 18516 - Senior Executive Service; Combined Performance Review Board (PRB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-04

    ..., Executive Director, Administrative Resource Center, Bureau of Public Debt Debra L. Hines, Assistant Commissioner, Office of Public Debt Accounting, Bureau of Public Debt Kimberly A. McCoy, Assistant Commissioner, Office of Information Technology, Bureau of Public Debt. Alternate Members Keith Rake, Deputy Executive...

  10. Director of Office for Equal Opportunity named

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Sally L.

    2005-01-01

    Kevin G. McDonald, of Baltimore, former associate director for Compliance and Conflict Resolution at The Johns Hopkins University, has been named director of Virginia Tech's Office for Equal Opportunity. He will begin work at Virginia Tech in July.

  11. Integration of Leadership Styles of School Director

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovic, Nebojsa; Oljaca, Milka; Kostovic, Svetlana

    2012-01-01

    Management style can be defined as a special behavior of directors in the work process that affects the performance in an organization, in this case-school. Management style has two related meanings: first is behavior of directors to employees, second is directors' approach in school regarding management, participation of employees in decision…

  12. Access to Music Education: Nebraska Band Directors' Experiences and Attitudes regarding Students with Physical Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabb, David; Balcetis, Emily

    2010-01-01

    Students with physical disabilities frequently are excluded from participation in instrumental music programs, yet the obstacles band directors face that preclude integration of these students have not been documented systematically. The primary purpose of this study was to measure Nebraska High School band directors' concerns regarding the…

  13. 17 CFR 200.24a - Director of the Office of Consumer Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... COMMISSION ORGANIZATION; CONDUCT AND ETHICS; AND INFORMATION AND REQUESTS Organization and Program Management General Organization § 200.24a Director of the Office of Consumer Affairs. The Director of the Office of... behavior, and the rights of investors in disputes they may have with individuals and entities regulated by...

  14. Secondary Choral Directors' Multicultural Teaching Practices, Attitudes and Experiences in International Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett Walling, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether secondary choral directors employed at international schools implemented a multicultural education in their programs. Participants (N = 126) were secondary choral directors working at international schools in 59 different countries. A researcher-designed questionnaire was used to collect…

  15. Noted astrophysicist Michael S. Turner to Head NSF'S mathematical and physical sciences directorate

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "The National Science Foundation has named celebrated astrophysicist Michael S. Turner of the University of Chicago as Assistant Director for Mathematical and Physical Sciences. He will head a $1 billion directorate that supports research in mathematics, physics, chemistry, materials and astronomy, as well as multidisciplinary programs and education" (1/2 page).

  16. Nanotechnology Concepts at MSFC: Engineering Directorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Biliyar; Kaul, Raj; Shah, Sandeep; Smithers, Gweneth; Watson, Michael D.

    2000-01-01

    Nanotechnology is the art and science of building materials and devices at the ultimate level of finesse: atom by atom. Our nation's space program has needs for miniaturization of components, minimization of weight and maximization of performance, and nanotechnology will help us get there. MSFC - Engineering Directorate (ED) is committed to developing nanotechnology that will enable MSFC missions in space transportation, space science and space optics manufacturing. MSFC-ED has a dedicated group of technologists who are currently developing high pay-off nanotechnology concepts. This poster presentation will outline some of the concepts being developed at this time including, nanophase structural materials, carbon nanotube reinforced metal and polymer matrix composites, nanotube temperature sensors and aerogels. The poster will outline these concepts and discuss associated technical challenges in turning these concepts into real components and systems.

  17. Virtual reality exercise on a home-based phase III cardiac rehabilitation program, effect on executive function, quality of life and depression, anxiety and stress: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Ágata; Melo, Cristina; Machado, Jorge; Gabriel, Joaquim

    2018-02-01

    To analyse the effect of a six-month home-based phase III cardiac rehabilitation (CR) specific exercise program, performed in a virtual reality (Kinect) or conventional (booklet) environment, on executive function, quality of life and depression, anxiety and stress of subjects with coronary artery disease. A randomized controlled trial was conducted with subjects, who had completed phase II, randomly assigned to intervention group 1 (IG1), whose program encompassed the use of Kinect (n = 11); or intervention group 2 (IG2), a paper booklet (n = 11); or a control group (CG), only subjected to the usual care (n = 11). The three groups received education on cardiovascular risk factors. The assessed parameters, at baseline (M0), 3 (M1) and 6 months (M2), were executive function, control and integration in the implementation of an adequate behaviour in relation to a certain objective, specifically the ability to switch information (Trail Making Test), working memory (Verbal Digit Span test), and selective attention and conflict resolution ability (Stroop test), quality of life (MacNew questionnaire) and depression, anxiety and stress (Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale 21). Descriptive and inferential statistical measures were used, significance level was set at .05. The IG1 revealed significant improvements, in the selective attention and conflict resolution ability, in comparison with the CG in the variable difference M0 - M2 (p = .021) and in comparison with the IG2 in the variable difference M1 - M2 and M0 - M2 (p = .001 and p = .002, respectively). No significant differences were found in the quality of life, and depression, anxiety and stress. The virtual reality format had improved selective attention and conflict resolution ability, revealing the potential of CR, specifically with virtual reality exercise, on executive function. Implications for Rehabilitation In cardiac rehabilitation, especially in phase III, it is

  18. 2011 Computation Directorate Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, D L

    2012-04-11

    From its founding in 1952 until today, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has made significant strategic investments to develop high performance computing (HPC) and its application to national security and basic science. Now, 60 years later, the Computation Directorate and its myriad resources and capabilities have become a key enabler for LLNL programs and an integral part of the effort to support our nation's nuclear deterrent and, more broadly, national security. In addition, the technological innovation HPC makes possible is seen as vital to the nation's economic vitality. LLNL, along with other national laboratories, is working to make supercomputing capabilities and expertise available to industry to boost the nation's global competitiveness. LLNL is on the brink of an exciting milestone with the 2012 deployment of Sequoia, the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA's) 20-petaFLOP/s resource that will apply uncertainty quantification to weapons science. Sequoia will bring LLNL's total computing power to more than 23 petaFLOP/s-all brought to bear on basic science and national security needs. The computing systems at LLNL provide game-changing capabilities. Sequoia and other next-generation platforms will enable predictive simulation in the coming decade and leverage industry trends, such as massively parallel and multicore processors, to run petascale applications. Efficient petascale computing necessitates refining accuracy in materials property data, improving models for known physical processes, identifying and then modeling for missing physics, quantifying uncertainty, and enhancing the performance of complex models and algorithms in macroscale simulation codes. Nearly 15 years ago, NNSA's Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI), now called the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Program, was the critical element needed to shift from test-based confidence to science-based confidence

  19. Build and Execute Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-04-21

    workflows for repeatable and partial re-execution. We will coordinate the physical snapshots of virtual machines with parallel programming constructs, such as barriers, to automate checkpoint and restart. We will also integrate with HPC-specific container runtimes to gain access to accelerators and other specialized hardware to preserve native performance. Containers will link development to continuous integration. When application developers check code in, it will automatically be tested on a suite of different software and hardware architectures.

  20. U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCar & Vehicle Technologies Program CARB Executive Order Exemption Process for a Hydrogen-fueled Internal Combustion engine Vehicle -- Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2008-04-01

    The CARB Executive Order Exemption Process for a Hydrogen-fueled Internal Combustion Engine Vehicle was undertaken to define the requirements to achieve a California Air Resource Board Executive Order for a hydrogenfueled vehicle retrofit kit. A 2005 to 2006 General Motors Company Sierra/Chevrolet Silverado 1500HD pickup was assumed to be the build-from vehicle for the retrofit kit. The emissions demonstration was determined not to pose a significant hurdle due to the non-hydrocarbon-based fuel and lean-burn operation. However, significant work was determined to be necessary for Onboard Diagnostics Level II compliance. Therefore, it is recommended that an Experimental Permit be obtained from the California Air Resource Board to license and operate the vehicles for the durability of the demonstration in support of preparing a fully compliant and certifiable package that can be submitted.

  1. Francisco Miranda, Director de Colciencias.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efraím Otero Ruiz

    2006-09-01

    De su desempeño en Sussex (universidad distinguida mundialmente por sus estudios sobre desarrollo tecnológico, transferencia de tecnología y administración de proyectos se recibieron siempre los mejores informes, que lo colocaron en el alto nivel de los latinoamericanos ilustres que han pasado larga o brevemente por dicho claustro, como Máximo Halty-Carrere del Uruguay, Francisco Sagasti del Perú o Fernando Chaparro de Colombia. Con ese bagaje regresó al país donde fue designado como Director Administrativo del Centro Internacional de Entrenamiento e Investigación Médica (CIDEIM de Cali, cargo que ocupó de 1992 a 2002; y al terminar ese decenio fue nombrado por la Junta Directiva como Director Ejecutivo, cargo que ocupó hasta su designación en COLCIENCIAS. En Cali ha ocupado también distinguidas posiciones, tales como Miembro del Consejo Directivo de la Fundación Planeta Valle y del Consejo de Internacionalización de la Universidad Javeriana en esa ciudad...

  2. “Come you spirits unsex me!”: representations of the female executive in recent French film & fiction

    OpenAIRE

    Lane, Jeremy F.

    2015-01-01

    This article analyses the representation of female executives in a corpus of French films and novels produced from 2000 on. The corpus includes a mixture of male and female directors and novelists, all of whom adopt broadly centre-left or left-wing positions that are highly critical of contemporary forms of globalised, neo-liberal capitalism. Yet each of these directors and novelists depicts powerful female executives in highly conservative terms, figuring them as ‘unsexed’ beings who have tu...

  3. Marketing perspectives of hospital pharmacy directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauer, D W; Pathak, D S

    1983-06-01

    The familiarity of hospital pharmacy directors (HPDs) with various marketing concepts for the development of pharmaceutical services was assessed. A questionnaire was designed to assess whether (1) HPDs seek input from relevant publics when evaluating or designing pharmaceutical services; (2) HPDs use marketing concepts in the development and implementation of pharmaceutical programs; and (3) marketing perspectives of HPDs differ depending on their institutional affiliations and personal characteristics. The questionnaire was sent to 320 HPDs in seven states. A total of 158 unable questionnaires were received. In response to the questions concerning input from relevant publics, HPDs agreed that they should seek input from all relevant publics with the exception of third-party agencies and patients. HPDs put more emphasis on obtaining information for evaluating existing programs and designing long-term plans from physicians, nurses, patients, and hospital administrators and less emphasis on understanding the needs of third-party agencies. HPDs seem to use marketing concepts in the development and implementation of pharmaceutical programs. HPDs indicated a clear perception of pharmacy goals, target segments among relevant publics, and a dynamic orientation toward changes in the health-care marketplace. Hospital size, level of pharmaceutical education, and years of administrative experience were found to influence the marketing perspectives of HPDs. HPDs were familiar with marketing concepts, and a favorable climate seems to exist for transferring marketing approaches to the hospital pharmacy setting.

  4. United States; 2001 Article IV Consultation-Staff Report; Staff Statement; and Public Information Notice on the Executive Board Discussion

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2001-01-01

    Sound fiscal and monetary policies have provided a strong foundation for the longest U.S. economic expansion on record. Executive Directors agreed that the U.S. economy strength had been supported by rising real income, enhanced profitability, and rising household wealth. Directors cautioned the need to reduce the domestic demand growth, and maintain monetary and fiscal policies. Directors expressed concern about the decline in personal saving, rise in household and corporate debt levels, and...

  5. Domestic violence and sexual assault agency directors' perspectives on services that help survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macy, Rebecca J; Giattina, Mary C; Montijo, Natalie Johns; Ermentrout, Dania M

    2010-10-01

    Community-based domestic violence and sexual assault service providers need sound knowledge regarding services that work well to improve the lives of survivors. This exploratory, qualitative research aimed to help provide such knowledge by investigating domestic violence and sexual assault agency executive directors' ( n = 14) opinions regarding what services are most helpful for survivors. In-depth interviews with directors provided findings about (a) critical services for survivors; (b) essential service delivery practices; (c) ideal services that are challenging to deliver because of funding and other barriers; and (d) areas of service delivery practice uncertainty due to a lack of best practices.

  6. Management training of physician executives, their leadership style, and care management performance: an empirical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xirasagar, Sudha; Samuels, Michael E; Curtin, Thomas F

    2006-02-01

    To examine associations between management training of physician executives and their leadership styles, as well as effectiveness in achieving disease management goals. Cross-sectional national survey. Executive directors of community health centers (269 respondents; response rate = 40.9%) were surveyed regarding their perceptions of the medical director's leadership, and for quantitative information on the center's achievement of clinical (mostly disease management) goals. The dependent variables were the medical director's scores (as perceived by the executive director) on transformational, transactional, and laissez-faire leadership, effectiveness, satisfaction with the leader, and subordinate extra effort, using an adapted Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (43 items; 5-point Likert scale). The independent variable was the medical director's management training status. Compared with medical directors with or =30 days of in-service training, had 0.32, 0.35, 0.30, 0.36, and 0.37 higher scores on transformational leadership, transactional leadership, rated effectiveness, satisfaction, and subordinate extra effort, respectively, and 0.31 lower score on laissez-faire leadership (all P management degrees but with > or =30 days of in-service training had 0.34, 0.36, 0.50, and 0.47 higher scores on transformational leadership, transactional leadership, rated effectiveness, and satisfaction with the leader (all P leadership significantly influences achievement of disease management goals. Training may enable physician executives to develop leadership styles that are effective in influencing clinical providers' adoption of disease management guidelines under managed care.

  7. Director general presentation to personnel

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Dear Colleagues, Many important discussions are scheduled for the upcoming Council Week (13-17 June) on topics including the Medium-Term Plan, the Pension Fund and other matters of great relevance to us.   I would therefore like to share the main outcome of the week with you and I invite you to join me and the Directors in the Main Auditorium at 10 a.m. on Thursday 23 June. The meeting will last about one hour and a webcast will also be available. Best regards, Fabiola Gianotti DG presentation to personnel Thursday 23 June at 10 am Main Auditorium Retransmission in Council Chamber, IT Auditorium, Kjell Jonhsen Auditorium, Prevessin 864-1-C02 Webcast on cern.ch/webcast More information on the event page.

  8. Institutional directors and board compensation: Spanish evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix López-Iturriaga

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We address the influence of directors who represent institutional investors in three aspects of board compensation policies: level of compensation, composition, and performance sensitivity. We differentiate pressure-sensitive directors (i.e., with business links and pressure-resistant directors (i.e., without business links. Our results show that pressure-resistant directors decrease total board compensation and its fixed proportion, whereas they increase the variable proportion of total remuneration and the pay-for-performance sensitivity. By contrast, pressure-sensitive directors offer the opposite results. These findings are consistent with the view that institutional investors are not a homogeneous group and that pressure-resistant directors fulfill a more thorough monitoring role.

  9. Writing executable assertions to test flight software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, A.; Andrews, D. M.; Mccluskey, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    An executable assertion is a logical statement about the variables or a block of code. If there is no error during execution, the assertion statement results in a true value. Executable assertions can be used for dynamic testing of software. They can be employed for validation during the design phase, and exception and error detection during the operation phase. The present investigation is concerned with the problem of writing executable assertions, taking into account the use of assertions for testing flight software. They can be employed for validation during the design phase, and for exception handling and error detection during the operation phase The digital flight control system and the flight control software are discussed. The considered system provides autopilot and flight director modes of operation for automatic and manual control of the aircraft during all phases of flight. Attention is given to techniques for writing and using assertions to test flight software, an experimental setup to test flight software, and language features to support efficient use of assertions.

  10. Response of a veterinary college to career development needs identified in the KPMG LLP study and the executive summary of the Brakke study: a combined MBA/DVM program, business certificate program, and curricular modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, Lori R; McConnell, Sherry L; Schoenfeld-Tacher, Regina

    2005-04-01

    In the present market, veterinarians with a strong background in career development, practice management, and business skills have a clear advantage in achieving financial success. Although there is ample evidence that the scientific and clinical skills of veterinary college graduates are high, there are also data that suggest that additional capabilities in the business realm may promote greater economic success. As noted in the KPMG executive summary, the field of veterinary medicine must make changes in its "current business practices and attitudes" to be successful in the future. Furthermore, the KPMG study found that 36% of industry employers reported that some jobs within their companies had specific job requirements that were not met by a veterinarian with only a veterinary medical degree. The areas of additional training most often cited included business, administration, personnel management, sales and marketing, and financial skills. Yet, Lewis and Klausner found that veterinarians reported challenges in the business realm, such as "how business works and how business goals are translated into action. This challenge held true for veterinarians in industry, academia, government, and private practice." The present gender trends in the field of veterinary medicine provide additional impetus to make career development and business skills training more prevalent. Presently, women comprise >65% of the veterinary student population and approximately 45% of all practicing veterinarians. In some areas of practice, the rate is much higher. For example, in 2002, women comprised 48.2% of all small animal exclusive private practitioners. Unfortunately, the KPMG study found that female veterinarians in private practice report lower self-evaluation of business management and financial skills, compared with their male cohorts. Female veterinarians in nonprivate practice report lower self-evaluation in communication, personnel management, business management, and

  11. The executive MBA in information security

    CERN Document Server

    Trinckes, John J

    2009-01-01

    Supplying a complete overview of the concepts executives need to know, this book provides the tools needed to ensure your organization has an effective information security management program in place. It also includes a ready-to use security framework for developing workable programs and supplies proven tips for avoiding common pitfalls.

  12. Hawaii energy strategy: Executive summary, October 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    This is an executive summary to a report on the Hawaii Energy Strategy Program. The topics of the report include the a description of the program including an overview, objectives, policy statement and purpose and objectives; energy strategy policy development; energy strategy projects; current energy situation; modeling Hawaii`s energy future; energy forecasts; reducing energy demand; scenario assessment, and recommendations.

  13. Statistical Symbolic Execution with Informed Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filieri, Antonio; Pasareanu, Corina S.; Visser, Willem; Geldenhuys, Jaco

    2014-01-01

    Symbolic execution techniques have been proposed recently for the probabilistic analysis of programs. These techniques seek to quantify the likelihood of reaching program events of interest, e.g., assert violations. They have many promising applications but have scalability issues due to high computational demand. To address this challenge, we propose a statistical symbolic execution technique that performs Monte Carlo sampling of the symbolic program paths and uses the obtained information for Bayesian estimation and hypothesis testing with respect to the probability of reaching the target events. To speed up the convergence of the statistical analysis, we propose Informed Sampling, an iterative symbolic execution that first explores the paths that have high statistical significance, prunes them from the state space and guides the execution towards less likely paths. The technique combines Bayesian estimation with a partial exact analysis for the pruned paths leading to provably improved convergence of the statistical analysis. We have implemented statistical symbolic execution with in- formed sampling in the Symbolic PathFinder tool. We show experimentally that the informed sampling obtains more precise results and converges faster than a purely statistical analysis and may also be more efficient than an exact symbolic analysis. When the latter does not terminate symbolic execution with informed sampling can give meaningful results under the same time and memory limits.

  14. CSP for Executable Scientific Workflows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friborg, Rune Møllegaard

    This thesis presents CSP as a means of orchestrating the execution of tasks in a scientific workflow. Scientific workflow systems are popular in a wide range of scientific areas, where tasks are organised in directed graphs. Execution of such graphs is handled by the scientific workflow systems...... and the readability of Python source code. Python is a popular programming language in the scientific community, with many scientific libraries (modules) and simple integration to external languages. This thesis presents a PyCSP extended with many new features and a more robust implementation to allow scientific...... applications to run on heterogenous hardware, combining multiple hardware architectures. This is especially important in scientific computing as the performance of computational tasks may be orders of magnitude faster depending on the hardware architecture used. To ensure the robustness of the PyCSP library...

  15. Gender differences in salary of internal medicine residency directors: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Lisa L; Halvorsen, Andrew J; McDonald, Furman S; Chaudhry, Saima I; Arora, Vineet M

    2015-06-01

    Whether salary disparities exist between men and women in medical education leadership roles is not known. The study objective was to determine whether salary disparities exist between male and female Internal Medicine residency program directors, and if so, to identify factors associated with the disparities and explore historical trends. The annual Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine (APDIM) survey in August 2012 included items to assess the salary and demographic characteristics of program directors, which were merged with publically available program data. To assess historical trends, we used similarly obtained survey data from 2008 to 2011. The study included program directors of 370 APDIM member programs, representing 95.6% of the 387 accredited Internal Medicine training programs in the United States and Puerto Rico. Of the 370 APDIM member programs, 241 (65.1%) completed the survey, of whom 169 (70.1%) were men and 72 (29.9%) were women. Program directors' total annual salary, measured in $25,000 increments, ranged from $75,000 or less to more than $400,000. Historical trends of mode salary by gender from 2008 to 2012 were assessed. The mode salary was $200,000 to 225,000 for men and $175,000 to $200,000 for women (P = .0005). After controlling for academic rank, career in general internal medicine, and program director age, the distribution of salary remained different by gender (P = .004). Historical trends show that the difference in mode salary has persisted since 2008. Leaders in academic medical centers, residency and fellowship directors, and all faculty in medical education need to be aware that salary disparities cited decades ago persist in this sample of medical educators. Closing the gender gap will require continued advocacy for measuring and reporting salary gaps, and changing the culture of academic medical centers. Copyright © 2015 Alliance for Academic Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The medical director and quality requirements in the dialysis facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Brigitte

    2015-03-06

    Four decades after the successful implementation of the ESRD program currently providing life-saving dialysis therapy to >430,000 patients, the definitions of and demands for a high-quality program have evolved and increased at the same time. Through substantial technological advances ESRD care improved, with a predominant focus on the technical aspects of care and the introduction of medications such as erythropoiesis-stimulating agents and active vitamin D for anemia and bone disease management. Despite many advances, the size of the program and the increasingly older and multimorbid patient population have contributed to continuing challenges for providing consistently high-quality care. Medicare's Final Rule of the Conditions for Coverage (April 2008) define the medical director of the dialysis center as the leader of the interdisciplinary team and the person ultimately accountable for quality, safety, and care provided in the center. Knowledge and active leadership with a hands-on approach in the quality assessment and performance improvement process (QAPI) is essential for the achievement of high-quality outcomes in dialysis centers. A collaborative approach between the dialysis provider and medical director is required to optimize outcomes and deliver evidence-based quality care. In 2011 the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services introduced a pay-for-performance program-the ESRD quality incentive program (QIP)- with yearly varying quality metrics that result in payment reductions in subsequent years when targets are not achieved during the performance period. Success with the QIP requires a clear understanding of the structure, metrics, and scoring methods. Information on achievement and nonachievement is publicly available, both in facilities (through the facility performance score card) and on public websites (including Medicare's Dialysis Facility Compare). By assuming the leadership role in the quality program of dialysis facilities, the medical

  17. [Patient safety culture in directors and managers of a health service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez-Júlvez, Teresa; Hernández-García, Ignacio; Aibar-Remón, Carlos; Gutiérrez-Cía, Isabel; Febrel-Bordejé, Mercedes

    To assess patient safety culture in directors/managers. Cross-sectional descriptive study carried out from February to June 2011 among the executive/managing staff of the Aragón Health Service through semi-structured interviews. A total of 12 interviews were carried out. All the respondents admitted that there were many patient safety problems and agreed that patient safety was a priority from a theoretical rather than practical perspective. The excessive changes in executive positions was considered to be an important barrier which made it difficult to establish long-term strategies and achieve medium-term continuity. This study recorded perceptions on patient safety culture in directors, an essential factor to improve patient safety culture in this group and in the organisations they run. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Predictors of Choral Directors' Voice Handicap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Vocal demands of teaching are considerable and these challenges are greater for choral directors who depend on the voice as a musical and instructive instrument. The purpose of this study was to (1) examine choral directors' vocal condition using a modified Voice Handicap Index (VHI), and (2) determine the extent to which the major variables…

  19. Guidance for the Directors of Banks

    OpenAIRE

    Westlake, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The need for sound governance of banks worldwide has never been stronger. After the global financial crisis of 2007-2009, spectacular bank failures, whether caused by greed, incompetence, or indifference, are still occurring. This guide is intended mainly for three groups of readers: (i) new directors with experience in banking; (ii) directors who understand governance, but have no experie...

  20. PLAY DIRECTING AND DIRECTORS: AN EVOLUTIONARY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... seen as a priest and a carrier who must coordinate human and material resources a master and a messenger. Drawing from the above, this paper traces the evolution of play directing and the theatre director in different theatres of the world. It also critically evaluates the art of play directing and the Nigerian theatre director.