WorldWideScience

Sample records for program encourages jurisdictions

  1. Encouraging energy efficiency: Policies and programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Successfully overcoming the barriers to higher energy efficiency requires development of policies designed for specific users and locations. Reform of energy pricing, which entails removing subsidies and beginning internalization of externalities, is critical to give technology producers and users proper signals for investment and management decisions. But while a rise in energy prices increases the amount of energy-efficiency improvement that is cost-effective, it does not remove other barriers that deter investment. Minimum efficiency standards or agreements can raise the market floor, and are important because they affect the entire market in the near-term. But they may not raise the celining very much, and do little to push the efficiency frontier. To accomplish these goals, incentives and other market-development strategies are needed. Utility programs in particular can play a key role in pushing energy efficiency beyond the level where users are likely to invest on their own. Policies, programs, and pricing should complement one another. Pricing reform alone will not overcome the many entrenched barriers to higher energy efficiency, but trying to accelerate energy efficiency improvement without addressing energy pricing problems will lead to limited success. Whether tagerting new equipment or management of existing systems, policies must reflect a thorough understanding of the particular system and an awareness of the motivations of the actors. 25 refs

  2. Encouraging engagement in enabling programs: The students’ perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzi Hellmundt

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Student retention is a key concern in tertiary education enabling programs with research showing that early engagement leads to higher completion rates (Hodges et al., 2013. But how do students new to university education learn how to engage effectively? This article outlines an engagement framework that foregrounds Guidance, Encouragement, Modelling and Structure (GEMS as a holistic approach to facilitating effective student engagement. This framework was developed from qualitative data gleaned from students enrolled in the Preparing for Success Program at Southern Cross University, New South Wales, Australia. The findings from the students indicate that the GEMS framework activates student potential and enables them to use existing knowledge and experience to not only deepen and broaden their learning but also successfully prepare for further study.

  3. A multifaceted program to encourage medical students' research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zier, K; Stagnaro-Green, A

    2001-07-01

    Clinician-scientists are important members of a research community that has more opportunities than ever before to solve problems important to patients. Nevertheless, the number of physicians applying for and receiving grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has dropped. Introducing medical students to research and relevant support mechanisms early in their education may help to reverse this trend. In 1995, the Mount Sinai School of Medicine created its Office of Student Research Opportunities (OSRO) to stimulate students to engage in research. It also appointed a new dean to direct the OSRO; the person who filled this new position was a senior faculty member involved in patient-oriented research. The OSRO advises students, identifies faculty who want to mentor students, sponsors the Distinction in Research program, organizes an annual research day, helps fund summer and full-time research, and has created an endowment to support student travel to national meetings. Between 1997 and 2000 the number of students who participated in the research day increased from 18 to 74, and the number of publications by the graduating classes increased from 34 to 58 between 1997 and 1999. Participants have presented both basic and clinical projects. The authors' experience has shown that medical students can be motivated to carry out research with appropriate encouragement from the administration and the faculty, something that may help to reverse a troubling national trend. Based upon these early successes, Mount Sinai is developing a novel five-year program to provide medical students with research training.

  4. ENCOURAGING THE USE OF WETLANDS IN WATER QUALITY TRADING PROGRAMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The interest in water quality trading (WQT) has grown in recent years because of its potential to meet nutrient reduction goals at lower costs. However, one problem identified by researchers in most WQT programs has been few actual trades, usually associated with low numbers of ...

  5. Federal Program Encourages Health Service Innovations on Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nix, Mary P.

    2009-01-01

    There is always room for improvement in the delivery of health services. This article discusses the U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's (AHRQ) Health Care Innovations Exchange (www.innovations.ahrq.gov), a comprehensive program that aims to increase awareness of innovative strategies to meet health service delivery challenges and…

  6. Secrecy Jurisdictions

    OpenAIRE

    Schjelderup, Guttorm

    2015-01-01

    This paper surveys tax haven legislation and links the literature on tax havens to the literature on asymmetric information. I argue that the core aim of tax haven legislation is to create private information (secrecy) for the users of tax havens. This leads to moral hazard and transaction costs in non-havens. The business model of tax havens is illustrated by using Mauritsius and Jersey as case studies. I also provide several real world examples of how secrecy jurisdictions le...

  7. 77 FR 74625 - Policy To Encourage Trial Disclosure Programs; Information Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-17

    ... BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION 12 CFR Chapter X [Docket No. CFPB-2012-0046] Policy To Encourage Trial Disclosure Programs; Information Collection AGENCY: Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection... Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection (Bureau) invites the general public and other Federal agencies to...

  8. Comparing and contrasting poverty reduction performance of social welfare programs across jurisdictions in Canada using Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA): an exploratory study of the era of devolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibov, Nazim N; Fan, Lida

    2010-11-01

    In the mid-1990s, the responsibilities to design, implement, and evaluate social welfare programs were transferred from federal to local jurisdictions in many countries of North America and Europe through devolution processes. Devolution has caused the need for a technique to measure and compare the performances of social welfare programs across multiple jurisdictions. This paper utilizes Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) for a comparison of poverty reduction performances of jurisdictional social welfare programs across Canadian provinces. From the theoretical perspective, findings of this paper demonstrates that DEA is a promising method to evaluate, compare, and benchmark poverty reduction performance across multiple jurisdictions using multiple inputs and outputs. This paper demonstrates that DEA generates easy to comprehend composite rankings of provincial performances, identifies appropriate benchmarks for each inefficient province, and estimates sources and amounts of improvement needed to make the provinces efficient. From a practical perspective the empirical results presented in this paper indicate that Newfoundland, Prince Edwards Island, and Alberta achieve better efficiency in poverty reduction than other provinces. Policy makers and social administrators of the ineffective provinces across Canada may find benefit in selecting one of the effective provinces as a benchmark for improving their own performance based on similar size and structure of population, size of the budget for social programs, and traditions with administering particular types of social programs. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Optimization programs of radiation protection applied to post-graduation and encouraging research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, Denise S.; Sordi, Gian Maria A.A.

    2013-01-01

    In 2011 we started the automation and integration of radiological protection optimization programs, in order to offer unified programs and inter-related information in Portuguese, providing Brazilian radioactive facilities a complete repository for research, consultation and information. The authors of this project extended it to postgraduate education, in order to encourage postgraduate students researches, expanding methods for enhancing student learning through the use of different combined resources, such as educational technology, information technology and group dynamics. This new methodology was applied in a postgraduate discipline at Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Brazil, in the postgraduate discipline entitled Fundamental Elements of Radiological Protection (TNA-5732). Students have six weeks to assimilate a complex content of optimization, considering national and international standards, guidelines and recommendations published by different organizations over the past decades. Unlike traditional classes, in which students receive prompt responses, this new methodology stimulates discussion, encouraging collective thinking processes and promoting ongoing personal reflection and researches. Case-oriented problem-solving permitted students to play different roles, promoting whole-group discussions and cooperative learning, approaching theory and practical applications. Students discussed different papers, published in international conferences, and their implications according to current standards. The automation of optimization programs was essential as a research tool during the course. The results of this experience were evaluated in two consecutive years. We had excellent results compared to the previous 14 years. The methodology has exceeded expectations and will be also applied in 2013 to ionizing radiation monitoring postgraduate classes. (author)

  10. Global agenda, local health: including concepts of health security in preparedness programs at the jurisdictional level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eby, Chas

    2014-01-01

    The Global Health Security Agenda's objectives contain components that could help health departments address emerging public health challenges that threaten the population. As part of the agenda, partner countries with advanced public health systems will support the development of infrastructure in stakeholder health departments. To facilitate this process and augment local programs, state and local health departments may want to include concepts of health security in their public health preparedness offices in order to simultaneously build capacity. Health security programs developed by public health departments should complete projects that are closely aligned with the objectives outlined in the global agenda and that facilitate the completion of current preparedness grant requirements. This article identifies objectives and proposes tactical local projects that run parallel to the 9 primary objectives of the Global Health Security Agenda. Executing concurrent projects at the international and local levels in preparedness offices will accelerate the completion of these objectives and help prevent disease epidemics, detect health threats, and respond to public health emergencies. Additionally, future funding tied or related to health security may become more accessible to state and local health departments that have achieved these objectives.

  11. Communicating Program Outcomes to Encourage Policymaker Support for Evidence-Based State Tobacco Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison M. Schmidt

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco use, the leading cause of preventable death in the U.S., can be reduced through state-level tobacco prevention and cessation programs. In the absence of research about how to communicate the need for these programs to policymakers, this qualitative study aimed to understand the motivations and priorities of policymakers in North Carolina, a state that enacted a strong tobacco control program from 2003–2011, but drastically reduced funding in recent years. Six former legislators (three Democrats, three Republicans and three lobbyists for health organizations were interviewed about their attitudes towards tobacco use, support of state-funded programs, and reactions to two policy briefs. Five themes emerged: (1 high awareness of tobacco-related health concerns but limited awareness of program impacts and funding, (2 the primacy of economic concerns in making policy decisions, (3 ideological differences in views of the state’s role in tobacco control, (4 the impact of lobbyist and constituent in-person appeals, and (5 the utility of concise, contextualized data. These findings suggest that building relationships with policymakers to communicate ongoing program outcomes, emphasizing economic data, and developing a constituent advocacy group would be valuable to encourage continued support of state tobacco control programs.

  12. Communicating program outcomes to encourage policymaker support for evidence-based state tobacco control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Allison M; Ranney, Leah M; Goldstein, Adam O

    2014-12-04

    Tobacco use, the leading cause of preventable death in the U.S., can be reduced through state-level tobacco prevention and cessation programs. In the absence of research about how to communicate the need for these programs to policymakers, this qualitative study aimed to understand the motivations and priorities of policymakers in North Carolina, a state that enacted a strong tobacco control program from 2003-2011, but drastically reduced funding in recent years. Six former legislators (three Democrats, three Republicans) and three lobbyists for health organizations were interviewed about their attitudes towards tobacco use, support of state-funded programs, and reactions to two policy briefs. Five themes emerged: (1) high awareness of tobacco-related health concerns but limited awareness of program impacts and funding, (2) the primacy of economic concerns in making policy decisions, (3) ideological differences in views of the state's role in tobacco control, (4) the impact of lobbyist and constituent in-person appeals, and (5) the utility of concise, contextualized data. These findings suggest that building relationships with policymakers to communicate ongoing program outcomes, emphasizing economic data, and developing a constituent advocacy group would be valuable to encourage continued support of state tobacco control programs.

  13. Marine Jurisdiction Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The NOAA Coastal Services Center's Marine Jurisdiction dataset was created to assist in marine spatial planning and offshore alternative energy sitting. This is a...

  14. Marine Jurisdictions Database

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goldsmith, Roger

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to take the data gathered for the Maritime Claims chart and create a Maritime Jurisdictions digital database suitable for use with oceanographic mission planning objectives...

  15. From Knowledge to Action: Tips for Encouraging and Measuring Program-Related Behavior Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chazdon, Scott; Horntvedt, Jody; Templin, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    It is challenging to document the behavior changes that result from Extension programming. This article describes an evaluation method we call the "action items method." Unlike other approaches for measuring behavior change, this method requires program participants to define their own action plans as part of a program and then asks them…

  16. Encouraging more women into computer science: Initiating a single-sex intervention program in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandell, Gerd; Carlsson, Svante; Ekblom, Håkan; Nord, Ann-Charlotte

    1997-11-01

    The process of starting a new program in computer science and engineering, heavily based on applied mathematics and only open to women, is described in this paper. The program was introduced into an educational system without any tradition in single-sex education. Important observations made during the process included the considerable interest in mathematics and curiosity about computer science found among female students at the secondary school level, and the acceptance of the single-sex program by the staff, administration, and management of the university as well as among male and female students. The process described highlights the importance of preparing the environment for a totally new type of educational program.

  17. The survive and thrive program: encouraging coaching, mentoring, and peer learning among new local health officials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Vonna; Sarpy, Sue Ann; Green, Rachel; Kaplan, Seth; Bonzon, Ramon

    2010-01-01

    There is a need for programs tailored to train the approximately 300 new local health officials (LHOs) who emerge each year with the knowledge and skills needed to build, maintain, and enhance public health capacity and infrastructure. The Survive and Thrive program incorporates a curriculum that is designed to address the challenges faced by a new LHO. The Survive and Thrive program seeks to address these issues by leveraging the expertise of the current generation of local public health leadership by incorporating experienced LHOs as coaches. Coaching, mentoring, and peer assistance by seasoned LHOs is critical to these new learning opportunities. This article highlights aspects of the coaching component of Survive and Thrive program. Actual examples of its relevance to the professional growth and development of new LHOs and the coaches themselves are presented. The article also describes the novel approach of including coaches in evaluating program effectiveness. The Survive and Thrive program's coaching component can serve as a template for other public health leadership programs and related workforce development initiatives as well as a model to help facilitate lifelong learning of LHOs.

  18. Mentoring in Medicine Program Encourages Careers in Health | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City, and practices as an emergency medicine physician ... that dream.” MIM currently is under way in New York City, Atlanta, and Oakland, Calif., operating programs that ...

  19. A review of low income energy assistance measures adopted in other jurisdictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Low-income energy assistance programs (LIEPs) have been established and implemented in many jurisdictions to help make electricity and natural gas more affordable. Low-income programs also serve many other public interest goals, such as safeguarding and protecting the public health and welfare of the citizens; augmenting incomes or standards of living for the lowest income energy customers; encouraging conservation and more efficient use of energy resources; reducing customer care costs for utilities; reducing uncollectible accounts and bad debt expense for utilities; and reducing carbon emissions and greenhouse gas levels. This report contained a summary of the policies, programs, and measures that have been implemented, mandated, or allowed by regulators in other jurisdictions to assist low-income energy consumers with electricity and natural gas costs. The report categorized the differing low income policies and programs that have been implemented and examined the effectiveness of those policies and programs as measured by the costs and benefits, as well the level of customer participation. These categories included rate discounts or waivers; modified rate designs; alternative billing methods; customer rebates; conservation and demand side management programs; budget or equal billing; payment plans for past due accounts; waivers of late payment charges; waivers or reductions of customer security deposits; limits on disconnections; and reduced or waived fees for reconnections. The report covered regulatory jurisdictions, including those in Canada, the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, France, Spain, and Finland. The report also discussed the role of regulators, utilities, charitable organizations, and other interested parties in developing and implementing low-income energy assistance programs that were cost-effective and efficient. It was concluded that, in addition to rate discounts or waivers of the fixed monthly service charge, many

  20. Transcending jurisdictions: developing partnerships for health in Manitoba First Nation communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eni, Rachel; Phillips-Beck, Wanda

    2011-09-01

    The article describes national, regional and community-level activities that contributed to the Manitoba First Nation partnership in maternal and child health programming. The activities reveal a potential for health change that is possible through working together across jurisdictional boundaries. Although we are only in the early phases of program implementation, the Manitoba First Nation Strengthening Families Maternal Child Health Program already suggests considerable successes and measurable outcomes. The article encourages development of further partnerships in the promotion of First Nation health and wellness programming.

  1. An Empathic Avatar in a Computer-Aided Learning Program to Encourage and Persuade Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gwo-Dong; Lee, Jih-Hsien; Wang, Chin-Yeh; Chao, Po-Yao; Li, Liang-Yi; Lee, Tzung-Yi

    2012-01-01

    Animated pedagogical agents with characteristics such as facial expressions, gestures, and human emotions, under an interactive user interface are attractive to students and have high potential to promote students' learning. This study proposes a convenient method to add an embodied empathic avatar into a computer-aided learning program; learners…

  2. Encouraging Wildland Fire Preparedness: Lessons Learned from Three Wildfire Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victoria Sturtevant; Sarah McCaffrey

    2006-01-01

    Managers may often wonder why some people do not choose to adopt defensible space practices despite understanding the benefits of doing so. Research has sought to understand why a new practice or innovation is or is not adopted. This paper will briefly discuss factors found to influence adoption rates and describe how three different fire education programs - Firewise...

  3. Encouraging responses in sexual and relationship violence prevention: what program effects remain 1 year later?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynihan, Mary M; Banyard, Victoria L; Cares, Alison C; Potter, Sharyn J; Williams, Linda M; Stapleton, Jane G

    2015-01-01

    Colleges and universities are high-risk settings for sexual and relationship violence. To address these problems, institutions of higher education have implemented prevention programs, many of which train students as potential bystanders who can step in to help diffuse risky situations, identify and challenge perpetrators, and assist victims. The impact of bystander sexual and relationship violence prevention programs on long-term behavior of bystanders has remained a key unanswered question for those who seek to offer the most effective programs as well as for policy makers. In this study, the researchers experimentally evaluated the effectiveness of the Bringing in the Bystander® in-person program. Participants were 948 1st-year college students of whom 47.8% were women and 85.2% identified as White (15% also identified as Hispanic in a separate question) between the ages of 18 and 24 at two universities (one a rural, primarily residential campus and the other an urban, highly commuter campus) in the northeastern United States. To date, this is the first study to have found positive behavior changes as long-lasting as 1 year following an educational workshop focusing on engaging bystanders in preventing sexual and relationship violence. Even so, many questions remain to be answered about prevention and intervention of this type. More prospective research is needed on bystander-focused prevention of these forms of violence to help understand and better predict the complicated relationships both between and among the attitudes and behaviors related to preventing sexual and relationship violence. In this regard, we make specific recommendations for designing and evaluating programs based on our findings relating to the importance of moderators, especially two key understudied ones, readiness to help and opportunity to intervene. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Encouraging Family and Parent Education: Program Development and Evaluation in the Federal State of Baden-Württemberg, Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Landhäusser

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Against the background of a European-wide strategy of governance aimed at improving support for parents and families, the following report details the conceptualization and evaluation of a federal state program 4 in Baden-Württemberg (Germany which was launched in 2008 to encourage family and parent education. Two program components, a voucher system for parents with a new-born child and an element that emphasizes educational offers for families with special needs in particular living situations, were started to increase requests for educational courses. The aim was to establish and deepen cooperation between different public and private professional services that are in contact with parents and their children. The results show that main goals of the program were reached.

  5. A Communication Training Program to Encourage Speaking-Up Behavior in Surgical Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostino, Thomas A; Bialer, Philip A; Walters, Chasity B; Killen, Aileen R; Sigurdsson, Hrafn O; Parker, Patricia A

    2017-10-01

    Patient safety in the OR depends on effective communication. We developed and tested a communication training program for surgical oncology staff members to increase communication about patient safety concerns. In phase one, 34 staff members participated in focus groups to identify and rank factors that affect speaking-up behavior. We compiled ranked items into thematic categories that included role relations and hierarchy, staff rapport, perceived competence, perceived efficacy of speaking up, staff personality, fear of retaliation, institutional regulations, and time pressure. We then developed a communication training program that 42 participants completed during phase two. Participants offered favorable ratings of the usefulness and perceived effect of the training. Participants reported significant improvement in communicating patient safety concerns (t 40  = -2.76, P = .009, d = 0.48). Findings offer insight into communication challenges experienced by surgical oncology staff members and suggest that our training demonstrates the potential to improve team communication. Copyright © 2017 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Should MD-PhD programs encourage graduate training in disciplines beyond conventional biomedical or clinical sciences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mara, Ryan J; Hsu, Stephen I; Wilson, Daniel R

    2015-02-01

    The goal of MD-PhD training programs is to produce physician-scientists with unique capacities to lead the future biomedical research workforce. The current dearth of physician-scientists with expertise outside conventional biomedical or clinical sciences raises the question of whether MD-PhD training programs should allow or even encourage scholars to pursue doctoral studies in disciplines that are deemed nontraditional, yet are intrinsically germane to major influences on health. This question is especially relevant because the central value and ultimate goal of the academic medicine community is to help attain the highest level of health and health equity for all people. Advances in medical science and practice, along with improvements in health care access and delivery, are steps toward health equity, but alone they will not come close to eliminating health inequalities. Addressing the complex health issues in our communities and society as a whole requires a biomedical research workforce with knowledge, practice, and research skills well beyond conventional biomedical or clinical sciences. To make real progress in advancing health equity, educational pathways must prepare physician-scientists to treat both micro and macro determinants of health. The authors argue that MD-PhD programs should allow and encourage their scholars to cross boundaries into less traditional disciplines such as epidemiology, statistics, anthropology, sociology, ethics, public policy, management, economics, education, social work, informatics, communications, and marketing. To fulfill current and coming health care needs, nontraditional MD-PhD students should be welcomed and supported as valuable members of our biomedical research workforce.

  7. Administration and Jurisdictional Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Hernando Nieto

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available To what extent does studying jurisdictional politics need the knowledge of different administrative theories in general and the science of public administration in particular? This small text proposes such reflection and comes to the conclusion that it is impossible to propose a new approximation to this topic without considering the administrative theory, for that the specialists and thinkers will get more with the contact of this discipline from what it is called a multidisciplinary approach.

  8. Target salt 2025: a global overview of national programs to encourage the food industry to reduce salt in foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Jacqui; Trieu, Kathy; Dunford, Elizabeth; Hawkes, Corinna

    2014-08-21

    Reducing population salt intake has been identified as a priority intervention to reduce non-communicable diseases. Member States of the World Health Organization have agreed to a global target of a 30% reduction in salt intake by 2025. In countries where most salt consumed is from processed foods, programs to engage the food industry to reduce salt in products are being developed. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of national initiatives to encourage the food industry to reduce salt. A systematic review of the literature was supplemented by key informant questionnaires to inform categorization of the initiatives. Fifty nine food industry salt reduction programs were identified. Thirty eight countries had targets for salt levels in foods and nine countries had introduced legislation for some products. South Africa and Argentina have both introduced legislation limiting salt levels across a broad range of foods. Seventeen countries reported reductions in salt levels in foods-the majority in bread. While these trends represent progress, many countries have yet to initiate work in this area, others are at early stages of implementation and further monitoring is required to assess progress towards achieving the global target.

  9. Jurisdiction Size and Local Democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, David Dreyer; Serritslew, Søren

    2011-01-01

    and problems of endogeneity. We focus on internal political efficacy, a psychological condition that many see as necessary for high-quality participatory democracy. We identify a quasiexperiment, a large-scale municipal reform in Denmark, which allows us to estimate a causal effect of jurisdiction size......Optimal jurisdiction size is a cornerstone of government design. A strong tradition in political thought argues that democracy thrives in smaller jurisdictions, but existing studies of the effects of jurisdiction size, mostly cross-sectional in nature, yield ambiguous results due to sorting effects...

  10. The University of Minnesota Morris (UMM) STEP Program: an initiative to encourage the participation of Native Americans in the sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, J. F.

    2009-12-01

    The goal of the UMM STEP program is to increase the number of graduates in STEM fields through innovative curricular, recruiting and mentoring strategies. A unique focus of the UMM STEP program is increasing the number of Native American science majors. The STEP program fosters a summer research environment where peer interaction and mentoring creates a web of support. To do so we will establish a supportive and fulfilling pipeline that: 1) Identifies Native American students and involves them in research while they are high school; 2) Mentors and prepares participants for university academics the summer before their freshman year; 3) Provides a complete tuition waiver, mentoring and a support network throughout their undergraduate career; and 4) Involves participants in an active and dynamic summer undergraduate research environment where under-represented individuals are in the majority. The third and fourth components of this pipeline are in very good shape. The Morris campus was originally established as an Indian School in 1887. When the federal government deeded the Indian school campus to the University of Minnesota a stipulation was that Native American students attend the college for free. At present, 196 Native Americans are enrolled at UMM (50 are STEM majors). The UMM STEP research experience provides the unique opportunity to interact with a scientific community that both breaks down a number of traditional barriers and aids in the maturation of these students as scientists. In Summer 2008, 4 students were involved in summer research and in 2009 seven Native American students participated. Early efforts of the UMM STEP program are encouraging. UMM Admissions staff used the UMM STEP program to recruit Native American students and the P.I. phoned “uncommitted admits”, visited reservations and hosted reservation student visits. The result was an increase in freshman Native American Science majors from 7 in Fall 2007, 15 in fall 2008 and 20 in fall

  11. The Military Extraterritorial Jurisdiction Act

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kerrigan, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    .... Its interpretation affects both national security and the rights of American citizens overseas. This statute gives the United States judicial system the ability to exercise jurisdictional control over American civilians committing felonies on foreign soil...

  12. An Educational Program for Underserved Middle School Students to Encourage Pursuit of Pharmacy and Other Health Science Careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Carroll-Ann; Tran, Thao T; Tran, Linh

    2014-11-15

    To develop and implement an active, hands-on program for underrepresented minority (URM) seventh grade students and to determine if participation in the program increased interest in health care careers and understanding of pharmacy and physician assistant (PA) professions. A hands-on educational program was developed in conjunction with local middle school administrators and staff for URM 7th grade students. The program was designed to be hands-on and focus on pharmacy and PA laboratory skills. A discussion component was included, allowing participants to interact personally with pharmacy and PA students and faculty members. Students' responses to survey questions about interest in health care careers and knowledge about health professions were compared before and after 2 separate offerings of the program. After the program, significant increases were seen in participants' understanding of the pharmacy and PA professions. An increased percentage of participants reported interest in health care careers after the program than before the program. Introducing middle school-aged URM students to the pharmacy and PA professions through a hands-on educational program increased interest in, and knowledge of, these professions.

  13. An Educational Program for Underserved Middle School Students to Encourage Pursuit of Pharmacy and Other Health Science Careers

    OpenAIRE

    Goldsmith, Carroll-Ann; Tran, Thao T.; Tran, Linh

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To develop and implement an active, hands-on program for underrepresented minority (URM) seventh grade students and to determine if participation in the program increased interest in health care careers and understanding of pharmacy and physician assistant (PA) professions.

  14. DSM in restructured jurisdictions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, M.

    1996-08-01

    The impact of regulatory restructuring on demand side management (DSM) was reviewed, drawing on the experiences gained in Norway, England and New Zealand, with a view to determining alternative motivators for energy efficiency in the absence of regulations. The implications of deregulation were examined. It was found that each of the three countries was forced to return to the question of DSM and energy services programs, and the role of utilities. Evidence seemed to indicate that with the removal of the shielding effect of regulation on the utilities generation market, the difference in investment payback between generators and suppliers was likely to approach the levels that exist in other segment of the economy, thus pricing market failure is likely to be removed. However, other market failures may well remain, such as (1) attention to environmental externalities, (2) consumers` inability to influence the efficiency or use of energy consuming equipment, (3) consumers` difficulty in acquiring information on efficiency measures, and in implementing such measures. In view of the Rio de Janeiro obligations policy makers will have to find market mechanisms to remedy these shortcomings. 16 refs.

  15. Fighting Harmful Tax Competition Generated by Offshore Jurisdictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Drosu Saguna

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Harmful tax competition is not just tax system, but can also undermine the interests of local communities and the environment. Tax havens are a huge drain of resources from other countries (basic non tax haven to offshore areas. To operate, tax havens are supported economically, politically, and socially by high tax states. Also, by encouraging savings, it boosts investment and capital formation. Because they are low tax jurisdictions, they exert a higher tax on tax rates worldwide.

  16. Children's tooth decay in a public health program to encourage low-income pregnant women to utilize dental care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirtcliff R Mike

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A community-based public health program to provide a dental home for women covered by the Oregon Health Plan (Medicaid in Klamath County, Oregon USA was instituted with the long-term goal to promote preventive oral care for both mothers and their new infants provided by dental managed care companies. Methods As part of the evaluation of the program, children in Klamath and comparable non-program counties were examined in their 2nd year of life to begin to determine if benefits accrued to the offspring of the mothers in Klamath County. Results Eighty-five and 58.9% of the children were caries free in the Klamath and comparison county samples, respectively (RR = 1.48, 95% CI 1.13, 1.93. The mean (SD number of teeth with any decay was .75 (2.5 in the test population and 1.6 (2.5 in the comparison population (t = 2.08, p = .04. Conclusions The assessment showed that children of mothers in the Klamath County program were about one and a half times more likely to be caries free than children in the comparison counties. Additional controlled studies are being undertaken.

  17. Children's tooth decay in a public health program to encourage low-income pregnant women to utilize dental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgrom, Peter; Sutherland, Marilynn; Shirtcliff, R Mike; Ludwig, Sharity; Smolen, Darlene

    2010-02-18

    A community-based public health program to provide a dental home for women covered by the Oregon Health Plan (Medicaid) in Klamath County, Oregon USA was instituted with the long-term goal to promote preventive oral care for both mothers and their new infants provided by dental managed care companies. As part of the evaluation of the program, children in Klamath and comparable non-program counties were examined in their 2nd year of life to begin to determine if benefits accrued to the offspring of the mothers in Klamath County. Eighty-five and 58.9% of the children were caries free in the Klamath and comparison county samples, respectively (RR = 1.48, 95% CI 1.13, 1.93). The mean (SD) number of teeth with any decay was .75 (2.5) in the test population and 1.6 (2.5) in the comparison population (t = 2.08, p = .04). The assessment showed that children of mothers in the Klamath County program were about one and a half times more likely to be caries free than children in the comparison counties. Additional controlled studies are being undertaken.

  18. The Outcomes of an Educational Program Involving Men as Motivators to Encourage Women to Be Screened for Cervical Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rwamugira, Jeniffer; Maree, Johanna E; Mafutha, Nokuthula

    2017-11-14

    Cervical cancer is a major health problem in South Africa. Despite having a national, population-based screening program, screening coverage is as low as 13%. Based on the role men could play in increasing cervical cancer screening and the low level of knowledge, men living in the study setting had about this health issue, we developed and pilot tested an educational program aimed at empowering men to teach their female partners and family members about cervical cancer and motivate them to be screened. The study setting was Ward 23 in Muldersdrift, a semi-urban, resource poor area situated northeast of Johannesburg. We used an intervention research design to assess the outcomes of our educational program. The primary outcome was screening uptake, with knowledge the secondary outcome. Statistics and face-to-face and telephone interviews, guided by questionnaires, were used to collect the data which were analyzed by means of descriptive statistics and content analysis. A total of 120 men (n = 120) participated in the educational program and 100 (n = 100) completed the post-test questionnaire. Only 30 women (n = 30) reported for screening. The men's knowledge improved after the education program but did not guarantee that they would educate women about cervical cancer as only 55% (n = 66) indicated they taught a female family member or their partner. Cultural restrictions were the most common reason presented for not teaching women about this health issue. Ways of supporting men to overcome cultural barriers prohibiting them from discussing matters related to sexuality should be explored, before refining and replicating the intervention.

  19. Program encourages use of renewable energies in Algeria-20 co-operative projects by sonelgaz in one year

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khiat, Z.; Stambouli, A. Boudghene

    2006-01-01

    The renewable energy projects are tools for the management of reserves and sustainable development of desert communities. These are generally areas wher a diesel or gas-powered generator present a problem of fuel transportation and may potentially harm the environment. Tremendous opportunities exist in Algeria for growth in the use of renewable energy technologies in particular photovoltaic solar power. According to some estimates, more than five million Algerians do not have access to grid electricity, while many rural communities are in need of drinking water and water for livestock or irrigation. Given Algerian's abundant solar resource, these rural needs represent a potential market for renewable energy technologies. Nowadays a growing number of people in the south of Algeria are using renewable energy to irrigate their land, light their houses, pump well water and then improve their lives, thanks to the 'Ministere de l'Energie et des Mines' and the Sonelgaz (Societe Nationale de l'Electricite et du Gaz) R and D office. From 1999 up 2002. Sonelgaz Renewable Energy Program, and the above mentioned ministry have collaborated and sponsored several photovoltaic projects in 20 villages of the desert of Algeria concerning this renewable energy program aiming at increasing the use of renewable energy technologies, thus providing green power to isolated villages. Sonelgaz's role in the project is to initiate renewable energy pilot projects that could be easily replicated by area residents and provide training with technical assistance. Based on its feasibility, potential projecs are initially identified and selected by the Sonelgaz R and D office which develops system requirements, provides technical review, evaluates and monitors the projects following their installation. Since 1999, Sonelgaz has received 988 millions of DA (Algerian Dinars) to operate the program. Most activities focus on house lighting and implementing water pumping systems. For most of these

  20. Should providers encourage realistic weight expectations and satisfaction with lost weight in commercial weight loss programs? a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, Gretchen E; Thomas, Colleen S; Patel, Roshni H; McMullen, Jillian S; Lutes, Lesley D

    2014-01-01

    Attrition is a problem among patients who participate in commercial weight loss programs. One possible explanation is that if patients are unable to reach a weight that they expect to achieve, they may be more likely to drop out of treatment. This study investigated variables associated with attrition among 30 obese patients who completed a liquid meal replacement program (LMR) and enrolled in a 52-week Small Changes Maintenance intervention (SCM). Patients lost a median 18% of body weight during LMR and completed assessments about weight expectations and weight satisfaction pre- and post-SCM. Of the 30 patients who started SCM, 8 (27%) were lost to attrition. Odds of SCM attrition were higher in patients who lost ≤ 18.2% of pre-LMR weight (OR: 12.25, P = 0.035), had lower satisfaction (≤7) pre-SCM (OR: 10.11, P = 0.040), and who expected further weight loss of 9.1 kg or more pre-SCM (OR: 10.11, P = 0.040). SCM completers significantly increased weight loss expectations by a median of 2.3 kg from pre-SCM to post-SCM (WSR P = 0.049) that paralleled weight regained post-SCM (2.7 kg). After completion of a medically-supervised commercial weight loss program, patients with the greatest expectations for further weight loss and the lowest weight satisfaction were more likely to drop out of SCM. Failure to participate in maintenance treatment may lead to regain of greater than half of lost weight over the next year. Among SCM completers, lower expectations for further weight loss and greater weight satisfaction appeared to be associated with continued engagement in maintenance treatment.

  1. 25 CFR 11.905 - Jurisdiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAW AND ORDER COURTS OF INDIAN OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Children's Court § 11.905 Jurisdiction. The children's court has exclusive, original jurisdiction of the... established is alleged to be a juvenile offender, unless the children's court transfers jurisdiction to the...

  2. 5 CFR 1201.2 - Original jurisdiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Original jurisdiction. 1201.2 Section 1201.2 Administrative Personnel MERIT SYSTEMS PROTECTION BOARD ORGANIZATION AND PROCEDURES PRACTICES AND PROCEDURES Jurisdiction and Definitions § 1201.2 Original jurisdiction. The Board's original...

  3. Encouraging Physical Activity in Pediatric Asthma: A Case–Control Study of the Wonders of Walking (WOW) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walders-Abramson, Natalie; Wamboldt, Frederick S.; Curran-Everett, Douglas; Zhang, Lening

    2010-01-01

    among typically sedentary groups, and represents an effective, safe, and inexpensive walking program. PMID:19658109

  4. Encouraging physical activity in pediatric asthma: a case-control study of the wonders of walking (WOW) program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walders-Abramson, Natalie; Wamboldt, Frederick S; Curran-Everett, Douglas; Zhang, Lening

    2009-09-01

    , safe, and inexpensive walking program. Copyright 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. The University of Minnesota Morris - N.S.F. REU Program: Twenty years of encouraging women to participate in the Geological Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, J. F.

    2009-12-01

    The goal of the UMM - REU program is to nurture the development of women in the geological sciences. Women are historically under-represented in the geological sciences. This program introduces undergraduate women to research project design and independent data collection and analysis designed to increase student’s scientific skills, introduce them to new fields of study, and to develop academic/professional confidence. In so doing, the program tries to encourage students to continue their education at the graduate level and/or to pursue a career in the Geosciences. The program was first proposed in 1988 and was run during the summers of 1989, '90, '91, '94, '95, '97, ’99, 2000, 05, 07, and 09 (in 1996 and 1998 a similar program was run at Gustavus Adolphus College). The focus of the program is field and laboratory research to determine the origin and history of glacial deposits in west-central Minnesota and the late Paleozoic Glacial deposits of the Parana Basin, Brazil. Much of the success of the program can be attributed to developing student “ownership” of their individual projects, their particular REU group, and the UMM-REU program overall. Research projects are selected and designed by the participants. Frequently considered are: research subject, location of field area and geologic techniques employed. Both project ownership and team building is encouraged by participant led weekly visits to field areas and frequent group discussions of research problems, successes and major gaffes. Additional team building activities include: 1) living in the same on-campus apartments and Brazilian B&B, 2) organized social activities, 3) international travel and working with Brazilian (women) students, 4) readings and discussions on "women in geology”, 5) shared strategies and concerns for career choices and; 6) participation in the "Friends of UMM-REU" conference (an "informal" presentation of results). Finally, an emphasis is placed on the utilization of the

  6. Effect of Educational Program to Encourage Safe Sexual Behaviors Among Addicted Men Refered to Substance Abuse Treatment Centers in Hamadan, Western Iran: Applying the Theory of Planned Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Moeini

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Unsafe sexual behaviors as important risky behaviors can expose individuals and society to dangerous infectious disease such as AIDS and viral hepatitis. Considering the high prevalence of unsafe sexual behaviors, this study aimed to determine the effect of educational programs to encourage safe sexual behaviors among substance abusers referred to substance abuse treatment centers in Hamadan, Western Iran by applying the theory of planned behavior. Materials & Methods: This quasi-experimental study was performed on 104 men substance abusers (52 participants in each of the control and intervention groups referred to substance abuse treatment centers in Hamadan. Data collection tool was a questionnaire containing demographic information and the theory of planned behavior constructs. Before the educational program, questionnaires were completed by both groups. After the pretest in both groups, participants in the intervention group participated in four educational sessions designed based on the theory of planned behavior. Two months after the end of program, posttest was performed. Data was analyzed using independent T-test, chi-square, fisher exact test, McNemar’s test and multiple linear regressions using SPSS-16. Results: After educational intervention, the mean scores of the theory constructs (attitude toward behavior, subjective norms, behavioral control, behavioral intention and behaviors, in the intervention group increased significantly (P<0.05, despite the fact, changes were not significant in the control group. Conclusion: Implementation of educational courses to encourage safe sexual behaviors based on the theory of planned behavior can be beneficial for substance abusers referred to substance abuse treatment centers.

  7. Potential Transferability of Economic Evaluations of Programs Encouraging Physical Activity in Children and Adolescents across Different Countries—A Systematic Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Korber

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Physical inactivity is an increasing problem. Owing to limited financial resources, one method of getting information on the cost-effectiveness of different types of prevention programs is to examine existing programs and their results. The aim of this paper is to give an overview of the transferability of cost-effectiveness results of physical activity programs for children and adolescents to other contexts. Based on a systematic review of the literature, the transferability of the studies found was assessed using a sub-checklist of the European Network of Health Economic Evaluation Databases (EURONHEED. Thirteen studies of different physical activity interventions were found and analyzed. The results for transferability ranged from “low” to “very high”. A number of different factors influence a program’s cost-effectiveness (i.e., discount rate, time horizon, etc.. Therefore, transparency with regard to these factors is one fundamental element in the transferability of the results. A major point of criticism is that transferability is often limited because of lack of transparency. This paper is the first to provide both an overview and an assessment of transferability of economic evaluations of existing programs encouraging physical activity in children and adolescents. This allows decision makers to gain an impression on whether the findings are transferable to their decision contexts, which may lead to time and cost savings.

  8. Substantive law problems in jurisdiction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sternberg, D.

    1977-01-01

    Substantive law problems in nuclear licensing procedure jurisdiction are discussed. Preconditions for the right to file a suit pursuant to section 42, sub-section 2 VwGO are investigated, in the context of which the necessity is pointed out to differentiate between normal operation and possible accidents. Furthermore, comments are made on the definition of 'facility' in terms of nuclear law, the understanding of which is rather decisive for the substantial scope of the nuclear licensing procedures. Also, legal problems are examined which arise from special forms of financing for nuclear power plant projects, in particular in connection with leasing financing. (HP) [de

  9. Making change happen: a case study of the successful establishment of a peer-administered naloxone program in one Australian jurisdiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Kari; Ritter, Alison

    2014-09-01

    Analysis of how policy processes happen in real-world, contemporary settings is important for generating new and timely learning which can inform other drug policy issues. This paper describes and analyses the process leading to the successful establishment of Australia's first peer-administered naloxone program. Within a case study design, qualitative data were collected using semi-structured interviews with key individuals associated with the initiative (n=9), and a collaborative approach to data analysis was undertaken. Central to policy development in this case was the formation of a committee structure to provide expert guidance and support. The collective, collaborative and relational features of this group are consistent with governing by network. The analysis demonstrates that the Committee served more than a merely consultative role. We posit that the Committee constituted the policy process of stakeholder engagement, communication strategy, program development, and implementation planning, which led to the enactment of the naloxone program. We describe and analyse the roles of actors involved, the goodwill and volunteerism which characterised the group's processes, the way the Committee was used as a strategic legitimising mechanism, the strategic framings used to garner support, emergent tensions and the evolving nature of the Committee. This case demonstrates how policy change can occur in the absence of strong political imperatives or ideological contestation, and the ways in which a collective process was used to achieve successful outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. It Could Be a Pearl to You: Exploring Recruitment and Retention of the Program to Encourage Active, Rewarding Lives (PEARLS) With Hard-to-Reach Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinman, Lesley; Hammerback, Kristen; Snowden, Mark

    2015-08-01

    We partnered with 3 social service organizations to identify hard-to-reach populations, barriers to reach, and strategies for improving recruitment and retention for Program to Encourage Active, Rewarding Lives (PEARLS), a home-based depression-care management program for elders. We conducted semistructured interviews with staff and former PEARLS participants. All interviews were transcribed verbatim and thematically analyzed. Veterans, African Americans, Filipino men, other immigrants and English-language learners, old-older adults, rural communities, and people with limited education were identified as hard to reach. The themes of trust, cultural appropriateness, meet them where they are, and framing and reframing, cut across barriers to participation in PEARLS and approaches for overcoming these barriers. Research findings will be used to inform technical assistance activities with PEARLS providers, changes to PEARLS program and training materials, and future PEARLS research activities. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Jurisdiction Over Cybertorts in the EU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savin, Andrej

    2016-01-01

    The article analyses EU jurisdiction rules for civil and commercial tort cases involving the use of the Internet (cybertorts). Since cybertorts have multiplied globally, determination of the appropriate forum in which to recover damages is of paramount importance. Brussels I Regulation (Recast......) contains rules on general jurisdiction, which have largely been unproblematic and rules on special jurisdiction, which have been subject to intense interpretation in the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU). The CJEU case law on special jurisdiction in cybertorts is divided into two groups: cases...

  12. Cybercrime, digital forensics and jurisdiction

    CERN Document Server

    Chawki, Mohamed; Khan, Mohammad Ayoub; Tyagi, Sapna

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of law is to prevent the society from harm by declaring what conduct is criminal, and prescribing the punishment to be imposed for such conduct. The pervasiveness of the internet and its anonymous nature make cyberspace a lawless frontier where anarchy prevails. Historically, economic value has been assigned to visible and tangible assets. With the increasing appreciation that intangible data disseminated through an intangible medium can possess economic value, cybercrime is also being recognized as an economic asset. The Cybercrime, Digital Forensics  and Jurisdiction disseminate knowledge for everyone involved with understanding and preventing cybercrime - business entities, private citizens, and government agencies. The book is firmly rooted in the law demonstrating that a viable strategy to confront cybercrime must be international in scope.

  13. Rationale and study protocol of the EASY Minds (Encouraging Activity to Stimulate Young Minds) program: cluster randomized controlled trial of a primary school-based physical activity integration program for mathematics

    OpenAIRE

    Riley, Nicholas; Lubans, David R; Holmes, Kathryn; Morgan, Philip J

    2014-01-01

    Background Novel strategies are required to increase school-based physical activity levels of children. Integrating physical activity in mathematics lessons may lead to improvements in students’ physical activity levels as well as enjoyment, engagement and learning. The primary aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of a curriculum-based physical activity integration program known as EASY Minds (Encouraging Activity to Stimulate Young Minds) on children’s daily school time physical activ...

  14. Permissions and Prohibitions in Data Protection Jurisdiction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taylor, M.S.C.

    Under public international law, a State has a right to exercise jurisdiction and is expected to show restraint when applying extraterritorial jurisdiction. The EU’s Data Protection Directive is far-reaching and has notable effects beyond its territory. The General Data Protection Regulation could

  15. 13 CFR 134.405 - Jurisdiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Jurisdiction. (a) The Administrative Law Judge selected to preside over an appeal shall decline to accept... disadvantage, economic disadvantage, ownership or control; (2) The appeal is untimely filed under § 134.202 or... before a court of competent jurisdiction over such matters. (b) Once the Administrative Law Judge accepts...

  16. 29 CFR 301.4 - Jurisdiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Jurisdiction. 301.4 Section 301.4 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor NATIONAL RAILROAD ADJUSTMENT BOARD RULES OF PROCEDURE § 301.4 Jurisdiction. (a) First... porters, and maids and dining-car employees. (d) Fourth Division. The Fourth Division will have...

  17. Page TOWARDS CONTAINING THE JURISDICTIONAL PROBLEMS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fr. Ikenga

    General's argument and asserted jurisdiction over the website owner based in .... would be false to claim that the webpage was anywhere else but on the ... 31 See W. Byassee, “Jurisdiction of Cyberspace: Applying Real World ... and Spread of Nationalism, Macmillan, London, 1983, p. ..... 45 Cable News Network, L.P. v.

  18. Encouraging Classroom Discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Joseph McKee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Classroom discussion has the potential to enhance the learning environment and encourages students to become active participants in the educational process. Student participation in classroom discussion has been shown to significantly improve the student learning experience. Research suggests that classroom discussion is an effective method for encouraging student classroom participation and for motivating student learning beyond the classroom. Participation in classroom discussion encourages students to become active collaborators in the learning process, while at the same time providing instructors with a practical method of assessing student learning. Classroom discussion is an effective tool for developing higher-level cognitive skills like critical thinking. Despite the potential discussion holds for student learning, many in academia lament the lack of participation in the classroom. The lack of student participation in classroom discussion is not a recent problem; it is one that has frustrated instructors for decades. Instructors report that some of the more current methods for encouraging classroom discussion can be exasperating and at times non-productive. This two-year study of 510 college and university students provides insight into the reasons why some students do not participate in classroom discussion. This study, which also elicited input from sixteen college and university professors and two high school teachers, offers some suggestions for creating and encouraging an environment conducive to student participation in the classroom.

  19. HOME Participating Jurisdictions Open Activities Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — This report is an MS Excel spreadsheet broken up by state. Participating Jurisdictions can use this report to view open activities in IDIS including activities with...

  20. Page | 14 STATES' CRIMINAL JURISDICTION UNDER ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fr. Ikenga

    The criminal jurisdiction of a State's courts under international law is primarily territorial.25 Only under ..... Attorney General of the Government .... also P. Sands, ''After Pinochet : the role of national courts'' in P. Sands (ed) From Nuremberg to ...

  1. HOME Participating Jurisdictions Vacant Units Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — This report is an MS Excel spreadsheet broken up by state, similar to the HOME Participating Jurisdiction's Open Activities Reports. The purpose of the HOME...

  2. 38 CFR 1.956 - Jurisdiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Referrals to Gao, Department of Justice, Or Irs § 1.956 Jurisdiction. (a) The regional office Committees are... loan defaults as well as from other overpayments of educational assistance benefits) or insurance...

  3. Text Mining of Supreme Administrative Court Jurisdictions

    OpenAIRE

    Feinerer, Ingo; Hornik, Kurt

    2007-01-01

    Within the last decade text mining, i.e., extracting sensitive information from text corpora, has become a major factor in business intelligence. The automated textual analysis of law corpora is highly valuable because of its impact on a company's legal options and the raw amount of available jurisdiction. The study of supreme court jurisdiction and international law corpora is equally important due to its effects on business sectors. In this paper we use text mining methods to investigate Au...

  4. Encouraging research and teaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    In support of the Burmese Government's effort to encourage scientific research and teaching, the Agency provided, under the United Nations Development Programme, the services of an expert in nuclear chemistry. He stayed for three months at the Rangoon Arts and Science University. As a result a radiochemistry laboratory has been set up, where radioisotopes are used in chemical research and where radiochemistry is taught to fourth-year bachelor of science students

  5. A Bayesian encourages dropout

    OpenAIRE

    Maeda, Shin-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Dropout is one of the key techniques to prevent the learning from overfitting. It is explained that dropout works as a kind of modified L2 regularization. Here, we shed light on the dropout from Bayesian standpoint. Bayesian interpretation enables us to optimize the dropout rate, which is beneficial for learning of weight parameters and prediction after learning. The experiment result also encourages the optimization of the dropout.

  6. 30 CFR 282.10 - Jurisdiction and responsibilities of Director.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... part and are under the jurisdiction of the Director: Exploration, testing, and mining operations... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Jurisdiction and responsibilities of Director... Jurisdiction and Responsibilities of Director § 282.10 Jurisdiction and responsibilities of Director. Subject...

  7. Encouraging environmentally strategic technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heaton, G.R.

    1994-01-01

    Having moved beyond its initial absorption with controlling new technology, environmental policy today must focus more strongly on promoting the development and adoption of new technologies. World Resource Institute's (WRI) ongoing study of 'environmentally strategic technology' is addressed to this fundamental policy issue. The study proposes criteria for identifying such technology, offers a specific list, suggests the kinds of public policy changes necessary to encourage their development and finally presents a comparison of critical technology lists (from the White House, the European Community, Japan and the US Department of Defense). (TEC)

  8. Conflicts of Jurisdiction in Criminal Proceedings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihail Silviu Pocora

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper will consider the practical settlement of conflicts of jurisdiction both in relation to the forum for prosecution and transfer of proceedings. The corollary of free movement of people is free movement of judgments, sentences and related powers of investigation and prosecution. Cross border crime requires to be addressed by equipping law enforcement and prosecution authorities with mechanisms to ensure the public interest in the investigation and prosecution of crime is met. The starting point for any consideration is the place where the criminal conduct took place. Sometimes the crime is such that criminal jurisdiction will be fixed - such as theft of property, crimes of violence - where others have an impact or criminal conduct in more than one jurisdiction - drug importation, major transnational drug dealing, human trafficking, terrorism.

  9. 28 JURISDICTION OF THE INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL COURT

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fr. Ikenga

    legal responses by concerned governments or the international community to international crimes. As a result of hard negotiations, it was agreed that the Rome Statute prohibits the ... the ICC may exercise its jurisdiction when the crime is committed on the ..... Human Rights Committee indicates that non bis in idem has only.

  10. 5 CFR 1209.2 - Jurisdiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... APPEALS AND STAY REQUESTS OF PERSONNEL ACTIONS ALLEGEDLY BASED ON WHISTLEBLOWING Jurisdiction and..., proposed, taken, or not taken because of the appellant's whistleblowing activities. (b) The Board exercises..., taken, or not taken because of the appellant's whistleblowing activities. If the action is not otherwise...

  11. Administrative jurisdiction of customs of Ukraine

    OpenAIRE

    DOROSH M.M.

    2012-01-01

    The author describes the customs authorities as subjects of administrative jurisdiction, serving a variety of executive power. The customs authorities of Ukraine in nature play an important role in the law enforcement activities of the state. There is a constant struggle against customs violations.

  12. Competing jurisdictions : settling land claims in Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, S.; Spierenburg, M.; Wels, H.

    2005-01-01

    The papers included in this volume were earlier presented at a conference on the settlement of land claims in Africa, which was held in Amsterdam in September 2003. The papers are written primarily from an anthropological perspective. Contributions: Introduction: competing jurisdictions: settling

  13. 24 CFR 92.451 - Reallocation of HOME funds from a jurisdiction that is not designated a participating...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Development HOME INVESTMENT PARTNERSHIPS PROGRAM Reallocations § 92.451 Reallocation of HOME funds from a... that the jurisdiction has failed to: (i) Meet the participation threshold amount in § 92.102; (ii...

  14. Jurisdiction of the international Criminal Court: Analysis, loopholes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jurisdiction of the international Criminal Court: Analysis, loopholes and challenges. ... Journal Home > Vol 3 (2012) > ... One of the most fundamental questions of law is whether a given court has jurisdiction to preside over a given case.

  15. The Expansion of Swiss Criminal Jurisdiction in Light of International Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Petrig

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few decades, a global trend of extending the reach of domestic penal power can be observed, namely driven by the changing face of crime as it becomes increasingly transnational in nature. It is demonstrated in this article that the Swiss legislature has clearly followed this global trend of broadening the extraterritorial reach of domestic criminal law, most notably since the 1980s. It has acted with particular resolve in the last decade, adding jurisdictional bases to the Swiss Criminal Code by virtue of which Swiss criminal law can be applied to many instances of conduct taking place abroad. Certain offences – specified crimes against minors and female genital mutilation – have even been subjected to an absolute and unrestricted universality principle. The Swiss legislature is not indifferent to the problems that such an expansive approach to jurisdiction may create, notably in terms of conflicts of jurisdiction. Yet, the rules it adopted to temper the effects of applying Swiss criminal law to extraterritorial conduct only partially remedy the situation. This development in Swiss law begs the question whether such an expansive approach towards jurisdiction is permissible – or even encouraged or requested by international law. Hence, this article explores to what extent international law informs the reach of domestic penal power and concludes that international law is Janus-faced with regard to the question of the geographical scope of domestic criminal law. While some of its rules push for long-arm jurisdiction, others put limits on the domestic legislature’s endeavour to expand the reach of its domestic criminal law. In light of this, the idea of adopting, on an international level, general principles governing the definition of the scope of domestic prescriptive and adjudicative jurisdiction for transnational cases is tempting, albeit difficult to realize.

  16. Coupling Immersive Experiences with the Use of Mission Data to Encourage Students' Interest in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math: Examples from the Mars Exploration Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klug, S. L.; Valderrama, P.; Viotti, M. A.; Watt, K.; Wurman, G.

    2004-12-01

    The Mars Exploration Program, in partnership with the Arizona State University Mars Education Program has created and successfully tested innovative pathways and programs that introduce, develop, and reinforce science, technology, engineering, and mathematics - STEM subjects into pre-college curriculum. With launches scheduled every 26 months, Mars has the unique opportunity and ability to have a long-term, systemic influence on science education. Also, because of the high level of interest in Mars, as exemplified by the10 billion Internet hits during the Mars Exploration Rover mission, it is a great vehicle for the infusion of current science into today's classrooms. These Mars education programs have linked current mission science and engineering with the National Education Standards, integrating them in a teacher-friendly and student-friendly format. These linkages are especially synergistic when combined with long-term partnerships between educators, Mars scientists and engineers, as they exemplify real-world collaborations and teamwork. To accommodate many different audience needs, an array of programs and a variety of approaches to these programs have been developed. High tech, low tech and no tech options can be implemented to help insure that as many students can be accommodated and impacted by these programs as possible. These programs are scaled to match the National Education Standards in the grade levels in which students need to become proficient in these subjects. The Mars Student Imaging Project - MSIP allows teams of students from the fifth grade through community college to be immersed in a hands-on program and experience the scientific process firsthand by using the Thermal Emission Imaging System - THEMIS camera to target their own image of Mars using an educational version of the real flight software used to target THEMIS images. The student teams then analyze their image and report their findings to the MSIP website. This project has been in

  17. New Aspects Regarding the Labour Jurisdiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Răzvan Radu POPESCU

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The existence of two degrees of jurisdiction, the use of a single way of attack, the recourse, and the suppressing of the attack path of the appeal in the matter of labour conflicts, does not constitute unconstitutional dispositions. They have as finality only the assurance of the rapidity in solving such conflicts, without breaching the constitutional disposition according to which no law can restrict access to justice. I've tried to find the new regulation in this domain very important for those who practice labour law. In the Romanian legislation, the enforcement of the court decisions in the matter of labour conflicts is viewed by the lawmaker with great care, in certain cases the non-execution of a court decision being considered a felony. We think this article is a small step in the disclosure of the problem raised by the labour jurisdiction.

  18. Rationale and study protocol of the EASY Minds (Encouraging Activity to Stimulate Young Minds) program: cluster randomized controlled trial of a primary school-based physical activity integration program for mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Nicholas; Lubans, David R; Holmes, Kathryn; Morgan, Philip J

    2014-08-08

    Novel strategies are required to increase school-based physical activity levels of children. Integrating physical activity in mathematics lessons may lead to improvements in students' physical activity levels as well as enjoyment, engagement and learning. The primary aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of a curriculum-based physical activity integration program known as EASY Minds (Encouraging Activity to Stimulate Young Minds) on children's daily school time physical activity levels. Secondary aims include exploring the impact of EASY Minds on their engagement and 'on task' behaviour in mathematics. Grade 5/6 classes from eight public schools in New South Wales, Australia will be randomly allocated to intervention (n = 4) or control (n = 4) groups. Teachers from the intervention group will receive one day of professional development, a resource pack and asked to adapt their lessons to embed movement-based learning in their daily mathematics program in at least three lessons per week over a six week period. Intervention support will be provided via a weekly email and three lesson observations. The primary outcomes will be children's physical activity levels (accelerometry) across both the school day and during mathematics lessons (moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and sedentary time). Children's 'on-task' behaviour, enjoyment of mathematics and mathematics attainment will be assessed as secondary outcomes. A detailed process evaluation will be undertaken. EASY Minds is an innovative intervention that has the potential to improve key physical and academic outcomes for primary school aged children and help guide policy and practice regarding the teaching of mathematics. Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register ACTRN12613000637741 13/05/2013.

  19. 43 CFR 4.1101 - Jurisdiction of the Board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Jurisdiction of the Board. 4.1101 Section... APPEALS PROCEDURES Special Rules Applicable to Surface Coal Mining Hearings and Appeals General Provisions § 4.1101 Jurisdiction of the Board. (a) The jurisdiction of the Board, as set forth in § 4.1(b)(3...

  20. 40 CFR 1508.15 - Jurisdiction by law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Jurisdiction by law. 1508.15 Section 1508.15 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY TERMINOLOGY AND INDEX § 1508.15 Jurisdiction by law. Jurisdiction by law means agency authority to approve, veto, or finance all or part of the...

  1. 28 CFR 2.17 - Original jurisdiction cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Original jurisdiction cases. 2.17 Section... Original jurisdiction cases. (a) Following any hearing conducted pursuant to these rules, the Regional Commissioner may designate that a case should be decided as an original jurisdiction case. If the Regional...

  2. [Evaluation of process of an educational web-based and mobile phone-based program for encouraging healthy behaviours among Spanish and Mexican students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lana Pérez, Alberto; García Fernández, María José; López González, María Luisa

    2013-01-01

    Current communication technologies can be used in health education. The aim was to assess the process of an online program designed to prevent cancer risk behaviours using an educational website and mobile phones. High school students from Spain and Mexico were recruited during 3 academic years (2009-12) to participate in a web-based program supplemented with mobile phone messages (SMS) which aim was to prevent cancer risk behaviours. The program was designed as a randomized trial, with control and experimental group (EG). Recruitment and adherence were analyzed using data of the Web management platform and Google Analytics. 3,855 students started the logging on the program of which 2,001 (51.9%) completed the questionnaire.77.5% were Mexicans, 13 years old (40.6%), with good academic level (68.7%) and with parents (49.6%) and mothers (53.9%) having university degree. 56.4% recorded a phone number to receive SMS. The EG consisted of 1,014 students and the averages of their visits to the website were 31.6 in the first year, 21.8 in the second and 21.9 in the third. Each adolescent of the EG was able to incorporate 1.16 adults (total 1,172) and other 1,076 were recorded spontaneously. Retention rate at the end of follow-up was 41.5% and was higher among those who were best students (OR: 12,5), Mexicans (OR: 4.4), 12 years old (OR: 3.1) and have been incorporated in the first three months of the implementation (OR: 2.8). Students' recruitment and retention was scarce, mainly in Spain. However students involved visited the program website with sufficient amount of time to achieve good results.

  3. Optimization programs of radiation protection applied to post-graduation and encouraging research; Programas de otimizacao da protecao radiologica aplicados a pos-graduacao e o incentivo a pesquisa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, Denise S., E-mail: denise@omiccron.com.br [Omiccron Programacao Grafica, Sao Paulo, Atibaia, SP (Brazil); Sordi, Gian Maria A.A., E-mail: adelia@atomo.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    In 2011 we started the automation and integration of radiological protection optimization programs, in order to offer unified programs and inter-related information in Portuguese, providing Brazilian radioactive facilities a complete repository for research, consultation and information. The authors of this project extended it to postgraduate education, in order to encourage postgraduate students researches, expanding methods for enhancing student learning through the use of different combined resources, such as educational technology, information technology and group dynamics. This new methodology was applied in a postgraduate discipline at Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Brazil, in the postgraduate discipline entitled Fundamental Elements of Radiological Protection (TNA-5732). Students have six weeks to assimilate a complex content of optimization, considering national and international standards, guidelines and recommendations published by different organizations over the past decades. Unlike traditional classes, in which students receive prompt responses, this new methodology stimulates discussion, encouraging collective thinking processes and promoting ongoing personal reflection and researches. Case-oriented problem-solving permitted students to play different roles, promoting whole-group discussions and cooperative learning, approaching theory and practical applications. Students discussed different papers, published in international conferences, and their implications according to current standards. The automation of optimization programs was essential as a research tool during the course. The results of this experience were evaluated in two consecutive years. We had excellent results compared to the previous 14 years. The methodology has exceeded expectations and will be also applied in 2013 to ionizing radiation monitoring postgraduate classes. (author)

  4. 38 CFR 20.101 - Rule 101. Jurisdiction of the Board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 15). (5) All-Volunteer Force Educational Assistance Program (38 U.S.C. chapter 30). (6) Training and... of Veterans Affairs under a law that affects the provision of benefits by the Secretary to veterans... jurisdiction include, but are not limited to, the following: (1) Entitlement to, and benefits resulting from...

  5. Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Field Office Jurisdiction/Divisions

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This dataset represents the FBI (Federal Bureau of Investigations) national field office jurisdiction/divisional boundary locations. The field offices are centrally...

  6. Is optimum and effective work done in administrative jurisdiction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoecht, H.

    1980-01-01

    Is optimum and effective work done in administrative jurisdiction. The author describes the general situation prevailing in administrative jurisdiction. He gives tables on the number of subjects received per annum, of judges administering justice and figures on executed and non-executed proceedings. He reports on districts of jurisdiction, personnel, court administration and the amount of work. The investigation into administrative jurisdiction has shown accomplishments for 1978 which are not bad at all. Sporadic administrative shortcomings are to be realized and put to an end. (HSCH) [de

  7. Is jurisdiction ousting policy-making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuerst, W.

    1981-01-01

    This report was given by the President of the Federal Administrative Court at a meeting of the Rechts- und Staatswissenschaftliche Vereinigung (Jurisprudence and Political Science Association) held at Duesseldorf in April 1979. It points out problems arising with the administration of justice in the field of administrative law as well as the limits set to it. If parliaments avoid to take political responsibility, the solving of political conflicts will be shifted to the other two powers. In case of controversy, jurisdiction in the field of administrative law would then have to make the final decision. It is for the legislator to preserve the function of judicial power, i.e., to exact from judges to make political, especially socio-political decisions. (HSCH) [de

  8. Local Identity in Times of Jurisdictional Consolidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sune Welling; Kjær, Ulrik

    of a dataset which consists of large scale citizen surveys conducted in 2001, 2009 and 2013, combined with register data on the Danish municipalities (the two surveys in 2001 and 2009 even have a panel structure). Our paper contributes to the existing literature on local identity by examining the influence......Reforming the public sector has become increasingly popular. Some of the reforms have been jurisdictional consolidations of subnational authorities such as regions and municipalities. One question which remains unanswered is whether such consolidations affect citizens’ local identity? We take...... a first step towards providing an answer by examining whether citizens’ affective attachment to their municipality – and other administrative and geographical areas – declined or flourished in connection with a large-scale municipal reform implemented in Denmark in 2007. Empirically, we make use...

  9. 43 CFR 24.3 - General jurisdictional principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false General jurisdictional principles. 24.3 Section 24.3 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE POLICY: STATE-FEDERAL RELATIONSHIPS § 24.3 General jurisdictional principles. (a) In...

  10. 15 CFR 990.41 - Determination of jurisdiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OIL POLLUTION ACT REGULATIONS NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Preassessment Phase § 990.41 Determination of jurisdiction. (a... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Determination of jurisdiction. 990.41...

  11. 18 CFR 39.2 - Jurisdiction and applicability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... RELIABILITY STANDARDS § 39.2 Jurisdiction and applicability. (a) Within the United States (other than Alaska... Reliability Standards established under section 215 of the Federal Power Act and enforcing compliance with... jurisdiction under paragraph (a) of this section shall comply with applicable Reliability Standards, the...

  12. Encouraging Literacy for Personal Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boody, Robert M.

    2003-01-01

    Considers that because literature can exert such a powerful hold on the imagination, certain works can be used to invite students to become more literate and to encourage students to take responsibility for their ongoing personal development. Notes that reading and other ways of learning are shown in fictional works of Louis L'Amour to be a rich…

  13. Dealing with duplicate regulations and conflicting jurisdictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aamodt, P.L.

    1991-01-01

    There are a number of situations where mixed wastes are regulated by dual regulations and regulators. This presentation attempts to show where such duplication exists and how it evolved historically through legislative actions. The presentation includes a discussion of strategies that have been used to deal with the problems that result from duplicate regulations and jurisdictional conflicts. The RCRA and AEA regulations are really more similar than dissimilar. There are significant issues that must be worked through with the regulators. It is most important to work with your regulators early in process. The following are suggestions for dealing with the regulators. (1) Know the regulations in advance of discussions. (2) Begin dialogue with the regulator(s) as early as possible and get to know the people you will be dealing with -- and let them know you. (3) Explain the technical/regulatory issues/problems that you face at your facility in sufficient detail that they are clearly understood, and work with the regulator(s) to reasonably address them in the language/requirements of the permit. (4) Always attempt to comply with the regulations first before going in with a variance request -- document your efforts, and be honest with your assessment of issues. (5) Don't be adversarial -- remember that the regulator has the same objectives as you do. 1 tab

  14. 78 FR 19353 - Biodiversity Beyond National Jurisdiction; Notice of Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice 8262] Biodiversity Beyond National Jurisdiction; Notice of... information session regarding issues related to marine biodiversity in areas beyond national jurisdiction... international meetings and negotiations on marine biodiversity beyond national jurisdiction, such as the meeting...

  15. Using Discovery Learning to Encourage Creative Thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mardia Hi. Rahman

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Creative thinking ability development is needed to be implemented by every educator including lecturers to their students. Therefore, they need to seriously act and design their learning process. One of the ways to develop student’s creative thinking is using discovery learning model. This research is conducted in physics education study program in 2016 with students who took learning and teaching class as research subject. From the research analysis result and discussion, it can be concluded that discovery learning model can encourage students’ creative thinking ability in learning and teaching strategy subject.

  16. Cleanups In My Community (CIMC) - Brownfields Grant Jurisdictions, National Layer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data layer provides access to Brownfields Grant Jurisdictions as part of the CIMC web service. The data represent polygonal boundaries that show different types...

  17. Original jurisdiction in matters relating to transport of radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Decisions on actions for avoidance of government supervision in matters of transport of radioactive substances are placed under the original jurisdiction of administrative courts. (Kassel Administrative Court, decision of 20 December 1988 - 8 A 699/88). (orig.) [de

  18. EPA Region 1 Coast Guard Jurisdictional Boundary - Polygons

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Jurisdictional boundary between EPA and Coast Guard for EPA Region I. Created from 1:100000 USGS DLGs with greater detail drawn from 1:24000 commercial street data...

  19. EPA Region 1 Coast Guard Jurisdictional Boundary - Arcs

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Jurisdictional boundary between EPA and Coast Guard for EPA Region I. Created from 1:100000 USGS DLGs with greater detail drawn from 1:24000 commercial street data...

  20. Jurisdiction in international law : United States and European perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Ryngaert, Cedric

    2007-01-01

    This study starts with a quote by Professor Meessen: “The function of scholars of international law offers less opportunity for creative thinking [compared to scholars of conflict of laws]: they may compile and analyze state practice, but they cannot replace it with their own concepts.”[1] This study, which primarily looks at the phenomenon of jurisdiction through a (public) international law lens, rejects that limiting claim. While the current state of the international law of jurisdiction ...

  1. Offshore jurisdictions, controversial topic of the modern business world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxana-Daniela PĂUN

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to present synthetically the off-shore jurisdiction issues in the context of the globalisation of our lives and automatically of the business world facing new issues and challenges regarding the business in the international area, starting from defining elements and approaching some of the practical challenges offered by the widespread use of such offshore jurisdictions known as “tax havens”.

  2. Medicare FFS Jurisdiction Error Rate Contribution Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services CMS is dedicated to continually strengthening and improving the Medicare program, which provides vital services to...

  3. THE USE OF OFFSHORE JURISDICTIONS IN INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL FITTINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DANIELA RADU

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Essential legal and financial Structures, sometimes complex, had until recently been small and medium entrepreneurs away from the use of offshore jurisdictions, but the constraints of increasingly heavy taxation of excessive in certain States, you push even those with limited resources to use in these jurisdictions to protect revenue. The purpose of this research is to analyze the offshore jurisdictions in order to determine the possibilities of useof their disadvantages in order to improve measures to combat tax evasion, as well as for the use of their advantages in order to reduce illegal migration and regular employment of capital through the analysis of specific cases of the use of offshore jurisdictions – Case Frabklin Jurado, The Bank of Commerce and Credit InternationalAmerican Express Bank International. Scientific novelty and originality of the investigation consists of:-the identification on the basis of international practice, some offshore jurisdictions specific items in order to reflect their fiscal policies (trade and investment, etc.-analysis of cases of the use of offshore jurisdictions in international financial fittings (such as the Bank of Credit and Commerce International; Franklin Jurado; American Express Bank International,-identification of the impact paradisurilor tax and offshore financial centres of the world economy– revealing secret financial transactions carried out within the framework of ofssore, research instruments jurisdictions and management techniques of cadrulacestor tax jurisdictions.It is interesting to be seen through the prism of analysis of economic-fiscal financiare if a competition is beneficial or not for the welfare of States and to what extent this competition will have a say in future developments and tax paradisurilor finanaciare offshore centres. In conclusion, I appreciate that in order to survive successfully in the global economy of the future, offshoreJurisdictions should promote a

  4. Setting a minimum age for juvenile justice jurisdiction in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    S Barnert, Elizabeth; S Abrams, Laura; Maxson, Cheryl; Gase, Lauren; Soung, Patricia; Carroll, Paul; Bath, Eraka

    2017-03-13

    Purpose Despite the existence of minimum age laws for juvenile justice jurisdiction in 18 US states, California has no explicit law that protects children (i.e. youth less than 12 years old) from being processed in the juvenile justice system. In the absence of a minimum age law, California lags behind other states and international practice and standards. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach In this policy brief, academics across the University of California campuses examine current evidence, theory, and policy related to the minimum age of juvenile justice jurisdiction. Findings Existing evidence suggests that children lack the cognitive maturity to comprehend or benefit from formal juvenile justice processing, and diverting children from the system altogether is likely to be more beneficial for the child and for public safety. Research limitations/implications Based on current evidence and theory, the authors argue that minimum age legislation that protects children from contact with the juvenile justice system and treats them as children in need of services and support, rather than as delinquents or criminals, is an important policy goal for California and for other national and international jurisdictions lacking a minimum age law. Originality/value California has no law specifying a minimum age for juvenile justice jurisdiction, meaning that young children of any age can be processed in the juvenile justice system. This policy brief provides a rationale for a minimum age law in California and other states and jurisdictions without one.

  5. Setting a minimum age for juvenile justice jurisdiction in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnert, Elizabeth S.; Abrams, Laura S.; Maxson, Cheryl; Gase, Lauren; Soung, Patricia; Carroll, Paul; Bath, Eraka

    2018-01-01

    Purpose Despite the existence of minimum age laws for juvenile justice jurisdiction in 18 US states, California has no explicit law that protects children (i.e. youth less than 12 years old) from being processed in the juvenile justice system. In the absence of a minimum age law, California lags behind other states and international practice and standards. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach In this policy brief, academics across the University of California campuses examine current evidence, theory, and policy related to the minimum age of juvenile justice jurisdiction. Findings Existing evidence suggests that children lack the cognitive maturity to comprehend or benefit from formal juvenile justice processing, and diverting children from the system altogether is likely to be more beneficial for the child and for public safety. Research limitations/implications Based on current evidence and theory, the authors argue that minimum age legislation that protects children from contact with the juvenile justice system and treats them as children in need of services and support, rather than as delinquents or criminals, is an important policy goal for California and for other national and international jurisdictions lacking a minimum age law. Originality/value California has no law specifying a minimum age for juvenile justice jurisdiction, meaning that young children of any age can be processed in the juvenile justice system. This policy brief provides a rationale for a minimum age law in California and other states and jurisdictions without one. Paper type Conceptual paper PMID:28299968

  6. The fine art of giving encouragement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidhizar, R

    1991-11-01

    1. Support and encouragement can significantly influence emotional well-being and profoundly affect quality of life. Encouragement is a powerful nursing strategy, increasing both nursing effectiveness and feelings of job satisfaction. 2. A variety of encouragement techniques are available, including focusing on the positive, communicating respect, showing appreciation, picking up the phone, avoiding a superior attitude, sharing personal experiences, providing motivation, and cheerleading. 3. To be most meaningful, words of encouragement should relate to a specific behavior. If encouragement is not consistent with an individual's personal wishes, goals, or feelings, encouragement may receive a negative response or be denied.

  7. Fuel Mix Impacts from Transportation Fuel Carbon Intensity Standards in Multiple Jurisdictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witcover, J.

    2017-12-01

    Fuel carbon intensity standards have emerged as an important policy in jurisdictions looking to target transportation greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for reduction. A carbon intensity standard rates transportation fuels based on analysis of lifecycle GHG emissions, and uses a system of deficits and tradable, bankable credits to reward increased use of fuels with lower carbon intensity ratings while disincentivizing use of fuels with higher carbon intensity ratings such as conventional fossil fuels. Jurisdictions with carbon intensity standards now in effect include California, Oregon, and British Columbia, all requiring 10% reductions in carbon intensity of the transport fuel pool over a 10-year period. The states and province have committed to grow demand for low carbon fuels in the region as part of collaboration on climate change policies. Canada is developing a carbon intensity standard with broader coverage, for fuels used in transport, industry, and buildings. This study shows a changing fuel mix in affected jurisdictions under the policy in terms of shifting contribution of transportation energy from alternative fuels and trends in shares of particular fuel pathways. It contrasts program designs across the jurisdictions with the policy, highlights the opportunities and challenges these pose for the alternative fuel market, and discusses the impact of having multiple policies alongside federal renewable fuel standards and sometimes local carbon pricing regimes. The results show how the market has responded thus far to a policy that incentivizes carbon saving anywhere along the supply chain at lowest cost, in ways that diverged from a priori policy expectations. Lessons for the policies moving forward are discussed.

  8. Location, Location: Jurisdiction & Conflicts in Transborder Contract Litigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lookofsky, Joseph

    In transborder contract litigation place-based factors are often decisive, both as regards jurisdiction to adjudicate as well as the rules which determine the applicable substantive law. Relevant locations include the place where the contract was made, where the parties reside, transact business...... or own property, the place of delivery, payment or other performance etc. Using concrete case-based examples, Professor Lookofsky explains how rules of jurisdiction and contract conflicts in Europe are tied to rigidly defined, single-place-based factors. In the United States, by contrast...

  9. 36 CFR 293.10 - Jurisdiction over wildlife and fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and fish. 293.10 Section 293.10 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WILDERNESS-PRIMITIVE AREAS § 293.10 Jurisdiction over wildlife and fish. Nothing in the... States with respect to wildlife and fish in the National Forests. ...

  10. 1/54 CROSS-BORDER JURISDICTION AND ASSISTANCE IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Tanya du Plessis

    2.1 The place of Malaysia and Singapore within common law nations. The history of ..... security to be given by a liquidator50 was held applicable to a company ... jurisdiction restrain a party from proceeding with an action on liability incurred.

  11. States' criminal jurisdiction under International Law: fostering a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Over the past few years, the extent to which international law allows States to exercise their jurisdiction in criminal matters has been a subject of diplomatic tensions between States. The purpose of this paper is to shed some light, on the question as to what extent a State, powerful or weak, has a right under international law ...

  12. International Jurisdiction and Commercial Litigation: uniform rules for contract disputes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. van Lith (Hélène)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThis book deals with judicial jurisdiction of state courts in international disputes, in particular those arising out of transnational commercial contracts entered into between private entities, individuals, and corporations.1 The present study examines whether any common grounds in

  13. Thinking out the Box: Promoting Inter-jurisdictional Collaboration in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The issue of inter-jurisdictional collaboration is explored with reference to the Karoo region of South Africa. This region has not reached its economic potential, because it straddles four provinces. Nevertheless, there are positive signs of a new appreciation of regionalism in South Africa, in terms of academic analyses, civil ...

  14. EPA Region 1 Coast Guard Jurisdictional Boundary - Polygons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurisdictional boundary between EPA and Coast Guard for EPA Region I. Created from 1:100000 USGS DLGs with greater detail drawn from 1:24000 commercial street data for Region I.This layer is used to determine which agency will be reponsible in the event of an oil spill.

  15. EPA Region 1 Coast Guard Jurisdictional Boundary - Arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurisdictional boundary between EPA and Coast Guard for EPA Region I. Created from 1:100000 USGS DLGs with greater detail drawn from 1:24000 commercial street data for Region I.This layer is used to determine which agency will be reponsible in the event of an oil spill.

  16. 76 FR 52658 - State Program Requirements; Approval of Application for Program Revision to the National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-23

    ... program, pretreatment program, and miscellaneous non-domestic discharges; and Phase III includes mining... the EPA consider adopting stipulations related to jurisdiction issues and authorities of federally...

  17. Sharing Ideas: Tough Times Encourage Colleges to Collaborate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fain, Paul; Blumenstyk, Goldie; Sander, Libby

    2009-01-01

    Tough times are encouraging colleges to share resources in a variety of areas, including campus security, research, and degree programs. Despite its veneer of cooperation, higher education is a competitive industry, where resource sharing is eyed warily. But the recession is chipping away at that reluctance, and institutions are pursuing…

  18. EXPORT CONTROLS: Change in Export Licensing Jurisdiction for Two Sensitive Dual-Use Items

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Spencer, F

    1997-01-01

    This report examines the jurisdiction shift of two items, previously controlled by the State Department to the Department of Commerce, and the implications of this change to export licensing jurisdiction...

  19. Competition for Jurisdiction Over Food Industry in South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungeun Park

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the government’s multilateral effort to control food safety, there have been constantly many shock events threatening citizens’ health. This paper points out the matter of food safety management system with a view of competition for jurisdiction over food industry among the Ministry of Health and Welfare and the Ministry for Food, Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries and affiliated organizations. Use description qualitative method in research. Each ministry has separate basic positions and approaches to food industry policy: regulation and promotion.The policy image has been changed into “regulation” as public anxiety and concern for hazardous foods has grown since the end of 1990. They competeto take charge of promoting or regulating the food industry by establishing or amending laws, expanding organizations and mobilizing a coalition.Coordination by policy committee, cooperation between agencies, and integration of agencies were introduced as measures to eliminate unnecessary competition for jurisdiction.

  20. Jurisdictional Competition Between Private and Public Sector Auditors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov Jeppesen, Kim

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the apparent paradox that while public sector auditors have become more powerful by claiming performance auditing expertise and linking this to New Public Management reforms, the same reforms have provided an opening for competition between private and public sector auditors....... In Denmark, the competitive relation has led to a jurisdictional dispute between public and private sector auditors in which the former have developed a special qualification for public sector auditors. The paper analyses the development of this qualification using Abbott's (1988) theory of the system...... of professions, thus focusing on how the involved groups have attempted to build networks of support for their competing jurisdictional claims of expertise. The case contributes to knowledge about the potential for development of a distinct public sector auditor identity. The case suggests that to develop...

  1. Discourse Analysis of Encouragement in Healthcare Manga

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Rieko; Smith, Ian; Uchimura, Mari

    2011-01-01

    This article examines how healthcare professionals use encouragement. Focusing on GAMBARU ["to try hard"], forty-one scenes were collected from healthcare manga. Each scene of encouragement was analyzed from three perspectives; the contextual background of the communication, the relationship with the patients and the patients' response…

  2. Conflicts of Criminal Jurisdiction in the European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Zimmermann

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Conflicts of criminal jurisdiction between the Member States belong to the most difficult challenges that the European Union has to face in order to establish a true “area of freedom, security and justice”. This article starts with an analysis of the interests that are affected by such conflicts: on the one hand, they are most problematic for the individual because they can lead to repeated or simultaneous proceedings in different Member States and forum shopping by prosecution authorities. What is more, they can even make it impossible to foresee whether and how severely an act will be punished. Thus, essential criminal law and procedure guarantees like ne bis in idem, the principle of legality, the right to a court established by law as well as the right to an effective defence are jeopardised. On the other, the Member States involved often have a legitimate interest in prosecution—or non-prosecution—and risk to spend their financial and personnel resources for ineffective parallel proceedings. In order to avoid conflicts of criminal jurisdiction, various models are conceivable. However, the most convincing one—according to the author’s opinion—builds upon a combination of different elements: a hierarchy of jurisdictional links should form the basis, but it would have to be complemented with provisions allowing for more flexibility in precisely defined circumstances. With this in mind, this article calls for the adoption of an EU regulation in order to solve the most urgent problems arising from conflicts of criminal jurisdiction and makes concrete suggestions as to its drafting.

  3. Transportation and access for sub-national island jurisdictions

    OpenAIRE

    Stuart, Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    The overall aim of this paper is to discern lessons from the category of sub-national island jurisdictions (SNIJs) which have in some way exploited and capitalized upon their airspace, territorial waters, seaports and harbours to solve their transportation problems as well as enhance their global economic competitiveness and development. The focus here is on sub-national island territories (larger than municipalities) which have and use, to varying degrees, their formal and ...

  4. Local jurisdictions and active shooters : building networks, building capacities

    OpenAIRE

    Frazzano, Tracy L.

    2010-01-01

    CHDS State/Local Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited States incidents (Columbine High School shooting (April 20, 1999) and North Hollywood Bank shoot out (February 28, 1997) were studied. Individuals from the U.S. cases were interviewed to explore information not necessarily documented. Data from the case studies and interviews were collated and reviewed for common themes. These themes were analyzed to draw conclusions on how smaller jurisdictions should proceed in bu...

  5. 75 FR 30301 - Jurisdictional Separations and Referral to the Federal-State Joint Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 36 [CC Docket No. 80-286; FCC 10-89] Jurisdictional Separations and Referral to the Federal-State Joint Board AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION... relationships and jurisdictional cost allocation factors used in jurisdictional separations. Extending the...

  6. 17 CFR 250.8 - Exemption of subsidiaries subject to jurisdiction of Interstate Commerce Commission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... subject to jurisdiction of Interstate Commerce Commission. 250.8 Section 250.8 Commodity and Securities... to jurisdiction of Interstate Commerce Commission. Any subsidiary company of a registered holding company, which subsidiary is subject to the jurisdiction of the Interstate Commerce Commission but is not...

  7. The role of encouragement in primary schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalić Nataša Z.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Encouragement can be applied in several important segments: creation of a positive social and emotional atmosphere, creation of a positive learning environment, use of preventive techniques in some discipline-related situations, type of intervention when dealing with behavioral problems of students and in the strategy of strengthening students self-confidence. The paper deals with the frequency and manners in which encouragement is used. One of the primary segments in which encouragement is exercised is teacher-student relation, where both verbal and non-verbal encouragement approval, praise, reward and example have large rational and emotional significance. The research comprises the results of systematic observation of individual encouragement tools with their characteristics and functions in primary school teaching practice. The research has been conducted in three primary schools in Belgrade. The quantitative indicators show the reduced frequency of encouragement with the growing age of students. The collected results reveal that in relation to the tested variables the teacher’s personality plays an important role. This suggests the need for teachers to be instructed on the possibilities and conditions for the use of encouragement with primary school children.

  8. 78 FR 13604 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement: Encouragement of Science, Technology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-28

    ..., either formal or informal, that encourage the pursuit of education and experience in the science..., programs or initiatives, either formal or informal, which encourage the pursuit of education and experience... Title I schools in order to enhance STEM education and programs; Making personnel available to advise...

  9. COLLABORATIVE PROCEDURE TO ACHIEVE AN EFFECTIVE JURISDICTIONAL TUTELAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darilê Marques da Matta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Set in a constitutional context, the procedure should be an effective instrument for the guarantee and realization of rights. Attentive to the needs imposed by the state of Law, the new Civil Procedure Code, approved this year, 2 015, seeks to settle several constitutional guarantees, for the purpose of making the procedure more effective. From the inclusion of collaborative institutes, the new Civil Procedure C ode introduces the concept of self-composition and cooperation of procedural agents to achieve, timely, effective jurisdictional tutelage.

  10. Delays in Medical Malpractice Litigation in Civil Law Jurisdictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grembi, Veronica; Garoupaa, Nuno

    2013-01-01

    Medical malpractice law and tort reform are contentious issues. In this paper, we focus on Italy as an example of a civil law jurisdiction. Italian medical malpractice law is essentially judge-made law. However, its effectiveness is likely to be curtailed by excessive delays in litigation. Several...... reforms have been enacted since the late 1980s to correct this situation. By making use of the decisions of the Italian Court of Cassation (which have shaped medical malpractice law) from 1970 to 2009, we show that these reforms had no general statistically significant impact on delays. Recent reduction...

  11. Charitable Incorporated Organisations : an analysis of the three UK jurisdictions

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan, Gareth G

    2015-01-01

    The specific legal forms available for charitable organisations have received much less attention by scholars as compared to work on the definition of charity, the boundaries of charitable status and the duties of charity trustees.\\ud \\ud Under each of the three UK jurisdictions, it could be argued that all charitable property is held on trust (in the sense that it is held for interests of the charity’s\\ud beneficiaries) but many charities are no longer formed using the structure of a trust. ...

  12. Cross-jurisdictional management of a trophy-hunted species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochard, Jacob; Finnoff, David

    2017-05-07

    Gray wolves (Canis lupus) are managed for competing uses in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE). Tourism benefits Yellowstone National Park (YNP) visitors while trophy hunting benefits hunters outside of the park. We investigate the policy scope of gray wolf management across jurisdictional boundaries by incorporating three foundations of the behavioral ecology of wolves: refuge-seeking behavior, optimal foraging group size and territoriality. Tradeoffs between and within consumptive and non-consumptive human benefits and wolf population fitness and life history indicators are quantified as a set of elasticities, providing clear implications to resource managers. Our approach highlights that hunting intensity affects the provision of consumptive and non-consumptive human benefits across jurisdictional boundaries and ought to be managed accordingly. We also show that population levels are an incomplete indicator of species fitness, which may depend on how hunting policies impact underlying group ecology. Our findings suggest traditional optimization approaches to wildlife management may lead to suboptimal policy recommendations when the boundaries on the natural system are oversimplified. Highlighting the human element of wildlife management, we show that understanding tourist and hunter responses to wildlife population abundances is critical to balancing provision of consumptive and non-consumptive human uses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Abortion law across Australia--A review of nine jurisdictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Costa, Caroline; Douglas, Heather; Hamblin, Julie; Ramsay, Philippa; Shircore, Mandy

    2015-04-01

    This article reviews the current legal status of abortion in Australia and its implications. Australian abortion law has been a matter for the states since before Federation. In the years since Federation there have been significant reforms and changes in the abortion laws of some jurisdictions, although not all. Across Australia there are now nine sets of laws, state and Commonwealth, concerned with abortion. The test of a lawful abortion varies greatly across jurisdictions. In a number of states and territories, it is necessary to establish a serious risk to the physical or mental health of the woman if the pregnancy was to continue. In some cases, the certification of two doctors is required, particularly for abortions at later gestations. There are also physical restrictions on access, such as in South Australia and the Northern Territory where abortion must take place in a hospital. Only in the ACT has abortion been removed from the criminal law altogether. Variations in the law and restrictions arising from these are not consistent with the aims and provision of the universal, accessible health care system aspired to in Australia. There is an urgent need for overall reform and the introduction of uniformity to Australia's abortion laws, including removal of abortion from the criminal law. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  14. Federal/State Jurisdictional Split: Implications for Emerging Electricity Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis, Jeffery S. [Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP, Washington, DC (United States); Kelly, Suedeen G. [Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP, Washington, DC (United States); Nordhaus, Robert R. [Van Ness Feldman, LLP, Washington, DC (United States); Smith, Douglas W. [Van Ness Feldman, LLP, Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-12-01

    The first Administration-wide Quadrennial Energy Review (QER), released in April 2015, found that the “interacting and overlapping” division of authority between “federal, regional and state institutions and regulatory structures” for the electricity sector could “impede development of the grid of the future [and] . . . the development of markets that efficiently integrate” new and emerging technologies.1 While “technology is indifferent to state-Federal boundaries and jurisdictions,” the QER explained, “technology users cannot be.”2 The report concluded that “[b]oth Federal and state governments need to play constructive and collaborative roles in the future to ensure that consumers and industry are able to maximize the value of new technologies.”3 The QER recommended that the Department of Energy (“DOE”) facilitate such collaboration by playing a “convening role” to bring together state and federal regulators and other stakeholders to consider these issues.4 This paper provides background and analysis on these jurisdictional issues and the impact they may have on adoption of emerging energy technologies and coordination of markets for those technologies, in support of future dialogs on these subjects. In particular, this paper reviews the structure of the Federal Power Act (“FPA”),5 and compares the division of authority between the federal and state governments adopted there with other federal energy and energy-related statutes.

  15. Incidence of cancer in children residing in ten jurisdictions of the Mexican Republic: importance of the Cancer registry (a population-based study)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajardo-Gutiérrez, Arturo; Juárez-Ocaña, Servando; González-Miranda, Guadalupe; Palma-Padilla, Virginia; Carreón-Cruz, Rogelio; Ortega-Alvárez, Manuel Carlos; Mejía-Arangure, Juan Manuel

    2007-01-01

    In 1996, Mexico started to register cases of childhood cancer. Here, we describe the incidence of cancer in children, residing in ten Mexican jurisdictions, who were treated by the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS). New cases of childhood cancer, which were registered prospectively in nine principal Medical Centers of IMSS during the periods 1998–2000 (five jurisdictions) and 1996–2002 (five jurisdictions), were analyzed. Personnel were specifically trained to register, capture, and encode information. For each of these jurisdictions, the frequency, average annual age-standardized incidence (AAS) and average annual incidence per period by sex and, age, were calculated (rates per 1,000,000 children/years). In total 2,615 new cases of cancer were registered, with the male/female ratio generally >1, but in some tumors there were more cases in females (retinoblastoma, germ cells tumors). The principal groups of neoplasms in seven jurisdictions were leukemias, central nervous system tumors (CNS tumors), and lymphomas, and the combined frequency for these three groups was 62.6 to 77.2%. Most frequently found (five jurisdictions) was the North American-European pattern (leukemias-CNS tumors-lymphomas). Eight jurisdictions had AAS within the range reported in the world literature. The highest incidence was found for children underless than five year of age. In eight jurisdictions, leukemia had high incidence (>50). The AAS of lymphomas was between 1.9 to 28.6. Chiapas and Guerrero had the highest AAS of CNS tumors (31.9 and 30.3, respectively). The frequency and incidence of neuroblastoma was low. Chiapas had the highest incidence of retinoblastoma (21.8). Germ-cell tumors had high incidence. The North American-European pattern of cancers was the principal one found; the overall incidence was within the range reported worldwide. In general but particularly in two jurisdictions (Yucatán and Chiapas), it will be necessary to carry out studies concerning the

  16. Teaching statistics in an activity encouraging format

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knypstra, S.

    2009-01-01

    In a statistics course for bachelor students in econometrics a new format was adopted in which students were encouraged to study more actively and in which cooperative learning and peer teaching was implemented. Students had to work in groups of two or three students where each group had to perform

  17. Reasons encouraging adolescents to take up smoking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orosova, Olga; Geckova, Andrea Madarasova; Bacikova-Sleskova, Maria; van Dijk, Jitse P.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To understand adolescents' smoking behavior by analyzing retrospective self-ratings of the reasons encouraging them to take up smoking. Method: Participating in the study were 883 students (373 boys) of elementary and secondary schools in Kosice, Slovak Republic (74.9% of adolescents in the

  18. Do markets encourage risk-seeking behaviour?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mengel, F.; Peeters, R.J.A.P.

    2015-01-01

    Excessive risk taking in markets can have devastating consequences as recent financial crises have high-lighted. In this paper we ask whether markets as an institution encourage such excessive risk taking. To establish causality, we isolate the effects of market interaction in a laboratory

  19. Encouraging Creativity in the Science Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyster, Linda

    2010-01-01

    Although science is a creative endeavor (NRC 1996, p. 46), many students think they are not encouraged--or even allowed--to be creative in the laboratory. When students think there is only one correct way to do a lab, their creativity is inhibited. Park and Seung (2008) argue for the importance of creativity in science classrooms and for the…

  20. Using Emoticons to Encourage Students to Recycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Matthew D.; Trudel, Remi

    2017-01-01

    Uncovering inexpensive, simple techniques to encourage students to act in a pro-environmental manner is of critical importance. Through a four-week field study at a large, environmentally focused elementary school, it was found that placing negatively valenced emoticons (i.e., red frowny faces) on trash cans increased the proportion of recycled…

  1. Programa para estimular autocontrol emocional en población laboral con ansiedad del Área Previsora. Municipio Camagüey Anxiety in the working population: A program to encourage emotional self - control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazmín Claro Toledo

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available La presente investigación, enmarcada dentro de los paradigmas cualitativo y cuantitativo, tuvo por objetivo general diseñar y aplicar un Programa de Intervención Psicológica para estimular Autocontrol Emocional y así disminuir niveles y/o puntajes de ansiedad en una población laboral activa adscripta al Policlínico Previsora del municipio Camagüey, la cual se llevó a cabo entre febrero y junio del 2005. Se compararon los dos grupos que componían la muestra, (un grupo estudio de 30 sujetos y uno lista de espera con 30 sujetos, utilizándose como técnicas la observación, la entrevista, el IDARE, el ISRA-B; se analizaron cualitativa y cuantitativamente los resultados, los que corroboraron la hipótesis inicial trazada: El Programa de Intervención Psicológica es efectivo al estimular el autocontrol emocional y propiciar reducciones en los niveles de ansiedad en la población laboral activa objeto de estudio, lo cual se corroboróThe present investigation, framed of the qualitative and quantitative paradigms. It had for general to design and to apply a program of psychological intervention to stimulate emotional auto control and this way to diminish levels of anxiety in active labour population assigned to the Previsora Polyclinic of Camagüey municipality which has carried out between February and June of the 2005. The two groups that compound the sample were compared (a group-study of 30 fellows and a waiting list of 30 fellows using techniques as the observation, the interview, the IDARE and the ISRA-B. The results were analized qualitative and quantitatively, which corroborated the planned initial hypothesis. The program of Psychological Intervention is effective to stimulate the emotional auto control and to propitiate reductions in the levels of anxiety in active labor population object of study. This was corroborated.

  2. 76 FR 39341 - Encouraging New Markets Tax Credit Non-Real Estate Investments; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 [REG-114206-11] RIN 1545-BK21 Encouraging New Markets Tax Credit Non-Real Estate Investments; Correction AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service... how the new markets tax credit program may be amended to encourage non-real estate investments. FOR...

  3. 76 FR 32880 - Encouraging New Markets Tax Credit Non-Real Estate Investments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-07

    ... Encouraging New Markets Tax Credit Non-Real Estate Investments AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS... markets tax credit. Specifically, this document invites comments from the public on how the new markets tax credit program may be amended to encourage non-real estate investments. The regulations will...

  4. THE ORGANIZATION OF JURISDICTION IN EUROPEAN UNION PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Agheniţei

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, universal jurisdiction is the favorite technique used to prevent impunity for international crimes and it is one of the most effective methods to deter and prevent international crimes by increasing the like hood of prosecution and punishment of its propagators. In regard to the defendants’ rights, the European Union states consider applicable all the rights that are necessary to assure that the trial is equitable and expeditious. There is no exception to the right to a fair trial. So, a defendant who is being prosecuted on the basis of the universality principle can rely on all the procedural rights provided for the Convention on Human Rights and the domestic code of criminal procedure without any restrictions. In Germany, the Federal Constitutional Court, in a case concerning genocide committed abroad, declared expressly that no special criminal proceedings must be provided for specific crimes.

  5. Hageseth's principle of extraterritorial jurisdiction and international telemedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Thomas R; McLean, Alexander B

    2008-01-01

    At what point does an international telemedicine transaction create a sufficient commercial nexus to allow one country the authority to impose its laws on a foreign telemedicine providers? Some light on this matter was shed by the US case of Hageseth versus Superior Court. The authority for extraterritorial jurisdiction is found in the US Constitution, which requires the states to cooperate in matters of law enforcement. Similar cooperation from foreign nations cannot be expected. Unless a defendant is charged with a capital offence, nations are rarely willing to extradite their citizens. As the unlicensed practice of medicine is not a capital offence, it is unlikely that an unlicensed telemedicine provider would be extradited to the US. Because low-volume unlicensed offshore telemedicine providers are unlikely to be extradited or to be subject to trade sanctions, they may be able to operate beyond the law.

  6. Border Patrol: Professional Jurisdictions in Sustainable Urban Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Henn

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available According to the United Nations, our world is becoming more populated, more urban, more connected, more globalized, and more complex. With this physical and social complexity comes a need for increased coordination in negotiating our urban futures. Environmental design and planning professionals have worked for decades according to traditional institutionalized role structures. Sustainability—in considering a wider variety of stakeholders—promises not only to include more members in the typical design and construction team (e.g., sustainability consultants, community representatives, technical specialists, etc., but also to change the jurisdiction of tasks (e.g., project management, decision making, design leadership, etc. taken on by actors in traditional roles (e.g., owner, architect, contractor, etc.. This paper examines how a wider social concern for environmental and social sustainability has affected the design and construction industry. Organizational and sociological theories suggest that professions are “bound to a set of tasks by ties of jurisdiction... [P]rofessions make up an interacting system... and a profession’s success reflects as much the situations of its competitors and the system structure as it does the profession’s own efforts” (Abbott 1988: 33. Abbott also suggests that “larger social forces” affect the structuring of professional boundaries. Treating sustainability as a “larger social force,” this paper examines current understandings of professional boundaries in the planning, design, and construction of our environments. It answers questions of how professionals renegotiate roles, responsibilities, and compensation when dealing with an uncertain change in traditional processes.The qualitative data stem from three university building projects. Each project was proposed ab initio without a mandate to achieve LEED Certification, but this complex criterion was subsequently added at different phases of

  7. Incentives to Encourage Scientific Web Contribution (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, A. K.

    2010-12-01

    We suggest improvements to citation standards and creation of remuneration opportunities to encourage career scientist contributions to Web2.0 and social media science channels. At present, agencies want to accomplish better outreach and engagement with no funding, while scientists sacrifice their personal time to contribute to web and social media sites. Securing active participation by scientists requires career recognition of the value scientists provide to web knowledge bases and to the general public. One primary mechanism to encourage participation is citation standards, which let a contributor improve their reputation in a quantifiable way. But such standards must be recognized by their scientific and workplace communities. Using case studies such as the acceptance of web in the workplace and the growth of open access journals, we examine what agencies and individual can do as well as the time scales needed to secure increased active contribution by scientists. We also discuss ways to jumpstart this process.

  8. Prescolar teacher's encouragement of the children's storytelling

    OpenAIRE

    Kokovnik, Veronika

    2011-01-01

    In my graduate thesis titled »Prescolar teacher's encouragement of the children's storytelling« I want to highlight the importance of the professional workers in kindergartens when it comes to the development of the children's way of thinking and their speech. With the adequate planning and practicing of the activities we have a great influence over children's language capacities; among them the children's capacities of the storytelling. In the theoretical part of the thesis I will focus o...

  9. Creativity and Innovation Encouraged in Hospital X

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateja Bogovič

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Research Question (RQ: Are creativity and innovation encouraged in Hospital X? Does satisfaction of employees at the workplace depend on the length of their employment? Does employee satisfaction depend on innovation? Purpose: It is important that creativity and innovation of employees are noticed in Hospital X in a timely manner. Various approaches can be used to motivate their creative thinking (using different professional factors. Method: Qualitative method, questionnaire with 8 questions and processing of results with χ2 test and frequency distribution. Results: The results of the research showed that 60% of employees at Hospital X were encouraged to be creative and innovative, whereas satisfaction at the workplace in connection with the period of employment did not have an effect on their satisfaction within the organization. Organization: The research results will give the management a clearer idea of employees’ opinions concerning their creativity and innovation. Society: Opinion of workers in a certain organization can encourage other organizations to be more creative and innovative. Originality: It is a small organization and results of the research refer to its originality. Limitations/Future Research: The limitation of this study was with regard to time and for this reason data collection was carried out only in the surgical unit of Hospital X.

  10. Does Daylight Savings Time encourage physical activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zick, Cathleen D

    2014-07-01

    Extending Daylight Savings Time (DST) has been identified as a policy intervention that may encourage physical activity. However, there has been little research on the question of if DST encourages adults to be more physically active. Data from residents of Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah ages 18-64 who participated in the 2003-2009 American Time Use Survey are used to assess whether DST is associated with increased time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). The analysis capitalizes on the natural experiment created because Arizona does not observe DST. Both bivariate and multivariate analyses indicate that shifting 1 hour of daylight from morning to evening does not impact MVPA of Americans living in the southwest. While DST may affect the choices people make about the timing and location of their sports/recreational activities, the potential for DST to serve as a broad-based intervention that encourages greater sports/recreation participation is not supported by this analysis. Whether this null effect would persist in other climate situations is an open question.

  11. Rewriting abortion: deploying medical records in jurisdictional negotiation over a forbidden practice in Senegal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Siri

    2014-01-01

    Boundary work refers to the strategies deployed by professionals in the arenas of the public, the law and the workplace to define and defend jurisdictional authority. Little attention has been directed to the role of documents in negotiating professional claims. While boundary work over induced abortion has been extensively documented, few studies have examined jurisdictional disputes over the treatment of abortion complications, or post-abortion care (PAC). This study explores how medical providers deploy medical records in boundary work over the treatment of complications of spontaneous and induced abortion in Senegal, where induced abortion is prohibited under any circumstance. Findings are based on an institutional ethnography of Senegal’s national PAC program over a period of 13 months between 2010 and 2011. Data collection methods included in-depth interviews with 36 health care professionals, observation of PAC services at three hospitals, a review of abortion records at each hospital, and a case review of illegal abortions prosecuted by the state. Findings show that health providers produce a particular account of the type of abortion treated through a series of practices such as the patient interview and the clinical exam. Providers obscure induced abortion in medical documents in three ways: the use of terminology that does not differentiate between induced and spontaneous abortion in PAC registers, the omission of data on the type of abortion altogether in PAC registers, and reporting the total number but not the type of abortions treated in hospital data transmitted to state health authorities. The obscuration of suspected induced abortion in the record permits providers to circumvent police inquiry at the hospital. PAC has been implemented in nearly 50 countries worldwide. This study demonstrates the need for additional research on how medical professionals negotiate conflicting medical and legal obligations in the daily practice of treating abortion

  12. 9 CFR 329.4 - Notification of governmental authorities having jurisdiction over article or livestock detained...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... authorities having jurisdiction over article or livestock detained; form of written notification. 329.4... governmental authorities having jurisdiction over article or livestock detained; form of written notification. Within 48 hours after the detention of any livestock or article pursuant to this part, an authorized...

  13. Jurisdiction by Necessity and the Regulation of the Transnational Corporate Actor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chilenye Nwapi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the feasibility of using the jurisdiction by necessity doctrine to promote the accountability of transnational corporations (TNCs for extraterritorial human and environmental rights abuses committed in developing countries with weak accountability mechanisms. Under the doctrine, a court devoid of jurisdiction may nevertheless hear a dispute where it considers that there is no other court where the dispute may be heard or where the plaintiff may be reasonably expected to bring the action. The article analyzes the inadequacy of existing jurisdictional doctrines in light of the complex web of operations of TNCs, which shields them from the reach of traditional jurisdictional doctrines. After exploring the origin of the jurisdiction by necessity doctrine, the article critically examines the elements of the doctrine to see how they may be applied to the regulation of TNCs. The article argues that the emergence of the jurisdiction by necessity doctrine offers plaintiffs in transnational corporate human rights litigation a new jurisdictional possibility to weigh, as the doctrine has the potential to address some of the jurisdictional difficulties encountered in such litigation.

  14. 76 FR 76037 - Office of the Attorney General; Assumption of Concurrent Federal Criminal Jurisdiction in Certain...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-06

    ... Office of the Attorney General; Assumption of Concurrent Federal Criminal Jurisdiction in Certain Areas of Indian Country AGENCY: Office of the Attorney General, Department of Justice. ACTION: Final rule... concurrent criminal jurisdiction within the tribe's Indian country, and for the Attorney General to decide...

  15. 29 CFR 37.84 - What happens if CRC does not have jurisdiction over a complaint?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true What happens if CRC does not have jurisdiction over a complaint? 37.84 Section 37.84 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor IMPLEMENTATION OF THE... Procedures § 37.84 What happens if CRC does not have jurisdiction over a complaint? If CRC does not have...

  16. 8 CFR 1003.24 - Fees pertaining to matters within the jurisdiction of an immigration judge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... jurisdiction of an immigration judge. 1003.24 Section 1003.24 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE GENERAL PROVISIONS EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW Immigration Court-Rules of Procedure § 1003.24 Fees pertaining to matters within the jurisdiction of an...

  17. 15 CFR 806.10 - Determining place of residence and country of jurisdiction of individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... DIRECT INVESTMENT SURVEYS § 806.10 Determining place of residence and country of jurisdiction of... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Determining place of residence and country of jurisdiction of individuals. 806.10 Section 806.10 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations...

  18. Scholarships for scientific initiation encourage post-graduation degree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Gabriela S; Nascimento, Gustavo G; Mendes, Matheus S; Ogliari, Fabrício A; Demarco, Flávio F; Correa, Marcos B

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the factors associated with the decision to attend an academic post-graduation program by dental students. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2012, last-year undergraduate students from Dental Schools of Southern Brazil. A closed questionnaire was applied including questions grouped in three different blocks: pre-graduate, undergraduate period and future perspectives. The outcome was the decision to pursuit an academic post-graduation degree. Associations were tested using chi-squared test and chi-squared test for linear trends when appropriate. Multivariate Poisson regression was also performed. The sample was composed by 671 students (response rate of 69.9%, n=467). In relation to future perspectives, 68% of the interviewed students intended to attend a post-graduation program, but only 17.5% would choose a program with academic and research post-graduation program (Master and PhD programs). In the final model, students from public universities (PR 2.08, 95%CI 1.41-3.08) and students that received scientific initiation scholarship (PR 1.93 95%CI 1.14-3.27) presented a twice greater prevalence to seek academic post-graduate programs. Students with higher family incomes showed a lower prevalence to seek these programs (PR 0.50, 95%IC 0.28-0.90). Scholarships seem to encourage undergraduate students to pursue stricto sensu post-graduation.

  19. What would encourage blood donation in Ireland?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, M; Sweeney, M R; Bailie, K; Morris, K; Kennedy, A; Boilson, A; O'Riordan, J; Staines, A

    2007-05-01

    Recent changes have resulted in the loss of 4% of the donor panel in the Republic of Ireland and 3% in Northern Ireland. In order to increase the number of donors in these two regions, it is important that transfusion service providers explore and understand the reasons, which prevent individuals from donating. The aim of this study was to explore these issues particularly in non-donors and those who had lapsed. This 7-month all-Ireland study was conducted by computer-assisted telephone interview. Data collected included sociodemographic history, donation status, as well as barriers/deterrents to donation. There were 4166 completed questionnaires (44% donors; 56% non-donors). Of the donors, 13% had donated blood within the last 2 years. Current donors cited 'awareness of patients needs' (88%), 'trust in the blood transfusion service' (70%), and 'an advertising campaign' (70%) as reasons encouraging them to donate blood. Lapsed donors and non-donors cited 'more frequent mobile clinics/sessions' (30% lapsed donors; 53% non-donors), 'if I was asked' (28% lapsed donors; 53% non-donors), and 'more flexible opening hours' (23% lapsed donors; 44% non-donors) as reasons that would encourage them to donate. The main reasons cited by non-donors for never having donated included 'medical reasons' (41% Republic of Ireland; 43% Northern Ireland), 'lack of information' (20% Republic of Ireland; 22% Northern Ireland), 'fear of needles' (15% Republic of Ireland; 17% Northern Ireland), and 'time constraints' (12% Republic of Ireland; 13% Northern Ireland). Among the non-donor group, 10% (Republic of Ireland) and 6% (Northern Ireland) claimed that they are not permitted to donate. Replacing regular donors is a major challenge for the transfusion service providers. This study shows that by facilitating the general public by introducing more mobile clinics/sessions, more flexible opening hours and having a better level of knowledge in the community about blood donation may encourage

  20. Alternative Fuels Data Center: City of Chicago Program Encourages Petroleum

    Science.gov (United States)

    lacked the funds to support such a project, but officials worked with the Chicago Area Clean Cities (CACC networking opportunities. This photo shows a parked compressed natural gas van the City of Chicago's fleet Infrastructure: 11 private E85 fueling stations Related Links Ethanol Natural Gas Chicago Area Clean Cities

  1. Universal Jurisdiction between Unity and Fragmentation of International Criminal Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasculli Maria Antonella

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents the outcome of research fellowship Marie Curie at the Universiteit Leiden -Campud Den Haag Grotius, Centre for International Legal Studies (prof. C. Stahn and prof. Larissa van den Herik, supervisors on the topic "The Fragmentation and the Diversification of International Criminal Law in a Global Society”.In my paper I will examine the question of whether Universal Jurisdiction (UJ leads to unity or fragmentation within International Criminal Law (ICL. Given that there is already quite a lot of literature on UJ, it is important to focus the research on the issue of fragmentation and/or unity rather than to deal with the issue of UJ more generally. I will focus on this topic in sections 1 and 2, explaining some cursory remarks to these issues in my analysis on fragmentation. In the introduction, I will briefly introduce UJ as a controversial form of jurisdiction, but still necessary given that territorial jurisdiction does not always function well in the case of international crime. I will demonstrate that many state parties to the International Criminal Court (ICC Statute have vested or reconfirmed UJ for the core crimes when implementing the ICC Statute. The leading question of my research is whether this practice has led or has the potential to lead to unity or rather to fragmentation within ICL. In the research I will approach this question from different perspectives.In section 1 I will examine how State parties have may actually enacted universal jurisdiction for the core crimes, with a view to determining whether there is indeed some unity on this front or whether the practice on this matter is actually rather diverse (or fragmented. Subsequently, I will analyse which conditions States have formulated for the exercise of UJ, and whether this practice is consistent (unity or again rather diverse (fragmentation. It might also be interesting to see whether States have different conditions for UJ over core crimes than

  2. Implementing a Standardized Social Networks Testing Strategy in a Low HIV Prevalence Jurisdiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Casey; Kahn, Danielle; Broaddus, Michelle; Dougherty, Jacob; Elderbrook, Megan; Vergeront, James; Westergaard, Ryan

    2018-05-15

    Alternative HIV testing strategies are needed to engage individuals not reached by traditional clinical or non-clinical testing programs. A social networks recruitment strategy, in which people at risk for or living with HIV are enlisted and trained by community-based agencies to recruit individuals from their social, sexual, or drug-using networks for HIV testing, demonstrates higher positivity rates compared to other non-clinical recruitment strategies in some jurisdictions. During 2013-2015, a social networks testing protocol was implemented in Wisconsin to standardize an existing social networks testing program. Six community-based, non-clinical agencies with multiple sites throughout the state implemented the protocol over the 2-year period. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected. The new positivity rate (0.49%) through social networks testing did not differ from that of traditional counseling, testing, and referral recruitment methods (0.48%). Although social networks testing did not yield a higher new positivity rate compared to other testing strategies, it proved to be successful at reaching high risk individuals who may not otherwise engage in HIV testing.

  3. Decree amending and adding various provisions to the Penal Code for the Federal District with respect to local jurisdiction and to the Penal Code for the whole Republic with respect to federal jurisdiction, 29 December 1988. [Selected provisions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Mexico's decree amending and adding various provisions to the penal code for the federal district, with respect to local jurisdiction, and to the penal code for the whole republic, with respect to federal jurisdiction, December 29, 1988, among other things, amends the penal code to strengthen provisions relating to sex crimes. Among the provisions are the following: anyone procuring or facilitating the corruption of a minor (under 18) or a person lacking capacity, by means of sexual acts, or who induces him to engage in begging, drunkenness, drug addiction, or some other vice; to form part of an unlawful association; or to commit whatever crimes will be imprisoned for 3-8 years and subjected to a fine. The sentence shall be enhanced if the minor or incapacitated person forms a habit due to repeated acts of corruption. Whoever encourages or facilitates a person's engaging in prostitution or obtains or delivers a person for the purpose of prostitution will be imprisoned for 2-9 years and fined. Pandering will be punished with imprisonment for 2-9 years and a fine. Whoever, without consent and without the purpose of achieving intercourse, performs on her a sexual act with lascivious intent, or forces her to perform it, will be sentenced to "15 days to 1 year's or to 10-40 days' community service work." If physical or moral violence is used, the penalty will be 2-7 years imprisonment. Performing the above act on a person under age 12 or on someone unable to resist increases the punishment. Whoever uses physical or moral violence to have intercourse with a person of whatever sex shall be imprisoned 8-14 years; using an object other than a penis either vaginally or anally on either a male or a female will result in imprisonment of 1-5 years. If the victim is under age 12, unable to resist, or if 2 or more persons commit the crime, an enhanced punishment will result.

  4. Understanding and encouraging volunteerism and community involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stukas, Arthur A; Snyder, Mark; Clary, E Gil

    2016-01-01

    Volunteerism and community involvement have been demonstrated to offer benefits both to communities and to volunteers themselves. However, not every method to encourage these behaviors is equally effective in producing committed volunteers. Drawing on relevant theoretical and empirical literatures, we identify features of efforts that are likely to produce intrinsically motivated other-oriented volunteers and those that may produce extrinsically motivated self-oriented volunteers. In particular, we explore ways to socialize young people to help and ways to build a sense of community focused on particular issues. We also examine requirements for community service and other approaches that highlight self-oriented benefits that volunteers may obtain. Finally, we return to a focus on the importance of intrinsic motivation for promoting sustained involvement in volunteers, even as we acknowledge that volunteers who come with extrinsic or self-oriented reasons can still offer much to communities and can be satisfied when their activities match their motivations.

  5. CERN encourages girls to "expand their horizons"

    CERN Document Server

    François Briard

    2015-01-01

    On 14 November, CERN took part for the fourth time in "Élargis tes horizons" (see here), a conference organised every two years at Geneva University for girls from the local region aged 11 to 14 aiming to encourage them to take up studies and careers in the scientific and technical domains.   Claude Sanz (left), a fellow in the EN Department, explaining to three girls how to build a particle accelerator in a salad bowl. This year, young physicists and engineers from ATLAS and CMS ran three workshops: "Seeing the invisible using a cloud chamber", "Great cold fun and treats with liquid nitrogen" and "Build your own accelerator in a salad bowl!" CERN was also represented at the Forum de Découverte, represented by the Diversity Office and the Medialab team, presenting the "Higgnite" interactive experiment, which illustrates the principle of the Higgs field. More...

  6. Exploring and encouraging through social interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adamsen, Lis; Rasmussen, Julie Midtgaard

    2003-01-01

    as a social networker and uses her contextual competence by consciously encouraging relationships between fellow patients. Furthermore, the study illustrates that the nurse's involvement with self-help groups for patients with cancer serves as a complementary dimension to the traditional nursing discourse....... It is concluded that when individualized care is supported through social practice and when personal issues are exchanged and negotiated, the nurse facilitates a milieu of togetherness in self-help groups for patients with cancer. The concept of self-help groups is a valuable contribution to new theories...... and service development in psychosocial care and complies with the understanding of the postmodern individual, who viewed as primarily responsible for negotiating, socializing, and making his or her own decisions....

  7. Jumpin' Jaguars: Encouraging Physical Activity After School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, Heather E.; Rose, Stephanie A.; Small, Sarah R.; Perman, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Many afterschool physical activity programs and curricula are available, but evaluation of their effectiveness is needed. Well-marketed programs such as the Child and Adolescent Trial for Cardiovascular Health (CATCH) Kids Club have shown limited effectiveness in increasing physical activity for participants in comparison to control groups.…

  8. Encouraging Family Involvement through Culturally Relevant Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Kela; Hooks, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe one teacher education program's experience using an integrated approach to provide preservice teachers with both knowledge of and experience with diverse cultures. Included are three important components within this program that strive to assist preservice teachers as they develop an understanding of…

  9. HUD Entitlement Grantee Jurisdiction - National Geospatial Data Asset (NGDA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program is a flexible program that provides communities with resources to address a wide range of unique community...

  10. 20 CFR 410.701 - Jurisdiction for determining entitlement under part B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Rules for the Review of Denied and Pending Claims Under the Black Lung Benefits Reform Act (BLBRA) of 1977 § 410.701 Jurisdiction...

  11. Fundamentals of law and of technical regulations and the problem of jurisdiction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukes, R.

    1980-01-01

    The fundamentals of the legal requirements and technical specifications for the licensing of Nuclear Power Plants in the Federal Republic of Germany and the German administrative jurisdiction in this area are discussed. (A.L.) [pt

  12. 78 FR 28779 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations for Armstrong County, Pennsylvania (All Jurisdictions)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-16

    ... Armstrong County, Pennsylvania (All Jurisdictions) AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION... proposed rule concerning proposed flood elevation determinations for Armstrong County, Pennsylvania (All... sources in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania. Because FEMA has or [[Page 28780

  13. Jurisdictional control of administrative acts related to the safety of nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Plasencia, S.

    1983-01-01

    This paper stresses the importance of jurisdictional control over nuclear power plants to ensure their safe operation. It also describes examples of case law concerning such plants in France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Italy and Spain. (NEA) [fr

  14. The Regulatory Framework Across International Jurisdictions for Risks Associated with Consumption of Botanical Food Supplements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Low, Teng Yong; Wong, Kwok Onn; Yap, Adelene L.L.; Haan, De Laura H.J.; Rietjens, Ivonne M.C.M.

    2017-01-01

    Dietary supplements, including those containing botanical ingredients and botanical-derived compounds, have been marketed to consumers globally for many decades. However, the legislative framework for such products remains inconsistent across jurisdictions internationally. This study aims to

  15. Encouraging an ecological evolution of data infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Infrastructure is often thought of as a complex physical construct usually designed to transport information or things (e.g. electricity, water, cars, money, sound, data…). The Research Data Alliance (RDA) takes a more holistic view and considers infrastructure as a complex body of relationships between people, machines, and organisations. This paper will describe how this more ecological perspective leads RDA to define and govern an agile virtual organization. We seek to harness the power of the volunteer, through an open problem solving approach that focusses on the problems of our individual members and their organisations. We focus on implementing solutions that make data sharing work better without defining a priori what is necessary. We do not judge the fitness of a solution, per se, but instead assess how broadly the solution is adopted, recognizing that adoption is often the social challenge of technical problem. We seek to encourage a bottoms up approach with light guidance on principles from the top. The goal is to develop community solutions that solve real problems today yet are adaptive to changing technologies and needs.

  16. Attentional bias modification encourages healthy eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakoschke, Naomi; Kemps, Eva; Tiggemann, Marika

    2014-01-01

    The continual exposure to unhealthy food cues in the environment encourages poor dietary habits, in particular consuming too much fat and sugar, and not enough fruit and vegetables. According to Berridge's (2009) model of food reward, unhealthy eating is a behavioural response to biased attentional processing. The present study used an established attentional bias modification paradigm to discourage the consumption of unhealthy food and instead promote healthy eating. Participants were 146 undergraduate women who were randomly assigned to two groups: one was trained to direct their attention toward pictures of healthy food ('attend healthy' group) and the other toward unhealthy food ('attend unhealthy' group). It was found that participants trained to attend to healthy food cues demonstrated an increased attentional bias for such cues and ate relatively more of the healthy than unhealthy snacks compared to the 'attend unhealthy' group. Theoretically, the results support the postulated link between biased attentional processing and consumption (Berridge, 2009). At a practical level, they offer potential scope for interventions that focus on eating well. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Encouraging girl child education in my village

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Entongwe

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available My critical reflection will be drawn from an experience I had just a year after my graduation from the university where I was appointed as one of the X-students to lead a student cultural week in my village with the theme “raising awareness on education”. At the university, I was a member of my association in which students from my tribe generally come together to promote unity and encourage others in education. My role was to present a discourse on girl child education all the entire villagers who were gathered at the village square that evening. A high dropout rate at school and illiteracy are major problems in my region, in which there is still a great deal of gender disparity when it comes to educating children, especially the girl child. This programme is in line with the government’s policy of promoting education in my country, whose priority is for education to reach the grass-roots communities.

  18. A Script Analysis of the Distribution of Counterfeit Alcohol Across Two European Jurisdictions

    OpenAIRE

    Lord, Nicholas; Spencer, Jonathan; Bellotti, Elisa; Benson, Katie

    2017-01-01

    This article presents a script analysis of the distribution of counterfeit alcohols across two European jurisdictions. Based on an analysis of case file data from a European regulator and interviews with investigators, the article deconstructs the organisation of the distribution of the alcohol across jurisdictions into five scenes (collection, logistics, delivery, disposal, proceeds/finance) and analyses the actual (or likely permutations of) behaviours within each scene. The analysis also i...

  19. Governance Challenges in Joint Inter-Jurisdictional Management: The Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, Elk Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Susan G.; Vernon, Marian E.

    2015-08-01

    The controversial elk reduction program (elk hunt) in Grand Teton National Park, WY, has been a source of conflict since it was legislated in 1950. The hunt is jointly managed by the National Park Service and the Wyoming Game and Fish Department. This forced organizational partnership and the conflicting mandates of these two agencies have led to persistent conflict that seems irresolvable under the current decision-making process. To better understand the decision-making process and participant perspectives, we reviewed management documents, technical literature, and newspaper articles, and interviewed 35 key participants in this case. We used these data to analyze and appraise the adequacy of the decision-making process for the park elk hunt and to ask whether it reflects the common interest. We found deficiencies in all functions of the decision-making process. Neither the decisions made nor the process itself include diverse perspectives, nor do they attend to valid and appropriate participant concerns. Agency officials focus their attention on technical rather than procedural concerns, which largely obfuscates the underlying tension in the joint inter-jurisdictional management arrangement and ultimately contributes to the hunt's annual implementation to the detriment of the common interest. We offer specific yet widely applicable recommendations to better approximate an inclusive and democratic decision-making process that serves the community's common interests.

  20. Designing Effective Programmes for Encouraging the Business Start-up Process: Lessons from UK Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibb, Allan A.

    1987-01-01

    Outlines programs in the United Kingdom (UK) designed to encourage the starting of small businesses. Successful programs help entrepreneurs obtain financial support, get business training, and develop a business plan. Recommends emphasis on personal competency and motivation training as well as shorter courses. (CH)

  1. Encouraging Girls into Science and Technology with Feminine Role Model: Does This Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamberger, Yael M.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the effect of a program that aimed to encourage girls to choose a science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) career in Israel. The program involved school visits to a high-tech company and meeting with role model female scientists. Sixty ninth-grade female students from a Jewish modern-orthodox single-sex…

  2. Encouraging Student Participation While Designing Writing Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, M.

    2017-12-01

    Encouraging student participation while designing writing exercises requires a certain pragmatic approach. Wilbert James McKeachie is the author of a widely read textbook on college teaching. McKeachie was a longtime faculty member at the University of Michigan. He served as president of the American Psychological Association, the American Psychological Foundation and the American Association of Higher Education. In his famous book Teaching and Learning in the College Classroom, McKeachie provides an introduction and notes the role of research in identifying new goals for higher education. He also offers a conceptual framework based on a student mediation model and a focuses on the processs-product relationships between faculty teacher behavior and student learning outcomes. McKeachie' s Teaching Tips provides helpful strategies for dealing with both the everyday problems of university teaching and those that arise in trying to maximize learning for every student. The book does not suggest a set of recipes to be followed mechanically; it gives instructors the tools they need to deal with the ever-changing dynamics of teaching and learning. First, it is extremely important to define the target skill areas and means of implementation. Next, the professor can then proceed to focus on the techniques that could be employed to ensure student participation. This includes selection of an appropriate topic that is relevant to the field of study as well as classroom learning experiences. By pragmatically combining these objectives, the teacher can expect both enthusiasm and effective learning among the student population. McKeachie, Wilbert James. (1980) Learning, Cognition and College Teaching. San Francisco: Jossey - Bass McKeachie, Wilbert James. (1980) Teaching Tips: A Guidebook for the Beginning College Teacher Lexington, MASS. : Heath. 1986. ISBN: 0669067520 McKeachie, Wilbert James., et. al. (2001) Teaching Tips (Eleventh Edition): Strategies, Research, and Theory for

  3. Peer Helpers: Encouraging Kids to Confide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Gail; Reid, Kelley

    1997-01-01

    In peer-helping programs, a professional counselor or teacher trains a group of students who then help other students by listening, providing information, and referring them to others with the necessary expertise. Peer helpers can help improve the school climate by contributing to its health and security. Since 1979, Seattle's Natural Helpers…

  4. Use of the Encouragement Process in Adlerian Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinkmeyer, Don C.

    1972-01-01

    Encouragement in all facets of the counseling interview is a critical ingredient in the counseling process. This article sets forth the theory and specific applications of the encouragement process in counseling, as viewed in the socio-teleological model. (Author)

  5. Encouraging the Domestic Small Turbine Market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsyth, T.

    2001-01-01

    The state incentives for home-based renewables in the domestic market continue to grow and change creating opportunities for the small wind turbine market. Tracking the opportunities to get small wind turbines included in incentive policies and developing a proactive industry approach is important because market changes can occur anytime. There are near-term opportunities to work with states in developing their strategies for disbursing system benefit charges, adding tags to existing policies for other small renewables to include small wind, and developing state-wide net metering programs. Other opportunities to improve the domestic market exist but will be quite challenging to implement. Other opportunities include federal tax credits, state wind access laws, equipment verification for specific states, and leasing programs for small wind turbines

  6. Using Discovery Learning to Encourage Creative Thinking

    OpenAIRE

    Mardia Hi. Rahman

    2017-01-01

    Creative thinking ability development is needed to be implemented by every educator including lecturers to their students. Therefore, they need to seriously act and design their learning process. One of the ways to develop student’s creative thinking is using discovery learning model. This research is conducted in physics education study program in 2016 with students who took learning and teaching class as research subject. From the research analysis result and discussion, it can be concluded...

  7. The Universal Jurisdiction of South African Criminal Courts and Immunities of Foreign State Officials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evode

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Under the "complementarity" regime of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC, the jurisdiction of the ICC is secondary to the jurisdiction of domestic courts. States Parties, not the ICC, have the primary responsibility of investigating and prosecuting international crimes. The ICC acts only when States are "unable" or "unwilling" to prosecute. As a State Party, in order to give effect to the complementarity principle, South Africa enacted the Implementation of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court Act 27 of 2002, which determines the modalities of prosecuting perpetrators of the crimes of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes in South African courts. The Implementation Act also provides that South African courts will have jurisdiction over these crimes not only when they are committed on the territory of South Africa but also when they are committed outside the Republic. By granting South African courts jurisdiction over a person who commits a crime outside the Republic when that person is later found on South African territory, without regard to that person's nationality or the nationality of the victims, the Implementation Act empowers South African courts with universal jurisdiction over international crimes. This paper seeks to determine whether and to what extent foreign State officials, such as foreign heads of State, heads of government and ministers of foreign affairs, can plead immunity when they are accused of international crimes before South African courts when exercising their universal jurisdiction in terms of the Implementation Act and in accordance with the complementarity regime of the Rome Statute. In other words, the article endeavours to determine whether international law rules regarding immunities of State officials may or may not limit the ability of South African courts to exercise universal jurisdiction over international crimes committed in foreign States.

  8. Towards Uniformity of Radiation Protection Legislation in a Multi-jurisdictional country- the Australian Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koperski, J. G.

    2004-01-01

    Australia is a federation of nine jurisdictions, each with independent radiation protection legislation. The existing legislative non-uniformity across the jurisdictions has constituted an impediment for operators who must comply with differing legislative requirements in different jurisdictions. To address this issue, a National Competition Policy Review of Radiation Protection Legislation took place in 2000/2001. It has produced 19 Recommendations, which addressed objectives of the legislation, the need to regulate, alternative regulatory approaches, national uniformity, licensing and registration, strict and prescriptive standards, advertising and promotional activities, compliance costs and cost recovery issues. The Review has recommended that jurisdictions should retain the regulatory approach to achieve radiation protection objectives rather than leave them to be decided by market forces. But the approach should be performance-based, i.e. outcome-focused rather than prescriptive. An Implementation Plan of the Recommendations has been created which, by the end of 2004, will produce the National Directory for Radiation Protection. The Directory, which will become a consolidated repository of radiation protection standards, guidelines, codes of practice and administrative principles will provide a uniform national framework for radiation protection legislation in Australia. It will provide guidance for the jurisdictions redrawing their legislations. Because of its central role in shaping future legislation, the Directory will contain only those provisions, which have passed a formal process (process for issue resolution) concluded by an approval by the Australian Health Ministers Conference. Such process will also expedite the uniform adoption nationwide of legislative trends emerging from international radiation protection recommendations and standards. This Australian model might be a viable example for other multi-jurisdictional countries to consider

  9. ACO model should encourage efficient care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, John; Krueger, David; Shortell, Stephen M; Milstein, Arnold; Cutler, David M

    2015-09-01

    The independent Office of the Actuary for CMS certified that the Pioneer ACO model has met the stringent criteria for expansion to a larger population. Significant savings have accrued and quality targets have been met, so the program as a whole appears to be working. Ironically, 13 of the initial 32 enrollees have left. We attribute this to the design of the ACO models which inadequately support efficient care delivery. Using Bellin-ThedaCare Healthcare Partners as an example, we will focus on correctible flaws in four core elements of the ACO payment model: finance spending and targets, attribution, and quality performance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Utilizing Technology to Encourage Healthy Lifestyles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Shuster

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In our fast paced world, using technology allows us to connect with people and assist them in developing healthier lifestyles within their time limits due to families, work, and other responsibilities. The goal of our project was the development of online, technology-based, nutrition, health, and fitness education challenges using social media as a means of helping consumers develop healthy lifestyle changes. Participants completed preassessments and postassessments to determine overall program impact and to self-report perceptions of knowledge gained and practice/behavior change. Results from the challenges indicated participants gained knowledge on nutrition, health and fitness topics while making strides towards lifestyle changes and adoption of healthy habits. Results revealed healthier eating habits were developed and physical activity was increased with many participants losing weight. Ease of participating was the most reported reason for participating in the challenges. To determine “best practice,” varying lengths of time for the challenges from four, seven, and thirteen weeks allowed the educators to derive implications for future programming, including branding, length of the challenge, frequency, and participant behavior change. To remain relevant and reach a greater diversity of populations, educators need to continue to explore and utilize various social media tools.

  11. Limited criminal jurisdiction on investigation and judgement of High-ranking government officials. Procedural issues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Arturo Gómez Pavajeau

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Constitution of Colombia provides that certain senior officials, because of their position, should be investigated and tried by the Supreme Court (members of Congress or by the same Court upon indictment by the General Attorney (art. 235 n. 4. The Constitution provides that the President, the judges of the high courts and the prosecutor also have a special status, as the investigation and prosecution is allocated in the Senate, previous accusation in the House of Representatives, and in the Supreme Court for the common crimes. The criminal and disciplinary jurisdiction of investigation and prosecution has generated countless controversies at the doctrinal and jurisprudential level, related to the exclusive competence of the Prosecutor General’s Office and the judges of the Supreme Court to advance the investigation. In particular, the impossibility of delegating the commission of evidence and proceedings related to jurisdiction in such processes; the courts and their relationship with the position or function; the retention or recovery of competition by the criminal court room after renouncing the jurisdiction in the parapolitics processes; the notion tenure as a basis for criminal jurisdiction in the case of the governors in charge; a second hearing as a minimum guarantee derived from international standards on human rights and the issue related to jurisdiction and impunity on the subject of political or “impeachment” judgments.

  12. New jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice in resolving monetary and fiscal disputes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrijević Marko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The global financial crisis has caused the need for a stronger positioning of the European Court of Justice in the new model of economic governance in the European Union. The Jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice contributes in creating the optimal legal control mechanism of budget spending in the European monetary law and ensure maintenance of euro-zone fiscal framework. The role of the European Court of Justice in the EMU in earlier periods was secondary, but in times of crisis, it points to the growing need of Jurisdiction's extending in the field of monetary relations between member states and respect of convergence rules. Court's Jurisdiction in resolving of monetary and fiscal disputes is increasingly implemented in determining the legal nature of international agreements, whose ratio is economic stability, where the Judgments regarding complementarities of these legal documents with primary law provisions have the crucial impact on the future direction of national fiscal policies coordination. Although, the Court's Jurisdiction in this area is still underdeveloped and Judgments are often conditioned by pragmatism reasons, by development of credible macroeconomic dialogue between Court of Justice, European Central Bank and European Court of Auditors may establish conditions for fullfiling legal gaps in the performance of monetary and fiscal Jurisdiction of the Court.

  13. The res judicata rule in jurisdictional decisions of the international Court of justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kreća Milenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The author discusses the effects of the res judicata rule as regards jurisdictional decisions of the International Court of Justice. He finds that there exists a special position of a judgment on preliminary objection in respect to both aspects of the res judicata rule - its binding force and finality. A perception of distinct relativity of a jurisdictional decision of the Court, expressing its interlocatory character pervades, in his opinion, the body of law regulating the Court's activity. Preliminary objections as such do not exhaust objections to the jurisdiction of the Court, as evidenced by non-preliminary objections to the jurisdiction of the Court giving rise to the application of the principle compétence de la compétence understood in the narrow sense. With regard to the binding force of a judgment on preliminary objections, it does not create legal obligations stricto sensu. The author finds that the relative character of jurisdictional decisions of the Court as compared with a judgment on the merits is justified on a number of grounds.

  14. Issue of special jurisdiction in disputes coming from contractual relationship under the EU and Serbian law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Milena

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Special jurisdiction in matters of contracts is based on the close link between the cause of action and the territory of the court on which the jurisdiction is conferred. This is exception to the general jurisdiction based on defendant's domicile. It is introduced to legal systems with aims to facilitate the sound administration of justice and to make the balance between parties, giving the plaintiff a choice to bring proceedings to a court of his convenience. The structure of special jurisdiction rules contained in Brussels I Regulation is very complex. The general rule disguises more than it reveals at first glance and ought to be read in the light of the previous judgments of the ECJ and special rule is the modernizing element as it introduces an autonomous fact-based concept for the most important categories of contracts. After adoption of the new Serbian Law on International Private Law the rules on special jurisdiction shall be applied in accordance with EU standards, i.e. with ECJ practice.

  15. The exclusion-inclusion spectrum in state and community response to sex offenders in Anglo-American and European jurisdictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrunik, Michael; Deutschmann, Linda

    2008-10-01

    Continental European and Anglo-American jurisdictions differ with regard to criminal justice and community responses to sex offenders on an exclusion-inclusion spectrum ranging from community protection measures on one end to therapeutic programs in the middle and restorative justice measures on the other end. In the United States, populist pressure has resulted in a community protection approach exemplified by sex offender registration, community notification, and civil commitment of violent sexual predators. Although the United Kingdom and Canada have followed, albeit more cautiously, the American trend to adopt exclusionist community protection measures, these countries have significant community-based restorative justice initiatives, such as Circles of Support and Accountability. Although sex offender crises have recently occurred in continental Europe, a long-standing tradition of the medicalization of deviance, along with the existence of social structural buffers against the influence of victim-driven populist penal movements, has thus far limited the spread of formal community protection responses.

  16. Ukraine and the International Criminal Court: Implications of the Ad Hoc Jurisdiction Acceptance and Beyond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marchuk, Iryna

    2016-01-01

    The Article examines an array of important legal issues that arise out of the acceptance of the jurisdiction of the International Criminal Court by Ukraine, a non-State Party to the Rome Statute, within the framework of Article 12(3) with respect to the alleged crimes against humanity committed...... during the 2014 Maydan protests (Declaration I) and the alleged war crimes committed in eastern Ukraine and Crimea (Declaration II). It provides an in-depth analysis of constitutional law issues linked to the acceptance of the jurisdiction by Ukraine and discusses its possible implications...

  17. Functional Programming

    OpenAIRE

    Chitil, Olaf

    2009-01-01

    Functional programming is a programming paradigm like object-oriented programming and logic programming. Functional programming comprises both a specific programming style and a class of programming languages that encourage and support this programming style. Functional programming enables the programmer to describe an algorithm on a high-level, in terms of the problem domain, without having to deal with machine-related details. A program is constructed from functions that only map inputs to ...

  18. Successfully navigating electricity transactions through jurisdictions in the northeast and midwest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chappelle, H. [EES Group, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    This presentation described the framework of issues defining the effectiveness of inter-jurisdictional power transactions with reference to open market competition in Ontario and the current FERC initiative affecting transactions with adjacent markets in the United States. The opportunities and risks associated with inter-jurisdictional power transactions were pointed out, along with the interplay between forward and balancing markets. The future of the Regional Transmission Organizations (RTOs) and standard market design were also described. Inter-jurisdictional transactions were described as being a fundamental element of power markets in North America where consumers benefit from reliable supply and cost efficiency. Locational value of the delivered energy is reflected in transparent price which is determined by supply and demand. The efficient balancing markets promote liquid forward markets, as well as investment in power generation and transmission. Price risk is managed through market-based mechanisms by load-serving companies and capable consumers. Opportunities for Ontario buyers include increased reliability, increased competition among suppliers, and market drivers for demand response and innovation. Opportunities for suppliers include additional customers, hedge transactions across jurisdictions, and portfolio strategies. Opportunities for risk managers include broader, more liquid markets for standard products, robust markets for energy-linked commodities, and an increased need for customized, highly-structured financial products. 11 figs.

  19. 33 CFR 329.12 - Geographic and jurisdictional limits of oceanic and tidal waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Geographic and jurisdictional limits of oceanic and tidal waters. 329.12 Section 329.12 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DEFINITION OF NAVIGABLE WATERS OF THE UNITED STATES...

  20. Inter-jurisdictional cooperation on pharmaceutical product listing agreements: views from Canadian provinces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan Steven G

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Confidential product listing agreements (PLAs negotiated between pharmaceutical manufacturers and individual health care payers may contribute to unwanted price disparities, high administrative costs, and unequal bargaining power within and across jurisdictions. In the context of Canada’s decentralized health system, we aimed to document provincial policy makers’ perceptions about collaborative PLA negotiations. Methods We conducted semi-structured telephone interviews with a senior policy maker from nine of the ten Canadian provinces. We conducted a thematic analysis of interview transcripts to identify benefits, drawbacks, and barriers to routine collaboration on PLA negotiations. Results Canadian policy makers expressed support for joint negotiations of PLAs in principle, citing benefits of increased bargaining power and reduced inter-jurisdictional inequities in drug prices and formulary listings. However, established policy institutions and the politics of individual jurisdictional authority are formidable barriers to routine PLA collaboration. Achieving commitment to a joint process may be difficult to sustain among heterogeneous and autonomous partners. Conclusions Though collaboration on PLA negotiation is an extension of collaboration on health technology assessment, it is a very significant next step that requires harmonization of the outcomes of decision-making processes. Views of policy makers in Canada suggest that sustaining routine collaborations on PLA negotiations may be difficult unless participating jurisdictions have similar policy institutions, capacities to implement coverage decisions, and local political priorities.

  1. Due Process in the Internet Jurisdiction: Landing Softly on the Other Side of the Looking Glass

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kolb, Natalie A

    2001-01-01

    .... However, even if a U.S. state court exercises improper jurisdiction over a non-resident defendant in an Internet case, due process protection can be revived at the choice-of-law and enforcement stages of the judicial proceeding...

  2. 48 CFR 6301.3 - Jurisdiction and authority of the Board and its members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... authority of the Board and its members. (a) The Board hears and decides: (1) Appeals from decisions made by... decide the appeal; (3) Matters within jurisdiction of the Board in accordance with the provisions of the... Administrative Judge assigned to hear an appeal has authority to act for the Board in all matters with respect to...

  3. Cross-Jurisdictional Resource Sharing in Changing Public Health Landscape: Contributory Factors and Theoretical Explanations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Gulzar H; Badana, Adrian N S; Robb, Claire; Livingood, William C

    2016-01-01

    Local health departments (LHDs) are striving to meet public health needs within their jurisdictions, amidst fiscal restraints and complex dynamic environment. Resource sharing across jurisdictions is a critical opportunity for LHDs to continue to enhance effectiveness and increase efficiency. This research examines the extent of cross-jurisdictional resource sharing among LHDs, the programmatic areas and organizational functions for which LHDs share resources, and LHD characteristics associated with resource sharing. Data from the National Association of County & City Health Officials' 2013 National Profile of LHDs were used. Descriptive statistics and multinomial logistic regression were performed for the 5 implementation-oriented outcome variables of interest, with 3 levels of implementation. More than 54% of LHDs shared resources such as funding, staff, or equipment with 1 or more other LHDs on a continuous, recurring basis. Results from the multinomial regression analysis indicate that economies of scale (population size and metropolitan status) had significant positive influences (at P ≤ .05) on resource sharing. Engagement in accreditation, community health assessment, community health improvement planning, quality improvement, and use of the Community Guide were associated with lower levels of engagement in resource sharing. Doctoral degree of the top executive and having 1 or more local boards of health carried a positive influence on resource sharing. Cross-jurisdictional resource sharing is a viable and commonly used process to overcome the challenges of new and emerging public health problems within the constraints of restricted budgets. LHDs, particularly smaller LHDs with limited resources, should consider increased resource sharing to address emerging challenges.

  4. Why Jurisdiction and Uranium Deposit Quality are Essential Considerations for Exploration and Mining of Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: JURISDICTION versus GRADE: Grade is King! But government policy can and does affect the ability to mine. Government can and does help get projects into production by: • Streamlining Permit Process; • Favorable Royalty and Infrastructure Support; • And by default, faster approval allows a better economic return by hitting peak price and utilizing the time value of money factor.

  5. Doctors’ Orders: Specialists’ Day to Day Work and their jurisdictional Claims in Dutch Hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J. Kruijthof

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThis study analyses the nature and organisation of specialists' day to day work in general hospitals in the Netherlands and the claims for jurisdiction specialists make in their work. It is of interest because it presents a picture of specialist work from within. Most

  6. 8 CFR 1003.1 - Organization, jurisdiction, and powers of the Board of Immigration Appeals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... the Board of Immigration Appeals. 1003.1 Section 1003.1 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE GENERAL PROVISIONS EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW Board of Immigration Appeals § 1003.1 Organization, jurisdiction, and powers of the Board of Immigration Appeals. (a)(1...

  7. No longer in suspense: Clarifying the human rights jurisdiction of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Unfortunately, the same judgment resulted in the suspension of the SADC Tribunal in 2010 because it had purportedly acted beyond its mandate when it adjudicated over a case concerning a human rights dispute. This article investigates whether the SADC Tribunal had jurisdiction to deal with cases involving allegations of ...

  8. A bioeconomic analysis of an emerald ash borer invasion of an urban forest with multiple jurisdictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent F. Kovacs; Robert G. Haight; Rodrigo J. Mercader; Deborah G. McCullough

    2014-01-01

    Bio-invasions occur in management mosaics where local control affects spread and damage across political boundaries. We address two obstacles to local implementation of optimal regional control of a bio-invasion that damages public and private resources across jurisdictions: lack of local funds to protect the public resource and lack of access to protect the private...

  9. 47 CFR 76.913 - Assumption of jurisdiction by the Commission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... jurisdiction by the Commission. (a) Upon denial or revocation of the franchising authority's certification, the... continue until the franchising authority has obtained certification or recertification. (b) A franchising... cable service and associated equipment of its franchisee when: (1) The franchising authority lacks the...

  10. 76 FR 30840 - Jurisdictional Separations and Referral to the Federal-State Joint Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-27

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 36 [CC Docket No. 80-286; FCC 11-71] Jurisdictional Separations and Referral to the Federal-State Joint Board AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION... this document, the Commission extends the current freeze of part 36 category relationships and...

  11. 77 FR 30410 - Jurisdictional Separations and Referral to the Federal-State Joint Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 36 [CC Docket No. 80-286; FCC 12-49] Jurisdictional Separations and Referral to the Federal-State Joint Board AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION... this document, the Commission extends the current freeze of part 36 category relationships and...

  12. Universal jurisdiction: state of affairs and ways ahead. : A policy paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Zegveld (Liesbeth); J.D. Handmaker (Jeff)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractOn 17 September 2010, the International Institute of Social Studies (ISS), Leiden University and ICCO organised an expert meeting at the ISS on universal jurisdiction (UJ). The meeting was chaired in the morning by Professor John Dugard and in the afternoon by Professor Karin Arts. The

  13. Negotiating jurisdiction in the workplace: a multiple-case study of nurse prescribing in hospital settings.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroezen, M.; Mistiaen, P.; Dijk, L. van; Groenewegen, P.P.; Francke, A.L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a multiple-case study of prescribing by nurse specialists in Dutch hospital settings. Most analyses of interprofessional negotiations over professional boundaries take a macro sociological approach and ignore workplace jurisdictions. Yet boundary blurring takes place and

  14. Negotiating jurisdiction in the workplace: A multiple-case study of nurse prescribing in hospital settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroezen, M.; Mistiaen, P.; van Dijk, L.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Francke, A.L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a multiple-case study of prescribing by nurse specialists in Dutch hospital settings. Most analyses of interprofessional negotiations over professional boundaries take a macro sociological approach and ignore workplace jurisdictions. Yet boundary blurring takes place and

  15. Master Learning: A Way to Manage Tertiary Education in Small Island Jurisdictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovgaard, Gestur

    2016-01-01

    As a consequence of globalisation, there is now a general trend among hesitant small island jurisdictions to focus on educational planning in the tertiary sector. The question therefore is how smart solutions adapted to the specific contexts can be developed. This article argues for the need to innovate the societal role of the smaller state…

  16. 18 CFR 270.501 - Publication of notice from jurisdictional agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Publication of notice from jurisdictional agency. 270.501 Section 270.501 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL... to the extent the material is treated as confidential under § 270.506, at the offices of the...

  17. Successfully navigating electricity transactions through jurisdictions in the northeast and midwest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chappelle, H.

    2002-01-01

    This presentation described the framework of issues defining the effectiveness of inter-jurisdictional power transactions with reference to open market competition in Ontario and the current FERC initiative affecting transactions with adjacent markets in the United States. The opportunities and risks associated with inter-jurisdictional power transactions were pointed out, along with the interplay between forward and balancing markets. The future of the Regional Transmission Organizations (RTOs) and standard market design were also described. Inter-jurisdictional transactions were described as being a fundamental element of power markets in North America where consumers benefit from reliable supply and cost efficiency. Locational value of the delivered energy is reflected in transparent price which is determined by supply and demand. The efficient balancing markets promote liquid forward markets, as well as investment in power generation and transmission. Price risk is managed through market-based mechanisms by load-serving companies and capable consumers. Opportunities for Ontario buyers include increased reliability, increased competition among suppliers, and market drivers for demand response and innovation. Opportunities for suppliers include additional customers, hedge transactions across jurisdictions, and portfolio strategies. Opportunities for risk managers include broader, more liquid markets for standard products, robust markets for energy-linked commodities, and an increased need for customized, highly-structured financial products. 11 figs

  18. 76 FR 67473 - Notice of Proposed Withdrawal, Transfer of Jurisdiction, and Notice of Public Meeting; California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [CACA 43949, LLCA930000, L14300000.ET0000] Notice of Proposed Withdrawal, Transfer of Jurisdiction, and Notice of Public Meeting; California AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice; Correction. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management...

  19. 75 FR 70288 - Notice of Proposed Withdrawal, Transfer of Jurisdiction, and Notice of Public Meeting; California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [LLCAD06000-L14300000-ET0000; CACA 43949] Notice of Proposed Withdrawal, Transfer of Jurisdiction, and Notice of Public Meeting; California AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Correction. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management published...

  20. Negotiating jurisdiction in the workplace : A multiple-case study of nurse prescribing in hospital settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroezen, M.; Mistiaen, P.; van Dijk, L.; Groenewegen, P. P.; Francke, A. L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a multiple-case study of prescribing by nurse specialists in Dutch hospital settings. Most analyses of interprofessional negotiations over professional boundaries take a macro sociological approach and ignore workplace jurisdictions. Yet boundary blurring takes place and

  1. Responsive and Responsible: Faculty Encouragement of Civic Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Eddie R.; Howe, Elijah C.; Laird, Thomas F. Nelson

    2016-01-01

    This study explores how often faculty members encourage students to engage with campus, local, state, national, and global issues. Using data from the 2013 administration of the Faculty Survey of Student Engagement (FSSE), the results show that faculty members are more likely to encourage students to engage in state, national, or global issues…

  2. Influence of Parental Encouragement towards Health Care of Their Wards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sophia, R. Grace; Veliappan, A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to explore how parents are encouraging towards health care of their wards. A "Survey Method" was used in the present study. A standardized "Agarwal Parental Encouragement Scale (APES)" was used to collect information from the students. The sample consists of thousand and ninety five higher…

  3. Female Counselor Educators: Encouraging and Discouraging Factors in Academia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Nicole R.; Leinbaugh, Tracy; Bradley, Carla; Hazler, Richard

    2005-01-01

    The current study explores the encouraging and discouraging factors influencing female counselor educators. This study asked 115 female counselor educators to rate each of 91 items as to how encouraging or discouraging each item was to them as faculty members. The means and standard deviations were calculated for each of the 91 items of the PMBCE.…

  4. Interdisciplinary Intellect: HASTAC and the Commitment to Encourage Collective Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singletary, Kimberly Alecia

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the role of the Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Advanced Collaboratory (HASTAC) in facilitating and encouraging a collaborative community of junior and senior scholars on issues of technology and humanistic learning. As a result of its emphasis on collaboration and discussion, HASTAC encourages a form of collective…

  5. The use of law to encourage smaller families in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, T W

    1980-01-01

    To pursue its goal of rapid economic development, Singapore provides family planning services and has vigorously encouraged its citizens to limit family size. The government has legislated disincentives for families to have more than 2 children. This discussion reviews the history of these legal measures and their usefulness as a tool to promote social change and development. Singapore has used the law as a means to encourage family planning in order to supplement the overall thrust for economic development in the late 1960s. Freed from obligations to the Malaysian Federation and lacking the support of the British military as of 1969, Lee Kuan Yew led his people's economic development along a Western model. Reduction of population growth is an essential component of that model. Lee stressed family planning by providing clinics, by advertising, by promoting housing and lifestyles conducive to nuclear families, and by gradually adopting a set of laws favoring small families. These laws were introduced in different sectors of the economy at different times and were revised as social conditions changed. Typically, they set a minor monetary or priority penalty for parents of 3 or more children. The laws discourage additional births rather than prohibit them, guiding rather than forcing family planning decisions. To what extent the laws were the cause of decreasing family size in Singapore is uncertain, but they contributed to some extent to the country's phenomenal progress in income and lifestyle. The Abortion Act of 1969 legalized abortion on nonmedical grounds with the Singapore Family Planning and Population Board (SFPPB) approval. The Act was amended twice in 1974 to make abortions available "on demand." The charging of progressive delivery (accouchement) fees in government hospitals for mothers with 2 or more children might be considered as the focal point of the total disincentives system. The fees placed financial pressure directly on those who violated the

  6. Home birth integration into the health care systems of eleven international jurisdictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comeau, Amanda; Hutton, Eileen K; Simioni, Julia; Anvari, Ella; Bowen, Megan; Kruegar, Samantha; Darling, Elizabeth K

    2018-02-13

    The purpose of this study was to develop assessment criteria that could be used to examine the level of integration of home birth within larger health care systems in developed countries across 11 international jurisdictions. An expert panel developed criteria and a definition to assess home birth integration within health care systems. We selected jurisdictions based on the publications that were eligible for inclusion in our systematic review and meta-analysis on planned place of birth. We sent the authors of the included publications a questionnaire about home birth practitioners and practices in their respective health care system at the time of their studies. We searched published peer-reviewed, non-peer-reviewed, and gray literature, and the websites of professional bodies to document information about home birth integration in each jurisdiction based on our criteria. Where information was lacking, we contacted experts in the field from the relevant jurisdiction. Home birth is well integrated into the health care system in British Columbia (Canada), England, Iceland, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Ontario (Canada), and Washington State (USA). Home birth is less well integrated into the health care system in Australia, Japan, Norway, and Sweden. This paper is the first to propose criteria for the evaluation of home birth integration within larger maternity care systems. Application of these criteria across 11 international jurisdictions indicates differences in the recognition and training of home birth practitioners, in access to hospital facilities, and in the supplies and equipment available at home births, which give rise to variation in the level of integration across different settings. Standardized criteria for the evaluation of systems integration are essential for interpreting planned home birth outcomes that emerge from contextual differences. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Encouraging leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) participation in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Encouraging leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) participation in children and youth: The use of strength training programmes to improve health. ... exercises, communities may begin to develop group strength training programmes for all ages.

  8. Why should modified Atkins diet be encouraged for treating epilepsy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Why should modified Atkins diet be encouraged for treating epilepsy in emerging countries? ... advantages, primarily that its efficacy appears in studies to date to be very ... important role in adapting the diet to local eating habits and finding ...

  9. Why should modified Atkins diet be encouraged for treating epilepsy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Why should modified Atkins diet be encouraged for treating epilepsy in emerging countries? Amal Satte, Eric Heath Kossoff, Mohamed Belghiti, Abderrahim Zerhouni, Hamid Ouhabi, Hassania Guerinech, Jamal Mounach ...

  10. Encouraging alternative transportation behavior among baby boomers via simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Due to disruptions prompted by changing demographic patterns, aging infrastructure, and a : growing green culture New England states have been at the forefront of searching for options : to encourage sustainable transportation alternatives. How...

  11. Systemic Policy Compliance in a Multi-Jurisdictional Defence Program - Defence Suppliers Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    Organisation Based Access Control (OrBAC) [4] systems start new grounds in leveraging outcome of social and organisational sciences (and not...and convey these attributes to the resource domain, using a standard identity-federation protocol;  An enterprise directory is used to repose user

  12. A Question of Jurisdiction: Art. 267 TFEU Preliminary References of a CFSP Nature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butler, Graham

    2017-01-01

    Can the Court of Justice of the European Union assert jurisdiction and provide a national court with an interpretation of Union law in a case referred to it from a national court under an Art. 267 TFEU preliminary reference, when the subject matter is in regard to the Common Foreign and Security...... Policy (CFSP)? This was one of a number of questions referred to the Court of Justice from the High Court of England and Wales in Rosneft (judgment of 28 March 2017, case C-72/15). In March 2017, the Court of Justice meeting in a Grand Chamber formation, answered this jurisdictional question...... in the affirmative. Given the significance of this judgment for the law of CFSP, and the Opinion of the Advocate General in 2016, this judgment was hotly anticipated given its implications for the “specific rules and procedures” that are applicable to the law of CFSP. As the Court of Justice continues in a line...

  13. The Determination of Jurisdiction in Grid and Cloud Service Level Agreements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrilli, Davide Maria

    Service Level Agreements in Grid and Cloud scenarios can be a source of disputes particularly in case of breach of the obligations arising under them. It is then important to determine where parties can litigate in relation with such agreements. The paper deals with this question in the peculiar context of the European Union, and so taking into consideration Regulation 44/2001. According to the rules on jurisdiction provided by the Regulation, two general distinctions are drawn in order to determine which (European) courts are competent to adjudicate disputes arising out of a Service Level Agreement. The former is between B2B and B2C transactions, and the latter regards contracts which provide a jurisdiction clause and contracts which do not.

  14. Review of the regulation and safety assessment of food substances in various countries and jurisdictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnuson, Bernadene; Munro, Ian; Abbot, Peter; Baldwin, Nigel; Lopez-Garcia, Rebeca; Ly, Karen; McGirr, Larry; Roberts, Ashley; Socolovsky, Susan

    2013-01-01

    This review compares the regulations, definitions and approval processes for substances intentionally added to or unintentionally present in human food in the following specific countries/jurisdictions: Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, the European Union, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, and the United States. This includes direct food additives, food ingredients, flavouring agents, food enzymes and/or processing aids, food contact materials, novel foods, and nanoscale materials for food applications. The regulatory authority of each target jurisdiction/country uses its own regulatory framework and although the definitions, regulations and approval processes may vary among all target countries, in general there are many similarities. In all cases, the main purpose of each authority is to establish a regulatory framework and maintain/enforce regulations to ensure that food consumed and sold within its respective countries is safe. There is a move towards harmonisation of food regulations, as illustrated by Australia and New Zealand and by Mercosur. The European Union has also established regulations, which are applicable for all member states, to establish a common authorisation procedure for direct food additives, flavourings and enzymes. Although the path for approval of different categories of food additives varies from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, there are many commonalities in terms of the data requirements and considerations for assessment of the safety of use of food additives, including the use of positive lists of approved substances, pre-market approval, and a separation between science and policy decisions. The principles applied are largely reflective of the early work by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) committees and JECFA assessments of the safety of food additives for human and animal foods. PMID:23781843

  15. Incorporating transparency into the governance of deep-seabed mining in the Area beyond national jurisdiction

    OpenAIRE

    Ardron, Jeff A.; Ruhl, Henry A.; Jones, Daniel O.B.

    2018-01-01

    In the governance of natural resources, transparency has been linked to improved accountability, as well as enforceability, compliance, sustainability, and ultimately more equitable outcomes. Here, good practices in transparency relevant to the emerging governance of deep-seabed mining in the Area beyond national jurisdiction are identified and compared with current practices of the International Seabed Authority (ISA). The analysis found six areas of good transparency practice that could imp...

  16. Responding to Public Health Emergencies on Tribal Lands: Jurisdictional Challenges and Practical Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Justin B

    2015-01-01

    Response to public health emergencies on tribal lands poses a unique challenge for state and tribal public health officials. The complexity and intensely situation-specific nature of federal Indian jurisprudence leaves considerable question as to which government entity, state or tribal, has jurisdiction on tribal lands to undertake basic emergency measures such as closure of public spaces, quarantine, compulsory medical examination, and investigation. That jurisdictional uncertainty, coupled with cultural differences and an often troubled history of tribal-state relations, threatens to significantly impede response to infectious disease outbreaks or other public health emergencies on tribal lands. Given that tribal communities may be disproportionately impacted by public health emergencies, it is critical that tribal, state, and local governments engage with each other in coordinated planning for public health threats. This Article is offered as a catalyst for such planning efforts. The Article identifies some of the most pressing jurisdictional issues that may confront governments responding to a public health emergency on tribal lands, with the aim of highlighting the nature of the problem and the need for action. The Article goes on to examine the most promising means of addressing jurisdictional uncertainty: intergovernmental agreements. Already utilized in many areas of shared interest between tribe and state, intergovernmental agreements offer neighboring state, local, and tribal governments a vehicle for delineating roles and authorities in an emergency, and may lay the groundwork for sharing resources. The Article surveys various representative tribal public health intergovernmental agreements, and concludes with suggestions for tribes and state or local governments looking to craft their own agreements.

  17. JURISDICTION, COMPETENT JUDICIAL AUTHORITIES AND PROCEEDINGS UNDER REGULATION (EU NO 650/2012 ON SUCCESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Poretti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Novelties in the field of matters of succession brought by implementation of Regulation (EU No 650/2012 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 4 July 2012 on jurisdiction, applicable law, recognition and enforcement of decisions and acceptance and enforcement of authentic instruments in matters of succession and on the creation of a European Certificate of Succession are disscused in the paper. Especial emphasis is on jurisdiction, competent judicial authority and proceedings under Regulation on succession. In this sense, in the first part of the paper detailed analysis of provisions of Commission Implementing Regulation (EU No 1329/2014 of 9 December 2014 establishing the Forms referred to in Regulation (EU No 650/2012 of the European Parliament and of the Council on jurisdiction, applicable law, recognition and enforcement of decisions and acceptance and enforcement of authentic instruments in matters of succession and on the creation of a European Certificate of Succession and provisions of Croatian Law on implementation of Regulation (EU No 650/2012 of the European Parliament and of the Council on jurisdiction, applicable law, recognition and enforcement of decisions and acceptance and enforcement of authentic instruments in matters of succession and on the creation of a European Certificate of Succession is provided. In the second part of the paper case C404/14 Matoušková v. Republic of Czech is presented and difficulties in determining whether the case at issue falls within the scope of Regulation (EC No 2201/2003 or Regulation No 650/2012 on succession which could occur in matters of succession with cross-border implications are reffered to.

  18. The Historical Perspective of Formation of Offshore Jurisdictions as the Global System of Tax Evasion

    OpenAIRE

    Synyutka Nataliya G.; Synyutka Oleg M.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this publication is improving the knowledge about the genesis of formation of offshore jurisdictions. The article characterizes the historical stages of origination of tax havens on the basis of theoretical generalizations and comparing the results of studies and publications on the specified issues. The article identifies the main groups of tax havens: offshores of the colonies of the former British Empire; the European havens; the group of simulators (such as Panama, Uruguay, Dub...

  19. 33 CFR 2.38 - Waters subject to the jurisdiction of the United States; waters over which the United States has...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Waters subject to the jurisdiction of the United States; waters over which the United States has jurisdiction. 2.38 Section 2.38 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL JURISDICTION...

  20. Comprehensive Review of Preschool Age Anemia in the Pacific Island Jurisdictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tiffany F; Huang, James N; Cash, Haley L

    2017-12-01

    Anemia can be an indicator of poor nutrition and health, and it can have significant consequences. Children are disproportionately affected by anemia. This comprehensive review summarizes the available literature on anemia prevalence in young children in the islands of the Oceania region. The anemia prevalence, the criteria used for diagnosis, the date the data was reported, and the types of samples collected were reviewed. Anemia prevalence estimates were reported for eighteen of the Pacific Island Jurisdictions. From the fifteen data sources that were evaluable, anemia prevalence ranged from 12.3% to over 70%. A major limitation in the data is a lack of representative primary data from many of the jurisdictions in the region. Prevalance estimates reported for those jurisdictions are estimated by regression analysis from the World Health Organization (WHO). Moreover, the primary data available does not use standardized reporting criteria. Nevertheless, this review serves as a new baseline for further investigations on the prevalence of anemia and a baseline for evaluating public health prevention and treatment measures to detect and improve anemia prevalence in the Pacific.

  1. JURISDICTION OVER CRIMES COMMITTED ON BOARD AIRCRAFT IN FLIGHT UNDER THE TOKYO CONVENTION 1963

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna Sopilko

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: the main aim of this paper is to clarify several issues of conflicting jurisdiction over crimes committed on board aircraft in flight. The study will examine the way in which the Tokyo Convention attempts to provide justice in the event of aviation security violations, and discuss its effectiveness in preventing such offences in the future. Methods: formal legal and case-study methods together with inductive reasoning, and comparison were used to analyse the legislation in the area of jurisdiction over crimes and other offences committed on board aircraft in flight. Results: it follows from the study that although the Tokyo Convention has contributed considerably to the establishing of clearer rules of jurisdiction over offences committed on board aircraft, considerable deficiencies of this treaty remain. The results have important implications for international policy-making. Discussion: the results of the study reveal several weaknesses of the Tokyo Convention. Firstly, it does not provide any definition or list of offences to which it applies, instead it relies on national penal laws to do so. In addition, the ‘freedom fighter exception’ and the lack of a strong enforcement mechanism may prove to impede the effective attainment of the Tokyo Convention’s main objectives – that is, to provide justice in the event of aviation security violations, and prevent such offences in the future. Therefore, further improvement in aviation security legislation is necessary to ensure that it is effective and adequate in the challenges faced today.

  2. The Philippine Regulatory Frameworks, Support Policies, And Initiatives Encouraging Women Entrepreneurship

    OpenAIRE

    EDRALIN, Divina M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the Philippine regulatory frameworks, support policies, initiatives, and barriers to encouraging women entrepreneurship. Currently, women entrepreneurship seems to be nurtured with the right environment, including regulatory frameworks, financial resources and support programs for, as well as business practices and social attitudes in the country towards women entrepreneurs and entrepreneurship in general. However, though many SME-friendly laws and policies exist, their im...

  3. Labour Market Policies for Encouraging Economic Activity and Labour Productivity in Bulgaria

    OpenAIRE

    Beleva, Iskra

    2016-01-01

    This article aims to present the recent labour market policies for encouraging economic activity of working age population, labour market inclusion and increasing labour productivity. It points out that a number of different programs and labour market measures have been implemented in Bulgaria in the last twenty years. The results of the analysis show up both positive and negative features of the implemented policies. These policies contribute to increasing labour market inclusion in the shor...

  4. Overview of the NRC nuclear waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malaro, J.C.

    1976-01-01

    The NRC has firmly established waste management as a high-priority effort and has made the commitment to act rapidly and methodically to establish a sound regulatory base for licensing waste management activities. We believe the priorities for NRC work in waste management are consistent with the needs of the overall national waste management program. Present licensing procedures and criteria are adequate for the short term, and priority attention is being given to the longer term, when the quantities of waste to be managed will be greater and licensing demands will increase. Recognizing that its decision will affect industry, other governmental jurisdictions, private interest groups, and the public at large, NRC has encouraged and will continue to encourage their participation in planning our program. We also recognize that the problems of nuclear waste management are international in scope. Many waste management problems (e.g., potential for contamination of oceans and atmosphere, need for isolation of some wastes for longer periods than governments and political boundaries have remained stable in the past), require a set of internationally acceptable and accepted solutions. The wastes from the U.S. nuclear industry will account for only about one third of the nuclear waste generated in the world. Therefore, we propose to cooperate and where appropriate take the lead in establishing acceptable worldwide policies, standards and procedures for handling nuclear wastes

  5. Decree 560/003. It approve the National Regulations text about dangerous goods transport by road, for national jurisdiction routes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This decree approve the transport regulation in the national jurisdiction routes. Is prohibited the transport of dangerous good with contamination risk in food, medication or articles intended for human or animal use

  6. Should the District Courts Have Jurisdiction Over Pre-Award Contract Claims? A Claim for the Claims Court

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Short, John J

    1987-01-01

    This thesis briefly examines the jurisdiction of the federal district courts and the United States Court of Claims over pre-award contract claims before the Federal Courts Improvement Act of October 1...

  7. Actively Encouraging Learning and Degree Persistence in Advanced Astrophysics Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Daniel H.

    2018-01-01

    The need to grow and diversify the STEM workforce remains a critical national challenge. Less than 40% of college students interested in STEM achieve a bachelor's degree. These numbers are even more dire for women and URMs, underscoring a serious concern about the country's ability to remain competitive in science and tech. A major factor is persistent performance gaps in rigorous 'gateway' and advanced STEM courses for majors from diverse backgrounds leading to discouragement, a sense of exclusion, and high dropout rates. Education research has clearly demonstrated that interactive-engagement (`active learning') strategies increase performance, boost confidence, and help build positive 'identity' in STEM. Likewise, the evidence shows that traditional science education practices do not help most students gain a genuine understanding of concepts nor the necessary skill set to succeed in their disciplines. Yet, lecture-heavy courses continue to dominate the higher-ed curriculum, thus, reinforcing the tired notion that only a small percentage of 'special' students have the inherent ability to achieve a STEM degree. In short, very capable students with less experience and confidence in science, who belong to groups that traditionally are less identified with STEM careers, are effectively and efficiently 'weeded out' by traditional education practices. I will share specific examples for how I successfully incorporate active learning in advanced astrophysics courses to encourage students from all backgrounds to synthesize complex ideas, build bedrock conceptual frameworks, gain technical communication skills, and achieve mastery learning outcomes all necessary to successfully complete rigorous degrees like astrophysics. By creating an inclusive and active learning experience in junior-level extragalactic and stellar interiors/atmospheres courses, I am helping students gain fluency in their chosen major and the ability to 'think like a scientist', both critical to

  8. Pacific Association for Clinical Training (PACT): lessons learned and next steps in developing a sustainable continuing health professionals education system in the United States-Affiliated Pacific Island (USAPI) jurisdictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buenconsejo-Lum, Lee E; Maskarinec, Gregory G; Palafox, Neal A

    2007-03-01

    In response to the 1998 Institute of Medicine report, "Pacific Partnerships for Health ", acknowledging the need for the continuing education of health workers in the United States-Affiliated Pacific Island (USAPI) jurisdictions, the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) awarded a grant (1999-2003) to the University of Washington for a continuing education project in the Pacific. When shortfalls in HRSA funding threatened continuation of the program, Pacific advocates aggressively made a case for refunding of this important project. In 2003, HRSA announced competitive funding for a new program for continuing education. The Department of Family Medicine and Community Health (DFMCH) at the University of Hawai'i (UH), John A. Burns School of Medicine (JABSOM) was awarded the HRSA Cooperative Agreement to run from September 2003 through August 2007, creating PACT the Pacific Association for Clinical Training. PACT assembled a professional, community-based advisory board, most of whom were indigenous Pacific Islanders, and conducted a continuing clinical education needs assessment in every jurisdiction, subsequently developing and delivering programs utilizing distance education relevant to the needs of each USAPI jurisdiction. Priority health areas included diabetes, oral health and geriatrics, as mandated by HRSA. This report describes the processes, accomplishments, challenges and lessons learned from the project. PACT needs assessment reports for each jurisdiction and an executive summary are published as Original Articles in this issue of Pacific Health Dialog. As funding for PACT comes to an end, it is clear that much work remains to be done in the region. "Continuing clinical education" is only one part of a continuum of human resources for health (HRH) workforce development. Continued USAPI regional, U.S. national and international collaboration and resources are needed to achieve the ultimate goal of improved health and health care delivery

  9. with a comparative view at the jurisdiction of the U.S.- Supreme Court and the German Federal Constitutional Court

    OpenAIRE

    Hiller, Kinga

    2010-01-01

    This thesis is about the connection between the constitutional ownership guarantee and the political-philosophical conception of property. I portray and analyze the jurisdiction of the Hungarian Constitutional Court since the fall of Communism in 1989 in light of these two aspects and venture a comparison with the jurisdiction of the U.S.- Supreme Court and the German Federal Constitutional Court. In political and philosophical terms, there are - roughly speaking - two opposing conceptio...

  10. Encouraging innovation in business relationships - A research note

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooi, E.A.; Frambach, R.T.

    2012-01-01

    How do buyer-supplier relationships affect innovation? This study suggests that the relational exchange norms of flexibility, information sharing, and solidarity (the bright side) encourage buyer innovation. However, negative (dark side) aspects of relationships with suppliers-loss of supplier

  11. Business Plan Competitions in Tertiary Institutions: Encouraging Entrepreneurship Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Roslyn; Atchison, Mary; Brooks, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The development of entrepreneurial skills and knowledge is a priority for governments that want to encourage an innovative and enterprising society. Furthermore, education institutions are becoming increasingly required by employers to produce graduates that have practical, real-world skills. Business plan competitions, although primarily aimed at…

  12. Colleges Use Peer Pressure To Encourage Healthy Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisberg, Leo

    2000-01-01

    Examines "social norms" marketing, an effort by several colleges and universities to encourage healthy student behaviors by countering perceptions of unhealthy "cool" behaviors and stressing the positive behaviors of "most" students. Examples of posters and other marketing strategies are from Virginia Commonwealth University, Gustavus Adolphus…

  13. Talking with Young Children: How Teachers Encourage Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Test, Joan E.; Cunningham, Denise D.; Lee, Amanda C.

    2010-01-01

    In general, talking with young children encourages development in many areas: (1) spoken language; (2) early literacy; (3) cognitive development; (4) social skills; and (5) emotional maturity. Speaking with children in increasingly complex and responsive ways does this even better. This article explores research findings about the effects of…

  14. The ENCOURAGE ICT architecture for heterogeneous smart grids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albano, Michele; Ferreira, Luis; Le Guilly, Thibaut

    2013-01-01

    The ENCOURAGE project aims at rationalizing energy usage in building by implementing a smart energy grid based on intelligent scheduling of energy consuming appliances, renewable energy production, and inter-building energy trading. This paper presents the reference architecture proposed in the c...

  15. Encouraging Students to Consider Music Education as a Future Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Ann M.; Payne, Phillip D.; Burrack, Frederick W.; Fredrickson, William E.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes, communication, and opportunities provided by music teachers to encourage consideration of the music teaching profession. Survey participants (N = 436) were music educators from the Southeast (235), Midwest (51), and Southwest (149) National Association for Music Education regions of the…

  16. ENCOURAGING COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT, A TRAINING GUIDE FOR LOCAL WORKERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BIDDLE, LOUREIDE J.; BIDDLE, WILLIAM W.

    THIS TRAINING GUIDE IS WRITTEN TO MEET THE NEEDS OF UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES TO WHICH THE PEACE CORPS, VISTA, CHURCHES, AND OTHER VOLUNTEER-USING AGENCIES TURN FOR HELP IN TRAINING THE NONPROFESSIONAL OR PREPROFESSIONAL LOCAL WORKER IN COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT. THE LESSONS ARE DIRECTED TO THE "ENCOURAGER" WHO LIVES WITH THE PEOPLE PARTICIPATING IN…

  17. ENCOURAGEing results on ICT for energy efficient buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Guilly, Thibaut; Skou, Arne Joachim; Olsen, Petur

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents how the ICT infrastructure developed in the European ENCOURAGE project, centered around a message oriented middleware, enabled energy savings in buildings and households. The components of the middleware, as well as the supervisory control strategy, are overviewed, to support...

  18. Earthworms, Stamps and Butterfly Wings: Encouraging Children's Interests and Collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGreevy, Ann

    2000-01-01

    This article examines the importance of encouraging children's interests and the pursuit of collections and hobbies as strategies for developing talent and abilities. Excerpts are cited from eminent people's lives as examples of early interests/collections and eventual success. Letters from children on their collections are included. (Contains…

  19. Classroom Debates: Using Speed Rounds to Encourage Greater Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treme, Julianne

    2018-01-01

    The primary obstacle that can derail the effectiveness of a debate is one in which few students are involved and all of the energy and learning is limited to a few students. This leaves the majority of students passively absorbing information and does not encourage participation among those students that typically do not talk in class. This quick…

  20. Encouraging Reflection and Critical Friendship in Preservice Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bognar, Branko; Krumes, Irena

    2017-01-01

    Reflectivity is an important professional competence of contemporary teachers. In order to explore how to encourage students' reflection, we conducted a two-year action research project impelling them to become mutual critical friends. For critical friendship communication and other project activities, we utilised Moodle--an online learning…

  1. Communication for the Purpose of Encouraging Gifted Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatkovic, Nevenka; Ruzic, Maja; Dujmovic, Mauro

    2005-01-01

    This work starts with the theoretical definition of the conception of "talent"; then follows the explanation of the possibilities to identify and encourage talented pupils and students. Giftedness is regarded in terms of communication and interactive communication among the subjects of educational process. The attention is paid to the…

  2. Program collaboration and service integration activities among HIV programs in 59 U.S. health departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitz Harris, Lauren F; Toledo, Lauren; Dunbar, Erica; Aquino, Gustavo A; Nesheim, Steven R

    2014-01-01

    We identified the level and type of program collaboration and service integration (PCSI) among HIV prevention programs in 59 CDC-funded health department jurisdictions. Annual progress reports (APRs) completed by all 59 health departments funded by CDC for HIV prevention activities were reviewed for collaborative and integrated activities reported by HIV programs for calendar year 2009. We identified associations between PCSI activities and funding, AIDS diagnosis rate, and organizational integration. HIV programs collaborated with other health department programs through data-related activities, provider training, and providing funding for sexually transmitted disease (STD) activities in 24 (41%), 31 (53%), and 16 (27%) jurisdictions, respectively. Of the 59 jurisdictions, 57 (97%) reported integrated HIV and STD testing at the same venue, 39 (66%) reported integrated HIV and tuberculosis testing, and 26 (44%) reported integrated HIV and viral hepatitis testing. Forty-five (76%) jurisdictions reported providing integrated education/outreach activities for HIV and at least one other disease. Twenty-six (44%) jurisdictions reported integrated partner services among HIV and STD programs. Overall, the level of PCSI activities was not associated with HIV funding, AIDS diagnoses, or organizational integration. HIV programs in health departments collaborate primarily with STD programs. Key PCSI activities include integrated testing, integrated education/outreach, and training. Future assessments are needed to evaluate PCSI activities and to identify the level of collaboration and integration among prevention programs.

  3. International comparison of comparative effectiveness research in five jurisdictions: insights for the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Adrian R; Mitton, Craig; Johnston, Karissa M; Harrigan, Brian; Briggs, Andrew H

    2010-01-01

    Spurred by a desire to improve quality of care and to understand the relative value of medical treatments, there has been a recent surge of interest in publicly funded comparative effectiveness research (CER) in the US. As health technology assessment (HTA) shares some of the same goals as CER, and publicly funded HTA has been a feature within other industrialized countries for many years, a review of HTA activities in some of these countries can be a helpful source of information for the US debate. Informed by a literature review, and in two cases augmented by informant interviews, we reviewed the organization of HTA activities in five jurisdictions: Canada, Sweden, Scotland, the Netherlands and Australia. We provide a summary description of the healthcare system in each country as well as a description of the key features of their HTA bodies, with a particular focus on the processes of HTA for listing medications on public formularies. Four of the committees evaluating medications for formulary inclusion are funded by, but remain at arm's length from, the government (Canada, Australia, Sweden and Scotland), while the process is fully embedded within the government in the Netherlands. Each of these jurisdictions has a stated preference for comparative outcomes evidence from randomized controlled trials, but will, under certain circumstances, accept randomized evidence using surrogate markers, other comparators that are not directly relevant or non-randomized evidence. Health technology evaluation committees largely comprise health professionals, with public representatives included in the Canadian, Australian and Scottish committees. Scotland is the only one of the five jurisdictions reviewed to have industry representation on the evaluation committee. We identified seven characteristics that are shared across the jurisdictions reviewed and that potentially serve as insights for development of CER in the US: (i) the process must be responsive to stakeholders

  4. The problem of epistemic jurisdiction in global governance: The case of sustainability standards for biofuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winickoff, David E; Mondou, Matthieu

    2017-02-01

    While there is ample scholarly work on regulatory science within the state, or single-sited global institutions, there is less on its operation within complex modes of global governance that are decentered, overlapping, multi-sectorial and multi-leveled. Using a co-productionist framework, this study identifies 'epistemic jurisdiction' - the power to produce or warrant technical knowledge for a given political community, topical arena or geographical territory - as a central problem for regulatory science in complex governance. We explore these dynamics in the arena of global sustainability standards for biofuels. We select three institutional fora as sites of inquiry: the European Union's Renewable Energy Directive, the Roundtable on Sustainable Biomaterials, and the International Organization for Standardization. These cases allow us to analyze how the co-production of sustainability science responds to problems of epistemic jurisdiction in the global regulatory order. First, different problems of epistemic jurisdiction beset different standard-setting bodies, and these problems shape both the content of regulatory science and the procedures designed to make it authoritative. Second, in order to produce global regulatory science, technical bodies must manage an array of conflicting imperatives - including scientific virtue, due process and the need to recruit adoptees to perpetuate the standard. At different levels of governance, standard drafters struggle to balance loyalties to country, to company or constituency and to the larger project of internationalization. Confronted with these sometimes conflicting pressures, actors across the standards system quite self-consciously maneuver to build or retain authority for their forum through a combination of scientific adjustment and political negotiation. Third, the evidentiary demands of regulatory science in global administrative spaces are deeply affected by 1) a market for standards, in which firms and states can

  5. Considering marijuana legalization carefully: insights for other jurisdictions from analysis for Vermont.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulkins, Jonathan P; Kilmer, Beau

    2016-12-01

    In 2014 the legislature of Vermont, USA passed a law requiring the Secretary of Administration to report on the consequences of legalizing marijuana. The RAND Corporation was commissioned to write that report. This paper summarizes insights from that analysis that are germane to other jurisdictions. Translation of key findings from the RAND Corporation report to the broader policy debate. Marijuana legalization encompasses a wide range of possible regimes, distinguished along at least four dimensions: which organizations are allowed to produce and supply the drug, the regulations under which they operate, the nature of the products that can be distributed and taxes and prices. Vermont's decriminalization had already cut its costs of enforcing marijuana prohibition against adults to about $1 per resident per year. That is probably less than the cost of regulating a legal market. Revenues from taxing residents' purchases after legalization could be many times that amount, so the main fiscal cost of prohibition after decriminalization relative to outright legalization may be foregone tax revenues, not enforcement costs. Approximately 40 times as many users live within 200 miles of Vermont's borders as live within the state; drug tourism and associated tax revenues will be important considerations, as will be the response of other states. Indeed, if another state legalized with lower taxes, that could undermine the ability to collect taxes on even Vermont residents' purchases. Analysis of possible outcomes if Vermont, USA, legalized marijuana reveal that choices about how, and not just whether, to legalize a drug can have profound consequences for the effects on health and social wellbeing, and the choices of one jurisdiction can affect the options and incentives available to other jurisdictions. © 2016 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  6. Receipt and timing of HIV drug resistance testing in six U.S. jurisdictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Sharoda; Hall, H Irene; Hernandez, Angela L; Ocfemia, M Cheryl Bañez; Saduvala, Neeraja; Oster, Alexandra M

    2017-12-01

    The Department of Health and Human Services recommends drug resistance testing at linkage to HIV care. Because receipt and timing of testing are not well characterized, we examined testing patterns among persons with diagnosed HIV who are linked to care. Using surveillance data in six jurisdictions for persons aged ≥13 years with HIV infection diagnosed in 2013, we assessed the proportion receiving testing, and among these, the proportion receiving testing at linkage. Multivariable log-binomial regression modeling estimated associations between selected characteristics and receipt of testing (1) overall, and (2) at linkage among those tested. Of 9,408 persons linked to care, 66% received resistance testing, among whom 68% received testing at linkage. Less testing was observed among male persons who inject drugs (PWID), compared with men who have sex with men (adjusted prevalence ratio [aPR]: 0.88; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.81-0.97) and persons living in areas with population testing was lower for persons with initial CD4 counts ≥500 cells/mm 3 , compared with those with CD4 counts tested, testing at linkage was lower among male PWID (aPR: 0.85; CI: 0.75-0.95) and, in some jurisdictions, persons with CD4 counts ≥500 cells/mm 3 (aPR range: 0.63-0.73). Two-thirds of persons with diagnosed HIV who were linked to care received resistance testing, and most received testing at linkage as recommended. Improving receipt and timing of testing among male PWID, persons in less populous settings, and in all jurisdictions, regardless of CD4 count, may improve care outcomes.

  7. Modern environmental penal law in the light of the jurisdiction - review and tasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rengier, R.

    1992-01-01

    The jurisdiction in modern environmental penal law has gone beyond just adopting the ecological tenets of the legislature: it has farthered their development, thus contributing substantially to an ecologically oriented understanding of the offences of water pollution and ecologically harmful waste disposal. This orientation has made prosecution more efficient and through its preventive effects has increased ecological awareness. A good example within the sphere of public interest are communal plant operators. In other areas such as private business and private households the preventive effect is not yet as apparent, but this will probably change in the course of time. (orig.) [de

  8. An examination of measures designed to encourage energy conservation from the perspective of motivation theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-10-01

    This report addresses itself to the insights offered by the psychology of motivation to those wishing to encourage the conservation of energy. After an extensive review of the relevant literature, it was found that the bulk of the psychological literature offers little that can be adapted for immediate practical application to a large scale motivational campaign. There are, nevertheless, some well-supported conclusions that can be drawn from the theory and experimentation of psychology that are of direct relevance to the efficient and effective planning and execution of a campaign to encourage conservation of energy. This report addresses itself to these conclusions. The contents of the report include comments on the efficacy of various types of programs, the conditions under which those programs are most likely to succeed, and the critical elements which should be included in those programs if they are to exert their maximum effect. These types of programs include intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, i.e. creating new behavior patterns with internally or externally generated rewards, fear inducement (threats of energy shortages), and cogenitive dissonance, involving images of oneself and one's cultural environment. 66 refs.

  9. An examination of measures designed to encourage energy conservation from the perspective of motivation theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-10-01

    This report addresses itself to the insights offered by the psychology of motivation to those wishing to encourage the conservation of energy. After an extensive review of the relevant literature, it was found that the bulk of the psychological literature offers little that can be adapted for immediate practical application to a large scale motivational campaign. There are, nevertheless, some well-supported conclusions that can be drawn from the theory and experimentation of psychology that are of direct relevance to the efficient and effective planning and execution of a campaign to encourage conservation of energy. This report addresses itself to these conclusions. The contents of the report include comments on the efficacy of various types of programs, the conditions under which those programs are most likely to succeed, and the critical elements which should be included in those programs if they are to exert their maximum effect. These types of programs include intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, i.e. creating new behavior patterns with internally or externally generated rewards, fear inducement (threats of energy shortages), and cogenitive dissonance, involving images of oneself and one's cultural environment. 66 refs.

  10. A critical examination of factors that might encourage secrecy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tough, Allen

    If a signal is detected someday from extraterrestrial intelligence, several factors might encourage complete and immediate secrecy. As a result, all data might be restricted to the receiving facility or nation instead of being shared promptly with SETI scientists around the world. Seven factors seem particularly like to encourage secrecy: (1) the belief that people may panic; (2) the fear of a negative impact on religion, science, and culture; (3) embarrassment; (4) the individual and national competitive urge; (5) avoiding a harmful premature reply; (6) a national trade or military advantage; and (7) the fear of a Trojan Horse. Three steps might alleviate the particularly difficult factors (numbers 4, 5, 6): an international treaty for immediate sharing of possible signals with SETI scientists in several other countries; implementation and frequent use of an actual network of scientists for such sharing; and further study of the possible need for partial restriction of data about the location and channel of a suspected signal.

  11. Feeling Is Believing: Inspiration Encourages Belief in God.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critcher, Clayton R; Lee, Chan Jean

    2018-05-01

    Even without direct evidence of God's existence, about half of the world's population believes in God. Although previous research has found that people arrive at such beliefs intuitively instead of analytically, relatively little research has aimed to understand what experiences encourage or legitimate theistic belief systems. Using cross-cultural correlational and experimental methods, we investigated whether the experience of inspiration encourages a belief in God. Participants who dispositionally experience more inspiration, were randomly assigned to relive or have an inspirational experience, or reported such experiences to be more inspirational all showed stronger belief in God. These effects were specific to inspiration (instead of adjacent affective experiences) and a belief in God (instead of other empirically unverifiable claims). Being inspired by someone or something (but not inspired to do something) offers a spiritually transcendent experience that elevates belief in God, in part because it makes people feel connected to something beyond themselves.

  12. Four simple recommendations to encourage best practices in research software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Rafael C; Kuzak, Mateusz; Alhamdoosh, Monther; Barker, Michelle; Batut, Bérénice; Borg, Mikael; Capella-Gutierrez, Salvador; Chue Hong, Neil; Cook, Martin; Corpas, Manuel; Flannery, Madison; Garcia, Leyla; Gelpí, Josep Ll; Gladman, Simon; Goble, Carole; González Ferreiro, Montserrat; Gonzalez-Beltran, Alejandra; Griffin, Philippa C; Grüning, Björn; Hagberg, Jonas; Holub, Petr; Hooft, Rob; Ison, Jon; Katz, Daniel S; Leskošek, Brane; López Gómez, Federico; Oliveira, Luis J; Mellor, David; Mosbergen, Rowland; Mulder, Nicola; Perez-Riverol, Yasset; Pergl, Robert; Pichler, Horst; Pope, Bernard; Sanz, Ferran; Schneider, Maria V; Stodden, Victoria; Suchecki, Radosław; Svobodová Vařeková, Radka; Talvik, Harry-Anton; Todorov, Ilian; Treloar, Andrew; Tyagi, Sonika; van Gompel, Maarten; Vaughan, Daniel; Via, Allegra; Wang, Xiaochuan; Watson-Haigh, Nathan S; Crouch, Steve

    2017-01-01

    Scientific research relies on computer software, yet software is not always developed following practices that ensure its quality and sustainability. This manuscript does not aim to propose new software development best practices, but rather to provide simple recommendations that encourage the adoption of existing best practices. Software development best practices promote better quality software, and better quality software improves the reproducibility and reusability of research. These recommendations are designed around Open Source values, and provide practical suggestions that contribute to making research software and its source code more discoverable, reusable and transparent. This manuscript is aimed at developers, but also at organisations, projects, journals and funders that can increase the quality and sustainability of research software by encouraging the adoption of these recommendations.

  13. Nursing Teaching Strategies by Encouraging Students’ Questioning, Argumentation and Explanation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayse Neri de Souza

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nursing students need to develop competences in the field of explanation, argumentation and questioning as they are pivotal to foster a relationship with their patients and achieve a greater humanisation of care. The objective of this paper is to analyse the perception of 1st-year nursing students with regard to the humanisation of care provided to patients by encouraging them to discuss real-life episodes. The study is qualitative and content analysis used the students’ questions, explanations and argumentation as core discourses. Among other conclusions, results point towards the importance of promoting activities that encourage the different nursing students’ discourses and the ability to understand the humanisation and dehumanisation patterns arising from the real-life episodes used as case study.

  14. Four simple recommendations to encourage best practices in research software

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiménez, Rafael C.; Kuzak, Mateusz; Alhamdoosh, Monther

    2017-01-01

    Scientific research relies on computer software, yet software is not always developed following practices that ensure its quality and sustainability. This manuscript does not aim to propose new software development best practices, but rather to provide simple recommendations that encourage...... the adoption of existing best practices. Software development best practices promote better quality software, and better quality software improves the reproducibility and reusability of research. These recommendations are designed around Open Source values, and provide practical suggestions that contribute...... to making research software and its source code more discoverable, reusable and transparent. This manuscript is aimed at developers, but also at organisations, projects, journals and funders that can increase the quality and sustainability of research software by encouraging the adoption...

  15. Encouraging creativity and employability skills in undergraduate microbiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verran, Joanna

    2010-02-01

    Key skills such as communication and critical thinking are essential for today's microbiology graduate. There are many opportunities within the undergraduate curriculum to help students to use, develop and appreciate their own unique set of skills. This article describes personal experiences of research-led teaching at Manchester Metropolitan University (UK) which have been used successfully to encourage creativity and other employability skills in both large and smaller classroom settings, and through individual student project work. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Creating a board game for encouraging emotional intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Galič, Kaja

    2016-01-01

    The main focus of this thesis is on creating a board game for encouraging emotional intelligence of children in early childhood. Game is based on the Four-Branch Model which was proposed by Mayer and Salovey (1997). Board game covers emotional skills, which include the abilities to perceive emotions in oneself and other, to use emotions, to understand emotions and to manage emotions. Game was tested in Kindergarten Ledina Ljubljana and Kindergarten Mavrica Brežice. 57 children, aged five and ...

  17. Green Team Hosts Plant Swap to Encourage Gardening | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer What started out as a way for Howard Young, Ph.D., to thin out his garden last fall turned into the NCI at Frederick Green Team’s Plant Swap. The group held its Fall Plant Swap on October 24, encouraging all members of the Fort Detrick community to pick up a free plant or swap a plant of theirs for another. “Those who love to garden

  18. Current legal regime for environmental impact assessment in areas beyond national jurisdiction and its future approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Deqiang; Fang, Qinhua; Guan, Song

    2016-01-01

    In 2004, the United Nations launched an Ad Hoc Open-ended Informal Working Group to study issues relating to the conservation and sustainable use of marine biological diversity in areas beyond national jurisdiction. Since then, the topic of governing marine areas beyond national jurisdiction (ABNJ) has been widely discussed by politicians, policy makers and scholars. As one of management tools to protect marine biodiversity in ABNJ, environmental impact assessment (EIA) has been widely recognized and accepted by the international community, however, the biggest challenge is how to effectively implement the EIA regime in ABNJ. This paper explores the impacts of anthropogenic activities in ABNJ on marine ecosystems, reviews the existing legal regime for EIA in ABNJ and discusses possible measures to strengthen the implementation of EIA in ABNJ. - Highlights: • We identify human activities in ABNJ and their impacts on marine ecosystems. • We analyze the characters and gaps of the existing legal regime for EIA in ABNJ. • We analyze the pros and cons of alternative approaches of EIA in ABNJ.

  19. Current legal regime for environmental impact assessment in areas beyond national jurisdiction and its future approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Deqiang [Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory for Coastal Ecology and Environmental Studies, Xiamen University, 361102 (China); Coastal and Ocean Management Institute, Xiamen University, 361102 (China); Fang, Qinhua, E-mail: qhfang@xmu.edu.cn [Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory for Coastal Ecology and Environmental Studies, Xiamen University, 361102 (China); Coastal and Ocean Management Institute, Xiamen University, 361102 (China); Guan, Song [Coastal and Ocean Management Institute, Xiamen University, 361102 (China)

    2016-01-15

    In 2004, the United Nations launched an Ad Hoc Open-ended Informal Working Group to study issues relating to the conservation and sustainable use of marine biological diversity in areas beyond national jurisdiction. Since then, the topic of governing marine areas beyond national jurisdiction (ABNJ) has been widely discussed by politicians, policy makers and scholars. As one of management tools to protect marine biodiversity in ABNJ, environmental impact assessment (EIA) has been widely recognized and accepted by the international community, however, the biggest challenge is how to effectively implement the EIA regime in ABNJ. This paper explores the impacts of anthropogenic activities in ABNJ on marine ecosystems, reviews the existing legal regime for EIA in ABNJ and discusses possible measures to strengthen the implementation of EIA in ABNJ. - Highlights: • We identify human activities in ABNJ and their impacts on marine ecosystems. • We analyze the characters and gaps of the existing legal regime for EIA in ABNJ. • We analyze the pros and cons of alternative approaches of EIA in ABNJ.

  20. Stillbirth and the law: options for law reform and issues for the coronial jurisdiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freckelton, Ian

    2013-09-01

    In spite of its relative frequency, stillbirth is a phenomenon that has been relatively little discussed and requires further research for comprehensive clinical understanding. It impacts upon the legal system by way of the need to determine whether a life has come into being such that legal consequences such as criminal law, probate law and the coronial jurisdiction can attach to it. This requires contemporary clinically informed interpretation and application of the ancient "born alive rule" in respect of the ramifications of matters such as pulseless electrical activity in the heart, brain activity and agonal gasping. In the coronial domain, arguments have been put in South Australia, Victoria and Northern Ireland in recent cases and discussion has taken place publicly about whether coroners should be permitted to investigate and make findings and recommendations about cases of stillbirth. The article identifies merit in principle in such a development but highlights the need for care about such reform to the law lest it engender inconsistency in respect of important threshold definitions of "life" and "death" lest it generate incoherent approaches of the law on the subject, and lest it have unforeseen counter-therapeutic consequences for the grieving parents of infants who have been stillborn. It notes, too, that such a change to the ambit of coronial jurisdiction would have important resourcing ramifications.

  1. Why jurisdiction and uranium deposit type are essential considerations for exploration and mining of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.

    2014-01-01

    Uranium is a relatively abundant element, being 25 times more common than silver, and having the same crustal abundance as tin. Economically minable uranium grades vary greatly, from a low of 0.01% U to over 20% U. What are the factors that allow mining of these very low grade ores that are only 50 times background concentrations? Why don’t the high grade deposits of the world exclusively supply all of the worlds newly mined uranium needs? There are two main reasons that the high grade deposits of the world do not exclusively supply all of the worlds newly mined uranium needs: 1) jurisdictional issues, the favorability or lack thereof of governmental policies where the deposit is located and the delays caused by an ineffective or corrupt policy and 2) the deposit type, which has a great influence on the recovery cost of the uranium. The quality of a deposit can override more difficult political jurisdictions if recovery of the investment occurs quickly and in an environmentally friendly way.

  2. Inconvenient marriages, or what happens when ethnic minorities marry trans-jurisdictionally

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Shah

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents evidence of a trend in the practice of British immigration control of denying recognition to marriages which take place trans-jurisdictionally across national and continental boundaries and across different state jurisdictions. The article partly draws on evidence gleaned from the writer’s own experience of being instructed as an expert witness to provide opinions of the validity of such marriages, and partly on evidence from reported cases at different levels of the judicial system. The evidence demonstrates that decision making in this area, whether by officials or judges, often takes place in arbitrary ways, arguably to fulfil wider aims of controlling the immigration of certain population groups whose presence in the UK and Europe is increasingly seen as undesirable. However, and quite apart from the immigration control concerns underlying such actions, the field throws up evidence of the kinds of legal insecurity faced by those whose marriages are solemnized under non-Western legal traditions and calls into question respect for those traditions when they come into contact with Western officialdom.

  3. Encouraging Reflection and Critical Friendship in Preservice Teacher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branko Bognar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Reflectivity is an important professional competence of contemporary teachers. In order to explore how to encourage students’ reflection, we conducted a two-year action research project impelling them to become mutual critical friends. For critical friendship communication and other project activities, we utilised Moodle – an online learning management system. On the basis of the analysed data that were gathered at the end of each action research cycle, we determined that the students felt comfortable in the role of critical friends and that critical friends’ reflections were particularly pleasant for them. They experienced the comments of their critical friends as friendly, encouraging, useful, specific, interesting, detailed, positive, professional and clear. The majority of students (91% think that the critical friendship discussion should be continued within the course Correlated-integrated systems in Croatian language teaching, and 85% of them suggest introducing this approach in other teachers’ education courses. We determined that the technical mode of reflective thinking prevails in the students’ correspondence. The practical or contextual level could rarely be observed while critical reflection was completely absent in 11 of 14 discussions. Reflective thinking of students (future teachers should be fostered from the beginning of their studies within various courses, particularly in the pedagogical and methodological ones. To encourage their students to be critically reflective, university teachers should embrace reflective thinking by becoming critically-reflective practitioners and conducting action research in their teaching practices.

  4. Original jurisdiction of the Superior Administrative Court for litigation on licensing of large-scale commercial plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ule, C.H.

    1983-01-01

    Proceeding from the suggestion of the Bundesrat (Deutscher Bundestag, Document 9/1851) concerning the draft of Rules of the Administrative Courts (VwGO), according to which original jurisdiction of the Higher Administrative Court (OVG) is to be introducing legel actions concerning the licensing of large scale installations in the field of energy, the author points out the now existing regulations and former ones in administrative jurisdiction and criminal jurisdiction by which legal protection is limited to a court of first instance which is competent for fact-finding (e.g. sec. 138 Para. 1 Act of compulsory consolidation of the boundaries of land (FlurbG), sec. 47 Rules of the Administrative Courts (VwGO), sections 24 Para. 1 No. 3, 74 Para. 1 p. 2 Judicature Act (GVG). He tries to transfer the idea of accelerating legal procedure from the model of the Criminal Court in criminal jurisdiction to administrative jurisdiction. Finally, the author examines the question whether cutting down the length of proceedings is really necessary, or if the same result could be reached by making an appeal subject to special admission. (HP) [de

  5. Regulating (for the benefit of) future persons: a different perspective on the FDA's jurisdiction to regulate human reproductive cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javitt, Gail H; Hudson, Kathy

    2003-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has taken the position that human reproductive cloning falls within its regulatory jurisdiction. This position has been subject to criticism on both procedural and substantive grounds. Some have contended that the FDA has failed to follow administrative law principles in asserting its jurisdiction, while others claim the FDA is ill suited to the task of addressing the ethical and social implications of human cloning. This Article argues, that, notwithstanding these criticisms, the FDA could plausibly assert jurisdiction over human cloning as a form of human gene therapy, an area in which the FDA is already regarded as having primary regulatory authority. Such an assertion would require that the FDA's jurisdiction extend to products affecting future persons, i.e., those not yet born. This Article demonstrates, for the first time, that such jurisdiction was implicit in the enactment of the 1962 Kefauver-Harris Amendments to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and that the FDA has historically relied on such authority in promulgating regulations for drugs and devices.

  6. Tribal Waste Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA’s Tribal Waste Management Program encourages environmentally sound waste management practices that promote resource conservation through recycling, recovery, reduction, clean up, and elimination of waste.

  7. Encouraging Realistic Expectations in STEM Students: Paradoxical Effects of a Motivational Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan C. Hall

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available College students in STEM disciplines are increasingly faced with highly competitive and demanding degree programs and are at risk of academic overconfidence. Following from theory and research highlighting the psychological and developmental risks of unrealistic expectations, the present exploratory study evaluated the longitudinal effects of a motivational intervention encouraging college students in STEM degree programs (N = 52 to consider the importance of downgrading one’s expectations in response to academic setbacks. Contrary to study hypotheses, the results showed intervention participants to report significantly higher expectations and optimism on post-test measures administered four months later, no significant gains in emotional well-being or achievement goal orientations, and lower GPAs over five subsequent semesters. These paradoxical effects underscore the need for additional larger-scale research on the nature of students’ responses to potentially ego-threatening motivational programs in STEM disciplines so as to minimize achievement deficits at the expense of preserving motivational resources.

  8. The software improvement process - tools and rules to encourage quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigerud, K.; Baggiolini, V.

    2012-01-01

    The Applications section of the CERN accelerator controls group has decided to apply a systematic approach to quality assurance (QA), the 'Software Improvement Process' - SIP. This process focuses on three areas: the development process itself, suitable QA tools, and how to practically encourage developers to do QA. For each stage of the development process we have agreed on the recommended activities and deliverables, and identified tools to automate and support the task. For example we do more code reviews. As peer reviews are resource intensive, we only do them for complex parts of a product. As a complement, we are using static code checking tools, like FindBugs and Checkstyle. We also encourage unit testing and have agreed on a minimum level of test coverage recommended for all products, measured using Clover. Each of these tools is well integrated with our IDE (Eclipse) and give instant feedback to the developer about the quality of their code. The major challenges of SIP have been to 1) agree on common standards and configurations, for example common code formatting and Javadoc documentation guidelines, and 2) how to encourage the developers to do QA. To address the second point, we have successfully implemented 'SIP days', i.e. one day dedicated to QA work to which the whole group of developers participates, and 'Top/Flop' lists, clearly indicating the best and worst products with regards to SIP guidelines and standards, for example test coverage. This paper presents the SIP initiative in more detail, summarizing our experience since two years and our future plans. (authors)

  9. Whistleblowing: Don’t Encourage It, Prevent It

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDougall, D. Robert

    2016-01-01

    In a recent article, Mannion and Davies argue that there are a multitude of ways in which organizations (such as the National Health Service [NHS]) can deal with wrongdoing or ethical problems, including the formation of policies that encourage and protect would-be whistleblowers. However, it is important to distinguish internal reporting about wrongdoing from whistleblowing proper, because the two are morally quite different and should not be dealt with in the same way. This article argues that we should not understand the authors’ conclusions to apply to "whistleblowing" proper, because their recommended approach would be both unfeasible and undesirable for addressing whistleblowing defined in this way. PMID:26927590

  10. D2.3 - ENCOURAGE platform reference architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, Luis Lino; Pinho, Luis Miguel; Albano, Michele

    2012-01-01

    documents produced in work package WP2, the framework for the detailed specification activities to be developed in the technical work packages of the project (WP3-WP6). In order to provide the required background for the ENCOURAGE platform reference, the document describes the most relevant standards...... and functionalities of the modules of the architecture logical blocks. Furthermore, the document defines the main interface standards to be used for interoperability. These functionalities and interfaces will then be specified in detail in work packages WP3-WP6. Finally, the document provides the mapping...

  11. Deradicalization or Disengagement : A Framework for Encouraging Jihad Abandonment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    resulted in entire group disengagement, while the German HAYAT Program and Saudi Counseling Program seek individual de-radicalization/disengagement... Counseling Y Optional N/A Y Y Family Counseling N Y N Y Y Practical Support Measures Y Y Y Y Y Disengage Guarantee – Type Y - Family N Y – Group N...disengagement. The U.S. could easily support religious counseling in de-radicalization programs in partner nations overseas. Group or Individual Programs

  12. On the Issue of the Unification of Norms on Jurisdiction in the Field of Civil Proceedings Within the European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena V. Maystrovich

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article author examines some issues of norms on jurisdiction unification in the field of civil proceedings within the European Union. Author emphasizes that as a result of the adoption of the new Regulation No. 1215/2012 "Brussels Ibis", which came into force in 2012, rules on jurisdiction in the field of civil proceedings have undergone a number of changes. Article deals with the draft of the proposed amendments and their practical implementation. Amendments, their significance, efficiency and correlation with the projected initially are analyzed.

  13. A Step Forward in the Harmonization of European Jurisdiction: Regulation Brussels I Recast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Alavi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Brussels regime is a legislative framework that regulates questions of transnational litigation in the European Union. Having been initially shaped upon negotiation of the 1968 Brussels Convention, it has been subsequently superseded and expanded in scope by the Brussels I Regulation on jurisdiction and the recognition and enforcement of judgments in civil and commercial matters, alongside other instruments addressing specific areas of law. Recently, the Brussels regime has been amended by the Recast Brussels I Regulation, which entered into force on January 15, 2015, bringing about significant and long-awaited change. Addressing the experience of application of its predecessors, the changes in the Recast Regulation have been introduced to the treatment of choice-of-court agreements and their relationship with the lis pendens doctrine, abolition of exequatur, reaffirmation and clarification of the arbitration exclusion, as well as further minor amendments.

  14. Job Satisfaction: Insights from Home Support Care Workers in Three Canadian Jurisdictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotoglou, Dimitra; Fancey, Pamela; Keefe, Janice; Martin-Matthews, Anne

    2017-03-01

    This mixed-methods study identified the personal and workplace characteristics that drive the job satisfaction of home support workers (HSWs) providing assistance to elderly clients. Data were based on a standardized measure of job satisfaction, along with in-depth qualitative interviews with 176 home support workers from three Canadian provincial jurisdictions (British Columbia, n = 108; Ontario, n = 28; Nova Scotia, n = 40). We anticipated that variability in demographic profiles between the three groups of workers and different job descriptions would be associated with differences in perceived job satisfaction. This was not the case. Results from the qualitative analysis highlight key areas that contributed to job satisfaction. These are job (scheduling, travel, and safety), economic (income security), and organizational (communication, support, and respect) factors. Given these findings, we recommend improvements to workplace communication, increased travel time allowance between clients, and wage parity with equivalent positions in long-term care facilities.

  15. Synthesizing Global and Local Datasets to Estimate Jurisdictional Forest Carbon Fluxes in Berau, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griscom, Bronson W; Ellis, Peter W; Baccini, Alessandro; Marthinus, Delon; Evans, Jeffrey S; Ruslandi

    2016-01-01

    Forest conservation efforts are increasingly being implemented at the scale of sub-national jurisdictions in order to mitigate global climate change and provide other ecosystem services. We see an urgent need for robust estimates of historic forest carbon emissions at this scale, as the basis for credible measures of climate and other benefits achieved. Despite the arrival of a new generation of global datasets on forest area change and biomass, confusion remains about how to produce credible jurisdictional estimates of forest emissions. We demonstrate a method for estimating the relevant historic forest carbon fluxes within the Regency of Berau in eastern Borneo, Indonesia. Our method integrates best available global and local datasets, and includes a comprehensive analysis of uncertainty at the regency scale. We find that Berau generated 8.91 ± 1.99 million tonnes of net CO2 emissions per year during 2000-2010. Berau is an early frontier landscape where gross emissions are 12 times higher than gross sequestration. Yet most (85%) of Berau's original forests are still standing. The majority of net emissions were due to conversion of native forests to unspecified agriculture (43% of total), oil palm (28%), and fiber plantations (9%). Most of the remainder was due to legal commercial selective logging (17%). Our overall uncertainty estimate offers an independent basis for assessing three other estimates for Berau. Two other estimates were above the upper end of our uncertainty range. We emphasize the importance of including an uncertainty range for all parameters of the emissions equation to generate a comprehensive uncertainty estimate-which has not been done before. We believe comprehensive estimates of carbon flux uncertainty are increasingly important as national and international institutions are challenged with comparing alternative estimates and identifying a credible range of historic emissions values.

  16. Jurisdiction of courts with a focus on the Special Chamber of the Supreme Court of Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr.Sc. Sabri Halili

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The legal solution offered by the Law establishing the Special Chamber of the Supreme Court of Kosovo is rather challenging for practical implementation. Due to this fact, the decisions of the Special Chamber contain various dilemmas of judges on the jurisdiction of the Chamber on the matters related to natural persons sued by the PAK, which are related to various liabilities of these persons to socially-owned enterprises, namely to the PAK. Since the PAK administers and represents socially owned property in general, it is naturally bound to seek for legal resolutions for all legal contests before a competent court. Naturally, the PAK would seek for such a solution before the Special Chamber of the Supreme Court of Kosovo on PAK-related matters, which is already bound by the title itself, “on PAK-related matters”. Comparisons of remedies by various laws related to subject competence are based on legal literature used in higher education in Kosovo. Analysis of subject competences of regular and special courts is two-fold: the Commercial Court and the Military Court, while the competence of the Special Chamber is only analysed in relation with the Law on Courts, and the Law on the Special Chamber of the Supreme Court, comparing it with the Law on Contested Procedure and the Law on the PAK. The Special Chamber has before and still continues to avoid jurisdiction of this Court, which is sanctioned by Articles 4 and 5 of the Law on the Special Chamber, due to the fact that in cases in which the PAK has sued a natural or legal person, due to debts, occupation of socially owned property, or any other disputed matter, which is directly related to socially owned properties, the Special Chamber proclaims itself incompetent, and transfers the case to regular courts, although the Special Chamber adjudicates “on PAK-related matters”, but in this case only when the PAK is respondent, not when it is claimant.

  17. Jurisdictional conflict in the early modern Valencia. Conflicting instances and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa CANET APARISI

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false ES X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi; mso-fareast-language:EN-US;} This work analyzes the different profiles of the jurisdictional conflict provoked inside the Kingdom of Valencia during the XVIth and XVIIth century. It establishes the reasons of the same ones and his protagonists and it also announces the institutional creations arisen to solve them. The obtained conclusions indicate the jurisdictional conflict (or of competitions as a very active element in the process of configuration of the administration of the early modern period; an effect obtained by the route of activating new forms of government across new institutions or changing the relation of hierarchy between the already existing.

  18. The right to appeal under the constitution of Albania and court jurisdiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donika Plakolli

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The right to appeal is both a fundamental human right and a procedural tool, whereby parties exercise examination of the lawfulness of court rulings, etc. The constitution of the Republic of Albania, 1 approved in 1998, expressly provides for and guarantees the right to file an appeal. Unlike other rights, this fundamental right was not restricted, being in accordance with Article 17 of the Constitution, except for cases otherwise provided in the Constitution. In accordance with this constitutional right and guarantee, all codes of administrative procedures, civil and criminal procedure, provided for and widely guaranteed the exercise of the right to file an appeal. This absence of restriction of the right to fi le an appeal brought about an overload of court cases and trial delays, thus making the completion of the adjudication within a reasonable deadline uncertain. As a result, there rose the necessity to limit this right in the Constitution of the Republic of Albania. The amendments to the Constitution by Law no. 76/2016 also limited the right to fi le an appeal under Article 17 of the Constitution. However, these amendments were not complete, as they did not entail the exercise of the right to file an appeal against decisions of administrative authorities. The jurisdiction of the Constitutional Court of Albania is a guarantee of the right to appeal/effective access in the civil and administrative process, although slightly controversial in the criminal process. However, positive developments regarding the guarantee of effective access to the court have recently occurred. Even in the broad jurisdiction of the European Court of Human Rights, when cases from Albania have been adjudicated, violations of the right to effective appeal have been observed in the criminal process.

  19. Encouraging resilience within SMEs: the Cabinet Office's proposed approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Stuart

    2011-06-01

    This paper introduces the Cabinet Office's Civil Contingencies Secretariat (CCS). It explains how the National Risk Assessment, produced within the CCS, is created and used. As part of the recent Strategic Defence and Security Review, the Government made a commitment to improve the business continuity of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).This paper describes the CCS's approach to achieving this, and explains why the resilience of SMEs is important to both local communities, at a time of disruption or crisis, and the essential services sectors, such as energy, food and transport. It provides an outline of a strategic approach that will seek to simplify business continuity by making it accessible, achievable and affordable, and, in partnership with the organisations that SMEs turn to for advice, promotes the benefits of business continuity and encourages its use.

  20. Encouraging Second Language Use in Cooperative Learning Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George M Jacobs

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This article presents, explains and organizes ideas for promoting students’ use of their second language (this term includes foreign language when they work together in cooperative learning groups. The first part of the article reviews arguments as to whether students of second languages should be encouraged to use their second language with classmates when doing group activities. These arguments are discussed with reference to Second Language Acquisition (SLA theory. Practical issues are also explored. Next, the majority of the article presents ideas on how to promote second language use during peer interaction. Twenty-nine of these ideas are explained. The ideas are organized into five categories: a role for the L1; understanding the issue; creating a conducive climate; providing language support; and the task. It is recommended that teachers use ideas from the literature on cooperative learning when they ask students to interact.

  1. Educational technologies to encourage (self) care in postpartum women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Eryjosy Marculino Guerreiro; Sousa, Albertina Antonielly Sydney de; Vasconcelos, Mardênia Gomes Ferreira; Carvalho, Rhanna Emanuela Fontenele Lima de; Oriá, Mônica Oliveira Batista; Rodrigues, Dafne Paiva

    2016-06-01

    to evaluate national and international literature regarding the use of educational technologies to encourage self care in postpartum women. an integrative review of the literature. The articles were collected from the CINAHL, SCOPUS, PubMed, SciELO, LILACS and Cochrane databases; the time period for the articles referred to January/2004 to July/2014; the languages used in the articles were Portuguese, English, Spanish and French; the articles were selected from the following descriptors: postpartum care period, educational technology, nursing and self care. Twenty-seven articles were selected for analysis Results: based on the information found, the scales, counseling and home visits were among the most recommended educational technologies. the technologies promote communication, but are sometimes dependent on computer and internet access, which hinder their use by low-income women.

  2. Designing an Assistant System Encouraging Ergonomic Computer Usage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin GÜRÜLER

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Today, people of almost every age group are users of computers and computer aided systems. Technology makes our life easier, but it can also threaten our health. In recent years, one of the main causes of the proliferation of diseases such as lower back pain, neck pain or hernia, Arthritis, visual disturbances and obesity is wrong computer usage. The widespread use of computers also increases these findings. The purpose of this study is to direct computer users to use computers more carefully in terms of ergonomics. The user-interactive system developed for this purpose controls distance of the user to the screen and calculates the look angle and the time spent looking at the screen and provides audio or text format warning when necessary. It is thought that this system will reduce the health problems caused by the frequency of computer usage by encouraging individuals to use computers ergonomically.

  3. Encouraging data citation and discovery with the Data Citation Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Force, Megan M; Robinson, Nigel J

    2014-10-01

    An overview of the Data Citation Index is provided. Thomson Reuters developed this resource in response to a stated desire among members of the research community for increased attribution of non-traditional scholarly output. Launched in October of 2012 on the Web of science research platform, its aims include linking published research articles to their underlying data sets and tracking the citation of the data, as well as encouraging bibliographic citation of data. Cross-disciplinary search capabilities in the Index enable new possibilities for data discovery and synthesis. Data repositories are evaluated with respect to various selection criteria, with particular attention to their relevance to scientific and scholarly research. Index content reflects current data deposition practices. As data citation standards and practices continue to move toward widespread formalization and adoption, the initiative seeks to address issues of data citation, reuse, and author credit in a developing climate.

  4. The Russian Nuclear Society, engineers and researchers to encourage innovation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2015-01-01

    The Russian Nuclear Society (NSR) was born in 1989 just after the Chernobyl accident in order to help the public to overcome its fear and worries about nuclear power. Now NSR's purposes are manifold from communication about nuclear issues to the development and sharing of knowledge. The president is elected for 2 years with a rotating presidency for representing in turn nuclear sciences, industry and energy. Hundreds of events like conferences, international meetings, workshops, exhibitions have been organized so far. These events took place at Moscow and in the regional NSR centers. One of today's NSR objectives is to encourage the youth to embrace jobs and careers in nuclear industry. On the 5. may 2016 NSR and French SFEN renewed their cooperation agreement concerning the closure of the fuel cycle among other things. (A.C.)

  5. Remark on receiving encouraging prize; Shoreisho jusho shokan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizutani, Tomichika [Meji University, Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-07-31

    The 1998 fiscal year Japan Solar Energy Soc. encouraging prize is received this time, and it is really sure of thank you and this winning prize for future research activity with large encouragement, while research activity in the university becomes in the good commemoration. This study also put environmental problem in visual field oil crisis energy resource worldwide new, and it was noticed in the wave energy which was one of the natural energy, it was started. That the wave energy was noticed, when the research of various natural energy was advanced, Over 10 years, it is the idea which was produced by the process in which the mechanics laboratory studies the vibration problem, and it is regarded as connecting with present winning prize as a summing-up of research result kept since the front. In the keyword of 'new{exclamation_point}' it began to leave Mr.Taichi Matsuoka and cooperation of the science graduate student as a partner of the graduation thesis the research the present it was a start from the nothing as a thing of this type. It is negative to advance this study in which the failure was always given here, when the new work began, of Mr.Matsuoka of the passion for the research. Away from the research of the wave power generation, solar light and wind power generation are noticed a little, and I aim at the hybridization of the wave power generation, and the research is advanced. Therefore, the vibration-proof stage for installing sun and wind energy conversion system on the wave-power device at present has been designed. At the end, the gratitude is shown to the everybody who received the enthusiastic guidance for this study. (translated by NEDO)

  6. Biocarburants : la Commission propose d’encourager leur utilisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vermeersch Georges

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Depuis longtemps, la Commission, le Parlement et le Conseil encouragent le développement des sources d’énergie renouvelables, et plus particulièrement des biocarburants. Cela s’est traduit, entre autres, par la publication en novembre 2000 d’un livre vert intitulé « Vers une stratégie européenne de sécurité d’approvisionnement énergétique », qui fixe comme objectif, d’ici 2020, le remplacement de 20% des carburants classiques par des carburants de substitution pour le transport routier. Plus récemment, en juin 2001, au sommet de Göteborg, a été souligné le rôle important des biocarburants dans la lutte contre le changement climatique et le développement des énergies propres. Ces encouragements restaient au niveau de la déclaration d’intention faute de moyens administratifs et fiscaux pour bâtir une véritable stratégie. Depuis le 7 novembre 2001, les choses semblent évoluer : en effet, à cette date, le collège des Commissaires a adopté une communication sur les carburants de substitution pour les transports routiers et une série de mesures visant à promouvoir l’utilisation des biocarburants. De plus - et c’est ce qui est fondamental - cette communication était assortie de deux propositions de directives, l’une visant à promouvoir l’utilisation des biocarburants dans les transports, l’autre concernant la possibilité d’appliquer un taux d’accises réduit sur certaines huiles minérales qui contiennent des biocarburants et sur les biocarburants.

  7. The cleanup of releases of radioactive materials from commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal sites: Whose jurisdiction?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartnett, C.

    1994-01-01

    There exists an overlap between the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Recovery Act (open-quotes CERCLAclose quotes) and the Atomic Energy Act (open-quotes AEAclose quotes) regarding the cleanup of releases of radioactive materials from commercial low-level radioactive waste sites. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (open-quotes NRCclose quotes) and Agreement States have jurisdiction under the AEA, and the Environmental Protection Agency (open-quotes EPAclose quotes) has jurisdiction pursuant to CERCLA. This overlapping jurisdiction has the effect of imposing CERCLA liability on parties who have complied with AEA regulations. However, CERCLA was not intended to preempt existing legislation. This is evidenced by the federally permitted release exemption, which explicitly exempts releases from CERCLA liability pursuant to an AEA license. With little guidance as to the applicability of this exemption, it is uncertain whether CERCLA's liability is broad enough to supersede the Atomic Energy Act. It is the purpose of this paper to discuss the overlapping jurisdiction for the cleanup of releases of radioactive materials from commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal sites with particular emphasis on the cleanup at the Maxey Flats, West Valley and Sheffield sites

  8. 76 FR 72756 - Finding That the Islamic Republic of Iran Is a Jurisdiction of Primary Money Laundering Concern

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-25

    ... Money Laundering Concern AGENCY: The Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (``FinCEN''), Treasury. ACTION... that the Islamic Republic of Iran is a jurisdiction of primary money laundering concern. DATES: The... PATRIOT Act''), Public Law 107-56. Title III of the USA PATRIOT Act amends the anti- money laundering...

  9. Understanding Inclusive Education Practices in Schools under Local Government Jurisdiction: A Study of Khon Kaen Municipality in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantavong, Pennee

    2018-01-01

    This article investigates inclusive education practices in schools under the jurisdiction of Thai local government through a study of schools in Khon Kaen Municipality in Northeastern Thailand. Thailand's 1997 Constitution and 1999 National Education Act both legislated that the educational system must become inclusive, and under these laws…

  10. Online Peer Review: Encouraging Student Response and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansiquot, Reneta; Rosalia, Christine

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the use of a tailored online peer review program for first-year undergraduate students at an urban college of technology. The program facilitated group peer review in meaningful and technologically elegant ways. Students in a composition class were divided into two groups. One group acted as first reviewers, and the other group…

  11. Maritime zones and the new provisions on jurisdiction in the 1997 Vienna protocol and in the 1997 Convention on Supplementary Compensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gioia, A.

    1999-01-01

    The issue of maritime zones and the new provisions on jurisdiction in the 1997 conventions are discussed. The relations between the international law of the sea and maritime zones, and civil jurisdiction for acts outside a state's territory are presented. Main implications of the new provisions are discussed. (K.A.)

  12. Exploring the relationship between social identity and workplace jurisdiction for new nursing roles: a case study approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, E; Baillie, L; Rickard, W; McLaren, S M

    2013-05-01

    The introduction of new healthcare roles internationally has had mixed results with some evidence that variations can be accounted for by the manner of their introduction rather than role content. Explanation may be found partly in the ways in which new roles establish a workplace jurisdiction; that is, recognition in the workplace of a role's legitimate rights to undertake a particular scope of practice. To explore the factors that influence the development of workplace jurisdiction of new nursing roles. Critical realist multiple case study design within two NHS Acute Hospital Trusts in England and two new nursing roles as embedded units of analysis in each case (n=4 roles). In Phase 1, data were collected through semi-structured interviews (n=21), non-participant observation of committees (n=11), partial participant observation and shadowing of the role holders' working day (n=9), together with analysis of organisational documents (n=33). In Phase 2, follow up interviews with role-holders (n=4) were conducted. Participants Staff in new nursing roles (n=4) were selected purposively as embedded units according to the theoretical framework and other informants (n=17) were selected according to the study propositions. Qualitative analysis demonstrated that different role drivers produced two different role types, each of whom faced different challenges in negotiating the implementation of the role in the workplace. Negotiation of workplace jurisdiction was shown to be dependent on sharing social identities with co-workers. Four major workplace identities were found: professional, speciality, organisational and relational. The current focus on setting legal and public jurisdictions for new nursing roles through national standards and statutory registration needs to be complemented by a better understanding of how workplace jurisdiction is achieved. This study suggests that social identity is a significant determinant. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  13. The Denver region traffic signal system improvement program : planning for management and operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    The Denver Regional Council of Governments (DRCOG) works with over 30 local jurisdictions on the Traffic Signal System Improvement Program (TSSIP), a combination of management and operations strategies designed to time and coordinate traffic signals ...

  14. Abu Dhabi-Great Britain and the crisis over jurisdiction 1959-1960

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Velez

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Las demandas presentadas por el Jeque Shakhbout en 1959 para obtener la plena soberanía jurídica sobre el emirato de Abu Dhabi generaron una crisis diplomática plasmada en la correspondencia interna del gobierno Británico. Con sus demandas, el Jeque Shakhbout forzaba a la burocracia a cargo de los Estados de la Tregua – La Oficina de Asuntos Extranjeros en Londres, el representante del gobierno Británico en Bahreín, y los agente administrativos y políticos en Dubai y Abu Dhabi a reexaminar las bases legales de la presencia Británica en la zona y los límites éticos del sistema judicial impuesto sobre sus habitantes. La crisis va mas allá de una discusión sobre los poderes jurisdiccionales. La crisis nos ofrece una ventana a las contradicciones inherentes a la  presencia Británica en la zona, en el marco del movimiento nacionalista árabe y del desarrollo de la industria petrolera y la futura redefinición de la relación entre Abu Dhabi  y la Gran Bretaña.Palabras clave: Abu Dhabi, Gran Bretaña, colonialismo___________________________Abstract:Demands to the British government for supreme jurisdiction over his territory presented by the ruler of Abu Dhabi in 1959 created a diplomatic crisis captured in the internal correspondence of the British government. Sheikh Shakhbout forced the entire bureaucracy that was dealing with the Trucial States – the Foreign Office in London, the British Resident in Bahrain, and the Political and Administrative Agents in Abu Dhabi and Dubai – to reexamine the legality of their presence in the region and the ethical limits of the judicial system imposed on this land.The crisis went beyond the mere discussion over jurisdictional powers. It is also a window into the contradictions linked to the British presence in the region, within the framework of the nascent Arab Nationalist movement and the development of the oil industry . All of which will soon change the nature of the relationship between

  15. Small Business Taxation: Revamping Incentives to Encourage Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duanjie Chen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This study adopts a new approach in assessing the impact of taxes on small business growth and suggests the need to consider new incentives that would be more effective in encouraging small business growth and would also improve the neutrality of the existing tax system. In recent years, federal and provincial governments have provided various corporate tax incentives to small businesses with the aim of helping them grow. While it is commonly believed that small businesses are responsible for most job creation, unfortunately the only study available has shown that while many small businesses are created, few grow. Yet many governments believe that the incentives are important even though little evidence supports the effectiveness of small business corporate concessions. Some provinces have actually eliminated corporate taxes on small businesses or reduced such taxes to a symbolic level (e.g., one to two percent without there being any empirical support in favour of the effectiveness of such actions. In contradiction to the widely held view that small business tax concessions encourage growth, such small business tax relief could actually be antithetical to growth by creating a “taxation wall.” First, it could result in the breakup of companies into smaller, less efficient-sized units in order to take advantage of tax benefits even if there are economic gains to growing in size. Second, it could encourage individuals to create small corporations in order to reduce their personal tax liabilities rather than grow companies. And third, it could lead to a “threshold effect” that holds back small business from growing beyond the official definition of “smallness,” regardless of the criteria for measuring size (e.g., the size of revenue or assets, or the number of employees. In this paper, we evaluate the impact of both corporate and personal taxes on the growth of small business and we focus in particular on the likely consequences of the

  16. In response to The role of smartphones in encouraging physical activity in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mittal A

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aaina Mittal,1 Shyam Gokani,1 Alexander Zargaran,2 Javier Ash,1 Georgina Kerry,3 Dara Rasasingam1 1Department of Medicine, Imperial College School of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, 2Department of Medicine, St. George’s, University of London, London, 3Department of Medicine, University of Birmingham Medical School, Birmingham, UK We read with great interest the article by Stuckey et al1 entitled “The role of smartphones in encouraging physical activity in adults” recently published in the International Journal of General Medicine. As the article identifies, “lack of physical activity is a global public health issue”,1 so finding ways of encouraging it is essential to better health outcomes worldwide. Bearing this in mind and recognising the article has set groundwork for prospective exploration in the areas it addresses, scope for future research in this area can be identified.  Authors' replyMelanie I Stuckey,1 Shawn W Carter,2 Emily Knight3 1Research and Academics, Ontario Shores Centre for Mental Health Sciences, Whitby, ON, Canada, 2Eating Disorder Residential Program, Ontario Shores Centre for Mental Health Sciences, Whitby, ON, Canada, 3Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada Thank you for providing the opportunity to respond to the letter written by Mittal et al in response to our paper titled “The role of smartphones in encouraging physical activity in adults.”1 We generally agree with their comments, but add considerations for each of their three suggestions. View the original paper by Stuckey and colleagues. 

  17. Facilitating small groups: how to encourage student learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, Mark

    2012-02-01

    Many clinicians are involved in medical education, with small group teaching (SGT) forming a significant part of their work. Most facilitate these sessions by experience and common sense: less than one-third of them have received formal training in SGT. Evidence suggests small group productivity depends on good facilitation rather than on topic knowledge. Applying the fundamental concepts of SGT will lead to improvements in the quality of clinicians' teaching and in student learning. Good SGT creates the perfect environment for learning and discussion, without the need for didactic teaching. SGT emphasises the role of students in sharing and discussing their ideas in a safe learning environment, without domination by the tutor. This article provides clinicians with basic requirements for effective session design and planning, explains how to encourage student participation, how to manage students as a group, how to manage student learning, and how to recognise and deal with problems. Active facilitation and group management is the key to success in SGT, and consequently better learning outcomes. Improving the facilitation skills of clinical teachers makes teaching more effective, stimulating, and enjoyable for both tutors and students. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2012.

  18. Common Genetic Risk for Melanoma Encourages Preventive Behavior Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori Diseati

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available There is currently great interest in using genetic risk estimates for common disease in personalized healthcare. Here we assess melanoma risk-related preventive behavioral change in the context of the Coriell Personalized Medicine Collaborative (CPMC. As part of on-going reporting activities within the project, participants received a personalized risk assessment including information related to their own self-reported family history of melanoma and a genetic risk variant showing a moderate effect size (1.7, 3.0 respectively for heterozygous and homozygous individuals. Participants who opted to view their report were sent an optional outcome survey assessing risk perception and behavioral change in the months that followed. Participants that report family history risk, genetic risk, or both risk factors for melanoma were significantly more likely to increase skin cancer preventive behaviors when compared to participants with neither risk factor (ORs = 2.04, 2.79, 4.06 and p-values = 0.02, 2.86 × 10−5, 4.67 × 10−5, respectively, and we found the relationship between risk information and behavior to be partially mediated by anxiety. Genomic risk assessments appear to encourage positive behavioral change in a manner that is complementary to family history risk information and therefore may represent a useful addition to standard of care for melanoma prevention.

  19. Ranking system for national regulatory jurisdictions based on pesticide standard values in major exposures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zijian Li

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available To control the risk of human exposure to pesticides, about 50 nations have promulgated pesticide soil regulatory guidance values (RGVs, and 104 nations have provided pesticide drinking water maximum concentration levels (MCLs. In addition, 90 nations have regulated pesticide agricultural commodity maximum residue limits (MRLs. Pesticide standard values (PSVs for one single pesticide varied in a range of six, seven, or even eight orders of magnitude. Some PSVs are too large to prevent the impact of pesticides on human health. Many nations have not provided PSVs for some commonly used pesticides until now. This research has introduced several completeness values and numerical values methods to evaluate the national jurisdiction’s performance on PSVs on a nation base. The national jurisdiction ranking system developed by these methods will be beneficial to the environmental regulation makers in the management of PSVs. Results also indicate that European countries perform better in the regulation of pesticide soil RGVs, drinking water MCLs, and agricultural commodity MRLs.

  20. The Federal Government's supervisory authority, Land jurisdiction, and the Atomic Energy Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinberg, R.

    1990-01-01

    The instructions given in spring 1988 by the Federal German Minister of the Environment to the Minister of Economics of the Land North-Rhine Westphalia, in matters concerning the Kalkar nuclear reactor, form the background of the expert opinion presented as an analysis of significant problems arising in connection with the execution of Federal laws. The development of legal criteria for issuing instructions is analysed as a point of main interest in the process. The author discusses an important requirement given by the Constitution, namely that the principle of federation-agreeable conduct involves the duty to minimize interference with the responsibilities and jurisdiction of a Land. The Land North-Rhine Westphalia presented this expert opinion in April 1989 in legal proceedings before the Federal Constitutional Court in a dispute between the Federal Government and the Lands over Art. 93, paragraph 1, no. 3 of the Constitution. The decision given by the Federal Constitutional Court on 22 May 1990 confirmed the legality of the Federal Government's conduct in this matter. (orig./HP) [de

  1. Crossing lines: a multidisciplinary framework for assessing connectivity of hammerhead sharks across jurisdictional boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, A; Simpfendorfer, C A; White, W T; Johnson, G J; McAuley, R B; Heupel, M R

    2017-04-21

    Conservation and management of migratory species can be complex and challenging. International agreements such as the Convention on Migratory Species (CMS) provide policy frameworks, but assessments and management can be hampered by lack of data and tractable mechanisms to integrate disparate datasets. An assessment of scalloped (Sphyrna lewini) and great (Sphyrna mokarran) hammerhead population structure and connectivity across northern Australia, Indonesia and Papua New Guinea (PNG) was conducted to inform management responses to CMS and Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species listings of these species. An Integrated Assessment Framework (IAF) was devised to systematically incorporate data across jurisdictions and create a regional synopsis, and amalgamated a suite of data from the Australasian region. Scalloped hammerhead populations are segregated by sex and size, with Australian populations dominated by juveniles and small adult males, while Indonesian and PNG populations included large adult females. The IAF process introduced genetic and tagging data to produce conceptual models of stock structure and movement. Several hypotheses were produced to explain stock structure and movement patterns, but more data are needed to identify the most likely hypothesis. This study demonstrates a process for assessing migratory species connectivity and highlights priority areas for hammerhead management and research.

  2. Law, ethics and pandemic preparedness: the importance of cross-jurisdictional and cross-cultural perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Belinda; Carney, Terry

    2010-04-01

    To explore social equity, health planning, regulatory and ethical dilemmas in responding to a pandemic influenza (H5N1) outbreak, and the adequacy of protocols and standards such as the International Health Regulations (2005). This paper analyses the role of legal and ethical considerations for pandemic preparedness, including an exploration of the relevance of cross-jurisdictional and cross-cultural perspectives in assessing the validity of goals for harmonisation of laws and policies both within and between nations. Australian and international experience is reviewed in various areas, including distribution of vaccines during a pandemic, the distribution of authority between national and local levels of government, and global and regional equity issues for poorer countries. This paper finds that questions such as those of distributional justice (resource allocation) and regulatory frameworks raise important issues about the cultural and ethical acceptability of planning measures. Serious doubt is cast on a 'one size fits all' approach to international planning for managing a pandemic. It is concluded that a more nuanced approach than that contained in international guidelines may be required if an effective response is to be constructed internationally. The paper commends the wisdom of reliance on 'soft law', international guidance that leaves plenty of room for each nation to construct its response in conformity with its own cultural and value requirements. © 2010 The Authors. Journal Compilation © 2010 Public Health Association of Australia.

  3. The Historical Perspective of Formation of Offshore Jurisdictions as the Global System of Tax Evasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Synyutka Nataliya G.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this publication is improving the knowledge about the genesis of formation of offshore jurisdictions. The article characterizes the historical stages of origination of tax havens on the basis of theoretical generalizations and comparing the results of studies and publications on the specified issues. The article identifies the main groups of tax havens: offshores of the colonies of the former British Empire; the European havens; the group of simulators (such as Panama, Uruguay, Dubai, new havens in the countries with transition economy and in African countries. A comprehensive list of offshores in terms of actors by the domestic classification has been provided. The authors suggest, as a timely measures, establishing a coordinated international campaign to counter the aggressive tax planning. For the purpose of stabilization of the internal capital markets, as well as success of the fiscal control, the main directions of the anti-offshore policy have been proposed as follows: unification of the taxation rules for residents and non-residents within the offshore countries; global limitation of the bank secrecy along with transparency of information for the taxation purposes, ensuring transparency of ownership and tracing of end the beneficiaries of assets; changing the model convention for the avoidance of double taxation and the data exchange.

  4. Hydropower developments in Canada: number, size and jurisdictional and ecological distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Peter G.; Hanneman, Matt; Cheng, Ryan [Global Forest Watch Canada (Canada)

    2011-08-15

    For over 200 years, energy production and consumption, along with all human activities, have been contributing to global warming. This report is part of a project that examines 10 major energy sectors to provide information on Canada's energy options in the face of climate change; this present study gives information on hydropower reservoirs and associated dams in Canada. The mapping, jurisdictional and ecological distribution of reservoirs and dams across Canada is provided herein. Canada's hydropower installations are composed of 271 large hydropower facilities covering 58,015 km2 with a capacity of 71,857 MW, accounting for 44% of Canada's total technical hydroelectric capacity. Quebec, Ontario and British Columbia are the provinces with the most large hydropower dams; 19% of the watersheds are occupied in part by hydropower reservoirs and the taiga shield, boreal shield and montane cordillera ecozones contain most of the reservoir areas. The majority of future developments are expected to be built within 5km of intact forest landscapes.

  5. Modeling of the spatial distribution of ten endangered bird species in jurisdiction of Corantioquia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez M, Ana Maria; Alvarez, Esteban

    2006-01-01

    Recently, thanks to advances made in Geographic Information Systems (GIS), techniques have been developed for the construction of models that predict the spatial distribution of species and other attributes of biodiversity. These methods have allowed for the development of objective criteria that are fundamental for making decisions regarding the creation of protected areas systems throughout the world. In this research, the spatial distribution of ten endangered species of birds found within the jurisdiction of CORANTIOQUIA (JDC from here on) was modelled, using GIS techniques. The JDC was divided into 177 squares of 15 x 10 Km and the following variables were quantified within each one: presence or absence of endangered species of birds, rainfall, temperature, sun brightness, relative humidity, day duration, altitude, vegetal cover, slope and primary net productivity. With the help of logistic regression were made predictive models. Based on logistic regressions techniques predictive models were made. These models allow to explain a percentage between 24% and 80% of spatial distribution variability of these species. Those results can help in the identification of valuable zones for the biodiversity conservation. In places where there are neither the time or the economic resources to carry out exhaustive analyses of biodiversity, the models can predict the probable presence of this endangered species

  6. Assisted dying in liberalised jurisdictions and the role of psychiatry: a clinician's view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macleod, Sandy

    2012-10-01

    Assisted dying is a contentious and topical issue. Mental disorder is a relevant influence on requests of hastened death. The psychiatry of dying is not a prominent component in the assessment of euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide (PAS) in jurisdictions with liberalised assisted dying laws. The literature on the assessment processes, with particular reference to mental status, involved in euthanasia requests is considered. An experienced palliative medicine specialist and psychiatrist selectively reviewed the recent literature published about the mental health issues involved in euthanasia and PAS. Assessments of competency, sustained wish to die prematurely, depressive disorder, demoralisation and 'unbearable suffering' in the terminally ill are clinically uncertain and difficult tasks. There is a growing psychiatric and psychological literature on the mental status of the terminally ill. As yet psychiatry does not have the expertise to 'select' those whose wish for hastened death is rational, humane and 'healthy'. Rarely in those societies with liberalised assisted dying laws are psychiatrists involved in the decision-making for individuals requesting early death. This role is fulfilled by non-specialists. There remain significant concerns about the accuracy of psychiatric assessment in the terminally ill. Mental processes are more relevant influences on a hastened wish to die than are the physical symptoms of terminal malignant disease. Psychiatric review of persons requesting euthanasia is relevant. It is not obligatory or emphasised in those legislations allowing assisted dying. Psychiatry needs to play a greater role in the assessment processes of euthanasia and PAS.

  7. The Nuclear Disarmament Cases: Is Formalistic Rigour in Establishing Jurisdiction Impeding Access to Justice?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenakshi Ramkumar

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear disarmament falls within the purview of the purposes envisaged in Article 1 of the United Nations Charter. The International Court of Justice (ICJ in 1996 delivered an advisory opinion on legality of use of nuclear weapons and has stated that the states in good faith must strive towards nuclear disarmament. In the 'Marshall Islands Cases', 20 years later the ICJ had the opportunity to address questions relating to cessation of the nuclear arms race and nuclear disarmament. However, the ICJ has failed to foster nuclear disarmament within the international community. The ICJ dismissed Marshall Islands’ application on jurisdictional grounds because there was no legal dispute between the parties. The ICJ in determining the existence of a dispute introduced a subjective 'awareness' test. In this case note, we aim to examine the awareness test and its politico-legal effects in the development of international law. While doing so, we also argue that the test has further rendered the enforcement of nuclear disarmament obligations arduous.

  8. Crossing lines: a multidisciplinary framework for assessing connectivity of hammerhead sharks across jurisdictional boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, A.; Simpfendorfer, C. A.; White, W. T.; Johnson, G. J.; McAuley, R. B.; Heupel, M. R.

    2017-04-01

    Conservation and management of migratory species can be complex and challenging. International agreements such as the Convention on Migratory Species (CMS) provide policy frameworks, but assessments and management can be hampered by lack of data and tractable mechanisms to integrate disparate datasets. An assessment of scalloped (Sphyrna lewini) and great (Sphyrna mokarran) hammerhead population structure and connectivity across northern Australia, Indonesia and Papua New Guinea (PNG) was conducted to inform management responses to CMS and Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species listings of these species. An Integrated Assessment Framework (IAF) was devised to systematically incorporate data across jurisdictions and create a regional synopsis, and amalgamated a suite of data from the Australasian region. Scalloped hammerhead populations are segregated by sex and size, with Australian populations dominated by juveniles and small adult males, while Indonesian and PNG populations included large adult females. The IAF process introduced genetic and tagging data to produce conceptual models of stock structure and movement. Several hypotheses were produced to explain stock structure and movement patterns, but more data are needed to identify the most likely hypothesis. This study demonstrates a process for assessing migratory species connectivity and highlights priority areas for hammerhead management and research.

  9. Role of the provincial government of Saskatchewan in encouraging growth in the oil and gas sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lautermilch, E.

    1997-01-01

    The year 1996 was one of the most successful years for the oil and gas industry in Saskatchewan. In the view of the author this may be said to be due, at least in part, to the provincial government's efforts to establish and implement policies that stimulate economic activity. Government regulation is essential to ensure safe and sensible development, a level playing field for all participants, and to ensure that residents of the province receive a fair share of the benefits of resource development. Some of the positive government actions taken in 1996 include: revisions to the royalty rate structure, simplification of the natural gas administration system, a program to encourage exploration in less-explored areas, re-balancing electrical rates, and a review of all regulations with the goal of streamlining or eliminating them. New technologies such as horizontal drilling were also encouraged. Issues presently before the government include postage stamp tolls, global warming, greenhouse gas emissions and environmental concerns from farmers. On the whole, the oil and gas industry received high marks for taking a responsible approach to self-regulation, but continued public support will depend on how well the industry addresses environmental concerns and demonstrates the benefits of oil and development to the people

  10. Population-level interventions in government jurisdictions for dietary sodium reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, Lindsay; Sumar, Nureen; Barberio, Amanda M; Trieu, Kathy; Lorenzetti, Diane L; Tarasuk, Valerie; Webster, Jacqui; Campbell, Norman Rc

    2016-09-16

    Excess dietary sodium consumption is a risk factor for high blood pressure, stroke and cardiovascular disease. Currently, dietary sodium consumption in almost every country is too high. Excess sodium intake is associated with high blood pressure, which is common and costly and accounts for significant burden of disease. A large number of jurisdictions worldwide have implemented population-level dietary sodium reduction initiatives. No systematic review has examined the impact of these initiatives. • To assess the impact of population-level interventions for dietary sodium reduction in government jurisdictions worldwide.• To assess the differential impact of those initiatives by social and economic indicators. We searched the following electronic databases from their start date to 5 January 2015: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); Cochrane Public Health Group Specialised Register; MEDLINE; MEDLINE In Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations; EMBASE; Effective Public Health Practice Project Database; Web of Science; Trials Register of Promoting Health Interventions (TRoPHI) databases; and Latin American Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS). We also searched grey literature, other national sources and references of included studies.This review was conducted in parallel with a comprehensive review of national sodium reduction efforts under way worldwide (Trieu 2015), through which we gained additional information directly from country contacts.We imposed no restrictions on language or publication status. We included population-level initiatives (i.e. interventions that target whole populations, in this case, government jurisdictions, worldwide) for dietary sodium reduction, with at least one pre-intervention data point and at least one post-intervention data point of comparable jurisdiction. We included populations of all ages and the following types of study designs: cluster-randomised, controlled pre-post, interrupted time series

  11. Programming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    The programmer's task is often taken to be the construction of algorithms, expressed in hierarchical structures of procedures: this view underlies the majority of traditional programming languages, such as Fortran. A different view is appropriate to a wide class of problem, perhaps including some problems in High Energy Physics. The programmer's task is regarded as having three main stages: first, an explicit model is constructed of the reality with which the program is concerned; second, this model is elaborated to produce the required program outputs; third, the resulting program is transformed to run efficiently in the execution environment. The first two stages deal in network structures of sequential processes; only the third is concerned with procedure hierarchies. (orig.)

  12. Programming

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, M A

    1982-01-01

    The programmer's task is often taken to be the construction of algorithms, expressed in hierarchical structures of procedures: this view underlies the majority of traditional programming languages, such as Fortran. A different view is appropriate to a wide class of problem, perhaps including some problems in High Energy Physics. The programmer's task is regarded as having three main stages: first, an explicit model is constructed of the reality with which the program is concerned; second, thi...

  13. Interventions for encouraging sexual behaviours intended to prevent cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Jonathan P; Frampton, Geoff K; Harris, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the key risk factor for cervical cancer. Continuing high rates of HPV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in young people demonstrate the need for effective behavioural interventions. Objectives To assess the effectiveness of behavioural interventions for young women to encourage safer sexual behaviours to prevent transmission of STIs (including HPV) and cervical cancer. Search methods Systematic literature searches were performed on the following databases: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL Issue 4, 2009) Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Review Group (CGCRG) Specialised Register, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsychINFO, Social Science Citation Index and Trials Register of Promoting Health Interventions (TRoPHI) up to the end of 2009. All references were screened for inclusion against selection criteria. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of behavioural interventions for young women up to the age of 25 years that included, amongst other things, information provision about the transmission and prevention of STIs. Trials had to measure behavioural outcomes (e.g. condom use) and/or biological outcomes (e.g. incidence of STIs, cervical cancer). Data collection and analysis A narrative synthesis was conducted. Meta-analysis was not considered appropriate due to heterogeneity between the interventions and trial populations. Main results A total of 5271 references were screened and of these 23 RCTs met the inclusion criteria. Most were conducted in the USA and in health-care clinics (e.g. family planning). The majority of interventions provided information about STIs and taught safer sex skills (e.g. communication), occasionally supplemented with provision of resources (e.g. free sexual health services). They were heterogeneous in duration, contact time, provider, behavioural aims and outcomes. A variety of STIs were addressed including HIV and chlamydia. None of the trials explicitly

  14. Encouraging formative assessments of leadership for foundation doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadley, Lindsay; Black, David; Welch, Jan; Reynolds, Peter; Penlington, Clare

    2015-08-01

    Clinical leadership is considered essential for maintaining and improving patient care and safety in the UK, and is incorporated in the curriculum for all trainee doctors. Despite the growing focus on the importance of leadership, and the introduction of the Medical Leadership Competency Framework (MLCF) in the UK, leadership education for doctors in training is still in its infancy. Assessment is focused on clinical skills, and trainee doctors receive very little formal feedback on their leadership competencies. In this article we describe the approach taken by Health Education Kent, Sussex and Surrey (HEKSS) to raise the profile of leadership amongst doctors in training in the South Thames Foundation School (STFS). An annual structured formative assessment in leadership for each trainee has been introduced, supported by leadership education for both trainees and their supervisors in HEKSS trusts. We analysed over 500 of these assessments from the academic year 2012/13 for foundation doctors in HEKSS trusts, in order to assess the quality of the feedback. From the analysis, potential indicators of more effective formative assessments were identified. These may be helpful in improving the leadership education programme for future years. There is a wealth of evidence to highlight the importance and value of formative assessments; however, particularly for foundation doctors, these have typically been focused on assessing clinical capabilities. This HEKSS initiative encourages doctors to recognise leadership opportunities at the beginning of their careers, seeks to help them understand the importance of acquiring leadership skills and provides structured feedback to help them improve. Leadership education for doctors in training is still in its infancy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Microcomputer Activities Which Encourage the Reading-Writing Connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balajthy, Ernest

    Many reading teachers, cognizant of the creative opportunities for skill development allowed by new reading-writing software, are choosing to use microcomputers in their classrooms full-time. Adventure story creation programs capitalize on reading-writing integration by allowing children, with appropriate assistance, to create their own…

  16. Daily travel feedback to encourage eco-routing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how individuals responded to a robust and interactive daily travel feedback : program. Fifty individuals from the Moscow, Idaho area participated in a before-and-after study using an android-based : device tha...

  17. Encouraging energy conservation in multifamily housing: RUBS and other methods of allocating energy costs to residents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClelland, L

    1980-10-01

    Methods of encouraging energy conservation in multifamily housing by allocating energy costs to residents are discussed; specifically, methods appropriate for use in master metered buildings without equipment to monitor energy consumption in individual apartments are examined. Several devices available for monitoring individual energy consumption are also discussed plus methods of comparing the energy savings and cost effectiveness of monitoring devices with those of other means of promoting conservation. Specific information in Volume I includes a comparison study on energy use in master and individually metered buildings; types of appropriate conservation programs for master metered buildings; a description of the Resident Utility Billing System (RUBS); energy savings associated with RUBS; Resident reactions to RUBS; cost effectiveness of RUBS for property owners; potential abuses, factors limiting widespread use, and legal status of RUBS. Part I of Volume II contains a cost allocation decision guide and Part II in Volume II presents the RUBS Operations Manual. Pertinent appendices to some chapters are attached. (MCW)

  18. Sector model analysis of risk on cross-jurisdictional treatment of disaster waste related to the Great East Japan Earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagashima, Miori; Itokawa, Etsuko; Ozuka, Yohei

    2012-01-01

    This study addressed the controversial issue of disaster waste treatment in the reconstruction efforts following the Great East Japan Earthquake. Using the Sector Model (Matsumoto 2009), we categorized a range of actions taken in relation to the cross-jurisdictional treatment into the four sectors, government, industry, academia, and private. The analysis through this Sector Model made it possible to map the entire layout of waste treatment, inclusive of less-visible industry and academia sectors. Accordingly, we have argued that differences of risk awareness are not necessarily due to sector differences but rather depend on two aspects of the disaster waste treatment; the safety levels and the nationwide treatment of waste in Japan. We further suggest that the discrepancy in the arguments on safety levels emerged as a result of scientific under-determination and cross-jurisdictional treatment from social and/or political under-determination. (author)

  19. The impact of public policy on entrepreneurship : a critical investigation of the protestant ethic on a divided island jurisdiction

    OpenAIRE

    Baldacchino, Godfrey; Dana, Leo Paul

    2006-01-01

    The island of St. Martin is the world’s smallest shared jurisdiction. For around 350 years, 37 square miles (92km2) have been divided into two legal entities, Dutch Sint Maarten and French Saint Martin, each with its separate sub-national government and its respective business policies. This situation carries the hallmarks of an almost controlled experiment on the impact of ‘The Protestant Ethic’, with each nation’s respective policy being the treatment variable under study. Keepi...

  20. Electronic voting to encourage interactive lectures: a randomised trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    to continue with the EVS technology. The 2 lecturers disagreed regarding the ease of preparation of the traditional lecture, their ability to keep to time in the EVS lecture, and personal satisfaction with the EVS lecture. The lecturers felt that EVS encouraged student participation and helped identify where students were having difficulty. Conclusion In this setting, EVS technology used in large group lectures did not offer significant advantages over the more traditional lecture format. PMID:17655773

  1. Lateral Erosion Encourages Vertical Incision in a Bimodal Alluvial River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gran, K. B.

    2015-12-01

    Sand can have a strong impact on gravel transport, increasing gravel transport rates by orders of magnitude as sand content increases. Recent experimental work by others indicates that adding sand to an armored bed can even cause armor to break-up and mobilize. These two elements together help explain observations from a bimodal sand and gravel-bedded river, where lateral migration into sand-rich alluvium breaks up the armor layer, encouraging further incision into the bed. Detailed bedload measurements were coupled with surface and subsurface grain size analyses and cross-sectional surveys in a seasonally-incised channel carved into the upper alluvial fan of the Pasig-Potrero River at Mount Pinatubo, Philippines. Pinatubo erupted in 1991, filling valleys draining the flanks of the volcano with primarily sand-sized pyroclastic flow debris. Twenty years after the eruption, sand-rich sediment inputs are strongly seasonal, with most sediment input to the channel during the rainy season. During the dry season, flow condenses from a wide braided planform to a single-thread channel in most of the upper basin, extending several km onto the alluvial fan. This change in planform creates similar unit discharge ranges in summer and winter. Lower sediment loads in the dry season drive vertical incision until the bed is sufficiently armored. Incision proceeds downstream in a wave, with increasing sediment transport rates and decreasing grain size with distance downstream, eventually reaching a gravel-sand transition and return to a braided planform. Incision depths in the gravel-bedded section exceeded 3 meters in parts of a 4 km-long study reach, a depth too great to be explained by predictions from simple winnowing during incision. Instead, lateral migration into sand-rich alluvium provides sufficient fine sediment to break up the armor surface, allowing incision to start anew and increasing the total depth of the seasonally-incised valley. Lateral migration is recorded in a

  2. Encouraging Girls into Science and Technology with Feminine Role Model: Does This Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamberger, Yael M.

    2014-08-01

    This study examines the effect of a program that aimed to encourage girls to choose a science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) career in Israel. The program involved school visits to a high-tech company and meeting with role model female scientists. Sixty ninth-grade female students from a Jewish modern-orthodox single-sex secondary school in the same city as the company participated in the study. The control group contained 30 girls from the same classes who did not participate in the program. Data were collected through pre-post questionnaires, observations, and focus group interviews. It was analyzed for three main themes: perceptions of scientists and engineers, capability of dealing with STEM, and future career choice. Findings indicated respect toward the women scientists as being smart and creative, but significant negative change on the perceptions of women scientists/engineers, the capability of dealing with STEM, and the STEM career choices. Possible causes for these results are discussed, as well as implications for education.

  3. Negotiating the use of biodiversity in marine areas beyond national jurisdiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Blasiak

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A relatively small group of states is disproportionately active in marine areas beyond national jurisdiction (ABNJ, raising questions of equity, while a myriad of sectoral regulations and guidelines spread across multiple international bodies has led to uneven conservation and use of biological diversity and resources in these areas. Within this context, the UN General Assembly resolved in 2015 to begin negotiations on an international legally-binding instrument to conserve and protect biodiversity in ABNJ, with the negotiations framed by four issues: (1 marine genetic resources, including questions on the sharing of benefits; (2 measures such as area-based management tools, including marine protected areas; (3 environmental impact assessments; (4 capacity building and the transfer of marine technology. Yet our analysis demonstrates that least developed countries (LDCs and small island developing states (SIDS are significantly under-represented in regional and international meetings on such issues, while the authorship of academic literature on these topics is dominated to an unusual extent by Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD member states (97%. Statistical analysis of delegation statements delivered during the first round of negotiations following the UN General Assembly resolution also illustrates that the interests of OECD member states differ substantially from LDCs and SIDS, suggesting that imbalanced representation has the potential to result in skewed negotiations. Moreover, the restriction on negotiating parties not to undermine the mandate of existing organizations limits their maneuverability, and may hamper progress towards achieving ambitious time-bound commitments to promote sustainable resource use and reduce inequality (e.g. under the Sustainable Development Goals and Aichi Targets. With ABNJ covering half the world’s surface, self-interested compliance with new regulations is the most promising

  4. Population-level interventions in government jurisdictions for dietary sodium reduction: a Cochrane Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberio, Amanda M; Sumar, Nureen; Trieu, Kathy; Lorenzetti, Diane L; Tarasuk, Valerie; Webster, Jacqui; Campbell, Norman R C; McLaren, Lindsay

    2017-10-01

    Worldwide, excessive salt consumption is common and is a leading cause of high blood pressure. Our objectives were to assess the overall and differential impact (by social and economic indicators) of population-level interventions for dietary sodium reduction in government jurisdictions worldwide. This is a Cochrane systematic review. We searched nine peer-reviewed databases, seven grey literature resources and contacted national programme leaders. We appraised studies using an adapted version of the Cochrane risk of bias tool. To assess impact, we computed the mean change in salt intake (g/day) from before to after intervention. Fifteen initiatives met the inclusion criteria and 10 provided sufficient data for quantitative analysis of impact. Of these, five showed a mean decrease in salt intake from before to after intervention including: China, Finland (Kuopio area), France, Ireland and the UK. When the sample was constrained to the seven initiatives that were multicomponent and incorporated activities of a structural nature (e.g. procurement policy), most (4/7) showed a mean decrease in salt intake. A reduction in salt intake was more apparent among men than women. There was insufficient information to assess differential impact by other social and economic axes. Although many initiatives had methodological strengths, all scored as having a high risk of bias reflecting the observational design. Study heterogeneity was high, reflecting different contexts and initiative characteristics. Population-level dietary sodium reduction initiatives have the potential to reduce dietary salt intake, especially if they are multicomponent and incorporate intervention activities of a structural nature. It is important to consider data infrastructure to permit monitoring of these initiatives. © The Author 2017; all rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association

  5. Deep-sea genetic resources: New frontiers for science and stewardship in areas beyond national jurisdiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden-Davies, Harriet

    2017-03-01

    The deep-sea is a large source of marine genetic resources (MGR), which have many potential uses and are a growing area of research. Much of the deep-sea lies in areas beyond national jurisdiction (ABNJ), including 65% of the global ocean. MGR in ABNJ occupy a significant gap in the international legal framework. Access and benefit sharing of MGR is a key issue in the development of a new international legally-binding instrument under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) for the conservation and sustainable use of marine biological diversity in ABNJ. This paper examines how this is relevant to deep-sea scientific research and identifies emerging challenges and opportunities. There is no internationally agreed definition of MGR, however, deep-sea genetic resources could incorporate any biological material including genes, proteins and natural products. Deep-sea scientific research is the key actor accessing MGR in ABNJ and sharing benefits such as data, samples and knowledge. UNCLOS provides the international legal framework for marine scientific research, international science cooperation, capacity building and marine technology transfer. Enhanced implementation could support access and benefit sharing of MGR in ABNJ. Deep-sea scientific researchers could play an important role in informing practical new governance solutions for access and benefit sharing of MGR that promote scientific research in ABNJ and support deep-sea stewardship. Advancing knowledge of deep-sea biodiversity in ABNJ, enhancing open-access to data and samples, standardisation and international marine science cooperation are significant potential opportunity areas.

  6. No longer in suspense: Clarifying the Human Rights Jurisdiction of the SADC Tribunal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moses R Phooko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Southern African Development Community Tribunal's (SADC Tribunal decision in the matter of Mike Campbell (Pvt Ltd v Republic of Zimbabwe 2008 SADCT 2 (28 November 2008 demonstrated its ability to utilise the principles contained in the Treaty of the Southern African Development Community when it ruled that it had the power and competency to adjudicate over a human rights case. The aforesaid decision was hailed by many scholars as a progressive judgment in the SADC region that would promote the rule of law and ensure that member states respected their treaty obligations in their own territories. Unfortunately, the same judgment resulted in the suspension of the SADC Tribunal in 2010 because it had purportedly acted beyond its mandate when it adjudicated over a case concerning a human rights dispute. This article investigates whether the SADC Tribunal had jurisdiction to deal with cases involving allegations of human rights violations. In addressing this question, this article will discuss the powers (implied and tacit of international organisations as understood within international law. In addition, the study will ascertain how the International Court of Justice and the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia have dealt with cases that involved disputes concerning a tribunal or an international organisation that was said to have acted beyond its mandate. The study will also make reference to the East African Court of Justice and the Economic Community of West African States Court of Justice as they have also dealt with implied powers when they were confronted with cases concerning human rights abuses. Certain decisions of the SADC Summit of Heads of States or Government (Summit and the Council of Ministers whose roles include the control of functions and/or overseeing the functioning of the SADC will also be referred to in this study.

  7. Construction Waste Management Profiles, Practices, and Performance: A Cross-Jurisdictional Analysis in Four Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Wing-Yan Tam

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Construction waste management (CWM has received worldwide attention for some time. As a result, a plethora of research, investigating a wide array of CWM issues such as their profiles, practices, and performance, has been reported in individual economies around the globe. However, a cross-jurisdictional comparison of these issues is limitedly presented in the literature despite its importance to benchmarking performance and identifying best CWM practices in the context of globalization whereby knowledge sharing has already transcended traditional country boundaries. The aim of this ex post facto research is to compare CWM profiles, practices, and performance in Australia, Europe (Europe refers to EU-27 member countries in the European Union, including Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Denmark, Great Britain, Ireland, Portugal, Spain, Greece, Austria, Finland, Sweden, Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia, Malta, Cyprus, Bulgaria, and Romania., Hong Kong, and the United Kingdom at a national-level, with a view to facilitating CWM knowledge sharing internationally. It does so by triangulating empirical data collected from various national statistical yearbooks with research papers and professional reports on CWM in these economies. It is found that in producing one million (US dollars’ work, construction contributes a volume of solid waste ranging from 28 to 121 tons among countries. Conscientious CWM practices can make a significant difference in reducing, reusing, or recycling construction waste, as evident in the large variation in the CWM performance. While it might be oversimplified to conclude that the best practices in one country can be applied in another, the research provides insightful references into sharing CWM knowledge across boundaries.

  8. A multi-level, multi-jurisdictional strategy: Transnational tobacco companies' attempts to obstruct tobacco packaging restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Benjamin; Holden, Chris; Mackinder, Sophie

    2018-03-09

    Despite the extensive literature on the tobacco industry, there has been little attempt to study how transnational tobacco companies (TTCs) coordinate their political activities globally, or to theorise TTC strategies within the context of global governance structures and policy processes. This article draws on three concepts from political science - policy transfer, multi-level governance and venue shifting - to analyse TTCs' integrated, global strategies to oppose augmented packaging requirements across multiple jurisdictions. Following Uruguay's introduction of extended labelling requirements, Australia became the first country in the world to require tobacco products to be sold in standardised ('plain') packaging in 2012. Governments in the European Union, including in the United Kingdom and Ireland, adopted similar laws, with other member states due to follow. TTCs vehemently opposed these measures and developed coordinated, global strategies to oppose their implementation, exploiting the complexity of contemporary global governance arrangements. These included a series of legal challenges in various jurisdictions, alongside political lobbying and public relations campaigns. This article draws on analysis of public documents and 32 semi-structured interviews with key policy actors. It finds that TTCs developed coordinated and highly integrated strategies to oppose packaging restrictions across multiple jurisdictions and levels of governance.

  9. Reform of the Belgian Justice System: Changes to the Role of Jurisdiction Chief, the Empowerment of Local Managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Dupont

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The last waves of reform that affected, and continue to affect, the Belgian legal system led to an injunction for increased responsibility on the part of local managers, the jurisdiction chiefs. This tendency was initiated in the 1990s, with the introduction of a managerial logic into the legal sphere, whereby local initiatives took precedence in the absence of any clear and binding direction. The 2014 reform project, through its three constituent pillars, led to the strengthening of this logic, to the point where it became an important subject. The jurisdiction chiefs were therefore confronted with a new type of responsibility in that they became responsible for the dissemination of managerial discourse within their local body, for the implementation of change, and, consequently, for the success of this change, while at the same time, being confronted by a state and by political authorities that preferred to take a back-seat role. By observing, from an exploratory perspective, the developments caused by this transformational dynamic with regard to the role and function of the jurisdiction chiefs, our contribution highlights the wide range of receptions and appropriations of the reform project, and the concepts supporting the founding trio of pillars, based on five emerging, empirically-established subjects.

  10. Reforming the South African Social Security Adjudication System: Innovative Experiences from South African Non-Social Security Jurisdictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Ashu Tako Nyenti

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available There is currently no uniform social security dispute resolution system in South Africa due to the piecemeal fashion in which schemes were established or protection against individual risks regulated. The result is that each statute provides for its own dispute resolution institution(s and processes. There are also various gaps and challenges in the current social security dispute resolution systems, some of these relating to the uncoordinated and fragmented nature of the system; inaccessibility of some social security institutions; inappropriateness of some current appeal institutions; the lack of a systematic approach in establishing appeal institutions; a limited scope of jurisdiction and powers of adjudication institutions; inconsistencies in review and/or appeal provisions in various laws; an unavailability of alternative dispute resolution procedures; and an absence of institutional independence of adjudication institutions or forums. The system is therefore in need of reform. In developing an appropriate system, much can be learned from innovative experiences in comparative South African non-social security jurisdictions on the establishment of effective and efficient dispute resolution frameworks. Dispute resolution systems in the labour relations, business competition regulation and consumer protection jurisdictions have been established to realise the constitutional rights of their users (especially the rights of access to justice, to a fair trial and to just administrative action. They thus provide a benchmark for the development of the South African social security dispute resolution system.

  11. Drinking Water Quality Guidelines across Canadian Provinces and Territories: Jurisdictional Variation in the Context of Decentralized Water Governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Dunn

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the first comprehensive review and analysis of the uptake of the Canadian Drinking Water Quality Guidelines (CDWQG across Canada’s 13 provinces and territories. This review is significant given that Canada’s approach to drinking water governance is: (i highly decentralized and (ii discretionary. Canada is (along with Australia only one of two Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD member states that does not comply with the World Health Organization’s (WHO recommendation that all countries have national, legally binding drinking water quality standards. Our review identifies key differences in the regulatory approaches to drinking water quality across Canada’s 13 jurisdictions. Only 16 of the 94 CDWQG are consistently applied across all 13 jurisdictions; five jurisdictions use voluntary guidelines, whereas eight use mandatory standards. The analysis explores three questions of central importance for water managers and public health officials: (i should standards be uniform or variable; (ii should compliance be voluntary or legally binding; and (iii should regulation and oversight be harmonized or delegated? We conclude with recommendations for further research, with particular reference to the relevance of our findings given the high degree of variability in drinking water management and oversight capacity between urban and rural areas in Canada.

  12. Drinking Water Quality Guidelines across Canadian provinces and territories: jurisdictional variation in the context of decentralized water governance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Gemma; Bakker, Karen; Harris, Leila

    2014-04-25

    This article presents the first comprehensive review and analysis of the uptake of the Canadian Drinking Water Quality Guidelines (CDWQG) across Canada's 13 provinces and territories. This review is significant given that Canada's approach to drinking water governance is: (i) highly decentralized and (ii) discretionary. Canada is (along with Australia) only one of two Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) member states that does not comply with the World Health Organization's (WHO) recommendation that all countries have national, legally binding drinking water quality standards. Our review identifies key differences in the regulatory approaches to drinking water quality across Canada's 13 jurisdictions. Only 16 of the 94 CDWQG are consistently applied across all 13 jurisdictions; five jurisdictions use voluntary guidelines, whereas eight use mandatory standards. The analysis explores three questions of central importance for water managers and public health officials: (i) should standards be uniform or variable; (ii) should compliance be voluntary or legally binding; and (iii) should regulation and oversight be harmonized or delegated? We conclude with recommendations for further research, with particular reference to the relevance of our findings given the high degree of variability in drinking water management and oversight capacity between urban and rural areas in Canada.

  13. Drinking Water Quality Guidelines across Canadian Provinces and Territories: Jurisdictional Variation in the Context of Decentralized Water Governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Gemma; Bakker, Karen; Harris, Leila

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the first comprehensive review and analysis of the uptake of the Canadian Drinking Water Quality Guidelines (CDWQG) across Canada’s 13 provinces and territories. This review is significant given that Canada’s approach to drinking water governance is: (i) highly decentralized and (ii) discretionary. Canada is (along with Australia) only one of two Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) member states that does not comply with the World Health Organization’s (WHO) recommendation that all countries have national, legally binding drinking water quality standards. Our review identifies key differences in the regulatory approaches to drinking water quality across Canada’s 13 jurisdictions. Only 16 of the 94 CDWQG are consistently applied across all 13 jurisdictions; five jurisdictions use voluntary guidelines, whereas eight use mandatory standards. The analysis explores three questions of central importance for water managers and public health officials: (i) should standards be uniform or variable; (ii) should compliance be voluntary or legally binding; and (iii) should regulation and oversight be harmonized or delegated? We conclude with recommendations for further research, with particular reference to the relevance of our findings given the high degree of variability in drinking water management and oversight capacity between urban and rural areas in Canada. PMID:24776725

  14. Upholding Tuberculosis Services during the 2014 Ebola Storm: An Encouraging Experience from Conakry, Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortuno-Gutierrez, Nimer; Zachariah, Rony; Woldeyohannes, Desalegn; Bangoura, Adama; Chérif, Gba-Foromo; Loua, Francis; Hermans, Veerle; Tayler-Smith, Katie; Sikhondze, Welile; Camara, Lansana-Mady

    2016-01-01

    Ten targeted health facilities supported by Damien Foundation (a Belgian Non Governmental Organization) and the National Tuberculosis (TB) Program in Conakry, Guinea. To uphold TB program performance during the Ebola outbreak in the presence of a package of pre-emptive additional measures geared at reinforcing the routine TB program, and ensuring Ebola infection control, health-workers safety and motivation. A retrospective comparative cohort study of a TB program assessing the performance before (2013) and during the (2014) Ebola outbreak. During the Ebola outbreak, all health facilities were maintained opened, there were no reported health-worker Ebola infections, drug stockouts or health staff absences. Of 2,475 presumptive pulmonary TB cases, 13% were diagnosed with TB in both periods (160/1203 in 2013 and 163/1272 in 2014). For new TB, treatment success improved from 84% before to 87% during the Ebola outbreak (P = 0.03). Adjusted Hazard-ratios (AHR) for an unfavorable outcome was alwo lower during the Ebola outbreak, AHR = 0.8, 95% CI:0.7-0.9, P = 0.04). Treatment success improved for HIV co-infected patients (72% to 80%, P<0.01). For retreatment patients, the proportion achieving treatment success was maintained (68% to 72%, P = 0.05). Uptake of HIV-testing and Cotrimoxazole Preventive Treatment was maintained over 85%, and Anti-Retroviral Therapy uptake increased from 77% in 2013 to 86% in 2014 (P<0.01). Contingency planning and health system and worker support during the 2014 Ebola outbreak was associated with encouraging and sustained TB program performance. This is of relevance to future outbreaks.

  15. Upholding Tuberculosis Services during the 2014 Ebola Storm: An Encouraging Experience from Conakry, Guinea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nimer Ortuno-Gutierrez

    Full Text Available Ten targeted health facilities supported by Damien Foundation (a Belgian Non Governmental Organization and the National Tuberculosis (TB Program in Conakry, Guinea.To uphold TB program performance during the Ebola outbreak in the presence of a package of pre-emptive additional measures geared at reinforcing the routine TB program, and ensuring Ebola infection control, health-workers safety and motivation.A retrospective comparative cohort study of a TB program assessing the performance before (2013 and during the (2014 Ebola outbreak.During the Ebola outbreak, all health facilities were maintained opened, there were no reported health-worker Ebola infections, drug stockouts or health staff absences. Of 2,475 presumptive pulmonary TB cases, 13% were diagnosed with TB in both periods (160/1203 in 2013 and 163/1272 in 2014. For new TB, treatment success improved from 84% before to 87% during the Ebola outbreak (P = 0.03. Adjusted Hazard-ratios (AHR for an unfavorable outcome was alwo lower during the Ebola outbreak, AHR = 0.8, 95% CI:0.7-0.9, P = 0.04. Treatment success improved for HIV co-infected patients (72% to 80%, P<0.01. For retreatment patients, the proportion achieving treatment success was maintained (68% to 72%, P = 0.05. Uptake of HIV-testing and Cotrimoxazole Preventive Treatment was maintained over 85%, and Anti-Retroviral Therapy uptake increased from 77% in 2013 to 86% in 2014 (P<0.01.Contingency planning and health system and worker support during the 2014 Ebola outbreak was associated with encouraging and sustained TB program performance. This is of relevance to future outbreaks.

  16. 76 FR 8294 - TRICARE Program; Surgery for Morbid Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-14

    ... habits and lifestyles. The Air Force Fit to Fight Program encourages unit fitness programs, encourages...) The distribution of power and responsibilities among the various levels of Government. The final rule...

  17. Implementing Good Practices Programs to Encourage Production of High-Quality, Safer Produce in Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Barakat S. M.; Stafne, Eric T.; Coker, Christine H.; Bachman, Gary R.; Bell, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Fifty-four growers/producers attended four 1-day good agricultural practices (GAP) and good handling practices (GHP) workshops at four locations in Mississippi. Pre- and post workshop survey data indicated that the participants' food safety knowledge increased by 15%. Furthermore, the workshops helped producers develop their own food safety plans.…

  18. Preschool Teacher Assessment of the NTC Program Reach: Encouraging Creative Elements of Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajovic, Ranko; Gojkov-Rajic, Aleksandra; Stojanovic, Aleksandar

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents a part of the findings of an evaluation study which is experimental in character and in which the experiment with one group was used as a method. The subject and problem relate to the observation of the effects of the project "Smart Children Network-SMART", code: 1286, which is based on the NTC learning system with the…

  19. 78 FR 64389 - Policy To Encourage Trial Disclosure Programs; Information Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-29

    ... context. In-market testing of consumer behavior and reactions to new products or new ways of delivering... rules to ensure that consumers receive such disclosures, as well as model forms to help companies comply...

  20. The Legal Solutions in the Field of Financial and Budgetary Discipline in France in the Light of the Code of Finance Jurisdiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Cilak

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to present French institutional and law solutions in the field of public finance discipline. The article describes legal position and functioning of Court of Budgetary and Finance Discipline in France. The jurisdiction of Court covers the cases of serious breach of public finance law. The Court is one of the elements of the system of jurisdiction in financial matters, that constitute a specialized type of administrative jurisdiction. The law that regulate the legal position and functioning of the Court, as well as the actes which are breaches of public finance discipline, and the sanctions for them, is the Code of finance jurisdiction (Code des juridictions financières.

  1. Teach them to Fly: Strategies for Encouraging Active Online Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen HARDIN

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Teach them to Fly: Strategies for Encouraging Active Online Learning Karen HARDIN Cameron University Lawton, OK, USA PROBLEM One of the hot topics in education in the past 10 years has been the shift of the role of the educator. Whereas, he has traditionally been the owner and deliverer of the knowledge (Sage on the stage, now his role is shifting to a guide and facilitator (guide by the side. The purpose is to give the students ownership in their own learning process. As technology becomes more sophisticated, automation is replacing students’ problem solving skills, critical thinking and sometimes patience. On one of my evaluations in a 1999 online course, a student criticized that, “she’s not doing the teaching, I’m doing the learning.” Of course in my desire to encourage active learning, I took the response as a compliment, but the student meant it as a criticism. I began pondering the reluctance of students to take control of the learning process. I’ve noticed this lack of problem solving, critical thinking and patience with young adults in the workplace. For example, I often visit Sam’s, a warehouse store owned by Wal-Mart. When I check out, I pay with a check. The computerized register will print the check for me, so I allow the cashier to do that. I often ask him or her to add $15 to the total to give me cash back. It’s amazing how long it takes these young adults to add $15 to the total because of their reliance on computers. In another situation, when I was in an outlet shoe store in Texas, I purchased a pair of sandals. After I checked out, I noticed a sign that promoted, “buy one, get a second for one cent.” Of course, I wanted to take advantage of this opportunity, so I told the cashier that I wanted to find another pair of shoes. She replied, “It’s too late, your transaction is complete. I wouldn’t know what to do.” I said, “It’s simple, I owe you one cent.” She said, “I don’t know how to make the computer fix it

  2. 75 FR 48525 - Pennsylvania Regulatory Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-10

    ... maintain jurisdiction of the regulatory program under the Federal Surface Mining Control and Reclamation... Part IV Department of the Interior Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30 CFR... Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 938 [PA-153; Docket ID OSM-2008-0021] Pennsylvania...

  3. San Francisco Bay Area CHARG: Coastal Hazards Adaptation Resiliency Group, a Multi-Jurisdictional Collaboration to Develop Innovative Regional Solutions to Address Sea Level Rise and Improve Shoreline Resiliency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, R.

    2017-12-01

    For a challenge as complex and far-reaching as sea level rise and improving shoreline resiliency, strong partnerships between scientists, elected officials, decision-makers, and the general public are the only way that effective solutions can be developed. The San Francisco Bay, like many similar sheltered water coastal environments (for example, Galveston Bay, Tampa Bay, or Venetian Lagoon) offers a unique opportunity for multiple jurisdictions to collaborate to address sea level rise on a regional basis. For the San Francisco Bay, significant scientific progress has been made in building a real-time simulation model for riverine and Bay hydrodynamics. Other major scientific initiatives, such as morphology mapping, shoreline mapping, and a sediment budget are also underway. In 2014, leaders from the Bay Area science, engineering, planning, policy, elected, and regulatory communities representing jurisdictions around the Bay joined together to address sea level rise. The group includes people from local, regional, state, and federal agencies and organizations. Together, CHARG (Coastal Hazards Adaptation Resiliency Group) established a collective vision and approach to implementing regional solutions. Decision-makers within many Bay Area jurisdictions are motivated to show demonstrable progress toward addressing sea level rise. However, the cost to implement shoreline resiliency solutions will be very large, and must be founded on strong science.CHARG is now tackling several key technical challenges. One is to develop science-based guidelines for local jurisdictions to determine when a project is local, sub-regional, or regional. Concurrently, several organizations are planning or implementing pilot shoreline resiliency projects and other programs. Many creative regional solutions are possible in a sheltered water environment that simply would not be feasible along the open coast. By definition, these solutions cannot be undertaken by one entity alone. Large

  4. Jurisdiction in international civil and commercial cases : a comparative study of the law in the IBSA countries and the Hague Convention on Choice of Court Agreements

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    LL.M. (International Commercial Law) This dissertation concerns a comparative analysis of Brazilian, Indian and South African private international law principles on the exercise of jurisdiction in international civil and commercial cases. The intention is to uncover the fundamental grounds of jurisdiction in these legal systems and in doing so draw attention to their comparable characteristics. Emphasis is placed on matters of a commercial nature. Furthermore, a discussion of the Hague Co...

  5. Precautionary principles: a jurisdiction-free framework for decision-making under risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Paolo F; Cox, Louis A; MacDonald, Thomas R

    2004-12-01

    Fundamental principles of precaution are legal maxims that ask for preventive actions, perhaps as contingent interim measures while relevant information about causality and harm remains unavailable, to minimize the societal impact of potentially severe or irreversible outcomes. Such principles do not explain how to make choices or how to identify what is protective when incomplete and inconsistent scientific evidence of causation characterizes the potential hazards. Rather, they entrust lower jurisdictions, such as agencies or authorities, to make current decisions while recognizing that future information can contradict the scientific basis that supported the initial decision. After reviewing and synthesizing national and international legal aspects of precautionary principles, this paper addresses the key question: How can society manage potentially severe, irreversible or serious environmental outcomes when variability, uncertainty, and limited causal knowledge characterize their decision-making? A decision-analytic solution is outlined that focuses on risky decisions and accounts for prior states of information and scientific beliefs that can be updated as subsequent information becomes available. As a practical and established approach to causal reasoning and decision-making under risk, inherent to precautionary decision-making, these (Bayesian) methods help decision-makers and stakeholders because they formally account for probabilistic outcomes, new information, and are consistent and replicable. Rational choice of an action from among various alternatives--defined as a choice that makes preferred consequences more likely--requires accounting for costs, benefits and the change in risks associated with each candidate action. Decisions under any form of the precautionary principle reviewed must account for the contingent nature of scientific information, creating a link to the decision-analytic principle of expected value of information (VOI), to show the

  6. Science PhD career preferences: levels, changes, and advisor encouragement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Sauermann

    Full Text Available Even though academic research is often viewed as the preferred career path for PhD trained scientists, most U.S. graduates enter careers in industry, government, or "alternative careers." There has been a growing concern that these career patterns reflect fundamental imbalances between the supply of scientists seeking academic positions and the availability of such positions. However, while government statistics provide insights into realized career transitions, there is little systematic data on scientists' career preferences and thus on the degree to which there is a mismatch between observed career paths and scientists' preferences. Moreover, we lack systematic evidence whether career preferences adjust over the course of the PhD training and to what extent advisors exacerbate imbalances by encouraging their students to pursue academic positions. Based on a national survey of PhD students at tier-one U.S. institutions, we provide insights into the career preferences of junior scientists across the life sciences, physics, and chemistry. We also show that the attractiveness of academic careers decreases significantly over the course of the PhD program, despite the fact that advisors strongly encourage academic careers over non-academic careers. Our data provide an empirical basis for common concerns regarding labor market imbalances. Our results also suggest the need for mechanisms that provide PhD applicants with information that allows them to carefully weigh the costs and benefits of pursuing a PhD, as well as for mechanisms that complement the job market advice advisors give to their current students.

  7. Science PhD career preferences: levels, changes, and advisor encouragement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauermann, Henry; Roach, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Even though academic research is often viewed as the preferred career path for PhD trained scientists, most U.S. graduates enter careers in industry, government, or "alternative careers." There has been a growing concern that these career patterns reflect fundamental imbalances between the supply of scientists seeking academic positions and the availability of such positions. However, while government statistics provide insights into realized career transitions, there is little systematic data on scientists' career preferences and thus on the degree to which there is a mismatch between observed career paths and scientists' preferences. Moreover, we lack systematic evidence whether career preferences adjust over the course of the PhD training and to what extent advisors exacerbate imbalances by encouraging their students to pursue academic positions. Based on a national survey of PhD students at tier-one U.S. institutions, we provide insights into the career preferences of junior scientists across the life sciences, physics, and chemistry. We also show that the attractiveness of academic careers decreases significantly over the course of the PhD program, despite the fact that advisors strongly encourage academic careers over non-academic careers. Our data provide an empirical basis for common concerns regarding labor market imbalances. Our results also suggest the need for mechanisms that provide PhD applicants with information that allows them to carefully weigh the costs and benefits of pursuing a PhD, as well as for mechanisms that complement the job market advice advisors give to their current students.

  8. Understanding the conditions that encourage the persistence of women in science, mathematics, and engineering career pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrick, Linda C.

    The purpose of this study was to determine which factors encourage the persistence of women in the pursuit of Science, Math, and Engineering (SME) careers. Surveys with 36 parallel pairs of theory and history questions regarding the importance and the aptness of variables identified in the literature were completed by 205 SME career women. The variables covered three educational levels: High School, Undergraduate and Graduate. Results reveal which variables fit the experiences of these women and were also believed by them to be important to women in the pursuit of an SME career goal. False Negatives, women who according to the SME literature should not have persisted but did, were identified. Their existence, together with the false positives identified in the SME literature, is evidence, according to Confirmation/Disconfirmation Theory, that important variables in SME persistence are yet to be discovered. Follow-up telephone interviews with nineteen respondents identified important affective variables. Love of math or science was in itself a powerful motivator. Respondents made suggestions for intervention programs that may help to develop that abiding interest. Mentors, role models, and social support networks were identified as important in building the confidence and sustaining the focus needed to cope with the rigorous curriculum and negative sex-bias encountered in SME programs. The qualitative and quantitative results were synthesized in a Causal Event Flow Network, a cognitive map of the longitudinal effects of both positive and negative push/pull vectors operating on women in pursuit of an SME career goal.

  9. Virginia Demonstration Project Encouraging Middle School Students in Pursuing STEM Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Jane T.; Kota, Dena H.; Kota, Aaron J.

    2011-01-01

    Encouraging students at all grade levels to consider pursuing a career in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) fields i s a national focus. In 2005, the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren Division (NSWCDD), a Department of Defense laboratory located in Da hlgren, Virginia, began work on the Virginia Demonstration Project (VDP) with the goal of increasing more student interest in STEM educatio n and pursuing STEM careers. This goal continues as the program enters its sixth year. This project has been successful through the partici pation of NSWCDD's scientists and engineers who are trained as mentor s to work in local middle school classrooms throughout the school year, As an extension of the in-class activities, several STEM summer aca demies have been conducted at NSWCDD, These academies are supported by the Navy through the VDP and the STEM Learning Module Project. These projects are part of more extensive outreach efforts offered by the National Defense Education Program (NDEP), sponsored by the Director, Defense Research and Engineering. The focus of this paper is on the types of activities conducted at the summer academy, an overview of the academy planning process, and recommendations to help support a nati onal plan of integrating modeling and simulation-based engineering and science into all grade levels. based upon the lessons learned

  10. Encouraging Vietnamese Household Recycling Behavior: Insights and Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    The Ninh Nguyen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to provide new insights into various determinants affecting household recycling. By focusing on Vietnam, this research also extends knowledge about sustainable behavior in emerging markets, which are the major culprits in terms of greenhouse gas emissions. Hypotheses were developed as a result of the critical review of relevant studies in the fields of marketing, psychology, and economics, and then tested using a quantitative survey data. Structured questionnaires were administered to Vietnamese respondents which yielded 486 usable responses. Multivariate statistics reveal that all the determinants influenced their recycling behavior except for moral norms. Attitude towards the importance of recycling exerted the strongest influence, followed by subjective norms and warm glow respectively. On the other hand, attitude towards the inconvenience of recycling significantly reduced recycling behavior. The research findings have important implications for strategies aimed at promoting recycling behavior. Communication and education programs should emphasize how household recycling contributes to environmental protection, as well as stress intrinsic rewards when recycling. Public media campaigns should feature opinion leaders and attractive communicators, who can effectively apply social pressure to perform recycling behavior. Organizations should also make every effort to make recycling more convenient.

  11. 24 CFR 984.202 - Program Coordinating Committee (PCC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... private education or training institutions, child care providers, nonprofit service providers, private business, and any other public and private service providers with resources to assist the FSS program. (c... private resources for the operation of the FSS program within the PHA's jurisdiction, including assistance...

  12. Mexico's "Telesecundaria" Program and Equitable Access to Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Dana; Etcheverry, Jose; Ferris, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    This Note provides an analysis of Mexico's "Telesecundaria" program within the context of Mexico's new education reform framework offering a succinct background of the project, as well as key policy lessons that can be useful for other jurisdictions interested in the development of distance education programs. This Note uses a literature…

  13. An assessment of schoolyard renovation strategies to encourage children's physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greenwood Emily

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children in poor and minority neighborhoods often lack adequate environmental support for healthy physical development and community interventions designed to improve physical activity resources serve as an important approach to addressing obesity. In Denver, the Learning Landscapes (LL program has constructed over 98 culturally-tailored schoolyard play spaces at elementary schools with the goal to encourage utilization of play spaces and physical activity. In spite of enthusiasm about such projects to improve urban environments, little work has evaluated their impact or success in achieving their stated objectives. This study evaluates the impacts of LL construction and recency of renovation on schoolyard utilization and the physical activity rates of children, both during and outside of school, using an observational study design. Methods This study employs a quantitative method for evaluating levels of physical activity of individuals and associated environmental characteristics in play and leisure environments. Schools were selected on the basis of their participation in the LL program, the recency of schoolyard renovation, the size of the school, and the social and demographic characteristics of the school population. Activity in the schoolyards was measured using the System for Observing Play and Leisure Activity (SOPLAY, a validated quantitative method for evaluating levels of physical activity of individuals in play and leisure environments. Trained observers collected measurements before school, during school recess, after school, and on weekends. Overall utilization (the total number of children observed on the grounds and the rate of activity (the percentage of children observed who were physically active were analyzed. Observations were compared using t-tests and the data were stratified by gender for further analysis. In order to assess the impacts of LL renovation, recently-constructed LL schoolyards were

  14. Encouraging Combined Heat and Power in California Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadler, Michael [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Groissbock, Markus [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Cardoso, Goncalo [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Muller, Andreas [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Lai, Judy [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Governor Brown’s research priorities include an additional 6.5 GW of combined heat and power (CHP) by 2030. As of 2009, roughly 0.25 GW of small natural gas and biogas fired CHP is documented by the Self-Generation Incentive Program (SGIP) database. The SGIP is set to expire, and the anticipated grid de-carbonization based on the development of 20 GW of renewable energy will influence the CHP adoption. Thus, an integrated optimization approach for this analysis was chosen that allows optimizing the adoption of distributed energy resources (DER) such as photovoltaics (PV), CHP, storage technologies, etc. in the California commercial sector from the building owners’ perspective. To solve this DER adoption problem the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM), developed by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and used extensively to address the problem of optimally investing and scheduling DER under multiple settings, has been used. The application of CHP at large industrial sites is well known, and much of its potential is already being realized. Conversely, commercial sector CHP, especially those above 50 to 100 kW peak electricity load, is widely overlooked. In order to analyze the role of DER in CO2 reduction, 147 representative sites in different climate zones were selected from the California Commercial End Use Survey (CEUS). About 8000 individual optimization runs, with different assumptions for the electric tariffs, natural gas costs, marginal grid CO2 emissions, and nitrogen oxide treatment costs, SGIP, fuel cell lifetime, fuel cell efficiency, PV installation costs, and payback periods for investments have been performed. The most optimistic CHP potential contribution in this sector in 2020 will be 2.7 GW. However, this result requires a SGIP in 2020, 46% average electric efficiency for fuel cells, a payback period for investments of 10 years, and a CO2 focused approach of the building owners. In

  15. Research to Encourage Exercise for Fibromyalgia (REEF): use of motivational interviewing design and method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Dennis C; Kaleth, Anthony S; Bigatti, Silvia; Mazzuca, Steve; Saha, Chandan; Hilligoss, Janna; Lengerich, Mimi; Bandy, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM), defined as the presence of both chronic widespread pain and the finding of 11/18 tender points on examination, is an illness associated with major personal and societal burden. Supervised aerobic exercise is an important treatment modality to improve patient symptoms. Unfortunately, adherence to an exercise regimen after a structured supervised program is disappointingly low. Since FM is a chronic illness, studies are needed to test strategies that would enhance exercise adherence in these individuals. Individuals who are able to adhere to exercise almost always maintain the symptomatic benefits of exercise. The objective of this paper was to describe the protocol of the Research to Encourage Exercise for Fibromyalgia (REEF). REEF is a randomized attention-controlled trial that seeks to test the efficacy of 6 sessions of telephone delivered motivational interviewing (MI) that targets exercise adherence to improve FM-relevant clinical outcomes (i.e., physical function and pain severity). The trial has recently completed enrolling 216 subjects, and randomization has resulted in well-balanced groups. Details on the study design, MI program, and treatment fidelity are provided in the paper. Outcome assessments at week 12, week 24 and week 36 will test the immediate, intermediate and long-term effects of exercise-based MI on adherence (as measured by the Community Health Activities Model Program for Seniors/CHAMPS and accelerometer) and clinical outcomes. When completed, REEF will determine whether exercise-based MI could be utilized as a management strategy to sustain the clinical benefits of exercise for FM. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Natural Gas STAR Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA’s Voluntary Methane Programs encourage oil and natural gas companies to adopt cost-effective technologies and practices that improve operational efficiency and reduce emissions of methane, a potent greenhouse gas.

  17. Marine protected areas in areas beyond national jurisdiction
    The pioneering efforts under the OSPAR Convention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik J. Molenaar

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The international community has committed itself to establishing a coherent network of marine protected areas (MPAs by 2012. This network should also extend to areas beyond national jurisdiction (ABNJ, namely the high seas and the ‘Area’ (the seabed and ocean floor and the subsoil thereof beyond the limits of national jurisdiction. This article examines the pioneering efforts of OSPAR to establish MPAs in ABNJ in the North-East Atlantic Ocean. In that connection, OSPAR has to work out how to deal with the applicable international governance and regulatory framework, most importantly the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS and the various ‘competent’ international organizations functioning thereunder. The article’s most important conclusion is that an effective regime for ABNJ in general and also for holistic MPAs in ABNJ requires complementary action at the global and regional levels. OSPAR’s pioneering approach may, if pursued carefully – among other things by respecting the competence of other global and regional bodies – have a decisive impact on the development of the global legal regime in respect of the role of regional environmental organizations in the management of ABNJ.

  18. Evaluation of the environmental potential of the resources, soil, water, mineral and forests in the Cardique jurisdiction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velasquez Monsalve, Elkin; Viana Rios, Ricardo; Perez Ceron, Rosalbina

    1999-01-01

    The general objective of the study is to obtain a global vision of the potential of the soils, of the water, of the forests, of the construction materials and of the recharge areas of aquifer, as well as of the existent forests in the territory understood inside the Cardique jurisdiction to scale 1:100.000 with base in the existent secondary information and a general revision of field. The potential of the soils was determined to produce cultivations and to characterize this resource like basic element in the ecosystems operation. The hydrological and climatologically characterization was elaborated. It was determined with base in properties like the primary and secondary porosity of the rocks, the areas with potential of recharge of the aquifers. They were characterized and they evaluated the present forests in the Cardique jurisdiction, and some aspects of the structure and flora composition and their relationship were known with some physiographic elements; finally the areas were determined with possibility of use of construction materials

  19. Questions of jurisdiction in the event of a nuclear accident in a member state of the European union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galizzi, P.

    1996-01-01

    Jurisdictional problems are outlined that could be encountered by victims of a serious nuclear accident, with transboundary consequences, seeking to recover compensation (in a Member State of the European Union). The situation is only partly covered by existing treaty law and not all Member States are a party to the relevant treaties. A hypothetical case-study has been devised which supposes that a nuclear accident has occurred in the Netherlands causing damage in three selected countries. Of these, the first (Germany) is a party to the 1960 Paris Convention on Third Party Liability in the field of Nuclear Energy, the second (Hungary) is a party to the 1963 Vienna Convention on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage, and the third (Luxembourg) is a not a party to either Convention. Answers are sought for two questions related to this hypothetical accident. Firstly, which courts have jurisdiction over private claims for damage caused in these various countries? Secondly, which law will the competent courts apply? (UK)

  20. The Relations of Parental Affect and Encouragement to Children's Moral Emotions and Behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinrad, Tracy L.; Losoya, Sandra H.; Eisenburg, Nancy; Fabes, Richard A.; Shepard, Stephanie A.; Cumberland, Amanda; Guthrie, Ivanna K.; Murphy, Bridget C.

    1999-01-01

    Explores the role of observed parental affect and encouragement in children's empathy-related responding and moral behavior, specifically cheating on a puzzle activity. Finds that (1) parents' affect and encouragement positively related to children's sympathy (not empathy) and (2) boys' cheating on the puzzle correlated to parents' affect and…

  1. Parental Encouragement in Relation to Academic Achievement of Higher Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, A. S. Arul; Barathi, C.

    2016-01-01

    Parental Encouragement refers to the general process undertaken by the parents to initiative and directs the behaviour of the children towards high academic achievement. The present study aims to probe the relationship between Parental Encouragement and Academic Achievement of Higher Secondary School Students. Survey method was employed and the…

  2. Teaching about Designer Babies and Genetically Modified Foods: Encouraging the Teaching of Biotechnology in Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Glenda; Schibecci, Renato

    2006-01-01

    Biotechnology is a cutting edge science/technology which impacts the community in many ways. For this and other reasons, it is important we encourage teachers to include biotechnology in the science curriculum. First, however, we need to know what hinders and encourages teachers. We surveyed the views of 88 high school science teachers. The …

  3. Encouraging Reflexivity in Urban Geography Fieldwork: Study Abroad Experiences in Singapore and Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Fieldwork in urban geography courses can encourage reflexivity among students regarding the cities they encounter. This article outlines how student reflexivity was encouraged within a new international field research course in Singapore and Malaysia. Drawing on examples from students' field exercises written during an intensive and occasionally…

  4. Using Interdisciplinary and Active Research to Encourage Higher Resolution Research and Prototyping in Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adream Blair-Early

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available University art and design programs are branching out and creating interdisciplinary programs and research centers that connect design students and faculty across various disciplines such as business, engineering, architecture, information studies, health sciences and education. A human-centered, problem-based approach to design research looks to position industry and academic leaders to work alongside students, community leaders, artists and non-profits to develop creative and innovative solutions to the challenges facing contemporary society. But product design benefits even more from practices that engage users throughout the entire design process, often called participatory design. Participatory design process utilizes user feedback throughout the design process to spur innovation and improve design quality. It is possible in the classroom to engage in participatory design and participatory prototyping through the use of inexpensive 3D printers and laser cutters as well as traditional hand tools, requiring only mastery of a few simple techniques and technology readily available on laptop computers. The class research being presented was conceived as part of a new interdisciplinary classroom research space call the Digital Craft Research Lab (DCRL housed within the department of Art and Design. Courses taught within the DCRL offer students, researchers and faculty continual access to both low resolution and high-resolution prototyping machinery and materials. This paper looks at the role of action and participatory research in a design course that created printed hand innovations in collaboration with a nine-year-old female user. Students were asked to work on modeling new designs as well as capturing the progress in a final open source book and models. This paper asks the question can the use of classroom collaboration, action research and work spaces encourage creativity, innovation, and critical thinking in student and professional

  5. Fostering creativity: how the Duke Graduate Medical Education Quasi-Endowment encourages innovation in GME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andolsek, Kathryn M; Murphy, Gwendolyn; Nagler, Alisa; Moore, Peggy R; Schlueter, Joanne; Weinerth, John L; Cuffe, Michael S; Dzau, Victor J

    2013-02-01

    The Duke Medicine Graduate Medical Education Quasi-Endowment, established in 2006, provides infrastructure support and encourages educational innovation. The authors describe Duke's experience with the "grassroots innovation" part of the fund, the Duke Innovation Fund, and discuss the Innovation Fund's processes for application, review, and implementation, and also outcomes, impact, and intended and unintended consequences.In the five years of the Innovation Fund described (2007-2011), 105 projects have been submitted, and 78 have been funded. Thirty-seven projects have been completed. Approved funding ranged from $2,363 to $348,750, with an average award of $66,391. This represents 42% of funding originally requested. Funding could be requested for a period of 6 months to 3 years. The average duration of projects was 27 months, with a range from 6 months to 36 months. Eighty percent of projects were completed on time. Two projects were closed because of lack of progress and failure to adhere to reporting requirements. Thirty-nine are ongoing.Program directors report great success in meeting project outcomes and concrete impacts on resident and faculty attitudes and performance. Ninety-two percent report that their projects would have never been accomplished without this funding. Projects have resulted in at least 68 posters, abstracts, and peer-reviewed presentations. At least 12 peer-reviewed manuscripts were published.There has been tremendous diversity of projects; all 13 clinical departments have been represented. Interdepartmental and intradepartmental program cooperation has increased. This modest seed money has resulted in demonstrable sustainable impacts on teaching and learning, and increased morale and scholarly recognition.

  6. Morning Programs Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Susan

    1993-01-01

    Like British morning programs of recent decades, upstate New York program encourages parents and community residents to get involved in children's education. Parents and community residents--watercolor artists, auto mechanics, doll collectors, and others--are welcomed and valued in schools. Program's purpose is learning, not entertainment. Topics…

  7. Encouraging Entrepreneurship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author features the Opportunity Funding Corporation's (OFC) Venture Challenge, a business competition that allows HBCU (historically Black colleges and universities) students to develop and foster sustainable business ventures. The OFC Venture Challenge was established to help HBCUs develop a comprehensive entrepreneurship…

  8. Encouraging Advice.

    OpenAIRE

    Clay, Allyson

    1990-01-01

    Allyson Clay’s "Traces of a City in the Spaces Between Some People" is a series of twenty diptychs contrasting fabricated faux finishing with expressionist painting and text. The fabricated paint applications evoke city surfaces like concrete and granite; they also evoke modernist painting.  Unlike modernist painting, however, the faux surfaces are decorative and mechanically painted. The choice to have the surfaces fabricated serves to disrupt the egoism of modern abstraction and the im...

  9. Encouraging Cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koss Rasmussen, Rasmus

    In CMS, debates on methodology have typically taken second stage to those on epistemology and ontology as the field embraced a plurality of methods. Recent work pushing for CMS to engage more strongly with mainstream theory, however, raises the need for a discussion on how to use methods...

  10. Do U.S. family planning clinics encourage parent-child communication? Findings from an exploratory survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rachel K

    2006-09-01

    Clinics that receive Title X funding have a mandate to encourage parent-child communication for minors seeking family planning services. Little is known about the programs and practices that clinics have adopted to achieve this goal, or whether clinics not receiving Title X funds encourage family participation. As part of a larger project examining parental engagement among adolescents using family planning clinics, 81 clinics that served 200 or more adolescent contraceptive clients in 2001 completed a questionnaire containing closed- and open-ended items. Topic areas included clinic counseling and policies regarding clients younger than 18, activities to improve parent-child communication and community relations. Frequency distributions were calculated for the prevalence of activities, and cross-tabulations were used to compare prevalence by clinic characteristics. Every clinic engaged in at least one activity to promote parent-child communication, and nine in 10 offered multiple activities. Most of the clinics used counseling sessions to talk to adolescent clients about the importance of discussing sexual health issues with parents (73-94%, depending on the reason for the visit). More than eight in 10 clinics (84%) distributed pamphlets on how to talk about these issues. A substantial minority (43%) offered or referred interested individuals to educational programs designed to improve communication. Some of these exploratory findings reflect the prevalence of activities among all U.S. family planning clinics that serve adolescent clients. Evaluation and expansion of clinic efforts to promote voluntary communication about sexual health issues between parents and children could help encourage family participation.

  11. Nurse prescribing of medicines in Western European and Anglo-Saxon countries: a survey on forces, conditions and jurisdictional control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroezen, Marieke; Francke, Anneke L; Groenewegen, Peter P; van Dijk, Liset

    2012-08-01

    The number of Western European and Anglo-Saxon countries where nurses are legally allowed to prescribe medicines is growing. As the prescribing of medicines has traditionally been the task of the medical profession, nurse prescribing is changing the relationship between the medical and nursing professions. To gain more insight into the forces that led to the introduction of nurse prescribing of medicines in Western European and Anglo-Saxon countries, as well as into the legal, educational and organizational conditions under which nurses prescribe in these countries. Moreover, this study sought to determine which consequences nurse prescribing has for the division of jurisdictional control over prescribing between the nursing and medical professions. International survey. An email survey was sent to 60 stakeholders of professional nursing or medical associations or government bodies, at national, state or provincial level across ten Western European and Anglo-Saxon countries, namely Australia, Canada, Finland, Ireland, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Spain, Sweden, the United Kingdom and the United States of America. The survey addressed the reasons for the introduction of nurse prescribing and the conditions under which nurses are or will be prescribing medicines. The response rate was 65% (n=39). It was shown that a diversity of forces led to the introduction of nurse prescribing, and respondents from nursing and medical associations and government bodies cited different forces as being important for the introduction of nurse prescribing. Representatives of nurses' associations oftentimes emphasized the medication needs of patients living in remote geographical areas, while representatives of medical associations more often pointed to workforce shortages within the health care service. The conditions under which nurses prescribe medicines vary considerably, from countries where nurses prescribe independently to countries in which prescribing by nurses is only

  12. Increasing Awareness of Gynecologic Cancer Risks and Symptoms among Asian, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander Women in the US-Associated Pacific Island Jurisdictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novinson, Daniel; Puckett, Mary; Townsend, Julie; Reichhardt, Martina; Tareg, Aileen; Palemar, Jennifer; Wichilib, Ritchie; Stewart, Sherri L

    2017-08-27

    Background: Gynecologic cancers are common among Asian/Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander (A/NH/PI) women. Prevention is important in United States associated Pacific Island jurisdictions (USAPIJ) because there are limited resources to treat cancer. The objective of this study was to educate A/NH/PI women and providers about evidence-based interventions to prevent and control gynecologic cancers in Yap, one of four major islands comprising the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM). This was done through a partnership between Inside Knowledge: Get The Facts About Gynecologic Cancer national campaign and the Yap comprehensive cancer control program, both funded by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Methods: Inside Knowledge educational materials were obtained from the CDC website and used in facilitated educational sessions. Sessions were planned according to leading health education theories, and were implemented and led by local Yap public health practitioners. Pre- and post-session surveys were used to assess changes in gynecologic cancer awareness, confidence and behavioral intentions related to prevention/early detection for gynecologic cancer. Results: Twenty-nine providers and 326 adult women participated in sessions. All participants demonstrated significant increases in knowledge across all measured domains post-session. Public knowledge that HPV causes cervical, vulvar and vaginal cancer increased from 4.9% pre-session to 51.4% post-session (pgynecologic cancer knowledge pre-session compared to 91.7% post-session. Conclusion: Targeted education about gynecologic cancer symptoms and risk factors can be effective at increasing awareness, behavioral intention, confidence and knowledge. These increases can lead to more widespread prevention of these five cancers. Creative Commons Attribution License

  13. An investigation of routes to cancer diagnosis in 10 international jurisdictions, as part of the International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership: survey development and implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, David; Vedsted, Peter; Anandan, Chantelle; Zalounina, Alina; Fourkala, Evangelia Ourania; Desai, Rakshit; Liston, William; Jensen, Henry; Barisic, Andriana; Gavin, Anna; Grunfeld, Eva; Lambe, Mats; Law, Rebecca-Jane; Malmberg, Martin; Neal, Richard D; Kalsi, Jatinderpal; Turner, Donna; White, Victoria; Bomb, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This paper describes the methods used in the International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership Module 4 Survey (ICBPM4) which examines time intervals and routes to cancer diagnosis in 10 jurisdictions. We present the study design with defining and measuring time intervals, identifying patients with cancer, questionnaire development, data management and analyses. Design and setting Recruitment of participants to the ICBPM4 survey is based on cancer registries in each jurisdiction. Questionnaires draw on previous instruments and have been through a process of cognitive testing and piloting in three jurisdictions followed by standardised translation and adaptation. Data analysis focuses on comparing differences in time intervals and routes to diagnosis in the jurisdictions. Participants Our target is 200 patients with symptomatic breast, lung, colorectal and ovarian cancer in each jurisdiction. Patients are approached directly or via their primary care physician (PCP). Patients’ PCPs and cancer treatment specialists (CTSs) are surveyed, and ‘data rules’ are applied to combine and reconcile conflicting information. Where CTS information is unavailable, audit information is sought from treatment records and databases. Main outcomes Reliability testing of the patient questionnaire showed that agreement was complete (κ=1) in four items and substantial (κ=0.8, 95% CI 0.333 to 1) in one item. The identification of eligible patients is sufficient to meet the targets for breast, lung and colorectal cancer. Initial patient and PCP survey response rates from the UK and Sweden are comparable with similar published surveys. Data collection was completed in early 2016 for all cancer types. Conclusion An international questionnaire-based survey of patients with cancer, PCPs and CTSs has been developed and launched in 10 jurisdictions. ICBPM4 will help to further understand international differences in cancer survival by comparing time intervals and routes to cancer

  14. Delays in medical malpractice litigation in civil law jurisdictions: some evidence from the Italian Court of Cassation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grembi, Veronica; Garoupa, Nuno

    2013-10-01

    Medical malpractice law and tort reform are contentious issues. In this paper, we focus on Italy as an example of a civil law jurisdiction. Italian medical malpractice law is essentially judge-made law. However, its effectiveness is likely to be curtailed by excessive delays in litigation. Several reforms have been enacted since the late 1980s to correct this situation. By making use of the decisions of the Italian Court of Cassation (which have shaped medical malpractice law) from 1970 to 2009, we show that these reforms had no general statistically significant impact on delays. Recent reduction of delays does not seem to be related to legal reforms but rather explained by other factors.

  15. Provisions on waiting periods in international investment protection treaties and their impact on the jurisdiction of arbitral tribunals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đundić Petar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Provisions on so-called waiting periods in international investment protection treaties give an investor from one contracting state an opportunity to initiate arbitration against the host state provided that the time designated by the treaty from the date on which the dispute arose has elapsed. The aim of those provisions is to enable parties to the dispute to use this time for consultations and attempt to reach a negotiated settlement. The paper analyzes the attitude of contemporary arbitral practice towards the legal nature and effect of those provisions on tribunals' jurisdiction in investment disputes. The analysis shows gradual and clear shift of position taken by the tribunals in cases in which claimants did not comply with waiting periods. Because arbitral tribunals today are more resolved to penalize premature submission of the dispute to arbitration than they were one decade ago, in the future one can expect much more cautious conduct of potential claimants in this regard.

  16. The taxation jurisdiction of the ISSQN in the exclusive economic zone; A competencia tributaria do ISSQN na zona economica exclusiva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raposo, Rodrigo Luis Keller [Keller Raposo Escritorio Juridico, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    The oil and natural gas exploitation in the Exclusive Economic Zone will propel the economy of the country, states and municipalities, due to tax revenues, jobs creation. It will also attract new businesses needed to support all the demand created by the main service and correlates. The Tax Service, under the municipal jurisdiction, is a major source of revenue. As the services are performed on the high seas and there is no law to regulate the territorial extent of each municipality, it can be argued that certain Artificial Island (oil platform, for example) is located within the extension of municipal sovereignty, which will allow the ISS taxation, problems will arise. This paper addresses these problems. (author)

  17. A participatory approach to sustainable energy strategy development in a carbon-intensive jurisdiction: The case of Nova Scotia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, Michelle; Wheeler, David; Woolston, Genna

    2011-01-01

    The need for governments to reduce the exposure of energy consumers to future increases in fossil fuel prices places urgent pressure on policy-makers to deliver fundamental transformations in energy strategies, particularly in jurisdictions with high dependency on fossil fuel sources (). This transformation is unlikely without a high level of stakeholder engagement in the policy development process. This paper describes two policy development processes recently undertaken in Nova Scotia in which the inclusion of stakeholder views was central to the approach. The first delivered a new institutional framework for electricity energy efficiency involving the inception of an independent performance-based administrator. The second required the delivery of a strategy to significantly increase renewable energy generation in the Province. It involved recommendations for changes in institutional arrangements, financial incentives and technological options. This process was followed by new commitments to renewable energy developments, new infrastructure for the importation of hydro-electricity, and the announcement of FITs for ocean energy. In both cases, recommendations were made by an independent academic institution, and the Government responded directly to a majority of recommendations. The paper concludes with a discussion of lessons learned and the implications for future energy policy making in carbon-intensive jurisdictions. - Research highlights: → Fundamental transformations in energy policy require stakeholder engagement to be successful. → We describe two policy development processes where stakeholder views were key considerations. → The first delivered a new institutional framework for electricity energy efficiency. → The second delivered a strategy to significantly increase renewable energy generation. → In each case, the Government directly responded to the majority of recommendations.

  18. A participatory approach to sustainable energy strategy development in a carbon-intensive jurisdiction: The case of Nova Scotia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Michelle, E-mail: adamsm@dal.c [School for Resource and Environmental Studies, Dalhousie University, 6100 University Avenue, Suite 5010, Halifax, NS, B3H 3J5 (Canada); Wheeler, David [Plymouth Business School, University of Plymouth, Cookworthy Building, Drake Circus, Plymouth, Devon PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Woolston, Genna [School for Resource and Environmental Studies, Dalhousie University, 6100 University Avenue, Suite 5010, Halifax, NS, B3H 3J5 (Canada)

    2011-05-15

    The need for governments to reduce the exposure of energy consumers to future increases in fossil fuel prices places urgent pressure on policy-makers to deliver fundamental transformations in energy strategies, particularly in jurisdictions with high dependency on fossil fuel sources (). This transformation is unlikely without a high level of stakeholder engagement in the policy development process. This paper describes two policy development processes recently undertaken in Nova Scotia in which the inclusion of stakeholder views was central to the approach. The first delivered a new institutional framework for electricity energy efficiency involving the inception of an independent performance-based administrator. The second required the delivery of a strategy to significantly increase renewable energy generation in the Province. It involved recommendations for changes in institutional arrangements, financial incentives and technological options. This process was followed by new commitments to renewable energy developments, new infrastructure for the importation of hydro-electricity, and the announcement of FITs for ocean energy. In both cases, recommendations were made by an independent academic institution, and the Government responded directly to a majority of recommendations. The paper concludes with a discussion of lessons learned and the implications for future energy policy making in carbon-intensive jurisdictions. - Research highlights: {yields} Fundamental transformations in energy policy require stakeholder engagement to be successful. {yields} We describe two policy development processes where stakeholder views were key considerations. {yields} The first delivered a new institutional framework for electricity energy efficiency. {yields} The second delivered a strategy to significantly increase renewable energy generation. {yields} In each case, the Government directly responded to the majority of recommendations.

  19. SmartTrips Ithaca : encouraging sustainable transportation options through a personalized educational campaign : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    SmartTrips Ithaca is a neighborhood-based personalized educational campaign that encouraged residents : of downtown Ithaca to try out sustainable modes of transportation such as walking, biking, transit, and : carsharing through incentives and commun...

  20. Encouraging entrepreneurship in university labs: Research activities, research outputs, and early doctorate careers

    OpenAIRE

    Roach, Michael

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates how the encouragement of entrepreneurship within university research labs relates with research activities, research outputs, and early doctorate careers. Utilizing a panel survey of 6,840 science & engineering doctoral students at 39 R1 research universities, this study shows that entrepreneurship is widely encouraged across university research labs, ranging from 54% in biomedical engineering to 18% in particle physics, while only a small share of labs openly discoura...

  1. Applying Modern Stage Theory to Mauritania: A Prescription to Encourage Entrepreneurship

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    STAGE THEORY TO MAURITANIA: A PRESCRIPTION TO ENCOURAGE ENTREPRENEURSHIP by Jennifer M. Warren December 2014 Thesis Advisor: Robert E...PRESCRIPTION TO ENCOURAGE ENTREPRENEURSHIP 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Jennifer M. Warren 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval...a chapter in which Dr. Looney relates modern stage theory to emerging economies. With an understanding that entrepreneurship is key for sustained

  2. Encouraging entrepreneurship in university labs: Research activities, research outputs, and early doctorate careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates how the encouragement of entrepreneurship within university research labs relates with research activities, research outputs, and early doctorate careers. Utilizing a panel survey of 6,840 science & engineering doctoral students at 39 R1 research universities, this study shows that entrepreneurship is widely encouraged across university research labs, ranging from 54% in biomedical engineering to 18% in particle physics, while only a small share of labs openly discourage entrepreneurship, from approximately 3% in engineering to approximately 12% in the life sciences. Within fields, there is no difference between labs that encourage entrepreneurship and those that do not with respect to basic research activity and the number of publications. At the same time, labs that encourage entrepreneurship are significantly more likely to report invention disclosures, particularly in engineering where such labs are 41% more likely to disclose inventions. With respect to career pathways, PhDs students in labs that encourage entrepreneurship do not differ from other PhDs in their interest in academic careers, but they are 87% more likely to be interested in careers in entrepreneurship and 44% more likely to work in a startup after graduation. These results persist even when accounting for individuals’ pre-PhD interest in entrepreneurship and the encouragement of other non-academic industry careers. PMID:28178270

  3. Encouraging entrepreneurship in university labs: Research activities, research outputs, and early doctorate careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Michael

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates how the encouragement of entrepreneurship within university research labs relates with research activities, research outputs, and early doctorate careers. Utilizing a panel survey of 6,840 science & engineering doctoral students at 39 R1 research universities, this study shows that entrepreneurship is widely encouraged across university research labs, ranging from 54% in biomedical engineering to 18% in particle physics, while only a small share of labs openly discourage entrepreneurship, from approximately 3% in engineering to approximately 12% in the life sciences. Within fields, there is no difference between labs that encourage entrepreneurship and those that do not with respect to basic research activity and the number of publications. At the same time, labs that encourage entrepreneurship are significantly more likely to report invention disclosures, particularly in engineering where such labs are 41% more likely to disclose inventions. With respect to career pathways, PhDs students in labs that encourage entrepreneurship do not differ from other PhDs in their interest in academic careers, but they are 87% more likely to be interested in careers in entrepreneurship and 44% more likely to work in a startup after graduation. These results persist even when accounting for individuals' pre-PhD interest in entrepreneurship and the encouragement of other non-academic industry careers.

  4. Encouraging entrepreneurship in university labs: Research activities, research outputs, and early doctorate careers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Roach

    Full Text Available This paper investigates how the encouragement of entrepreneurship within university research labs relates with research activities, research outputs, and early doctorate careers. Utilizing a panel survey of 6,840 science & engineering doctoral students at 39 R1 research universities, this study shows that entrepreneurship is widely encouraged across university research labs, ranging from 54% in biomedical engineering to 18% in particle physics, while only a small share of labs openly discourage entrepreneurship, from approximately 3% in engineering to approximately 12% in the life sciences. Within fields, there is no difference between labs that encourage entrepreneurship and those that do not with respect to basic research activity and the number of publications. At the same time, labs that encourage entrepreneurship are significantly more likely to report invention disclosures, particularly in engineering where such labs are 41% more likely to disclose inventions. With respect to career pathways, PhDs students in labs that encourage entrepreneurship do not differ from other PhDs in their interest in academic careers, but they are 87% more likely to be interested in careers in entrepreneurship and 44% more likely to work in a startup after graduation. These results persist even when accounting for individuals' pre-PhD interest in entrepreneurship and the encouragement of other non-academic industry careers.

  5. Maternal Encouragement to Approach Novelty: A Curvilinear Relation to Change in Anxiety for Inhibited Toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiel, Elizabeth J; Premo, Julie E; Buss, Kristin A

    2016-04-01

    Various parenting behaviors (e.g., protection, intrusiveness, sensitivity) have been shown to impact young children's anxiety development, particularly for temperamentally inhibited children. These behaviors have sometimes predicted both increases and decreases in anxiety in inhibited children, suggesting that linear relations may not adequately model their influence. In the current study, we proposed the dimension of encouragement to approach novelty to characterize parenting behavior ranging from very little encouragement (i.e., protective behavior) to very strong encouragement (i.e., intrusiveness), with gentle encouragement residing in the middle. In a sample of 110 toddlers (48 female, 62 male) and their mothers, the linear and curvilinear effects of this parenting dimension were investigated in relation to change in child separation anxiety and shyness from age 2 to age 3. Inhibited temperament was also investigated as a moderator. Encouragement to approach novelty displayed the hypothesized curvilinear relation to change in separation anxiety, but not shyness, at extreme levels of inhibited temperament. Toddlers increased in separation anxiety when mothers' encouragement resided at either extreme end of the continuum, with lower child anxiety occurring when mothers displayed behavior closer to the middle of the continuum. Implications for the study of parenting outcomes for inhibited toddlers are discussed.

  6. 30 CFR 903.700 - Arizona Federal program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Resources has jurisdiction over the mining of minerals, and oil and gas under Title 27 of the Arizona....700 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE ARIZONA § 903.700 Arizona Federal...

  7. 31 CFR 515.560 - Travel-related transactions to, from, and within Cuba by persons subject to U.S. jurisdiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., and within Cuba by persons subject to U.S. jurisdiction. 515.560 Section 515.560 Money and Finance... Licensing Policy § 515.560 Travel-related transactions to, from, and within Cuba by persons subject to U.S... guidelines with respect to Cuba or engaged in by U.S.-owned or -controlled foreign firms (general and...

  8. 28 CFR Appendix to Part 55 - Jurisdictions Covered Under Sections 4(f)(4) and 203(c) of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, as Amended

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... REGARDING LANGUAGE MINORITY GROUPS Pt. 55, App. Appendix to Part 55—Jurisdictions Covered Under Sections 4(f...)(4) and 203(c) of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, as Amended [Applicable language minority group(s... (Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Vietnamese), Spanish heritage. Merced County Spanish heritage Monterey County...

  9. Electricity subsidies in low-cost jurisdictions : the case of British Columbia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pineau, P.O.

    2008-01-01

    This article reviewed the concept of energy subsidies and estimated their significance to residential consumers in British Columbia. It cautioned that energy subsidies provided to electricity consumers create artificially low electricity prices that result in inefficient consumption levels to the detriment of the environment. An estimate of the indirect subsidies was presented along with an evaluation of potential consumption reduction scenarios if market prices were used. The author argued that subsidies, which are customary in developed countries where electricity use is high, tend to help higher-income households. An evaluation of the distribution of this subsidy across income groups showed that high-income households, which use more electricity than lower-income households, receive more than $500 per year in subsidy through regulated low electricity prices, whereas low-income households get approximately $200. This subsidy is estimated at $489 million per year in British Columbia. The author suggested that profits could be increased by $432 million by setting residential electricity prices nearer to the regional export price. This profit could be realized even after allowing for a direct transfer payment program that compensates low-income households for the higher prices. In addition, such a measure would reduce residential electricity consumption in the province by 25 per cent

  10. Human Sexuality Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claremont Univ. Center, CA.

    This program provides information to students about human sexual biology, behavior and attitudes. The primary intent of the workshops described is to provide fuller information and opportunity for self awareness to encourage participants to be more responsible as sexual beings, and to restructure their attitudes. The program presents the…

  11. Dimensions and intensity of inter-professional teamwork in primary care: evidence from five international jurisdictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, Jean-Frederic; Harris, Mark F; Scott, Cathie; Crabtree, Benjamin; Miller, William; Halma, Lisa M; Hogg, William E; Weenink, Jan-Willem; Advocat, Jenny R; Gunn, Jane; Russell, Grant

    2017-10-23

    Inter-professional teamwork in primary care settings offers potential benefits for responding to the increasing complexity of patients' needs. While it is a central element in many reforms to primary care delivery, implementing inter-professional teamwork has proven to be more challenging than anticipated. The objective of this study was to better understand the dimensions and intensity of teamwork and the developmental process involved in creating fully integrated teams. Secondary analyses of qualitative and quantitative data from completed studies conducted in Australia, Canada and USA. Case studies and matrices were used, along with face-to-face group retreats, using a Collaborative Reflexive Deliberative Approach. Four dimensions of teamwork were identified. The structural dimension relates to human resources and mechanisms implemented to create the foundations for teamwork. The operational dimension relates to the activities and programs conducted as part of the team's production of services. The relational dimension relates to the relationships and interactions occurring in the team. Finally, the functional dimension relates to definitions of roles and responsibilities aimed at coordinating the team's activities as well as to the shared vision, objectives and developmental activities aimed at ensuring the long-term cohesion of the team. There was a high degree of variation in the way the dimensions were addressed by reforms across the national contexts. The framework enables a clearer understanding of the incremental and iterative aspects that relate to higher achievement of teamwork. Future reforms of primary care need to address higher-level dimensions of teamwork to achieve its expected outcomes. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  12. How do markets encourage the adoption of sustainable practices? The role of institutional innovation in developing countries.

    OpenAIRE

    Loconto , Allison Marie; Vicovaro , Marcello; Santacoloma , Pilar; Poisot , Anne Sophie

    2016-01-01

    How do markets encourage the adoption of sustainable practices? The role of institutional innovation in developing countries.; How do markets encourage the adoption of sustainable practices? The role of institutional innovation in developing countries.

  13. “Above all, we must train teachers to encourage their students”:ecouragement in theory and practice

    OpenAIRE

    Ainesmaa, S. (Susanna)

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This research is a deductive, theory-oriented, narrative research that studies the topic of encouragement which as a topic was born out of my own experiences of encouraging and discouraging teachers. Encouragement is generally expected of teachers, but during my studies I have not gained much practical knowledge on how to actually implement it. One of the goals was to find how encouragement is defined by different ...

  14. Encouraging Competence in Basic Mathematics in Hydrology using The Math You Need

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrick, K. C.

    2011-12-01

    California University of Pennsylvania has experienced significant growth in interest of its Earth Science programs over the last few years. With the burgeoning shale gas exploration and drilling, along with continued environmental problems, students and parents recognize the potential for jobs in the region in the Geosciences. With this increase in student interest has come an increase in the number of majors including a greater number of first-year students entering the major right from high school. Hydrology, is an important course within the Earth Science department curriculum. It is required by all Geology, Meteorology, and Earth and Space Science Education majors. It also serves majors from the Biology program, but is not required. This mix of students based on major expectations, grade level, and background leads to a varied distribution of math competencies. Many students enter unprepared for the rigors of a physics-based Hydrology course. The pre-requisites for the course are Introduction to Geology, a mostly non-quantitative survey course, and College Algebra. However, some students are more confident in their math skills because they have completed some level of Calculus. Regardless of the students' perceived abilities, nearly all struggle early on in the course because they have never used math within the context of Hydrology (or Science for that matter) , including continuity, conservation, and fluid dynamics. In order to make sure students have the basic skills to understand the science, it has been necessary to dedicate significant class time to such topics as Unit Conversions, Scientific Notation, Significant Figures, and basic Graphing. The Math You Need (TMYN) is an online tool, which requires students to complete instructor-selected questions to assess student competence in fundamental math topics. Using Geology as the context for the questions in the database, TMYN is ideal for introductory-level courses, but can also be effective as a review

  15. Educational Encouragement, Parenting Styles, Gender and Ethnicity as Predictors of Academic Achievement among Special Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Aqeel; Ahmad, Roslee; Hamdan, Abdul Rahim; Mustaffa, Mohamed Sharif

    2014-01-01

    Current study examines the predictors of academic achievement: role of parenting styles, educational encouragement, gender and ethnicity among special education students. Participants of this study consisted 200 special education students (N = 105 boys and N = 95 girls) age varies 14 to 19 years from one school located at Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.…

  16. Minority Students of Color and the Psychology Graduate Pipeline: Disquieting and Encouraging Trends, 1989-2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maton, Kenneth I.; Kohout, Jessica L.; Wicherski, Marlene; Leary, George E.; Vinokurov, Andrey

    2006-01-01

    Trends since 1989 in the minority graduate pipeline in psychology are examined, with special focus on trends in recent years. Encouraging trends generally outweigh troubling ones at lower levels of the pipeline. However, in recent years disquieting trends dominate at the higher pipeline levels. Promising trends include a rise in the percentage (to…

  17. Tutoring Online Tutors: Using Digital Badges to Encourage the Development of Online Tutoring Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrastinski, Stefan; Cleveland-Innes, Martha; Stenbom, Stefan

    2018-01-01

    Online tutors play a critical role in e-learning and need to have an appropriate set of skills in addition to subject matter expertise. This paper explores how digital badges can be used to encourage the development of online tutoring skills. Based on previous research, we defined three digital badges, which are examples of essential tutoring…

  18. Using Audience Response Systems to Encourage Student Engagement and Reflection on Ethical Orientation and Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheletto, Melinda J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use an audience response system (ARS) to engage students in classroom discussions concerning sensitive and controversial topics (e.g., business ethics), assess student's ethical orientation and conduct in unethical behaviors, and encourage reflection on their personal level of ethicality. Students used ARS devices…

  19. Encouraging Engagement in Water Conservation: Can Trust from Extension Create Change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Brandon H.; Lamm, Alexa J.; Bunch, J. C.

    2017-01-01

    Extension educators seek to provide scientific research and perspective to farmers and the public. The connection that Extension educators foster between farmers and consumers can be capitalized upon to build trust and ultimately encourage behavior change through social capital. Agricultural educators have recognized the need for consumers and…

  20. The intrinsic features of Environmental Management Systems that facilitate adoption and encourage innovation in primary industries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carruthers, Genevieve; Vanclay, Frank

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the theoretical underpinnings of the adoption of innovations, and applies this knowledge to the uptake of Environmental Management Systems (EMS) amongst Australian farmers. We examine the specific features of the EMS process that might encourage or inhibit EMS adoption. We also

  1. Developing Critical Understanding in HRM Students: Using Innovative Teaching Methods to Encourage Deep Approaches to Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Michael J. R.; Reddy, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to focus on developing critical understanding in human resource management (HRM) students in Aston Business School, UK. The paper reveals that innovative teaching methods encourage deep approaches to study, an indicator of students reaching their own understanding of material and ideas. This improves student employability…

  2. How "ought" exceeds but implies "can": Description and encouragement in moral judgment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turri, John

    2017-11-01

    This paper tests a theory about the relationship between two important topics in moral philosophy and psychology. One topic is the function of normative language, specifically claims that one "ought" to do something. Do these claims function to describe moral responsibilities, encourage specific behavior, or both? The other topic is the relationship between saying that one "ought" to do something and one's ability to do it. In what respect, if any, does what one "ought" to do exceed what one "can" do? The theory tested here has two parts: (1) "ought" claims function to both describe responsibilities and encourage people to fulfill them (the dual-function hypothesis); (2) the two functions relate differently to ability, because the encouragement function is limited by the person's ability, but the descriptive function is not (the interaction hypothesis). If this theory is correct, then in one respect "ought implies can" is false because people have responsibilities that exceed their abilities. But in another respect "ought implies can" is legitimate because it is not worthwhile to encourage people to do things that exceed their ability. Results from two behavioral experiments support the theory that "ought" exceeds but implies "can." Results from a third experiment provide further evidence regarding an "ought" claim's primary function and how contextual features can affect the interpretation of its functions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Does Encouragement by Others Increase Rape Reporting? Findings from a National Sample of Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Lisa A.; Zinzow, Heidi M.; McCauley, Jenna L.; Kilpatrick, Dean G.; Resnick, Heidi S.

    2014-01-01

    Our study explores the role of victims' consultation with others about whether or not to report their rape to police. Three groups were observed within this sample of 435 rape victims from a national telephone household probability sample of women: those who did not consult with anyone about reporting (n = 364), those who consulted with someone and were encouraged to report to police (n = 40), and those who consulted with someone and were not encouraged to report (n = 31). Descriptive analyses indicated that the encouraged group was more likely to report to police than either of the other two groups (which did not differ from each other). Because there were no differences between the two consulting groups on demographic or rape-related variables, they were combined in subsequent analyses. Consulting with others about whether to report, peri-traumatic fear of injury or death, assault perpetration by a stranger, and concerns about contracting a sexually transmitted disease were significant predictors of reporting to police after controlling for other significant predictors in a multivariate regression analysis. Implications of these findings are discussed, including the benefits and consequences of formal rape reporting for victims, and the role that disclosure recipients may have in assisting victims post-rape (e.g., encouragement of reporting, emotional support). PMID:25431519

  4. [Development of the Coparental Regulation Inventory and cross-sectional analysis of mothers' encouragement and criticism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Michiyo; Kurosawa, Tai; Kamiya, Tetsuji

    2014-02-01

    We developed the Coparental Regulation Inventory to assess the regulatory behavior of the mothers in involving fathers with child rearing. We translated and modified the short form of the Parental Regulation Inventory (PRI) for Japanese couples in different stages of child rearing. An online questionnaire was conducted with mothers (n = 500) and fathers (n = 500) whose youngest child was less than 21-years-old. Exploratory factor analysis identified two factors, which were labeled "encouragement" and "criticism". The resulting Coparental Regulation Inventory (the modified PRI) had high internal consistency and test-retest reliability. The construct validity of the scale was supported by its correlation with parenting alliance, marital satisfaction, and the father's involvement. These findings suggest that the scale is an adequate instrument for identifying the behaviors of mothers related to coparenting. In addition, we examined the frequency of encouragement and criticism used by the mother in relation to the child-rearing stage using cross-sectional analysis. In the mothers' reports, mothers with infants and children encouraged fathers more than mothers with early and late adolescents. Mothers with late adolescents criticized fathers less than mothers with infants. In the fathers' reports, mothers gave more encouragement to fathers who had infants than at any other age, whereas the child's age was not related to mothers' criticism perceived by the fathers.

  5. Encouraging Lifelong Healthy Habits for a Positive Body Image in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Christine

    This article discusses issues related to body image in adolescents, explaining what school practitioners can do to encourage lifelong healthy habits that enhance body image. Body image is the picture of physical self carried in the mind's eye. This impression can have little resemblance to how a teen actually looks. Body image culturalization is…

  6. Encouraging Free Play: Extramural Digital Game-Based Language Learning as a Complex Adaptive System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Kyle

    2017-01-01

    Massively multiplayer online role-playing games like World of Warcraft are ideally suited to encourage and facilitate second language development (SLD) in the extramural setting, but to what extent do the language learners' actual trajectories of gameplay contribute to SLD? With the current propensity to focus research in digital game-based…

  7. An Exploration of Parental Encouragement as an Intervening Variable in Occupational Educational Learning of Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, R. Brooke

    1971-01-01

    Based upon data from a random sample of families a typology of Parental Encouragement (PE) techniques was tested and two predominant types were found. A three way" analysis using comparable data from both parents and the ninth grade son reveals considerably less than one to one" correspondence on reported PE attempts. (Author)

  8. [The role of the nurse in encouraging compliance in dialysis patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lethuillier, Valérie

    2010-05-01

    The impact of starting dialysis on patients with renal failure requires nurses to draw on their educational, pedagogical and interpersonal skills. It is important to monitor the patients in their daily lives to support them and encourage them to comply with their prescribed therapy.

  9. The Monte Carlo Quiz: Encouraging Punctual Completion and Deep Processing of Assigned Readings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernald, Peter S.

    2004-01-01

    The Monte Carlo Quiz (MCQ), a single-item quiz, is so named because chance, with the roll of a die, determines (a) whether the quiz is administered; (b) the specific article, chapter, or section of the assigned reading that the quiz covers; and (c) the particular question that makes up the quiz. The MCQ encourages both punctual completion and deep…

  10. Teaching Note--Using TED Talks in the Social Work Classroom: Encouraging Student Engagement and Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loya, Melody Aye; Klemm, Terri

    2016-01-01

    Focusing on TED Talks (online videos) as a resource for social work educators, this teaching note shares our ideas regarding the use of the online videos as an avenue for reaching students and encouraging discussions in the social work classroom. The article first explores the TED platform and then discusses using TED as a teaching tool. Finally,…

  11. Structures and Technology Encouraging Discussion in Human Sexuality Courses: Strategies to Engage a Range of Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angera, Jeffrey J.; Latty, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    Human sexuality courses are common across many college/university campuses. The methods of instruction typically encourage discussion to increase knowledge and critical thinking about self, relationships, and professional pathways. However, often the pedagogical practices do not include methods to draw out students with a range of personalities,…

  12. Nature and Young Children: Encouraging Creative Play and Learning in Natural Environments. Second Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Now in its second edition, "Nature and Young Children" promotes the holistic development of children by connecting them with nature. It offers advice and guidance on how to set up indoor and outdoor nature play spaces as well as encouraging environmentally responsible attitudes, values and behaviour in your early childhood setting. Covering topics…

  13. The CSI Academy: Encouraging Diverse Students to Consider Science Careers and Science Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Karen; Turner, John F.; Emigh, James

    2011-01-01

    The CSI academies employed a multi-layered, collaborative approach to encourage diverse students to consider STEM careers, including science teaching. The academies recruited a diverse group of high school students. This was due, in large part, to the creation of a unique selection process that identified students with unrealized potential. The…

  14. Educating for Critical Thinking: Thought-Encouraging Questions in a Community of Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golding, Clinton

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents one method for educating for critical thinking in Higher Education. It elaborates Richard Paul's method of Socratic questioning to show how students can learn to be critical thinkers. This method combines and uses the wider pedagogical and critical thinking literature in a new way: it emphasises a thinking-encouraging approach…

  15. How and Why We Should Encourage Undergraduate Geography Students to Participate in the Erasmus Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deakin, Hannah

    2013-01-01

    Studying or working abroad during the course of an undergraduate degree has been associated with many positive outcomes and benefits. Despite this, there is scant literature on the role higher education institution (HEIs) play in encouraging outgoing student mobility. There is subsequently limited practical guidance for individuals within HEIs…

  16. Encouraging Student Reflection and Articulation Using a Learning Companion: A Commentary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Bradley; Linton, Frank; Gaimari, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Our 1998 paper "Encouraging Student Reflection and Articulation using a Learning Companion" (Goodman et al. 1998) was a stepping stone in the progression of learning companions for intelligent tutoring systems (ITS). A simulated learning companion, acting as a peer in an intelligent tutoring environment ensures the availability of a…

  17. Encouraging Connections: Integrating Expressive Art and Drama into Therapeutic Social Skills Training with Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, A. Stephen; Holman, Rachel L.; Dominguez, Denise L.

    2010-01-01

    The effective use of social skills has been positively associated with career success, romantic involvement, academic achievement, and mood. In response, counselors often integrate social skills training into counseling interventions with adolescents to encourage authentic and effective interactions with others. We illustrate some therapeutic…

  18. Researchers and Institutions in the Periphery: Challenges in Measuring Research Capacity for Geographically Specific Programs in the U.S

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melkers, J.

    2016-07-01

    The U.S. research funding system supports two geographically targeted government programs designed to enhance the research capacity of less competitive states in seeking federal research funds. Program eligibility is based on a relatively narrow measures of overall jurisdiction research funding track record. Yet, in order to adequately measure and address improved capacity development in these areas, a more nuanced understanding of the research capacity in these settings is needed. While the metric of prior research funding metric may be useful in assigning jurisdictions program eligibility, they do not account for variations within or across these areas, nor for factors that may function differently in lower capacity regions. This paper addresses the particular institutional and social/human capital aspects of measuring and identifying research capacity in these regions. Institutional data are used to categorize institutions within and across eligible jurisdictions. Survey data are used to address capacity issues and factors relevant to capacity development at the researcher level. (Author)

  19. Cannabis Impairment in the Workplace: A Jurisdictional Analysis of Drug Testing Policies and Recommendations in the Context of Canadian Legalization and Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Van Pelt, Kelsey

    2017-01-01

    Cannabis impairment can affect safety in the workplace. However, the proposed Cannabis Act does not include a framework for cannabis impairment in the workplace, as workplace health and safety in Canada is a provincial jurisdiction for most industries. In British Columbia, workplace health and safety is regulated by the Occupational Health and Safety Regulations (OHSR) under the Workers Compensation Act (WCA). Part 4 – General Conditions of the OHSR contains regulations for impairment in the ...

  20. The role of express submission to jurisdiction under the Brussels I Regulation, Brussels I (Recast) and the Hague Convention on Choice of Court Agreements

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    LL.M. (International Commercial Law) This essay seeks to look at the role of express submission to jurisdictjon under the Brussels I Regulation,lthe Brussels I (recast) Regulation2 and the Hague Convention on Choice of Court Agreements.3 The express submission to jurisdiction under the three instruments mentioned in the previous sentence refers to the situation in which parties to an international commercial contract include in their contract a court of their choice to govern any disputes ...

  1. Mandatory Reporting Laws and Identification of Child Abuse and Neglect: Consideration of Differential Maltreatment Types, and a Cross-Jurisdictional Analysis of Child Sexual Abuse Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Mathews

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Mandatory reporting laws have been created in many jurisdictions as a way of identifying cases of severe child maltreatment on the basis that cases will otherwise remain hidden. These laws usually apply to all four maltreatment types. Other jurisdictions have narrower approaches supplemented by differential response systems, and others still have chosen not to enact mandatory reporting laws for any type of maltreatment. In scholarly research and normative debates about mandatory reporting laws and their effects, the four major forms of child maltreatment—physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional abuse, and neglect—are often grouped together as if they are homogenous in nature, cause, and consequence. Yet, the heterogeneity of maltreatment types, and different reporting practices regarding them, must be acknowledged and explored when considering what legal and policy frameworks are best suited to identify and respond to cases. A related question which is often conjectured upon but seldom empirically explored, is whether reporting laws make a difference in case identification. This article first considers different types of child abuse and neglect, before exploring the nature and operation of mandatory reporting laws in different contexts. It then posits a differentiation thesis, arguing that different patterns of reporting between both reporter groups and maltreatment types must be acknowledged and analysed, and should inform discussions and assessments of optimal approaches in law, policy and practice. Finally, to contribute to the evidence base required to inform discussion, this article conducts an empirical cross-jurisdictional comparison of the reporting and identification of child sexual abuse in jurisdictions with and without mandatory reporting, and concludes that mandatory reporting laws appear to be associated with better case identification.

  2. Independent Evaluators of Federal Programs: Approaches, Devices, and Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-16

    rehabilitation of the disorder; the status of studies and clinical trials involving innovative treatments; a description of each treatment program and a...Transit Administration ( FTA ), a part of the Department of Transportation (DOT), oversees the safety and security of rail transit agencies which...an oversight body for each jurisdiction. The program is designed, according to a GAO summary, “as one in which FTA , other federal agencies, states

  3. The AU Model Law on Universal Jurisdiction: An African Response to Western Prosecutions based on the Universality Principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Dube

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The African continent has been consistent in placing its concerns regarding the manner in which international criminal justice is administered on the international platform. For the past decade, the continent has minced no words about its misgivings concerning the use of universal jurisdiction (UJ by both foreign States and the International Criminal Court (ICC. The African Union (AU has been very supportive of UJ and its utility in fighting impunity and affording justice to victims of the core crimes of international law, namely, genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity. Often referred to as core crimes, these are regarded as customary law crimes which are an affront to entire humankind. These crimes were also codified by the Rome Statute of the ICC. However, the political and selective use of the principle of universality by foreign States to prosecute perpetrators of these crimes was seen as causing conflicts and undermining peace efforts, reconciliation and regional stability. As a result the African continent voiced its concerns at various public platforms, including under the auspices of the UN and it therefore called for reforms. This prompted the AU to produce its own model law on UJ, which African States could adapt to their own socio-political circumstances and legal context. The debates that ensued around UJ on the African continent offered African States a chance to contribute to the development of international law, especially on the rules concerning UJ. This paper analyses the interaction amongst African states that eventually led to the development of UJ regulations within their individual legal systems, and tries to determine if there is indeed an African signature in those legal rules.

  4. PRINCIPIOS DE COMPETENCIA JUDICIAL INTERNACIONAL Y DE PROTECCIÓN DEL MEDIO AMBIENTE Principles of international jurisdiction and environmental protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pía Moscoso Restovic

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available ¿Como se resuelve el problema de la objetivación del vínculo de conexión cuando intervienen daños civiles y daños ambientales? Es decir, ¿podemos sostener que el fuero "lugar del hecho dañoso" puede determinarse con independencia de los sujetos que intervienen? ¿Es relevante el principio favor laesi en los casos de daño ambiental? Proponemos abordar estos problemas desde la relación que existe entre los principios de Competencia Judicial Civil Internacional y los principios de protección del medioambiente. Así, advertiremos que la mayor o menor extensión del fuero "lugar del hecho dañoso", adquiere connotaciones especiales si interpretamos armónicamente los principios de competencia judicial internacional y los principios de protección internacional del medio ambiente. En efecto, la política de protección ambiental, constituye un "valor superior del ordenamiento", y por tanto incide directamente en el juicio razonabilidad que el juez debe realizar sobre el vínculo de conexión. Si bien abordamos el problema desde la experiencia europea, las conclusiones tendrán validez universal.How to solve the problem of objectivity in the link between the court and the action, when engaging civil damages and environmental damages? In other words ¿ can we argue that the place of the harmful event can be determined independently of the persons involved? ¿Is favor Iaesi principle relevant in cases of environmental damage? We propose analyze those problems through the connections between International Civil Jurisdiction principles and environmental protection principles. In fact, environmental protection policy constitutes a "superior value". Therefore it affects directly the judge opinion about the connection link. Our approach is European, but the findings have universal validity.

  5. Impact of modular training on tobacco control on the knowledge of health workers in two jurisdictions of northern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, S; Singh, R J; Tripathy, J P

    2015-01-01

    National Tobacco Control Programme was launched in India in year 2007-08. It was realized that community health workers can play an important role of agents for positive change to bring down the tobacco morbidity and mortality in the country. Keeping this in view, a health worker guide was developed by the Government of India, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (GOI) in collaboration with The Union South-East Asia (The Union) in the year 2010. The guide provides the information needed by the most basic level of health workers to effectively address the problem of tobacco use in the community. A modular training was conducted in two jurisdictions in India (namely, Chandigarh and Hamirpur (Himachal Pradesh)) to assess the usefulness of the guide as training material for community health workers in undertaking tobacco control activities at community and village levels. A total of 271 participants were trained, which included 133 from Chandigarh and 138 from Hamirpur. The pre and post-training assessment of knowledge of health worker was done. There was marked increase in post-test scores as compared to the pretest scores. The health workers scoring more than 60% increased from 40% in the pretest to over 80% in the post-test. Only three workers had a post-test score of less than 30% against 54 workers in the pretest. The understanding on tobacco control had increased significantly after the training in each group. It is strongly recommended that such training should be replicated to all community health workers across all the states in India.

  6. Numerical simulation of groundwater flow, resource optimization, and potential effects of prolonged drought for the Citizen Potawatomi Nation Tribal Jurisdictional Area, central Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryter, Derek W.; Kunkel, Christopher D.; Peterson, Steven M.; Traylor, Jonathan P.

    2015-08-13

    A hydrogeological study including two numerical groundwater-flow models was completed for the Citizen Potawatomi Nation Tribal Jurisdictional Area of central Oklahoma. One numerical groundwater-flow model, the Citizen Potawatomi Nation model, encompassed the jurisdictional area and was based on the results of a regional-scale hydrogeological study and numerical groundwater flow model of the Central Oklahoma aquifer, which had a geographic extent that included the Citizen Potawatomi Nation Tribal Jurisdictional Area. The Citizen Potawatomi Nation numerical groundwater-flow model included alluvial aquifers not in the original model and improved calibration using automated parameter-estimation techniques. The Citizen Potawatomi Nation numerical groundwater-flow model was used to analyze the groundwater-flow system and the effects of drought on the volume of groundwater in storage and streamflow in the North Canadian River. A more detailed, local-scale inset model was constructed from the Citizen Potawatomi Nation model to estimate available groundwater resources for two Citizen Potawatomi Nation economic development zones near the North Canadian River, the geothermal supply area and the Iron Horse Industrial Park.

  7. Political Jurisdiction Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  8. Political Jurisdiction Boundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  9. Small Cash Incentives Can Encourage Primary Care Visits By Low-Income People With New Health Care Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Cathy J; Neumark, David

    2017-08-01

    In a randomized controlled trial, we studied low-income adults newly covered by a primary care program to determine whether a cash incentive could encourage them to make an initial visit to a primary care provider. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of four groups: three groups whose members received $10 to complete a baseline survey during an interview and who were randomized to incentives of $50, $25, or $0 to visit their assigned primary care provider within six months after enrolling in the study; and a nonincentivized control group not contacted by the research team. Subjects in the $50 and $25 incentive groups were more likely to see a primary care provider (77 percent and 74 percent, respectively), compared to subjects in the $0 incentive group (68 percent). The effects of the intervention were about twice as large when we compared the proportions of subjects in the $50 and $25 incentive groups who visited their providers and the proportion in the nonincentivized group (61 percent). Cash incentive programs may steer newly covered low-income patients toward primary care, which could result in improved health outcomes and lower costs. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  10. Digital Game-Based Learning to Encourage Secondary Students to Purse STEM Related Careers Using Arecibo Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Correa, Z. M.; Lautenbach, J.; Franco-Diaz, E.; Raizada, S.; Ghosh, T.; Rivera-Valentín, E.; Ortiz, A.

    2017-12-01

    This project was developed to encourage secondary students to pursue STEM related careers through exposure to the interdisciplinary nature of the Arecibo Observatory (AO) in Puerto Rico. The idea for this project was initiated due to the NSF-funded Research Experience for Teachers (RET) Summer Program. The AO RET summer program allows teaching faculty from public schools to collaborate with scientist on their ongoing research or instrument development projects at the AO for five weeks. Subsequently, the research is disseminated among secondary students through several workshops and hands-on activities. Through the workshops and hands-on activities underrepresented secondary students will learn about the research conducted at the AO to study Earth's upper atmosphere, asteroids and other Solar System bodies, as well as stars and galaxies beyond. Afterwards, students will develop virtual worlds simulating the different AO facilities (Lidar Laboratory, Radio Telescope, Planetary Radar System, HF Facility, Visitor Center, among others) and showing their functions using digital game-based learning.

  11. Towards an Applied Gamification Model for Tracking, Managing, & Encouraging Sustainable Travel Behaviours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Wells

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we introduce a gamification model for encouraging sustainable multi-modal urban travel in modern European cities. Our aim is to provide a mechanism that encourages users to reflect on their current travel behaviours and to engage in more environmentally friendly activities that lead to the formation of sustainable, long-term travel behaviours. To achieve this our users track their own behaviours, set goals, manage their progress towards those goals, and respond to challenges. Our approach uses a point accumulation and level achievement metaphor to abstract from the underlying specifics of individual behaviours and goals to allow an extensible and flexible platform for behaviour management. We present our model within the context of the SUPERHUB project and platform.

  12. The advantages and disadvantages of encouraging consumerist notions of health care at two minor injury units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgeon, David

    2018-03-22

    Over the past four decades, UK governments have moved towards an increasingly pro-market model of healthcare provision. Under this system, patients are not only encouraged, but expected, to take increasing responsibility for healthcare decision-making and the risks that it might entail. This article investigate how and why patients make choices about their health care and how service providers help facilitate this. Between October 2014 and May 2015, the researcher was embedded as an emergency nurse practitioner at two minor injury units in order to undertake direct and participant observation. During this time, 40 patients, 17 service providers and 1 senior manager also consented to semi-structured interview. The findings suggest that patients should continue to be encouraged to make decisions about their health care, but only if they feel confident to do so. The challenge for service providers is to recognise when this is or is not appropriate and tailor interaction accordingly.

  13. Positive expectations encourage generalization from a positive intergroup interaction to outgroup attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, Matthew P; Hehman, Eric; Gaertner, Samuel L; Dovidio, John F

    2015-01-01

    The current research reveals that while positive expectations about an anticipated intergroup interaction encourage generalization of positive contact to outgroup attitudes, negative expectations restrict the effects of contact on outgroup attitudes. In Study 1, when Blacks and Whites interacted with positive expectations, interaction quality predicted outgroup attitudes to a greater degree than when groups interacted with negative expectations. When expectations (Studies 2 and 3) and the actual interaction quality (Study 4) were manipulated orthogonally, negative expectations about the interaction predicted negative outgroup attitudes, regardless of actual interaction quality. By contrast, participants holding positive expectations who experienced a positive interaction expressed positive outgroup attitudes, whereas when they experienced a negative interaction, they expressed outgroup attitudes as negative as those with negative expectations. Across all four studies, positive expectations encouraged developing outgroup attitudes consistent with interaction quality. © 2014 by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc.

  14. Four simple recommendations to encourage best practices in research software [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael C. Jiménez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Scientific research relies on computer software, yet software is not always developed following practices that ensure its quality and sustainability. This manuscript does not aim to propose new software development best practices, but rather to provide simple recommendations that encourage the adoption of existing best practices. Software development best practices promote better quality software, and better quality software improves the reproducibility and reusability of research. These recommendations are designed around Open Source values, and provide practical suggestions that contribute to making research software and its source code more discoverable, reusable and transparent. This manuscript is aimed at developers, but also at organisations, projects, journals and funders that can increase the quality and sustainability of research software by encouraging the adoption of these recommendations.

  15. An Approach to Transmetatarsal Amputation to Encourage Immediate Weightbearing in Diabetic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales, Michael B; Heurich, Maureen E; Mandela, Ashley M; Razzante, Mark C

    Transmetatarsal amputation remains the standard treatment for the unsalvageable diabetic forefoot; however, this operation is often complicated by wound dehiscence, ulceration, and the need for additional surgery and tendon balancing. The technique described in the present report provides an uncomplicated suturing method for closure of a standard transmetatarsal amputation. A drill hole is created through the first, second, and fourth metatarsals, which facilitates added stability to the plantar flap of the residual metatarsals. The patients are encouraged to begin protected weightbearing as early as the first postoperative day. The security of the flap promotes immediate weightbearing, which could result in fewer postoperative complications of transmetatarsal amputations. Early weightbearing will not only encourage tendon rebalancing, but also could improve angiogenesis through capillary ingrowth. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Encouraging tobacco control using national multisectoral ministerial mandate and priorities in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farrukh Qureshi

    2018-03-01

    In countries having strong tobacco industry influence, tobacco control issue needs to be brought forward within larger policy mandates of non-health sector ministries, using their national priorities. Intergovernmental organizations as well as other partners and organizations working on tobacco control should expand reach out to sectors beyond health, establish and encourage dialogue; and help develop ownership of these sectors on specific policy interventions that directly or indirectly support implementation of key policy measures for tobacco control.

  17. Encouraging ethical considerations - One important task for a national co-ordinator for nuclear waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soederberg, O.

    1999-01-01

    The paper is a brief description of the role and tasks of the Swedish National Co-ordinator for Nuclear Waste Disposal with special regard to one of his activities encouraging ethical considerations in the nuclear waste management issue. Examples are given of ethical considerations which have emerged during discussions among representatives of municipalities which are affected by the current search for a site for a deep geological repository in Sweden for spent nuclear fuel

  18. An instructional intervention to encourage effective deep collaborative learning in undergraduate veterinary students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosa, Deep K; Volet, Simone E; Bolton, John R

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, veterinary education has received an increased amount of attention directed at the value and application of collaborative case-based learning. The benefit of instilling deep learning practices in undergraduate veterinary students has also emerged as a powerful tool in encouraging continued professional education. However, research into the design and application of instructional strategies to encourage deep, collaborative case-based learning in veterinary undergraduates has been limited. This study focused on delivering an instructional intervention (via a 20-minute presentation and student handout) to foster productive, collaborative case-based learning in veterinary education. The aim was to instigate and encourage deep learning practices in a collaborative case-based assignment and to assess the impact of the intervention on students' group learning. Two cohorts of veterinary students were involved in the study. One cohort was exposed to an instructional intervention, and the other provided the control for the study. The instructional strategy was grounded in the collaborative learning literature and prior empirical studies with veterinary students. Results showed that the intervention cohort spent proportionally more time on understanding case content material than did the control cohort and rated their face-to-face discussions as more useful in achieving their learning outcomes than did their control counterparts. In addition, the perceived difficulty of the assignment evolved differently for the control and intervention students from start to end of the assignment. This study provides encouraging evidence that veterinary students can change and enhance the way they interact in a group setting to effectively engage in collaborative learning practices.

  19. Just-in-Time Technology to Encourage Incremental, Dietary Behavior Change

    OpenAIRE

    Intille, Stephen S.; Kukla, Charles; Farzanfar, Ramesh; Bakr, Waseem

    2003-01-01

    Our multi-disciplinary team is developing mobile computing software that uses “just-in-time” presentation of information to motivate behavior change. Using a participatory design process, preliminary interviews have helped us to establish 10 design goals. We have employed some to create a prototype of a tool that encourages better dietary decision making through incremental, just-in-time motivation at the point of purchase.

  20. Just-in-Time Technology to Encourage Incremental, Dietary Behavior Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intille, Stephen S.; Kukla, Charles; Farzanfar, Ramesh; Bakr, Waseem

    2003-01-01

    Our multi-disciplinary team is developing mobile computing software that uses “just-in-time” presentation of information to motivate behavior change. Using a participatory design process, preliminary interviews have helped us to establish 10 design goals. We have employed some to create a prototype of a tool that encourages better dietary decision making through incremental, just-in-time motivation at the point of purchase. PMID:14728379

  1. Targeting carbonic anhydrase to treat diabetic retinopathy: Emerging evidences and encouraging results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiwei, Zhang [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, HuaShan Hospital, Institute of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, No. 12 Wulumuqi Road, Shanghai 200040 (China); Hu, Renming, E-mail: taylorzww@gmail.com [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, HuaShan Hospital, Institute of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, No. 12 Wulumuqi Road, Shanghai 200040 (China)

    2009-12-18

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of vision loss among working-age populations in developed countries. Current treatment options are limited to tight glycemic, blood pressure control and destructive laser surgery. Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are a group of enzymes involving in the rapid conversion of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate and protons. Emerging evidences reveal CA inhibitors hold the promise for the treatment of DR. This article summarizes encouraging results from clinical and animal studies, and reviews the possible mechanisms.

  2. Targeting carbonic anhydrase to treat diabetic retinopathy: Emerging evidences and encouraging results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiwei, Zhang; Hu, Renming

    2009-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of vision loss among working-age populations in developed countries. Current treatment options are limited to tight glycemic, blood pressure control and destructive laser surgery. Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are a group of enzymes involving in the rapid conversion of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate and protons. Emerging evidences reveal CA inhibitors hold the promise for the treatment of DR. This article summarizes encouraging results from clinical and animal studies, and reviews the possible mechanisms.

  3. How do brochures encourage walking in natural environments in the UK? A content analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Elliott, LR; White, MP; Taylor, AH; Abraham, C

    2016-01-01

    Although walking for leisure can support health, there has been little systematic attempt to consider how recreational walking is best promoted. In the UK, local authorities create promotional materials for walking networks, but little is known about whether they effectively encourage walking through persuasive messaging. Many of these materials pertain to walks in natural environments which evidence suggests are generally visited less frequently by physically inactive individuals. Consequent...

  4. Which electricity market design to encourage the development of demand response?

    OpenAIRE

    Vincent Rious, Fabien Roques and Yannick Perez

    2012-01-01

    Demand response is a cornerstone problem in electricity markets under climate change constraint. Most liberalized electricity markets have a poor track record at encouraging the deployment of smart meters and the development of demand response. In Europe, different models are considered for demand response, from a development under a regulated regime to a development under competitive perspectives. In this paper, focusing on demand response and smart metering for mid-size and small consumers,...

  5. Which electricity market design to encourage the development of demand response?

    OpenAIRE

    Rious , Vincent; Perez , Yannick; Roques , Fabien

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Demand response is a cornerstone problem in electricity markets under climate change constraints. Most liberalized electricity markets have a poor track record at encouraging the deployment of smart meters and the development of demand response. In Europe, different models are considered for demand response, from a development under a regulated regime to a development under competitive perspectives. In this paper focusing on demand response and smart metering for mid-­...

  6. Carrots, sticks and apples - mechanisms to encourage the use of CPTED

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kruger, T

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available attended by representatives from other countries as well, including developing countries such as Chile and South Africa. This paper examines a number of mechanisms available to encourage the use of CPTED and support its effective implementation... was therefore spearheaded by research projects complimented by reports, publications and guideline documents. It did not include practical implementation projects, as was the case for instance in Chile. Although there are examples of interventions made...

  7. Needing a nudge: the effect of encouragement on submission rates and journal selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendling, Andrea; Brocato, Joseph

    2014-06-01

    Mentorship within academic institutions influences research productivity; no published studies have addressed whether encouragement on a national level would have similar effects. We studied whether contact by a journal's editorial board members would affect submission rates or journal selection by authors. Authors of potentially publishable conference materials presented at national conferences sponsored by the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine were randomized to receive an invitation to submit work to Family Medicine or to receive no contact. After 2 years, we surveyed authors regarding whether a manuscript had been attempted and, if completed, where it had been submitted and eventually published. A total of 345 submissions were reviewed, 72 met inclusion criteria, and 41 authors responded to the survey (57%). There were no differences in demographics, scholarly activity in general, or faculty status between study groups. There was no significant difference in whether manuscripts based on targeted projects had been written, completed, submitted, or published. There was a significant difference in where manuscripts were submitted with the inviting journal receiving proportionately more submissions from the group of authors that had been contacted (90% Contacted group, 43% No-Contact). Simple encouragement from editorial board members of a national peer-reviewed journal in the form of a single e-mail invitation did not increase the scholarly production of authors. Encouragement may, however, increase the likelihood that completed works are submitted to the inviting journal, which is a useful finding for journals interested in soliciting scholarly works of interest.

  8. Short-term effects of social encouragement on exercise behavior: insights from China's Wanbu network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liuan; Guo, Xitong; Wu, Tianshi; Lv, Lucheng; Zhang, Zhiwei

    2017-07-01

    The objective is to explore the short-term effects of social encouragement on exercise behavior in China. A longitudinal observational study. We collected longitudinal data on exercise and social interactions through public access to the Wanbu network, a large Chinese social network designed to encourage people to walk more. Our data set consisted of 5010 subjects who participated in the network between March 14, 2014, and September 4, 2015, and had at least one social interaction recorded. The data were analyzed using linear regression models relating the number of steps (NS) walked per day to the number of comments (NC), number of thumbs-up (NT), and number of posts (NP) received on the previous day, while adjusting for day of week, quarter of year, and a fixed or random subject effect, with or without a lag term (NS on the previous day) to account for serial correlation. We found that all three social interactions have positive effects on the next day's exercise level. The estimated effect sizes can be ordered as NT > NC > NP for each of the four models considered. The results also indicate that the participants walked less in the first quarter than in the other three quarters and more on weekdays than on weekends, with Monday being the most active day of a week. Social encouragement has positive short-term effects on exercise behavior. Copyright © 2017 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Cyclists' attitudes toward policies encouraging bicycle travel: findings from the Taupo Bicycle Study in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tin Tin, Sandar; Woodward, Alistair; Thornley, Simon; Langley, John; Rodgers, Anthony; Ameratunga, Shanthi

    2010-03-01

    Utility cycling provides substantial health, environmental and economic benefits. Despite a favourable trend in leisure-time cycling, cycling is infrequently used for everyday travel needs in New Zealand. This study investigated cyclists' attitudes toward environmental and policy measures that would encourage them to cycle more, particularly for a trip to work. A cross-sectional analysis was undertaken using baseline data obtained from the Taupo Bicycle Study, a web-based longitudinal study. The study population comprised 2469 cyclists, aged 16 years or over, who had enrolled in the 2006 Wattyl Lake Taupo Cycle Challenge. The majority (88%) reported the provision of bicycle lanes as an important factor that would encourage them to cycle more often, followed by bicycle paths (76%), better bicycle security (64%), reduced motor vehicle speed (55%) and bike friendly public transport (38%). Of those who reported travelling to work at least once a week (N = 2223), varying proportions reported shower facilities at work (61%), fewer difficult intersections (43%), rising fuel costs (41%), fewer car parks (27%), bike designed to commute (26%) and rising cost of car parking (25%) as important factors that would encourage them to cycle to work more often. There were important differences in these perceived influences defined by the participants' socio-demographic characteristics and current cycling habits.

  10. William L. Wolfe, 1989 President of SPIE, encourages scientists from Eastern Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmit, Joanna

    2012-10-01

    In 1990 Professor Wolfe after his SPIE presidency trekked the world, even making it as far as post-communist Poland, to see (in the visible and maybe in infrared - who knows) the work of optical scientists hidden behind the iron curtain. I am not sure if he was ready for how different that world was at this time, but for sure he was very inquisitive and eager to learn about the nuances of Poland right after the fall of communism. He met, visited with and encouraged young and old scientists from Poland, Russia, Hungary and Lithuania to add their expertise to the scientific conversations happening in the West. His mission in Poland was to invite us all, and he was ready to help us achieve our dreams. I was one of those he encouraged. This talk is my personal reflection of Professor Wolfe as an encouraging and sometimes brave SPIE pioneer - a stranger in a strange land - and as an energetic, caring SPIE president, Optical Sciences professor and human being. Disclaimer: Professor Bill Wolfe's contributions to the field of radiometry are well known and very well recognized. This conference is a tribute to him. However, my paper is not on radiometry; rather, I wish to illustrate the adventurous, caring and positive Bill Wolfe that helped me find my way to the American desert Southwest.

  11. Empowerment Zones and Enterprise Districts, Municipal Service Area - area defined by Ordinance that provides for the City jurisdiction related to development and future growth, Published in 2009, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, City of Topeka Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Empowerment Zones and Enterprise Districts dataset current as of 2009. Municipal Service Area - area defined by Ordinance that provides for the City jurisdiction...

  12. C++ how to program

    CERN Document Server

    Deitel, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    This best-selling comprehensive text is aimed at readers with little or no programming experience. It teaches programming by presenting the concepts in the context of full working programs and takes an early-objects approach. The authors emphasize achieving program clarity through structured and object-oriented programming, software reuse and component-oriented software construction. The Ninth Edition encourages students to connect computers to the community, using the Internet to solve problems and make a difference in our world. All content has been carefully fine-tuned in response to a team of distinguished academic and industry reviewers.

  13. Understanding how dogs encourage and motivate walking: cross-sectional findings from RESIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Westgarth

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many people live with dogs but not all walk with them regularly. This study examines the demographic and behavioural factors that contribute towards owners reporting having a strong sense of encouragement and motivation to walk provided by their dogs, which we call ‘the Lassie effect’. Methods Data was collected from 629 dog owners participating in the RESIDE cross-sectional survey in Perth, Western Australia. Multivariable logistic regression analyses of factors associated with two separate outcome survey items ‘Dog encouragement to walk’ (how often dog encouraged me to go walking in last month and ‘Dog motivation to walk’ (Having a dog makes me walk more. Results Owning a larger dog; having an increased level of attachment to dog; knowing dog enjoys going for a walk; believing walking keeps dog healthy; and having high social support from family to go walking, were positively associated with both outcomes ‘dog encouragement to walk’ and ‘dog motivation to walk’. Conversely, reporting the presence of children at home; that the child is the main person who walks with the dog; and perceiving dog-specific barriers to walking with dog daily; were negatively associated with both outcomes. In addition, ‘Dog motivation to walk’ only was positively associated with a belief walking reduces barking, and negatively with owning a dog that is overweight or a dog that is too old/sick. Reporting that the spouse/partner is main person who walks with the dog was also negatively associated with ‘dog motivation to walk’, as was increased perceived access to public open spaces with dog-supportive features. Conclusions There are both dog and owner factors that are associated with an owner’s sense of encouragement, and motivation to walk the dog, which in turn has been found to be associated with dog waking behaviour. These factors may be targeted in future interventions to increase and maintain physical activity

  14. Neuro-Linguistic Programming and Altered States: Encouraging Preparation for Learning in the Classroom for Students with Special Educational Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudliskis, Voldis

    2013-01-01

    In seeking to identify the processes associated with the immediate engagement of learning for students with mild special educational needs, this study examined the responses of an extraction group (n = 7) of 11- to 13-year-old students who participated in a number of lessons in which the opening episode involved the use of visualisation techniques…

  15. 30 CFR 872.26 - What are minimum program make up funds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are minimum program make up funds? 872.26 Section 872.26 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... your jurisdiction. (c) We will make funds available to the States of Missouri and Tennessee under this...

  16. 28 CFR 66.25 - Program income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Program income. 66.25 Section 66.25... Administration § 66.25 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees for services performed, from the use or rental of real...

  17. 45 CFR 1174.25 - Program income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Program income. 1174.25 Section 1174.25 Public....25 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees for services performed, from the use or rental of real or...

  18. 20 CFR 437.25 - Program income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Program income. 437.25 Section 437.25....25 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees for services performed, from the use or rental of real or...

  19. 44 CFR 13.25 - Program income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Program income. 13.25 Section... LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 13.25 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees...

  20. 45 CFR 2541.250 - Program income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Program income. 2541.250 Section 2541.250 Public... Post-Award Requirements § 2541.250 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees for services performed, from the...

  1. 36 CFR 1207.25 - Program income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Program income. 1207.25... GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 1207.25 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees for...

  2. 40 CFR 31.25 - Program income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Program income. 31.25 Section 31.25... Requirements Financial Administration § 31.25 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees for services performed, from the...

  3. 38 CFR 43.25 - Program income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Program income. 43.25... Requirements Financial Administration § 43.25 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees for services performed, from the...

  4. 29 CFR 1470.25 - Program income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Program income. 1470.25 Section 1470.25 Labor Regulations... Financial Administration § 1470.25 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees for services performed, from the use or...

  5. 29 CFR 97.25 - Program income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Program income. 97.25 Section 97.25 Labor Office of the... LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 97.25 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees...

  6. 45 CFR 1183.25 - Program income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Program income. 1183.25 Section 1183.25 Public....25 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees for services performed, from the use or rental of real or...

  7. 24 CFR 85.25 - Program income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Program income. 85.25 Section 85.25... TRIBAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 85.25 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees...

  8. 21 CFR 1403.25 - Program income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Program income. 1403.25 Section 1403.25 Food and....25 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees for services performed, from the use of rental of real or...

  9. 14 CFR 1273.25 - Program income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Program income. 1273.25 Section 1273.25... Administration § 1273.25 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees for services performed, from the use or rental of real...

  10. 10 CFR 600.225 - Program income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Program income. 600.225 Section 600.225 Energy DEPARTMENT....225 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees for services performed, from the use or rental of real or...

  11. 45 CFR 602.25 - Program income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Program income. 602.25 Section 602.25 Public... Requirements § 602.25 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees for services performed, from the use or rental of real...

  12. 43 CFR 12.65 - Program income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Program income. 12.65 Section 12.65 Public... to State and Local Governments Post-Award Requirements § 12.65 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees for...

  13. 45 CFR 92.25 - Program income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Program income. 92.25 Section 92.25 Public Welfare... Administration § 92.25 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees for services performed, from the use or rental of real...

  14. 32 CFR 33.25 - Program income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Program income. 33.25 Section 33.25 National... Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 33.25 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees for services...

  15. 15 CFR 24.25 - Program income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Program income. 24.25 Section 24.25... Administration § 24.25 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees for services performed, from the use or rental of real...

  16. 7 CFR 3016.25 - Program income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Program income. 3016.25 Section 3016.25 Agriculture... GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 3016.25 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees for...

  17. Word By Word: A Mobile Game To Encourage Collaborative Storytelling Within The Museum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingimundardottir, Elin; Stanciauskaite, Greta; Sachse, Kristoffer Kjul

    2018-01-01

    design, our research provides insights into which mobile interface design factors could inhibit or enhance a collaborative storytelling experience, and how a mobile game could be used to support a meaningful social museum experience by encouraging visitors to construct their own personal interpretations......This paper presents Word by Word—a mobile game that allows visitors to personalize and share their experience by allowing them to construct and continue each other's stories based on the objects that they observe within the museum. The objective of the game’s concept and development...

  18. Game-Based Methods to Encourage EFL Learners to Transition to Autonomous Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine Berger

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a work in progress in which we aim to encourage EFL students to take their learning beyond the classroom in order to experience English in different ways. Inspired by what is being done at the Quest to Learn middle and high school in New York City and ChicagoQuest (Institute of Play, 2014b our idea involves conducting an action research project in order to find out if game-like learning techniques, modified and adapted to the needs of university-aged EFL learners in Ecuador will help to increase motivation and independent learning for our students.

  19. Tax policy as a lifeline: encouraging blood and organ donation through tax credits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clamon, Joseph B

    2008-01-01

    This article, the second concerning the organ donation crisis, proposes the use of tax policy to encourage blood and organ donation. After critiquing the ethical and logistical problems posed by other commercial and non-commercial solutions, the author demonstrates how tax credits can be used as an effective and ethical solution to address the shortage of donors. The author also offers two model statutes that provide guidance as to how a nonrefundable tax credit for blood and organ donation might operate in the tax code.

  20. Influencing Factors for Developing Managerial Behaviours That Encourage a Work-Family Culture in the University Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Dolores Álvarez-Pérez

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article develops and tests a theoretical model to find out which factors influence the behaviour of supervisors in terms of promoting a work-family culture. This model explains to what extent the factors studied are relevant to encourage deans to promote this type of culture at Spanish universities. The hypotheses were tested using linear regression analysis. Data were obtained through a questionnaire to deans. The results yield five key factors: (1 the personal work-family conflict of managers; (2 the transformational leadership style of managers; (3 the identification with subordinates in need of work-family cares; (4 the perceived institutional support; and (5 the perceived support from other supervisors in the centre. The findings have practical implications for human resources management (HRM practices. Human resources management practices such as (a providing deans and other supervisors with training about the importance of work-family programs; (b promoting deans’ training in order to develop transformational leadership skills; or (c increasing institutional support can be useful when implementing a work-family culture in Spanish universities.