WorldWideScience

Sample records for program encompasses experiments

  1. On the effects of a workplace fitness program upon pain perception: a case study encompassing office workers in a Portuguese context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Angela C; Trindade, Carla S; Brito, Ana P; Socorro Dantas, M

    2011-06-01

    INTRODUCTION Office workers share several behavioural patterns: they work seated without moving for long times, they use only a few specific muscles of their arms, wrists and hands, and they keep an overall poor body posture. These working patterns generate musculoskeletal disorders, and produce discomfort or pain. Implementation of a work fitness program is thus a low-cost strategy to reduce/prevent body pain derived from work. The aim of this study was to test the benefits of a workplace fitness program, specifically applied to an administrative department of a Portuguese enterprise. Recall that this type of primary prevention level of musculoskeletal disorders has been seldom applied in Portugal, so this research effort materialized an important contribution to overcome such a gap. METHODS The participants in this study were office workers (n = 29 in the study group, and n = 21 in the control group)-who consistently had reported pain mostly on their back side (neck, posterior back, and dorsal and lumbar zones), wrists and posterior legs. The workplace fitness program consisted of three sessions per week during an 8-month period, with 15 min per session; emphasis was on stretching exercises for the body regions most affected by workers' pain perception. Each participant was requested to point out the injured region, as well as the intensity of pain felt, by using a visual analogue scale. Statistical analyses of the perceived pain data from control and study groups resort to non-parametric hypothesis tests. RESULTS There was a strong evidence that the workplace fitness program applied was effective in reducing workers' pain perception for their posterior back, dorsal and lumbar zones, and for their right wrist (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS These results generated are rather promising, so they may efficiently serve as an example for other enterprises in that country-while raising awareness on the important issue of quality of life at the workplace.

  2. The Skylab experiment program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, W. C.; Green, W. D., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Description of planned Skylab experiments in the general fields of life sciences, solar physics, earth observations, astrophysics, engineering, and technology. Each experiment is outlined in terms of its specific purpose, supporting hardware, relevant functions to be performed by an astronaut, and data recovery measures. Major support facilities described include the scientific airlock, the articulated mirror system, the extendable boom, and the film vault.

  3. Educational NASA Computational and Scientific Studies (enCOMPASS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memarsadeghi, Nargess

    2013-01-01

    engineering applications to computer science and applied mathematics university classes, and makes NASA objectives part of the university curricula. There is great potential for growth and return on investment of this program to the point where every major university in the U.S. would use at least one of these case studies in one of their computational courses, and where every NASA scientist and engineer facing a computational challenge (without having resources or expertise to solve it) would use enCOMPASS to formulate the problem as a case study, provide it to a university, and get back their solutions and ideas.

  4. Random Experiment Program Resource Impact (REPRI) program: User's manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pease, W. T.; Alford, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    A complete user and programmer guide for the REPRI program is presented. This program was developed to perform mission concept, subsystem capability, and experiment support compatibility studies for a space station. The program utilizes Monte Carlo techniques to randomly schedule events in discrete intervals. Resources, logistics, cost, and space station volume are considered.

  5. Experiments Program for NASA's Space Communications Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelmins, David; Reinhart, Richard

    2012-01-01

    NASA developed a testbed for communications and navigation that was launched to the International Space Station in 2012. The testbed promotes new software defined radio (SDR) technologies and addresses associated operational concepts for space-based SDRs, enabled by this first flight of NASA's Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) architecture standard. The experiments program consists of a mix of in-house and external experiments from partners in industry, academia, and government. The experiments will investigate key challenges in communications, networking, and global positioning system navigation both on the ground and on orbit. This presentation will discuss some of the key opportunities and challenges for the testbed experiments program.

  6. From Balancing the Numbers to an Encompassing Business Case

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Labucay, Inéz

    2013-01-01

    , Diversity measurement) are presented in more detail, followed by a summary and conclusion on its applicability and relevance for diversity practitioners. An outlook on further research ensues. The paper aims at delineating an approach to building a more encompassing Business Case.......The Business Case of Diversity Management has evolved as the predominant concept underlying many diversity studies and practices in the field. In this line of reasoning, corporate bottom line results like an increased return on investment (ROI) are partially explained by the existence of Diversity...... Management programs that aim at increasing both customer retention and employee performance. This rationale tends to overestimate the process gains and at the same time to underestimate the process losses in the face of mixed evidence on the link between diversity and performance (Kochan 2003; Horwitz...

  7. Beginning the Program. Project DEEP (Diversified Educational Experiences Program).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connett, Jane; And Others

    Project DEEP (Diversified Educational Experience Program) was developed to improve the behavior and attitudes of secondary students in schools where dropouts, absenteeism, and poor attitudes are existing problems. The open classroom with student involvement and participation in goal setting, presentation, and evaluation is the basic concept of…

  8. Wilderness Experience Program. Final Evaluation Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, Richard Owen

    The Wilderness Experience is an innovative, experiential program under New Mexico's Statewide Forensic Treatment System for mentally disordered first offenders and those soon to be released on parole or probation. Developed from the concepts of Outward Bound, criminal offenders undergo an intensive 17-21 day confrontation with their physical,…

  9. The Laser Communications Relay Demonstration Experiment Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, David J.; Edwards, Bernard L.; Moores, John D.; Piazzolla, Sabino; Merritt, Scott

    2017-01-01

    This paper elaborates on the Laser Communications Relay Demonstration (LCRD) Experiment Program, which will engage in a number of pre-determined experiments and also call upon a wide variety of experimenters to test new laser communications technology and techniques, and to gather valuable data. LCRD is a joint project between NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratory (MIT LL). LCRD will test the functionality in various settings and scenarios of optical communications links from a GEO (Geosynchronous Earth Orbit) payload to ground stations in Southern California and Hawaii over a two-year period following launch in 2019. The LCRD investigator team will execute numerous experiments to test critical aspects of laser communications activities over real links and systems, collecting data on the effects of atmospheric turbulence and weather on performance and communications availability. LCRD will also incorporate emulations of target scenarios, including direct-to-Earth (DTE) links from user spacecraft and optical relay providers supporting user spacecraft. To supplement and expand upon the results of these experiments, the project also includes a Guest Experimenters Program, which encourages individuals and groups from government agencies, academia and industry to propose diverse experiment ideas.

  10. Wilderness experience programs: A state-of-the-knowledge summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chad P. Dawson; Keith C. Russell

    2012-01-01

    One of the defining characteristics of Wilderness Experience Programs (WEPs) is the centrality of wilderness - settings, conditions, and characteristics - to the delivery of the program and the client or visitor experience. Wilderness Experience Programs have been classified into three types based on their primary program aim: education, personal growth, and therapy...

  11. Status of Pharmacy Practice Experience Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eccles, Dayl; Kwasnik, Abigail; Craddick, Karen; Heinz, Andrew K.; Harralson, Arthur F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To assess financial, personnel, and curricular characteristics of US pharmacy practice experiential education programs and follow-up on results of a similar survey conducted in 2001. Methods. Experiential education directors at 118 accredited US pharmacy colleges and schools were invited to participate in a blinded, Web-based survey in 2011. Aggregate responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics and combined with data obtained from the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy to assess program demographics, faculty and administrative organizational structure, and financial support. Results. The number of advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) sites had increased by 24% for medium, 50% for large, and 55% for very large colleges and schools. Introductory pharmacy practice experience (IPPE) sites outnumbered APPEs twofold. The average experiential education team included an assistant/associate dean (0.4 full-time equivalent [FTE]), a director (1.0 FTE), assistant/associate director (0.5 FTE), coordinator (0.9 FTE), and multiple administrative assistants (1.3 FTE). Most faculty members (63%-75%) were nontenure track and most coordinators (66%) were staff members. Estimated costs to operate an experiential education program represented a small percentage of the overall expense budget of pharmacy colleges and schools. Conclusion. To match enrollment growth, pharmacy practice experiential education administrators have expanded their teams, reorganized responsibilities, and found methods to improve cost efficiency. These benchmarks will assist experiential education administrators to plan strategically for future changes. PMID:24850934

  12. [Pneumonia: Regional experience with prevention programs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuchalin, A G; Onishchenko, G G; Kolosov, V P; Kurganova, O P; Tezikov, N L; Manakov, L G; Gulevich, M P; Perelman, Yu M

    to generalize the regional experience in implementing a package of organizational and methodical and antiepidemic measures for preventing pneumococcal infections. How the prevention programs were implemented using the materials and methods of the epidemiological and statistical monitoring of the incidence of pneumonia in the Amur Region was analyzed. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (Prevenar-13) and influenza vaccines were used for immunoprophylaxis against acute respiratory viral and pneumococcal infections. Information on the incidence of acute respiratory viral infections and pneumonia over time in the period 2010 to 2015 must be taken into account. Indicators and special criteria are used to evaluate the efficiency of vaccination. The comparative statistical analysis revealed the high efficiency of regional programs using the methods for immunoprophylaxis against pneumococcal infections: the vaccination prophylactic efficiency index in terms of the incidence of pneumonia might be as high as 75-100%. Pneumonia morbidity rates became 2.3 times lower in the vaccinated population of the region. The results of the investigation suggest that the Program for the clinical and epidemiological monitoring and prevention of community-acquired pneumonias, by using the vaccine against pneumococcal infection in the Amur Region, has a high medical and socioeconomic efficiency.

  13. Hawaii Ocean Mixing Experiment: Program Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Richard D.; Chao, Benjamin F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    It is becoming apparent that insufficient mixing occurs in the pelagic ocean to maintain the large scale thermohaline circulation. Observed mixing rates fall a factor of ten short of classical indices such as Munk's "Abyssal Recipe." The growing suspicion is that most of the mixing in the sea occurs near topography. Exciting recent observations by Polzin et al., among others, fuel this speculation. If topographic mixing is indeed important, it must be acknowledged that its geographic distribution, both laterally and vertically, is presently unknown. The vertical distribution of mixing plays a critical role in the Stommel Arons model of the ocean interior circulation. In recent numerical studies, Samelson demonstrates the extreme sensitivity of flow in the abyssal ocean to the spatial distribution of mixing. We propose to study the topographic mixing problem through an integrated program of modeling and observation. We focus on tidally forced mixing as the global energetics of this process have received (and are receiving) considerable study. Also, the well defined frequency of the forcing and the unique geometry of tidal scattering serve to focus the experiment design. The Hawaiian Ridge is selected as a study site. Strong interaction between the barotropic tide and the Ridge is known to take place. The goals of the Hawaiian Ocean Mixing Experiment (HOME) are to quantify the rate of tidal energy loss to mixing at the Ridge and to identify the mechanisms by which energy is lost and mixing generated. We are challenged to develop a sufficiently comprehensive picture that results can be generalized from Hawaii to the global ocean. To achieve these goals, investigators from five institutions have designed HOME, a program of historic data analysis, modeling and field observation. The Analysis and Modeling efforts support the design of the field experiments. As the program progresses, a global model of the barotropic (depth independent) tide, and two models of the

  14. Encompassing Sexual Medicine within Psychiatry: Pros and Cons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segraves, Robert Taylor

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This article examines the positive and negative aspects of psychiatry encompassing sexual medicine within its purview. Methods: MEDLINE searches for the period between 1980 to the present were performed with the terms "psychiatry," "sexual medicine," and "sexual dysfunction." In addition, sexual medicine texts were reviewed for chapters…

  15. Cultural Respect Encompassing Simulation Training: Being Heard About Health Through Broadband.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min-Yu Lau, Phyllis; Woodward-Kron, Robyn; Livesay, Karen; Elliott, Kristine; Nicholson, Patricia

    2016-04-26

    include language and cultural barriers. To address these disparities, culturally competent patient-centred care is increasingly recognised to be critical to improving care quality, patient satisfaction, patient compliance and patient outcomes. Yet there is a lack of quality in the teaching and learning of cultural competence in healthcare education curricula, particularly in rural settings where qualified trainers and resources can be limited. The Cultural Respect Encompassing Simulation Training (CREST) program offers opportunities to health professional students and practitioners to learn and develop communication skills with professionally trained culturally and linguistically diverse simulated patients who contribute their experiences and health perspectives. It has already been shown to contribute to health professionals' learning and is effective in improving cultural competency in urban settings. This study demonstrates that CREST when delivered via live video-streaming and simulation can achieve similar results in rural settings.

  16. Nephrology elective experience during medical residency: a national survey of US nephrology fellowship training program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Hitesh H; Adams, Nancy Day; Mattana, Joseph; Kadiyala, Aditya; Jhaveri, Kenar D

    2015-07-01

    Interest in nephrology careers continues to decline in the United States. The reasons for this declining interest are not fully understood but it is plausible that inadequate exposure to the full spectrum of what a career in nephrology encompasses may be part of the explanation. Inpatient-based nephrology electives have been a common venue for residents to gain exposure to nephrology but little is known regarding the details of such electives and how often they include outpatient experiences. We carried out a national survey of nephrology fellowship training program directors to obtain data on the content of nephrology elective experiences as well as their ideas on how to promote interest in the field. The survey revealed the majority of elective experiences to be either exclusively or heavily inpatient based, with only a small percentage having a substantial outpatient component, particularly in outpatient dialysis or transplantation. Training program directors felt that providing greater outpatient experiences to residents during elective rotations would be an effective means to promote interest in nephrology, along with structured faculty mentoring. Our findings suggest that current approaches to the nephrology elective experience are heavily inpatient-based and might benefit from incorporating much more of the rich spectrum of activities a career in nephrology entails. Hopefully such efforts can create and enhance interest in careers in nephrology and potentially begin a sustained reversal of an unfortunate and serious decline in interest.

  17. Graphical programming for pulse automated NMR experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belmonte, S.B. [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Oliveira, I.S.; Guimaraes, A.P. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1999-01-01

    We describe a software program designed to control a broadband pulse Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectrometer used in zero-field NMR studies of magnetic metals. The software is written in the graphical language LabVIEW. This type of programming allows modifications and the inclusion of new routines to be easily made by the non-specialist, without changing the basic structure of the program. The program corrects for differences in the gain of the two acquisition channels [U (phase) and V (quadrature)], and automatic baseline subtraction. We present examples of measurements of NMR spectra, spin-echo decay (T{sub 2}), and quadrupolar oscillations, performed in magnetic intermetallic compounds. (author)

  18. Alternative utility conservation program designs: an evaluation based on case study program experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreitler, V.

    1985-01-01

    Utilities around the nation are promoting residential conservation through a variety of program activities, ranging from customer education programs to financial incentive programs to direct installation programs. This report was undertaken to evaluate some of these alternative program designs, to compare their achievements against those of the RCS program, and to suggest program planning directions that seem most promising. Interviews with program managers were used to elucidate the rationale behind the alternative programs and to discuss program effectiveness. The experiences of nine utilities and one nonutility organization are reviewed. Program managers' opinions about RCS and their experiences with thirteen other programs are summarized. The effectiveness of the alternative program designs are compared and some implications for conservation program planning and implementation are highlighted.

  19. An all-encompassing study of an authentic court setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tina Paulsen

    Most professional interpreters and interpreting researchers probably see quality or "professiona¬lism" as the main goal of interpreting in general, but still there is no agreement within the inter¬preting community of how to define interpreting quality. Facing the fact that interpreting can...... necessarily be judged from a particular (subjective) perspective on the communicative event. In this paper I shall address the issue of interpreting quality in an all-encompassing perspective on an authentic Danish courtroom setting. The aim of the empirical case-based survey is unlike that of most existing...... studies which generally have taken either one particular perspective - that of inter¬preters, clients or users - or been experimental in nature - to investigate to which extent different users (judge, defence counsel, prosecutor and non-majority-language speaking user) in a specific courtroom setting...

  20. First experience of programming a court decision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey B. Polyakov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective Consideration of the computer program model for making a lawful and wellgrounded judicial act in order to reduce the times for making the court decision. Methods universal dialecticmaterialistic method which removes the contradictions of the professional training of judges and procedural controls the formal legal method for transferring the requirements of the law and jurisprudence for the lawenforcement activity into programs for judges and case participants the objectoriented modeling objectoriented programming methodology. Results a computer program was created that allows to adjudicate in a civil case if the claim is recognized by the defendant. The program does not resolve the judge from the decisionmaking process but creates conditions to move along the stages of lawenforcement procedure and legal reasoning in accordance with the requirements of the law and of legal science. Therefore filling forms manually in the trial should be simultaneous with writing the decision judgment sentence assessment. The program includes the following sections preparation of forms common to certain types of proceedings certain categories of cases courts in the above forms determination of the order to establish the actual circumstances the burden of proof distribution types of evidence methods of law interpretation characteristics of collisions and gaps in legislation and ways to overcome them the standard wording in the judicial act templates and in the forms mandatory and optional information in the form. Based on the above the article concludes that by analogy with the presented program it is possible to create software for making a lawful wellgrounded and fair judicial act for other categories of cases and as a consequence to reduce the period of making judicial decisions. Scientific novelty the first computer program is created for rendering and production of judicial decisions. Practical significance the model is made to create a mass tool of

  1. NASA physics and chemistry experiments in-space program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabris, E. A.

    1981-01-01

    The Physics and Chemistry Experiments Program (PACE) is part of the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology (OAST) research and technology effort in understanding the fundamental characteristics of physics and chemical phenomena. This program seeks to increase the basic knowledge in these areas by well-planned research efforts which include in-space experiments when the limitations of ground-based activities precludes or restricts the achievement of research goals. Overview study areas are concerned with molecular beam experiments for Space Shuttle, experiments on drops and bubbles in a manned earth-orbiting laboratory, the study of combustion experiments in space, combustion experiments in orbiting spacecraft, gravitation experiments in space, and fluid physics, thermodynamics, and heat-transfer experiments. Procedures for the study program have four phases. An overview study was conducted in the area of materials science.

  2. Research Experience in Psychiatry Residency Programs Across Canada: Current Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugalingam, Arany; Ferreria, Sharon G; Norman, Ross M G; Vasudev, Kamini

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the current status of research experience in psychiatry residency programs across Canada. Method: Coordinators of Psychiatric Education (COPE) resident representatives from all 17 psychiatry residency programs in Canada were asked to complete a survey regarding research training requirements in their programs. Results: Among the 17 COPE representatives, 15 completed the survey, representing 88% of the Canadian medical schools that have a psychiatry residency program. Among the 15 programs, 11 (73%) require residents to conduct a scholarly activity to complete residency. Some of these programs incorporated such a requirement in the past 5 years. Ten respondents (67%) reported availability of official policy and (or) guidelines on resident research requirements. Among the 11 programs that have a research requirement, 10 (91%) require residents to complete 1 scholarly activity; 1 requires completion of 2 scholarly activities. Eight (53%) residency programs reported having a separate research track. All of the programs have a research coordinator and 14 (93%) programs provide protected time to residents for conducting research. The 3 most common types of scholarly activities that qualify for the mandatory research requirement are a full independent project (10 programs), a quality improvement project (8 programs), and assisting in a faculty project (8 programs). Six programs expect their residents to present their final work in a departmental forum. None of the residency programs require publication of residents’ final work. Conclusions: The current status of the research experience during psychiatry residency in Canada is encouraging but there is heterogeneity across the programs. PMID:25565474

  3. Global engineering education programs: More than just international experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeill, Nathan J.

    Engineers in both industry and academia recognize the global nature of the profession. This has lead to calls for engineering students to develop knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for success within a global profession. Many institutions are developing globally oriented programs specifically for their engineering students and are eager to know if these programs are helping their students to develop attributes that meet their program objectives, accreditation requirements, and the needs and desires of prospective employers. Administrators of such programs currently lack research data to support the learning objectives they are setting for their programs. This study documented the individual experiences and learning outcomes of students involved in three global education programs for engineering students. The first program provided a portfolio of experiences including foreign language instruction, one semester of study abroad, internships in the U.S. and abroad, and a two-semester global team design project. The second program was a one semester study abroad program in China, and the third was a global service project whose purpose was to design an irrigation system for two small farms in Rwanda. The research questions guiding this study were: 1. What specific knowledge, skills, and attitudes are students gaining from participation in their respective global engineering programs? 2. What kinds of experiences are resulting in these learning outcomes? Interviews were used to elicit the experiences and learning outcomes of participants in this study. Program administrators were also interviewed for their perspectives on the experiences and learning outcomes of participants for the purpose of triangulation. The study identified more than 50 outcomes that resulted from students' experiences in these three programs. The most prevalent outcomes across all three programs included knowledge of culture, openness to new experiences and other cultures, and communication

  4. A first W7-X experiment program editor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spring, A.; Lewerentz, M.; Bluhm, T.; Hennig, C.; Kuhner, G.; Laqua, H.; Riemann, H.; Schacht, J.; Werner, A. [Max-Planck-Institute for Plasmaphysics, Teilinstitut Greifswald (Germany); Heimann, P.; Kroiss, H.; Maier, J.; Zilker, M. [Max-Planck-Institute for Plasmaphysics, Garching (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    This document is composed of a poster and its abstract. The long Wendelstein 7-X experiment programs will be segmented into arbitrary time slices. For each of these segments the planned behaviour is stored in a configuration database - and that for every component within the W7X hierarchical layout. Up to now we have an editor to set up these segments for each single component. But generating the compound program description out of the components' segments is still time-consuming experts' hand work. It is planned to implement a top-down program editor which is able to break down a high level physics program proposal to component segments while observing all the physical and technical constraints - a quite ambitious intention. This poster describes the first step to an experiment program editor: The 'express program editor' will be able to modify parameters of a single, a subset, or all segments within a given program, thus adapting its behaviour in an easy way. A graphical program structure overview has been implemented giving fast access to program parameters for comparison and editing. Appropriate parameter editors regard type and constraints as known from the single-segment editor. In a single transaction all changes are saved, the resulting experiment program is re-generated and the involved components are triggered to reload the changed program. Even though changing the program's structure is not supported in this version, the express program editor will serve as a tool for quick program adaptations in the daily experiment routine. Furthermore this implementation will be used as a design and usage study for the later high-end W7-X program editor. (authors)

  5. Programming the iPhone User Experience

    CERN Document Server

    Boudreaux, Toby

    2009-01-01

    Apple's iPhone and iPod Touch not only feature the world's most powerful mobile operating system, they also usher in a new standard of human-computer interaction through gestural interfaces and multi-touch navigation. This book provides you with a hands-on, example-driven tour of UIKit, Apple's user interface toolkit, and includes common design patterns to help you create new iPhone and iPod Touch user experiences. Using Apple's Cocoa Touch framework, you'll learn how to build applications that respond in unique ways when users tap, slide, swipe, tilt, shake, or pinch the screen. Programmin

  6. Experiments in Program Verification using Event-B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallerstede, Stefan; Leuschel, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The Event-B method can be used to model all sorts of discrete event systems, among them sequential programs. In this article we describe our experiences with using Event-B by way of two examples. We present a simple model of a factorial program, explaining the method, and a more intricate model...

  7. New accreditation program: university health network's experience with Qmentum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepfers, Anita; Hruska, Christa; Stone, Justin; Moser, Jane

    2009-01-01

    In 2008, University Health Network was surveyed using Accreditation Canada's new Qmentum program. The following article describes UHN's experience rolling out the program to over 12,000 staff, physicians and volunteers. The article also outlines key challenges and lessons learned by the multi-site organization, with a focus on staff engagement, on-site survey preparation and sustainability moving forward. Staff feedback on the Qmentum program was extremely positive, and forecast results from Accreditation Canada were excellent.

  8. Linking Experiences and Outcomes within a Postsecondary Leadership Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strawn, Kellie; McKim, Aaron J.; Velez, Jonathan J.

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the leadership development outcomes associated with specific experiences in a one-year, intensive leadership development program at a large northwest research university. Students highlighted three programmatic experiences for their effectiveness: (a) faculty mentoring, (b) participation in a weekly seminar, and (c)…

  9. Undergraduate Students' Experiences in Programming: Difficulties and Obstacles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Büşra Özmen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Programming courses become prominent as one of the courses in which undergraduate students are unsuccessful especially in departments which offer computer education. Students often state that these courses are quite difficult compared to other courses. Therefore, a qualitative phenomenological approach was used to reveal the reasons of the failures of the undergraduate students in programming courses and to examine the difficulties they confronted with programming. In this scope, the laboratory practices of the Internet Programming course were observed in fall term of the 2013-2014 academic year in a university at central Anatolia. Interviews were made with 12 undergraduate students taking this course. Finally, the difficulties students experienced in the programming were determined as programming knowledge, programming skills, understanding semantics of the program, and debugging. Students emphasized that the biggest causes of failure in programming languages are lack of practice, not using algorithms and lack of knowledge. In addition, it was seen that the students who had high programming experience possess higher programming success and self-efficacy related to programming

  10. Beyond dichotomies: Towards a more encompassing view of learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoeren, M.M.W.C.; Niessen, T.J.H.; Abma, T.A.

    2015-01-01

    In organisations, learning is generally seen as a dynamic, collective and often conscious process that occurs by reflecting on real work experiences. In this article, we discuss these assumptions about learning in the context of work by presenting a case study in the care for older people. The case

  11. Broader concepts of quality of life measurement, encompassing validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, A Y

    2017-08-01

    Developing and managing measures of quality of life (QoL) require attention to a range of broader concepts, in addition to meeting validation requirements. The aim of this review is to describe development and experience in Cardiff of these concepts and to inform users of Cardiff quality of life tools of aspects of their origin, for the benefit of developers of novel QoL measures or other patient reported outcome measures. Publications from the Cardiff team over the last three decades are used to illustrate descriptions of concepts involved in developing and managing QoL measures. The concepts are grouped into three main themes: (A) Design of tools: measurement ability turns ideas into science, QoL measurement based on patient experience, the need for tools to be clinically practical and useful with meaningful scores, different ages need tailored tools. (B) Practical management of tools: enabling ease of access, maintenance of single version, translation validity, enabling access to postpublication experience and further validation. (C) Promoting wider understanding of QoL: examples include educate thinking with disease severity definition; heighten awareness of broader burden, family impact, the time dimension and the new word quimp. The development and management of QoL and other outcome measures involves attention to a wide range of other issues, in addition to meeting validation requirements. © 2017 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  12. [International academic mobility program in nursing experience report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Mariana Gonçalves; Pagliuca, Lorita Marlena Freitag

    2012-03-01

    An experience of studying abroad or of academic exchange, really adds value to the professional and personal development of exchange students. This report aims to describe a student's experience in an international academic mobility program. It was developed from 2008 to 2009 in Brazil and Spain. The experiences, observations and activities of the student were emphasized believing that the training of students and researchers is not only restricted to the university and the students' home country, and that it is important to have possibilities of new experiences and differentiated knowledge. The conclusion is that this opportunity promoted a profound effect on psychological, cultural social and scientific development of the exchange student.

  13. How one teacher research experience program is transforming STEM education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warburton, J.; Fahnestock, J.; Larson, A.

    2016-12-01

    Celebrating over 10 years of success, the PolarTREC-Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating program, administered by the Arctic Research Consortium of the United States, is a unique professional development program for United States educators and polar researchers. Through an innovative teacher research experience, utilizing field-based experiences in the polar regions, PolarTREC provides teachers the content knowledge, pedagogical tools, confidence, understanding of science in the broader society, and experiences with scientific inquiry they need to promote authentic scientific research in their classroom. The program evaluation objectives were 1) to better understand the immediate impacts of the program on participating teachers, their students, and the researchers with whom they partnered; and 2) to explore the long-term impacts of the PolarTREC experiences on participating teachers' professional experiences, and in particular their use of authentic scientific research with their students and ongoing relationships with researcher team members and other PolarTREC teachers. In this presentation, we will share our data on how the PolarTREC model is transforming STEM educators not only how they teach science in their classroom but also how they both perceive science, a paradigm shift, that defines their careers.

  14. An optics education program designed around experiments with small telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompea, Stephen M.; Sparks, Robert T.; Walker, Constance E.; Dokter, Erin F. C.

    2010-08-01

    The National Optical Astronomy Observatory has led the development of a new telescope kit for kids as part of a strategic plan to interest young children in science. This telescope has been assembled by tens of thousands of children nationwide, who are now using this high-quality telescope to conduct optics experiments and to make astronomical observations. The Galileoscope telescope kit and its associated educational program are an outgrowth of the NSF sponsored "Hands-On Optics" (HOO) project, a collaboration of the SPIE, the Optical Society of America, and NOAO. This project developed optics kits and activities for upper elementary students and has reached over 20,000 middle school kids in afterschool programs. HOO is a highly flexible educational program and was featured as an exemplary informal science program by the National Science Teachers Association. Our new "Teaching with Telescopes" program builds on HOO, the Galileoscope and other successful optical education projects.

  15. My Program Is Ok--Am I? Computing Freshmen's Experiences of Doing Programming Assignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnunen, Paivi; Simon, Beth

    2012-01-01

    This article provides insight into how computing majors experience the process of doing programming assignments in their first programming course. This grounded theory study sheds light on the various processes and contexts through which students constantly assess their self-efficacy as a programmer. The data consists of a series of four…

  16. Community based clinical program: the Medunsa physiotherapy students` experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. Taukobong

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Backgound: The aim of community based clinical training is tproduce graduates who are responsive to the health needs of their communit It is envisaged that upon completion of training graduates would go back an serve their respective communities following exposure to community need Program evaluation should therefore allow students to express the inadequacie and strengths of the program.Aim: To evaluate the community-based clinical program through student's experiences.Methodology: A qualitative research design was used. End of block students reports for both third (8 and fourth (15 year physiotherapy students (n = 23 were used to collect the data. Responses in the reports were grouped into the following categories for purpose of data analysis: feeling about the block, suggestion/s and supervision.Results: The students described the community based clinical program as an unique learning experience which equipped them with the understanding of life within communities. Sixty five percent (65% expressed satisfaction with the supervision given. The main complaints were amounts of paper work involved and clinical workload.Conclusion: The student's experiences indicated that the community-based clinical program within the MEDUNSA physiotherapy department realizes the goal of community-based clinical training as determined by WHO, except for inclusion of some multi-professional approaches and adaptation of the supervision provided.

  17. Mandatory Parent Education Programs Can Create Positive Youth Sport Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christofferson, Jennifer; Strand, Bradford

    2016-01-01

    Youth sport leaders must not ignore the influence parents have on creating a positive developmental experience for young athletes. Therefore, expectations involving parental involvement and conduct must be addressed prior to athletes' participation. This article aims to examine the importance of creating mandatory parental training programs for…

  18. External quality control program: Experience in the department of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To share experiences and lessons learned from 2002 National External Quality Assessment Schemes for Leukocyte Immunophenotyping (UK NEQAS) and College of American Pathologists (CAP) proficiency testing (PT) panels received and tested as part of External Quality Control Program Setting: Department ...

  19. Raft River well stimulation experiments: geothermal reservoir well stimulation program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-08-01

    The Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP) performed two field experiments at the Raft River KGRA in 1979. Wells RRGP-4 and RRGP-5 were selected for the hydraulic fracture stimulation treatments. The well selection process, fracture treatment design, field execution, stimulation results, and pre- and post-job evaluations are presented.

  20. Capstone Experiences in Small MPA Programs in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Younhee

    2017-01-01

    A capstone experience, as an exit degree requirement, allows Master of Public Administration (MPA) students to build quasi-experimental practices by applying learned knowledge and skills throughout their curriculum in the United States. Accredited MPA programs have implemented their capstone courses differently to achieve required standards. Small…

  1. Designated-driver programs: college students' experiences and opinions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glascoff, M A; Knight, S M; Jenkins, L K

    1994-09-01

    We investigated the experiences and opinions of college students regarding the use of designated drivers. Although using designated drivers appeared to be common, results indicated that in many instances the designated driver did not abstain from drinking alcoholic beverages. The opinions of the participants indicated that the nondrivers in a drinking group may in fact drink more when there is a designated driver. Our findings lead us to question the overall value of currently practiced designated-driver programs for college student drinkers. Developing programs on how to be a designated driver are among our recommendations.

  2. Building Computer-Based Experiments in Psychology without Programming Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruisoto, Pablo; Bellido, Alberto; Ruiz, Javier; Juanes, Juan A

    2016-06-01

    Research in Psychology usually requires to build and run experiments. However, although this task has required scripting, recent computer tools based on graphical interfaces offer new opportunities in this field for researchers with non-programming skills. The purpose of this study is to illustrate and provide a comparative overview of two of the main free open source "point and click" software packages for building and running experiments in Psychology: PsychoPy and OpenSesame. Recommendations for their potential use are further discussed.

  3. The SUPER Program: A Research-based Undergraduate Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernakovich, J. G.; Boone, R. B.; Boot, C. M.; Denef, K.; Lavallee, J. M.; Moore, J. C.; Wallenstein, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    Producing undergraduates capable of broad, independent thinking is one of the grand challenges in science education. Experience-based learning, specifically hands-on research, is one mechanism for increasing students' ability to think critically. With this in mind, we created a two-semester long research program called SUPER (Skills for Undergraduate Participation in Ecological Research) aimed at teaching students to think like scientists and enhancing the student research experience through instruction and active-learning about the scientific method. Our aim was for students to gain knowledge, skills, and experience, and to conduct their own research. In the first semester, we hosted active-learning workshops on "Forming Hypotheses", "Experimental Design", "Collecting and Managing Data", "Analysis of Data", "Communicating to a Scientific Audience", "Reading Literature Effectively", and "Ethical Approaches". Each lesson was taught by different scientists from one of many ecological disciplines so that students were exposed to the variation in approach that scientists have. In the second semester, students paired with a scientific mentor and began doing research. To ensure the continued growth of the undergraduate researcher, we continued the active-learning workshops and the students attended meetings with their mentors. Thus, the students gained technical and cognitive skills in parallel, enabling them to understand both "the how" and "the why" of what they were doing in their research. The program culminated with a research poster session presented by the students. The interest in the program has grown beyond our expectations, and we have now run the program successfully for two years. Many of the students have gone on to campus research jobs, internships and graduate school, and have attributed part of their success in obtaining their positions to their experience with the SUPER program. Although common in other sciences, undergraduate research experiences are

  4. Java decaffeinated: experiences building a programming language from components

    OpenAIRE

    Dobson, Simon; Farragher, Linda

    2000-01-01

    non-peer-reviewed Most modern programming languages are complex and feature rich. Whilst this is (sometimes) an advantage for industrial-strength applications, it complicates both language teaching and language research. We describe our experiences in the design of a reduced sub-set of the Java language and its implementation using the Vanilla language development framework. We argue that Vanilla???s component-based approach allows the language???s feature set to be varied quickly and simp...

  5. ESADA Plutonium Program Critical Experiments: Power Distribution Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akkurt, H.

    2001-06-12

    In 1967, a series of critical experiments were conducted at the Westinghouse Reactor Evaluation Center (WREC) using mixed-oxide (MOX) PuO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2} and/or UO{sub 2} fuels in various lattices and configurations. These experiments were performed under the joint sponsorship of Empire State Atomic Development Associates (ESADA) plutonium program and Westinghouse. The purpose of these experiments was to develop experimental data useful in validating analytical methods used in the design of plutonium-bearing replacement fuel for water reactors. Three different fuel types were used during the experimental program: two MOX fuels and a low-enriched UO{sub 2} fuel. The MOX fuels were distinguished by their {sup 240}Pu content: 8 wt % {sup 240}Pu and 24 wt % {sup 240}Pu. Both MOX fuels contained 2.0 wt % PuO{sub 2} in natural UO{sub 2}. The UO{sub 2} fuel with 2.72 wt % enrichment was used for comparison with the plutonium data and for use in multiregion experiments.

  6. PandaEPL: a library for programming spatial navigation experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solway, Alec; Miller, Jonathan F; Kahana, Michael J

    2013-12-01

    Recent advances in neuroimaging and neural recording techniques have enabled researchers to make significant progress in understanding the neural mechanisms underlying human spatial navigation. Because these techniques generally require participants to remain stationary, computer-generated virtual environments are used. We introduce PandaEPL, a programming library for the Python language designed to simplify the creation of computer-controlled spatial-navigation experiments. PandaEPL is built on top of Panda3D, a modern open-source game engine. It allows users to construct three-dimensional environments that participants can navigate from a first-person perspective. Sound playback and recording and also joystick support are provided through the use of additional optional libraries. PandaEPL also handles many tasks common to all cognitive experiments, including managing configuration files, logging all internal and participant-generated events, and keeping track of the experiment state. We describe how PandaEPL compares with other software for building spatial-navigation experiments and walk the reader through the process of creating a fully functional experiment.

  7. Research Experience for Undergraduates Program in Multidisciplinary Environmental Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, M. S.

    2012-12-01

    During summers 2011 and 12 Montclair State University hosted a Research Experience for Undergraduates Program (REU) in transdisciplinary, hands-on, field-oriented research in environmental sciences. Participants were housed at the Montclair State University's field station situated in the middle of 30,000 acres of mature forest, mountain ridges and freshwater streams and lakes within the Kittatinny Mountains of Northwest New Jersey, Program emphases were placed on development of project planning skills, analytical skills, creativity, critical thinking and scientific report preparation. Ten students were recruited in spring with special focus on recruiting students from underrepresented groups and community colleges. Students were matched with their individual research interests including hydrology, erosion and sedimentation, environmental chemistry, and ecology. In addition to research activities, lectures, educational and recreational field trips, and discussion on environmental ethics and social justice played an important part of the program. The ultimate goal of the program is to facilitate participants' professional growth and to stimulate the participants' interests in pursuing Earth Science as the future career of the participants.

  8. [Peru's experience with a national blood banking program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribera Salcedo, José Fuentes; Roca Valencia, Oscar

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes Peru's experiences with its National Blood Banking Program. Until the mid-1990s, the country faced a host of problems, including the lack of a legal framework to regulate blood banks, a high maternal mortality rate due to a shortage of blood, virtually no voluntary donations, a high risk of infection from transfusions, the use of only whole blood for transfusion, serious disorganization in the blood banks, deficiencies in blood bank supervision and control, no training programs, indifference on the part of health officials, frequent selling of blood, and limited community awareness. Subsequently, a strategic plan was prepared that made it possible to solve many of those problems. Legal instruments were prepared; the rate of voluntary donations rose from 0% to 19.5%; the safety of the blood was improved through compulsory screening of all donated blood units for seven markers of infectious diseases, as well as by placing a national seal of quality on all screened units. The availability of blood doubled, thus meeting 70% of the need; sales of blood decreased; and the use of blood components was improved, with 80% of the blood being fractionated. In addition, supervisory control of 100% of the blood banks in the country was achieved, a national registry was established, the cost-benefit relationship for blood units was improved through centralized screening, internal and external quality control was made mandatory, and pro-donation campaigns led to commitments from civil society. While important, all these achievements represent just a first step. This is especially true given that developing the National Blood Banking Program required the participation of outside organizations, such as the Pan American Health Organization, whose support, together with the experience provided by other countries, was key. The Program is facing a number of new challenges, and the progress that has been achieved could be threatened if current activities stagnate or

  9. Subjective Experiences of Clients in a Voluntary Money Management Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serowik, Kristin L; Bellamy, Chyrell D; Rowe, Michael; Rosen, Marc I

    2013-01-01

    A large proportion of people diagnosed with mental illnesses have difficulty managing their money, and therefore many psychiatric treatments involve providing money management assistance. However, little is known about the subjective experience of having a money manager, and extant literature is restricted to people forced to work with a representative payee or conservator. In this study, fifteen people were interviewed about their experience receiving a voluntary money management intervention designed to minimize substance use. Clients emphasized the importance of trusting the money manager, financial mindfulness (an enhanced awareness of the financial transactions in clients' day-to-day lives), agency over their own affairs, and addiction. In contrast to evaluations of people assigned representative payees and/or conservators, there was little mention of feeling coerced. These findings suggest that money management programs can address client concerns by building trust, relating budgeting to clients' day-to-day lives, and encouraging clients' control over their own affairs.

  10. Conscious sedation experiences in graduate pediatric dentistry programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, S; Farrell, K; Griffen, A; Coury, D

    2001-01-01

    Conscious sedation is a behavior modification adjunct taught in all postgraduate pediatric dental residency programs. It has been a decade since the last survey was done specifically related to didactic and clinical aspects of conscious sedation in postgraduate pediatric dental programs. The aim of the study was to determine the clinical and didactic experiences associated with conscious sedation in these programs and to compare some of the findings to those collected a decade ago. A 31-item survey similar to that of a decade ago was constructed and sent to all pediatric dentistry program directors of accredited postgraduate and residency programs in the United States. The items covered several didactics including didactic topics, sedative agents, monitoring, and emergency policy among others. A follow-up mailing was done involving those who had not responded 6 weeks following the initial mailing. Fifty-four of 58 (93%) program directors returned the 31-item survey. The following are highlighted findings. Conscious sedation among residency programs was achieved most commonly with a combination of sedative agents used with N2O. Midazolam was more popular than chloral hydrate. The oral route was the predominant route of administration. More lecture hours were spent on conscious sedation than 10 years ago. The pre-cordial stethoscope, pulse oximeter, and blood pressure cuff were the most commonly used monitors. Sedative agent and anticipated depth of sedation were the factors most often considered in choosing monitors used during the sedation of a patient. The capnograph was being used more frequently than it was 10 years ago. Programs did not report an increase in sedation emergencies but practiced emergency drills more often and had increased numbers of individuals certified in Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) or Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS). The percent of the total patient population which required sedation is about 1-20%, with most directors

  11. Physics program of P¯ANDA experiment at FAIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Dipanwita; P¯ANDA Collaboration

    2011-07-01

    The "antiProton ANnihilation at DArmstadt"-experiment, P¯ANDA, is one of the main experiments at FAIR, the future Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research at GSI, Darmstadt. It will be using the antiproton beam of unprecedented intensity and high momentum resolution in the momentum range between 1.5 - 15 GeV/c which will be available at the High Energy Storage Ring (HESR) at FAIR. The P¯ANDA experiment aims at high precision spectroscopy in order to address the properties of the strong interaction. The major physics research topics are: hadron spectroscopy, in-medium effects of hadronic particles, study of nucleon structure and precision gamma-ray spectroscopy of single- and double-Λ hypernuclei. To meet the physics objectives of P¯ANDA, a detector with a nearly complete solid angle coverage, an excellent particle identification of hadrons and leptons over a large momentum range and high resolution calorimetry for neutral particles is essential. An overview of the goals and the extensive physics programs, detector development as well as simulation aspects of the P¯ANDA experiment will be discussed.

  12. Enhancing the Programming Experience for First-Year Engineering Students through Hands-On Integrated Computer Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Stephen L.; Ghafoor, Sheikh; Abdelrahman, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the redesign and implementation of the course, "Introduction to Programming for Engineers" using microcontroller (MCU) hardware as the programming target. The objective of this effort is to improve the programming competency for engineering students by more closely relating the initial programming experience to the student's…

  13. Communication skills program in the first semester: An experience report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela Liberali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 2001, Brazilian Guidelines for undergraduate medical education highlighted the need to include communication skills (CS in the curriculum. At the Federal University of Santa Catarina (South Brazil, CS were taught in the third year in theoretical classes as an overview of physician-patient relationships, and in a nonsystematic way in practical classes. In 2013, theory and practice were aligned, mediated by reflection, by adding three classes: CS overview; responding to strong emotions; and giving bad news. Two Portuguese translation of modules from DocCom, a web-based audiovisual learning resource on CS in Healthcare (AACH, DUCOM, 2005- 2015, were used. In 2015, we started to teach CS to the 53 students registered in the first semester of our medical course. We report on the program in the first semester of the course and students’ perceptions of it. The CS program consisted of seven 1.5-hr face-to-face sessions with all students, co-taught by the authors, a PhD student and a medical school professor. The content included CS overview and importance in healthcare; relationship-centered care, building relationships and gathering information; students’ experiences in the medical course; and Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI. To encourage continuous reflection and align theory with practice, before or after theoretical brief presentations, additional resources were used: exercises to raise awareness of verbal and nonverbal communication, drawings on medical students’ life experiences, reflections about the poem “After a While” by Veronica Shoffstall and after listening to Bach’s Brandenburg concerto #1; DocCom modules #6 “Build a relationship” and #8 “Gather information” (viewed online to prepare for class followed by face-toface small group discussions (6-7 students in each about CS learned and theirs practice in role-play; peers’ and patients’ interviews; students’ MBTI identification (at distance and group dynamics

  14. Vascular Trauma Operative Experience is Inadequate in General Surgery Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Huan; Maximus, Steven; Koopmann, Matthew; Keeley, Jessica; Smith, Brian; Virgilio, Christian de; Kim, Dennis Y

    2016-05-01

    Vascular injuries may be challenging, particularly for surgeons who have not received formal vascular surgery fellowship training. Lack of experience and improper technique can result in significant complications. The objective of this study was to examine changes in resident experience with operative vascular trauma over time. A retrospective review was performed using Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) case logs of general surgery residents graduating between 2004 and 2014 at 2 academic, university-affiliated institutions associated with level 1 trauma centers. The primary outcome was number of reported vascular trauma operations, stratified by year of graduation and institution. A total of 112 residents graduated in the study period with a median 7 (interquartile range 4.5-13.5) vascular trauma cases per resident. Fasciotomy and exposure and/or repair of peripheral vessels constituted the bulk of the operative volume. Linear regression showed no significant trend in cases with respect to year of graduation (P = 0.266). Residents from program A (n = 53) reported a significantly higher number of vascular trauma cases when compared with program B (n = 59): 12.0 vs. 5.0 cases, respectively (P < 0.001). Level 1 trauma center verification does not guarantee sufficient exposure to vascular trauma. The operative exposure in program B is reflective of the national average of 4.0 cases per resident as reported by the ACGME, and this trend is unlikely to change in the near future. Fellowship training may be critical for surgeons who plan to work in a trauma setting, particularly in areas lacking vascular surgeons. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The dish-Rankine SCSTPE program (Engineering Experiment no. 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, R. L.; Grigsby, C. E.

    1980-05-01

    Activities planned for phase 2 Of the Small Community Solar Thermal Power Experiment (PFDR) program are summarized with emphasis on a dish-Rankine point focusing distributed receiver solar thermal electric system. Major design efforts include: (1) development of an advanced concept indirect-heated receiver;(2) development of hardware and software for a totally unmanned power plant control system; (3) implementation of a hybrid digital simulator which will validate plant operation prior to field testing; and (4) the acquisition of an efficient organic Rankine cycle power conversion unit. Preliminary performance analyses indicate that a mass-produced dish-Rankine PFDR system is potentially capable of producing electricity at a levelized busbar energy cost of 60 to 70 mills per KWh and with a capital cost of about $1300 per KW.

  16. Evaluating virtual STEM mentoring programs: The SAGANet.org experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Som, S. M.; Walker, S. I.; Miller, E.; Anbar, M.; Kacar, B.; Forrester, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Many school districts within the United States continue to seek new ways of engaging students within Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) disciplines. SAGANet.org, a web-based 501c3 Astrobiology outreach initiative, works with a number of schools, partnering K-12 students and their families with professional scientist mentors from around the world to teach and inspire students using virtual technology platforms. Current programs include two mentoring partnerships: pairing scientist-mentors with at-risk youth at the Pittsburg Community School in Pittsburg CA, and pairing scientist-mentors with families from the Kyrene del Cielo Elementary School in Chandler AZ. These programs represent two very different models for utilizing the virtual media platform provided by SAGANet.org to engage K-12 students and their families in STEM. For the former, scientists mentor the students of the Pittsburg School as part of the formal in-class curriculum. For the latter, scientists work with K-5 students and their families through Cielo's Science & Engineering Discovery Room to develop a science project as part of an informal learning experience that is independent of the formal curriculum. In this presentation, we (1) discuss the challenges and successes of engaging these two distinct audiences through virtual media, (2) present the results of how these two very-different mentoring partnership impact K-12 students science self-efficacy, interest in science, and STEM career awareness, and (3) share the impact of the mentoring experience on the mentor's confidence and self-efficacy with communicating science to the public.

  17. Cultural respect encompassing simulation training: being heard about health through broadband

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phyllis Min-yu Lau

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cultural Respect Encompassing Simulation Training (CREST is a learning program that uses simulation to provide health professional students and practitioners with strategies to communicate sensitively with culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD patients. It consists of training modules with a cultural competency evaluation framework and CALD simulated patients to interact with trainees in immersive simulation scenarios. The aim of this study was to test the feasibility of expanding the delivery of CREST to rural Australia using live video streaming; and to investigate the fidelity of cultural sensitivity – defined within the process of cultural competency which includes awareness, knowledge, skills, encounters and desire – of the streamed simulations. Design and Methods. In this mixed-methods evaluative study, health professional trainees were recruited at three rural academic campuses and one rural hospital to pilot CREST sessions via live video streaming and simulation from the city campus in 2014. Cultural competency, teaching and learning evaluations were conducted. Results. Forty-five participants rated 26 reliable items before and after each session and reported statistically significant improvement in 4 of 5 cultural competency domains, particularly in cultural skills (P<0.05. Qualitative data indicated an overall acknowledgement amongst participants of the importance of communication training and the quality of the simulation training provided remotely by CREST. Conclusions. Cultural sensitivity education using live video-streaming and simulation can contribute to health professionals’ learning and is effective in improving cultural competency. CREST has the potential to be embedded within health professional curricula across Australian universities to address issues of health inequalities arising from a lack of cultural sensitivity training.

  18. Community College First-Year Experience Programs: Examining Student Access, Experience, and Success from the Student Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo-Gil, Nancy; Zerquera, Desiree D.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter examines community college first-year experience programs using critical race theory and ecological theory. The study draws on diverse students' experiences with access, support, and long-term success within community colleges to assess how these programs foster student success, as told through the voices of student participants.

  19. Semantics-Driven Migration of Java Programs: a Practical Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artyom O. Aleksyuk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to demonstrate the feasibility of automated code migration to a new set of programming libraries. Code migration is a common task in modern software projects. For example, it may arise when a project should be ported to a more secure or feature-rich library, a new platform or a new version of an already used library. The developed method and tool are based on the previously created by the authors a formalism for describing libraries semantics. The formalism specifies a library behaviour by using a system of extended finite state machines (EFSM. This paper outlines the metamodel designed to specify library descriptions and proposes an easy to use domainspecific language (DSL, which can be used to define models for particular libraries. The mentioned metamodel directly forms the code migration procedure. A process of migration is split into five steps, and each step is also described in the paper. The procedure uses an algorithm based on the breadth- first search extended for the needs of the migration task. Models and algorithms were implemented in the prototype of an automated code migration tool. The prototype was tested by both artificial code examples and a real-world open source project. The article describes the experiments performed, the difficulties that have arisen in the process of migration of test samples, and how they are solved in the proposed procedure. The results of experiments indicate that code migration can be successfully automated. 

  20. Environmental disturbance confounds prenatal glucocorticoid programming experiments in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Regan, D; Kenyon, C J; Seckl, J R; Holmes, M C

    2010-07-01

    Low birth weight in humans is predictive of hypertension in adult life, and while the mechanisms underlying this link remain unknown, fetal overexposure to glucocorticoids has been implicated. We have previously shown that prenatal dexamethasone (DEX) exposure in the rat lowers birth weight and programmes adult hypertension. This current study aimed to unravel the molecular nature of this hypertension. However, unknowingly, post hoc investigations revealed that our animals had been subjected to environmental noise stresses from an adjacent construction site, which were sufficient to confound our prenatal DEX-programming experiments. This perinatal stress successfully established low birth weight, hypercorticosteronaemia, insulin resistance, hypertension and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysfunction in vehicle (VEH)-treated offspring, such that the typical distinctions between both treatment groups were ameliorated. The lack of an additional effect on DEX-treated offspring is suggestive of a maximal effect of perinatal stress and glucocorticoids, serving to prevent against the potentially detrimental effects of sustained glucocorticoid hyper-exposure. Finally, this paper serves to inform researchers of the potential detrimental effects of neighbouring construction sites to their experiments.

  1. The new spin physics program of the COMPASS experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Luís

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The COMPASS experiment, at CERN SPS, has been compiling for more than a decade successful and precise results on nucleon structure and hadron spectroscopy, leading to statistical errors much smaller than previously measured. The new COMPASS spin physics program, starting this year, aims to a rather complete nucleon structure description; this new representation goes beyond the collinear approximation by including the quark intrinsic transverse momentum distributions. The theoretical framework, for this new picture of the nucleon, is given by the Transverse Momentum Dependent distributions (TMDs and by the Generalised Parton Distributions (GPDs. The TMDs, in particular Sivers, Boer-Mulders, pretzelosity and transversity functions will be obtained through the polarised Drell-Yan process, for the first time. The results will be complementary to those already obtained via polarised Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering (SIDIS. Also unpolarised SIDIS will be studied, allowing the knowledge improvement of the strange quark PDF and the access to the kaon fragmentation functions (FFs. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS off an unpolarised hydrogen target will be used to study the GPDs, in a kinematic region not yet covered by any existing experiment.

  2. Participant Trends in the Geosciences Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, C. K.; Patino, L. C.; Rom, E. L.; Adams, A. S.

    2016-12-01

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) supports programs for undergraduate students to gain experience in research. In 2016, there were nearly 60 active Research Experience for Undergraduate (REU) sites across the nation that provided research opportunities in Geosciences (GEO). At these REU sites, students carried out independent research projects and had the chance to present the information at national conferences. The participants often joined research groups that included other undergraduate and graduate students, postdoctoral scholars, and investigators. Between 2009 and 2016, there were over 26,000 applications to GEO REU sites and about 1,953 applicants were selected to participate. Data for GEO REU sites has been collected using two mechanisms, direct queries to the REU site managers (2009-2012, and 2016) and analysis of award progress reports (2014-2015). The information collected since 2009 has provided a temporal description of who is participating in the GEO REU sites (e.g. gender, demographics, academic level). The analysis of the trends in the REU sites has shown an increase of women participating in the research opportunities across all disciplines, to the point that in some sites there is need to increase the participation of men. The number of minority and underrepresented students has also increased. Throughout this period, the academic level of the participants in GEO REU sites has also changed; the number of students who have completed only the first or second year of college has increased. The trends in the data allow NSF to understand who is participating in the REUs and to incentivize the research community to engage students who will benefit from these experiences, but who are not currently participating.

  3. Python and Roles of Variables in Introductory Programming: Experiences from Three Educational Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikula, Uolevi; Sajaniemi, Jorma; Tedre, Matti; Wray, Stuart

    2007-01-01

    Students often find that learning to program is hard. Introductory programming courses have high drop-out rates and students do not learn to program well. This paper presents experiences from three educational institutions where introductory programming courses were improved by adopting Python as the first programming language and roles of…

  4. Research Experience for Undergraduates: an International Program Enhancing Interdisciplinary Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfiffner, S. M.; Davis, K. L.; Phelps, T. J.; Kieft, T. L.; Gihring, T. M.; Onstott, T. C.; Nthangeni, B.; Piater, L.; van Heerden, E.

    2004-12-01

    This NSF-funded research experience for undergraduates (REU) took place in South Africa, where gold mines provided outstanding field sites to investigate biogeochemical processes in deep subsurface environments. Underrepresented minorities were encouraged to participate. Cross-disciplinary training was a major ambition for this REU Site: Biogeochemical Educational Experiences - South Africa. Students were selected from diverse academic disciplines (biology, chemistry, and geology) to participate in this interdisciplinary research program. Research projects included characterizing microbial communities with molecular and biochemical techniques, cultivating microorganisms, utilizing geochemical and isotopic parameters to constrain nutrient cycling in groundwater, investigating extreme enzymes and examining functional genes. During the REU, students collected biofilms and fissure water emanating from gas-rich boreholes in 2-3 km deep mines and performed laboratory research in teams under joint mentorship of U.S. and South African scientists. Research teams consisted of three to five students with at least one student from each country and at least two of the disciplines represented. Team membership reflected students' ranking of their choices among mentor-proposed projects. The REU encouraged students to increase scientific knowledge across disciplines, improve oral and written communication skills, and explore cultural and international challenges for scientific research in the global community. Each research team presented oral progress reports to the other research teams to provide communication skill development and to provide a forum for data exchange and interpretation among the various disciplines. Oral communication training culminated in a public presentation by each team at a university/industry science symposium. Mentors reviewed students' writing skills as they prepared text on experimental design, research findings, data interpretation, and literature

  5. Evaluation of a Group-Based Trauma Recovery Program in Gaza: Students' Subjective Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Ian; Abdullah, Ghassan

    2012-01-01

    Internationally, evaluation of group-based trauma recovery programs has relied upon normative outcome measures, with no studies systematically analyzing children's subjective experience for program development. In contrast, the current study explored children's experience of a Gazan recovery program "in their own words." Twenty-four…

  6. Three Alabama Teen Parent Programs: Perspectives from Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Cynthia Ivey

    2009-01-01

    Although there are many programs that concentrate on reducing the overall rate of teen pregnancy, there are few programs designed to assist teen parents. The purpose of this study was to determine how and to what extent three teen parenting programs in Alabama met the needs of teen parents with a positive environment and assisted them in…

  7. Evaluating the Application of Program Outcomes to Study Abroad Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Patricia Joanne; Mrozek, Lawrence J.

    2016-01-01

    A search through the 2015 annual conference program of the National Collegiate Honors Council (NCHC) turned up a dozen sessions focusing on the topic of study abroad, demonstrating that a growing number of honors programs and colleges are encouraging or requiring study abroad. Many programs now offer and support honors semesters abroad or…

  8. Experiences with Efficient Methodologies for Teaching Computer Programming to Geoscientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Christian T.; Gorman, Gerard J.; Rees, Huw E.; Craig, Lorraine E.

    2016-01-01

    Computer programming was once thought of as a skill required only by professional software developers. But today, given the ubiquitous nature of computation and data science it is quickly becoming necessary for all scientists and engineers to have at least a basic knowledge of how to program. Teaching how to program, particularly to those students…

  9. Program Evolves from Basic CAD to Total Manufacturing Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassola, Joel

    2011-01-01

    Close to a decade ago, John Hersey High School (JHHS) in Arlington Heights, Illinois, made a transition from a traditional classroom-based pre-engineering program. The new program is geared towards helping students understand the entire manufacturing process. Previously, a JHHS student would design a project in computer-aided design (CAD) software…

  10. Poverty reduction strategies and programs: the Nigeria's experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reviews the poverty reduction strategies and programs in Nigeria using the historical research design. The paper concludes that poverty reduction programs in Nigeria have not been effective due to policy inconsistency and the lack of coordination between the federal government and the sub-national ...

  11. Friendship Experiences of Participants in a University Based Transition Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasr, Maya; Cranston-Gingras, Ann; Jang, Seung-Eun

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the nature of friendships of 14 students with intellectual and developmental disabilities participating in a university-based transition program in the United States. The transition program is a bridge between high school and adulthood, designed to foster students' self-esteem and self-confidence by providing them with training…

  12. Sick-listed persons' experiences with taking part in an in-patient occupational rehabilitation program based on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: a qualitative focus group interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rise, Marit B; Gismervik, Sigmund Ø; Johnsen, Roar; Fimland, Marius S

    2015-11-27

    Occupational medicine has shifted emphasis from disease treatment to disability rehabilitation and management. Hence, newly developed occupational rehabilitation programs are often generic and multicomponent, aiming to influence the sick-listed persons' perception on return to work, and thereby support the return to work process. The aim of this study was to explore sick-listed persons' experiences with taking part in an in-patient occupational rehabilitation program based on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. Twenty-nine adults on sickness benefit or work assessment allowance due to musculoskeletal and/or common mental health disorders participated in this study. They were interviewed in focus groups at the beginning and at the end of a 3.5 week inpatient group-based occupational rehabilitation program in Central Norway. Key elements in the program were Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), physical exercise and creating a work-participation plan. The program was mainly group-based including participants with different diagnoses. Data was analyzed according to a phenomenological approach. At the start of the program most participants expressed frustration regarding being sick-listed, external anticipations as well as hindrances towards returning to work, and described hope that the program would provide them with the skills and techniques necessary to cope with health problems and being able to return to work. At the end of the program the participants described that they had embarked upon a long process of increased awareness. This process encompassed four areas; an increased awareness of what was important in life, realizing the strain from external expectations and demands, a need to balance different aspects of life, and return to work as part of a long and complex process. The occupational rehabilitation program induced a perceived meaningful reorientation encompassing several aspects of life. However, the return to work process was described as diffuse

  13. Commercial Instrumentation Technology Associates, Biomedical Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Experiments to seek solutions for a range of biomedical issues are at the heart of several investigations that will be hosted by the Commercial Instrumentation Technology Associates (ITA), Inc. Biomedical Experiments (CIBX-2) payload. CIBX-2 is unique, encompassing more than 20 separate experiments including cancer research, commercial experiments, and student hands-on experiments from 10 schools as part of ITA's ongoing University Among the Stars program. A number of Liquids Mixing Apparatus (LMA) syringes like this one will be used in the experiments. The experiments are sponsored by NASA's Space Product Development Program (SPD).

  14. Isolation of a P1 phagemid encompassing the autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease gene (PKD1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, F.; Schneider, M.C.; Reeders, S.T. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    We have isolated a P1 phagemid using primers for the 3 prime end of the tuberin gene (TSC2) on chromosome 16p13, which encompasses a large gene (KG8) which shows PKD1-specific mutations. The approximately 90-100 kilobase phagemid encompasses at least 4 genes (KG8, Nik7, KG3, and KM17). The CA repeats SM6 (upstream of the KG8 gene) and KG8 localized to the gene itself (3 prime untranslated) are found in the phagemid, as well as a number of trinucleotide repeat elements. One, a CCT-hybridizing fragment maps internal to the KG8 cDNA and appears to make the cosmid corresponding to the region (cGGG10) unstable. None of the previously published cosmids from the region completely encompasses the KG8 gene. A detailed R1 map of the region has been prepared and compared to the cosmid maps. Sequence of the regional genes will be presented. The phagemid will provide an alternative genomic source for evaluating the genomic sequence/map. In addition, this phagemid will potentially be useful as a vector for transfection of the entire PKD1 gene and its regulatory sequences.

  15. For debate: consensus injury definitions in team sports should focus on encompassing all injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Lisa; Gissane, Conor; Gabbett, Tim J; King, Doug A

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to highlight the most effective method of collecting injury data by using a definition that encompasses all injuries into the data collection system. The definition provides an accurate picture of injury incidence and also allows filtering of records so that data can be reported in a variety of comparable ways. A qualitative review of literature in team sports, plus expert opinion, served as the basis for data collection strategies. Articles were retrieved from SportsDiscus and PubMed using the terms "sports injury definition" and "injury definition." These terms were searched for the period 1966 to November 2006. One of the major results (from this paper) that supports the use of an all-encompassing injury definition is that 70% to 92% of all injuries sustained fall into the transient category--that is, by only recording injuries that result in missed matches, the majority of injuries are missed and therefore injury rates are underreported. An injury definition should be the most encompassing definition that enables a true, global picture of injury incidence to be seen in participation in any team sport.

  16. Remote programming of MED-EL cochlear implants: users' and professionals' evaluation of the remote programming experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzovkov, Vladislav; Yanov, Yuri; Levin, Sergey; Bovo, Roberto; Rosignoli, Monica; Eskilsson, Gunnar; Willbas, Staffan

    2014-07-01

    Remote programming is safe and is well received by health-care professionals and cochlear implant (CI) users. It can be adopted into clinic routine as an alternative to face-to-face programming. Telemedicine allows a patient to be treated anywhere in the world. Although it is a growing field, little research has been published on its application to CI programming. We examined hearing professionals' and CI users' subjective reactions to the remote programming experience, including the quality of the programming and the use of the relevant technology. Remote CI programming was performed in Italy, Sweden, and Russia. Programming sessions had three participants: a CI user, a local host, and a remote expert. After the session, each CI user, local host, and remote expert each completed a questionnaire on their experience. In all, 33 remote programming sessions were carried out, resulting in 99 completed questionnaires. The overwhelming majority of study participants responded positively to all aspects of remote programming. CI users were satisfied with the results in 96.9% of the programming sessions; 100% of participants would use remote programming again. Although technical problems were encountered, they did not cause the sessions to be considerably longer than face-to-face sessions.

  17. The UCAR SOARS Program: Strategies for Supplementing Undergraduate Research Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, R. E.

    2005-12-01

    Many REU programs have a goal of recruiting students to continue in the sciences. Undergraduate research is a successful strategy for engaging talented undergraduates to think about a career in science, encouraging them to purse graduate degrees, and for preparing them to succeed in graduate school. In the Significant Opportunities for Atmospheric Research (SOARS) program, we supplement undergraduate research with several strategies as part of an undergraduate-to-graduate bridge program aimed at broadening participation in the atmospheric and related sciences. In addition to a 10-week research program, SOARS also includes a formal mentoring program, writing workshop, vigorous learning community, and extensive professional development opportunities. Our presentation will describe these research-extending strategies in SOARS in more detail, with an eye toward how such strategies might be adapted for other programs. To do this, we will draw on the results of a major, independent evaluation of the SOARS program to determine the relative importance of these strategies in the overall success of the SOARS program. In the 10 yeas since SOARS creations, 98 students have participated in the program. Of those participants, 18 are still enrolled as undergraduates, and 55 have gone on to purse graduate school in the atmospheric sciences. Overall, this represents a graduate school placement rate of 69% and an overall retention rate of 82%. Of the 27 SOARS participants who have entered the workforce, 23 are in STEM related disciplines. Finally, 3 SOARS participants have already earned their PhD, and 32 have earned Master's. These numbers are especially significant given that SOARS participants come from groups that have been historically under-represented in the atmospheric sciences.

  18. Federal Workplace Laws: Are Business Work Experience Programs in Compliance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, Martha H.; Kurth, Linda A.

    1999-01-01

    Reviews federal laws (Fair Labor Standard Act's child labor regulations, Occupational Safety and Health Act, Immigration Reform and Control Act) for their implications for cooperative education and school-to-work programs. (SK)

  19. Marketing Program Standardization: The Experience of TNCs in Poland

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sagan, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the rate of standardization of marketing programs in transnational corporations in the consumer goods market in Poland, which currently is one of the fastest...

  20. Myth and Misguided Faith? Women's Experiences in a Literacy Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumann, Susan Marie; Chavez, Rudolfo Chavez

    2001-01-01

    Inductive analysis of the stories of five Mexican-American women in a literacy program resulted in a framework of myths or misperceptions that proceeds through stages of consciousness from magical to naive to critical. (Contains 41 references.) (SK)

  1. Phenomenological Experiences of International Students in Marriage, Couple, and Family Counseling Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Mohd Khairul Anuar

    2017-01-01

    This phenomenological study explored the experiences of international students in CACREP-accredited marriage, couple, and family counseling programs. Seven former international students from the program who have practiced counseling in their home country were interviewed to understand their learning experiences, adaptation process and counseling…

  2. An Experiment on the Short-Term Effects of Engagement and Representation in Program Animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevalainen, Seppo; Sajaniemi, Jorma

    2008-01-01

    When visualization tools utilized in computer programming education have been evaluated empirically, the results have remained controversial. To address this problem, we have developed a model of short-term effects of program animation, and used it in a series of experiments. In the current experiment, we varied visual representation of an…

  3. Instructional Technology in an Innovative Program of Preservice and In-Service Laboratory Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971

    Northeast Missouri State College developed a Teaching Skills Center providing a program of early professional laboratory experiences for all elementary and secondary education majors. The program includes four components: audiovisual utilization, instructional materials preparation, microteaching, and actual school experience. Each training…

  4. Integrated population-development program performance: the Malaysian Felda experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, C O

    1985-01-01

    Program performance of the Malaysian Felda program, an integrated population development program, is examined in this report. It also evaluates the relationship of the performance of this program with its organizational, integrational, and community support factors. Starting in 1956, Felda had, by the end of 1981, developed 308 land schemes covering an area of 1.4 million acres planted predominantly with oil palm (59.4%) and rubber (31.6%). The land schemes have settled a total of 70,600 families or over 400,000 people. The integrated programs existing in the Felda schmes are the focus of analysis for this study. Out of the universe of 308 Felda schemes, 26 schemes were randomly selected for the study. In each scheme, 2 surveys were conducted: first, the staff surveys to gather information on the organizational factors and extent of integration in existence in the scheme and then household surveys to gather information on the extent of community support for the integrated program and the performance of the program. In the case of the performance variables, the information gathered from the household survey was supplemented by the records from the Felda scheme office. In the sample of 26 schemes, a total of 1641 settler households were selected for the household survey and 363 staff were selected for the staff survey. The surveys were conducted in the 1st quarter of 1982. The results indicate that the Felda mode of delivering population and community development services has been very effective. Over 55.2% of the eligible women were found to be practicing family planning (compared to about 35.5% for the national rural average), while over 78.9% of the eligible women utilized postnatal health care facilities. About 1 in 3 of the eligible children in Felda schemes attend kindergarten classes, while over 46.9% of the Felda households are involved in some form of extramural income generating activities. The more integrated the program in a particular community, the more

  5. Supervised Agricultural Experience Instruction in Agricultural Teacher Education Programs: A National Descriptive Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rank, Bryan D.; Retallick, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    Faculty in agricultural teacher education programs are responsible for preparing future teachers to lead effective school-based agricultural education programs. However, agriculture teachers are having difficulty implementing supervised agricultural experience (SAE), even though they value it conceptually as a program component. In an effort to…

  6. Children Learning Computer Programming: Experiments with Languages, Curricula and Programmable Devices. Technical Report No. 250.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyer, S. A.; Cannara, A. B.

    An experiment was conducted to study how children, aged 10-15 years, learn concepts relevant to computer programing and how they learn modern programing languages. The implicit educational goal was to teach thinking strategies through the medium of programing concepts and their applications. The computer languages Simper and Logo were chosen…

  7. A 5-year experience with an elective scholarly concentrations program

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Paul; Green, Emily P.; Park, Yoon S.; Gruppuso, Philip A.

    2015-01-01

    Problem Programs that encourage scholarly activities beyond the core curriculum and traditional biomedical research are now commonplace among US medical schools. Few studies have generated outcome data for these programs. The goal of the present study was to address this gap. Intervention The Scholarly Concentration (SC) Program, established in 2006 at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, is a 4-year elective program that not only encourages students to pursue scholarly work that may include traditional biomedical research but also seeks to broaden students’ focus to include less traditional areas. We compared characteristics and academic performance of SC students and non-SC students for the graduating classes of 2010–2014. Context Approximately one-third of our students opt to complete an SC during their 4-year undergraduate medical education. Because this program is additional to the regular MD curriculum, we sought to investigate whether SC students sustained the academic achievement of non-SC students while at the same time producing scholarly work as part of the program. Outcome Over 5 years, 35% of students elected to enter the program and approximately 81% of these students completed the program. The parameters that were similar for both SC and non-SC students were age at matriculation, admission route, proportion of undergraduate science majors, and number of undergraduate science courses. Most academic indicators, including United States Medical Licensing Examinations scores, were similar for the two groups; however, SC students achieved more honors in the six core clerkships and were more likely to be inducted into the medical school's two honor societies. Residency specialties selected by graduates in the two groups were similar. SC students published an average of 1.3 peer-reviewed manuscripts per student, higher than the 0.8 manuscripts per non-SC student (p=0.013). Conclusions An elective, interdisciplinary scholarly program with

  8. Implementing Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training Programs in High Schools: Iowa's Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyme, Derek B; Atkins, Dianne L

    2017-02-01

    To understand perceived barriers to providing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) education, implementation processes, and practices in high schools. Iowa has required CPR as a graduation requirement since 2011 as an unfunded mandate. A cross-sectional study was performed through multiple choice surveys sent to Iowa high schools to collect data about school demographics, details of CPR programs, cost, logistics, and barriers to implementation, as well as automated external defibrillator training and availability. Eighty-four schools responded (26%), with the most frequently reported school size of 100-500 students and faculty size of 25-50. When the law took effect, 51% of schools had training programs already in place; at the time of the study, 96% had successfully implemented CPR training. Perceived barriers to implementation were staffing, time commitment, equipment availability, and cost. The average estimated startup cost was CPR training programs can be implemented with reasonable resource and time allocations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The US DV Visa Lottery Program and the African experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article discusses the pros and cons of the US State Department-sponsored DV Visa lottery Program (DLVP) for the poor countries and its role in shaping perceptions of Black African immigrants in the US territory (the cultural potpourri). Using the brain drain, assimilation and ethnic hegemonic models and sporadic ...

  10. Distal Deletion of Chromosome 11q Encompassing Jacobsen Syndrome without Platelet Abnormality

    OpenAIRE

    Sheth, Frenny J; Datar, Chaitanya; Andrieux, Joris; Pandit, Anand; Nayak, Darshana; Rahman, Mizanur; Sheth, Jayesh J

    2014-01-01

    Terminal 11q deletion, known as Jacobsen syndrome (JBS), is a rare genetic disorder associated with numerous dysmorphic features. We studied two cases with multiple congenital anomalies that were cytogenetically detected with deletions on 11q encompassing JBS region: 46,XX,der(11) del(11)(q24). Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) analysis confirmed partial deletion of 11.8–11.9 Mb at 11q24.1q25 (case 1) and 13.9–14 Mb deletion at 11q23.3q25 together with 7.3–7.6 Mb duplication at 1...

  11. Onboarding for Pathology Residency Programs-The Montefiore Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébert, Tiffany Michele; Szymanski, James; Mantilla, Jose; McLemore, Lauren; Walsh, Ronald; Vasovic, Ljiljana; Steinberg, Jacob J; Prystowsky, Michael B

    2016-01-01

    Onboarding is a system frequently used in the corporate world as a means of orienting incoming employees to their duties and inculcating the workplace values. The program aims to facilitate transition into new work roles and improve employee retention rates. At Montefiore, we have instituted an onboarding curriculum that is given to new anatomic and clinical pathology residents about a month prior to the start of residency. The program includes an introductory video series of basic histology and a series of anatomic and clinical case studies illustrating basic laboratory principles. This didactic content is tagged to learning objectives and short self-assessment modules. In addition, content related to the work ethos at Montefiore and the role of the core competencies and milestones in residency education are included. Finally, a broader component of the onboarding gives the incoming residents a social welcome to our area, including key information about living in the area surrounding Montefiore. The program has been well received by our residents for whom the content has helped to boost confidence when starting. We feel that the program is helpful in ensuring that all incoming residents start having received the same baseline didactic content. Transmitting this didactic content via onboarding allows our residents to begin the work of learning pathology immediately, rather than spending the first weeks of residency covering remedial content such as basic histology. Such a program may be useful to other pathology residencies, most of whom have residents from a range of backgrounds and whose prior exposure to pathology may be limited.

  12. ESRO study program for a space experiment on gravitation theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, G. M.

    1971-01-01

    ESRO is considering a space experiment which is the definition phase. A more complete utilization of space techniques, leading to highly accurate acceleration measurements in a heliocentric spacecraft, together with an improved laser signal propagation method (using a space-borne atomic clock), could substantially increase the validity of the gravitational time delay test during solar conjunction. Preliminary investigations of the primary required techniques were carried out. These studies included an orbit analysis, investigation of drag-free techniques, and studies of the time measuring instrument. These studies were used to define the framework of a space experiment on gravitation theories. A preliminary feasibility study of the mission is being undertaken.

  13. A Monumental Experience: The Undergraduate Program in Washington, DC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betsock, Lori

    2009-08-01

    All undergraduate chemical science students are invited to attend the Undergraduate Program at the 238th ACS National Meeting in Washington, DC on August 16-17, 2009. This educational and career-oriented program is designed to increase our understanding of the world with chemistry. Symposia will focus on the chemistry of our oceans and atmosphere. Nobel Laureate Susan Solomon will be the featured Eminent Scientist speaker. Attend the Graduate School Reality Check and graduate school networking events to meet and talk with graduate school recruiters. All events will take place in the Capital Hilton (1001 16th Street NW), except for the Undergraduate Poster Session and Sci-Mix, which will be held in the Walter E. Washington Convention Center, located between 7th and 9th Streets and N Street and Mt. Vernon Place (approximately K Street).

  14. The Persint visualization program for the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Pomarède, D

    2003-01-01

    The Persint program is designed for the three-dimensional representation of objects and for the interfacing and access to a variety of independent applications, in a fully interactive way. Facilities are provided for the spatial navigation and the definition of the visualization properties, in order to interactively set the viewing and viewed points, and to obtain the desired perspective. In parallel, applications may be launched through the use of dedicated interfaces, such as the interactive reconstruction and display of physics events. Recent developments have focalized on the interfacing to the XML ATLAS General Detector Description AGDD, making it a widely used tool for XML developers. The graphics capabilities of this program were exploited in the context of the ATLAS 2002 Muon Testbeam where it was used as an online event display, integrated in the online software framework and participating in the commissioning and debug of the detector system.

  15. Urgent lung transplantation national program: the Italian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretagostini, R; Peritore, D; Rizzato, L; Stabile, D; D'Alessandro, F; Michelangeli, G; Vespasiano, F; Costa, A Nanni

    2013-09-01

    An urgent lung transplantation national program in Italy was developed over the past three years. Indispensable conditions that were included in the program were invasive respiratory support and/or extracorporeal vascular device (DECAP excluded). The aim of this study was to test the effectiveness of the program. We analyzed urgent lung requests received between 2009 and 2011 taking into account primary pathology, request outcome, average waiting time, and organ origin. Taking as reference the same period of time, we also examined the ordinary waiting list, waiting list mortality, and number of transplantations performed and we have compared them with another three-year period prior to the activation of the program. The total number of urgent requests was 43. Primary pathologies with the highest incidence proportion were cystic fibrosis (40%) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (26.6%). A total of 34 requests (79%) were successfully dealt with and 9 of them were suspended because of worsening conditions. The average waiting time was 17.9 days. During the same period of time 340 lung transplantations were performed and there were 499, 524, and 564 wait-listed patients in 2009, 2010, and 2011, respectively. The mortality rate was 21.3%. Over the previous three-year period 295 transplantations were performed and there were 457, 476, and 464 wait-listed patients in 2006, 2007, and 2008, respectively. Also the mortality rate was 25.3%. Urgent lung transplantations can provide patients in an imminent life-threatening situation with adequate care without affecting the mortality rate of patients on the ordinary waiting list. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Designing fractional factorial split-plot experiments using integer programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capehart, Shay R.; Keha, Ahmet; Kulahci, Murat

    2011-01-01

    Split-plot designs are commonly used in industrial experiments when there are hard-to-change and easy-to-change factors. Due to the number of factors and resource limitations, it is more practical to run a fractional factorial split-plot (FFSP) design. These designs are variations of the fraction...

  17. Experiences of Bridging Program Students at a Regional Satellite Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsom, Sandra; Greenaway, Ruth; Marshman, Margaret

    2017-01-01

    The benefits of higher education to individuals and to society are acknowledged both in Australia and internationally. Increased access to higher education means that greatly diverse students are beginning their tertiary learning journey. We investigate the experiences of a group of non-traditional students undertaking a tertiary preparation…

  18. Implementing NICU critical thinking programs: one unit's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Denise; Pilcher, Jobeth

    2008-01-01

    Critical thinking is the hallmark of today's nursing practice environment. Nowhere is this more critical than in the high-tech environment of the NICU. Despite the importance of critical thinking in nursing practice, there is limited information on the process of teaching new NICU nurses to think critically. Based on the principles of adult education, orientation and continuing education for NICU nurses should be goal directed, build on the learner's prior experience, and build in opportunities for active participation, reflection, and experiential learning. This article reviews the principles of adult education and their application to the process of teaching critical thinking in the NICU. One unit's experience of critical thinking education is used to provide concrete examples of how NICU education can be transformed from a traditional didactic methodology to a more dynamic experiential approach.

  19. Marginal Ice Zone (MIZ) Program: Science and Experiment Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    followed by a Fram Strait ice edge component called SIZEX (Seasonal Ice Zone Experiment) (Johannessen and Sandven, 1989) in early spring 1989. The focus...from the Arctic Basin through Fram Strait as sea ice (about 105 m3 s −1) is roughly comparable to the total continental runoff entering the basin. In...summer. A project timeline (Figure 3) provides an overview of field operations. The flexible nature of ice- mounted and mobile, autonomous oceanographic

  20. Optimizing the Effectiveness of CME Program: NAMS Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuldeep Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available purposeful learning require strong basis of principles of adult learning along with a sound knowledge and requisite skills in both psychology as well as technology of medical education. Assessing effectiveness of a CME program is as important as the organization of learning activities and delivery of academic program as these may provide further directions for enhancing the efficacy of the CME delivery system.Objective: (i The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of well planned and conducted CME program in terms of enhancing knowledge and competence of the participants. (ii To explore if the gain in knowledge and competence, if any, can be attributed to the interactive design of the educational process.Methods: The study was conducted during NAMS-AIIMS Regional Symposium on Sleep Medicine at AIIMS, Jodhpur as part of NAMSCON 2013. After explaining the objectives of the study to the participants and assurance of confidentiality, a validated and pre-tested questionnaire consisting of 30 multiple choice, single response questions, was administered to 103 participants. Following intervention consisting of didactic lectures by experts in different aspects of sleep medicine, interactive sessions and problem triggered sessions consisting of clinical data, participants were re-administered post test questions which were, however, different from pre-test but had similar difficulty level.Result: The response rate of participants was 89%. Pre-intervention scores were 11.76 ± 4.4, with only 26 % of participants achieving an arbitrary pass score of 50 %. Comparison of paired score of participants who attempted both pre and post tests (n=59 showed improvement from 12.1 ±4.6 to 18.3 ± 3.8 which was significant (p <0.05. 84.7 % of participants secured above pre decided 50% score. The mean increase in the score was 6.2 with 95% CIs 4.8; 7.5 (P <0.001. Higher gain in knowledge and competencies is attributed to intense interactive

  1. A European Acid Rain Program based on the US experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, U. Steiner; Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    2000-01-01

    The paper shows that cost-effective involvement of the source location involves utmost difficulty in practice. Based on the RAINS model, it is recommended that source location should be ignored in a European market for SO2, as is the case in the US Acid Rain Program. Based on the political target...... levels in the Second Sulfur Protocol from 1994, free trade will, compared to Command-And-Control, lead to 37% cost-savings and 2% environmental degradation. To mitigate this 2% environmental degradation, we recommend that some of the large cost-savings should be reallocated in further overall reduction...

  2. [The accreditation program in hospitals: Clalit Health Services experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Ratson, Edna; Dreiher, Jacob; Wirtheim, Eytan; Perlman, Lily; Gruzman, Carlos; Rosenbaum, Ziv; Davidson, Ehud

    2011-04-01

    Accreditation is a process for assessing the healthcare organization, to determine if it meets a set of requirements designed to improve quality of care. White research regarding the benefits of accreditation is lacking, accreditation has been shown to be associated with promoting quality. Accreditation differs from licensing and quality assurance audits such as ISO. In various countries, the accreditation processes have been in operation in heaLthcare organization for decades. In the U.S.A., the Leading organization for accreditation of healthcare organizations is the Joint Commission. Accreditation Canada is the leading authority for accreditation in Canada. The Australian Council for Healthcare Standards and the King's Fund in the United Kingdom are other noted authorities for accreditation. Several European countries have initiated accreditation programs and some are in the process of implementing such programs. In Israel, no national accreditation system exists, although the Ministry of Health conducts audits on specific issues, and for relicensing of hospitals, and the Scientific Council of the Israel Medical Association conducts audits for recognizing a department as suitable for residency. Clalit Health Services is the first healthcare organization in Israel to gain Joint Commission International (JCI) accreditation. Three hospitals run by Clalit (Ha'emek, Meir and Soroka) have been accredited by JCI, and another four are in the process of accreditation by JCI. An organized national accreditation scheme in Israel is a challenging process, yet it appears to be a central act for promoting the quality of care in hospitals.

  3. Role of Mecp2 in Experience-Dependent Epigenetic Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph A. Zimmermann

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the X-linked gene MECP2, the founding member of a family of proteins recognizing and binding to methylated DNA, are the genetic cause of a devastating neurodevelopmental disorder in humans, called Rett syndrome. Available evidence suggests that MECP2 protein has a critical role in activity-dependent neuronal plasticity and transcription during brain development. Moreover, recent studies in mice show that various posttranslational modifications, notably phosphorylation, regulate Mecp2’s functions in learning and memory, drug addiction, depression-like behavior, and the response to antidepressant treatment. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis drives the stress response and its deregulation increases the risk for a variety of mental disorders. Early-life stress (ELS typically results in sustained HPA-axis deregulation and is a major risk factor for stress related diseases, in particular major depression. Interestingly, Mecp2 protein has been shown to contribute to ELS-dependent epigenetic programming of Crh, Avp, and Pomc, all of these genes enhance HPA-axis activity. Hereby ELS regulates Mecp2 phosphorylation, DNA binding, and transcriptional activities in a tissue-specific and temporospatial manner. Overall, these findings suggest MECP2 proteins are so far underestimated and have a more dynamic role in the mediation of the gene-environment dialog and epigenetic programming of the neuroendocrine stress system in health and disease.

  4. International Experience with Key Program Elements of IndustrialEnergy Efficiency or Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Target-SettingPrograms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Kramer, Klaas Jan

    2008-02-02

    Target-setting agreements, also known as voluntary ornegotiated agreements, have been used by a number of governments as amechanism for promoting energy efficiency within the industrial sector. Arecent survey of such target-setting agreement programs identified 23energy efficiency or GHG emissions reduction voluntary agreement programsin 18 countries. International best practice related to target-settingagreement programs calls for establishment of a coordinated set ofpolicies that provide strong economic incentives as well as technical andfinancial support to participating industries. The key program elementsof a target-setting program are the target-setting process,identification of energy-saving technologies and measures usingenergy-energy efficiency guidebooks and benchmarking as well as byconducting energy-efficiency audits, development of an energy-savingsaction plan, development and implementation of energy managementprotocols, development of incentives and supporting policies, monitoringprogress toward targets, and program evaluation. This report firstprovides a description of three key target-setting agreement programs andthen describes international experience with the key program elementsthat comprise such programs using information from the three keytarget-setting programs as well as from other international programsrelated to industrial energy efficiency or GHG emissionsreductions.

  5. Teaching and learning curriculum programs: recommendations for postgraduate pharmacy experiences in education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Eric A; Brown, Bonnie; Gettig, Jacob; Martello, Jay L; McClendon, Katie S; Smith, Kelly M; Teeters, Janet; Ulbrich, Timothy R; Wegrzyn, Nicole; Bradley-Baker, Lynette R

    2014-08-01

    Recommendations for the development and support of teaching and learning curriculum (TLC) experiences within postgraduate pharmacy training programs are discussed. Recent attention has turned toward meeting teaching- and learning-related educational outcomes through a programmatic process during the first or second year of postgraduate education. These programs are usually coordinated by schools and colleges of pharmacy and often referred to as "teaching certificate programs," though no national standards or regulation of these programs currently exists. In an effort to describe the landscape of these programs and to develop a framework for their basic design and content, the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Pharmacy Practice Section's Task Force on Student Engagement and Involvement, with input from the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, reviewed evidence from the literature and conference proceedings and considered author experience and expertise over a two-year period. The members of the task force created and reached consensus on a policy statement and 12 recommendations to guide the development of best practices of TLC programs. The recommendations address topics such as the value of TLC programs, program content, teaching and learning experiences, feedback for participants, the development of a teaching portfolio, the provision of adequate resources for TLC programs, programmatic assessment and improvement, program transparency, and accreditation. TLC programs provide postgraduate participants with valuable knowledge and skills in teaching applicable to the practitioner and academician. Postgraduate programs should be transparent to candidates and seek to ensure the best experiences for participants through systematic program implementation and assessments. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. EPA-RTP STEM Outreach Program recognized for Excellence in Volunteer Experience and Mobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA-RTP’s Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) Outreach Program was recently awarded two US2020 STEM Mentoring Awards – one for Excellence in Volunteer Experience, and a second for Volunteer Mobilization.

  7. Mucho camino: the experiences of two undocumented Mexican mothers participating in their child's early intervention program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alvarado, M Irma

    2004-01-01

    This study describes the experiences of two mothers of Mexican origin who are immigrants living under undocumented status in the United States and who participated in their children's early intervention programs...

  8. COMPARING SEARCHING AND SORTING ALGORITHMS EFFICIENCY IN IMPLEMENTING COMPUTATIONAL EXPERIMENT IN PROGRAMMING ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sagan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This article considers different aspects which allow defining correctness of choosing sorting algorithms. Also some algorithms, needed for computational experiments for certain class of programs, are compared.

  9. Successes and Challenges in the SAGE (Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience) REU Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braile, L. W.; Baldridge, W. S.; Pellerin, L.; Ferguson, J. F.; Bedrosian, P.; Biehler, S.; Jiracek, G. R.; Snelson, C. M.; Kelley, S.; McPhee, D.

    2014-12-01

    The SAGE program was initiated in 1983 to provide an applied geophysics research and education experience for students. Since 1983, 820 students have completed the SAGE summer program. Beginning in 1992, with funding from the NSF, SAGE has included an REU (Research Experience for Undergraduates) experience for selected undergraduate students from U.S. colleges and universities. Since 1992, 380 undergraduate REU students have completed the SAGE program. The four week, intensive, summer program is based in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and involves students in learning geophysical theory and applications; collection of geophysical field data in the northern Rio Grande Rift area; data processing, modeling and interpretation; and presentation (oral and written) of results of each student's research results. Students (undergraduates, graduates and professionals) and faculty are together on a school campus for the summer program. Successful strategies (developed over the years) of the program include teamwork experience, mentoring of REUs (by faculty and more senior students), cultural interchange due to students from many campuses across the U.S. and international graduate students, including industry visitors who work with the students and provide networking, a capstone experience of the summer program that includes all students making a "professional-meeting" style presentation of their research and submitting a written report, a follow-up workshop for the REU students to enhance and broaden their experience, and providing professional development for the REUs through oral or poster presentations and attendance at a professional meeting. Program challenges include obtaining funding from multiple sources; significant time investment in program management, reporting, and maintaining contact with our many funding sources and industry affiliates; and, despite significant efforts, limited success in recruiting racial and ethnic minority students to the program.

  10. The Impact of Parental Involvement on a Structured Youth Program Experience: A Qualitative Inquiry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mat D. Duerden

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Parental involvement is an often proposed, but rarely researched, key element of youth programs. Questions remain regarding the impact of parental involvement on program processes and outcomes. Qualitative data were collected over a one-year period with youth participants (n=46, parents (n=26, and teachers (n=5 associated with an international immersion/service learning program for adolescents. Three main research questions guided the data analysis: (1 what role does parental involvement play in the youths’ experience in the program; (2 how does parental involvement in the program influence the parent/child relationship; and (3 what role does parental involvement play in terms of the program’s long-term impact on the youth participants? Findings suggest a relationship between parental involvement in youth programs and improved parent/child communication, bonding, and perceptions of one another. Findings also suggest that having a common ground experience prolonged the experience’s positive post-participation effects.

  11. Does Prior RN Clinical Experience Predict Academic Success in Graduate Nurse Practitioner Programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Banna, Majeda M; Briggs, Linda A; Leslie, Mayri Sagady; Athey, Erin K; Pericak, Arlene; Falk, Nancy L; Greene, Jessica

    2015-05-01

    There is limited evidence on whether prior RN clinical experience is predictive of academic success in graduate nurse practitioner (NP) programs. The purpose of this study was to explore whether the frequently held assumption that more prior clinical experience is associated with better academic success in The George Washington University online NP programs. Applications (n = 106) for clinical NP students entering from 2008-2010 were examined along with data on academic performance. No relationship was found between years of prior RN clinical experience and three educational outcome variables (cumulative grade point average [GPA], clinical course GPA, and having failed any courses or been put on probation). However, students with the most prior RN clinical experience were less likely to graduate in 4 years, compared with those with the least experience. These findings serve as a building block of empirical evidence for admissions committees as they consider entry requirements for NP programs. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Design Strategies and Knowledge in Object-Oriented Programming: Effects of Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detienne, Francoise

    1995-01-01

    Presents research findings from an empirical study of design strategies and knowledge used in object-oriented (OO) software design by programmers both experienced and not experienced with OO programming. Results indicated that levels of experience with OO programming affect the design process. (Author/JKP)

  13. Does Teaching Experience Matter? Examining Biology Teachers' Prior Knowledge for Teaching in an Alternative Certification Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrichsen, Patricia J.; Abell, Sandra K.; Pareja, Enrique M.; Brown, Patrick L.; Lankford, Deanna M.; Volkmann, Mark J.

    2009-01-01

    Alternative certification programs (ACPs) have been proposed as a viable way to address teacher shortages, yet we know little about how teacher knowledge develops within such programs. The purpose of this study was to investigate prior knowledge for teaching among students entering an ACP, comparing individuals with teaching experience to those…

  14. The Effects of Honors Program Participation on Experiences of Good Practices and Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Tricia A.; Pascarella, Ernest T.; Colangelo, Nicholas; Assouline, Susan G.

    2007-01-01

    Using multi-institution data and a longitudinal, pretest-posttest design, this study investigated the impact of honors programs on student experiences of good practices in undergraduate education as well as cognitive development in the first year of college. We found students in honors programs advantaged in terms of the good practice measures…

  15. Teaching for Transformative Educational Experience in a Sport for Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Paul M.; Jacobs, Jenn M.; Ressler, James D.; Jung, Jinhong

    2016-01-01

    Despite the assumption that Sport for Development and Peace programs can foster social change, many fail to provide intentional educational experiences. This limits the attainment and sustainability of positive outcomes for participants and communities. The literature calls for such programs to use sport as an educational tool that shifts power to…

  16. A Collective Self-Study to Improve Program Coherence of Clinical Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaras, Anastasia P.; Frank, Toya Jones; Williams, Monique Apollon; Christopher, Emily; Rodick, William Harry, III.

    2016-01-01

    Student feedback collected through program evaluation of secondary education licensure and Master's program clinical experiences prompted us to conduct a collective self-study. We used a reflective framework for analysis and discussion of the shifts students in our courses made as they progressed from observers to practicing teachers. Along with…

  17. Experiences and Outcomes of a Women's Leadership Development Program: A Phenomenological Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brue, Krystal L.; Brue, Shawn A.

    2016-01-01

    Women's leadership training programs provide organizations opportunities to value women leaders as organizational resources. This qualitative research utilized phenomenological methodology to examine lived experiences of seven alumni of a women's-only leadership program. We conducted semi-structured interviews to clarify what learning elements…

  18. The effect of a science work experience program for teachers on the classroom environment: A qualitative program evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Wendy Michelle

    Science Work Experience Programs for Teachers (SWEPTs) provide an opportunity for science and math teachers to work in research laboratories during the summer to experience science as it is practiced in the laboratory-setting. Through the use of interviews with teachers and students, classroom observations, and an analysis of printed student sheets and student work, the lived experience of a cohort of program participants in Columbia University's Summer Research Program for Secondary School Science Teachers was recorded in an effort to describe the effect of experience in a SWEPT on the classroom environment of teacher participants and student outcomes. Relying on Social Learning Theory and science education reform documentation as a theoretical framework the following dimensions of the classroom were examined: (1) emergent themes that include the participants' perceptions of the importance of technology in the classroom, (2) interpersonal relationships with the teachers at the participants' schools, fellow program participants, research scientists, and students, and (3) changes in epistemological structure, curriculum, instructional strategies, and classroom practices. Methodological and theoretical implications are addressed with respect to future studies, and suggestions for refinement of SWEPTs are provided.

  19. Supporting the whole student: Inclusive program design for making undergraduate research experiences accessible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haacker-Santos, R.; Allen, L.; Batchelor, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    As undergraduate research experiences have become an unofficial pre-requisite to enter graduate school programs in the sciences, we have to make sure that these experiences are inclusive and accessible to all students. Program managers who make a conscious effort to recruit students from traditionally under-represented groups, including veterans, non-traditional students or students with disabilities, are often unaware of the financial and program implications these students require, and discover that their current program design might inadvertently exclude or not fully support these students. The SOARS Program, an undergraduate-to-graduate bridge program in the atmospheric sciences, has supported this group of students for over 15 years. We have found that we needed to adjust some program elements and secure extra funding sources to holistically support our students in their research experience, however, the program and the students have reaped tremendous benefits. Involving non-traditional students or veterans in our program has raised the maturity level and problem solving skills of the group, and having students with disabilities participate has been a vehicle for broadening perspective and diverse knowledge into the field of study, e.g. researching weather and climate beyond what you can 'see'. This presentation will highlight some of the findings from the SOARS program experience, and will share practices for recruitment and holistic support to ensure student success. We will share resources and tips on inclusive program design, including working with students with family commitments or physical disabilities, and will report on the enormous program benefits and peer learning these students have brought to the student cohorts and research labs they are working in.

  20. Mothers’ experiences in the Nurse-Family Partnership program: a qualitative case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landy Christine

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few studies have explored the experiences of low income mothers participating in nurse home visiting programs. Our study explores and describes mothers' experiences participating in the Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP Program, an intensive home visiting program with demonstrated effectiveness, from the time of program entry before 29 weeks gestation until their infant's first birthday. Methods A qualitative case study approach was implemented. A purposeful sample of 18 low income, young first time mothers participating in a pilot study of the NFP program in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada partook in one to two face to face in-depth interviews exploring their experiences in the program. All interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. Conventional content analysis procedures were used to analyze all interviews. Data collection and initial analysis were implemented concurrently. Results The mothers participating in the NFP program were very positive about their experiences in the program. Three overarching themes emerged from the data: 1. Getting into the NFP program; 2. The NFP nurse is an expert, but also like a friend providing support; and 3. Participating in the NFP program is making me a better parent. Conclusions Our findings provide vital information to home visiting nurses and to planners of home visiting programs about mothers' perspectives on what is important to them in their relationships with their nurses, how nurses and women are able to develop positive therapeutic relationships, and how nurses respond to mothers' unique life situations while home visiting within the NFP Program. In addition our findings offer insights into why and under what circumstances low income mothers will engage in nurse home visiting and how they expect to benefit from their participation.

  1. PROGRAM OF PALLIATIVE CANCER CARE – OUR EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Slánská

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Annually more than 27,000 persons die of cancer in the Czech Republic and the overall incidence of malignancies is still increasing. These data shows the need for affordable and good follow-up care especially for patients without any cancer treatment due to irreversible progression of tumor. Currently the outpatient palliative cancer care gets more into the forefront. Prerequisite for a well working outpatient palliative care is cooperation with general practitioners and home health care agencies. The purpose of the so called program of palliative cancer care is to guide a patient in palliative cancer care and to improve the cooperation among health care providers. Methods: During the period from January 2008 to October 2010 we evaluated in patient without any oncology treatment due to irreversible progression of tumor. Results: In palliative outpatient clinic we treated 446 patients, 119 of them received home care services with average length of 27.8 days. 77 patients died at home, 51 in health facilities and 41 in inpatient hospice care. Conclusion: We present pilot study focusing on outpatient palliative cancer care which shows the real benefit from early indication of palliative cancer care. This type of care allows patients to stay as long as possible at home among their close relatives.

  2. Marketing Program Standardization: The Experience of TNCs in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Sagan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine the rate of standardization of marketing programs in transnational corporations in the consumer goods market in Poland, which currently is one of the fastest growing markets in the world. An important research objective was to observe how Polish consumers adopt the marketing patterns and related lifestyles from countries of Western Europe and the USA. The empirical tests and data, collected in a sample survey of 35 transnational corporations and their 140 products, and using varied methods of statistical inference, allowed to formulate the following conclusions. The analyzed TNC’s adopted a clear standardization strategy in the Polish market. Among the analyzed products, 2/3 of them have been entirely transferred from foreign markets into the Polish market. A detailed analysis has indicated that the standardization rate of product and its items in the FMCG market in Poland is high and very high, and significantly higher than the pricing and advertising strategy standardization rates. The product standardization rate in the Polish market has been slightly higher than the rate in the developed countries, yet the pricing standardization has been significantly lower. The standardization of advertising strategies showed similar features.

  3. Early Experience with a Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Quality Improvement Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Derek; Edmiston, Rachel; Bijoor, Pooja; Deshpande, Rahul; de'Liguori Carino, Nicola; Ammori, Basil; Sherlock, David J

    2014-01-01

    This project aims to assess the impact of the introduction of a hepatobiliary and pancreatic (HPB) Quality Improvement Program (QIP) on postoperative complications following liver, biliary and pancreatic surgery. A prospective analysis of postoperative complications over a six month period was performed. Complications were analysed and graded according to internationally agreed definitions. Justification was sought and errors identified. Weekly meetings were performed to review each complication enabling an action plan to be created to prevent future recurrence. Rates were compared with previously audited and published results, using the chi-square test. A total of 326 procedures were performed over the six months including 30 pancreatectomies, 45 liver resections and 251 other procedures. 37 patients developed complications (11.3%) with 47 complications in total including two deaths. Using the ISGPS grading, eight complications were identified; two grade A, four grade B and two grade C. There were three grade A ISGLS complications and one grade B. 30 complications were justified as unavoidable, 16 as avoidable and one as indeterminate. Action plans included continued monitoring (n=41), formulation of new policy (n=3), individual counselling (n=4), educational offering (n=4). When compared with 2010 complication rates, 114 complications occurred in 233 liver operations during the baseline period, compared with 17 complications in 45 liver operations during the QIP period, OR=0.63 (95% CI: 0.33 to 1.22), p=0.17 and 86 complications occurred in 99 pancreatic resections during the baseline period, compared with 20 complications in 30 pancreatic resections during the QIP period OR=0.30 (95% CI: 0.12 to 0.79), p=0.01 The HPB QIP is a rigorous approach to grade every complication and death. A statistically significant reduction in pancreas related complications has already been obtained. Further work is required to determine the persistence and magnitude of this quality

  4. Instructor-Led Engagement and Immersion Programs: Transformative Experiences of Study Abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Natalie; Crawford, Pat

    2012-01-01

    Study abroad is associated with transformative experiences--that is, events that lead to a change in how a person sees the world. In this study the authors sought to ascertain whether there are common themes of transformative experiences and whether these transformations are related to particular types of study abroad programs. Principles guiding…

  5. Online Student Evaluation Improves Course Experience Questionnaire Results in a Physiotherapy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Beatrice; Jones, Sue; Straker, Leon

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports the use of an online student evaluation system, Course Experience on the Web (CEW), in a physiotherapy program to improve their Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ) results. CEW comprises a course survey instrument modeled on the CEQ and a tailored unit survey instrument. Closure of the feedback loop is integral in the CEW…

  6. Suggestions for Implementing First Year Experience Learning Communities in Teacher Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintz, Kathryn; Genareo, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    This article describes the creation of a First Year Experience learning community in a teacher education program. The First Year Experience model was adopted by the university because of declining enrollment, retention, and graduation rates and has been generally successful in the education department. With little information available for teacher…

  7. Integrating Clinical Experiences in a TESOL Teacher Education Program: Curriculum Mapping as Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baecher, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Across all certification areas, teacher education is being challenged to better integrate clinical experiences with coursework. This article describes the process of curriculum mapping and its impact on the organization of clinical experiences in a master's TESOL program over a 1-year redesign process. Although curriculum mapping has been employed…

  8. Faculty Experiences of Merger and Organizational Change in a Social Work Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adedoyin, A Christson; Miller, Monte; Jackson, Mary S; Dodor, Bernice; Hall, Kristen

    2016-01-01

    Social work programs are experiencing unprecedented organizational changes due to budget cuts, dwindling resources, global, and technological challenges. However, there is limited information in the literature about the merger experiences of faculty in social work programs. On one hand undergoing merger and reorganization provides the opportunity to reorganize, reprioritize, re-assess, develop strategies, and explore previously untapped opportunities for social work programs. Conversely, merger experiences have caused frustration, intention to quit, confusion, and loss of professional identity for social work faculty. In this article the authors utilize a journaling method and sense-making approach of the merger experiences of some of the faculty members of a social work program in the United States. The authors suggest a framework to understand how the faculty confronted the challenges, overcame the pitfalls, and maximized the opportunities offered during the merger and organizational change process.

  9. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN GENDER AND STUDENTS’ ATTITUDE AND EXPERIENCE of USING A MATHEMATICAL SOFTWARE PROGRAM (MATLAB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet A. OCAK

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This correlation study examined the relationship between gender and the students’ attitude and prior knowledge of using one of the mathematical software programs (MATLAB. Participants were selected from one community college, one state university and one private college. Students were volunteers from three Calculus I classrooms (one class from each school in which MATLAB was used extensively. A survey regarding students’ attitude and experience on using the MATLAB program was administered to classes. The findings of the study indicated that gender differences are not related to students’ attitude and experience on the program. The results revealed slightly positive correlation between and students’ attitude and experience on the program. The implications of this study shows that teachers who use MATLAB in their instruction and classroom practices must pay attention on how much students use it, the obstacles students had to overcome to succeed in its use, and their general issues and concerns regarding MATLAB use.

  10. Online public health preparedness training programs: an evaluation of user experience with the technological environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambisan, Priya

    2010-01-01

    Several public health education programs and government agencies across the country have started offering virtual or online training programs in emergency preparedness for people who are likely to be involved in managing or responding to different types of emergency situations such as natural disasters, epidemics, bioterrorism, etc. While such online training programs are more convenient and cost-effective than traditional classroom-based programs, their success depends to a great extent on the underlying technological environment. Specifically, in an online technological environment, different types of user experiences come in to play-users' utilitarian or pragmatic experience, their fun or hedonic experience, their social experience, and most importantly, their usability experience-and these different user experiences critically shape the program outcomes, including course completion rates. This study adopts a multi-disciplinary approach and draws on theories in human computer interaction, distance learning theories, usability research, and online consumer behavior to evaluate users' experience with the technological environment of an online emergency preparedness training program and discusses its implications for the design of effective online training programs. . Data was collected using a questionnaire from 377 subjects who had registered for and participated in online public health preparedness training courses offered by a large public university in the Northeast. Analysis of the data indicates that as predicted, participants had higher levels of pragmatic and usability experiences compared to their hedonic and sociability experiences. Results also indicate that people who experienced higher levels of pragmatic, hedonic, sociability and usability experiences were more likely to complete the course(s) they registered for compared to those who reported lower levels. The study findings hold important implications for the design of effective online emergency

  11. Is the covariate based non-stationary rainfall IDF curve capable of encompassing future rainfall changes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agilan, V.; Umamahesh, N. V.

    2016-10-01

    Storm water management and other engineering design applications are primarily based on rainfall Intensity-Duration-Frequency (IDF) curves and the existing IDF curves are based on the concept of stationary Extreme Value Theory (EVT). However, during the last few decades, global climate change is intensifying the extreme precipitation events and creating a non-stationary component in the extreme rainfall time series. Subsequently, in recent years, advancements in the EVT helped the researchers to propose a method for developing non-stationary rainfall IDF curve by modelling trend present in the observed extreme rainfall series using covariate. But, is it capable of encompassing future rainfall changes? Towards answering this question, the Hyderabad city, India non-stationary rainfall IDF curves are compared with the IDF curves of two future time periods (2015-2056 and 2057-2098). Using 24 Global Climate Models' (GCMs') simulations and 'K' Nearest Neighbor (KNN) weather generator based downscaling method, the IDF curves are developed for two future time periods and they are compared with covariate based non-stationary rainfall IDF curves of the Hyderabad city. The results of this study indicate that the return of period of an extreme rainfall of the Hyderabad city is reducing. In addition, it is noted that the non-stationary IDF curve developed by modelling trend in the observed extreme rainfall with covariate is an appropriate choice for designing the Hyderabad city infrastructure under climate change.

  12. Deletion 1q43 encompassing only CHRM3 in a patient with autistic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Andrea Klunder; Ahmad, Ausaf; Shafiq, Mustafa; Brown-Kipphut, Brigette; Fong, Chin-To; Anwar Iqbal, M

    2013-02-01

    Deletions on the distal portion of the long arm of chromosome 1 result in complex and highly variable clinical phenotypes which include intellectual disability, autism, seizures, microcephaly/craniofacial dysmorphology, corpus callosal agenesis/hypogenesis, cardiac and genital anomalies, hand and foot abnormalities and short stature. Genotype-phenotype correlation reported a minimum region of 2 Mb at 1q43-q44. We report on a 3 ½ year old male patient diagnosed with autistic disorder who has social withdrawal, eating problems, repetitive stereotypic behaviors including self-injurious head banging and hair pulling, and no seizures, anxiety, or mood swings. Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) showed an interstitial deletion of 473 kb at 1q43 region (239,412,391-239,885,394; NCBI build37/hg19) harboring only CHRM3 (Acetylcholine Receptor, Muscarinic, 3; OMIM: 118494). Recently, another case with a de novo interstitial deletion of 911 kb at 1q43 encompassing three genes including CHRM3 was reported. The M3 muscarinic receptor influences a multitude of central and peripheral nervous system processes via its interaction with acetylcholine and may be an important modulator of behavior, learning and memory. We propose CHRM3 as a candidate gene responsible for our patient's specific phenotype as well as the overlapping phenotypic features of other patients with 1q43 or 1q43-q44 deletions. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  13. Distal Deletion of Chromosome 11q Encompassing Jacobsen Syndrome without Platelet Abnormality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frenny J. Sheth

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Terminal 11q deletion, known as Jacobsen syndrome (JBS, is a rare genetic disorder associated with numerous dysmorphic features. We studied two cases with multiple congenital anomalies that were cytogenetically detected with deletions on 11q encompassing JBS region: 46,XX,der(11 del(11(q24. Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH analysis confirmed partial deletion of 11.8–11.9 Mb at 11q24.1q25 (case 1 and 13.9–14 Mb deletion at 11q23.3q25 together with 7.3–7.6 Mb duplication at 12q24.32q24.33 (case 2. Dysmorphism because of the partial duplication of 12q was not overtly decipherable over the Jacobsen phenotype except for a triangular facial profile. Aberrant chromosome 11 was inherited from phenotypically normal father, carrier of balanced translocation 46,XY,t(11;12(q23.3; q24.32. In the present study, both cases had phenotypes that were milder than the ones described in literature despite having large deletion size. Most prominent features in classical JBS is thrombocytopenia, which was absent in both these cases. Therefore, detailed functional analysis of terminal 11q region is warranted to elucidate etiology of JBS and their clinical presentation.

  14. Distal Deletion of Chromosome 11q Encompassing Jacobsen Syndrome without Platelet Abnormality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Frenny J; Datar, Chaitanya; Andrieux, Joris; Pandit, Anand; Nayak, Darshana; Rahman, Mizanur; Sheth, Jayesh J

    2014-01-01

    Terminal 11q deletion, known as Jacobsen syndrome (JBS), is a rare genetic disorder associated with numerous dysmorphic features. We studied two cases with multiple congenital anomalies that were cytogenetically detected with deletions on 11q encompassing JBS region: 46,XX,der(11) del(11)(q24). Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) analysis confirmed partial deletion of 11.8-11.9 Mb at 11q24.1q25 (case 1) and 13.9-14 Mb deletion at 11q23.3q25 together with 7.3-7.6 Mb duplication at 12q24.32q24.33 (case 2). Dysmorphism because of the partial duplication of 12q was not overtly decipherable over the Jacobsen phenotype except for a triangular facial profile. Aberrant chromosome 11 was inherited from phenotypically normal father, carrier of balanced translocation 46,XY,t(11;12)(q23.3; q24.32). In the present study, both cases had phenotypes that were milder than the ones described in literature despite having large deletion size. Most prominent features in classical JBS is thrombocytopenia, which was absent in both these cases. Therefore, detailed functional analysis of terminal 11q region is warranted to elucidate etiology of JBS and their clinical presentation.

  15. 'The divorce program': gendered experiences of HIV positive mothers enrolled in PMTCT programs - the case of rural Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blystad Astrid

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For HIV infected mothers in developing countries, choosing to enroll in a prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTCT of HIV program is supposed to represent the first step towards protecting their child from possible transmission of HIV from mother to child. Counseling and testing enable HIV infected mothers to learn about their status and to obtain the benefits of a PMTCT package. The study on which this article is based explored experiences of HIV positive women and their partners linked to Prevention of Mother to Child Transmission of HIV (PMTCT programs in Chiradzulu district, Southern Malawi. Methods A qualitative study using in-depth interviews (IDIs, focus group discussion (FGDs and case studies was carried at two PMTCT sites. IDIs and FGDs were recorded and transcribed. The case studies involved a deeper inquiry into the past, present and situational factors of selected participants. Results In a context of customary matrilineal kinship, matrilocal residence patterns and complete male absence from the PMTCT program, the demand by the PMTCT program for partner disclosure played up fears of rejection among men given accusations of infidelity by the wives' relatives. This situation led many men to abandon their families. Mothers enrolled in PMTCT programs hence faced not only the fear of transmitting the virus to their infants, but also the loss of income and support associated with a departed husband and the social disgrace of a ruined family. Community members referred to the PMTCT program as 'the divorce program' Conclusions PMTCT programs may vary in effectiveness in different contexts unless they fundamentally respond to socio-cultural factors as lived out in communities they intend to serve. The PMTCT program in rural southern Malawi is a case in point.

  16. 'The divorce program': gendered experiences of HIV positive mothers enrolled in PMTCT programs - the case of rural Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njunga, John; Blystad, Astrid

    2010-10-26

    For HIV infected mothers in developing countries, choosing to enroll in a prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV program is supposed to represent the first step towards protecting their child from possible transmission of HIV from mother to child. Counseling and testing enable HIV infected mothers to learn about their status and to obtain the benefits of a PMTCT package. The study on which this article is based explored experiences of HIV positive women and their partners linked to Prevention of Mother to Child Transmission of HIV (PMTCT) programs in Chiradzulu district, Southern Malawi. A qualitative study using in-depth interviews (IDIs), focus group discussion (FGDs) and case studies was carried at two PMTCT sites. IDIs and FGDs were recorded and transcribed. The case studies involved a deeper inquiry into the past, present and situational factors of selected participants. In a context of customary matrilineal kinship, matrilocal residence patterns and complete male absence from the PMTCT program, the demand by the PMTCT program for partner disclosure played up fears of rejection among men given accusations of infidelity by the wives' relatives. This situation led many men to abandon their families. Mothers enrolled in PMTCT programs hence faced not only the fear of transmitting the virus to their infants, but also the loss of income and support associated with a departed husband and the social disgrace of a ruined family. Community members referred to the PMTCT program as 'the divorce program' PMTCT programs may vary in effectiveness in different contexts unless they fundamentally respond to socio-cultural factors as lived out in communities they intend to serve. The PMTCT program in rural southern Malawi is a case in point.

  17. Programming experience promotes higher STEM motivation among first-grade girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Master, Allison; Cheryan, Sapna; Moscatelli, Adriana; Meltzoff, Andrew N

    2017-08-01

    The gender gap in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) engagement is large and persistent. This gap is significantly larger in technological fields such as computer science and engineering than in math and science. Gender gaps begin early; young girls report less interest and self-efficacy in technology compared with boys in elementary school. In the current study (N=96), we assessed 6-year-old children's stereotypes about STEM fields and tested an intervention to develop girls' STEM motivation despite these stereotypes. First-grade children held stereotypes that boys were better than girls at robotics and programming but did not hold these stereotypes about math and science. Girls with stronger stereotypes about robotics and programming reported lower interest and self-efficacy in these domains. We experimentally tested whether positive experience with programming robots would lead to greater interest and self-efficacy among girls despite these stereotypes. Children were randomly assigned either to a treatment group that was given experience in programming a robot using a smartphone or to control groups (no activity or other activity). Girls given programming experience reported higher technology interest and self-efficacy compared with girls without this experience and did not exhibit a significant gender gap relative to boys' interest and self-efficacy. These findings show that children's views mirror current American cultural messages about who excels at computer science and engineering and show the benefit of providing young girls with chances to experience technological activities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Multilevel approach to mentoring in the Research Experiences for Undergraduates programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonine, K. E.; Dontsova, K.; Pavao-Zuckerman, M.; Paavo, B.; Hogan, D.; Oberg, E.; Gay, J.

    2015-12-01

    This presentation focuses on different types of mentoring for students participating in Research Experiences for Undergraduates programs with examples, including some new approaches, from The Environmental and Earth Systems Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program at Biosphere 2. While traditional faculty mentors play essential role in students' development as researchers and professionals, other formal and informal mentoring can be important component of the REU program and student experiences. Students receive mentoring from program directors, coordinators, and on site undergraduate advisors. While working on their research projects, REU students receive essential support and mentoring from undergraduate and graduate students and postdoctoral scientists in the research groups of their primary mentors. Cohort living and group activities give multiple opportunities for peer mentoring where each student brings their own strengths and experiences to the group. Biosphere 2 REU program puts strong emphasis on teaching students to effectively communicate their research to public. In order to help REUs learn needed skills the outreach personnel at Biosphere 2 mentor and advise students both in groups and individually, in lecture format and by personal example, on best outreach approaches in general and on individual outreach projects students develop. To further enhance and strengthen outreach mentoring we used a novel approach of blending cohort of REU students with the Cal Poly STAR (STEM Teacher And Researcher) Program fellows, future K-12 STEM teachers who are gaining research experience at Biosphere 2. STAR fellows live together with the REU students and participate with them in professional development activities, as well as perform research side by side. Educational background and experiences gives these students a different view and better preparation and tools to effectively communicate and adapt science to lay audiences, a challenge commonly facing

  19. MPH program at Manipal University, India-experiences, challenges, and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Hattangadi Vinod; Kamath, Ramachandra; Arunkumar, Govindakarnavar; Delzell, Elizabeth; Tipre, Meghan; Upadhyay, Divvy Kant; Sathiakumar, Nalini

    2013-01-01

    The UAB-ITREOH program has initiated a skill-based MPH program at Manipal University (MU), India, in 2009, to address the critical need for trained public health professionals and build institutional public health training capacity in the country. Funds from Fogarty have supported the curriculum development and specialized training of MU faculty to teach in the MPH program. The program has been successfully launched and is gaining momentum. The lessons learned from our experiences as well as several challenges faced from the initialization to execution of the program are described in the article. Government support is crucial for raising the profile of this program by accreditation, creating job opportunities and by recognizing these professionals as leaders in the public health sector. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. 5 years of experience with a large-scale mentoring program for medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinilla, Severin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present our 5-year-experience with a large-scale mentoring program for undergraduate medical students at the Ludwig Maximilians-Universität Munich (LMU. We implemented a two-tiered program with a peer-mentoring concept for preclinical students and a 1:1-mentoring concept for clinical students aided by a fully automated online-based matching algorithm. Approximately 20-30% of each student cohort participates in our voluntary mentoring program. Defining ideal program evaluation strategies, recruiting mentors from beyond the academic environment and accounting for the mentoring network reality remain challenging. We conclude that a two-tiered program is well accepted by students and faculty. In addition the online-based matching seems to be effective for large-scale mentoring programs.

  1. 5 years of experience with a large-scale mentoring program for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinilla, Severin; Pander, Tanja; von der Borch, Philip; Fischer, Martin R; Dimitriadis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present our 5-year-experience with a large-scale mentoring program for undergraduate medical students at the Ludwig Maximilians-Universität Munich (LMU). We implemented a two-tiered program with a peer-mentoring concept for preclinical students and a 1:1-mentoring concept for clinical students aided by a fully automated online-based matching algorithm. Approximately 20-30% of each student cohort participates in our voluntary mentoring program. Defining ideal program evaluation strategies, recruiting mentors from beyond the academic environment and accounting for the mentoring network reality remain challenging. We conclude that a two-tiered program is well accepted by students and faculty. In addition the online-based matching seems to be effective for large-scale mentoring programs.

  2. 78 FR 63747 - Public Housing Capital Fund Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ... Housing Development Program (which encompasses mixed-finance development), into the Capital Fund Program... that promote energy conservation and efficiency, including green construction and retrofits, which... Housing Development Program (which encompasses mixed-finance development). In 2008, the Housing and...

  3. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN GENDER AND STUDENTS’ ATTITUDE AND EXPERIENCE of USING A MATHEMATICAL SOFTWARE PROGRAM (MATLAB)

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet A. OCAK

    2006-01-01

    This correlation study examined the relationship between gender and the students’ attitude and prior knowledge of using one of the mathematical software programs (MATLAB). Participants were selected from one community college, one state university and one private college. Students were volunteers from three Calculus I classrooms (one class from each school) in which MATLAB was used extensively. A survey regarding students’ attitude and experience on using the MATLAB program was administered t...

  4. An exploration of participants' experience of an intensive care nursing transition to specialty practice program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhuvu, Auxillia E; Plummer, Virginia; Morphet, Julia

    2017-09-26

    Transition to specialty practice programs were developed to support, educate and facilitate recruitment and retention of nurses in specialised areas of practice. The intensive care nursing transition to specialty practice program in this study was implemented in 2000. To date, in Australia there are no published studies which focus on intensive care nursing transition to specialty practice programs. The study aimed to explore the effects of an intensive care nursing transition to specialty practice program offered in two intensive care units in a single Australian health service. A cross-sectional survey design was used. Quantitative data were collected from nurses who participated in the transition to specialty practice program from 2005 to 2015 using an anonymous online survey. Summary statistics and Chi-square tests were used to analyse the data. The response rate was 51.8% (n=86). Most of the transition to specialty practice program participants had medical nursing experience (n=35, 40.7%) or surgical nursing experience (n=35, 40.7%) prior to enrolling into the program. More than half (n=46, 53.5%) of the participants had worked in the intensive care units for more than two years post program. The majority of the participants (n=60, 69.8%) undertook post graduate education after the transition to specialty practice program. Significant numbers of experienced nurses undertook transition to specialty practice program into intensive care and majority of the participants reported positive results of the program. Copyright © 2017 Australian College of Critical Care Nurses Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. IMPROVING EXPERIMENT DESIGN SKILLS: USING THE JOKO TINGKIR PROGRAM AS A LEARNING TOOL OF TSUNAMI TOPIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madlazim

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Students are rarely given an opportunity to think deeply about experimental design or asked to develop experimental skills on their own. Without participating in these endeavors, they are often unaware of the many decisions necessary to construct a precise methodology. This article describes the Joko Tingkir Program as an Early Warning Tsunami, and how we have used this program as a learning tool for physics teacher candidates to improve their experimental design skills. The Joko Tingkir computer program has implemented a Tsunami Faulting Model (TFM. The TFM uses the principle that the tsunami is affected by the length and width of earthquake rupture. Both can be represented by the duration of rupture (Tdur or Exceed 50 second duration (T50Ex and the dominant period (Td. The TFM has been implemented by the Joko Tingkir computer program. When students are given a simple method using the Joko Tingkir program - such as the tutorial, observation of seismic station distribution, seismograms of the earthquake, equipment and software for this experiment, measurement of P time onset and determination of Tdur, Td and T50Ex - it allows them to focus exclusively on improving experiment design skills as indicated by significantly improved gain scores. Based on the gain analysis it can be inferred that the experiment design skills can be improved by implementation of Joko Tingkir Program as a Learning Tool of Tsunami Warning in the learning process

  6. E-Commerce Infusion into Business Education--Encompassing the Realities of an Emerging Business Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, James L.; Oladunjoye, Ganiyu Titi

    2002-01-01

    A survey of 287 business faculty found that few were infusing electronic commerce topics into existing curricula despite its growing use in business. Responses were similar regardless of faculty gender, region, and program size or level. (SK)

  7. Understanding Student Experiences in a Near-Peer Resident Shadowing Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon R. Turner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The preparation of medical students for clerkship has been criticized, both in terms of students’ ability to understand their new role as clinical trainees and in their ability to carry out that role. To begin to address this gap, this paper reports the experiences of students in a shadowing program aimed at enhancing the preparedness of medical students for clinical training. The study examined a novel program, the Resident-Medical Student Shadowing Program, in which first-year medical students at the University of Alberta shadowed a first-year resident during clinical duties over the course of eight months. Methods. A study was conducted to assess the experiences of 83 first-year medical student participants who shadowed a first-year resident intermittently for one year. Student and resident participants’ experiences were explored using semistructured interviews. Results. Students and residents experiences indicate that participation increased students’ understanding of the clinical environment and their role within it and introduced them to skills and knowledge needed to perform that role. Students reported that a close relationship with their resident enhanced their learning experience. Conclusion. This study demonstrates that a low-cost program in which first-year students shadow residents may be a useful tool for helping prepare students for clerkship.

  8. A comparison of two programs for the control of behavioral experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, W Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    Two of the most widely used programs for the control of behavioral experiments are Med Associates' MedState Notation and Coulbourn Instruments' Graphic State 2. The two systems vary considerably in their approach to programming and data recording, with Graphic State 2 using a point-and-click interface that appeals to non-programmers while MedState Notation requires the typing of programming code. Graphic State 2 provides many data analysis routines, while MedState Notation allows the user to embed simple data analysis within the behavioral protocol. Graphic State 2 is simpler to use, but MedState Notation is more versatile.

  9. A Comparison of Two Programs for the Control of Behavioral Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, W. Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    Two of the most widely used programs for the control of behavioral experiments are Med Associates? MedState Notation and Coulbourn Instruments? Graphic State 2. The two systems vary considerably in their approach to programming and data recording, with Graphic State 2 using a point-and-click interface that appeals to non-programmers while MedState Notation requires the typing of programming code. Graphic State 2 provides many data analysis routines, while MedState Notation allows the user to ...

  10. [OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE FOR THE PROGRAM FOR THE FORMATION OF HEALTHY LIFESTYLE SKILLS AMONG SCHOOLCHILDREN].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, A V; Tafeeva, E A; Vasilev, V V

    2015-01-01

    In the paper there are presented data concerning the experience of the implementation of educational programs for schoolchildren "Being healthy is fashionable ". The program has been tested in the territory of the Penza Region. The awareness of students about the factors affecting health was shown to increase by 15,8% over three years of the realization of the program. The number of students taking systematic participation in sports competitions has increased by 3.8%, going in for various sports and physical exercises in sports sections and circles has increased by 2.6%. The prevalence of regular smoking among schoolchildren decreased by 4.1%.

  11. [Computer simulation programs as an alternative for classical nerve, muscle and heart experiments using frog tissues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breves, G; Schröder, B

    2000-03-01

    Courses in Physiology include different methodical approaches such as exercises with living animals, experiments using organs or tissues from killed or slaughtered animals, application of diagnostic techniques in humans and theoretical seminars. In addition to these classical approaches computer programs for multimedia simulation of nerve, muscle and heart physiology are now a regular component of courses in Physiology at the School of Veterinary Medicine in Hannover. It is the aim of the present paper to give the first experiences about these new components.

  12. Programming Basics for Beginners. Experience of the Institute of Informatics at Tallinn University of Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Mironova

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The present paper demonstrates the teaching approach in programming basics course for novices: schoolchildren of different ages and schoolteachers. This programming course was developed at the Institute of Informatics at Tallinn University of Technology in Tallinn, Estonia and it based on many years experience in teaching programming for non-IT first year students. The main aim of the chosen teaching approach in the course is to raise the motivation and keep the learners’ interest in programming field on the high level. The idea of developed teaching technique is the implementation of the visual programming before a serious textual coding. Furthermore, authors suggest readers some ways and methods to overcome learners’ difficulties in the first stage in a textual coding.

  13. Integrating scientific knowledge into large-scale restoration programs: the CALFED Bay-Delta Program experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, K.A.; Short, A.

    2009-01-01

    Integrating science into resource management activities is a goal of the CALFED Bay-Delta Program, a multi-agency effort to address water supply reliability, ecological condition, drinking water quality, and levees in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of northern California. Under CALFED, many different strategies were used to integrate science, including interaction between the research and management communities, public dialogues about scientific work, and peer review. This paper explores ways science was (and was not) integrated into CALFED's management actions and decision systems through three narratives describing different patterns of scientific integration and application in CALFED. Though a collaborative process and certain organizational conditions may be necessary for developing new understandings of the system of interest, we find that those factors are not sufficient for translating that knowledge into management actions and decision systems. We suggest that the application of knowledge may be facilitated or hindered by (1) differences in the objectives, approaches, and cultures of scientists operating in the research community and those operating in the management community and (2) other factors external to the collaborative process and organization.

  14. Iowa's public health-based infant oral health program: a decade of experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber-Gasparoni, Karin; Kanellis, Michael J; Qian, Fang

    2010-04-01

    The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends that children have their first dental visit no later than age one. However, not all dental schools have made hands-on infant oral health programs a reality in their predoctoral programs. To target high-caries risk infants/toddlers and provide dental students more hands-on experience with this age group, the University of Iowa Department of Pediatric Dentistry established an Infant Oral Health Program (IOHP) affiliated with the local Special Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) clinic. This article reports the IOHP activities and describes how this program is integrated into a dental school curriculum. Most of the children served were around age one, from racial and ethnic minority groups, and had never been to the dentist. More than 600 fourth-year dental students received hands-on experience providing preventive dental care for infants and toddlers. A 2004 survey of dentists who graduated from the University of Iowa suggested that those who rotated at the IOHP while in dental school were more willing to see very young children when compared to dentists who did not rotate at the IOHP. These findings suggest that community-based IOHPs can provide an important community resource for preventive dental care for high-caries risk young children, while complementing the pediatric dental experience in a dental school curriculum.

  15. Perceptions of Skill Development in a Living-Learning First-Year Experience Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kerri Anna

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of students and faculty involved in a living-learning first-year experience program at a small, liberal arts institution about developing skills for life-long learning including critical thinking, written communication, and reflection and engagement across disciplines. The researcher…

  16. Does personal experience affect choice-based preferences for wildfire protection programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armando González-Cabán; Thomas P. Holmes; John B. Loomis; José J. Sánchez

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate homeowner preferences and willingness to pay for wildfire protection programs using a choice experiment with three attributes: risk, loss, and cost. A phone-mail-phone survey was used to collect data from homeowners predominantly living in medium and high wildfire risk communities in Florida. We tested three hypotheses: (1) homeowner...

  17. Learning by Experience in a Standardized Testing Culture: Investigation of a Middle School Experiential Learning Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scogin, Stephen C.; Kruger, Christopher J.; Jekkals, Regan E.; Steinfeldt, Chelsea

    2017-01-01

    Standardized testing pressure sometimes discourages schools from broadly implementing experiential learning opportunities. However, some K-12 schools are challenging the trend with greater commitment to learning by experience. STREAM (science, technology, reading, engineering, arts, mathematics) school is a project-based program providing students…

  18. The Impact of Programming Experience on Successfully Learning Systems Analysis and Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wang-chan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the author reports the results of an empirical study on the relationship between a student's programming experience and their success in a traditional Systems Analysis and Design (SA&D) class where technical skills such as dataflow analysis and entity relationship data modeling are covered. While it is possible to teach these…

  19. Disciplinary Enculturation Experiences of Three Korean Students in U.S.-Based MATESOL Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seonhee

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the disciplinary enculturation experiences of three Korean students in U.S.-based Master of Arts in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (MATESOL) programs. Guided by theories of situated learning (Lave & Wenger, 1991; Wenger, 1998) and social identities (Block, 2007; Clarke, 2008; Norton, 2009), and largely drawn…

  20. Perceptions and Lived Experiences of Illinois Parents as Teachers Program Leaders While Managing a Multigenerational Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhe Marsh, Linda

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative narrative inquiry was to explore the perceptions and lived experiences of Illinois Parents as Teachers (PAT) program leaders managing a multigenerational workforce. Supervisors state that leading a multigenerational staff possesses challenges that affect overall productivity (Bell, 2008). PAT stakeholders including…

  1. Student Experiences of High-Stakes Testing for Progression in One Undergraduate Nursing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClenny, Tammy

    2016-01-01

    High-stakes testing in undergraduate nursing education are those assessments used to make critical decisions for student progression and graduation. The purpose of this study was to explore the different ways students experience multiple high-stakes tests for progression in one undergraduate BSN program. Research participants were prelicensure…

  2. The Effectiveness of an Embedded Approach to Practicum Experiences in Educational Leadership: Program Candidates' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Mary; Chan, Tak Cheung; Jiang, Binbin

    2013-01-01

    This study examined how effective an embedded practicum experience in an educational leadership program in a Southeastern University is in serving the purpose of preparing educational leaders to meet future challenges. Findings of this study confirm practicum areas that met the educational demands and highlight areas that need improvement to…

  3. A Guide for Implementing Project DEEP (Diversified Educational Experiences Program). Administrator's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connett, Jane; Swanson, Monty

    The guide is designed to provide the building level administrator a step by step model for implementing Project DEEP's (Diversified Educational Experiences Program) alternative classroom management system for secondary academic classrooms with disaffected (attendance problems, discipline problems, potential dropouts), average, and gifted and…

  4. Frail older adults' experiences with a proactive, nurse-led primary care program: a qualitative study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleijenberg, N.; Boeije, H.R.; Onderwater, A.T.; Schuurmans, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to explore frail older adults' perceptions and experiences with a proactive, integrated nurse-led primary care program. A qualitative study nested within a randomized trial in primary care was conducted. In total, 11 semistructured interviews were conducted in a

  5. MyCrystals - a simple visual data management program for laboratory-scale crystallization experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvgreen, Monika Nøhr; Løvgreen, Mikkel; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager

    2009-01-01

    MyCrystals is designed as a user-friendly program to display crystal images and list crystallization conditions. The crystallization conditions entry fields can be customized to suit the experiments. MyCrystals is also able to sort the images by the entered crystallization conditions, which...

  6. Creation of the selection list for the Experiment Scheduling Program (ESP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deuermeyer, B. L.; Shannon, R. E.; Underbrink, A. J., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The efforts to develop a procedure to construct selection groups to augment the Experiment Scheduling Program (ESP) are summarized. Included is a User's Guide and a sample scenario to guide in the use of the software system that implements the developed procedures.

  7. Introducing Ethics to Chemistry Students in a "Research Experiences for Undergraduates" (REU) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    A three-day ethics seminar introduced ethics to undergraduate environmental chemistry students in the Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program. The seminar helped students become sensitive to and understand the ethical and values dimensions of their work as researchers. It utilized a variety of resources to supplement lectures and…

  8. Blended Learning Experience of Students Participating Pedagogical Formation Program: Advantages and Limitation of Blended Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltan, Fatih

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the learning experience of students studying pedagogic formation in blended design with regard to attendance, self confidence, and attitudes toward both Pedagogic Formation Program (PFP) and the teaching profession. In order to achieve this aim, a qualitative case study approach was carried out. The…

  9. The Experiences of International Nursing Students in a Baccalaureate Nursing Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanner, Susan; Wilson, Astrid H.; Samson, Linda F.

    2002-01-01

    Eight female Nigerians studying nursing in the United States experienced social isolation, became resolved to acceptance of antagonistic attitudes encountered in the program, and persisted in spite of obstacles. From their experiences, recommendations for the adjustment of international students were developed. (Contains 20 references.) (SK)

  10. A W7-X experiment program editor--A usage driven development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spring, Anett, E-mail: anett.spring@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Teilinstitut Greifswald, Wendelsteinstrasse 1, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Lewerentz, Marc; Bluhm, Torsten [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Teilinstitut Greifswald, Wendelsteinstrasse 1, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Heimann, Peter [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Hennig, Christine; Kuehner, Georg [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Teilinstitut Greifswald, Wendelsteinstrasse 1, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Kroiss, Hugo [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Krom, Johannes G.; Laqua, Heike [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Teilinstitut Greifswald, Wendelsteinstrasse 1, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Maier, Josef [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Riemann, Heike; Schacht, Joerg; Werner, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Teilinstitut Greifswald, Wendelsteinstrasse 1, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Zilker, Manfred [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    The set-up of experiment programs for the complex fusion device Wendelstein 7-X has to define a multitude of parameters which have to obey large number of rules arising from physics and technical constraints. Since this is hard to automate as long as the dependencies are not known sufficiently, the W7-X CoDaC team decided to implement an editor following a constructive approach: starting from an established experiment program the user is able to modify parts of it - thus complying the usual workflow of experimenters. Already the very first implementation has been deployed at the W7-X CoDaC prototype, the WEGA stellarator. Driven by agile programming principles the weighting of the requirements has been influenced by the editor usage in the daily experiment routine, thus ensuring client-oriented development steps and short release cycles. At present, a stable program editor implementation with graphical preview, immediate feedback on user actions and instantaneous warnings about incorrect settings is under continuous operation at the CoDaC prototype. It has potential to improve together with growing knowledge about the physical and technical constraints. The experiences gained give certainty that the editor is suitable for future use during the start-up phase and the first years of W7-X operation.

  11. Understanding the Experience of Women in Undergraduate Engineering Programs at Public Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Jessica Ohanian

    2017-01-01

    Women earn bachelor's degrees in engineering at a rate of less than 17% at public universities in California. The purpose of this study was to understand how women experience undergraduate engineering programs at public universities. To understand this lack of attainment, a qualitative methodology and Feminist Poststructuralist perspective were…

  12. The effect of personal experience on choice-based preferences for wildfire protection programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tom Holmes; Armando Gonzalez-Caban; John Loomis; Jose Sanchez

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate homeowner preferences and willingness to pay for wildfire protection programs using a choice experiment with three attributes: risk, loss and cost. Preference heterogeneity among survey respondents was examined using three econometric models and risk preferences were evaluated by comparing willingness to pay for wildfire protection...

  13. POBE: A Computer Program for Optimal Design of Multi-Subject Blocked fMRI Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bärbel Maus

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI studies, researchers can use multi-subject blocked designs to identify active brain regions for a certain stimulus type of interest. Before performing such an experiment, careful planning is necessary to obtain efficient stimulus effect estimators within the available financial resources. The optimal number of subjects and the optimal scanning time for a multi-subject blocked design with fixed experimental costs can be determined using optimal design methods. In this paper, the user-friendly computer program POBE 1.2 (program for optimal design of blocked experiments, version 1.2 is presented. POBE provides a graphical user interface for fMRI researchers to easily and efficiently design their experiments. The computer program POBE calculates the optimal number of subjects and the optimal scanning time for user specified experimental factors and model parameters so that the statistical efficiency is maximised for a given study budget. POBE can also be used to determine the minimum budget for a given power. Furthermore, a maximin design can be determined as efficient design for a possible range of values for the unknown model parameters. In this paper, the computer program is described and illustrated with typical experimental factors for a blocked fMRI experiment.

  14. Schools' Responses to Voucher Policy: Participation Decisions and Early Implementation Experiences in the Indiana Choice Scholarship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Megan J.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the supply side of voucher programs, despite schools' central role in program effectiveness. Using survey and interview data on the Indiana Choice Scholarship Program (ICSP), I analyze schools' participation decisions and early implementation experiences to understand better how schools respond to program regulations. I find…

  15. Development and feasibility of a mobile experience sampling application for tracking program implementation in youth well-being programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, TanChyuan; Rickard, Nikki S; Vella-Brodrick, Dianne A

    Well-being program evaluations mostly focus on identifying effective outcomes rather than measuring the actual extent to which program participants may apply learned skills in subsequent everyday lives. This study examined the feasibility of using a newly developed mobile experience sampling app called Wuzzup to study program implementation in young people participating in well-being programs. Ninety-six participants (60 females; 36 males) between the ages of 13 and 15 years (M = 13.87, SD = 0.71) were recruited to respond to two random prompts each day, for 7 days, at each of the three data collection time-points. Responses from 69 participants (72 % of initial sample) that met study criteria were retained for analysis. The average response rate was 92.89 %, with an average of 85.92 s to complete each ESM survey. Significant associations between first and second halves of the ESM week, and their respective positive affect and negative affect survey responses, demonstrate internal reliability and construct validity of the Wuzzup app to capture momentary affect and activation states of young people. This study also demonstrated the feasibility and practical utility of the Wuzzup app to profile and track an individual's learning over time.

  16. MCTP Summer Research Internship Program. Research Presentation Day: Experience Mathematics and Science in the Real World

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the summaries of the MCTP Summer Research Internship Program. Technological areas discussed include: Mathematical curriculum development for real world problems; Rain effects on air-water gas exchange; multi-ring impact basins on mars; developing an interactive multimedia educational cd-rom on remote sensing; a pilot of an activity for for the globe program; fossils in maryland; developing children's programming for the american horticultural society at river farm; children's learning, educational programs of the national park service; a study of climate and student satisfaction in two summer programs for disadvantaged students interested in careers in mathematics and science; the maryland governor's academy, integrating technology into the classroom; stream sampling with the maryland biological stream survey (MBSS); the imaging system inspection software technology, the preparation and detection of nominal and faulted steel ingots; event-based science, the development of real-world science units; correlation between anxiety and past experiences; environmental education through summer nature camp; enhancing learning opportunities at the Salisbury zoo; plant growth experiment, a module for the middle school classroom; the effects of proxisome proliferators in Japanese medaka embryos; development of a chapter on birth control and contraceptive methodologies as part of an interactive computer-based education module on hiv and aids; excretion of gentamicin in toadfish and goldfish; the renaissance summer program; and Are field trips important to the regional math science center?

  17. Early Experience with a Brief, Multimodal, Multidisciplinary Treatment Program for Fibromyalgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Ann; Whipple, Mary O.; Oh, Terry H.; Guderian, Janet A.; Barton, Debra L.; Luedtke, Connie A.

    2014-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a complex, heterogeneous disorder for which a multidisciplinary individualized approach is currently advocated. We executed a 1 week multidisciplinary fibromyalgia clinical program with 7 patients, based on our previous experience with our existing 1.5 day multidisciplinary fibromyalgia program that has demonstrated both short- and long-term benefits. The current expanded program was not designed as a clinical study, but rather as a clinical feasibility assessment and was multidisciplinary in nature, with cognitive behavioral therapy, activity pacing and graded exercise therapy as major components. We assessed changes in individual patients at 1 week and 3 months following the program utilizing validated self-report measures of pain, fatigue, and self-efficacy. All patients indicated at least small improvements in pain and physical symptoms both at 1 week and 3 months and all but one patient showed improvement in self-efficacy at 1 week and 3 months. Similar trends were observed for fatigue. Based on our early clinical experience, we conclude that the 1 week multidisciplinary fibromyalgia program is logistically feasible and has potential for clinical efficacy. Further research is needed and is planned to test the clinical efficacy of this program and compare it with other interventions. PMID:24315246

  18. Informed Practice: Students' Clinical Experiences in the Undergraduate Phase of an Accelerated Physician Assistant Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereczyk, Amy; DeWitt, Rachel

    2016-06-01

    This qualitative study explored the clinical experiences of students in an accelerated physician assistant (PA) program. The participants were either certified nursing assistants (CNAs) or emergency medical technicians-basic (EMTs-B). The study was designed to elicit (1) how the participants perceived their older patients and (2) how the participants' experiences might affect their own future communications, bedside manner, and clinical preparedness as PAs. This study used a focus group to explore students' clinical experiences before the graduate phase of their accelerated PA program. Five female and 2 male PA students (N = 7) participated in the study. All participants were 23 years old and worked as either a CNA or an EMT-B. Results fell into 2 basic themes: informing practice and forming relationships. Regarding the first theme, participants felt that their experience as entry-level health care providers allowed them to improve their communication skills and bedside manner and to provide greater comfort to patients. Regarding the second theme, participants gained appreciation for older people and began to recognize the knowledge deficits and learning needs of their patients. The results suggested that a student's clinical experience as a CNA or an EMT-B before entering a PA program has a positive effect on the student's personal and professional development. The participants acquired greater appreciation and respect for older patients and members of the health care team.

  19. Three Women’s Educational Doctoral Program Experiences: A Case Study of Performances and Journeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Goodykoontz

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Three academic women joined to write this piece to explore individual doctoral program experiences and to establish common understandings. They collectively analyzed their experiences using the conceptual approach of doctoral program performances and journeys. This case study shares their experiences within the conceptual approach through emerging themes. The common understandings developed herein about doctoral education based on these themes are also shared. The broader contributions of the three women’s work are two-fold. First, the entire case study provides a way to view, discuss, and consider women’s doctoral education pluralistically. Secondly, perhaps readers of this piece will recognize that individual and common understandings with others are a way to develop professional knowledge as academics. Further, readers of this piece might be able to relate more deeply to their own and others’ unique doctoral program experiences through the lens of performances or journeys. Some of these connections might be based on the overarching framework, while others might be specific to the shared women’s experiences.

  20. Non-Constant Learning Rates in Retrospective Experience Curve Analyses and their Correlation to Deployment Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Max [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Smith, Sarah J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sohn, Michael D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-07-16

    A key challenge for policy-makers and technology market forecasters is to estimate future technology costs and in particular the rate of cost reduction versus production volume. A related, critical question is what role should state and federal governments have in advancing energy efficient and renewable energy technologies? This work provides retrospective experience curves and learning rates for several energy-related technologies, each of which have a known history of federal and state deployment programs. We derive learning rates for eight technologies including energy efficient lighting technologies, stationary fuel cell systems, and residential solar photovoltaics, and provide an overview and timeline of historical deployment programs such as state and federal standards and state and national incentive programs for each technology. Piecewise linear regimes are observed in a range of technology experience curves, and public investments or deployment programs are found to be strongly correlated to an increase in learning rate across multiple technologies. A downward bend in the experience curve is found in 5 out of the 8 energy-related technologies presented here (electronic ballasts, magnetic ballasts, compact fluorescent lighting, general service fluorescent lighting, and the installed cost of solar PV). In each of the five downward-bending experience curves, we believe that an increase in the learning rate can be linked to deployment programs to some degree. This work sheds light on the endogenous versus exogenous contributions to technological innovation and highlights the impact of exogenous government sponsored deployment programs. This work can inform future policy investment direction and can shed light on market transformation and technology learning behavior.

  1. Space Shuttle Program (SSP) Shock Test and Specification Experience for Reusable Flight Hardware Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Curtis E.

    2012-01-01

    As commercial companies are nearing a preliminary design review level of design maturity, several companies are identifying the process for qualifying their multi-use electrical and mechanical components for various shock environments, including pyrotechnic, mortar firing, and water impact. The experience in quantifying the environments consists primarily of recommendations from Military Standard-1540, Product Verification Requirement for Launch, Upper Stage, and Space Vehicles. Therefore, the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) formed a team of NASA shock experts to share the NASA experience with qualifying hardware for the Space Shuttle Program (SSP) and other applicable programs and projects. Several team teleconferences were held to discuss past experience and to share ideas of possible methods for qualifying components for multiple missions. This document contains the information compiled from the discussions

  2. Experience of health-system pharmacy administration residents in a longitudinal human resource management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amerine, Lindsey B Poppe; Granko, Robert P; Savage, Scott W; Daniels, Rowell; Eckel, Stephen F

    2014-12-15

    The experience of health-system pharmacy administration (HSPA) residents in a longitudinal human resource (HR) management program is described. The subsequent benefits to the residents, department, and profession are also discussed. Postgraduate year 2 HSPA residents at an academic medical center desired more responsibility for managing an operational area. To this end, a program was created in which these residents directly manage a small group of pharmacy technicians and report to a clinical manager or assistant director with oversight responsibility. These "resident managers" are responsible, under the direction of the area's clinical manager, for the personnel, schedule, time and attendance, and HR activities of the area. Resident managers have led and sustained operational improvement projects in their areas. In addition to providing learning experiences to residents, the HSPA residency program has also improved the operations of the areas in which these residents work. Benefits to the residents include conducting annual performance evaluations for employees with whom they have a relationship as it is a task every administrator completes. Resident managers at UNC have consistently stated that this longitudinal HR experience is one of the most rewarding and most challenging experiences offered in the two-year HSPA residency. The involvement of HSPA residents in longitudinal management responsibilities furthers residents' leadership success by providing trained managers who are ready to immerse themselves into practice postresidency, having employee engagement and HR skills as well as experiences with leading operational improvements. A longitudinal HR management experience was successfully incorporated into an HSPA residency combined Master of Science degree program. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Providing International Research Experiences in Water Resources Through a Distributed REU Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, J.; Sahrawat, K.; Mylavarapu, R.

    2012-12-01

    Research experiences for undergraduates offer training in problem solving and critical thinking via hands-on projects. The goal of the distributed Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) Program in the Agricultural and Biological Engineering Department (ABE) at the University of Florida (UF) is to provide undergraduate students a unique opportunity to conduct research in water resources using interdisciplinary approaches, integrating research and extension, while the cohort is not co-located. The eight-week REU Program utilizes the extensive infrastructure of UF - Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) through the Research and Education Centers (RECs). To provide international research and extension experience, two students were located at the International Crop Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), in India. Prior to the beginning of the Program, the students worked closely with their research mentors at University of Florida and ICRISAT to develop a project plan for understanding the water quality issues in two watersheds. The students were co-located during the Orientation week at the University of Florida. During the Program, they achieved an enriching cohort experience through social networking, daily blogs, and weekly video conferences to share their research and other REU experiences. The group meetings and guest lectures are conducted via synchronously through video conferencing. The students who were distributed across Florida benefited from the research experiences of the students who were located in India, as their project progressed. They described their challenges and achievements during the group meetings and in the blogs. This model of providing integrated research and extension opportunities in hydrology where not all the REU participants are physically co-located, is unique and can be extended to other disciplines.

  4. PyGaze: An open-source, cross-platform toolbox for minimal-effort programming of eyetracking experiments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dalmaijer, Edwin S; Mathôt, Sebastiaan; Van der Stigchel, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    .... It is designed for creating eyetracking experiments in Python syntax with the least possible effort, and it offers programming ease and script readability without constraining functionality and flexibility...

  5. A human papillomavirus public vaccination program in Taiwan: The Kinmen County experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Chih Lee

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In Taiwan, cervical cancer is ranked sixth among all causes of death in women. With the goal of reducing the incidence of cervical cancer, the Kinmen County Health Bureau planned to implement a pilot human papillomavirus (HPV vaccination program in 2007. The Bureau established a committee to promote public awareness, coordinate with the schools, arrange for the administration of the vaccine, establish a vaccination registry, and develop a plan for follow-up and assessment. Vaccination for female residents aged 16–18 began through a school-based program in 2008. A total of 1633 girls completed the vaccination protocol within 3 years, and vaccine uptake rates of over 90% were achieved by 2010. No serious adverse events were reported among those who were vaccinated. The experience gained from the Kinmen County HPV vaccination program has helped and will continue to help establish an operational model for similar programs throughout the country.

  6. Towards program theory validation: Crowdsourcing the qualitative analysis of participant experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harman, Elena; Azzam, Tarek

    2018-02-01

    This exploratory study examines a novel tool for validating program theory through crowdsourced qualitative analysis. It combines a quantitative pattern matching framework traditionally used in theory-driven evaluation with crowdsourcing to analyze qualitative interview data. A sample of crowdsourced participants are asked to read an interview transcript and identify whether program theory components (Activities and Outcomes) are discussed and to highlight the most relevant passage about that component. The findings indicate that using crowdsourcing to analyze qualitative data can differentiate between program theory components that are supported by a participant's experience and those that are not. This approach expands the range of tools available to validate program theory using qualitative data, thus strengthening the theory-driven approach. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Authentic Astronomy Research Experiences for Teachers: The NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program (NITARP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebull, L. M.; Gorjian, V.; Squires, G.; Nitarp Team

    2012-08-01

    How many times have you gotten a question from the general public, or read a news story, and concluded that "they just don't understand how real science works?" One really good way to get the word out about how science works is to have more people experience the process of scientific research. Since 2004, the way we have chosen to do this is to provide authentic research experiences for teachers using real data (the program used to be called the Spitzer Teacher Program for Teachers and Students, which in 2009 was rechristened the NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program, or NITARP). We partner small groups of teachers with a mentor astronomer, they do research as a team, write up a poster, and present it at an American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting. The teachers incorporate this experience into their classroom, and their experiences color their teaching for years to come, influencing hundreds of students per teacher. This program differs from other similar programs in several important ways. First, each team works on an original, unique project. There are no canned labs here! Second, each team presents their results in posters at the AAS, in science sessions (not outreach sessions). The posters are distributed throughout the meeting, in amongst other researchers' work; the participants are not "given a free pass" because they are teachers. Finally, the "product" of this project is the scientific result, not any sort of curriculum packet. The teachers adapt their project to their classroom environment, and we change the way they think about science and scientists.

  8. Family carers’ experiences of attending a multicomponent psychosocial intervention program for carers and persons with dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannessen, Aud; Bruvik, Frøydis Kristine; Hauge, Solveig

    2015-01-01

    Background Psychosocial interventions for persons with dementia and their primary family carers are promising approaches to reducing the challenges associated with care, but, obtaining significant outcomes may be difficult. Even though carers in general are satisfied with such interventions, few studies have evaluated the interventions by means of qualitative methods. Aim The objective of the study reported here was to investigate family carers’ experiences of a multicomponent psychosocial intervention program, and also to offer advice on how to develop the intervention program. Methods Content analyses were taken from individual qualitative interviews conducted in 2012 with 20 carers (aged 50–82 years) who participated in a psychosocial intervention program that included education, individual and family counseling, and parallel group sessions for carers and persons with dementia. Results Two main categories emerged: 1) benefits of the intervention program, which sets out the informants’ experiences for the benefits of participation, described in the subcategories “importance of content and group organization” and “importance of social support”; and 2) missing content in the intervention program, which details the informants’ suggestions for future interventions, contained in the subcategories “need for extended content” and “need for new group organization”. Conclusion The carers found the interventions useful. The importance of even earlier and more flexible interventions for the family carers, the extended family, and the persons with dementia was underscored. PMID:25709469

  9. Family carers' experiences of attending a multicomponent psychosocial intervention program for carers and persons with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannessen, Aud; Bruvik, Frøydis Kristine; Hauge, Solveig

    2015-01-01

    Psychosocial interventions for persons with dementia and their primary family carers are promising approaches to reducing the challenges associated with care, but, obtaining significant outcomes may be difficult. Even though carers in general are satisfied with such interventions, few studies have evaluated the interventions by means of qualitative methods. The objective of the study reported here was to investigate family carers' experiences of a multicomponent psychosocial intervention program, and also to offer advice on how to develop the intervention program. Content analyses were taken from individual qualitative interviews conducted in 2012 with 20 carers (aged 50-82 years) who participated in a psychosocial intervention program that included education, individual and family counseling, and parallel group sessions for carers and persons with dementia. Two main categories emerged: 1) benefits of the intervention program, which sets out the informants' experiences for the benefits of participation, described in the subcategories "importance of content and group organization" and "importance of social support"; and 2) missing content in the intervention program, which details the informants' suggestions for future interventions, contained in the subcategories "need for extended content" and "need for new group organization". The carers found the interventions useful. The importance of even earlier and more flexible interventions for the family carers, the extended family, and the persons with dementia was underscored.

  10. Implementing Health-Promoting Leadership in Municipal Organizations: Managers’ Experiences with a Leadership Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Larsson

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze how line and middle managers experience and describe barriers and enablers in the implementation of a health-promoting leadership program in municipal organizations. A qualitative case study design was applied to examine the leadership program in a case involving implementation of an organizational health intervention. Data were mainly collected using semi-structured interviews with line and middle managers participating in the leadership program. Interviews with senior managers, notes from meetings/workshops, and written action plans were used as complementary data. The interview data were analyzed using a thematic analysis, and the complementary data using a summative content analysis. The findings show that the interviewed line and middle managers experienced this leadership program as a new approach in leadership training because it is based primarily on employee participation. Involvement and commitment of the employees was considered a crucial enabler in the implementation of the leadership program. Other enablers identified include action plans with specific goals, earlier experiences of organizational change, and integration of the program content into regular routines and structures. The line and middle managers described several barriers in the implementation process, and they described various organizational conditions, such as high workload, lack of senior management support, politically initiated projects, and organizational change, as challenges that limited the opportunities to be drivers of change. Taken together, these barriers interfered with the leadership program and its implementation. The study contributes to the understanding of how organizational-level health interventions are implemented in public sector workplaces.

  11. An evaluation system for postgraduate pediatric residency programs: report of a 3-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Dalt, Liviana; Anselmi, Pasquale; Furlan, Sara; Carraro, Silvia; Baraldi, Eugenio; Robusto, Egidio; Perilongo, Giorgio

    2017-09-01

    The way a postgraduate medical training program is organized and the capacity of faculty members to function as tutors and to organize effective professional experiences are among the elements that affect the quality of training. An evaluation system designed to target these elements has been implemented within the framework of the Pediatric Residency Program of the University of Padua (Italy). The aim of this report is to describe some aspects of the experience gained in the first 3 years of implementation of the system (2013-2015). Data were collected using four validated questionnaires: the "Resident Assessment Questionnaire", the "Tutor-Assessment Questionnaire", the "Rotation-Assessment Questionnaire", and the "Resident Affairs Committee-Assessment Questionnaire". The response rate was 72% for the "Resident Assessment Questionnaires"; 78% for the "Tutor-/Rotation-Assessment Questionnaires" and 84% for the "Resident Affair Committee-Assessment Questionnaires". The scores collected were validated by psychometric tests. The high rates of completed questionnaires returned and the psychometric validation of the results collected indicate that the evaluation system reported herein can be effectively implemented. Efforts should be made to refine this system and, more importantly, to document its impact in improving the Pediatric Residency Program. What is known: • The elements that influence the quality of postgraduate training programs and the knowledge, performance, and competences of residents must be regularly assessed. • Comprehensive evaluation systems for postgraduate residency programs are not universally implemented also because quite often common guidelines and rules, well-equipped infrastructures, and financial resources are missing. What is new: • We show the feasibility of implementing an evaluation system that targets some of the key elements of a postgraduate medical training program in Italy, a European country in which the regulations

  12. Improving Undergraduate Research Experiences With An Intentional Mentoring Program: Lessons Learned Through Assessment of Keck Geology Consortium Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, K. R.; Garver, J. I.; Greer, L.; Pollock, M.; Varga, R. J.; Davidson, C. M.; Frey, H. M.; Hubbard, D. K.; Peck, W. H.; Wobus, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Keck Geology Consortium, with support from the National Science Foundation (REU Program) and ExxonMobil, is a collaborative effort by 18 colleges to improve geoscience education through high-quality research experiences. Since its inception in 1987 more than 1350 undergraduate students and 145 faculty have been involved in 189 yearlong research projects. This non-traditional REU model offers exceptional opportunities for students to address research questions at a deep level, to learn and utilize sophisticated analytical methods, and to engage in authentic collaborative research that culminates in an undergraduate research symposium and published abstracts volume. The large numbers of student and faculty participants in Keck projects also affords a unique opportunity to study the impacts of program design on undergraduate research experiences in the geosciences. Students who participate in Keck projects generally report significant gains in personal and professional dimensions, as well as in clarification of educational and career goals. Survey data from student participants, project directors, and campus advisors identify mentoring as one of the most critical and challenging elements of successful undergraduate research experiences. Additional challenges arise from the distributed nature of Keck projects (i.e., participants, project directors, advisors, and other collaborators are at different institutions) and across the span of yearlong projects. In an endeavor to improve student learning about the nature and process of science, and to make mentoring practices more intentional, the Consortium has developed workshops and materials to support both project directors and campus research advisors (e.g., best practices for mentoring, teaching ethical professional conduct, benchmarks for progress, activities to support students during research process). The Consortium continues to evolve its practices to better support students from underrepresented groups.

  13. Material and surface - Course synergy as a channel towards a more encompassing view of learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Nuutinen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The course Material and Surface is a combination of four minor courses: Experiential Textile Design, Dyeing, Textile Printing and Embroidery. The course combination is offered to first-year textile teacher students. Through combining courses, the aim has been to support integrated learning and transform fragmented education into a thematically coherent whole. The four courses form an intertwined and progressive structure in which each course is based on the knowledge learned from the previous course. The creative basis of the Experiential Textile Design course applies David Kolb’s theory (1984. The creative ideas are then applied to assignments in Dyeing, Textile Printing and Embroidery. Following the courses, students collect assignments in a learning portfolio. They organize their assignments in a progressive order to self-assess personal development, the creative process and changes in learning and thinking. The aims of this research were to find out 1 how the course combination reinforced students’ understanding of their own learning, 2 in which ways students’ own experiences strengthened their personal development and 3 what effect the collaboration had on teachers and their working. Data collected during the years 2008–2013 consisted of students’ portfolios (N=152, teachers' self-reflections as notes and diary remarks and notes from the final critiques. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The results indicate that the learning portfolio serves as feedback for the teachers. During the courses, the students worked in groups and shared experiences which strengthened collective values and meanings. Mutual sharing built the group’s cohesion, which was observable in students’ vivid and increasing discussions: they shared more of their ideas, they encouraged and inspired each other.  Diversity appeared to be the most important feature that arose from the data – all experiences were evaluated equally true and

  14. Retrospective North American CFL Experience Curve Analysis and Correlation to Deployment Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Sarah J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wei, Max [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sohn, Michael D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Retrospective experience curves are a useful tool for understanding historic technology development, and can contribute to investment program analysis and future cost estimation efforts. This work documents our development of an analysis approach for deriving retrospective experience curves with a variable learning rate, and its application to develop an experience curve for compact fluorescent lamps for the global and North American markets over the years 1990-2007. Uncertainties and assumptions involved in interpreting data for our experience curve development are discussed, including the processing and transformation of empirical data, the selection of system boundaries, and the identification of historical changes in the learning rate over the course of 15 years. In the results that follow, we find that that the learning rate has changed at least once from 1990-2007. We also explore if, and to what degree, public deployment programs may have contributed to an increased technology learning rate in North America. We observe correlations between the changes in the learning rate and the initiation of new policies, abrupt technological advances, including improvements to ballast technology, and economic and political events such as trade tariffs and electricity prices. Finally, we discuss how the findings of this work (1) support the use of segmented experience curves for retrospective and prospective analysis and (2) may imply that investments in technological research and development have contributed to a change in market adoption and penetration.

  15. Communications experiment for the Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokulic, Robert S.; Gatsonis, Nikolaos A.; Bythrow, Peter F.; Mauk, Barry H.

    1993-06-01

    A planned experiment for characterizing RF/plume interaction effects on the Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP) is described. The NEPSTP spacecraft will use a Russian Topaz II nuclear reactor to power a suite of electric thrusters on-orbit. Transmission of signals through the thruster plumes at S-band (2 GHz) will be characterized over a wide range of viewing angles by controlling the spacecraft attitude as it passes by the ground station. Planned measurements include signal strength, bit error count, scintillation, phase transient effects, and radio frequency interference. Possible future augmentations to the experiment, including a UHF transmitter and a measurement of total election content, are also described.

  16. HIV prevention through extended education encompassing students, parents, and teachers in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamatsu, Miyuki; Sato, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Aki; Saito, Hisako

    2011-11-01

    We developed an extended HIV prevention program for students, parents, and school teachers, and then evaluated its effectiveness. The participants were 490 students, aged 13-14 years, attending four public junior high schools in Saga Prefecture, Japan. They were divided into two groups: control and intervention. All the students received group education by health professionals. In the control group, students received only two group education sessions given by health professionals. In the intervention group, there were three intervention components: parent education, teacher education, and student individual counseling by health professionals. Before and 3 months after the intervention, participants underwent evaluation of their frequency of communication about AIDS with parents or teachers, their knowledge of HIV/AIDS, and attitudes to sexual intercourse, self-esteem, and high-risk behavior. A total of 135 students (80 boys and 55 girls) from the intervention group and 236 students (115 boys and 121 girls) from the control group participated in the evaluation 3 months after intervention. Adolescents in the intervention group showed more positive changes than those in the control group from baseline to follow-up. Intervention had a significant impact on the frequency of communication about AIDS with teachers (p = 0.027) and HIV/AIDS knowledge among females (p = 0.023), and intervention also had a significant impact on refusal of sexual activity by males (p = 0.045). These findings suggest that effective prevention of HIV might be achieved by an expanded education program for students and teachers such as that described, and individual counseling that takes into consideration the sexual differences of Japanese adolescents.

  17. A Three-Year Reflective Writing Program as Part of Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Jessica; Kerr, Kevin; Zielenski, Christopher; Toppel, Brianna; Johnson, Lauren; McCauley, Patrina; Turner, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To implement and evaluate a 3-year reflective writing program incorporated into introductory pharmacy practice experiences (IPPEs) in the first- through third-year of a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) program. Design. Reflective writing was integrated into 6 IPPE courses to develop students’ lifelong learning skills. In their writing, students were required to self-assess their performance in patient care activities, identify and describe how they would incorporate learning opportunities, and then evaluate their progress. Practitioners, faculty members, and fourth-year PharmD students served as writing preceptors. Assessment. The success of the writing program was assessed by reviewing class performance and surveying writing preceptor’s opinions regarding the student’s achievement of program objectives. Class pass rates averaged greater than 99% over the 8 years of the program and the large majority of the writing preceptors reported that student learning objectives were met. A support pool of 99 writing preceptors was created. Conclusions. A 3-year reflective writing program improved pharmacy students’ reflection and reflective writing skills. PMID:23788811

  18. Participant experiences of a community-based maintenance program post-pulmonary rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desveaux, Laura; Rolfe, Debbie; Beauchamp, Marla; Goldstein, Roger; Brooks, Dina

    2014-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the perspectives of individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who participated in a minimally supervised maintenance exercise intervention and identify the barriers and facilitators associated with participation. The intervention was delivered in a community center and was designed to maintain exercise capacity and quality of life following discharge from pulmonary rehabilitation. This study utilized qualitative focus groups (FGs) involving individuals with COPD (n = 12) who had been attending the maintenance community program for at least 6 months. All individuals who met the inclusion criteria for the FGs consented to participate. Four themes were identified: (1) issues around attendance; (2) perceived benefits of the program; (3) perceived burdens of the program; and (4) recommendations for program improvement. Participants expressed more benefits than barriers, stating that their experience of improved function and quality of life facilitated their attendance. Barriers included exacerbations, fatigue, access to transportation, and weather. Participants endorsed the benefits of a community-based maintenance exercise program after pulmonary rehabilitation. Minimally supervised community-based programs with access to a case manager may provide a useful approach to enhancing adherence to exercise.

  19. Distributed Solar Incentive Programs: Recent Experience and Best Practices for Design and Implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, L.; Reger, A.; Heeter, J.

    2012-12-01

    Based on lessons from recent program experience, this report explores best practices for designing and implementing incentives for small and mid-sized residential and commercial distributed solar energy projects. The findings of this paper are relevant to both new incentive programs as well as those undergoing modifications. The report covers factors to consider in setting and modifying incentive levels over time, differentiating incentives to encourage various market segments, administrative issues such as providing equitable access to incentives and customer protection. It also explores how incentive programs can be designed to respond to changing market conditions while attempting to provide a longer-term and stable environment for the solar industry. The findings are based on interviews with program administrators, regulators, and industry representatives as well as data from numerous incentive programs nationally, particularly the largest and longest-running programs. These best practices consider the perspectives of various stakeholders and the broad objectives of reducing solar costs, encouraging long-term market viability, minimizing ratepayer costs, and protecting consumers.

  20. Weld-metal property optimization from flux ingredients through mixture experiments and mathematical programming approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ademola David Adeyeye

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new methodology for weld-metal properties optimization from welding flux ingredients. The methodology integrates statistical design of mixture experiment with mathematical programming optimization technique. The mixture experiment is responsible for the modeling of the weld-metal properties as a function of welding flux levels while mathematical programming optimizes the model. Data and confirmed models from the literature were used to perform optimization on the responses. The maximum values possible with the prevailing conditions for acicular ferrite, charpy impact toughness and silicon transfer are 51.2%, 29 J and 0.231% respectively while the minimum oxygen content possible is 249 ppm. The new methodology is able to eliminate the limitations associated with the traditional experimental optimization methodology for flux formulation.

  1. Evaluating Improvements to the Student Learning Experience in an Honours Earth and Environmental Sciences Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyles, C. H.; Vajoczki, S.; Zobel, G.

    2002-12-01

    The School of Geography and Geology (SGG) at McMaster University recently received funding for a three-year project to apply new teaching strategies to enhance the undergraduate learning experience. A major focus of this project is to develop multiple opportunities for inquiry-based and experiential learning in the four-year Honours B.Sc program in Earth and Environmental Sciences. A second aim of the project is to enhance systematic personal transferable skills development in all students enrolled in this program. The aims of the SGG educational project are being met through progressive revision and refinement of instructional methodologies and the introduction of increased opportunities for experimental lab work, fieldwork, co-op and volunteer placements. Introductory level laboratory assignments are now up to 70% inquiry-based and fieldwork opportunities exist for all students within the program. A major hurdle to assessing the success of the project is evaluation of the effectiveness of the educational changes made in the programs. To date, a number of evaluation tools have been used to assess improvements to the learning experience including formative and summative student feedback (both informal and formal), student performance evaluations (pre- and post-course), and surveys of program alumni and potential employers. A system for the evaluation of personal transferable skills development is currently being developed using a skills attainment grid. By comparing future student attainment and feedback with that documented in a `baseline' survey carried out at the beginning of the project, it is hoped that assessment of improvements to the student learning experience can be made.

  2. Holistic science: An understanding of science education encompassing ethical and social issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekpour, Susan

    Science has often been viewed, by the majority of our educators and the general public, as being objective and emotionless. Based on this view, our educators teach science in the same manner, objectively and in an abstract form. This manner of teaching has hindered our learners' ability for active learning and distanced them from the subject matter. In this action research, I have examined holistic science pedagogy in conjunction with a constructivism theory. In holistic science pedagogy, scientific knowledge is combined with subjective personal experiences and social issues. There is an interaction between student and scientific data when the student's context, relationships, and lived experiences that play a role in the scientific recognition of the world were incorporated into the learning process. In this pedagogical model, the factual content was viewed from the context of social and ethical implications. By empowering learners with this ability, science knowledge will no longer be exclusive to a select group. This process empowers the general population with the ability to understand scientific knowledge and therefore the ability to make informed decisions based on this knowledge. The goal was to make curriculum developers more conscious of factors that can positively influence the learning process and increase student engagement and understanding within the science classroom. The holistic approach to science pedagogy has enlightened and empowered our adult learners more effectively. Learners became more actively engaged in their own process of learning. Teachers must be willing to listen and implement student suggestions on improving the teaching/learning process. Teachers should be willing to make the effort in connecting with their students by structuring courses so the topics would be relevant to the students in relation to real world and social/ethical and political issues. Holistic science pedagogy strives for social change through the empowerment of

  3. Students' experiences of embedded academic literacy support in a graduate entry nursing program: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramjan, Lucie M; Maneze, Della; Everett, Bronwyn; Glew, Paul; Trajkovski, Suza; Lynch, Joan; Salamonson, Yenna

    2018-01-01

    Graduate entry nursing (GEN) programs were designed to address the predicted nursing shortfall. In Australia, although these programs attract students from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds, the workload is compounded by cultural differences and a new academic learning environment which presents additional challenges. This qualitative descriptive study explored the experiences of GEN students enrolled in the introductory unit of their nursing program with embedded academic literacy support in Sydney, Australia. Twenty-four commencing GEN students were interviewed in January 2016. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed. Three main themes emerged which illustrated that GEN students were 'diamonds in the rough'. They possessed a raw natural beauty that required some shaping and polishing to ensure academic needs were met. To ensure retention is high, institutions need to evaluate how best to support and harness the potential of these unique students. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Economic implications of cardiovascular disease management programs: moving beyond one-off experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maru, Shoko; Byrnes, Joshua; Carrington, Melinda J; Stewart, Simon; Scuffham, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    Substantial variation in economic analyses of cardiovascular disease management programs hinders not only the proper assessment of cost-effectiveness but also the identification of heterogeneity of interest such as patient characteristics. The authors discuss the impact of reporting and methodological variation on the cost-effectiveness of cardiovascular disease management programs by introducing issues that could lead to different policy or clinical decisions, followed by the challenges associated with net intervention effects and generalizability. The authors conclude with practical suggestions to mitigate the identified issues. Improved transparency through standardized reporting practice is the first step to advance beyond one-off experiments (limited applicability outside the study itself). Transparent reporting is a prerequisite for rigorous cost-effectiveness analyses that provide unambiguous implications for practice: what type of program works for whom and how.

  5. Program to enrich science and mathematics experiences of high school students through interactive museum internships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reif, R.J. [State Univ. of New York, New Paltz, NY (United States); Lock, C.R. [Univ. of North Carolina, Charlotte, NC (United States)

    1998-11-01

    This project addressed the problem of female and minority representation in science and mathematics education and in related fields. It was designed to recruit high school students from under-represented groups into a program that provided significant, meaningful experiences to encourage those young people to pursue careers in science and science teaching. It provided role models for those students. It provided experiences outside of the normal school environment, experiences that put the participants in the position to serve as role models themselves for disadvantaged young people. It also provided encouragement to pursue careers in science and mathematics teaching and related careers. In these respects, it complemented other successful programs to encourage participation in science. And, it differed in that it provided incentives at a crucial time, when career decisions are being made during the high school years. Further, it encouraged the pursuit of careers in science teaching. The objectives of this project were to: (1) provide enrichment instruction in basic concepts in the life, earth, space, physical sciences and mathematics to selected high school students participating in the program; (2) provide instruction in teaching methods or processes, including verbal communication skills and the use of questioning; (3) provide opportunities for participants, as paid student interns, to transfer knowledge to other peers and adults; (4) encourage minority and female students with high academic potential to pursue careers in science teaching.

  6. Lung cancer screening: fourteen year experience of the Pamplona early detection program (P-IELCAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Salcedo, Pablo; Berto, Juan; de-Torres, Juan P; Campo, Arantzazu; Alcaide, Ana B; Bastarrika, Gorka; Pueyo, Jesús C; Villanueva, Alberto; Echeveste, José I; Lozano, Maria D; García-Velloso, María J; Seijo, Luis M; García, Javier; Torre, Wenceslao; Pajares, Maria J; Pío, Ruben; Montuenga, Luis M; Zulueta, Javier J

    2015-04-01

    European experience regarding lung cancer screening using low-dose chest CT (LDCT) is available. However, there is limited data on the Spanish experience in this matter. Our aim is to present the results from the longest ongoing screening program in Spain. The Pamplona International Early Lung Cancer Detection Program (P-IELCAP) is actively screening participants for lung cancer using LDCT since year 2000 following the IELCAP protocol, including spirometric assessments. Men and women, ≥40 years of age, current or former smokers with a tobacco history of ≥10 pack-years are included. Results are compared to those from other European trials. A total of 2989 participants were screened until March 2014 (73% male). A median of 2 (IQR 1-3) annual screening rounds were performed. Sixty lung cancers were detected in 53 participants (73% in StageI). Adenocarcinoma was the most frequent. The lung cancer prevalence and incidence proportion was 1.0% and 1.4%, respectively, with an annual detection rate of 0.41. The estimated 10-year survival rate among individuals with lung cancer was 70%. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and emphysema are important lung cancer predictors. The experience in Spain's longest lung cancer screening program is comparable to what has been described in the rest of Europe, and confirms the feasibility and efficacy of lung cancer screening using LDCT. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Integrity of the National Resident Matching Program for Radiation Oncology: National Survey of Applicant Experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holliday, Emma B. [Division of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Thomas, Charles R., E-mail: thomasch@ohsu.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine, OHSU Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Kusano, Aaron S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine the experiences of radiation oncology applicants and to evaluate the prevalence of behaviors that may be in conflict with established ethical standards. Methods and Materials: An anonymous survey was sent to all 2013 applicants to a single domestic radiation oncology residency program through the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP). Questions included demographics, survey of observed behaviors, and opinions regarding the interview and matching process. Descriptive statistics were presented. Characteristics and experiences of respondents who matched were compared with those who did not match. Results: Questionnaires were returned by 87 of 171 applicants for a 51% response rate. Eighty-two questionnaires were complete and included for analysis. Seventy-eight respondents (95.1%) reported being asked at least 1 question in conflict with the NRMP code of conduct. When asked where else they were interviewing, 64% stated that this query made them uncomfortable. Forty-five respondents (54.9%) reported unsolicited post-interview contact by programs, and 31 (37.8%) felt pressured to give assurances. Fifteen respondents (18.3%) reported being told their rank position or that they were “ranked to match” prior to Match day, with 27% of those individuals indicating this information influenced how they ranked programs. Half of respondents felt applicants often made dishonest or misleading assurances, one-third reported that they believed their desired match outcome could be improved by deliberately misleading programs, and more than two-thirds felt their rank position could be improved by having faculty from their home institutions directly contact programs on their behalf. Conclusions: Radiation oncology applicants report a high prevalence of behaviors in conflict with written NRMP policies. Post-interview communication should be discouraged in order to enhance fairness and support the professional development of future

  8. Emotions, Ideas and Experiences of Caregivers of Patients With Schizophrenia About "Family to Family Support Program".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bademli, Kerime; Duman, Zekiye Çetinkaya

    2016-06-01

    "Family to Family Support Program" is a significant intervention program to assist families by informing them about treatment procedures and coping strategies, increasing their functionality, helping them to overcome the challenges of the disease. This study was particularly designed to investigate the emotions, thoughts, and experiences of caregivers of schizophrenia patients who participated in "Family to Family Support Program." The study was conducted with one of the qualitative research methods, phenomenological method. The study sample included caregivers who care for schizophrenia patients and participated in the "Family to Family Support Program". Twenty caregivers were included in the sample. The study was carried out in İzmir Schizophrenia Support Association. The study data were collected with four open ended questions. The average age of the participants was 56,77 ± 72,89, 10 male caregivers and 10 female caregivers, 9 caregivers were fathers, 6 caregivers were mothers, and 5 of them were siblings. The thematic analysis indicated that the emotions, thoughts and experiences of caregivers can be categorized in four groups: "I learned to deal with my problems", "I am conscious in my interaction with the patient and I know and I am not alone", "I feel much better", and "Schizophrenia is not the end of the road, knowledge sorts things out." Caregivers who participated in "Family to Family Support Program" expressed their satisfaction that they were benefited from the program, their coping skills were improved, they experienced less challenges when providing care, they understood the disease better, and it felt comfortable. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Perceptions of the Inpatient Training Experience: A Nationwide Survey of Gastroenterology Program Directors and Fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Navin L; Perencevich, Molly L; Trier, Jerry S

    2017-10-01

    Inpatient training is a key component of gastroenterology (GI) fellowship programs nationwide, yet little is known about perceptions of the inpatient training experience. To compare the content, objectives and quality of the inpatient training experience as perceived by program directors (PD) and fellows in US ACGME-accredited GI fellowship programs. We conducted a nationwide, online-based survey of GI PDs and fellows at the conclusion of the 2016 academic year. We queried participants about (1) the current models of inpatient training, (2) the content, objectives, and quality of the inpatient training experience, and (3) the frequency and quality of educational activities on the inpatient service. We analyzed five-point Likert items and rank assessments as continuous variables by an independent t test and compared proportions using the Chi-square test. Survey response rate was 48.4% (75/155) for PDs and a total of 194 fellows completed the survey, with both groups reporting the general GI consult team (>90%) as the primary model of inpatient training. PDs and fellows agreed on the ranking of all queried responsibilities of the inpatient fellow to develop during the inpatient service. However, fellows indicated that attendings spent less time teaching and provided less formal feedback than that perceived by PDs (p < 0.0001). PDs rated the overall quality of the inpatient training experience (p < 0.0001) and education on the wards (p = 0.0003) as better than overall ratings by fellows. Although GI fellows and PDs agree on the importance of specific fellow responsibilities on the inpatient service, fellows report experiencing less teaching and feedback from attendings than that perceived by PDs. Committing more time to education and assessment may improve fellows' perceptions of the inpatient training experience.

  10. Calculating Program for Decommissioning Work Productivity based on Decommissioning Activity Experience Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Chan-Ho; Park, Seung-Kook; Park, Hee-Seong; Moon, Jei-kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    KAERI is performing research to calculate a coefficient for decommissioning work unit productivity to calculate the estimated time decommissioning work and estimated cost based on decommissioning activity experience data for KRR-2. KAERI used to calculate the decommissioning cost and manage decommissioning activity experience data through systems such as the decommissioning information management system (DECOMMIS), Decommissioning Facility Characterization DB System (DEFACS), decommissioning work-unit productivity calculation system (DEWOCS). In particular, KAERI used to based data for calculating the decommissioning cost with the form of a code work breakdown structure (WBS) based on decommissioning activity experience data for KRR-2.. Defined WBS code used to each system for calculate decommissioning cost. In this paper, we developed a program that can calculate the decommissioning cost using the decommissioning experience of KRR-2, UCP, and other countries through the mapping of a similar target facility between NPP and KRR-2. This paper is organized as follows. Chapter 2 discusses the decommissioning work productivity calculation method, and the mapping method of the decommissioning target facility will be described in the calculating program for decommissioning work productivity. At KAERI, research on various decommissioning methodologies of domestic NPPs will be conducted in the near future. In particular, It is difficult to determine the cost of decommissioning because such as NPP facility have the number of variables, such as the material of the target facility decommissioning, size, radiographic conditions exist.

  11. Image integrity and aesthetics: towards a more encompassing definition of visual quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redi, Judith A.; Heynderickx, Ingrid

    2012-03-01

    Visual quality is a multifaceted quantity that depends on multiple attributes of the image/video. According to Keelan's definition, artifactual attributes concern features of the image that when visible, are annoying and compromise the integrity of the image. Aesthetic attributes instead depend on the observer's personal taste. Both types of attributes have been studied in the literature in relation to visual quality, but never in conjunction with each other. In this paper we perform a psychometric experiment to investigate how artifactual and aesthetic attributes interact, and how they affect the viewing behavior. In particular, we studied to what extent the appearance of artifacts impacts the aesthetic quality of images. Our results indicate that indeed image integrity somehow influences the aesthetic quality scores. By means of an eye-tracker, we also recorded and analyzed the viewing behavior of our participants while scoring aesthetic quality. Results reveal that, when scoring aesthetic quality, viewing behavior significantly departs from the natural free looking, as well as from the viewing behavior observed for integrity scoring.

  12. Teachers' experiences of English-language-taught degree programs within health care sector of Finnish polytechnics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkajarvi, Marianne; Eriksson, Elina; Kekki, Pertti

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to research teachers' experiences of the English-Language-Taught Degree Programs in the health care sector of Finnish polytechnics. More specifically, the focus was on teachers' experiences of teaching methods and clinical practice. The data were collected from eighteen teachers in six polytechnics through focus group interviews. Content analysis was used to analyse the data. The results suggested that despite the positive interaction between students and teachers, choosing appropriate teaching methods provided a challenge for teachers, due to cultural diversity of students as well as to the use of a foreign language in tuition. Due to students' language-related difficulties, clinical practice was found to be the biggest challenge in the educational process. Staffs' attitudes were perceived to be significant for students' clinical experience. Further research using stronger designs is needed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Commercial Instrumentation Technology Associates' Biomedical Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Experiments to seek solutions for a range of biomedical issues are at the heart of several investigations that will be hosted by the Commercial Instrumentation Technology Associates (ITA), Inc. Biomedical Experiments (CIBX-2) payload. CIBX-2 is unique, encompassing more than 20 separate experiments including cancer research, commercial experiments, and student hands-on experiments from 10 schools as part of ITA's ongoing University Among the Stars program. Student Marnix Aklian and ITA's Mark Bem prepare biological samples for flight as part of ITA's hands-on student outreach program on STS-95. Similar activities are a part of the CIBX-2 payload. The experiments are sponsored by NASA's Space Product Development Program (SPD).

  14. Experiences in the New York Academy of Sciences STEM Mentoring Program (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomposi, C.; Thompson, K. J.

    2013-12-01

    In the Fall of 2010, The New York Academy of Sciences (NYAS) established an after school STEM Mentoring Program. The program recruits both current graduate students and postdocs to teach an after school curriculum to 4th-8th graders in any of the following areas: genetics, human body systems, space science, earth science, robotics, or math. Since its inception, the program has grown and now has branches in New York City, Newark (NJ), and other locations. My talk will focus on my experiences within the NYAS STEM Mentoring program during both the Fall of 2012 and the Fall of 2013 (expected teaching fellow). As a teaching fellow, I not only developed a unique curriculum in Earth Science Education, along with my teaching partner, but also delivered the lectures and executed various laboratory exercises to maintain a hands-on learning environment for the students. I will discuss the development of a coherent earth science curriculum, focused around the theme of ';Natural Disasters' and culminating in our semester-end project in which the students completed an AGU-style presentation for community members. I plan to describe how the students' perception of earth science changed from the program's beginning to its end 10 weeks later. Best practices of the inquiry-based, student-centered curriculum will be discussed, with the hope that they can be applied across similar educational and outreach opportunities.

  15. Review of Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and Control Programs: International Experience and Challenges in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seng Chuen Tan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Major cardiovascular risk factors in China, such as hyperlipidemia, hypertension, dietary factors, exposure to tobacco, diabetes, obesity and physical inactivity, have contributed to deteriorating trends in cardiovascular disease (CVD deaths. In past years, a number of CVD prevention programs have been initiated in European and American countries and successfully brought down CVD related death rate by involving various parties such as physicians, patients, government agencies and payers. However, there is rare published literature that systemically reviewed such experience, which would be highly valuable for China and other countries with high CVD burden. In this article, we review the published literature on CVD prevention and control programs and report on interviews of local and foreign experts to provide recommendations for China-specific CVD prevention and control programs. In order to provide practical suggestions, we describe the type of programs as patient, physician, pharmacist, nurse, or payer-focused. Based on this evidence and identified challenges in China, programs focusing on disease management, treatment adherence, physician/health care provider education, financial incentives, and integrated healthcare are recommended for the prevention and control of CVD in China.

  16. The perspectives and experiences of African American students in an informal science program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulls, Domonique L.

    Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields are the fastest growing sectors of the economy, nationally and globally. In order for the United States (U.S.) to maintain its competitiveness, it is important to address STEM experiences at the precollege level. In early years, science education serves as a foundation and pipeline for students to pursue STEM in college and beyond. Alternative approaches to instruction in formal classrooms have been introduced to engage more students in science. One alternative is informal science education. Informal science education is an avenue used to promote science education literacy. Because it is less regulated than science teaching in formal classroom settings, it allows for the incorporation of culture into science instruction. Culturally relevant science teaching is one way to relate science to African American students, a population that continually underperforms in K-12 science education. This study explores the science perspectives and experiences of African American middle school students participating in an informal science program. The research is framed by the tenets of culturally relevant pedagogy and shaped by the following questions: (1) What specific aspects of the Carver Program make it unique to African American students? (2) How is culturally relevant pedagogy incorporated into the informal science program? (3) How does the incorporation of culturally relevant pedagogy into the informal science program influence African American students' perceptions about science? The findings to the previously stated questions add to the limited research on African American students in informal science learning environments and contribute to the growing research on culturally relevant science. This study is unique in that it explores the cultural components of an informal science program.

  17. Community translation of the Math Interactive Learning Experience Program for children with FASD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kable, Julie A; Taddeo, Elles; Strickland, Dorothy; Coles, Claire D

    2015-04-01

    The Math Interactive Learning Experience (MILE), a program designed to address academic and behavioral problems found in children with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD), was found to be effective in a randomized clinical trials with results that persisted at a 6-month follow-up. The current study evaluated the effectiveness of a community translation, in partnership with several community sites in the metropolitan Atlanta area. A total of 60 participants were randomly assigned to one of the three treatment groups: the MILE program administered at a specialty care center (Center MILE) or in the community (Community MILE), or to parent math instruction only (Parent Instruction). This study evaluated instructor satisfaction with the training program, knowledge related to FASD and the MILE program, adherence to the MILE teaching methodology, participant math outcomes, and parents' satisfaction with their treatment experience. Instructors reported a high degree of satisfaction with the overall training and mean site fidelity ratings were positively correlated with change in math performance. Those in the MILE intervention groups demonstrated more positive gains in math skills than those in the Parent Instruction group but did not differ from each other. Parents in the Parent Instruction group reported less satisfaction with their intervention than those assigned to the Center MILE group but satisfaction ratings did not differ between those in the MILE intervention groups. These results indicate that the community translation and the MILE instructor training program developed as part of this process were well-received and effective in producing positive treatment outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A Cultural Approach to Understanding Professional Experiences of Foreign-Born Faculty in U.S. Educational Leadership Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrabrova, Iryna; Sanzo, Karen L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the professional experiences of foreign-born faculty members serving in U.S. educational leadership preparation programs, utilizing a cultural approach to discern their lived experiences related to professional life. Cultural values were explored as reflected in professional life experiences. The…

  19. Faculty-Exchange Programs Promoting Change: Motivations, Experiences, and Influence of Participants in the Carnegie Mellon University-Portugal Faculty Exchange Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrício, Maria Teresa; Santos, Patrícia; Loureiro, Paulo Maia; Horta, Hugo

    2018-01-01

    The international mobility of faculty is increasing worldwide. Although studies have considered the experiences of academics abroad, less is known about faculty-exchange programs with policy objectives. This study helps to fill this gap by analyzing a nationwide structured faculty exchange program established by Carnegie Mellon University and…

  20. Career support in medicine - experiences with a mentoring program for junior physicians at a university hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddeberg-Fischer, Barbara; Vetsch, Esther; Mattanza, Guido

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Until now, mentoring has hardly been used by the medical profession in German-speaking countries as a means of supporting junior physicians in their careers. The aim of the mentoring project described here was to obtain information for promoting and developing future mentoring programs at a university hospital. Method: A new integrated mentoring model was developed and implemented over a 12-month period. Peer groups were advised on the mentoring process by mentors and program managers. A total of eight mentoring groups (40 peers) from four departments of a university hospital took part in the project: four voluntarily, and four on a compulsory basis. The evaluation was carried out using qualitative methods for analysis of the group protocols and the focus group interviews with the participants. Results: Group discussions revealed that individual mentees, young female physicians in particular, developed concrete career plans and initiated further career-relevant steps. Some mentees - again more women than men - were promoted to senior physician posts. Further measurable career steps were increased research and publishing activity, and research fellowships abroad. The group process developed in five typical phases (forming, storming, norming, performing, and finalizing), which differed according to whether the groups had been formed on a voluntary or compulsory basis. In the evaluation interviews, mentees emphasized the following as effective mentoring factors: Concrete definition of own career goals; exchange of experiences within the peer groups; support and motivation from the mentors; and fostering of the group process by the program managers. Conclusion: Participation in mentoring programs has to be voluntary. Mentees are motivated, autonomous, goal-oriented and prepared to take action. Mentors serve as examples and advisers. They derive satisfaction from being held in high esteem, as well as from the advancement of their own careers. Program managers

  1. Career support in medicine - experiences with a mentoring program for junior physicians at a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddeberg-Fischer, Barbara; Vetsch, Esther; Mattanza, Guido

    2004-07-01

    Until now, mentoring has hardly been used by the medical profession in German-speaking countries as a means of supporting junior physicians in their careers. The aim of the mentoring project described here was to obtain information for promoting and developing future mentoring programs at a university hospital. A new integrated mentoring model was developed and implemented over a 12-month period. Peer groups were advised on the mentoring process by mentors and program managers. A total of eight mentoring groups (40 peers) from four departments of a university hospital took part in the project: four voluntarily, and four on a compulsory basis. The evaluation was carried out using qualitative methods for analysis of the group protocols and the focus group interviews with the participants. Group discussions revealed that individual mentees, young female physicians in particular, developed concrete career plans and initiated further career-relevant steps. Some mentees - again more women than men - were promoted to senior physician posts. Further measurable career steps were increased research and publishing activity, and research fellowships abroad. The group process developed in five typical phases (forming, storming, norming, performing, and finalizing), which differed according to whether the groups had been formed on a voluntary or compulsory basis. In the evaluation interviews, mentees emphasized the following as effective mentoring factors: Concrete definition of own career goals; exchange of experiences within the peer groups; support and motivation from the mentors; and fostering of the group process by the program managers. Participation in mentoring programs has to be voluntary. Mentees are motivated, autonomous, goal-oriented and prepared to take action. Mentors serve as examples and advisers. They derive satisfaction from being held in high esteem, as well as from the advancement of their own careers. Program managers have experience in systems theory and

  2. Client Experiences With Dietary, Exercise, and Behavioral Services in a Community-Based Weight Management Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zizzi, Sam; Kadushin, Peter; Michel, Jesse; Abildso, Christiaan

    2016-01-01

    Compared with randomized trials, community-based interventions are delivered by a wider variety of professionals with varied training backgrounds. When evidence-based programs are scaled into larger formats and disseminated to a wider audience, little is understood about how clients experience these interventions. To understand the experience of clients after meetings with nutrition, exercise, and health behavior professionals, researchers surveyed participants after 6 months in a weight management program. A total of 958 participants were recruited in monthly cohorts beginning September 2011 to complete a program evaluation survey. Qualitative inductive analysis was completed on several open-text items querying respondents as to what they found helpful from meetings with a registered dietitian, personal trainer, and health behavior counselor. Results indicate participants benefitted from gaining knowledge, learning new behavioral skills, or from interpersonal interactions. Findings suggest that the various professional services are valued by clients and that professionals appear to stay within their scope of practice. Implications for those working in weight management are discussed. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  3. Consolidated fuel reprocessing program: Criticality experiments with fast test reactor fuel pins in an organic moderator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bierman, S.R.

    1986-12-01

    The results obtained in a series of criticality experiments performed as part of a joint program on criticality data development between the United States Department of Energy and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan are presented in this report along with a complete description of the experiments. The experiments involved lattices of Fast Test Reactor (FTR) fuel pins in an organic moderator mixture similar to that used in the solvent extraction stage of fuel reprocessing. The experiments are designed to provide data for direct comparison with previously performed experimental measurements with water moderated lattices of FTR fuel pins. The same lattice arrangements and FTR fuel pin types are used in these organic moderated experimental assemblies as were used in the water moderated experiments. The organic moderator is a mixture of 38 wt % tributylphosphate in a normal paraffin hydrocarbon mixture of C{sub 11}H{sub 24} to C{sub 15}H{sub 32} molecules. Critical sizes of 1054.8, 599.2, 301.8, 199.5 and 165.3 fuel pins were obtained respectively for organic moderated lattices having 0.761 cm, 0.968 cm, 1.242 cm, 1.537 cm and 1.935 cm square lattice pitches as compared to 1046.9, 571.9, 293.9, 199.7 and 165.1 fuel pins for the same lattices water moderated.

  4. PsyToolkit: a software package for programming psychological experiments using Linux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoet, Gijsbert

    2010-11-01

    PsyToolkit is a set of software tools for programming psychological experiments on Linux computers. Given that PsyToolkit is freely available under the Gnu Public License, open source, and designed such that it can easily be modified and extended for individual needs, it is suitable not only for technically oriented Linux users, but also for students, researchers on small budgets, and universities in developing countries. The software includes a high-level scripting language, a library for the programming language C, and a questionnaire presenter. The software easily integrates with other open source tools, such as the statistical software package R. PsyToolkit is designed to work with external hardware (including IoLab and Cedrus response keyboards and two common digital input/output boards) and to support millisecond timing precision. Four in-depth examples explain the basic functionality of PsyToolkit. Example 1 demonstrates a stimulus-response compatibility experiment. Example 2 demonstrates a novel mouse-controlled visual search experiment. Example 3 shows how to control light emitting diodes using PsyToolkit, and Example 4 shows how to build a light-detection sensor. The last two examples explain the electronic hardware setup such that they can even be used with other software packages.

  5. The Students' Experiences of Ethics in Online Systems: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosalanejad, Leili; Dehghani, Ali; Abdolahifard, Khadije

    2014-01-01

    Cyber ethics is the philosophical study of ethics pertaining to computer networks encompassing users' behavior, what networked computers are programmed to do, and how this affects the individuals and the society. This study aimed to investigate the students' experiences of ethics in cyber systems.In the present study, the researchers conducted…

  6. Low-Income Urban Mothers' Experiences with the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Sarah; Ettinger, Anna K; Keefe, Carolyn; Riley, Anne; Surkan, Pamela J

    2017-10-01

    Food insecurity remains a public health concern in the United States, particularly among low-income urban ethnically diverse families, even with the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). Limited phenomenologic data exist to capture how programmatic changes to SNAP address the needs of users and why a gap in SNAP use may exist. The primary aim of this study was to examine the experiences of low-income, Baltimore, MD, mothers in applying for and maintaining access to SNAP. Secondary aims included understanding participants' perspectives on the influence of changes in SNAP over a 3-year period and how SNAP fits into the overall system of social services for families. In this qualitative, phenomenologic study, in-depth interviews were conducted with 13 mothers and three focus groups with 20 mothers, for a total sample of 33 mothers receiving SNAP benefits. Ten mothers participated in the first round of data collection (January to May 2010), and 23 in the second round (February to May 2013). Participants were 33 mothers receiving SNAP benefits in Baltimore City, MD. Baltimore SNAP users' experiences with applying for and maintaining access to SNAP, as well as with program changes to the SNAP program. Data were analyzed using an iterative emergent design and phenomenologic approach. A constructivist perspective was implemented throughout the coding process. SNAP functioned as a valuable support system within the broader social safety net for mothers living in poverty, yet participants expressed frustration about the processes of applying for and maintaining benefits due to communication problems and poor integration of services. In applying for and accessing SNAP, positive interactions with caseworkers and previous knowledge of the SNAP program were important for maintaining benefits. Interviews and focus group discussions revealed the need for additional outreach and education about the implemented program changes to build trust and improve access to SNAP

  7. The US etonogestrel implant mandatory clinical training and active monitoring programs: 6-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creinin, Mitchell D; Kaunitz, Andrew M; Darney, Philip D; Schwartz, Lisa; Hampton, Tonja; Gordon, Keith; Rekers, Hans

    2017-02-01

    utility and real-life experience that clinical training programs can provide. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. An advisory program for first- and second-year medical students: the Weill Cornell experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis M. Drusin

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: First-year students negotiate new professional culture with a certain amount of excitement and anxiety. There are different approaches for offering guidance. In this study, the authors present Weill Cornell Medical College's experience with an advising program for first- and second-year students. Methods: Fifty faculty advisors were each assigned 1–3 first-year students who they would follow for 2 years. The responsibilities were outlined to both faculty and students. The program was evaluated using an anonymous questionnaire. Results: For the two classes surveyed (2011 and 2012, most students met their advisors once. For both classes, the most frequently discussed issues were general adjustment to medical school, academic life, and the professional life of the advisor. Summer research and career opportunities were also discussed. Most students were satisfied with the advising program. Satisfaction increased with an increase in visits. Most students who did not meet their advisors established an advisor relationship on their own. Conclusions: An advising program was established at Weill Cornell Medical College that satisfied most of the students. It is important to evaluate its format regularly, from both student and advisor perspectives, in order to ensure its continued success.

  9. Developing a Comprehensive Cardio-Oncology Program at a Cancer Institute: The Moffitt Cancer Center Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fradley, Michael G.; Brown, Allen C.; Shields, Bernadette; Viganego, Federico; Damrongwatanasuk, Rongras; Patel, Aarti A.; Hartlage, Gregory; Roper, Natalee; Jaunese, Julie; Roy, Larry; Ismail-Khan, Roohi

    2017-01-01

    Cardio-oncology is a multidisciplinary field focusing on the management and prevention of cardiovascular complications in cancer patients and survivors. While the initial focus of this specialty was on heart failure associated with anthracycline use, novel anticancer agents are increasingly utilized and are associated with many other cardiotoxicities including hypertension, arrhythmias and vascular disease. Since its inception, the field has developed at a rapid pace with the establishment of programs at many major academic institutions and community practices. Given the complexities of this patient population, it is important for providers to possess knowledge of not only cardiovascular disease but also cancer subtypes and their specific therapeutics. Developing a cardio-oncology program at a stand-alone cancer center can present unique opportunities and challenges when compared to those affiliated with other institutions including resource allocation, cardiovascular testing availability and provider education. In this review, we present our experiences establishing the cardio-oncology program at Moffitt Cancer Center and provide guidance to those individuals interested in developing a program at a similar independent cancer institution. PMID:28781723

  10. Developing a Comprehensive Cardio-Oncology Program at a Cancer Institute: The Moffitt Cancer Center Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fradley, Michael G; Brown, Allen C; Shields, Bernadette; Viganego, Federico; Damrongwatanasuk, Rongras; Patel, Aarti A; Hartlage, Gregory; Roper, Natalee; Jaunese, Julie; Roy, Larry; Ismail-Khan, Roohi

    2017-06-14

    Cardio-oncology is a multidisciplinary field focusing on the management and prevention of cardiovascular complications in cancer patients and survivors. While the initial focus of this specialty was on heart failure associated with anthracycline use, novel anticancer agents are increasingly utilized and are associated with many other cardiotoxicities including hypertension, arrhythmias and vascular disease. Since its inception, the field has developed at a rapid pace with the establishment of programs at many major academic institutions and community practices. Given the complexities of this patient population, it is important for providers to possess knowledge of not only cardiovascular disease but also cancer subtypes and their specific therapeutics. Developing a cardio-oncology program at a stand-alone cancer center can present unique opportunities and challenges when compared to those affiliated with other institutions including resource allocation, cardiovascular testing availability and provider education. In this review, we present our experiences establishing the cardio-oncology program at Moffitt Cancer Center and provide guidance to those individuals interested in developing a program at a similar independent cancer institution.

  11. Participant experiences in a workplace pedometer-based physical activity program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauzon, Nicola; Chan, Catherine B; Myers, Anita M; Tudor-Locke, Catrine

    2008-09-01

    Limited process evaluation of pedometer-based interventions has been reported. Feedback via focus groups (n=38) and exit questionnaires (n=68) was used to examine participants' experiences in a group-based, pedometer-based physical activity (PA) program delivered in the workplace. The pedometer was described as a useful tool for increasing awareness of PA, providing motivation and visual feedback, and encouraging conversation and support among participants and others such as family and friends. Group meetings provided motivation and social support, as did participation by coworkers. Self-selected goals, self-selected PA strategies, and recording of steps/d were also important. Given the importance of social support as a mediating variable in changing PA behavior, future pedometer-based programs might benefit from including a group-based component.

  12. Boston Violence Intervention Advocacy Program: a qualitative study of client experiences and perceived effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Thea L; Bibi, Salma; Langlois, Breanne K; Dugan, Elizabeth; Mitchell, Patricia M

    2014-07-01

    This study intended to explore clients' experiences and provide a contextual basis for understanding their perceptions of the effectiveness of the Boston Medical Center (BMC) Violence Intervention Advocacy Program (VIAP). This was an exploratory, qualitative study conducted in an urban, Level I trauma center from July 1, 2011 to February 24, 2012. Emergency department (ED) patients older than 18 years with penetrating trauma, and who were enrolled in the VIAP, were eligible. Two trained, qualitative interviewers who were not part of the VIAP obtained consent and conducted in-depth, semistructured interviews. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, deidentified, coded, and analyzed. Thematic content analysis consistent with grounded theory was used to identify themes related to client experiences with VIAP, life circumstances, challenges to physical and emotional healing postinjury, services provided by VIAP, and perceptions of VIAP's effectiveness. Twenty subjects were interviewed. Most were male, African American, and younger than 30 years of age, reflecting the overall program's clientele. Most subjects perceived their advocates as caring adults in their lives and cited aspects of the peer support model that helped establish trusting relationships. Major challenges to healing were fear and safety, trust, isolation as a coping mechanism, bitterness, and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Every subject noted important services provided by VIAP advocates. Most subjects explicitly stated that they had positive experiences with the VIAP and perceived advocates' roles as a positive influence, providing client-centered advocacy, education, and support. This study provides insight into the lives of 20 BMC VIAP clients and contextualizes their unique challenges. Participants described positive, life-changing behaviors on their journey to healing through connections to caring, supportive adults. Information gained from this study will help the VIAP to

  13. Experiences of a critical reflection program for mid-career nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyamada, Kyoko

    2012-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the experiences of Japanese nurses who participated in a critical reflection program for mid-career nurses. Critical reflection is one method that is appropriate for the professional development of mid-career nurses. However, its implementation is difficult because of the need for educational resources. Of the numerous reports on critical reflection outcomes, few delineate the underlying process and none relates to Japanese nurses. A program was developed, based on Mezirow's transformation theory, to facilitate nurses' critical reflection. The program was implemented at three hospitals in Japan with 14 mid-career nurses. The data-collection period was from 2006 to 2007. The grounded theory approach was used to describe the results. Two participants experienced a transformation in their frame of reference after undergoing critical reflection during the program. One participant's viewpoint began to change and the other's "habit of mind" (social norms and personality characteristics that provide one with a general orientation) changed. Both participants met the conditions that were necessary for transformation, such as having an open attitude toward change, and compared to the other participants, their critical reflection progressed markedly on the worksheets that were designed to promote critical reflection. The process of change in the frame of reference that was experienced by the two participants followed eight of the ten phases of Mezirow's transformation theory. The characteristics of the experiences of the two participants who underwent changes in their frame of reference were described and discussed. The conditions for such transformation and the effects of critical reflection on the participants were consistent with those reported by previous studies. © 2011 The Author. Japan Journal of Nursing Science © 2011 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  14. Initial Results from the STEM Student Experiences Aboard Ships (STEMSEAS) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, J. C.; Cooper, S. K.; Thomson, K.; Rabin, B.; Alberts, J.

    2016-12-01

    The Science Technology Engineering and Math Student Experiences Aboard Ships (STEMSEAS) program was created as a response to NSF's call (through GEOPATHS) for improving undergraduate STEM education and enhancing diversity in the geosciences. It takes advantage of unused berths on UNOLS ships during transits between expeditions. During its 2016 pilot year - which consisted of three transits on three different research vessels in different parts of the country, each with a slightly different focus - the program has gained significant insights into how best to create and structure these opportunities and create impact on individual students. A call for applications resulted in nearly 900 applicants for 30 available spots. Of these applicants, 32% are from minority groups underrepresented in the geosciences (Black, Hispanic, or American Indian) and 20% attend community colleges. The program was able to sail socioeconomically diverse cohorts and include women, veterans, and students with disabilities and from two- and four-year colleges. Twenty-three are underrepresented minorities, 6 attend community colleges, 5 attend an HBCU or tribal college, and many are at HSIs or other MSIs. While longer term impact assessment will have to wait, initial results and 6-month tracking for the first cohort indicate that these kinds of relatively short but intense experiences can indeed achieve significant impacts on students' perception of the geosciences, in their understanding of STEM career opportunities, their desire to work in a geoscience lab setting, and to incorporate geosciences into non-STEM careers. Insights were also gained into the successful makeup of mentor/leader groups, factors to consider in student selection, necessary pre- and post-cruise logistics management, follow-up activities, structure of activities during daily life at sea, increasing student networks and access to mentorships, and leveraging of pre-existing resources and ship-based opportunities

  15. Older persons' experiences of a home-based exercise program with behavioral change support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkkukangas, Marina; Sundler, Annelie J; Söderlund, Anne; Eriksson, Staffan; Johansson, Ann-Christin

    2017-12-01

    It is a challenge to promote exercise among older persons. Knowledge is needed regarding the maintenance of exercise aiming at preventing falls and promoting health and well-being in older persons. This descriptive study used a qualitative inductive approach to describe older persons' experiences of a fall-preventive, home-based exercise program with support for behavioral change. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 12 elderly persons aged 75 years or older, and a qualitative content analysis was performed. Four categories emerged: facilitators of performing exercise in everyday life, the importance of support, perceived gains from exercise, and the existential aspects of exercise. With support from physiotherapists (PTs), home-based exercise can be adapted to individual circumstances in a meaningful way. Including exercises in everyday life and daily routines could support the experience of being stronger, result in better physical functioning, and give hope for an extended active life in old age.

  16. An Analysis of NSF Geosciences Research Experience for Undergraduate Site Programs from 2009 to 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rom, E. L.; Patino, L. C.; Gonzales, J.; Weiler, C. S.; Antell, L.; Colon, Y.; Sanchez, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    The Research Experience for Undergraduate (REU) Program at the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) provides undergraduate students from across the nation the opportunity to conduct research at a different institution and in an area that may not be available at their home campus. REU Sites funded by the Directorate of Geosciences provide student research opportunities in earth, ocean, atmospheric and geospace research. This paper provides an overview of the Geosciences REU Site programs run from 2009 to 2012. Information was gathered from over 45 REU sites each year on recruitment methods, student demographics, enrichment activities, and fields of research. The internet is the most widely used mechanism to recruit participants. The admissions rate for REU Sites in Geosciences varies by discipline but averages between 6% to 18% each year, with the majority of participants being rising seniors and juniors. A few Sites include rising sophomores and freshmen. Most students attend PhD granting institutions. Among the participants, gender distribution depends on discipline, with atmospheric and geospace sciences having more male than female participants, but ocean and earth sciences having a majority of female participants. Regarding ethnic diversity, the REU Sites reflect the difficulty of attracting diverse students into Geosciences as a discipline; a large majority of the participants are Caucasian or Asian students. Furthermore, participants from minority-serving institutions or community colleges constitute a small percentage of those taking part in these research experiences. The enrichment activities are very similar across the REU Sites, and mimic well activities common to the scientific community, including intellectual exchange of ideas (lab meetings, seminars, and professional meetings), networking and social activities. Results from this study will be used to examine strengths in the REU Sites in the Geosciences and opportunities for improvement in the

  17. Women's experiences of attending a creative arts program during their pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demecs, Ilona Pappne; Fenwick, Jennifer; Gamble, Jenny

    2011-09-01

    This small qualitative study aimed to explore pregnant women's experiences of participating in a pregnancy program designed around the use of creative activities. Increasingly childbirth, in resource rich countries, is considered a medical event with limited attention paid to the emotional aspects of pregnancy. However, the use of the creative arts to promote physical and emotional health and well-being has also gained increasing acknowledgement and recognition. Based on this latter literature, a program of activities including singing, dancing, storytelling and weaving was developed for pregnant women. A qualitative descriptive approach was employed. Seven pregnant women participated in six 2-h creative activity sessions. Data were collected using diaries, interviews, field notes and a brief questionnaire. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the qualitative data. Four themes, labelled 'Seeking support', 'Connecting with each other, myself and the baby', 'Finding a place to share, learn and grow,' and 'Finding balance' were identified. The findings suggest that participating in the program afforded women social support, a sense of connection with each other and enhanced perceptions of emotional well-being during pregnancy. The findings provide preliminary evidence that engaging in creative activities during pregnancy may enhance women's sense of emotional well-being. In addition, the findings confirm the growing body of literature that suggests that when childbearing women come together in a supportive sharing environment an opportunity is created whereby women learn or regain their cultural knowledge about birth and feel confident to make the decisions that best meet their own individual needs and preferences. Although the creative activities program was not designed to prepare women for birth it facilitated the sharing of information which appeared to increase the women's confidence and sense of competence to give birth and transition into motherhood. While the

  18. Third conference on radiation protection and dosimetry. Program and abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1991-01-01

    This conference has been designed with the objectives of promoting communication among applied, research, regulatory, and standards personnel involved in radiation protection and providing them with sufficient information to evaluate their programs. To partly fulfill these objectives, a technical program consisting of more than 75 invited and contributed oral presentations encompassing all aspects of radiation protection has been prepared. General topics include external dosimetry, internal dosimetry, instruments, regulations and standards, accreditation and test programs, research advances, and applied program experience. This publication provides a summary of the technical program and a collection of abstracts of the oral presentations.

  19. Lessons Learned: A review of utility experience with conservation and load management programs for commercial and industrial customers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadel, S.

    1990-10-01

    This report examines utility experience with conservation and load management (C LM) programs of commercial and industrial (C I) customers in order to summarize the lessons learned from program experiences to date and what these teach us about how to operate successful programs in the future. This analysis was motivated by a desire to learn about programs which achieve high participation rates and high electricity savings while remaining cost effective. Also, we wanted to review the very latest experiences with innovative program approaches -- approaches that might prove useful to utilities as they scale up their C LM activities. Specific objectives of this phase of the study are threefold: (1) To disseminate information on utility C LM experience to a nationwide audience. (2) To review current New York State utility programs and make suggestions on how these programs can be improved. (3) To collect data for the final phase of the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy/New York State Energy Research and Development Authority project, which will examine the savings that are achievable if C LM programs are pushed to the limit'' of current knowledge on how to structure and run cost-effective C LM programs. 19 tabs.

  20. Promising and Established Investigators' Experiences Participating in the National Athletic Trainers' Association Foundation Research Mentor Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nottingham, Sara L; Mazerolle, Stephanie M; Barrett, Jessica L

    2017-04-01

      Mentorship is a helpful resource for individuals who transition from doctoral student to tenure-track faculty member. The National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) Research & Education Foundation offers a Research Mentor Program to provide mentorship to promising investigators, particularly as they work to establish independent lines of research.   To gain the perspectives of promising and established investigators on their participation in the NATA Foundation Research Mentor Program.   Qualitative, phenomenological research.   Higher education institutions.   Seven promising investigators (5 women, 2 men) and 7 established investigators (2 women, 5 men), all of whom had completed the NATA Foundation Research Mentor Program. Data Collection and Analysis We developed and piloted intervi: ew guides designed to gain participants' perspectives on their experiences participating in the NATA Foundation Research Mentor Program. Semistructured telephone interviews were completed with each individual and transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed using a phenomenological approach, and saturation was obtained. Trustworthiness was established with the use of member checking, multiple-analyst triangulation, and data-source triangulation.   Three themes emerged from the interviews: (1) motivation, (2) collaboration, and (3) resources. Participants were motivated to become involved because they saw the value of mentorship, and mentees desired guidance in their research. Participants believed that collaboration on a project contributed to a positive relationship, and they also desired additional program and professional resources to support novice faculty.   Promising and established investigators should be encouraged to engage in mentoring relationships to facilitate mentees' research agendas and professional development. The NATA Foundation and athletic training profession may consider providing additional resources for novice faculty, such as training on

  1. Assessing preferences for a university-based smoking cessation program in Lebanon: a discrete choice experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salloum, Ramzi G; Abbyad, Christine W; Kohler, Racquel E; Kratka, Allison K; Oh, Leighanne; Wood, Kathryn A

    2015-05-01

    Smoking prevalence rates in Lebanon are among the highest in the Eastern Mediterranean region. Few smoking cessation programs are offered in Lebanon and little is known about the preferences of Lebanese smokers for cessation treatment programs. To establish which attributes of smoking cessation programs are most important to Lebanese smokers. Smokers at the American University of Beirut were surveyed to elicit their preferences for, and tradeoffs between the attributes of a hypothetical university-based smoking cessation program. Preferences for medication type/mechanism, risk of benign side effects, availability of support, distance traveled to obtain medication, and price of complete treatment were assessed using the discrete choice experiment method. The smokers' responses (N = 191) to changes in attributes were statistically significant. Smokers were willing to make trade-offs between attributes. On average, smokers were willing to pay LBP 103,000 (USD 69) for cessation support. Respondents were willing to give up LBP 105,000 (USD 70) to avoid an additional 10% risk of minor side effects and LBP 18,000 (USD 12) to avoid an addition kilometer of travel to the nearest pharmacy. Heavy smokers were the least responsive group and had the lowest demand elasticities. Student smokers were willing to participate in a relatively complex exercise that weighs the advantages and disadvantages of a hypothetical smoking cessation program. Overall they were less interested in the pill form of smoking cessation treatment, but they were willing to make tradeoffs to be smoke-free. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Design Considerations in Development of a Mobile Health Intervention Program: The TEXT ME and TEXTMEDS Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, Jay; Barry, Tony; Thiagalingam, Aravinda; Redfern, Julie; McEwan, Alistair L; Rodgers, Anthony; Chow, Clara K

    2016-11-15

    Mobile health (mHealth) has huge potential to deliver preventative health services. However, there is paucity of literature on theoretical constructs, technical, practical, and regulatory considerations that enable delivery of such services. The objective of this study was to outline the key considerations in the development of a text message-based mHealth program; thus providing broad recommendations and guidance to future researchers designing similar programs. We describe the key considerations in designing the intervention with respect to functionality, technical infrastructure, data management, software components, regulatory requirements, and operationalization. We also illustrate some of the potential issues and decision points utilizing our experience of developing text message (short message service, SMS) management systems to support 2 large randomized controlled trials: TEXT messages to improve MEDication adherence & Secondary prevention (TEXTMEDS) and Tobacco, EXercise and dieT MEssages (TEXT ME). The steps identified in the development process were: (1) background research and development of the text message bank based on scientific evidence and disease-specific guidelines, (2) pilot testing with target audience and incorporating feedback, (3) software-hardware customization to enable delivery of complex personalized programs using prespecified algorithms, and (4) legal and regulatory considerations. Additional considerations in developing text message management systems include: balancing the use of customized versus preexisting software systems, the level of automation versus need for human inputs, monitoring, ensuring data security, interface flexibility, and the ability for upscaling. A merging of expertise in clinical and behavioral sciences, health and research data management systems, software engineering, and mobile phone regulatory requirements is essential to develop a platform to deliver and manage support programs to hundreds of

  3. Sustaining liminality: Experiences and negotiations of international females in U.S. engineering graduate programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Debalina

    This project examines the intersectionalities of international females in engineering graduate programs of the United States, using frameworks of sustainability and liminality theory. According to Dutta and Kisselburgh (2011) international females in graduate engineering constitute the minorities of minorities, not only in terms of their status as international students but also by their underrepresentation as women in engineering (Faulkner, 2009). Research regarding international female graduate students tends to be categorized as the experiences of international students in the U.S. (Lee & Rice, 2007), or as the struggles of female engineers in engineering disciplines (Tonso, 2007). Therefore, this project aims to distinguish the unique population of female engineers of international origin from holistic studies of international students, and attempts to draw out and understand the experiences of international female students in U.S. engineering graduate programs. Dutta and Kisselburgh (2011) found that female engineers who are international in origin exist in liminal states indefinitely. This liminal nature has been described under the theory of liminality (Turner, 1967) which posits that when transitioning from one life-changing event to another (such as birth, death, marriage), individuals go through a transformatory phase where they are subjected to invisibility, vulnerability, and a feeling of loss. Although Turner posited this phase as transcendental and temporary, Dutta and Kisselburgh (2011) suggest the liminal period can be more permanent in contemporary global societies. In other words, liminal experiences of vulnerability and structural invisibility may be sustained experiences of international female engineering students. Furthermore, the project attends to the overlaps, tensions and challenging experiences faced by international females in surviving engineering graduate program. To achieve this goal, liminality theory is limited in accounting for how

  4. Transporting ideas between marine and social sciences: experiences from interdisciplinary research programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy M. Turner

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The oceans comprise 70% of the surface area of our planet, contain some of the world’s richest natural resources and are one of the most significant drivers of global climate patterns. As the marine environment continues to increase in importance as both an essential resource reservoir and facilitator of global change, it is apparent that to find long-term sustainable solutions for our use of the sea and its resources and thus to engage in a sustainable blue economy, an integrated interdisciplinary approach is needed. As a result, interdisciplinary working is proliferating. We report here our experiences of forming interdisciplinary teams (marine ecologists, ecophysiologists, social scientists, environmental economists and environmental law specialists to answer questions pertaining to the effects of anthropogenic-driven global change on the sustainability of resource use from the marine environment, and thus to transport ideas outwards from disciplinary confines. We use a framework derived from the literature on interdisciplinarity to enable us to explore processes of knowledge integration in two ongoing research projects, based on analyses of the purpose, form and degree of knowledge integration within each project. These teams were initially focused around a graduate program, explicitly designed for interdisciplinary training across the natural and social sciences, at the Gothenburg Centre for Marine Research at the University of Gothenburg, thus allowing us to reflect on our own experiences within the context of other multi-national, interdisciplinary graduate training and associated research programs.

  5. Experience and policy implications of children presenting with dental emergencies to US pediatric dentistry training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelstein, Burton; Vargas, Clemencia M; Candelaria, Devanie; Vemuri, Maryen

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe and substantiate the experience of children, their families, and their caregivers with children's dental pain and to explore implications of these experiences for public policy. Data for 301 children presenting to 35 pediatric dentistry training programs during a 1-week period in 2000 for pain relief were collected with a questionnaire asking for: (1) sociodemographic characteristics; (2) oral health status; (3) dental care history; (4) presenting problem; (5) clinical findings; and (6) clinical disposition. Descriptive statistics are presented. Among children presenting to training programs with oral pain, 28% were under age 6, 57% were on Medicaid, and 38% were regarded by their dentists to have "likely or obvious" functional impairment-with 22% reporting the highest pain level. Parents reported that 59% had "poor or fair oral health" and 29% had a prior dental emergency in the previous year. Pain, experienced for several days by 73% of children, was associated with difficulty: (1) eating; (2) sleeping; (3) attending school; and (4) playing. Parent-reported barriers to seeking dental care included: (1) missed work (24%); (2) transportation costs (12%); and (3) arranging child care (10%). In this study of children with dental pain, many suffered significant pain: (1) duration; (2) intensity; (3) recurrence; and (4) consequences. This study demonstrates the ongoing need for public policies that assure timely, comprehensive, and affordable dental care for vulnerable children.

  6. A synchronous communication experiment within an online distance learning program: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulos, Maged N Kamel; Taylor, Andrea D; Breton, Alice

    2005-10-01

    Student-teacher and student-student interactions in purely asynchronous distance learning courses are much lacking compared to similar interactions found in face-to-face teaching, causing learners to experience feelings of isolation, thus reducing motivation and increasing dropout rates. We used PalTalk, an Internet text and audio chat client from AVM Software, Inc. (New York, NY), to offer our students live virtual classroom sessions within a unit of our online distance learning M.Sc. program in Healthcare Informatics. On-demand replays of audio excerpts from the sessions were also provided to accommodate absenteeism and for student review. Five students completed an evaluation questionnaire. Our results highlighted the potential merits of using synchronous conferencing to assist in fostering a sense of belonging to one supportive learning community among distance learners and improve educational outcomes. Students were very positive toward the real-time human interaction and voted for a 95/5 (asynchronous/synchronous percentages) blended delivery approach for a typical unit in our program. They also praised PalTalk's voice quality and ease of use. This paper presents educational and technological perspectives about this experiment in the form of a state-of the- art review, without intending to be statistically rigorous. However, robust research evidence is still required to convince educators fully about the benefits of synchronous communication tools and help them decide on the most suitable solutions for their particular circumstances.

  7. The experience of primary care providers with an integrated mental health care program in safety-net clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentham, Wayne D; Ratzliff, Anna; Harrison, David; Chan, Ya-Fen; Vannoy, Steven; Unützer, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Primary care providers participating in a statewide implementation of an integrated mental health care program for "safety-net" patients in primary care clinics were surveyed to elicit their experiences and level of satisfaction. Quantitative analyses were performed to identify respondent characteristics and satisfaction with the program. Qualitative analyses were done to identify common themes in response to the question "How could psychiatric consultation [in the program] be improved?" Primary care providers were generally satisfied with the integrated mental health care program and raised several concerns that suggest important principles for successful future implementations of these types of programs.

  8. More than just dancing: experiences of people with Parkinson's disease in a therapeutic dance program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bognar, Stephanie; DeFaria, Anne Marie; O'Dwyer, Casey; Pankiw, Elana; Simic Bogler, Jennifer; Teixeira, Suzanne; Nyhof-Young, Joyce; Evans, Cathy

    2017-06-01

    To understand why individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) participate in a community-based therapeutic dance program and to explore its influence on perceived physical, social and emotional well-being of participants. A qualitative descriptive design was employed using one-on-one semi-structured interviews. Individuals with PD who participated in the Dancing with Parkinson's program were recruited from two locations. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, de-identified and then placed into NVivo 10 software for analysis. A content analysis approach was used with an inductive analysis method to generate a coding scheme. Group discussion facilitated development of overarching themes. Ten participants' responses revealed that the dance program allows for self-improvement and regaining identity through disease self-management. Positive influences of socialization arose through the class, decreasing isolation and improving quality of life. Participants communicate through music and dance to enhance connection with others. Dancing with Parkinson's classes allow for re-development of the social self, which can increase sense of enjoyment in life. Dance programs provide opportunities for social interaction, non-verbal communication and self-improvement, reestablishing self-identity and a sense of usefulness. This study provides unique insight into the experience of participating in a dance program from the perspective of individuals with PD. Implications for rehabilitation Dance is emerging as a strategy to address the physical and psychosocial effects of Parkinson's disease (PD), but little is known regarding participants' perceptions of community-based therapeutic dance programs for PD. This study found that Dancing with Parkinson's (DWP) facilitated an improvement in social participation, resulting in decreased isolation and improved quality of life. Participation in the DWP program can facilitate a positive change in perspective and attitude toward a PD

  9. The impact of program experiences on the retention of women engineering students in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Maria Del Carmen Garcia

    This qualitative study sought to describe and understand the experiences of female students attending engineering colleges in Mexico and the sources of support and strategies that helped them persist in their programs. The participants were 20 women engineering students enrolled in at least their third year in selected colleges of engineering in Mexico, in both public and private universities, and pursuing a variety of engineering majors. Findings focus on the experiences of female students that helped them stay in their programs. Participants described their experiences in college as very challenging and perceived the environment as hostile and uncertain. In addition, patriarchal Mexican cultural values and stereotypes were identified by students as influencing and helping shape the engineering environment. However, in this context, participants were able to find sources of support and use strategies that helped them remain in their majors, such as a strong desire to succeed, a perceived academic self-ability; and support from their families, peers, institutions, and---most importantly---their professors. Furthermore, the fact that participants were able to persist in their programs gave them a sense of pride and satisfaction that was shared by their families, peers, and faculty. In addition, participants experienced contradictory forces and were constantly negotiating between rejecting traditional gender norms and upholding the norms that are so deeply engrained in Mexican society. Finally, as the students advanced in their programs and became "accepted to the club," they tended to reproduce the male-dominated value system present in engineering colleges accepting their professors' expectations of being "top students," accepting the elitist culture of engineering superiority, and embracing the protection given by their male peers. Retention of Mexican female engineering students is important for all engineering colleges, but cultural factors must be taken into

  10. Interactions between youth and mental health professionals: The Youth Aware of Mental health (YAM) program experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Camilla; Postuvan, Vita; Herta, Dana; Iosue, Miriam; Värnik, Peeter; Carli, Vladimir

    2018-01-01

    The Youth Aware of Mental health (YAM) experience Youth stand at the core of much mental health promotion, yet little is written about their experiences of such efforts. We aimed to take this on by interviewing youth after they participated in Youth Aware of Mental Health (YAM), a universal mental health promotion program. YAM has a non-anticipatory methodology that provides youth with a safe space for reflection, role-play, and discussion. Addressing everyday mental health, YAM invites the experiences and issues relevant to the youth present to influence the program in a slightly different direction every time. The YAM instructor guides the participants but does not present the youth with given formulas on how to solve their problems. Like any mental health promotion, YAM appeals to some more than others in its intended audience and individuals engage with the program in many different ways. We set out to learn more about these experiences. Conversations about mental health Thirty-two semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15–17 year olds in Estonia, Italy, Romania and Spain. In these interviews, the researchers made an effort to discuss mental health in terms relevant to youth. Still, wide-ranging levels of motivation, ease with engaging in dialogue with mental health professionals, and comfort with the format and content of YAM were detected. The youth were clustered in five different groups relating to their positioning vis-à-vis the researcher during the interview. The following evocative labels were used: “interested”, “foot in the door”, “respect for authority”, “careful”, and “not my topic”. Corresponding labels were devised for their YAM experience: “engaged”, “initially hesitant”, “cautious”, “eager to please”, or “disengaged”. We also observed that the researchers brought their own expectations and employed a variety of approaches that led to anticipating answers, stating the obvious, or getting along

  11. Establishment of a renal supportive care program: Experience from a rural community hospital in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Ter Chao

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Renal supportive care (RSC denotes a care program dedicated for patients with acute, chronic renal failure, and end-stage renal disease (ESRD, aiming to offer maximal symptom relief and optimize patients' quality of life. The uncertainty of prognosis for patients with chronic kidney disease and ESRD, the sociocultural issues inherent to the Taiwanese society, and the void of structured and practical RSC pathway, contributes to the underrecognition and poor utilization of RSC. Taiwanese patients rarely receive information regarding RSC as part of a standardized care and are not commonly offered this option. In National Taiwan University Hospital Jinshan branch, we started a RSC subprogram, supported by the community-based palliative/hospice care main program. We focused on understanding the need and providing the choice of RSC to suitable candidates. A three-step and four-phase protocol was designed and implemented to identify appropriate patients and to enhance the applicability of the RSC. We harnessed family visit and home-based family meeting as a vehicle to understand the patients' preferences, to discover what ESRD patients and their family value most, and to introduce the option of RSC. In the current review, we described our pilot experience of establishing a RSC program in Taiwan, and discuss its potential advantage.

  12. An Analysis of NSF Research Experience for Undergraduate Site Programs from 2009 through 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, R.; Patino, L. C.; Rom, E. L.; Adams, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    The Research Experience for Undergraduate (REU) Program at the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) supports U.S. institutions so that they can provide undergraduate students from any college or university the opportunity to conduct research at many different institutions. Participants also gain a better understanding of pathways for research careers. In 2013 a new system for annual report data collection was implemented by the National Science Foundation for all awards, including REU Sites. As a result, REU Site Directors must ask students to self-report data using the NSF Fastlane system. NSF has been collecting this data for several years and information is now available about the effectiveness of this new data collection system. Information on the GEO REU Site student demographics from 2014 will be presented and compared to data from previous years. Results show low participation rates by REU students in the data submission process. Many students who do participate skip questions or chose not to provide answers to the questions. Methods for increasing student participation in the data collection process will be discussed and suggestions for other ways to improve data collection as a community will be presented. Accurate information on student demographics for GEO REU Site programs are important because these students often go on to graduate programs and are the future role models for a diverse workforce.

  13. The value of an open, early academic development program to students’ transition and first year experience: The UTAS UniStart program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Adam

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The University of Tasmania’s (UTAS UniStart program is a pre- and early-semester academic transition support program available to all HECs-eligible incoming students. The aim of the program is to nurture critical thinking and independent study skills in commencing students. UniStart has been offered to commencing UTAS students for over 10 years, with a significant increase both in enrolments and in the flexibility of delivery over recent years. Evaluation of the program indicates that students feel more confident and prepared for their academic studies after undertaking the program and that the majority of students affirm, later in the year, that they have utilised and applied the skills developed in UniStart during their core studies. The program represents an important component of the university’s approach to supporting the first-year experience and student transition.

  14. The Community Mentoring REU: A Novel Paradigm for Research Experiences for Undergraduates Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobulnicky, Henry; Maierhofer, Lara; Kobulnicky, Carol; Dale, Daniel A.

    2018-01-01

    Research Experience for Undergraduates programs were conceived to promote entry of college students into STEM disciplines. Evidence suggests that participating in REUs increases interest in STEM, conveys skills leading to STEM jobs and graduate study, increases science self-efficacy, builds professional networks for young scientists, and cultivates identity as a scientist. Nevertheless, the factors that mediate desired outcomes are still poorly understood, and persistence of negative mentoring experiences among REU participants motivates the design and study of novel approaches to preparing future STEM professionals. During five summers spanning 2012-2016 we implemented a "Community Mentoring" paradigm at the University of Wyoming's 10-week Astronomy REU program. In contrast to "traditional model (TM)" REUs that pair a single senior scientist mentor with a single junior mentee, community mentoring (CM) unites 6-8 undergraduates with 3-5 faculty (perhaps assisted by a graduate student or postdoc) on a collaborative team addressing a single science goal. In CM, students have access to a pool of mentors and a peer group reading the same literature, working in a common location, sharing equipment (in this case the WIRO 2.3 meter telescope), sharing data, and learning the same analysis skills. The community interacts daily, modeling the highly collaborative nature of modern scientific teams. Our study used an electronic survey consisting of 24 questions to compare a cohort of 28 CM students to a national control group of 77 students who conducted REUs elsewhere during the same period, typically under the TM. CM students report a significantly higher level of "learning from their peers", "learning to work on a science team", and "sense of community" compared to the TM cohort. The CM cohort also reports a higher overall level of satisfaction with the REU and a lower level of negative experiences, such as finding it difficult to get time with a mentor. This talk will

  15. NYU Dance Education Study Abroad Program to Uganda: Impact on Work Experiences of Study Abroad Alumni in New York City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabingo, Alfdaniels

    2015-01-01

    Study abroad programs in dance education have played a key role in equipping students with globally and culturally diverse academic, pedagogic and professional knowledge, aptitudes and experiences. For this study, I interviewed six subjects who participated in New York University dance education study abroad program to Uganda from 2007 to 2010 to…

  16. Experiences of general practices with a participatory pay-for-performance program: a qualitative study in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirschner, K.; Braspenning, J.C.C.; Jacobs, J.E.; Grol, R.P.

    2013-01-01

    The involvement of target users in the design choices of a pay-for-performance program may enhance its impact, but little is known about the views of participants in these programs. To explore general practices' experiences with pay-for-performance in primary care we conducted a qualitative study in

  17. Broadening Student Learning Experiences via a Novel Cross-Disciplinary Art and Anatomy Education Program--A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speed, Caroline J.; Kleiner, Adina; Macaulay, Janet O.

    2015-01-01

    This study explored student learning and engagement in a novel cross-disciplinary education program, in particular whether medical students learning experiences can be enhanced through interaction and exchange of knowledge with students of varying disciplines. The program, entitled AnaRtomy, studies the historical relationship between art and…

  18. Astrobiology Research Experience for Undergraduates: An Interdisciplinary REU Program at the SETI Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, C. B.; Devore, E. K.

    2009-12-01

    The SETI Institute hosts a summer Astrobiology Research Experience for Undergraduates program for highly motivated students interested in astrobiology research. Students work with scientists at the SETI Institute and at the nearby NASA Ames Research Center on projects spanning the field of astrobiology from microbiology to planetary geology to astronomy and astrophysics. Each student is mentored by a scientist for his/her summer research project. As astrobiology is interdisciplinary, the first week includes a seminar series to provide a broad foundation in the field as the students begin their research projects. The 10-week program includes a week-long field trip to the SETI Institute’s Allen Telescope Array, located at the Hat Creek Radio Astronomy Observatory in Northern California, as well as a field experience at hydrothermal systems at nearby Lassen Volcanic National Park. Students also participate in local field trips to places like the California Academy of Sciences and other nearby locations of scientific interest, and attend seminars, lectures, and discussions on astrobiology. Students are also invited to attend events at nearby NASA Ames Research Center, which offers the opportunity to interact with other undergraduate and graduate students participating in NASA summer programs. At the end of the program, students write up and present their research projects, and mentors recommend some projects for submission to a national scientific conference, which the selected students will be funded to attend. The Astrobiology REU program emphasizes three main areas, which are listed in the table along with typical project themes. Each year, specific student research projects are described on the website, and students are asked to select the three that most interest them as a part of their applications. Applications are due in early February. Typically, 10 students apply for each available position. Students have been selected from colleges and universities

  19. On the Cutting Edge Professional Development Program - An effective model built from years of experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckner, M. Z.; Macdonald, H.; Beane, R. J.; Manduca, C. A.; Mcconnell, D. A.; Mogk, D. W.; Tewksbury, B. J.; Wiese, K.; Wysession, M. E.; Iverson, E. A. R.; Fox, S.

    2015-12-01

    The On the Cutting Edge (CE) program offers a successful model for designing and convening professional development events. Information about the model is now available on the CE website. The program model has evolved from more than 12 years of experience, building with input from strong leaders and participants. CE offers face-to-face, virtual, and hybrid events, and features a rich website that supports these professional development events as well as a growing community with a shared interest in effective geoscience teaching. Data from national surveys, participant feedback, and self-report data indicate the program's success in improving undergraduate geoscience education. Successes are also demonstrated in classroom observations using RTOP, indicating a significant difference in teaching style among participants and non-participants. A suite of web pages, with a planning timeline, provides guidance to those interested in designing and convening face-to-face or virtual events based on the CE model. The pages suggest ways to develop robust event goals and evaluation tools, how to choose strong leaders and recruit diverse participants, advice for designing effective event programs that utilize participant expertise, websites, and web tools, and suggestions for effectively disseminating event results and producing useful products. The CE model has been successfully transferred to projects that vary in scale and discipline. Best practices from the CE model include (1) thinking of the workshop as shared enterprise among conveners and participants; (2) incorporating conveners and participants who bring diverse viewpoints and approaches; (3) promoting structured discussions that utilize participants' expertise; (4) emphasizing practical strategies to effect change; and (5) using the website as a platform to prepare for the workshop, share ideas, and problem-solve challenges. Learn more about how to utilize this model for your project at:serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/workshops/convene

  20. Resident continuity of care experience in a Canadian general surgery training program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Ravindar S.; Walker, G. Ross

    Objectives To provide baseline data on resident continuity of care experience, to describe the effect of ambulatory centre surgery on continuity of care, to analyse continuity of care by level of resident training and to assess a resident-run preadmission clinic’s effect on continuity of care. Design Data were prospectively collected for 4 weeks. All patients who underwent a general surgical procedure were included if a resident was present at operation. Setting The Division of General Surgery, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ont. Outcome measures Preoperative, operative and inhospital postoperative involvement of each resident with each case was recorded. Results Residents assessed preoperatively (before entering the operating room) 52% of patients overall, 20% of patients at the ambulatory centre and 83% of patients who required emergency surgery. Of patients assessed by the chief resident, 94% were assessed preoperatively compared with 32% of patients assessed by other residents ( p 0.1). Conclusions This study serves as a reference for the continuity of care experience in Canadian surgical programs. Residents assessed only 52% of patients preoperatively, and only 40% of patients had complete continuity of care. Factors such as ambulatory surgery and junior level of training negatively affected continuity experience. Such factors must be taken into account in planning surgical education. PMID:10526519

  1. Change Management Model for Implementing an Effective First-Year Experience Program in the Community College Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Joy C.

    2015-01-01

    This study provides evidence that systematic management of change can facilitate the implementation of first-year experience programming that leads to improved results in retention and student success for community college students. The study includes four major themes: (a) first-year experience, (b) change management, (c) change leadership, and…

  2. Planning a New Education and Outreach Program Based on Past Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, W. H.; Eriksson, S. C.

    2004-12-01

    In 2004, UNAVCO, a geodetic research consortium, celebrated its 20th birthday and hired its first Education and Outreach Coordinator. UNAVCO has informally reached out to various constituents such as geodetic researchers, undergraduate and graduate students, and K-12 teachers through web-based mapping tools, short courses, and one-to-one training on research equipment. A strategically planned and implemented Education and Outreach Program will, by definition, depend on the organization's leadership and on the experience of the people leading such a program. Based on 39 years of combined experience, here are some lessons-learned that will inform UNAVCO's efforts. E & O should focus on what is special and unique to our organization. UNAVCO supports high precision, GPS, geodetic research as its primary mission. Define our audience. UNAVCO serves the research scientists at the member institutions. Do we have a broader goal of helping in the education of undergraduates? Is our work relevant in middle and secondary school? Include the audience in planning what we will do. A two-way dialogue to determine the most effective education and outreach products must balance what scientists think the audience needs and having the audience learn about a subject to help in making decisions. Involve the scientists and decision-makers in the process to develop ownership. Having people `buy in' from the beginning is important for participation, advocacy, and finding long term resources. Decide on quality and quantity. Is it important to serve large numbers of people? Would a small program that focuses on a few individuals over a long period of time serve the organization's goals better? What do we need from an E & O program? Being explicit about what an organization needs from E & O helps define what activities it will do. Does UNAVCO need visibility with members? Does the membership need help with `broader impacts'? Does UNAVCO see itself serving its members or being a `good citizen

  3. An Analysis of NSF Geosciences Research Experience for Undergraduate Site Programs from 2009 through 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rom, E. L.; Patino, L. C.; Weiler, S.; Sanchez, S. C.; Colon, Y.; Antell, L.

    2011-12-01

    The Research Experience for Undergraduate (REU) Program at the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) provides U.S. undergraduate students from any college or university the opportunity to conduct research at a different institution and gain a better understanding of research career pathways. The Geosciences REU Sites foster research opportunities in areas closely aligned with geoscience programs, particularly those related to earth, atmospheric and ocean sciences. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the Geosciences REU Site programs run in 2009 through 2011. A survey requesting information on recruitment methods, student demographics, enrichment activities, and fields of research was sent to the Principal Investigators of each of the active REU Sites. Over 70% of the surveys were returned with the requested information from about 50 to 60 sites each year. The internet is the most widely used mechanism to recruit participants, with personal communication as the second most important recruiting tool. The admissions rate for REU Sites in Geosciences varies from less than 10% to 50%, with the majority of participants being rising seniors and juniors. Many of the participants come from non-PhD granting institutions. Among the participants, gender distribution varies by discipline, with ocean sciences having a large majority of women and earth sciences having a majority of men. Regarding ethnic diversity, the REU Sites reflect the difficulty of attracting diverse students into Geosciences as a discipline; a large majority of participants are Caucasian and Asian students. Furthermore, participants from minority-serving institutions and community colleges constitute a small percentage of those taking part in these research experiences. The enrichment activities are very similar across the REU Sites, and mimic activities common to the scientific community, including intellectual exchange of ideas (lab meetings, seminars, and professional meetings

  4. Comparing Homeless Persons’ Care Experiences in Tailored Versus Nontailored Primary Care Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Cheryl L.; Steward, Jocelyn L.; Jones, Richard N.; Roth, David L.; Stringfellow, Erin; Gordon, Adam J.; Kim, Theresa W.; Austin, Erika L.; Henry, Stephen Randal; Kay Johnson, N.; Shanette Granstaff, U.; O’Connell, James J.; Golden, Joya F.; Young, Alexander S.; Davis, Lori L.; Pollio, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We compared homeless patients’ experiences of care in health care organizations that differed in their degree of primary care design service tailoring. Methods. We surveyed homeless-experienced patients (either recently or currently homeless) at 3 Veterans Affairs (VA) mainstream primary care settings in Pennsylvania and Alabama, a homeless-tailored VA clinic in California, and a highly tailored non-VA Health Care for the Homeless Program in Massachusetts (January 2011-March 2012). We developed a survey, the “Primary Care Quality-Homeless Survey," to reflect the concerns and aspirations of homeless patients. Results. Mean scores at the tailored non-VA site were superior to those from the 3 mainstream VA sites (P homelessness. PMID:24148052

  5. Comparing homeless persons' care experiences in tailored versus nontailored primary care programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertesz, Stefan G; Holt, Cheryl L; Steward, Jocelyn L; Jones, Richard N; Roth, David L; Stringfellow, Erin; Gordon, Adam J; Kim, Theresa W; Austin, Erika L; Henry, Stephen Randal; Kay Johnson, N; Shanette Granstaff, U; O'Connell, James J; Golden, Joya F; Young, Alexander S; Davis, Lori L; Pollio, David E

    2013-12-01

    We compared homeless patients' experiences of care in health care organizations that differed in their degree of primary care design service tailoring. We surveyed homeless-experienced patients (either recently or currently homeless) at 3 Veterans Affairs (VA) mainstream primary care settings in Pennsylvania and Alabama, a homeless-tailored VA clinic in California, and a highly tailored non-VA Health Care for the Homeless Program in Massachusetts (January 2011-March 2012). We developed a survey, the "Primary Care Quality-Homeless Survey," to reflect the concerns and aspirations of homeless patients. Mean scores at the tailored non-VA site were superior to those from the 3 mainstream VA sites (P homelessness.

  6. Use of mock media in emergency management exercises: the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Ken; Meshenberg, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Disasters of any kind attract significant attention from news media, and media play an important role in disaster response. In a US government program for hazardous materials preparedness, risk communication functions were incorporated into planning and are demonstrated during response exercises. To provide the best training and most realistic play, exercise controllers play the role of news media reporters-mock media-during these exercises. They attend news conferences, interview exercise players in the field, and make calls to participants. They produce news stories including television reports, newspaper articles, radio spots, blog entries, and social media messages. This allows exercise players to experience how their actions and statements would be represented in the media, more effectively mimicking the environment of a real event.

  7. Transdisciplinary teamwork: the experience of clinicians at a functional restoration program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartmill, Carrie; Soklaridis, Sophie; David Cassidy, J

    2011-03-01

    This research explored the experience of clinicians during the transition from working as an interdisciplinary team to providing a transdisciplinary model of care in a functional restoration program (FRP) for clients with chronic disabling musculoskeletal pain. This qualitative study used a grounded theory approach to data collection and analysis. In depth interviews were conducted to gather data and analysis was performed by the coding of emergent themes. Three major themes were identified that contributed towards building a successful transdisciplinary team: the client population; opportunities for communication with colleagues; and an organizational structure that supports transdisciplinary teamwork. Transdisciplinary teams with multiple health care providers are suitable for treating patients with complex needs and with injuries that are chronic in nature. However, transdisciplinary teamwork requires input from an organizational level and from a communication level to effectively contribute to both clinician satisfaction and to improved coordination in patient care.

  8. Frail Older Adults' Experiences With a Proactive, Nurse-Led Primary Care Program: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleijenberg, Nienke; Boeije, Hennie R; Onderwater, Astrid T; Schuurmans, Marieke J

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the current study was to explore frail older adults' perceptions and experiences with a proactive, integrated nurse-led primary care program. A qualitative study nested within a randomized trial in primary care was conducted. In total, 11 semistructured interviews were conducted in a subsample of participants who received nurse-led care in the intervention group. Generally, proactive, nurse-led care was well-received and four different nursing roles were observed: (a) monitor, (b) director, (c) coach, and (d) visitor. The monitor role (i.e., observing and assessing potential risks) was perceived as the most important. The relationship with the nurse, timing of visits, and provided care, as well as tailoring the care to individual needs, were identified as conditions related to appreciation. If the care was well-regarded, older adults were more likely to accept it, which helped them anticipate changes or handle consequences of aging more easily. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Developing a culturally appropriate family planning program for the Navrongo experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazzar, A; Adongo, P B; Binka, F N; Phillips, J F; Debpuur, C

    1995-01-01

    This article describes the first six months of the strategic planning process to develop a culturally appropriate community health and family planning program for a traditional community in a district of northern Ghana, served by the Navrongo Health Research Centre. To explain the context within which fertility decisions are made, this article describes the district's severe ecological, social, economic, and health constraints to family planning. It discusses related programmatic obstacles and presents the strategies developed to respond to them. A system of care has been developed that is closely coordinated with traditional leaders and communication networks. Management systems support outreach workers by emphasizing the importance of peer leadership, supervisory support, and community liaison in the implementation of village-based services. A large-scale experiment will be fielded to test the demographic impact of this approach.

  10. Differential Experiences of Women and Minority Engineering Students in a Cooperative Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fifolt, Matthew M.; Abbott, Gypsy

    Although slight gains have been made in attracting women and minority students to the field of engineering, the differences are not great enough to meet current economic demands [National Academy of Sciences (2007). Rising above the gathering storm: Energizing and employing America for a brighter economic future, Washington, DC: National Academies Press]. Therefore, it has become imperative that colleges and universities increase efforts to both recruit and retain these students who express interest in the STEM fields [National Science Foundation (2006), Women, minorities, and persons with disabilities in science and engineering, NSF 4-311, Arlington, VA: NSF]. In engineering, one promising venue for students to gain professional experience as part of their undergraduate training is through cooperative education (co-op). However, there is a dearth of information in the research literature regarding how co-op programs can be structured to address the needs of diverse students. There is consensus, however, about one aspect of addressing the needs of diverse students, namely, mentoring and role models are key strategies for success. In this study, a mixed methods design was used to examine students' perceptions of mentoring in a cooperative education program in a southeastern university. Using Noe's [Noe, R. (1988). An investigation of the determinants of successful assigned mentoring relationships. Personnel Psychology, 1, 457-479] mentoring functions scales, which described psychosocial and career-related support, research findings indicated a statistically significant difference between gender and the psychosocial aspect of mentoring. Analysis of the qualitative data further confirmed differences in cooperative education experiences with respect to both gender and ethnicity.

  11. Las Cumbres Observatory Partners With Local Museums In “Experience The Eclipse” Community Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenstreet, Sarah; Seale, Sandy; Rivera, Javier; Skinner, Ron

    2017-10-01

    Las Cumbres Observatory (LCO) in Goleta, California, together with the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History (SBMNH) and the Wolf Museum of Exploration & Innovation (MOXI) put together a community program called “Experience the Eclipse” for the month of August.The greater Santa Barbara community includes over 200,000 people and the city is known for its vibrant cultural life. Events featuring science, physics, and astronomy are very popular. In 2016, Javier Rivera, the Astronomy Program Manager of the SBMNH, and Ron Skinner, the Director of Education at MOXI, met with LCO to discuss planning a month of activities to educate the public about the Great American Eclipse. The vision was to capitalize on the strength of each organization and to share information and events.The events included daily planetarium shows and open houses at the observatory of the SBMNH. All three organizations gave parties at public venues with presentations by astronomers. Together the group purchased 6,000 pairs of eclipse viewer glasses and they shared the responsibility of distributing these to local schools and community groups. A master calendar of the events was published in local press outlets and a document describing the eclipse and safe viewing practices was distributed widely. Preparation of these materials was a joint effort among the three institutions.“Experience the Eclipse” was a great success. The open houses at SBMNH were well attended and all public events sold out very quickly. On August 21, the SBMNH presented a live feed of the eclipse taken from their own observatory.We will present photos and videos from these events, along with data on the attendance and quotes from enthusiastic participants.

  12. Effects of an Individual Development Account Program on Retirement Saving: Follow-up Evidence From a Randomized Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinstein-Weiss, Michal; Sherraden, Michael; Gale, William G; Rohe, William M; Schreiner, Mark; Key, Clinton; Oliphant, Jane E

    2015-01-01

    We examine the 10-year follow-up effects on retirement saving of an individual development account (IDA) program using data from a randomized experiment that ran from 1998 to 2003 in Tulsa, Oklahoma. The IDA program included financial education, encouragement to save, and matching funds for several qualified uses of the saving, including contributions to retirement accounts. The results indicate that as of 2009, 6 years after the program ended, the IDA program had no impact on the propensity to hold a retirement account, the account balance, or the sufficiency of retirement balances to meet retirement expenses.

  13. Haplotypes and variable position detection in the mitochondrial DNA coding region encompassing nucleotide positions 10,716-11,184.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, Imad Hadi; Abdulzahra, Ameer Ibrahim; Jebor, Mohammed Abdullah; Kqueen, Cheah Yoke; Ommer, Aamera Jaber

    2015-08-01

    This study evaluates the mitochondrial noncoding regions by using the Sanger sequencing method for application in Forensic Science. FTA® Technology (FTA™ paper DNA extraction) was utilized to extract DNA. Portion of coding region encompassing positions from (10,716 to 11,184) amplified in accordance with the Anderson reference sequence. PCR products purified by EZ-10 spin column were then sequenced and detected using the ABI 3730 × L DNA Analyzer. A new polymorphic positions 10,750 and 10,790 that are described may be suitable sources in future for identification purpose. The data obtained can be used to identify variable nucleotide positions characterized by frequent occurrence, most promising for identification variants.

  14. Implementing a robotics curriculum at an academic general surgery training program: our initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winder, Joshua S; Juza, Ryan M; Sasaki, Jennifer; Rogers, Ann M; Pauli, Eric M; Haluck, Randy S; Estes, Stephanie J; Lyn-Sue, Jerome R

    2016-09-01

    The robotic surgical platform is being utilized by a growing number of hospitals across the country, including academic medical centers. Training programs are tasked with teaching their residents how to utilize this technology. To this end, we have developed and implemented a robotic surgical curriculum, and share our initial experience here. Our curriculum was implemented for all General Surgical residents for the academic year 2014-2015. The curriculum consisted of online training, readings, bedside training, console simulation, participating in ten cases as bedside first assistant, and operating at the console. 20 surgical residents were included. Residents were provided the curriculum and notified the department upon completion. Bedside assistance and operative console training were completed in the operating room through a mix of biliary, foregut, and colorectal cases. During the fiscal years of 2014 and 2015, there were 164 and 263 robot-assisted surgeries performed within the General Surgery Department, respectively. All 20 residents completed the online and bedside instruction portions of the curriculum. Of the 20 residents trained, 13/20 (65 %) sat at the Surgeon console during at least one case. Utilizing this curriculum, we have trained and incorporated residents into robot-assisted cases in an efficient manner. A successful curriculum must be based on didactic learning, reading, bedside training, simulation, and training in the operating room. Each program must examine their caseload and resident class to ensure proper exposure to this platform.

  15. The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses program: A translational research experience in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohan, Romina; Pesaola, Favio; Guelbert, Norberto; Pons, Patricia; Oller-Ramírez, Ana María; Rautenberg, Gisela; Becerra, Adriana; Sims, Katherine; Xin, Winnie; Cismondi, Inés Adriana; Noher de Halac, Inés

    2015-10-01

    The Argentinean program was initiated more than a decade ago as the first experience of systematic translational research focused on NCL in Latin America. The aim was to overcome misdiagnoses and underdiagnoses in the region. 216 NCL suspected individuals from 8 different countries and their direct family members. Clinical assessment, enzyme testing, electron microscopy, and DNA screening. 1) The study confirmed NCL disease in 122 subjects. Phenotypic studies comprised epileptic seizures and movement disorders, ophthalmology, neurophysiology, image analysis, rating scales, enzyme testing, and electron microscopy, carried out under a consensus algorithm; 2) DNA screening and validation of mutations in genes PPT1 (CLN1), TPP1 (CLN2), CLN3, CLN5, CLN6, MFSD8 (CLN7), and CLN8: characterization of variant types, novel/known mutations and polymorphisms; 3) Progress of the epidemiological picture in Latin America; and 4) NCL-like pathology studies in progress. The Translational Research Program was highly efficient in addressing the misdiagnosis/underdiagnosis in the NCL disorders. The study of "orphan diseases" in a public administrated hospital should be adopted by the health systems, as it positively impacts upon the family's quality of life, the collection of epidemiological data, and triggers research advances. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: "Current Research on the Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinoses (Batten Disease)". Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The student assistabce programs of higher education in Brazil: the experience of UTFPR-Dois Vizinhos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Palavezzini

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article results from the research developed at the Masters Course in Education at State University of West Paraná (UNIOESTE aim to analyze the contribution of the student political assistance as proportion the access conditions, stability and graduation, having as basis the information from Federal Technological University of Paraná – Dois Vizinhos. Brazil has got disproportional numbers in terms of access and persistence on the educational system, especially in the graduation. In the last decades, federal government, proposals of higher education spreading, as well as students assistance. The discussion intend to present how the Bourgeois State has established itself and how the ideology of the bourgeoisie affect the government actions, sustaining the propositions of the social politicians, particularly when it comes to education. Also, the objective is to understand the actual political configuration of higher education, concentrating on the actual normative aspects of the student assistance programs. After all, to examine the experience of Federal Technological University of Paraná – Dois Vizinhos and trace some considerations about the topic. From the quantitative search with the Academic System UTFPR-DV data, documents and regulations of the institution (public notices, regulations, reports, etc. it has been observed that the main results and conclusions indicate students assistance programs have been essential to the retention of students with socioeconomic difficulties in higher education.

  17. PICOGEN: five years experience with a genetic counselling program for dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortea, J; Lladó, A; Clarimón, J; Lleó, A; Oliva, R; Peri, J; Pintor, L; Yagüe, J; Blesa, R; Molinuevo, J L; Sánchez-Valle, R

    2011-04-01

    We describe the 5 year experience of a genetic counselling program for familial dementias (the PICOGEN program). The neurologist selected the candidates for genetic testing in the screening visit based on family history and phenotype (Alzheimer disease-AD, frontotemporal lobar degeneration-FTLD, or prion disease). Asymptomatic subjects who decided to know their genetic status were evaluated within a structured protocol by the psychiatrist and psychologist prior to entering the program and followed up afterwards. A total of 87 patients from 72 families were candidates for the genetic study, 20 of the 72 families had a family history of autosomal dominant early-onset dementia (ADEOD). A pathogenic mutation was found in 22 patients (8 PSEN1, 1 PSEN2, 1 APP, 4 MAPT, 8 PRNP), 5 of which had not been previously described. All positive cases, except for 1 PSEN1 (12.5%) and 4 PRNP (50%) showed ADEOD. In 3 ADEOD cases (15%) no pathogenic mutation was found. After individual genetic counselling, 24/54 asymptomatic subjects at risk decided to have the pre-symptomatic study, of whom 10 (42%) were carriers of the pathogenic mutation. In the follow up, no major psychiatric complication was observed. In our series, family history of ADEOD was a sensitive criterion for the detection of pathogenic mutations in AD and FTLD but not in prion diseases. No genetic anomalies were detected in 15% of the ADEOD cases using conventional diagnostic procedures, and 43% of pre-symptomatic subjects at risk who received individual genetic counselling decided to have the study. The pre-symptomatic diagnosis proved to be safe under these conditions. Copyright © 2009 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Adolescent values for immunisation programs in Australia: A discrete choice experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Chen, Gang; Ratcliffe, Julie; Afzali, Hossein Haji Ali; Giles, Lynne; Marshall, Helen

    2017-01-01

    The importance of adolescent engagement in health decisions and public health programs such as immunisation is becoming increasingly recognised. Understanding adolescent preferences and further identifying barriers and facilitators for immunisation acceptance is critical to the success of adolescent immunisation programs. This study applied a discrete choice experiment (DCE) to assess vaccination preferences in adolescents. This study was conducted as a cross-sectional, national online survey in Australian adolescents. The DCE survey evaluated adolescent vaccination preferences. Six attributes were assessed including disease severity, target for protection, price, location of vaccination provision, potential side effects and vaccine delivery method. A mixed logit model was used to analyse DCE data. This survey was conducted between December 2014 and January 2015. Of 800 adolescents aged 15 to 19 years, stronger preferences were observed overall for: vaccination in the case of a life threatening illness (p<0.001), lower price vaccinations (p<0.001), mild but common side effects (p = 0.004), delivery via a skin patch (p<0.001) and being administered by a family practitioner (p<0.001). Participants suggested that they and their families would be willing to pay AU$394.28 (95%CI: AU$348.40 to AU$446.92) more for a vaccine targeting a life threatening illness than a mild-moderate illness, AU$37.94 (95%CI: AU$19.22 to AU$57.39) more for being vaccinated at a family practitioner clinic than a council immunisation clinic, AU$23.01 (95%CI: AU$7.12 to AU$39.24) more for common but mild and resolving side effects compared to rare but serious side effects, and AU$51.80 (95%CI: AU$30.42 to AU$73.70) more for delivery via a skin patch than injection. Consideration of adolescent preferences may result in improved acceptance of, engagement in and uptake of immunisation programs targeted for this age group.

  19. High temperature experiments on a 4 tons UF6 container TENERIFE program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casselman, C.; Duret, B.; Seiler, J.M.; Ringot, C.; Warniez, P.

    1991-12-31

    The paper presents an experimental program (called TENERIFE) whose aim is to investigate the behaviour of a cylinder containing UF{sub 6} when exposed to a high temperature fire for model validation. Taking into account the experiments performed in the past, the modelization needs further information in order to be able to predict the behaviour of a real size cylinder when engulfed in a 800{degrees}C fire, as specified in the regulation. The main unknowns are related to (1) the UF{sub 6} behaviour beyond the critical point, (2) the relationship between temperature field and internal pressure and (3) the equivalent conductivity of the solid UF{sub 6}. In order to investigate these phenomena in a representative way it is foreseen to perform experiments with a cylinder of real diameter, but reduced length, containing 4 tons of UF{sub 6}. This cylinder will be placed in an electrically heated furnace. A confinement vessel prevents any dispersion of UF{sub 6}. The heat flux delivered by the furnace will be calibrated by specific tests. The cylinder will be changed for each test.

  20. An Analysis of NSF Geosciences 2009 Research Experience for Undergraduate Site Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, S. C.; Patino, L. C.; Rom, E. L.; Weiler, S. C.

    2009-12-01

    The Research Experience for Undergraduate (REU) Program at the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) provides undergraduate students the opportunity to conduct research at different institutions and in areas that may not be available in their home campuses. The Geosciences REU Sites foster research opportunities in areas closely aligned with undergraduate majors and facilitates discovery of the multidisciplinary nature of the Geosciences. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the Geosciences REU Site programs run in 2009. A survey requesting information on recruitment methods, student demographics, enrichment activities, and fields of research was sent to the Principal Investigators of each of the 50 active REU Sites; over 70% of the surveys were returned with the requested information. The internet is the most widely used mechanism to recruit participants, but the survey did not distinguish among different tools like websites, emails, social networks, etc. The admissions rate for REU Sites in Geosciences varies from less than 10% to 50%, with the majority of participants being rising seniors and juniors. A few Sites include rising sophomores. At least 40% of the participants come from non-PhD granting institutions. Among the participants, gender distribution is balanced, with a slightly larger number of female participants. Regarding ethnic diversity, the REU Sites reflect the difficulty of attracting diverse students into Geosciences as a discipline; more than 75% of the participants are Caucasian and Asian students. Furthermore, participants from minority-serving institutions constitute a small percentage of those taking part in these research experiences. The enrichment activities are very similar across the REU Sites, and mimic well activities common to the scientific community, including intellectual exchange of ideas (lab meetings, seminars, and professional meetings), networking and social activities. There are some clear similarities among

  1. DNA Radiation Environments Program - Spring 1990 2-meter box experiments and analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santoro, R.T (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Whitaker, S.Y. (Clark Atlanta Univ., GA (United States))

    1992-09-01

    This report summarizes the Spring 1990 2-m Box Experiments performed at the Army Pulse Radiation Facility (APRF) at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. These studies were sponsored by the Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA) under the Radiation Environments Program to obtain measured data for benchmarking the Adjoint Monte Carlo Code System, MASH, Version 1.0. MASH was developed as the Department of Defense and NATO code system for calculating neutron and gamma-ray radiation fields and shielding protection factors for armored vehicles and military structures against nuclear weapon radiation. In the experiments, neutron and gamma-ray dose and reduction factors were measured in the free-field and as a function of position on an anthropomorphic phantom that was placed outside and inside the steel-walled 2-m box. The data were acquired at a distance of 400-m from the APRF reactor. The measurements were performed by APRF, Bubble Technology Industries, the Defence Research Establishment Ottawa, Establishment Technique Central de l'Armement, and Harry Diamond Laboratory. Calculations were carried out by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Science Applications International Corporation. The purpose of these experiments was to measure the neutron and gamma-ray dose as a function of detector location on the phantom for cases when the phantom was standing in the free-field and inside of the box. Neutron measurements were made using a BD-IOOR bubble detector and gamma-ray measurements were made using thermoluminescent detectors (TLD). Calculated and measured data were compared in terms of the C/M ratio. DNA mandated that C/M values of {plus minus}20% define the acceptable limits for the comparison of the dose and reduction factor data and for qualifying the MASH code in replicating integral parameters.

  2. DNA Radiation Environments Program Spring 1991 2-meter box experiments and analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santoro, R.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Whitaker, S.Y. [Clark Atlanta Univ., GA (United States)

    1993-03-01

    This report summarizes the Spring 1991 2-m Box experiments that were performed at the Army Pulse Radiation Facility (APRF) at Aberdeen Proving Ground. These studies were sponsored by the Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA) under the Radiation Environments Program to obtain measured data for benchmarking the Adjoint Monte Carlo Code System, MASH, Version 1.0. The MASH code system was developed for the Department of Defense and NATO for calculating neutron and gamma-ray radiation fields and shielding protection factors for armored vehicles and military structures against nuclear weapon radiation. In the 2-m Box experiments, neutron and gamma-ray dose rates and reduction factors were measured in the free-field and as a function of position on an anthropomorphic phantom that was placed outside and inside a borated polyethylene lined steel-walled 2-m box. The data were acquired at a distance of 400-m from the APRF reactor. The purpose of these experiments was to measure the neutron and gamma-ray dose rates as a function of detector location on the phantom for cases when the phantom was in the free-field and inside of the box. Neutron measurements were made using a BD-100R bubble detector and gamma-ray measurements were made using thermoluminescent detectors (TLD). Calculated and measured data were compared in terms of the C/M ratio. The calculated and measured neutron and gamma-ray dose rates and reduction factors agreed on the average within the {plus_minus}20% limits mandated by DNA and demonstrate the capability of the MASH code system in reproducing measured data in nominally shielded assemblies.

  3. DNA Radiation Environments Program Spring 1991 2-meter box experiments and analyses. [DEfense Nuclear Agency (DNA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santoro, R.T. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Whitaker, S.Y. (Clark Atlanta Univ., GA (United States))

    1993-03-01

    This report summarizes the Spring 1991 2-m Box experiments that were performed at the Army Pulse Radiation Facility (APRF) at Aberdeen Proving Ground. These studies were sponsored by the Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA) under the Radiation Environments Program to obtain measured data for benchmarking the Adjoint Monte Carlo Code System, MASH, Version 1.0. The MASH code system was developed for the Department of Defense and NATO for calculating neutron and gamma-ray radiation fields and shielding protection factors for armored vehicles and military structures against nuclear weapon radiation. In the 2-m Box experiments, neutron and gamma-ray dose rates and reduction factors were measured in the free-field and as a function of position on an anthropomorphic phantom that was placed outside and inside a borated polyethylene lined steel-walled 2-m box. The data were acquired at a distance of 400-m from the APRF reactor. The purpose of these experiments was to measure the neutron and gamma-ray dose rates as a function of detector location on the phantom for cases when the phantom was in the free-field and inside of the box. Neutron measurements were made using a BD-100R bubble detector and gamma-ray measurements were made using thermoluminescent detectors (TLD). Calculated and measured data were compared in terms of the C/M ratio. The calculated and measured neutron and gamma-ray dose rates and reduction factors agreed on the average within the [plus minus]20% limits mandated by DNA and demonstrate the capability of the MASH code system in reproducing measured data in nominally shielded assemblies.

  4. DNA Radiation Environments Program - Spring 1990 2-meter box experiments and analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santoro, R.T [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Whitaker, S.Y. [Clark Atlanta Univ., GA (United States)

    1992-09-01

    This report summarizes the Spring 1990 2-m Box Experiments performed at the Army Pulse Radiation Facility (APRF) at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. These studies were sponsored by the Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA) under the Radiation Environments Program to obtain measured data for benchmarking the Adjoint Monte Carlo Code System, MASH, Version 1.0. MASH was developed as the Department of Defense and NATO code system for calculating neutron and gamma-ray radiation fields and shielding protection factors for armored vehicles and military structures against nuclear weapon radiation. In the experiments, neutron and gamma-ray dose and reduction factors were measured in the free-field and as a function of position on an anthropomorphic phantom that was placed outside and inside the steel-walled 2-m box. The data were acquired at a distance of 400-m from the APRF reactor. The measurements were performed by APRF, Bubble Technology Industries, the Defence Research Establishment Ottawa, Establishment Technique Central de l`Armement, and Harry Diamond Laboratory. Calculations were carried out by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Science Applications International Corporation. The purpose of these experiments was to measure the neutron and gamma-ray dose as a function of detector location on the phantom for cases when the phantom was standing in the free-field and inside of the box. Neutron measurements were made using a BD-IOOR bubble detector and gamma-ray measurements were made using thermoluminescent detectors (TLD). Calculated and measured data were compared in terms of the C/M ratio. DNA mandated that C/M values of {plus_minus}20% define the acceptable limits for the comparison of the dose and reduction factor data and for qualifying the MASH code in replicating integral parameters.

  5. Using NetCloak to develop server-side Web-based experiments without writing CGI programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Christopher R; Reyna, Valerie F

    2002-05-01

    Server-side experiments use the Web server, rather than the participant's browser, to handle tasks such as random assignment, eliminating inconsistencies with JAVA and other client-side applications. Heretofore, experimenters wishing to create server-side experiments have had to write programs to create common gateway interface (CGI) scripts in programming languages such as Perl and C++. NetCloak uses simple, HTML-like commands to create CGIs. We used NetCloak to implement an experiment on probability estimation. Measurements of time on task and participants' IP addresses assisted quality control. Without prior training, in less than 1 month, we were able to use NetCloak to design and create a Web-based experiment and to help graduate students create three Web-based experiments of their own.

  6. [Experiences of a nation-wide integrated program for healthy body weight among students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Yiing Mei; Chen, Mei-Yen; Chiang, Li-Chi; Chien, Li-Yin; Chang, Po-Lun; Hung, Yung-Tai

    2007-10-01

    Taiwan has good support systems for obesity prevention and management. The percentage of elementary school students with normal body weight, however, has undergone a sustained decrease to 55%. Many factors are associated with this trend, such as lack of physical activity, dissatisfaction with body image, unbalanced dietary pattern, and unsupportive environment. Even though the rate of overweight and obesity is under control, the rate of underweight among girls has undergone a sustained increase, to 28%. Nurses therefore organized the "Aid students to fit" project, which emphasizes the bipolar issue of overweight and underweight. This national project is sponsored by the Ministry of Education and is expected to establish a beneficial environment, in which students can easily adopt healthy lifestyles and increase self-esteem. The program incorporates the AID triangle concept (Active, Image, Diet) and five strategies for achieving the goals. These strategies are: 1. Develop a persuasive statement to fit in with the philosophies of parents, students and teachers. 2. Set up measurable behavior indices and slogans. (Active life: 210 minutes per week. Image: confident and elegant. Diet: balanced and wise choice of low fat and high fiber foods.) 3. Establish a nation-wide interactive surveillance system for body weight control. 4. Develop an internet system that emphasizes tailored case management for overweight students. 5. Develop a supportive teaching plan, material, and aids to promote a healthy school environment. Five modeling schools, moreover, can be used to demonstrate the program. Educators can also download a free teaching plan, material, and aids at the website for healthy weight management (www.ym.edu.tw/active/aid). The authors brought together scholars from eight universities to accomplish the program. In support of the program, the Taiwan Ministry of Education addressed the new recommendation for physical activity which is to engage in moderate intensity

  7. Eliciting older people's preferences for exercise programs: a best-worst scaling choice experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia R Franco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Question: What relative value do older people with a previous fall or mobility-related disability attach to different attributes of exercise? Design: Prospective, best-worst scaling study. Participants: Two hundred and twenty community-dwelling people, aged 60 years or older, who presented with a previous fall or mobility-related disability. Methods: Online or face-to-face questionnaire. Outcome measures: Utility values for different exercise attributes and levels. The utility levels were calculated by asking participants to select the attribute that they considered to be the best (ie, they were most likely to want to participate in programs with this attribute and worst (ie, least likely to want to participate. The attributes included were: exercise type; time spent on exercise per day; frequency; transport type; travel time; out-of-pocket costs; reduction in the chance of falling; and improvement in the ability to undertake tasks inside and outside of home. Results: The attributes of exercise programs with the highest utility values were: home-based exercise and no need to use transport, followed by an improvement of 60% in the ability to do daily tasks at home, no costs, and decreasing the chances of falling to 0%. The attributes with the lowest utility were travel time of 30 minutes or more and out-of-pocket costs of AUD50 per session. Conclusion: The type of exercise, travel time and costs are more highly valued by older people than the health benefits. These findings suggest that physical activity engagement strategies need to go beyond education about health benefits and focus on improving accessibility to exercise programs. Exercise that can be undertaken at or close to home without any cost is most likely to be taken up by older people with past falls and/or mobility-related disability. [Franco MR, Howard K, Sherrington C, Ferreira PH, Rose J, Gomes JL, Ferreira ML (2015 Eliciting older people's preferences for exercise programs: a best

  8. The Atmospheric Neutral Density Experiment (ANDE) and Modulating Retroreflector in Space (MODRAS): Combined Flight Experiments for the Space Test Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nicholas, A. C; Gilbreath, G. C; Thonnard, S. E; Kessel, R; Lucke, R; Sillman, C. P

    2003-01-01

    The Atmospheric Neutral Density Experiment (ANDE) is a low cost mission proposed by the Naval Research Laboratory to demonstrate a method to monitor the thermospheric neutral density at an altitude of 400 km...

  9. An Authentic Research Experience in an Astronomy Education Professional Development Program: An Analysis of 8 Years of Data on the NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program (NITARP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebull, Luisa; Roberts, Tracy; Laurence, Wendi; Fitzgerald, Michael; French, Debbie; Gorjian, Varoujan; Squires, Gordon

    2018-01-01

    The NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program (NITARP) partners small groups of educators with a research astronomer for a year-long authentic research project. This program aligns well with the characteristics of high-quality professional development (PD) programs and has worked with a total of 103 educators since 2005. In this poster, we explore surveys obtained from 74 different educators, at up to four waypoints during the course of 13 months, incorporating data from the class of 2010 through the class of 2017. The reasons educators participate are mapped onto a continuum ranging from more inward-focused to more outward-focused; NITARP has had more outward-focused educators than inward-focused, though there is a bias against the extremes on either end of the continuum. This insight into teacher motivations has implications for how the educators are supported during the NITARP year. Three-quarters of the educators self-report some or major changes in their understanding of the nature of science. The program provides educators with experience collaborating with astronomers and other educators, and forges a strong link to the astronomical research community; the NITARP community of practice encourages and reinforces these linkages. During the experience, educators get comfortable with learning complex new concepts, with ~40% noting in their surveys that their approach to learning has changed. Educators are provided opportunities for professional growth; at least 12% have changed career paths substantially in part due to the program, and 11% report that the experience was “life changing.” At least 60% are including richer, more authentic science activities in their classrooms. This work illuminates what benefits the program brings to its participants, and serves as a model for similar PD programs in other STEM subjects.

  10. Understanding the Educational Experiences of Science Teachers in a Five-Year Teacher Education Program: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Nitin

    This qualitative study provides an overview of educational experiences of six in-service and three pre-service secondary science teachers in the Benedum Collaborative Five-Year Teacher Education Program at a land-grant university. The researcher interviewed secondary science teachers on the experiences they found meaningful in various program components that influenced their teacher identity, beliefs about science pedagogy, and their sense of preparedness for teaching. Document analysis of teachers' journals and lesson plans supplemented the qualitative data in addition to the researcher's role and knowledge as an outsider (non-Benedum graduate) and insider (facilitator and instructor in the technology integration based classes for one year) of the Benedum Collaborative Five-Year Teacher Education Program. Findings also supported the Holmes (1986) and Goodlad (1990) views for extended field experiences and "collaborative culture" in teacher education for well-prepared teachers.

  11. Encouraging PV Adoption in New Market-Rate ResidentialConstruction: A Critical Review of Program Experiences to Date

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2006-04-24

    In this paper, we review experiences with programs to support the deployment of photovoltaics (PV) in new, market-rate homes, drawing upon interviews with program managers around the country, project data, and publicly-available documentation on program design, impacts, and experiences. We focus on state clean energy funds, which have been established in 14 U.S. states to build markets for clean energy resources, as well as a select number of other state or local organizations whose activities are particularly noteworthy. We describe the types of programs implemented and their impacts to date, and discuss key issues and lessons learned for initiatives aimed at growing the new home market for PV.

  12. Evidence for neurocognitive plasticity in at-risk older adults: the experience corps program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Michelle C; Erickson, Kirk I; Kramer, Arthur F; Voss, Michelle W; Bolea, Natalie; Mielke, Michelle; McGill, Sylvia; Rebok, George W; Seeman, Teresa; Fried, Linda P

    2009-12-01

    To determine whether Experience Corps (EC), a social service program, would improve age-vulnerable executive functions and increase activity in brain regions in a high-risk group through increased cognitive and physical activity. Eight community-dwelling, older female volunteers and nine matched wait-list controls were recruited to serve in the ongoing EC: Baltimore program in three elementary schools. We employed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) preintervention and postintervention to examine whether EC volunteers improved executive function and showed increased activity in the prefrontal cortex relative to controls. fMRI volunteers were trained and placed with other volunteers 15 h/wk for 6 months during the academic year to assist teachers in kindergarten through third grade to promote children's literacy and academic achievement. Participants were African American and had low education, low income, and low Mini-Mental State Examination scores (M = 24), indicative of elevated risk for cognitive impairment. Volunteers exhibited intervention-specific increases in brain activity in the left prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex over the 6-month interval relative to matched controls. Neural gains were matched by behavioral improvements in executive inhibitory ability. Using fMRI, we demonstrated intervention-specific short-term gains in executive function and in the activity of prefrontal cortical regions in older adults at elevated risk for cognitive impairment. These pilot results provide proof of concept for use-dependent brain plasticity in later life, and, that interventions designed to promote health and function through everyday activity may enhance plasticity in key regions that support executive function.

  13. Clinical audits in a postgraduate general practice training program: an evaluation of 8 years' experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abeer Al-Baho

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clinical audit can be of valuable assistance to any program which aims to improve the quality of health care and its delivery. Yet without a coherent strategy aimed at evaluating audits' effectiveness, valuable opportunities will be overlooked. Clinical audit projects are required as a part of the formative assessment of trainees in the Family Medicine Residency Program (FMRP in Kuwait. This study was undertaken to draw a picture of trainees' understanding of the audit project with attention to the knowledge of audit theory and its educational significance and scrutinize the difficulties confronted during the experience. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The materials included the records of 133 audits carried out by trainees and 165 post course questionnaires carried out between 2004 and 2011. They were reviewed and analyzed. The majority of audit projects were performed on diabetic (44.4% and hypertensive (38.3% care. Regarding audits done on diabetic care, they were carried out to assess doctors' awareness about screening for smoking status (8.6%, microalbuminuria (19.3%, hemoglobin A1c (15.5%, retinopathy (10.3%, dyslipidemia (15.8%, peripheral neuropathy (8.8%, and other problems (21.7%. As for audits concerning hypertensive care, they were carried out to assess doctors' awareness about screening for smoking status (38.0%, obesity (26.0%, dyslipidemia (12.0%, microalbuminuria (10.0% and other problems (14.0%. More than half the participants (68.48% who attended the audit course stated that they 'definitely agreed' about understanding the meaning of clinical audit. Most of them (75.8% 'definitely agreed' about realizing the importance of clinical audit in improving patients' care. About half (49.7% of them 'agreed' that they can distinguish between 'criteria' and 'standards'. CONCLUSION: The eight years of experience were beneficial. Trainees showed a good understanding of the idea behind auditing the services provided. They

  14. The Influence of Loyalty Program Membership Card and Customer Experience on Customer Loyalty at the Urban Gym Aston Hotel Manado

    OpenAIRE

    Emor, Keizia Laureina

    2016-01-01

    Customer loyalty plays an important role in gaining the company's profit. In order to maintain the customer loyalty, company need to find out some strategies for increase their sales. The strategy to maintain the customer loyalty that set by The Urban Gym Aston Hotel is Loyalty Program Membership Card and provide the best service to their members so the members will get a great experience in there. The objective of this research is to analyze the influence of loyalty program membership card ...

  15. Adolescent values for immunisation programs in Australia: A discrete choice experiment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Wang

    Full Text Available The importance of adolescent engagement in health decisions and public health programs such as immunisation is becoming increasingly recognised. Understanding adolescent preferences and further identifying barriers and facilitators for immunisation acceptance is critical to the success of adolescent immunisation programs. This study applied a discrete choice experiment (DCE to assess vaccination preferences in adolescents.This study was conducted as a cross-sectional, national online survey in Australian adolescents. The DCE survey evaluated adolescent vaccination preferences. Six attributes were assessed including disease severity, target for protection, price, location of vaccination provision, potential side effects and vaccine delivery method. A mixed logit model was used to analyse DCE data.This survey was conducted between December 2014 and January 2015. Of 800 adolescents aged 15 to 19 years, stronger preferences were observed overall for: vaccination in the case of a life threatening illness (p<0.001, lower price vaccinations (p<0.001, mild but common side effects (p = 0.004, delivery via a skin patch (p<0.001 and being administered by a family practitioner (p<0.001. Participants suggested that they and their families would be willing to pay AU$394.28 (95%CI: AU$348.40 to AU$446.92 more for a vaccine targeting a life threatening illness than a mild-moderate illness, AU$37.94 (95%CI: AU$19.22 to AU$57.39 more for being vaccinated at a family practitioner clinic than a council immunisation clinic, AU$23.01 (95%CI: AU$7.12 to AU$39.24 more for common but mild and resolving side effects compared to rare but serious side effects, and AU$51.80 (95%CI: AU$30.42 to AU$73.70 more for delivery via a skin patch than injection.Consideration of adolescent preferences may result in improved acceptance of, engagement in and uptake of immunisation programs targeted for this age group.

  16. PROPOSAL FOR AN EXPERIMENT PROGRAM IN NEUTRINO PHYSICS AND PROTON DECAY IN THE HOMESTAKE LABORATORY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DIWAN, M.; KETTELL, S.; LITTENBERG, W.; MARIANO, W.; PARSA, Z.; SAMIOS, N.; WHITE, S.; ET AL.

    2006-07-24

    This report is intended to describe first, the principal physics reasons for an ambitious experimental program in neutrino physics and proton decay based on construction of a series of massive water Cherenkov detectors located deep underground (4850 ft) in the Homestake Mine of the South Dakota Science and Technology Authority (SDSTA); and second, the engineering design of the underground chambers to house the Cherenkov detector modules; and third, the conceptual design of the water Cherenkov detectors themselves for this purpose. In this proposal we show the event rates and physics sensitivity for beams from both FNAL (1300 km distant from Homestake) and BNL (2540 km distant from Homestake). The program we propose will benefit with a beam from FNAL because of the high intensities currently available from the Main Injector with modest upgrades. The possibility of tuning the primary proton energy over a large range from 30 to 120 GeV also adds considerable flexibility to the program from FNAL. On the other hand the beam from BNL over the larger distance will produce very large matter effects, and consequently a hint of new physics (beyond CP violation) can be better tested with that configuration. In this proposal we focus on the CP violation physics. Included in this document are preliminary costs and time-to-completion estimates which have been exposed to acknowledged experts in their respective areas. This presentation is not, however, to be taken as a technical design report with the extensive documentation and contingency costs that a TDR usually entails. Nevertheless, some contingency factors have been included in the estimates given here. The essential ideas expressed here were first laid out in a letter of intent to the interim director of the Homestake Laboratory on July 26, 2001. Since that time, the prospect of a laboratory in the Homestake Mine has been realized, and the design of a long baseline neutrino experiment has been refined. The extrapolation

  17. Can a Clinician-Scientist Training Program Develop Academic Orthopaedic Surgeons? One Program's Thirty-Year Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Aaron M; Rettig, Samantha A; Kale, Neel K; Zuckerman, Joseph D; Egol, Kenneth A

    2017-10-25

    Clinician-scientist numbers have been stagnant over the past few decades despite awareness of this trend. Interventions attempting to change this problem have been seemingly ineffective, but research residency positions have shown potential benefit. We sought to evaluate the effectiveness of a clinician-scientist training program (CSTP) in an academic orthopedic residency in improving academic productivity and increasing interest in academic careers. Resident training records were identified and reviewed for all residents who completed training between 1976 and 2014 (n = 329). There were no designated research residents prior to 1984 (pre-CSTP). Between 1984 and 2005, residents self-selected for the program (CSTP-SS). In 2005, residents were selected by program before residency (CSTP-PS). Residents were also grouped by program participation, research vs. clinical residents (RR vs. CR). Data were collected on academic positions and productivity through Internet-based and PubMed search, as well as direct e-mail or phone contact. Variables were then compared based on the time duration and designation. Comparing all RR with CR, RR residents were more likely to enter academic practice after training (RR, 34%; CR, 20%; p = 0.0001) and were 4 times more productive based on median publications (RR, 14; CR, 4; p scientists. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Academic performance and personal experience of local, international, and collaborative exchange students enrolled in an Australian pharmacy program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Andrew K; Grant, Gary D; Anoopkumar-Dukie, Shailendra

    2013-09-12

    To assess the academic performance and experiences of local, international, and collaborative exchange students enrolled in a 4-year Australian bachelor of pharmacy degree program. Survey instruments exploring the demographics, background, and academic and cultural experiences of students during the program were administered in 2005 to students in all 4 years. Additionally, grades from each semester of the program for students (406 local, 70 international, 155 exchange) who graduated between 2002 and 2006 were analyzed retrospectively. The main differences found in the survey responses among the 3 groups were in students' motivations for choosing the degree program and school, with international and collaborative exchange students having put more thought into these decisions than local students. The average grades over the duration of the program were similar in all 3 demographic groups. However, local students slightly outperformed international students, particularly at the start of the year, whereas collaborative exchange students' grades mirrored those of local students during the 2 years prior to leaving their home country of Malaysia but more closely mirrored those of international students in the final 2 years after arriving on campus in Australia. Despite differences in academic backgrounds and culture, international and exchange students can perform well compared to local students in a bachelor of pharmacy program and were actually more satisfied than local students with the overall experience. Studying in a foreign country can negatively influence academic grades to a small extent and this is probably related to adjusting to the new environment.

  19. The Best of Both Worlds: Resident Experiences of Urban and Regional Contexts in a Hybrid Pediatrics Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topps, Maureen; Ellaway, Rachel H; Baron, Tara; Peek, Alison

    2015-12-01

    The context for specialty residency training in pediatrics has broadened in recent decades to include distributed community sites as well as academic health science centers. Rather than creating parallel, community-only programs, most programs have expanded to include both community and large urban tertiary health center experiences. Despite these changes, there has been relatively little research looking at residents' experiences in these distributed graduate medical education programs. A longitudinal case study was undertaken to explore the experiences of residents in a Canadian pediatrics residency program that involved a combination of clinical placements in a large urban tertiary health center and in regional hospitals. The study drew on 2 streams of primary data: 1-on-1 interviews with residents at the end of each block rotation and annual focus groups with residents. A thematic analysis (using grounded theory techniques) of transcripts of the interviews and focus groups identified 6 high-level themes: access to training, quality of learning, patient mix, continuity of care, learner roles, and residents as teachers. Rather than finding that certain training contexts were "better" than others when comparing residents' experiences of the various training contexts in this pediatrics residency, what emerged was an understanding that the different settings complemented each other. Residents were adamant that this was not a matter of superiority of one context over any other; their experiences in different contexts each made a valuable contribution to the quality of their training.

  20. Environmental stress-dependent effects of deletions encompassing Hsp70Ba on canalization and quantitative trait asymmetry in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuo H Takahashi

    Full Text Available Hsp70 genes may influence the expression of wing abnormalities in Drosophila melanogaster but their effects on variability in quantitative characters and developmental instability are unclear. In this study, we focused on one of the six Hsp70 genes, Hsp70Ba, and investigated its effects on within- and among-individual variability in orbital bristle number, sternopleural bristle number, wing size and wing shape under different environmental conditions. To do this, we studied a newly constructed deletion, Df(3RED5579, which encompasses Hsp70Ba and nine non-Hsp genes, in the heterozygous condition and another, Hsp70Ba(304, which deletes only Hsp70Ba, in the homozygous condition. We found no significant effect of both deletions on within-individual variation quantified by fluctuating asymmetry (FA of morphological traits. On the other hand, the Hsp70Ba(304/Hsp70Ba(304 genotype significantly increased among-individual variation quantified by coefficient of variation (CV of bristle number and wing size in female, while the Df(3RED5579 heterozygote showed no significant effect. The expression level of Hsp70Ba in the deletion heterozygote was 6 to 20 times higher than in control homozygotes, suggesting that the overexpression of Hsp70Ba did not influence developmental stability or canalization significantly. These findings suggest that the absence of expression of Hsp70Ba increases CV of some morphological traits and that HSP70Ba may buffer against environmental perturbations on some quantitative traits.

  1. 4q25 microdeletion encompassing PITX2: A patient presenting with tetralogy of Fallot and dental anomalies without ocular features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vande Perre, P; Zazo Seco, C; Patat, O; Bouneau, L; Vigouroux, A; Bourgeois, D; El Hout, S; Chassaing, N; Calvas, P

    2018-02-01

    Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome (ARS) is a heterogeneous clinical entity transmitted in an autosomal dominant manner. The main feature, Axenfeld-Rieger Anomaly (ARA), is a malformation of the anterior segment of the eye that can lead to glaucoma and impair vision. Extra-ocular defects have also been reported. Point mutations of FOXC1 and PITX2 are responsible for about 40% of the ARS cases. We describe the phenotype of a patient carrying a deletion encompassing the 4q25 locus containing PITX2 gene. This child presented with a congenital heart defect (Tetralogy of Fallot, TOF) and no signs of ARA. He is the first patient described with TOF and a complete deletion of PITX2 (arr[GRCh37]4q25(110843057-112077858)x1, involving PITX2, EGF, ELOVL6 and ENPEP) inherited from his ARS affected mother. In addition, to our knowledge, he is the first patient reported with no ocular phenotype associated with haploinsufficiency of PITX2. We compare the phenotype and genotype of this patient to those of five other patients carrying 4q25 deletions. Two of these patients were enrolled in the university hospital in Toulouse, while the other three were already documented in DECIPHER. This comparative study suggests both an incomplete penetrance of the ocular malformation pattern in patients carrying PITX2 deletions and a putative association between TOF and PITX2 haploinsufficiency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Environmental Stress-Dependent Effects of Deletions Encompassing Hsp70Ba on Canalization and Quantitative Trait Asymmetry in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazuo H.; Daborn, Phillip J.; Hoffmann, Ary A.; Takano-Shimizu, Toshiyuki

    2011-01-01

    Hsp70 genes may influence the expression of wing abnormalities in Drosophila melanogaster but their effects on variability in quantitative characters and developmental instability are unclear. In this study, we focused on one of the six Hsp70 genes, Hsp70Ba, and investigated its effects on within-and among-individual variability in orbital bristle number, sternopleural bristle number, wing size and wing shape under different environmental conditions. To do this, we studied a newly constructed deletion, Df(3R)ED5579, which encompasses Hsp70Ba and nine non-Hsp genes, in the heterozygous condition and another, Hsp70Ba304, which deletes only Hsp70Ba, in the homozygous condition. We found no significant effect of both deletions on within-individual variation quantified by fluctuating asymmetry (FA) of morphological traits. On the other hand, the Hsp70Ba304/Hsp70Ba304 genotype significantly increased among-individual variation quantified by coefficient of variation (CV) of bristle number and wing size in female, while the Df(3R)ED5579 heterozygote showed no significant effect. The expression level of Hsp70Ba in the deletion heterozygote was 6 to 20 times higher than in control homozygotes, suggesting that the overexpression of Hsp70Ba did not influence developmental stability or canalization significantly. These findings suggest that the absence of expression of Hsp70Ba increases CV of some morphological traits and that HSP70Ba may buffer against environmental perturbations on some quantitative traits. PMID:21541022

  3. From recovery programs to recovery-oriented practice? A qualitative study of mental health professionals' experiences when facilitating a recovery-oriented rehabilitation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalum, Helle Stentoft; Pedersen, Inge Kryger; Cunningham, Harry; Eplov, Lene Falgaard

    2015-12-01

    The recovery model has influenced mental health services and fostered new standards for best practice. However, knowledge about how mental health care professionals (HCPs) experience recovery-oriented programs is sparse. This paper explores HCPs' experiences when facilitating a recovery-oriented rehabilitation program. The research question is how do HCPs experience a change in their attitude and practice when applying recovery-oriented programs? This paper draws on semi-structured in-depth qualitative interviews conducted with 16 HCPs experienced in facilitating a recovery-oriented rehabilitation program in either the USA or Denmark. Three themes emerged from the HCPs' reflections on changes in attitudes and practices: "Hopeful Attitude" captures a change in the HCPs' attitude toward a more positive view on the future for clients' living with mental illness; "A New Focus in the Dialogue With Clients" thematizes how the HCPs focus more on the individual's own goal for recovery rather than disease-induced goals in the dialog with clients; "A Person-Centered Role" comprises a shift in the professional role whereby the HCPs value the client's own ideas in addition to the professional's standards. This study supports the theory of the recovery model by its empirical findings and indications that when facilitating a recovery-oriented program, HCPs experience recovery-oriented changes in their attitude toward life with mental illness, and it alters their professional practice toward a stronger focus on client's own goals during treatment. More studies are needed to further clarify how changes in HCPs' attitudes translate into changes in mental health practices. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Patients' Experiences With Communication-and-Resolution Programs After Medical Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jennifer; Bismark, Marie; Mello, Michelle M

    2017-11-01

    Dissatisfaction with medical malpractice litigation has stimulated interest by health care organizations in developing alternatives to meet patients' needs after medical injury. In communication-and-resolution programs (CRPs), hospitals and liability insurers communicate with patients about adverse events, use investigation findings to improve patient safety, and offer compensation when substandard care caused harm. Despite increasing interest in this approach, little is known about patients' and family members' experiences with CRPs. To explore the experiences of patients and family members with medical injuries and CRPs to understand different aspects of institutional responses to injury that promoted and impeded reconciliation. From January 6 through June 30, 2016, semistructured interviews were conducted with patients (n = 27), family members (n = 3), and staff (n = 10) at 3 US hospitals that operate CRPs. Patients and families were eligible for participation if they experienced a CRP, spoke English, and could no longer file a malpractice claim because they had accepted a settlement or the statute of limitations had expired. The CRP administrators identified hospital and insurer staff who had been involved in a CRP event and had a close relationship with the injured patient and/or family. They identified patients and families by applying the inclusion criteria to their CRP databases. Of 66 possible participants, 40 interviews (61%) were completed, including 30 of 50 invited patients and families (60%) and 10 of 16 invited staff (63%). Patients' reported satisfaction with disclosure and reconciliation efforts made by hospitals. A total of 40 participants completed interviews (15 men and 25 women; mean [range] age, 46 [18-67] years). Among the 30 patients and family members interviewed, 27 patients experienced injuries attributed to error and received compensation. The CRP experience was positive overall for 18 of the 30 patients and family members

  5. Monetary and social impact measures of visitor experience and the effects of a piping plover recovery program on visitor experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laura Gilbert

    1995-01-01

    This study examined visitor perceptions and attitudes towards their experience at a national wildlife refuge which limits access to its barrier beach during the nesting season of the threatened piping plover. It determined attitudes towards the closure, as well as what factors influenced these attitudes. It also examined how willingness to pay for refuge protection...

  6. In-Space technology experiments program. A high efficiency thermal interface (using condensation heat transfer) between a 2-phase fluid loop and heatpipe radiator: Experiment definition phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohner, John A.; Dempsey, Brian P.; Herold, Leroy M.

    1990-01-01

    Space Station elements and advanced military spacecraft will require rejection of tens of kilowatts of waste heat. Large space radiators and two-phase heat transport loops will be required. To minimize radiator size and weight, it is critical to minimize the temperature drop between the heat source and sink. Under an Air Force contract, a unique, high-performance heat exchanger is developed for coupling the radiator to the transport loop. Since fluid flow through the heat exchanger is driven by capillary forces which are easily dominated by gravity forces in ground testing, it is necessary to perform microgravity thermal testing to verify the design. This contract consists of an experiment definition phase leading to a preliminary design and cost estimate for a shuttle-based flight experiment of this heat exchanger design. This program will utilize modified hardware from a ground test program for the heat exchanger.

  7. Promising Practices for Making Recreation Programming Matter for People who Experience Mental Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Susan L; Fenton, Lara

    2017-08-31

    There is merit in understanding how recreation-oriented programs for adults living with mental illness address barriers to participation and how programming is structured to create safe and inclusive environments, resulting in programming that amplifies the benefits of recreation for mental well-being. Following an environmental scan of programs targeting adults living with mental illness in Canada, ten coordinators in community mental health settings were interviewed. Four themes were constructed to reflect characteristics deemed to be 'promising practices' related to recreation-oriented programming: (a) barriers and solutions to individual participation, (b) characteristics of welcoming and supportive environments, (c) leadership characteristics, and (d) program characteristics.

  8. Student Experiences: the 2013 Cascadia Initiative Expedition Team's Apply to Sail Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, H.; Hooft, E. E.; Fattaruso, L.

    2013-12-01

    During the summer of 2013, the Cascadia Initiative Expedition Team led six oceanographic expeditions to recover and redeploy ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) across the Cascadia subduction zone and Juan de Fuca plate. The Cascadia Initiative (CI) is an onshore/offshore seismic and geodetic experiment to study questions ranging from megathrust earthquakes to volcanic arc structure to the formation, deformation and hydration of the Juan de Fuca and Gorda plates with the overarching goal of understanding the entire subduction zone system. The Cascadia Initiative Expedition Team is a team of scientists charged with leading the oceanographic expeditions to deploy and recover CI OBSs and developing the associated Education and Outreach effort. Students and early career scientists were encouraged to apply to join the cruises via the Cascadia Initiative Expedition Team's Apply to Sail Program. The goal of this call for open participation was to help expand the user base of OBS data by providing opportunities for students and scientists to directly experience at-sea acquisition of OBS data. Participants were required to have a strong interest in learning field techniques, be willing to work long hours at sea assisting in OBS deployment, recovery and preliminary data processing and have an interest in working with the data collected. In total, there were 51 applicants to the Apply to Sail Program from the US and 4 other countries; 21 graduate students as well as a few undergraduate students, postdocs and young scientists from the US and Canada were chosen to join the crew. The cruises lasted from 6 to 14 days in length. OBS retrievals comprised the three first legs, of which the first two were aboard the Research Vessel Oceanus. During each of the retrievals, multiple acoustic signals were sent while the vessel completed a semi-circle around the OBS to accurately determine its position, a final signal was sent to drop the seismometer's anchor, and finally the ship and crew

  9. Using the Five Senses of Success framework to understand the experiences of midwifery students enroled in an undergraduate degree program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidebotham, M; Fenwick, J; Carter, A; Gamble, J

    2015-01-01

    developing a student's sense of capability, purpose, resourcefulness, identity and connectedness (five-senses of success) are key factors that may be important in predicting student satisfaction and progression within their university program. the study aimed to examine the expectations and experiences of second and third year midwifery students enroled in a Bachelor of Midwifery program and identify barriers and enablers to success. a descriptive exploratory qualitative design was used. Fifty-six students enroled in either year 2 or 3 of the Bachelor of Midwifery program in SE Queensland participated in an anonymous survey using open-ended questions. In addition, 16 students participated in two year-level focus groups. Template analysis, using the Five Senses Framework, was used to analyse the data set. early exposure to 'hands on' clinical midwifery practice as well as continuity of care experiences provided students with an opportunity to link theory to practice and increased their perception of capability as they transitioned through the program. Students' sense of identity, purpose, resourcefulness, and capability was strongly influenced by the programs embedded meta-values, including a 'woman centred' approach. In addition, a student's ability to form strong positive relationships with women, peers, lecturers and supportive clinicians was central to developing connections and ultimately a sense of success. A sense of connection not only fostered an ongoing belief that challenges could be overcome but that students themselves could initiate or influence change. the five senses framework provided a useful lens through which to analyse the student experience. Key factors to student satisfaction and retention within a Bachelor of Midwifery program include: a clearly articulated midwifery philosophy, strategies to promote student connectedness including the use of social media, and further development of clinicians' skills in preceptorship, clinical teaching and

  10. The CIFF proof procedure for abductive logic programming with constraints: Theory, implementation and experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mancarella, P.; Terreni, G.; Sadri, F.; Toni, F.; Endriss, U.

    2009-01-01

    We present the CIFF proof procedure for abductive logic programming with constraints, and we prove its correctness. CIFF is an extension of the IFF proof procedure for abductive logic programming, relaxing the original restrictions over variable quantification (allowedness conditions) and

  11. PROBLEMS OF FINANCING OF TARGET PROGRAMS OF DEVELOPMENT OF REGION (EXPERIENCE OF KHABAROVSK TERRITORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Z. Shljahovoj

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In article considers variants of financing of target programs of development of the region, providing joint participation state and commercial structures. Parameters of conformity of conditions of target programs and terms of financing of programs are specified by the credit organization. The three-level scheme of financing of regional programs by the regional banks, being a component of bank strategy of development, is offered.

  12. A social program for adolescent and young adult survivors of pediatric brain tumors: The power of a shared medical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liptak, Cori; Brinkman, Tara; Bronson, Amanda; Delaney, Brian; Chordas, Christine; Brand, Sarah; Patenaude, Andrea Farkas; Muriel, Anna C; Manley, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Survivors of pediatric brain tumors experience several medical and psychosocial late effects including deficits in social competence. This mixed methods study investigated the experience of 19 adolescent and young adult survivors of pediatric brain tumors and 17 parents who participated in a social support program. Qualitative results demonstrated a significant social isolation that was compounded by medical late effects. Survivors perceived social support and acceptance from interactions with peers who have similar medical backgrounds as a key aspect of the group experience. Parents reported increased social confidence among survivors, although they did not report that social gains generalized beyond the group setting. Interventions to promote the transfer of specific social skills are needed.

  13. The Induction Program--Teachers' Experience after Five Years of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenschmidt, Eve; Oder, Tuuli; Reiska, Epp

    2013-01-01

    The induction program to provide support for novice teachers was introduced into teacher education in Estonia in 2004. The teachers who participated in the first program have now been working for several years. To evaluate the effectiveness of induction activities, we explored how mentoring and an induction program influence teachers' opinions…

  14. Resolving Issues in Innovative Graduate Degree Programs: The Metropolitan State University Doctor of Business Administration Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmont, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Applied Master's Degree and doctoral programs have been criticized widely for their lack of relevance, rigor and quality. New graduate degree programs have responded to these criticisms by implementing innovative academic policies, program curriculum, and student services. A case study of the Metropolitan State University Doctor of Business…

  15. An Online High School "Shepherding" Program: Teacher Roles and Experiences Mentoring Online Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drysdale, Jeffery S.; Graham, Charles R.; Borup, Jered

    2014-01-01

    Several online programs use on-site facilitators to create a stronger sense of community and reduce student dropout. However, very little research addresses how programs that are fully online can provide their students with comparable support. Using K-12 online research, this case study analyzed a "shepherding program" at Mountain…

  16. Group Cognitive Behavior Therapy Program with Troubled Adolescents: A Learning Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, Sarah; Remond, Louise

    2005-01-01

    Group CBT programs are widely used for assisting teenagers with anxiety, depression and other psychological problems. The majority of reported programs have targeted school or clinical populations however few have specifically targeted adolescents from highly troubled and disadvantaged backgrounds. This paper describes a group CBT program that was…

  17. The Lived Experience of Nurses Enrolled in the Regents College Nursing Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailey, Mary Ann

    1994-01-01

    Reflection by 15 nurses in the Regents College Nursing Program, an external degree program based on four criterion-referenced tests, uncovered motivations for selecting the program, clarified such needs as support networks and learning resources, and revealed a pervasive pattern of stress that affected exam preparation and performance. (SK)

  18. Experiences of Students with Specific Learning Disorder (Including ADHD) in Online College Degree Programs: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunch, Seleta LeAnn

    2016-01-01

    Enrollment in online degree programs is rapidly expanding due to the convenience and affordability offered to students and improvements in technology. The purpose of this hermeneutical phenomenological study was to understand the shared experiences of students with documented specific learning disorders (including Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity…

  19. Suggestions for planning a migration-monitoring network based on the experience of establishing and operating the maps program

    Science.gov (United States)

    David F. DeSante

    2005-01-01

    Based on the experience of creating and implementing the Monitoring Avian Productivity and Survivorship (MAPS) program, I suggest that, to be successful, a migration-monitoring network must: (1) provide strong justification for the data it proposes to collect; (2) provide direct links between those monitoring data and both research and management goals; (3) provide...

  20. Basic surgical training in Ireland: the impact of operative experience, training program allocation and mentorship on trainee satisfaction.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, K E

    2013-12-01

    Application to the Irish basic surgical training (BST) program in Ireland has decreased progressively over the past 5 years. We hypothesised that this decline was secondary to dissatisfaction with training correlated with reduced operative experience and lack of mentorship among BSTs.

  1. Cope and Grow: A Grounded Theory Approach to Early College Entrants' Lived Experiences and Changes in a STEM Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, David Yun; Steenbergen-Hu, Saiying; Zhou, Yehan

    2015-01-01

    In this grounded theory qualitative study, we interviewed 34 graduates from one cohort of 51 students from a prestigious early college entrance program in China. Based on the interview data, we identified distinct convergent and divergent patterns of lived experiences and changes. We found several dominant themes, including peers' mutual…

  2. Children and Residential Experiences: A Comprehensive Strategy for Implementing a Research-Informed Program Model for Residential Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Martha J.; Izzo, Charles; Nunno, Michael; Smith, Elliott G.; Endres, Thomas; Holden, Jack C.; Kuhn, Frank

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an effort to bridge research and practice in residential care through implementing a program model titled Children and Residential Experiences (CARE). The strategy involves consulting at all levels of the organization to guide personnel to incorporate CARE evidence-based principles into daily practice, and fostering an…

  3. Introducing an enhanced recovery after surgery program in colorectal surgery: A single center experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bona, Stefano; Molteni, Mattia; Rosati, Riccardo; Elmore, Ugo; Bagnoli, Pietro; Monzani, Roberta; Caravaca, Monica; Montorsi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To study the implementation of an enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) program at a large University Hospital from “pilot study” to “standard of care”. METHODS: The study was designed as a prospective single centre cohort study. A prospective evaluation of compliance to a protocol based on full application of all ERAS principles, through the progressive steps of its implementation, was performed. Results achieved in the initial pilot study conducted by a dedicated team (n = 47) were compared to those achieved in the shared protocol phase (n = 143) three years later. Outcomes were length of postoperative hospital stay, readmission rate, compliance to the protocol and morbidity. Primary endpoint was the description of the results and the identification of critical issues of large scale implementation of an ERAS program in colorectal surgery emerged in the experience of a single center. Secondary endpoint was the identification of interventions that have been proven to be effective for facilitating the transition from traditional care pathways to a multimodal management protocol according to ERAS principles in colorectal surgery at a single center. RESULTS: During the initial pilot study (March 2009 to December 2010; 47 patients) conducted by a dedicated multidisciplinary team, compliance to the items of ERAS protocol was 93%, with a median length of hospital stay (LOS) of 3 d. Early anastomotic fistulas were observed in 2 cases (4.2%), which required reoperation (Clavien-Dindo grade IIIb). None of the patients had been discharged before the onset of the complication, which could therefore receive prompt treatment. There were also four (8.5%) minor complications (Clavien-Dindo grade II). Thirty days readmission rate was 4%. Perioperative mortality was nil. After implementation of the protocol throughout the Hospital in unselected patients (May 2012 to December 2012; 147 patients) compliance was 74%, with a median LOS of 6 d. Early anastomotic fistulas

  4. Brazilian Program For HIV Point-Of-Care Test Evaluation: A Decade’s Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando da Costa Ferreira Jr.

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The point-of-care tests (POCTs for HIV diagnosis have been widely used in Brazil in order to expand and to allow HIV diagnosis outside health units including remote areas, such as the Amazon region. In order to guarantee the quality of HIV diagnostics based on rapid tests, the Brazilian Ministry of Health (MoH implemented the HIV POCT Evaluation Program. This study compiles the Brazilian experience acquired over the last 13 years conducting the HIV POCT Evaluation Program.   Methods and Findings The selection of tests was based on the interest of manufacturers to qualify for the MoH tenders. Each round was performed with fresh whole blood and oral fluid samples, always including HIV positive and negative ones. In addition to the POCT, every sample was submitted to a reference testing protocol, based on an immunoassay followed by Western blot. The POCTs were evaluated for clinical sensitivity, clinical specificity, assay operational characteristics, detection of HIV-2 antibodies, sensitivity to subtypes panels; and sensitivity to seroconversion panels. Since its implementation in 2003, the POCT evaluation protocol has undergone some modifications aiming to improve and simplify the evaluation process, to know: (i  for HIV-positive samples, perform EIA and Western blot only if the POCT is non-reactive; (ii reduction from 800 to 600 HIV negative samples; (iii increase from one to three subtype panels (including HIV-2 samples; and (iv inclusion of seroconversion panel. We evaluated six tests, four of which met the sensitivity criteria of 99.5%: BD Chek™ HIV Multi-test (whole blood, HIV 1/2 Colloidal Gold (whole blood, OraQuick ADVANCE® Rapid HIV-1/2 Antibody Test (whole blood and oral fluid and TR DPP HIV-1/2 (whole blood, plasma and oral fluid. Regarding other evaluated criteria, all assays met the requirements.   Conclusions The successful Brazilian policy on POCT use for HIV infection diagnosis includes the evaluation of the POCT itself in

  5. External Mill Monitoring of Wheat Flour Fortification Programs: An Approach for Program Managers Using Experiences from Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P. Wirth

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The fortification of wheat flour with micronutrients is a common strategy to increase vitamin and mineral intake. While wheat flour mills are often inspected by agencies affiliated with national ministries to ensure compliance with national fortification standards, few countries use data derived from these inspections to construct an external monitoring system for use in program management and evaluation. The primary objective of this paper is to assess the performance of the external monitoring system utilized in Jordan according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Updated Guidelines for Evaluating Public Health Surveillance Systems. A secondary objective is to present mill monitoring results from 2009 to 2010 in order to demonstrate the data generated by the system. The review concludes that the data required for the system is representative, simple to collect, and can be collected in a flexible manner. The external monitoring system is acceptable to participating agencies and millers and is stable due to mandatory fortification legislation which provides the legal framework for external monitoring. Data on production of fortified flour and utilization of premix can be provided in a timely manner, but on-site mill monitoring and flour sample collection are more challenging due to resource constraints. The frequent collection of a small number of indicators can provide fortification program managers with timely information with which to base decisions. Jordan’s external monitoring system successfully documented the performance of each mill and the entire flour fortification program, and can serve as a model for other national fortification programs considering external monitoring approaches.

  6. Blended Learning Experience in a Programming Language Course and the Effect of the Thinking Styles of the Students on Success and Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagci, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    High-level thinking and problem solving skill is one requirement of computer programming that most of the students experience problems with. Individual differences such as motivation, attitude towards programming, thinking style of the student, and complexity of the programming language have influence on students' success on programming. Thus,…

  7. Can Static Habitat Protection Encompass Critical Areas for Highly Mobile Marine Top Predators? Insights from Coastal East Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi Pérez-Jorge

    Full Text Available Along the East African coast, marine top predators are facing an increasing number of anthropogenic threats which requires the implementation of effective and urgent conservation measures to protect essential habitats. Understanding the role that habitat features play on the marine top predator' distribution and abundance is a crucial step to evaluate the suitability of an existing Marine Protected Area (MPA, originally designated for the protection of coral reefs. We developed species distribution models (SDM on the IUCN data deficient Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops aduncus in southern Kenya. We followed a comprehensive ecological modelling approach to study the environmental factors influencing the occurrence and abundance of dolphins while developing SDMs. Through the combination of ensemble prediction maps, we defined recurrent, occasional and unfavourable habitats for the species. Our results showed the influence of dynamic and static predictors on the dolphins' spatial ecology: dolphins may select shallow areas (5-30 m, close to the reefs (< 500 m and oceanic fronts (< 10 km and adjacent to the 100 m isobath (< 5 km. We also predicted a significantly higher occurrence and abundance of dolphins within the MPA. Recurrent and occasional habitats were identified on large percentages on the existing MPA (47% and 57% using presence-absence and abundance models respectively. However, the MPA does not adequately encompass all occasional and recurrent areas and within this context, we propose to extend the MPA to incorporate all of them which are likely key habitats for the highly mobile species. The results from this study provide two key conservation and management tools: (i an integrative habitat modelling approach to predict key marine habitats, and (ii the first study evaluating the effectiveness of an existing MPA for marine mammals in the Western Indian Ocean.

  8. The Perform Codesign Experiment – on what people actually do and the relation between program and experiment in research through design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Eva; Eriksen, Mette Agger; Binder, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Design experiments are powerful inquiries, working from the ambiguous and tentative to more firm programmatic statements. In participatory design and codesign, learning and knowing is closely tied to participation − the engagement with and manipulation of shared representations, as participants....... We will give examples of the considerations and crises faced by the participants and how they try to solve them. In addition, we suggest using the notion of ‘sub-program’ as a way of describing the framing of a specific experiment thus adding to the program-experiment dialectics in the designing...... expose how they become knowledgeable in what they collaboratively make. However, working with codesign as an integral part of knowledge production poses challenges to how we conceive of such inquiries in the practices of research through design. This paper reports from collaborative research where fellow...

  9. A national survey of residents in combined Internal Medicine and Dermatology residency programs: educational experience and future plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostaghimi, Arash; Wanat, Karolyn; Crotty, Bradley H; Rosenbach, Misha

    2015-10-16

    In response to a perceived erosion of medical dermatology, combined internal medicine and dermatology programs (med/derm) programs have been developed that aim to train dermatologists who take care of medically complex patients. Despite the investment in these programs, there is currently no data with regards to the potential impact of these trainees on the dermatology workforce. To determine the experiences, motivations, and future plans of residents in combined med/derm residency programs. We surveyed residents at all United States institutions with both categorical and combined training programs in spring of 2012. Respondents used visual analog scales to rate clinical interests, self-assessed competency, career plans, and challenges. The primary study outcomes were comfort in taking care of patients with complex disease, future practice plans, and experience during residency. Twenty-eight of 31 med/derm residents (87.5%) and 28 of 91 (31%) categorical residents responded (overall response rate 46%). No significant differences were seen in self-assessed dermatology competency, or comfort in performing inpatient consultations, cosmetic procedures, or prescribing systemic agents. A trend toward less comfort in general dermatology was seen among med/derm residents. Med/derm residents were more likely to indicate career preferences for performing inpatient consultation and taking care of medically complex patients. Categorical residents rated their programs and experiences more highly. Med/derm residents have stronger interests in serving medically complex patients. Categorical residents are more likely to have a positive experience during residency. Future work will be needed to ascertain career choices among graduates once data are available.

  10. Out-reach in-space technology experiments program: Control of flexible robot manipulators in zero gravity, experiment definition phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Warren F.

    1989-01-01

    The results obtained show that it is possible to control light-weight robots with flexible links in a manner that produces good response time and does not induce unacceptable link vibrations. However, deflections induced by gravity cause large static position errors with such a control system. For this reason, it is not possible to use this control system for controlling motion in the direction of gravity. The control system does, on the other hand, have potential for use in space. However, in-space experiments will be needed to verify its applicability to robots moving in three dimensions.

  11. Comparative Evaluation of Financing Programs: Insights From California’s Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deason, Jeff [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Electricity Markets and Policy Group

    2017-07-31

    Berkeley Lab examines criteria for a comparative assessment of multiple financing programs for energy efficiency, developed through a statewide public process in California. The state legislature directed the California Alternative Energy and Advanced Transportation Financing Authority (CAEATFA) to develop these criteria. CAEATFA's report to the legislature, an invaluable reference for other jurisdictions considering these topics, discusses the proposed criteria and the rationales behind them in detail. Berkeley Lab's brief focuses on several salient issues that emerged during the criteria development and discussion process. Many of these issues are likely to arise in other states that plan to evaluate the impacts of energy efficiency financing programs, whether for a single program or multiple programs. Issues discussed in the brief include: -The stakeholder process to develop the proposed assessment criteria -Attribution of outcomes - such as energy savings - to financing programs vs. other drivers -Choosing the outcome metric of primary interest: program take-up levels vs. savings -The use of net benefits vs. benefit-cost ratios for cost-effectiveness evaluation -Non-energy factors -Consumer protection factors -Market transformation impacts -Accommodating varying program goals in a multi-program evaluation -Accounting for costs and risks borne by various parties, including taxpayers and utility customers, in cost-effectiveness analysis -How to account for potential synergies among programs in a multi-program evaluation

  12. Broadening participation in Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) programs: an evaluation of the team research model for undergraduate research experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelote, A. R.; Geraghty Ward, E. M.; Dalbotten, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    The REU site on sustainable land and water resources has a goal of broadening participation in the geosciences by underrepresented groups and particularly Native American students. We are evaluating modifications to the traditional REU model in order to better support these students. First, we review a team research model for REU students, where students are placed on teams and work together in peer groups supported by a team of mentors. Second, the REU takes place in locations that have high populations of Native American students to remove barriers to participation for non-traditional students. Finally, the teams do research on issues related to local concerns with cultural focus. Traditional REU models (1 faculty to 1 student/on campus) have been shown to be effective in supporting student movement into graduate programs but often fail to attract a diverse group of candidates. In addition, they rely for success on the relationship between faculty and student, which can often be undermined by unrealistic expectations on the part of the student about the mentor relationship, and can be exacerbated by cultural misunderstanding, conflicting discourse, or students' personal or family issues. At this REU site, peer mentorship and support plays a large role. Students work together to select their research question, follow the project to completion and present the results. Students from both native and non-native backgrounds learn about the culture of the partner reservations and work on a project that is of immediate local concern. The REU also teaches students protocols for working on Native American lands that support good relations between reservation and University. Analysis of participant data gathered from surveys and interview over the course of our 3-year program indicates that the team approach is successful. Students noted that collaborating with other teams was rewarding and mentors reported positively about their roles in providing guidance for the student

  13. The urgent necessity for an all-encompassing ideal of re­form for South Africa 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. van Niekerk

    1986-03-01

    Full Text Available In view of the ironies of the realisation of the democratic ideal, which often do not answer to the exaggerated expectations of the participants, the idea of the regstaat is investigated as an "overriding purpose or transcending value" for reform in South Africa . Important facets emerge with regard to the concept of the regstaat in the legal and political development of the Greeks and Romans w ith the institutionalization of the idea th a t the state is a res publica, and especially the influence of the Roman ius gentium is visible in the legal and political development in Western Europe via the reception of Roman law in the development of the modern differentiated civil law which is based on the fundamental human rights of civil freedom and equality (independent of nationality, public legal status, race, religion etc. of all people and all societal forms within the territory of the state. A study of the development of the regstaat in England indicates that the institutionalization of the concept of rule of law developed during the "Glorious Revolution" prior to the actual development of the individual political right of the English citizen. Through this it becomes clear that the institutionalization of the regstaat is not necessarily dependent on democracy. While the idea of democracy stresses political freedom and participation, the concept of rule of law goes much further and encompasses not only the sphere of public law (within which political rights constitute apart but also the sphere of civil law and the curtailment of the power of government with respect to the sphere of internal jurisdiction of the non-state societal forms. Be­ cause of the problems which reform in South Africa faces, the emphasis on political participation for the immediate future can be counter-productive for the institutionalization of the regstaat. The concept of the regstaat which has to be incorporated in a declaration of intent will link reform in South Africa

  14. Cybersemiotics: Suggestion for a Transdisciplinary Framework Encompassing Natural, Life, and Social Sciences as Well as Phenomenology and Humanities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Brier

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The modern evolutionary paradigm combined with phenomenology forces us to view human consciousness as a product of evolution as well as accepting humans as observers from “within the universe”. The knowledge produced by science has first-person embodied consciousness combined with second-person meaningful communication in language as a prerequisite for third-person fallibilist scientific knowledge. Therefore, the study of consciousness forces us theoretically to encompass the natural and social sciences as well as the humanities in one framework of unrestricted or absolute naturalism. This means to view conscious quale life world with its intentionality as well as the intersubjectivity of culture as a part of nature, and therefore the whole human being as treated in modern bio-medicine. The ‘bio’ is not enough. The crucial question for a transdisciplinary theory of conscious human being is therefore: What is the role of consciousness, signs, and meaning in evolution as well as in cultural development? But this is problematic since the sciences in their present form are without concepts of qualia and meaning, and the European phenomenological-hermeneutic “sciences of meaning” does not have an evolutionary foundation. It is therefore interesting that C.S. Peirce phaneroscopic semiotics - in its modern form of a biosemiotics - was based on a phenomenological basis as well as an evolutionary thinking and ecology of sign webs at the same time drawing on knowledge from the sciences. To develop this 100 year old paradigm it is necessary to supplement it with the knowledge gained from the technologically founded information sciences, as well as systems, and cybernetics in order to produce a transdisciplinary alternative to logical positivism on the one hand and postmodern constructivism on the other. Cybersemiotics constructs such a non-reductionist naturalistic framework in order to integrate third-person knowledge from the exact sciences

  15. The NPS CISR Graduate Program in INFOSEC: Six Years of Experience

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Irvine, Cynthia E; Warren, Daniel F; Clark, Paul C

    1997-01-01

    The Naval Postgraduate School Center for Information Systems Security "INFOSEC" Studies and Research "NPS CISR" is developing a comprehensive program in INFOSEC education and research that can become...

  16. Complementary knowledge sharing: Experiences of nursing students participating in an educational exchange program between Madagascar and Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjoflåt, Ingrid; Razaonandrianina, Julie; Karlsen, Bjørg; Hansen, Britt Sætre

    2017-02-01

    To describe how Malagasy and Norwegian nursing students experience an educational exchange program in Madagascar. Previous studies show that nursing students participating in an educational exchange program enhanced their cultural knowledge and experienced personal growth. However, few studies have described two-way exchange programs, including experiences from both the hosts' and the guest students' perspectives. This study applies a descriptive qualitative design. Data were collected in 2015 by means of five semi-structured interviews with Malagasy students and two focus group interview sessions with Norwegian students. They were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The study was conducted in Madagascar. The data analyses revealed one main theme and two sub-themes related to the Malagasy and Norwegian nursing students' experiences. Main theme: complementary knowledge sharing; sub-themes: (1) learning from each other and (2) challenges of working together. The findings indicate that both the Malagasy and Norwegian nursing students experienced the exchange program as valuable and essential in exchanging knowledge. They also highlighted challenges, linked mainly to language barriers and the lack of available resources. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Going Domestic: Importing the Study Abroad Experience. The Development of a Multicultural New York City Study Away Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Susan Hayes; Huffman, Carolyn; Brackney, Dana E; Cuddy, Alyssa

    2017-07-01

    Significant off-campus domestic study away experiences have been shown to be a transformative active learning environment for students and achieve similar learning outcomes as study abroad programs. This manuscript describes the conception, development, and pedagogical approach of a faculty-led domestic study away experience in New York City for pre-licensure and post-licensure nursing students as an active learning strategy for developing cultural competence. Students participated in service-learning activities that illuminated the realities and challenges persons from other cultures face as they interact with health care in a culture that is not their own. In partnership with New York Cares©, students were immersed in well-established ongoing sustainable community-based projects. These experiences fostered reflective conversations between community members, student participants, and faculty regarding social factors, cultural issues and needs, and global issues and trends. Through the New York study away program, students were able to broaden their perspectives about social factors and culture beyond geographic or ethnic boundaries and apply these service experiences to their nursing practice. Study away programs are an excellent strategy for nursing educators to prepare students for care of multicultural populations and for proficiency in cultural competency within the globalization of the United States. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Perceived Impacts of a Public Health Training Center Field Placement Program among Trainees: Findings from a Small Group Externship Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Patrik; Grimm, Brandon; Abdel-Monem, Tarik; Hoffman, Stacey J; DeKraai, Mark; McMillan, Analisa

    2014-01-01

    There is heightened interest in identifying the impact of the federally funded Public Health Training Center (PHTC) program. Although evaluation studies have been conducted of public health training in general, evaluations of PHTC programs are rare. Field placement components are congressionally mandated requirements of PHTCs. Field placements are typically intensive, supervised externships for students to gain public health experience with local health departments or non-profit organizations. We have found no published evaluations of PHTC field placement components. This may be because of their small size and unique nature. We designed and evaluated a 200-h field placement program at an established PHTC. The evaluation included pre/post surveys measuring public health core competencies, and post-experience interviews. We found significant increases in three competency domains among trainees: policy development and program planning, communication skills, and community dimensions of practice. These outcomes contribute to evidence based on the efficacy of PHTC field placement programs, and underscore their role in public health training.

  19. Methadone Maintenance: The Experience of Four Programs. The Drug Abuse Council Manuscript Series, No. 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danaceau, Paul

    Methadone maintenance is a relatively new method for treating heroin addiction. Controversy and questions remain about the drug itself and its use of methadone. The author was engaged by The Drug Abuse Council to prepare these descriptions of four methadone programs and the accompanying summary. The evolution of these programs is examined, and the…

  20. Organising and learning experiences of the first semester MA Program ePedagogy / Visual Knowledge Building

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaap Jansen

    2006-01-01

    This paper will discuss the process of the MA program ePedagogy / Visual Knowledge Building during the first semester of the academic year 2005 – 2006. This MA program is a joint venture between the Universities of Helsinki, Hamburg and INHOLLAND. This publication will discuss and evaluate the

  1. Strategies To Expand a Pen Pal Program from Simple Letters into a Full Intergenerational Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiernan, Holly Way; Mosher-Ashley, Pearl M.

    2002-01-01

    The Senior Pen Pal Program began as an exchange of letters between first graders and older adults. Structured group visits between the classroom and the senior center, a holiday concert, and assigned readings about aging expanded the reach of the intergenerational program. (SK)

  2. The effectiveness of extended day programs : Evidence from a randomized field experiment in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyer, Erik; Van Klaveren, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Policies that aim at improving student achievement frequently increase instructional time, for example by means of an extended day program. There is, however, hardly any evidence that these programs are effective, and the few studies that allow causal inference indicate that we should expect neutral

  3. The McNair Scholars Program as an Agent of Socialization in the Doctoral Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gittens, Cheryl Bailey

    2013-01-01

    Interventions such as the Ronald E. McNair Post-Baccalaureate Achievement Program (McNair Scholars Program) are among the national strategies for promoting doctoral degree attainment amongst first-generation college students from low socioeconomic backgrounds or groups underrepresented in graduate education. This study aimed to understand how…

  4. Incentives for healthy behaviors: experience from Florida Medicaid's Enhanced Benefit Rewards program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Allyson G; Lemak, Christy Harris; Landry, Amy Yarbrough; Duncan, R Paul

    2013-04-01

    Engaging individuals in their own health care proves challenging for policy makers, health plans, and providers. Florida Medicaid introduced the Enhanced Benefits Rewards (EBR) program in 2006, providing financial incentives as rewards to beneficiaries who engage in health care seeking and healthy behaviors. This study analyzed beneficiary survey data from 2009 to determine predictors associated with awareness of and participation in the EBR program. Non-English speakers, those in a racial and ethnic minority group, those with less than a high school education, and those with limited or no connection to a health care provider were associated with lower awareness of the program. Among those aware of the program, these factors were also associated with reduced likelihood of engaging in the program. Individuals in fair or poor health were also less likely to engage in an approved behavior. Individuals who speak Spanish at home and those without a high school diploma were more likely than other groups to spend their earned program credits. Findings underscore the fact that initial engagement in such a program can prove challenging as different groups are not equally likely to be aware of or participate in an approved activity or redeem a credit. Physicians may play important roles in encouraging participation in programs to incentivize healthy behaviors.

  5. Physician management and leadership education at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation: program impact and experience over 14 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, James K; Berkowitz, Eric; Bailin, Philip L

    2007-01-01

    As the challenges of leading in healthcare become more complex, healthcare institutions have increasingly emphasized the importance of leadership training for physicians. Several institutions have offered in-house training programs. This paper describes the 14-year experience and evolution of physician leadership development training at the Cleveland Clinic. We describe the curriculum, organization, and goals of the Leading in Health Care course, which is offered to high-potential physician leaders. As a metric of the success of this physician leadership effort, we report the number and types of business plans developed in the course that have been either implemented at the Cleveland Clinic or have directly affected plans for program implementation.

  6. Experience in the design, implementation and use of PL-11, a programming language for the PDP-11

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, R D

    1976-01-01

    PL-11 is a programming language for the PDP-11 family of computers designed and implemented as part of the OMEGA Project at CERN (the European Organization for Nuclear Research). Its purpose is to provide an effective tool for both physicists and systems programmers to use in building real time data acquisition systems that are online to high-energy physics experiments. It is a fairly typical member of the PL-class of programming languages which are based on the initial design of PL360. (44 refs).

  7. The Kintun program for families with dementia: From novel experiment to national policy (innovative practice).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajardo, Jean; Aravena, José M; Budinich, Marilú; Larraín, Alberto; Fuentes, Patricio; Gitlin, Laura N

    2017-01-01

    The Kintun program is the first public health strategy specifically designed for dementia care in Chile. It was launched in 2013 in the city of Santiago with support from the National Service for the Elderly and the Municipality of Peñalolén. Using an interdisciplinary team, the program seeks to promote community integration and better support for persons with dementia and their caregivers. The multicomponent program includes: an activity-based day care center, training and education of family caregivers, home visits, and community outreach to increase dementia awareness. Case management helps to monitor ongoing needs and link families to resources. To date, 259 dyads (persons with dementia and their families) have been enrolled in the program. Due to its success in 2015, the Kintun program received funding from the Ministry of Health. This has led to the integration of previously disparate initiatives, better consistency across services, and the development of a comprehensive national dementia plan for Chile.

  8. Material Programming: A New Interaction Design Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vallgårda, Anna; Boer, Laurens; Tsaknaki, Vasiliki

    2016-01-01

    We propose the notion of material programming as a new practice for designing future interactive artifacts. Material programming would be a way for the interaction designer to better explore the dynamics of the materials at hand and through that familiarity be able to compose more sophisticated...... and complex temporal forms in their designs. As such it would blur the boundaries between programming and crafting these new smart and computational materials. We envision a material programming practice developed around physical tools (e.g. Fig 1) that draw on bodily skills and experiences (Fig 2) while...... enabling actions performed directly on the material with immediate effects (no program vs. execution mode). Finally, the tools would enable one layer of abstraction and as such encompass the potential of the computational materials but not that of possibly adjacent computers, which could run more complex...

  9. E-learning programs in oncology: a nationwide experience from 2005 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degerfält, Jan; Sjöstedt, Staffan; Fransson, Per; Kjellén, Elisabeth; Werner, Mads U

    2017-01-13

    E-learning is an established concept in oncological education and training. However, there seems to be a scarcity of long-term assessments of E-learning programs in oncology vis-á-vis their structural management and didactic value. This study presents descriptive, nationwide data from 2005 to 2014. E-learning oncology programs in chemotherapy, general oncology, pain management, palliative care, psycho-social-oncology, and radiotherapy, were reviewed from our databases. Questionnaires of self-perceived didactic value of the programs were examined 2008-2014. The total number of trainees were 4693, allocated to 3889 individuals. The trainees included medical doctors (MDs; n = 759), registered nurses (RNs; n = 2359), radiation therapy technologists (n = 642), and, social and health care assistants (SHCAs; n = 933). The E-learning covered 29 different program classifications, comprising 731 recorded presentations, and covering 438 themes. A total of 490 programs were completed by the trainees. The European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System (ECTS; 1 ECTS point equals 0.60 US College Credit Hours) points varied across the educational programs from 0.7 to 30.0, corresponding to a duration of full-time studies ranging between 15 to 900 h (0.4-24 weeks) per program. The total number of ECTS points for the trainee cohort, was 20,000 corresponding to 530,000 full-time academic hours or 324.0 standard academic working years. The overall drop-out rate, across professions and programs, was 10.6% (499/4693). The lowest drop-out rate was seen for RNs (4.3%; P E-learning programs. While the E-learning paradigm, across professions, seems to have been well received, it is imperative that prospective studies, benchmarking against traditional training methods, are carried out, examining the hypothesized didactic value of our E-programs.

  10. IMAGINE-ing interprofessional education: program evaluation of a novel inner city health educational experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Tina; Cox, Kelly Anne; Nyhof-Young, Joyce

    2017-02-01

    Poverty is a key determinant of health that leads to poor health outcomes. Although most healthcare providers will work with patients experiencing poverty, surveys among healthcare students have reported a curriculum gap in this area. This study aims to introduce and evaluate a novel, student-run interprofessional inner city health educational program that combines both practical and didactic educational components. Students participating in the program answered pre- and post-program surveys. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests and descriptive thematic analysis were used for quantitative and qualitative data, respectively. A total of 28 out of 35 participants responded (response rate: 80%). Student knowledge about issues facing underserved populations and resources for underserved populations significantly increased after program participation. Student comfort working with underserved populations also significantly increased after program participation. Valued program elements included workshops, shadowing, and a focus on marginalized populations. Interprofessional inner city health educational programs are beneficial for students to learn about poverty intervention and resources, and may represent a strategy to address a gap in the healthcare professional curriculum.

  11. Programming Social Applications Building Viral Experiences with OpenSocial, OAuth, OpenID, and Distributed Web Frameworks

    CERN Document Server

    LeBlanc, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Social networking has made one thing clear: websites and applications need to provide users with experiences tailored to their preferences. This in-depth guide shows you how to build rich social frameworks, using open source technologies and specifications. You'll learn how to create third-party applications for existing sites, build engaging social graphs, and develop products to host your own socialized experience. Programming Social Apps focuses on the OpenSocial platform, along with Apache Shindig, OAuth, OpenID, and other tools, demonstrating how they work together to help you solve pra

  12. Caring About Residents' Experiences and Symptoms (CARES) Program: A Model of Palliative Care Consultation in the Nursing Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Deborah A; Galicia-Castillo, Marissa

    2017-06-01

    To describe the CARES program, a model of palliative care for nursing home residents. Descriptive analysis of the Caring About Residents' Experiences and Symptoms (CARES) Program that provides palliative care services to nursing home residents. The CARES Program serves as an example of collaborative efforts to meet community needs. To evaluate the program, we document the services provided as well as process outcomes (changes to care plans, hospitalizations, location of death, and hospice utilization) for residents referred. 170 nursing home residents were seen by CARES Program between February 2013 to December 2015, 48% for skilled services, and 52% for long term care. Majority of referrals were for goals of care and concurrent symptom management. Following consultation, 67% of residents had a change in code status. Of residents desiring a palliative course 90% were never hospitalized. Overall, 53% of residents died; and those in long term care dying more often with hospice. The CARES program of palliative consultation addresses the needs of nursing home residents. The model has potential to be reproducible in in other communities.

  13. [Implementation of telemedicine programs in Spain: experience of the main actors involved in the decision-making process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahtani Chugani, Vinita; Martín Fernández, Roberto Luis; Soto Pedre, Enrique; Yanes López, Virginia; Serrano Aguilar, Pedro

    2009-01-01

    To identify the main benefits and risks related to the implementation of telemedicine programs in Spain, based on the experience of the actors influencing the decision-making process. We performed a qualitative study based on audiotaped semi-structured telephone interviews. Eleven interviews were carried out, and the perspective of four physicians, three administrators, two researchers and two telecommunications industry workers were included. Theoretical sampling was used and thematic inductive analysis was performed. The following factors were identified as necessary to successfully resolve problems by using telemedicine programs: the commitment of the persons involved, technological aspects, economic and institutional support, acceptance by healthcare professionals and patients, the existence of protocols adjusted to the context, the need for information and training prior to the development of telemedicine programs, a forward-looking approach, routine use and full acceptance of telemedicine programs in the organization, and the need to defend equity for professionals and users. Successfully developing a telemedicine program requires a favorable environment in which risk can be foreseen. The main key element seems to be the human factor. The factors identified in this study should be considered when developing strategies to increase the chances of success of telemedicine programs in Spain.

  14. Interdisciplinary professional practice leadership within a program model: BC Rehab's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, J M; Ang, R; Findlay, T

    1997-01-01

    In restructuring from a departmental to a program management model, BC Rehab successfully developed the role of professional practice leader to address clinical standards of practice and other concerns related to individual disciplines. A review of the role of professional practice leader is presented. Practice leaders are in a unique position to promote interdisciplinary, client-focused service. Because practice leaders' mandates cross program boundaries, they are able to keep the broad scope and goals of rehabilitation in the forefront, offering a balance to the program-specific perspective. It is imperative for practice leaders to maintain connections to operational and clinical issues to avoid isolation.

  15. PyGaze: an open-source, cross-platform toolbox for minimal-effort programming of eyetracking experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmaijer, Edwin S; Mathôt, Sebastiaan; Van der Stigchel, Stefan

    2014-12-01

    The PyGaze toolbox is an open-source software package for Python, a high-level programming language. It is designed for creating eyetracking experiments in Python syntax with the least possible effort, and it offers programming ease and script readability without constraining functionality and flexibility. PyGaze can be used for visual and auditory stimulus presentation; for response collection via keyboard, mouse, joystick, and other external hardware; and for the online detection of eye movements using a custom algorithm. A wide range of eyetrackers of different brands (EyeLink, SMI, and Tobii systems) are supported. The novelty of PyGaze lies in providing an easy-to-use layer on top of the many different software libraries that are required for implementing eyetracking experiments. Essentially, PyGaze is a software bridge for eyetracking research.

  16. Experience in using computer technologies for university training of future NPP personnel based on “University-Enterprise” program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.K. Semenov

    2015-10-01

    Software packages and procedural guides have been developed for mathematical modeling of reactor transients; simulation programs and procedures for the computer and full-scale simulators of neutron experiments and plant startup/shutdown operations have also been developed. Integrated training systems contribute to promoting occupational mentality and form an efficient tool for the personal development of future staff, so most attention in the use of simulators is given to the effects of individual qualities on the level of success achieved at the given stage of training. For illustration, a mathematical model is described and results from numerical experiments to study the reactor xenon stability are presented. Integrated implementation of the described training programs makes it possible to cut practically by half the period for the university graduates to adapt themselves to plant environment as confirmed by reports from the leaders of respective departments.

  17. The REDIH experience: an emerging design to develop an effective training program for graduate students in reproductive science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacDonald CJ

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Colla J MacDonald,1 Douglas Archibald,2 Jay M Baltz,3 Gerald M Kidder4 1Faculty of Education, 2Department of Family Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada; 3Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, ON, Canada; 4Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada Background: A training program in Reproduction, Early Development, and the Impact on Health (REDIH was initiated in 2009 by researchers specializing in biomedical, clinical, population health, and ethics research from seven collaborating universities in Quebec and Ontario, and Health Canada. This paper reports the findings from the first three years of the 6-year program. Objectives: The objective of the REDIH program is to provide increased opportunities for excellent training in reproduction and early development for graduate students and fellows, in order to build research, clinical, regulatory, decision-making, and industry capacity in Canada. Methods: A mixed methods approach was used to evaluate the REDIH training program, so as to combine the strengths of both qualitative and quantitative studies. A total of four focus groups (two with mentors and two with trainees were run during the June 2012 REDIH meeting. Surveys were administered directly after each training module. The W(eLearn framework was used as a guide to design and evaluate the program and answer the research questions. Results: The data from the analysis of the focus group interviews, in corroboration with the survey data, suggested trainees enjoyed and benefited from the REDIH experience. Trainees provided several examples of new knowledge and skills they had acquired from REDIH sessions, regarding reproductive and early developmental biology, and health. A few trainees who had been in the program for over a year provided examples of knowledge and skills acquired during the REDIH session that they were using in their place of work. Next steps will include

  18. Effective Recruiting and Intrusive Retention Strategies for Diversifying the Geosciences through a Research Experiences for Undergraduate Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou-Mark, J.; Blake, R.; Norouzi, H.; Yuen-Lau, L.; Ikramova, M.

    2016-12-01

    Worse than in most Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) fields, underrepresented minority (URM) groups in the geosciences are reported to be farthest beneath the national benchmarks. Even more alarming, the geosciences have the lowest diversity of all the STEM disciplines at all three levels of higher education. In order to increase the number of underrepresented groups in the geosciences, a National Science Foundation funded Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program at the New York City College of Technology has implemented effective recruitment strategies to attract and retain diverse student cohorts. Recruitment efforts include: 1) establishing partnership with the local community colleges; 2) forging collaborations with scientists of color; 3) reaching out to the geoscience departments; and 4) forming relationships with STEM organizations. Unlike the other REU programs which primarily provide a summer-only research experience, this REU program engages students in a year-long research experience. Students begin their research in the summer for nine weeks, and they continue their research one day a week in the fall and spring semesters. During the academic year, they present their projects at conferences. They also serve as STEM ambassadors to community and high school outreach events. This one-year triad connection of 1) professional organizations/conferences, 2) continual research experience, and 3) service constituent has resulted in higher retention and graduation rates of URMs in the STEM disciplines. Both formative and summative program assessment have uncovered and shown that strong recruitment efforts accompanied by intrusive retention strategies are essential to: a) sustain and support STEM URMs in developing confidence as scientists; b) create formal and informal STEM communities; and c) provide a clear pathway to advanced degrees and to the geoscience workforce. This project is supported by NSF REU Grant #1560050.

  19. IMAGINE-ing interprofessional education: program evaluation of a novel inner city health educational experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Hu

    2017-02-01

    Conclusion: Interprofessional inner city health educational programs are beneficial for students to learn about poverty intervention and resources, and may represent a strategy to address a gap in the healthcare professional curriculum.

  20. Setting up a pediatric robotic urology program: A USA institution experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Prithvi B; Schadler, Eric D; Orvieto, Marcelo; Zagaja, Gregory; Shalhav, Arieh L; Gundeti, Mohan S

    2018-02-01

    Implementing a robotic urological surgery program requires institutional support, and necessitates a comprehensive, detail-oriented plan that accounts for training, oversight, cost and case volume. Given the prevalence of robotic surgery in adult urology, in many instances it might be feasible to implement a pediatric robotic urology program within the greater context of adult urology. This involves, from an institutional standpoint, proportional distribution of equipment cost and operating room time. However, the pediatric urology team primarily determines goals for volume expansion, operative case selection, resident training and surgical innovation within the specialty. In addition to the clinical model, a robust economic model that includes marketing must be present. This review specifically highlights these factors in relationship to establishing and maintaining a pediatric robotic urology program. In addition, we share our data involving robot use over the program's first nine years (December 2007-December 2016). © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  1. Photonics Explorer - An European program to foster science education with hands-on experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The Photonics Explorer program aims to equip science teachers at Europe's secondary schools free-of-charge with up-to-date educational material to really engage, excite and educate students about the fascination of working with light.

  2. NURail Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) Summer Program in Multimodal Freight Transportation Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    NURail hosted an REU Summer Program in Multimodal Freight Transportation Risk at the Rail Transportation and Engineering Center (RailTEC) in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC...

  3. Teaching, Learning and Technology for Concurrent-Use Programs: The Partnership Library Experience in Central Florida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mem Stahley

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to share the local context and strategies implemented at community college- university locations to address educational needs in partnering area campus locations. Working strategies include providing quality faculty and accredited programs of study fully supported with local library resources and full-text access for lower and upper division research. The discussion begins with a review of the legislative and higher education initiatives that advanced joint and concurrent-use programs in Florida. Next, the author presents the community college curriculum with supporting library access and resources for concurrent-use programs in partnership with the university. Last, the reciprocal university concurrent-use curriculum with supporting library access and services is presented. The University of Central Florida s partnership and concurrent-use program extends to six community colleges at 13 sites.

  4. Adapted recreational and sports programs for children with disabilities: A decade of experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moberg-Wolff, Elizabeth; Kiesling, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    To identify and describe community based adapted sports and recreational programs (SARPs) for children with physically disabilities, documenting program types, benefits, challenges, growth and/or decline, and lessons they have learned over a 10-year period. In 1996, a total of 277 children's hospitals and freestanding rehabilitation hospitals stating that they provided pediatric rehabilitation services were contacted and asked to provide information regarding adapted recreational and sports programs in their region. Seventy-nine SARPs were identified, contacted, and survyed about programming, benefits and challenges they faced. They were then re-surveyed in 2006 for comparison data. Ten years ago, the average SARP served 25 or fewer clients and was led by a therapeutic recreation specialist with assistance from volunteers. Most programs had been in place for 5 years or more, met weekly for 2-3 hours, and were recreational in orientation. Activities varied, with basketball, aquatics, horseback riding and snow skiing being most common. Fund-raisers and grants supported most programs, and securing funding was their greatest challenge. Participant benefits noted by programs included improved socialization, enhanced physical fitness, increased self esteem, improved therapeutic skills (ADL's, transfers, etc.), enhanced cognition, expanded client independence, improved community relations, and enhanced leisure skills. Ten years later, the majority of SARPs noted similar benefits, and reported an increase in number of participants despite continued challenges with funding and staffing. Leadership and mentorship by those with disabilities was still very low, but community awareness of the abilities of those with disabilities had increased. Adapted sports and recreation programs surveyed in 1996 and again in 2006, report overall that their health is good, and many have retained the same programming, financial support mechanisms, leadership and participant mix over the years

  5. Training Program in the Field of Addiction Medicine – An Experience of Learning While Abroad

    OpenAIRE

    Norsiah, A; Whelan, G; L Piterman

    2008-01-01

    This paper illustrates the training program in the field of Addiction Medicine designed for primary care doctors by the Department of General Practice, School of Primary Care at Monash University in Melbourne. The nine month program was based around coursework, field visits and clinical observations. There were five modules that were completed and passed, twenty six Continuous Medical Education sessions attended, twenty nine field visits on Drug & Alcohol services, forty seven clinical visits...

  6. Career support in medicine - experiences with a mentoring program for junior physicians at a university hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Buddeberg-Fischer, Barbara; Vetsch, Esther; Mattanza, Guido

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Until now, mentoring has hardly been used by the medical profession in German-speaking countries as a means of supporting junior physicians in their careers. The aim of the mentoring project described here was to obtain information for promoting and developing future mentoring programs at a university hospital. Method: A new integrated mentoring model was developed and implemented over a 12-month period. Peer groups were advised on the mentoring process by mentors and program manager...

  7. The Content and Integrative Component of Capstone Experiences: An Analysis of Political Science Undergraduate Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummer, Jill Abraham

    2014-01-01

    In 1991, the APSA Task Force on Political Science recommended elements of a curricular structure that would best promote student learning. The report stated that there should be a capstone experience at the end of the senior year and that the capstone should require students to integrate their whole learning experience in the major. This article…

  8. Program Coordinators Disposition toward Educational Leadership Best Practices: Practicum Experience in Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, J. Eric

    2008-01-01

    The importance of field experiences in educational leadership was well documented in literature. However, scholars and practitioners disagreed on how field experiences should be provided to achieve the greatest effect. On the other hand, practicum efficiency and effectiveness were not assessed in the last ten years. Therefore, this study was…

  9. Organizational Change in Academic Programs: A Case Study of Doctoral Students' Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Christina Coffee

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative case study explored the experiences of doctoral students at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities as they transitioned from a fairly stable academic department experiencing significant changes. To achieve the purpose of the study, I investigated the experiences of doctoral students through an organizational development…

  10. Measuring energy-saving retrofits: Experiences from the Texas LoanSTAR program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haberl, J.S.; Reddy, T.A.; Claridge, D.E.; Turner, W.D.; O`Neal, D.L.; Heffington, W.M. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Energy Systems Lab.

    1996-02-01

    In 1988 the Governor`s Energy Management Center of Texas received approval from the US Department of Energy to establish a $98.6 million state-wide retrofit demonstration revolving loan program to fund energy-conserving retrofits in state, public school, and local government buildings. As part of this program, a first-of-its-kind, statewide Monitoring and Analysis Program (MAP) was established to verify energy and dollar savings of the retrofits, reduce energy costs by identifying operational and maintenance improvements, improve retrofit selection in future rounds of the LoanSTAR program, and initiate a data base of energy use in institutional and commercial buildings located in Texas. This report discusses the LoanSTAR MAP with an emphasis on the process of acquiring and analyzing data to measure savings from energy conservation retrofits when budgets are a constraint. This report includes a discussion of the program structure, basic measurement techniques, data archiving and handling, data reporting and analysis, and includes selected examples from LoanSTAR agencies. A summary of the program results for the first two years of monitoring is also included.

  11. Do residency applicants know what the ACGME core competencies are? One program's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasnick, John D; Chang, Laura; Russell, Cortessa; Gadsden, Jeff

    2010-05-01

    To determine the degree of knowledge that medical students applying to the St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center anesthesiology residency program had regarding the core physician competencies mandated by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. As a part of the department's annual resident-selection process, in the fall of 2008, 193 interviewed fourth-year U.S. MD-degree medical students applying to the St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center anesthesiology program were given a brief, written questionnaire to determine their knowledge of the six core physician competencies. The instructions for completing the instrument were standardized and delivered to the applicants by one of the program directors. A total of 193 applicants completed the interview questionnaire. Seventy-six had no knowledge of any of the physician competencies, and only three were able to correctly identify all six. While this research is an observation of only one set of applicants to one residency program, if the findings are applicable to other programs and specialties, that suggests that medical schools and residency program directors should develop methods for increasing competency awareness among medical students.

  12. Developing an interactive web-based learning program on skin cancer: the learning experiences of clinical educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Waqas R; Geller, Alan; Alexander, Gwen; Asgari, Maryam M; Chanange, Gunther J; Dusza, Stephen; Eide, Melody J; Fletcher, Suzanne W; Goulart, Jacqueline M; Halpern, Allan C; Landow, Shoshana; Marghoob, Ashfaq A; Quigley, Elizabeth A; Weinstock, Martin A

    2012-12-01

    Web-based learning in medical education is rapidly growing. However, there are few firsthand accounts on the rationale for and development of web-based learning programs. We present the experience of clinical educators who developed an interactive online skin cancer detection and management course in a time-efficient and cost-efficient manner without any prior skills in computer programming or technical construction of web-based learning programs. We review the current state of web-based learning including its general advantages and disadvantages as well as its specific utility in dermatology. We then detail our experience in developing an interactive online skin cancer curriculum for primary care clinicians. Finally, we describe the main challenges faced and lessons learned during the process. This report may serve medical educators who possess minimal computer programming and web design skills but want to employ the many strengths of web-based learning without the huge costs associated with hiring a professional development team.

  13. Development of a Breast Cancer Treatment Program in Port-au-Prince, Haiti: Experiences From the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libby, Rachel; Patberg, Elizabeth; Gabriel, Dieudina; Al-Quran, Samer; Kasher, Matthew; Heldermon, Coy; Daily, Karen; Auguste, Joseph R.; Suprien, Valery C.; Hurley, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The nonprofit Project Medishare launched a breast cancer treatment program in Port-au-Prince in July 2013 to address the demand for breast cancer care in Haiti. We outline the development of the program, highlight specific challenges, and discuss key considerations for others working in global oncology. Methods We reflected on our experiences in the key areas of developing partnerships, building laboratory capacity, conducting medical training, using treatment algorithms, and ensuring access to safe, low-cost chemotherapy drugs. We also critically reviewed our costs and quality measures. Results The program has treated a total of 139 patients with breast cancer with strong adherence to treatment regimens in 85% of patients. In 273 chemotherapy administrations, no serious exposure or adverse safety events were reported by staff. The mortality rate for 94 patients for whom we have complete data was 24% with a median survival time of 53 months. Our outcome data were likely influenced by stage at presentation, with more than half of patients presenting more than 12 months after first noticing a tumor. Future efforts will therefore focus on continuing to improve the level of care, while working with local partners to spread awareness, increase screening, and get more women into care earlier in the course of their disease. Conclusion Our experiences may inform others working to implement protocol-based cancer treatment programs in resource-poor settings and can provide valuable lessons learned for future global oncology efforts. PMID:28717677

  14. "Peri-border" health care programs: the Ecuador-Peru experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Cafagna

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify the main strengths, weaknesses, and challenges of the Ecuador-Peru "peri-border" health care program and to analyze the legislative, managerial, and organizational arrangements adopted to integrate the two country's national health systems in the border area. METHODS: A descriptive, qualitative case study was carried out using three complementary methods: literature review and analysis of official Peruvian and Ecuadoran national and binational documents, 18 semi-structured interviews of key informants, and a survey of the entire health worker population of the Suyo-Macará binational micro-network. RESULTS: The key program challenge was the absence of reciprocity; Peruvian citizens were entitled to free health care services in Ecuador but Ecuadoran citizens did not receive the same benefit in Peru. The need for improvements in the binational system's human resources was also identified. The program's main strength was its organizational structure, which is designed mainly for the implementation of 1 the binational network and 2 a patient referral / counter-referral system that includes the transfer of patient clinical information. CONCLUSIONS: Notwithstanding considerable challenges, peri-border programs are feasible and replicable. Program success seems to be highly dependent on the completion of a number of steps, including 1 consolidation of the original binational memorandum into a binding binational agreement between the two countries; 2 achievement of similar standards in both countries for the provision and quality of health care services, focusing on complementarities; and 3 development of an integrated binational information system.

  15. "Peri-border" health care programs: the Ecuador-Peru experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cafagna, Gianluca; Missoni, Eduardo; Beingolea, Rosa Luz Benites de

    2014-03-01

    To identify the main strengths, weaknesses, and challenges of the Ecuador-Peru "peri-border" health care program and to analyze the legislative, managerial, and organizational arrangements adopted to integrate the two country's national health systems in the border area. A descriptive, qualitative case study was carried out using three complementary methods: literature review and analysis of official Peruvian and Ecuadoran national and binational documents, 18 semi-structured interviews of key informants, and a survey of the entire health worker population of the Suyo-Macará binational micro-network. The key program challenge was the absence of reciprocity; Peruvian citizens were entitled to free health care services in Ecuador but Ecuadoran citizens did not receive the same benefit in Peru. The need for improvements in the binational system's human resources was also identified. The program's main strength was its organizational structure, which is designed mainly for the implementation of 1) the binational network and 2) a patient referral / counter-referral system that includes the transfer of patient clinical information. Notwithstanding considerable challenges, peri-border programs are feasible and replicable. Program success seems to be highly dependent on the completion of a number of steps, including 1) consolidation of the original binational memorandum into a binding binational agreement between the two countries; 2) achievement of similar standards in both countries for the provision and quality of health care services, focusing on complementarities; and 3) development of an integrated binational information system.

  16. A study on the Secondary School Teacher's Perception Change for Nuclear Power through an Experiment Practice Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, ByungChae; Kim, JuHyun; Na, JungHyun; Yoo, DaYoung; Kim, WoongKi [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    It is important to correct mis-understanding perception of general public for nuclear power for development of nuclear industry and the nation‟s advancement. It is required to provide secondary school students and teachers with correct information by learning activities in addition to mass media and textbook. If teachers have wrong concept, students are affected by the negative impact. Therefore, teachers should understand nuclear power correctly. KAERI(Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) has served an education program entitled „to understand nuclear power correctly by experiment and practice‟ as an practice and improvement program for the secondary school teachers. We checked the change of the secondary teacher‟s recognition for nuclear power by the survey. In this study, we checked the change of the secondary school teacher‟s recognition level for nuclear power by the survey before and after the education program. Nuclear Perception level was increased by 8% showing optimistic mind for the safety, dangerousness, and necessity of nuclear power plants after the education. Nuclear knowledge level also went up 15% through the education program. It is concluded that the nuclear perception of the secondary school teachers can be improved through the education program for nuclear power. Secondary school students form general public in the future. Perception of the students is influenced by teachers deeply.

  17. A Community-Based Sensory Training Program Leads to Improved Experience at a Local Zoo for Children with Sensory Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Kong

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Sensory processing difficulties are common among many special needs children, especially those with autism spectrum disorder (ASD. The sensory sensitivities often result in interference of daily functioning and can lead to social isolation for both the individual and family unit. A quality improvement (QI project was undertaken within a local zoo to systematically implement a sensory training program targeted at helping special needs individuals with sensory challenges, including those with ASD, Down’s syndrome, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and speech delay. We piloted the program over a 2-year period. The program consisted of staff training, provision of sensory bags and specific social stories, as well as creation of quiet zones. Two hundred family units were surveyed before and after implementation of the sensory training program. In this pilot QI study, families reported increased visitation to the zoo, improved interactions with staff members, and the overall quality of their experience. In conclusion, we are able to demonstrate that a sensory training program within the community zoo is feasible, impactful, and has the potential to decrease social isolation for special needs individuals and their families.

  18. Learning for Entrepreneurship in Heterogeneous Groups: Experiences From an International, Interdisciplinary Higher Education Student Program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lans, T.; Popov, V.; Oganisjana, K.; Täks, M.

    2013-01-01

    Although entrepreneurship education (EE) has gained popularity internationally, empirical work is scarce on the factors which influence the underlying learning process. This article presents the experiences of a European summer school where factors which contribute to entrepreneurial learning in

  19. A discharge planning program in orthopaedics: experiences in implementation and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matt-Hensrud, N; Severson, M; Hansen, D C; Holland, D E

    2001-01-01

    The acute care orthopaedic registered nurse plays a key role in assessing and communicating the continuing care needs of patient's and their families, coordinating community resources, and formulating a timely discharge plan to maximize rehabilitation and recovery. Developing and maintaining a staff nurse's discharge planning knowledge and skills can be a challenging endeavor. Discharge Planning Coordinators at a tertiary medical center developed and implemented a Discharge Planning Mentorship Program, an educational pilot program designed to enhance the knowledge and skill level of select nurses in the orthopaedic specialty practice, thus maximizing expert resources at the bedside. Program implementation and evaluation of role preparation, practice changes, and actualization challenges are discussed in this article. Overall, participants demonstrated increased skill in articulating and problem solving a patient's postdischarge needs, devised creative strategies to enhance communication between multiple levels of care, and developed a greater knowledge of community resources and reimbursement mechanisms for continuing care.

  20. Emerging issues in the evaluation of energy-efficiency programs. The US experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vine, E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory LBNL, Berkeley, CA (United States); Hall, N.; Keating, K.M. [TecMarket Works, Oregon, WI (United States); Kushler, M. [American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, Washington, DC (United States); Prahl, R. [Prahl and Associates, Fremont, CA (United States)

    2012-01-15

    The evaluation, measurement, and verification (EM and V) of energy-efficiency programs has a rich and extensive history in the United States, dating back to the late 1970s. During this time, many different kinds of EM and V issues have been addressed: technical (primarily focusing on EM and V methods and protocols), policy (primarily focusing on how EM and V results will be used by energy-efficiency program managers and policymakers), and infrastructure (primarily focusing on the development of EM and V professionals and an EM and V workforce). We address the issues that are currently important and/or are expected to become more critical in the coming years. We expect many of these issues will also be relevant for a non-US audience, particularly as more attention is paid to the reliability of energy savings and carbon emissions reductions from energy-efficiency programs.

  1. A Two-Phase Support Method for Solving Linear Programs: Numerical Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohand Bentobache

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We develop a single artificial variable technique to initialize the primal support method for solving linear programs with bounded variables. We first recall the full artificial basis technique, then we will present the proposed algorithm. In order to study the performances of the suggested algorithm, an implementation under the MATLAB programming language has been developed. Finally, we carry out an experimental study about CPU time and iterations number on a large set of the NETLIB test problems. These test problems are practical linear programs modelling various real-life problems arising from several fields such as oil refinery, audit staff scheduling, airline scheduling, industrial production and allocation, image restoration, multisector economic planning, and data fitting. It has been shown that our approach is competitive with our implementation of the primal simplex method and the primal simplex algorithm implemented in the known open-source LP solver LP_SOLVE.

  2. Federal workers' compensation programs: Department of Defense and Veterans Health Administration experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallon, Timothy M; Grizzell, Tifani L; Hodgson, Michael J

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this article is to introduce the reader to this special supplement to the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine regarding Federal Workers' Compensation Programs. The short history of both the VHA and DoD Federal Workers' Compensation Programs are provided and a short synopsis of each author's article is provided. The lessons learned from the articles in the supplement are summarized in this article and 6 key findings are highlighted. Cooperation between human resources workers' compensation personnel, safety and occupational health personnel is a must for successful management of the WC program. Information and data sharing are critical for root cause and injury prevention, case management, and cost containment efforts. Enhancing efforts in these areas will save an estimated $100 million through cost avoidance efforts.

  3. Accreditation of Spanish engineering programs, first experiences. The case of the Terrassa School of Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª Dolores Álvarez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of the European Space for Higher Education has entailed new requirements for Spanish Higher Education Programs. Regulations (RD 1393, 2007 stablish that university programs, in order to have official validity, must be submitted to an external evaluation process before their official implementation, denominated Validation, and to an ex-post process or Accreditation. Terrassa School of Engineering (EET was one of the first schools in Spain to adapt to the European Space for Higher Education, in the academic period 2009-10 and then, one of the first university institutions submitted to an accreditation process. In this communication, the important role of the Internal Quality Assurance System in the assessment of the school’s programs is exposed as well as the approach followed in the key steps of the process: Accreditation

  4. An evolving integrative treatment program for military sexual trauma (MST) and one veteran's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdinand, Lisa G; Kelly, Ursula A; Skelton, Kelly; Stephens, Kisha J; Bradley, Bekh

    2011-01-01

    Military sexual trauma (MST) increases the risk for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and multiple other comorbidities, presenting substantial challenges for nurses and psychiatric and medical clinicians. A specialized VA Medical Center outpatient program is patterned after Herman's three-phased, empirically-supported, recovery treatments. We use a case example of a female veteran MST survivor to illustrate our treatment model. She presented to our program meeting diagnostic criteria for PTSD, Major Depressive Disorder, and a history of substance abuse. Post-treatment she demonstrated improved scores on measures of PTSD, quality of life, and socialization. This model shows promise for treatment of MST survivors with PTSD.

  5. 0 + 5 Vascular Surgery Residents' Operative Experience in General Surgery: An Analysis of Operative Logs from 12 Integrated Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brigitte K; Kang, P Chulhi; McAninch, Chris; Leverson, Glen; Sullivan, Sarah; Mitchell, Erica L

    2016-01-01

    Integrated (0 + 5) vascular surgery (VS) residency programs must include 24 months of training in core general surgery. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education currently does not require specific case numbers in general surgery for 0 + 5 trainees; however, program directors have structured this time to optimize operative experience. The aim of this study is to determine the case volume and type of cases that VS residents are exposed to during their core surgery training. Accreditation council for graduate medical education operative logs for current 0 + 5 VS residents were obtained and retrospectively reviewed to determine general surgery case volume and distribution between open and laparoscopic cases performed. Standard statistical methods were applied. A total of 12 integrated VS residency programs provided operative case logs for current residents. A total of 41 integrated VS residents in clinical years 2 through 5. During the postgraduate year-1 training year, residents participated in significantly more open than laparoscopic general surgery cases (p surgery cases are hernia repair (20%), skin and soft tissue (7.4%), and breast (6.3%). Residents in programs with core surgery over 3 years participated in significantly more general surgery operations compared with residents in programs with core surgery spread out over 4 years (p = 0.035). 0 + 5 VS residents perform significantly more open operations than laparoscopic operations during their core surgery training. The majority of these operations are minor, nonabdominal procedures. The 0 + 5 VS residency program general surgery operative training requirements should be reevaluated and case minimums defined. The general surgery training component of 0 + 5 VS residencies may need to be restructured to meet the needs of current and future trainees. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A qualitative study of student perspectives and experiences in an information technology education program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Heekyung

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to learn about students' perspectives of an undergraduate level information technology (IT) education program. The IT program is a recent effort to create a new educational opportunity for computing in college, with recognition that the recent IT developments have had a greater influence on various aspects of people's lives than ever. Students' perspectives are a necessary piece of information to develop this innovative IT education program into a sound educational opportunity. Data were gathered through qualitative in-depth interviews conducted with 28 undergraduate students, most of whom have taken one or more IT classes before. The interview data were analyzed using the grounded theory approach. The analysis found that college students perceived that they were very competent in dealing with IT primarily due to their continued exposure to computers since youth. However, this perceived competency was not very stable. Students felt that they did not have sufficient IT competency when technical skills of dealing with IT came to attention. They also felt so when comparing their IT competency with that of their peers, examining it in a class context, and confronting a transition from education to the real world. In spite of their preference for and confidence in self-guided learning, students wanted to receive a formal instruction in IT when they needed to learn something difficult, something that they were not very interested in, and something important for their future lives. They also expressed a desire to gain a comprehensive understanding of computers without needing to learn fundamental computing principles. Students' various interests in IT education were dispersed around learning practical technical skills and understanding social implications of IT. Many participants' focus was a mix of the two factors, which was often expressed as an area that dealt with "how humans and computers interact." This blended interest suggested a

  7. Participant outcomes, perceptions, and experiences in the Internationally Educated Engineers Qualification Program, University of Manitoba: An exploratory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Marcia R.

    Immigration, economic, and regulatory trends in Canada have challenged all professions to examine the processes by which immigrant professionals (international graduates) achieve professional licensure and meaningful employment in Canada. The Internationally Educated Engineers Qualification Program (IEEQ) at the University of Manitoba was developed as an alternate pathway to integrate international engineering graduates into the engineering profession in Manitoba. However, universities have the neither mandate nor the historical practice to facilitate licensure for immigrant professionals and, thus, the knowledge base for program development and delivery is predominantly experiential. This study was developed to address the void in the knowledge base and support the program's ongoing development by conducting a critical, exploratory, participant-oriented evaluation of the IEEQ Program for both formative and summative purposes. The research questions focussed on how the IEEQ participants perceived and described their experiences in the IEEQ Program, and how the participants' outcomes in the IEEQ Program compared to international engineering graduates pursuing other licensing pathways. The study was built on an interpretivist theoretical approach that supported a primarily qualitative methodology with selected quantitative elements. Data collection was grounded in focus group interviews, written questionnaires, student reports, and program records for data collection, with inductive data analysis for qualitative data and descriptive statistics for quantitative data. The findings yielded rich understandings of participants' experiences in the IEEQ Program, their outcomes relative to international engineering graduates (IEGs) pursuing other licensing pathways, and their perceptions of their own adaptation to the Canadian engineering profession. Specifically, the study suggests that foreign credentials recognition processes have tended to focus on the recognition and

  8. Differences Between Emergency Nurse Perception and Patient Reported Experience With an ED HIV and Hepatitis C Virus Screening Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Douglas A E; Anderson, Erik S; Pfeil, Sarah K; Graffman, Sarah E; Trivedi, Tarak K

    2016-03-01

    Nontargeted human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) screening and targeted hepatitis C virus (HCV) screening for selected high-risk patients (those born between 1945 and 1965 and those who report injection drug use) was integrated into our ED triage process and carried out by nurses. Determining whether emergency nurses accurately perceive what patients experience is important to know because staff misperceptions may pose a barrier to program adherence and sustainability. We performed a cross-sectional survey study of emergency nurses and patients to assess the accuracy of emergency nurses' perception of patient experience with the HIV/HCV screening program. Respondents evaluated their level of agreement using a 5-item Likert scale for 9 statements across 4 domains related to the patient experience with the screening process (satisfaction, sense of autonomy, sense of privacy, and comfort level). Surveys were completed by 65 of the 153 eligible emergency nurses (42%). Of the 1040 patients approached, 610 (59%) were eligible, and 491 of the 610 eligible patients (80%) completed surveys. Across all domains, statistically significant differences were found between emergency nurse perception and patient report, P < .001. Emergency nurses perceived patients to be less satisfied with the screening program, more uncomfortable with being asked screening questions, more concerned about privacy issues, and less likely to feel that the decision to decline screening was autonomous than were patients. Emergency nurses not only frequently misperceive how patients experience ED-based HIV/HCV screening, but these misperceptions are skewed toward the negative, representing a type of staff bias. Further research is recommended to determine if such misperceptions adversely affect implementation of screening. Copyright © 2016 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Sustaining Liminality: Experiences and Negotiations of International Females in U.S. Engineering Graduate Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Debalina

    2012-01-01

    This project examines the intersectionalities of international females in engineering graduate programs of the United States, using frameworks of sustainability and liminality theory. According to Dutta and Kisselburgh (2011) international females in graduate engineering constitute the "minorities of minorities," not only in terms of…

  10. Outcomes of Curricular Enhancement in a Health Program: LPU CAMP Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Anacleta P.; Panganiban, Citadel A.; Alday, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Higher educational system has gone through substantial reforms and changes vis-à-vis curriculum innovation over the past years. The evaluation of a revised program is one of the most relevant courses of action done when curriculum change is to be implemented. One of the main reasons is that it is a chance for practitioners to test for themselves…

  11. Elementary School-Located Influenza Vaccine Programs: Key Stakeholder Experiences from Initiation to Continuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Valerie; Rousculp, Matthew D.; Price, Mark; Coles, Theresa; Therrien, Michelle; Griffin, Jane; Hollis, Kelly; Toback, Seth

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the initiation and logistics, funding, perceived barriers and benefits, and disruption of school activities by school-located influenza vaccination (SLIV) programs conducted during the 2008-2009 influenza season. Seventy-two interviews using a structured protocol were conducted with 26 teachers, 16 school administrators, and 30…

  12. Exploring the Lived Experiences of Program Managers Regarding an Automated Logistics Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Ronald Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Automated Logistics Environment (ALE) is a new term used by Navy and aerospace industry executives to describe the aggregate of logistics-related information systems that support modern aircraft weapon systems. The development of logistics information systems is not always well coordinated among programs, often resulting in solutions that cannot…

  13. Programmed Lab Experiments for Biochemical Investigation of Quorum-Sensing Signal Molecules in Rhizospheric Soil Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nievas, Fiorela L.; Bogino, Pablo C.; Giordano, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Biochemistry courses in the Department of Molecular Biology at the National University of Río Cuarto, Argentina, are designed for undergraduate students in biology, microbiology, chemistry, agronomy, and veterinary medicine. Microbiology students typically have previous coursework in general, analytical, and organic chemistry. Programmed sequences…

  14. 75 FR 15675 - Professional Research Experience Program in Chemical Science and Technology Laboratory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-30

    ... Marine Laboratory in Charleston, South Carolina. DATES: All applications, paper and electronic, must be..., Gaithersburg Laboratories in Gaithersburg, Maryland or at the NIST Hollings Marine Laboratory in Charleston..., Thermophysical Properties, and Analytical Chemistry. In Charleston, the CSTL carries out programs in the...

  15. The Relationship between Gender and Students' Attitude and Experience of Using a Mathematical Software Program (MATLAB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocak, Mehmet A.

    2006-01-01

    This correlation study examined the relationship between gender and the students' attitude and prior knowledge of using one of the mathematical software programs (MATLAB). Participants were selected from one community college, one state university and one private college. Students were volunteers from three Calculus I classrooms (one class from…

  16. The Study Abroad Experience: A Crucial Element in Globalizing Business School Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiero, George A.; Kraten, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Globalization is a fundamental reality of modern business practice. Participation in a study abroad program is a crucial element in helping students become well rounded global business leaders; it is an increasingly important element of a well rounded business curriculum. A semester or summer abroad, properly conceived and designed, can provide…

  17. Practitioners' Experiences Creating and Implementing an Emotional Recovery and Physical Activity Program Following a Natural Disaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl-Alexander, Zachary

    2015-01-01

    On April 27, 2011 a series of tornadoes tore through the southeast United States. Sixty-four percent of the counties in the state of Alabama were directly affected by these storms. After a natural disaster, children who are directly or indirectly affected show numerous intense emotional reactions. Recovery programs can be set up to enable them to…

  18. Organization and Implementation of Online Cytology Quality Assurance Program – Georgian Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kldiashvili Ekaterina

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Medical information system (MIS is at the heart of information technology (IT implementation policies in healthcare systems around the world. Different architecture and application models of MIS are developed. Despite of obvious advantages and benefits, application of MIS in everyday practice is slow. On the background of analysis of the existing models of MIS in Georgia has been created a multi-user web-based approach. This article will present the architecture of the system and its application for cytology quality assurance programs. Five hundred Georgian language electronic medical records from the cervical screening activity illustrated by images were selected for quality assurance program. The primary goal of the MIS is patient management. However, the system can be used for quality assurance programs. The ideal of healthcare in the information age must be to create a situation where healthcare professionals spend more time creating knowledge from medical information and less time managing medical information. The application of easily available and adaptable technology and improvement of the infrastructure conditions is the basis for eHealth applications. The MIS is perspective and actual technology solution. It can be used for cytology quality assurance programs.

  19. University partnerships with the corporate sector faculty experiences with for-profit matriculation pathway programs

    CERN Document Server

    Winkle, Carter

    2013-01-01

    Carter Winkle provides emperically derived insight into both positive and negative implications of the contemporary phenomena of partnerships between universities and private, for-profit educational service providers resulting in matriculation pathway programs for non-native English speaking students in the United States.

  20. A Successful Experience of ABET Accreditation of an Electrical Engineering Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Yahya, S. A.; Abdel-Halim, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    The procedures followed and the various factors that led to the ABET accreditation of the College of Engineering, Qassim University, Buraidah, Saudi Arabia, are illustrated and evaluated for the benefit of other similar colleges. Taking the Electrical Engineering (EE) program as an example, this paper describes the procedures followed to implement…

  1. Fostering Technology-Rich Service-Learning Experiences between School Librarians and Teacher Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Craig E.; Dousay, Tonia; Kvenild, Cassandra; Meredith, Tamara

    2015-01-01

    School libraries are untapped resources for fieldwork by preservice teachers. Many school librarians have expertise in pedagogy and standards-based curriculum development, both for information literacy and for technology integration. By forging partnerships with teacher-preparation programs, school librarians can provide fieldwork sites rich in…

  2. The Ethics and Citizenship Program: A Brazilian Experience in Moral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Ulisses; Arantes, Valeria

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the Ethics and Citizenship Program, a moral education project developed by the Brazilian government to promote education in ethics and citizenship in Brazilian fundamental and middle schools through four key themes: ethics, democratic coexistence, human rights and social inclusion. Some findings from a research project that…

  3. Assessment of Programming Language Learning Based on Peer Code Review Model: Implementation and Experience Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanqing; Li, Hang; Feng, Yuqiang; Jiang, Yu; Liu, Ying

    2012-01-01

    The traditional assessment approach, in which one single written examination counts toward a student's total score, no longer meets new demands of programming language education. Based on a peer code review process model, we developed an online assessment system called "EduPCR" and used a novel approach to assess the learning of computer…

  4. Teaching Humanities in Medicine: The University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Hugh; Shields, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Humanities in medicine (HIM) is an important aspect of medical education intended to help preserve humanism and a focus on patients. At the University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program, we have been expanding our HIM curriculum for our residents including orientation, home visit reflective writing, didactics and a department-wide…

  5. The Economic Impact of Starting, Stopping, and Restarting an Antibiotic Stewardship Program: A 14-Year Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A. Bosso

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Regions Hospital started a multidisciplinary antibiotic stewardship program (ASP in 1998. The program effectively shut down from 2002–2004 as key personnel departed and was then restarted but without the dedicated pharmacist and infectious diseases physician. Purchasing data (in dollars or dollars/patient/day unadjusted for inflation served as a surrogate marker of antibiotic consumption. These data were reviewed monthly, quarterly, and yearly along with antibiotic susceptibility patterns on a semi-annual basis. Segmented regression analysis was use to compare restricted antibiotic purchases for performance periods of 1998–2001 (construction, 2002–2004 (de-construction, and 2005–2011 (reconstruction. After 4 years (1998–2001 of operation, a number of key participants of the ASP departed. For the following three years (2002–2004 the intensity and focus of the program floundered. This trend was averted when the program was revitalized in early 2005. The construction, deconstruction, and reconstruction of our ASP provided a unique opportunity to statistically examine the financial impact of our ASP or lack thereof in the same institution. We demonstrate a significant economic impact during ASP deconstruction and reconstruction.

  6. Community Youth Program: A Model for Providing Field Experiences for Pre-Student Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lydecker, Ann M.

    A Saturday morning youth program was developed by Gustavus Adolphus College (Minnesota) for the purpose of providing field expereinces for pre-student teaching elementary education majors. Children from the community attend enrichment classes in social studies and science, taught by teams of students from the college of education. One objective of…

  7. Developing Short-Term Study Abroad Programs: Achieving Successful International Student Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, James; Luqmani, Mushtaq; Newell, Stephen; Quraeshi, Zahir; Wagner, Bret

    2013-01-01

    Most business schools in the U.S. are employing various initiatives to "internationalize" their curriculum in order to prepare students to participate more effectively in a globally interconnected business world. An integral part of these initiatives is to encourage more students to participate in study abroad programs. Though it maybe…

  8. Black Male Retention Initiatives: Exploring Students' Experiences and Program Effectiveness at Predominantly White Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Leger, Gabrielle

    2012-01-01

    Recent initiatives in higher education have been designed to increase Black undergraduate male collegiate retention and persistence through graduation for this historically underrepresented population. Although institutional leaders in higher education have focused on creating more inclusive campuses, designing and implementing programs to retain…

  9. The impact of protest responses in choice experiments: an application to a Biosphere Reserve Management Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Barrio

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: To identify protest responses and compute welfare estimates with and without the inclusion of such responses using follow-up statements in a choice experiment exercise. To our knowledge, this is one of the first empirical applications that, following the conventional treatment used in contingent valuation methodology, explicitly deals with the treatment and identification of protest responses in choice experiments.Area of study: the Eo, Oscos y Terras de Burón Biosphere Reserve sited between the regions of Galicia and Asturias. We are interested in the influence of such responses on preference elicitation for alternative management actions in this Reserve.Materials and methods: A face-to-face survey conducted in a sample of residents and non-residents of this Reserve. In total, more than 450 surveys were collected.Main results show that protest responses are fairly common in choice experiments, and their analysis affects the statistical performance of the empirical models as well as the valuation estimates. In fact, when the sample is corrected by protest responses, its size decreases to 303 individuals. Furthermore, we can observe that protest responses are triggered by a less positive attitude towards the wolf.Research highlight: Protest responses are a common issue in choice experiments and, therefore, future exercises should consider them explicitly, as earlier contingent valuation studies have.Key words: Biosphere Reserve; choice experiments; protest responses; willingness to pay.

  10. Feasibility of a web-based continuing medical education program in dermatology: the DermoFAD experience in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naldi, Luigi; Manfrini, Roberto; Martin, Leigh; Deligant, Christian; Dri, Pietro

    2006-01-01

    Web-based systems are increasingly being considered for medical education. A draft legislation on distance-learning programs was licensed in Italy by the National Commission for Continuous Education in November 2003. A series of pilot studies were developed, among these the DermoFAD project, based on five simulated clinical cases of acne and a systematic appraisal of the evidence for their clinical management. From July 1 to August 27, 2004, a total of 500 medical doctors participated in a free of charge evaluation program of the project. Users were distributed all over Italy. Two hundred and eighty-one (56.2%) were primary care physicians, 83 (16.6%) dermatologists, and 136 (27.2%) other medical specialists. A wide range of connecting times was observed. The pass rate of each individual case, at first attempt, ranged from 44 to 77%. When asked to assess the overall distance-learning experience, 98% of the doctors considered it to be enjoyable. A total of 2,152 continuing medical education (CME) credits were awarded. Over 50% of the users stated they would still use the system if they had to pay for it. Our experience shows that distance learning is feasible and is well accepted by physicians. The DermoFAD program was an efficient means of delivering CME to the Italian medical community at large.

  11. FTAP: a Linux-based program for tapping and music experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finney, S A

    2001-02-01

    This paper describes FTAP, a flexible data collection system for tapping and music experiments. FTAP runs on standard PC hardware with the Linux operating system and can process input keystrokes and auditory output with reliable millisecond resolution. It uses standard MIDI devices for input and output and is particularly flexible in the area of auditory feedback manipulation. FTAP can run a wide variety of experiments, including synchronization/continuation tasks (Wing & Kristofferson, 1973), synchronization tasks combined with delayed auditory feedback (Aschersleben & Prinz, 1997), continuation tasks with isolated feedback perturbations (Wing, 1977), and complex alterations of feedback in music performance (Finney, 1997). Such experiments have often been implemented with custom hardware and software systems, but with FTAP they can be specified by a simple ASCII text parameter file. FTAP is available at no cost in source-code form.

  12. Introduction of a cultural training experience into interdisciplinary health science education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasnett, Bonita; Royal, Patricia D; Ross, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    In the 21st century the U.S. will have an increasingly diverse population, challenging healthcare communities to deliver culturally sensitive services. Healthcare professionals must be culturally competent to address the needs of this changing population. While education can assist health professional students to attain progressively higher levels of cultural competence, delivering this education must rely heavily on field experiences or engagement to help students simultaneously learn and apply culturally sensitive skills. The implementation of a cultural sensitivity training experience in an interdisciplinary curriculum and the use of the Purnell Model for Cultural Competence are discussed in the assessment of the case study write-up for cultural sensitivity and awareness. Overall, students gained a greater understanding of patient's cultural background and a willingness to incorporate cultural issues into their health assessments as a result of the cultural experience.

  13. Providing Authentic Research Experiences for Pre-Service Teachers through UNH's Transforming Earth System Science Education (TESSE) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varner, R. K.; Furman, T.; Porter, W.; Darwish, A.; Graham, K.; Bryce, J.; Brown, D.; Finkel, L.; Froburg, E.; Guertin, L.; Hale, S. R.; Johnson, J.; von Damm, K.

    2007-12-01

    The University of New Hampshire's Transforming Earth System Science Education (UNH TESSE) project is designed to enrich the education and professional development of in-service and pre-service teachers, who teach or will teach Earth science curricula. As part of this program, pre-service teachers participated in an eight- week summer Research Immersion Experience (RIE). The main goal of the RIE is to provide authentic research experiences in Earth system science for teachers early in their careers in an effort to increase future teachers` comfort and confidence in bringing research endeavors to their students. Moreover, authentic research experiences for teachers will complement teachers` efforts to enhance inquiry-based instruction in their own classrooms. Eighteen pre-service teachers associated with our four participating institutions - Dillard University (4), Elizabeth City State University (4), Pennsylvania State University (5), and University of New Hampshire (UNH) (5) participated in the research immersion experience. Pre-service teachers were matched with a faculty mentor who advised their independent research activities. Each pre-service teacher was expected to collect and analyze his or her own data to address their research question. Some example topics researched by participants included: processes governing barrier island formation, comparison of formation and track of hurricanes Hugo and Katrina, environmental consequences of Katrina, numerical models of meander formation, climatic impacts on the growth of wetland plants, and the visual estimation of hydrothermal vent properties. Participants culminated their research experience with a public presentation to an audience of scientists and inservice teachers.

  14. The Experiences of South-Western Taiwanese Male Adolescents Controlling Their Smoking After Exposure to an Education Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rei-Mei Hong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco use is the most preventable cause of chronic diseases and cancers worldwide. In south-western Taiwan, tobacco use has become one of the top risk behaviors. Smoking in young people has been associated with alcohol addiction and drug abuse in later life; and most smokers start young. Initiation of cigarette smoking at an early age leads to more life-years of tobacco use, makes quitting harder, and increases the risk for serious health consequences. How adolescent boys effectively control their tobacco use is still uncertain. The article explores on the experience of 12 adolescent boys in south-western Taiwan controlling tobacco use as a result of participating in a smoking prevention education program. In addition to the use of interviews and focus groups as the traditional method of data gathering, the lead author also included the use of participants’ paintings as representations of the participants’ lived experience of the phenomenon. The findings of the study suggest that adolescent boys with smoking experience in Taiwan had the desire to control their smoking behavior after obtaining information through a local education program. In addition, they chose suitable methods for controlling their smoking based on the information that had been provided.

  15. Exploring science and mathematics teaching experiences in Thailand using reflective journals of an internship program between Vietnamese and Thai students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruekpramool, Chaninan; Kanyaprasith, Kamonwan; Phonphok, Nason; Diem, Huynh Thi Thuy

    2018-01-01

    An internship program between Vietnamese student teachers from Cantho University and Thai graduate students from Srinakharinwirot University has occurred in June 2016. There were six Vietnamese student teachers and four Thai graduate students participated in this program with the help of science teachers from two schools in Sa Kaeo and Chachoengsao Provinces of Thailand. To explore Vietnamese and Thai students' life experiences and their perceptions in science and Mathematics teaching, reflective journals were used to record their progress as team teaching in primary and lower secondary classrooms in the form of the online format via social media in English language. The data were collected from 54 reflective journals from their eight days experiences at the schools. The data were analyzed qualitatively using Van Manen's level of reflectivity which composed of three levels; 1) Technical Rationality (TR), 2) Practical Action (PA) and 3) Critical Reflection (CR). The results explicitly revealed that the three levels of reflectivity have appeared in the reflective journals. Besides, Vietnamese and Thai students have learned more from each other and can exchange their educational experiences and culture. Certainly, this was the first time for them to teach science and mathematics in English to Thai students. Moreover, they have shared their impressions toward schools, teachers and also students in the schools in their reflective journal as well.

  16. Using Informal Articles in Extensive Reading (ER Program: A Personal Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chothibul Umam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this digital age, informal articles which contain some valuable informations and extensive input to develop the learners’ language proficiency are easily found on internet or other reading sources. Unfortunately most literature shows that informal articles are not widely used in extensive reading (henceforth ER program. For this reason, the paper introduces steps procedure in using informal articles as authentic material in one semester ER program for Indonesian EFL college learners. The procedure is developed on the basis of my great interest in creating innovative way in teaching ER at one of the State Institute for Islamic Studies in Indonesia. The proposed steps are expected to be an alternative pathway in teaching ER for English teachers particularly at a college-university level. Keywords: Extensive Reading, informal article.Copyright © 2015 by Al-Ta'lim All right reserved

  17. SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION FOR A PEACE CULTURE AN EXPERIENCE FROM ONDAS-COLCIENCIAS PROGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Pérez-Viramontes

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A central element in contemporary societies is the scientific and technological development that has as one of its aims to contribute to the welfare and satisfaction of their needs. Considering that this is also one of the objectives pursued when talking of Culture of Peace, in this essay attempts to outline a possible relationship between the two fields of action, emphasizing the importance of participation of people in the process knowledge and relevance to assume a communication paradigm for building peace. Some of these relationships are present in the Waves-Colciencias Program through which Colombia will seek to educate children and young people in this technical-scientific spirit through active and critical participation in the Program.

  18. Faculty role modeling of professional writing: one baccalaureate nursing program's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Sarah E

    2008-01-01

    According to The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice (American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 1998), professional writing is an important outcome of baccalaureate nursing education. Most baccalaureate nursing programs in the United States expect formally written student papers to adhere to the style requirements outlined in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA, 2001). It is essential for the baccalaureate nursing faculty members who evaluate student papers to be role models for the desired writing behaviors to facilitate student attainment of professional writing outcomes. However, to what extent nursing faculty members' writing behaviors and knowledge of the APA style requirements impact student writing outcomes is not known because the issue has not been addressed in the literature. The purpose of this article is to describe one Midwestern baccalaureate nursing program's faculty development efforts to assess faculty familiarity with the APA style requirements and how such knowledge may impact baccalaureate nursing students' writing outcomes.

  19. Utility of a dedicated pediatric cardiac anticoagulation program: the Boston Children's Hospital experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Jenna M; Hellinger, Amy; Dionne, Roger; Brown, Loren; Galvin, Rosemary; Griggs, Suzanne; Mittler, Karen; Harney, Kathy; Manzi, Shannon; VanderPluym, Christina; Baker, Annette; O'Brien, Patricia; O'Connell, Cheryl; Almond, Christopher S

    2015-04-01

    Congenital heart disease is the leading cause of stroke in children. Warfarin therapy can be difficult to manage safely in this population because of its narrow therapeutic index, multiple drug and dietary interactions, small patient size, high-risk cardiac indications, and lack of data to support anticoagulation recommendations. We sought to describe our institution's effort to develop a dedicated cardiac anticoagulation service to address the special needs of this population and to review the literature. In 2009, in response to Joint Commission National Patient Safety Goals for Anticoagulation, Boston Children's Hospital created a dedicated pediatric Cardiac Anticoagulation Monitoring Program (CAMP). The primary purpose was to provide centralized management of outpatient anticoagulation to cardiac patients, to serve as a disease-specific resource to families and providers, and to devise strategies to evolve clinical care with rapidly emerging trends in anticoagulation care. Over 5 years the CAMP Service, staffed by a primary pediatric cardiology attending, a full-time nurse practitioner, and administrative assistant with dedicated support from pharmacy and nutrition, has enrolled over 240 patients ranging in age from 5 months to 55 years. The most common indications include a prosthetic valve (34 %), Fontan prophylaxis (20 %), atrial arrhythmias (11 %), cardiomyopathy (10 %), Kawasaki disease (7 %), and a ventricular assist device (2 %). A patient-centered multi-disciplinary cardiac anticoagulation clinic was created in 2012. Overall program international normalized ratio (INR) time in therapeutic range (TTR) is favorable at 67 % (81 % with a 0.2 margin) and has improved steadily over 5 years. Pediatric-specific guidelines for VKOR1 and CYP2C9 pharmacogenomics testing, procedural bridging with enoxaparin, novel anticoagulant use, and quality metrics have been developed. Program satisfaction is rated highly among families and providers. A dedicated pediatric

  20. Literacy Experiences and Disciplinary Socialization of Second Language Students in an M.A. TESOL Program

    OpenAIRE

    Tseng, Chi-Chih

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation uncovered how a group of second language (L2) students, including international and immigrant students, became socialized into American academic discourse through the writing that they did as graduate students in the context of their academic field. In particular, this study focused on Mandarin Chinese-speaking graduate students studying in an M.A. program of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) at a major U.S. university located in the Bay Area of Northe...

  1. Teaching, Learning and Technology for Concurrent-Use Programs: The Partnership Library Experience in Central Florida

    OpenAIRE

    Mem Stahley

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to share the local context and strategies implemented at community college- university locations to address educational needs in partnering area campus locations. Working strategies include providing quality faculty and accredited programs of study fully supported with local library resources and full-text access for lower and upper division research. The discussion begins with a review of the legislative and higher education initiatives that advanced joint and co...

  2. Experiences in Developing an Experimental Robotics Course Program for Undergraduate Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Seul

    2013-01-01

    An interdisciplinary undergraduate-level robotics course offers students the chance to integrate their engineering knowledge learned throughout their college years by building a robotic system. Robotics is thus a core course in system and control-related engineering education. This paper summarizes the experience of developing robotics courses…

  3. Too Smart to Fail: Perceptions of Asian American Students' Experiences in a Collegiate Honors Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henfield, Malik S.; Woo, Hongryun; Lin, Yi-Chun; Rausch, Meredith A.

    2014-01-01

    There is a considerable history of misunderstandings associated with Asian American in education. Although many educators and scholars have begun to pay more attention to unique issues associated with this population, studies exploring these students' experiences as honors students in collegiate contexts are scant in the educational literature.…

  4. Experiments at the Frontiers of Nuclear Physics: the Experimental Program of the Super-Frs Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheidenberger, C.; Äystö, J.; Behr, K.-H.; Benlliure, J.; Bracco, A.; Egelhof, P.; Fomichev, A.; Galès, S.; Geissel, H.; Grahn, T.; Grigorenko, L.; Harakeh, M. N.; Hayano, R.; Heinz, S.; Itahashi, K.; Jokinen, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kanungo, R.; Lenske, H.; Muenzenberg, G.; Mukha, I.; Nociforo, C.; Ong, H. J.; Pfützner, M.; Prochazka, A.; Pietri, S.; Plaß, W. R.; Purushothaman, S.; Saito, T.; Simon, H.; Tanihata, I.; Terashima, S.; Toki, H.; Trache, L.; Weick, H.; Winfield, J. S.; Winkler, M.; Zamfir, V.

    2015-06-01

    The superconducting fragment separator (Super-FRS) will be one of the main scientific instruments of the future FAIR facility. This versatile high-resolution spectrometer allows for a variety of exciting experiments in atomic, nuclear and hadron physics. Future directions are presented in this contribution.

  5. Learning from Experience, Volume 4: Lessons from Australia’s Collins Submarine Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    the periscopes, unreliable communication masts, and a poor propeller shaft seal . All these problems accumulated, and the schedule delays continued...well as the Leopard - and Salisbury-class frigates, were fitted with the ASR1. Thus, the RAN had plenty of experience to lean on with the Oberon

  6. The influence of wilderness restoration programs on visitor experience and visitor opinions of managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph P. Flood; Leo H. McAvoy

    2000-01-01

    Wilderness campsites heavily damaged by recreational use pose a significant management challenge that threatens the integrity of the wilderness resource and the quality of the visitors’ experience. This study, conducted in the Mission Mountains Wilderness of northwestern Montana, surveyed 293 visitors to determine what influence heavily damaged campsites and site...

  7. International Encounters: Experiences of Visitors and Hosts in a Cross-Cultural Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranz, Rebecca; Nuttman-Shwartz, Orit; Thachil, Githa

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to gain further insights into how visiting international social work students and their hosts from different cultures learn about each others' social services, culture, and personal values. Six Israeli students and 8 Indian students have written narratives and reflections on their experiences in the international encounter…

  8. Experiences of International Female Students in U.S. Graduate Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras-Aguirre, Hilda Cecilia; Gonzalez Y Gonzalez, Elsa

    2017-01-01

    International students enrolled in American institutions of higher education have been increasing during the past decades. The current study addresses the experiences of international female graduate students in the United States, in terms of difficulties as students at a southern American university and temporal residents of the United States.…

  9. Students' Lived Experiences with the Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) Program in Middle School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to report the lived experiences of seventh and eighth grade students experiencing Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) in middle school. Although there is increasing popularity in the use of the PBIS system in schools throughout the country, there is little known about students' perceptions of the…

  10. Satisfaction of Middle School Lunch Program Participants and Non-Participants with the School Lunch Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stephanie; Cunningham-Sabo, Leslie; Auld, Garry

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine middle school students' satisfaction with the school lunch experience, using two validated surveys; the Middle/Junior High School Student Participation Survey and the Middle/Junior High School Student Non-Participation Survey, both developed by the National Food Service Management…

  11. Embedding International Experiences in Business Curriculum Design: Cultivating a Study Abroad Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babb, Jeffry; Womble, Lynsee A.; De'Armond, De'Arno

    2013-01-01

    In business education, the impacts of the globalization of markets, financial institutions, and economies exert increasing influence on the curriculum in business schools. Schools of business recognize the need to embed international experiences into their curriculum in order to prepare students for global context of the marketplace. Often,…

  12. Measurement of quality of life and participant experience with the mindfulness-based stress reduction program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flugel Colle, Kathleen F; Vincent, Ann; Cha, Stephen S; Loehrer, Laura L; Bauer, Brent A; Wahner-Roedler, Dietlind L

    2010-02-01

    Clinical studies of MBSR have reported efficacy in treating pain, mood disorders, arthritis, sleep disturbances, and stress. Several academic medical institutions in the United States offer MBSR to their patients, but it has never been offered at Mayo Clinic. The objective of this study was to collect quality-of-life data from subjects who participated in the first MBSR program offered at Mayo Clinic. The class was taught as a collaborative effort with the University of Minnesota that had an established MBSR program. Sixteen participants completed a validated, 12-question, linear analogue self-assessment instrument, administered at the beginning and end of the program. Comparison of assessment scores using paired t-tests showed statistically significant improvement in overall quality of life (P=0.04), mental well-being (P=0.005), physical well-being (Pactivity (P=.02), and spiritual well-being (P=0.006). Although positive changes also were observed for frequency of pain, severity of pain, level of fatigue, level of support from friends and family, and financial and legal concerns, they were not statistically significant. A short intervention in the education of mindfulness significantly improved quality of life for participants. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Using process evaluation for program improvement in dose, fidelity and reach: the ACT trial experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitzman-Ulrich Heather

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to demonstrate how formative program process evaluation was used to improve dose and fidelity of implementation, as well as reach of the intervention into the target population, in the "Active by Choice Today" (ACT randomized school-based trial from years 1 to 3 of implementation. Methods The intervention integrated constructs from Self-Determination Theory and Social Cognitive Theory to enhance intrinsic motivation and behavioral skills for increasing long-term physical activity (PA behavior in underserved adolescents (low income, minorities. ACT formative process data were examined at the end of each year to provide timely, corrective feedback to keep the intervention "on track". Results Between years 1 and 2 and years 2 and 3, three significant changes were made to attempt to increase dose and fidelity rates in the program delivery and participant attendance (reach. These changes included expanding the staff training, reformatting the intervention manual, and developing a tracking system for contacting parents of students who were not attending the after-school programs regularly. Process outcomes suggest that these efforts resulted in notable improvements in attendance, dose, and fidelity of intervention implementation from years 1 to 2 and 2 to 3 of the ACT trial. Conclusion Process evaluation methods, particularly implementation monitoring, are useful tools to ensure fidelity in intervention trials and for identifying key best practices for intervention delivery.

  14. Using process evaluation for program improvement in dose, fidelity and reach: the ACT trial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Dawn K; Griffin, Sarah; Saunders, Ruth P; Kitzman-Ulrich, Heather; Meyers, Duncan C; Mansard, Leslie

    2009-11-30

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate how formative program process evaluation was used to improve dose and fidelity of implementation, as well as reach of the intervention into the target population, in the "Active by Choice Today" (ACT) randomized school-based trial from years 1 to 3 of implementation. The intervention integrated constructs from Self-Determination Theory and Social Cognitive Theory to enhance intrinsic motivation and behavioral skills for increasing long-term physical activity (PA) behavior in underserved adolescents (low income, minorities). ACT formative process data were examined at the end of each year to provide timely, corrective feedback to keep the intervention "on track". Between years 1 and 2 and years 2 and 3, three significant changes were made to attempt to increase dose and fidelity rates in the program delivery and participant attendance (reach). These changes included expanding the staff training, reformatting the intervention manual, and developing a tracking system for contacting parents of students who were not attending the after-school programs regularly. Process outcomes suggest that these efforts resulted in notable improvements in attendance, dose, and fidelity of intervention implementation from years 1 to 2 and 2 to 3 of the ACT trial. Process evaluation methods, particularly implementation monitoring, are useful tools to ensure fidelity in intervention trials and for identifying key best practices for intervention delivery.

  15. Enhancing Price Response Programs through Auto-DR: California's 2007 Implementation Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiliccote, Sila; Wikler, Greg; Chiu, Albert; Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila; Hennage, Dan; Thomas, Chuck

    2007-12-18

    This paper describes automated demand response (Auto-DR) activities, an innovative effort in California to ensure that DR programs produce effective and sustainable impacts. Through the application of automation and communication technologies coupled with well-designed incentives and DR programs such as Critical Peak Pricing (CPP) and Demand Bidding (DBP), Auto-DR is opening up the opportunity for many different types of buildings to effectively participate in DR programs. We present the results of Auto-DR implementation efforts by the three California investor-owned utilities for the Summer of 2007. The presentation emphasizes Pacific Gas and Electric Company's (PG&E) Auto-DR efforts, which represents the largest in the state. PG&E's goal was to recruit, install, test and operate 15 megawatts of Auto-DR system capability. We describe the unique delivery approaches, including optimizing the utility incentive structures designed to foster an Auto-DR service provider community. We also show how PG&E's Critical Peak Pricing (CPP) and Demand Bidding (DBP) options were called and executed under the automation platform. Finally, we show the results of the Auto-DR systems installed and operational during 2007, which surpassed PG&E's Auto-DR goals. Auto-DR is being implemented by a multi-disciplinary team including the California Investor Owned Utilities (IOUs), energy consultants, energy management control system vendors, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and the California Energy Commission (CEC).

  16. Parental experiences with a hospital-based bereavement program following the loss of a child to cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrett-Abebe, Julie; Levin-Russman, Elyse; Gioiella, Marie Elena; Adams, Jeffrey M

    2017-06-01

    The death of a child from cancer is an intense and life-changing loss for a parent. Guided by the principles of patient- and family-centered care, hospital-based caregivers developed a program to provide bereavement support for parents through phone calls and mailings. The aim of the present qualitative phenomenological study was to understand how parents experienced participating in this bereavement program. A total of eight parents from six families participated in a focus-group evaluation of the two-year hospital-based bereavement program. Two social work clinicians/researchers independently analyzed the transcript of the focus group to define themes. Four themes were identified: (1) lived experience of grief, (2) importance of relationships with the hospital-based team, (3) bereavement support from hospital-based providers, and (4) extending bereavement care. Participants indicated the value of ongoing communication and connection with members of the healthcare team, who were often central to a family's life for years during their child's cancer treatment. Parents also provided suggestions for extending bereavement support through continued contact with providers and informal annual gatherings, as well as through a peer (parent-to-parent) support program.

  17. Rapid, autonomous analysis of He spectra I: Overview of the RadID program, user experience, and structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gosnell, Thomas B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chavez, Joseph R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rowland, Mark S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wong, James L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-02-26

    RadID is a new gamma-ray spectrum analysis program for rapid screening of HPGe gamma-ray data to reveal the presence of radionuclide signatures. It is an autonomous, rule-based heuristic system that can identify well over 200 radioactive sources with particular interest in uranium and plutonium characteristics. It executes in about one second. RadID does not require knowledge of the detector efficiency, the source-to-detector distance, or the geometry of the inspected radiation source—including any shielding. In this first of a three-document series we sketch the RadID program’s origin, its minimal requirements, the user experience, and the program operation.

  18. Using a wellness program to promote a culture of breastfeeding in the workplace: Oregon Health & Science University's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magner, Antoinette; Phillipi, Carrie Anne

    2015-02-01

    In the United States, many women stop breastfeeding within the first month that they return to work. Working mothers experience challenges in maintaining milk supply and finding the time and space to express breast milk or feed their babies in workplace settings. Changing attitudes and culture within the workplace may be accomplished in conjunction with ensuring compliance with state and federal laws regarding breastfeeding to improve breastfeeding rates after return to work. Employee wellness programs can be 1 avenue to promote breastfeeding and human milk donation as healthy behaviors. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Review of ORNL-TSF shielding experiments for the gas-cooled Fast Breeder Reactor Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, L.S.; Ingersoll, D.T.; Muckenthaler, F.J.; Slater, C.O.

    1982-01-01

    During the period between 1975 and 1980 a series of experiments was performed at the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility in support of the shield design for a 300-MW(e) Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Demonstration Plant. This report reviews the experiments and calculations, which included studies of: (1) neutron streaming in the helium coolant passageways in the GCFR core; (2) the effectiveness of the shield designed to protect the reactor grid plate from radiation damage; (3) the adequacy of the radial shield in protecting the PCRV (prestressed concrete reactor vessel) from radiation damage; (4) neutron streaming between abutting sections of the radial shield; and (5) the effectiveness of the exit shield in reducing the neutron fluxes in the upper plenum region of the reactor.

  20. Learning from Experience, Volume 3: Lessons from the United Kingdom’s Astute Submarine Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear Installations Inspectorate NSRP nuclear steam-raising plant PNO Principal Naval Overseer RCNC Royal Corps of Naval Constructors SEPP Submarine...experience. The Royal Corps of Naval Constructors (RCNC)8 and the engineering officers of the Royal Navy supplemented the technical resources at the MOD...shipyard’s Dockside Test Organisation composed of members from the shipyard, the ship crew, and the MOD. They pre- pared the test agenda and acceptance

  1. A cost-reducing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) program model: a single institution experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavarocchi, N C; Wallace, S; Hong, E Y; Tropea, A; Byrne, J; Pitcher, H T; Hirose, H

    2015-03-01

    The worldwide demand for ECMO support has grown. Its provision remains limited due to several factors (high cost, complicated technology, lack of expertise) that increase healthcare cost. Our goal was to assess if an intensive care unit (ICU)-run ECMO model without continuous bedside perfusionists would decrease costs while maintaining patient safety and outcomes. A new ECMO program was implemented in 2010, consisting of dedicated ICU multidisciplinary providers (ICU-registered nurses, mid-level providers and intensivists). In year one, we introduced an education platform, new technology and dedicated space. In year two, continuous bedside monitoring by perfusionists was removed and new management algorithms designating multidisciplinary providers as first responders were established. The patient safety and cost benefit from the removal of the continuous bedside monitoring of the perfusionists of this new ECMO program was retrospectively reviewed and compared. During the study period, 74 patients (28 patients in year 1 and 46 patients in year 2) were placed on ECMO (mean days: 8 ± 5.7). The total annual hospital expenditure for the ECMO program was significantly reduced in the new model ($234,000 in year 2 vs. $600,264 in year 1), showing a 61% decrease in cost. This cost decrease was attributed to a decreased utilization of perfusion services and the introduction of longer lasting and more efficient ECMO technology. We did not find any significant changes in registered nurse ratios or any differences in outcomes related to ICU safety events. We demonstrated that the ICU-run ECMO model managed to lower hospital cost by reducing the cost of continuous bedside perfusion support without a change in outcomes. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. What linear programming contributes: world food programme experience with the "cost of the diet" tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frega, Romeo; Lanfranco, Jose Guerra; De Greve, Sam; Bernardini, Sara; Geniez, Perrine; Grede, Nils; Bloem, Martin; de Pee, Saskia

    2012-09-01

    Linear programming has been used for analyzing children's complementary feeding diets, for optimizing nutrient adequacy of dietary recommendations for a population, and for estimating the economic value of fortified foods. To describe and apply a linear programming tool ("Cost of the Diet") with data from Mozambique to determine what could be cost-effective fortification strategies. Based on locally assessed average household dietary needs, seasonal market prices of available food products, and food composition data, the tool estimates the lowest-cost diet that meets almost all nutrient needs. The results were compared with expenditure data from Mozambique to establish the affordability of this diet by quintiles of the population. Three different applications were illustrated: identifying likely "limiting nutrients," comparing cost effectiveness of different fortification interventions at the household level, and assessing economic access to nutritious foods. The analysis identified iron, vitamin B2, and pantothenic acid as "limiting nutrients." Under the Mozambique conditions, vegetable oil was estimated as a more cost-efficient vehicle for vitamin A fortification than sugar; maize flour may also be an effective vehicle to provide other constraining micronutrients. Multiple micronutrient fortification of maize flour could reduce the cost of the "lowest-cost nutritious diet" by 18%, but even this diet can be afforded by only 20% of the Mozambican population. Within the context of fortification, linear programming can be a useful tool for identifying likely nutrient inadequacies, for comparing fortification options in terms of cost effectiveness, and for illustrating the potential benefit of fortification for improving household access to a nutritious diet.

  3. Eliciting older people's preferences for exercise programs: a best-worst scaling choice experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Marcia R; Howard, Kirsten; Sherrington, Catherine; Ferreira, Paulo H; Rose, John; Gomes, Juliana L; Ferreira, Manuela L

    2015-01-01

    What relative value do older people with a previous fall or mobility-related disability attach to different attributes of exercise? Prospective, best-worst scaling study. Two hundred and twenty community-dwelling people, aged 60 years or older, who presented with a previous fall or mobility-related disability. Online or face-to-face questionnaire. Utility values for different exercise attributes and levels. The utility levels were calculated by asking participants to select the attribute that they considered to be the best (ie, they were most likely to want to participate in programs with this attribute) and worst (ie, least likely to want to participate). The attributes included were: exercise type; time spent on exercise per day; frequency; transport type; travel time; out-of-pocket costs; reduction in the chance of falling; and improvement in the ability to undertake tasks inside and outside of home. The attributes of exercise programs with the highest utility values were: home-based exercise and no need to use transport, followed by an improvement of 60% in the ability to do daily tasks at home, no costs, and decreasing the chances of falling to 0%. The attributes with the lowest utility were travel time of 30 minutes or more and out-of-pocket costs of AUD50 per session. The type of exercise, travel time and costs are more highly valued by older people than the health benefits. These findings suggest that physical activity engagement strategies need to go beyond education about health benefits and focus on improving accessibility to exercise programs. Exercise that can be undertaken at or close to home without any cost is most likely to be taken up by older people with past falls and/or mobility-related disability. Copyright © 2014 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Note: A versatile mass spectrometer chamber for molecular beam and temperature programmed desorption experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonks, James P., E-mail: james.tonks@awe.co.uk [Department of Mechanical Engineering Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); AWE Plc, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Galloway, Ewan C., E-mail: ewan.galloway@awe.co.uk; King, Martin O. [AWE Plc, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Kerherve, Gwilherm [VACGEN Ltd, St. Leonards-On-Sea, East Sussex TN38 9NN (United Kingdom); Watts, John F. [Department of Mechanical Engineering Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-15

    A dual purpose mass spectrometer chamber capable of performing molecular beam scattering (MBS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) is detailed. Two simple features of this design allow it to perform these techniques. First, the diameter of entrance aperture to the mass spectrometer can be varied to maximize signal for TPD or to maximize angular resolution for MBS. Second, the mass spectrometer chamber can be radially translated so that it can be positioned close to the sample to maximize signal or far from the sample to maximize angular resolution. The performance of this system is described and compares well with systems designed for only one of these techniques.

  5. Environmental Horticulture Program Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This program guide contains the standard environmental horticulture curriculum for technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum encompasses the minimum competencies required for entry-level workers in the environmental horticulture field. The general information section contains the following: purpose and objectives; program description,…

  6. Kenyan medical student and consultant experiences in a pilot decentralized training program at the University of Nairobi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibore, Minnie W; Daniels, Joseph A; Child, Mara J; Nduati, Ruth; Njiri, Francis J; Kinuthia, Raphael M; O'Malley, Gabrielle; John-Stewart, Grace; Kiarie, James; Farquhar, Carey

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, the University of Nairobi (UoN) has increased the number of enrolled medical students threefold in response to the growing need for more doctors. This has resulted in a congested clinical training environment and limited opportunities for students to practice clinical skills at the tertiary teaching facility. To enhance the clinical experience, the UoN Medical Education Partnership Initiative Program Undertook training of medical students in non-tertiary hospitals around the country under the mentorship of consultant preceptors at these hospitals. This study focused on the evaluation of the pilot decentralized training rotation. The decentralized training program was piloted in October 2011 with 29 fourth-year medical students at four public hospitals for a 7-week rotation. We evaluated student and consultant experiences using a series of focus group discussions. A three-person team developed the codes for the focus groups and then individually and anonymously coded the transcripts. The team's findings were triangulated to confirm major themes. Before the rotation, the students expressed the motivation to gain more clinical experience as they felt they lacked adequate opportunity to exercise clinical skills at the tertiary referral hospital. By the end of the rotation, the students felt they had been actively involved in patient care, had gained clinical skills and had learned to navigate socio-cultural challenges in patient care. They further expressed their wish to return to those hospitals for future practice. The consultants expressed their motivation to teach and mentor students and acknowledged that the academic interaction had positively impacted on patient care. The decentralized training enhanced students' learning by providing opportunities for clinical and community experiences and has demonstrated how practicing medical consultants can be engaged as preceptors in students learning. This training may also increase students' ability

  7. Kenyan medical student and consultant experiences in a pilot decentralised training program at the University of Nairobi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibore, Minnie W.; Daniels, Joseph A.; Child, Mara J.; Nduati, Ruth; Njiri, Francis J.; Kinuthia, Raphael; O'Malley, Gabrielle; John-Stewart, Grace; Kiarie, James; Farquhar, Carey

    2015-01-01

    Background Over the past decade, the University of Nairobi (UoN) has increased the number of enrolled medical students three-fold in response to the growing need for more doctors. This has resulted in a congested clinical training environment and limited opportunities for students to practice clinical skills at the tertiary teaching facility. To enhance the clinical experience, the UoN Medical Education Partnership Initiative Program undertook to train medical students in non-tertiary hospitals around the country under the mentorship of consultant preceptors at these hospitals. This study focused on the evaluation of the pilot decentralised training rotation. Methods The decentralised training program was piloted in October 2011 with 29 fourth-year medical students at four public hospitals for a seven-week rotation. We evaluated student and consultant experiences using a series of focus group discussions. A three-person team developed the codes for the focus groups and then individually and anonymously coded the transcripts. The teams’ findings were triangulated to confirm major themes. Results Before the rotation, the students expressed the motivation to gain more clinical experience as they felt they lacked adequate opportunity to exercise clinical skills at the tertiary referral hospital. By the end of the rotation, the students felt they had been actively involved in patient care, had gained clinical skills and had learned to navigate socio-cultural challenges in patient care. They further expressed the wish to return to those hospitals for future practice. The consultants expressed their motivation to teach and mentor students and acknowledged that the academic interaction had positively impacted on patient care. Discussion The decentralised training enhanced students’ learning by providing opportunities for clinical and community experiences and has demonstrated how practicing medical consultants can be engaged as preceptors in students learning. This

  8. Commercial Instrumentation Technology Associates Inc. Biomedical Experiments Payload (CIBX-2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis; Edmundson, Allen; Robinson, Keith (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Experiments to find solutions for a range of biomedical issues are being hosted by the Commercial Instrumentation Technology Associates Inc. (ITA) Biomedical Experiments (CIBX-2) payload. This research encompasses more than 20 separate experiments including cancer research, commercial experiments and hands-on student experiments from 10 schools as part of ITA's ongoing University Among the Stars program. Protein crystal growth experiments will address the structure of urokinase - a protein that has been identified as a key enzyme in the spread of brain, lung, colon, prostate and breast cancers. Crystals of Bence Jones, a protein associated with bone cancer, will also be grown. Understanding their structures may help scientists develop treatments. In a related area, the Microencapsulation of Drugs (MEPS) is an anti-cancer drug delivery system, based on a 10-year partnership with NASA's Johnson Space Center. On this mission, the co-encapsulation of antibodies and immune stimulants will be made in submicron microcapsules to target pulmonary and bacterial infections.

  9. Changes in Families' Caregiving Experiences through Involvement as Participants then Facilitators in a Family Peer-Education Program for Mental Disorders in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageyama, Masako; Yokoyama, Keiko; Nakamura, Yukako; Kobayashi, Sayaka

    2017-06-01

    A family peer-education program for mental disorders was developed in Japan, similar to existing programs in the United States and Hong Kong. Families that serve as facilitators in such programs may enhance their caregiving processes and, thereby, their well-being. This study's aim was to describe how families' caregiving experiences change, beginning with the onset of a family member's mental illness, through their involvement in a family group or peer-education program as participants then facilitators. Thus, this study was conducted in a family peer-education program for mental disorders in Japan. Group interviews were conducted with 27 facilitators from seven program sites about their experiences before, during, and after becoming facilitators. Interview data were coded and categorized into five stages of caregiving processes: (1) withdrawing and suppressing negative experiences with difficulty and regret; (2) finding comfort through being listened to about negative experiences; (3) supporting participants' sharing as facilitators; (4) understanding and affirming oneself through repeated sharing of experiences; and (5) finding value and social roles in one's experiences. The third, fourth, and fifth stages were experienced by the facilitators. The value that the facilitators placed on their caregiving experiences changed from negative to positive, which participants regarded as helpful and supportive. We conclude that serving as facilitators may improve families' caregiving processes. © 2015 Family Process Institute.

  10. Science teacher's perception about science learning experiences as a foundation for teacher training program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapilouw, Marisa Christina; Firman, Harry; Redjeki, Sri; Chandra, Didi Teguh

    2017-05-01

    Teacher training is one form of continuous professional development. Before organizing teacher training (material, time frame), a survey about teacher's need has to be done. Science teacher's perception about science learning in the classroom, the most difficult learning model, difficulties of lesson plan would be a good input for teacher training program. This survey conducted in June 2016. About 23 science teacher filled in the questionnaire. The core of questions are training participation, the most difficult science subject matter, the most difficult learning model, the difficulties of making lesson plan, knowledge of integrated science and problem based learning. Mostly, experienced teacher participated training once a year. Science training is very important to enhance professional competency and to improve the way of teaching. The difficulties of subject matter depend on teacher's education background. The physics subject matter in class VIII and IX are difficult to teach for most respondent because of many formulas and abstract. Respondents found difficulties in making lesson plan, in term of choosing the right learning model for some subject matter. Based on the result, inquiry, cooperative, practice are frequently used in science class. Integrated science is understood as a mix between Biology, Physics and Chemistry concepts. On the other hand, respondents argue that problem based learning was difficult especially in finding contextual problem. All the questionnaire result can be used as an input for teacher training program in order to enhanced teacher's competency. Difficult concepts, integrated science, teaching plan, problem based learning can be shared in teacher training.

  11. Analysis of Core Physics Experiments on Irradiated BWR MOX Fuel in REBUS Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Toru; Ando, Yoshihira [Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization, Safety Standard Division, Tokyo (Japan); Hayashi, Yamato [Toshiba Corporation, Power System Company, Yokohama (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    As part of analyses of experimental data of a critical core containing a irradiated BWR MOX test bundle in the REBUS program, depletion calculations was performed for the BWR MOX fuel assemblies from that the MOX test rods were selected by using a general purpose neutronics code system SRAC. The core analyses were carried out using SRAC and a continuous energy Monte Carlo code MVP. The calculated k{sub eff}s were compared with those of the core containing a fresh MOX fuel bundle in the program. The SRAC-diffusion calculation underestimates k{sub eff}s of the both cores by 1.0 to 1.3 %dk and the k{sub eff}s of MVP are 1.001. The difference in k{sub eff} between the irradiated BWR MOX test bundle core and the fresh MOX one is 0.4 %dk in the SRAC-diffusion calculation and 0.0 %dk in the MVP calculation. The calculated fission rate distributions are in good agreement with the measurement in the SRAC-diffusion and MVP calculations. The calculated neutron flux distributions are also in good agreement with the measurement. The calculated burnup reactivity in the both calculations well reproduce the measurements. (authors)

  12. Ten years' experience with an external quality control program for semen analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallidis, Con; Cooper, Trevor G; Hellenkemper, Barbara; Lablans, Martin; Uckert, Frank; Nieschlag, Eberhard

    2012-09-01

    To gauge the performance of laboratories and impact of the German semen analysis external quality control program (QuaDeGA) over its first 10 years. Retrospective analysis of QuaDeGA's twice yearly distribution of fixed semen samples and electronic material documenting sperm motility. Ranking of each participant's responses was determined according to their relation to a "target window." Multicenter. PAITENT(S): Healthy donors. None. Laboratory performance, World Health Organization (WHO) adherence. Over 19 runs, there was a steady increase of participants (280 laboratories), the largest group being private urologic practices. Although use of WHO-recommended Neubauer chamber (from 33% to 55%) and diluent (from 11% to 32%) increased, the opposite occurred with morphology staining protocols (from 41% to 19%). Overall, <8% of laboratories truly followed WHO guidelines. Median-based comparisons, replacing reference laboratories, resulted in a merging of performance rankings regardless of the protocols used. Adherence to WHO recommendations is low, with the majority of laboratories using methods expressly opposed by the guidelines. Participation in QuaDeGA was found to improve the performance of the laboratories involved in the program. However, the use of median-based ranking, while decreasing the extent of variance between laboratories, brings into question the significance of the rankings. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Negotiating and Designing Public Space. Experiences with a new M.Sc. in Urban Design Program in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik Tieben

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This contribution reflects on first experiences made with a newly launched Master of Science in Urban Design program at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. As an important part of this program, students have to develop their design proposal in response to feedback of different stakeholders and community members. Thus the program responds to the growing aspiration of Hong Kong’s citizens to shape the urban development of their city and a lack of a meaningful participation process in the region. With its high density, protected country parks, efficient public transport and large scale housing program, generally, Hong Kong offers important lessons for contemporary urbanism. However, since the end of the British colonial rule and in face of increasing property prices, pollution and the disappearance of local heritage, intensive debates started about the regions future. Another central point of the recent discussion in Hong Kong – and key theme of the new urban design program - is the demand for the rights and qualities of public space. The paper presents the set-up of the design studio, which was closely linked to a course on “urban processes”. During the semester, students had to organize community forums and street exhibitions in a specific district, invite stakeholders and residents and discuss with them their ideas. Their projects, then, had to respond on the various feedbacks and integrate them in their design and policy proposals. The text reflects on the student projects and the lessons learned in the process. It addresses general questions such as the challenges in communicating with a diverse community (e.g. language barriers and culturally different ideas of public space. It addresses the question of the intended and unintended effects of a participatory design studio in the community, and possible follow-ups. And it reflects on the general role of design and designers in shaping community spaces.

  14. A Research Experiences for Undergraduates program (REU) Program Designed to Recruit, Engage and Prepare a Diverse Student Population for Careers in Ocean Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkston, B. E.; Garza, C.

    2016-02-01

    The problem of improving diversity within the Ocean Sciences workforce—still underperforming relative to other scientific disciplines—can only be addressed by first recruiting and engaging a more diverse student population into the discipline, then retaining them in the workforce. California State University, Monterey Bay (CSUMB) is home to the Monterey Bay Regional Ocean Science Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program. As an HSI with strong ties to multiple regional community colleges and other Predominantly Undergraduate Institutions (PUIs) in the CSU system, the Monterey Bay REU is uniquely positioned to address the crucial recruitment and engagement of a diverse student body. Eleven sophomore and junior-level undergraduate students are recruited per year from academic institutions where research opportunities in STEM are limited and from groups historically underrepresented in the Ocean Sciences, including women, underrepresented minorities, persons with disabilities, and veterans. During the program, students engage in a 10-week original research project guided by a faculty research mentor in one of four themes: Oceanography, Marine Biology and Ecology, Ocean Engineering, and Marine Geology. In addition to research, students develop scientific self-efficacy and literacy skills through rigorous weekly professional development workshops in which they practice critical thinking, ethical decision-making, peer review, writing and oral communication skills. These workshops include tangible products such as an NSF-style proposal paper, Statement of Purpose and CV modelled for the SACNAS Travel Award Application, research abstract, scientific report and oral presentation. To help retain students in Ocean Sciences, students build community during the REU by living together in the CSUMB dormitories; post-REU, students stay connected through an online facebook group, LinkedIn page and group webinars. To date, the REU has supported 22 students in two

  15. Team-Based Learning: Successful Experience in a Public Health Graduate Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Bezerra da Silva Junior

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background: In the review of curriculum matrices, the elaboration of learning strategies that combine theory and practice is extremely important, allowing the building of new concepts and learning methods by the students. Team-based learning (TBL is growing in academic centers and refers to the pedagogic strategy grounded in constructivism. The aim of this research was to describe the application of TBL in a Public Health graduate program. Methods: TBL was applied in a class with 22 students in the discipline “Quantitative Research in Health” of the Public Health graduate program (Master degree at the University of Fortaleza, Brazil, in 2016. The discipline was structured in 8 lessons, approaching the thematic of quantitative research. Before each class the students were required to study the contents at home, a test was done for each subject in the beginning of each class (individually and then in teams of 5 or 6 students and then a brief review was performed by the professor, where the students could ask questions and solve any doubt. At the end of the semester an evaluation questionnaire was applied with objective questions and a qualitative survey. Results: The application of TBL was done in a class with 22 students of the Public health Master Program, aged 22 to 36 years, and 83.3% were female. The method was well received by the students. All the evaluations and discussions went on without any problem. There were some complaints about the requirement to study at home prior to the classes. Students’ evaluation of the discipline and the TBL method was satisfactory with answers’ average score of 4.7 (scale 0-5. The lowestscore was achieved by the question number 11 (4.3 about the students motivation for their study at home. The comparison with the evaluation of the previous semester (where a traditional method was applied evidenced higher scores for the TBL method. Conclusions: The application of TBL was satisfactory and the

  16. A dynamic programming approach for the alignment of signal peaks in multiple gas chromatography-mass spectrometry experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McConville Malcolm J

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS is a robust platform for the profiling of certain classes of small molecules in biological samples. When multiple samples are profiled, including replicates of the same sample and/or different sample states, one needs to account for retention time drifts between experiments. This can be achieved either by the alignment of chromatographic profiles prior to peak detection, or by matching signal peaks after they have been extracted from chromatogram data matrices. Automated retention time correction is particularly important in non-targeted profiling studies. Results A new approach for matching signal peaks based on dynamic programming is presented. The proposed approach relies on both peak retention times and mass spectra. The alignment of more than two peak lists involves three steps: (1 all possible pairs of peak lists are aligned, and similarity of each pair of peak lists is estimated; (2 the guide tree is built based on the similarity between the peak lists; (3 peak lists are progressively aligned starting with the two most similar peak lists, following the guide tree until all peak lists are exhausted. When two or more experiments are performed on different sample states and each consisting of multiple replicates, peak lists within each set of replicate experiments are aligned first (within-state alignment, and subsequently the resulting alignments are aligned themselves (between-state alignment. When more than two sets of replicate experiments are present, the between-state alignment also employs the guide tree. We demonstrate the usefulness of this approach on GC-MS metabolic profiling experiments acquired on wild-type and mutant Leishmania mexicana parasites. Conclusion We propose a progressive method to match signal peaks across multiple GC-MS experiments based on dynamic programming. A sensitive peak similarity function is proposed to balance peak retention time and peak

  17. Operational experience and maintenance programs of Transamerica Delaval, Inc., diesel generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajan, J.R.

    1994-05-01

    Concerns regarding the reliability of large-bore, medium-speed diesel generators manufactured by Transamerica Delaval, Inc. (TDI) for application at domestic nuclear plants were first prompted by a crankshaft failure at Shoreham Nuclear Power Station in August 1983. A number of diesel generator components were identified which had potential deficiencies from a manufacturing and operational standpoint. In response to these problems, 11 (now 8) U.S. nuclear utility owners formed a TDI Diesel Generator Owners Group (Owners Group) to address operational and regulatory issues relative to diesel generator sets used for standby emergency power. The Owners` Group performed extensive design reviews of all key engine components and developed recommendations to be implemented by the individual owners concerning needed component replacements and modifications, component inspections to validate the {open_quotes}as-manufactured{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}as-assembled{close_quotes} quality of key engine components, engine testing, and an enhanced maintenance and surveillance program.

  18. The experience of living with diabetes following a self-management program based on motivational interviewing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbek Minet, Lisbeth K; Lønvig, Else-Marie; Henriksen, Jan Erik

    2011-01-01

    Self-management is an important part of diabetes treatment, but the promotion of self-care activities is still a challenge. In this study, we explored how living with diabetes in everyday life was experienced following a self-management intervention program based on motivational interviewing. We...... conducted seven focus group interviews, each comprising 3 to 5 participants diagnosed with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Data analysis based on a phenomenological method revealed three main themes concerning diabetes self-management: becoming a self-regulating practitioner, managing the rules of self-management......, and creating a supportive social network. Narrative analysis revealed a divergence in patients' self-perceived competence in handling diabetes. The study findings indicate that people with diabetes have specific needs for support in the daily responsibility of managing diet, exercise, medication, and blood...

  19. Distributed cognition and process management enabling individualized translational research: The NIH Undiagnosed Diseases Program experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda E Links

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The National Institutes of Health Undiagnosed Diseases Program (NIH UDP applies translational research systematically to diagnose patients with undiagnosed diseases. The challenge is to implement an information system enabling scalable translational research. The authors hypothesized that similarly complex problems are resolvable through process management and the distributed cognition of communities. The team therefore built the NIH UDP Integrated Collaboration System (UDPICS to form virtual collaborative multidisciplinary research networks or communities. UDPICS supports these communities through integrated process management, ontology-based phenotyping, biospecimen management, cloud-based genomic analysis, and an electronic laboratory notebook. UDPICS provided a mechanism for efficient, transparent, and scalable translational research and thereby addressed many of the complex and diverse research and logistical problems of the NIH UDP. Full definition of the strengths and deficiencies of UDPICS will require formal qualitative and quantitative usability and process improvement measurement.

  20. The integrated first year experience in the master of public health program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewar, Diane M; Bloom, Michael S; Choi, Hyunok; Gensburg, Lenore; Hosler, Akiko

    2015-03-01

    Schools of Public Health historically introduced core curriculum courses in the first year of the Master of Public Health program as independent perspectives; these perspectives included epidemiology, biostatistics, environmental health, public health biology, health behaviors, and health policy. We performed a pilot project that integrated the core areas around diabetes as a cross-cutting public health issue to provide early exposure to the interdisciplinary nature of public health. In each core curriculum course, diabetes was explored in the curriculum and related to other core courses. Based on positive evaluations, this project will be replicated using a different health issue. Such an issue can be easily introduced as an overarching umbrella under which students are motivated to work through interdisciplinary collaboration.

  1. From Project to Program: Tupange's Experience with Scaling Up Family Planning Interventions in Urban Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyonzo, Nelson; Nyachae, Paul; Kagwe, Peter; Kilonzo, Margaret; Mumba, Feddis; Owino, Kenneth; Kichamu, George; Kigen, Bartilol; Fajans, Peter; Ghiron, Laura; Simmons, Ruth

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes how the Urban Reproductive Health Initiative in Kenya, the Tupange Project (2010-2015), successfully applied the ExpandNet approach to sustainably scale up family planning interventions, first in Machakos and Kakamega, and subsequently also in its three core cities, Nairobi, Kisumu and Mombasa. This new focus meant shifting from a "project" to a "program" approach, which required paying attention to government leadership and ownership, limiting external inputs, institutionalizing interventions in existing structures and emphasizing sustainability. The paper also highlights the project's efforts to prepare for the future scale up of Tupange's interventions in other counties to support continuing and improved access to family planning services in the new context of devolution (decentralization) in Kenya. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. When practice precedes theory - A mixed methods evaluation of students' learning experiences in an undergraduate study program in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Kristin; Falk, Hanna; Jakobsson Ung, Eva

    2016-01-01

    A key area for consideration is determining how optimal conditions for learning can be created. Higher education in nursing aims to prepare students to develop their capabilities to become independent professionals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of sequencing clinical practice prior to theoretical studies on student's experiences of self-directed learning readiness and students' approach to learning in the second year of a three-year undergraduate study program in nursing. 123 nursing students was included in the study and divided in two groups. In group A (n = 60) clinical practice preceded theoretical studies. In group (n = 63) theoretical studies preceded clinical practice. Learning readiness was measured using the Directed Learning Readiness Scale for Nursing Education (SDLRSNE), and learning process was measured using the revised two-factor version of the Study Process Questionnaire (R-SPQ-2F). Students were also asked to write down their personal reflections throughout the course. By using a mixed method design, the qualitative component focused on the students' personal experiences in relation to the sequencing of theoretical studies and clinical practice. The quantitative component provided information about learning readiness before and after the intervention. Our findings confirm that students are sensitive and adaptable to their learning contexts, and that the sequencing of courses is subordinate to a pedagogical style enhancing students' deep learning approaches, which needs to be incorporated in the development of undergraduate nursing programs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Outcome after renal transplantation in a "senior" program: the Croatian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basic-Jukic, N; Furic-Cunko, V; Kes, P; Bubic-Filipi, L; Pasini, J; Hudolin, T; Juric, I

    2008-12-01

    The Eurotransplant "senior" program allocates kidneys from elderly donors to patients >65 years old. It aims to increase the number of renal transplantations. Kidneys are allocated locally without human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matching to decrease the cold ischemia time. Croatia has introduced its own "senior" program based on HLA matching. We compared results with those from Eurotransplant. We identified and prospectively followed all patients aged of >or=65 years who underwent a first renal transplantation. We recorded their HLA matching, cold ischemia time, renal function, surgical and medical complications, and duration of hospitalization. Through October 2007, 22 elderly patients received an allograft from donors who were >65 years old. There were 8 female and 14 male patients of mean age at transplantation of 67.4 years. Mean donor age was 66 years. The number of HLA mismatches ranged from 1 to 5, and cold ischemia time from 7 to 15 hours. One-year patient survival was 95.4%, and graft survival was 81.8%. Delayed graft function, defined as the need for dialysis for >7 days after transplantation, occurred in 63.6% of patients. Older recipients required prolonged hospitalization after transplantation (45 days; range, 16-131). Frequent posttransplant complications included posttransplant diabetes mellitus in 1 patient, delayed wound healing in 5 patients, and lymphocoel in 2 patients. Maligancies occurred in 3 patients, neoplasm of the native kidney, posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease, and skin cancer. One patient experienced acute rejection that was successfully treated with steroids. Seventeen patients experienced 20 viral infections. There was only 1 serious infection (pulmonary tuberculosis). The major problems were cardiovascular complications which occurred in 40.9% of patients.

  4. Socio-cognitive habilitation using the math interactive learning experience program for alcohol-affected children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kable, Julie A; Coles, Claire D; Taddeo, Elles

    2007-08-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) has been recognized as a disabling condition with a significant impact on the neurobehavioral functioning of affected individuals, including cognition, behavior, and academic functioning, but little research has been performed on targeted interventions for these children. A socio-cognitive habilitative program focused on improving behavior and math functioning in children 3 to 10 years of age (n=61) was developed and evaluated. The intervention provided parental instruction on FAS, advocacy, and behavioral regulation via workshops and interactive math tutoring with children. All families received parental instruction and were then randomly assigned to either the math instruction or standard psychoeducational care groups. Satisfaction with workshops was very high, with over 90% agreeing that trainers were knowledgeable and materials easy to understand and helpful. Significant gains in knowledge were found for information provided in the instructional groups. At posttesting, caregivers reported fewer problem behaviors on the Achenbach Child Behavior Checklist, Internalizing Problem Behavior, Externalizing Problem Behavior, and Total Problem Behavior summary scales. After 5 months, both groups of children demonstrated gains in math knowledge but significantly higher gains were found in the group receiving direct math instruction. The math treatment group was also more likely to demonstrate a gain of over 1 standard deviation on any of the 4 math outcome measures used. These findings suggest that parents of children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FAS(D)) benefit from instruction in understanding their child's alcohol-related neurological damage and strategies to provide positive behavioral supports and that targeted psychoeducational programs may be able to remediate some of the math deficits associated with prenatal alcohol exposure.

  5. Master's Degree Program in Scientific and Cultural Communication: Preliminary reports on an innovative experience in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Vogt

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The multidisiciplinary Master’s Degree Program in Scientific and Cultural Communication (MDCC began in the first semester of 2007. It is offered by the Laboratory of Advanced Studies in Journalism (Labjor of the Creativity Development Nucleus (NUDECRI and by the Institute of Language Studies (IEL, both of which are entities the State University of Campinas (UNICAMP. The program is also supported by the Department of Scientific and Technological Policy (DPCT of the Geosciences Institute (IG and by MediaTec – Media and Communication Technologies Laboratory of the Multimedia Department (DMM of the Art Institute (IA. The objective of the MDCC is to train and enable researchers with in-depth theoretical knowledge about current questions related to science communication. A global vision of the systems of science and technology are joined together with an understanding of a solid, contemporary literary and cultural repertoire. The interaction among subjects offered in the MDCC seeks to provide an education that allows critical reflection about the main accomplishments of science, technology and culture in our current society and the way in which the mass or specialized media have worked in order to communicate these accomplishments. The areas of research focus on the analysis of cultural production and science communication within the most diverse means of information, such as print, radio, television and electronic media. There is a special emphasis on areas such as science and technical history and the sociology of science, as well as other spaces of science and cultural communication, such as museums, forums and events.

  6. Assessing the Development of Multidisciplinary Care: Experience of the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Eliot L; Chawla, Neetu; Morris, Paul T; Castro, Kathleen M; Carrigan, Angela C; Das, Irene Prabhu; Clauser, Steven B

    2015-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP) began in 2007 with a goal of expanding cancer research and delivering quality care in communities. The NCCCP Quality of Care (QoC) Subcommittee was charged with developing and improving the quality of multidisciplinary care. An assessment tool with nine key elements relevant to MDC structure and operations was developed. Fourteen NCCCP sites reported multidisciplinary care assessments for lung, breast, and colorectal cancer in June 2010, June 2011, and June 2012 using an online reporting tool. Each site evaluated their level of maturity (level 1 = no multidisciplinary care, level 5 = highly integrated multidisciplinary care) in nine elements integral to multidisciplinary care. Thematic analysis of open-ended qualitative responses was also conducted. The proportion of sites that reported level 3 or greater on the assessment tool was tabulated at each time point. For all tumor types, sites that reached this level increased in six elements: case planning, clinical trials, integration of care coordination, physician engagement, quality improvement, and treatment team integration. Factors that enabled improvement included increasing organizational support, ensuring appropriate physician participation, increasing patient navigation, increasing participation in national quality initiatives, targeting genetics referrals, engaging primary care providers, and integrating clinical trial staff. Maturation of multidisciplinary care reflected focused work of the NCCCP QoC Subcommittee. Working group efforts in patient navigation, genetics, and physician conditions of participation were evident in improved multidisciplinary care performance for three common malignancies. This work provides a blueprint for health systems that wish to incorporate prospective multidisciplinary care into their cancer programs. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  7. The international package for scientific experiments (IPSE) for Mars surveyor program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coradini, A.; Angrilli, F.; Bellucci, G.; Bianchi, R.; Capaccioni, F.; Colangeli, L.; Debei, S.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Di Lellis, A. M.; Espinasse, S.; Federico, C.; Magni, G.; Mahnes, G.; Philippe, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    IPSE is a micro-laboratory for Mars soil and environment analysis. It provides the capability to serve and handle scientific miniaturised instruments accommodated inside its envelope. The instruments have the goal to perform in situ study of the collected martian samples, thus quantitatively characterizing the mineralogy, the composition, the microphysical structure of the materials of the Martian soils down to the depth available to the sampling mechanism. Given the complex structure of the surface material it will be essential to perform in-situ science, both at the surface and at different depths. This is done in order to validate remote sensing observations through specific measurements, identify local characteristics of the selected landing areas, document sample collection both for in situ and sample return. IPSE is an example of a small and flexible lab, that can be integrated on different Landers and Megarovers. IPSE contains: Scientific instruments A small robotic arm - with five degrees of freedom - to provide samples to the IPSE instruments. Power conditioning. Electronics for system and thermal control, communications and instrument data handling. The Phase A report for all the IPSE instruments has been already provided to the Italian Space Agency. The experiments MAGO, IRMA, MA_FLUX are inherited from previous space qualified instruments and breadboards of them already exist. DOSE is a new experiment, however, a breadboard of the detector and of the photomultiplier is under development.

  8. Adoption of a wiki within a large internal medicine residency program: a 3-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crotty, Bradley H; Mostaghimi, Arash; Reynolds, Eileen E

    2012-01-01

    To describe the creation and evaluate the use of a wiki by medical residents, and to determine if a wiki would be a useful tool for improving the experience, efficiency, and education of housestaff. In 2008, a team of medical residents built a wiki containing institutional knowledge and reference information using Microsoft SharePoint. We tracked visit data for 3 years, and performed an audit of page views and updates in the second year. We evaluated the attitudes of medical residents toward the wiki using a survey. Users accessed the wiki 23,218, 35,094, and 40,545 times in each of three successive academic years from 2008 to 2011. In the year two audit, 85 users made a total of 1082 updates to 176 pages and of these, 91 were new page creations by 17 users. Forty-eight percent of residents edited a page. All housestaff felt the wiki improved their ability to complete tasks, and 90%, 89%, and 57% reported that the wiki improved their experience, efficiency, and education, respectively, when surveyed in academic year 2009-2010. A wiki is a useful and popular tool for organizing administrative and educational content for residents. Housestaff felt strongly that the wiki improved their workflow, but a smaller educational impact was observed. Nearly half of the housestaff edited the wiki, suggesting broad buy-in among the residents. A wiki is a feasible and useful tool for improving information retrieval for house officers.

  9. Dentists' experience with low-income patients benefiting from a public insurance program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegon-Machat, E; Tubert-Jeannin, S; Loignon, C; Landry, A; Bedos, C

    2009-08-01

    France has a system of public coverage that guarantees low-income earners full payment of basic dental health costs. In spite of this coverage and major needs for care, deprived populations have lower access to dental care. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore dentists' experience with low-income patients benefiting from the French universal healthcare coverage system. This study is based on 17 one-on-one semistructured interviews carried out with French private dentists. Dentists distinguished two categories of low-income patients: 'good patients', described as being regular attenders; and 'bad patients', whose main characteristic is irregular attendance. Dentists explained that they have difficulties in dealing with patients who do not keep their appointments. First, dentists feel that they fail in conducting their mission of being a care provider (therapeutic failure). The absence of the patient is also seen as a lack of recognition (relationship failure). Furthermore, dentists do not earn money when patients miss their appointments (financial failure). In this context, many dentists feel discouraged and powerless (personal failure). Moreover, dentists do not understand why patients renounce the dental-care opportunities offered under the system of public coverage (failure of the system). Dentists who repeatedly experience failures related to irregular attendance tend to adopt exclusion strategies.

  10. A phenomenographic study of students' experiences with transition from pre-college engineering programs to first-year engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzman, Noah

    Recent national dialogues on the importance of preparing more students for careers in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics has driven the development of formal and informal learning opportunities for children and adolescents to explore engineering. Despite the growth of these programs, relatively little research exists on how participation in these programs affects students who choose to pursue further study in engineering. The present study addressed this gap through an exploration of the different ways that First-Year Engineering students experience the transition from pre-college engineering to undergraduate engineering studies. Given the focus of this research on students' experiences, phenomenography was chosen to explore the phenomenon of transition from pre-college to first-year engineering at a large, public Midwestern university. This facilitated understanding the range of variation in the ways that students experienced this transition. Twenty-two students with different amounts of participation in a variety of different engineering programs were selected to be interviewed using a purposeful maximum variation sampling strategy. The interviews were guided by a semi-structured interview protocol that encouraged the participants to reflect on their pre-college engineering experiences, their experiences in First-Year Engineering, and the transition between the two domains. The interviews were analyzed using phenomenographic methods to develop an outcome space consisting of five qualitatively different but related ways of experiencing the transition from pre-college to First-Year Engineering. These categories of description included Foreclosure, Frustration, Tedium, Connection, and Engaging Others. With the exception of the first category which was characterized by a lack of passion and commitment to engineering, the remaining four categories formed a hierarchical relationship representing increasing integration in First-Year Engineering. The

  11. Internet-based virtual classroom and educational management software enhance students' didactic and clinical experiences in perfusion education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Jeffrey B; Austin, Jon W; Holt, David W; Searles, Bruce E; Darling, Edward M

    2004-09-01

    A challenge faced by many university-based perfusion education (PE) programs is the need for student clinical rotations at hospital locations that are geographically disparate from the main educational campus. The problem has been addressed through the employment of distance-learning environments. The purpose of this educational study is to evaluate the effectiveness of this teaching model as it is applied to PE. Web-based virtual classroom (VC) environments and educational management system (EMS) software were implemented independently and as adjuncts to live, interactive Internet-based audio/video transmission from classroom to classroom in multiple university-based PE programs. These Internet environments have been used in a variety of ways including: 1) forum for communication between the university faculty, students, and preceptors at clinical sites, 2) didactic lectures from expert clinicians to students assigned to distant clinical sites, 3) small group problem-based-learning modules designed to enhance students analytical skills, and 4) conversion of traditional face-to-face lectures to asynchronous learning modules. Hypotheses and measures of student and faculty satisfaction, clinical experience, and learning outcomes are proposed, and some early student feedback was collected. For curricula that emphasize both didactic and clinical education, the use of Internet-based VC and EMS software provides significant advancements over traditional models. Recognized advantages include: 1) improved communications between the college faculty and the students and clinical preceptors, 2) enhanced access to a national network of clinical experts in specialized techniques, 3) expanded opportunity for student distant clinical rotations with continued didactic course work, and 4) improved continuity and consistency of clinical experiences between students through implementation of asynchronous learning modules. Students recognize the learning efficiency of on

  12. Curriculum development for an advanced regional anesthesia education program: one institution's experience from apprenticeship to comprehensive teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouanes, Jean-Pierre P; Schwengel, Deborah; Mathur, Vineesh; Ahmed, Omar I; Hanna, Marie N

    2014-02-01

    Results of recent attitude survey studies suggest that most practicing physicians are inadequately treating postoperative pain. Residents in anesthesia are confident in performing lumbar epidural and spinal anesthesia, but many are not confident in performing the blocks with which they have the least exposure. Changes need to be made in the training processes to a comprehensive model that prepares residents to perform a wider array of blocks in postgraduate practice. Here, we describe one institution's approach to creating a standardized, advanced regional anesthesia curriculum for residents that follows the six core competencies of the ACGME. Residents received training in anatomy dissection, ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia, traditional nerve stimulation techniques, problem-based learning and simulation sessions, oral board presentation sessions, and journal club sessions. Residents kept a detailed log for their use of peripheral nerve block procedures. We have now redesigned and implemented an advanced regional anesthesia program within our institution to provide residents with experience in regional anesthesia at a competent level. Resident's knowledge in regional anesthesia did improve after the first year of implementation as reflected in improvements between the pre- and post-tests. As the advanced regional anesthesia education program continues to improve, we hope to demonstrate levels of validity, reliability, and usability by other programs.

  13. Women veterans' experience with a web-based diabetes prevention program: a qualitative study to inform future practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moin, Tannaz; Ertl, Kristyn; Schneider, Jessica; Vasti, Elena; Makki, Fatima; Richardson, Caroline; Havens, Kathryn; Damschroder, Laura

    2015-05-25

    Diabetes prevention is a national goal and particularly important in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) where 1 in 4 veterans has diabetes. There is growing evidence to support the use of Web-based diabetes prevention program (DPP) interventions, shown to be as effective and often more feasible than in-person interventions. Our primary objective was to qualitatively explore women veterans' early experiences with a Web-based DPP intervention. Our secondary objective was to estimate weight loss, participation, and engagement to provide context for our qualitative findings. We conducted and analyzed semistructured interviews and collected data on weight change, participation, and engagement. A total of 17 women veterans with prediabetes from a Midwest VA Women's Health Clinic were eligible to participate; 15 completed interviews. Participants perceived the DPP program as an appealing way of initiating lifestyle changes and made them feel accountable in achieving their daily goals. The online program was convenient because it could be accessed at any time, and many found that it integrated well into daily life. However, some did not like the logging aspect and some found it to be too impersonal. Participants logged in a mean 76 times, posted a mean 46 group messages, and sent a mean 20.5 private messages to the health coach over 16 weeks. Participants lost 5.24% of baseline weight, and 82% (14/17) of participants completed at least 9 of 16 core modules. Women veterans' early experiences with a Web-based DPP intervention were generally positive. Accountability and convenience were key enabling factors for participation and engagement. A Web-based DPP intervention appears to be a promising means of translating the DPP for women veterans with prediabetes.

  14. News from strong interactions program of the NA61/SHINE experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Grebieszkow, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    The NA61/SHINE experiment aims to discover the critical point of strongly interacting matter and study the properties of the onset of deconfinement. This is performed by a two dimensional phase diagram ($T-\\mu_B$) scan of measurements of particle spectra and fluctuations in proton-proton, proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus interactions as a function of collision energy and system size. In this contribution new NA61/SHINE results on negative pion production, as well as transverse momentum and multiplicity fluctuations in Ar+Sc collisions are presented. Moreover, the latest results on higher order moments of net-charge multiplicity distribution in p+p collisions are also discussed. The Ar+Sc results are compared to NA61 p+p and Be+Be data, as well as to NA49 $A+A$ results.

  15. A new drift chamber TDC readout for the high intensity program of the NA48 experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ramusino, A C; Cartiglia, N; Chiozzi, S; Clemencic, M; Damiani, C; Gianoli, A; Milano, L; Malaguti, R; Petrucci, F; Scarpa, M

    2004-01-01

    A new read-out for the drift chambers (DCH) (8192 channels) of the NA48 experiment at CERN has been developed and realized by the Ferrara and Torino INFN sites and has taken data during the 2002 run. The core of the system is a set of 32 VME-9U Time-to-Digital- Converter boards (NA48-TDC). The NA48-TDCs record the time of arrival of signals from the DCH and store them in 40 MHz pipelined ring memories pending the trigger supervisor's decision. Dual memories and data extraction resources allow independent and simultaneous processing of level-1 and level-2 trigger requests. Time measurements are performed by the TDC-F1 commercial ASICs, having an intrinsic time resolution of 120 ps and multi-hit capabilities. The NA48-TDC board features a maximum sustained rate of 500 kHz per channel.

  16. Experiences with recruitment of marginalized groups in a Danish health promotion program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Marianne; Poulsen, Eva Kanstrup; Rytter, Anne Stoffersen

    2016-01-01

    a document evaluation. The collected documents consisted of 1,500 pages of written material with 12 project descriptions, three midterm and 10 final evaluations. The collected data were analyzed through a qualitative content analysis. RESULTS: The results are based on the fact that only 10 municipalities...... have developed evaluations related to recruitment, and only three evaluations provided a description of which marginalized groups were recruited. Challenges related to recruitment consist of difficulties involving the target group, including general distrust, language barriers and a lack of ability...... to cope with new situations and strangers. Additional geographical challenges emerged, especially in rural areas. Positive experiences with recruitment approaches were mainly related to relationship building and trust building, especially through face-to-face contact and the project employees' presence...

  17. Improving pharmacy practice through public health programs: experience from Global HIV/AIDS initiative Nigeria project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oqua, Dorothy; Agu, Kenneth Anene; Isah, Mohammed Alfa; Onoh, Obialunamma U; Iyaji, Paul G; Wutoh, Anthony K; King, Rosalyn C

    2013-01-01

    The use of medicines is an essential component of many public health programs (PHPs). Medicines are important not only for their capacity to treat and prevent diseases. The public confidence in healthcare system is inevitably linked to their confidence in the availability of safe and effective medicines and the measures for ensuring their rational use. However, pharmacy services component receives little or no attention in most public health programs in developing countries. This article describes the strategies, lessons learnt, and some accomplishments of Howard University Pharmacists and Continuing Education (HU-PACE) Centre towards improving hospital pharmacy practice through PHP in Nigeria. In a cross-sectional survey, 60 hospital pharmacies were randomly selected from 184 GHAIN-supported health facilities. The assessment was conducted at baseline and repeated after at least 12 months post-intervention using a study-specific instrument. Interventions included engagement of stakeholders; provision of standards for infrastructural upgrade; development of curricula and modules for training of pharmacy personnel; provision of job aids and tools amongst others. A follow-up hands-on skill enhancement based on identified gaps was conducted. Chi-square was used for inferential statistics. All reported p-values were 2-tailed at 95% confidence interval. The mean duration of service provision at post-intervention assessment was 24.39 (95% CI, 21.70-27.08) months. About 16.7% of pharmacies reported been trained in HIV care at pre-intervention compared to 83.3% at post-intervention. The proportion of pharmacies with audio-visual privacy for patient counseling increased significantly from 30.9% at pre-intervention to 81.4% at post-intervention. Filled prescriptions were cross-checked by pharmacist (61.9%) and pharmacy technician (23.8%) before dispensing at pre-intervention compared to pharmacist (93.1%) and pharmacy technician (6.9%) at post intervention. 40.0% of

  18. Experiences of Participants in a Self-Management Program for Employees with Complaints of the Arm, Neck or Shoulder (CANS): A Mixed Methods Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hutting, N.; Detaille, S.I.; Heerkens, Y.F.; Engels, J.A.; Staal, J.B.; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, M.W.G.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the experiences of participants of a self-management program for employees with complaints of the arm, neck or shoulder (CANS). The program consisted of six group sessions combined with an eHealth module. Methods Semi-structured interviews with the first 31 consecutive

  19. The Effects of an Anti-Cyberbullying Program on Decreasing the Number of Aggressive Experiences for Students While Using Digital Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corso, Patricia-Ann Schullery

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effect of an anti-bullying program, Cyberbullying: A Prevention Curriculum for Grades 6-12 (Limber, Kowalski & Agatston, 2008). A quasi-experimental post-test design was used to investigate (a) whether or not participation in the program was related to the frequency of aggressive on-line experiences for victims and/or…

  20. Teaching and Learning Technology and New Media in a Community-Based Program: Adult Educators and Older Learners' Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Regina

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative case study documented the experiences of two adult educators and four older learners' teaching and learning technology and new media in a community-based program in Texas. The research questions guiding this study included: (1) What can we learn from looking at the educational efforts of a community-based programs offering…

  1. Seizing the Future: How Ohio's Career-Technical Education Programs Fuse Academic Rigor and Real-World Experiences to Prepare Students for College and Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarino, Heidi; Yoder, Shaun

    2015-01-01

    "Seizing the Future: How Ohio's Career and Technical Education Programs Fuse Academic Rigor and Real-World Experiences to Prepare Students for College and Work," demonstrates Ohio's progress in developing strong policies for career and technical education (CTE) programs to promote rigor, including college- and career-ready graduation…

  2. PyGaze: an open-source, cross-platform toolbox for minimal-effort programming of eye-tracking experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalmaijer, E.S.; Mathôt, S.; van der Stigchel, S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/29880977X

    2014-01-01

    he PyGaze toolbox is an open-source software package for Python, a high-level programming language. It is designed for creating eyetracking experiments in Python syntax with the least possible effort, and it offers programming ease and script readability without constraining functionality and

  3. Bone Loss in Space: Shuttle/MIR Experience and Bed Rest Countermeasure Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shackelford, L. C.; LeBlanc, A.; Feiveson, A.; Oganov, V.

    1999-01-01

    Loss of bone mineral during space flight was documented in the 1970's Skylab missions. The USSR space program made similar observations in the 1980's. The Institute of Biomedical Problems in Moscow and NASA JSC in 1989 began to collect pre- and post-flight bone mineral density (BMD) using Hologic QDR 1000 DEXA scanners transferred from JSC to Moscow and Star City. DEXA whole body, hip, and lumbar spine scans were performed prior to and during the first week after return from 4- to 6-month missions (plus one 8-month mission and one 14- month mission) on the Mir space station. These data documented the extent and regional nature of bone loss during long duration space flight. Of the 18 cosmonauts participating in this study between 1990 and 1995, seven flew two missions. BMD scans prior to the second flight compared to the first mission preflight scans indicated that recovery was possibly delayed or incomplete. Because of these findings, NASA and IBMP initiated the study "Bone Mineral Loss and Recovery After Shuttle/Mir Flights" in 1995 to evaluate bone recovery during a 3-year post-flight period. All of the 14 participants thus far evaluated lost bone in at least one region of the spine and lower extremities during flight. Of the 14, only one to date has exhibited full return to baseline BNM values in all regions. The current study will continue until the last participant has reached full bone recovery in all regions, has reached a plateau, or until three years after the flight (2001 for the last mission of the program). Bone mineral density losses in space and difficulty in returning to baseline indicate a need for countermeasure development. In late 1996 NASA JSC and Baylor College of Medicine were approved to conduct two countermeasure studies during 17 weeks of bed rest. In 1997 the studies were begun in the bed rest facility established by NASA, Baylor College of Medicine, and The Methodist Hospital in Houston. To date, three bed rest controls, five resistive

  4. Initial experience with GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay in the Arkansas Tuberculosis Control Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Naveen; Saba, Hamida; Marco, Asween; Samant, Rohan; Mukasa, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains one of the most significant causes of death from an infectious agent. Rapid and accurate diagnosis of pulmonary and extra-pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is still a great challenge. The GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay is a novel integrated diagnostic system for the diagnosis of tuberculosis and rapid detection of Rifampin (RIF) resistance in clinical specimens. In 2012, the Arkansas Tuberculosis Control Program introduced GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay to replace the labour-intensive Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Direct (MTD) assay. To rapidly diagnose TB within two hours and to simultaneously detect RIF resistance. Describe the procedure used to introduce GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay in the Arkansas Tuberculosis Control Program.Characterise the current gap in rapid M. tuberculosis diagnosis in Arkansas.Assess factors that predict acid fast bacilli (AFB) smearnegative but culture-positive cases in Arkansas.Illustrate, with two case reports, the role of GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay in reduction of time to confirmation of M. tuberculosis diagnosis in the first year of implementation. Between June 2012 and June 2013, all AFB sputum smearpositive cases and any others, on request by the physician, had GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay performed as well as traditional M. tuberculosis culture and susceptibilities using Mycobacteria Growth Indicator Tube (MGIT) 960 and Löwenstein-Jensen (LJ) slants. Surveillance data for January 2009-June 2013 was analysed to characterise sputum smear-negative but culture-positive cases. Seventy-one TB cases were reported from June 2012- June 2013. GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay identified all culture-positive cases as well as three cases that were negative on culture. Also, this rapid assay identified all six smear-negative but M. tuberculosis culture-positive cases; two of these cases are described as case reports. GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay has made rapid TB diagnosis possible, with tremendous potential in determining isolation of TB suspects on one

  5. Home infusion program for Fabry disease: experience with agalsidase alfa in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Kisinovsky

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by inherited deficiency of the enzyme α-galactosidase A. Enzyme replacement treatment using agalsidase alfa significantly reduces pain, improves cardiac function and quality of life, and slows renal deterioration. Nevertheless, it is a life-long treatment which requires regular intravenous infusions and entails a great burden for patients. Our objective was to evaluate retrospectively the safety and tolerability of the home infusion of agalsidase alfa in patients with Fabry disease in Argentina. We evaluated all the patients with Fabry disease who received home infusion with agalsidase alfa 0.2 mg/kg between January 2005 and June 2011. The program included 87 patients; 51 males (mean age: 30 years and 36 females (mean age: 34 years. A total of 5229 infusions (mean: 59 per patient; range: 1-150 were administered. A total of 5 adverse reactions were seen in 5 patients (5.7% of patients and 0.9% of the total number of infusions. All were mild in severity and resolved by reducing the rate of infusion and by using antihistaminics. All these 5 patients were positive for IgG antibodies, but none of them presented IgE antibodies and none suffered an anaphylactic shock. In our group 18 patients were switched from agalsidase beta to agalsidase alfa without complications. Home infusion with agalsidase alfa is safe, well tolerated and is associated to high compliance.

  6. Social Media for Academic Neurosurgical Programs: The University of Toronto Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Naif M; Samuel, Nardin; Guha, Daipayan; Nassiri, Farshad; Badhiwala, Jetan H; Tam, Joseph; Shamji, Mohammed F; Kulkarni, Abhaya V; Macdonald, R Loch; Lozano, Andres M

    2016-09-01

    There is a paucity of available strategies to increase visibility and engagement in social media (SM) within the neurosurgical community. The objective of this study was to investigate the possible factors for engagement and reach among SM users in neurosurgery. Data from Facebook and Twitter accounts of our institution were collected. We extracted data on demographics and attributes of our current users, including sex, country, age group, device used, and language. Attributes of SM posts were also collected, including time of post, type and content of post, impressions, and engagements. Nonparametric analyses were conducted to evaluate differences in metrics. Metrics were obtained on 192 Facebook and Twitter posts, published online between October 1, 2013, and March 13, 2016. On both platforms, there was a greater representation of male users relative to female users. Facebook users were predominantly in the 18-34 years age range (83%), with most users being from outside of North America. Conversely, users from Canada and the United States comprised the highest proportion of Twitter users. On both platforms, posts containing photos or videos scored significantly higher in engagements and impressions (P media materials may lead to higher visibility and engagement. The impact of high SM reach on academic neurosurgical programs remains to be determined. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Materials management system in interventional radiology -- initial experience with a computer-supported program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clevert, D-A; Jung, E M; Reiser, M; Rupp, N

    2004-10-01

    To perform a cost analysis for assessing options of reorganizing material supplies and reducing costs of the radiology division through the introduction of a materials management system. A materials management system (Piranha, Boston Scientific) was installed on an existing computer system. All consumables were inventoried and entered into the system. An ABC analysis determined further action. On the basis of order frequencies and availability requirements for emergencies, safety levels were agreed with physicians and other medical staff. Inventory costs were computed using these data. The interest rate for the capital tied up in the inventory was 8 % per year. The inventory showed that the capital tied up in stocks was euro 260,000 in 2001 and euro 190,000 in 2002. A change in supply strategy reduced inventory cost in 2001 and 2002. Annual interest expense was lowered by euro 18,420. Another saving of euro 2,700 was achieved by a reduction in storage cost. Annual inventory turnover totaled euro 298,000. The total cost cut through improved inventory management was euro 21,120 per year, which is equivalent to 7 % of the annual expenses. Adding the decline in the cost of shelf time overruns equal to 5 % of the annual expenses, the saving was approximately 12 % of total interventional radiology cost in 2001 and some 11 % in 2002. Flexible supply strategies and the introduction of a materials management program can help to reduce inventory costs in interventional radiology divisions without any impact on service levels.

  8. Living with childhood obesity: the experience of children enrolled in a multidisciplinary monitoring program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Veridiana Zamparoni Victorino

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to understand the perceptions of obesity from the perspective of obese children enrolled in a multidisciplinary monitoring program. Descriptive exploratory study of qualitative nature. Data collection occurred in December 2013, along with eight children accompanied by a child and adolescent obesity group in a municipality in northwestern Paraná, Brazil, through semi-structured interviews. Data were submitted to content analysis, from which four categories emerged: “Obesity in children’s perspective”; “Being an obese child”; “Eating and the practice of physical exercise in the routine of obese children”; and “Living with obesity: social and family implications for children.” It was verified the negative impact of obesity on children’s lives, justifying the importance of multidisciplinary follow-up through group activities, seeking a comprehensive care. Nursing is accountable for planning activities of health promotion and control of this disease, in order to improve the quality of life.

  9. Present status and future programs of the n_TOF experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wright T.J.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The neutron time-of-flight facility n_TOF at CERN, Switzerland, operational since 2001, delivers neutrons using the Proton Synchrotron (PS 20 GeV/c proton beam impinging on a lead spallation target. The facility combines a very high instantaneous neutron flux, an excellent time of flight resolution due to the distance between the experimental area and the production target (185 meters, a low intrinsic background and a wide range of neutron energies, from thermal to GeV neutrons. These characteristics provide a unique possibility to perform neutron-induced capture and fission cross-section measurements for applications in nuclear astrophysics and in nuclear reactor technology. The most relevant measurements performed up to now and foreseen for the future will be presented in this contribution. The overall efficiency of the experimental program and the range of possible measurements achievable with the construction of a second experimental area (EAR-2, vertically located 20 m on top of the n_TOF spallation target, might offer a substantial improvement in measurement sensitivities. A feasibility study of the possible realisation of the installation extension will be also presented.

  10. Present status and future programs of the n_TOF experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaveri, E.; Calviani, M.; Vlachoudis, V.; Weis, C.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Avrigeanu, F.; Barbagallo, M.; Bécares, V.; Beĉvář, F.; Belloni, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Billowes, J.; Boccone, V.; Brugger, M.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Carrapiço, C.; Cerutti, F.; Chin, M.; Colonna, N.; Cortés, G.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Diakaki, M.; Dillmann, I.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Duran, I.; Dzysiuk, N.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Fernández-Ordóñez, M.; Ferrari, A.; Fraval, K.; Ganesan, S.; Giubrone, G.; Gómez-Hornillos, M. B.; Gonçalves, I. F.; González-Romero, E.; Gramegna, F.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Heil, M.; Jenkins, D. G.; Jericha, E.; Kadi, Y.; Käppeler, F.; Karadimos, D.; Kokkoris, M.; Krtička, M.; Kroll, J.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Leong, L. S.; Losito, R.; Lozano, M.; Manousos, A.; Marganiec, J.; Martinez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P. F.; Mastromarco, M.; Meaze, M.; Mendoza, E.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mirea, M.; Paradela, C.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J. M.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Riego, A.; Roman, F.; Rubbia, C.; Sarmento, R.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tarrio, D.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tsinganis, A.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Vermeulen, M. J.; Versaci, R.; Vlastou, R.; Wallner, A.; Ware, T.; Wright, T. J.

    2012-02-01

    The neutron time-of-flight facility n_TOF at CERN, Switzerland, operational since 2001, delivers neutrons using the Proton Synchrotron (PS) 20 GeV/c proton beam impinging on a lead spallation target. The facility combines a very high instantaneous neutron flux, an excellent time of flight resolution due to the distance between the experimental area and the production target (185 meters), a low intrinsic background and a wide range of neutron energies, from thermal to GeV neutrons. These characteristics provide a unique possibility to perform neutron-induced capture and fission cross-section measurements for applications in nuclear astrophysics and in nuclear reactor technology. The most relevant measurements performed up to now and foreseen for the future will be presented in this contribution. The overall efficiency of the experimental program and the range of possible measurements achievable with the construction of a second experimental area (EAR-2), vertically located 20 m on top of the n_TOF spallation target, might offer a substantial improvement in measurement sensitivities. A feasibility study of the possible realisation of the installation extension will be also presented.

  11. A school-based oral health educational program: the experience of Maringa- PR, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrado, Carlos Alberto; Maciel, Sandra Mara; Oliveira, Márcia Regina

    2004-03-01

    The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the preliminary results of a school-based oral health educational strategy adopted in public primary schools from the city of Maringa, State of Parana, Brazil. The study sample was composed by 556 children and adolescents aged 6 to 17 years old, 124 schoolteachers and a group of 55 mothers. The educational approach was implemented for 18 months and consisted of reinforcements of interventions addressed to students and schoolteachers at school level and few activities targeted at the mothers, performed by means of home visits. Baseline and follow-up interviews focused on oral health care were undertaken for the entire study population. As a stimulus for the students to achieve proper oral hygiene habits, the simplified oral hygiene index was assessed at three different moments. A statistically significant improvement in their oral hygiene index (ppreparation of schoolteachers in oral health topics, as well the instructions to the mothers for their oral health care. Moreover, they highlight the importance of the continuous implementation of school-based programs to promote the oral health.

  12. Expansion of Parents' Undetermined Experience in Socioeducational Programs: Extending the Dialogical Self Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulanger, Dany

    2017-12-01

    The Dialogic Self Theory (DST-Hermans et al. Integrative Psychology and Behavioral Sciences, 51(4), 1-31, 2017) is extended here in its dynamic aspects through focusing on the notions of indeterminacy, emptiness and movement. Linking with Husserl, I propose moving the dialogical self (DS) from a clear position in the "repertory of the Self" to an undetermined horizon. This makes it possible to introduce "holes" (emptiness) into the schematic representation of the "repertory of the Self". Yet Husserl's concept of horizon seems to focus too much on making the indeterminable determinate. To overcome this limit, I incorporate Bergson's concept of empty form into the DST. This enables conceptualising the extension and emergence of horizon. Extending Bergson's concept of organisation, it is possible to see how the expansion of the horizon in a movement of globalisation does not necessarily entail the disorganisation of the DS but rather to its further organisation. Extending the system of DS by Hermans et al. Integrative Psychology and Behavioral Sciences, 51(4), 1-31, (2017), I open by suggesting that movements are both horizontal (between people) and vertical (between the person, the institutions and the norms) connectors. My conceptual propositions are illustrated by parents' and educators' discourses in two Canadian socio-educational programs.

  13. Programa Saúde da Família: a experiência de equipe multiprofissional Family Health Program: the experience of a multiprofessional team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Machado de Oliveira

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O Programa Saúde da Família propõe uma nova dinâmica para estruturação dos serviços de saúde, assim como para a relação com a comunidade e para diversos níveis de assistência. O objetivo do estudo foi analisar o significado da experiência do trabalho em equipe para os profissionais do Programa Saúde da Família. MÉTODOS: O estudo foi realizado no município de Conchas, Estado de São Paulo no ano de 2004. A abordagem utilizada foi qualitativa, na vertente da fenomenologia, buscando a essência da realidade vivenciada por oito profissionais de duas equipes do Programa Saúde da Família. RESULTADOS: Os temas revelaram que o trabalho em equipe se caracteriza por dedicação durante as atividades diárias. É necessário haver interação entre todos os membros para ações integrais, embora haja diferenças de ideologias e condutas entre os profissionais. O contato próximo com as famílias permitiu melhor intervenção nos problemas e o trabalho integrado é fundamental para atuação eficaz e de qualidade. CONCLUSÕES: O fenômeno desvelado engendra nova perspectiva de atuação para os profissionais e possibilita a compreensão do trabalho em equipe multiprofissional.OBJECTIVE: The Family Health Program proposes a new dynamics for the structuring of health service, as well as for its relationship with the community in its different levels of care. The aim of the present study was to analyze the significance of teamwork for professionals working in the Family Health Program. METHODS: The study was carried out in the city of Conchas, Southeastern Brazil, in 2004. We used a qualitative approach based on phenomenology as an attempt to reveal the essence of the reality experienced by eight professionals from two Family Health Program teams. RESULTS: Themes revealed that teamwork is characterized by dedication to daily activities. Interaction among all members is required for integral action, although there are differences in

  14. Five-year experience with infliximab: Follow up of the product familiarisation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Rebecca; Braue, Anna; Baker, Chris; Foley, Peter

    2016-11-01

    This 5-year retrospective analysis is of 22 patients who participated in the product familiarisation program (PFP) at St Vincent's Hospital Melbourne, prior to the listing of infliximab on the Pharmaceutical Benefit Scheme. Criteria for inclusion were being an adult with chronic plaque psoriasis, having a psoriasis area and severity index (PASI) score of at least 15 with an inadequate response or intolerance to three of the following: phototherapy, acitretin, cyclosporin and methotrexate. Participants were infused with infliximab 5 mg/kg on the standard induction (weeks 0, 2 and 6) and maintenance (8-weekly) protocols. At each visit PASI and dermatology life quality index (DLQI) scores were recorded. Success was determined as the proportion of patients achieving at least a 75% improvement in the PASI score from baseline (PASI 75). At 60 months after commencement of therapy, 31% of patients remained on infliximab. Those who did retained PASI 75 with a DLQI of 0 or 1. Of those who ceased infliximab, nine did so due to loss of efficacy, three for personal reasons, two for serious adverse events and one was lost to follow up. Adverse events included non-melanoma skin cancers, infections and abnormal liver enzymes. Infliximab in the Australian context has proven to be a highly effective treatment of chronic plaque psoriasis, and patients who remained on the drug derived a high level of satisfaction, assessed both subjectively (DLQI) and objectively (PASI 75). The variable response indicates that psoriasis is a heterogeneous disease and investigation into potential patient selection for treatment in the future is warranted. © 2015 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  15. Matching user needs to technology in dementia care: experiences with the Alma Supervisor Educational Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torhild Holthe

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The number of individuals with dementia in Norway is more than 78,000, and, as in all other European countries, this figure is expected to rise over the coming decades. The Norwegian Health Directorate encourages municipalities to make use of ‘welfare technology’ in order to contribute to independent living and quality of life in older adults, to increase the quality of community health care, to save time when providing community health services and to reduce costs, e.g. admission to a nursing home. Introducing welfare technology to care recipients requires innovation on the part of the community health care service with regard to increasing the competency of the staff in the operation of the technologies, as well as in establishing an infrastructure for ‘digital communication’. Research has shown that access to assistive technology may support individuals with mild cognitive impairments, as well as in an early phase of dementia. However, it is crucial that the technology addresses an identified need, and that the device is tailored to the person’s preferences and context. Therefore, it is important to train health professionals to assess the user’s needs and preferences and to identify resources and limitations in the particular context. Alma’s House in Oslo is a demonstration site and education center for welfare technologies. The education program for the certification of Alma supervisors has become an important strategy in educating occupational therapists (OTs and nurses on how to assess user needs, identify appropriate technology and implement this into the care recipient’s home.

  16. The P4 Parallel Programming System, the Linda Environment, and Some Experiences with Parallel Computation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan R. Larrabee

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The first digital computers consisted of a single processor acting on a single stream of data. In this so-called "von Neumann" architecture, computation speed is limited mainly by the time required to transfer data between the processor and memory. This limiting factor has been referred to as the "von Neumann bottleneck". The concern that the miniaturization of silicon-based integrated circuits will soon reach theoretical limits of size and gate times has led to increased interest in parallel architectures and also spurred research into alternatives to silicon-based implementations of processors. Meanwhile, sequential processors continue to be produced that have increased clock rates and an increase in memory locally available to a processor, and an increase in the rate at which data can be transferred to and from memories, networks, and remote storage. The efficiency of compilers and operating systems is also improving over time. Although such characteristics limit maximum performance, a large improvement in the speed of scientific computations can often be achieved by utilizing more efficient algorithms, particularly those that support parallel computation. This work discusses experiences with two tools for large grain (or "macro task" parallelism.

  17. COMPASS experiment at CERN open charm results and future hadron program

    CERN Document Server

    Kouznetsov, O

    2009-01-01

    COMPASS (COmmon Muon and Proton Apparatus for Structure and Spectroscopy) is a fixed target experiment at CERN dedicated to studies of the spin structure of the nucleon and of the spectroscopy of hadrons. During the years 2002–2004 and 2006–2007, the COMPASS collaboration has collected a large amount of data by scattering polarized 160 GeV/c muons on polarized 6LiD and NH3 targets. These data were used to evaluate the gluon contribution to the nucleon spin. The gluon polarization was directly measured from the cross-section helicity asymmetry of D0 mesons production in the photon-gluon fusion reaction. In 2008 COMPASS will perform a search for JPC-exotic mesons, glueballs or hybrids, through light hadron spectroscopy in high energy (190 GeV/c π−) pion-proton reactions using both centrally produced and diffractive events. Preliminary results from diffractive pion dissociation into a π−π−π+ final state obtained in 2004 are also discussed.

  18. Robotic pulmonary lobectomy for lung cancer treatment: program implementation and initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terra, Ricardo Mingarini; Araujo, Pedro Henrique Xavier Nabuco de; Lauricella, Leticia Leone; Campos, José Ribas Milanez de; Costa, Herbert Felix; Pego-Fernandes, Paulo Manuel

    2016-01-01

    To describe the implementation of a robotic thoracic surgery program at a public tertiary teaching hospital and to analyze its initial results. This was a planned interim analysis of a randomized clinical trial aimed at comparing video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery and robotic surgery in terms of the results obtained after pulmonary lobectomy. The robotic surgery program developed at the Instituto do Câncer do Estado de São Paulo, in the city of São Paulo, Brazil, is a multidisciplinary initiative involving various surgical specialties, as well as anesthesiology, nursing, and clinical engineering teams. In this analysis, we evaluated the patients included in the robotic lobectomy arm of the trial during its first three months (from April to June of 2015). Ten patients were included in this analysis. There were eight women and two men. The mean age was 65.1 years. All of the patients presented with peripheral tumors. We performed right upper lobectomy in four patients, right lower lobectomy in four, and left upper lobectomy in two. Surgical time varied considerably (range, 135-435 min). Conversion to open surgery or video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery was not necessary in any of the cases. Intraoperative complications were not found. Only the first patient required postoperative transfer to the ICU. There were no deaths or readmissions within the first 30 days after discharge. The only postoperative complication was chest pain (grade 3), in two patients. Pathological examination revealed complete tumor resection in all cases. When there is integration and proper training of all of the teams involved, the implementation of a robotic thoracic surgery program is feasible and can reduce morbidity and mortality. Descrever a implantação de um programa de cirurgia torácica robótica em um hospital terciário público universitário e analisar seus resultados iniciais. Este estudo é uma análise interina planejada de um ensaio clínico aleatorizado cujo objetivo

  19. High energy physics program: Task A, Experiment and theory; Task B, Numerical simulation. Progress report, July 1, 1988--June 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    This report discusses research in High Energy Physics at Florida State University. Contained in this paper are: highlights of activities during the past few years; five year summary; fixed target experiments; collider experiments; SSC preparation, detector development and detector construction; computing, networking and VAX upgrade to ALPHA; and particle theory programs.

  20. Investigating the experiences in a school-based occupational therapy program to inform community-based paediatric occupational therapy practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rens, Lezahn; Joosten, Annette

    2014-06-01

    A collaborative approach with teachers is required when providing community-based occupational therapy to educationally at risk children. Collaborators share common goals and interact and support each other but challenges arise in providing collaborative occupational therapy in settings outside the school environment. The aim of this study was to capture experiences of teachers and occupational therapists working within a school-based occupational therapy program to determine if their experiences could inform collaborative practice. In this pilot study, participant responses to questionnaires (n = 32) about their experiences formed the basis for focus groups and individual interviews. Two focus group were conducted, one with teachers (n = 11) and one with occupational therapy participants (n = 6). Individual interviews were conducted with the supervising occupational therapist, school principal and two leading teachers. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse the data from closed questions, and thematic analysis using a constant comparison approach was used to analyse open ended questions, focus groups and interviews. Three main themes emerged: (i) the need for occupational therapists to spend time in the school, to explain their role, build relationships, understand classroom routines and the teacher role; (ii) occupational therapists need to not see themselves as the expert but develop equal partnerships to set collaborative goals and (iii) occupational therapists advocating for all parties to be informed throughout the occupational therapy process. The pilot study findings identified teacher and therapist experiences within the school setting that could inform improved collaborative practice with teachers and community-based occupational therapists and these findings warrant further investigation. © 2013 Occupational Therapy Australia.