WorldWideScience

Sample records for program dmsp spacecraft

  1. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites collect visible and infrared cloud imagery as well as monitoring the atmospheric, oceanographic,...

  2. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Film

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The United States Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS) is a polar orbiting meteorological sensor with two...

  3. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) - Space Weather Sensors

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) maintains a constellation of sun-synchronous, near-polar orbiting satellites. The orbital period is 101 minutes...

  4. Conjugate observation of sharp dynamical boundary in the inner magnetosphere by Cluster and DMSP spacecraft and ground network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Apatenkov

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigate an unusual sharp boundary separating two plasma populations (inner magnetospheric plasma with high fluxes of energetic particles and plasma sheet observed by the Cluster quartet near its perigee on 16 December 2003. Cluster was in a pearl-on-string configuration at 05:00 MLT and mapped along magnetic field lines to ~8–9 RE in the equatorial plane. It was conjugate to the MIRACLE network and the DMSP F16 spacecraft passed close to Cluster footpoint. The properties of the sharp boundary, repeatedly crossed 7 times by five spacecraft during ~10 min, are: (1 upward FAC sheet at the boundary with ~30 nA/m2 current density at Cluster and ~2000 nA/m2 at DMSP; (2 the boundary had an embedded layered structure with different thickness scales, the electron population transition was at ~20 km scale at Cluster (<7 km at DMSP, proton population had a scale ~100 km, while the FAC sheet thickness was estimated to be ~500 km at Cluster (~100 km at DMSP; (3 the boundary propagated in the earthward-eastward direction at ~8 km/s in situ (equatorward-eastward ~0.8 km/s in ionosphere, and then decelerated and/or stopped. We discuss the boundary formation by the collision of two different plasmas which may include dynamical three-dimensional field-aligned current loops.

  5. Simultaneous Remote Observations of Intense Reconnection Effects by DMSP and MMS Spacecraft During a Storm Time Substorm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varsani, A.; Nakamura, R.; Sergeev, V. A.; Baumjohann, W.; Owen, C. J.; Petrukovich, A. A.; Yao, Z.; Nakamura, T. K. M.; Kubyshkina, M. V.; Sotirelis, T.; Burch, J. L.; Genestreti, K. J.; Vörös, Z.; Andriopoulou, M.; Gershman, D. J.; Avanov, L. A.; Magnes, W.; Russell, C. T.; Plaschke, F.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Giles, B. L.; Coffey, V. N.; Dorelli, J. C.; Strangeway, R. J.; Torbert, R. B.; Lindqvist, P.-A.; Ergun, R.

    2017-11-01

    During a magnetic storm on 23 June 2015, several very intense substorms took place, with signatures observed by multiple spacecraft including DMSP and Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS). At the time of interest, DMSP F18 crossed inbound through a poleward expanding auroral bulge boundary at 23.5 h magnetic local time (MLT), while MMS was located duskward of 22 h MLT during an inward crossing of the expanding plasma sheet boundary. The two spacecraft observed a consistent set of signatures as they simultaneously crossed the reconnection separatrix layer during this very intense reconnection event. These include (1) energy dispersion of the energetic ions and electrons traveling earthward, accompanied with high electron energies in the vicinity of the separatrix; (2) energy dispersion of polar rain electrons, with a high-energy cutoff; and (3) intense inward convection of the magnetic field lines at the MMS location. The high temporal resolution measurements by MMS provide unprecedented observations of the outermost electron boundary layer. We discuss the relevance of the energy dispersion of the electrons, and their pitch angle distribution, to the spatial and temporal evolution of the boundary layer. The results indicate that the underlying magnetotail magnetic reconnection process was an intrinsically impulsive and the active X-line was located relatively close to the Earth, approximately at 16-18 RE.

  6. A comparison between ion characteristics observed by the POLAR and DMSP spacecraft in the high-latitude magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Stubbs

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available We study here the injection and transport of ions in the convection-dominated region of the Earth's magnetosphere. The total ion counts from the CAMMICE MICS instrument aboard the POLAR spacecraft are used to generate occurrence probability distributions of magnetospheric ion populations. MICS ion spectra are characterised by both the peak in the differential energy flux, and the average energy of ions striking the detector. The former permits a comparison with the Stubbs et al. (2001 survey of He2+ ions of solar wind origin within the magnetosphere. The latter can address the occurrences of various classifications of precipitating particle fluxes observed in the topside ionosphere by DMSP satellites (Newell and Meng, 1992. The peak energy occurrences are consistent with our earlier work, including the dawn-dusk asymmetry with enhanced occurrences on the dawn flank at low energies, switching to the dusk flank at higher energies. The differences in the ion energies observed in these two studies can be explained by drift orbit effects and acceleration processes at the magnetopause, and in the tail current sheet. Near noon at average ion energies of ≈1keV, the cusp and open LLBL occur further poleward here than in the Newell and Meng survey, probably due to convection- related time-of-flight effects. An important new result is that the pre-noon bias previously observed in the LLBL is most likely due to the component of this population on closed field lines, formed largely by low energy ions drifting earthward from the tail. There is no evidence here of mass and momentum transfer from the solar wind to the LLBL by non-reconnection coupling. At higher energies ≈2–20keV, we observe ions mapping to the auroral oval and can distinguish between the boundary and central plasma sheets. We show that ions at these energies relate to a transition from dawnward to duskward dominated flow, this is evidence of how ion drift orbits in the

  7. Conductive spacecraft materials development program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehn, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The objectives of this program are to provide design criteria, techniques, materials, and test methods to ensure control of absolute and differential charging of spacecraft surfaces. The control of absolute and differential charging of spacecraft cannot be effected without the development of new and improved or modified materials or techniques that will provide electrical continuity over the surface of the spacecraft. The materials' photoemission, secondary emission, thermooptical, physical, and electrical properties in the space vacuum environment both in the presence and absence of electrical stress and ultraviolet, electron, and particulate radiation, are important to the achievement of charge control. The materials must be stable or have predictable response to exposure to the space environment for long periods of time. The materials of interest include conductive polymers, paints, transparent films and coatings as well as fabric coating interweaves.

  8. New DMSP Database of Precipitating Auroral Electrons and Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmon, Robert J; Denig, William F; Kilcommons, Liam M; Knipp, Delores J

    2017-08-01

    Since the mid 1970's, the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft have operated instruments for monitoring the space environment from low earth orbit. As the program evolved, so to have the measurement capabilities such that modern DMSP spacecraft include a comprehensive suite of instruments providing estimates of precipitating electron and ion fluxes, cold/bulk plasma composition and moments, the geomagnetic field, and optical emissions in the far and extreme ultraviolet. We describe the creation of a new public database of precipitating electrons and ions from the Special Sensor J (SSJ) instrument, complete with original counts, calibrated differential fluxes adjusted for penetrating radiation, estimates of the total kinetic energy flux and characteristic energy, uncertainty estimates, and accurate ephemerides. These are provided in a common and self-describing format that covers 30+ years of DMSP spacecraft from F06 (launched in 1982) through F18 (launched in 2009). This new database is accessible at the National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) and the Coordinated Data Analysis Web (CDAWeb). We describe how the new database is being applied to high latitude studies of: the co-location of kinetic and electromagnetic energy inputs, ionospheric conductivity variability, field aligned currents and auroral boundary identification. We anticipate that this new database will support a broad range of space science endeavors from single observatory studies to coordinated system science investigations.

  9. New DMSP database of precipitating auroral electrons and ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmon, Robert J.; Denig, William F.; Kilcommons, Liam M.; Knipp, Delores J.

    2017-08-01

    Since the mid-1970s, the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft have operated instruments for monitoring the space environment from low Earth orbit. As the program evolved, so have the measurement capabilities such that modern DMSP spacecraft include a comprehensive suite of instruments providing estimates of precipitating electron and ion fluxes, cold/bulk plasma composition and moments, the geomagnetic field, and optical emissions in the far and extreme ultraviolet. We describe the creation of a new public database of precipitating electrons and ions from the Special Sensor J (SSJ) instrument, complete with original counts, calibrated differential fluxes adjusted for penetrating radiation, estimates of the total kinetic energy flux and characteristic energy, uncertainty estimates, and accurate ephemerides. These are provided in a common and self-describing format that covers 30+ years of DMSP spacecraft from F06 (launched in 1982) to F18 (launched in 2009). This new database is accessible at the National Centers for Environmental Information and the Coordinated Data Analysis Web. We describe how the new database is being applied to high-latitude studies of the colocation of kinetic and electromagnetic energy inputs, ionospheric conductivity variability, field-aligned currents, and auroral boundary identification. We anticipate that this new database will support a broad range of space science endeavors from single observatory studies to coordinated system science investigations.

  10. OLS DIGITAL DERIVED LIGHTNING FROM DMSP F12 V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Global lightning signatures from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS) flown on DMSP 5D-F12 have been analyzed from...

  11. OLS DIGITAL DERIVED LIGHTNING FROM DMSP F10 V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Global lightning signatures from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS) flown on DMSP 5D-F10 have been analyzed from...

  12. Comparison of the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) and the NOAA Polar-Orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite (POES) Program,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-10-01

    1.047 mrad/s), or slew (5.236 mrad/s)--to " track the sun. Power and signals are transferred by 31 gold -on- gold VacKote lubricated slip rings. e...1.5 45 . ’-.-.i.. U.-q : conical gold -plated nickel light pipe. The 1.1 mm diameter exit aperture of the pipe defines the illuminated area on the...are TOGA, EPOCS , SEQUAL, and a University of Miami/NOAA cooperative program. TOGA. The Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA) program is *- an

  13. A New DMSP Magnetometer & Auroral Boundary Dataset and Estimates of Field Aligned Currents in Dynamic Auroral Boundary Coordinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilcommons, Liam M; Redmon, Robert J; Knipp, Delores J

    2017-08-01

    We have developed a method for reprocessing the multi-decadal, multi-spacecraft Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Magnetometer (DMSP SSM) dataset and have applied it to fifteen spacecraft-years of data (DMSP Flight 16-18, 2010-2014). This Level-2 dataset improves on other available SSM datasets with recalculated spacecraft locations and magnetic perturbations, artifact signal removal, representations of the observations in geomagnetic coordinates, and in-situ auroral boundaries. Spacecraft locations have been recalculated using ground-tracking information. Magnetic perturbations (measured field minus modeled main-field) are recomputed. The updated locations ensure the appropriate model field is used. We characterize and remove a slow-varying signal in the magnetic field measurements. This signal is a combination of ring current and measurement artifacts. A final artifact remains after processing: step-discontinuities in the baseline caused by activation/deactivation of spacecraft electronics. Using coincident data from the DMSP precipitating electrons and ions instrument (SSJ4/5), we detect the in-situ auroral boundaries with an improvement to the Redmon et al. [2010] algorithm. We embed the location of the aurora and an accompanying figure of merit in the Level-2 SSM data product. Finally, we demonstrate the potential of this new dataset by estimating field-aligned current (FAC) density using the Minimum Variance Analysis (MVA) technique. The FAC estimates are then expressed in dynamic auroral boundary coordinates using the SSJ-derived boundaries, demonstrating a dawn-dusk asymmetry in average FAC location relative to the equatorward edge of the aurora. The new SSM dataset is now available in several public repositories.

  14. DMSP OLS - Operational Linescan System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Visible and infrared imagery from DMSP Operational Linescan System (OLS) instruments are used to monitor the global distribution of clouds and cloud top temperatures...

  15. Discovering the cosmos with small spacecraft the American explorer program

    CERN Document Server

    Harvey, Brian

    2018-01-01

    Explorer was the original American space program and Explorer 1 its first satellite, launched in 1958. Sixty years later, it is the longest continuously running space program in the world, demonstrating to the world how we can explore the cosmos with small spacecraft. Almost a hundred Explorers have already been launched.  Explorers have made some of the fundamental discoveries of the Space Age.Explorer 1 discovered Earth’s radiation belts. Later Explorers surveyed the Sun, the X-ray and ultraviolet universes, black holes, magnetars and gamma ray bursts. An Explorer found the remnant of the Big Bang. One Explorer chased and was the first to intercept a comet. The program went through a period of few launches during the crisis of funding for space science in the 1980s. However, with the era of ‘faster, cheaper, better,’ the program was reinvented, and new exiting missions began to take shape, like Swift and the asteroid hunter WISE.  Discovering the Cosmos with Small Spacecraft gives an account of ...

  16. Evaluation of spacecraft technology programs (effects on communication satellite business ventures), volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenburg, J. S.; Kaplan, M.; Fishman, J.; Hopkins, C.

    1985-01-01

    The computational procedures used in the evaluation of spacecraft technology programs that impact upon commercial communication satellite operations are discussed. Computer programs and data bases are described.

  17. Characteristic of plasma bubbles observed by DMSP in the topside ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    To study the characteristic of plasma bubbles in the topside ionosphere during the solar minima, we have analyzed a large database of post-sunset plasma density measurement acquired during ∼5104 equatorial crossings made by Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F14 in 2005. On 675 of these crossings, ...

  18. Defecation of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) by the copepod Acartia tonsa as functions of ambient food concentration and body DMSP content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, K.W.

    2001-01-01

    The dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) defecation rate of Acartia tonsa (calanoid copepod)feeding on Tetraselmis impellucida (prasinophyte) was correlated with food concentration and copepod body DMSP content. Copepod fecal pellets represent a highly concentrated source of DMSP and thus play an im...... an important role in DMSP flux and microbial processes in the ocean....

  19. DMSP observations of high latitude Poynting flux during magnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cheryl Y.; Huang, Yanshi; Su, Yi-Jiun; Hairston, Marc R.; Sotirelis, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that energy can enter the high-latitude regions of the Ionosphere-Thermosphere (IT) system on open field lines. To assess the extent of high-latitude energy input, we have carried out a study of Poynting flux measured by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites during magnetic storms. We report sporadic intense Poynting fluxes measured by four DMSP satellites at polar latitudes during two moderate magnetic storms which occurred in August and September 2011. Comparisons with a widely used empirical model for energy input to the IT system show that the model does not adequately capture electromagnetic (EM) energy at very high latitudes during storms. We have extended this study to include more than 30 storm events and find that intense EM energy is frequently detected poleward of 75° magnetic latitude.

  20. Evaluation of spacecraft technology programs (effects on communication satellite business ventures), volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenburg, J. S.; Gaelick, C.; Kaplan, M.; Fishman, J.; Hopkins, C.

    1985-01-01

    Commercial organizations as well as government agencies invest in spacecraft (S/C) technology programs that are aimed at increasing the performance of communications satellites. The value of these programs must be measured in terms of their impacts on the financial performane of the business ventures that may ultimately utilize the communications satellites. An economic evaluation and planning capability was developed and used to assess the impact of NASA on-orbit propulsion and space power programs on typical fixed satellite service (FSS) and direct broadcast service (DBS) communications satellite business ventures. Typical FSS and DBS spin and three-axis stabilized spacecraft were configured in the absence of NASA technology programs. These spacecraft were reconfigured taking into account the anticipated results of NASA specified on-orbit propulsion and space power programs. In general, the NASA technology programs resulted in spacecraft with increased capability. The developed methodology for assessing the value of spacecraft technology programs in terms of their impact on the financial performance of communication satellite business ventures is described. Results of the assessment of NASA specified on-orbit propulsion and space power technology programs are presented for typical FSS and DBS business ventures.

  1. Near-Real-Time DMSP SSM/I-SSMIS Pathfinder Daily EASE-Grid Brightness Temperatures, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Notice (04/21/2016): On 04/05/2016 a change in the solar panel position to shade the nitrogen tank on board the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F-17...

  2. The variability in DMSP content and DMSP lyase activity in marine dinoflagellates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruana, Amandine M. N.; Malin, Gill

    2014-01-01

    More than 20 years ago Maureen Keller and co-workers published a study that identified dinoflagellates as an important marine phytoplankton group with respect to the production of dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP). Here, we present a synthesis and analysis of all the DMSP and DMSP lyase activity (DLA) measurements currently available for dinoflagellates. The data cover 110 species and strains and reveal over 6 orders of magnitude variability in intracellular DMSP concentrations and substantial variations in DLA in 23 strains. Inter-specific variability was explored with reference to a range of biological characteristics. The presence of a theca did not appear to be related to DMSP concentration but there was a potential relationship with toxicity (P = 0.06) and bioluminescent species produced significantly lower concentrations (P knowledge.

  3. Space Environments and Effects (SEE) Program: Spacecraft Charging Technology Development Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, B.; Hardage, D.; Minor, J.

    2004-01-01

    Reducing size and weight of spacecraft, along with demanding increased performance capabilities, introduces many uncertainties in the engineering design community on how materials and spacecraft systems will perform in space. The engineering design community is forever behind on obtaining and developing new tools and guidelines to mitigate the harmful effects of the space environment. Adding to this complexity is the continued push to use Commercial-off-the-Shelf (COTS) microelectronics, potential usage of unproven technologies such as large solar sail structures and nuclear electric propulsion. In order to drive down these uncertainties, various programs are working together to avoid duplication, save what resources are available in this technical area and possess a focused agenda to insert these new developments into future mission designs. This paper will introduce the SEE Program, briefly discuss past and currently sponsored spacecraft charging activities and possible future endeavors.

  4. Integrating Multiple Source Data to Enhance Variation and Weaken the Blooming Effect of DMSP-OLS Light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruifang Hao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Defense Meteorological Satellite Program/Operational Linescan System (DMSP-OLS nighttime light has proved to be an effective tool to monitor human activities, especially in mapping urban areas. However, the inherent defects of DMSP-OLS light including saturation and blooming effects remain to be tackled. In this study, the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI product of the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer/Normalized Difference Vegetation Index 1-Month (MODND1M, the temperature product of Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer/Land Surface Temperature 1-Month (MODLT1M and DMSP-OLS light were integrated to establish the Vegetation Temperature Light Index (VTLI, aiming at weakening the saturation and blooming effects of DMSP-OLS light. In comparison with DMSP-OLS nighttime light, this new methodology achieved the following improvements: (1 the high value (30%–100% range of VTLI was concentrated in the urban areas; (2 VTLI could effectively enhance the variation of DMSP-OLS light, especially in the urban center; and (3 VTLI reached convergence faster than Vegetation Adjusted Normalized Urban Index (VANUI. Results showed that the urban areas extracted by VTLI were closer to those from Landsat TM images with the accuracy of kappa coefficients in Beijing (0.410, Shanghai (0.718, Lanzhou (0.483, and Shenyang (0.623, respectively. Thus, it can be concluded that the proposed index is able to serve as a favorable option for urban areas mapping.

  5. Adaptation and Re-Use of Spacecraft Power System Models for the Constellation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojnicki, Jeffrey S.; Kerslake, Thomas W.; Ayres, Mark; Han, Augustina H.; Adamson, Adrian M.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Constellation Program is embarking on a new era of space exploration, returning to the Moon and beyond. The Constellation architecture will consist of a number of new spacecraft elements, including the Orion crew exploration vehicle, the Altair lunar lander, and the Ares family of launch vehicles. Each of these new spacecraft elements will need an electric power system, and those power systems will need to be designed to fulfill unique mission objectives and to survive the unique environments encountered on a lunar exploration mission. As with any new spacecraft power system development, preliminary design work will rely heavily on analysis to select the proper power technologies, size the power system components, and predict the system performance throughout the required mission profile. Constellation projects have the advantage of leveraging power system modeling developments from other recent programs such as the International Space Station (ISS) and the Mars Exploration Program. These programs have developed mature power system modeling tools, which can be quickly modified to meet the unique needs of Constellation, and thus provide a rapid capability for detailed power system modeling that otherwise would not exist.

  6. Double-lunar swingby trajectories for the spacecraft of the International Solar Terrestrial Physics program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, David W.; Jen, Shao-Chiang; Lee, Taesul; Swade, D.; Kawaguchi, Jun'ichiro; Farquhar, Robert W.; Broaddus, S.; Engel, Cheryl

    1989-01-01

    The ISEE-3 satellite carried out the first extensive exploration of the distant geomagnetic tail during 1983. ISEE-3's orbit was altered with four lunar gravity assists that alternately decreased and increased its orbital energy while keeping the apogees aligned in the antisolar direction. Two spacecraft of the International Solar Terrestrial Physics program will use similar double-lunar swingby orbits to study the solar wind and the geomagnetic environment. Geotail will be built in Japan for the Institute of Space and Astronautical Sciences; its main purpose will be to explore the earth's geomagnetic tail. Wind is a NASA spacecraft that will monitor the solar wind upstream from the earth and will also study the bowshock region of the magnetosphere. Current plans call for launches of both by NASA with expendable launch vehicles during the second half of 1992.

  7. The Status of Spacecraft Bus and Platform Technology Development Under the NASA ISPT Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David; Munk, Michelle M.; Pencil, Eric; Dankanich, John; Glaab, Louis; Peterson, Todd

    2014-01-01

    The In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) program is developing spacecraft bus and platform technologies that will enable or enhance NASA robotic science missions. The ISPT program is currently developing technology in three areas that include Propulsion System Technologies, Entry Vehicle Technologies, and Systems Mission Analysis. ISPTs propulsion technologies include: 1) NASAs Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) ion propulsion system, a 0.6-7 kW throttle-able gridded ion system; 2) a Hall-effect electric propulsion (HEP) system for sample return and low cost missions; 3) the Advanced Xenon Flow Control System (AXFS); ultra-lightweight propellant tank technologies (ULTT); and propulsion technologies for a Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV). The AXFS and ULTT are two component technologies being developed with nearer-term flight infusion in mind, whereas NEXT and the HEP are being developed as EP systems. ISPTs entry vehicle technologies are: 1) Aerocapture technology development with investments in a family of thermal protection system (TPS) materials and structures; guidance, navigation, and control (GNC) models of blunt-body rigid aeroshells; and aerothermal effect models; and 2) Multi-mission technologies for Earth Entry Vehicles (MMEEV) for sample return missions. The Systems Mission Analysis area is focused on developing tools and assessing the application of propulsion, entry vehicle, and spacecraft bus technologies to a wide variety of mission concepts. Several of the ISPT technologies are related to sample return missions and other spacecraft bus technology needs like: MAV propulsion, MMEEV, and electric propulsion. These technologies, as well as Aerocapture, are more vehicle and mission-focused, and present a different set of technology development challenges. These in-space propulsion technologies are applicable, and potentially enabling for future NASA Discovery, New Frontiers, Flagship and sample return missions currently under consideration. This paper provides

  8. DMSP SSM/T-2 microwave water vapor profiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galin, Israel; Brest, Dennis H.; Martner, Glen R.

    1993-08-01

    The Special Sensor Microwave water vapor profiler (SSM/T-2) is a five channel passive microwave sensor that operates in the 90 - 190 GHz frequency band. The instrument was developed by Aerojet Electronic Systems Division (AESD) of GenCorp Aerojet under a contract to the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP). The first in a series of these instruments was successfully orbited in November 1991. This paper addresses details of the instrument configuration, as well as relevant information on the status of the project. A block diagram of the instrument is described in relation to its electrical, environmental and reliability requirements. Performance data measured in laboratory conditions is presented along with data from the operating unit in orbit.

  9. The status of spacecraft bus and platform technology development under the NASA ISPT program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D. J.; Munk, M. M.; Pencil, E.; Dankanich, J.; Glaab, L.; Peterson, T.

    The In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) program is developing spacecraft bus and platform technologies that will enable or enhance NASA robotic science missions. The ISPT program is currently developing technology in four areas that include Propulsion System Technologies (electric and chemical), Entry Vehicle Technologies (aerocapture and Earth entry vehicles), Spacecraft Bus and Sample Return Propulsion Technologies (components and ascent vehicles), and Systems/Mission Analysis. Three technologies are ready for near-term flight infusion: 1) the high-temperature Advanced Material Bipropellant Rocket (AMBR) engine providing higher performance; 2) NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) ion propulsion system, a 0.6-7 kW throttle-able gridded ion system; and 3) Aerocapture technology development with investments in a family of thermal protection system (TPS) materials and structures; guidance, navigation, and control (GN& C) models of blunt-body rigid aeroshells; and aerothermal effect models. Two component technologies being developed with flight infusion in mind are the Advanced Xenon Flow Control System and ultra-lightweight propellant tank technologies. Future directions for ISPT are technologies that relate to sample return missions and other spacecraft bus technology needs like: 1) Mars Ascent Vehicles (MAV); 2) multi-mission technologies for Earth Entry Vehicles (MMEEV); and 3) electric propulsion. These technologies are more vehicles and mission-focused, and present a different set of technology development and infusion steps beyond those previously implemented. The Systems/Mission Analysis area is focused on developing tools and assessing the application of propulsion and spacecraft bus technologies to a wide variety of mission concepts. These in-space propulsion technologies are applicable, and potentially enabling for future NASA Discovery, New Frontiers, and sample return missions currently under consideration, as well as having broad applicabilit- to

  10. Spacecraft Bus and Platform Technology Development under the NASA ISPT Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David J.; Munk, Michelle M.; Pencil, Eric J.; Dankanich, John W.; Glaab, Louis J.; Peterson, Todd T.

    2013-01-01

    The In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) program is developing spacecraft bus and platform technologies that will enable or enhance NASA robotic science missions. The ISPT program is currently developing technology in four areas that include Propulsion System Technologies (electric and chemical), Entry Vehicle Technologies (aerocapture and Earth entry vehicles), Spacecraft Bus and Sample Return Propulsion Technologies (components and ascent vehicles), and Systems/Mission Analysis. Three technologies are ready for near-term flight infusion: 1) the high-temperature Advanced Material Bipropellant Rocket (AMBR) engine providing higher performance 2) NASAs Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) ion propulsion system, a 0.6-7 kW throttle-able gridded ion system and 3) Aerocapture technology development with investments in a family of thermal protection system (TPS) materials and structures guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) models of blunt-body rigid aeroshells and aerothermal effect models. Two component technologies being developed with flight infusion in mind are the Advanced Xenon Flow Control System, and ultra-lightweight propellant tank technologies. Future direction for ISPT are technologies that relate to sample return missions and other spacecraft bus technology needs like: 1) Mars Ascent Vehicles (MAV) 2) multi-mission technologies for Earth Entry Vehicles (MMEEV) for sample return missions and 3) electric propulsion for sample return and low cost missions. These technologies are more vehicle and mission-focused, and present a different set of technology development and infusion steps beyond those previously implemented. The Systems/Mission Analysis area is focused on developing tools and assessing the application of propulsion and spacecraft bus technologies to a wide variety of mission concepts. These in-space propulsion technologies are applicable, and potentially enabling for future NASA Discovery, New Frontiers, and sample return missions currently

  11. Role of bacteria in DMS(P) cycle

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kumar, S.S.; Chinchkar, U.; Nair, S.; LokaBharathi, P.A.; Chandramohan, D.

    especially in regions dominated by phytoplankton. The biogeochemical importance of DMSP is based on its bacterial (Wolfe et al., 1999) or algal mediated (Steinke et al., 2002) enzymatic cleavage to acrylic acid and dimethyl sulphide (DMS). Dissolved DMSP... mats: In situ concentrations & metabolism by a colourless sulphur bacterium. Appl. Environ. Microbiol . 57 :1758?1763. Wolfe, G.V., M. Levasseur, G. Cantin, and S. Michaud. 1999. Microbial consumption and production of dimethyl sulphide (DMS...

  12. The Status of Spacecraft Bus and Platform Technology Development under the NASA In-Space Propulsion Technology Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David; Pencil, Eric J.; Glaab, Louis; Falck, Robert D.; Dankanich, John

    2013-01-01

    NASA's In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) program has been developing technologies for lowering the cost of planetary science missions. The technology areas include electric propulsion technologies, spacecraft bus technologies, entry vehicle technologies, and design tools for systems analysis and mission trajectories. The electric propulsion technologies include critical components of both gridded and non-gridded ion propulsion systems. The spacecraft bus technologies under development include an ultra-lightweight tank (ULTT) and advanced xenon feed system (AXFS). The entry vehicle technologies include the development of a multi-mission entry vehicle, mission design tools and aerocapture. The design tools under development include system analysis tools and mission trajectory design tools.

  13. Limiting future collision risk to spacecraft: an assessment of NASA's meteoroid and orbital debris programs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Committee for the Assessment of NASA's Orbital Debris Programs; National Research Council

    2011-01-01

    "Derelict satellites, equipment and other debris orbiting Earth (aka space junk) have been accumulating for many decades and could damage or even possibly destroy satellites and human spacecraft if they collide...

  14. The brightness of lights on Earth at night, digitally recorded by DMSP satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, Thomas A.

    1979-01-01

    The U.S. Air Force has operated its Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) for nearly a decade, and film images from the system have been openly available since 1973. Films are well suited for the study of weather, and users of such films have derived much useful data. For many potential remote sensing applications, however, a quantitative measurement of the brightness of the imaged light patterns is needed, and it cannot be extracted with adequte accuracy from the films. Such information is contained in the telemetry from the spacecraft and is retained on digital tapes, which store the images for a few days while they await filming. For practical reasons, it has not heretofore been feasible for the Air Force to provide a remote-sensing user with these digital data, and the quantitative brightness information has been lost with the erasure of tapes for re-use. For the purpose of evaluation of tapes as a means for remote sensing, the Air Force recently did provide to the author six examples containing records of nighttime DMSP imagery similar to that which has previously 1 been evaluated by SRI International in a film format. The digital data create many new applications for these images, owing to a combination of several factors, the most important of which are the preservation of photometric information and of full spatial resolution. In this evaluation, stress has been placed upon determination of the broad potential value of the data rather than the full exploitation of any one aspect of it. The effort was guided by an objective to develop handling methods for the vast body of numbers--methods which will be practical for use in a research or engineering environment where budgets are limited, and specialized capabilities and image reproduction equipment has not already been developed. We report the degree of success obtained in this effort, pointing out the relative strengths and the relative limitations, as compared to the sophisticated, weather

  15. Limiting Future Collision Risk to Spacecraft: An Assessment of NASA's Meteoroid and Orbital Debris Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Over the past 50 years, various NASA communities have contributed significantly to maturing NASA s meteoroid and orbital debris (MMOD)1 programs to their current state. As a result of these community efforts, and to NASA s credit, NASA s MMOD programs and models are now widely used and respected by the providers and users of both government and commercial satellites, nationally as well as internationally. Satellites have been redesigned to protect critical components from MMOD damage by moving critical components from exterior surfaces to deep inside a satellite s structure. Orbits are monitored and altered to minimize the risk of collision with tracked orbital debris. MMOD shielding added to the International Space Station (ISS) protects critical components and astronauts from potentially catastrophic damage that might result from smaller, untracked debris and meteoroid impacts. The space shuttle, as it orbited Earth, and whether docked to the ISS or not, was optimally oriented to protect its fragile thermal protection and thermal radiation systems from MMOD damage. In addition, astronauts inspected its thermal protection system for MMOD damage before the shuttle reentered Earth s atmosphere; Orion, NASA s capsule to carry astronauts to low Earth orbit, includes designs to mitigate the threat of MMOD damage and provide increased safety to the crew. When a handful of reasonable assumptions are used in NASA s MMOD models, scenarios are uncovered that conclude that the current orbital debris environment has already reached a "tipping point." That is, the amount of debris - in terms of the population of large debris objects, as well as overall mass of debris in orbit - currently in orbit has reached a threshold where it will continually collide with itself, further increasing the population of orbital debris. This increase will lead to corresponding increases in spacecraft failures, which will only create more feedback into the system, increasing the debris population

  16. Sulfur isotopic ratio of DMS and DMSP from Lake Kinneret

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sela-Adler, Michal; Said-Ahmad, Ward; Eckert, Werner; Kamyshny, Alexey; Sivan, Orit; Amrani, Alon

    2014-05-01

    Volatile Organic sulfur compounds (VOSC) such as dimethylsulfide (DMS) are an important source of biogenic sulfur to the atmosphere. The main precursor of DMS is dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), a common osmolyte in marine algae. Atmospheric release of VOS compounds contributes to the formation of sulfate aerosols. The latter are of global importance due to their role as cloud-condensation nuclei. VOSC are abundant in terrestrial environments as well and may be involved in important biogeochemical cycles. In lake sediments, another mechanism for the formation of DMS by H2S methylation may be important. The 34S/32S ratio (d34S values) of DMSP of marine surface water around the globe is very homogeneous ranging between +18.9 o to +20.3 o and the fractionation between DMSP and DMS is < +1 o (Amrani et al. 2013). The δ34S values of DMS and other VOSC in sediments should be 34S depleted, similar to its H2S precursor (Oduro et al., 2011). Our goal was to quantify the benthic DMS and DMSP emissions from the sediments of warm monomictic Lake Kinneret relative to their formation by surface water algae by using sulfur isotope ratios. Water column samples and sediment samples from Lake Kinneret were purged and trap in order to extract the VOSC and then introduced to a GC/MC-ICPMS for isotopic measurements (Amrani et al. 2013). The δ34S of DMSP in the water and sediment columns of Lake Kinneret a mesotrophic monomictic lake were measured. Our preliminary results show δ34S values for DMSP ranged between +10.3 o and +13.4 o in the water column. The sulfate δ34S values ranged between +12.6 o to +14.9 o. δ34S -DMSP in the sediment column showed similar values between +9.4 o and +13.0 o, indicating a similar sulfur source. Similar δ34S values obtain for other VOSC such as ethanethiol that contributes significantly to the VOSC of Lake Kinneret sediments. Amrani, A., W. Said-Ahmad,Y. Shaked, and R. P. Kiene. 2013. Sulfur isotopes homogeneity of oceanic DMSP and DMS. PNAS 110

  17. Characteristics of DMSP-lyase in Phaeocystis sp (Prymnesiophyceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stefels, J.; Dijkhuizen, L.

    The marine phytoplankton species Phaeocystis sp, is one of the few microalgae known to be able to convert dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) enzymatically into dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and acrylic acid. The function of this enzymatic process for the organism is not known. From experiments with crude

  18. DET/MPS - THE GSFC ENERGY BALANCE PROGRAM, DIRECT ENERGY TRANSFER/MULTIMISSION SPACECRAFT MODULAR POWER SYSTEM (UNIX VERSION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagielski, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    The DET/MPS programs model and simulate the Direct Energy Transfer and Multimission Spacecraft Modular Power System in order to aid both in design and in analysis of orbital energy balance. Typically, the DET power system has the solar array directly to the spacecraft bus, and the central building block of MPS is the Standard Power Regulator Unit. DET/MPS allows a minute-by-minute simulation of the power system's performance as it responds to various orbital parameters, focusing its output on solar array output and battery characteristics. While this package is limited in terms of orbital mechanics, it is sufficient to calculate eclipse and solar array data for circular or non-circular orbits. DET/MPS can be adjusted to run one or sequential orbits up to about one week, simulated time. These programs have been used on a variety of Goddard Space Flight Center spacecraft projects. DET/MPS is written in FORTRAN 77 with some VAX-type extensions. Any FORTRAN 77 compiler that includes VAX extensions should be able to compile and run the program with little or no modifications. The compiler must at least support free-form (or tab-delineated) source format and 'do do-while end-do' control structures. DET/MPS is available for three platforms: GSC-13374, for DEC VAX series computers running VMS, is available in DEC VAX Backup format on a 9-track 1600 BPI tape (standard distribution) or TK50 tape cartridge; GSC-13443, for UNIX-based computers, is available on a .25 inch streaming magnetic tape cartridge in UNIX tar format; and GSC-13444, for Macintosh computers running AU/X with either the NKR FORTRAN or AbSoft MacFORTRAN II compilers, is available on a 3.5 inch 800K Macintosh format diskette. Source code and test data are supplied. The UNIX version of DET requires 90K of main memory for execution. DET/MPS was developed in 1990. A/UX and Macintosh are registered trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc. VMS, DEC VAX and TK50 are trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation. UNIX is a

  19. DMSP SSM/I Daily and Monthly Polar Gridded Bootstrap Sea Ice Concentrations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — DMSP SSM/I Daily and Monthly Polar Gridded Bootstrap Sea Ice Concentrations in polar stereographic projection currently include Defense Meteorological Satellite...

  20. Data processing for the DMSP microwave radiometer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigone, J. L.; Stogryn, A. P.

    1977-01-01

    A software program was developed and tested to process microwave radiometry data to be acquired by the microwave sensor (SSM/T) on the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program spacecraft. The SSM/T 7-channel microwave radiometer and systems data will be data-linked to Air Force Global Weather Central (AFGWC) where they will be merged with ephemeris data prior to product processing for use in the AFGWC upper air data base (UADB). The overall system utilizes an integrated design to provide atmospheric temperature soundings for global applications. The fully automated processing at AFGWC was accomplished by four related computer processor programs to produce compatible UADB soundings, evaluate system performance, and update the a priori developed inversion matrices. Tests with simulated data produced results significantly better than climatology.

  1. Physiological aspects of the production and conversion of DMSP in marine algae and higher plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stefels, J

    Dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP) is a compound produced in several classes of algae and higher plants that live in the marine environment. Considering its generally high intracellular concentrations, DMSP has a function in the osmotic protection of algal cells. Due to the relatively slow

  2. Temperature, light, and the dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) content of Emiliania huxleyi (Prymnesiophyceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijssel, M; Gieskes, W.W C

    The precursor of the volatile S-compound dimethylsulfide (DMS), dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), is produced by marine microalgae, notably by Prymnesiophyceae. The production of DMSP by an axenic isolate of Emiliania huxleyi (Lohm.) Hay et Mohler under different temperature and light conditions

  3. First Results From the SSJ5 Precipitating Particle Sensor on DMSP F16: Simultaneous Observation of KeV and MeV Particles During the 2003 Halloween Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadinsky-Cade, K.; Holeman, E.; McGarity, J.; Rich, F.; Denig, W.; Burke, W.; Hardy, D.

    2004-05-01

    The first SSJ5 auroral electron and ion spectrometer was launched on the F16 spacecraft of the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) on 18 October 2003, and started providing data on 27 October 2003. This sensor replaces the highly successful SSJ4 series of particle spectrometers (ten SSJ4s launched between 1982 and 1999). The SSJ5 has mass 3.2 Kg, nominal power 1.4 W, and size 23 x 15 x 15 cm3. It is an electrostatic analyzer with triquadrisphere geometry, and a 90° x 4° field of view. The 90° zenith to horizon dimension is divided into six 15° angular sectors. Electron and ion counts at 19 energies, from 30 KeV to 30 eV, are measured each second, with a dwell time of 50 msec per energy channel. The instrument can be run in either of two formats. In Format A, particle counts from all six angular sectors are summed once per second. This emulates the temporal resolution of the SSJ4, which does not have angular zones. In Format B, particle counts from the six angular sectors are provided one zone at a time to provide enhanced pitch-angle resolution. In this format, the particle counts for each zone have been summed over the previous six seconds. The instrument has been run for extended time periods in both Format A and B. While Format B has reduced precision for determining features such as auroral boundary crossings, it is useful for characterizing the degree of anisotropy of the particle fluxes. The SSJ5 sensor was turned on in time to catch the Halloween storms of 2003, and provided an excellent data set. In addition to the expected 30 KeV - 30 eV particles that entered the instrument through its apertures and traveled along the intended triquadrisphere paths until they reached the microchannel plate (MCP) detectors, the data included MeV particles that are interpreted as having penetrated the side of the instrument. The SSJ5 MCP detectors are much more sensitive to these MeV particles than the SSJ4 channeltrons due to the larger sensitive area of

  4. A statistical comparison of SuperDARN spectral width boundaries and DMSP particle precipitation boundaries in the afternoon sector ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Chisham

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The open-closed magnetic field line boundary (OCB is best measured at the foot points of the boundary in the Earth's ionosphere where continuous and extensive spatiotemporal measurements can be made. The ability to make routine observations of this type is crucial if accurate global measurements of energy transfer processes occurring at the boundary, such as magnetic reconnection, are to become a reality. The spectral width boundary (SWB measured by the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN has been shown to be a reliable ionospheric proxy for the OCB at certain magnetic local times (MLTs. However, the reliability of the SWB proxy in the afternoon sector ionosphere (12:00-18:00 MLT has been questionable. In this paper we undertake a statistical comparison of the latitudinal locations of SWBs measured by SuperDARN and particle precipitation boundaries (PPBs measured by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP spacecraft, concentrating on the PPB which best approximates the location of the OCB. The latitudes of SWBs and PPBs were identified using automated algorithms applied to 5 years (1997-2001 of data measured in the 12:00-18:00 MLT range. A latitudinal difference was measured between each PPB and the nearest SWB within a ±10 min universal time (UT window and within a ±1 h MLT window. The results show that when the SWB is identified at higher geomagnetic latitudes (poleward of ~74, it is a good proxy for the OCB, with 76% of SWBs lying within 3 of the OCB. At lower geomagnetic latitudes (equatorward of ~74, the correlation is poor and the results suggest that most of the SWBs being identified represent ionospheric variations unassociated with the OCB, with only 32% of SWBs lying within 3 of the OCB. We propose that the low level of precipitating electron energy flux, typical of latitudes well equatorward of the OCB in the afternoon sector, may be a factor in enhancing spectral width values at these lower latitudes. A

  5. A statistical comparison of SuperDARN spectral width boundaries and DMSP particle precipitation boundaries in the morning sector ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Chisham

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Determining reliable proxies for the ionospheric signature of the open-closed field line boundary (OCB is crucial for making accurate ionospheric measurements of many magnetospheric processes (e.g. magnetic reconnection. This study compares the latitudes of Spectral Width Boundaries (SWBs, identified in the morning sector ionosphere using the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN, with Particle Precipitation Boundaries (PPBs determined using the low-altitude Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP spacecraft, in order to determine whether the SWB represents a good proxy for the ionospheric projection of the OCB. The latitudes of SWBs and PPBs were identified using automated algorithms applied to 5 years (1997-2001 of data measured in the 00:00-12:00 Magnetic Local Time (MLT range. A latitudinal difference was measured between each PPB and the nearest SWB within a ±10min Universal Time (UT window and within a ±1h MLT window. The results show that the SWB represents a good proxy for the OCB close to midnight (~00:00-02:00 MLT and noon (~08:00-12:00 MLT, but is located some distance (~2°-4° equatorward of the OCB across much of the morning sector ionosphere (~02:00-08:00 MLT. On the basis of this and other studies we deduce that the SWB is correlated with the poleward boundary of auroral emissions in the Lyman-Birge-Hopfield ``Long" (LBHL UV emission range and hence, that spectral width is inversely correlated with the energy flux of precipitating electrons. We further conclude that the combination of two factors may explain the spatial distribution of spectral width values in the polar ionospheres. The small-scale structure of the convection electric field leads to an enhancement in spectral width in regions close to the OCB, whereas increases in ionospheric conductivity (relating to the level of incident electron energy flux lead to a reduction in spectral width in regions just equatorward of the OCB.

  6. Regional urban area extraction using DMSP-OLS data and MODIS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X. Y.; Cai, C.; Li, P. J.

    2014-03-01

    Stable night lights data from Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Line-scan System (OLS) provide a unique proxy for anthropogenic development. This paper proposed two new methods of extracting regional urban extents using DMSP-OLS data, MODIS NDVI data and Land Surface Temperature (LST) data. MODIS NDVI data were used to reduce the over-glow effect, since urban areas generally have lower vegetation index values than the surrounding areas (e.g. agricultural and forest areas). On the other hand, urban areas generally show higher surface temperatures than the surrounding areas. Since urban area is the only class of interest, a one-class classifier, the One-Class Support Vector Machine (OCSVM), was selected as the classifier. The first method is classification of different data combinations for mapping: (1) OLS data and NDVI data, (2) OLS data and LST data, and (3) OLS data, NDVI data and LST data combined. The second one is a morphological reconstruction based method which combines classification results from OLS plus NDVI data and from OLS plus LST data. In the morphological reconstruction based method, the classification result using OLS and NDVI data was used as a mask image, while the classification result using OLS and LST data was used as a marker image. The north China area covering 14 provinces was selected as study area. Classification results from Landsat TM/ETM+ data from selected areas with different development levels were used as reference data to validate the proposed methods. The results show that the proposed methods effectively reduced the over-glow effect caused by DSMP-OLS data and achieved better results compared to the results from the traditional thresholding technique. The combination of all three datasets produces more accurate results than those of using any two datasets. The proposed morphological reconstruction based method achieves the best result in urban extent mapping.

  7. Management of Guidance, Navigation and Control Technologies for Spacecraft Formations under the NASA Cross-Enterprise Technology Development Program (CETDP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Kathy; Weidow, David; Hadaegh, Fred

    1999-01-01

    Breakthrough technology development is critical to securing the future of our space industry. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Cross-Enterprise Technology Development Program (CETDP) is developing critical space technologies that enable innovative and less costly missions, and spawn new mission opportunities through revolutionary, long-term, high-risk, high-payoff technology advances. The CETDP is a NASA-wide activity managed by the Advanced Technology and Mission Studies Division (AT&MS) at Headquarters Office of Space Science. Program management for CETDP is distributed across the multiple NASA Centers and draws on expertise throughout the Agency. The technology research activities are organized along Project-level divisions called thrust areas that are directly linked to the Agency's goals and objectives of the Enterprises: Earth Science, Space Science, Human Exploration and Development of Space; and the Office of the Chief Technologist's (OCT) strategic technology areas. Cross-Enterprise technology is defined as long-range strategic technologies that have broad potential to span the needs of more than one Enterprise. Technology needs are identified and prioritized by each of the primary customers. The thrust area manager (TAM) for each division is responsible for the ultimate success of technologies within their area, and can draw from industry, academia, other government agencies, other CETDP thrust areas, and other NASA Centers to accomplish the goals of the thrust area. An overview of the CETDP and description of the future directions of the thrust area called Distributed Spacecraft are presented in this paper. Revolutionary technologies developed within this thrust area will enable the implementation of a spatially distributed network of individual vehicles, or assets, collaborating as a single collective unit, and exhibiting a common system-wide capability to accomplish a shared objective. With such a capability, new Earth and space

  8. Management of Guidance, Navigation, and Control Technologies for Spacecraft Formations Under the NASA Cross Enterprise Technology Development Program (CETDP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Kathy; Weidow, David; Hadaegh, Fred

    1999-01-01

    Breakthrough technology development is critical to securing the future of our space industry. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Cross-Enterprise Technology Development Program (CETDP) is developing critical space technologies that enable innovative and less costly missions, and spawn new mission opportunities through revolutionary, long-term, high-risk, high-payoff technology advances. The CETDP is a NASA-wide activity managed by the Advanced Technology and Mission Studies Division (AT&MS) at Headquarters Office of Space Science. Program management for CETDP is distributed across the multiple NASA Centers and draws on expertise throughout the Agency. The technology research activities are organized along Project-level divisions called thrust areas that are directly linked to the Agency's goals and objectives of the Enterprises: Earth Science, Space Science, Human Exploration and Development of Space; and the Office of the Chief Technologist's (OCT) strategic technology areas. Cross-Enterprise technology is defined as long-range strategic technologies that have broad potential to span the needs of more than one Enterprise. Technology needs are identified and prioritized by each of the primary customers. The thrust area manager (TAM) for each division is responsible for the ultimate success of technologies within their area, and can draw from industry, academia, other government agencies, other CETDP thrust areas, and other NASA Centers to accomplish the goals of the thrust area. An overview of the CETDP and description of the future directions of the thrust area called Distributed Spacecraft are presented in this paper. Revolutionary technologies developed within this thrust area will enable the implementation of a spatially distributed network of individual vehicles, or assets, collaborating as a single collective unit, and exhibiting a common system-wide capability to accomplish a shared objective. With such a capability, new Earth and space

  9. Spacecraft sterilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalfayan, S. H.

    1972-01-01

    Spacecraft sterilization is a vital factor in projects for the successful biological exploration of other planets. The microorganisms of major concern are the fungi and bacteria. Sterilization procedures are oriented toward the destruction of bacterial spores. Gaseous sterilants are examined, giving attention to formaldehyde, beta-propiolactone, ethylene oxide, and the chemistry of the bactericidal action of sterilants. Radiation has been seriously considered as another method for spacecraft sterilization. Dry heat sterilization is discussed together with the effects of ethylene oxide decontamination and dry heat sterilization on materials.

  10. Internet Access to Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rash, James; Parise, Ron; Hogie, Keith; Criscuolo, Ed; Langston, Jim; Jackson, Chris; Price, Harold; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Operating Missions as Nodes on the Internet (OMNI) project at NASA's Goddard Space flight Center (GSFC), is demonstrating the use of standard Internet protocols for spacecraft communication systems. This year, demonstrations of Internet access to a flying spacecraft have been performed with the UoSAT-12 spacecraft owned and operated by Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd. (SSTL). Previously, demonstrations were performed using a ground satellite simulator and NASA's Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). These activities are part of NASA's Space Operations Management Office (SOMO) Technology Program, The work is focused on defining the communication architecture for future NASA missions to support both NASA's "faster, better, cheaper" concept and to enable new types of collaborative science. The use of standard Internet communication technology for spacecraft simplifies design, supports initial integration and test across an IP based network, and enables direct communication between scientists and instruments as well as between different spacecraft, The most recent demonstrations consisted of uploading an Internet Protocol (IP) software stack to the UoSAT- 12 spacecraft, simple modifications to the SSTL ground station, and a series of tests to measure performance of various Internet applications. The spacecraft was reconfigured on orbit at very low cost. The total period between concept and the first tests was only 3 months. The tests included basic network connectivity (PING), automated clock synchronization (NTP), and reliable file transfers (FTP). Future tests are planned to include additional protocols such as Mobile IP, e-mail, and virtual private networks (VPN) to enable automated, operational spacecraft communication networks. The work performed and results of the initial phase of tests are summarized in this paper. This work is funded and directed by NASA/GSFC with technical leadership by CSC in arrangement with SSTL, and Vytek Wireless.

  11. Development of a single-phase harmonic power flow program to study the 20 kHz AC power system for large spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, L. Alan; Kankam, M. David

    1991-01-01

    The development of software is described to aid in design and analysis of AC power systems for large spacecraft. The algorithm is an important version of harmonic power flow program, HARMFLO, used for the study of AC power quality. The new program is applicable to three-phase systems typified by terrestrial power systems, and single-phase systems characteristic of space power systems. The modified HARMFLO accommodates system operating frequencies ranging from terrestrial 60 Hz to and beyond aerospace 20 kHz, and can handle both source and load-end harmonic distortions. Comparison of simulation and test results of a representative spacecraft power system shows a satisfactory correlation. Recommendations are made for the direction of future improvements to the software, to enhance its usefulness to power system designer and analysts.

  12. RSS SSM/I OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS DAILY FROM DMSP F11 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The RSS SSM/I Ocean Product Grids Daily from DMSP F11 netCDF dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor...

  13. RSS SSMIS OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS WEEKLY AVERAGE FROM DMSP F17 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The RSS SSMIS Ocean Product Grids Weekly Average from DMSP F17 netCDF dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor...

  14. RSS SSMIS OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS DAILY FROM DMSP F17 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The RSS SSMIS Ocean Product Grids Daily from DMSP F17 netCDF dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor...

  15. Raman Lidar Calibration for the DMSP SSM/T-2 Microwave Water Vapor Sensor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wessel, J

    2000-01-01

    Campaigns were conducted at the Pacific Missile Range Facility, Barking Sands, Kauai, investigating Raman lidar as a method to improve calibration of the DMSP SSM/T-2 microwave water vapor profiling instrument...

  16. DMSP-F8 SSM/I Pathfinder Global Level 2 Sea Ice Concentrations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — These sea ice concentrations have been generated by applying the NASA Team algorithm to DMSP F8 SSM/I brightness temperature observations from 19 GHz (vertical and...

  17. RSS SSMIS OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS 3-DAY AVERAGE FROM DMSP F16 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The RSS SSMIS Ocean Product Grids 3-Day Average from DMSP F16 netCDF dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor...

  18. RSS SSMIS OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS MONTHLY AVERAGE FROM DMSP F17 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The RSS SSMIS Ocean Product Grids Monthly Average from DMSP F17 netCDF dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special...

  19. RSS SSM/I OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS MONTHLY AVERAGE FROM DMSP F15 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The RSS SSM/I Ocean Product Grids Monthly Average from DMSP F15 netCDF dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special...

  20. RSS SSM/I OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS MONTHLY AVERAGE FROM DMSP F13 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The RSS SSM/I Ocean Product Grids Monthly Average from DMSP F13 netCDF dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special...

  1. RSS SSMIS OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS WEEKLY AVERAGE FROM DMSP F16 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The RSS SSMIS Ocean Product Grids Weekly Average from DMSP F16 netCDF dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor...

  2. RSS SSM/I OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS DAILY FROM DMSP F14 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The RSS SSM/I Ocean Product Grids Daily from DMSP F14 netCDF dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor...

  3. RSS SSM/I OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS MONTHLY AVERAGE FROM DMSP F14 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The RSS SSM/I Ocean Product Grids Monthly Average from DMSP F14 netCDF dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special...

  4. RSS SSM/I OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS DAILY FROM DMSP F15 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The RSS SSM/I Ocean Product Grids Daily from DMSP F15 netCDF dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor...

  5. RSS SSM/I OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS DAILY FROM DMSP F13 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The RSS SSM/I Ocean Product Grids Daily from DMSP F13 netCDF dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor...

  6. RSS SSM/I OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS MONTHLY AVERAGE FROM DMSP F11 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The RSS SSM/I Ocean Product Grids Monthly Average from DMSP F11 netCDF dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special...

  7. RSS SSM/I OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS MONTHLY AVERAGE FROM DMSP F10 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The RSS SSM/I Ocean Product Grids Monthly Average from DMSP F10 netCDF dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special...

  8. RSS SSM/I OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS DAILY FROM DMSP F10 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The RSS SSM/I Ocean Product Grids Daily from DMSP F10 netCDF dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor...

  9. RSS SSMIS OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS DAILY FROM DMSP F16 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The RSS SSMIS Ocean Product Grids Daily from DMSP F16 netCDF dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor...

  10. RSS SSMIS OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS MONTHLY AVERAGE FROM DMSP F16 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The RSS SSMIS Ocean Product Grids Monthly Average from DMSP F16 netCDF dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special...

  11. RSS SSMIS OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS 3-DAY AVERAGE FROM DMSP F17 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The RSS SSMIS Ocean Product Grids 3-Day Average from DMSP F17 netCDF dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor...

  12. Near-Real-Time DMSP SSM/I-SSMIS Daily Polar Gridded Brightness Temperatures

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Near-Real-Time DMSP SSM/I-SSMIS Daily Polar Gridded Brightness Temperature product provides near-real-time brightness temperatures for both the Northern and...

  13. DMSP-consuming bacteria associated with the calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa (Dana)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, K.W.; Visscher, P.T.; Dam, H.G.

    2001-01-01

    (4) after the copepod fed on DMSP-containing alga. DCB abundance associated with fecal pellets averaged 1.2 X 10(4) cells pellet(-1). In enrichment cultures, the DCB grew with a doubling time of 1.1- 2.9 days, and consumed DMSP at a rate of 4.5-7.5 fmol cell(-1) day(-1). The apparent DMSP-to-DMS conversion......DMSP-consuming bacteria (DCB) were recovered from the body and fecal pellets of the copepod Acartia tonsa (Dana). The most probable number of DCB associated with starved A. tonsa was 9.2 X 10(2) cells copepod(-1). The abundance of DCB recovered from the copepod body increased to 1.6-2.8 X 10...

  14. Dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP as an Indicator of Bleaching Tolerance in Scleractinian Corals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham B. Jones

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Thermal tolerance tests on Acropora millepora, a common Indo-Pacific hard coral, have shown that adult corals can acquire increased thermal tolerance by shuffling existing type C to type D Symbiodinium zooxanthellae when subjected to increased seawater temperatures. We report here dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP concentrations in A. millepora and examine links between DMSP concentrations, zooxanthellae clade, and bleaching tolerance. DMSP analysis on native and transplanted corals from three locations in the Great Barrier Reef indicated that the lower thermal tolerance in type C zooxanthellae coincided with variable DMSP concentrations, whilst the more thermal tolerant type D zooxanthellae had more stable areal DMSP concentrations as seawater temperatures increased. Our results suggest this increased thermal tolerance in type D zooxanthellae may reflect the ability of these coral symbionts to conserve their antioxidant DMSP levels to relatively constant concentrations, enabling the coral to overcome the build-up of oxygen free radicals in the cytoplasm of A. millepora. A conceptual diagram illustrates how the antioxidants DMS (P participate in the bleaching process by scavenging oxygen free radicals and form DMSO, thus moderating coral bleaching and increasing thermotolerance.

  15. The LASSII Program: Objectives, Spacecraft Design, and Mission Scenarios for Full-Scale, Shuttle-Launched, Free-Flyer Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-16

    Control Unit ( ECU ) which provides buffering and fault unloading isolation between the "The product assurance (5.8) and orbital mectanics (5.9...to regu- lated bus power, both the PCU and ECU switch ± 12 V regulated power to experiment and housekeep- ing instrumentation loads. Ordnance...storage in on-board tape recorders or memory. In addition, MICRO- CATS will decode, authenticate , and distribute to all spacecraft systems commands

  16. Spatiotemporal Evolution of the Imbalanced Regional Development in Mainland China Using Dmsp-Ols Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, K.; Jia, T.

    2017-09-01

    The Defense Meteorological Satellite Programs Operational Linescan System (DMSP-OLS) nighttime lights imagery has been widely used to monitor economic activities and regional development in recent decades. In this paper, we firstly processed the nighttime light imageries of the Mainland China from 1992 to 2013 due to the radiation or geometric errors. Secondly, by dividing the Mainland China into seven regions, we found high correlation between the sum light values and GDP of each region. Thirdly, we extracted the economic centers of each region based on their nighttime light images. Through the analysis, we found the distribution of these economic centers was relatively concentrated and the migration of these economic centers showed certain directional trend or circuitous changes, which suggested the imbalanced socio-economic development of each region. Then, we calculated the Regional Development Gini of each region using the nighttime light data, which indicated that social-economic development in South China presents great imbalance while it is relatively balanced in Southwest China. This study would benefit the macroeconomic control to regional economic development and the introduction of appropriate economic policies from the national level.

  17. FSD- FLEXIBLE SPACECRAFT DYNAMICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedor, J. V.

    1994-01-01

    The Flexible Spacecraft Dynamics and Control program (FSD) was developed to aid in the simulation of a large class of flexible and rigid spacecraft. FSD is extremely versatile and can be used in attitude dynamics and control analysis as well as in-orbit support of deployment and control of spacecraft. FSD has been used to analyze the in-orbit attitude performance and antenna deployment of the RAE and IMP class satellites, and the HAWKEYE, SCATHA, EXOS-B, and Dynamics Explorer flight programs. FSD is applicable to inertially-oriented spinning, earth oriented, or gravity gradient stabilized spacecraft. The spacecraft flexibility is treated in a continuous manner (instead of finite element) by employing a series of shape functions for the flexible elements. Torsion, bending, and three flexible modes can be simulated for every flexible element. FSD can handle up to ten tubular elements in an arbitrary orientation. FSD is appropriate for studies involving the active control of pointed instruments, with options for digital PID (proportional, integral, derivative) error feedback controllers and control actuators such as thrusters and momentum wheels. The input to FSD is in four parts: 1) Orbit Construction FSD calculates a Keplerian orbit with environmental effects such as drag, magnetic torque, solar pressure, thermal effects, and thruster adjustments; or the user can supply a GTDS format orbit tape for a particular satellite/time-span; 2) Control words - for options such as gravity gradient effects, control torques, and integration ranges; 3) Mathematical descriptions of spacecraft, appendages, and control systems- including element geometry, properties, attitudes, libration damping, tip mass inertia, thermal expansion, magnetic tracking, and gimbal simulation options; and 4) Desired state variables to output, i.e., geometries, bending moments, fast Fourier transform plots, gimbal rotation, filter vectors, etc. All FSD input is of free format, namelist construction. FSD

  18. DMSP-LYASE ACTIVITY IN A SPRING PHYTOPLANKTON BLOOM OFF THE DUTCH COAST, RELATED TO PHAEOCYSTIS SP ABUNDANCE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    STEFELS, J; DIJKHUIZEN, L; GIESKES, WWC

    An enzyme assay for measuring dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP)-lyase activity was applied to natural sea water samples taken during the 1993 spring bloom off the Dutch coast. When relating the measured DMSP-lyase activity to the most abundant algal species found during the cruise, a significant

  19. The origin of DMS(P)cies : a survey of the sources and sinks of the two dimethylated sulphur compounds ß-dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP) and dimethylsulphide (DMS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwint, Richard Leendert Jan

    1997-01-01

    Dimethylsulphide (DMS), is a ubiquitous trace gas, derived from the precursor B-dimethyl-sulphoniopropionate (DMSP), which is produced by many marine algae. The function of DMSP in algae is still under discussion; it has been suggested that DMSP acts as a compatible solute under nitrogen limited

  20. Evolution of the energy consumed by street lighting in Spain estimated with DMSP-OLS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez de Miguel, Alejandro; Zamorano, Jaime; Gómez Castaño, José; Pascual, Sergio

    2014-05-01

    We present the results of the analysis of satellite imagery to study light pollution in Spain. Both calibrated and non-calibrated DMSP-OLS images were used. We describe the method to scale the non-calibrated DMSP-OLS images which allows us to use differential photometry techniques in order to study the evolution of the light pollution. Population data and DMSP-OLS satellite calibrated images for the year 2006 were compared to test the reliability of official statistics in public lighting consumption. We found a relationship between the population and the energy consumption which is valid for several regions. Finally the true evolution of the electricity consumption for street lighting in Spain from 1992 to 2010 was derived; it has been doubled in the last 18 years in most of the provinces.

  1. Spacecraft crew escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, B. A.

    Safe crew escape from spacecraft is extremely difficult to engineer and has large cost and vehicle payload penalties. Because of these factors calculated risks have apparently been taken and only the most rudimentary means of crew protecion have been provided for space programs. Although designed for maximum reliability and safety a calculated risk is taken that on-balance it is more acceptable to risk the loss of possibly some or all occupants than introduce the mass, cost and complexity of an escape system. This philosophy was accepted until the Challenger tragedy. It is now clear that the use of this previously acceptable logic is invalid and that provisions must be made for spacecraft crew escape in the event of a catastrophic accident. This paper reviews the funded studies and subsequent proposals undertaken by Martin-Baker for the use of both encapsullated and open ejection seats for the Hermes Spaceplane. The technical difficulties, special innovations and future applications are also discussed.

  2. Dynamics of Urbanization Levels in China from 1992 to 2012: Perspective from DMSP/OLS Nighttime Light Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Gao

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The authenticity and reliability of urbanization levels measured by different indicators in China have not reached a consensus, which may impede our understanding of the process of urbanization and its impacts on the environment. The objective of this study was to describe a reliable method of estimating urbanization level based on the Operational Line-scan System (OLS on the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP nighttime light data and to analyze the dynamics of urbanization levels in China from 1992 to 2012. We calculated the comprehensive urbanization level at the national, provincial, and county scales using a compounded night light index (CNLI and compared the change rate of CNLI with those of the other two conventional urbanization level indicators, proportion of the nonagricultural population and proportion of built-up area. Our results showed that CNLI derived from the DMSP/OLS data set provided a relatively reliable and accurate measure of the comprehensive urbanization level in China. During the last two decades, China has experienced continued and rapid urbanization with large regional variations. The CNLI increased 3.12 times, from 1.72 × 10−3 to 7.09 × 10−3. The annual increases of CNLI in eastern provinces were much faster than those in western provinces. In addition, we found that the rates of change in these three indicators were consistent for most provinces with the exception of the four municipalities (Beijing, Tianjin, Shanghai, and Chongqing and a few eastern coastal provinces (Jiangsu, Zhejiang, Fujian, and Guangdong. Because the imbalance among population growth, urban expansion and socioeconomic development may affect cities’ sustainable development, we should pay more attention to these regions with large disparities between different indicators.

  3. DET/MPS - THE GSFC ENERGY BALANCE PROGRAM, DIRECT ENERGY TRANSFER/MULTIMISSION SPACECRAFT MODULAR POWER SYSTEM (MACINTOSH A/UX VERSION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagielski, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    The DET/MPS programs model and simulate the Direct Energy Transfer and Multimission Spacecraft Modular Power System in order to aid both in design and in analysis of orbital energy balance. Typically, the DET power system has the solar array directly to the spacecraft bus, and the central building block of MPS is the Standard Power Regulator Unit. DET/MPS allows a minute-by-minute simulation of the power system's performance as it responds to various orbital parameters, focusing its output on solar array output and battery characteristics. While this package is limited in terms of orbital mechanics, it is sufficient to calculate eclipse and solar array data for circular or non-circular orbits. DET/MPS can be adjusted to run one or sequential orbits up to about one week, simulated time. These programs have been used on a variety of Goddard Space Flight Center spacecraft projects. DET/MPS is written in FORTRAN 77 with some VAX-type extensions. Any FORTRAN 77 compiler that includes VAX extensions should be able to compile and run the program with little or no modifications. The compiler must at least support free-form (or tab-delineated) source format and 'do do-while end-do' control structures. DET/MPS is available for three platforms: GSC-13374, for DEC VAX series computers running VMS, is available in DEC VAX Backup format on a 9-track 1600 BPI tape (standard distribution) or TK50 tape cartridge; GSC-13443, for UNIX-based computers, is available on a .25 inch streaming magnetic tape cartridge in UNIX tar format; and GSC-13444, for Macintosh computers running AU/X with either the NKR FORTRAN or AbSoft MacFORTRAN II compilers, is available on a 3.5 inch 800K Macintosh format diskette. Source code and test data are supplied. The UNIX version of DET requires 90K of main memory for execution. DET/MPS was developed in 1990. A/UX and Macintosh are registered trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc. VMS, DEC VAX and TK50 are trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation. UNIX is a

  4. DET/MPS - THE GSFC ENERGY BALANCE PROGRAM, DIRECT ENERGY TRANSFER/MULTIMISSION SPACECRAFT MODULAR POWER SYSTEM (DEC VAX VMS VERSION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagielski, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    The DET/MPS programs model and simulate the Direct Energy Transfer and Multimission Spacecraft Modular Power System in order to aid both in design and in analysis of orbital energy balance. Typically, the DET power system has the solar array directly to the spacecraft bus, and the central building block of MPS is the Standard Power Regulator Unit. DET/MPS allows a minute-by-minute simulation of the power system's performance as it responds to various orbital parameters, focusing its output on solar array output and battery characteristics. While this package is limited in terms of orbital mechanics, it is sufficient to calculate eclipse and solar array data for circular or non-circular orbits. DET/MPS can be adjusted to run one or sequential orbits up to about one week, simulated time. These programs have been used on a variety of Goddard Space Flight Center spacecraft projects. DET/MPS is written in FORTRAN 77 with some VAX-type extensions. Any FORTRAN 77 compiler that includes VAX extensions should be able to compile and run the program with little or no modifications. The compiler must at least support free-form (or tab-delineated) source format and 'do do-while end-do' control structures. DET/MPS is available for three platforms: GSC-13374, for DEC VAX series computers running VMS, is available in DEC VAX Backup format on a 9-track 1600 BPI tape (standard distribution) or TK50 tape cartridge; GSC-13443, for UNIX-based computers, is available on a .25 inch streaming magnetic tape cartridge in UNIX tar format; and GSC-13444, for Macintosh computers running AU/X with either the NKR FORTRAN or AbSoft MacFORTRAN II compilers, is available on a 3.5 inch 800K Macintosh format diskette. Source code and test data are supplied. The UNIX version of DET requires 90K of main memory for execution. DET/MPS was developed in 1990. A/UX and Macintosh are registered trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc. VMS, DEC VAX and TK50 are trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation. UNIX is a

  5. Spacecraft Thermal Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlbert, Kathryn Miller

    2009-01-01

    In the 21st century, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Russian Federal Space Agency, the National Space Agency of Ukraine, the China National Space Administration, and many other organizations representing spacefaring nations shall continue or newly implement robust space programs. Additionally, business corporations are pursuing commercialization of space for enabling space tourism and capital business ventures. Future space missions are likely to include orbiting satellites, orbiting platforms, space stations, interplanetary vehicles, planetary surface missions, and planetary research probes. Many of these missions will include humans to conduct research for scientific and terrestrial benefits and for space tourism, and this century will therefore establish a permanent human presence beyond Earth s confines. Other missions will not include humans, but will be autonomous (e.g., satellites, robotic exploration), and will also serve to support the goals of exploring space and providing benefits to Earth s populace. This section focuses on thermal management systems for human space exploration, although the guiding principles can be applied to unmanned space vehicles as well. All spacecraft require a thermal management system to maintain a tolerable thermal environment for the spacecraft crew and/or equipment. The requirements for human rating and the specified controlled temperature range (approximately 275 K - 310 K) for crewed spacecraft are unique, and key design criteria stem from overall vehicle and operational/programatic considerations. These criteria include high reliability, low mass, minimal power requirements, low development and operational costs, and high confidence for mission success and safety. This section describes the four major subsystems for crewed spacecraft thermal management systems, and design considerations for each. Additionally, some examples of specialized or advanced thermal system technologies are presented

  6. Moderate Drought Stress Induces Increased Foliar Dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP Concentration and Isoprene Emission in Two Contrasting Ecotypes of Arundo donax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Haworth

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The function of dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP in plants is unclear. It has been proposed as an antioxidant, osmolyte and overflow for excess energy under stress conditions. The formation of DMSP is part of the methionine (MET pathway that is involved in plant stress responses. We used a new analytical approach to accurately quantify the changes in DMSP concentration that occurred in two ecotypes of the biomass crop Arundo donax subject to moderate drought stress under field conditions. The ecotypes of A. donax were from a hot semi-arid habitat in Morocco and a warm-humid environment in Central Italy. The Moroccan ecotype showed more pronounced reductions in photosynthesis, stomatal conductance and photochemical electron transport than the Italian ecotype. An increase in isoprene emission occurred in both ecotypes alongside enhanced foliar concentrations of DMSP, indicative of a protective function of these two metabolites in the amelioration of the deleterious effects of excess energy and oxidative stress. This is consistent with the modification of carbon within the methyl-erythritol and MET pathways responsible for increased synthesis of isoprene and DMSP under moderate drought. The results of this study indicate that DMSP is an important adaptive component of the stress response regulated via the MET pathway in A. donax. DMSP is likely a multifunctional molecule playing a number of roles in the response of A. donax to reduced water availability.

  7. The relative abundance of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) among other zwitterions in branching coral at Heron Island, southern Great Barrier Reef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Hilton B; Deschaseaux, Elisabeth S M; Jones, Graham B; Eyre, Bradley D

    2017-07-01

    Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) and eleven other target zwitterions were quantified in the branch tips of six Acropora species and Stylophora pistillata hard coral growing on the reef flat surrounding Heron Island in the southern Great Barrier Reef (GBR), Australia. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS) was used for sample analysis with isotope dilution MS applied to quantify DMSP. The concentration of DMSP was ten times greater in A. aspera than A. valida, with this difference being maintained throughout the spring, summer and winter seasons. In contrast, glycine betaine was present in significantly higher concentrations in these species during the summer than the winter. Exposure of branch tips of A. aspera to air and hypo-saline seawater for up to 1 h did not alter the concentrations of DMSP present in the coral when compared with control samples. DMSP was the most abundant target zwitterion in the six Acropora species examined, ranging from 44-78% of all target zwitterions in A. millepora and A. aspera, respectively. In contrast, DMSP only accounted for 7% in S. pistillata, with glycine betaine and stachydrine collectively accounting for 88% of all target zwitterions in this species. The abundance of DMSP in the six Acropora species examined points to Acropora coral being an important source for the biogeochemical cycling of sulfur throughout the GBR, since this reef-building branching coral dominates the coral cover of the GBR. Graphical Abstract HILIC-MS extracted ion chromatogram showing zwitterionic metabolites from the branching coral Acropora isopora.

  8. RSS SSM/I OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS WEEKLY AVERAGE FROM DMSP F10 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The RSS SSM/I Ocean Product Grids Weekly Average from DMSP F10 netCDF dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor...

  9. RSS SSM/I OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS WEEKLY AVERAGE FROM DMSP F15 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The RSS SSM/I Ocean Product Grids Weekly Average from DMSP F15 netCDF dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor...

  10. RSS SSM/I OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS WEEKLY AVERAGE FROM DMSP F13 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The RSS SSM/I Ocean Product Grids Weekly Average from DMSP F13 netCDF dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor...

  11. RSS SSM/I OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS DAILY FROM DMSP F8 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The RSS SSM/I Ocean Product Grids Daily from DMSP F8 netCDF dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor Microwave...

  12. RSS SSM/I OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS MONTHLY AVERAGE FROM DMSP F8 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The RSS SSM/I Ocean Product Grids Monthly Average from DMSP F8 netCDF dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor...

  13. RSS SSM/I OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS WEEKLY AVERAGE FROM DMSP F8 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The RSS SSM/I Ocean Products Grid Weekly Average from DMSP F8 netCDF dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor...

  14. RSS SSM/I OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS WEEKLY AVERAGE FROM DMSP F14 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The RSS SSM/I Ocean Product Grids Weekly Average from DMSP F14 netCDF dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor...

  15. RSS SSM/I OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS WEEKLY AVERAGE FROM DMSP F11 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The RSS SSM/I Ocean Product Grids Weekly Average from DMSP F11 netCDF dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor...

  16. DMSP : tetrahydrofolate methyltransferase from the marine sulfate-reducing bacterium strain WN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, M; Hansen, TA

    Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), an important compatible solute of many marine algae, can be metabolised by bacteria via cleavage to dimethylsulfide and acrylate or via an initial demethylation. This is the first report on the purification of an enzyme that specifically catalyses the demethylation

  17. Utility of DMSP-SSM/I for integrated water vapour over the Indian seas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Recent algorithms for Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (DMSP-SSM/I) satellite data are used for estimating integrated water vapour over the Indian seas. ... On the basis of this algorithm, distribution of integrated water vapour is determined during the monsoon depression (22nd{27th July, 1992) that formed over the Bay of ...

  18. Utility of DMSP-SSM/I for integrated water vapour over the Indian seas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging Solutions)

    Recent algorithms for Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (DMSP-SSM/I) satellite data are used for estimating integrated water vapour over the Indian seas. Integrated water vapour obtained from these algorithms is compared with that derived from radiosonde observations at Minicoy and Port. Blair islands. Algorithm-3 of ...

  19. Analyzing the Location of the Ion Convection Reversal Boundary in Polar Regions using DMSP Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tengdin, P. M.; Emery, B. A.; Maute, A. I.; Knipp, D. J.; Kilcommons, L.

    2011-12-01

    Measurements from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's (DMSP) F13 Satellite were used for a study of convection location in the polar regions of the earth's ionosphere. The satellite was in a sun-synchronous orbit in the dawn-dusk meridian. The data available corresponded to 4 second averages. Using a 20-second smoothing technique, the zero crossings in the ion drift velocity values were determined for each pass of the satellite. OMNI data were used to calculate the average IMF conditions for each pass from 5 minute data with a 10 minute lag to allow the IMF signal to propagate to the ionosphere. This study only considered passes with a Bz southward component where By was smaller than the Bz component. The location of the convection reversal boundary (CRB), or zero crossing in ion drift velocity, was archived for each Bz negative pass. This survey was conducted over the lifetime of the F13 satellite (1995-2009). The Weimer 2005 model was run under the same geophysical conditions in order to compare these models with the satellite observations. Model estimates of the CRB, or the location of the minimum and maximum electric potentials, were considered 'good' if they fell within 2 degrees of the 20-second observations, where 20 seconds corresponds to 1.176 degrees at 850 km. Preliminary results suggest that the model CRBs are 'good' about 65% of the time under Bz negative conditions. The model had a tendency to place the convection reversal boundary too far towards the pole, and showed higher accuracy levels on the dawn side of the earth than on the dusk side.

  20. DMSP F16 SSMIS PLO Anomaly Mitigation and LAS Sounding Channel Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, T.; Swadley, S. D.; Poe, G.; Uliana, A.; Shen, P.

    2016-12-01

    Since April, 2013, the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F16 Special Sensor Microwave Imager Sounder (SSMIS) instrument has suffered from a failed 56.4 GHz Phased Locked Oscillator (PLO). The out-of-lock frequency sweeping of the PLO resulting from this anomaly has significantly affected the spectral characteristics of the F16 SSMIS Lower and Upper Atmosphere Sounding (LAS/UAS) channels. The spectral passband characteristics are inputs to the Fast Radiative Transfer Models (Fast RTMs) used within Data Assimilation (DA) systems, and without compensating for the "effective" spectral characteristics of each channel post-PLO failure, the RTM simulated versus observed brightness temperatures exhibit large biases and standard deviations. This has resulted in the loss of F16 LAS and UAS temperature sensitive channels within Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) systems. The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) Calibration/Validation (CalVal) team has recently developed a Line-by-line (LBL) RTM for the SSMIS along with updated LAS channel passband shapes in order to account for the negative effects of a sweeping PLO. These were submitted to the developers of the Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) who have since provided updated F16 SSMIS spectral coefficients for use with CRTM versions 2.0.5 and 2.2.1. Trials were performed in the Navy's Global Environmental Model (NAVGEM) using the updated spectral coefficients and this has proven an effective method for reducing LAS channel biases and standard deviations, especially for channels 5, 6 and 7. Biases for all channels are now less than |± 0.6K| with departure standard deviations comparable to the measurement uncertainty for channels 2-7.

  1. Biochemical, Kinetic, and Spectroscopic Characterization of Ruegeria pomeroyi DddW--A Mononuclear Iron-Dependent DMSP Lyase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam E Brummett

    Full Text Available The osmolyte dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP is a key nutrient in marine environments and its catabolism by bacteria through enzymes known as DMSP lyases generates dimethylsulfide (DMS, a gas of importance in climate regulation, the sulfur cycle, and signaling to higher organisms. Despite the environmental significance of DMSP lyases, little is known about how they function at the mechanistic level. In this study we biochemically characterize DddW, a DMSP lyase from the model roseobacter Ruegeria pomeroyi DSS-3. DddW is a 16.9 kDa enzyme that contains a C-terminal cupin domain and liberates acrylate, a proton, and DMS from the DMSP substrate. Our studies show that as-purified DddW is a metalloenzyme, like the DddQ and DddP DMSP lyases, but contains an iron cofactor. The metal cofactor is essential for DddW DMSP lyase activity since addition of the metal chelator EDTA abolishes its enzymatic activity, as do substitution mutations of key metal-binding residues in the cupin motif (His81, His83, Glu87, and His121. Measurements of metal binding affinity and catalytic activity indicate that Fe(II is most likely the preferred catalytic metal ion with a nanomolar binding affinity. Stoichiometry studies suggest DddW requires one Fe(II per monomer. Electronic absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR studies show an interaction between NO and Fe(II-DddW, with NO binding to the EPR silent Fe(II site giving rise to an EPR active species (g = 4.29, 3.95, 2.00. The change in the rhombicity of the EPR signal is observed in the presence of DMSP, indicating that substrate binds to the iron site without displacing bound NO. This work provides insight into the mechanism of DMSP cleavage catalyzed by DddW.

  2. Biochemical, Kinetic, and Spectroscopic Characterization of Ruegeria pomeroyi DddW—A Mononuclear Iron-Dependent DMSP Lyase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummett, Adam E.; Schnicker, Nicholas J.; Crider, Alexander; Todd, Jonathan D.; Dey, Mishtu

    2015-01-01

    The osmolyte dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) is a key nutrient in marine environments and its catabolism by bacteria through enzymes known as DMSP lyases generates dimethylsulfide (DMS), a gas of importance in climate regulation, the sulfur cycle, and signaling to higher organisms. Despite the environmental significance of DMSP lyases, little is known about how they function at the mechanistic level. In this study we biochemically characterize DddW, a DMSP lyase from the model roseobacter Ruegeria pomeroyi DSS-3. DddW is a 16.9 kDa enzyme that contains a C-terminal cupin domain and liberates acrylate, a proton, and DMS from the DMSP substrate. Our studies show that as-purified DddW is a metalloenzyme, like the DddQ and DddP DMSP lyases, but contains an iron cofactor. The metal cofactor is essential for DddW DMSP lyase activity since addition of the metal chelator EDTA abolishes its enzymatic activity, as do substitution mutations of key metal-binding residues in the cupin motif (His81, His83, Glu87, and His121). Measurements of metal binding affinity and catalytic activity indicate that Fe(II) is most likely the preferred catalytic metal ion with a nanomolar binding affinity. Stoichiometry studies suggest DddW requires one Fe(II) per monomer. Electronic absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies show an interaction between NO and Fe(II)-DddW, with NO binding to the EPR silent Fe(II) site giving rise to an EPR active species (g = 4.29, 3.95, 2.00). The change in the rhombicity of the EPR signal is observed in the presence of DMSP, indicating that substrate binds to the iron site without displacing bound NO. This work provides insight into the mechanism of DMSP cleavage catalyzed by DddW. PMID:25993446

  3. Biochemical, Kinetic, and Spectroscopic Characterization of Ruegeria pomeroyi DddW--A Mononuclear Iron-Dependent DMSP Lyase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummett, Adam E; Schnicker, Nicholas J; Crider, Alexander; Todd, Jonathan D; Dey, Mishtu

    2015-01-01

    The osmolyte dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) is a key nutrient in marine environments and its catabolism by bacteria through enzymes known as DMSP lyases generates dimethylsulfide (DMS), a gas of importance in climate regulation, the sulfur cycle, and signaling to higher organisms. Despite the environmental significance of DMSP lyases, little is known about how they function at the mechanistic level. In this study we biochemically characterize DddW, a DMSP lyase from the model roseobacter Ruegeria pomeroyi DSS-3. DddW is a 16.9 kDa enzyme that contains a C-terminal cupin domain and liberates acrylate, a proton, and DMS from the DMSP substrate. Our studies show that as-purified DddW is a metalloenzyme, like the DddQ and DddP DMSP lyases, but contains an iron cofactor. The metal cofactor is essential for DddW DMSP lyase activity since addition of the metal chelator EDTA abolishes its enzymatic activity, as do substitution mutations of key metal-binding residues in the cupin motif (His81, His83, Glu87, and His121). Measurements of metal binding affinity and catalytic activity indicate that Fe(II) is most likely the preferred catalytic metal ion with a nanomolar binding affinity. Stoichiometry studies suggest DddW requires one Fe(II) per monomer. Electronic absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies show an interaction between NO and Fe(II)-DddW, with NO binding to the EPR silent Fe(II) site giving rise to an EPR active species (g = 4.29, 3.95, 2.00). The change in the rhombicity of the EPR signal is observed in the presence of DMSP, indicating that substrate binds to the iron site without displacing bound NO. This work provides insight into the mechanism of DMSP cleavage catalyzed by DddW.

  4. Dimethylsulphopropionate (DMSP) and proline from the surface of the brown alga Fucus vesiculosus inhibit bacterial attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, M; Rempt, M; Gebser, B; Grueneberg, J; Pohnert, G; Weinberger, F

    2012-01-01

    It was demonstrated previously that polar and non-polar surface extracts of the brown alga Fucus vesiculosus collected during winter from the Kiel Bight (Germany) inhibited bacterial attachment at natural concentrations. The present study describes the bioassay-guided identification of the active metabolites from the polar fraction. Chromatographic separation on a size-exclusion liquid chromatography column and bioassays identified an active fraction that was further investigated using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. This fraction contained the metabolites dimethylsulphopropionate (DMSP), proline and alanine. DMSP and proline caused the anti-attachment activity. The metabolites were further quantified on the algal surface together with its associated boundary layer. DMSP and proline were detected in the range 0.12-1.08 ng cm(-2) and 0.09-0.59 ng cm(-2), respectively. These metabolites were tested in the concentration range from 0.1 to 1000 ng cm(-2) against the attachment of five bacterial strains isolated from algae and sediment co-occurring with F. vesiculosus. The surface concentrations for 50% inhibition of attachment of these strains were always <0.38 ng cm(-2) for DMSP and in four cases <0.1 ng cm(-2) for proline, while one strain required 1.66 ng cm(-2) of proline for 50% inhibition. Two further bacterial strains that had been directly isolated from F. vesiculosus were also tested, but proved to be the least sensitive. This study shows that DMSP and proline have an ecologically relevant role as surface inhibitors against bacterial attachment on F. vesiculosus.

  5. Contrasting responses of DMS and DMSP to ocean acidification in Arctic waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D. Archer

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Increasing atmospheric CO2 is decreasing ocean pH most rapidly in colder regions such as the Arctic. As a component of the EPOCA (European Project on Ocean Acidification pelagic mesocosm experiment off Spitzbergen in 2010, we examined the consequences of decreased pH and increased pCO2 on the concentrations of dimethylsulphide (DMS. DMS is an important reactant and contributor to aerosol formation and growth in the Arctic troposphere. In the nine mesocosms with initial pHT 8.3 to 7.5, equivalent to pCO2 of 180 to 1420 μatm, highly significant but inverse responses to acidity (hydrogen ion concentration [H+] occurred following nutrient addition. Compared to ambient [H+], average concentrations of DMS during the mid-phase of the 30 d experiment, when the influence of altered acidity was unambiguous, were reduced by approximately 60% at the highest [H+] and by 35% at [H+] equivalent to 750 μatm pCO2, as projected for 2100. In contrast, concentrations of dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP, the precursor of DMS, were elevated by approximately 50% at the highest [H+] and by 30% at [H+] corresponding to 750 μatm pCO2. Measurements of the specific rate of synthesis of DMSP by phytoplankton indicate increased production at high [H+], in parallel to rates of inorganic carbon fixation. The elevated DMSP production at high [H+] was largely a consequence of increased dinoflagellate biomass and in particular, the increased abundance of the species Heterocapsa rotundata. We discuss both phytoplankton and bacterial processes that may explain the reduced ratios of DMS:DMSPt (total dimethylsulphoniopropionate at higher [H+]. The experimental design of eight treatment levels provides comparatively robust empirical relationships of DMS and DMSP concentration, DMSP production and dinoflagellate biomass versus [H+] in Arctic waters.

  6. The origin of DMS(P)cies. A survey of the sources and sinks of the two dimethylated sulphur compounds {beta}-dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP) and dimethylsulphide (DMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwint, R.L.J.

    1997-01-01

    The work presented here, was part of two larger projects. In 1991 the Dutch Ministry of Housing, Physical Planning and Environment (VROM) started a National Research Plan on Global Pollution and Climate Change (NOP/MLK). Part of this program was a project that aimed to assess processes and rates of biological production, accumulation and degradation of DMS and DMSP. Furthermore, to gain insight in the influence of changes in environmental factors on these processes. The last objective was to estimate fluxes of DMS from the water column to the atmosphere. In 1994 the European Commission initiated the Environmental Research Program `Role and Significance of Biological Processes in DMS Release from Ocean to Atmosphere: a Close Examination of the Black Box`. At the start of the first project the question whether the so-called feedback mechanism hypothesis is positive or negative was still unanswered. There existed a proposal about the important role of bacteria in degrading DMS. This led to the conclusion that a small (climatic) effect on these bacteria responsible for this consumption, may result in a tremendous effect on the production of DMS and the magnitude of its escape to the atmosphere. However, this subject was considered outside the scope of this thesis. The main goal of this study was to gain a better insight in the sizes of several of the pools of DMSP and DMS and the routes and magnitudes of fluxes connecting these pools. 177 refs.

  7. Neptune aerocapture mission and spacecraft design overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Robert W.; Hall, Jeff L.; Spliker, Tom R.; O'Kongo, Nora

    2004-01-01

    A detailed Neptune aerocapture systems analysis and spacecraft design study was performed as part of NASA's In-Space Propulsion Program. The primary objectives were to assess the feasibility of a spacecraft point design for a Neptune/Triton science mission. That uses aerocapture as the Neptune orbit insertion mechanism. This paper provides an overview of the science, mission and spacecraft design resulting from that study.

  8. Top down control of post-upwelling waters off Trivandrum: Indications from variability in DMS(P)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pandey S.; Bhonsle S.; RituKumari; Gauns, M.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    at this depth with dinoflagellates comprising approx. 25 percent of the population. Intermittent peaks of DMSP coincided with the abundance of dinoflagellates in the water column. Nitrate related positively with phytoplankton (r = 0.926, p less than 0...

  9. Modeling of Electric Demand for Sustainable Energy and Management in India Using Spatio-Temporal DMSP-OLS Night-Time Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Bismay Ranjan; Sajjad, Haroon; Elvidge, Christopher D; Ting, Yu; Pandey, Prem Chandra; Rani, Meenu; Kumar, Pavan

    2017-12-27

    Changes in the pattern of electric power consumption in India have influenced energy utilization processes and socio-economic development to greater extent during the last few decades. Assessment of spatial distribution of electricity consumption is, thus, essential for projecting availability of energy resource and planning its infrastructure. This paper makes an attempt to model the future electricity demand for sustainable energy and its management in India. The nighttime light database provides a good approximation of availability of energy. We utilized defense meteorological satellite program-operational line-scan system (DMSP-OLS) nighttime satellite data, electricity consumption (1993-2013), gross domestic product (GDP) and population growth to construct the model. We also attempted to examine the sensitiveness of electricity consumption to GDP and population growth. The results revealed that the calibrated DMSP and model has provided realistic information on the electric demand with respect to GDP and population, with a better accuracy of r 2  = 0.91. The electric demand was found to be more sensitive to GDP (r = 0.96) than population growth (r = 0.76) as envisaged through correlation analysis. Hence, the model proved to be useful tool in predicting electric demand for its sustainable use and management.

  10. Interactions and consequences of silicon, nitrogen, and Fusarium palustre on herbivory and DMSP levels of Spartina alterniflora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzano, Magalí; Elmer, Wade

    2017-11-01

    Sudden Vegetation Dieback (SVD) has been associated with multiple factors affecting the health of Spartina alterniflora. These include altered nutrition (N, Si and various metals), herbivory from the purple marsh crab, and the association with a fungal pathogen (Fusarium palustre). A metabolite produced by Spartina alterniflora that has been associated with plant health is dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), but little information exist on how these biotic stressors and nutrition interact to affect DMSP levels. Understanding how these factors might be interrelated might provide insight into the etiology of SVD. Surveys of a marsh affected by SVD confirmed lower levels of DMSP and higher concentrations of Si and other metals were present in Sp. alterniflora when compared to plants from marsh that exhibited no signs of SVD. In repeated greenhouse experiments, the application of Si to Sp. alterniflora had no effect on DMSP concentrations. However, when plants were inoculated with the pathogenic fungus, Fusarium palustre, and then treated with Si, DMSP levels were elevated 27%. Inoculation alone had no effect on DMSP levels. Si application neither favor growth nor suppress the stunting effect of disease by F. palustre. Furthermore, grazing by Sesarma reticulatum, a herbivorous crab, was not affected by Si nutrition. Grazing was increased by nitrogen fertilization and inoculation with F. palustre. Deciphering the role of Si nutrition in Sp. alterniflora and dieback remains unresolved, but no evidence suggests enhancing Si nutrition would directly favor marsh health.

  11. Analyzing Spacecraft Telecommunication Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordon, Mark; Hanks, David; Gladden, Roy; Wood, Eric

    2004-01-01

    Multi-Mission Telecom Analysis Tool (MMTAT) is a C-language computer program for analyzing proposed spacecraft telecommunication systems. MMTAT utilizes parameterized input and computational models that can be run on standard desktop computers to perform fast and accurate analyses of telecommunication links. MMTAT is easy to use and can easily be integrated with other software applications and run as part of almost any computational simulation. It is distributed as either a stand-alone application program with a graphical user interface or a linkable library with a well-defined set of application programming interface (API) calls. As a stand-alone program, MMTAT provides both textual and graphical output. The graphs make it possible to understand, quickly and easily, how telecommunication performance varies with variations in input parameters. A delimited text file that can be read by any spreadsheet program is generated at the end of each run. The API in the linkable-library form of MMTAT enables the user to control simulation software and to change parameters during a simulation run. Results can be retrieved either at the end of a run or by use of a function call at any time step.

  12. Mars Observer spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, Dennis L.

    1989-01-01

    The technical aspects of the spacecraft for the Mars Observer mission are discussed. The spacecraft development focuses on using existing flight subsystem designs and production techniques to offer a low-cost, reliable, production-type spacecraft. The scientific objectives of the mission and the scientific payloads of the spacecraft are considered. The spacecraft system and its performance are discussed. The subsystems are described in detail, including attitude and articulation control, electrical power supply, propulsion, structure, thermal control, command and data handling, telecommunications, mechanics, and flight software.

  13. Ensuring the climate record from the NPOESS and GOES-R spacecraft: elements of a strategy to recover measurement capabilities lost in program restructuring

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Space Studies Board; Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences; National Research Council

    2008-01-01

    .... Based on information gathered at a June 2007 workshop, ""Options to Ensure the Climate Record from the NPOESS and GOES-R Spacecraft,"" this book prioritizes capabilities, especially those related...

  14. Analyzing the Velocity of Urban Dynamic Over Northeastern China Using Dmsp-Ols Night-Time Lights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y.

    2017-09-01

    Stable night-time lights (NTL) data from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Operational Line-scan System (DMSPOLS) can serve as a good proxy for anthropogenic development. Here DMSP-OLS NTL data was used to detect the urban development status in northeastern China. The spatial and temporal gradients are combined to depict the velocity of urban expanding process. This velocity index represents the instantaneous local velocity along the Earth's surface needed to maintain constant NTL condition, and has a mean of 0.36 km/yr for northeastern China. The velocity change of NTL is lower in the urban center and its near regions, and the suburbs show a relatively high value. The connecting zones between satellite cities and metropolis have also a rapid rate of NTL evolution. The dynamic process of urbanization over the study area is mainly in a manner of spreading from urban cores to edges. The rank size of the velocity for the prefectures is analyzed and a long tail distribution is found. The velocity index can provide insights for the future pattern of urban sprawl.

  15. ANALYZING THE VELOCITY OF URBAN DYNAMIC OVER NORTHEASTERN CHINA USING DMSP-OLS NIGHT-TIME LIGHTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zhou

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Stable night-time lights (NTL data from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Operational Line-scan System (DMSPOLS can serve as a good proxy for anthropogenic development. Here DMSP-OLS NTL data was used to detect the urban development status in northeastern China. The spatial and temporal gradients are combined to depict the velocity of urban expanding process. This velocity index represents the instantaneous local velocity along the Earth’s surface needed to maintain constant NTL condition, and has a mean of 0.36 km/yr for northeastern China. The velocity change of NTL is lower in the urban center and its near regions, and the suburbs show a relatively high value. The connecting zones between satellite cities and metropolis have also a rapid rate of NTL evolution. The dynamic process of urbanization over the study area is mainly in a manner of spreading from urban cores to edges. The rank size of the velocity for the prefectures is analyzed and a long tail distribution is found. The velocity index can provide insights for the future pattern of urban sprawl.

  16. Analysis of the US Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Imagery for Global Lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharfen, Gregory R.

    1999-01-01

    The U. S. Air Force operates the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP), a system of near-polar orbiting satellites designed for use in operational weather forecasting and other applications. DMSP satellites carry a suite of sensors that provide images of the earth and profiles of the atmosphere. The National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) at the University of Colorado has been involved with the archival of DMSP data and its use for several research projects since 1979. This report summarizes the portion of this involvement funded by NASA.

  17. Spacecraft Spin Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides the capability to correct unbalances of spacecraft by using dynamic measurement techniques and static/coupled measurements to provide products of...

  18. Standardizing the information architecture for spacecraft operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easton, C. R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents an information architecture developed for the Space Station Freedom as a model from which to derive an information architecture standard for advanced spacecraft. The information architecture provides a way of making information available across a program, and among programs, assuming that the information will be in a variety of local formats, structures and representations. It provides a format that can be expanded to define all of the physical and logical elements that make up a program, add definitions as required, and import definitions from prior programs to a new program. It allows a spacecraft and its control center to work in different representations and formats, with the potential for supporting existing spacecraft from new control centers. It supports a common view of data and control of all spacecraft, regardless of their own internal view of their data and control characteristics, and of their communications standards, protocols and formats. This information architecture is central to standardizing spacecraft operations, in that it provides a basis for information transfer and translation, such that diverse spacecraft can be monitored and controlled in a common way.

  19. The sub-auroral electric field as observed by DMSP and the new SuperDARN mid-latitude radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaat, E. R.; Sotirelis, T.; Hairston, M. R.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Greenwald, R. A.; Lester, M.

    2008-12-01

    In this paper we present analyses of the sub-auroral electric field environment as observed from both space and ground. We discuss the dependency of the configuration and strength of the sub-auroral electric field on IMF and geomagnetic activity, longitudinal, seasonal, and solar cycle variability. Primarily, e use ~20 years of electric field measurement dataset derived from the suite of DMSP ion drift meters. A major component of our analysis is correctly specifying the aurora boundary, as the behavior and magnitude of these fields will be drastically different away from the high-conductance auroral oval. As such, we use the coincident particle flux measurements from the DMSP SSJ4 monitors. We also present the solar minimum observations of the sub-auroral flow newly available from the mid-latitude SuperDARN radars at Wallops and Blackstone in Virginia. Preliminary comparisons between these flows and the DMSP climatology are discussed.

  20. DMSP Special Sensor Microwave/Imager Calibration/Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-05-20

    W 31 1.26 COOK ISLES 91843 -21.20 159.82 W 218 8.83 TRINDADE IS. 83650 -20.50 29.32 W 10 .40 TUAMOTU 91944 -18.07 140.95 W OK N/A ST. HELEN,4 61901...was conducted on a VAX using the SAS statistical package and on a microcomputer u! ing a simple regression program written in Turbo Pascal 5.0. The...improvement at 90- 10U%, similar to 1he pooled data results. c The. underpiedictiota is due to the presence of new ice and the refrec,- ing of ol, ice

  1. Current LISA Spacecraft Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkowitz, S. M.; Castellucci, K. E.; Depalo, S. V.; Generie, J. A.; Maghami, P. G.; Peabody, H. L.

    2009-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission. a space based gravitational wave detector. uses laser metrology to measure distance fluctuations between proof masses aboard three spacecraft. LISA is unique from a mission design perspective in that the three spacecraft and their associated operations form one distributed science instrument. unlike more conventional missions where an instrument is a component of an individual spacecraft. The design of the LISA spacecraft is also tightly coupled to the design and requirements of the scientific payload; for this reason it is often referred to as a "sciencecraft." Here we describe some of the unique features of the LISA spacecraft design that help create the quiet environment necessary for gravitational wave observations.

  2. Current LISA spacecraft design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merkowitz, S M; Castellucci, K E; Depalo, S V; Generie, J A; Maghami, P G; Peabody, H L, E-mail: Stephen.M.Merkowitz@nasa.go [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2009-03-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission, a space based gravitational wave detector, uses laser metrology to measure distance fluctuations between proof masses aboard three spacecraft. LISA is unique from a mission design perspective in that the three spacecraft and their associated operations form one distributed science instrument, unlike more conventional missions where an instrument is a component of an individual spacecraft. The design of the LISA spacecraft is also tightly coupled to the design and requirements of the scientific payload; for this reason it is often referred to as a 'sciencecraft'. Here we describe some of the unique features of the LISA spacecraft design that help create the quiet environment necessary for gravitational wave observations.

  3. Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) cycling across contrasting biological hotspots of the New Zealand subtropical front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizotte, Martine; Levasseur, Maurice; Law, Cliff S.; Walker, Carolyn F.; Safi, Karl A.; Marriner, Andrew; Kiene, Ronald P.

    2017-11-01

    The oceanic frontal region above the Chatham Rise east of New Zealand was investigated during the late austral summer season in February and March 2012. Despite its potential importance as a source of marine-originating and climate-relevant compounds, such as dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and its algal precursor dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), little is known of the processes fuelling the reservoirs of these sulfur (S) compounds in the water masses bordering the subtropical front (STF). This study focused on two opposing short-term fates of DMSP-S following its uptake by microbial organisms (either its conversion into DMS or its assimilation into bacterial biomass) and has not considered dissolved non-volatile degradation products. Sampling took place in three phytoplankton blooms (B1, B2, and B3) with B1 and B3 occurring in relatively nitrate-rich, dinoflagellate-dominated subantarctic waters, and B2 occurring in nitrate-poor subtropical waters dominated by coccolithophores. Concentrations of total DMSP (DMSPt) and DMS were high across the region, up to 160 and 14.5 nmol L-1, respectively. Pools of DMSPt showed a strong association with overall phytoplankton biomass proxied by chlorophyll a (rs = 0.83) likely because of the persistent dominance of dinoflagellates and coccolithophores, both DMSP-rich taxa. Heterotrophic microbes displayed low S assimilation from DMSP (less than 5 %) likely because their S requirements were fulfilled by high DMSP availability. Rates of bacterial protein synthesis were significantly correlated with concentrations of dissolved DMSP (DMSPd, rs = 0.86) as well as with the microbial conversion efficiency of DMSPd into DMS (DMS yield, rs = 0.84). Estimates of the potential contribution of microbially mediated rates of DMS production (0.1-27 nmol L-1 day-1) to the near-surface concentrations of DMS suggest that bacteria alone could not have sustained DMS pools at most stations, indicating an important role for phytoplankton-mediated DMS

  4. Spacecraft thermal modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, J. H.; Panczak, T. D.; Fried, L.

    1992-09-01

    Thermal modeling of spacecraft requires approaches which can handle dominant radiative heat transfers and many special thermal control components. Present network-type thermal analyzers allow simulation, especially for components with rectangular geometries, but at the expense of considerable awkwardness and much error-prone manual input. The user interfaces for pre- and postprocessing for these analyzers are also very deficient. Finite element thermal analyzers solve some of the analytical difficulties, but are not widely used because they lack the flexibility to simulate special operations. The Galerkin finite element method (GFEM) distributes the contributions within an element to the element nodal points. The assembly of the contributions from all elements yields a system of energy balance equations for the nodal points of the system. Monte Carlo raytracing, in conjunction with a GFEM energy distribution to element nodal points, yields a procedure of consistent nonisothermal surface radiation exchange. This procedure reduces a source of simulation error caused by nonuniform element illumination and shading. Orbital heating, fluid flow and special analysis features are discussed. The main analysis program is interfaced to the preprocessing and postprocessing modules.

  5. Spacecraft Material Outgassing Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This compilation of outgassing data of materials intended for spacecraft use were obtained at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), utilizing equipment developed...

  6. Spacecraft Power Monitor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I project will develop the Spacecraft Power Monitor (SPM) which will use non-intrusive electrical monitoring (NEMO). NEMO transforms the power...

  7. Spacecraft momentum control systems

    CERN Document Server

    Leve, Frederick A; Peck, Mason A

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this book is to serve both as a practical technical reference and a resource for gaining a fuller understanding of the state of the art of spacecraft momentum control systems, specifically looking at control moment gyroscopes (CMGs). As a result, the subject matter includes theory, technology, and systems engineering. The authors combine material on system-level architecture of spacecraft that feature momentum-control systems with material about the momentum-control hardware and software. This also encompasses material on the theoretical and algorithmic approaches to the control of space vehicles with CMGs. In essence, CMGs are the attitude-control actuators that make contemporary highly agile spacecraft possible. The rise of commercial Earth imaging, the advances in privately built spacecraft (including small satellites), and the growing popularity of the subject matter in academic circles over the past decade argues that now is the time for an in-depth treatment of the topic. CMGs are augmented ...

  8. World manned spacecraft characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, M.

    1981-10-01

    Statistical data on manned spacecraft that have flown or will fly in the immediate future are presented. It is thought that this information has not been brought together before. Gemini is described as being the most spacecraft in the smallest package. In discussing Soyuz, special attention is given to the role played by the orbital module concept. Descriptions are also given of the Voskhod, Dynosaurs, and the Mercury-type capsule that will be used by Chinese astronauts.

  9. RSS SSM/I OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS 3-DAY AVERAGE FROM DMSP F13 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The RSS SSM/I Ocean Product Grids 3-Day Average from DMSP F13 netCDF dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor...

  10. RSS SSM/I OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS 3-DAY AVERAGE FROM DMSP F8 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The RSS SSM/I Oceean Product Grids 3-Day Average from DMSP F8 netCDF dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor...

  11. RSS SSM/I OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS 3-DAY AVERAGE FROM DMSP F10 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The RSS SSM/I Ocean Product Grids 3-Day Average from DMSP F10 netCDF dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor...

  12. RSS SSM/I OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS 3-DAY AVERAGE FROM DMSP F11 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The RSS SSM/I Ocean Product Grids 3-Day Average from DMSP F11 netCDF dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor...

  13. RSS SSM/I OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS 3-DAY AVERAGE FROM DMSP F15 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The RSS SSM/I Ocean Product Grids 3-Day Average from DMSP F15 netCDF dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor...

  14. RSS SSM/I OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS 3-DAY AVERAGE FROM DMSP F14 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The RSS SSM/I Ocean Product Grids 3-Day Average from DMSP F14 netCDF dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor...

  15. Assessing Spatiotemporal Characteristics of Urbanization Dynamics in Southeast Asia Using Time Series of DMSP/OLS Nighttime Light Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Zhao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraregional spatial variations of satellite-derived anthropogenic nighttime light signals are gradually applied to identify different lighting areas with various socioeconomic activity and urbanization levels when characterizing urbanization dynamics. However, most previous partitioning approaches are carried out at local scales, easily leading to multi-standards of the extracted results from local areas, and this inevitably hinders the comparative analysis on the urbanization dynamics of the large region. Therefore, a partitioning approach considering the characteristics of nighttime light signals at both local and regional scales is necessary for studying spatiotemporal characteristics of urbanization dynamics across the large region using nighttime light imagery. Based on the quadratic relationships between the pixel-level nighttime light brightness and the corresponding spatial gradient for individual cities, we here proposed an improved partitioning approach to quickly identify different types of nighttime lighting areas for the entire region of Southeast Asia. Using the calibrated Defense Meteorological Satellite Program/Operational Line-scan System (DMSP/OLS data with greater comparability, continuity, and intra-urban variability, the annual nighttime light imagery spanning years 1992–2013 were divided into four types of nighttime lighting areas: low, medium, high, and extremely high, associated with different intensity of anthropogenic activity. The results suggest that Southeast Asia has experienced a rapid and diverse urbanization process from 1992 to 2013. Areas with moderate or low anthropogenic activity show a faster growth rate for the spatial expansion than the developed areas with intense anthropogenic activity. Transitions between different nighttime lighting types potentially depict the trajectory of urban development, the darker areas are gradually transitioning to areas with higher lighting, indicating conspicuous trends

  16. Spacecraft environments interactions: Protecting against the effects of spacecraft charging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, J. L.; Mccollum, M. B.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of the natural space environments on spacecraft design, development, and operation are the topic of a series of NASA Reference Publications currently being developed by the Electromagnetics and Environments Branch, Systems Analysis and Integration Laboratory, Marshall Space Flight Center. This primer, second in the series, describes the interactions between a spacecraft and the natural space plasma. Under certain environmental/spacecraft conditions, these interactions result in the phenomenon known as spacecraft charging. It is the focus of this publication to describe the phenomenon of spacecraft charging and its possible adverse effects on spacecraft and to present the key elements of a Spacecraft Charging Effects Protection Plan.

  17. Internet Technology on Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rash, James; Parise, Ron; Hogie, Keith; Criscuolo, Ed; Langston, Jim; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Operating Missions as Nodes on the Internet (OMNI) project has shown that Internet technology works in space missions through a demonstration using the UoSAT-12 spacecraft. An Internet Protocol (IP) stack was installed on the orbiting UoSAT-12 spacecraft and tests were run to demonstrate Internet connectivity and measure performance. This also forms the basis for demonstrating subsequent scenarios. This approach provides capabilities heretofore either too expensive or simply not feasible such as reconfiguration on orbit. The OMNI project recognized the need to reduce the risk perceived by mission managers and did this with a multi-phase strategy. In the initial phase, the concepts were implemented in a prototype system that includes space similar components communicating over the TDRS (space network) and the terrestrial Internet. The demonstration system includes a simulated spacecraft with sample instruments. Over 25 demonstrations have been given to mission and project managers, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Department of Defense (DoD), contractor technologists and other decisions makers, This initial phase reached a high point with an OMNI demonstration given from a booth at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Inspection Day 99 exhibition. The proof to mission managers is provided during this second phase with year 2000 accomplishments: testing the use of Internet technologies onboard an actual spacecraft. This was done with a series of tests performed using the UoSAT-12 spacecraft. This spacecraft was reconfigured on orbit at very low cost. The total period between concept and the first tests was only 6 months! On board software was modified to add an IP stack to support basic IP communications. Also added was support for ping, traceroute and network timing protocol (NTP) tests. These tests show that basic Internet functionality can be used onboard spacecraft. The performance of data was measured to show no degradation from current

  18. Spacecraft Attitude Determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Thomas

    determination based on simple, reliable sensors. Meeting these objectives with a single vector magnetometer is difficult and requires temporal fusion of data in order to avoid local observability problems. In order to guaranteed globally nonsingular solutions, quaternions are generally the preferred attitude......This thesis describes the development of an attitude determination system for spacecraft based only on magnetic field measurements. The need for such system is motivated by the increased demands for inexpensive, lightweight solutions for small spacecraft. These spacecraft demands full attitude...... is a detailed study of the influence of approximations in the modeling of the system. The quantitative effects of errors in the process and noise statistics are discussed in detail. The third contribution is the introduction of these methods to the attitude determination on-board the Ørsted satellite...

  19. Mapping and Evaluating the Urbanization Process in Northeast China Using DMSP/OLS Nighttime Light Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunpeng Yi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an Urban Light Index (ULI is constructed to facilitate analysis and quantitative evaluation of the process of urbanization and expansion rate by using DMSP/OLS Nighttime Light Data during the years from 1992 to 2010. A unit circle urbanization evaluation model is established to perform a comprehensive analysis of the urbanization process of 34 prefecture-level cities in Northeast China. Furthermore, the concept of urban light space is put forward. In this study, urban light space is divided into four types: the core urban area, the transition zone between urban and suburban areas, suburban area and fluorescent space. Proceeding from the temporal and spatial variation of the four types of light space, the pattern of morphologic change and space-time evolution of the four principal cities in Northeast China (Harbin, Changchun, Shenyang, Dalian is analyzed and given particular attention. Through a correlation analysis between ULI and the traditional urbanization indexes (urban population, proportion of the secondary and tertiary industries in the regional GDP and the built-up area, the advantages and disadvantages as well as the feasibility of using the ULI in the study of urbanization are evaluated. The research results show that ULI has a strong correlation with urban built-up area (R2 = 0.8277. The morphologic change and history of the evolving urban light space can truly reflect the characteristics of urban sprawl. The results also indicate that DMSP/OLS Nighttime Light Data is applicable for extracting urban space information and has strong potential to urbanization research.

  20. Revamping Spacecraft Operational Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Victor

    2012-01-01

    The EPOXI flight mission has been testing a new commercial system, Splunk, which employs data mining techniques to organize and present spacecraft telemetry data in a high-level manner. By abstracting away data-source specific details, Splunk unifies arbitrary data formats into one uniform system. This not only reduces the time and effort for retrieving relevant data, but it also increases operational visibility by allowing a spacecraft team to correlate data across many different sources. Splunk's scalable architecture coupled with its graphing modules also provide a solid toolset for generating data visualizations and building real-time applications such as browser-based telemetry displays.

  1. Intelligent spacecraft module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oungrinis, Konstantinos-Alketas; Liapi, Marianthi; Kelesidi, Anna; Gargalis, Leonidas; Telo, Marinela; Ntzoufras, Sotiris; Paschidi, Mariana

    2014-12-01

    The paper presents the development of an on-going research project that focuses on a human-centered design approach to habitable spacecraft modules. It focuses on the technical requirements and proposes approaches on how to achieve a spatial arrangement of the interior that addresses sufficiently the functional, physiological and psychosocial needs of the people living and working in such confined spaces that entail long-term environmental threats to human health and performance. Since the research perspective examines the issue from a qualitative point of view, it is based on establishing specific relationships between the built environment and its users, targeting people's bodily and psychological comfort as a measure toward a successful mission. This research has two basic branches, one examining the context of the system's operation and behavior and the other in the direction of identifying, experimenting and formulating the environment that successfully performs according to the desired context. The latter aspect is researched upon the construction of a scaled-model on which we run series of tests to identify the materiality, the geometry and the electronic infrastructure required. Guided by the principles of sensponsive architecture, the ISM research project explores the application of the necessary spatial arrangement and behavior for a user-centered, functional interior where the appropriate intelligent systems are based upon the existing mechanical and chemical support ones featured on space today, and especially on the ISS. The problem is set according to the characteristics presented at the Mars500 project, regarding the living quarters of six crew-members, along with their hygiene, leisure and eating areas. Transformable design techniques introduce spatial economy, adjustable zoning and increased efficiency within the interior, securing at the same time precise spatial orientation and character at any given time. The sensponsive configuration is

  2. Comparison of DMSP cross-track ion drifts and SuperDARN line-of-sight velocities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Drayton

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Cross-track ion drifts measured by the DMSP satellites are compared with line-of-sight SuperDARN HF velocities in approximately the same directions. Good overall agreement is found for a data set comprising of 209 satellite passes over the field of view of nine SuperDARN radars in both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. The slope of the best linear fit line relating the SuperDARN and DMSP velocities is of the order of 0.7 with a tendency for SuperDARN velocities to be smaller. The agreement implies that the satellite and radar data can be merged into a common set provided that spatial and temporal variations of the velocity as measured by both instruments are smooth.

    Keywords. Ionosphere (Ionospheric irregularities; Plasma convection; Auroral ionosphere

  3. High production of nitrous oxide (N2O), methane (CH4) and dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP) in a massive marine phytoplankton culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florez-Leiva, L.; Tarifeño, E.; Cornejo, M.; Kiene, R.; Farías, L.

    2010-09-01

    The production of large amounts of algal biomass for different purposes such as aquaculture or biofuels, may cause impacts on the marine environment. One such impact is the production of radiatively active trace gases and aerosols with climate cooling (dimethyl sulfide DMS and its precursor DMSP) and warming (N2O and CH4) effects. Total and dissolved DMSP, N2O and CH4, together with other environmental variables were monitored daily for 46 days within a massive microalgae monoculture of Nannochloris (Chlorophyceae) in an open pond system. The growth of this green microalgae was stimulated by the addition of N- and P-rich salts, resulting in exponential growth (growth phase) during the first 17 days observed by cell abundance (1 × 106 to 4.4 × 106 cell mL-1) and Chl-a levels (from 1.4 to 96 mg Chl-a m-3) followed by a decrease in both Chl-a and cell abundance (senescence phase). Total DMSP (from 6.3 to 142 μmol m-3), dissolved DMSP i.e. 5.8 to 137 μmol m-3 and N2O (from 8 to 600 μmol m-3) abruptly peaked during the senescence phase, whereas CH4 steadily increased between 2 and 10 μmol m-3 during the growth phase. Different ratios between tracers and Chl-a during both phases reveal different biochemical processes involved in the cycling of these gases and tracers. Our results show that despite the consumption of large quantities of CO2 by the massive algal culture, a minor amount of DMS and huge amounts of greenhouse gases were produced, in particular N2O, which has a greater radiative effect per molecule than CO2. These findings have important implications for biogeochemical studies and for environmental management of aquaculture activities.

  4. Rockets and spacecraft: Sine qua non of space science

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    The evolution of the national launch vehicle stable is presented along with lists of launch vehicles used in NASA programs. A partial list of spacecraft used throughout the world is also given. Scientific spacecraft costs are presented along with an historial overview of project development and funding in NASA.

  5. Electrolysis Propulsion for Spacecraft Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    deGroot, Wim A.; Arrington, Lynn A.; McElroy, James F.; Mitlitsky, Fred; Weisberg, Andrew H.; Carter, Preston H., II; Myers, Blake; Reed, Brian D.

    1997-01-01

    Electrolysis propulsion has been recognized over the last several decades as a viable option to meet many satellite and spacecraft propulsion requirements. This technology, however, was never used for in-space missions. In the same time frame, water based fuel cells have flown in a number of missions. These systems have many components similar to electrolysis propulsion systems. Recent advances in component technology include: lightweight tankage, water vapor feed electrolysis, fuel cell technology, and thrust chamber materials for propulsion. Taken together, these developments make propulsion and/or power using electrolysis/fuel cell technology very attractive as separate or integrated systems. A water electrolysis propulsion testbed was constructed and tested in a joint NASA/Hamilton Standard/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories program to demonstrate these technology developments for propulsion. The results from these testbed experiments using a I-N thruster are presented. A concept to integrate a propulsion system and a fuel cell system into a unitized spacecraft propulsion and power system is outlined.

  6. Spacecraft Collision Avoidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussy-Virat, Charles

    The rapid increase of the number of objects in orbit around the Earth poses a serious threat to operational spacecraft and astronauts. In order to effectively avoid collisions, mission operators need to assess the risk of collision between the satellite and any other object whose orbit is likely to approach its trajectory. Several algorithms predict the probability of collision but have limitations that impair the accuracy of the prediction. An important limitation is that uncertainties in the atmospheric density are usually not taken into account in the propagation of the covariance matrix from current epoch to closest approach time. The Spacecraft Orbital Characterization Kit (SpOCK) was developed to accurately predict the positions and velocities of spacecraft. The central capability of SpOCK is a high accuracy numerical propagator of spacecraft orbits and computations of ancillary parameters. The numerical integration uses a comprehensive modeling of the dynamics of spacecraft in orbit that includes all the perturbing forces that a spacecraft is subject to in orbit. In particular, the atmospheric density is modeled by thermospheric models to allow for an accurate representation of the atmospheric drag. SpOCK predicts the probability of collision between two orbiting objects taking into account the uncertainties in the atmospheric density. Monte Carlo procedures are used to perturb the initial position and velocity of the primary and secondary spacecraft from their covariance matrices. Developed in C, SpOCK supports parallelism to quickly assess the risk of collision so it can be used operationally in real time. The upper atmosphere of the Earth is strongly driven by the solar activity. In particular, abrupt transitions from slow to fast solar wind cause important disturbances of the atmospheric density, hence of the drag acceleration that spacecraft are subject to. The Probability Distribution Function (PDF) model was developed to predict the solar wind speed

  7. Very Small Interstellar Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Mason A.

    2007-02-01

    This paper considers lower limits of length scale in spacecraft: interstellar vehicles consisting of little more material than found in a typical integrated-circuit chip. Some fundamental scaling principles are introduced to show how the dynamics of the very small can be used to realize interstellar travel with minimal advancements in technology. Our recent study for the NASA Institute for Advanced Concepts provides an example: the use of the Lorentz force that acts on electrically charged spacecraft traveling through planetary and stellar magnetospheres. Schaffer and Burns, among others, have used Cassini and Voyager imagery to show that this interaction is responsible for some of the resonances in the orbital dynamics of dust in Jupiter's and Saturn's rings. The Lorentz force turns out to vary in inverse proportion to the square of this characteristic length scale, making it a more effective means of propelling tiny spacecraft than solar sailing. Performance estimates, some insight into plasma interactions, and some hardware concepts are offered. The mission architectures considered here involve the use of these propellantless propulsion techniques for acceleration within our solar system and deceleration near the destination. Performance estimates, some insight into plasma interactions, and some hardware concepts are offered. The mission architectures considered here involve the use of these propellantless propulsion techniques for acceleration within our solar system and deceleration near the destination. We might envision a large number of such satellites with intermittent, bursty communications set up as a one-dimensional network to relay signals across great distances using only the power likely from such small spacecraft. Conveying imagery in this fashion may require a long time because of limited power, but the prospect of imaging another star system close-up ought to be worth the wait.

  8. Technology Needs for Air Force Autonomous Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-16

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s (JPL) Autonomous Spacecraft Project (ASP). Accession For IT " .. . cation ;; 4b Dist-4 ! Aion / Avn ’l!ity Codes .,iml and/or...technologies in different major headings cannot be made. INDEX C.1 System Design, Programming, and Validation Technology C.1.1 Autonomy Methodology C.1.2...interfacou, raduw.LAncy and programming. There are some configurations which are both centralized and distributed and therefore have different characteristics

  9. Spatial Recognition of the Urban-Rural Fringe of Beijing Using DMSP/OLS Nighttime Light Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuli Yang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Spatial identification of the urban-rural fringes is very significant for deeply understanding the development processes and regulations of urban space and guiding urban spatial development in the future. Traditionally, urban-rural fringe areas are identified using statistical analysis methods that consider indexes from single or multiple factors, such as population densities, the ratio of building land, the proportion of the non-agricultural population, and economic levels. However, these methods have limitations, for example, the statistical data are not continuous, the statistical standards are not uniform, the data is seldom available in real time, and it is difficult to avoid issues on the statistical effects from edges of administrative regions or express the internal differences of these areas. This paper proposes a convenient approach to identify the urban-rural fringe using nighttime light data of DMSP/OLS images. First, a light characteristics–combined value model was built in ArcGIS 10.3, and the combined characteristics of light intensity and the degree of light intensity fluctuation are analyzed in the urban, urban-rural fringe, and rural areas. Then, the Python programming language was used to extract the breakpoints of the characteristic combination values of the nighttime light data in 360 directions taking Tian An Men as the center. Finally, the range of the urban-rural fringe area is identified. The results show that the urban-rural fringe of Beijing is mainly located in the annular band around Tian An Men. The average inner radius is 19 km, and the outer radius is 26 km. The urban-rural fringe includes the outer portions of the four city center districts, which are the Chaoyang District, Haidian District, Fengtai District, and Shijingshan District and the part area border with Daxing District, Tongzhou District, Changping District, Mentougou District, Shunyi District, and Fangshan District. The area of the urban-rural fringe

  10. A Simulation Study on the Urban Population of China Based on Nighttime Light Data Acquired from DMSP/OLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingxu Huang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The urban population (UP measure is one of the most direct indicators that reflect the urbanization process and the impacts of human activities. The dynamics of UP is of great importance to studying urban economic, social development, and resource utilization. Currently, China lacks long time series UP data with consistent standards and comparability over time. The nighttime light images from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program’s (DMSP Operational Linescan System (OLS allow the acquisition of continuous and highly comparable long time series UP information. However, existing studies mainly focus on simulating the total population or population density level based on the nighttime light data. Few studies have focused on simulating the UP in China. Based on three regression models (i.e., linear, power function, and exponential, the present study discusses the relationship between DMSP/OLS nighttime light data and the UP and establishes optimal regression models for simulating the UPs of 339 major cities in China from 1990 to 2010. In addition, the present study evaluated the accuracy of UP and non-agricultural population (NAP simulations conducted using the same method. The simulation results show that, at the national level, the power function model is the optimal regression model between DMSP/OLS nighttime light data and UP data for 1990–2010. At the provincial scale, the optimal regression model varies among different provinces. The linear regression model is the optimal regression model for more than 60% of the provinces. In addition, the comparison results show that at the national, provincial, and city levels, the fitting results of the UP based on DMSP/OLS nighttime light data are better than those of the NAP. Therefore, DMSP/OLS nighttime light data can be used to effectively retrieve the UP of a large-scale region. In the context of frequent population flows between urban and rural areas in China and difficulty in obtaining

  11. Spacecraft Modularity for Serviceable Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Benjamin B.; Rossetti, Dino; Keer, Beth; Panek, John; Cepollina, Frank; Ritter, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Spacecraft modularity has been a topic of interest at NASA since the 1970s, when the Multi-Mission Modular Spacecraft (MMS) was developed at the Goddard Space Flight Center. Since then, modular concepts have been employed for a variety of spacecraft and, as in the case of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and the International Space Station (ISS), have been critical to the success of on-orbit servicing. Modularity is even more important for future robotic servicing. Robotic satellite servicing technologies under development by NASA can extend mission life and reduce life-cycle cost and risk. These are optimized when the target spacecraft is designed for servicing, including advanced modularity. This paper will explore how spacecraft design, as demonstrated by the Reconfigurable Operational spacecraft for Science and Exploration (ROSE) spacecraft architecture, and servicing technologies can be developed in parallel to fully take advantage of the promise of both.

  12. Urbanization Process Monitoring in Northwest China based on DMSP/OLS Nighttime Light Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K.; Bai, L. Y.; Feng, J. Z.

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, the DMSP/OLS nighttime light data have been widely applied to various fields such as monitoring and evaluation of urbanization, estimation of social economy, economical environment and health effects, hazards analysis, and fisheries research. The general urbanized level in China has rapidly developed since the 1990s, and the cities in northwest China, which were important population centres of the ancient silk road, have also been developed in a high speed thanks to China’s national strategy of Western Development. Given the Xinjiang autonomous region as a core area of One Belt and One Road, it is very necessary to study the urbanization processes and changes of its urban system and the whole northwest region of China. In this paper, we extracted built-up areas of the cities in northwest China in 1992, 1997, 2002, 2007, and 2012, evaluated urban expansion and spatial pattern through appropriate indexes, and also quantitatively analyzed the urbanized level of each city. The results showed that the cities in northwest China generally presented high strong and rapid expansion, but there were some large differences among cities. Urban expansion forms alternate with exterior expansion and interior filling, in general, the cities externally expandedafter 2002 and internally filledbefore 2002, meanwhile, there were a high positive correlation between urban built-up areas and population growth in Xinjiang autonomous.

  13. Spacecraft Thermal Control System Not Requiring Power Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The thermal management of spacecraft would be enhanced by dynamic control over surface emissivity in the mid-infrared. In this SBIR program, Triton Systems proposes...

  14. Software for Engineering Simulations of a Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shireman, Kirk; McSwain, Gene; McCormick, Bernell; Fardelos, Panayiotis

    2005-01-01

    Spacecraft Engineering Simulation II (SES II) is a C-language computer program for simulating diverse aspects of operation of a spacecraft characterized by either three or six degrees of freedom. A functional model in SES can include a trajectory flight plan; a submodel of a flight computer running navigational and flight-control software; and submodels of the environment, the dynamics of the spacecraft, and sensor inputs and outputs. SES II features a modular, object-oriented programming style. SES II supports event-based simulations, which, in turn, create an easily adaptable simulation environment in which many different types of trajectories can be simulated by use of the same software. The simulation output consists largely of flight data. SES II can be used to perform optimization and Monte Carlo dispersion simulations. It can also be used to perform simulations for multiple spacecraft. In addition to its generic simulation capabilities, SES offers special capabilities for space-shuttle simulations: for this purpose, it incorporates submodels of the space-shuttle dynamics and a C-language version of the guidance, navigation, and control components of the space-shuttle flight software.

  15. The MSAT spacecraft of Telesat Mobile Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertenyi, E.

    The MSAT spacecraft of the Canadian mobile satellite operator, Telesat Mobile Inc. (TMI) is described. When launched in 1994, the large geostationary MSAT spacecraft which is currently under construction by Hughes Aircraft Co. and Spar Aerospace Ltd. will enable TMI to provide mobile and transportable communications services to its customers even in the most remote parts of the North American continent. The main elements of TMI's mobile satellite system (described in a companion paper) are the space segment and the ground segment. TMI's space segment will employ one of two nearly identical satellites, one of which will be owned and operated by TMI, the other by the U.S. mobile satellite operator, American Mobile Satellite Corporation (AMSC). The two companies are participating in a joint spacecraft procurement in order to reduce the nonrecurring costs and to ensure system compatibility between the two systems; and they have also agreed to provide in-orbit backup to each other in the event of a catastrophic satellite failure. The program status, performance requirements, main parameters, and configuration of the MSAT spacecraft are reviewed. The major features of the communications subsystem are discussed in some detail, and a brief summary is presented of the spacecraft service module. Key technology items include the L-band RF power amplifier, which must operate with a high DC to RF power efficiency and generate low intermodulation when loaded with multi-carrier signals; and the large diameter deployable L-band antenna. The development status and expected performance of these spacecraft components is examined.

  16. Operational Philosophy Concerning Manned Spacecraft Cabin Leaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSimpelaere, Edward

    2011-01-01

    The last thirty years have seen the Space Shuttle as the prime United States spacecraft for manned spaceflight missions. Many lessons have been learned about spacecraft design and operation throughout these years. Over the next few decades, a large increase of manned spaceflight in the commercial sector is expected. This will result in the exposure of commercial crews and passengers to many of the same risks crews of the Space Shuttle have encountered. One of the more dire situations that can be encountered is the loss of pressure in the habitable volume of the spacecraft during on orbit operations. This is referred to as a cabin leak. This paper seeks to establish a general cabin leak response philosophy with the intent of educating future spacecraft designers and operators. After establishing a relative definition for a cabin leak, the paper covers general descriptions of detection equipment, detection methods, and general operational methods for management of a cabin leak. Subsequently, all these items are addressed from the perspective of the Space Shuttle Program, as this will be of the most value to future spacecraft due to similar operating profiles. Emphasis here is placed upon why and how these methods and philosophies have evolved to meet the Space Shuttle s needs. This includes the core ideas of: considerations of maintaining higher cabin pressures vs. lower cabin pressures, the pros and cons of a system designed to feed the leak with gas from pressurized tanks vs. using pressure suits to protect against lower cabin pressures, timeline and consumables constraints, re-entry considerations with leaks of unknown origin, and the impact the International Space Station (ISS) has had to the standard Space Shuttle cabin leak response philosophy. This last item in itself includes: procedural management differences, hardware considerations, additional capabilities due to the presence of the ISS and its resource, and ISS docking/undocking considerations with a

  17. Spacecraft rendezvous and docking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, John Leif

    1999-01-01

    The phenomenons and problems encountered when a rendezvous manoeuvre, and possible docking, of two spacecrafts has to be performed, have been the topic for numerous studies, and, details of a variety of scenarios has been analysed. So far, all solutions that has been brought into realization has...... been based entirely on direct human supervision and control. This paper describes a vision-based system and methodology, that autonomously generates accurate guidance information that may assist a human operator in performing the tasks associated with both the rendezvous and docking navigation...... relative pose information to assist the human operator during the docking phase. The closed loop and operator assistance performance of the system have been assessed using a test bench including human operator, navigation module and high fidelity visualization module. The tests performed verified...

  18. Human Spacecraft Structures Internship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhakta, Kush

    2017-01-01

    DSG will be placed in halo orbit around themoon- Platform for international/commercialpartners to explore lunar surface- Testbed for technologies needed toexplore Mars• Habitat module used to house up to 4crew members aboard the DSG- Launched on EM-3- Placed inside SLS fairing Habitat Module - Task Habitat Finite Element Model Re-modeled entire structure in NX2) Used Beam and Shell elements torepresent the pressure vessel structure3) Created a point cloud of centers of massfor mass components- Can now inspect local moments andinertias for thrust ring application8/ Habitat Structure – Docking Analysis Problem: Artificial Gravity may be necessary forastronaut health in deep spaceGoal: develop concepts that show how artificialgravity might be incorporated into a spacecraft inthe near term Orion Window Radiant Heat Testing.

  19. Operationally Responsive Spacecraft Subsystem Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Saber Astronautics proposes spacecraft subsystem control software which can autonomously reconfigure avionics for best performance during various mission conditions....

  20. Spacecraft telecommunications system mass estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, J. H.; Sakamoto, L. L.

    1988-01-01

    Mass is the most important limiting parameter for present-day planetary spacecraft design, In fact, the entire design can be characterized by mass. The more efficient the design of the spacecraft, the less mass will be required. The communications system is an essential and integral part of planetary spacecraft. A study is presented of the mass attributable to the communications system for spacecraft designs used in recent missions in an attempt to help guide future design considerations and research and development efforts. The basic approach is to examine the spacecraft by subsystem and allocate a portion of each subsystem to telecommunications. Conceptually, this is to divide the spacecraft into two parts, telecommunications and nontelecommunications. In this way, it is clear what the mass attributable to the communications system is. The percentage of mass is calculated using the actual masses of the spacecraft parts, except in the case of CRAF. In that case, estimated masses are used since the spacecraft was not yet built. The results show that the portion of the spacecraft attributable to telecommunications is substantial. The mass fraction for Voyager, Galileo, and CRAF (Mariner Mark 2) is 34, 19, and 18 percent, respectively. The large reduction of telecommunications mass from Voyager to Galileo is mainly due to the use of a deployable antenna instead of the solid antenna on Voyager.

  1. Mapping Urban Areas with Integration of DMSP/OLS Nighttime Light and MODIS Data Using Machine Learning Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenlong Jing

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mapping urban areas at global and regional scales is an urgent and crucial task for detecting urbanization and human activities throughout the world and is useful for discerning the influence of urban expansion upon the ecosystem and the surrounding environment. DMSP-OLS stable nighttime lights have provided an effective way to monitor human activities on a global scale. Threshold-based algorithms have been widely used for extracting urban areas and estimating urban expansion, but the accuracy can decrease because of the empirical and subjective selection of threshold values. This paper proposes an approach for extracting urban areas with the integration of DMSP-OLS stable nighttime lights and MODIS data utilizing training sample datasets selected from DMSP-OLS and MODIS NDVI based on several simple strategies. Four classification algorithms were implemented for comparison: the classification and regression tree (CART, k-nearest-neighbors (k-NN, support vector machine (SVM, and random forests (RF. A case study was carried out on the eastern part of China, covering 99 cities and 1,027,700 km2. The classification results were validated using an independent land cover dataset, and then compared with an existing contextual classification method. The results showed that the new method can achieve results with comparable accuracies, and is easier to implement and less sensitive to the initial thresholds than the contextual method. Among the four classifiers implemented, RF achieved the most stable results and the highest average Kappa. Meanwhile CART produced highly overestimated results compared to the other three classifiers. Although k-NN and SVM tended to produce similar accuracy, less-bright areas around the urban cores seemed to be ignored when using SVM, which led to the underestimation of urban areas. Furthermore, quantity assessment showed that the results produced by k-NN, SVM, and RFs exhibited better agreement in larger cities and low

  2. Comparison between the Suomi-NPP Day-Night Band and DMSP-OLS for Correlating Socio-Economic Variables at the Provincial Level in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Jing

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nighttime light imagery offers a unique view of the Earth’s surface. In the past, the nighttime light data collected by the DMSP-OLS sensors have been used as an efficient means to correlate regional and global socio-economic activities. With the launch of the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (Suomi-NPP satellite in 2011, the day-night band (DNB of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS onboard represents a major advancement in nighttime imaging capabilities, because it surpasses its predecessor DMSP-OLS in radiometric accuracy, spatial resolution and geometric quality. In this paper, four variables (total night light, light area, average night light and log average night light are extracted from nighttime radiance data observed by the VIIRS-DNB composite in 2013 and nighttime digital number (DN data from the DMSP-OLS stable dataset in 2012, respectively, and correlated with 12 socio-economic parameters at the provincial level in mainland China during the corresponding period. Background noise of DNB composite data is removed using either a masking method or an optimal threshold method. In general, the correlation of these socio-economic data with the total night light and light area of VIIRS-DNB composite data is better than with the DMSP-OLS stable data. The correlations between total night light of denoised DNB composite data and built-up area, gross regional product (GRP and power consumption are higher than 0.9 and so are the correlations between the light area of denoised DNB composite data and city and town population, built-up area, GRP, power consumption and waste water discharge. However, the correlations of socio-economic data with the average night light and log average night light of VIIRS-DNB composite data are not as good as with the DMSP-OLS stable data. To quantitatively analyze the reasons for the correlation difference, a cubic regression method is developed to correct the saturation effect of the DMSP

  3. Space Environments and Spacecraft Effects Organization Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, David L.; Burns, Howard D.; Miller, Sharon K.; Porter, Ron; Schneider, Todd A.; Spann, James F.; Xapsos, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is embarking on a course to expand human presence beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO) while also expanding its mission to explore the solar system. Destinations such as Near Earth Asteroids (NEA), Mars and its moons, and the outer planets are but a few of the mission targets. Each new destination presents an opportunity to increase our knowledge of the solar system and the unique environments for each mission target. NASA has multiple technical and science discipline areas specializing in specific space environments disciplines that will help serve to enable these missions. To complement these existing discipline areas, a concept is presented focusing on the development of a space environments and spacecraft effects (SENSE) organization. This SENSE organization includes disciplines such as space climate, space weather, natural and induced space environments, effects on spacecraft materials and systems and the transition of research information into application. This space environment and spacecraft effects organization will be composed of Technical Working Groups (TWG). These technical working groups will survey customers and users, generate products, and provide knowledge supporting four functional areas: design environments, engineering effects, operational support, and programmatic support. The four functional areas align with phases in the program mission lifecycle and are briefly described below. Design environments are used primarily in the mission concept and design phases of a program. Engineering effects focuses on the material, component, sub-system and system-level selection and the testing to verify design and operational performance. Operational support provides products based on real time or near real time space weather to mission operators to aid in real time and near-term decision-making. The programmatic support function maintains an interface with the numerous programs within NASA, other federal

  4. Printed Spacecraft Separation System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehoff, Ryan R [ORNL; Holmans, Walter [Planetary Systems Corporation

    2016-10-01

    In this project Planetary Systems Corporation proposed utilizing additive manufacturing (3D printing) to manufacture a titanium spacecraft separation system for commercial and US government customers to realize a 90% reduction in the cost and energy. These savings were demonstrated via “printing-in” many of the parts and sub-assemblies into one part, thus greatly reducing the labor associated with design, procurement, assembly and calibration of mechanisms. Planetary Systems Corporation redesigned several of the components of the separation system based on additive manufacturing principles including geometric flexibility and the ability to fabricate complex designs, ability to combine multiple parts of an assembly into a single component, and the ability to optimize design for specific mechanical property targets. Shock absorption was specifically targeted and requirements were established to attenuate damage to the Lightband system from shock of initiation. Planetary Systems Corporation redesigned components based on these requirements and sent the designs to Oak Ridge National Laboratory to be printed. ORNL printed the parts using the Arcam electron beam melting technology based on the desire for the parts to be fabricated from Ti-6Al-4V based on the weight and mechanical performance of the material. A second set of components was fabricated from stainless steel material on the Renishaw laser powder bed technology due to the improved geometric accuracy, surface finish, and wear resistance of the material. Planetary Systems Corporation evaluated these components and determined that 3D printing is potentially a viable method for achieving significant cost and savings metrics.

  5. Internet Distribution of Spacecraft Telemetry Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, Ted; Noble, David

    2006-01-01

    Remote Access Multi-mission Processing and Analysis Ground Environment (RAMPAGE) is a Java-language server computer program that enables near-real-time display of spacecraft telemetry data on any authorized client computer that has access to the Internet and is equipped with Web-browser software. In addition to providing a variety of displays of the latest available telemetry data, RAMPAGE can deliver notification of an alarm by electronic mail. Subscribers can then use RAMPAGE displays to determine the state of the spacecraft and formulate a response to the alarm, if necessary. A user can query spacecraft mission data in either binary or comma-separated-value format by use of a Web form or a Practical Extraction and Reporting Language (PERL) script to automate the query process. RAMPAGE runs on Linux and Solaris server computers in the Ground Data System (GDS) of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and includes components designed specifically to make it compatible with legacy GDS software. The client/server architecture of RAMPAGE and the use of the Java programming language make it possible to utilize a variety of competitive server and client computers, thereby also helping to minimize costs.

  6. Insights into the regulation of DMSP synthesis in the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana through APR activity, proteomics and gene expression analyses on cells acclimating to changes in salinity, light and nitrogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Louise Kettles

    Full Text Available Despite the importance of dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP in the global sulphur cycle and climate regulation, the biological pathways underpinning its synthesis in marine phytoplankton remain poorly understood. The intracellular concentration of DMSP increases with increased salinity, increased light intensity and nitrogen starvation in the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. We used these conditions to investigate DMSP synthesis at the cellular level via analysis of enzyme activity, gene expression and proteome comparison. The activity of the key sulphur assimilatory enzyme, adenosine 5'-phosphosulphate reductase was not coordinated with increasing intracellular DMSP concentration. Under all three treatments coordination in the expression of sulphur assimilation genes was limited to increases in sulphite reductase transcripts. Similarly, proteomic 2D gel analysis only revealed an increase in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase following increases in DMSP concentration. Our findings suggest that increased sulphur assimilation might not be required for increased DMSP synthesis, instead the availability of carbon and nitrogen substrates may be important in the regulation of this pathway. This contrasts with the regulation of sulphur metabolism in higher plants, which generally involves up-regulation of several sulphur assimilatory enzymes. In T. pseudonana changes relating to sulphur metabolism were specific to the individual treatments and, given that little coordination was seen in transcript and protein responses across the three growth conditions, different patterns of regulation might be responsible for the increase in DMSP concentration seen under each treatment.

  7. The structure of RdDddP from Roseobacter denitrificans reveals that DMSP lyases in the DddP-family are metalloenzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Hendrik Hehemann

    Full Text Available Marine microbes degrade dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP, which is produced in large quantities by marine algae and plants, with DMSP lyases into acrylate and the gas dimethyl sulfide (DMS. Approximately 10% of the DMS vents from the sea into the atmosphere and this emission returns sulfur, which arrives in the sea through rivers and runoff, back to terrestrial systems via clouds and rain. Despite their key role in this sulfur cycle DMSP lyases are poorly understood at the molecular level. Here we report the first X-ray crystal structure of the putative DMSP lyase RdDddP from Roseobacter denitrificans, which belongs to the abundant DddP family. This structure, determined to 2.15 Å resolution, shows that RdDddP is a homodimeric metalloprotein with a binuclear center of two metal ions located 2.7 Å apart in the active site of the enzyme. Consistent with the crystallographic data, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS and total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TRXF revealed the bound metal species to be primarily iron. A 3D structure guided analysis of environmental DddP lyase sequences elucidated the critical residues for metal binding are invariant, suggesting all proteins in the DddP family are metalloenzymes.

  8. A New Urban Index for Expressing Inner-City Patterns Based on MODIS LST and EVI Regulated DMSP/OLS NTL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangxiaoyue Liu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid pace of urban expansion, comprehensively understanding urban spatial patterns, built environments, green-spaces distributions, demographic distributions, and economic activities becomes more meaningful. Night Time Lights (NTL images acquired through the Operational Linescan System of the US Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP/OLS NTL have long been utilized to monitor urban areas and their expansion characteristics since this system detects variation in NTL emissions. However, the pixel saturation phenomenon leads to a serious limitation in mapping luminance variations in urban zones with nighttime illumination levels that approach or exceed the pixel saturation limits of OLS sensors. Consequently, we propose an NTL-based city index that utilizes the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS Land Surface Temperature (LST and Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI images to regulate and compensate for desaturation on NTL images acquired from corresponding urban areas. The regulated results achieve good performance in differentiating central business districts (CBDs, airports, and urban green spaces. Consequently, these derived imageries could effectively convey the structural details of urban cores. In addition, compared with the Vegetation Adjusted NTL Urban Index (VANUI, LST-and-EVI-regulated-NTL-city index (LERNCI reveals superior capability in delineating the spatial structures of selected metropolis areas across the world, especially in the large cities of developing countries. The currently available results indicate that LERNCI corresponds better to city spatial patterns. Moreover, LERNCI displays a remarkably better “goodness-of-fit” correspondence with both the Version 1 Nighttime Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite Day/Night Band Composite (NPP/VIIRS DNB data and the WorldPop population-density data compared with the VANUI imageries. Thus, LERNCI can act as a helpful indicator for differentiating

  9. Advanced Spacecraft Thermal Modeling Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For spacecraft developers who spend millions to billions of dollars per unit and require 3 to 7 years to deploy, the LoadPath reduced-order (RO) modeling thermal...

  10. Spacecraft Cabin Particulate Monitor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to design, build and test an optical extinction monitor for the detection of spacecraft cabin particulates. This monitor will be sensitive to particle...

  11. Spacecraft Cabin Particulate Monitor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We have built and tested an optical extinction monitor for the detection of spacecraft cabin particulates. This sensor sensitive to particle sizes ranging from a few...

  12. Spacecraft design applications of QUICK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, David L.

    1992-01-01

    The interactive space mission trajectory design environment software QUICK, which is currently available on 14 different machine architectures, furnishes a programmable FORTRAN-like interface for a wide range of both built-in and user-defined functions. Since its inception at JPL in 1971, QUICK has evolved from a specialized calculator into a general-purpose engineering tool which also facilitates spacecraft conceptual design by treating spacecraft as collections of data records describing individual components of instruments.

  13. Artist's drawing of Viking spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is developing an unmanned spacecraft called Viking to continue the exploration of Mars in the mid-1970s. Two Viking spacecraft, each including an orbiter and a lander will be launched by TitanIII/Centaur launch vehicles in August and September 1975 from Cape Kennedy to reach Mars in mid-1976. They will perform scientific investigations both from orbit and on the surface of Mars, including a search for life form on the planet.

  14. Influence of short-term synoptic events and snow depth on DMS, DMSP, and DMSO dynamics in Antarctic spring sea ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gauthier Carnat

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Temporal changes in the concentration profiles of dimethylsulfide (DMS, dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP, and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO were measured in pack ice from the Bellingshausen Sea (Antarctica during the winter-spring transition of 2007. Two sites with contrasting snow and ice thicknesses were sampled, with high concentrations of DMS, DMSP, and DMSO observed at both sites, especially in surface ice. These high concentrations were shown to correspond to the development of a surface ice microalgal community dominated by strong DMSP producers (flagellates and dinoflagellates following flooding of the ice cover. Several short-term synoptic events were observed and shown to influence strongly the dynamics of sea ice DMS, DMSP, and DMSO. In particular, a cold spell event was associated with drastic changes in the environmental conditions for the sea ice microbial communities and to a remarkable increase in the production of dimethylated sulfur compounds at both sites. A good correlation between all dimethylated sulfur compounds, sea ice temperature, and brine salinity suggested that the observed increase was triggered mainly by increased thermal and osmotic stresses on microalgal cells. Atmospheric forcing, by controlling sea ice temperature and hence the connectivity and instability of the brine network, was also shown to constrain the transfer of dimethylated sulfur compounds in the ice towards the ocean via brine drainage. Analysis of the two contrasting sampling sites shed light on the key role played by the snow cover in the sea ice DMS cycle. Thicker snow cover, by insulating the underlying sea ice, reduced the amplitude of environmental changes associated with the cold spell, leading to a weaker physiological response and DMS, DMSP, and DMSO production. Thicker snow also hampered the development of steep gradients in sea ice temperature and brine salinity, thereby decreasing the potential for the release of dimethylated sulfur

  15. Rapid turnover of dissolved DMS and DMSP by defined bacterioplankton communities in the stratified euphotic zone of the North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubkov, Mikhail V.; Fuchs, Bernhard M.; Archer, Stephen D.; Kiene, Ronald P.; Amann, Rudolf; Burkill, Peter H.

    Bacterioplankton-driven turnover of the algal osmolyte, dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP), and its degradation product, dimethylsulphide (DMS) the major natural source of atmospheric sulphur, were studied during a Lagrangian SF 6-tracer experiment in the North Sea (60°N, 3°E). The water mass sampled within the euphotic zone was characterised by a surface mixed layer (from 0 m to 13-30 m) and a subsurface layer (from 13-30 m to 45-58 m) separated by a 2°C thermocline spanning 2 m. The fluxes of dissolved DMSP (DMSPd) and DMS were determined using radioactive tracer techniques. Rates of the simultaneous incorporation of 14C-leucine and 3H-thymidine were measured to estimate bacterioplankton production. Flow cytometry was employed to discriminate subpopulations and to determine the numbers and biomass of bacterioplankton by staining for nucleic acids and proteins. Bacterioplankton subpopulations were separated by flow cytometric sorting and their composition determined using 16S ribosomal gene cloning/sequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridisation with designed group-specific oligonucleotide probes. A subpopulation, dominated by bacteria related to Roseobacter-( α-proteobacteria), constituted 26-33% of total bacterioplankton numbers and 45-48% of biomass in both surface and subsurface layers. The other abundant prokaryotes were a group within the SAR86 cluster of γ-proteobacteria and bacteria from the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium—cluster. Bacterial consumption of DMSPd was greater in the subsurface layer (41 nM d -1) than in the surface layer (20 nM d -1). Bacterioplankton tightly controlled the DMSPd pool, particularly in the subsurface layer, with a turnover time of 2 h, whereas the turnover time of DMSPd in the surface layer was 10 h. Consumed DMSP satisfied the majority of sulphur demands of bacterioplankton, even though bacterioplankton assimilated only about 2.5% and 6.0% of consumed DMSPd sulphur in the surface and subsurface layers, respectively

  16. Conceptual definition of Automated Power Systems Management. [for planetary spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, M. S.; Skelly, L.; Weiner, H.

    1977-01-01

    Automated Power Systems Management (APSM) is defined as the capability of a spacecraft power system to automatically perform monitoring, computational, command, and control functions without ground intervention. Power systems for future planetary spacecraft must have this capability because they must perform up to 10 years, and accommodate real-time changes in mission execution autonomously. Specific APSM functions include fault detection, isolation, and correction; system performance and load profile prediction; power system optimization; system checkout; and data storage and transmission control. This paper describes the basic method of implementing these specific functions. The APSM hardware includes a central power system computer and a processor dedicated to each major power system subassembly along with digital interface circuitry. The major payoffs anticipated are in enhancement of spacecraft reliability and life and reduction of overall spacecraft program cost.

  17. An Educational Multimedia Presentation on the Introduction to Spacecraft Charging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, E.; dePayrebrune, M.

    2004-01-01

    Over the last few decades, significant knowledge has been gained in how to protect spacecraft from charging; however, the continuing technical advancement in the design and build of satellites requires on-going effort in the study of spacecraft charging. A situation that we have encountered is that not all satellite designers and builders are familiar with the problem of spacecraft charging. The design of a satellite involves many talented people with diverse backgrounds, ranging from manufacturing and assembly to engineering and program management. The complex design and build of a satellite system requires people with highly specialized skills such that cross-specialization is often not achievable. As a result, designers and builders of satellites are not usually familiar with the problems outside their specialization. This is also true for spacecraft charging. Not everyone is familiar with the definition of spacecraft charging and the damage that spacecraft charging can cause. Understanding the problem is an important first step in getting everyone involved in addressing the appropriate spacecraft charging issues during the satellite design and build phases. To address this important first step, an educational multimedia presentation has been created to inform the general engineering community about the basics of spacecraft charging. The content of this educational presentation is based on relevant published technical papers. The presentation was developed using Macromedia Flash. This software produces a more dynamic learning environment than a typical slide show , resulting in a more effective learning experience. The end result is that the viewer will have learned about the basics of spacecraft charging. This presentation is available to the public through our website, www.dplscience.com, free of charge. Viewers are encouraged to pass this presentation to colleagues within their own work environment. This paper describes the content of the multimedia

  18. Electrical Power Subsystem for the Euclid Spacecraft

    OpenAIRE

    Ciancetta Ezio; Cimino Marco; Cuzzocrea Giuseppe; Gervasio Giuseppe; Maiorano Elena; Martinez Ignacio; Sanchez Luc

    2017-01-01

    European Space Agency in the frame of Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 program [ 1 ]. It is a cosmology mission whose prime objective is to study the geometry and the nature of the dark matter and the dark energy with unprecedented accuracy. The spacecraft will be launched in 2020 by a Soyuz launcher, to perform a six-year survey of the extragalactic sky from a large-amplitude orbit around Lagrange point L2 of the Sun-Earth system. This paper outlines the Euclid Electrical Power Subsystem (EPS) ...

  19. Spacecraft Crew Cabin Condensation Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Laurie Y.; Rickman, Steven L.; Ungar, Eugene K.

    2013-01-01

    A report discusses a new technique to prevent condensation on the cabin walls of manned spacecraft exposed to the cold environment of space, as such condensation could lead to free water in the cabin. This could facilitate the growth of mold and bacteria, and could lead to oxidation and weakening of the cabin wall. This condensation control technique employs a passive method that uses spacecraft waste heat as the primary wallheating mechanism. A network of heat pipes is bonded to the crew cabin pressure vessel, as well as the pipes to each other, in order to provide for efficient heat transfer to the cabin walls and from one heat pipe to another. When properly sized, the heat-pipe network can maintain the crew cabin walls at a nearly uniform temperature. It can also accept and distribute spacecraft waste heat to maintain the pressure vessel above dew point.

  20. How to feed a spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclaughlin, William

    1987-01-01

    The uplink process between ground computers and the spacecraft computer is examined. Data is uplinked to a spacecraft by a load (a sequence of preplanned commands) or by real-time commands; the differences between these two types of uplinks are discussed. The sequencing of a load involves: (1) request generation, (2) request integration, (3) reference generation, and (4) transmitting the load. The functions of each of the sequencing steps are described. The development of new sequencing methods using expert systems and AI is being studied. A symbolic processing software which has the ability to transmit data typed into a computer in English was developed. Consideration is given to the composition, capabilities of the parser, and application of the symbolic processing software to the Comet Renedezvous Asteroid Flyby spacecraft.

  1. Spacecraft computer technology at Southwest Research Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirley, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) has developed and delivered spacecraft computers for a number of different near-Earth-orbit spacecraft including shuttle experiments and SDIO free-flyer experiments. We describe the evolution of the basic SwRI spacecraft computer design from those weighing in at 20 to 25 lb and using 20 to 30 W to newer models weighing less than 5 lb and using only about 5 W, yet delivering twice the processing throughput. Because of their reduced size, weight, and power, these newer designs are especially applicable to planetary instrument requirements. The basis of our design evolution has been the availability of more powerful processor chip sets and the development of higher density packaging technology, coupled with more aggressive design strategies in incorporating high-density FPGA technology and use of high-density memory chips. In addition to reductions in size, weight, and power, the newer designs also address the necessity of survival in the harsh radiation environment of space. Spurred by participation in such programs as MSTI, LACE, RME, Delta 181, Delta Star, and RADARSAT, our designs have evolved in response to program demands to be small, low-powered units, radiation tolerant enough to be suitable for both Earth-orbit microsats and for planetary instruments. Present designs already include MIL-STD-1750 and Multi-Chip Module (MCM) technology with near-term plans to include RISC processors and higher-density MCM's. Long term plans include development of whole-core processors on one or two MCM's.

  2. Data base architecture for instrument characteristics critical to spacecraft conceptual design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowell, Lawrence F.; Allen, Cheryl L.

    1990-01-01

    Spacecraft designs are driven by the payloads and mission requirements that they support. Many of the payload characteristics, such as mass, power requirements, communication requirements, moving parts, and so forth directly affect the choices for the spacecraft structural configuration and its subsystem design and component selection. The conceptual design process, which translates mission requirements into early spacecraft concepts, must be tolerant of frequent changes in the payload complement and resource requirements. A computer data base was designed and implemented for the purposes of containing the payload characteristics pertinent for spacecraft conceptual design, tracking the evolution of these payloads over time, and enabling the integration of the payload data with engineering analysis programs for improving the efficiency in producing spacecraft designs. In-house tools were used for constructing the data base and for performing the actual integration with an existing program for optimizing payload mass locations on the spacecraft.

  3. Radiation Environment Effects on Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladbury, Ray.

    2017-01-01

    Space poses a variety of radiation hazards. These hazards pose different risks for different missions depending on the mission environment, duration and requirements. This presentation presents a brief look at several radiation related hazards, including destructive and nondestructive Single-Event Effect, Total Ionizing Dose, Displacement Damage and Spacecraft Charging. The temporal and spatial characteristics for the environments of concern for each are considered.

  4. Optimal Reorientation Of Spacecraft Orbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelnokov Yuriy Nikolaevich

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of optimal reorientation of the spacecraft orbit is considered. For solving the problem we used quaternion equations of motion written in rotating coordinate system. The use of quaternion variables makes this consideration more efficient. The problem of optimal control is solved on the basis of the maximum principle. An example of numerical solution of the problem is given.

  5. Passive Plasma Contact Mechanisms for Small-Scale Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTernan, Jesse K.

    Small-scale spacecraft represent a paradigm shift in how entities such as academia, industry, engineering firms, and the scientific community operate in space. However, although the paradigm shift produces unique opportunities to build satellites in unique ways for novel missions, there are also significant challenges that must be addressed. This research addresses two of the challenges associated with small-scale spacecraft: 1) the miniaturization of spacecraft and associated instrumentation and 2) the need to transport charge across the spacecraft-environment boundary. As spacecraft decrease in size, constraints on the size, weight, and power of on-board instrumentation increase--potentially limiting the instrument's functionality or ability to integrate with the spacecraft. These constraints drive research into mechanisms or techniques that use little or no power and efficiently utilize existing resources. One limited resource on small-scale spacecraft is outer surface area, which is often covered with solar panels to meet tight power budgets. This same surface area could also be needed for passive neutralization of spacecraft charging. This research explores the use of a transparent, conductive layer on the solar cell coverglass that is electrically connected to spacecraft ground potential. This dual-purpose material facilitates the use of outer surfaces for both energy harvesting of solar photons as well as passive ion collection. Mission capabilities such as in-situ plasma measurements that were previously infeasible on small-scale platforms become feasible with the use of indium tin oxide-coated solar panel coverglass. We developed test facilities that simulate the space environment in low Earth orbit to test the dual-purpose material and the various application of this approach. Particularly, this research is in support of two upcoming missions: OSIRIS-3U, by Penn State's Student Space Programs Lab, and MiTEE, by the University of Michigan. The purpose of

  6. Materials for Spacecraft. Chapter 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finckenor, Miria M.

    2016-01-01

    The general knowledge in this chapter is intended for a broad variety of spacecraft: manned or unmanned, low Earth to geosynchronous orbit, cis-lunar, lunar, planetary, or deep space exploration. Materials for launch vehicles are covered in chapter 7. Materials used in the fabrication of spacecraft hardware should be selected by considering the operational requirements for the particular application and the design engineering properties of the candidate materials. The information provided in this chapter is not intended to replace an in-depth materials study but rather to make the spacecraft designer aware of the challenges for various types of materials and some lessons learned from more than 50 years of spaceflight. This chapter discusses the damaging effects of the space environment on various materials and what has been successfully used in the past or what may be used for a more robust design. The material categories covered are structural, thermal control for on-orbit and re-entry, shielding against radiation and meteoroid/space debris impact, optics, solar arrays, lubricants, seals, and adhesives. Spacecraft components not directly exposed to space must still meet certain requirements, particularly for manned spacecraft where toxicity and flammability are concerns. Requirements such as fracture control and contamination control are examined, with additional suggestions for manufacturability. It is important to remember that the actual hardware must be tested to understand the real, "as-built" performance, as it could vary from the design intent. Early material trades can overestimate benefits and underestimate costs. An example of this was using graphite/epoxy composite in the International Space Station science racks to save weight. By the time the requirements for vibration isolation, Space Shuttle frequencies, and experiment operations were included, the weight savings had evaporated.

  7. Thermal observations of spacecraft target 1999 JU3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campins, Humberto; Barucci, Antonella; Dotto, Elizabetta; Emery, Joshua; Fernandez, Yanga; Kelley, Michael; Licandro, Javier

    2008-03-01

    We propose a 1.4 hr program to observe, with IRS, the near-Earth asteroid 161273 (1999 JU3), the primary target of two proposed spacecraft missions: the European Space Agency (ESA) MARCO POLO sample return mission and the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Hyabusa-2 mission. These observations will provide characterization of the composition and thermophysical properties of this distinctive asteroid.

  8. Video-Game-Like Engine for Depicting Spacecraft Trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upchurch, Paul R.

    2009-01-01

    GoView is a video-game-like software engine, written in the C and C++ computing languages, that enables real-time, three-dimensional (3D)-appearing visual representation of spacecraft and trajectories (1) from any perspective; (2) at any spatial scale from spacecraft to Solar-system dimensions; (3) in user-selectable time scales; (4) in the past, present, and/or future; (5) with varying speeds; and (6) forward or backward in time. GoView constructs an interactive 3D world by use of spacecraft-mission data from pre-existing engineering software tools. GoView can also be used to produce distributable application programs for depicting NASA orbital missions on personal computers running the Windows XP, Mac OsX, and Linux operating systems. GoView enables seamless rendering of Cartesian coordinate spaces with programmable graphics hardware, whereas prior programs for depicting spacecraft trajectories variously require non-Cartesian coordinates and/or are not compatible with programmable hardware. GoView incorporates an algorithm for nonlinear interpolation between arbitrary reference frames, whereas the prior programs are restricted to special classes of inertial and non-inertial reference frames. Finally, whereas the prior programs present complex user interfaces requiring hours of training, the GoView interface provides guidance, enabling use without any training.

  9. Concentrations and cycling of DMS, DMSP, and DMSO in coastal and offshore waters of the Subarctic Pacific during summer, 2010-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Elizabeth; Dacey, John W.; Ianson, Debby; Peña, Angelica; Tortell, Philippe D.

    2017-04-01

    Concentrations of dimethylsulfide (DMS), measured in the Subarctic Pacific during summer 2010 and 2011, ranged from ˜1 to 40 nM, while dissolved dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) concentrations (range 13-23 nM) exceeded those of dissolved dimethyl sulfoniopropionate (DMSP) (range 1.3-8.8 nM). Particulate DMSP dominated the reduced sulfur pool, reaching maximum concentrations of 100 nM. Coastal and off shore waters exhibited similar overall DMS concentration ranges, but sea-air DMS fluxes were lower in the oceanic waters due to lower wind speeds. Surface DMS concentrations showed statistically significant correlations with various hydrographic variables including the upwelling intensity (r2 = 0.52, p power at small scales. Stable isotope tracer experiments indicated that the DMSP cleavage pathway always exceeded the DMSO reduction pathway as a DMS source, leading to at least 85% more DMS production in each experiment. Gross DMS production rates were positively correlated with the upwelling intensity, while net rates of DMS production were significantly correlated to surface water DMS concentrations. This latter result suggests that our measurements captured dominant processes driving surface DMS accumulation across a coastal-oceanic gradient.

  10. Spacecraft fabrication and test MODIL. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, T.T.

    1994-05-01

    This report covers the period from October 1992 through the close of the project. FY 92 closed out with the successful briefing to industry and with many potential and important initiatives in the spacecraft arena. Due to the funding uncertainties, we were directed to proceed as if our funding would be approximately the same as FY 92 ($2M), but not to make any major new commitments. However, the MODIL`s FY 93 funding was reduced to $810K and we were directed to concentrate on the cryocooler area. The cryocooler effort completed its demonstration project. The final meetings with the cryocooler fabricators were very encouraging as we witnessed the enthusiastic reception of technology to help them reduce fabrication uncertainties. Support of the USAF Phillips Laboratory cryocooler program was continued including kick-off meetings for the Prototype Spacecraft Cryocooler (PSC). Under Phillips Laboratory support, Gill Cruz visited British Aerospace and Lucas Aerospace in the United Kingdom to assess their manufacturing capabilities. In the Automated Spacecraft & Assembly Project (ASAP), contracts were pursued for the analysis by four Brilliant Eyes prime contractors to provide a proprietary snap shot of their current status of Integrated Product Development. In the materials and structure thrust the final analysis was completed of the samples made under the contract (``Partial Automation of Matched Metal Net Shape Molding of Continuous Fiber Composites``) to SPARTA. The Precision Technologies thrust funded the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to prepare a plan to develop a Computer Aided Alignment capability to significantly reduce the time for alignment and even possibly provide real time and remote alignment capability of systems in flight.

  11. Introducing GV : The Spacecraft Geometry Visualizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Throop, Henry B.; Stern, S. A.; Parker, J. W.; Gladstone, G. R.; Weaver, H. A.

    2009-12-01

    GV (Geometry Visualizer) is a web-based program for planning spacecraft observations. GV is the primary planning tool used by the New Horizons science team to plan the encounter with Pluto. GV creates accurate 3D images and movies showing the position of planets, satellites, and stars as seen from an observer on a spacecraft or other body. NAIF SPICE routines are used throughout for accurate calculations of all geometry. GV includes 3D geometry rendering of all planetary bodies, lon/lat grids, ground tracks, albedo maps, stellar magnitudes, types and positions from HD and Tycho-2 catalogs, and spacecraft FOVs. It generates still images, animations, and geometric data tables. GV is accessed through an easy-to-use and flexible web interface. The web-based interface allows for uniform use from any computer and assures that all users are accessing up-to-date versions of the code and kernel libraries. Compared with existing planning tools, GV is often simpler, faster, lower-cost, and more flexible. GV was developed at SwRI to support the New Horizons mission to Pluto. It has been subsequently expanded to support multiple other missions in flight or under development, including Cassini, Messenger, Rosetta, LRO, and Juno. The system can be used to plan Earth-based observations such as occultations to high precision, and was used by the public to help plan 'Kodak Moment' observations of the Pluto system from New Horizons. Potential users of GV may contact the author for more information. Development of GV has been funded by the New Horizons, Rosetta, and LRO missions.

  12. Spacecraft Charge as a Source of Electrical Power for Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-11-01

    Limitations ............ . . 7.2 Appendix : MATHCAD 2.0 Document for Solving Spacecraft Charging Equations . . . APP.1 Bibliography...The charging model is solved using the equation solver routines in MATHCAD 2.0: an engineering computer software package by MathSoft Inc. The Appendix...lists the problem formulated as a MATHCAD document. The 3 output data from MATHCAD 2.0 has been graphed using the spreadsheet QUATTRO by Borland. 3

  13. DMSP-F8 SSM/I Pathfinder Land Surface Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Pathfinder Program, sponsored by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), is...

  14. Using DMSP-OLS Night Light Data for Proxying and Comparing Regional Development in Russia and China, 1992-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, M.; Smith, L. C.

    2016-12-01

    To date, no studies have examined the transition from communism to capitalism in Russia or China with night light (NTL) data despite the availability of DMSP-OLS satellite imagery dating back to 1992, one year after the dissolution of the Soviet Union. This paper uses the DMSP-OLS Version 4 stable lights annual image composites for every year from 1992-2012 to reveal the complex and sometimes divergent trajectories of regional development in Russia and China. We first characterize the spatial patterns and characteristics of NTL intensity and extensivity in Russia versus China at national and regional scales across this 21-year period. Although GDP rises in both countries during this time, NTL tells a different story: total night light (tNTL) in Russia in 2012 is slightly lower than in 1992, while tNTL in China is significantly higher. Next, we generate regional-level tNTL from each annual composite and examine their relationships with population, GDP, and fixed capital investment data from the Russian Federal State Statistics Service and the National Bureau of Statistics of China using a fixed effects model. We determine that while the fixed effects "between" model explains more of the differences in tNTL between Russia's federal subjects, the "within" model better explains differences over time within China's provinces. This suggests that on the one hand, Russia's regions are more heterogeneous than China's. On the other hand, whereas change over time in population and GRP explains change over time in tNTL in China's regions, they hardly do so at all for Russia's. Finally, we attempt to combine these socioeconomic variables with NTL data to build an NTL-based typology of regional development, representing a step beyond existing research. The preliminary creation of a regional development typology allows us to begin identifying emerging resource frontiers (places with increases in NTL but decreases in population) along with areas experiencing a reversal of

  15. SCL: An off-the-shelf system for spacecraft control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Brian; Vangaasbeck, James

    1994-11-01

    In this age of shrinking military, civil, and commercial space budgets, an off-the-shelf solution is needed to provide a multimission approach to spacecraft control. A standard operational interface which can be applied to multiple spacecraft allows a common approach to ground and space operations. A trend for many space programs has been to reduce operational staff by applying autonomy to the spacecraft and to the ground stations. The Spacecraft Command Language (SCL) system developed by Interface and Control Systems, Inc. (ICS) provides an off-the-shelf solution for spacecraft operations. The SCL system is designed to provide a hyper-scripting interface which remains standard from program to program. The spacecraft and ground station hardware specifics are isolated to provide the maximum amount of portability from system to system. Uplink and downlink interfaces are also isolated to allow the system to perform independent of the communications protocols chosen. The SCL system can be used for both the ground stations and the spacecraft, or as a value added package for existing ground station environments. The SCL system provides an expanded stored commanding capability as well as a rule-based expert system on-board. The expert system allows reactive control on-board the spacecraft for functions such as electrical power systems (EPS), thermal control, etc. which have traditionally been performed on the ground. The SCL rule and scripting capability share a common syntax allowing control of scripts from rules and rules from scripts. Rather than telemeter over sampled data to the ground, the SCL system maintains a database on-board which is available for interrogation by the scripts and rules. The SCL knowledge base is constructed on the ground and uploaded to the spacecraft. The SCL system follows an open-systems approach allowing other tasks to communicate with SCL on the ground and in space. The SCL system was used on the Clementine program (launched January 25

  16. Development of a Spacecraft Materials Selector Expert System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pippin, G.; Kauffman, W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This report contains a description of the knowledge base tool and examples of its use. A downloadable version of the Spacecraft Materials Selector (SMS) knowledge base is available through the NASA Space Environments and Effects Program. The "Spacecraft Materials Selector" knowledge base is part of an electronic expert system. The expert system consists of an inference engine that contains the "decision-making" code and the knowledge base that contains the selected body of information. The inference engine is a software package previously developed at Boeing, called the Boeing Expert System Tool (BEST) kit.

  17. Potential Polymeric Sphere Construction Materials for a Spacecraft Electrostatic Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joseph G., Jr.; Smith, Trent; Williams, Martha; Youngquist, Robert; Mendell, Wendell

    2006-01-01

    An electrostatic shielding concept for spacecraft radiation protection under NASA s Exploration Systems Research and Technology Program was evaluated for its effectiveness and feasibility. The proposed shield design is reminiscent of a classic quadrupole with positively and negatively charged spheres surrounding the spacecraft. The project addressed materials, shield configuration, power supply, and compared its effectiveness to that of a passive shield. The report herein concerns the identification of commercially available materials that could be used in sphere fabrication. It was found that several materials were needed to potentially construct the spheres for an electrostatic shield operating at 300 MV.

  18. Processing Images of Craters for Spacecraft Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yang; Johnson, Andrew E.; Matthies, Larry H.

    2009-01-01

    A crater-detection algorithm has been conceived to enable automation of what, heretofore, have been manual processes for utilizing images of craters on a celestial body as landmarks for navigating a spacecraft flying near or landing on that body. The images are acquired by an electronic camera aboard the spacecraft, then digitized, then processed by the algorithm, which consists mainly of the following steps: 1. Edges in an image detected and placed in a database. 2. Crater rim edges are selected from the edge database. 3. Edges that belong to the same crater are grouped together. 4. An ellipse is fitted to each group of crater edges. 5. Ellipses are refined directly in the image domain to reduce errors introduced in the detection of edges and fitting of ellipses. 6. The quality of each detected crater is evaluated. It is planned to utilize this algorithm as the basis of a computer program for automated, real-time, onboard processing of crater-image data. Experimental studies have led to the conclusion that this algorithm is capable of a detection rate >93 percent, a false-alarm rate <5 percent, a geometric error <0.5 pixel, and a position error <0.3 pixel.

  19. Quick Spacecraft Thermal Analysis Tool Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For spacecraft design and development teams concerned with cost and schedule, the Quick Spacecraft Thermal Analysis Tool (QuickSTAT) is an innovative software suite...

  20. Service Oriented Spacecraft Modeling Environment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The I-Logix team proposes development of the Service Oriented Spacecraft Modeling Environment (SOSME) to allow faster and more effective spacecraft system design...

  1. Spacecraft Tests of General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, John D.

    1997-01-01

    Current spacecraft tests of general relativity depend on coherent radio tracking referred to atomic frequency standards at the ground stations. This paper addresses the possibility of improved tests using essentially the current system, but with the added possibility of a space-borne atomic clock. Outside of the obvious measurement of the gravitational frequency shift of the spacecraft clock, a successor to the suborbital flight of a Scout D rocket in 1976 (GP-A Project), other metric tests would benefit most directly by a possible improved sensitivity for the reduced coherent data. For purposes of illustration, two possible missions are discussed. The first is a highly eccentric Earth orbiter, and the second a solar-conjunction experiment to measure the Shapiro time delay using coherent Doppler data instead of the conventional ranging modulation.

  2. Energy Storage Flywheels on Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Robert O.; Brown, Gary; Levinthal, Joel; Brodeur, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    With advances in carbon composite material, magnetic bearings, microprocessors, and high-speed power switching devices, work has begun on a space qualifiable Energy Momentum Wheel (EMW). An EMW is a device that can be used on a satellite to store energy, like a chemical battery, and manage angular momentum, like a reaction wheel. These combined functions are achieved by the simultaneous and balanced operation of two or more energy storage flywheels. An energy storage flywheel typically consists of a carbon composite rotor driven by a brushless DC motor/generator. Each rotor has a relatively large angular moment of inertia and is suspended on magnetic bearings to minimize energy loss. The use of flywheel batteries on spacecraft will increase system efficiencies (mass and power), while reducing design-production time and life-cycle cost. This paper will present a discussion of flywheel battery design considerations and a simulation of spacecraft system performance utilizing four flywheel batteries to combine energy storage and momentum management for a typical LEO satellite. A proposed set of control laws and an engineering animation will also be presented. Once flight qualified and demonstrated, space flywheel batteries may alter the architecture of most medium and high-powered spacecraft.

  3. Spacecraft and their Boosters. Aerospace Education I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coard, E. A.

    This book, one in the series on Aerospace Education I, provides a description of some of the discoveries that spacecraft have made possible and of the experience that American astronauts have had in piloting spacecraft. The basic principles behind the operation of spacecraft and their boosters are explained. Descriptions are also included on…

  4. Sequestration of Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) and Acrylate from the Green Alga Ulva Spp. by the Sea Hare Aplysia juliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamio, Michiya; Koyama, Mao; Hayashihara, Nobuko; Hiei, Kaori; Uchida, Hajime; Watanabe, Ryuichi; Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Nagai, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    Many animals sequester secondary metabolites from their food. In this study, we hypothesized that the sea hare Aplysia juliana sequesters secondary metabolites from green algae. To test this, we performed NMR-based metabolomic analysis on methanol extracts of Ulva spp. and A. juliana. Another sea hare, Bursatella leachii, which mainly feeds on another type of alga, was added to this analysis as an outgroup. Two body parts of the sea hares, skin and digestive glands, were used in the analysis. Principal component analysis (PCA) on the NMR data of these samples detected biomarkers common to Ulva spp. and A. juliana. This result indicates sequestration of secondary metabolites by the herbivore from the plants. The biomarker metabolites were identified as dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) and acrylate, which were concentrated in skin of A. juliana and were released from the skin of live animals when physically stressed. Thus, our NMR-based metabolomic study revealed sequestration of algae-derived secondary metabolites in skin of A. Juliana, and in the discharge of the metabolites under conditions that mimic attack by predators.

  5. Comparison of the characteristic energy of precipitating electrons derived from ground-based and DMSP satellite data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ashrafi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy maps are important for ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling studies, because quantitative determination of field-aligned currents requires knowledge of the conductances and their spatial gradients. By combining imaging riometer absorption and all-sky auroral optical data it is possible to produce high temporal and spatial resolution maps of the Maxwellian characteristic energy of precipitating electrons within a 240240 common field of view. These data have been calibrated by inverting EISCAT electron density profiles into equivalent energy spectra. In this paper energy maps produced by ground-based instruments (optical and riometer are compared with DMSP satellite data during geomagnetic conjunctions. For the period 1995-2002, twelve satellite passes over the ground-based instruments' field of view for the cloud-free conditions have been considered. Four of the satellite conjunctions occurred during moderate geomagnetic, steady-state conditions and without any ion precipitation. In these cases with Maxwellian satellite spectra, there is 71% agreement between the characteristic energies derived from the satellite and the ground-based energy map method.

  6. Event Detection Using Mobile Phone Mass GPS Data and Their Reliavility Verification by Dmsp/ols Night Light Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuki, Akiyama; Satoshi, Ueyama; Ryosuke, Shibasaki; Adachi, Ryuichiro

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we developed a method to detect sudden population concentration on a certain day and area, that is, an "Event," all over Japan in 2012 using mass GPS data provided from mobile phone users. First, stay locations of all phone users were detected using existing methods. Second, areas and days where Events occurred were detected by aggregation of mass stay locations into 1-km-square grid polygons. Finally, the proposed method could detect Events with an especially large number of visitors in the year by removing the influences of Events that occurred continuously throughout the year. In addition, we demonstrated reasonable reliability of the proposed Event detection method by comparing the results of Event detection with light intensities obtained from the night light images from the DMSP/OLS night light images. Our method can detect not only positive events such as festivals but also negative events such as natural disasters and road accidents. These results are expected to support policy development of urban planning, disaster prevention, and transportation management.

  7. Model of spacecraft atomic oxygen and solar exposure microenvironments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourassa, R. J.; Pippin, H. G.

    1993-01-01

    Computer models of environmental conditions in Earth orbit are needed for the following reasons: (1) derivation of material performance parameters from orbital test data, (2) evaluation of spacecraft hardware designs, (3) prediction of material service life, and (4) scheduling spacecraft maintenance. To meet these needs, Boeing has developed programs for modeling atomic oxygen (AO) and solar radiation exposures. The model allows determination of AO and solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposures for spacecraft surfaces (1) in arbitrary orientations with respect to the direction of spacecraft motion, (2) overall ranges of solar conditions, and (3) for any mission duration. The models have been successfully applied to prediction of experiment environments on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) and for analysis of selected hardware designs for deployment on other spacecraft. The work on these models has been reported at previous LDEF conferences. Since publication of these reports, a revision has been made to the AO calculation for LDEF, and further work has been done on the microenvironments model for solar exposure.

  8. Comprehension of Spacecraft Telemetry Using Hierarchical Specifications of Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havelund, Klaus; Joshi, Rajeev

    2014-01-01

    A key challenge in operating remote spacecraft is that ground operators must rely on the limited visibility available through spacecraft telemetry in order to assess spacecraft health and operational status. We describe a tool for processing spacecraft telemetry that allows ground operators to impose structure on received telemetry in order to achieve a better comprehension of system state. A key element of our approach is the design of a domain-specific language that allows operators to express models of expected system behavior using partial specifications. The language allows behavior specifications with data fields, similar to other recent runtime verification systems. What is notable about our approach is the ability to develop hierarchical specifications of behavior. The language is implemented as an internal DSL in the Scala programming language that synthesizes rules from patterns of specification behavior. The rules are automatically applied to received telemetry and the inferred behaviors are available to ground operators using a visualization interface that makes it easier to understand and track spacecraft state. We describe initial results from applying our tool to telemetry received from the Curiosity rover currently roving the surface of Mars, where the visualizations are being used to trend subsystem behaviors, in order to identify potential problems before they happen. However, the technology is completely general and can be applied to any system that generates telemetry such as event logs.

  9. DMSP SSM/I-SSMIS Pathfinder Daily EASE-Grid Brightness Temperatures

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Level-3 Equal-Area Scalable Earth-Grid (EASE-Grid) Brightness Temperature data set, collected since 09 July 1987, is a part of the NOAA/NASA Pathfinder Program....

  10. Deep Space Networking Experiments on the EPOXI Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ross M.

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Space Communications & Navigation Program within the Space Operations Directorate is operating a program to develop and deploy Disruption Tolerant Networking [DTN] technology for a wide variety of mission types by the end of 2011. DTN is an enabling element of the Interplanetary Internet where terrestrial networking protocols are generally unsuitable because they rely on timely and continuous end-to-end delivery of data and acknowledgments. In fall of 2008 and 2009 and 2011 the Jet Propulsion Laboratory installed and tested essential elements of DTN technology on the Deep Impact spacecraft. These experiments, called Deep Impact Network Experiment (DINET 1) were performed in close cooperation with the EPOXI project which has responsibility for the spacecraft. The DINET 1 software was installed on the backup software partition on the backup flight computer for DINET 1. For DINET 1, the spacecraft was at a distance of about 15 million miles (24 million kilometers) from Earth. During DINET 1 300 images were transmitted from the JPL nodes to the spacecraft. Then, they were automatically forwarded from the spacecraft back to the JPL nodes, exercising DTN's bundle origination, transmission, acquisition, dynamic route computation, congestion control, prioritization, custody transfer, and automatic retransmission procedures, both on the spacecraft and on the ground, over a period of 27 days. The first DINET 1 experiment successfully validated many of the essential elements of the DTN protocols. DINET 2 demonstrated: 1) additional DTN functionality, 2) automated certain tasks which were manually implemented in DINET 1 and 3) installed the ION SW on nodes outside of JPL. DINET 3 plans to: 1) upgrade the LTP convergence-layer adapter to conform to the international LTP CL specification, 2) add convergence-layer "stewardship" procedures and 3) add the BSP security elements [PIB & PCB]. This paper describes the planning and execution of the flight experiment and the

  11. Expert system for spacecraft command and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, R. E.

    The application of AI techniques to the automation of ground control functions in the defense satellite communication system (DSCS) is described. The aim of this effort is to lower the vulnerability of the DSCS to attack; a first step is the design of software for spacecraft maintenance and control. The benefits of automation and the need for high-level implementation are reviewed. A knowledge-based or expert approach was chosen to automate telemetry-interpretation, trend-analysis, anomaly-resolution, and status-maintenance functions now performed solely by operators; and a design concept was developed to meet the requirements of extendability, simplicity, and explicitness. Rule-based and logic-based knowledge-representation schemes, and data-driven and goal-driven control strategies are compared. The programming tools developed by the different organizations participating in the AI effort are indicated in a table.

  12. Spacecraft Status Report: 2001 Mars Odyssey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyles, Carole

    2012-01-01

    Fourth extension of Odyssey mission continues, with orbital science investigations and relay services for landed assets. Mitigation of aging IMU and UHF transceiver. ODY has responded to Program Office/board recommendations. All Stellar mode has been certified for flight operations and is now standard for nadir point operations on the A-side. Investigating options to mitigate aging Battery. Gradual transfer to a later LMST orbit node to shorten eclipse durations. Reduce spacecraft loads during the longer eclipses. Optimize battery performance. ODY is preparing for E5 Proposal and Planetary Science Division FY12 Senior Review activities. ODY is on track to support MSL EDL and surface operations. ODY is managing consumables in order to remain in operations until 2020.

  13. Development of the Microwave Radiative Transfer Program for Cloudy Atmospheres: Applications to DMSP SSM/T Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-30

    package. Other equipment of meteorological interest on board the space craft include visual and infrared imagery channels and a scanning infrared...UTST .bT .Z1lPj .TST=ZToP- F(l.lub.LE.Z7ST) 6U TO P CuiNS= (SZTOP-S7RUT /MLO6CSIPTtP/ SPROT ) SZZzAL0G CSPP/5PhOT)*(.ONS+SZt4C7 GO 1tu 9𔃾 2 kK=(PTOP

  14. Microbiological sampling of spacecraft cabling, antennas, solar panels and thermal blankets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koukol, R. C.

    1973-01-01

    Sampling procedures and techniques described resulted from various flight project microbiological monitoring programs of unmanned planetary spacecraft. Concurrent with development of these procedures, compatibility evaluations were effected with the cognizant spacecraft subsystem engineers to assure that degradation factors would not be induced during the monitoring program. Of significance were those areas of the spacecraft configuration for which special handling precautions and/or nonstandard sample gathering techniques were evolved. These spacecraft component areas were: cabling, high gain antenna, solar panels, and thermal blankets. The compilation of these techniques provides a historical reference for both the qualification and quantification of sampling parameters as applied to the Mariner Spacecraft of the late 1960's and early 1970's.

  15. Application of Modern Fortran to Spacecraft Trajectory Design and Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jacob; Falck, Robert D.; Beekman, Izaak B.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, applications of the modern Fortran programming language to the field of spacecraft trajectory optimization and design are examined. Modern object-oriented Fortran has many advantages for scientific programming, although many legacy Fortran aerospace codes have not been upgraded to use the newer standards (or have been rewritten in other languages perceived to be more modern). NASA's Copernicus spacecraft trajectory optimization program, originally a combination of Fortran 77 and Fortran 95, has attempted to keep up with modern standards and makes significant use of the new language features. Various algorithms and methods are presented from trajectory tools such as Copernicus, as well as modern Fortran open source libraries and other projects.

  16. MESSENGER Spacecraft and Payload Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, R. E.; Solomon, S. C.; McNutt, J. R., Jr.; Leary, J. C.; MESSENGER Team

    The Mercury, Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission, launched in May of this year, will be the first spacecraft to orbit the planet Mercury. The >14 kWm-2 solar thermal input and the large velocity change required to reach Mercury orbit make this a very challenging mission from thermal and mass perspectives. MESSENGER overcomes these challenges with innovative applications of existing technologies and materials. The spacecraft uses ordinary space electronics, has minimal moving parts, and has extensive redundancy and cross strapping to enhance its robustness. The major innovations are a ceramic-cloth thermal shade, an integrated lightweight structure, a high-performance propulsion system, and a solar array incorporating optical solar reflectors to prevent overheating. Seven miniaturized instruments, along with the spacecraft telecommunications system, satisfy all scientific objectives of the mission. The payload includes a dual imaging system with wide-angle and narrow-angle cameras; an integrated ultraviolet, visible, and infrared spectrometer that is sensitive enough to detect atmospheric emissions and robust enough to map mineralogical absorption features on the sun-lit surface; gamma-ray, X-ray, and neutron spectrometers for remote geochemical mapping; a vector magnetometer; a laser altimeter to determine the topography of surface features and determine whether Mercury has a fluid core; and an energetic particle and plasma spectrometer to characterize ionized species in the magnetosphere. The payload was fully calibrated before launch, and an additional series of calibration measurements are planned during the 5-year cruise to Mercury. The first of the three Venus flybys and two Mercury flybys during the cruise phase of the mission will occur in November 2004

  17. Integrated Spacecraft Navigation and Communication Using Radio, Optical, and X-rays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This program proposes to design and evaluate novel technology of X-ray navigation for augmentation and increased capability of high data-rate spacecraft...

  18. Titanium-Water Heat Pipe Radiator for Spacecraft Fission Power Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed program will develop titanium/water heat pipes suitable for Spacecraft Fission Power. NASA is examining small fission power reactors for future space...

  19. Satellite Spacecraft Charging Control Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-04-01

    MAAG, private comunication (3) A. PAILLOUS, Mise au point de matdriaux combinant la qualitf de rdflecteurs solaires et une bonne conductibilit...AD-A087 675 OFFICE NATIONAL D’EUDES ET DE RECHERCHES AEROSPATIALE--ETC F/G 22/2 SATELLITE SPACECRAFT CHARGING CONTROL MATERIALS*(U) APR 80 8 BENAISSA...this problem of outgassing (6)* The composite is obtained by lamin- ating at 280 C the quartz fabric with a FEP film and an aluminum (6) A.E. EAGLES et

  20. Spacecraft entry into an atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaroshevskii, Vasilii A.

    Problems related to the safe entry of spacecraft into the earth or other planetary atmospheres are discussed in a general manner. Attention is given to restrictions imposed on dynamical and thermal overloads, and an analysis is made of the aerodynamic characteristics of space vehicles of different types. Analytical and semianalytical methods for calculating entry trajectories are compared, and the applicability regions of approximate solutions are determined. The discussion also covers reentry trajectory optimization problems and the principal types of perturbations and navigation and control techniques.

  1. Spacecraft reliability/maintainability optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharmahd, J. N.

    1972-01-01

    Description of a procedure to develop a methodology to optimize man-serviced systems for reliability and maintainability. The spacecraft systems are analyzed using failure modes and effects analysis and maintenance analysis, component mean-time-between failure, duty cycle, type of redundancy, and cost information to develop parametric data on various time intervals. Included are crew time-to-repair, cost, weight, and volume effects of increasing subsystem reliability above the baseline. Results are presented for space systems using the existing data from a research and applications module. These results show the minimum cost of sustaining mission operations.

  2. Deep Impact Spacecraft Collides With Comet Tempel 1-Video

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    After 172 days and 268 million miles of deep space travel, the NASA Deep Impact spacecraft successfully reached out and touched comet Tempel 1. The collision between the coffee table-sized space probe and city-sized comet occurred July 4, 2005 at 12:52 a.m. CDT. The objects met at 23,000 miles per hour. The heat produced by the impact was at least several thousand degrees Kelvin and at that extreme temperature, just about any material begins to glow. This movie, made up of images taken by the medium resolution camera aboard the spacecraft, from May 1 to July 2, shows the Deep Impact approach to comet Tempel 1. The spacecraft detected 3 outbursts during this time period, on June 14th, June 22nd, and July 2nd. The movie ends during the final outburst. Mission scientists expect Deep Impact to provide answers to basic questions about the formation of the solar system. Principal investigator, Dr. Michael A'Hearn of the University of Maryland in College Park, is responsible for the mission, and project management is handled by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. The program office at Marshall Space Flight Center MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, assisted the Science Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington with program management, technology planning, systems assessment, flight assurance and public outreach. The spacecraft was built for NASA by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corporation of Boulder, Colorado. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/UMD)

  3. Anomalous accelerations in spacecraft flybys of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acedo, L.

    2017-12-01

    The flyby anomaly is a persistent riddle in astrodynamics. Orbital analysis in several flybys of the Earth since the Galileo spacecraft flyby of the Earth in 1990 have shown that the asymptotic post-encounter velocity exhibits a difference with the initial velocity that cannot be attributed to conventional effects. To elucidate its origin, we have developed an orbital program for analyzing the trajectory of the spacecraft in the vicinity of the perigee, including both the Sun and the Moon's tidal perturbations and the geopotential zonal, tesseral and sectorial harmonics provided by the EGM96 model. The magnitude and direction of the anomalous acceleration acting upon the spacecraft can be estimated from the orbital determination program by comparing with the trajectories fitted to telemetry data as provided by the mission teams. This acceleration amounts to a fraction of a mm/s2 and decays very fast with altitude. The possibility of some new physics of gravity in the altitude range for spacecraft flybys is discussed.

  4. Hybrid spacecraft attitude control system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renuganth Varatharajoo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The hybrid subsystem design could be an attractive approach for futurespacecraft to cope with their demands. The idea of combining theconventional Attitude Control System and the Electrical Power System ispresented in this article. The Combined Energy and Attitude ControlSystem (CEACS consisting of a double counter rotating flywheel assemblyis investigated for small satellites in this article. Another hybrid systemincorporating the conventional Attitude Control System into the ThermalControl System forming the Combined Attitude and Thermal ControlSystem (CATCS consisting of a "fluid wheel" and permanent magnets isalso investigated for small satellites herein. The governing equationsdescribing both these novel hybrid subsystems are presented and theironboard architectures are numerically tested. Both the investigated novelhybrid spacecraft subsystems comply with the reference missionrequirements.The hybrid subsystem design could be an attractive approach for futurespacecraft to cope with their demands. The idea of combining theconventional Attitude Control System and the Electrical Power System ispresented in this article. The Combined Energy and Attitude ControlSystem (CEACS consisting of a double counter rotating flywheel assemblyis investigated for small satellites in this article. Another hybrid systemincorporating the conventional Attitude Control System into the ThermalControl System forming the Combined Attitude and Thermal ControlSystem (CATCS consisting of a "fluid wheel" and permanent magnets isalso investigated for small satellites herein. The governing equationsdescribing both these novel hybrid subsystems are presented and theironboard architectures are numerically tested. Both the investigated novelhybrid spacecraft subsystems comply with the reference missionrequirements.

  5. Benefits of Spacecraft Level Vibration Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Scott; Kern, Dennis L.

    2015-01-01

    NASA-HDBK-7008 Spacecraft Level Dynamic Environments Testing discusses the approaches, benefits, dangers, and recommended practices for spacecraft level dynamic environments testing, including vibration testing. This paper discusses in additional detail the benefits and actual experiences of vibration testing spacecraft for NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) flight projects. JPL and GSFC have both similarities and differences in their spacecraft level vibration test approach: JPL uses a random vibration input and a frequency range usually starting at 5 Hz and extending to as high as 250 Hz. GSFC uses a sine sweep vibration input and a frequency range usually starting at 5 Hz and extending only to the limits of the coupled loads analysis (typically 50 to 60 Hz). However, both JPL and GSFC use force limiting to realistically notch spacecraft resonances and response (acceleration) limiting as necessary to protect spacecraft structure and hardware from exceeding design strength capabilities. Despite GSFC and JPL differences in spacecraft level vibration test approaches, both have uncovered a significant number of spacecraft design and workmanship anomalies in vibration tests. This paper will give an overview of JPL and GSFC spacecraft vibration testing approaches and provide a detailed description of spacecraft anomalies revealed.

  6. Mapping Development Pattern in Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei Urban Agglomeration Using DMSP/OLS Nighttime Light Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi’na Hu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Spatial inequality of urban development may cause problems like inequality of living conditions and the lack of sustainability, drawing increasing academic interests and societal concerns. Previous studies based on statistical data can hardly reveal the interior mechanism of spatial inequality due to the limitation of statistical units, while the application of remote sensing data, such as nighttime light (NTL data, provides an effective solution. In this study, based on the DMSP/OLS NTL data, the urbanization type of all towns in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei urban agglomeration was analyzed from the aspects of development level and speed. Meanwhile, spatial cluster analysis of development level by local Moran’s I was used to explore spatial inequality, and the trend was discussed by comparing the development characteristics on both sides of the transition line of different development levels (inequality boundary. The results showed that the development level of the whole region increased dramatically as the mean DN value increased by 65.99%, and 83.72% of the towns showed a positive development during 2000–2012. The spatial distribution of urbanization types showed that Beijing and Tianjin were at a high urbanization level with rapid speed of development, with the southern region having a medium development level and the northwestern region lagging behind. The spatial cluster analysis also revealed a gradually intensifying trend of inequality as the number of towns with balanced development reduced by 319 during 2000–2012, while the towns in the high-high areas increased by 99 and those in the low-low areas increased by 229. Moreover, the development speed inside the inequality boundary was obviously higher than that outside, indicating an increasingly serious situation for spatial inequality of urban development in the whole region.

  7. Spatiotemporally enhancing time-series DMSP/OLS nighttime light imagery for assessing large-scale urban dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yanhua; Weng, Qihao

    2017-06-01

    Accurate, up-to-date, and consistent information of urban extents is vital for numerous applications central to urban planning, ecosystem management, and environmental assessment and monitoring. However, current large-scale urban extent products are not uniform with respect to definition, spatial resolution, temporal frequency, and thematic representation. This study aimed to enhance, spatiotemporally, time-series DMSP/OLS nighttime light (NTL) data for detecting large-scale urban changes. The enhanced NTL time series from 1992 to 2013 were firstly generated by implementing global inter-calibration, vegetation-based spatial adjustment, and urban archetype-based temporal modification. The dataset was then used for updating and backdating urban changes for the contiguous U.S.A. (CONUS) and China by using the Object-based Urban Thresholding method (i.e., NTL-OUT method, Xie and Weng, 2016b). The results showed that the updated urban extents were reasonably accurate, with city-scale RMSE (root mean square error) of 27 km2 and Kappa of 0.65 for CONUS, and 55 km2 and 0.59 for China, respectively. The backdated urban extents yielded similar accuracy, with RMSE of 23 km2 and Kappa of 0.63 in CONUS, while 60 km2 and 0.60 in China. The accuracy assessment further revealed that the spatial enhancement greatly improved the accuracy of urban updating and backdating by significantly reducing RMSE and slightly increasing Kappa values. The temporal enhancement also reduced RMSE, and improved the spatial consistency between estimated and reference urban extents. Although the utilization of enhanced NTL data successfully detected urban size change, relatively low locational accuracy of the detected urban changes was observed. It is suggested that the proposed methodology would be more effective for updating and backdating global urban maps if further fusion of NTL data with higher spatial resolution imagery was implemented.

  8. Estimating Torque Imparted on Spacecraft Using Telemetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Allan Y.; Wang, Eric K.; Macala, Glenn A.

    2013-01-01

    There have been a number of missions with spacecraft flying by planetary moons with atmospheres; there will be future missions with similar flybys. When a spacecraft such as Cassini flies by a moon with an atmosphere, the spacecraft will experience an atmospheric torque. This torque could be used to determine the density of the atmosphere. This is because the relation between the atmospheric torque vector and the atmosphere density could be established analytically using the mass properties of the spacecraft, known drag coefficient of objects in free-molecular flow, and the spacecraft velocity relative to the moon. The density estimated in this way could be used to check results measured by science instruments. Since the proposed methodology could estimate disturbance torque as small as 0.02 N-m, it could also be used to estimate disturbance torque imparted on the spacecraft during high-altitude flybys.

  9. Computer simulation of spacecraft/environment interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Krupnikov, K K; Mileev, V N; Novikov, L S; Sinolits, V V

    1999-01-01

    This report presents some examples of a computer simulation of spacecraft interaction with space environment. We analysed a set data on electron and ion fluxes measured in 1991-1994 on geostationary satellite GORIZONT-35. The influence of spacecraft eclipse and device eclipse by solar-cell panel on spacecraft charging was investigated. A simple method was developed for an estimation of spacecraft potentials in LEO. Effects of various particle flux impact and spacecraft orientation are discussed. A computer engineering model for a calculation of space radiation is presented. This model is used as a client/server model with WWW interface, including spacecraft model description and results representation based on the virtual reality markup language.

  10. Attitude Fusion Techniques for Spacecraft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnø, Jonas Bækby

    areas such as highly miniaturized analog and digital electronics, instrument space qualification, test and validation procedures, sensor fusion techniques and optimized software implementations to reach a successful conclusion. The content of the project thus represents cutting edge aerospace technology...... due to the extreme performance that must be ascertained on all fronts whilst harnessing only a minimum of resources. Considering the physical limitations imposed by the μASC instrument as well as the next generation of smaller and more agile satellites, the main design drivers of the IRU......Spacecraft platform instability constitutes one of the most significant limiting factors in hyperacuity pointing and tracking applications, yet the demand for accurate, timely and reliable attitude information is ever increasing. The PhD research project described within this dissertation has...

  11. Rosetta spacecraft meets asteroid Steins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    Steins is Rosetta’s first nominal scientific target. The spacecraft will rendezvous with the asteroid in the course of its first incursion into the asteroid belt located between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter, while on its way to comet 67/P Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The study of asteroids is extremely important as they represent a sample of Solar System material at different stages of evolution - key to understanding the origin of our own planet and of our planetary neighbourhood. The closest approach to Steins is due to take place on 5 September at 20:58 CEST (Central European Summer Time), from a distance of 800 km, during which the spacecraft will not be communicating with Earth. First ground contact with the spacecraft and announcement of successful fly-by will take place at 22:23 CEST. The first data and images collected by Rosetta will be sent to Earth throughout the night of 5 to 6 September and will undergo preliminary processing in the morning of 6 September. The first images will be made available for broadcasters via a special satellite feed on Saturday 6 September (details will be given on http://television.esa.int). To register for the events, please use the attached form. The press conference on 6 September will also be streamed on the ESA web: at http://www.esa.int/rosetta. Rosetta Steins Fly-By Doors open to the media 5 September 2008, 18:00, Building K ESA-ESOC Robert-Bosch Strasse 5, 64293 Darmstadt, Germany 18:00 - Doors open 18:00 - 19:00 Interview opportunities 19:00 - 20:15 Buffet dinner 20:15 - 20:30 The Steins Fly-By, Introduction by Paolo Ferri, Head of Solar and Planetary Missions Division (Mission Operations Dept.), ESA The crucial role of Flight Dynamics, by Trevor Morley, Rosetta Flight Dynamics Team, ESA 20:30 - 21:00 Live from Rosetta’s control room (loss of telemetry signal at 20:47) 22:23 - First telemetry on ground: signal of successful fly-by 23:00 - End of event Rosetta Steins Fly-By Press Conference 6 September 2008, 12

  12. Spacecraft sails through comet's tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzoff, Judith A.

    Comet Giacobini-Zinner may not have a conventional bow shock, but the “interaction region” where the comet's sheath collides with the solar wind is a far more turbulent plasma than had been anticipated. On September 13, 2 days after the International Cometary Explorer (ICE) became the first spacecraft ever to pass through a comet's tail (Eos, September 3, 1985, p. 625), mission scientists gathered at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to review their preliminary results. One scientist attending the news conference said he understood the interaction region to be “the most turbulent region that we have seen in the solar system to date.”

  13. In-Flight spacecraft magnetic field monitoring using scalar/vector gradiometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Primdahl, Fritz; Risbo, Torben; Merayo, José M.G.

    2006-01-01

    Earth magnetic field mapping from planetary orbiting satellites requires a spacecraft magnetic field environment control program combined with the deployment of the magnetic sensors on a boom in order to reduce the measurement error caused by the local spacecraft field. Magnetic mapping missions...... the spacecraft centre-of-gravity. In line with the classical dual vector sensors technique for monitoring the spacecraft magnetic field, this paper proposes and demonstrates that a similar combined scalar/vector gradiometry technique is feasible by using the measurements from the boom-mounted scalar and vector...... sensors onboard the Oersted satellite. For Oersted, a large difference between the pre-flight determined spacecraft magnetic field and the in-flight estimate exists causing some concern about the general applicability of the dual sensors technique....

  14. A Prototyping Effort for the Integrated Spacecraft Analysis System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Raymond; Tung, Yu-Wen; Maldague, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Computer modeling and simulation has recently become an essential technique for predicting and validating spacecraft performance. However, most computer models only examine spacecraft subsystems, and the independent nature of the models creates integration problems, which lowers the possibilities of simulating a spacecraft as an integrated unit despite a desire for this type of analysis. A new project called Integrated Spacecraft Analysis was proposed to serve as a framework for an integrated simulation environment. The project is still in its infancy, but a software prototype would help future developers assess design issues. The prototype explores a service oriented design paradigm that theoretically allows programs written in different languages to communicate with one another. It includes creating a uniform interface to the SPICE libraries such that different in-house tools like APGEN or SEQGEN can exchange information with it without much change. Service orientation may result in a slower system as compared to a single application, and more research needs to be done on the different available technologies, but a service oriented approach could increase long term maintainability and extensibility.

  15. On the biogenic origin of dimethylsulfide: Relation between chlorophyll, ATP, organismic DMSP, phytoplankton species, and DMS distribution in Atlantic surface water and atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buergermeister, S.; Zimmermann, R.L.; Georgii, H.W. (J.W. Goethe-Univ., Frankfurt (West Germany)); Bingemer, H.G. (Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Chemie, Mainz (West Germany)); Kirst, G.O.; Janssen, M. (Univ. Bremen (West Germany)); Ernst, W. (Alfred-Wegener-Inst. fuer Polar- und Meeresforschung, Bremerhaven (West Germany))

    1990-11-20

    During a cruise over the Atlantic from 40{degree}S to 50{degree}N in March-April 1987 the concentrations of dimethylsulfide (DMS) in the ocean and atmosphere were measured as well as the distribution of its precursor, dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), and of several biological parameters such as chlorophyllm, phytoplankton species, and adenosine-5-triphosphate (ATP) in the surface water. The DMS concentration varied in the range 0.2-2 nmol DMS{sup {minus}1} (surface water) and 0.05-3 nmol DMS m{sup {minus}3} (atmosphere) in the region of the remote tropical and subtropical Atlantic and increased to 2-10 nmol DMS{sup {minus}1} (surface water) and 1-8 nmol DMS m{sup {minus}3} (atmosphere) north of 40{degree}N and in the English Channel. Based on these results the mean flux of DMS from the Atlantic to the atmosphere is estimated to be 4-4.65 nmol DMS m{sup {minus}2} min{sup {minus}1}. A moderate diurnal variation of atmospheric DMS was found with a minimum during daytime. The DMS concentration in seawater correlated well with the concentration of DMSP and showed a similar trend to ATP, chlorophyll, and some phytoplankton species.

  16. TTEthernet for Integrated Spacecraft Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveless, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Aerospace projects have traditionally employed federated avionics architectures, in which each computer system is designed to perform one specific function (e.g. navigation). There are obvious downsides to this approach, including excessive weight (from so much computing hardware), and inefficient processor utilization (since modern processors are capable of performing multiple tasks). There has therefore been a push for integrated modular avionics (IMA), in which common computing platforms can be leveraged for different purposes. This consolidation of multiple vehicle functions to shared computing platforms can significantly reduce spacecraft cost, weight, and design complexity. However, the application of IMA principles introduces significant challenges, as the data network must accommodate traffic of mixed criticality and performance levels - potentially all related to the same shared computer hardware. Because individual network technologies are rarely so competent, the development of truly integrated network architectures often proves unreasonable. Several different types of networks are utilized - each suited to support a specific vehicle function. Critical functions are typically driven by precise timing loops, requiring networks with strict guarantees regarding message latency (i.e. determinism) and fault-tolerance. Alternatively, non-critical systems generally employ data networks prioritizing flexibility and high performance over reliable operation. Switched Ethernet has seen widespread success filling this role in terrestrial applications. Its high speed, flexibility, and the availability of inexpensive commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components make it desirable for inclusion in spacecraft platforms. Basic Ethernet configurations have been incorporated into several preexisting aerospace projects, including both the Space Shuttle and International Space Station (ISS). However, classical switched Ethernet cannot provide the high level of network

  17. Tethered spacecraft in asteroid gravitational environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burov, Alexander A.; Guerman, Anna D.; Kosenko, Ivan I.; Nikonov, Vasily I.

    2018-02-01

    Relative equilibria of a pendulum attached to the surface of a uniformly rotating celestial body are considered. The locations of the tether anchor that correspond to a given spacecraft position are defined. The domains, where the spacecraft can be held with the help of such a pendulum, are also described. Stability of the found relative equilibria is studied.

  18. Spacecraft command and control using expert systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcross, Scott; Grieser, William H.

    1994-11-01

    This paper describes a product called the Intelligent Mission Toolkit (IMT), which was created to meet the changing demands of the spacecraft command and control market. IMT is a command and control system built upon an expert system. Its primary functions are to send commands to the spacecraft and process telemetry data received from the spacecraft. It also controls the ground equipment used to support the system, such as encryption gear, and telemetry front-end equipment. Add-on modules allow IMT to control antennas and antenna interface equipment. The design philosophy for IMT is to utilize available commercial products wherever possible. IMT utilizes Gensym's G2 Real-time Expert System as the core of the system. G2 is responsible for overall system control, spacecraft commanding control, and spacecraft telemetry analysis and display. Other commercial products incorporated into IMT include the SYBASE relational database management system and Loral Test and Integration Systems' System 500 for telemetry front-end processing.

  19. Humidity Testing for Human Rated Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Gary B.

    2009-01-01

    Determination that equipment can operate in and survive exposure to the humidity environments unique to human rated spacecraft presents widely varying challenges. Equipment may need to operate in habitable volumes where the atmosphere contains perspiration, exhalation, and residual moisture. Equipment located outside the pressurized volumes may be exposed to repetitive diurnal cycles that may result in moisture absorption and/or condensation. Equipment may be thermally affected by conduction to coldplate or structure, by forced or ambient air convection (hot/cold or wet/dry), or by radiation to space through windows or hatches. The equipment s on/off state also contributes to the equipment s susceptibility to humidity. Like-equipment is sometimes used in more than one location and under varying operational modes. Due to these challenges, developing a test scenario that bounds all physical, environmental and operational modes for both pressurized and unpressurized volumes requires an integrated assessment to determine the "worst-case combined conditions." Such an assessment was performed for the Constellation program, considering all of the aforementioned variables; and a test profile was developed based on approximately 300 variable combinations. The test profile has been vetted by several subject matter experts and partially validated by testing. Final testing to determine the efficacy of the test profile on actual space hardware is in the planning stages. When validation is completed, the test profile will be formally incorporated into NASA document CxP 30036, "Constellation Environmental Qualification and Acceptance Testing Requirements (CEQATR)."

  20. Deep Impact Spacecraft Collides With Comet Tempel 1 (Video)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    After 172 days and 268 million miles of deep space travel, the NASA Deep Impact spacecraft successfully reached out and touched comet Tempel 1. The collision between the coffee table-sized space probe and city-sized comet occurred July 4, 2005 at 12:52 a.m. CDT. Comprised of images taken by the targeting sensor aboard the impactor probe, this movie shows the spacecraft approaching the comet up to just seconds before impact. Mission scientists expect Deep Impact to provide answers to basic questions about the formation of the solar system. Principal investigator for Deep Impact, Dr. Michael A'Hearn of the University of Maryland in College Park, is responsible for the mission, and project management is handled by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. The program office at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama assisted the Science Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington with program management, technology planning, systems assessment, flight assurance and public outreach. The spacecraft was built for NASA by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corporation of Boulder, Colorado. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/UMD)

  1. Flexible Animation Computer Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallcup, Scott S.

    1990-01-01

    FLEXAN (Flexible Animation), computer program animating structural dynamics on Evans and Sutherland PS300-series graphics workstation with VAX/VMS host computer. Typical application is animation of spacecraft undergoing structural stresses caused by thermal and vibrational effects. Displays distortions in shape of spacecraft. Program displays single natural mode of vibration, mode history, or any general deformation of flexible structure. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  2. NASA-STD-6016 Standard Materials and Processes Requirements for Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, David B.

    2009-01-01

    The standards for materials and processes surrounding spacecraft are discussed. Presentation focused on minimum requirements for Materials and Processes (M&P) used in design, fabrication, and testing of flight components for NASA manned, unmanned, robotic, launch vehicle, lander, in-space and surface systems, and spacecraft program/project hardware elements.Included is information on flammability, offgassing, compatibility requirements, and processes; both metallic and non-metallic materials are mentioned.

  3. The Ruegeria pomeroyi acuI gene has a role in DMSP catabolism and resembles yhdH of E. coli and other bacteria in conferring resistance to acrylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Jonathan D; Curson, Andrew R J; Sullivan, Matthew J; Kirkwood, Mark; Johnston, Andrew W B

    2012-01-01

    The Escherichia coli YhdH polypeptide is in the MDR012 sub-group of medium chain reductase/dehydrogenases, but its biological function was unknown and no phenotypes of YhdH(-) mutants had been described. We found that an E. coli strain with an insertional mutation in yhdH was hyper-sensitive to inhibitory effects of acrylate, and, to a lesser extent, to those of 3-hydroxypropionate. Close homologues of YhdH occur in many Bacterial taxa and at least two animals. The acrylate sensitivity of YhdH(-) mutants was corrected by the corresponding, cloned homologues from several bacteria. One such homologue is acuI, which has a role in acrylate degradation in marine bacteria that catabolise dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) an abundant anti-stress compound made by marine phytoplankton. The acuI genes of such bacteria are often linked to ddd genes that encode enzymes that cleave DMSP into acrylate plus dimethyl sulfide (DMS), even though these are in different polypeptide families, in unrelated bacteria. Furthermore, most strains of Roseobacters, a clade of abundant marine bacteria, cleave DMSP into acrylate plus DMS, and can also demethylate it, using DMSP demethylase. In most Roseobacters, the corresponding gene, dmdA, lies immediately upstream of acuI and in the model Roseobacter strain Ruegeria pomeroyi DSS-3, dmdA-acuI were co-regulated in response to the co-inducer, acrylate. These observations, together with findings by others that AcuI has acryloyl-CoA reductase activity, lead us to suggest that YdhH/AcuI enzymes protect cells against damaging effects of intracellular acryloyl-CoA, formed endogenously, and/or via catabolising exogenous acrylate. To provide "added protection" for bacteria that form acrylate from DMSP, acuI was recruited into clusters of genes involved in this conversion and, in the case of acuI and dmdA in the Roseobacters, their co-expression may underpin an interaction between the two routes of DMSP catabolism, whereby the acrylate product of DMSP

  4. Human Factors Evaluations of Two-Dimensional Spacecraft Conceptual Layouts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Kriss J.; Toups, Larry D.; Rudisill, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    Much of the human factors work done in support of the NASA Constellation lunar program has been with low fidelity mockups. These volumetric replicas of the future lunar spacecraft allow researchers to insert test subjects from the engineering and astronaut population and evaluate the vehicle design as the test subjects perform simulations of various operational tasks. However, lunar outpost designs must be evaluated without the use of mockups, creating a need for evaluation tools that can be performed on two-dimension conceptual spacecraft layouts, such as floor plans. A tool based on the Cooper- Harper scale was developed and applied to one lunar scenario, enabling engineers to select between two competing floor plan layouts. Keywords: Constellation, human factors, tools, processes, habitat, outpost, Net Habitable Volume, Cooper-Harper.

  5. Investigation of nickel hydrogen battery technology for the RADARSAT spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccoy, D. A.; Lackner, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    The low Earth orbit (LEO) operations of the RADARSAT spacecraft require high performance batteries to provide energy to the payload and platform during eclipse period. Nickel Hydrogen cells are currently competing with the more traditional Nickel Cadmium cells for high performance spacecraft applications at geostationary Earth orbit (GEO) and Leo. Nickel Hydrogen cells appear better suited for high power applications where high currents and high Depths of Discharge are required. Although a number of GEO missions have flown with Nickel Hydrogen batteries, it is not readily apparent that the LEO version of the Nickel Hydrogen cell is able to withstand the extended cycle lifetime (5 years) of the RADARSAT mission. The problems associated with Nickel Hydrogen cells are discussed in the contex of RADARSAT mission and a test program designed to characterize cell performance is presented.

  6. Low power arcjet system spacecraft impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pencil, Eric J.; Sarmiento, Charles J.; Lichtin, D. A.; Palchefsky, J. W.; Bogorad, A. L.

    1993-01-01

    Application of electrothermal arcjets on communications satellites requires assessment of integration concerns identified by the user community. Perceived risks include plume contamination of spacecraft materials, induced arcing or electrostatic discharges between differentially charged spacecraft surfaces, and conducted and radiated electromagnetic interference (EMI) for both steady state and transient conditions. A Space Act agreement between Martin Marietta Astro Space, the Rocket Research Company, and NASA's Lewis Research Center was established to experimentally examine these issues. Spacecraft materials were exposed to an arcjet plume for 40 hours, representing 40 weeks of actual spacecraft life, and contamination was characterized by changes in surface properties. With the exception of the change in emittance of one sample, all measurable changes in surface properties resulted in acceptable end of life characteristics. Charged spacecraft samples were benignly and consistently reduced to ground potential during exposure to the powered arcjet plume, suggesting that the arcjet could act as a charge control device on spacecraft. Steady state EMI signatures obtained using two different power processing units were similar to emissions measured in a previous test. Emissions measured in UHF, S, C, Ku and Ka bands obtained a null result which verified previous work in the UHF, S, and C bands. Characteristics of conducted and radiated transient emissions appear within standard spacecraft susceptibility criteria.

  7. Submarines, spacecraft and exhaled breath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleil, Joachim D; Hansel, Armin

    2012-03-01

    Foreword The International Association of Breath Research (IABR) meetings are an eclectic gathering of researchers in the medical, environmental and instrumentation fields; our focus is on human health as assessed by the measurement and interpretation of trace chemicals in human exhaled breath. What may have escaped our notice is a complementary field of research that explores the creation and maintenance of artificial atmospheres practised by the submarine air monitoring and air purification (SAMAP) community. SAMAP is comprised of manufacturers, researchers and medical professionals dealing with the engineering and instrumentation to support human life in submarines and spacecraft (including shuttlecraft and manned rockets, high-altitude aircraft, and the International Space Station (ISS)). Here, the immediate concerns are short-term survival and long-term health in fairly confined environments where one cannot simply 'open the window' for fresh air. As such, one of the main concerns is air monitoring and the main sources of contamination are CO(2) and other constituents of human exhaled breath. Since the inaugural meeting in 1994 in Adelaide, Australia, SAMAP meetings have been held every two or three years alternating between the North American and European continents. The meetings are organized by Dr Wally Mazurek (a member of IABR) of the Defense Systems Technology Organization (DSTO) of Australia, and individual meetings are co-hosted by the navies of the countries in which they are held. An overriding focus at SAMAP is life support (oxygen availability and carbon dioxide removal). Certainly, other air constituents are also important; for example, the closed environment of a submarine or the ISS can build up contaminants from consumer products, cooking, refrigeration, accidental fires, propulsion and atmosphere maintenance. However, the most immediate concern is sustaining human metabolism: removing exhaled CO(2) and replacing metabolized O(2). Another

  8. Foot Pedals for Spacecraft Manual Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Stanley G.; Morin, Lee M.; McCabe, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Fifty years ago, NASA decided that the cockpit controls in spacecraft should be like the ones in airplanes. But controls based on the stick and rudder may not be best way to manually control a vehicle in space. A different method is based on submersible vehicles controlled with foot pedals. A new pilot can learn the sub's control scheme in minutes and drive it hands-free. We are building a pair of foot pedals for spacecraft control, and will test them in a spacecraft flight simulator.

  9. Spacecraft exploration of Phobos and Deimos

    OpenAIRE

    Duxbury, Thomas C.; Zakharov, Alexander V.; Hoffmann, Harald; Edward A. Guinness

    2014-01-01

    We review the previous exploration of Phobos and Deimos by spacecraft. The first close-up images of Phobos and Deimos were obtained by the Mariner 9 spacecraft in 1971, followed by much image data from the two Viking orbiters at the end of the 70s, which formed the basis for early Phobos and Deimos shape and dynamic models. The Soviet Phobos 2 spacecraft came within 100 km of landing on Phobos in 1988. Mars Global Surveyor (1996–2006) and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (since 2005) made close-up...

  10. A Ross-Stirling spacecraft refrigerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, G.; Scott, M.; Zylstra, S.

    A spacecraft refrigerator was investigated capable of providing cooling for storage of food and biological samples in the temperature range 0-20 F with cooling capacity in the range of 1 to 2 kW, operating for long periods with great reliability. The system operated on the Stirling refrigeration cycle using the spacecraft life-support gases as the working fluid. A prototype spacecraft Stirling refrigerator was designed, built, and tested with air as the working fluid. The system performance was satisfactory, meeting the requirements specified above. Potential applications for the prototype unit are mentioned.

  11. Passive Wireless Sensors for Spacecraft Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — New classes of sensors are needed on spacecraft that can be interrogated remotely using RF signals and respond with the sensor's identity as well as the...

  12. Space Robotics: What is a Robotic Spacecraft?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Ellery

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available In this first of three short papers, I introduce some of the basic concepts of space engineering with an emphasis on some specific challenging areas of research that are peculiar to the application of robotics to space development and exploration. The style of these short papers is pedagogical and this paper stresses the unique constraints that space application imposes. This first paper is thus a general introduction to the nature of spacecraft engineering and its application to robotic spacecraft. I consider the constraints and metrics used by spacecraft engineers in the design of spacecraft and how these constraints impose challenges to the roboticist. The following two papers consider specific robotics issues in more detail.

  13. A Sustainable Spacecraft Component Database Solution Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Numerous spacecraft component databases have been developed to support NASA, DoD, and contractor design centers and design tools. Despite the clear utility of...

  14. Odor Control in Spacecraft Waste Management Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Spacecraft and lunar bases generate a variety of wastes containing water, including food wastes, feces, and brines. Disposal of these wastes, as well as recovery of...

  15. Fermi FT2 Spacecraft Pointing Files

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This utility permits you to download the most current version of the spacecraft (FT2) file predicting the LAT's pointing for a given mission week. The FT2 file is a...

  16. Participation of women in spacecraft science teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathbun, Julie

    2017-06-01

    There is an ongoing discussion about the participation of women in science and particularly astronomy. Demographic data from NASA's robotic planetary spacecraft missions show women scientists to be consistently under-represented.

  17. Computer failure caused loss of Mars spacecraft

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zielinski, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    A computer error that occurred 5 months before NASA lost contact with the Mars Global Surveyor on 2 November 2006 led to the spacecraft's eventual battery failure and subsequent loss of orientation...

  18. Mirage Fire Sensor for Spacecraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Spacecraft fires create exception risks to crew members. There is usually no place to escape. Even small amounts of hardware damage can compromise a mission. The...

  19. Model of coupling discharges into spacecraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, A. J.; Treadway, M. J.; Grismore, R.; Leadon, R. E.; Flanagan, T.; Wenaas, E. P.

    1980-01-01

    The calculated results of a semiempirical model for electron-caused electromagnetic pulse (ECEMP) are compared to the experimental data for three spacecraft geometries. The appropriateness of certain model assumptions which have been employed in the absence of a microscopic theory for dielectric breakdown and associated electron blowoff is discussed. Results are limited to the exterior response of spacecraft structures, although neither the model nor the experiments were limited to the outside problem. Rationales for model assumptions are provided.

  20. Taurus Lightweight Manned Spacecraft Earth orbiting vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosset, M.

    The Taurus Lightweight Manned Spacecraft (LMS) was developed by students of the University of Maryland's Aerospace Engineering course in Space Vehicle Design. That course required students to design an Alternative Manned Spacecraft (AMS) to augment or replace the Space Transportation System and meet the following design requirements: (1) launch on the Taurus Booster being developed by Orbital Sciences Corporation; (2) 99.9 percent assured crew survival rate; (3) technology cutoff date of 1 Jan. 1991; (4) compatibility with current space administration infrastructure; and (5) first flight by May 1995. The Taurus LMS design meets the above requirements and represents an initial step toward larger and more complex spacecraft. The Taurus LMS has a very limited application when compared to the space shuttle, but it demonstrates that the U.S. can have a safe, reliable, and low-cost space system. The Taurus LMS is a short mission duration spacecraft designed to place one man into low Earth orbit (LEO). The driving factor for this design was the low payload carrying capabilities of the Taurus Booster - 1300 kg to a 300-km orbit. The Taurus LMS design is divided into six major design sections. The Human Factors section deals with the problems of life support and spacecraft cooling. The Propulsion section contains the Abort System, the Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS), the Reaction Control System (RCS), and Power Generation. The thermal protection systems and spacecraft structure are contained in the Structures section. The Avionics section includes Navigation, Attitude Determination, Data Processing, Communication systems, and Sensors. The Mission Analysis section was responsible for ground processing and spacecraft astrodynamics. The Systems Integration Section pulled the above sections together into one spacecraft, and addressed costing and reliability.

  1. Underactuated Spacecraft Control with Disturbance Compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-31

    permission to manufacture, use, or sell any patented invention that may relate to them. This report is the result of contracted fundamental research...utilizes Solar Radiation Pressure (SRP) to restore linear controllability to a spacecraft with only two functional Reaction Wheels (RWs). The second...The failure of Reaction Wheels (RWs) in an array can impair the spacecraft’s ability to perform imaging missions, during which a prescribed inertial

  2. Standard user data services for spacecraft applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. F.; Hwang, C.; Fowell, S.; Plummer, C.

    2003-01-01

    The Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems is an international organization of national space agencies that is branching out to provide new standards to enhanced reuse of spacecraft equiptment and software. These Spacecraft Onboard Interface (SOIF) standards will be based on the well-known Internet protocols. this paper will review the SOIF standards by looking at the services that are being proposed for SOIF.

  3. Engineered spacecraft deployables influenced by nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, David; Wolpert, W. D.

    2009-08-01

    Northrop Grumman has been a leader in the space industry for over 50 years, and in fact was the first in the industry to produce a contractor-built spacecraft. Since the dawn of the Space Age and that Pioneer-1 spacecraft, every sub-system that makes up a spacecraft has grown in capability. One of the most visible changes to a spacecraft that enables these enhanced capabilities is the variety of appendages called deployable systems. These systems include solar arrays, antenna reflectors, telescopes and a current design for a tennis court sized sunshield. While the end product may look very different and perform different functions, all deployable systems share certain common attributes. Among these are: a latch mechanism for the deployable restraining it to the spacecraft for launch, an unlatching or release mechanism once orbit is achieved, an energy storage device or driving mechanism for deployment and a re-latching, or sometimes a repositioning device for orientation of the system during the mission. This paper describes these space-based systems and draws some comparisons with various natural analogs. While it may not be the case that the aerospace engineer is attempting to duplicate natural systems, it is almost certain that spacecraft deployable systems have been influenced by nature.

  4. Stable Nighttime Light Decreased in Protected Area of California: Findings from DMSP-OLS Observations and the Importance for Protected Area Policy Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, S.; Gillespie, T. W.

    2016-12-01

    Stable nighttime light, an indicator of persisting human activity and light pollution is a well-recognized disturbance to the wilderness of protected areas (PAs). Mostly supported by in situ observations, very limited studies of light pollution for PAs focused at a regional level and on a continuous time span to support policy making effectively. DMSP-OLS stable nighttime series provide continuous observation of nightlight and have been widely applied in studies focusing on human activities. In this study, we employed inter-calibrated DMSP-OLS nightlight series from 1992 to 2012 to evaluate the change of intensity and extension of stable nighttime light inside California PAs. We observed a decrease of stable nighttime light and a shrinkage in spatial extent in PAs located in all ecoregions from 1992 to 2012, especially before 2004. Such decrease and shrinkage occurred mostly in southern California and the Bay Area where mega metropolitan clusters locate. The successful application of protecting strategies in PAs and the improved technologies of lighting may contribute to the relieving of light pollution in PAs. However, the stable nighttime light slightly increased since 2004, when there was limited room for stricter protective regulations and the pressure from population growth persisted. Population density explained most spatial distribution of nightlight in years with census tract level demographic data available, except PAs with the highest wilderness such as Sierra Nevada Mts. We anticipate to improve the models with the newest remote sensing nighttime product from NASA Suomi-NPP and annually updated demographic data from American Community Survey at census tract level in the future to provide a cost-effective evaluation on protecting strategies. Such evaluation will support land managers of PAs and local policy-makers for modification and proposal of policies.

  5. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Spacecraft Lithium Ion Battery Micro-Cycling Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakermanji, George; Lee, Leonine; Spitzer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) spacecraft was jointly developed by NASA and JAXA. It is a Low Earth Orbit (LEO) spacecraft launched on February 27, 2014. The power system is a Direct Energy Transfer (DET) system designed to support 1950 watts orbit average power. The batteries use SONY 18650HC cells and consist of three 8s by 84p batteries operated in parallel as a single battery. During instrument integration with the spacecraft, large current transients were observed in the battery. Investigation into the matter traced the cause to the Dual-Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) phased array radar which generates cyclical high rate current transients on the spacecraft power bus. The power system electronics interaction with these transients resulted in the current transients in the battery. An accelerated test program was developed to bound the effect, and to assess the impact to the mission.

  6. The Astro Edge solar array for the NASA SSTI Clark Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, B. R.

    1995-10-01

    The Astro Edge solar array is a new and innovative reflective low concentrator power generating system which has been selected for the CTA Incorporate/Lockheed Martin Clark spacecraft under the NASA Small Spacecraft Technology Initiative (SSTI) program. In support of this program, Astro Aerospace Corporation has produced one qualification and two flight solar array wings to support a July 1996 launch. The Astro Edge solar array was selected as a new technology to benefit future NASA, military and commercial missions by providing high specific power, high deployed stiffness, low stowed volume, low risk, and cost reduction features which meet the agency's 'better, faster, cheaper' goals. This novel array accounts for five of the thirty-six advanced technologies which the Clark spacecraft will demonstrate. A brief SSTI Astro Edge solar array program overview is presented. Completed qualification and acceptance testing is discussed. Finally, the major discriminators which make the Astro Edge solar array 'better, faster, cheaper' technology are provided.

  7. REQUIREMENTS FOR IMAGE QUALITY OF EMERGENCY SPACECRAFTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Altukhov

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the method for formation of quality requirements to the images of emergency spacecrafts. The images are obtained by means of remote sensing of near-earth space orbital deployment in the visible range. of electromagnetic radiation. The method is based on a joint taking into account conditions of space survey, characteristics of surveillance equipment, main design features of the observed spacecrafts and orbital inspection tasks. Method. Quality score is the predicted linear resolution image that gives the possibility to create a complete view of pictorial properties of the space image obtained by electro-optical system from the observing satellite. Formulation of requirements to the numerical value of this indicator is proposed to perform based on the properties of remote sensing system, forming images in the conditions of outer space, and the properties of the observed emergency spacecraft: dimensions, platform construction of the satellite, on-board equipment placement. For method implementation the authors have developed a predictive model of requirements to a linear resolution for images of emergency spacecrafts, making it possible to select the intervals of space shooting and get the satellite images required for quality interpretation. Main results. To verify the proposed model functionality we have carried out calculations of the numerical values for the linear resolution of the image, ensuring the successful task of determining the gross structural damage of the spacecrafts and identifying changes in their spatial orientation. As input data were used with dimensions and geometric primitives corresponding to the shape of deemed inspected spacecrafts: Resurs-P", "Canopus-B", "Electro-L". Numerical values of the linear resolution images have been obtained, ensuring the successful task solution for determining the gross structural damage of spacecrafts.

  8. LEO cooperative multi-spacecraft refueling mission optimization considering J2 perturbation and target's surplus propellant constraint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhao; Zhang, Jin; Li, Hai-yang; Zhou, Jian-yong

    2017-01-01

    The optimization of an LEO cooperative multi-spacecraft refueling mission considering the J2 perturbation and target's surplus propellant constraint is studied in the paper. First, a mission scenario is introduced. One service spacecraft and several target spacecraft run on an LEO near-circular orbit, the service spacecraft rendezvouses with some service positions one by one, and target spacecraft transfer to corresponding service positions respectively. Each target spacecraft returns to its original position after obtaining required propellant and the service spacecraft returns to its original position after refueling all target spacecraft. Next, an optimization model of this mission is built. The service sequence, orbital transfer time, and service position are used as deign variables, whereas the propellant cost is used as the design objective. The J2 perturbation, time constraint and the target spacecraft's surplus propellant capability constraint are taken into account. Then, a hybrid two-level optimization approach is presented to solve the formulated mixed integer nonlinear programming (MINLP) problem. A hybrid-encoding genetic algorithm is adopted to seek the near optimal solution in the up-level optimization, while a linear relative dynamic equation considering the J2 perturbation is used to obtain the impulses of orbital transfer in the low-level optimization. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed model and method is validated by numerical examples.

  9. System engineering of a nuclear electric propulsion testbed spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, G. E.; Herbert, G. A.

    1993-06-01

    A mission concept aimed at evaluating performance of a Russian Space Nuclear Power System (SNPS) and electric thrusters to be consistent with U.S. safety standards is discussed. Solutions of unique nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) problems optimized for the Nuclear Electric Propulsion Test Program (NEPSTP) are considered. The problems include radiation, thermal management, safety, ground processing concerns of a nuclear payload, the launch of an NEP payload, orbital operations, electromagnetic compatibility, contamination, guidance and control, and a power system. Attention is also given to preliminary spacecraft and mission design developed taking into account all aforementioned problems.

  10. An advanced environment for spacecraft engineering subsystem mission operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, K. A.; Harris, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    The Engineering Analysis Subsystem Environment (EASE) is under development at the JPL with a view to prospective small and large space missions. EASE is a modular multimission/multisystem architecture for spacecraft analysis that encompases monitoring and sequence support; its collection of software analysis modules is specific to a given mission, thereby easily accommodating mission scale. An EASE subsystem analysis module can be developed in modular program sets or packages, and a level of automation can then be introduced within such sets to achieve intramodule automation.

  11. Asynchronous Messaging and Data Transfer in a Spacecraft: An Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moholt, Joseph M.

    2005-01-01

    Data transfer and messaging is an important part of a spacecraft. Creating a standard protocol for messaging that can be used for a variety of applications is an extremely beneficial project at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The Asynchronous Messaging Service (AMS) is a protocol outlining how subsystems initialize and conduct communication between each other. There are currently two implementations of AMS in the works. At JPL, my task is to get a working implementation of AMS onto vxWorks as a proof of concept. An Autocoder, a program used to convert visually created state chart diagrams to C++, has also been created to accomplish a part of the implementation. I was assigned to make the program portable on any Unix type environment. Lastly, I was to develop a program to demonstrate messaging between two FireWire cards running vxworks.

  12. Modeling the fundamental characteristics and processes of the spacecraft functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazhenov, V. I.; Osin, M. I.; Zakharov, Y. V.

    1986-01-01

    The fundamental aspects of modeling of spacecraft characteristics by using computing means are considered. Particular attention is devoted to the design studies, the description of physical appearance of the spacecraft, and simulated modeling of spacecraft systems. The fundamental questions of organizing the on-the-ground spacecraft testing and the methods of mathematical modeling were presented.

  13. Spacecraft Attitude Maneuver Planning Using Genetic Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornfeld, Richard P.

    2004-01-01

    A key enabling technology that leads to greater spacecraft autonomy is the capability to autonomously and optimally slew the spacecraft from and to different attitudes while operating under a number of celestial and dynamic constraints. The task of finding an attitude trajectory that meets all the constraints is a formidable one, in particular for orbiting or fly-by spacecraft where the constraints and initial and final conditions are of time-varying nature. This approach for attitude path planning makes full use of a priori constraint knowledge and is computationally tractable enough to be executed onboard a spacecraft. The approach is based on incorporating the constraints into a cost function and using a Genetic Algorithm to iteratively search for and optimize the solution. This results in a directed random search that explores a large part of the solution space while maintaining the knowledge of good solutions from iteration to iteration. A solution obtained this way may be used as is or as an initial solution to initialize additional deterministic optimization algorithms. A number of representative case examples for time-fixed and time-varying conditions yielded search times that are typically on the order of minutes, thus demonstrating the viability of this method. This approach is applicable to all deep space and planet Earth missions requiring greater spacecraft autonomy, and greatly facilitates navigation and science observation planning.

  14. Singular control in minimum time spacecraft reorientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seywald, Hans; Kumar, Renjith R.

    1991-01-01

    Spacecraft reorientation is investigated numerically for an inertially symmetric rigid spacecraft with three bounded independent control torques aligned with the principal axes. The dynamical system of the spacecraft and the framework of the optimal-control problem are established in order to identify all of the potential strategies. The investigation lists bang-bang solutions and finite-order and infinite-order singular arcs, and the conditions for the finite-order singular arcs are given. Numerical examples are developed for all of the control-logic systems, and the suboptimality of the rest-to-rest maneuvers is proven for principal-axis rotations. The most efficient control technique is the singular control of infinite order, and the vector-valued singular control can be utilized in a derivative of the switching function.

  15. Motion of a spacecraft with magnetic damper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roithmayr, Carlos M.; Hu, Anren; Chipman, Richard

    1992-01-01

    Three methods of numerically simulating the motion of a spacecraft with a magnetic damper are compared. Simulations of motion of the initial assembly stage of Space Station Freedom show that results obtained with the first approach are in general agreement with those based on the second approach, while results from the third method are incorrect unless the spacecraft is nearly at rest in a local-vertical-local-horizontal reference frame. Simulations based on the second method proceed much more quickly than simulations based on the first. An integral of equations of motion governing the behavior of a spacecraft, and a sphere, which is part of the damper is presented. The integral can be used to test the results of numerical integrations performed in connection with the first and second approaches.

  16. Developing Sustainable Spacecraft Water Management Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Evan A.; Klaus, David M.

    2009-01-01

    It is well recognized that water handling systems used in a spacecraft are prone to failure caused by biofouling and mineral scaling, which can clog mechanical systems and degrade the performance of capillary-based technologies. Long duration spaceflight applications, such as extended stays at a Lunar Outpost or during a Mars transit mission, will increasingly benefit from hardware that is generally more robust and operationally sustainable overtime. This paper presents potential design and testing considerations for improving the reliability of water handling technologies for exploration spacecraft. Our application of interest is to devise a spacecraft wastewater management system wherein fouling can be accommodated by design attributes of the management hardware, rather than implementing some means of preventing its occurrence.

  17. Mars Science Laboratory Spacecraft Assembled for Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The major components of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft cruise stage atop the aeroshell, which has the descent stage and rover inside were connected together in October 2008 for several weeks of system testing, including simulation of launch vibrations and deep-space environmental conditions. These components will be taken apart again, for further work on each of them, after the environmental testing. The Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft is being assembled and tested for launch in 2011. This image was taken inside the Spacecraft Assembly Facility at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., which manages the Mars Science Laboratory Project for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Washington. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  18. Spacecraft Parachute Recovery System Testing from a Failure Rate Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Christine E.

    2013-01-01

    Spacecraft parachute recovery systems, especially those with a parachute cluster, require testing to identify and reduce failures. This is especially important when the spacecraft in question is human-rated. Due to the recent effort to make spaceflight affordable, the importance of determining a minimum requirement for testing has increased. The number of tests required to achieve a mature design, with a relatively constant failure rate, can be estimated from a review of previous complex spacecraft recovery systems. Examination of the Apollo parachute testing and the Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster recovery chute system operation will clarify at which point in those programs the system reached maturity. This examination will also clarify the risks inherent in not performing a sufficient number of tests prior to operation with humans on-board. When looking at complex parachute systems used in spaceflight landing systems, a pattern begins to emerge regarding the need for a minimum amount of testing required to wring out the failure modes and reduce the failure rate of the parachute system to an acceptable level for human spaceflight. Not only a sufficient number of system level testing, but also the ability to update the design as failure modes are found is required to drive the failure rate of the system down to an acceptable level. In addition, sufficient data and images are necessary to identify incipient failure modes or to identify failure causes when a system failure occurs. In order to demonstrate the need for sufficient system level testing prior to an acceptable failure rate, the Apollo Earth Landing System (ELS) test program and the Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Recovery System failure history will be examined, as well as some experiences in the Orion Capsule Parachute Assembly System will be noted.

  19. Modeling and simulation of spacecraft power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. R.; Cho, B. H.; Kim, S. J.; Lee, F. C.

    1987-01-01

    EASY5 modeling of a complete spacecraft power processing system is presented. Component models are developed, and several system models including a solar array switching system, a partially-shunted solar array system and COBE system are simulated. The power system's modes of operation, such as shunt mode, battery-charge mode, and battery-discharge mode, are simulated for a complete orbit cycle.

  20. Spacecraft Charging Sensitivity to Material Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Edwards, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Evaluating spacecraft charging behavior of a vehicle in the space environment requires knowledge of the material properties relevant to the charging process. Implementing surface and internal charging models requires a user to specify a number of material electrical properties including electrical resistivity parameters (dark and radiation induced), dielectric constant, secondary electron yields, photoemission yields, and breakdown strength in order to correctly evaluate the electric discharge threat posed by the increasing electric fields generated by the accumulating charge density. In addition, bulk material mass density and/or chemical composition must be known in order to analyze radiation shielding properties when evaluating internal charging. We will first describe the physics of spacecraft charging and show how uncertainties in material properties propagate through spacecraft charging algorithms to impact the results obtained from charging models. We then provide examples using spacecraft charging codes to demonstrate their sensitivity to material properties. The goal of this presentation is to emphasize the importance in having good information on relevant material properties in order to best characterize on orbit charging threats.

  1. Spacecraft potential control for Double Star

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Torkar

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The spacecraft potential of Double Star TC-1 is positive in large parts of the orbits due to the photo-effect from solar EUV irradiation. These positive potentials typically disturb low energy plasma measurements on board. The potential can be reduced, and thereby the particle measurements improved, by emitting a positive ion beam. This method has successfully been applied on several other spacecraft and it has also been chosen for TC-1. The instrument TC-1/ASPOC is a derivative of the Cluster/ASPOC instruments, from which it has inherited many features. The paper describes the adaptations and further developments made for the ion emitters and the electronics. The instrument performs very well and can support higher beam currents than on Cluster. The expected significant improvement of the low energy particle measurements on board was indeed observed. The modifications of the electron distributions are analysed for a one-time interval when the spacecraft was located in the magnetosheath. The change in the potential due to the ion beam was determined, and first studies of the 3-D electron distributions in response to the spacecraft potential control have been performed, which indicate that the method works as expected.

  2. Standardization activity for the spacecraft onboard interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. F.; Plummer, C.; Plancke, P.

    2003-01-01

    The Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) is an international organization of national space agencies that is organized to promote theinterchange of space related information. CCSDS is branching out to provide new standards to enhanced reuse of spacecraft equipment and software onboard of a spacecraft. This effort is know as Spacecraft Onboard Interface (SOIF). SOIF expects that these standards will be well used within the space community, and that they will be based on the well-known Internet protocols. This paper will provide a description of the SOIF work by reviewing this work with three orthogonal views. The Services View describes the data communications services that are provided to the users. The Interoperability view provides a description to users on how to use SOIF to interchange between different spacecraft data busses. And finally, the Protocol view, describes the protocols and services that are to be implemented in order to provide the users with the advantages of the SOIF architecture. This paper will give the reader an excellent introduction to the work of the international SOIF team.

  3. How Spacecraft Fly Spaceflight Without Formulae

    CERN Document Server

    Swinerd, Graham

    2009-01-01

    About half a century ago a small satellite, Sputnik 1, was launched. The satellite did very little other than to transmit a radio signal to announce its presence in orbit. However, this humble beginning heralded the dawn of the Space Age. Today literally thousands of robotic spacecraft have been launched, many of which have flown to far-flung regions of the Solar System carrying with them the human spirit of scientific discovery and exploration. Numerous other satellites have been launched in orbit around the Earth providing services that support our technological society on the ground. How Spacecraft Fly: Spaceflight Without Formulae by Graham Swinerd focuses on how these spacecraft work. The book opens with a historical perspective of how we have come to understand our Solar System and the Universe. It then progresses through orbital flight, rocket science, the hostile environment within which spacecraft operate, and how they are designed. The concluding chapters give a glimpse of what the 21st century may ...

  4. Integrated Thermal Insulation System for Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodziej, Paul (Inventor); Bull, Jeff (Inventor); Kowalski, Thomas (Inventor); Switzer, Matthew (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An integrated thermal protection system (TPS) for a spacecraft includes a grid that is bonded to skin of the spacecraft, e.g., to support the structural loads of the spacecraft. A plurality of thermally insulative, relatively large panels are positioned on the grid to cover the skin of the spacecraft to which the grid has been bonded. Each panel includes a rounded front edge and a front flange depending downwardly from the front edge. Also, each panel includes a rear edge formed with a rounded socket for receiving the rounded front edge of another panel therein, and a respective rear flange depends downwardly from each rear edge. Pins are formed on the front flanges, and pin receptacles are formed on the rear flanges, such that the pins of a panel mechanically interlock with the receptacles of the immediately forward panel. To reduce the transfer to the skin of heat which happens to leak through the panels to the grid, the grid includes stringers that are chair-shaped in cross-section.

  5. Spacecraft 3D Augmented Reality Mobile App

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussey, Kevin J.; Doronila, Paul R.; Kumanchik, Brian E.; Chan, Evan G.; Ellison, Douglas J.; Boeck, Andrea; Moore, Justin M.

    2013-01-01

    The Spacecraft 3D application allows users to learn about and interact with iconic NASA missions in a new and immersive way using common mobile devices. Using Augmented Reality (AR) techniques to project 3D renditions of the mission spacecraft into real-world surroundings, users can interact with and learn about Curiosity, GRAIL, Cassini, and Voyager. Additional updates on future missions, animations, and information will be ongoing. Using a printed AR Target and camera on a mobile device, users can get up close with these robotic explorers, see how some move, and learn about these engineering feats, which are used to expand knowledge and understanding about space. The software receives input from the mobile device's camera to recognize the presence of an AR marker in the camera's field of view. It then displays a 3D rendition of the selected spacecraft in the user's physical surroundings, on the mobile device's screen, while it tracks the device's movement in relation to the physical position of the spacecraft's 3D image on the AR marker.

  6. Microgravity Flammability Experiments for Spacecraft Fire Safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legros, Guillaume; Minster, Olivier; Tóth, Balazs

    2012-01-01

    As fire behaviour in manned spacecraft still remains poorly understood, an international topical team has been created to design a validation experiment that has an unprecedented large scale for a microgravity flammability experiment. While the validation experiment is being designed for a re-sup...

  7. Irradiate-anneal screening of total dose effects in semiconductor devices. [radiation hardening of spacecraft components of Mariner spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, A. G.; Price, W. E.

    1976-01-01

    An extensive investigation of irradiate-anneal (IRAN) screening against total dose radiation effects was carried out as part of a program to harden the Mariner Jupiter/Saturn 1977 (MJS'77) spacecraft to survive the Jupiter radiation belts. The method consists of irradiating semiconductor devices with Cobalt-60 to a suitable total dose under representative bias conditions and of separating the parts in the undesired tail of the distribution from the bulk of the parts by means of a predetermined acceptance limit. The acceptable devices are then restored close to their preirradiation condition by annealing them at an elevated temperature. IRAN was used when lot screen methods were impracticable due to lack of time, and when members of a lot showed a diversity of radiation response. The feasibility of the technique was determined by testing of a number of types of linear bipolar integrated circuits, analog switches, n-channel JFETS and bipolar transistors. Based on the results of these experiments a number of device types were selected for IRAN of flight parts in the MJS'77 spacecraft systems. The part types, screening doses, acceptance criteria, number of parts tested and rejected as well as the program steps are detailed.

  8. DMSP and DMS dynamics during a mesoscale iron fertilization experiment in the Northeast Pacific—Part I: Temporal and vertical distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levasseur, Maurice; Scarratt, Michael G.; Michaud, Sonia; Merzouk, Anissa; Wong, Chi Shing; Arychuk, Michael; Richardson, Wendy; Rivkin, Richard B.; Hale, Michelle; Wong, Emmy; Marchetti, Adrian; Kiyosawa, Hiroshi

    2006-10-01

    This paper reports on the influence of the Fe fertilization conducted during the subarctic ecosystem response to iron enrichment study (SERIES) on the distribution of the biogenic sulfur compounds dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) and dimethylsulfide (DMS) in the context of changes in plankton composition. The Fe enrichment resulted in a rapid increase in the abundance of a nanoplankton assemblage dominated by Prymnesiophyceae, Prasinophyceae, small diatoms (fertilization but peaked 1-2 days after the crash of the nanoplankton bloom. Inside the Fe patch, particulate DMSP (DMSPp) increased from 100 to 285 nmol L -1 during the nanoplankton bloom, decreased rapidly back to initial level as this bloom collapsed, and remained low during the bloom of large diatoms. Outside the patch, phytoplankton and protists abundance and DMSPp concentrations remained low and relatively stable throughout the experiment. DMS concentrations were elevated at the onset of the experiment outside the patch (maximum of 15.7 nmol L -1 on day 1), increased up to 26.5 nmol L -1 10 days after the enrichment, and decreased to ca. 6 nmol L -1 by the end of the experiment. This large natural pulse in DMS coincided with conditions of high irradiance and decreasing wind speed. Inside the Fe patch, DMS concentrations exhibited the same general pattern, but with distinctive features related to the Fe fertilization. First, DMS concentrations tended to increase more rapidly inside the patch during the initial nanoplankton bloom, leading to DMS concentrations ca. 2 times higher inside the patch than outside on day 6. Second, DMS concentrations became consistently lower inside the patch (often below our limit of quantification of 0.03 nmol L -1) than outside (ca. 6 nmol L -1) during the peak of the diatom bloom. Our results thus confirm the rapid increase in nanoplankton and DMSPp reported during all previous Fe-fertilization experiments. On the other hand, the decrease in DMS concentrations measured inside

  9. Superposed epoch analysis of vertical ion velocity, electron temperature, field-aligned current, and thermospheric wind in the dayside auroral region as observed by DMSP and CHAMP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kervalishvili, G.; Lühr, H.

    2016-12-01

    This study reports on the results obtained by a superposed epoch analysis (SEA) method applied to the electron temperature, vertical ion velocity, field-aligned current (FAC), and thermospheric zonal wind velocity at high-latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere. The SEA study is performed in a magnetic latitude versus magnetic local time (MLat-MLT) frame. The obtained results are based on observations collected during the years 2001-2005 by the CHAMP and DMSP (F13 and F15) satellites. The dependence on interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientations is also investigated using data from the NASA/GSFC's OMNI database. Further, the obtained results are subdivided into three Lloyd seasons of 130 days each, which are defined as follows: local winter (1 January ± 65 days), combined equinoxes (1 April and 1 October ± 32days), and local summer (1 July ± 65 days). A period of 130 days is needed by the CHAMP satellite to pass through all local times. The time and location of the electron temperature peaks from CHAMP measurements near the cusp region are used as the reference parameter for the SEA method to investigate the relationship between the electron temperature and other ionospheric quantities. The SEA derived MLat profiles of the electron temperature show a seasonal dependence, increasing from winter to summer, as expected. But, the temperature rise (difference between the reference temperature peak and the background electron temperature) strongly decreases towards local summer. The SEA derived MLat profiles of the ion vertical velocity at DMSP altitude show the same seasonal behaviour as the electron temperature rice. There exists a clear linear relation between these two variables with a quiet large correlation coefficient value, >0.9. The SEA derived MLat profiles of both, thermospheric zonal wind velocity and FAC, show a clear IMF By orientation dependence for all local seasons. The zonal wind velocity is prominently directed towards west in the MLat-MLT frame

  10. On the spacecraft attitude stabilization in the orbital frame

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antipov Kirill A.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with spacecraft in the circular near-Earth orbit. The spacecraft interacts with geomagnetic field by the moments of Lorentz and magnetic forces. The octupole approximation of the Earth’s magnetic field is accepted. The spacecraft electromagnetic parameters, namely the electrostatic charge moment of the first order and the eigen magnetic moment are the controlled quasiperiodic functions. The control algorithms for the spacecraft electromagnetic parameters, which allows to stabilize the spacecraft attitude position in the orbital frame are obtained. The stability of the spacecraft stabilized orientation is proved both analytically and by PC computations.

  11. Magnetic bearings for an optical disk read/write head. [for spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockney, Richard; Eisenhaure, David; Hawkey, Timothy

    1988-01-01

    A program is described whose aim is to establish the technical feasibility of developing magnetic bearings for an optical disk buffer for use in a spacecraft environment. The approach taken was to develop the specifications for the magnetic bearings and define the hardware configuration, controller characteristics, position sensors, and electronic functions required.

  12. Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) project. VI - Spacecraft, scientific instruments, and launching rocket. Part 1 - Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Thomas; Ihara, Toshio; Miida, Sumio

    1990-01-01

    A cooperative United States/Japan study was made for one year from 1987 to 1988 regarding the feasibility of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). As part of this study a phase-A-level design of spacecraft for TRMM was developed by NASA/GSFC, and the result was documented in a feasibility study. The phase-A-level design is developed for the TRMM satellite utilizing a multimission spacecraft.

  13. The dynamic cusp at low altitudes: a case study utilizing Viking, DMSP-F7, and Sondrestrom incoherent scatter radar observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Watermann

    Full Text Available Coincident multi-instrument magnetospheric and ionospheric observations have made it possible to determine the position of the ionospheric footprint of the magnetospheric cusp and to monitor its evolution over time. The data used include charged particle and magnetic field measurements from the Earth-orbiting Viking and DMSP-F7 satellites, electric field measurements from Viking, interplanetary magnetic field and plasma data from IMP-8, and Sondrestrom incoherent scatter radar observations of the ionospheric plasma density, temperature, and convection. Viking detected cusp precipitation poleward of 75.5° invariant latitude. The ionospheric response to the observed electron precipitation was simulated using an auroral model. It predicts enhanced plasma density and elevated electron temperature in the upper E- and F-regions. Sondrestrom radar observations are in agreement with the predictions. The radar detected a cusp signature on each of five consecutive antenna elevation scans covering 1.2 h local time. The cusp appeared to be about 2° invariant latitude wide, and its ionospheric footprint shifted equatorward by nearly 2° during this time, possibly influenced by an overall decrease in the IMF Bz component. The radar plasma drift data and the Viking magnetic and electric field data suggest that the cusp was associated with a continuous, rather than a patchy, merging between the IMF and the geomagnetic field.

  14. Development of a low expansion, composite antenna subreflector with a frequency selective surface. [for Voyager spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonier, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    A Kevlar-49 epoxy, composite frequency-selective-surface subreflector was developed for the high gain antenna used on the Voyager spacecraft. The Kevlar-49 material was selected for this sandwich structure because a dielectric material was required, and the use of Kevlar-49 resulted in a composite sandwich with a low thermal coefficient of expansion and reduced weight over an equivalent fiberglass construction. A detailed description and the results of the development program are given and include the design requirements for the structure, the development testing of the materials that led to the final design configuration, and the processes used to fabricate this advanced composite spacecraft antenna component.

  15. Extermophylic microorganisms: issue of interplanetary transfer on external spacecraft surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikova, N.; Deshevaya, E.; Polykarpov, N.; Svistunova, Y.; Grigoriev, A.

    Interplanetary transfer of terrestrial microbes capable of surviving in extreme environments and planetary protection from accidental biocontamination by them are the issues of major practical rather than hypothetical value The natural resistance of microbes to extreme environments and a possibility of their transfer beyond geographical barriers of Earth on external spacecraft surfaces have brought forward a need in profound research into the likelihood of their survival in outer space Hardware and a program have been developed at the State Scientific Research Center of the Russian Federation -- Institute for Biomedical Problems with the goal of carrying out a space experiment Biorisk The experiment was aimed at assessing the possibility of long-term comparable with the duration of the Martian flight survival of microorganisms in outer space on materials used in space industry Samples of materials were contaminated with test cultures of bacteria Bacillus and fungi Aspergillus Penicillium Cladosporium known to be common residents of various environments on Earth and resistant to multiple alternation of high and low temperatures Materials used in the construction of external spacecraft surfaces such as steel aluminium alloy heat-insulating coating were chosen as test samples for the experiment Containers with materials and test microorganisms were placed on the external side of the Russian segment of the ISS Unique data have been accumulated after a 204 day exposure on the external side of the ISS which have proved that

  16. Testing and Optimization of Electrically Conductive Spacecraft Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mell, R. J.; Wertz, G. E.; Edwards, D. L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report discussing the work done for the Space Environments and Effects (SEE) Program. It discusses test chamber design, coating research, and test results on electrically thermal control coatings. These thermal control coatings are being developed to have several orders of magnitude higher electrical conductivity than most available thermal control coatings. Most current coatings tend to have a range in surface resistivity from 1,011 to 1,013 ohms/sq. Historically, spacecraft have had thermal control surfaces composed of dielectric materials of either polymers (paints and metalized films) or glasses (ceramic paints and optical solar reflectors). Very seldom has the thermal control surface of a spacecraft been a metal where the surface would be intrinsically electrically conductive. The poor thermal optical properties of most metals have, in most cases, stopped them from being used as a thermal control surface. Metals low infrared emittance (generally considered poor for thermal control surfaces) and/or solar absorptance, have resulted in the use of various dielectric coatings or films being applied over the substrate materials in order to obtain the required optical properties.

  17. Spacecraft Formation Orbit Estimation Using WLPS-Based Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Ting Goh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the implementation of a novel wireless local positioning system (WLPS for spacecraft formation flying to maintain high-performance spacecraft relative and absolute position estimation. A WLPS equipped with antenna arrays allows each spacecraft to measure the relative range and coordinate angle(s of other spacecraft located in its coverage area. The dynamic base station and the transponder of WLPS enable spacecraft to localize each other in the formation. Because the signal travels roundtrip in WLPS, and due to the high spacecraft velocities, the signal transmission time delay reduces the localization performance. This work studies spacecraft formation positions estimation performance assuming that only WLPS is available onboard. The feasibility of estimating the spacecraft absolute position using only one-dimensional antenna array is also investigated. The effect of including GPS measurements in addition to WLPS is studied and compared to a GPS standalone system.

  18. High-Performance Fire Detector for Spacecraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The danger from fire aboard spacecraft is immediate with only moments for detection and suppression. Spacecraft are unique high-value systems where the cost of...

  19. Spacecraft Station-Keeping Trajectory and Mission Design Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Min-Kun J.

    2009-01-01

    Two tools were developed for designing station-keeping trajectories and estimating delta-v requirements for designing missions to a small body such as a comet or asteroid. This innovation uses NPOPT, a non-sparse, general-purpose sequential quadratic programming (SQP) optimizer and the Two-Level Differential Corrector (T-LDC) in LTool (Libration point mission design Tool) to design three kinds of station-keeping scripts: vertical hovering, horizontal hovering, and orbiting. The T-LDC is used to differentially correct several trajectory legs that join hovering points. In a vertical hovering, the maximum and minimum range points must be connected smoothly while maintaining the spacecrafts range from a small body, all within the law of gravity and the solar radiation pressure. The same is true for a horizontal hover. A PatchPoint is an LTool class that denotes a space-time event with some extra information for differential correction, including a set of constraints to be satisfied by T-LDC. Given a set of PatchPoints, each with its own constraint, the T-LDC differentially corrects the entire trajectory by connecting each trajectory leg joined by PatchPoints while satisfying all specified constraints at the same time. Vertical and horizontal hover both are needed to minimize delta-v spent for station keeping. A Python I/F to NPOPT has been written to be used from an LTool script. In vertical hovering, the spacecraft stays along the line joining the Sun and a small body. An instantaneous delta-v toward the anti- Sun direction is applied at the closest approach to the small body for station keeping. For example, the spacecraft hovers between the minimum range (2 km) point and the maximum range (2.5 km) point from the asteroid 1989ML. Horizontal hovering buys more time for a spacecraft to recover if, for any reason, a planned thrust fails, by returning almost to the initial position after some time later via a near elliptical orbit around the small body. The mapping or

  20. Nanocomposites in Multifuntional Structures for Spacecraft Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, J.; Mendizabal, M.; Elizetxea, C.; Florez, S.; Atxaga, G.; Del Olmo, E.

    2012-07-01

    The integration of functionalities as electrical, thermal, power or radiation shielding inside carrier electronic boxes, solar panels or platform structures allows reducing weight, volume, and harness for spacecraft. The multifunctional structures represent an advanced design approach for space components and subsystems. The development of such multifunctional structures aims the re-engineering traditional metallic structures by composites in space, which request to provide specific solutions for thermal conductivity, EMI-EMC, radiation shielding and integration. The use of nanomaterials as CNF and nano-adds to reinforce composite structures allows obtaining local solutions for improving electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and radiation shielding. The paper summarises the results obtained in of three investigations conducted by Tecnalia based on carbon nanofillers for improving electro-thermal characteristics of spacecraft platform, electronic substrates and electronics boxes respectively.

  1. Microgravity Flammability Experiments for Spacecraft Fire Safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legros, Guillaume; Minster, Olivier; Tóth, Balazs

    2012-01-01

    spread, and thus also the modeling thereof, in realistic conditions is described. Some of the parameters governing the flame spread are also identified and their scaling against the dimensions of the test specimen is briefly questioned. Then several of the current and scheduled efforts are presented......-supply vehicle like the ATV or Orbital’s Cygnus, a series of supporting experiments are being planned and conducted by the team members. In order to answer the appropriate scientific and engineering problems relevant for spacecraft fire safety, a canonical scenario that can improve the understanding of flame...... in terms of their relevance for the flame spread problem. Further, it is explained how the results can be combined to enhance the understanding of fire spread in the real scale configuration and thus improve the fire safety onboard spacecrafts. The results and particularly the ones from the large scale...

  2. Low noise spacecraft attitude control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondhalekar, Vijay; Downer, James R.; Eisenhaure, David B.; Hockney, Richard L.; Johnson, Bruce G.

    1991-01-01

    The authors describe two ongoing research efforts directed at developing advanced spacecraft momentum control flywheels. The first effort is directed at developing low-noise momentum wheels through the use of magnetic bearings. The second effort is directed at demonstrating critical subcomponents of an integrated power and attitude control system (IPACS) that stores energy as kinetic energy in mechanical rotors with the accompanying angular momentum available for attitude control of the spacecraft. The authors describe a ground experiment that was designed to demonstrate an energy storage capability of 1 kWh at a 40 Wh/kg energy density and a 1 kW electrical generation capacity at 85 percent round-trip efficiency and that will allow single-degree-of-freedom gimballing to quantify experimentally the bearing power requirements for processing the flywheel.

  3. Comprehensive Fault Tolerance and Science-Optimal Attitude Planning for Spacecraft Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Ali

    Spacecraft operate in a harsh environment, are costly to launch, and experience unavoidable communication delay and bandwidth constraints. These factors motivate the need for effective onboard mission and fault management. This dissertation presents an integrated framework to optimize science goal achievement while identifying and managing encountered faults. Goal-related tasks are defined by pointing the spacecraft instrumentation toward distant targets of scientific interest. The relative value of science data collection is traded with risk of failures to determine an optimal policy for mission execution. Our major innovation in fault detection and reconfiguration is to incorporate fault information obtained from two types of spacecraft models: one based on the dynamics of the spacecraft and the second based on the internal composition of the spacecraft. For fault reconfiguration, we consider possible changes in both dynamics-based control law configuration and the composition-based switching configuration. We formulate our problem as a stochastic sequential decision problem or Markov Decision Process (MDP). To avoid the computational complexity involved in a fully-integrated MDP, we decompose our problem into multiple MDPs. These MDPs include planning MDPs for different fault scenarios, a fault detection MDP based on a logic-based model of spacecraft component and system functionality, an MDP for resolving conflicts between fault information from the logic-based model and the dynamics-based spacecraft models" and the reconfiguration MDP that generates a policy optimized over the relative importance of the mission objectives versus spacecraft safety. Approximate Dynamic Programming (ADP) methods for the decomposition of the planning and fault detection MDPs are applied. To show the performance of the MDP-based frameworks and ADP methods, a suite of spacecraft attitude planning case studies are described. These case studies are used to analyze the content and

  4. Spacecraft Attitude Control in Hamiltonian Framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal

    2000-01-01

    is the sum of the gradient of the potential energy and the dissipative force. It is shown that this control law makes the system uniformly asymptotically stable to the desired reference point. Three problems were addressed in the paper: spacecraft stabilization in the inertial frame, libration damping...... with the use of electromagnetic coils and a slew maneuver with an additional objective of avoiding undesirable regions e.g. causing blindness of optical sensors...

  5. THE FUTURE OF SPACECRAFT NUCLEAR PROPULSION

    OpenAIRE

    Jansen, Frank

    2014-01-01

    This paper summarizes the advantages of space nuclear power and propulsion systems. It describes the actual status of international power level dependent spacecraft nuclear propulsion missions, especially the high power EU-Russian MEGAHIT study including the Russian Megawatt-Class Nuclear Power Propulsion System, the NASA GRC project and the low and medium power EU DiPoP study. Space nuclear propulsion based mission scenarios of these studies are sketched as well.

  6. The Future of Spacecraft Nuclear Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, F.

    2014-06-01

    This paper summarizes the advantages of space nuclear power and propulsion systems. It describes the actual status of international power level dependent spacecraft nuclear propulsion missions, especially the high power EU-Russian MEGAHIT study including the Russian Megawatt-Class Nuclear Power Propulsion System, the NASA GRC project and the low and medium power EU DiPoP study. Space nuclear propulsion based mission scenarios of these studies are sketched as well.

  7. Schema for Spacecraft-Command Dictionary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laubach, Sharon; Garcia, Celina; Maxwell, Scott; Wright, Jesse

    2008-01-01

    An Extensible Markup Language (XML) schema was developed as a means of defining and describing a structure for capturing spacecraft command- definition and tracking information in a single location in a form readable by both engineers and software used to generate software for flight and ground systems. A structure defined within this schema is then used as the basis for creating an XML file that contains command definitions.

  8. Building the Small Spacecraft Technology Pipeline

    OpenAIRE

    Reuther, Dr. James

    2011-01-01

    Biography - Dr. Reuther currently serves as the Acting Director for Crosscutting Capability Demonstrations in the Office of Chief Technologist of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Headquarters. Previously, Dr. Reuther served as the Lead of the Test and Verification (T&V) Office for the Orion spacecraft development. After graduating from the University of California Davis with a Bachelors, Masters, and Ph.D. in mechanical and aeronautical engineering, Dr. Reuther perform...

  9. Additive Manufacturing: Ensuring Quality for Spacecraft Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Theodore; Stephenson, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Reliable manufacturing requires that material properties and fabrication processes be well defined in order to insure that the manufactured parts meet specified requirements. While this issue is now relatively straightforward for traditional processes such as subtractive manufacturing and injection molding, this capability is still evolving for AM products. Hence, one of the principal challenges within AM is in qualifying and verifying source material properties and process control. This issue is particularly critical for applications in harsh environments and demanding applications, such as spacecraft.

  10. Experiments On Transparent Conductive Films For Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Davis, Marla E.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; De Groh, Kim K.; Hung, Ching-Cheh; Malave-Sanabria, Tania; Hambourger, Paul; Roig, David

    1995-01-01

    Report describes experiments on thin, transparent, electrically conductive films made, variously, of indium tin oxide covered by magnesium fluoride (ITO/MgF2), aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO), or pure zinc oxide (ZnO). Films are candidates for application to such spacecraft components, including various optoelectronic devices and window surfaces that must be protected against buildup of static electric charge. On Earth, such films useful on heat mirrors, optoelectronic devices, gas sensors, and automotive and aircraft windows.

  11. Artificial Intelligence and Spacecraft Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugel-Whitehead, Norma R.

    1997-01-01

    This talk will present the work which has been done at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center involving the use of Artificial Intelligence to control the power system in a spacecraft. The presentation will include a brief history of power system automation, and some basic definitions of the types of artificial intelligence which have been investigated at MSFC for power system automation. A video tape of one of our autonomous power systems using co-operating expert systems, and advanced hardware will be presented.

  12. Analysis of the Apollo spacecraft operational data management system. Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-01-01

    A study was made of Apollo, Skylab, and several other data management systems to determine those techniques which could be applied to the management of operational data for future manned spacecraft programs. The results of the study are presented and include: (1) an analysis of present data management systems, (2) a list of requirements for future operational data management systems, (3) an evaluation of automated data management techniques, and (4) a plan for data management applicable to future space programs.

  13. Methodology for Developing a Probabilistic Risk Assessment Model of Spacecraft Rendezvous and Dockings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnham, Steven J., II; Garza, Joel, Jr.; Castillo, Theresa M.; Lutomski, Michael

    2011-01-01

    In 2007 NASA was preparing to send two new visiting vehicles carrying logistics and propellant to the International Space Station (ISS). These new vehicles were the European Space Agency s (ESA) Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV), the Jules Verne, and the Japanese Aerospace and Explorations Agency s (JAXA) H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV). The ISS Program wanted to quantify the increased risk to the ISS from these visiting vehicles. At the time, only the Shuttle, the Soyuz, and the Progress vehicles rendezvoused and docked to the ISS. The increased risk to the ISS was from an increase in vehicle traffic, thereby, increasing the potential catastrophic collision during the rendezvous and the docking or berthing of the spacecraft to the ISS. A universal method of evaluating the risk of rendezvous and docking or berthing was created by the ISS s Risk Team to accommodate the increasing number of rendezvous and docking or berthing operations due to the increasing number of different spacecraft, as well as the future arrival of commercial spacecraft. Before the first docking attempt of ESA's ATV and JAXA's HTV to the ISS, a probabilistic risk model was developed to quantitatively calculate the risk of collision of each spacecraft with the ISS. The 5 rendezvous and docking risk models (Soyuz, Progress, Shuttle, ATV, and HTV) have been used to build and refine the modeling methodology for rendezvous and docking of spacecrafts. This risk modeling methodology will be NASA s basis for evaluating the addition of future ISS visiting spacecrafts hazards, including SpaceX s Dragon, Orbital Science s Cygnus, and NASA s own Orion spacecraft. This paper will describe the methodology used for developing a visiting vehicle risk model.

  14. Optimal autonomous spacecraft resiliency maneuvers using metaheuristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showalter, Daniel J.

    The growing congestion in space has increased the need for spacecraft to develop resilience capabilities in response to natural and man-made hazards. Equipping satellites with increased maneuvering capability has the potential to enhance resilience by altering their arrival conditions as they enter potentially hazardous regions. The propellant expenditure corresponding to increased maneuverability requires these maneuvers be optimized to minimize fuel expenditure and to the extent which resiliency can be preserved. This research introduces maneuvers to enhance resiliency and investigates the viability of metaheuristics to enable their autonomous optimization. Techniques are developed to optimize impulsive and continuous-thrust resiliency maneuvers. The results demonstrate that impulsive and low-thrust resiliency maneuvers require only meters per second of delta-velocity. Additionally, bi-level evolutionary algorithms are explored in the optimization of resiliency maneuvers which require a maneuvering spacecraft to perform an inspection of one of several target satellites while en-route to geostationary orbit. The methods developed are shown to consistently produce optimal and near-optimal results for the problems investigated and can be applied to future classes of resiliency maneuvers yet to be defined. Results indicate that the inspection requires an increase of only five percent of the propellant needed to transfer from low Earth orbit to geostationary orbit. The maneuvers and optimization techniques developed throughout this dissertation demonstrate the viability of the autonomous optimization of spacecraft resiliency maneuvers and can be utilized to optimize future classes of resiliency maneuvers.

  15. Probing interferometric parallax with interplanetary spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodeghiero, G.; Gini, F.; Marchili, N.; Jain, P.; Ralston, J. P.; Dallacasa, D.; Naletto, G.; Possenti, A.; Barbieri, C.; Franceschini, A.; Zampieri, L.

    2017-07-01

    We describe an experimental scenario for testing a novel method to measure distance and proper motion of astronomical sources. The method is based on multi-epoch observations of amplitude or intensity correlations between separate receiving systems. This technique is called Interferometric Parallax, and efficiently exploits phase information that has traditionally been overlooked. The test case we discuss combines amplitude correlations of signals from deep space interplanetary spacecraft with those from distant galactic and extragalactic radio sources with the goal of estimating the interplanetary spacecraft distance. Interferometric parallax relies on the detection of wavefront curvature effects in signals collected by pairs of separate receiving systems. The method shows promising potentialities over current techniques when the target is unresolved from the background reference sources. Developments in this field might lead to the construction of an independent, geometrical cosmic distance ladder using a dedicated project and future generation instruments. We present a conceptual overview supported by numerical estimates of its performances applied to a spacecraft orbiting the Solar System. Simulations support the feasibility of measurements with a simple and time-saving observational scheme using current facilities.

  16. Space Weathering Experiments on Spacecraft Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhart, D. P.; Cooper, R.; Cowardin, H.; Maxwell, J.; Plis, E.; Ferguson, D.; Barton, D.; Schiefer, S.; Hoffmann, R.

    2017-01-01

    A project to investigate space environment effects on specific materials with interest to remote sensing was initiated in 2016. The goal of the project is to better characterize changes in the optical properties of polymers found in multi-layered spacecraft insulation (MLI) induced by electron bombardment. Previous analysis shows that chemical bonds break and potentially reform when exposed to high energy electrons like those seen in orbit. These chemical changes have been shown to alter a material's optical reflectance, among other material properties. This paper presents the initial experimental results of MLI materials exposed to various fluences of high energy electrons, designed to simulate a portion of the geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO) space environment. It is shown that the spectral reflectance of some of the tested materials changes as a function of electron dose. These results provide an experimental benchmark for analysis of aging effects on satellite systems which can be used to improve remote sensing and space situational awareness. They also provide preliminary analysis on those materials that are most likely to comprise the high area-to-mass ratio (HAMR) population of space debris in the geosynchronous orbit environment. Finally, the results presented in this paper serve as a proof of concept for simulated environmental aging of spacecraft polymers that should lead to more experiments using a larger subset of spacecraft materials.

  17. Modeling Meteor Flares for Spacecraft Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlert, Steven

    2017-01-01

    NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office (MEO) is tasked with assisting spacecraft operators and engineers in quantifying the threat the meteoroid environment poses to their individual missions. A more complete understanding of the meteoroid environment for this application requires extensive observations. One manner by which the MEO observes meteors is with dedicated video camera systems that operate nightly. Connecting the observational data from these video cameras to the relevant physical properties of the ablating meteoroids, however, is subject to sizable observational and theoretical uncertainties. Arguably the most troublesome theoretical uncertainty in ablation is a model for the structure of meteoroids, as observations clearly show behaviors wholly inconsistent with meteoroids being homogeneous spheres. Further complicating the interpretation of the observations in the context of spacecraft risk is the ubiquitous process of fragmentation and the flares it can produce, which greatly muddles any attempts to estimating initial meteoroid masses. In this talk a method of estimating the mass distribution of fragments in flaring meteors using high resolution video observations will be dis- cussed. Such measurements provide an important step in better understanding of the structure and fragmentation process of the parent meteoroids producing these flares, which in turn may lead to better constraints on meteoroid masses and reduced uncertainties in spacecraft risk.

  18. Delamination Assessment Tool for Spacecraft Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portela, Pedro; Preller, Fabian; Wittke, Henrik; Sinnema, Gerben; Camanho, Pedro; Turon, Albert

    2012-07-01

    Fortunately only few cases are known where failure of spacecraft structures due to undetected damage has resulted in a loss of spacecraft and launcher mission. However, several problems related to damage tolerance and in particular delamination of composite materials have been encountered during structure development of various ESA projects and qualification testing. To avoid such costly failures during development, launch or service of spacecraft, launcher and reusable launch vehicles structures a comprehensive damage tolerance verification approach is needed. In 2009, the European Space Agency (ESA) initiated an activity called “Delamination Assessment Tool” which is led by the Portuguese company HPS Lda and includes academic and industrial partners. The goal of this study is the development of a comprehensive damage tolerance verification approach for launcher and reusable launch vehicles (RLV) structures, addressing analytical and numerical methodologies, material-, subcomponent- and component testing, as well as non-destructive inspection. The study includes a comprehensive review of current industrial damage tolerance practice resulting from ECSS and NASA standards, the development of new Best Practice Guidelines for analysis, test and inspection methods and the validation of these with a real industrial case study. The paper describes the main findings of this activity so far and presents a first iteration of a Damage Tolerance Verification Approach, which includes the introduction of novel analytical and numerical tools at an industrial level. This new approach is being put to the test using real industrial case studies provided by the industrial partners, MT Aerospace, RUAG Space and INVENT GmbH

  19. Spacecraft charging requirements and engineering issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Henry B.; Whittlesey, Albert C.

    2006-01-01

    An effort is currently underway to recast and combine two NASA guidelines for mitigating the effects of spacecraft charging and electrostatic discharge on spacecraft. The task has the goal of taking the existing NASA guidelines for preventing surface electrostatic charging, NASA-TP-2361 (Purvis et al., 1984), and internal electrostatic charging, NASAHDBK 4002 (Whittlesey, 1999), and bringing them up to date with recent laboratory and onorbit findings. This paper will describe the status of those on-going efforts to combine and update the two guidelines. Reasons for the upgrades will be presented, including new subject material for which there is now a greater understanding or a greater need which changes satellite design procedures, or both. There will be an emphasis on the proposed contents and on the differences and similarities between surface and internal charging mitigation techniques. In addition, the mitigation requirements that can be derived from the combined handbook will be discussed with emphasis on how they might affect the engineering design and testing of future spacecraft.

  20. Wireless Communication onboard Spacecraft : Draadloze Communicatie aan boord van Ruimtevaartuigen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amini, R.

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on intra-spacecraft wireless communication as a solution for reducing the spacecraft onboard harness. Despite outstanding advances in aerospace industry, the cost of accessing space is still very high and the amount of engineering work required for spacecraft design and

  1. Illustration of relative sizes of Mercury, Gemini and Apollo spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    Artist concept illustrating the relative sizes of the one-man Mercury spacecraft, the two-man Gemini spacecraft, and the three-man Apollo spacecraft. Also shows line drawing of launch vehichles to show their relative size in relation to each other.

  2. Wireless Intra-Spacecraft Communication: The Benefits and the Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Will H.; Armstrong, John T.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a systematic study of how intra-spacecraft wireless communication can be adopted to various subsystems of the spacecraft including C&DH (Command & Data Handling), Telecom, Power, Propulsion, and Payloads, and the interconnects between them. We discuss the advantages of intra-spacecraft wireless communication and the disadvantages and challenges and a proposal to address them.

  3. Spacecraft Fabrication and Test MODIL. Semiannual report, March 1992--October 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, T.T.; Spellman, G.P.; Sanders, D.M.; Griffith, L.V.; Cruz, G.E.

    1993-05-01

    The Spacecraft Fabrication and Test (SF&T) MODIL is off to a good start to achieve its objective of establishing a producibility culture in the spacecraft fabrication community. The MODIL has been organized into five thrust areas: Automated Spacecraft & Assembly Project (ASAP) Materials and Structures; Cryocoolers; Precision Technologies; Assembly and Test. In this six months of effort, we have established significant initiatives with the aerospace industry and government laboratories. We continue to, look to the Aerospace Corporation for significant technical support and advice. We have been key participants in the Producible Technology Working Groups (PTWGs) set fact hosted a plenary meeting for the PTWGs before the GBI visits in March. In addition to defining potential high payoff areas, some contractual work has been initiated to execute demonstration projects. The purpose of the demonstration potential payoff to SDIO in the specific areas and position the program on a larger scale after receipt of the FY93 funding. We held our first industrial briefing.

  4. Benefits of Operational Consideration into the Guidance, Navigation, and Control Design of Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Mark C.; Holt, Greg N.

    2011-01-01

    The following paper points out historical examples where operational consideration into the GN&C design could have helped avoid operational complexity, reduce costs, ensure the ability for a GN&C system to be able to adapt to failures, and in some cases might have helped save mission objectives. A costly repeat of mistakes could befall a program if previous operational lessons, especially from operators of vehicles with similar GN&C systems, are not considered during the GN&C design phase of spacecraft. The information gained from operational consideration during the design can lead to improvements of the design, allow less ground support during operations, and prevent repetition of previous mistakes. However, this benefit can only occur if spacecraft operators adequately capture lessons learned that would improve future designs for operations and those who are designing spacecraft incorporate inputs from those that have previously operated similar GN&C systems.

  5. Structures and materials technology needs for communications and remote sensing spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronet, M. J.; Jensen, G. A.; Hoskins, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    This report documents trade studies conducted from the perspective of a small spacecraft developer to determine and quantify the structures and structural materials technology development needs for future commercial and NASA small spacecraft to be launched in the period 1999 to 2005. Emphasis is placed on small satellites weighing less than 1800 pounds for two focus low-Earth orbit missions: commercial communications and remote sensing. The focus missions are characterized in terms of orbit, spacecraft size, performance, and design drivers. Small spacecraft program personnel were interviewed to determine their technology needs, and the results are summarized. A systems-analysis approach for quantifying the benefits of inserting advanced state-of-the-art technologies into a current reference, state-of-the-practice small spacecraft design is developed and presented. This approach is employed in a set of abbreviated trade studies to quantify the payoffs of using a subset of 11 advanced technologies selected from the interview results The 11 technology development opportunities are then ranked based on their relative payoff. Based on the strong potential for significant benefits, recommendations are made to pursue development of 8 and the 11 technologies. Other important technology development areas identified are recommended for further study.

  6. The research and practice of spacecraft software engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chengxin; Wang, Jinghua; Xu, Xiaoguang

    2017-06-01

    In order to ensure the safety and reliability of spacecraft software products, it is necessary to execute engineering management. Firstly, the paper introduces the problems of unsystematic planning, uncertain classified management and uncontinuous improved mechanism in domestic and foreign spacecraft software engineering management. Then, it proposes a solution for software engineering management based on system-integrated ideology in the perspective of spacecraft system. Finally, a application result of spacecraft is given as an example. The research can provides a reference for executing spacecraft software engineering management and improving software product quality.

  7. Contemporary state of spacecraft/environment interaction research

    CERN Document Server

    Novikov, L S

    1999-01-01

    Various space environment effects on spacecraft materials and equipment, and the reverse effects of spacecrafts and rockets on space environment are considered. The necessity of permanent updating and perfection of our knowledge on spacecraft/environment interaction processes is noted. Requirements imposed on models of space environment in theoretical and experimental researches of various aspects of the spacecraft/environment interaction problem are formulated. In this field, main problems which need to be solved today and in the nearest future are specified. The conclusion is made that the joint analysis of both aspects of spacecraft/environment interaction problem promotes the most effective solution of the problem.

  8. Research-Based Monitoring, Prediction, and Analysis Tools of the Spacecraft Charging Environment for Spacecraft Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yihua; Kuznetsova, Maria M.; Pulkkinen, Antti A.; Maddox, Marlo M.; Mays, Mona Leila

    2015-01-01

    The Space Weather Research Center (http://swrc. gsfc.nasa.gov) at NASA Goddard, part of the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (http://ccmc.gsfc.nasa.gov), is committed to providing research-based forecasts and notifications to address NASA's space weather needs, in addition to its critical role in space weather education. It provides a host of services including spacecraft anomaly resolution, historical impact analysis, real-time monitoring and forecasting, tailored space weather alerts and products, and weekly summaries and reports. In this paper, we focus on how (near) real-time data (both in space and on ground), in combination with modeling capabilities and an innovative dissemination system called the integrated Space Weather Analysis system (http://iswa.gsfc.nasa.gov), enable monitoring, analyzing, and predicting the spacecraft charging environment for spacecraft users. Relevant tools and resources are discussed.

  9. Electromagnetic Dissociation and Spacecraft Electronics Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, John W.

    2016-01-01

    When protons or heavy ions from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) or solar particle events (SPE) interact with target nuclei in spacecraft, there can be two different types of interactions. The more familiar strong nuclear interaction often dominates and is responsible for nuclear fragmentation in either the GCR or SPE projectile nucleus or the spacecraft target nucleus. (Of course, the proton does not break up, except possibly to produce pions or other hadrons.) The less familiar, second type of interaction is due to the very strong electromagnetic fields that exist when two charged nuclei pass very close to each other. This process is called electromagnetic dissociation (EMD) and primarily results in the emission of neutrons, protons and light ions (isotopes of hydrogen and helium). The cross section for particle production is approximately defined as the number of particles produced in nucleus-nucleus collisions or other types of reactions. (There are various kinematic and other factors which multiply the particle number to arrive at the cross section.) Strong, nuclear interactions usually dominate the nuclear reactions of most interest that occur between GCR and target nuclei. However, for heavy nuclei (near Fe and beyond) at high energy the EMD cross section can be much larger than the strong nuclear interaction cross section. This paper poses a question: Are there projectile or target nuclei combinations in the interaction of GCR or SPE where the EMD reaction cross section plays a dominant role? If the answer is affirmative, then EMD mechanisms should be an integral part of codes that are used to predict damage to spacecraft electronics. The question can become more fine-tuned and one can ask about total reaction cross sections as compared to double differential cross sections. These issues will be addressed in the present paper.

  10. Combined space environment on spacecraft engineering materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Gary L.; Smith, Guy A.; Kosten, Susan

    1993-01-01

    Spacecraft structures and surface materials exposed to the space environment for extended periods, up to thirty years, have increased potential for damage from long term exposure to the combined space environment including solar ultraviolet radiation, electrons, and protons and orbiting space debris. The space environment in which the Space Station Freedom and other space platforms will orbit is truly a hostile environment. For example, the currently estimated integral fluence for electrons above 1 Mev at 2000 nautical miles is above 2 x 10(exp 10) electrons/cm(sup 2)/day and the proton integral fluence is above 1 x 10(exp 9) protons/cm(sup 2)/day. At the 200 - 400 nautical miles, which is more representative of the altitude which will provide the environment for the Space Station, each of these fluences will be proportionately less; however, the data indicates that the radiation environment will obviously have an effect on structural materials exposed to the environment for long durations. The effects of ultraviolet radiation, particularly in the vacuum ultraviolet (less than 200 nm wavelength) is more difficult to characterize at this time. Very little data is available in the literature which can be used for determining the life cycle of a material placed in space for extended durations of time. In order to obtain critical data for planning and designing of spacecraft systems, use of a small vacuum system at the Environmental Effects Facility at MSFC, which can be used for these purposes was used. A special effort was made to build up this capability during the course of this research effort and perform a variety of experiments on materials proposed for the Space Station. A description of the apparatus and the procedure devised to process potential spacecraft materials is included.

  11. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Airborne Contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, John T.

    2008-01-01

    The enclosed table lists official spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations (SMACs), which are guideline values set by the NASA/JSC Toxicology Group in cooperation with the National Research Council Committee on Toxicology (NRCCOT). These values should not be used for situations other than human space flight without careful consideration of the criteria used to set each value. The SMACs take into account a number of unique factors such as the effect of space-flight stress on human physiology, the uniform good health of the astronauts, and the absence of pregnant or very young individuals. Documentation of the values is given in a 5 volume series of books entitled "Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Selected Airborne Contaminants" published by the National Academy Press, Washington, D.C. These books can be viewed electronically at http://books.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=9786&page=3. Short-term (1 and 24 hour) SMACs are set to manage accidental releases aboard a spacecraft and permit risk of minor, reversible effects such as mild mucosal irritation. In contrast, the long-term SMACs are set to fully protect healthy crewmembers from adverse effects resulting from continuous exposure to specific air pollutants for up to 1000 days. Crewmembers with allergies or unusual sensitivity to trace pollutants may not be afforded complete protection, even when long-term SMACs are not exceeded. Crewmember exposures involve a mixture of contaminants, each at a specific concentration (C(sub n)). These contaminants could interact to elicit symptoms of toxicity even though individual contaminants do not exceed their respective SMACs. The air quality is considered acceptable when the toxicity index (T(sub grp)) for each toxicological group of compounds is less than 1, where T(sub grp), is calculated as follows: T(sub grp) = C(sub 1)/SMAC(sub 1) + C(sub 2/SMAC(sub 2) + ...+C(sub n)/SMAC(sub n).

  12. Cluster PEACE observations of electrons of spacecraft origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Szita

    Full Text Available The two PEACE (Plasma Electron And Current Experiment sensors on board each Cluster spacecraft sample the electron velocity distribution across the full 4 solid angle and the energy range 0.7 eV to 26 keV with a time resolution of 4 s. We present high energy and angular resolution 3D observations of electrons of spacecraft origin in the various environments encountered by the Cluster constellation, including a lunar eclipse interval where the spacecraft potential was reduced but remained positive, and periods of ASPOC (Active Spacecraft POtential Control operation which reduced the spacecraft potential. We demonstrate how the spacecraft potential may be found from a gradient change in the PEACE low energy spectrum, and show how the observed spacecraft electrons are confined by the spacecraft potential. We identify an intense component of the spacecraft electrons with energies equivalent to the spacecraft potential, the arrival direction of which is seen to change when ASPOC is switched on. Another spacecraft electron component, observed in the sunward direction, is reduced in the eclipse but unaffected by ASPOC, and we believe this component is produced in the analyser by solar UV. We find that PEACE anodes with a look direction along the spacecraft surfaces are more susceptible to spacecraft electron contamination than those which look perpendicular to the surface, which justifies the decision to mount PEACE with its field-of-view radially outward rather than tangentially.

    Key words. Magnetosheric physics (general or miscellaneous Space plasma physics (spacecraft sheaths, wakes, charging

  13. Cluster PEACE observations of electrons of spacecraft origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Szita

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available The two PEACE (Plasma Electron And Current Experiment sensors on board each Cluster spacecraft sample the electron velocity distribution across the full 4 solid angle and the energy range 0.7 eV to 26 keV with a time resolution of 4 s. We present high energy and angular resolution 3D observations of electrons of spacecraft origin in the various environments encountered by the Cluster constellation, including a lunar eclipse interval where the spacecraft potential was reduced but remained positive, and periods of ASPOC (Active Spacecraft POtential Control operation which reduced the spacecraft potential. We demonstrate how the spacecraft potential may be found from a gradient change in the PEACE low energy spectrum, and show how the observed spacecraft electrons are confined by the spacecraft potential. We identify an intense component of the spacecraft electrons with energies equivalent to the spacecraft potential, the arrival direction of which is seen to change when ASPOC is switched on. Another spacecraft electron component, observed in the sunward direction, is reduced in the eclipse but unaffected by ASPOC, and we believe this component is produced in the analyser by solar UV. We find that PEACE anodes with a look direction along the spacecraft surfaces are more susceptible to spacecraft electron contamination than those which look perpendicular to the surface, which justifies the decision to mount PEACE with its field-of-view radially outward rather than tangentially.Key words. Magnetosheric physics (general or miscellaneous Space plasma physics (spacecraft sheaths, wakes, charging

  14. Fault Detection and Isolation for Spacecraft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hans-Christian Becker; Wisniewski, Rafal

    2002-01-01

    This article realizes nonlinear Fault Detection and Isolation for actuators, given there is no measurement of the states in the actuators. The Fault Detection and Isolation of the actuators is instead based on angular velocity measurement of the spacecraft and knowledge about the dynamics...... of the satellite. The algorithms presented in this paper are based on a geometric approach to achieve nonlinear Fault Detection and Isolation. The proposed algorithms are tested in a simulation study and the pros and cons of the algorithms are discussed....

  15. Conducted Transients on Spacecraft Primary Power Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mc Closkey, John; Dimov, Jen

    2017-01-01

    One of the sources of potential interference on spacecraft primary power lines is that of conducted transients resulting from equipment being switched on and off of the bus. Susceptibility to such transients is addressed by some version of the CS06 requirement of MIL-STD-461462. This presentation provides a summary of the history of the CS06 requirement and test method, a basis for understanding of the sources of these transients, analysis techniques for determining their worst-case characteristics, and guidelines for minimizing their magnitudes and applying the requirement appropriately.

  16. Large Scale Experiments on Spacecraft Fire Safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urban, David L.; Ruff, Gary A.; Minster, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Full scale fire testing complemented by computer modelling has provided significant knowhow about the risk, prevention and suppression of fire in terrestrial systems (cars, ships, planes, buildings, mines, and tunnels). In comparison, no such testing has been carried out for manned spacecraft due......-based microgravity facilities or has been limited to very small fuel samples. Still, the work conducted to date has shown that fire behaviour in low-gravity is very different from that in normal-gravity, with differences observed for flammability limits, ignition delay, flame spread behaviour, flame colour and flame...

  17. Concurrent rendezvous control of underactuated spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Vijay; Reza Emami, M.

    2017-09-01

    The concurrent control of spacecraft equipped with one-axis unilateral thruster and three-axis attitude actuator is considered in this paper. The proposed control law utilizes attitude control channels along with the single thrust force concurrently, for three-dimensional trajectory tracking and rendezvous with a target object. The concurrent controller also achieves orbital transfer to low Earth orbits with long range separation. To demonstrate the orbit transfer capabilities of the concurrent controller, a smooth elliptical orbit transfer trajectory for co-planar circular orbits is designed. The velocity change and energy consumption of the designed orbit transfer trajectory is observed to be equivalent to that of Hohmann transfer.

  18. Partial reconstruction of the rotational motion of Philae spacecraft during its landing on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    CERN Document Server

    Baranyai, Tamás; Várkonyi, Péter L

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a partial reconstruction of the rotational dynamics of the Philae spacecraft upon landing on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko as part of ESA's Rosetta mission. We analyze the motion and the events triggered by the failure to fix the spacecraft to the comet surface at the time of the first touchdown. Dynamic trajectories obtained by numerical simulation of a 7 degree-of-freedom mechanical model of the spacecraft are fitted to directions of incoming solar radiation inferred from in-situ measurements of the electric power provided by the solar panels. The results include a lower bound of the angular velocity of the lander immediately after its first touchdown. Our study also gives insight into the effect of the programmed turn-off of the stabilizing gyroscope after touchdown; the important dynamical consequences of a small collision during Philae's journey; and the probability that a similar landing scenario harms the operability of this type of spacecraft.

  19. Analysis of Spatial Pattern of Urban System along the Overland Silk Road Economic Belt Using DMSP-OLS Nighttime Light Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jianzhong; Bai, Linyan; wang, Kui; Zhang, Xuefu; Xie, Nengfu; Ran, Qiyun; Guo, Mingqiu; Xu, Lijun

    2017-02-01

    As China promotes the Belt and Road (BAR) initiative, the overland SREB development is widely concerned. The cities (including towns), population centers, of urban system are the cores of the economy along the SREB. Therefore, it is necessary to monitoring the urbanization of the belt so that the new growing points of urban development and the valid coupling mechanism between human and nature will be explored to promote the regional socio-economic sustainable development and effectively implement the BAR initiative. Using the DMSP-OLS stable nighttime lights (NTL) data in 1992, 2003, and 2014, in this paper we studied the urbanized spatial patterns of and the urbanized characteristics and trends of the main city system along the SREB in the view of the whole regionalized economic zone and typical cities and settlements (towns). The results showed that in general the NTL intensities in the SREB’s city system had the obvious geographical differentiation characteristics where there was maximum brightness of NTLs over the western European countries as well as being gradually decreasing from west to east. There were obvious increases of the NTL digital number (DN) values and NTL covering areas in 2003 and 2013 comparatively with that of 1992, which indicates the great urbanization development during this period. As for the four types of urban development process, there was an apparent consistency in a certain local area but a large heterogeneity among different areas. By analyzing the 273 pivot cities and the most pivot 26 cities, we found the number of the relatively small cities being decreasing but that of the large and medium-sized cities increasing. This study would provide the scientific support for the related researches and decision making of urbanization and urban economic development to promote the socio-economic comprehensive development of the overland SREB.

  20. Carbon Fiber Composites for Spacecraft Thermal Management Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banisaukas, John J.; Shioleno, Mark A.; Levan, Chris D.; Rawal, Suraj P.; Silverman, Edward M.; Watts, Roland J.

    2005-02-01

    Under a prime contract (No.F33615-00-C-5009) with the U.S. Air Force Materials Lab, Cytec Carbon Fibers, LLC has completed a program to identify high risk, high payoff thermal management applications for the insertion of high thermal conductivity carbon fiber composite materials in future spacecraft. The program involved the identification of relevant design requirements, the design of components for thermal management applications utilizing the most appropriate high-conductivity carbon fiber composite material solution, the fabrication of prototype test articles, performance and characterization tests on the prototype articles, and test data correlation of measured results. The final step in the program required end-user acceptance or qualification testing of the designed components. This paper provides a technical overview of two of the most recent applications: 1) an aluminum-clad carbon fiber composite as a thermal doubler for efficient, light weight satellite radiator panels, and 2) a laminate-wrapped carbon fiber composite doubler for effective removal or spreading of heat associated with the high energy of a traveling wave tube amplifier (TWTA) unit as currently employed on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

  1. Adaptive System Modeling for Spacecraft Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Justin

    2011-01-01

    This invention introduces a methodology and associated software tools for automatically learning spacecraft system models without any assumptions regarding system behavior. Data stream mining techniques were used to learn models for critical portions of the International Space Station (ISS) Electrical Power System (EPS). Evaluation on historical ISS telemetry data shows that adaptive system modeling reduces simulation error anywhere from 50 to 90 percent over existing approaches. The purpose of the methodology is to outline how someone can create accurate system models from sensor (telemetry) data. The purpose of the software is to support the methodology. The software provides analysis tools to design the adaptive models. The software also provides the algorithms to initially build system models and continuously update them from the latest streaming sensor data. The main strengths are as follows: Creates accurate spacecraft system models without in-depth system knowledge or any assumptions about system behavior. Automatically updates/calibrates system models using the latest streaming sensor data. Creates device specific models that capture the exact behavior of devices of the same type. Adapts to evolving systems. Can reduce computational complexity (faster simulations).

  2. Relativistic effects of spacecraft with circumnavigating observer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanklin, Nathaniel; West, Joseph

    A variation of the recently introduced Trolley Paradox, itself is a variation of the Ehrenfest Paradox is presented. In the Trolley Paradox, a ``stationary'' set of observers tracking a wheel rolling with a constant velocity find that the wheel travels further than its rest length circumference during one revolution of the wheel, despite the fact that the Lorentz contracted circumference is less than its rest value. In the variation presented, a rectangular spacecraft with onboard observers moves with constant velocity and is circumnavigated by several small ``sloops'' forming teams of inertial observers. This whole precession moves relative to a set of ``stationary'' Earth observers. Two cases are presented, one in which the sloops are evenly spaced according to the spacecraft observers, and one in which the sloops are evenly spaced according to the Earth observes. These two cases, combined with the rectangular geometry and an emphasis on what is seen by, and what is measured by, each set of observers is very helpful in sorting out the apparent contradictions. To aid in the visualizations stationary representations in excel along with animation in Visual Python and Unity are presented. The analysis presented is suitable for undergraduate physics majors.

  3. Space Weathering Experiments on Spacecraft Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, R.; Cowardin, H.; Engelhar, D.; Plis, Elena; Hoffman, R.

    2017-01-01

    A project to investigate space environment effects on specific materials with interest to remote sensing was initiated in 2016. The goal of the project is to better characterize changes in the optical properties of polymers and Mylar, specifically those found in multi-layered spacecraft insulation, due to electron bombardment. Previous analysis shows that chemical bonds break and potentially reform when exposed to high energy electrons. Among other properties these chemical changes altered the optical reflectance as documented in laboratory analysis. This paper presents results of the initial experiment results focused on the exposure of materials to various fluences of high energy electrons, used to simulate a portion of the geosynchronous space environment. The paper illustrates how the spectral reflectance changes as a function of time on orbit with respect to GEO environmental factors and investigates the survivability of the material after multiple electron doses. These results provide a baseline for analysis of aging effects on satellite systems used for remote sensing. They also provide preliminary analysis on what materials are most likely to encompass the high area-to-mass population of space debris in the geosynchronous environment. Lastly, the paper provides the results of the initial experimentation as a proof of concept for space aging on polymers and Mylar for conducting more experiments with a larger subset of spacecraft materials.

  4. Electrodeless plasma thrusters for spacecraft: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathgate, S. N.; Bilek, M. M. M.; McKenzie, D. R.

    2017-08-01

    The physics of electrodeless electric thrusters that use directed plasma to propel spacecraft without employing electrodes subject to plasma erosion is reviewed. Electrodeless plasma thrusters are potentially more durable than presently deployed thrusters that use electrodes such as gridded ion, Hall thrusters, arcjets and resistojets. Like other plasma thrusters, electrodeless thrusters have the advantage of reduced fuel mass compared to chemical thrusters that produce the same thrust. The status of electrodeless plasma thrusters that could be used in communications satellites and in spacecraft for interplanetary missions is examined. Electrodeless thrusters under development or planned for deployment include devices that use a rotating magnetic field; devices that use a rotating electric field; pulsed inductive devices that exploit the Lorentz force on an induced current loop in a plasma; devices that use radiofrequency fields to heat plasmas and have magnetic nozzles to accelerate the hot plasma and other devices that exploit the Lorentz force. Using metrics of specific impulse and thrust efficiency, we find that the most promising designs are those that use Lorentz forces directly to expel plasma and those that use magnetic nozzles to accelerate plasma.

  5. Space Environments and Spacecraft Effects Concept: Transitioning Research to Operations and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, D. L.; Burns, H. D.; Clinton, R. G.; Schumacher, D.; Spann, J. F.

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is embarking on a course to expand human presence beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO) while expanding its mission to explore the solar system. Destinations such as Near Earth Asteroids (NEA), Mars and its moons, and the outer planets are but a few of the mission targets. NASA has established numerous organizations specializing in specific space environments disciplines that will serve to enable these missions. To complement these existing discipline organizations, a concept is presented focusing on the development of a space environment and spacecraft effects organization. This includes space climate, space weather, natural and induced space environments, and effects on spacecraft materials and systems. This space environment and spacecraft effects organization would be comprised of Technical Working Groups (TWG) focusing on, for example: a) Charged Particles (CP), b) Space Environmental Effects (SEE), and c) Interplanetary and Extraterrestrial Environments (IEE). These technical working groups will generate products and provide knowledge supporting four functional areas: design environments, environment effects, operational support, and programmatic support. The four functional areas align with phases in the program mission lifecycle and are briefly described below. Design environments are used primarily in the mission concept and design phases of a program. Environment effects focuses on the material, component, sub-system and system-level selection and the testing to verify design and operational performance. Operational support provides products based on real time or near real time space weather observations to mission operators to aid in real time and near-term decision-making. The programmatic support function maintains an interface with the numerous programs within NASA and other federal agencies to ensure that communications are well established and the needs of the programs are being met. The programmatic

  6. Solar Array Structures for 300 kW-Class Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappa, Richard; Rose, Geoff; Mann, Troy O.; Warren, Jerry E.; Mikulas, Martin M., Jr.; Kerslake, Tom; Kraft, Tom; Banik, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    State-of-the-art solar arrays for spacecraft provide on the order of 20 kW of electrical power, and they usually consist of 3J solar cells bonded to hinged rigid panels about 1 inch in thickness. This structural construction allows specific mass and packaging volumes of up to approximately 70 W/kg and 15 kW/m3 to be achieved. Significant advances in solar array structures are required for future very-high-power spacecraft (300+ kW), such as those proposed for pre-positioning heavy cargo on or near the Moon, Mars, or asteroids using solar electric propulsion. These applications will require considerable increases in both W/kg and kW/m3, and will undoubtedly require the use of flexible-substrate designs. This presentation summarizes work sponsored by NASA's Game Changing Development Program since Oct. 2011 to address the challenge of developing 300+ kW solar arrays. The work is primarily being done at NASA Langley, NASA Glenn, and two contractor teams (ATK and DSS), with technical collaboration from AFRL/Kirtland. The near-tem objective of the project is design, analysis, and testing of 30-50 kW solar array designs that are extensible to the far-term objective of 300+ kW. The work is currently focused on three designs: the MegaFlex concept by ATK, the Mega-ROSA concept by DSS, and an in-house 300-kW Government Reference Array concept. Each of these designs will be described in the presentation. Results obtained to date by the team, as well as future work plans, for the design, analysis, and testing of these large solar array structures will be summarized.

  7. Electromagnetic Forces on a Relativistic Spacecraft in the Interstellar Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Thiem; Loeb, Abraham

    2017-10-01

    A relativistic spacecraft of the type envisioned by the Breakthrough Starshot initiative will inevitably become charged through collisions with interstellar particles and UV photons. Interstellar magnetic fields would therefore deflect the trajectory of the spacecraft. We calculate the expected deflection for typical interstellar conditions. We also find that the charge distribution of the spacecraft is asymmetric, producing an electric dipole moment. The interaction between the moving electric dipole and the interstellar magnetic field is found to produce a large torque, which can result in fast oscillation of the spacecraft around the axis perpendicular to the direction of motion, with a period of ˜0.5 hr. We then study the spacecraft rotation arising from impulsive torques by dust bombardment. Finally, we discuss the effect of the spacecraft rotation and suggest several methods to mitigate it.

  8. Spacecraft Dynamics Should be Considered in Kalman Filter Attitude Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yaguang; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Kalman filter based spacecraft attitude estimation has been used in some high-profile missions and has been widely discussed in literature. While some models in spacecraft attitude estimation include spacecraft dynamics, most do not. To our best knowledge, there is no comparison on which model is a better choice. In this paper, we discuss the reasons why spacecraft dynamics should be considered in the Kalman filter based spacecraft attitude estimation problem. We also propose a reduced quaternion spacecraft dynamics model which admits additive noise. Geometry of the reduced quaternion model and the additive noise are discussed. This treatment is more elegant in mathematics and easier in computation. We use some simulation example to verify our claims.

  9. The management approach to the NASA space station definition studies at the Manned Spacecraft Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heberlig, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    The overall management approach to the NASA Phase B definition studies for space stations, which were initiated in September 1969 and completed in July 1972, is reviewed with particular emphasis placed on the management approach used by the Manned Spacecraft Center. The internal working organizations of the Manned Spacecraft Center and its prime contractor, North American Rockwell, are delineated along with the interfacing techniques used for the joint Government and industry study. Working interfaces with other NASA centers, industry, and Government agencies are briefly highlighted. The controlling documentation for the study (such as guidelines and constraints, bibliography, and key personnel) is reviewed. The historical background and content of the experiment program prepared for use in this Phase B study are outlined and management concepts that may be considered for future programs are proposed.

  10. Plasma sheath structure surrounding a large powered spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandell, M. J.; Jongeward, G. A.; Katz, I.

    1984-01-01

    Various factors determining the floating potential of a highly biased (about 4-kV) spacecraft in low earth orbit are discussed. While the common rule of thumb (90 percent negative; 10 percent positive) is usually a good guide, different biasing and grounding patterns can lead to high positive potentials. The NASCAP/LEO code can be used to predict spacecraft floating potential for complex three-dimensional spacecraft.

  11. 3D Display of Spacecraft Dynamics Using Real Telemetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanguk Lee

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available 3D display of spacecraft motion by using telemetry data received from satellite in real-time is described. Telemetry data are converted to the appropriate form for 3-D display by the real-time preprocessor. Stored playback telemetry data also can be processed for the display. 3D display of spacecraft motion by using real telemetry data provides intuitive comprehension of spacecraft dynamics.

  12. High temperature thrust chamber for spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chazen, Melvin L. (Inventor); Mueller, Thomas J. (Inventor); Kruse, William D. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A high temperature thrust chamber for spacecraft (20) is provided herein. The high temperature thrust chamber comprises a hollow body member (12) having an outer surface and an internal surface (16) defining the high temperature chamber (10). The body member (12) is made substantially of rhenium. An alloy (18) consisting of iridium and at least alloying metal selected of the group consisting of rhodium, platinum and palladium is deposited on at least a portion of the internal surface (16) of the body member (12). The iridium and the alloying metal are electrodeposited onto the body member (12). A HIP cycle is performed upon the body member (12) to cause the coating of iridium and the alloying metal to form the alloy (18) which protects the body member (12) from oxidation.

  13. A corrector for spacecraft calculated electron moments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Geach

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available We present the application of a numerical method to correct electron moments calculated on-board spacecraft from the effects of potential broadening and energy range truncation. Assuming a shape for the natural distribution of the ambient plasma and employing the scalar approximation, the on-board moments can be represented as non-linear integral functions of the underlying distribution. We have implemented an algorithm which inverts this system successfully over a wide range of parameters for an assumed underlying drifting Maxwellian distribution. The outputs of the solver are the corrected electron plasma temperature Te, density Ne and velocity vector Ve. We also make an estimation of the temperature anisotropy A of the distribution. We present corrected moment data from Cluster's PEACE experiment for a range of plasma environments and make comparisons with electron and ion data from other Cluster instruments, as well as the equivalent ground-based calculations using full 3-D distribution PEACE telemetry.

  14. Human factors issues for interstellar spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Marc M.; Brody, Adam R.

    1991-01-01

    Developments in research on space human factors are reviewed in the context of a self-sustaining interstellar spacecraft based on the notion of traveling space settlements. Assumptions about interstellar travel are set forth addressing costs, mission durations, and the need for multigenerational space colonies. The model of human motivation by Maslow (1970) is examined and directly related to the design of space habitat architecture. Human-factors technology issues encompass the human-machine interface, crew selection and training, and the development of spaceship infrastructure during transtellar flight. A scenario for feasible instellar travel is based on a speed of 0.5c, a timeframe of about 100 yr, and an expandable multigenerational crew of about 100 members. Crew training is identified as a critical human-factors issue requiring the development of perceptual and cognitive aids such as expert systems and virtual reality.

  15. A Microwave Thruster for Spacecraft Propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiravalle, Vincent P [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-23

    This presentation describes how a microwave thruster can be used for spacecraft propulsion. A microwave thruster is part of a larger class of electric propulsion devices that have higher specific impulse and lower thrust than conventional chemical rocket engines. Examples of electric propulsion devices are given in this presentation and it is shown how these devices have been used to accomplish two recent space missions. The microwave thruster is then described and it is explained how the thrust and specific impulse of the thruster can be measured. Calculations of the gas temperature and plasma properties in the microwave thruster are discussed. In addition a potential mission for the microwave thruster involving the orbit raising of a space station is explored.

  16. Dynamic interactions between ionospheric plasma and spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, David B.

    1995-01-01

    Studies of the interactions between the Space Station Freedom and ionospheric plasma led to an improved understanding of the dynamics of these interactions. Some of the issues related to developing and sustaining arcs in ionospheric conditions are considered. A technique for the estimation of the amplitude and duration of arcs is presented. The technique uses the capacitance of the system to estimate the peak current and then uses the charge stored to estimate the arc duration. As new technologies are implemented on spacecraft, new environmental compatibility issues will arise. Some of the issues related to driving dielectric surfaces with alternating current voltages are considered. The steady state charging criteria is that over an oscillation, the ion charge collected is compensated for by the electron charge collected. This tends to drive the average potential negative so that the dielectric surface is positive for only a small portion of the cycle.

  17. Application of advanced electronics to a future spacecraft computer design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, P. C.

    1980-01-01

    Advancements in hardware and software technology are summarized with specific emphasis on spacecraft computer capabilities. Available state of the art technology is reviewed and candidate architectures are defined.

  18. Magellan spacecraft and memory state tracking: Lessons learned, future thoughts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Allen W.

    1993-03-01

    Numerous studies have been dedicated to improving the two main elements of Spacecraft Mission Operations: Command and Telemetry. As a result, not much attention has been given to other tasks that can become tedious, repetitive, and error prone. One such task is Spacecraft and Memory State Tracking, the process by which the status of critical spacecraft components, parameters, and the contents of on-board memory are managed on the ground to maintain knowledge of spacecraft and memory states for future testing, anomaly investigation, and on-board memory reconstruction. The task of Spacecraft and Memory State Tracking has traditionally been a manual task allocated to Mission Operations Procedures. During nominal Mission Operations this job is tedious and error prone. Because the task is not complex and can be accomplished manually, the worth of a sophisticated software tool is often questioned. However, in the event of an anomaly which alters spacecraft components autonomously or a memory anomaly such as a corrupt memory or flight software error, an accurate ground image that can be reconstructed quickly is a priceless commodity. This study explores the process of Spacecraft and Memory State Tracking used by the Magellan Spacecraft Team highlighting its strengths as well as identifying lessons learned during the primary and extended missions, two memory anomalies, and other hardships encountered due to incomplete knowledge of spacecraft states. Ideas for future state tracking tools that require minimal user interaction and are integrated into the Ground Data System will also be discussed.

  19. Magellan spacecraft and memory state tracking: Lessons learned, future thoughts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Allen W.

    1993-01-01

    Numerous studies have been dedicated to improving the two main elements of Spacecraft Mission Operations: Command and Telemetry. As a result, not much attention has been given to other tasks that can become tedious, repetitive, and error prone. One such task is Spacecraft and Memory State Tracking, the process by which the status of critical spacecraft components, parameters, and the contents of on-board memory are managed on the ground to maintain knowledge of spacecraft and memory states for future testing, anomaly investigation, and on-board memory reconstruction. The task of Spacecraft and Memory State Tracking has traditionally been a manual task allocated to Mission Operations Procedures. During nominal Mission Operations this job is tedious and error prone. Because the task is not complex and can be accomplished manually, the worth of a sophisticated software tool is often questioned. However, in the event of an anomaly which alters spacecraft components autonomously or a memory anomaly such as a corrupt memory or flight software error, an accurate ground image that can be reconstructed quickly is a priceless commodity. This study explores the process of Spacecraft and Memory State Tracking used by the Magellan Spacecraft Team highlighting its strengths as well as identifying lessons learned during the primary and extended missions, two memory anomalies, and other hardships encountered due to incomplete knowledge of spacecraft states. Ideas for future state tracking tools that require minimal user interaction and are integrated into the Ground Data System will also be discussed.

  20. Pulse-Width Predictive Control for LTV Systems with Application to Spacecraft Rendezvous

    OpenAIRE

    Vazquez, Rafael; Gavilan, Francisco; Camacho, Eduardo F.

    2015-01-01

    This work presents a model predictive controller (MPC) that is able to handle linear time-varying (LTV) plants with PWM control. The MPC is based on a planner that employs a PAM or impulsive approximation as a hot-start and then uses explicit linearization around successive PWM solutions for rapidly improving the solution by means of linear programming. As an example, the problem of rendezvous of spacecraft for eccentric target orbits is considered. The problem is modeled by the LTV Tschauner...

  1. Monitoring and forecasting of great radiation hazards for spacecraft and aircrafts by online cosmic ray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. I. Dorman

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available We show that an exact forecast of great radiation hazard in space, in the magnetosphere, in the atmosphere and on the ground can be made by using high-energy particles (few GeV/nucleon and higher whose transportation from the Sun is characterized by a much bigger diffusion coefficient than for small and middle energy particles. Therefore, high energy particles come from the Sun much earlier (8-20 min after acceleration and escaping into solar wind than the main part of smaller energy particles (more than 30-60 min later, causing radiation hazard for electronics and personal health, as well as spacecraft and aircrafts. We describe here principles of an automatic set of programs that begin with "FEP-Search", used to determine the beginning of a large FEP event. After a positive signal from "FEP-Search", the following programs start working: "FEP-Research/Spectrum", and then "FEP-Research/Time of Ejection", "FEP-Research /Source" and "FEP-Research/Diffusion", which online determine properties of FEP generation and propagation. On the basis of the obtained information, the next set of programs immediately start to work: "FEP-Forecasting/Spacecrafts", "FEP-Forecasting/Aircrafts", "FEP-Forecasting/Ground", which determine the expected differential and integral fluxes and total fluency for spacecraft on different orbits, aircrafts on different airlines, and on the ground, depending on altitude and cutoff rigidity. If the level of radiation hazard is expected to be dangerous for high level technology or/and personal health, the following programs will be used "FEP-Alert/Spacecrafts", "FEP-Alert/ Aircrafts", "FEP-Alert/Ground".

  2. Development of a Deployable Nonmetallic Boom for Reconfigurable Systems of Small Modular Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehnmark, Fredrik

    2007-01-01

    Launch vehicle payload capacity and the launch environment represent two of the most operationally limiting constraints on space system mass, volume, and configuration. Large-scale space science and power platforms as well as transit vehicles have been proposed that greatly exceed single-launch capabilities. Reconfigurable systems launched as multiple small modular spacecraft with the ability to rendezvous, approach, mate, and conduct coordinated operations have the potential to make these designs feasible. A key characteristic of these proposed systems is their ability to assemble into desired geometric (spatial) configurations. While flexible and sparse formations may be realized by groups of spacecraft flying in close proximity, flyers physically connected by active structural elements could continuously exchange power, fluids, and heat (via fluids). Configurations of small modular spacecraft temporarily linked together could be sustained as long as needed with minimal propellant use and reconfigured as often as needed over extended missions with changing requirements. For example, these vehicles could operate in extremely compact configurations during boost phases of a mission and then redeploy to generate power or communicate while coasting and upon reaching orbit. In 2005, NASA funded Phase 1 of a program called Modular Reconfigurable High-Energy Technology Demonstrator Assembly Testbed (MRHE) to investigate reconfigurable systems of small spacecraft. The MRHE team was led by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and included Lockheed Martin's Advanced Technology Center (ATC) in Palo Alto and its subcontractor, ATK. One of the goals of Phase 1 was to develop an MRHE concept demonstration in a relevant 1-g environment to highlight a number of requisite technologies. In Phase 1 of the MRHE program, Lockheed Martin devised and conducted an automated space system assembly demonstration featuring multipurpose free-floating robots representing Spacecraft in the newly

  3. An interhemispheric comparison of GPS phase scintillation with auroral emission observed at the South Pole and from the DMSP satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Prikryl

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The global positioning system (GPS phase scintillation caused by high-latitude ionospheric irregularities during an intense high-speed stream (HSS of the solar wind from April 29 to May 5, 2011, was observed using arrays of GPS ionospheric scintillation and total electron content monitors in the Arctic and Antarctica. The one-minute phase-scintillation index derived from the data sampled at 50 Hz was complemented by a proxy index (delta phase rate obtained from 1-Hz GPS data. The scintillation occurrence coincided with the aurora borealis and aurora australis observed by an all-sky imager at the South Pole, and by special sensor ultraviolet scanning imagers on board satellites of the Defense Meteorological Satellites Program. The South Pole (SP station is approximately conjugate with two Canadian High Arctic Ionospheric Network stations on Baffin Island, Canada, which provided the opportunity to study magnetic conjugacy of scintillation with support of riometers and magnetometers. The GPS ionospheric pierce points were mapped at their actual or conjugate locations, along with the auroral emission over the South Pole, assuming an altitude of 120 km. As the aurora brightened and/or drifted across the field of view of the all-sky imager, sequences of scintillation events were observed that indicated conjugate auroras as a locator of simultaneous or delayed bipolar scintillation events. In spite of the greater scintillation intensity in the auroral oval, where phase scintillation sometimes exceeded 1 radian during the auroral break-up and substorms, the percentage occurrence of moderate scintillation was highest in the cusp. Interhemispheric comparisons of bipolar scintillation maps show that the scintillation occurrence is significantly higher in the southern cusp and polar cap.

  4. On-orbit radiometric calibration over time and between spacecraft using the moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer, H.H.; Stone, T.C.; Barnes, R.A.; Bender, S.; Eplee, R.E.; Mendenhall, J.; Ong, L.; ,

    2002-01-01

    The Robotic Lunar Observatory (ROLO) project has developed a spectral irradiance model of the Moon that accounts for variations with lunar phase through the bright half of a month, lunar librations, and the location of an Earth-orbiting spacecraft. The methodology of comparing spacecraft observations of the Moon with this model has been developed to a set of standardized procedures so that comparisons can be readily made. In the cases where observations extend over several years (e.g., SeaWiFS), instrument response degradation has been determined with precision of about 0.1% per year. Because of the strong dependence of lunar irradiance on geometric angles, observations by two spacecraft cannot be directly compared unless acquired at the same time and location. Rather, the lunar irradiance based on each spacecraft instrument calibration can be compared with the lunar irradiance model. Even single observations by an instrument allow inter-comparison of its radiometric scale with other instruments participating in the lunar calibration program. Observations by SeaWiFS, ALI, Hyperion and MTI are compared here.

  5. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Selected Airborne Contaminants. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is aware of the potential toxicological hazards to humans that might be associated with prolonged spacecraft missions. Despite major engineering advances in controlling the atmosphere within spacecraft, some contamination of the air appears inevitable. NASA has measured numerous airborne contaminants during space missions. As the missions increase in duration and complexity, ensuring the health and well-being of astronauts traveling and working in this unique environment becomes increasingly difficult. As part of its efforts to promote safe conditions aboard spacecraft, NASA requested the National Research Council (NRC) to develop guidelines for establishing spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations (SMACs) for contaminants, and to review SMACs for various space-craft contaminants to determine whether NASA's recommended exposure limits are consistent with the guidelines recommended by the subcommittee. In response to NASA's request, the NRC organized the Subcommittee on Guidelines for Developing Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Space Station Contaminants within the Committee On Toxicology (COT). In the first phase of its work, the subcommittee developed the criteria and methods for preparing SMACs for spacecraft contaminants. The subcommittee's report, entitled Guidelines for Developing Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Space Station Contaminants, was published in 1992. The executive summary of that report is reprinted as Appendix A of this volume. In the second phase of the study, the Subcommittee on Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations reviewed reports prepared by NASA scientists and contractors recommending SMACs for approximately 35 spacecraft contaminants. The subcommittee sought to determine whether the SMAC reports were consistent with the 1992 guidelines. Appendix B of this volume contains the SMAC reports for 12 chemical contaminants that have been reviewed for

  6. Microbial diversity on spacecraft and in spacecraft assembly and testing facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rettberg, P.; Nellen, J.; Fritze, D.; Verbarg, S.; Stackebrandt, E.; Kminek, G.

    Planetary protection measures are necessary for all space flight missions involved with life detection and or sample return procedures to avoid the contamination of critical spacecraft hardware components with terrestrial organisms Spacecraft are assembled in clean rooms under defined and controlled environmental conditions These conditions might be considered as extreme with respect to controlled air circulation low relative humidity moderately high constant temperature and low nutrient conditions and represent a special artificial environment for microorganisms In the ESA-Project MiDiv the bioburden and the microbial diversity of three different spacecraft assembly and testing facilities has been investigated in periods where the facilities have been in full operation with the assembly and test of European satellites For the selected satellite missions SMART-1 and ROSETTA however no strict planetary protection measures like those required for a landing mission on Mars COSPAR Planetary Protection Category IV have been necessary and taken into consideration The result of this investigation therefore reflects the normal microbial conditions in standard class 100 000 clean rooms used by employees without any special training in planetary protection The investigation in the MiDiv project was restricted to so-called cultivable microorganisms in particular to those microorganisms that are able to grow under the selected conditions The analysis of the samples included cultivation on different media at different pH values and

  7. Low-Impact Mating System for Docking Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, James L.; Robertson, Brandan; Carroll, Monty B.; Le, Thang; Morales, Ray

    2008-01-01

    A document describes a low-impact mating system suitable for both docking (mating of two free-flying spacecraft) and berthing (in which a robot arm in one spacecraft positions an object for mating with either spacecraft). The low-impact mating system is fully androgynous: it mates with a copy of itself, i.e., all spacecraft and other objects to be mated are to be equipped with identical copies of the system. This aspect of the design helps to minimize the number of unique parts and to standardize and facilitate mating operations. The system includes a closed-loop feedback control subsystem that actively accommodates misalignments between mating spacecraft, thereby attenuating spacecraft dynamics and mitigating the need for precise advance positioning of the spacecraft. The operational characteristics of the mating system can be easily configured in software, during operation, to enable mating of spacecraft having various masses, center-of-gravity offsets, and closing velocities. The system design provides multi-fault tolerance for critical operations: for example, to ensure unmating at a critical time, a redundant unlatching mechanism and two independent pyrotechnic release subsystems are included.

  8. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Selected Airborne Contaminants, Volume 5

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Committee on Spacecraft Exposure Guidelines; Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology; Committee on Toxicology

    2008-01-01

    ... requested the National Research Council (NRC) to develop guidelines for establishing spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations (SMACs) for contaminants and to review SMACs for various spacecraft contaminants to determine whether NASA's recommended exposure limits are consistent with the guidelines recommended by the committee. In response to this...

  9. Spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations for selected airborne contaminants, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    As part of its efforts to promote safe conditions aboard spacecraft, NASA requested the National Research Council (NRC) to develop guidelines for establishing spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations (SMAC's) for contaminants, and to review SMAC's for various spacecraft contaminants to determine whether NASA's recommended exposure limits are consistent with the guidelines recommended by the subcommittee. In response to NASA's request, the NRC organized the Subcommittee on Guidelines for Developing Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Space Station Contaminants within the Committee on Toxicology (COT). In the first phase of its work, the subcommittee developed the criteria and methods for preparing SMAC's for spacecraft contaminants. The subcommittee's report, entitled Guidelines for Developing Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Space Station Contaminants, was published in 1992. The executive summary of that report is reprinted as Appendix A of this volume. In the second phase of the study, the Subcommittee on Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations reviewed reports prepared by NASA scientists and contractors recommending SMAC's for 35 spacecraft contaminants. The subcommittee sought to determine whether the SMAC reports were consistent with the 1992 guidelines. Appendix B of this volume contains the first 11 SMAC reports that have been reviewed for their application of the guidelines developed in the first phase of this activity and approved by the subcommittee.

  10. Precise Relative Positioning of Formation Flying Spacecraft using GPS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroes, R.

    2006-01-01

    Spacecraft formation flying is considered as a key technology for advanced space missions. Compared to large individual spacecraft, the distribution of sensor systems amongst multiple platforms offers improved flexibility, shorter times to mission, and the prospect of being more cost effective.

  11. A Comparison of Learning Technologies for Teaching Spacecraft Software Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    The development of software for spacecraft represents a particular challenge and is, in many ways, a worst case scenario from a design perspective. Spacecraft software must be "bulletproof" and operate for extended periods of time without user intervention. If the software fails, it cannot be manually serviced. Software failure may…

  12. Quaternion normalization in spacecraft attitude determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutschmann, J.; Markley, F. L.; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.

    1993-01-01

    Attitude determination of spacecraft usually utilizes vector measurements such as Sun, center of Earth, star, and magnetic field direction to update the quaternion which determines the spacecraft orientation with respect to some reference coordinates in the three dimensional space. These measurements are usually processed by an extended Kalman filter (EKF) which yields an estimate of the attitude quaternion. Two EKF versions for quaternion estimation were presented in the literature; namely, the multiplicative EKF (MEKF) and the additive EKF (AEKF). In the multiplicative EKF, it is assumed that the error between the correct quaternion and its a-priori estimate is, by itself, a quaternion that represents the rotation necessary to bring the attitude which corresponds to the a-priori estimate of the quaternion into coincidence with the correct attitude. The EKF basically estimates this quotient quaternion and then the updated quaternion estimate is obtained by the product of the a-priori quaternion estimate and the estimate of the difference quaternion. In the additive EKF, it is assumed that the error between the a-priori quaternion estimate and the correct one is an algebraic difference between two four-tuple elements and thus the EKF is set to estimate this difference. The updated quaternion is then computed by adding the estimate of the difference to the a-priori quaternion estimate. If the quaternion estimate converges to the correct quaternion, then, naturally, the quaternion estimate has unity norm. This fact was utilized in the past to obtain superior filter performance by applying normalization to the filter measurement update of the quaternion. It was observed for the AEKF that when the attitude changed very slowly between measurements, normalization merely resulted in a faster convergence; however, when the attitude changed considerably between measurements, without filter tuning or normalization, the quaternion estimate diverged. However, when the

  13. Spacecraft Electrical Connector Selection and Application Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannello, Chris; Davis, Mitchell I; Kichak, Robert A.; Slenski, George

    2009-01-01

    This assessment was initiated by the NASA Engineering & Safety Center (NESC) after a number of recent "high profile" connector problems, the most visible and publicized of these being the problem with the Space Shuttle's Engine Cut-Off System cryogenic feed-thru connector. The NESC commissioned a review of NASA's connector selection and application processes for space flight applications, including how lessons learned and past problem records are fed back into the processes to avoid recurring issues. Team members were primarily from the various NASA Centers and included connector and electrical parts specialists. The commissioned study was conducted on spacecraft connector selection and application processes at NASA Centers. The team also compared the NASA spacecraft connector selection and application process to the military process, identified recent high profile connector failures, and analyzed problem report data looking for trends and common occurrences. The team characterized NASA's connector problem experience into a list of top connector issues based on anecdotal evidence of a system's impact and commonality between Centers. These top issues are as follows, in no particular rank order: electrically shorted, bent and/or recessed contact pins, contact pin/socket contamination leading to electrically open or intermittencies, connector plating corrosion or corrosion of connector components, low or inadequate contact pin retention forces, contact crimp failures, unmated connectors and mis-wiring due to workmanship errors during installation or maintenance, loose connectors due to manufacturing defects such as wavy washer and worn bayonet retention, damaged connector elastomeric seals and cryogenic connector failure. A survey was also conducted of SAE Connector AE-8C1 committee members regarding their experience relative to the NASA concerns on connectors. The most common responses in order of occurrence were contact retention, plating issues, worn-out or damaged

  14. An Overview of the Space Environments and Spacecraft Effects Organization Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, David L.; Burns, Howard D.; Garrett, Henry B.; Miller, Sharon K.; Peddie, Darilyn; Porter Ron; Spann, James F.; Xapsos, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is embarking on a course to expand human presence beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO) while also expanding its mission to explore our Earth, and the solar system. Destinations such as Near Earth Asteroids (NEA), Mars and its moons, and the outer planets are but a few of the mission targets. Each new destination presents an opportunity to increase our knowledge on the solar system and the unique environments for each mission target. NASA has multiple technical and science discipline areas specializing in specific space environments fields that will serve to enable these missions. To complement these existing discipline areas, a concept is presented focusing on the development of a space environment and spacecraft effects (SESE) organization. This SESE organization includes disciplines such as space climate, space weather, natural and induced space environments, effects on spacecraft materials and systems, and the transition of research information into application. This space environment and spacecraft effects organization will be composed of Technical Working Groups (TWG). These technical working groups will survey customers and users, generate products, and provide knowledge supporting four functional areas: design environments, engineering effects, operational support, and programmatic support. The four functional areas align with phases in the program mission lifecycle and are briefly described below. Design environments are used primarily in the mission concept and design phases of a program. Environment effects focuses on the material, component, sub-system, and system-level response to the space environment and include the selection and testing to verify design and operational performance. Operational support provides products based on real time or near real time space weather to mission operators to aid in real time and near-term decision-making. The programmatic support function maintains an interface with

  15. Formulation of advanced consumables management models: Executive summary. [modeling spacecraft environmental control, life support, and electric power supply systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, J. K.; Torian, J. G.

    1979-01-01

    An overview of studies conducted to establish the requirements for advanced subsystem analytical tools is presented. Modifications are defined for updating current computer programs used to analyze environmental control, life support, and electric power supply systems so that consumables for future advanced spacecraft may be managed.

  16. Spacecraft with gradual acceleration of solar panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merhav, Tamir R. (Inventor); Festa, Michael T. (Inventor); Stetson, Jr., John B. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A spacecraft (8) includes a movable appendage such as solar panels (12) operated by a stepping motor (28) driven by pulses (311). In order to reduce vibration andor attitude error, the drive pulses are generated by a clock down-counter (312) with variable count ratio. Predetermined desired clock ratios are stored in selectable memories (314a-d), and the selected ratio (R) is coupled to a comparator (330) together with the current ratio (C). An up-down counter (340) establishes the current count-down ratio by counting toward the desired ratio under the control of the comparator; thus, a step change of solar panel speed never occurs. When a direction change is commanded, a flag signal generator (350) disables the selectable memories, and enables a further store (360), which generates a count ratio representing a very slow solar panel rotational rate, so that the rotational rate always slows to a low value before direction is changed. The principles of the invention are applicable to any movable appendage.

  17. NASA Medical Response to Human Spacecraft Accidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patlach, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews NASA's role in the response to spacecraft accidents that involve human fatalities or injuries. Particular attention is given to the work of the Mishap Investigation Team (MIT), the first response to the accidents and the interface to the accident investigation board. The MIT does not investigate the accident, but the objective of the MIT is to gather, guard, preserve and document the evidence. The primary medical objectives of the MIT is to receive, analyze, identify, and transport human remains, provide assistance in the recovery effort, and to provide family Casualty Coordinators with latest recovery information. The MIT while it does not determine the cause of the accident, it acts as the fact gathering arm of the Mishap Investigation Board (MIB), which when it is activated may chose to continue to use the MIT as its field investigation resource. The MIT membership and the specific responsibilities and tasks of the flight surgeon is reviewed. The current law establishing the process is also reviewed.

  18. Imaging of Titan from the Cassini spacecraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porco, Carolyn C; Baker, Emily; Barbara, John; Beurle, Kevin; Brahic, Andre; Burns, Joseph A; Charnoz, Sebastien; Cooper, Nick; Dawson, Douglas D; Del Genio, Anthony D; Denk, Tilmann; Dones, Luke; Dyudina, Ulyana; Evans, Michael W; Fussner, Stephanie; Giese, Bernd; Grazier, Kevin; Helfenstein, Paul; Ingersoll, Andrew P; Jacobson, Robert A; Johnson, Torrence V; McEwen, Alfred; Murray, Carl D; Neukum, Gerhard; Owen, William M; Perry, Jason; Roatsch, Thomas; Spitale, Joseph; Squyres, Steven; Thomas, Peter; Tiscareno, Matthew; Turtle, Elizabeth P; Vasavada, Ashwin R; Veverka, Joseph; Wagner, Roland; West, Robert

    2005-03-10

    Titan, the largest moon of Saturn, is the only satellite in the Solar System with a substantial atmosphere. The atmosphere is poorly understood and obscures the surface, leading to intense speculation about Titan's nature. Here we present observations of Titan from the imaging science experiment onboard the Cassini spacecraft that address some of these issues. The images reveal intricate surface albedo features that suggest aeolian, tectonic and fluvial processes; they also show a few circular features that could be impact structures. These observations imply that substantial surface modification has occurred over Titan's history. We have not directly detected liquids on the surface to date. Convective clouds are found to be common near the south pole, and the motion of mid-latitude clouds consistently indicates eastward winds, from which we infer that the troposphere is rotating faster than the surface. A detached haze at an altitude of 500 km is 150-200 km higher than that observed by Voyager, and more tenuous haze layers are also resolved.

  19. Optimal attitude corrections for cylindrical spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanardi, M. C.; Santos, R. M. K.; da Silva Fernandes, S.

    2003-04-01

    A first order analytical model for optimal small amplitude attitude maneuvers of spacecraft with cylindrical symmetry in an elliptical orbits is presented. The optimization problem is formulated as a Mayer problem with the control torques provided by a power limited propulsion system. The state is defined by Serret-Andoyer's variables and the control by the components of the propulsive torques. The Pontryagin Maximum Principle is applied to the problem and the optimal torques are given explicitly in Serret-Andoyer's variables and their adjoints. For small amplitude attitude maneuvers, the optimal Hamiltonian function is linearized around a reference attitude. A complete first order analytical solution is obtained by simple quadrature and is expressed through a linear algebraic system involving the initial values of the adjoint variables. A numerical solution is obtained by taking the Euler angles formulation of the problem, solving the two-point boundary problem through the shooting method, and, then, determining the Serret-Andoyer variables through Serret-Andoyer transformation. Numerical results show that the first order solution provides a good approximation to the optimal control law and also that is possible to establish an optimal control law for the artificial satellite's attitude.

  20. Kalman Filter for Spinning Spacecraft Attitude Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markley, F. Landis; Sedlak, Joseph E.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a Kalman filter using a seven-component attitude state vector comprising the angular momentum components in an inertial reference frame, the angular momentum components in the body frame, and a rotation angle. The relatively slow variation of these parameters makes this parameterization advantageous for spinning spacecraft attitude estimation. The filter accounts for the constraint that the magnitude of the angular momentum vector is the same in the inertial and body frames by employing a reduced six-component error state. Four variants of the filter, defined by different choices for the reduced error state, are tested against a quaternion-based filter using simulated data for the THEMIS mission. Three of these variants choose three of the components of the error state to be the infinitesimal attitude error angles, facilitating the computation of measurement sensitivity matrices and causing the usual 3x3 attitude covariance matrix to be a submatrix of the 6x6 covariance of the error state. These variants differ in their choice for the other three components of the error state. The variant employing the infinitesimal attitude error angles and the angular momentum components in an inertial reference frame as the error state shows the best combination of robustness and efficiency in the simulations. Attitude estimation results using THEMIS flight data are also presented.

  1. An AFDX Network for Spacecraft Data Handling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deredempt, Marie-Helene; Kollias, Vangelis; Sun, Zhili; Canamares, Ernest; Ricco, Philippe

    2014-08-01

    In aeronautical domain, ARINC-664 Part 7 specification (AFDX) [4] provides the enabling technology for interfacing equipment in Integrated Modular Avionics (IMA) architectures. The complementary part of AFDX for a complete interoperability - Time and Space Partitioning (ARINC 653) concepts [1]- was already studied as part of space domain ESA roadmap (i.e. IMA4Space project)Standardized IMA based architecture is already considered in aeronautical domain as more flexible, reliable and secure. Integration and validation become simple, using a common set of tools and data base and could be done by part on different means with the same definition (hardware and software test benches, flight control or alarm test benches, simulator and flight test installation).In some area, requirements in terms of data processing are quite similar in space domain and the concept could be applicable to take benefit of the technology itself and of the panel of hardware and software solutions and tools available on the market. The Mission project (Methodology and assessment for the applicability of ARINC-664 (AFDX) in Satellite/Spacecraft on-board communicatION networks), as an FP7 initiative for bringing terrestrial SME research into the space domain started to evaluate the applicability of the standard in space domain.

  2. Correcting Spacecraft Jitter in Hirise Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, S. S.; Boyd, A. K.; Kirk, R. L.; Cook, D.; Backer, J. W.; Fennema, A.; Heyd, R.; McEwen, A. S.; Mirchandani, S. D.

    2017-07-01

    Mechanical oscillations or vibrations on spacecraft, also called pointing jitter, cause geometric distortions and/or smear in high resolution digital images acquired from orbit. Geometric distortion is especially a problem with pushbroom type sensors, such as the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) instrument on board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). Geometric distortions occur at a range of frequencies that may not be obvious in the image products, but can cause problems with stereo image correlation in the production of digital elevation models, and in measuring surface changes over time in orthorectified images. The HiRISE focal plane comprises a staggered array of fourteen charge-coupled devices (CCDs) with pixel IFOV of 1 microradian. The high spatial resolution of HiRISE makes it both sensitive to, and an excellent recorder of jitter. We present an algorithm using Fourier analysis to resolve the jitter function for a HiRISE image that is then used to update instrument pointing information to remove geometric distortions from the image. Implementation of the jitter analysis and image correction is performed on selected HiRISE images. Resulting corrected images and updated pointing information are made available to the public. Results show marked reduction of geometric distortions. This work has applications to similar cameras operating now, and to the design of future instruments (such as the Europa Imaging System).

  3. CORRECTING SPACECRAFT JITTER IN HIRISE IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Sutton

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical oscillations or vibrations on spacecraft, also called pointing jitter, cause geometric distortions and/or smear in high resolution digital images acquired from orbit. Geometric distortion is especially a problem with pushbroom type sensors, such as the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE instrument on board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO. Geometric distortions occur at a range of frequencies that may not be obvious in the image products, but can cause problems with stereo image correlation in the production of digital elevation models, and in measuring surface changes over time in orthorectified images. The HiRISE focal plane comprises a staggered array of fourteen charge-coupled devices (CCDs with pixel IFOV of 1 microradian. The high spatial resolution of HiRISE makes it both sensitive to, and an excellent recorder of jitter. We present an algorithm using Fourier analysis to resolve the jitter function for a HiRISE image that is then used to update instrument pointing information to remove geometric distortions from the image. Implementation of the jitter analysis and image correction is performed on selected HiRISE images. Resulting corrected images and updated pointing information are made available to the public. Results show marked reduction of geometric distortions. This work has applications to similar cameras operating now, and to the design of future instruments (such as the Europa Imaging System.

  4. Formulation of consumables management models. Guidelines for the development of consumables subsystem redlines for advanced spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, M. A.

    1977-01-01

    Techniques developed for determining the safe operating range or condition of past space programs are inadequate to support requirements of highly repetitive and routine earth orbit operations of advanced spacecraft systems. General concepts are presented for establishing maximum and minimum limits (redlines) for the consumables subsystems of the space shuttle orbiter. Implementation of a redline status subprocessor is recommended as a substitute for methods employed in past programs. The algorithms developed are amenable for use in the Mission Control Center, the launch processing system, and the space shuttle onboard computer.

  5. Calculation of sheath and wake structure about a pillbox-shaped spacecraft in a flowing plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, L. W.

    1977-01-01

    A computer program was used for studies of the disturbed zones around bodies in flowing plasmas, particularly spacecraft and their associated sheaths and wakes. The program solved a coupled Poisson-Vlasov system of nonlinear partial differential integral equations to obtain distributions of electric potential and ion and electron density about a finite length cylinder in a plasma flow at arbitrary ion Mach numbers. The approach was applicable to a larger range of parameters than other available approaches. In sample calculations, bodies up to 100 Debye lengths in radius were treated, that is, larger than any previously treated realistically. Applications were made to in-situ satellite experiments.

  6. Lunar shadow eclipse prediction models for the Earth orbiting spacecraft: Comparison and application to LEO and GEO spacecrafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Vineet K.; Kumar, Jai; Kulshrestha, Shivali; Srivastava, Ashutosh; Bhaskar, M. K.; Kushvah, Badam Singh; Shiggavi, Prakash; Vallado, David A.

    2015-05-01

    A solar eclipse occurs when the Sun, Moon and Earth are aligned in such a way that shadow of the Moon falls on the Earth. The Moon's shadow also falls on the Earth orbiting spacecraft. In this case, the alignment of the Sun, Moon, and spacecraft is similar to that of the Sun, Moon, and Earth but this phenomenon is often referred as a lunar eclipse falling on the spacecraft. Lunar eclipse is not as regular in terms of times of occurrence, duration, and depth as the Earth shadow eclipse and number of its occurrence per orbital location per year ranges from zero to four with an average of two per year; a spacecraft may experience two to three lunar eclipses within a twenty-four hour period [2]. These lunar eclipses can cause severe spacecraft operational problems. This paper describes two lunar shadow eclipse prediction models using a projection map approach and a line of intersection method by extending the Earth shadow eclipse models described by Srivastava et al. [10,11] for the Earth orbiting spacecraft. The attractive feature of both models is that they are much easier to implement. Both mathematical models have been simulated for two Indian low Earth orbiting spacecrafts: Oceansat-2, Saral-1, and two geostationary spacecrafts: GSAT-10, INSAT-4CR. Results obtained by the models compare well with lunar shadow model given by Escobal and Robertson [12], and high fidelity commercial software package, Systems Tool Kit (STK) of AGI.

  7. An expert system for diagnosing environmentally induced spacecraft anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolincik, Mark; Lauriente, Michael; Koons, Harry C.; Gorney, David

    1992-01-01

    A new rule-based, machine independent analytical tool was designed for diagnosing spacecraft anomalies using an expert system. Expert systems provide an effective method for saving knowledge, allow computers to sift through large amounts of data pinpointing significant parts, and most importantly, use heuristics in addition to algorithms, which allow approximate reasoning and inference and the ability to attack problems not rigidly defined. The knowledge base consists of over two-hundred (200) rules and provides links to historical and environmental databases. The environmental causes considered are bulk charging, single event upsets (SEU), surface charging, and total radiation dose. The system's driver translates forward chaining rules into a backward chaining sequence, prompting the user for information pertinent to the causes considered. The use of heuristics frees the user from searching through large amounts of irrelevant information and allows the user to input partial information (varying degrees of confidence in an answer) or 'unknown' to any question. The modularity of the expert system allows for easy updates and modifications. It not only provides scientists with needed risk analysis and confidence not found in algorithmic programs, but is also an effective learning tool, and the window implementation makes it very easy to use. The system currently runs on a Micro VAX II at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The inference engine used is NASA's C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS).

  8. Reliability Considerations for Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels on Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Grimes-Ledesma, Lorie; Phoenix, S. L.

    2007-01-01

    Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) are used to store gases under high pressure onboard spacecraft. These are used for a variety of purposes such as propelling liquid fuel etc, Kevlar, glass, Carbon and other more recent fibers have all been in use to overwrap the vessels. COPVs usually have a thin metallic liner with the primary purpose of containing the gases and prevent any leakage. The liner is overwrapped with filament wound composite such as Kevlar, Carbon or Glass fiber. Although the liner is required to perform in the leak before break mode making the failure a relatively benign mode, the overwrap can fail catastrophically under sustained load due to stress rupture. It is this failure mode that is of major concern as the stored energy of such vessels is often great enough ta cause loss of crew and vehicle. The present paper addresses some of the reliability concerns associated specifically with Kevlar Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels. The primary focus of the paper is on how reliability of COPV's are established for the purpose of deciding in general their flight worthiness and continued use. Analytical models based on existing design data will be presented showing how to achieve the required reliability metric to the end of a specific period of performance. Uncertainties in the design parameters and how they affect reliability and confidence intervals will be addressed as well. Some trade studies showing how reliability changes with time during a program period will be presented.

  9. Spacecraft Charging at Geosynchronous Orbit and Large Scale Electric Fields in the High Latitude Ionosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-30

    parameters [rom E!fs. Sb._ 2, 297-387, 1962. geomagnetic records, Solar Phs., 42, 259, Link, F., Observations et catalogue des aurores 1975. boreales ...ionosphere- magnetosphere interactions in the polar cap and auroral zone. Air Force measurements of S3-2 electric and magnetic fields and electron and thermal...plasma fluxes were used as well as DMSP auroral imagery. I S~cUITYCLASIFIATIO OFTH SPAG(W~. Soa 3a.,i 9 i Scientific Personnel Principal Investigators

  10. Four-spacecraft determination of magnetopause orientation, motion and thickness: comparison with results from single-spacecraft methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Haaland

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we use Cluster data from one magnetopause event on 5 July 2001 to compare predictions from various methods for determination of the velocity, orientation, and thickness of the magnetopause current layer. We employ established as well as new multi-spacecraft techniques, in which time differences between the crossings by the four spacecraft, along with the duration of each crossing, are used to calculate magnetopause speed, normal vector, and width. The timing is based on data from either the Cluster Magnetic Field Experiment (FGM or the Electric Field Experiment (EFW instruments. The multi-spacecraft results are compared with those derived from various single-spacecraft techniques, including minimum-variance analysis of the magnetic field and deHoffmann-Teller, as well as Minimum-Faraday-Residue analysis of plasma velocities and magnetic fields measured during the crossings. In order to improve the overall consistency between multi- and single-spacecraft results, we have also explored the use of hybrid techniques, in which timing information from the four spacecraft is combined with certain limited results from single-spacecraft methods, the remaining results being left for consistency checks. The results show good agreement between magnetopause orientations derived from appropriately chosen single-spacecraft techniques and those obtained from multi-spacecraft timing. The agreement between magnetopause speeds derived from single- and multi-spacecraft methods is quantitatively somewhat less good but it is evident that the speed can change substantially from one crossing to the next within an event. The magnetopause thickness varied substantially from one crossing to the next, within an event. It ranged from 5 to 10 ion gyroradii. The density profile was sharper than the magnetic profile: most of the density change occured in the earthward half of the magnetopause.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause, cusp and

  11. Report on Alternative Devices to Pyrotechnics on Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucy, M. H.; Hardy, R. C.; Kist, E. H., Jr.; Watson, J. J.; Wise, S. A.

    1996-01-01

    Pyrotechnics accomplish many functions on today's spacecraft, possessing minimum volume/weight, providing instantaneous operation on demand, and requiring little input energy. However, functional shock, safety, and overall system cost issues, combined with emergence and availability of new technologies question their continued use on space missions. Upon request from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Program Management Council (PMC), Langley Research Center (LaRC) conducted a survey to identify and evaluate state-of-the-art non-explosively actuated (NEA) alternatives to pyrotechnics, identify NEA devices planned for NASA use, and investigate potential interagency cooperative efforts. In this study, over 135 organizations were contacted, including NASA field centers, Department of Defense (DOD) and other government laboratories, universities, and American and European industrial sources resulting in further detailed discussions with over half, and 18 face-to-face briefings. Unlike their single use pyrotechnic predecessors, NEA mechanisms are typically reusable or refurbishable, allowing flight of actual tested units. NEAs surveyed include spool-based devices, thermal knife, Fast Acting Shockless Separation Nut (FASSN), paraffin actuators, and shape memory alloy (SMA) devices (e.g., Frangibolt). The electro-mechanical spool, paraffin actuator and thermal knife are mature, flight proven technologies, while SMA devices have a limited flight history. There is a relationship between shock, input energy requirements, and mechanism functioning rate. Some devices (e.g., Frangibolt and spool based mechanisms) produce significant levels of functional shock. Paraffin, thermal knife, and SMA devices can provide gentle, shock-free release but cannot perform critically timed, simultaneous functions. The FASSN flywheel-nut release device possesses significant potential for reducing functional shock while activating nearly instantaneously. Specific study

  12. Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra Spacecraft 120 Volt Power Subsystem: Requirements, Development and Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keys, Denney J.

    2000-01-01

    Built by the Lockheed-Martin Corporation, the Earth Observing System (EOS) TERRA spacecraft represents the first orbiting application of a 120 Vdc high voltage spacecraft electrical power system implemented by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The EOS TERRA spacecraft's launch provided a major contribution to the NASA Mission to Planet Earth program while incorporating many state of the art electrical power system technologies to achieve its mission goals. The EOS TERRA spacecraft was designed around five state-of-the-art scientific instrument packages designed to monitor key parameters associated with the earth's climate. The development focus of the TERRA electrical power system (EPS) resulted from a need for high power distribution to the EOS TERRA spacecraft subsystems and instruments and minimizing mass and parasitic losses. Also important as a design goal of the EPS was maintaining tight regulation on voltage and achieving low conducted bus noise characteristics. This paper outlines the major requirements for the EPS as well as the resulting hardware implementation approach adopted to meet the demands of the EOS TERRA low earth orbit mission. The selected orbit, based on scientific needs, to achieve the EOS TERRA mission goals is a sun-synchronous circular 98.2degree inclination Low Earth Orbit (LEO) with a near circular average altitude of 705 kilometers. The nominal spacecraft orbit is approximately 99 minutes with an average eclipse period of about 34 minutes. The scientific goal of the selected orbit is to maintain a repeated 10:30 a.m. +/- 15 minute descending equatorial crossing which provides a fairly clear view of the earth's surface and relatively low cloud interference for the instrument observation measurements. The major EOS TERRA EPS design requirements are single fault tolerant, average orbit power delivery of 2, 530 watts with a defined minimum lifetime of five years (EOL). To meet

  13. A systematic process for assessing human spacecraft conceptual designs in terms of relative safety and operational characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higdon, Kevin Paul

    The research efforts in this dissertation are focused on reducing uncertainty in the conceptual design phase through a process of establishing a minimum functionality baseline before trading Safety and Operability in proposed spacecraft configurations. The challenge in human spacecraft development is how to combine the parts into a working design that complies with many requirements for top level mission objectives, safety, and mission success. The design methodologies presented here provides designers and decision makers with additional methods that provide an overall view of candidate design concepts. This work establishes a definition for a minimum functional design and is the first to group the fundamental mass parameters of a human spacecraft in the categories of Physics, Physiology, Safety, and Operability. The minimum functional baseline configuration described in this work is different from previous approaches because it eliminates the bias toward a minimum set of requirements. The amount of Safety in the spacecraft is the mass dedicated to safety through similar or dissimilar redundancy, safety components, margins, and dispersions. The amount of Operability in the spacecraft is the mass used to perform mission objectives and make functions easier or efficient. Because human spacecraft are highly coupled systems, the introduction of mass in one subsystem has downstream effects on other subsystems that are not easily recognized by designers and the use of rapidly reconfigurable prototypes allows designers and multidisciplinary teams to utilize Boundary Objects as a means of communication for maturing designs. The mass addition process coupled with the minimum functionality approach creates a tradespace of spacecraft configurations and provides designers with an overall view of how various levels of Safety or Operability will affect the overall spacecraft mass. The decisions made in the conceptual design phase are critical to the success of the program and

  14. Analysis of Opportunities for Intercalibration Between Two Spacecraft. Chapter 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roithmayr, Carlos M.; Speth, Paul W.

    2012-01-01

    There is currently a strong interest in obtaining highly accurate measurements of solar radiation reflected by Earth. For example, the Traceable Radiometry Underpinning Terrestrial- and Helio- Studies (TRUTHS) satellite mission has been under consideration in Europe for several years, and planning is now under way for the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) spacecraft in the United States. Such spacecraft will provide measurements whose high accuracy is traceable to SI standards; these measurements will be useful as a reference for calibrating similar instruments on board other spacecraft. Hence, analysis of opportunities for intercalibration between two spacecraft plays an important role in the planning of future missions. In order for intercalibration to take place, the measurements obtained from two spacecraft must have similar viewing geometry and be taken within a few minutes of one another. Viewing geometry is characterized in terms of viewing zenith angle, solar zenith angle, and relative azimuth angle. Opportunities for intercalibration are greater in number and longer in duration if the sensor with high accuracy can be aimed at points on the surface of the Earth other than the nadir or sub-satellite point. Analysis of intercalibration over long periods is rendered tractable by making several simplifying assumptions regarding orbital motions of the two spacecraft about Earth, as well as Earth s orbit about the Sun. The shape of the Earth is also considered. A geometric construction called a tent is introduced to facilitate analysis. It is helpful to think of an intercalibration opportunity as the passage of one spacecraft through a tent that has a fixed shape and moves with the spacecraft whose measurements are to be calibrated. Selection of points on Earth s surface as targets for measurement is discussed, as is aiming the boresight of a steerable instrument. Analysis results for a pair of spacecraft in typical low Earth orbits

  15. Application of DSN spacecraft tracking technology to experimental gravitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J. D.; Estabrook, F. B.

    1978-01-01

    Spacecraft tracking technology of the Deep Space Net (DSN) has been used in the past to measure the general-relativistic increase in round-trip group delay between earth and a spacecraft. As the DSN technology continues to improve, other gravitational experiments will become possible. Two possibilities are discussed in this paper. The first concerns the application of solar-system dynamics to the testing of general relativity. The second involves the detection of VLF gravitational radiation (0.1 to 0.0001 Hz) by means of Doppler tracking of spacecraft.

  16. Fifty-one years of Los Alamos Spacecraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenimore, Edward E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-09-04

    From 1963 to 2014, the Los Alamos National Laboratory was involved in at least 233 spacecraft. There are probably only one or two institutions in the world that have been involved in so many spacecraft. Los Alamos space exploration started with the Vela satellites for nuclear test detection, but soon expanded to ionospheric research (mostly barium releases), radioisotope thermoelectric generators, solar physics, solar wind, magnetospheres, astrophysics, national security, planetary physics, earth resources, radio propagation in the ionosphere, and cubesats. Here, we present a list of the spacecraft, their purpose, and their launch dates for use during RocketFest

  17. Cooper-Harper Experience Report for Spacecraft Handling Qualities Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Randall E.; Jackson, E. Bruce; Bilimoria, Karl D.; Mueller, Eric R.; Frost, Chad R.; Alderete, Thomas S.

    2009-01-01

    A synopsis of experience from the fixed-wing and rotary-wing aircraft communities in handling qualities development and the use of the Cooper-Harper pilot rating scale is presented as background for spacecraft handling qualities research, development, test, and evaluation (RDT&E). In addition, handling qualities experiences and lessons-learned from previous United States (US) spacecraft developments are reviewed. This report is intended to provide a central location for references, best practices, and lessons-learned to guide current and future spacecraft handling qualities RDT&E.

  18. Electronics speckle interferometry applications for NDE of spacecraft structural components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, M. V.; Samuel, R.; Ananthan, A.; Dasgupta, S.; Nair, P. S.

    2008-09-01

    The spacecraft components viz., central cylinder, deck plates, solar panel substrates, antenna reflectors are made of aluminium/composite honeycomb sandwich construction. Detection of these defects spacecraft structural components is important to assess the integrity of the spacecraft structure. Electronic Speckle Interferometry (ESI) techniques identify the defects as anomalous regions in the interferometric fringe patterns of the specklegram while the component is suitably stressed to give rise to differential displacement/strain around the defective region. Calibration studies, different phase shifting methods associated with ESI and the development of a prototype Twin Head ESSI System (THESSIS) and its use for the NDE of a typical satellite structural component are presented.

  19. Trajectory Design for the Phobos and Deimos & Mars Environment Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genova, Anthony L.; Korsmeyer, David J.; Loucks, Michel E.; Yang, Fan Yang; Lee, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    The presented trajectory design and analysis was performed for the Phobos and Deimos & Mars Environment (PADME) mission concept as part of a NASA proposal submission managed by NASA Ames Research Center in the 2014-2015 timeframe. The PADME spacecraft would be a derivative of the successfully flown Lunar Atmosphere & Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) spacecraft. While LADEE was designed to enter low-lunar orbit, the PADME spacecraft would instead enter an elliptical Mars orbit of 2-week period. This Mars orbit would pass by Phobos near periapsis on successive orbits and then raise periapsis to yield close approaches of Deimos every orbit thereafter.

  20. Effect of External Disturbing Gravity Field on Spacecraft Guidance and Surveying Line Layout for Marine Gravity Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUANG Motao

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Centred on the support requirement of flying track control for a long range spacecraft, a detail research is made on the computation of external disturbing gravity field, the survey accuracy of gravity anomaly on the earth' surface and the program of surveying line layout for marine gravity survey. Firstly, the solution expression of navigation error for a long range spacecraft is analyzed and modified, and the influence of the earth's gravity field on flying track of spacecraft is evaluated. Then with a given limited quota of biased error of spacecraft drop point, the accuracy requirement for calculating the external disturbing gravity field is discussed and researched. Secondly, the data truncation error and the propagated data error are studied and estimated, and the quotas of survey resolution and computation accuracy for gravity anomaly on the earth' surface are determined. Finally, based on the above quotas, a corresponding program of surveying line layout for marine gravity survey is proposed. A numerical test has been made to prove the reasonableness and validity of the suggested program.

  1. Low-Cost, Class D Testing of Spacecraft Photovoltaic Systems Can Reduce Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgione, Joshua B.; Kojima, Gilbert K.; Hanel, Robert; Mallinson, Mark V.

    2014-01-01

    The end-to-end verification of a spacecraft photovoltaic power generation system requires light! Specifically, the standard practice for doing so is the Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulation (LAPSS). A LAPSS test can characterize a photovoltaic system's efficiency via its response to rapidly applied impulses of simulated sunlight. However, a Class D program on a constrained budget and schedule may not have the resources to ship an entire satellite for a LAPSS test alone. Such was the case with the Lunar Atmospheric and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) program, which was also averse to the risk of hardware damage during shipment. When the Electrical Power System (EPS) team was denied a spacecraft-level LAPSS test, the lack of an end-to-end power generation test elevated to a project-level technical risk. The team pulled together very limited resources to not only eliminate the risk, but build a process to monitor the health of the system through mission operations. We discuss a process for performing a low-cost, end-to-end test of the LADEE photovoltaic system. The approach combines system-level functional test, panel-level performance results, and periodic inspection (and repair) up until launch. Following launch, mission operations tools are utilized to assess system performance based on a scant amount of data. The process starts in manufacturing at the subcontractor. The panel manufacturer provides functional test and LAPSS data on each individual panel. We apply an initial assumption that the per-panel performance is sufficient to meet the power generation requirements. The manufacturer's data is also carried as the performance allocation for each panel during EPS system modeling and initial mission operations. During integration and test, a high-power, professional theater lamp system provides simulated sunlight to each panel on the spacecraft, thereby permitting a true end-to-end system test. A passing test results in a step response to nearly full-rated current

  2. Revamping Spacecraft Operational Intelligence with Splunk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Victor

    2012-01-01

    So what is Splunk? Instead of giving the technical details, which you can find online, I'll tell you what it did for me. Splunk slapped everything into one place, with one uniform format, and gave me the ability to forget about all these annoying details of where it is, how to parse it, and all that. Instead, I only need to interact with Splunk to find the data I need. This sounds simple and obvious, but it's surprising what you can do once you all of your data is indexed in one place. By having your data organized, querying becomes much easier. Let's say that I want to search telemetry for a sensor_name gtemp_1 h and to return all data that is at most five minutes old. And because Splunk can hook into a real ]time stream, this data will always be up-to-date. Extending the previous example, I can now aggregate all types of data into one view based in time. In this picture, I've got transaction logs, telemetry, and downlinked files all in one page, organized by time. Even though the raw data looks completely than this, I've defined interfaces that transform it into this uniform format. This gives me a more complete picture for the question what was the spacecraft doing at this particular time? And because querying data is simple, I can start with a big block of data and whiddle it down to what I need, rather than hunting around for the individual pieces of data that I need. When we have all the data we need, we can begin widdling down the data with Splunk's Unix-like search syntax. These three examples highlights my trial-and-error attempts to find large temperature changes. I begin by showing the first 5 temperatures, only to find that they're sorted chronologically, rather than from highest temperatures to lowest temperatures. The next line shows sorting temperatures by their values, but I find that that fs not really what I want either. I want to know the delta temperatures between readings. Looking through Splunk's user manual, I find the delta function, which

  3. Spacecraft Environment May Reduce Resistance To Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Ott, C. Mark; Castro, V. A.; Leal, Melanie; Mehta, Satish K.

    2006-01-01

    Living and working in a spacecraft exposes the crew to a unique environment. This environment includes microgravity, increased radiation, chemical and biological contamination, and a variety of stressors. Disturbances in this balance are often manifested by diminished immunity in astronauts/cosmonauts. Reactivation of Epstein- Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) has been used as an indicator of immune status. Reactivation of EBV and VZV were detected and quantified in saliva. CMV was measured in urine. The DNA was extracted using a Qiagen Inc. kit and viral DNA was detected by real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based assay with Taqman 7700 (PE Biosystems). Patterns of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation in 32 astronauts and 18 healthy age-matched control subjects were characterized by quantifying EBV shedding. Saliva samples were collected before, during, and after 10 space shuttle missions of 5 to 14 d duration. Of 1398 saliva specimens from 32 astronauts, 314 (23%) were positive for EBV DNA. Examination by flight phase showed that 29% of the saliva specimens collected from 28 astronauts before flight were positive for EBV DNA, as were 16% of those collected from 25 astronauts during flight and 16% of those collected after flight from 23 astronauts. The mean number of EBV copies/mL from samples taken during the flights was 417, ten-fold greater (p < 0.05) than the copies from the preflight (40) and post flight (44) phases. In contrast, the control subjects shed EBV DNA with a frequency of 3.7% and mean EBV copies of 40 per mL of saliva. Ten days before flight and on landing day, titers of antibody to EBV viral capsid antigen were significantly (p < 0.05) greater than baseline levels. Increases in the number of viral copies and in the amount of EBV-specific antibody were consistent with EBV reactivation before, during, and after space flight. Similarly, CMV and VZV reactivation increased in response to space flight

  4. A Data Abstraction Architecture for Spacecraft Autonomy Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Spacecraft generate huge amounts of data. A significant challenge for both human operators and autonomous control systems is ensuring that the right data (and...

  5. Modeling Vacuum Arcs On Spacecraft Solar Panel Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Spacecraft charging and subsequent vacuum arcing poses a significant threat to satellites in LEO and GEO plasma conditions. Localized arc discharges can cause a...

  6. High-Performance Contaminant Monitor for Spacecraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Vision for Space Exploration demands increasing reliance on real-time trace gas monitors onboard spacecraft. Present grab samples and badges will be inadequate...

  7. Autonomous Supervisory Engine for Multi-Spacecraft Formation Flying Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overall goal of this project is to develop an onboard, autonomous Multi-spacecraft Supervisory Engine (MSE) for formation-flying guidance, navigation and control...

  8. High Throughput Hall Thruster for Small Spacecraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Busek is developing a high throughput nominal 100-W Hall Effect Thruster. This device is well sized for spacecraft ranging in size from several tens of kilograms to...

  9. Diagnosing Faults in Electrical Power Systems of Spacecraft and Aircraft

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Electrical power systems play a critical role in spacecraft and aircraft, and they exhibit a rich variety of failure modes. This paper discusses electrical power...

  10. High Throughput Hall Thruster for Small Spacecraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Busek Co. Inc. proposes to develop a high throughput, nominal 100 W Hall Effect Thruster (HET). This HET will be sized for small spacecraft (< 180 kg), including...

  11. A Self-Regulating Freezable Heat Exchanger for Spacecraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A spacecraft thermal control system must keep the vehicle, avionics and atmosphere (if crewed) within a defined temperature range. Since water is non-toxic and good...

  12. A Self-Regulating Freezable Heat Exchanger for Spacecraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A spacecraft thermal control system must keep the cabin (both air and its structure if manned) and electronic equipment within a narrow temperature range even though...

  13. Passive Devices for Advanced Fluid Management aboard Spacecraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Acute challenges are faced by the designers of fluid systems for spacecraft because of the persistently unfamiliar and unforgiving low-g environment. For example,...

  14. Advanced Portable Fine Water Mist Fire Extinguisher for Spacecraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Fine water mist (FWM) is a promising replacement technology for fire suppression on the next generation of manned spacecraft. It offers advantages in performance,...

  15. Charge Dissipating Transparent Conformal Coatings for Spacecraft Electronics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The space environment poses significant challenges to spacecraft electronics in the form of electrostatic discharge (ESD) as a result of exposure to highly charged...

  16. Fractionated spacecraft : The new sprout in distributed space systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guo, J.; Maessen, D.C.; Gill, E.K.A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a survey of current state-of-the-art technologies of fractionated spacecraft, a new architecture for distributed space systems. The survey covers six aspects: architecture, networking, wireless communication, wireless power transfer, distributed computing, and planned missions

  17. A new environment for multiple spacecraft power subsystem mission operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, K. A.

    1990-01-01

    The engineering analysis subsystem environment (EASE) is being developed to enable fewer controllers to monitor and control power and other spacecraft engineering subsystems. The EASE prototype has been developed to support simultaneous real-time monitoring of several spacecraft engineering subsystems. It is being designed to assist with offline analysis of telemetry data to determine trends, and to help formulate uplink commands to the spacecraft. An early version of the EASE prototype has been installed in the JPL Space Flight Operations Facility for online testing. The EASE prototype is installed in the Galileo Mission Support Area. The underlying concept, development, and testing of the EASE prototype and how it will aid in the ground operations of spacecraft power subsystems are discussed.

  18. Attitude control of Mariner Jupiter-Saturn spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, K. A.

    1976-01-01

    A major challenge of the Mariner Jupiter-Saturn '77 spacecraft was devising a suboptimal attitude controller that could meet the demanding mission requirements. The challenge was met by implementing a discrete stochastic controller for a specially designed onboard computer. The paper describes the design and operation of the controller, based on a simple model of spacecraft dynamics. Two types of cruising modes are considered: inertial cruise, where spacecraft attitude is determined from gyro position outputs, and celestial cruise, where position information is obtained from sun sensors and a star tracker. These two cruise modes under conditions of disturbances were simulated on computer, and the results showed that the controller maintained the spacecraft attitude with low rates. An appendix gives details on the single-step predictor.

  19. Novel Metal Organic Framework Synthesis for Spacecraft Oxygen Capture Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Busek and University of Utah propose to develop novel metal organic framework (MOF) material to efficiently capture oxygen in spacecraft cabin environment. The...

  20. Dynamics, Distributed Control and Autonomous Cluster Operations of Fractionated Spacecraft

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chu, J.

    2015-01-01

    Fractionated spacecraft deploy satellites' functionalities, such as computation, communication, data storage, payload operations and even power generation, onboard several modules that share those functionalities through a wireless network. With the advent of such an innovative space architecture,

  1. Wireless Data and Power Transfer on Small Spacecraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Achieving low-cost space missions implies lowering all phases of mission development, including spacecraft design, assembly, integration and test. The concept of the...

  2. Foil Gas Bearing Supported Quiet Fan for Spacecraft Ventilation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Developing a quiet fan for Environmental Control and Life Support systems to enhance the livable environment within the spacecraft has been a challenge. A Foil Gas...

  3. Spacecraft Water Regeneration by Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this project is to develop advanced catalysts for a volatile removal assembly used to purify spacecraft water. The innovation of the proposed...

  4. Internal Mass Motion for Spacecraft Dynamics and Control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hall, Christopher D

    2008-01-01

    We present a detailed description of the application of a noncanonical Hamiltonian formulation to the modeling, analysis, and simulation of the dynamics of gyrostat spacecraft with internal mass motion...

  5. Aerogel Insulation for the Thermal Protection of Venus Spacecraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — One of NASA's primary goals for the next decade is the design, development and launch of a spacecraft aimed at the in-situ exploration of the deep atmosphere and...

  6. Effects of Knowledge Reuse on the Spacecraft Development Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, Esther S.

    1997-01-01

    The experimental objective was to assess the impact of knowledge reuse on spacecraft development time. A Secondary objective was to produce a comprehensive, flexible model other DNP teams could use to test their methodologies.

  7. Distributed Control Architectures for Precision Spacecraft Formations Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — LaunchPoint Technologies, Inc. (LaunchPoint) proposes to develop synthesis methods and design architectures for distributed control systems in precision spacecraft...

  8. Triple3 Redundant Spacecraft Subsystems (T3RSS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Redefine Technologies, along with researchers at the University of Colorado, will use three redundancy methods to decrease the susceptibility of a spacecraft, on a...

  9. A small spacecraft for multipoint measurement of ionospheric plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, T. M.; Lynch, K. A.; Clayton, R. E.; Weiss, J.; Hampton, D. L.

    2017-07-01

    Measurement of ionospheric plasma is often performed by a single in situ device or remotely using cameras and radar. This article describes a small, low-resource, deployed spacecraft used as part of a local, multipoint measurement network. A B-field aligned sounding rocket ejects four of these spin-stabilized spacecraft in a cross pattern. In this application, each spacecraft carries two retarding potential analyzers which are used to determine plasma density, flow, and ion temperature. An inertial measurement unit and a light-emitting diode array are used to determine the position and orientation of the devices after deployment. The design of this spacecraft is first described, and then results from a recent test flight are discussed. This flight demonstrated the successful operation of the deployment mechanism and telemetry systems, provided some preliminary plasma measurements in a simple mid-latitude environment, and revealed several design issues.

  10. Miniature Quartz Crystal Microbalance for Spacecraft and Missile Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Uy, O

    1999-01-01

    Quartz crystal microbalances (QCMs) have been used for over 20 years as contamination monitors in spacecraft to measure film deposition on sensitive surfaces such as optical mirrors, thermal radiators, and solar arrays...

  11. The Impact of Autonomy Technology on Spacecraft Software Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, E. B., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Autonomy technology for high-level, closed-loop control of spacecraft offers considerable benefits to space-flight projects. Those benefits can enable whole new classes of missions; however, they are not without cost.

  12. Applicability of ISO 16697 Data to Spacecraft Fire Fighting Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, David B.; Beeson, Harold D.

    2012-01-01

    Presentation Agenda: (1) Selected variables affecting oxygen consumption during spacecraft fires, (2) General overview of ISO 16697, (3) Estimated amounts of material consumed during combustion in typical ISS enclosures, (4) Discussion on potential applications.

  13. A multi-spacecraft formation approach to space debris surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felicetti, Leonard; Emami, M. Reza

    2016-10-01

    This paper proposes a new mission concept devoted to the identification and tracking of space debris through observations made by multiple spacecraft. Specifically, a formation of spacecraft has been designed taking into account the characteristics and requirements of the utilized optical sensors as well as the constraints imposed by sun illumination and visibility conditions. The debris observations are then shared among the team of spacecraft, and processed onboard of a ;hosting leader; to estimate the debris motion by means of Kalman filtering techniques. The primary contribution of this paper resides on the application of a distributed coordination architecture, which provides an autonomous and robust ability to dynamically form spacecraft teams once the target has been detected, and to dynamically build a processing network for the orbit determination of space debris. The team performance, in terms of accuracy, readiness and number of the detected objects, is discussed through numerical simulations.

  14. Micro GC's for Contaminant Monitoring in Spacecraft Air Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this proposal is to create new gas chromatographs (GCs) for contaminant monitoring in spacecraft air that do not require any reagents or special...

  15. Trace Contaminant Monitor for Air in Spacecraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A need exists for analyzers that can measure trace contaminants in air on board spacecraft. Toxic gas buildup can endanger the crew particularly during long...

  16. Project Overview of the Naval Postgraduate School Spacecraft Architecture and Technology Demonstration Experiment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reuer, Charles

    2001-01-01

    The Naval Postgraduate School's current attempt at getting another spacecraft into orbit is focusing on Naval Postgraduate School Spacecraft Architecture and Technology Demonstration Experiment (NPSAT1...

  17. Control System of a Three DOF Spacecraft Simulator by Vectorable Thrusters and Control Moment Gyros

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Price, William D

    2006-01-01

    ...) Spacecraft Simulator used in the Proximity Operations Simulator Facility, as part of the Naval Postgraduate School's Spacecraft Robotics Laboratory, to simulate autonomous guidance, navigation and control (GNC...

  18. Artificial Intelligence Techniques for Controlling Spacecraft Power System

    OpenAIRE

    Hanaa T. El-Madany; Faten H. Fahmy; Ninet M. A. El-Rahman; Hassen T. Dorrah

    2011-01-01

    Advancements in the field of artificial intelligence (AI) made during this decade have forever changed the way we look at automating spacecraft subsystems including the electrical power system. AI have been used to solve complicated practical problems in various areas and are becoming more and more popular nowadays. In this paper, a mathematical modeling and MATLAB–SIMULINK model for the different components of the spacecraft power system is presented. Also, a control sys...

  19. Description of the Spacecraft Control Laboratory Experiment (SCOLE) facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jeffrey P.; Rallo, Rosemary A.

    1987-01-01

    A laboratory facility for the study of control laws for large flexible spacecraft is described. The facility fulfills the requirements of the Spacecraft Control Laboratory Experiment (SCOLE) design challenge for laboratory experiments, which will allow slew maneuvers and pointing operations. The structural apparatus is described in detail sufficient for modelling purposes. The sensor and actuator types and characteristics are described so that identification and control algorithms may be designed. The control implementation computer and real-time subroutines are also described.

  20. Vibroacoustic Analysis of Large Heat Rejection Radiators for Future Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larko, Jeffrey M.; McNelis, Mark E.; Hughes, William O.

    2006-01-01

    Spacecraft structures such as antennas, solar arrays and radiator panels significantly respond to high acoustic levels seen at lift-off. Some future spacecraft may utilize nuclear electric propulsion that require large radiator panels to reject waste heat. A vibroacoustic assessment was performed for two different radiator panel designs. Results from the analysis of the two designs using different analytical approaches are presented and discussed.

  1. Setpoint Weighted PID Controller for the Electromechanical Actuator in Spacecraft

    OpenAIRE

    Sumathi, R.; Usha, M

    2014-01-01

    An intelligent control system for the rocket engine during electromechanical stage is designed and scrutinized in this paper. The rocket is the only vehicle that lift-offs the spacecraft in the space. But, the motion of the rocket can be influenced by internal and external disturbances. Furthermore, the rocket is a multi-input and multi-output nonlinear system whose dynamics are unstable and poorly understood. So the orientation of the spacecraft in precise position is so critical. Hence, att...

  2. Operational Analysis of Time-Optimal Maneuvering for Imaging Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Earth orbit EOS Earth Observing Satellite EPS Electrical Power System AOI Area of Interest ROI Return on Investment AHP Analytic Hierarchy Process...absorption to reduce spacecraft systems’ reliance on internal Electrical Power System (EPS). d. Targeting imaging equipment and sensor systems at AOIs for...image collection. Instead of sweeping the imaging sensors from side to side (whisk- broom or push- broom mode3), the entire spacecraft body is able to

  3. Dynamics and control of Lorentz-augmented spacecraft relative motion

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Ye; Yang, Yueneng

    2017-01-01

    This book develops a dynamical model of the orbital motion of Lorentz spacecraft in both unperturbed and J2-perturbed environments. It explicitly discusses three kinds of typical space missions involving relative orbital control: spacecraft hovering, rendezvous, and formation flying. Subsequently, it puts forward designs for both open-loop and closed-loop control schemes propelled or augmented by the geomagnetic Lorentz force. These control schemes are entirely novel and represent a significantly departure from previous approaches.

  4. An economy of scale system's mensuration of large spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deryder, L. J.

    1981-01-01

    The systems technology and cost particulars of using multipurpose platforms versus several sizes of bus type free flyer spacecraft to accomplish the same space experiment missions. Computer models of these spacecraft bus designs were created to obtain data relative to size, weight, power, performance, and cost. To answer the question of whether or not large scale does produce economy, the dominant cost factors were determined and the programmatic effect on individual experiment costs were evaluated.

  5. Adaptive Estimation and Heuristic Optimization of Nonlinear Spacecraft Attitude Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-15

    NONLINEAR SPACECRAFT ATTITUDE DYNAMICS DISSERTATION Presented to the Faculty Graduate School of Engineering and Management Air Force Institute of...PhD Dean, Graduate School of Engineering and Management AFIT-ENY-DS-16-S-061 Abstract For spacecraft conducting on-orbit operations, changes to the...dynamics and typically require estimation. For systems with time-varying inertia parameters, multiple model adaptive estimation (MMAE) routines can be

  6. An assessment of spacecraft target mode selection methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, J. F.; Aglietti, G. S.; Remedia, M.; Kiley, A.

    2017-11-01

    Coupled Loads Analyses (CLAs), using finite element models (FEMs) of the spacecraft and launch vehicle to simulate critical flight events, are performed in order to determine the dynamic loadings that will be experienced by spacecraft during launch. A validation process is carried out on the spacecraft FEM beforehand to ensure that the dynamics of the analytical model sufficiently represent the behavior of the physical hardware. One aspect of concern is the containment of the FEM correlation and update effort to focus on the vibration modes which are most likely to be excited under test and CLA conditions. This study therefore provides new insight into the prioritization of spacecraft FEM modes for correlation to base-shake vibration test data. The work involved example application to large, unique, scientific spacecraft, with modern FEMs comprising over a million degrees of freedom. This comprehensive investigation explores: the modes inherently important to the spacecraft structures, irrespective of excitation; the particular 'critical modes' which produce peak responses to CLA level excitation; an assessment of several traditional target mode selection methods in terms of ability to predict these 'critical modes'; and an indication of the level of correlation these FEM modes achieve compared to corresponding test data. Findings indicate that, although the traditional methods of target mode selection have merit and are able to identify many of the modes of significance to the spacecraft, there are 'critical modes' which may be missed by conventional application of these methods. The use of different thresholds to select potential target modes from these parameters would enable identification of many of these missed modes. Ultimately, some consideration of the expected excitations is required to predict all modes likely to contribute to the response of the spacecraft in operation.

  7. Applications of holographic interferometry for spacecraft structural components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, M. V.; Samuel, R.; Nair, P. S.

    1994-06-01

    An overview of the applications of holographic interferometry for spacecraft structural components at ISRO Satellite Center, Bangalore, India, is presented. The details of the development of a dual vacuum stressing technique and its application for holographic nondestructive testing (HNDT) of honeycomb panels are presented. Results of some calibration studies conducted for HNDT of propellant tanks are also presented. It is found that holographic interferometry is quite useful, particularly for HNDT of honeycomb panels and propellant tanks used for spacecraft structural components.

  8. Assurance Policy Evaluation - Spacecraft and Strategic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-17

    electromechanical ( EEE ) parts, software, design and workmanship, work instructions, manufacturing and tooling, cleanrooms, electrostatic discharge...strategies and processes of MDA suppliers. MDA’s audit program has uncovered several significant findings. For example, an MDA contractor purchased EEE ...parts for a rocket motor controller from an unauthorized supplier, increasing the risk that counterfeit parts were used. The purchased EEE parts were

  9. ESA unveils its big XMM spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-02-01

    XMM, the X-ray Multi-Mirror mission, is due do be lanched in 1999. It is a European conception with innovative telescopes. XMM will revolutionize the study of X-rays coming from the Universe, by harvesting far more X-rays per hour than any previous mission. Its enormous capacity will enable astronomers to analyse many strong sources of cosmic X-rays very quickly, and to discover and characterize many faint sources previously beyond their reach. As the most popular and competitive branch of space astronomy, X-ray astronomy reveals special places in the Universe where very high temperatures or violent forces generate energetic radiation. These sources include black holes, exploding stars, paris of stars orbiting very close together, and the central region of clusters of galaxies. XMM's optical monitor, viewing the scenes by visible light, will help in the interpretations. The combination of X-ray telescopes and optical monitoring should be well-suited to tracking down gamma-ray bursters - extraordinary explosions in space that mystify the astronomers. Full descriptions of the X-ray sources will depend on precise spectral analysis of the relative intensities of X-rays of different energies, including the signatures of identifiable chemical elements. Such spectral analysis is XMM's task, using instruments of the highest quality fed by the remarkable telescopes. As seen at ESTEC today, the spacecraft stands upside down. Its front end, where the mirror modules of the X-ray telescopes pass through the satellite's service module, is closest to the ground. At the top is the section containing detectors at the focus of the X-ray telescopes. Surmounting the assembly, a pair of cones will carry heat away from the detectors. XMM's appearance is, though, dominated by the long tube that spans the telescope's focal length, and by the black thermal blanket that will protect the spacecraft from unequal heating on the sunny and shaded sides. A miracle of telescope engineering « You

  10. Outgassing study of spacecraft materials and contaminant transport simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chung M.; Labatete-Goeppinger, Aura C.; Fowler, Jesse D.; Easton, Myriam P.; Liu, De-Ling

    2016-09-01

    Contamination control plays an important role in sustaining spacecraft performance. One spacecraft degradation mechanism involves long-term on-orbit molecular outgassing from spacecraft materials. The outgassed molecules may accumulate on thermal control surfaces and/or optics, causing degradation. In this study, we performed outgassing measurements of multiple spacecraft materials, including adhesives, Nylon Velcro, and other assembly materials through a modified ASTM E595 test method. The modified ASTM E595 test had the source and receiver temperature remained at 125°C and 25°C, respectively, but with prolonged outgassing periods of two weeks. The condensable contaminants were analyzed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) to determine their spectral transmission and chemical composition. The FTIR spectra showed several spacecraft materials, primarily adhesives and potting materials, exhibiting slight absorption from contaminants consisting of hydroxyl groups and carboxylic acids. To gain insight into molecular contaminant transport, simulations were conducted to characterize contaminant accumulation inside a hypothetical space system cavity. The simulation indicated that contaminant molecules bouncing inside the hypothetical payload cavity can lead to deposition on colder surfaces, even though large openings are available to provide venting pathways for escaping to space. The newly established molecular contaminant transport simulation capability holds the promise of providing quantitative guidance for future spacecraft and its venting design.

  11. Spacecraft Re-Entry Impact Point Targeting Using Aerodynamic Drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Sanny R.; Bevilacqua, Riccardo

    2017-01-01

    The ability to re-enter the atmosphere at a desired location is important for spacecraft containing components that may survive re-entry. While impact point targeting has traditionally been initiated through impulsive burns with chemical thrusters on large vehicles such as the Space Shuttle, and the Soyuz and Apollo capsules, many small spacecraft do not host thrusters and require an alternative means of impact point targeting to ensure that falling debris do not cause harm to persons or property. This paper discusses the use of solely aerodynamic drag force to perform this targeting. It is shown that by deploying and retracting a drag device to vary the ballistic coefficient of the spacecraft, any desired longitude and latitude on the ground can be targeted provided that the maneuvering begins early enough and the latitude is less than the inclination of the orbit. An analytical solution based on perturbations from a numerically propagated trajectory is developed to map the initial state and ballistic coefficient profile of a spacecraft to its impact point. This allows the ballistic coefficient profile necessary to reach a given target point to be rapidly calculated, making it feasible to generate the guidance for the decay trajectory onboard the spacecraft. The ability to target an impact point using aerodynamic drag will enhance the capabilities of small spacecraft and will enable larger space vehicles containing thrusters to save fuel by more effectively leveraging the available aerodynamic drag.

  12. Modeling, Simulation, and Parameter Estimation of Lateral Spacecraft Fuel Slosh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatman, Yadira; Gangadharan, Sathya; Marsell, Brandon; Schlee, Keith; Sudermann, James; Walker, Charles; Ristow, James

    2008-01-01

    Predicting the effect of fuel slosh on a spacecraft and/or launch vehicle attitude control system is a very important and a challenging task. Whether the spacecraft is under spinning or lateral moving conditions, the dynamic effect of the fuel slosh will help determine whether the spacecraft will remain on its chosen trajectory. There are three categories of slosh that can be caused by launch vehicle and/or spacecraft maneuvers when the fuel is in the presence of an acceleration field. These include bulk fluid motion, subsurface wave motion, and free surface slosh. Each of these slosh types have a periodic component that is defined by either a spinning or lateral motion. For spinning spacecraft, all three types of slosh can play a major role in determining stability. Bulk fluid motion and free surface slosh can affect the lateral slosh characteristics. For either condition, the possibility for an unpredicted coupled resonance between the spacecraft and its on board fuel can have mission threatening affects. This on-going research effort aims at improving the accuracy and efficiency of modeling techniques used to predict these types of lateral fluid motions. In particular, efforts will focus on analyzing the effects of viscoelastic diaphragms on slosh dynamics.

  13. Mesh Network Architecture for Enabling Inter-Spacecraft Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Christopher; Merrill, Garrick

    2017-01-01

    To enable communication between spacecraft operating in a formation or small constellation, a mesh network architecture was developed and tested using a time division multiple access (TDMA) communication scheme. The network is designed to allow for the exchange of telemetry and other data between spacecraft to enable collaboration between small spacecraft. The system uses a peer-to-peer topology with no central router, so that it does not have a single point of failure. The mesh network is dynamically configurable to allow for addition and subtraction of new spacecraft into the communication network. Flight testing was performed using an unmanned aerial system (UAS) formation acting as a spacecraft analogue and providing a stressing environment to prove mesh network performance. The mesh network was primarily devised to provide low latency, high frequency communication but is flexible and can also be configured to provide higher bandwidth for applications desiring high data throughput. The network includes a relay functionality that extends the maximum range between spacecraft in the network by relaying data from node to node. The mesh network control is implemented completely in software making it hardware agnostic, thereby allowing it to function with a wide variety of existing radios and computing platforms..

  14. Multiple spacecraft formation reconfiguration using solar radiation pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Kamran; Kumar, Krishna Dev

    2014-10-01

    In this paper the use of solar radiation pressure for spacecraft formation reconfiguration at the L2 Sun-Earth/Moon collinear libration point is presented. The system consisting of a leader and three follower spacecraft is considered. The leader spacecraft is assumed to be in a fixed halo trajectory and the follower spacecraft position relative to the leader satellite is controlled using two angles and area; these are varied based on a variable structure model reference adaptive control technique to achieve the desired formation reconfiguration. This approach ensures that all follower spacecraft complete the required maneuver in the same time. An intertially fixed circular trajectory, which is suitable for interferometer missions, is used in this paper. The stability of the proposed controller is established using Lyapunov theory. The performance of the proposed controller is tested through numerical simulation of the governing nonlinear equations of motion and is applied for formation initialization, resizing, retargeting, and rotation. The numerical results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control technique for spacecraft formation reconfiguration using solar radiation pressure at the L2 libration point. Furthermore, control inputs on the order of 15 degrees and 2 m2 for area change are sufficient to execute the maneuvers.

  15. A Survey of LIDAR Technology and Its Use in Spacecraft Relative Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, John A.; Cryan, Scott P.

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides a survey of modern LIght Detection And Ranging (LIDAR) sensors from a perspective of how they can be used for spacecraft relative navigation. In addition to LIDAR technology commonly used in space applications today (e.g. scanning, flash), this paper reviews emerging LIDAR technologies gaining traction in other non-aerospace fields. The discussion will include an overview of sensor operating principles and specific pros/cons for each type of LIDAR. This paper provides a comprehensive review of LIDAR technology as applied specifically to spacecraft relative navigation. HE problem of orbital rendezvous and docking has been a consistent challenge for complex space missions since before the Gemini 8 spacecraft performed the first successful on-orbit docking of two spacecraft in 1966. Over the years, a great deal of effort has been devoted to advancing technology associated with all aspects of the rendezvous, proximity operations, and docking (RPOD) flight phase. After years of perfecting the art of crewed rendezvous with the Gemini, Apollo, and Space Shuttle programs, NASA began investigating the problem of autonomous rendezvous and docking (AR&D) to support a host of different mission applications. Some of these applications include autonomous resupply of the International Space Station (ISS), robotic servicing/refueling of existing orbital assets, and on-orbit assembly.1 The push towards a robust AR&D capability has led to an intensified interest in a number of different sensors capable of providing insight into the relative state of two spacecraft. The present work focuses on exploring the state-of-the-art in one of these sensors - LIght Detection And Ranging (LIDAR) sensors. It should be noted that the military community frequently uses the acronym LADAR (LAser Detection And Ranging) to refer to what this paper calls LIDARs. A LIDAR is an active remote sensing device that is typically used in space applications to obtain the range to one or more

  16. International Solar Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, R.; Muhonen, D.; Sizemore, K. O.

    1991-01-01

    The International Solar Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Program is a large, multi-national program involving three space agencies and up to eight spacecraft. NASA, together with the Institute of Space and Astronomical Science (ISAS) and the European Space Agency (ESA), has agreed in principle to coordinate their efforts in investigating the Sun and the Earth. Each agency is planning to construct and operate different spacecraft as part of this cooperative venture: Geotail provided by ISAS, the Solar Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and Cluster (four spacecraft) contributed by ESA, and Wind and Polar by NASA. A general description of the program is presented.

  17. Social Control Disclosure and Accountability of Direct Money Program in Rio de Janeiro’s Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina de Oliveira Medeiros

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Education in Brazil have expanded the debate concerning the quality offered, as well as being a constitutional guarantee, there are the State's efforts in the allocation of financial resources annually. In the case of Basic Education was created in 2007 the Direct Money in School Program (DMSP that the Union transfers financial assistance to state and local public schools, and encourage widespread participation in resource management. Thus, the study’s objective was to investigate how civil society involved in the management of public resources of TSA, in a descriptive research with a quantitative and qualitative approach. The data collection was a documentary research: 29 accounts rendered digitized Direct Money in School Program (DMSP from schools and day care centers located in the municipality of Rio de Janeiro for the year 2012. Consolidating research, we sought to understand the perception of the Director of School / Day Care and President of the Community Council-School on the subject employing a questionnaire. In addition to the Audit Services scanned the TSA was checked for evidence of compliance with the principle of accountability and encouraging the social control in the electronic media. The results show the need to improve the participation of civil society, given that this study found that schools/nurseries do not provide the program information on official websites, minimizing transparency, and there is the existence of oversight failures in the assessment of benefits accounts and composition of the Councils.

  18. An auroral westward flow channel (AWFC and its relationship to field-aligned current, ring current, and plasmapause location determined using multiple spacecraft observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Parkinson

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available An auroral westward flow channel (AWFC is a latitudinally narrow channel of unstable F-region plasma with intense westward drift in the dusk-to-midnight sector ionosphere. AWFCs tend to overlap the equatorward edge of the auroral oval, and their life cycle is often synchronised to that of substorms: they commence close to substorm expansion phase onset, intensify during the expansion phase, and then decay during the recovery phase. Here we define for the first time the relationship between an AWFC, large-scale field-aligned current (FAC, the ring current, and plasmapause location. The Tasman International Geospace Environment Radar (TIGER, a Southern Hemisphere HF SuperDARN radar, observed a jet-like AWFC during ~08:35 to 13:28 UT on 7 April 2001. The initiation of the AWFC was preceded by a band of equatorward expanding ionospheric scatter (BEES which conveyed an intense poleward electric field through the inner plasma sheet. Unlike previous AWFCs, this event was not associated with a distinct substorm surge; rather it occurred during an interval of persistent, moderate magnetic activity characterised by AL~−200 nT. The four Cluster spacecraft had perigees within the dusk sector plasmasphere, and their trajectories were magnetically conjugate to the radar observations. The Waves of High frequency and Sounder for Probing Electron density by Relaxation (WHISPER instruments on board Cluster were used to identify the plasmapause location. The Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE EUV experiment also provided global-scale observations of the plasmapause. The Cluster fluxgate magnetometers (FGM provided successive measurements specifying the relative location of the ring current and filamentary plasma sheet current. An analysis of Iridium spacecraft magnetometer measurements provided estimates of large-scale ionospheric FAC in relation to the AWFC evolution. Peak flows in the AWFC were located close to the peak of a Region 2

  19. Modeling of the Lightning Plasma Channel Stroke to a Spacecraft during Ascent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarditi, Alfonso; Norgard, John

    2009-11-01

    Lightning protection is an important aspect of modern aerospace design: the increased use of composite materials (vs. metals) reduces the shielding and robustness of the conducting path that the outer shell of a vehicle can present to a lightning discharge. A spacecraft during ascent becomes vulnerable to lightning strokes immediately after leaving the launch pad: in addition to natural lightning conditions, there is the possibility of triggered lightning events, caused by a perturbation of the atmospheric electric field [1]. The purpose of this study, in support of the NASA Constellation program, is to determine the evolution of the plasma current and its distribution on the spacecraft surface. Following earlier ``gas dynamic'' approaches [2], the model considers a plasma channel attached to the ascending spacecraft after a return stroke is established. The conductive exhaust plume [3] is an integral part of the model. The NIMROD 3D plasma fluid code [4] is used to model the plasma channel, reproducing the full transient due to the self-consistent magnetic field and the possibility of sweeping of the attachment point along the moving structure [5]. References: [1] M.A. Uman, Proc. IEEE, 76, 1548 (1988). [2] V. A. Rakov, M. A. Uman, IEEE Trans. EMC, EMC-2940, 403 (1998). [3] J. D. Norgard, G.S. Smith, IEEE Trans. EMC, EMC-29, 157 (1987) [4] C. R. Sovinec et al., J. Comput. Phys. 195, 355 (2004). [5] Larsson et al., J. Phys. D, 33, 1876 (2000)

  20. A feedback linearization approach to spacecraft control using momentum exchange devices. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzielski, John Edward

    1988-01-01

    Recent developments in the area of nonlinear control theory have shown how coordiante changes in the state and input spaces can be used with nonlinear feedback to transform certain nonlinear ordinary differential equations into equivalent linear equations. These feedback linearization techniques are applied to resolve two problems arising in the control of spacecraft equipped with control moment gyroscopes (CMGs). The first application involves the computation of rate commands for the gimbals that rotate the individual gyroscopes to produce commanded torques on the spacecraft. The second application is to the long-term management of stored momentum in the system of control moment gyroscopes using environmental torques acting on the vehicle. An approach to distributing control effort among a group of redundant actuators is described that uses feedback linearization techniques to parameterize sets of controls which influence a specified subsystem in a desired way. The approach is adapted for use in spacecraft control with double-gimballed gyroscopes to produce an algorithm that avoids problematic gimbal configurations by approximating sets of gimbal rates that drive CMG rotors into desirable configurations. The momentum management problem is stated as a trajectory optimization problem with a nonlinear dynamical constraint. Feedback linearization and collocation are used to transform this problem into an unconstrainted nonlinear program. The approach to trajectory optimization is fast and robust. A number of examples are presented showing applications to the proposed NASA space station.

  1. Integrated Avionics System (IAS), Integrating 3-D Technology On A Spacecraft Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Don J.; Halpert, Gerald

    1999-01-01

    As spacecraft designs converge toward miniaturization, and with the volumetric and mass challenges placed on avionics, programs will continue to advance the "state of the art" in spacecraft system development with new challenges to reduce power, mass and volume. Traditionally, the trend is to focus on high-density 3-D packaging technologies. Industry has made significant progress in 3-D technologies, and other related internal and external interconnection schemes. Although new technologies have improved packaging densities, a system packaging architecture is required that not only reduces spacecraft volume and mass budgets, but increase integration efficiencies, provide modularity and flexibility to accommodate multiple missions while maintaining a low recurring cost. With these challenges in mind, a novel system packaging approach incorporates solutions that provide broader environmental applications, more flexible system interconnectivity, scalability, and simplified assembly test and integration schemes. The Integrated Avionics System (IAS) provides for a low-mass, modular distributed or centralized packaging architecture which combines ridged-flex technologies, high-density COTS hardware and a new 3-D mechanical packaging approach, Horizontal Mounted Cube (HMC). This paper will describe the fundamental elements of the IAS, HMC hardware design, system integration and environmental test results.

  2. Using Spacecraft in Climate and Natural Disasters Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokol, Galyna; Kotlov, Vladyslav; Khorischenko, Oleksandr; Davydova, Angelica; Heti, Kristina

    2017-04-01

    Since the beginning of the space age it become possible the global monitoring of the planet Earth's state. Since the second half of the 20th century there are observations of the atmosphere's state and the Earth's climate have been held by a spacecraft. Also become possible large-scale monitoring of climate change. An attempt was made to define the role of infrasound in the interaction between a space weather, climate and biosphere of the Earth using spacecraft sensors recording. Many countries are involving in the detection of earthquakes, predicting volcanic eruptions and floods and also the monitoring of irregular solar activity. Understanding this leads to the conclusion that international cooperation for the protection of humanity is not only a political priority in the international arena, but also a question of the quality of living standards of any state. Commonly known following monitoring systems: Disaster Monitoring Constellation (DMC), FUEGO program (Spain), Sentinel-Asia program (Japan) and International aerospace system for monitoring of global phenomena (MAKCM, Russia). The Disaster Monitoring Constellation for International Imaging (DMCii) consists of a number of remote sensing satellites constructed by Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (SSTL) and operated for the Algerian, Nigerian, Turkish, British and Chinese governments by DMC International Imaging. The DMC has monitored the effects and aftermath of the Indian Ocean Tsunami (December 2004), Hurricane Katrina (August 2005), and many other floods, fires and disasters. The individual DMC satellites are: 1. First generation satellites (AlSAT-1 - Algeria, BilSAT - Turkey, NigeriaSAT-1 - Nigeria, UK-DMC - United Kingdom); 2. Second generation satellites (Beijing - China, UK-DMC 2 - United Kingdom, Deimos-1 - Spanish commercial, NigeriaSAT-2 and NigeriaSAT-X). The sun-synchronous orbits of these satellites are coordinated so that the satellites follow each other around an orbital plane, ascending north

  3. Topology Optimization of Spacecraft Transfer Compartment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Borovikov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThe subject of this research is topology optimization of the adapter of a spacecraft transfer compartment. The finite element topology optimization [1] is widely used for simple structure elements [6, 7]. It is argued that using this method in conjunction with additive technology (3D - printing it is possible to create construction designs with the best weight characteristics. However, the paper shows that when applying this method to a complex construction design the optimization results are highly sensitive to optimization algorithm parameters. The goal of this research is to study parameters of the topology optimization algorithm and the influence of their variations on results.1.      Problem formulation   A commercial software Altair HyperWorks/OptiStruct (student’s license performed numerical calculations. The paper presents a detailed description of the finite element model.The main features of the proposed model are as follows:-          Simplicity with non-complicated geometry;-          Building a finite element model in terms of computing time minimization;-          Using the lumped mass elements to simulate the impacts of the conjugates on the adapter;-          A limit of material strength, decreased by an order of magnitude, to eliminate stress concentrators;-          The gravitational load applied corresponds to the loads for the Angara-A5 launcher [8]. 2.      Method of solutionA brief description of the SIMP-method realized in the Altair HyperWorks/OptiStruct software is given.3.      ResultsPerformed numerical calculations, and shown the influence of variations of algorithm parameters (DISCRETE, MATINIT, MINDIM, MAXDIM on construction design as well as the parameters SINGLE and SPLIT used to reveal restrictions on manufacturing.Shown that, depending on variations of parameters, an adapter construction strives to «truss» or «shell» type. Described

  4. Improved Spacecraft Materials for Radiation Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Tripathi, Ram K.; Clowdsley, M. S.; Shinn, J. L.; Singleterry, Robert C., Jr.; Thibeault, Sheila Ann; Kim, M.-H. Y.; Heinbockel, John H.; Badhwar, Gautam D.

    2001-01-01

    Sv limit for the exposure of the blood forming organs (this limit is strictly for LEO but can be used as a guideline for the Mars mission analysis). The current estimates require aluminum shield thicknesses above 50 g/sq cm., which is impractical. In such a heavily shielded vehicle, the neutrons produced throughout the vehicle also contribute significantly to the exposure and this demands greater care in describing the angular dependence of secondary particle production processes. As such the continued testing of databases and transport procedures in laboratory and spaceflight experiments has continued. This has been the focus of much of the last year's activity and has resulted in improved neutron prediction capability. These new methods have also improved our understanding of the surface environment of Mars. The Mars 2003 NRA HEDS related surface science requirements were driven by the need to validate predictions on the upward flux of neutrons produced in the Martian regolith and bedrock made by the codes developed under this project. The codes used in the surface environment definition are also being used to look at in situ resources for the development of construction material for Martian surface facilities. For example, synthesis of polyimides and polyethylene as binders of regolith for developing basic structural elements has been studied and targets built for accelerator beam testing of radiation shielding properties. Preliminary mechanical tests have also been promising. Improved spacecraft materials have been identified (using the criteria reported by this project at the last conference) as potentially important for future shielding materials. These are liquid hydrogen, hydrogenated nanofibers, liquid methane, LiH, Polyethylene, Polysulfone, and Polyetherimide (in order of decreasing shield performance). Some of the materials are multifunctional and are required for other onboard systems. We are currently preparing software for trade studies with these materials

  5. Design, Fabrication, and Testing of a Hopper Spacecraft Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucasey, Evan Phillip Krell

    A robust test bed is needed to facilitate future development of guidance, navigation, and control software for future vehicles capable of vertical takeoff and landings. Specifically, this work aims to develop both a hardware and software simulator that can be used for future flight software development for extra-planetary vehicles. To achieve the program requirements of a high thrust to weight ratio with large payload capability, the vehicle is designed to have a novel combination of electric motors and a micro jet engine is used to act as the propulsion elements. The spacecraft simulator underwent several iterations of hardware development using different materials and fabrication methods. The final design used a combination of carbon fiber and fiberglass that was cured under vacuum to serve as the frame of the vehicle which provided a strong, lightweight platform for all flight components and future payloads. The vehicle also uses an open source software development platform, Arduino, to serve as the initial flight computer and has onboard accelerometers, gyroscopes, and magnetometers to sense the vehicles attitude. To prevent instability due to noise, a polynomial kalman filter was designed and this fed the sensed angles and rates into a robust attitude controller which autonomously control the vehicle' s yaw, pitch, and roll angles. In addition to the hardware development of the vehicle itself, both a software simulation and a real time data acquisition interface was written in MATLAB/SIMULINK so that real flight data could be taken and then correlated to the simulation to prove the accuracy of the analytical model. In result, the full scale vehicle was designed and own outside of the lab environment and data showed that the software model accurately predicted the flight dynamics of the vehicle.

  6. Differential and Active Charging Results from the ATS Spacecraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Richard Christopher

    1980-12-01

    This study of spacecraft charging concentrates on the differential charging and artificial particle emission experiments on ATS-5 and ATS-6. It was found that differential charging of spacecraft surfaces generated large electrostatic barriers to spacecraft generated electrons, from photoemission, secondary emission, and thermal emitters. The electrostatic barrier is a potential minimum outside the charged spacecraft which causes low energy electrons to be trapped near the spacecraft. The large dish antenna on ATS-6 was identified as the source of the electrostatic barrier around the Environmental Measurements Experiment package. Daylight charging on ATS-6 was shown to have behavior suggesting the dominance of differential charging on the absolute potential of the mainframe. Electron emission experiments on ATS-5 in eclipse charging environments showed that the electron emitter could partially or totally discharge the satellite, but the mainframe recharged negatively in a few 10's of seconds. The equilibrium emitter current was found to be .3 microamps, substantially below the milliamp capability of the emitter. The limiting of the current and the time dependence seen in the ATS-5 potential during these operations were explained as the result of differential charging of the insulating surfaces on the spacecraft, and the creation of an electrostatic barrier by the differential potential. This barrier limited the artificially generated electron current to the point that the net flux to the spacecraft was again negative. Both the daylight charging events of ATS-6 and the eclipse electron emission experiments of ATS-5 were further analyzed with a simple time dependent model which showed that the barrier height quickly reached an equilibrium value which limited but did not completely stop electron emission. Average and differential potentials developed in time subject to the constraint that the barrier height remain constant. Ion engine operations and plasma emission

  7. SimSup's Loop: A Control Theory Approach to Spacecraft Operator Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Brandon Dewain; Crocker, Alan R.

    2015-01-01

    Immersive simulation is a staple of training for many complex system operators, including astronauts and ground operators of spacecraft. However, while much has been written about simulators, simulation facilities, and operator certification programs, the topic of how one develops simulation scenarios to train a spacecraft operator is relatively understated in the literature. In this paper, an approach is presented for using control theory as the basis for developing the immersive simulation scenarios for a spacecraft operator training program. The operator is effectively modeled as a high level controller of lower level hardware and software control loops that affect a select set of system state variables. Simulation scenarios are derived from a STAMP-based hazard analysis of the operator's high and low level control loops. The immersive simulation aspect of the overall training program is characterized by selecting a set of scenarios that expose the operator to the various inadequate control actions that stem from control flaws and inadequate control executions in the different sections of the typical control loop. Results from the application of this approach to the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) mission are provided through an analysis of the simulation scenarios used for operator training and the actual anomalies that occurred during the mission. The simulation scenarios and inflight anomalies are mapped to specific control flaws and inadequate control executions in the different sections of the typical control loop to illustrate the characteristics of anomalies arising from the different sections of the typical control loop (and why it is important for operators to have exposure to these characteristics). Additionally, similarities between the simulation scenarios and inflight anomalies are highlighted to make the case that the simulation scenarios prepared the operators for the mission.

  8. Controlling Charging and Arcing on a Solar Powered Auroral Orbiting Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Dale C.; Rhee, Michael S.

    2008-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement satellite (GPM) will be launched into a high inclination (65 degree) orbit to monitor rainfall on a global scale. Satellites in high inclination orbits have been shown to charge to high negative potentials, with the possibility of arcing on the solar arrays, when three conditions are met: a drop in plasma density below approximately 10,000 cm(exp -3), an injection of energetic electrons of energy more that 7-10 keV, and passage through darkness. Since all of these conditions are expected to obtain for some of the GPM orbits, charging calculations were done using first the Space Environment and Effects (SEE) Program Interactive Spacecraft Charging Handbook, and secondly the NASA Air-force Spacecraft Charging Analyzer Program (NASCAP-2k). The object of the calculations was to determine if charging was likely for the GPM configuration and materials, and specifically to see if choosing a particular type of thermal white paint would help minimize charging. A detailed NASCAP-2k geometrical model of the GPM spacecraft was built, with such a large number of nodes that it challenged the capability of NASCAP-2k to do the calculations. The results of the calculations were that for worst-case auroral charging conditions, charging to levels on the order of -120 to -230 volts could occur on GPM during night-time, with differential voltages on the solar arrays that might lead to solar array arcing. In sunlit conditions, charging did not exceed -20 V under any conditions. The night-time results were sensitive to the spacecraft surface materials chosen. For non-conducting white paints, the charging was severe, and could continue unabated throughout the passage of GPM through the auroral zone. Somewhat conductive (dissipative) white paints minimized the night-time charging to levels of -120 V or less, and thus were recommended for GPM thermal control. It is shown that the choice of thermal control paints is important to prevent arcing on high

  9. NASA-STD-(I)-6016, Standard Materials and Processes Requirements for Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedley, Michael; Griffin, Dennis

    2006-01-01

    This document is directed toward Materials and Processes (M&P) used in the design, fabrication, and testing of flight components for all NASA manned, unmanned, robotic, launch vehicle, lander, in-space and surface systems, and spacecraft program/project hardware elements. All flight hardware is covered by the M&P requirements of this document, including vendor designed, off-the-shelf, and vendor furnished items. Materials and processes used in interfacing ground support equipment (GSE); test equipment; hardware processing equipment; hardware packaging; and hardware shipment shall be controlled to prevent damage to or contamination of flight hardware.

  10. ATS-6 spacecraft - An EMC challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampinsky, A.

    1975-01-01

    A series of analytical, measurement, and experimental EMI tests were performed on ATS-6. The EMC problems encountered included: (1) wiring pickup and reradiation, (2) input rectification and bias offset, (3) harmonics, (4) component degradation, (5) unbalanced shield ground, (6) inadvertent pickup, and (7) electro-explosive devices. The test program consisted of materials evaluation (with regard to shielding effectiveness, cost, weight, etc.), sun sensor RF susceptibility, cable shielding material evaluation, RF integrity of solar panels and power harnesses, anechoic chamber tests, bonding and grounding, and shielding and thermal control.

  11. Nuclear-Powered GPS Spacecraft Design Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raab, Bernard

    1977-05-01

    This is the final report of a study to investigate the potential benefits of a nuclear (radioisotope) - powered satellite for advanced phases of the Global Positioning System (GPS) program. The critical parameters were: power to user; mean mission duration; orbital predictability; thermal control of on-board frequency standards; and vulnerability. The reference design approach is described, and input data are given for two power systems that are under development: an organic Rankine system and a Brayton cycle system. Reference design details are provided and structural design and analysis are discussed, as well as thermal design and analysis. A higher altitude version is also considered.

  12. Microcomputer spacecraft thermal analysis routines (MSTAR) Phase I: The user interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teti, Nicholas M.

    1993-01-01

    The Microcomputer Spacecraft Thermal Analysis Routines (MSTAR) software package is being developed for NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center by Swales and Associates, Inc. (S&AI). In December 1992, S&AI was awarded a phase I Small Business Inovative Research contract fronm NASA to develop a microcomputer based thermal analysis program to replace the current SSPTA and TRASYS programs. Phase I consists of a six month effort which will focus on developing geometric model generation and visualization capabilities using a graphical user interface (GUI). The information contained in this paper encompasses the work performed during the Phase I development cycle; with emphasis on the development of the graphical user interface (GUI). This includes both the theory behind and specific examples of how the MSTAR GUI was implemented. Furthermore, this report discusses new applications and enhancements which will improve the capabilities and commercialization of the MSTAR program.

  13. Alternative solution of power supply for new spacecraft generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgasov, Michail P.; Tchuyan, Rostislav K.; Tolyarenko, Nikolai V.

    1996-02-01

    The power supply for new generation of the long life spacecraft is one of the complicated problem staying in front of designers within practically all the space vehicle life phases. Up to day the most widespread solution consists of the own on board power supply system for each spacecraft including main (usually solar arrays or radioisotope thermal electric units) and redundant (usually chemical accumulating batteries) power sources. The technical and cost efficiency aspects of an advanced scheme of spacecraft power supply by the directional power beams from board of several Space Power Plants is analyzed. Practically all possible spacecraft types are included into the study: systems of communication satellites in the LEO and GEO, navigation and remote sensing satellites operated in the orbits with altitudes to 25000 km, surveillance and technology space platforms into LEO, as well as orbital maneuvering vehicle equipped with electrical propulsion to transport payloads from LEO into operational orbit. The preliminary evaluation of PowerSat's and servicing spacecraft systems orbital configuration is presented. Side by side with some characteristics of the power generation units (on base of solar arrays, solar thermal dynamics facilities, nuclear power plants) the brief discussion of electric thrusters and power transmission system is provided. The perspectives and ways of the further studies for all of main PowerSat's subsystems are nominated.

  14. Low-Frequency Gravitational Wave Searches Using Spacecraft Doppler Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armstrong J. W.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses spacecraft Doppler tracking, the current-generation detector technology used in the low-frequency (~millihertz gravitational wave band. In the Doppler method the earth and a distant spacecraft act as free test masses with a ground-based precision Doppler tracking system continuously monitoring the earth-spacecraft relative dimensionless velocity $2 Delta v/c = Delta u/ u_0$, where $Delta u$ is the Doppler shift and $ u_0$ is the radio link carrier frequency. A gravitational wave having strain amplitude $h$ incident on the earth-spacecraft system causes perturbations of order $h$ in the time series of $Delta u/ u_0$. Unlike other detectors, the ~1-10 AU earth-spacecraft separation makes the detector large compared with millihertz-band gravitational wavelengths, and thus times-of-flight of signals and radio waves through the apparatus are important. A burst signal, for example, is time-resolved into a characteristic signature: three discrete events in the Doppler time series. I discuss here the principles of operation of this detector (emphasizing transfer functions of gravitational wave signals and the principal noises to the Doppler time series, some data analysis techniques, experiments to date, and illustrations of sensitivity and current detector performance. I conclude with a discussion of how gravitational wave sensitivity can be improved in the low-frequency band.

  15. APOLLO PROGRAM - LEADERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-01-01

    Key members of the NASA management council were at space port today to participate in Flight Readiness Review for Apollo 9. Dr. George E. Mueller, Associate Administrator for Manned Space Flight, Lt. Gen. Samuel C. Phillips, Apollo Program manager, NASA Headquarters, Dr. Kurt H. Debus, Director KSC, Dr. Robert Gilruth, Director, Manned Spacecraft Center and Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Director, Marshall Space Flight Center.

  16. Hubble Space Telescope Spacecraft Overview Briefing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This Kennedy Space Center video release presents the third part of a press conference held at Goddard Space Flight Center on Jan. 13, 1994. The session is moderated by Randee Exler (News Chief, GSFC) and includes presentations by Ken Ledbetter (HST Program Manager, NASA Headquarters), Frank Cepollina (HST Project Manager for Flight Systems and Servicing, GSFC) and Joe Rothenberg (Director, HST Flight Projects, GSFC) that discuss pre-flight testing and training, on-orbit servicing, highlights, and the status of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). A question and answer period follows the presentations, after which three short highlight videos are presented that include actual footage of on-orbit servicing, galactic images taken by the HST, and pre-flight preparation and construction.

  17. Lessons Learned for Improving Spacecraft Ground Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Michael; Henderson, Gena; Stambolian, Damon

    2013-01-01

    NASA policy requires each Program or Project to develop a plan for how they will address Lessons Learned. Projects have the flexibility to determine how best to promote and implement lessons learned. A large project might budget for a lessons learned position to coordinate elicitation, documentation and archival of the project lessons. The lessons learned process crosses all NASA Centers and includes the contactor community. o The Office of The Chief Engineer at NASA Headquarters in Washington D.C., is the overall process owner, and field locations manage the local implementation. One tool used to transfer knowledge between program and projects is the Lessons Learned Information System (LLIS). Most lessons come from NASA in partnership with support contractors. A search for lessons that might impact a new design is often performed by a contractor team member. Knowledge is not found with only one person, one project team, or one organization. Sometimes, another project team, or person, knows something that can help your project or your task. Knowledge sharing is an everyday activity at the Kennedy Space Center through storytelling, Kennedy Engineering Academy presentations and through searching the Lessons Learned Information system. o Project teams search the lessons repository to ensure the best possible results are delivered. o The ideas from the past are not always directly applicable but usually spark new ideas and innovations. Teams have a great responsibility to collect and disseminate these lessons so that they are shared with future generations of space systems designers. o Leaders should set a goal for themselves to host a set numbers of lesson learned events each year and do more to promote multiple methods of lessons learned activities. o High performing employees are expected to share their lessons, however formal knowledge sharing presentation are not the norm for many employees.

  18. Using IoT Device Technology in Spacecraft Checkout Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Chris

    2015-09-01

    The Internet of Things (IoT) has become a common theme in both the technical and popular press in recent years because many of the enabling technologies that are required to make IoT a reality have now matured. Those technologies are revolutionising the way industrial systems and products are developed because they offer significant advantages over older technologies. This paper looks at how IoT device technology can be used in spacecraft checkout systems to achieve smaller, more capable, and more scalable solutions than are currently available. It covers the use of IoT device technology for classical spacecraft test systems as well as for hardware-in-the-loop simulation systems used to support spacecraft checkout.

  19. Art concept of Magellan spacecraft in cruise configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    Magellan spacecraft cruise configuration is illustrated in this artist concept. With solar panels deployed and having jettisoned the inertial upper stage (IUS), Magellan approaches the sun which it will orbit approximately 1.6 times before encountering Venus. Magellan, named after the 16th century Portuguese explorer, will orbit Venus about once every three hours, acquiring radar data for 37 minutes of each orbit when it is closest to the surface. Using an advanced instrument called a synthetic aperture radar (SAR), it will map more than 90 per cent of the surface with resolution ten times better than the best from prior spacecraft. Magellan is managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL); Martin Marietta Aerospace is developing the spacecraft and Hughes Aircraft Company, the advanced imaging radar. Magellan will be deployed from payload bay (PLB) of Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, during the STS-30 mission.

  20. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Selected Airborne Contaminants. Volume 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    To protect space crews from air contaminants, NASA requested that the National Research Council (NRC) provide guidance for developing spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations (SMACs) and review NASA's development of exposure guidelines for specific chemicals. The NRC convened the Committee on Spacecraft Exposure Guidelines to address this task. The committee published Guidelines for Developing Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Space Station Contaminants (NRC 1992). The reason for the review of chemicals in Volume 5 is that many of them have not been examined for more than 10 years, and new research necessitates examining the documents to ensure that they reflect current knowledge. New knowledge can be in the form of toxicologic data or in the application of new approaches for analysis of available data. In addition, because NASA anticipates longer space missions beyond low Earth orbit, SMACs for 1,000-d exposures have also been developed.

  1. Fire safety arrangement of inhabited pressurized compartments of manned spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolodian, Ivan; Melikhov, Anatoliy; Tanklevskiy, Leonid

    2017-06-01

    The article deals with innovative technical solutions that provide fire safety in inhabited pressurized compartments of manned spacecraft by means of a fireproof device of inhabited pressurized compartments via application of engineering means of fire prevention and fire spreading prevention by lowering fire load in an inhabited pressurized module up to the point when the maximum possible levels of fire factors in an inhabited pressurized compartment of a manned spacecraft are prevented. Represented technical solutions are used at the present time according to stated recommendations during provision of fire safety of equipment created by a number of Russian organizations for equipage of inhabited pressurized compartments of spacecraft of the Russian segment of International space station.

  2. Kalman Filter Estimation of Spinning Spacecraft Attitude using Markley Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlak, Joseph E.; Harman, Richard

    2004-01-01

    There are several different ways to represent spacecraft attitude and its time rate of change. For spinning or momentum-biased spacecraft, one particular representation has been put forward as a superior parameterization for numerical integration. Markley has demonstrated that these new variables have fewer rapidly varying elements for spinning spacecraft than other commonly used representations and provide advantages when integrating the equations of motion. The current work demonstrates how a Kalman filter can be devised to estimate the attitude using these new variables. The seven Markley variables are subject to one constraint condition, making the error covariance matrix singular. The filter design presented here explicitly accounts for this constraint by using a six-component error state in the filter update step. The reduced dimension error state is unconstrained and its covariance matrix is nonsingular.

  3. Solar wind plasma interaction with solar probe plus spacecraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Guillemant

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available 3-D PIC (Particle In Cell simulations of spacecraft-plasma interactions in the solar wind context of the Solar Probe Plus mission are presented. The SPIS software is used to simulate a simplified probe in the near-Sun environment (at a distance of 0.044 AU or 9.5 RS from the Sun surface. We begin this study with a cross comparison of SPIS with another PIC code, aiming at providing the static potential structure surrounding a spacecraft in a high photoelectron environment. This paper presents then a sensitivity study using generic SPIS capabilities, investigating the role of some physical phenomena and numerical models. It confirms that in the near- sun environment, the Solar Probe Plus spacecraft would rather be negatively charged, despite the high yield of photoemission. This negative potential is explained through the dense sheath of photoelectrons and secondary electrons both emitted with low energies (2–3 eV. Due to this low energy of emission, these particles are not ejected at an infinite distance of the spacecraft and would rather surround it. As involved densities of photoelectrons can reach 106 cm−3 (compared to ambient ions and electrons densities of about 7 × 103 cm−3, those populations affect the surrounding plasma potential generating potential barriers for low energy electrons, leading to high recollection. This charging could interfere with the low energy (up to a few tens of eV plasma sensors and particle detectors, by biasing the particle distribution functions measured by the instruments. Moreover, if the spacecraft charges to large negative potentials, the problem will be more severe as low energy electrons will not be seen at all. The importance of the modelling requirements in terms of precise prediction of spacecraft potential is also discussed.

  4. Spacecraft Fire Safety Research at NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Marit

    2016-01-01

    Appropriate design of fire detection systems requires knowledge of both the expected fire signature and the background aerosol levels. Terrestrial fire detection systems have been developed based on extensive study of terrestrial fires. Unfortunately there is no corresponding data set for spacecraft fires and consequently the fire detectors in current spacecraft were developed based upon terrestrial designs. In low gravity, buoyant flow is negligible which causes particles to concentrate at the smoke source, increasing their residence time, and increasing the transport time to smoke detectors. Microgravity fires have significantly different structure than those in 1-g which can change the formation history of the smoke particles. Finally the materials used in spacecraft are different from typical terrestrial environments where smoke properties have been evaluated. It is critically important to detect a fire in its early phase before a flame is established, given the fixed volume of air on any spacecraft. Consequently, the primary target for spacecraft fire detection is pyrolysis products rather than soot. Experimental investigations have been performed at three different NASA facilities which characterize smoke aerosols from overheating common spacecraft materials. The earliest effort consists of aerosol measurements in low gravity, called the Smoke Aerosol Measurement Experiment (SAME), and subsequent ground-based testing of SAME smoke in 55-gallon drums with an aerosol reference instrument. Another set of experiments were performed at NASAs Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility (WSTF), with additional fuels and an alternate smoke production method. Measurements of these smoke products include mass and number concentration, and a thermal precipitator was designed for this investigation to capture particles for microscopic analysis. The final experiments presented are from NASAs Gases and Aerosols from Smoldering Polymers (GASP) Laboratory, with selected

  5. Large-Scale Spacecraft Fire Safety Experiments in ISS Resupply Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, Gary A.; Urban, David

    2013-01-01

    Our understanding of the fire safety risk in manned spacecraft has been limited by the small scale of the testing we have been able to conduct in low-gravity. Fire growth and spread cannot be expected to scale linearly with sample size so we cannot make accurate predictions of the behavior of realistic scale fires in spacecraft based on the limited low-g testing to date. As a result, spacecraft fire safety protocols are necessarily very conservative and costly. Future crewed missions are expected to be longer in duration than previous exploration missions outside of low-earth orbit and accordingly, more complex in terms of operations, logistics, and safety. This will increase the challenge of ensuring a fire-safe environment for the crew throughout the mission. Based on our fundamental uncertainty of the behavior of fires in low-gravity, the need for realistic scale testing at reduced gravity has been demonstrated. To address this concern, a spacecraft fire safety research project is underway to reduce the uncertainty and risk in the design of spacecraft fire safety systems by testing at nearly full scale in low-gravity. This project is supported by the NASA Advanced Exploration Systems Program Office in the Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate. The activity of this project is supported by an international topical team of fire experts from other space agencies to maximize the utility of the data and to ensure the widest possible scrutiny of the concept. The large-scale space flight experiment will be conducted on three missions; each in an Orbital Sciences Corporation Cygnus vehicle after it has deberthed from the ISS. Although the experiment will need to meet rigorous safety requirements to ensure the carrier vehicle does not sustain damage, the absence of a crew allows the fire products to be released into the cabin. The tests will be fully automated with the data downlinked at the conclusion of the test before the Cygnus vehicle reenters the

  6. Digital image transformation and rectification of spacecraft and radar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S. S. C.

    1985-01-01

    The application of digital processing techniques to spacecraft television pictures and radar images is discussed. The use of digital rectification to produce contour maps from spacecraft pictures is described; images with azimuth and elevation angles are converted into point-perspective frame pictures. The digital correction of the slant angle of radar images to ground scale is examined. The development of orthophoto and stereoscopic shaded relief maps from digital terrain and digital image data is analyzed. Digital image transformations and rectifications are utilized on Viking Orbiter and Lander pictures of Mars.

  7. Spacecraft-borne long life cryogenic refrigeration: Status and trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A. L.

    1983-01-01

    The status of cryogenic refrigerator development intended for, or possibly applicable to, long life spacecraft-borne application is reviewed. Based on these efforts, the general development trends are identified. Using currently projected technology needs, the various trends are compared and evaluated. The linear drive, non-contacting bearing Stirling cycle refrigerator concept appears to be the best current approach that will meet the technology projection requirements for spacecraft-borne cryogenic refrigerators. However, a multiply redundant set of lightweight, moderate life, moderate reliability Stirling cycle cryogenic refrigerators using high-speed linear drive and sliding contact bearings may possibly suffice.

  8. Periodic H-2 Synthesis for Spacecraft Attitude Control with Magnetometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2004-01-01

    A control synthesis for a spacecraft equipped with a set of magnetorquer coils is addressed. The electromagnetic actuation is particularly attractive for small low-cost spacecraft missions, due to their relatively low price, high reliability, light weight, and low power consumption. The interaction...... between the Earth´s magnetic field and an artificial magnetic field generated by the coils produces a control torque. The magnetic attitude control is intrinsically periodic due to cyclic variation of the geomagnetic field in orbit. The control performance is specified by the generalized H2 operator norm...

  9. Herschel observations of near-Earth objects: Encounters with the spacecraft and with the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, L.; Müller, T.; Altieri, B.; Kiss, C.; Kùppers, M.; Barucci, M.; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Gonzalez-Garcia, B.; Dotto, E.; Yoshikawa, M.; Carry, B.; Kidger, M.; Sanchez-Portal, M.; Vavrek, R.; Teyssier, D.; Marston, A.

    2014-07-01

    The Herschel MACH-11 (Measurements of 11 Asteroids & Comets with Herschel) Programme has as its prime goal to observe those asteroids & comets which have been or will be visited by spacecraft or those which are being studied with a similar goal in mind. The following near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) form part of the list of targets making up this program and will be addressed in this analysis: - 1999 JU_3 (Hayabusa 2 mission target) - 1999 RQ_{36} (OSIRIS-REx mission target) - 1996 FG_3 (Marco-Polo R backup mission target) - (99942) Apophis (Study target) An additional NEA (not part of the MACH-11 program) will also be reviewed, namely 2005 YU_{55}. Each target was observed using the PACS Photometer of the Herschel Space Observatory (Pilbratt et al 2010). The extracted fluxes from each observation campaign were fed into a thermophysical model which has been validated against a large database of asteroids including targets of other spacecraft missions. In all cases, radiometric properties of each target have been derived and will be presented, with their impact on already published data being analysed & discussed.

  10. Mars Pathfinder Spacecraft, Lander, and Rover Testing in Simulated Deep Space and Mars Surface Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kenneth R.

    1997-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder (MPF) Spacecraft was built and tested at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory during 1995/96. MPF is scheduled to launch in December 1996 and to land on Mars on July 4, 1997. The testing program for MPF required subjecting the mission hardware to both deep space and Mars surface conditions. A series of tests were devised and conducted from 1/95 to 7/96 to study the thermal response of the MPF spacecraft to the environmental conditions in which it will be exposed during the cruise phase (on the way to Mars) and the lander phase (landed on Mars) of the mission. Also, several tests were conducted to study the thermal characteristics of the Mars rover, Sojourner, under Mars surface environmental conditions. For these tests, several special test fixtures and methods were devised to simulate the required environmental conditions. Creating simulated Mars surface conditions was a challenging undertaking since Mars' surface is subjected to diurnal cycling between -20 C and -85 C, with windspeeds to 20 m/sec, occurring in an 8 torr CO2 atmosphere. This paper describes the MPF test program which was conducted at JPL to verify the MPF thermal design.

  11. On the Piloted Ignition of Solid Fuels in Spacecraft Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fereres-Rapoport, Sonya M.

    The effect of environmental variables on the ignition of solid combustible materials is explored through a combination of experimental, analytical and numerical analyses. This research stems from NASA's design requirement to reduce the cabin internal pressure and increase the oxygen concentration in human space vehicles and in future lunar habitats of the Constellation Program. These new environmental conditions may result in an increased fire risk of combustible solid materials due to higher flame temperatures (attributed to enhanced oxygen) and reduced convective heat losses from heated surfaces (attributed to reduced pressure). In particular, the influence of low pressure on ignition is emphasized here because little is known concerning this topic. A series of experiments conducted in a laboratory-scale combustion wind tunnel with externally irradiated samples of PMMA (polymethyl-methacrylate) showed that both the ignition delay time and the fuel mass flux at ignition decrease when the ambient pressure is lowered. An analytical model is used to identify the governing processes that lead to these results and then a numerical model is applied to quantify the influence of ambient variables (particularly pressure) on the piloted ignition of PMMA. The numerical model verifies the phenomenological explanations inferred from the experimental findings and the qualitative analytical results, and correctly simulates the thermo-physical mechanisms leading to ignition. It is concluded that reduced pressure environments result in: (1) smaller convective heat losses from the heated material to the surroundings due to a thickening of the thermal boundary layer next to the solid fuel surface, allowing for the material to heat more rapidly and pyrolyze faster; and, (2) a lower mass flux of volatiles required to reach the lean flammability limit of the gases at the pilot, leading to earlier ignition, due mainly to an enlarged boundary layer and a thicker fuel species profile

  12. PLATO: a multiple telescope spacecraft for exo-planets hunting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragazzoni, Roberto; Magrin, Demetrio; Rauer, Heike; Pagano, Isabella; Nascimbeni, Valerio; Piotto, Giampaolo; Piazza, Daniele; Levacher, Patrick; Schweitzer, Mario; Basso, Stefano; Bandy, Timothy; Benz, Willy; Bergomi, Maria; Biondi, Federico; Boerner, Anko; Borsa, Francesco; Brandeker, Alexis; Brändli, Mathias; Bruno, Giordano; Cabrera, Juan; Chinellato, Simonetta; De Roche, Thierry; Dima, Marco; Erikson, Anders; Farinato, Jacopo; Munari, Matteo; Ghigo, Mauro; Greggio, Davide; Gullieuszik, Marco; Klebor, Maximilian; Marafatto, Luca; Mogulsky, Valery; Peter, Gisbert; Rieder, Martin; Sicilia, Daniela; Spiga, Daniele; Viotto, Valentina; Wieser, Matthias; Heras, Ana Maria; Gondoin, Philippe; Bodin, Pierre; Catala, Claude

    2016-07-01

    PLATO stands for PLAnetary Transits and Oscillation of stars and is a Medium sized mission selected as M3 by the European Space Agency as part of the Cosmic Vision program. The strategy behind is to scrutinize a large fraction of the sky collecting lightcurves of a large number of stars and detecting transits of exo-planets whose apparent orbit allow for the transit to be visible from the Earth. Furthermore, as the transit is basically able to provide the ratio of the size of the transiting planet to the host star, the latter is being characterized by asteroseismology, allowing to provide accurate masses, radii and hence density of a large sample of extra solar bodies. In order to be able to then follow up from the ground via spectroscopy radial velocity measurements these candidates the search must be confined to rather bright stars. To comply with the statistical rate of the occurrence of such transits around these kind of stars one needs a telescope with a moderate aperture of the order of one meter but with a Field of View that is of the order of 50 degrees in diameter. This is achieved by splitting the optical aperture into a few dozens identical telescopes with partially overlapping Field of View to build up a mixed ensemble of differently covered area of the sky to comply with various classes of magnitude stars. The single telescopes are refractive optical systems with an internally located pupil defined by a CaF2 lens, and comprising an aspheric front lens and a strong field flattener optical element close to the detectors mosaic. In order to continuously monitor for a few years with the aim to detect planetary transits similar to an hypothetical twin of the Earth, with the same revolution period, the spacecraft is going to be operated while orbiting around the L2 Lagrangian point of the Earth-Sun system so that the Earth disk is no longer a constraints potentially interfering with such a wide field continuous uninterrupted survey.

  13. Spacecraft Sterilization Using Non-Equilibrium Atmospheric Pressure Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Moogega; Vaze, Nachiket; Anderson, Shawn; Fridman, Gregory; Vasilets, Victor N.; Gutsol, Alexander; Tsapin, Alexander; Fridman, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    As a solution to chemically and thermally destructive sterilization methods currently used for spacecraft, non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas are used to treat surfaces inoculated with Bacillus subtilis and Deinococcus radiodurans. Evidence of significant morphological changes and reduction in viability due to plasma exposure will be presented, including a 4-log reduction of B. subtilis after 2 minutes of dielectric barrier discharge treatment.

  14. Spacecraft and Their Boosters. Aerospace Education I. Instructor Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air Univ., Maxwell AFB, AL. Junior Reserve Office Training Corps.

    This curriculum guide is prepared for the textbook entitled "Spacecraft and their Boosters," published in the Aerospace Education I series. Specific guidelines are provided for teachers on each chapter included in the textbook. The guidelines are organized in nine categories: objectives, behavioral objectives, textbook outline,…

  15. New Approach to Total Dose Specification for Spacecraft Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xapsos, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Variability of the space radiation environment is investigated with regard to total dose specification for spacecraft electronics. It is shown to have a significant impact. A new approach is developed for total dose requirements that replaces the radiation design margin concept with failure probability during a mission.

  16. Computer Graphics Tools for the Visualization of Spacecraft Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-15

    34Describing an Attitude", paper presented at the 16th Annual AAS Guidnace and Control Conference, Keystone, Colorado, Feb 6 - 10, 1993. 4. Halliday ...David, and Resnick , Robert, Fundamentals of Physics, John Wiley & Sons, 1988. 5. Agrawal, Brij, N., Design of Geosynchronous Spacecraft, Prentice

  17. Automated workstation for the operation of spacecraft engineering subsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, K. A.; Atkins, K. L.; Saxon, R.; Kaufman, N.

    1988-01-01

    This paper addresses the development of a workstation that exploits automated tools to enable an operator to monitor concurrently several engineering subsystems and/or several space missions. The use of artificial intelligence and advanced graphics capabilities to achieve fast prototypes is discussed. The monitoring of engineering telemetry data from the Power and Pyro Subsystem of the Galileo spacecraft is emphasized.

  18. Evaluation of a Conductive Elastomer Seal for Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Christopher C.; Mather, Janice L.; Oravec, Heather A.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    An electrically conductive elastomer was evaluated as a material candidate for a spacecraft seal. The elastomer used electrically conductive constituents as a means to reduce the resistance between mating interfaces of a sealed joint to meet spacecraft electrical bonding requirements. The compound's outgassing levels were compared against published NASA requirements. The compound was formed into a hollow O-ring seal and its compression set was measured. The O-ring seal was placed into an interface and the electrical resistance and leak rate were quantified. The amount of force required to fully compress the test article in the sealing interface and the force needed to separate the joint were also measured. The outgassing and resistance measurements were below the maximum allowable levels. The room temperature compression set and leak rates were fairly high when compared against other typical spacecraft seal materials, but were not excessive. The compression and adhesion forces were desirably low. Overall, the performance of the elastomer compound was sufficient to be considered for future spacecraft seal applications.

  19. Spacecraft VLBI and Doppler tracking : Algorithms and implementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duev, D.A.; Molera Calvés, G.; Pogrebenko, S.V.; Gurvits, L.I.; Cimó, G.; Bocanegra Bahamon, T.

    2012-01-01

    Aims. We present the results of several multi-station Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) experiments conducted with the ESA spacecraft Venus Express as a target. To determine the true capabilities of VLBI tracking for future planetary missions in the solar system, it is necessary to

  20. Spacecraft Power. America in Space: The First Decade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corliss, William R.

    The various electric power sources suitable for use aboard spacecraft are described in this booklet. These power sources include batteries, fuel cells, solar cells, RTGs (radioisotope thermoelectric generator), and nuclear fission power plants. The introductory sections include a discussion of power requirements and the anatomy of a space power…