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Sample records for program directors results

  1. Results of the Association of Directors of Radiation Oncology Programs (ADROP) Survey of Radiation Oncology Residency Program Directors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, Eleanor; Abdel-Wahab, May; Spangler, Ann E.; Lawton, Colleen A.; Amdur, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To survey the radiation oncology residency program directors on the topics of departmental and institutional support systems, residency program structure, Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requirements, and challenges as program director. Methods: A survey was developed and distributed by the leadership of the Association of Directors of Radiation Oncology Programs to all radiation oncology program directors. Summary statistics, medians, and ranges were collated from responses. Results: Radiation oncology program directors had implemented all current required aspects of the ACGME Outcome Project into their training curriculum. Didactic curricula were similar across programs nationally, but research requirements and resources varied widely. Program directors responded that implementation of the ACGME Outcome Project and the external review process were among their greatest challenges. Protected time was the top priority for program directors. Conclusions: The Association of Directors of Radiation Oncology Programs recommends that all radiation oncology program directors have protected time and an administrative stipend to support their important administrative and educational role. Departments and institutions should provide adequate and equitable resources to the program directors and residents to meet increasingly demanding training program requirements.

  2. Burnout and distress among internal medicine program directors: results of a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Colin P; Halvorsen, Andrew J; Swenson, Sara L; McDonald, Furman S

    2013-08-01

    Physician burnout and distress has been described in national studies of practicing physicians, internal medicine (IM) residents, IM clerkship directors, and medical school deans. However, no comparable national data exist for IM residency program directors. To assess burnout and distress among IM residency program directors, and to evaluate relationships of distress with personal and program characteristics and perceptions regarding implementation and consequences of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) regulations. The 2010 Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine (APDIM) Annual Survey, developed by the APDIM Survey Committee, was sent in August 2010 to the 377 program directors with APDIM membership, representing 99.0 % of the 381 United States categorical IM residency programs. The 2010 APDIM Annual Survey included validated items on well-being and distress, including questions addressing quality of life, satisfaction with work-life balance, and burnout. Questions addressing personal and program characteristics and perceptions regarding implementation and consequences of ACGME regulations were also included. Of 377 eligible program directors, 282 (74.8 %) completed surveys. Among respondents, 12.4 % and 28.8 % rated their quality of life and satisfaction with work-life balance negatively, respectively. Also, 27.0 % reported emotional exhaustion, 10.4 % reported depersonalization, and 28.7 % reported overall burnout. These rates were lower than those reported previously in national studies of medical students, IM residents, practicing physicians, IM clerkship directors, and medical school deans. Aspects of distress were more common among younger program directors, women, and those reporting greater weekly work hours. Work-home conflicts were common and associated with all domains of distress, especially if not resolved in a manner effectively balancing work and home responsibilities. Associations with program characteristics

  3. Object Oriented Programming in Director

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian DARDALA

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Director is one of the most popular authoring software. As software for developing multimedia applications, Director is an object oriented programming environment. A very important issue to develop multimedia applications is the designing of their own classes. This paper presents the particular aspects concerning the available facilities offered by Lingo to design classes and to generate objects.

  4. Pregnancy and parental leave among obstetrics and gynecology residents: results of a nationwide survey of program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariton, Eduardo; Matthews, Benjamin; Burns, Abigail; Akileswaran, Chitra; Berkowitz, Lori R

    2018-04-16

    The health and economic benefits of paid parental leave have been well-documented. In 2016, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists released a policy statement about recommended parental leave for trainees; however, data on adoption of said guidelines are nonexistent, and published data on parental leave policies in obstetrics-gynecology are outdated. The objective of our study was to understand existing parental leave policies in obstetrics-gynecology training programs and to evaluate program director opinions on these policies and on parenting in residency. A Web-based survey regarding parental leave policies and coverage practices was sent to all program directors of accredited US obstetrics-gynecology residency programs. Cross-sectional Web-based survey. Sixty-five percent (163/250) of program directors completed the survey. Most program directors (71%) were either not aware of or not familiar with the recommendations of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists 2016 policy statement on parental leave. Nearly all responding programs (98%) had arranged parental leave for ≥1 residents in the past 5 years. Formal leave policies for childbearing and nonchildbearing parents exist at 83% and 55% of programs, respectively. Program directors reported that, on average, programs offer shorter parental leaves than program directors think trainees should receive. Coverage for residents on leave is most often provided by co-residents (98.7%), usually without compensation or schedule rearrangement to reduce work hours at another time (45.4%). Most program directors (82.8%) believed that becoming a parent negatively affected resident performance, and approximately one-half of the program directors believed that having a child in residency decreased well-being (50.9%), although 19.0% believed that it increased resident well-being. Qualitative responses were mixed and highlighted the complex challenges and competing priorities related to parental

  5. Quality in-training initiative--a solution to the need for education in quality improvement: results from a survey of program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelz, Rachel R; Sellers, Morgan M; Reinke, Caroline E; Medbery, Rachel L; Morris, Jon; Ko, Clifford

    2013-12-01

    The Next Accreditation System and the Clinical Learning Environment Review Program will emphasize practice-based learning and improvement and systems-based practice. We present the results of a survey of general surgery program directors to characterize the current state of quality improvement in graduate surgical education and introduce the Quality In-Training Initiative (QITI). In 2012, a 20-item survey was distributed to 118 surgical residency program directors from ACS NSQIP-affiliated hospitals. The survey content was developed in collaboration with the QITI to identify program director opinions regarding education in practice-based learning and improvement and systems-based practice, to investigate the status of quality improvement education in their respective programs, and to quantify the extent of resident participation in quality improvement. There was a 57% response rate. Eighty-five percent of program directors (n = 57) reported that education in quality improvement is essential to future professional work in the field of surgery. Only 28% (n = 18) of programs reported that at least 50% of their residents track and analyze their patient outcomes, compare them with norms/benchmarks/published standards, and identify opportunities to make practice improvements. Program directors recognize the importance of quality improvement efforts in surgical practice. Subpar participation in basic practice-based learning and improvement activities at the resident level reflects the need for support of these educational goals. The QITI will facilitate programmatic compliance with goals for quality improvement education. Copyright © 2013 American College of Surgeons. All rights reserved.

  6. Pregnancy and Parenthood among Surgery Residents: Results of the First Nationwide Survey of General Surgery Residency Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, Britt J; Tackett, John J; Longo, Walter E; Yoo, Peter S

    2016-06-01

    Although family and lifestyle are known to be important factors for medical students choosing a specialty, there is a lack of research about general surgery residency program policies regarding pregnancy and parenthood. Similarly, little is known about program director attitudes about these issues. We performed a cross-sectional survey of United States (US) general surgery residency program directors. Sixty-six respondents completed the survey: 70% male, 59% from university-based programs, and 76% between 40 and 59 years of age. Two-thirds (67%) reported having a maternity leave policy. Less than half (48%) reported having a leave policy for the non-childbearing parent (paternity leave). Leave duration was most frequently reported as 6 weeks for maternity leave (58%) and 1 week for paternity leave (45%). Thirty-eight percent of general surgery residency program directors (PDs) reported availability of on-site childcare, 58% reported availability of lactation facilities. Forty-six percent of university PDs said that the research years are the best time to have a child during residency; 52% of independent PDs said that no particular time during residency is best. Sixty-one percent of PDs reported that becoming a parent negatively affects female trainees' work, including placing an increased burden on fellow residents (33%). Respondents perceived children as decreasing female trainees' well-being more often than male trainees' (32% vs 9%, p leave, length of leave, as well as inconsistency in access to childcare and availability of spaces to express and store breast milk. Program directors perceived parenthood to affect the training and well-being of female residents more adversely than that of male residents. Copyright © 2016 American College of Surgeons. All rights reserved.

  7. The program director and accreditation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tristan, T.A.; Capp, M.P.; Krabbenhoft, K.L.; Armbruster, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    Field Survey is contrasted with the Specialist Site Visitor. The discussion addresses the reasons for different types of surveys and how the surveys and the Hospital Information Form are used in evaluating a graduate residency program in radiology for accreditation. The Residency Review Committee for Radiology (RRC) and the staff of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) of Residencies in Radiology offer a program for program directors and other interested leaders in graduate programs in radiology. The authors explain the review and accreditation process for residencies in radiology with special emphasis on the preparation for inspection by accurate and full completion of the Hospital Information Form on which the program is judged, and the nature of the inspection procedures

  8. Subspeciality training in hematology and oncology, 2003: results of a survey of training program directors conducted by the American Society of Hematology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Robert F; Gitlin, Scott D; Burns, Linda J

    2004-06-15

    A survey of directors of adult and pediatric hematology/oncology subspecialty training programs in the United States and Canada was conducted to assess the environment in which recruitment and training is conducted in these medical disciplines. A total of 107 program directors responded to the survey, representing 66% of internal medicine and 47% of pediatric subspecialty programs in hematology or hematology/oncology. Specific areas covered in the web-based questionnaire included the type and demographics of the training program, profile of the training program director, characteristics of the applicant pool and existing trainee recruits, characteristics of the training program environment and curricula, research productivity of trainees, and the career pathways taken by recent training program graduates (including dominant areas of clinical interest). The results of this survey show considerable heterogeneity in the recruiting practices and the environment in which subspecialty training occurs, leading the authors to recommend improvements in or a heightened attention to issues, including recruitment of minority trainees, flexibility to recruit international medical school graduates, timing of trainee acceptance, maintaining the financial support of Medicare graduation medical education (GME), training of physician scientists, organization of the continuity clinic experience, visibility of nonmalignant hematology as a career path, and level of training program director support.

  9. Veterinary Technician Program Director Leadership Style and Program Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renda-Francis, Lori A.

    2012-01-01

    Program directors of American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) accredited veterinary technician programs may have little or no training in leadership. The need for program directors of AVMA-accredited veterinary technician programs to understand how leadership traits may have an impact on student success is often overlooked. The purpose of…

  10. Postdoctoral periodontal program directors' perspectives of resident selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Saba; Carmosino, Andrew J; Yuan, Judy Chia-Chun; Lucchiari, Newton; Kawar, Nadia; Sukotjo, Cortino

    2015-02-01

    Applications for postdoctoral periodontal programs have recently increased. The National Board Dental Examinations (NBDE) has adopted a pass/fail format. The purpose of this study is to examine the criteria used by accredited postdoctoral periodontal programs in the United States to evaluate potential applicants. A secondary purpose was to determine whether the absence of NBDE scores would change program directors' selection process. Basic demographic information of the program directors was also collected. A questionnaire was sent to all 54 program directors of accredited postdoctoral periodontal programs in the United States. The raw data were compiled, descriptive analyses were performed, and results were tabulated and ranked when applicable. Thirty-five of 54 program directors (64.8%) responded to the survey. The five most important factors in selecting residents were: 1) interview ratings; 2) dental school clinical grades; 3) dental school periodontics grades; 4) personal statement; and 5) letters of recommendation. The majority of the programs (94%; n = 33) require an interview, and many (86%; n = 30) have a committee that makes the final decision on candidate acceptance. More than half of the respondents (56%; n = 17) stated that the pass/fail format of the NBDE would affect the decision-making process. This study describes the criteria used by postdoctoral periodontal programs to help select applicants. Interview ratings, dental school grades, personal statements, and letters of recommendation were found to be the most important factors. Results from this study may be helpful for prospective postdoctoral periodontal program applicants in the United States.

  11. Quality Improvement in Otolaryngology Residency: Survey of Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowe, Sarah N

    2016-02-01

    The Clinical Learning Environment Review focuses on the responsibility of the sponsoring institution for quality and patient safety. Very little information is known regarding the status of quality improvement (QI) education during otolaryngology training. The purpose of this survey is to evaluate the extent of resident and faculty participation in QI and identify opportunities for both resident curriculum and faculty development. Cross-sectional survey A 15-item survey was distributed to all 106 otolaryngology program directors. The survey was developed after an informal review of the literature regarding education in QI and patient safety. Questions were directed at the format and content of the QI curriculum, as well as barriers to implementation. There was a 39% response rate. Ninety percent of responding program directors considered education in QI important or very important to a resident's future success. Only 23% of responding programs contained an educational curriculum in QI, and only 33% monitored residents' individual outcome measures. Barriers to implementation of a QI program included inadequate number of faculty with expertise in QI (75%) and competing resident educational demands (90%). Every program director considered morbidity and mortality conferences as an integral component in QI education. Program directors recognize the importance of QI in otolaryngology practice. Unfortunately, this survey identifies a distinct lack of resources in support of these educational goals. The results highlight the need to generate a comprehensive and stepwise approach to QI for faculty development and resident instruction. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  12. Program Director Survey: Attitudes Regarding Child Neurology Training and Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Ignacio; Feist, Terri B; Gilbert, Donald L

    2016-04-01

    As a result of major clinical and scientific advances and changes in clinical practice, the role of adult neurology training for Child Neurology and Neurodevelopmental Disability (NDD) certification has become controversial. The most recently approved requirements for board eligibility for child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability residents still include 12 months in adult neurology rotations. The objective of this study was to assess United States child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability residency program directors' opinions regarding optimal residency training. The authors developed an 18-item questionnaire and contacted all 80 child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability program directors via e-mail, using SurveyMonkey. A total of 44 program directors responded (55%), representing programs that train 78 categorical and 94 total resident positions, approximately 70% of those filled in the match. Respondents identified multiple areas where child neurology residents need more training, including genetics and neuromuscular disease. A substantial majority (73%) believed child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability residents need less than 12 adult neurology training months; however, most (75%) also believed adult hospital service and man-power needs (55%) and finances (34%) would pose barriers to reducing adult neurology. Most (70%) believed reductions in adult neurology training should be program flexible. A majority believed the written initial certification examination should be modified with more child neurology and fewer basic neuroscience questions. Nearly all (91%) felt the views of child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability program directors are under-represented within the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Residency Review Committee. The requirement for 12 adult neurology months for Child Neurology and Neurodevelopmental Disability certification is not consistent with the views of the majority of program

  13. FEMA Grants Program Directorate - Preparedness (Non-Disaster) and Assistance to Firefighter Grants

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The Grant Programs Directorate (GPD) strategically and effectively administers and manages FEMA grants to ensure critical and measurable results for customers and...

  14. REP activities of the conference of radiation control program directors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bevill, B.

    1995-01-01

    This talk provides an overview of the activities within the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors associated with Radiological Emergency Preparedness. Included are summaries of interactions with FEMA, with US DOE, with US FDA, and with US DOT

  15. User's operating procedures. Volume 3: Projects directorate information programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haris, C. G.; Harris, D. K.

    1985-01-01

    A review of the user's operating procedures for the scout project automatic data system, called SPADS is presented. SPADS is the results of the past seven years of software development on a prime mini-computer. SPADS was developed as a single entry, multiple cross-reference data management and information retrieval system for the automation of Project office tasks, including engineering, financial, managerial, and clerical support. This volume, three of three, provides the instructions to operate the projects directorate information programs in data retrieval and file maintenance via the user friendly menu drivers.

  16. The Special Education Director's Role in Inservice Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donatell, Henry

    1978-01-01

    Reviewed in the article on the special education director's role in inservice training programs are planning procedures (including evaluation of the present program by all staff), types of programs offered (such as summer curriculum writing and teacher orientation week), and evaluation methods. (CL)

  17. Critical Care Pharmacist Market Perceptions: Comparison of Critical Care Program Directors and Directors of Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, David R; Persaud, Rosemary A; Naseman, Ryan W; Choudhary, Kavish; Carter, Kristen E; Hansen, Amanda

    2017-05-01

    Background: While hospital beds continue to decline as patients previously treated as inpatients are stabilized in ambulatory settings, the number of critical care beds available in the United States continues to rise. Growth in pharmacy student graduation, postgraduate year 2 critical care (PGY2 CC) residency programs, and positions has also increased. There is a perception that the critical care trained pharmacist market is saturated, yet this has not been evaluated since the rise in pharmacy graduates and residency programs. Purpose: To describe the current perception of critical care residency program directors (CC RPDs) and directors of pharmacy (DOPs) on the critical care pharmacist job market and to evaluate critical care postresidency placement and anticipated changes in PGY2 CC programs. Methods: Two electronic surveys were distributed from October 2015 to November 2015 through Vizient/University HealthSystem Consortium, American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP), Society of Critical Care Medicine, and American College of Clinical Pharmacy listservs to target 2 groups of respondents: CC RPDs and DOPs. Questions were based on the ASHP Pharmacy Forecast and the Pharmacy Workforce Center's Aggregate Demand Index and were intended to identify perceptions of the critical care market of the 2 groups. Results: Of 116 CC RPDs, there were 66 respondents (56.9% response rate). Respondents have observed an increase in applicants; however, they do not anticipate increasing the number of positions in the next 5 years. The overall perception is that there is a balance in supply and demand in the critical care trained pharmacist market. A total of 82 DOPs responded to the survey. Turnover of critical care pharmacists within respondent organizations is expected to be low. Although a majority of DOPs plan to expand residency training positions, only 9% expect to increase positions in critical care PGY2 training. Overall, DOP respondents indicated a balance of

  18. Burnout and Resiliency Among Family Medicine Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Maribeth; Hagan, Helen; Klassen, Rosemary; Yang, Yang; Seehusen, Dean A; Carek, Peter J

    2018-02-01

    Nearly one-half (46%) of physicians report at least one symptom of burnout. Family medicine residency program directors may have similar and potentially unique levels of burnout as well as resiliency. The primary aims of this study were to examine burnout and resiliency among family medicine residency directors and characterize associated factors. The questions used were part of a larger omnibus survey conducted by the Council of Academic Family Medicine (CAFM) Educational Research Alliance (CERA) in 2016. Program and director-specific characteristics were obtained. Symptoms of burnout were assessed using two single-item measures adapted from the full Maslach Burnout Inventory, and level of resiliency was assessed using the Brief Resilience Scale. The overall response rate for the survey was 53.7% (245/465). Symptoms of high emotional exhaustion or high depersonalization were reported in 27.3% and 15.8% of program directors, respectively. More than two-thirds of program directors indicated that they associated themselves with characteristics of resiliency. Emotional exhaustion and depersonalization were significantly correlated with never having personal time, an unhealthy work-life balance, and the inability to stop thinking about work. The presence of financial stress was significantly correlated with higher levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. In contrast, the level of resiliency reported was directly correlated with having a moderate to great amount of personal time, healthy work-life balance, and ability to stop thinking about work, and negatively correlated with the presence of financial stress. Levels of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and resiliency are significantly related to personal characteristics of program directors rather than characteristics of their program.

  19. Sexual Health Education in Massage Therapy Programs: A Survey of Program Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamboni, Brian D.; Healey, Dale K.

    2016-01-01

    Massage therapy program directors completed an online survey to explore sexual education in massage therapy programs. The overall data suggest that program directors are supportive of sexual health education in the training of massage therapists and that such education is integrated into several aspects of their training programs. To enhance…

  20. Learning to Manage: A Program Just for Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Megan E.

    1996-01-01

    Describes the Head Start-Johnson & Johnson Management Fellows program, whose mission is strengthening management skills of Head Start directors by providing training in human resources management, organizational design and development, financial management, computers and information systems, operations, marketing, and development of strategic…

  1. Program Director Participation in a Leadership and Management Skills Fellowship and Characteristics of Program Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carek, Peter J; Mims, Lisa D; Conry, Colleen M; Maxwell, Lisa; Greenwood, Vicki; Pugno, Perry A

    2015-01-01

    The association between a residency program director completing a leadership and management skills fellowship and characteristics of quality and innovation of his/her residency program has not been studied. Therefore, the aim of this study is to examine the association between a residency program director's completion of a specific fellowship addressing these skills (National Institute for Program Director Development or NIPDD) and characteristics of quality and innovation of the program they direct. Using information from the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP), National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) and FREIDA® program characteristics were obtained. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the data. The relationship between programs with a NIPDD graduate as director and program quality measures and indicators of innovation was analyzed using both chi square and logistic regression. Initial analyses showed significant associations between the NIPDD graduate status of a program director and regional location, mean years of program director tenure, and the program's 5-year aggregate ABFM board pass rate from 2007--2011. After grouping the programs into tertiles, the regression model showed significant positive associations with programs offering international experiences and being a NIPDD graduate. Program director participation in a fellowship addressing leadership and management skills (ie, NIPDD) was found to be associated with higher pass rates of new graduates on a Board certification examination and predictive of programs being in the upper tertile of programs in terms of Board pass rates.

  2. Gail Harlamoff: Executive Director, Life Lab Science Program

    OpenAIRE

    Rabkin, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    Gail Harlamoff is Executive Director of the Life Lab Science Program, a nationally recognized, award-winning nonprofit science and environmental organization located on the UC Santa Cruz campus. Founded in 1979, Life Lab helps schools develop gardens and implement curricula to enhance students’ learning about science, math, and the natural world. The program has trained tens of thousands of educators in more than 1400 schools across the country. Life Lab’s specialized initiatives inc...

  3. Case-Logging Practices in Otolaryngology Residency Training: National Survey of Residents and Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermody, Sarah M; Gao, William; McGinn, Johnathan D; Malekzadeh, Sonya

    2017-06-01

    Objective (1) Evaluate the consistency and manner in which otolaryngology residents log surgical cases. (2) Assess the extent of instruction and guidance provided by program directors on case-logging practices. Study Design Cross-sectional national survey. Setting Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education otolaryngology residency programs in the United States. Subjects and Methods US otolaryngology residents, postgraduate year 2 through graduating chiefs as of July 2016, were recruited to respond to an anonymous questionnaire designed to characterize surgical case-logging practices. Program directors of US otolaryngology residency programs were recruited to respond to an anonymous questionnaire to elucidate how residents are instructed to log cases. Results A total of 272 residents and 53 program directors completed the survey, yielding response rates of 40.6% and 49.5%, respectively. Perceived accuracy of case logs is low among residents and program directors. Nearly 40% of residents purposely choose not to log certain cases, and 65.1% of residents underreport cases performed. More than 80% of program directors advise residents to log procedures performed outside the operating room, yet only 16% of residents consistently log such cases. Conclusion Variability in surgical case-logging behaviors and differences in provided instruction highlight the need for methods to improve consistency of logging practices. It is imperative to standardize practices across otolaryngology residency programs for case logs to serve as an accurate measure of surgical competency. This study provides a foundation for reform efforts within residency programs and for the Resident Case Log System.

  4. Opinions of practitioners and program directors concerning accreditation standards for postdoctoral pediatric dentistry training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casamassimo, P S; Wilson, S

    1999-01-01

    This study was performed to assess opinions of program directors and practitioners about the importance and necessary numbers of experiences required by current accreditation standards for training of pediatric dentists. A 32-item questionnaire was sent to all program directors of ADA-accredited postdoctoral pediatric dentistry training programs and to a random sample of 10% of the fellow/active membership of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry. An overall response rate of 56% was obtained from the single mailing. Practitioners and program directors differed significantly (P dentistry: initiating and completing a research paper, biostatistics/epidemiology, and practice management. Program directors had little difficulty obtaining required experiences, and program dependence on Medicaid did not negatively affect quality of education. Practitioners and program directors agreed on the importance of most experiences and activities required by current accreditation standards.

  5. 76 FR 5186 - National Protection and Programs Directorate; Agency Information Collection Activities; Office of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY [Docket No. DHS-2010-0084] National Protection and Programs... Protection Stakeholder Input Project--Generic Clearance AGENCY: National Protection and Programs Directorate.... SUMMARY: The Department of Homeland Security (DHS), National Protection and Programs Directorate (NPPD...

  6. Accelerating medical education: a survey of deans and program directors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Cangiarella

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: A handful of medical schools in the U.S. are awarding medical degrees after three years. While the number of three-year pathway programs is slowly increasing there is little data on the opinions of medical education leaders on the need for shortening training. Purpose: To survey deans and program directors (PDs to understand the current status of 3-year medical degree programs and to elicit perceptions of the need for shortening medical school and the benefits and liabilities of 3-year pathway programs (3YPP. Methods: Online surveys were emailed to the academic deans of all U.S. medical schools and to a convenience sample of residency and fellowship PDs. Frequency distributions are reported for key survey items and content analysis was used to describe open-ended responses. Results: Of the respondents, 7% have a 3YPP, 4% were developing one, and 35% were considering development. In 2014, 47% of educational deans and 32% of PDs agreed that there may be a need to shorten medical school. From a list of benefits, both deans and PDs agreed that the greatest benefit to a 3YPP was debt reduction (68%. PDs and deans felt reduced readiness for independence, reduced exposure to complementary curricula regarding safety and quality improvement, premature commitment to a specialty, and burnout were all potential liabilities. From a list of concerns, PDs were concerned about depth of clinical exposure, direct patient care experience, ability to assume increased responsibility, level of maturity, and certainty regarding career choice. Conclusions: Over one-third of medical schools are considering the development of a 3YPP. While there may be benefits for a select group of students, concerns regarding maturity, depth of clinical exposure, and competency must be addressed for these programs to be well received.

  7. Resident Preferences for Program Director Role in Wellness Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolarik, Russ C; O'Neal, Richard L; Ewing, Joseph A

    2018-05-01

    Burnout and depression are prevalent among resident physicians, though the supportive role of the program director (PD) is not well defined. To understand the residents' view of the residency program director's role in assessing and promoting resident wellness. A single institution survey of all house staff was conducted in 2017. Rates of burnout and depression were identified via the 2-item Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) and the Patient Health Questionaire-2 (PHQ-2), respectively. Residents then qualified their preferences for various assistance services and for the role of their program directors in assisting them. One-hundred sixty-one of 202 (79.7%) residents completed the survey. The rate of depression was 28%. Rates of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization (2-item MBI) were 44 and 62%, respectively. Only 4% of respondents had used the Employee Assistance Program (EAP) in the prior 12 months. Eighty-two percent of residents were in favor of PDs inquiring about wellness regardless of their job performance and only 1% of residents stated the PD should not inquire about wellness at all. Thirty-three percent of residents reported that they would be likely to contact EAP on their own if they felt unwell. Significantly more residents (62%) reported being more likely to contact EAP if recommended by their PD (33 vs 62%, p assistance were lack of time (65%), lack of knowledge of how to contact EAP (41%), and concerns about appearing weak (35%). Despite a high prevalence of burnout and depression, residents are unlikely to seek help on their own. Program directors have an important role in assessing and promoting the wellness of their residents. The majority of residents wants their PD to inquire about wellness and may be more likely to seek and receive help if recommended and facilitated by their PD.

  8. Are surgery training programs ready for virtual reality? A survey of program directors in general surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haluck, R S; Marshall, R L; Krummel, T M; Melkonian, M G

    2001-12-01

    The use of advanced technology, such as virtual environments and computer-based simulators (VR/CBS), in training has been well established by both industry and the military. In contrast the medical profession, including surgery, has been slow to incorporate such technology in its training. In an attempt to identify factors limiting the regular incorporation of this technology into surgical training programs, a survey was developed and distributed to all general surgery program directors in the United States. A 22-question survey was sent to 254 general surgery program directors. The survey was designed to reflect attitudes of the program directors regarding the use of computer-based simulation in surgical training. Questions were scaled from 1 to 5 with 1 = strongly disagree and 5 = strongly agree. A total of 139 responses (55%) were returned. The majority of respondents (58%) had seen VR/CBS, but only 19% had "hands-on" experience with these systems. Respondents strongly agreed that there is a need for learning opportunities outside of the operating room and a role for VR/CBS in surgical training. Respondents believed both staff and residents would support this type of training. Concerns included VR/CBS' lack of validation and potential requirements for frequent system upgrades. Virtual environments and computer-based simulators, although well established training tools in other fields, have not been widely incorporated into surgical education. Our results suggest that program directors believe this type of technology would be beneficial in surgical education, but they lack adequate information regarding VR/CBS. Developers of this technology may need to focus on educating potential users and addressing their concerns.

  9. Program directors in their role as leaders of teaching teams in residency training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slootweg, Irene A.; van der Vleuten, Cees; Heineman, Maas Jan; Scherpbier, Albert; Lombarts, Kiki M. J. M. H.

    2014-01-01

    Program directors have a formal leading position within a teaching team. It is not clear how program directors fulfill their leadership role in practice. In this interview study we aim to explore the role of the program director as strategic leader, based on the research-question: What are the

  10. Program directors in their role as leaders of teaching teams in residency training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slootweg, I.A.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der; Heineman, M.J.; Scherpbier, A.; Lombarts, K.M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Program directors have a formal leading position within a teaching team. It is not clear how program directors fulfill their leadership role in practice. In this interview study we aim to explore the role of the program director as strategic leader, based on the research-question: What

  11. Child Welfare Training in Child Psychiatry Residency: A Program Director Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Terry G.; Cox, Julia R.; Walker, Sarah C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study surveys child psychiatry residency program directors in order to 1) characterize child welfare training experiences for child psychiatry residents; 2) evaluate factors associated with the likelihood of program directors' endorsing the adequacy of their child welfare training; and 3) assess program directors'…

  12. Clinical skills assessment of procedural and advanced communication skills: performance expectations of residency program directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenau, Erik E.; Zhang, Xiuyuan; Roberts, William L.; DeChamplain, Andre F.; Boulet, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Background High stakes medical licensing programs are planning to augment and adapt current examinations to be relevant for a two-decision point model for licensure: entry into supervised practice and entry into unsupervised practice. Therefore, identifying which skills should be assessed at each decision point is critical for informing examination development, and gathering input from residency program directors is important. Methods Using data from previously developed surveys and expert panels, a web-delivered survey was distributed to 3,443 residency program directors. For each of the 28 procedural and 18 advanced communication skills, program directors were asked which clinical skills should be assessed, by whom, when, and how. Descriptive statistics were collected, and Intraclass Correlations (ICC) were conducted to determine consistency across different specialties. Results Among 347 respondents, program directors reported that all advanced communication and some procedural tasks are important to assess. The following procedures were considered ‘important’ or ‘extremely important’ to assess: sterile technique (93.8%), advanced cardiovascular life support (ACLS) (91.1%), basic life support (BLS) (90.0%), interpretation of electrocardiogram (89.4%) and blood gas (88.7%). Program directors reported that most clinical skills should be assessed at the end of the first year of residency (or later) and not before graduation from medical school. A minority were considered important to assess prior to the start of residency training: demonstration of respectfulness (64%), sterile technique (67.2%), BLS (68.9%), ACLS (65.9%) and phlebotomy (63.5%). Discussion Results from this study support that assessing procedural skills such as cardiac resuscitation, sterile technique, and phlebotomy would be amenable to assessment at the end of medical school, but most procedural and advanced communications skills would be amenable to assessment at the end of the first

  13. Women’s Health Training in Gastroenterology Fellowship: A National Survey of Fellows and Program Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, Erica; Richie, Kelly; Lindstrom, Mary J.; Esposti, Silvia Degli; Wald, Arnold

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims The Gastroenterology Core Curriculum requires training in women’s digestive disorders; however, requirements do not necessarily produce knowledge and competence. Our study goals were: (1) to compare perceptions of education, fellow-reported levels of competence, and attitudes towards training in women’s gastrointestinal (GI) health issues during fellowship between gastroenterology fellows and program directors, and (2) to determine the barriers for meeting training requirements. Methods A national survey assessing four domains of training was conducted. All GI program directors in the United States (n = 153) and a random sample of gastroenterology fellows (n = 769) were mailed surveys. Mixed effects linear modeling was used to estimate all mean scores and to assess differences between the groups. Cronbach’s alpha was used to assess the consistency of the measures which make up the means. Results Responses were received from 61% of program directors and 31% of fellows. Mean scores in perceived didactic education, clinical experiences, and competence in women’s GI health were low and significantly differed between the groups (P < 0.0001). Fellows’ attitudes towards women’s GI health issues were more positive compared to program directors’ (P = 0.004). Barriers to training were: continuity clinic at a Veteran’s Administration hospital, low number of pregnant patients treated, low number of referrals from obstetrics and gynecology, and lack of faculty interest in women’s health. Conclusions (1) Fellows more so than program directors perceive training in women’s GI health issues to be low. (2) Program directors more so than fellows rate fellows to be competent in women’s GI health. (3) Multiple barriers to women’s health training exist. PMID:21267780

  14. 25 CFR 2.19 - Action by Area Directors and Education Programs officials on appeal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Programs officials on appeal. (a) Area Directors, Area Education Programs Administrators, Agency... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Action by Area Directors and Education Programs officials on appeal. 2.19 Section 2.19 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROCEDURES...

  15. 78 FR 31955 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security National Protection and Programs Directorate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-28

    ... 1974; Department of Homeland Security National Protection and Programs Directorate--001 Arrival and... of records titled Department of Homeland Security/National Protection and Programs Directorate--001... of 1974, 5 U.S.C. 552a, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) National Protection and Programs...

  16. Resident and program director gender distribution by specialty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Timothy R; Elliott, Beth A; Warner, Mary Ellen; Brown, Michael J; Rose, Steven H

    2011-12-01

    Although enrollment of women in U.S. medical schools has increased, women remain less likely to achieve senior academic rank, lead academic departments, or be appointed to national leadership positions. The purpose of this paper is to compare the gender distribution of residency program directors (PDs) with residents and faculty in the 10 largest specialties. The gender distribution of residents training in the 10 specialties with the largest enrollment was obtained from the annual education issue of Journal of the American Medical Association. The gender distribution of the residents was compared with the gender distribution of PDs and medical school faculty. The number of programs and the names of the PDs were identified by accessing the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education web site. Gender was confirmed through electronic search of state medical board data, program web sites, or by using internet search engines. The gender distribution of medical school faculty was determined using the Association of American Medical Colleges faculty roster database (accessed June 15, 2011). The correlation between female residents and PDs was assessed using Pearson's product-moment correlation. The gender distribution of female PDs appointed June 1, 2006, through June 1, 2010, was compared with the distribution appointed before June 1, 2006, using chi square analysis. Specialties with higher percentages of female PDs had a higher percentage of female residents enrolled (r=0.81, p=0.005). The number of female PDs appointed from July 1, 2006, through June 30, 2010, was greater than the number appointed before July 1, 2006, in emergency medicine (pWomen remain underrepresented in PD appointments relative to the proportion of female medical school faculty and female residents. Mechanisms to address gender-based barriers to advancement should be considered.

  17. Views of surgery program directors on the current ACGME and proposed IOM duty-hour standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Ross E; Coverdill, James E; Mellinger, John D; Collins, J Craig; Potts, John R; Dent, Daniel L

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to survey the experiences of surgery program directors with the current Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) duty-hour standards and views of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) proposed duty-hour recommendations. A total of 118 program directors (47.6% of all surgery programs in the US) responded to the survey. Results showed that the current duty-hour standards have hindered clinical education opportunities by reducing or eliminating rotations on many services, didactic teaching conferences, and clinical bedside teaching opportunities. Additionally, patient safety has been compromised by frequent hand offs of care. Most IOM recommendations were perceived as extremely difficult or impossible to implement, with the exception of the moonlighting recommendation. The results indicated that adopting the IOM recommendations is not feasible given current workforce limitations, and most program directors supported maintaining the current duty-hour standards until such time as there is evidence-based outcomes research to direct change. The conclusion was that the current ACGME duty-hour standards have reduced teaching opportunities and narrowed the scope of training.

  18. What skills should new internal medicine interns have in july? A national survey of internal medicine residency program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, Steven; Vu, T Robert; Halvorsen, Andrew J; Aiyer, Meenakshy; McKown, Kevin; Chmielewski, Amy F; McDonald, Furman S

    2014-03-01

    The transition from medical student to intern may cause stress and burnout in new interns and the delivery of suboptimal patient care. Despite a formal set of subinternship curriculum guidelines, program directors have expressed concern regarding the skill set of new interns and the lack of standardization in that skill set among interns from different medical schools. To address these issues, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's Next Accreditation System focuses on the development of a competency-based education continuum spanning undergraduate, graduate, and continuing medical education. In 2010, the Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine subinternship task force, in collaboration with the Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine survey committee, surveyed internal medicine residency program directors to determine which competencies or skills they expected from new medical school graduates. The authors summarized the results using categories of interest. In both an item rank list and free-text responses, program directors were nearly uniform in ranking the skills they deemed most important for new interns-organization and time management and prioritization skills; effective communication skills; basic clinical skills; and knowing when to ask for assistance. Stakeholders should use the results of this survey as they develop a milestone-based curriculum for the fourth year of medical school and for the internal medicine subinternship. By doing so, they should develop a standardized set of skills that meet program directors' expectations, reduce the stress of transitions across the educational continuum, and improve the quality of patient care.

  19. Attitudes of program directors toward women in pediatric dentistry training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seale, N S; Waggoner, W F

    1992-01-01

    The number of women entering pediatric dentistry graduate programs is increasing. A formal survey was conducted in the fall of 1990 to determine what impact, if any, this increase is having on the programs. The survey sample consisted of the 57 pediatric dentistry graduate program directors from the United States and Canada. The survey form included program data about gender distribution in the current and previous classes, and female faculty distribution within the programs. The survey requested information about the attitudes of various groups of individuals who interacted with the residents relative to the gender of the resident and again, relative to whether the resident was pregnant. Inquiry was made concerning maternity leave policies and selected treatment scenarios involving pregnant residents. Finally, questions were asked about motivational factors, personal priorities, and policy change for female vs. male residents. Fifty forms were returned for a return rate of 88%. The 48 forms analyzed revealed that 52% of current classes are female and 51% of applicants for 1991 were female. Women comprise 23% of full-time and 26% of part-time faculty. There was no single issue perceived by program directors as a group to be a significant concern or problem relating to gender. Program directors would consider removing pregnant females from contact with combative patients (83%) and environmental hazards (85%), but fewer would consider removing them from contact with for HIV+ or Hb+ patients.

  20. Programs director`s report for the Office of Health and Environmental Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    Since its establishment, the Department of Energy`s Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) has had responsibility for conducting biological research to develop the knowledge needed to identify, understand, and anticipate the long-term health consequences of energy use and development, including the potential health impacts of radiation. The Health Effects Research Program has established the basis for understanding the health consequences of radiation for humans, developed radiation dosimetry methodology, characterized and evaluated the health impacts of fossil fuels, and developed and conducted research to determine the health impacts of inhaled toxicants. The results of this research have provided input for setting genetic standards for radiation and chemical exposure.

  1. 75 FR 18850 - National Protection and Programs Directorate; Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-13

    ... Directorate; Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards Personnel Surety Program AGENCY: National Protection...-terrorism Vulnerability Information (CVI), Sensitive Security Information (SSI), or Protected Critical... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Program Description The Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards (CFATS), 6 CFR...

  2. Program Director as Webmaster? Analysis of 131 Anesthesiology Department Web Sites and Program Director Web Site Involvement and Opinion Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshpayeh, Negin; Lee, Howard; Berger, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    The last formal review of academic anesthesiology department Web sites (ADWs) for content was conducted in 2009. ADWs have been rated as very important by medical students in researching residency training programs; however, the rapid evolution of sites require that descriptive statistics must be more current to be considered reliable. We set out to provide an updated overview of ADW content and to better understand residency program directors' (PD) role and comfort with ADWs. Two independent reviewers (ND and HL) analyzed all 131 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) accredited ADWs. A binary system (Yes/No) was used to determine which features were present. Reviewer reliability was confirmed with inter-rater reliability and percentage agreement calculation. Additionally, a blinded electronic survey (Survey Monkey, Portland, OR) was sent to anesthesiology residency PDs via electronic mail investigating the audiences for ADWs, the frequency of updates and the degree of PD involvement. 13% of anesthesiology departments still lack a Web site with a homepage with links to the residency program and educational offerings (18% in 2009). Only half (55%) of Web sites contain information for medical students, including clerkship information. Furthermore, programs rarely contain up-to-date calendars (13%), accreditation cycle lengths (11%), accreditation dates (7%) or board pass rates (6%). The PD survey, completed by 42 of 131 PDs, noted a correlation (r = 0.36) between the number of years as PD and the frequency of Web site updates - less experienced PDs appear to update their sites more frequently (p = 0.03). Although 86% of PDs regarded a Web site as "very" important in recruitment, only 9% felt "very" comfortable with the skills required to advertise and market a Web site. Despite the overall increase in ADW content since 2009, privacy concerns, limited resources and time constraints may prevent PDs from providing the most up-to-date Web sites for

  3. Enhancing teamwork between chief residents and residency program directors: description and outcomes of an experiential workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhillips, Heather A; Frohna, John G; Murad, M Hassan; Batra, Maneesh; Panda, Mukta; Miller, Marsha A; Brigham, Timothy P; Doughty, Robert A

    2011-12-01

    An effective working relationship between chief residents and residency program directors is critical to a residency program's success. Despite the importance of this relationship, few studies have explored the characteristics of an effective program director-chief resident partnership or how to facilitate collaboration between the 2 roles, which collectively are important to program quality and resident satisfaction. We describe the development and impact of a novel workshop that paired program directors with their incoming chief residents to facilitate improved partnerships. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education sponsored a full-day workshop for residency program directors and their incoming chief residents. Sessions focused on increased understanding of personality styles, using experiential learning, and open communication between chief residents and program directors, related to feedback and expectations of each other. Participants completed an anonymous survey immediately after the workshop and again 8 months later to assess its long-term impact. Participants found the workshop to be a valuable experience, with comments revealing common themes. Program directors and chief residents expect each other to act as a role model for the residents, be approachable and available, and to be transparent and fair in their decision-making processes; both groups wanted feedback on performance and clear expectations from each other for roles and responsibilities; and both groups identified the need to be innovative and supportive of changes in the program. Respondents to the follow-up survey reported that workshop participation improved their relationships with their co-chiefs and program directors. Participation in this experiential workshop improved the working relationships between chief residents and program directors. The themes that were identified can be used to foster communication between incoming chief residents and residency directors and to

  4. Neurocritical care education during neurology residency: AAN survey of US program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, K N; Drogan, O; Manno, E; Geocadin, R G; Ziai, W

    2012-05-29

    Limited information is available regarding the current state of neurocritical care education for neurology residents. The goal of our survey was to assess the need and current state of neurocritical care training for neurology residents. A survey instrument was developed and, with the support of the American Academy of Neurology, distributed to residency program directors of 132 accredited neurology programs in the United States in 2011. A response rate of 74% (98 of 132) was achieved. A dedicated neuroscience intensive care unit (neuro-ICU) existed in 64%. Fifty-six percent of residency programs offer a dedicated rotation in the neuro-ICU, lasting 4 weeks on average. Where available, the neuro-ICU rotation was required in the vast majority (91%) of programs. Neurology residents' exposure to the fundamental principles of neurocritical care was obtained through a variety of mechanisms. Of program directors, 37% indicated that residents would be interested in performing away rotations in a neuro-ICU. From 2005 to 2010, the number of programs sending at least one resident into a neuro-ICU fellowship increased from 14% to 35%. Despite the expansion of neurocritical care, large proportions of US neurology residents have limited exposure to a neuro-ICU and neurointensivists. Formal training in the principles of neurocritical care may be highly variable. The results of this survey suggest a charge to address the variability of resident education and to develop standardized curricula in neurocritical care for neurology residents.

  5. 76 FR 2700 - National Protection and Programs Directorate; National Emergency Communications Plan (NECP) Goal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-14

    ... Programs Directorate (NPPD)/Office of Cybersecurity and Communications (CS&C)/Office of Emergency Communications (OEC) will submit the following Information Collection Request to the Office of Management and... Directorate; National Emergency Communications Plan (NECP) Goal 2 Performance Report AGENCY: National...

  6. 75 FR 14454 - National Protection and Programs Directorate; National Infrastructure Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-25

    ..., National Infrastructure Advisory Council. [FR Doc. 2010-6633 Filed 3-24-10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 9110-9P-P ... Directorate; National Infrastructure Advisory Council AGENCY: National Protection and Programs Directorate... Infrastructure Advisory Council (NIAC) will meet on Tuesday, April 13, 2010, at the National Press Club's...

  7. 75 FR 39266 - National Protection and Programs Directorate; National Infrastructure Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-08

    ... Infrastructure Disruptions VII. New Business VIII. Closing Remarks IX. Adjournment Procedural While this meeting... Directorate; National Infrastructure Advisory Council AGENCY: National Protection and Programs Directorate... Infrastructure Advisory Council (NIAC) will meet on Tuesday, July 13, 2010, at the National Press Club's Ballroom...

  8. 76 FR 34732 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security/National Protection and Programs Directorate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-14

    ... 1974; Department of Homeland Security/National Protection and Programs Directorate--002 Chemical... Homeland Security/National Protection and Programs Directorate--002 Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism.... 552a, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS)/National Protection and Programs Directorate (NPPD...

  9. Stress and Burnout Among Residency Program Directors in United States Radiation Oncology Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aggarwal, Sonya [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States); Kusano, Aaron S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Carter, Justin Nathaniel; Gable, Laura [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States); Thomas, Charles R. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health and Sciences University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Chang, Daniel T., E-mail: dtchang@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate stressors among radiation oncology residency program directors (PDs) and determine the prevalence and indicators of burnout. Methods and Materials: An anonymous, online, cross-sectional survey was offered to PDs of US radiation oncology programs in the fall of 2014. Survey content examined individual and program demographics, perceptions surrounding the role of PD, and commonly encountered stressors. Burnout was assessed using the validated Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey. Results: In total, 47 of 88 PDs (53%) responded to the survey. Although 78% of respondents reported feeling “satisfied” or “highly satisfied” with their current role, 85% planned to remain as PD for <5 years. The most commonly cited stressors were satisfying Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education/Residency Review Committee requirements (47%), administrative duties (30%) and resident morale (28%). Three-quarters of respondents were satisfied that they became PDs. Overall, 11% of respondents met criteria for low burnout, 83% for moderate burnout, and 6% for high burnout. Not having served as a PD at a prior institution correlated with high depersonalization (OR 6.75, P=.04) and overall burnout (odds ratio [OR], 15.6; P=.04). Having more years on faculty prior to becoming PD correlated with less emotional exhaustion (OR, 0.44, P=.05) and depersonalization (OR, 0.20, P=.04). Finally, having dedicated time for PD duties correlated with less emotional exhaustion (OR, 0.27, P=.04). Conclusions: Moderate levels of burnout are common in U.S. radiation oncology PDs with regulatory stressors being common. Despite this, many PDs are fulfilled with their role. Longitudinal studies assessing dynamic external factors and their influence on PD burnout would be beneficial.

  10. Stress and Burnout Among Residency Program Directors in United States Radiation Oncology Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Sonya; Kusano, Aaron S.; Carter, Justin Nathaniel; Gable, Laura; Thomas, Charles R.; Chang, Daniel T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate stressors among radiation oncology residency program directors (PDs) and determine the prevalence and indicators of burnout. Methods and Materials: An anonymous, online, cross-sectional survey was offered to PDs of US radiation oncology programs in the fall of 2014. Survey content examined individual and program demographics, perceptions surrounding the role of PD, and commonly encountered stressors. Burnout was assessed using the validated Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey. Results: In total, 47 of 88 PDs (53%) responded to the survey. Although 78% of respondents reported feeling “satisfied” or “highly satisfied” with their current role, 85% planned to remain as PD for <5 years. The most commonly cited stressors were satisfying Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education/Residency Review Committee requirements (47%), administrative duties (30%) and resident morale (28%). Three-quarters of respondents were satisfied that they became PDs. Overall, 11% of respondents met criteria for low burnout, 83% for moderate burnout, and 6% for high burnout. Not having served as a PD at a prior institution correlated with high depersonalization (OR 6.75, P=.04) and overall burnout (odds ratio [OR], 15.6; P=.04). Having more years on faculty prior to becoming PD correlated with less emotional exhaustion (OR, 0.44, P=.05) and depersonalization (OR, 0.20, P=.04). Finally, having dedicated time for PD duties correlated with less emotional exhaustion (OR, 0.27, P=.04). Conclusions: Moderate levels of burnout are common in U.S. radiation oncology PDs with regulatory stressors being common. Despite this, many PDs are fulfilled with their role. Longitudinal studies assessing dynamic external factors and their influence on PD burnout would be beneficial.

  11. 75 FR 82037 - National Protection and Programs Directorate; President's National Security Telecommunications...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY [Docket No. DHS-2010-0050] National Protection and Programs Directorate; President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee AGENCY: National Protection... Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: The President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee (NSTAC...

  12. Residency Training in Robotic General Surgery: A Survey of Program Directors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea C. George

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Robotic surgery continues to expand in minimally invasive surgery; however, the literature is insufficient to understand the current training process for general surgery residents. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to identify the current approach to and perspectives on robotic surgery training. Methods. An electronic survey was distributed to general surgery program directors identified by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education website. Multiple choice and open-ended questions regarding current practices and opinions on robotic surgery training in general surgery residency programs were used. Results. 20 program directors were surveyed, a majority being from medium-sized programs (4–7 graduating residents per year. Most respondents (73.68% had a formal robotic surgery curriculum at their institution, with 63.16% incorporating simulation training. Approximately half of the respondents believe that more time should be dedicated to robotic surgery training (52.63%, with simulation training prior to console use (84.21%. About two-thirds of the respondents (63.16% believe that a formal robotic surgery curriculum should be established as a part of general surgery residency, with more than half believing that exposure should occur in postgraduate year one (55%. Conclusion. A formal robotics curriculum with simulation training and early surgical exposure for general surgery residents should be given consideration in surgical residency training.

  13. Program director`s overview report for the Office of Health & Environmental Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, D. [ed.

    1994-02-01

    LBL performs basic and applied research and develops technologies in support of the Office of Health and Environmental Research`s mission to explore and mitigate the long-term health and environmental consequences of energy use and to advance solutions to major medical challenges. The ability of the Laboratory to engage in this mission depends upon the strength of its core competencies. In addition, there are several key capabilities that are cross-cutting, or underlie, many of the core competencies. Attention is focused on the following: Facilities and resources; research management practices; research in progress; program accomplishments and research highlights; program orientation; work for non-OHER organizations DOE; critical issues; and resource orientation.

  14. Use of social media by residency program directors for resident selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Jeff; Scott, Doneka R; Smith, Kelly

    2010-10-01

    Pharmacy residency program directors' attitudes and opinions regarding the use of social media in residency recruitment and selection were studied. A 24-item questionnaire was developed, pilot tested, revised, and sent to 996 residency program directors via SurveyMonkey.com. Demographic, social media usage, and opinions on social media data were collected and analyzed. A total of 454 residency program directors completed the study (response rate, 46.4%). The majority of respondents were women (58.8%), were members of Generation X (75.4%), and worked in a hospital or health system (80%). Most respondents (73%) rated themselves as either nonusers or novice users of social media. Twenty percent indicated that they had viewed a pharmacy residency applicant's social media information. More than half (52%) had encountered e-professionalism issues, including questionable photos and posts revealing unprofessional attitudes, and 89% strongly agreed or agreed that information voluntarily published online was fair game for judgments on character, attitudes, and professionalism. Only 4% of respondents had reviewed applicants' profiles for residency selection decisions. Of those respondents, 52% indicated that the content had no effect on resident selection. Over half of residency program directors were unsure whether they will use social media information for future residency selection decisions. Residency program directors from different generations had different views regarding social media information and its use in residency applicant selections. Residency program directors anticipated using social media information to aid in future decisions for resident selection and hiring.

  15. Elective time during dermatology residency: A survey of residents and program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppal, Pushpinder; Shantharam, Rohini; Kaufmann, Tara Lynn

    2017-12-15

    Elective time during residency training provides residents with exposure to different subspecialties. This opportunity gives residents the chance tonurture growth in particular areas of interest and broaden their knowledge base in certain topics in dermatology by having the chance to work withexperts in the field. The purpose of this study was to assess the views of residency program directors and dermatology residents on the value of elective time through a cross sectional survey. An eight-questionIRB exempt survey was sent out to 113 residency program directors via email through the American Professors of Dermatology (APD) program director listserv. Program directors were asked to forward a separate set of 9 questions to their residents. The majority of programs that responded allowed for some elective time within their schedule, often duringthe PGY 4 (3rd year of dermatology training), but the amount of time allowed widely varied among many residency programs. Overall, residents and program directors agree that elective is important in residencytraining, but no standardization is established across programs.

  16. Dental Hygiene Program Directors' Perceptions of Graduate Dental Hygiene Education and Future Faculty Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, Rebecca S.; Mann, Ginger; Tishk, Maxine

    1999-01-01

    A survey of 161 dental-hygiene-program directors investigated perceived future needs for faculty, preferences for type of faculty degree for selection and promotion, the extent to which master's programs are meeting those needs in both numbers and skills, and how the programs can better prepare graduates for the millennium. (MSE)

  17. Director's Discretionary Research and Development Program: Annual Report, Fiscal Year 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-03-01

    The Director's Discretionary Research and Development Program, Annual Report Fiscal Year 2006 is an annual management report that summarizes research projects funded by the DDRD program. The NREL DDRD program comprises projects that strengthen NREL's four technical competencies: Integrated Systems, Renewable Electricity, Renewable Fuels, and Strategic Analysis.

  18. Ten-year survey of program directors: trends, challenges, and mentoring in prosthodontics. Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Deborah M; Kinnunen, Taru; Chang, Brian M; Wright, Robert F

    2011-10-01

    This study consisted of two parts. Part 1 was a survey of US program directors, and Part 2 reports on the survey findings distributed to the deans of US dental schools. Both surveys evaluated observations of trends in prosthodontic education. The first survey (2005) of program directors and deans was published in 2007. This second survey was conducted in 2009. The 2009 survey provided 10-year data on trends in prosthodontics as reported by program directors. A national e-mail survey of 46 program directors was used to collect enrollment data for years 1 to 3 of prosthodontics training for US and international dental school graduates, the total number of applicants and applications considered, and the trends over time of applicants to prosthodontics for US dental school graduates and for international graduates. In addition, the program directors were asked to rank 13 key factors that may have contributed to any changes in the prosthodontic applicant pool. Program directors were also asked for information on student financial incentives and whether their programs were state or federally funded, and whether their sponsoring institution was a dental school. Of the 46 program directors, 40 responded, for an 87% response rate. Respondents reported that 66% of their enrollees were graduates of US dental schools. Between 2000 and 2009 the applicant pool in prosthodontics nearly doubled, with 50% of the program directors reporting an increase in US-trained applicants, 42.5% reporting no change, and only 7.5% reporting a decrease. Using the Spearman correlation for the 10-year survey, there was a positive, statistically significant correlation that society's demand for a higher level of training and credentialing and interest in prosthodontics among dental students contributed to an increase in the number of US dental graduates applying to prosthodontic programs. Only four programs offered no financial packages to offset tuition. The remaining 36 respondents reported some

  19. The 80-hour work week for residents: views from obstetric and gynecology program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janoo, Jabin; Hashmi, Mahreen; Seybold, Dara J; Shapiro, Robert; Calhoun, Byron C; Bush, Stephen H

    2014-01-01

    In 2003, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education mandated an 80-hour work week restriction for residency programs. We examined program directors' views on how this mandate affects the education of Obstetrics and Gynecology residents. A 25 question survey was administered via Survey Monkey to Obstetrics and Gynecology program directors in the United States over three months in 2011. Fifty program directors (response rate of 28%) completed it with more men (62%) than women (38%) respondents. Overall, only 28% (14/50) responded that the program had improved, with significantly fewer men (5/14; 16.1%) than women (47.4% 9/19; p performance objectives and in the CREOG scores, with the improvement ranging from 8% to 12%. In fact, while we observed the percentage of women directors reporting improvement in patient care and interpersonal and communication skills significantly higher compared with their male counterparts, the majority of women still reported either no improvement or a decline in these areas. Though our sample size was small, we found some significant difference between the views of male and female program directors. Both groups nonetheless responded with the majority with a decline or no change rather than a perceived improvement in any of the educational endeavors studied.

  20. Leadership training in Endocrinology fellowship A survey of program directors and recent graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-16

    Program Directors and Recent Graduates presented at/ published to SAMHS and Universities Research Forum (SURF) 2017, San Antonio, TX 16 June 2017 m...Research Division may pay for your basic journal publishing charges (to include costs for tables and black and white photos). We cannot pay for...efforts. LINDA STEEL-GOODWIN, Col, USAF, BSC Director , Clinical Investigations & Research Support Warrior Medics - Mission Ready - Patient Focused

  1. Association of General Surgery Resident Remediation and Program Director Attitudes With Resident Attrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwed, Alexander C; Lee, Steven L; Salcedo, Edgardo S; Reeves, Mark E; Inaba, Kenji; Sidwell, Richard A; Amersi, Farin; Are, Chandrakanth; Arnell, Tracey D; Damewood, Richard B; Dent, Daniel L; Donahue, Timothy; Gauvin, Jeffrey; Hartranft, Thomas; Jacobsen, Garth R; Jarman, Benjamin T; Melcher, Marc L; Mellinger, John D; Morris, Jon B; Nehler, Mark; Smith, Brian R; Wolfe, Mary; Kaji, Amy H; de Virgilio, Christian

    2017-12-01

    Previous studies of resident attrition have variably included preliminary residents and likely overestimated categorical resident attrition. Whether program director attitudes affect attrition has been unclear. To determine whether program director attitudes are associated with resident attrition and to measure the categorical resident attrition rate. This multicenter study surveyed 21 US program directors in general surgery about their opinions regarding resident education and attrition. Data on total resident complement, demographic information, and annual attrition were collected from the program directors for the study period of July 1, 2010, to June 30, 2015. The general surgery programs were chosen on the basis of their geographic location, previous collaboration with some coauthors, prior work in surgical education and research, or a program director willing to participate. Only categorical surgical residents were included in the study; thus, program directors were specifically instructed to exclude any preliminary residents in their responses. Five-year attrition rates (2010-2011 to 2014-2015 academic years) as well as first-time pass rates on the General Surgery Qualifying Examination and General Surgery Certifying Examination of the American Board of Surgery (ABS) were collected. High- and low-attrition programs were compared. The 21 programs represented different geographic locations and 12 university-based, 3 university-affiliated, and 6 independent program types. Programs had a median (interquartile range [IQR]) number of 30 (20-48) categorical residents, and few of those residents were women (median [IQR], 12 [5-17]). Overall, 85 of 966 residents (8.8%) left training during the study period: 15 (17.6%) left after postgraduate year 1, 34 (40.0%) after postgraduate year 2, and 36 (42.4%) after postgraduate year 3 or later. Forty-four residents (51.8%) left general surgery for another surgical discipline, 21 (24.7%) transferred to a different surgery

  2. 78 FR 65716 - Sunshine Act Meeting; Finance, Budget & Program Committee Meeting of the Board of Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    ... NEIGHBORHOOD REINVESTMENT CORPORATION Sunshine Act Meeting; Finance, Budget & Program Committee Meeting of the Board of Directors TIME & DATE: 2:00 p.m., Thursday, November 7, 2013. PLACE: Telephonic.... Quarterly Program Reports C. Corporate Scorecard Report D. HUD Counseling Rule E. Grants Report VIII...

  3. The Current State of Early Childhood Education Programs: How Early Childhood Center Directors Manage Their Human Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arend, Lauren E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Research in the field of early childhood education (ECE) demonstrated the association between skilled directors and high quality programs. Still, most state licensing requirements do not delineate the requisite knowledge or experience necessary to be an effective director. Many ECE directors advance to their position directly from the…

  4. The use of social media in dental hygiene programs: a survey of program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Rachel K; Pieren, Jennifer A

    2014-08-01

    The use of social media and social networking sites has become increasingly common by the current generation of students. Colleges and universities are using social media and social networking sites to advertise, engage and recruit prospective students. The purpose of this study was to evaluate how social media is being used in dental hygiene program admissions and policy. Researchers developed a survey instrument investigating the use of social media. The survey included questions about demographic information, personal use of social media, program use of social media, social media use in admissions and social media policies. An email was sent to 321 dental hygiene program directors asking them to complete the survey. All participants were provided 4 weeks to complete the survey, and 2 reminder emails were sent. A total of 155 responses were received (48.3% response rate). While 84% of respondents indicated their program had a web page, only 20% had an official Facebook page for the program and 2% had a Twitter page. Thirty-five percent had a program policy specifically addressing the use of social media and 31% indicated that their university or institution had a policy. Only 4% of programs evaluate a potential student's Internet presence, mostly by searching on Facebook. Statistically significant differences (p≤0.05) were noted between those respondents with more personal social media accounts and those with fewer accounts, as those with more accounts were more likely to evaluate a potential student's Internet presence. Open ended responses included concern about social media issues, but some uncertainty on how to handle social media in the program. The concern for social media and professionalism was evident and more research and discussion in this area is warranted. Social media is currently being used in a variety of ways in dental hygiene programs, but not in the area of admissions. There is some uncertainty about the role social media should play in a

  5. Program director and chief resident perspectives on the educational environment of US radiation oncology programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berriochoa, Camille; Weller, Michael; Berry, Danielle; Reddy, Chandana A; Koyfman, Shlomo; Tendulkar, Rahul

    Our goals were toexamine the educational approachesused at radiation oncology residency programs nationwide andto evaluate program director(PD) and chief resident (CR) perceptions of their educational environment. We distributed a survey regarding curricular structure via email toall identified US radiation oncology residency PDs and CRs. Pearson χ 2 test was used toevaluate whether differences existed between answers provided by the 2 study populations. The survey was disseminated to 200 individuals in 85 US residency programs: 49/85PDs(58%)and 74/115 (64%)CRs responded. More than one-half of PDs and CRs report that attending physicians discussed management, reviewed contours, and conducted mock oral board examinations with the residents. At nearly 50% of programs, the majority of teaching conferences use a lecture-based approach, whereas only 20% reported predominant utilization of the Socratic method. However, both PDs (63%) and CRs (49%) reported that Socratic teaching is more effective than didactic lectures (16% and 20%, respectively), with the remainder responding that they are equally effective. Teaching sessions were reported to be resident-led ≥75% of the time by 50% of CRs versus 18% of PDs (P = .002). Significantly more CRs than PDs felt that faculty-led teaching conferences were more effective than resident-led conferences (62% vs 26%, respectively; P Socratic-based teaching conferences. Increased communication between PDs and CRs can better align perceptions with educational goals. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Teaching geriatric fellows how to teach: a needs assessment targeting geriatrics fellowship program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Veronica; Yukawa, Michi; Aronson, Louise; Widera, Eric

    2014-12-01

    The entire healthcare workforce needs to be educated to better care for older adults. The purpose of this study was to determine whether fellows are being trained to teach, to assess the attitudes of fellowship directors toward training fellows to be teachers, and to understand how to facilitate this type of training for fellows. A nine-question survey adapted from a 2001 survey issued to residency program directors inquiring about residents-as-teachers curricula was developed and administered. The survey was issued electronically and sent out three times over a 6-week period. Of 144 ACGME-accredited geriatric fellowship directors from geriatric, internal medicine, and family medicine departments who were e-mailed the survey, 101 (70%) responded; 75% had an academic affiliation, 15% had a community affiliation, and 10% did not report. Academic and community programs required their fellows to teach, but just 55% of academic and 29% of community programs offered teaching skills instruction as part of their fellowship curriculum; 67% of academic programs and 79% of community programs felt that their fellows would benefit from more teaching skill instruction. Program directors listed fellow (39%) and faculty (46%) time constraints as obstacles to creation and implementation of a teaching curriculum. The majority of fellowship directors believe that it is important for geriatric fellows to become competent educators, but only approximately half of programs currently provide formal instruction in teaching skills. A reproducible, accessible curriculum on teaching to teach that includes a rigorous evaluation component should be created for geriatrics fellowship programs. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  7. Barriers to Implementing the ACGME Outcome Project: A Systematic Review of Program Director Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Mohammad U; Diaz Voss Varela, David A; Stewart, Charles M; Laeeq, Kulsoom; Yenokyan, Gayane; Francis, Howard W; Bhatti, Nasir I

    2012-12-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) introduced the Outcome Project in July 2001 to improve the quality of resident education through competency-based learning. The purpose of this systematic review is to determine and explore the perceptions of program directors regarding challenges to implementing the ACGME Outcome Project. We used the PubMed and Web of Science databases and bibliographies for English-language articles published between January 1, 2001, and February 17, 2012. Studies were included if they described program directors' opinions on (1) barriers encountered when attempting to implement ACGME competency-based education, and (2) assessment methods that each residency program was using to implement competency-based education. Articles meeting the inclusion criteria were screened by 2 researchers. The grading criterion was created by the authors and used to assess the quality of each study. The survey-based data reported the opinions of 1076 program directors. Barriers that were encountered include: (1) lack of time; (2) lack of faculty support; (3) resistance of residents to the Outcome Project; (4) insufficient funding; (5) perceived low priority for the Outcome Project; (6) inadequate salary incentive; and (7) inadequate knowledge of the competencies. Of the 6 competencies, those pertaining to patient care and medical knowledge received the most responses from program directors and were given highest priority. The reviewed literature revealed that time and financial constraints were the most important barriers encountered when implementing the ACGME Outcome Project.

  8. State of the environment: selected topics, 1979. [Annual report of Executive Director, UN Environment Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    This annual report of the Executive Director, UN Environment Program, to the Governing Council of the United Nations focuses on four topics of global significance: schistosomiasis, pesticide resistance, noise pollution, and tourism. The four topics, while not the only urgent ones, are important contemporary problems associated with the impacts of development and environmental management. The pressures of man's efforts to increase the agricultural base through irrigation and chemical pesticides have resulted in an unprecedented spread of infectious schistosomiasis and pesticide pollution. Industrialization and urbanization have raised noise levels until they represent serious health hazards. International tourism has grown to such proportions that hundreds of millions of individual trips are taken by the average public each year. The positive and negative aspects of these developments are examined in hopes of stimulating discussions that will lead to more desirable planning and management. 81 references. (DCK)

  9. Sexual Assault Training in Emergency Medicine Residencies: A Survey of Program Directors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret K Sande

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is currently no standard forensic medicine training program for emergency medicine residents. In the advent of sexual assault nurse examiner (SANE programs aimed at improving the quality of care for sexual assault victims, it is also unclear how these programs impact emergency medicine (EM resident forensic medicine training. The purpose of this study was togather information on EM residency programs’ training in the care of sexual assault patients and determine what impact SANE programs may have on the experience of EM resident training from the perspective of residency program directors (PDs.Methods: This was a cross-sectional survey. The study cohort was all residency PDs from approved EM residency training programs who completed a closed-response self-administered survey electronically.Results: We sent surveys to 152 PDs, and 71 responded for an overall response rate of 47%. Twenty-two PDs (31% reported that their residency does not require procedural competency for the sexual assault exam, and 29 (41% reported their residents are required only to observe sexual assault exam completion to demonstrate competency. Residency PDs were asked how their programs established resident requirements for sexual assault exams. Thirty-seven PDs (52% did not know how their sexual assault exam requirement was established.Conclusion: More than half of residency PDs did not know how their sexual assault guidelines were established, and few were based upon recommendations from the literature. There is no clear consensus as to how PDs view the effect of SANE programs on resident competency with the sexual assault exam. This study highlights both a need for increased awareness of EM resident sexual assault education nationally and also a possible need for a training curriculum defining guidelines forEM residents performing sexual assault exams. [West J Emerg Med. 2013;14(5:461–466.

  10. Space Technology Mission Directorate Game Changing Development Program FY2015 Annual Program Review: Advanced Manufacturing Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, John; Fikes, John

    2015-01-01

    The Advance Manufacturing Technology (AMT) Project supports multiple activities within the Administration's National Manufacturing Initiative. A key component of the Initiative is the Advanced Manufacturing National Program Office (AMNPO), which includes participation from all federal agencies involved in U.S. manufacturing. In support of the AMNPO the AMT Project supports building and Growing the National Network for Manufacturing Innovation through a public-private partnership designed to help the industrial community accelerate manufacturing innovation. Integration with other projects/programs and partnerships: STMD (Space Technology Mission Directorate), HEOMD, other Centers; Industry, Academia; OGA's (e.g., DOD, DOE, DOC, USDA, NASA, NSF); Office of Science and Technology Policy, NIST Advanced Manufacturing Program Office; Generate insight within NASA and cross-agency for technology development priorities and investments. Technology Infusion Plan: PC; Potential customer infusion (TDM, HEOMD, SMD, OGA, Industry); Leverage; Collaborate with other Agencies, Industry and Academia; NASA roadmap. Initiatives include: Advanced Near Net Shape Technology Integrally Stiffened Cylinder Process Development (launch vehicles, sounding rockets); Materials Genome; Low Cost Upper Stage-Class Propulsion; Additive Construction with Mobile Emplacement (ACME); National Center for Advanced Manufacturing.

  11. Away Rotations and Matching in Integrated Plastic Surgery Residency: Applicant and Program Director Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drolet, Brian C; Brower, Jonathan P; Lifchez, Scott D; Janis, Jeffrey E; Liu, Paul Y

    2016-04-01

    Although nearly all medical students pursuing integrated plastic surgery residency participate in elective rotations away from their home medical school, the value and costs of these "away" rotations have not been well studied. The authors surveyed all integrated plastic surgery program directors and all applicants in the 2015 National Residency Matching Program. Forty-two program directors and 149 applicants (64 percent and 70 percent response rate, respectively) completed the survey. Applicants reported 13.7 weeks spent on plastic surgery rotations during medical school, including a mean of 9.2 weeks on away rotations. Average reported cost for away rotations was $3591 per applicant. Both applicants and program directors most commonly reported "making a good impression" (44.6 percent and 36.6 percent, respectively) or finding a "good-fit" program (27.7 percent and 48.8 percent, respectively) as the primary goal for away rotations. Almost all applicants (91.1 percent) believed an away rotation made them more competitive for matching to a program at which they rotated. Program directors ranked a strong away rotation performance as the most important residency selection criterion. Twenty-seven percent of postgraduate year-1 positions were filled by an away rotatorm and an additional 17 percent were filled by a home medical student. Away rotations appear to be mutually beneficial for applicants and programs in helping to establish a good fit between students and training programs through an extended interaction with the students, residents, and faculty. In addition, making a good impression on a senior elective rotation (home or away) may improve an applicant's chance of matching to a residency program.

  12. Searching for the Core of Journalism Education: Program Directors Disagree on Curriculum Priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Robin; Davenport, Lucinda D.

    2012-01-01

    To carry out their mission of preparing students to be successful journalism professionals, educators make important decisions on the core curriculum: the common courses that all journalism students must take to graduate, no matter their area of emphasis or academic constraints. This national study of U.S. journalism program directors shows they…

  13. School Nutrition Directors' Perceptions of Technology Use in School Nutrition Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Peggy; Bednar, Carolyn; Kwon, Junehee

    2012-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: This study investigated the types of technology/software currently used by Southwest Region school nutrition directors (SNDs) and assessed their perceptions of barriers to purchasing new technology/software. In addition, the importance of future technology/software acquisitions in meeting school nutrition program (SNP) goals…

  14. Stress on the Job: How Family Literacy Program Directors Perceive Occupational Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandlin, Jennifer A.; Chen, Chia-Yin

    2007-01-01

    Little research has examined stress among family literacy administrators, although studies in other contexts reveal occupational stress can lead to illness, distress, and organizational problems. This article presents findings from a recent study of stress among family literacy program directors in Texas. Findings reveal family literacy program…

  15. 76 FR 67764 - Finance, Budget & Program Committee Board of Directors Meeting; Sunshine Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-02

    ... NEIGHBORHOOD REINVESTMENT CORPORATION Finance, Budget & Program Committee Board of Directors..., Assistant Corporate Secretary (202) 220-2376; [email protected] . Agenda: I. Call To Order II. Executive Session III. Financial Report III. Budget Report IV. Lease Update V. Corporate Scorecard VI. NFMC & EHLP VII...

  16. 78 FR 24438 - Board of Directors Finance, Budget & Program Committee: Sunshine Act Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-25

    ... NEIGHBORHOOD REINVESTMENT CORPORATION Board of Directors Finance, Budget & Program Committee... Corporate Secretary (202) 220-2376; [email protected] . AGENDA: I. CALL TO ORDER II. FY 2013 Budget Update III... Corporate Milestone Report and Dashboard IX. NFMC, EHLP & MHA X. NeighborhoodLIFT & CityLIFT XI. Recent...

  17. The Role of an Actuarial Director in the Development of an Introductory Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staples, Susan G.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the roles and duties of a director in developing an introductory actuarial program. Degree plan design, specialized exam courses, internship classes, coordination of efforts with Economics and Finance Departments, opportunities for creating a minor in actuarial mathematics, actuarial clubs, career advice, and interaction with actuarial…

  18. Reproductive Psychiatry Residency Training: A Survey of Psychiatric Residency Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Lauren M; MacLean, Joanna V; Barzilay, Erin Murphy; Meltzer-Brody, Samantha; Miller, Laura; Yang, Sarah Nagle

    2018-04-01

    The reproductive life cycle has unique influences on the phenotypic expression of mental illness in women. Didactic and clinical training focused on these sex-specific influences should be a vital component of the education of future psychiatrists. The authors sought to determine the current state of and attitudes toward reproductive psychiatry in resident education. The authors administered a web-based survey to psychiatry residency training directors. They assessed the availability of both mandated and optional didactic and clinical training experiences in reproductive psychiatry. Fifty residency program directors answered the survey, for a response rate of 28%. More than half of residency program directors (59%) reported requiring some training in reproductive psychiatry. Both the breadth and depth of topics covered varied greatly among programs. Lack of time (48%) and lack of qualified faculty (26%) were the most frequently cited barriers to more training. Only 40% of residency directors surveyed agreed that all residents should be competent in reproductive psychiatry. These findings suggest that specific training in reproductive psychiatry is inconsistent in US residency programs, and that training that does exist varies considerably in clinical time and content. Given that women comprise more than 50% of all psychiatric patients and most women will menstruate, give birth, and undergo menopause, future psychiatrists would benefit from more systematic instruction in this area. The authors propose the development of a national, standardized reproductive psychiatry curriculum to address this gap and aid in producing psychiatrists competent to treat women at all stages of life.

  19. International electives in neurology training: a survey of US and Canadian program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Jennifer L; Coleman, Mary E; Engstrom, John W; Mateen, Farrah J

    2014-01-14

    To ascertain the current status of global health training and humanitarian relief opportunities in US and Canadian postgraduate neurology programs. There is a growing interest among North American trainees to pursue medical electives in low- and middle-income countries. Such training opportunities provide many educational and humanitarian benefits but also pose several challenges related to organization, human resources, funding, and trainee and patient safety. The current support and engagement of neurology postgraduate training programs for trainees to pursue international rotations is unknown. A survey was distributed to all program directors in the United States and Canada (December 2012-February 2013) through the American Academy of Neurology to assess the training opportunities, institutional partnerships, and support available for international neurology electives. Approximately half of responding programs (53%) allow residents to pursue global health-related electives, and 11% reported that at least 1 trainee participated in humanitarian relief during training (survey response rate 61%, 143/234 program directors). Canadian programs were more likely to allow residents to pursue international electives than US programs (10/11, 91% vs 65/129, 50%, p = 0.023). The number of trainees participating in international electives was low: 0%-9% of residents (55% of programs) and 10%-19% of residents (21% of programs). Lack of funding was the most commonly cited reason for residents not participating in global health electives. If funding was available, 93% of program directors stated there would be time for residents to participate. Most program directors (75%) were interested in further information on global health electives. In spite of high perceived interest, only half of US neurology training programs include international electives, mostly due to a reported lack of funding. By contrast, the majority of Canadian programs that responded allow international

  20. Do we pay our community preceptors? Results from a CERA clerkship directors' survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, David; Jerpbak, Christine M; Margo, Katherine L; Power, David V; Slatt, Lisa M; Tarn, Derjung M

    2014-03-01

    Family medicine clerkships depend heavily on community-based family physician preceptors to teach medical students. These preceptors have traditionally been unpaid, but in recent years some clerkships have started to pay preceptors. This study determines trends in the number and geographic region of programs that pay their community preceptors, identifies reasons programs pay or do not pay, and investigates perceived advantages and disadvantages of payment. We conducted a cross-sectional, electronic survey of 134 family medicine clerkship directors at allopathic US medical schools. The response rate was 62% (83/132 clerkship directors). Nineteen of these (23%) currently pay community preceptors, 11 of whom are located in either New England or the South Atlantic region. Sixty-three percent of programs who pay report that their community preceptors are also paid for teaching other learners, compared to 32% of those programs who do not pay. Paying respondents displayed more positive attitudes toward paying community preceptors, though a majority of non-paying respondents indicated they would pay if they had the financial resources. The majority of clerkships do not pay their community preceptors to teach medical students, but competition from other learners may drive more medical schools to consider payment to help with preceptor recruitment and retention. Medical schools located in regions where there is competition for community preceptors from other medical and non-medical schools may need to consider paying preceptors as part of recruitment and retention efforts.

  1. Exploring social support and job satisfaction among associate degree program directors in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintz-Binder, Ronda D; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

    2009-01-01

    A troubling trend noted in California has been an increase in the number of open positions for program directors of associate degree registered nursing (ADRN) programs. Positions remain open for extended periods of time, and the number of qualified applicants for such positions is insufficient. The loss of and ensuing slow replacement of ADRN program directors can put these programs in jeopardy of student admission suspension, or, worse yet, closure by the state nursing board. In this exploratory study, variables of social support and job satisfaction were studied. Variables were found to be limited opportunities for peer interaction, expressed discontent, and retention concerns. A significant positive relationship between job satisfaction and social support was noted. Recommendations for future research are offered.

  2. The Role of Program Directors in Treatment Practices: The Case of Methadone Dose Patterns in U.S. Outpatient Opioid Agonist Treatment Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frimpong, Jemima A; Shiu-Yee, Karen; D'Aunno, Thomas

    2017-10-01

    To describe changes in characteristics of directors of outpatient opioid agonist treatment (OAT) programs, and to examine the association between directors' characteristics and low methadone dosage. Repeated cross-sectional surveys of OAT programs in the United States from 1995 to 2011. We used generalized linear regression models to examine associations between directors' characteristics and methadone dose, adjusting for program and patient factors. Data were collected through telephone surveys of program directors. The proportion of OAT programs with an African American director declined over time, from 29 percent in 1995 to 16 percent in 2011. The median percentage of patients in each program receiving role in explaining variations in methadone dosage across programs and patients. Further research should investigate the causal pathways through which directors' characteristics affect treatment practices. This may lead to new, multifaceted managerial interventions to improve patient outcomes. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  3. Attributes of Candidates Passing the ABS Certifying Examination on the First Attempt-Program Directors׳ Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Mohd Raashid; Hulme, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The American Board of Surgery Certifying Examination (CE) is a pivotal event in a surgeon's career development, as it is the last challenge before achieving Board certification. First-time pass rate on the CE is one of the key metrics of surgery residency programs. The overall pass rate on the CE has declined significantly in recent years. The goal of this study was the identification of attributes of general surgery residents that are associated with passing the CE at the first attempt. The modified Delphi process was used to survey general surgery program directors. The study was conducted in 2 rounds in the interest of time available for surgical education research fellowship project. All 259 program directors were contacted in each round of surveys. In all, 49 (19%) responded to the first round and 54 (21%) responded to the second round of survey. The characteristics of a successful resident on CE include confidence, self-motivation, sound knowledge base, strong performance on the Board's training examination (American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination), and mock orals, and good communication skills. Postgraduate years 4 and 5 are the most likely resident levels at which failure could be predicted. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Faculty perceptions of occupational therapy program directors' leadership styles and outcomes of leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snodgrass, Jeff; Shachar, Mickey

    2008-01-01

    This research study investigated the relationship between faculty perceptions of occupational therapy program directors' leadership styles and outcomes of leadership and the effects of moderating demographic and institutional characteristics. Data for this study were collected utilizing the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire Form 5X and the self-designed Demographic and Institution Questionnaire. The study working sample included 184 graduate occupational therapy faculty members from 98 (65%) of all accredited academic occupational therapy programs in the United States for the 2005-06 academic year. Major findings from the study indicate that, in general, transformational leadership had a significant (p leadership outcomes whereas transactional leadership had a significant (p leadership attribute (although belonging to the transactional leadership construct) was found to be a positive predictor of leadership outcomes. Demographic and institutional characteristics did not have a significant (p > 0.01) influence on perceived leadership styles and leadership outcomes. The results of this research show that the most effective occupational therapy leaders in academia have been found to be those who adopt and utilize a full range of leadership styles that combine both transformational and transactional contingent reward leadership styles and suggest common effectiveness for other allied health fields.

  5. What Are We Doing? A Survey of United States Nephrology Fellowship Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebman, Scott E; Moore, Catherine A; Monk, Rebeca D; Rizvi, Mahrukh S

    2017-03-07

    Interest in nephrology has been declining in recent years. Long work hours and a poor work/life balance may be partially responsible, and may also affect a fellowship's educational mission. We surveyed nephrology program directors using a web-based survey in order to define current clinical and educational practice patterns and identify areas for improvement. Our survey explored fellowship program demographics, fellows' workload, call structure, and education. Program directors were asked to estimate the average and maximum number of patients on each of their inpatient services, the number of patients seen by fellows in clinic, and to provide details regarding their overnight and weekend call. In addition, we asked about number of and composition of didactic conferences. Sixty-eight out of 148 program directors responded to the survey (46%). The average number of fellows per program was approximately seven. The busiest inpatient services had a mean of 21.5±5.9 patients on average and 33.8±10.7 at their maximum. The second busiest services had an average and maximum of 15.6±6.0 and 24.5±10.8 patients, respectively. Transplant-only services had fewer patients than other service compositions. A minority of services (14.5%) employed physician extenders. Fellows most commonly see patients during a single weekly continuity clinic, with a typical fellow-to-faculty ratio of 2:1. The majority of programs do not alter outpatient responsibilities during inpatient service time. Most programs (approximately 75%) divided overnight and weekend call responsibilities equally between first year and more senior fellows. Educational practices varied widely between programs. Our survey underscores the large variety in workload, practice patterns, and didactics at different institutions and provides a framework to help improve the service/education balance in nephrology fellowships. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  6. Preparedness of Entering Pediatric Dentistry Residents: Advanced Pediatric Program Directors' and First-Year Residents' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkauskas, John; Seale, N Sue; Casamassimo, Paul; Rutkauskas, John S

    2015-11-01

    For children to receive needed oral health care, adequate training at both the predoctoral and postdoctoral levels of dental education is required, but previous studies have found inadequacies in predoctoral education that lead to general dentists' unwillingness to treat certain young populations. As another way of assessing predoctoral preparation, the aim of this study was to determine the perspectives of first-year residents and pediatric program directors about residents' preparedness to enter advanced education programs in pediatric dentistry. Surveys were sent to all 74 U.S. program directors and 360 first-year residents. The survey focused on procedures related to prevention, behavior management, restorative procedures, pulp therapy, sedation, and surgery, as well as treating patients funded by Medicaid and with special health care needs. Among the first-year residents, 173 surveys were returned for a 48% response rate; 61 directors returned surveys for an 82% response rate. Only half of the residents (55%) reported feeling adequately prepared for their first year in residency; less than half cited adequate preparation to place stainless steel crowns (SSCs) (42%) and perform pulpotomies (45%). Far fewer felt adequately prepared to provide treatment for children six months to three years of age, including examinations (29%), infant oral exams (27%), and children with severe caries (37%). The program directors were even less positive about the adequacy of residents' preparation. Only 17% deemed them adequately prepared to place SSCs and 13% to perform pulpotomies. Approximately half reported their first-year residents were inadequately prepared to treat very young children and children with severe caries (55% each). This study found that the perceived inadequacy of predoctoral education in pediatric dentistry was consistent at both the learner and educator levels, supporting previous studies identifying inadequacies in this area.

  7. Essential hand surgery procedures for mastery by graduating plastic surgery residents: a survey of program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noland, Shelley S; Fischer, Lauren H; Lee, Gordon K; Friedrich, Jeffrey B; Hentz, Vincent R

    2013-12-01

    This study was designed to establish the essential hand surgery procedures that should be mastered by graduating plastic surgery residents. This framework can then be used as a guideline for developing Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skill to teach technical skills in hand surgery. Ten expert hand surgeons were surveyed regarding the essential hand surgery procedures that should be mastered by graduating plastic surgery residents. The top 10 procedures from this survey were then used to survey all 89 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-approved plastic surgery program directors. There was a 69 percent response rate to the program director survey (n = 61). The top nine hand surgery procedures included open carpal tunnel release, open A1 pulley release, digital nerve repair with microscope, closed reduction and percutaneous pinning of metacarpal fracture, excision of dorsal or volar ganglion, zone II flexor tendon repair with multistrand technique, incision and drainage of the flexor tendon sheath for flexor tenosynovitis, flexor tendon sheath steroid injection, and open cubital tunnel release. Surgical educators need to develop objective methods to teach and document technical skill. The Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skill is a valid method for accomplishing this task. There has been no consensus regarding which hand surgery procedures should be mastered by graduating plastic surgery residents. The authors have identified nine procedures that are overwhelmingly supported by plastic surgery program directors. These nine procedures can be used as a guideline for developing Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skill to teach and document technical skills in hand surgery.

  8. Laser Science and Technology Program Annual Report-2002 NIF Programs Directorate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackel, L; Chen, H L

    2003-01-01

    The Laser Science and Technology (LSandT) Program's mission is to develop advanced lasers, optics, materials technologies, and applications to solve problems and create new capabilities of importance to the nation and the Laboratory. A top, near-term priority is to provide technical support in the deployment and upgrade of the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Our other program activities synergistically develop technologies that are consistent with the goals of the NIF Directorate and develop state-of-the-art capabilities. The primary objectives of LSandT activities in 2002 have been fourfold--(a) to support deployment of hardware and to enhance laser and optics performance for NIF, (b) to develop high-energy petawatt laser science and technology for the Department of Energy (DOE), (c) to develop advanced solid-state laser systems and optical components for the Department of Defense (DoD), and (d) to invent, develop, and deliver improved concepts and hardware for other government agencies and industry. LSandT activities during 2002 focused on seven major areas: (1) NIF Project-LSandT led major advances in the deployment of NIF Final Optics Assembly (FOA) and the development of 30.1 optics processing and treatment technologies to enhance NIF's operations and performance capabilities. (2) Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP)-LSandT personnel continued development of ultrashort-pulse lasers and high-power, large-aperture optics for applications in SSP, extreme-field science and national defense. To enhance the high-energy petawatt (HEPW) capability in NIF, LSandT continued development of advanced compressor-grating and front-end laser technologies utilizing optical-parametric chirped-pulse amplification (OPCPA). (3) High-energy-density physics and inertial fusion energy-LSandT continued development of kW- to MW-class, diode-pumped, solid-state laser (DPSSL). (4) Department of Defense (DoD)-LSandT continued development of a 100 kw-class solid-state heat-capacity laser

  9. Training in Emergency Obstetrics: A Needs Assessment of U.S. Emergency Medicine Program Directors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel W. Robinson

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Obstetrical emergencies are a high-risk yet infrequent occurrence in the emergency department. While U.S. emergency medicine (EM residency graduates are required to perform 10 low-risk normal spontaneous vaginal deliveries, little is known about how residencies prepare residents to manage obstetrical emergencies. We sought to profile the current obstetrical training curricula through a survey of U.S. training programs. Methods We sent a web-based survey covering the four most common obstetrical emergencies (pre-eclampsia/eclampsia, postpartum hemorrhage (PPH, shoulder dystocia, and breech presentation through email invitations to all program directors (PD of U.S. EM residency programs. The survey focused on curricular details as well as the comfort level of the PDs in the preparation of their graduating residents to treat obstetrical emergencies and normal vaginal deliveries. Results Our survey had a 55% return rate (n=105/191. Of the residencies responding, 75% were in the academic setting, 20.2% community, 65% urban, and 29.8% suburban, and the obstetrical curricula were 2–4 weeks long occurring in post-graduate year one. The most common teaching method was didactics (84.1–98.1%, followed by oral cases for pre-eclampsia (48% and PPH (37.2%, and homemade simulation for shoulder dystocia (37.5% and breech delivery (33.3%. The PDs’ comfort about residency graduate skills was highest for normal spontaneous vaginal delivery, pre-eclampsia, and PPH. PDs were not as comfortable about their graduates’ skill in handling shoulder dystocia or breech delivery. Conclusion Our survey found that PDs are less comfortable in their graduates’ ability to perform non-routine emergency obstetrical procedures.

  10. Stepping up to the challenge: the development, implementation, and assessment of a statewide, regional, leadership program for school nutrition directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Jacqueline J; Briggs, Marilyn M; Beall, Deborah L; Curwood, Sandy; Gray, Pilar; Soiseth, Scott; Taylor, Rodney K; Zidenberg-Cherr, Sheri

    2015-01-01

    A statewide professional development program was developed and implemented throughout California for school nutrition directors with the goal of creating healthy school environments and regional networks for collaboration and healthy school environment sustainability. Needs of school nutrition directors were identified through a needs assessment questionnaire. Results of the needs assessment questionnaire (n = 256) identified (a) planning cost-effective menus; (b) reducing calories, sodium, saturated fat, and trans fat in menus; and (c) using U.S. Department of Agriculture foods cost-effectively as the most useful topics. Highest rated topics informed the content of the professional development program. A post-professional development questionnaire identified key "insights, inspirations, and strategies" as (a) marketing of school foods program, (b) expansion of salad bars, and (c) collaboration with community partners. A 6-month follow-up questionnaire identified that 86% of participants made progress toward implementing at least one of their five insights, inspirations, and strategies in their school districts. Most common areas that were implemented were marketing and branding (32%), revamping salad bars (18%), and motivating staff (16%). School and Community Actions for Nutrition survey analysis showed a significant increase in the use of marketing methods in school nutrition programs from baseline to 6-month post-program implementation (p = .024). © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  11. E-learning in graduate medical education: survey of residency program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittich, Christopher M; Agrawal, Anoop; Cook, David A; Halvorsen, Andrew J; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Chaudhry, Saima; Dupras, Denise M; Oxentenko, Amy S; Beckman, Thomas J

    2017-07-11

    E-learning-the use of Internet technologies to enhance knowledge and performance-has become a widely accepted instructional approach. Little is known about the current use of e-learning in postgraduate medical education. To determine utilization of e-learning by United States internal medicine residency programs, program director (PD) perceptions of e-learning, and associations between e-learning use and residency program characteristics. We conducted a national survey in collaboration with the Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine of all United States internal medicine residency programs. Of the 368 PDs, 214 (58.2%) completed the e-learning survey. Use of synchronous e-learning at least sometimes, somewhat often, or very often was reported by 85 (39.7%); 153 programs (71.5%) use asynchronous e-learning at least sometimes, somewhat often, or very often. Most programs (168; 79%) do not have a budget to integrate e-learning. Mean (SD) scores for the PD perceptions of e-learning ranged from 3.01 (0.94) to 3.86 (0.72) on a 5-point scale. The odds of synchronous e-learning use were higher in programs with a budget for its implementation (odds ratio, 3.0 [95% CI, 1.04-8.7]; P = .04). Residency programs could be better resourced to integrate e-learning technologies. Asynchronous e-learning was used more than synchronous, which may be to accommodate busy resident schedules and duty-hour restrictions. PD perceptions of e-learning are relatively moderate and future research should determine whether PD reluctance to adopt e-learning is based on unawareness of the evidence, perceptions that e-learning is expensive, or judgments about value versus effectiveness.

  12. Identifying areas of weakness in thoracic surgery residency training: a comparison of the perceptions of residents and program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Janet P; Schofield, Adam; Paolucci, Elizabeth Oddone; Schieman, Colin; Kelly, Elizabeth; Servatyari, Ramin; Dixon, Elijah; Ball, Chad G; Grondin, Sean C

    2014-01-01

    To identify core thoracic surgery procedures that require increased emphasis during thoracic surgery residency for residents to achieve operative independence and to compare the perspectives of residents and program directors in this regard. A modified Delphi process was used to create a survey that was distributed electronically to all Canadian thoracic surgery residents (12) and program directors (8) addressing the residents' ability to perform 19 core thoracic surgery procedures independently after the completion of residency. Residents were also questioned about the adequacy of their operative exposure to these 19 procedures during their residency training. A descriptive summary including calculations of frequencies and proportions was conducted. The perceptions of the 2 groups were then compared using the Fisher exact test employing a Bonferroni correction. The relationship between residents' operative exposure and their perceived operative ability was explored in the same fashion. The response rate was 100% for residents and program directors. No statistical differences were found between residents' and program directors' perceptions of residents' ability to perform the 19 core procedures independently. Both groups identified lung transplantation, first rib resection, and extrapleural pneumonectomy as procedures for which residents were not adequately prepared to perform independently. Residents' subjective ratings of operative exposure were in good agreement with their reported operative ability for 13 of 19 procedures. This study provides new insight into the perceptions of thoracic surgery residents and their program directors regarding operative ability. This study points to good agreement between residents and program directors regarding residents' surgical capabilities. This study provides information regarding potential weaknesses in thoracic surgery training, which may warrant an examination of the curricula of existing programs as well as a

  13. Residency Training in Robotic General Surgery: A Survey of Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Lea C; O'Neill, Rebecca; Merchant, Aziz M

    2018-01-01

    Robotic surgery continues to expand in minimally invasive surgery; however, the literature is insufficient to understand the current training process for general surgery residents. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to identify the current approach to and perspectives on robotic surgery training. An electronic survey was distributed to general surgery program directors identified by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education website. Multiple choice and open-ended questions regarding current practices and opinions on robotic surgery training in general surgery residency programs were used. 20 program directors were surveyed, a majority being from medium-sized programs (4-7 graduating residents per year). Most respondents (73.68%) had a formal robotic surgery curriculum at their institution, with 63.16% incorporating simulation training. Approximately half of the respondents believe that more time should be dedicated to robotic surgery training (52.63%), with simulation training prior to console use (84.21%). About two-thirds of the respondents (63.16%) believe that a formal robotic surgery curriculum should be established as a part of general surgery residency, with more than half believing that exposure should occur in postgraduate year one (55%). A formal robotics curriculum with simulation training and early surgical exposure for general surgery residents should be given consideration in surgical residency training.

  14. Dermatology Residency Selection Criteria with an Emphasis on Program Characteristics: A National Program Director Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzam Gorouhi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Dermatology residency programs are relatively diverse in their resident selection process. The authors investigated the importance of 25 dermatology residency selection criteria focusing on differences in program directors’ (PDs’ perception based on specific program demographics. Methods. This cross-sectional nationwide observational survey utilized a 41-item questionnaire that was developed by literature search, brainstorming sessions, and online expert reviews. The data were analyzed utilizing the reliability test, two-step clustering, and K-means methods as well as other methods. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the differences in PDs’ perception regarding the importance of the selection criteria based on program demographics. Results. Ninety-five out of 114 PDs (83.3% responded to the survey. The top five criteria for dermatology residency selection were interview, letters of recommendation, United States Medical Licensing Examination Step I scores, medical school transcripts, and clinical rotations. The following criteria were preferentially ranked based on different program characteristics: “advanced degrees,” “interest in academics,” “reputation of undergraduate and medical school,” “prior unsuccessful attempts to match,” and “number of publications.” Conclusions. Our survey provides up-to-date factual data on dermatology PDs’ perception in this regard. Dermatology residency programs may find the reported data useful in further optimizing their residency selection process.

  15. Director's Discretionary Research and Development Program: Annual Report, Fiscal Year 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2005-12-01

    The Director's Discretionary Research and Development (DDRD) program is designed to encourage technical innovation and build new research and development capabilities at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Technical innovation is critical to the long-term viability of NREL (also referred to as the Laboratory) and to the success of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The strategic value of DDRD is being continuously enhanced by expanding the opportunities to propose and pursue innovative ideas for building new and enhanced capabilities.

  16. Remediation in the Context of the Competencies: A Survey of Pediatrics Residency Program Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riebschleger, Meredith P.; Haftel, Hilary M.

    2013-01-01

    Background The 6 competencies defined by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education provide the framework of assessment for trainees in the US graduate medical education system, but few studies have investigated their impact on remediation. Methods We obtained data via an anonymous online survey of pediatrics residency program directors. For the purposes of the survey, remediation was defined as “any form of additional training, supervision, or assistance above that required for a typical resident.” Respondents were asked to quantify 3 groups of residents: (1) residents requiring remediation; (2) residents whose training was extended for remediation purposes; and (3) residents whose training was terminated owing to issues related to remediation. For each group, the proportion of residents with deficiencies in each of the 6 competencies was calculated. Results In all 3 groups, deficiencies in medical knowledge and patient care were most common; deficiencies in professionalism and communication were moderately common; and deficiencies in systems-based practice and practice-based learning and improvement were least common. Residents whose training was terminated were more likely to have deficiencies in multiple competencies. Conclusion Although medical knowledge and patient care are reported most frequently, deficiencies in any of the 6 competencies can lead to the need for remediation in pediatrics residents. Residents who are terminated are more likely to have deficits in multiple competencies. It will be critical to develop and refine tools to measure achievement in all 6 competencies as the graduate medical education community may be moving further toward individualized training schedules and competency-based, rather than time-based, training. PMID:24404228

  17. Toward creating family-friendly work environments in pediatrics: baseline data from pediatric department chairs and pediatric program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhillips, Heather A; Burke, Ann E; Sheppard, Kate; Pallant, Adam; Stapleton, F Bruder; Stanton, Bonita

    2007-03-01

    The objective was to determine baseline characteristics of pediatric residency training programs and academic departments in regard to family-friendly work environments as outlined in the Report of the Task Force on Women in Pediatrics. We conducted Web-based anonymous surveys of 147 pediatric department chairs and 203 pediatric program directors. The chair's questionnaire asked about child care, lactation facilities, family leave policies, work-life balance, and tenure and promotion policies. The program director's questionnaire asked about family leave, parenting, work-life balance, and perceptions of "family-friendliness." The response rate was 52% for program directors and 51% for chairs. Nearly 60% of chairs reported some access to child care or provided assistance locating child care; however, in half of these departments, demand almost always exceeded supply. Lactation facilities were available to breastfeeding faculty in 74% of departments, although only 57% provided access to breast pumps. A total of 78% of chairs and 90% of program directors reported written maternity leave policies with slightly fewer reporting paternity leave policies. The majority (83%) of chairs reported availability of part-time employment, whereas only 27% of program directors offered part-time residency options. Most departments offered some flexibility in promotion and tenure. Although progress has been made, change still is needed in many areas in pediatric departments and training programs, including better accessibility to quality child care; improved lactation facilities for breastfeeding mothers; clear, written parental leave policies; and flexible work schedules to accommodate changing demands of family life.

  18. Relationships between high-stakes clinical skills exam scores and program director global competency ratings of first-year pediatric residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenau, Erik E.; Pugliano, Gina; Roberts, William L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Responding to mandates from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and American Osteopathic Association (AOA), residency programs have developed competency-based assessment tools. One such tool is the American College of Osteopathic Pediatricians (ACOP) program directors’ annual report. High-stakes clinical skills licensing examinations, such as the Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing Examination Level 2-Performance Evaluation (COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE), also assess competency in several clinical domains. Objective The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationships between program director competency ratings of first-year osteopathic residents in pediatrics and COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE scores from 2005 to 2009. Methods The sample included all 94 pediatric first-year residents who took COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE and whose training was reviewed by the ACOP for approval of training between 2005 and 2009. Program director competency ratings and COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE scores (domain and component) were merged and analyzed for relationships. Results Biomedical/biomechanical domain scores were positively correlated with overall program director competency ratings. Humanistic domain scores were not significantly correlated with overall program director competency ratings, but did show moderate correlation with ratings for interpersonal and communication skills. The six ACGME or seven AOA competencies assessed empirically by the ACOP program directors’ annual report could not be recovered by principal component analysis; instead, three factors were identified, accounting for 86% of the variance between competency ratings. Discussion A few significant correlations were noted between COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE scores and program director competency ratings. Exploring relationships between different clinical skills assessments is inherently difficult because of the heterogeneity of tools used and overlap of constructs within the AOA

  19. Leadership styles and occupational stress among college athletic directors: the moderating effect of program goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryska, Todd A

    2002-03-01

    The interaction between an individual's abilities and the perceived demands of the workplace appears to make a unique contribution to job-related stress above and beyond that of dispositional or situational factors alone (R. S. Lazarus, 1990). In the present study, the author evaluated this contention among 245 male intercollegiate athletic directors by assessing the combined influence of leadership style and program goals on occupational stress. Regression analyses revealed the presence of both significant main effects and interaction effects of leadership style and program goals in the prediction of emotional exhaustion, daily job stress, and personal accomplishment. Findings are discussed in terms of person-environment fit theory (J. R. P. French, R. D. Caplan, & R. V. Harrison, 1982) and the notion of perceived control within the occupational setting.

  20. North American Pediatric Gastroenterology Fellowship Needs Assessment in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Trainee and Program Director Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotson, Jennifer L; Falaiye, Tolulope; Bricker, Josh B; Strople, Jennifer; Rosh, Joel

    2016-07-01

    Pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) care is complex and rapidly evolving. The Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America and North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition cosponsored a needs assessment survey of pediatric gastroenterology trainees and program directors (PDs) to inform on educational programming. A Web-based, self-completed survey was provided to North American trainees and PDs during the 2013-2014 academic year. Standard descriptive statistics summarized demographics and responses. One hundred sixty-six of 326 (51%) trainees (62% female) and 37 of 74 (50%) PDs responded. Median trainees per program = 5 and median total faculty = 10 (3 IBD experts); 15% of programs did not have a self-identified "IBD expert" faculty member. Sixty-nine percent of trainees were confident/somewhat confident in their IBD inpatient training, whereas 54% were confident/somewhat confident in their outpatient training. Trainees identified activities that would most improve their education, including didactics (55%), interaction with national experts (50%), trainee-centered IBD Web resources (42%), and increased patient exposure (42%). Trainees were most confident in managing inpatient active Crohn's disease/ulcerative colitis, phenotype classification, managing biological therapies, and using clinical disease activity indices. They were least confident in managing J-pouch complications, performing pouchoscopy, managing extraintestinal manifestations, and ostomy-related complications. Eighty-five percent would like an IBD-focused training elective. Most directors (86%) would allow trainees to do electives at other institutions. This IBD needs assessment survey of pediatric gastroenterology trainees and PDs demonstrated a strong resource commitment to IBD training and clinical care. Areas for educational enrichment emerged, including pouch and ostomy complications.

  1. Program Director Perceptions of Surgical Resident Training and Patient Care under Flexible Duty Hour Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadat, Lily V; Dahlke, Allison R; Rajaram, Ravi; Kreutzer, Lindsey; Love, Remi; Odell, David D; Bilimoria, Karl Y; Yang, Anthony D

    2016-06-01

    The Flexibility in Duty Hour Requirements for Surgical Trainees (FIRST) trial was a national, cluster-randomized, pragmatic, noninferiority trial of 117 general surgery programs, comparing standard ACGME resident duty hour requirements ("Standard Policy") to flexible, less-restrictive policies ("Flexible Policy"). Participating program directors (PDs) were surveyed to assess their perceptions of patient care, resident education, and resident well-being during the study period. A survey was sent to all PDs of the general surgery residency programs participating in the FIRST trial (N = 117 [100% response rate]) in June and July 2015. The survey compared PDs' perceptions of the duty hour requirements in their arm of the FIRST trial during the study period from July 1, 2014 to June 30, 2015. One hundred percent of PDs in the Flexible Policy arm indicated that residents used their additional flexibility in duty hours to complete operations they started or to stabilize a critically ill patient. Compared with the Standard Policy arm, PDs in the Flexible Policy arm perceived a more positive effect of duty hours on the safety of patient care (68.9% vs 0%; p care (98.3% vs 0%; p care (71.8%), continuity of care (94.0%), quality of resident education (83.8%), and resident well-being (55.6%) would be improved with a hypothetical permanent adoption of more flexible duty hours. Program directors involved in the FIRST trial perceived improvements in patient safety, continuity of care, and multiple aspects of resident education and well-being with flexible duty hours. Copyright © 2016 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A Profile of Academic Training Program Directors and Chairs in Radiation Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Lynn D.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Smith, Benjamin D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To identify objective characteristics and benchmarks for program leadership in academic radiation oncology. Methods and Materials: A study of the 87 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education radiation oncology training program directors (PD) and their chairs was performed. Variables included age, gender, original training department, highest degree, rank, endowed chair assignment, National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding, and Hirsch index (H-index). Data were gathered from online sources such as departmental websites, NIH RePORTER, and Scopus. Results: There were a total of 87 PD. The median age was 48, and 14 (16%) were MD/PhD. A total of 21 (24%) were female, and rank was relatively equally distributed above instructor. Of the 26 professors, at least 7 (27%) were female. At least 24 (28%) were working at the institution from which they had received their training. A total of 6 individuals held endowed chairs. Only 2 PD had active NIH funding in 2012. The median H-index was 12 (range, 0-51) but the index dropped to 9 (range, 0-38) when those who served as both PD and chair were removed from the group. A total of 76 chairs were identified at the time of the study. The median age was 55, and 9 (12%) were MD/PhD. A total of 7 (9%) of the chairs were female, and rank was professor for all with the exception of 1 who was listed as “Head” and was an associate professor. Of the 76 chairs, at least 10 (13%) were working at the institution from which they received their training. There were a total of 21 individuals with endowed chairs. A total of 13 (17%) had NIH funding in 2012. The median H-index was 29 (range, 3-60). Conclusions: These data provide benchmarks for individuals and departments evaluating leadership positions in the field of academic radiation oncology. Such data are useful for evaluating leadership trends over time and comparing academic radiation oncology with other specialties

  3. A Profile of Academic Training Program Directors and Chairs in Radiation Oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Lynn D., E-mail: Lynn.wilson@yale.edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, Smilow Cancer Hospital, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Haffty, Bruce G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Smith, Benjamin D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, UMDNJ-RWJMS, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To identify objective characteristics and benchmarks for program leadership in academic radiation oncology. Methods and Materials: A study of the 87 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education radiation oncology training program directors (PD) and their chairs was performed. Variables included age, gender, original training department, highest degree, rank, endowed chair assignment, National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding, and Hirsch index (H-index). Data were gathered from online sources such as departmental websites, NIH RePORTER, and Scopus. Results: There were a total of 87 PD. The median age was 48, and 14 (16%) were MD/PhD. A total of 21 (24%) were female, and rank was relatively equally distributed above instructor. Of the 26 professors, at least 7 (27%) were female. At least 24 (28%) were working at the institution from which they had received their training. A total of 6 individuals held endowed chairs. Only 2 PD had active NIH funding in 2012. The median H-index was 12 (range, 0-51) but the index dropped to 9 (range, 0-38) when those who served as both PD and chair were removed from the group. A total of 76 chairs were identified at the time of the study. The median age was 55, and 9 (12%) were MD/PhD. A total of 7 (9%) of the chairs were female, and rank was professor for all with the exception of 1 who was listed as “Head” and was an associate professor. Of the 76 chairs, at least 10 (13%) were working at the institution from which they received their training. There were a total of 21 individuals with endowed chairs. A total of 13 (17%) had NIH funding in 2012. The median H-index was 29 (range, 3-60). Conclusions: These data provide benchmarks for individuals and departments evaluating leadership positions in the field of academic radiation oncology. Such data are useful for evaluating leadership trends over time and comparing academic radiation oncology with other specialties.

  4. The role of librarians in teaching evidence-based medicine to pediatric residents: a survey of pediatric residency program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boykan, Rachel; Jacobson, Robert M

    2017-10-01

    The research sought to identify the general use of medical librarians in pediatric residency training, to define the role of medical librarians in teaching evidence-based medicine (EBM) to pediatric residents, and to describe strategies and curricula for teaching EBM used in pediatric residency training programs. We sent a 13-question web-based survey through the Association of Pediatric Program Directors to 200 pediatric residency program directors between August and December 2015. A total of 91 (46%) pediatric residency program directors responded. Most (76%) programs had formal EBM curricula, and more than 75% of curricula addressed question formation, searching, assessment of validity, generalizability, quantitative importance, statistical significance, and applicability. The venues for teaching EBM that program directors perceived to be most effective included journal clubs (84%), conferences (44%), and morning report (36%). While 80% of programs utilized medical librarians, most of these librarians assisted with scholarly or research projects (74%), addressed clinical questions (62%), and taught on any topic not necessarily EBM (58%). Only 17% of program directors stated that librarians were involved in teaching EBM on a regular basis. The use of a librarian was not associated with having an EBM curriculum but was significantly associated with the size of the program. Smaller programs were more likely to utilize librarians (100%) than were medium (71%) or large programs (75%). While most pediatric residency programs have an EBM curriculum and engage medical librarians in various ways, librarians' expertise in teaching EBM is underutilized. Programs should work to better integrate librarians' expertise, both in the didactic and clinical teaching of EBM.

  5. Pediatric Program Director Minimum Milestone Expectations before Allowing Supervision of Others and Unsupervised Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Su-Ting T; Tancredi, Daniel J; Schwartz, Alan; Guillot, Ann; Burke, Ann E; Trimm, R Franklin; Guralnick, Susan; Mahan, John D; Gifford, Kimberly

    2018-04-25

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires semiannual Milestone reporting on all residents. Milestone expectations of performance are unknown. Determine pediatric program director (PD) minimum Milestone expectations for residents prior to being ready to supervise and prior to being ready to graduate. Mixed methods survey of pediatric PDs on their programs' Milestone expectations before residents are ready to supervise and before they are ready to graduate, and in what ways PDs use Milestones to make supervision and graduation decisions. If programs had no established Milestone expectations, PDs indicated expectations they considered for use in their program. Mean minimum Milestone level expectations adjusted for program size, region, and clustering of Milestone expectations by program were calculated for prior to supervise and prior to graduate. Free-text questions were analyzed using thematic analysis. The response rate was 56.8% (113/199). Most programs had no required minimum Milestone level before residents are ready to supervise (80%; 76/95) or ready to graduate (84%; 80/95). For readiness to supervise, minimum Milestone expectations PDs considered establishing for their program were highest for humanism (2.46, 95% CI: 2.21-2.71) and professionalization (2.37, 2.15-2.60). Minimum Milestone expectations for graduates were highest for help-seeking (3.14, 2.83-3.46). Main themes included the use of Milestones in combination with other information to assess learner performance and Milestones are not equally weighted when making advancement decisions. Most PDs have not established program minimum Milestones, but would vary such expectations by competency. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Toward an objective assessment of technical skills: a national survey of surgical program directors in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alkhayal A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abdullah Alkhayal,1 Shahla Aldhukair,2 Nahar Alselaim,1 Salah Aldekhayel,1 Sultan Alhabdan,1 Waleed Altaweel,3 Mohi Elden Magzoub,4 Mohammed Zamakhshary1,21Department of Surgery, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 2Public Health Section, King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 3Urology Department, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 4Department of Medical Education, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaBackground: After almost a decade of implementing competency-based programs in postgraduate training programs, the assessment of technical skills remains more subjective than objective. National data on the assessment of technical skills during surgical training are lacking. We conducted this study to document the assessment tools for technical skills currently used in different surgical specialties, their relationship with remediation, the recommended tools from the program directors’ perspective, and program directors’ attitudes toward the available objective tools to assess technical skills.Methods: This study was a cross-sectional survey of surgical program directors (PDs. The survey was initially developed using a focus group and was then sent to 116 PDs. The survey contains demographic information about the program, the objective assessment tools used, and the reason for not using assessment tools. The last section discusses the recommended tools to be used from the PDs’ perspective and the PDs’ attitude and motivation to apply these tools in each program. The associations between the responses to the assessment questions and remediation were statistically evaluated.Results: Seventy-one (61% participants responded. Of the respondents, 59% mentioned using only nonstandardized, subjective, direct observation for technical skills assessment. Sixty percent use only summative

  7. Sleep technologists educational needs assessment: a survey of polysomnography, electroneurodiagnostic technology, and respiratory therapy education program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Mary Ellen; Vaughn, Bradley V

    2013-10-15

    In this study, we assessed the community and educational needs for sleep technologists by surveying program directors of nationally accredited polysomnography, electroneurodiagnostic technology, and respiratory care educational programs. Currently, little is known about our educational capacity and the need for advanced degrees for sleep medicine technical support. A questionnaire was developed about current and future community and educational needs for sleep technologists. The questionnaire was sent to directors of CAAHEP-accredited polysomnography and electroneurodiagnostic technology programs (associate degree and certificate programs), and directors of CoARC-accredited respiratory therapy associate degree and bachelor degree programs (n = 358). Qualitative and quantitative data were collected via an internet survey tool. Data analysis was conducted with the IBM SPSS statistical package and included calculating means and standard deviations of the frequency of responses. Qualitative data was analyzed and classified based on emerging themes. One hundred seven of 408 program directors completed the survey. Seventy-four percent agreed that demand for qualified sleep technologists will increase, yet 50% of those surveyed believe there are not enough educational programs to meet the demand. Seventy-eight percent of those surveyed agreed that the educational requirements for sleep technologists will soon increase; 79% of those surveyed believe sleep centers have a need for technologists with advanced training or specialization. Our study shows educators of associate and certificate degree programs believe there is a need for a bachelor's degree in sleep science and technology.

  8. An Introduction to Intelligent Processing Programs Developed by the Air Force Manufacturing Technology Directorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Paul G.; Sny, Linda C.

    1992-01-01

    The Air Force has numerous on-going manufacturing and integration development programs (machine tools, composites, metals, assembly, and electronics) which are instrumental in improving productivity in the aerospace industry, but more importantly, have identified strategies and technologies required for the integration of advanced processing equipment. An introduction to four current Air Force Manufacturing Technology Directorate (ManTech) manufacturing areas is provided. Research is being carried out in the following areas: (1) machining initiatives for aerospace subcontractors which provide for advanced technology and innovative manufacturing strategies to increase the capabilities of small shops; (2) innovative approaches to advance machine tool products and manufacturing processes; (3) innovative approaches to advance sensors for process control in machine tools; and (4) efforts currently underway to develop, with the support of industry, the Next Generation Workstation/Machine Controller (Low-End Controller Task).

  9. Antibiotic prophylaxis for children with sickle cell disease: a survey of pediatric dentistry residency program directors and pediatric hematologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Anupama Rao; Norris, Chelita Kaye; Minniti, Caterina P

    2006-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to: (1) investigate the current clinical practice regarding the use of antibiotic prophylaxis by pediatric dentistry residency program directors and pediatric hematologists for children with sickle cell disease (SCD) requiring dental treatment; and (2) evaluate the perceived relative risk of bacteremia following specific dental procedures, as defined by pediatric dentistry residency program directors and pediatric hematologists. A written survey depicting various clinical scenarios of SCD children requiring common dental procedures was mailed to directors of pediatric dental advanced education programs and distributed to pediatric hematologists attending the 2003 Annual Sickle Cell Disease Association of America conference in Washington, DC. Surveys were returned by 60% (N=34/57) of the pediatric dentistry residency program directors. The surveys were obtained from 51% of pediatric hematologists at the meeting (N=72/140). At least 50% of all respondents recommended prophylaxis for the following clinical situations: dental extractions, treatment under general anesthesia, and status post splenectomy. The perceived risk of infectious complication was highest for extractions, followed by restorative treatment and tooth polishing. Dental residency program directors were more likely (71%, N=24/34) to recommend additional antibiotic therapy for patients taking penicillin prophylaxis if they required an invasive oral surgical procedure. Conversely, only 38% (N=25/66) of pediatric hematologists recommended additional antibiotic therapy (P=.001). Eighty-six percent of dental residency program directors (N=25/29) chose amoxicillin for prophylaxis whereas only 62% of pediatric hematologists (N=36/58) recommended amoxicillin. (Pchildren undergoing dental treatments. Further research and risk/benefit assessment is needed to create a unified approach.

  10. Flipped Classrooms in Graduate Medical Education: A National Survey of Residency Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittich, Christopher M; Agrawal, Anoop; Wang, Amy T; Halvorsen, Andrew J; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Chaudhry, Saima; Dupras, Denise M; Oxentenko, Amy S; Beckman, Thomas J

    2018-03-01

    To begin to quantify and understand the use of the flipped classroom (FC)-a progressive, effective, curricular model-in internal medicine (IM) education in relation to residency program and program director (PD) characteristics. The authors conducted a survey that included the Flipped Classroom Perception Instrument (FCPI) in 2015 regarding programs' use and PDs' perceptions of the FC model. Among the 368 IM residency programs, PDs at 227 (61.7%) responded to the survey and 206 (56.0%) completed the FCPI. Regarding how often programs used the FC model, 34 of the 206 PDs (16.5%) reported "never"; 44 (21.4%) reported "very rarely"; another 44 (21.4%) reported "somewhat rarely"; 59 (28.6%) reported "sometimes"; 16 (7.8%) reported "somewhat often"; and 9 (4.4%) reported "very often." The mean FCPI score (standard deviation [SD]) for the in-class application factor (4.11 [0.68]) was higher (i.e., more favorable) than for the preclass activity factor (3.94 [0.65]) (P 50 years, 3.94 [0.61]; P = .04) and women compared with men (4.28 [0.56] vs. 3.91 [0.62]; P < .001). PDs with better perceptions of FCs had higher odds of using FCs (odds ratio, 4.768; P < .001). Most IM programs use the FC model at least to some extent, and PDs prefer the interactive in-class components over the independent preclass activities. PDs who are women and younger perceived the model more favorably.

  11. Balancing innovation with commercialization in NASA's Science Mission Directorate SBIR Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrile, R. J.; Jackson, B. L.

    The NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) administers a portion of the Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) Program. One of the challenges of administrating this program is to balance the need to foster innovation in small businesses and the need to demonstrate commercialization by infusion into NASA. Because of the often risky nature of innovation, SBIR programs will tend to drift into a status that rewards proposals that promise to deliver a product that is exactly what was specified in the call. This often will satisfy the metric of providing a clear demonstration of infusion and thus also providing a publishable success story. However, another goal of the SBIR program is to foster innovation as a national asset. Even though data from commercially successful SMD SBIR tasks indicate a higher value for less innovative efforts, there are programmatic and national reasons to balance the program toward risking a portion of the portfolio on higher innovation tasks. Establishing this balance is made difficult because there is a reward metric for successful infusion and commercialization, but none for successful innovation. In general, the ultimate infusion and commercialization of innovative solutions has a lower probability than implementation of established ideas, but they can also have a much higher return on investment. If innovative ideas are valued and solicited in the SBIR program, then NASA technology requirements need to be specified in a way that defines the problem and possible solution, but will also allow for different approaches and unconventional methods. It may also be necessary to establish a guideline to risk a percentage of awards on these innovations.

  12. Taking Care of Our Own: A Multispecialty Study of Resident and Program Director Perspectives on Contributors to Burnout and Potential Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Emily G; Connolly, AnnaMarie; Putnam, Karen T; Penaskovic, Kenan M; Denniston, Clark R; Clark, Leslie H; Rubinow, David R; Meltzer-Brody, Samantha

    2017-04-01

    Rates of resident physician burnout range from 60 to 76 % and are rising. Consequently, there is an urgent need for academic medical centers to develop system-wide initiatives to combat burnout in physicians. Academic psychiatrists who advocate for or treat residents should be familiar with the scope of the problem and the contributors to burnout and potential interventions to mitigate it. We aimed to measure burnout in residents across a range of specialties and to describe resident- and program director-identified contributors and interventions. Residents across all specialties at a tertiary academic hospital completed surveys to assess symptoms of burnout and depression using the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, respectively. Residents and program directors identified contributors to burnout and interventions that might mitigate its risk. Residents were asked to identify barriers to treatment. There were 307 residents (response rate of 61 %) who completed at least one question on the survey; however, all residents did not respond to all questions, resulting in varying denominators across survey questions. In total, 190 of 276 residents (69 %) met criteria for burnout and 45 of 263 (17 %) screened positive for depression. Program directors underestimated rates of burnout, with only one program director estimating a rate of 50 % or higher. Overall residents and program directors agreed that lack of work-life balance and feeling unappreciated were major contributors. Forty-two percent of residents reported that inability to take time off from work was a significant barrier to seeking help, and 25 % incorrectly believed that burnout is a reportable condition to the medical board. Resident distress is common and most likely due to work-life imbalance and feeling unappreciated. However, residents are reluctant to seek help. Interventions that address work-life balance and increase access to support are urgently needed in academic

  13. Status of neurology medical school education: results of 2005 and 2012 clerkship director survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Jonathan L; Ali, Imran I; Isaacson, Richard S; Safdieh, Joseph E; Finney, Glen R; Sowell, Michael K; Sam, Maria C; Anderson, Heather S; Shin, Robert K; Kraakevik, Jeff A; Coleman, Mary; Drogan, Oksana

    2014-11-04

    To survey all US medical school clerkship directors (CDs) in neurology and to compare results from a similar survey in 2005. A survey was developed by a work group of the American Academy of Neurology Undergraduate Education Subcommittee, and sent to all neurology CDs listed in the American Academy of Neurology database. Comparisons were made to a similar 2005 survey. Survey response rate was 73%. Neurology was required in 93% of responding schools. Duration of clerkships was 4 weeks in 74% and 3 weeks in 11%. Clerkships were taken in the third year in 56%, third or fourth year in 19%, and fourth year in 12%. Clerkship duration in 2012 was slightly shorter than in 2005 (fewer clerkships of ≥4 weeks, p = 0.125), but more clerkships have moved into the third year (fewer neurology clerkships during the fourth year, p = 0.051). Simulation training in lumbar punctures was available at 44% of schools, but only 2% of students attempted lumbar punctures on patients. CDs averaged 20% protected time, but reported that they needed at least 32%. Secretarial full-time equivalent was 0.50 or less in 71% of clerkships. Eighty-five percent of CDs were "very satisfied" or "somewhat satisfied," but more than half experienced "burnout" and 35% had considered relinquishing their role. Trends in neurology undergraduate education since 2005 include shorter clerkships, migration into the third year, and increasing use of technology. CDs are generally satisfied, but report stressors, including inadequate protected time and departmental support. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  14. Palliative care and palliative radiation therapy education in radiation oncology: A survey of US radiation oncology program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Randy L; Colbert, Lauren E; Jones, Joshua; Racsa, Margarita; Kane, Gabrielle; Lutz, Steve; Vapiwala, Neha; Dharmarajan, Kavita V

    The purpose of this study was to assess the state of palliative and supportive care (PSC) and palliative radiation therapy (RT) educational curricula in radiation oncology residency programs in the United States. We surveyed 87 program directors of radiation oncology residency programs in the United States between September 2015 and November 2015. An electronic survey on PSC and palliative RT education during residency was sent to all program directors. The survey consisted of questions on (1) perceived relevance of PSC and palliative RT to radiation oncology training, (2) formal didactic sessions on domains of PSC and palliative RT, (3) effective teaching formats for PSC and palliative RT education, and (4) perceived barriers for integrating PSC and palliative RT into the residency curriculum. A total of 57 responses (63%) was received. Most program directors agreed or strongly agreed that PSC (93%) and palliative radiation therapy (99%) are important competencies for radiation oncology residents and fellows; however, only 67% of residency programs had formal educational activities in principles and practice of PSC. Most programs had 1 or more hours of formal didactics on management of pain (67%), management of neuropathic pain (65%), and management of nausea and vomiting (63%); however, only 35%, 33%, and 30% had dedicated lectures on initial management of fatigue, assessing role of spirituality, and discussing advance care directives, respectively. Last, 85% of programs reported having a formal curriculum on palliative RT. Programs were most likely to have education on palliative radiation to brain, bone, and spine, but less likely on visceral, or skin, metastasis. Residency program directors believe that PSC and palliative RT are important competencies for their trainees and support increasing education in these 2 educational domains. Many residency programs have structured curricula on PSC and palliative radiation education, but room for improvement exists in

  15. Palliative Care Exposure in Internal Medicine Residency Education: A Survey of ACGME Internal Medicine Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Asher; Nam, Samuel

    2018-01-01

    As the baby boomer generation ages, the need for palliative care services will be paramount and yet training for palliative care physicians is currently inadequate to meet the current palliative care needs. Nonspecialty-trained physicians will need to supplement the gap between supply and demand. Yet, no uniform guidelines exist for the training of internal medicine residents in palliative care. To our knowledge, no systematic study has been performed to evaluate how internal medicine residencies currently integrate palliative care into their training. In this study, we surveyed 338 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited internal medicine program directors. We queried how palliative care was integrated into their training programs. The vast majority of respondents felt that palliative care training was "very important" (87.5%) and 75.9% of respondents offered some kind of palliative care rotation, often with a multidisciplinary approach. Moving forward, we are hopeful that the data provided from our survey will act as a launching point for more formal investigations into palliative care education for internal medicine residents. Concurrently, policy makers should aid in palliative care instruction by formalizing required palliative care training for internal medicine residents.

  16. Report on an Investigation into an Entry Level Clinical Doctorate for the Genetic Counseling Profession and a Survey of the Association of Genetic Counseling Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, Catherine; LeRoy, Bonnie; Grubs, Robin; Walton, Carol

    2015-10-01

    The master's degree is the required entry-level degree for the genetic counseling profession in the US and Canada. In 2012 the Association of Genetic Counseling Program Directors (AGCPD) passed resolutions supporting retention of the master's as the entry-level and terminal degree and opposing introduction of an entry-level clinical doctorate (CD) degree. An AGCPD workgroup surveyed directors of all 34 accredited training programs with the objective of providing the Genetic Counseling Advanced Degrees Task Force (GCADTF) with information regarding potential challenges if master's programs were required to transition to an entry-level CD. Program demographics, projected ability to transition to an entry-level CD, factors influencing ability to transition, and potential effects of transition on programs, students and the genetic counseling workforce were characterized. Two programs would definitely be able to transition, four programs would close, thirteen programs would be at risk to close and fourteen programs would probably be able to transition with varying degrees of difficulty. The most frequently cited limiting factors were economic, stress on clinical sites, and administrative approval of a new degree/program. Student enrollment under an entry-level CD model was projected to decrease by 26.2 %, negatively impacting the workforce pipeline. The results further illuminate and justify AGCPD's position to maintain the master's as the entry-level degree.

  17. Perceptions of the Inpatient Training Experience: A Nationwide Survey of Gastroenterology Program Directors and Fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Navin L; Perencevich, Molly L; Trier, Jerry S

    2017-10-01

    Inpatient training is a key component of gastroenterology (GI) fellowship programs nationwide, yet little is known about perceptions of the inpatient training experience. To compare the content, objectives and quality of the inpatient training experience as perceived by program directors (PD) and fellows in US ACGME-accredited GI fellowship programs. We conducted a nationwide, online-based survey of GI PDs and fellows at the conclusion of the 2016 academic year. We queried participants about (1) the current models of inpatient training, (2) the content, objectives, and quality of the inpatient training experience, and (3) the frequency and quality of educational activities on the inpatient service. We analyzed five-point Likert items and rank assessments as continuous variables by an independent t test and compared proportions using the Chi-square test. Survey response rate was 48.4% (75/155) for PDs and a total of 194 fellows completed the survey, with both groups reporting the general GI consult team (>90%) as the primary model of inpatient training. PDs and fellows agreed on the ranking of all queried responsibilities of the inpatient fellow to develop during the inpatient service. However, fellows indicated that attendings spent less time teaching and provided less formal feedback than that perceived by PDs (p < 0.0001). PDs rated the overall quality of the inpatient training experience (p < 0.0001) and education on the wards (p = 0.0003) as better than overall ratings by fellows. Although GI fellows and PDs agree on the importance of specific fellow responsibilities on the inpatient service, fellows report experiencing less teaching and feedback from attendings than that perceived by PDs. Committing more time to education and assessment may improve fellows' perceptions of the inpatient training experience.

  18. Family medicine residency program directors attitudes and knowledge of family medicine CAM competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Paula; Filippelli, Amanda C; Lebensohn, Patricia; Bonakdar, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the incorporation of integrative medicine (IM) and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) into family medicine residency programs. The Society for Teachers of Family Medicine (STFM) approved a set of CAM/IM competencies for family medicine residencies. We hope to evaluate whether residency programs are implementing such competencies into their curriculum using an online survey tool. We also hope to assess the knowledge and attitudes of Residency Directors (RDs) on the CAM/IM competencies. A survey was distributed by the Council of Academic Family Medicine (CAFM) Educational Research Alliance to RDs via e-mail. The survey was distributed to 431 RDs. Of those who received it, 212 responded, giving a response rate of 49.1%. Questions assessed the knowledge and attitudes of CAM/IM competencies and incorporation of CAM/IM into the residency curriculum. Forty-five percent of RDs were aware of the competencies. In terms of RD attitudes, 58% reported that CAM/IM is an important component of residents' curriculum; yet, 60% report not having specific learning objectives for CAM/IM in their residency curriculum. Among all programs, barriers to CAM/IM implementation included time in residents' schedules (77%); faculty training (75%); access to CAM experts (43%); lack of reimbursement (43%); and financial resources (29%). While many RDs are aware of the STFM CAM/IM competencies and acknowledge their role in residence education, there are many barriers that prevent residencies from implementing the STFM CAM/IM competencies. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. An assessment of burnout in undergraduate athletic training education program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Jessica M; Van Lunen, Bonnie L; Walker, Stacy E; Ismaeli, Zahra C; Oñate, James A

    2009-01-01

    Athletic training education program directors (ATEPDs) often manage their time among students, program administration, and patient care. To assess the level of burnout in ATEPDs and to determine the relationship between burnout and various demographics of ATEPDs. Cross-sectional study. Public and private colleges and universities nationwide. Two hundred forty-nine ATEPDs of undergraduate athletic training education programs accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education. We administered the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) to all participants. The MBI consisted of 21 items assessing 3 characteristics of burnout: emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment. Another component of the survey requested demographic information about the ATEPDs. We used univariate, multivariate, and factorial analyses of variance with the alpha level set a priori at .05. We also calculated Pearson product moment correlation coefficients. Women had greater emotional exhaustion than men (20.67 +/- 9.43 and 16.47 +/- 9.64, respectively) (P = .001). The difference between tenure-status groups for emotional exhaustion was significant (P = .014), with tenure-track ATEPDs scoring higher on emotional exhaustion than tenured ATEPDs. Pearson product moment correlation coefficients revealed a weak negative relationship among emotional exhaustion and age (r = -0.263, P depersonalization (r = -0.171, P = .007). There was a weak positive relationship between years at current job and personal accomplishment (r = 0.197, P = .002). We found that ATEPDs experienced a moderate form of emotional exhaustion burnout and low depersonalization and personal accomplishment burnout, with women experiencing greater emotional exhaustion than males. Additionally, ATEPDs in tenure-track positions experienced greater emotional exhaustion than tenured ATEPDs. The ATEPDs need to obtain healthy coping strategies early within their directorships to manage components

  20. What does remediation and probation status mean? A survey of emergency medicine residency program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weizberg, Moshe; Smith, Jessica L; Murano, Tiffany; Silverberg, Mark; Santen, Sally A

    2015-01-01

    Emergency medicine (EM) residency program directors (PDs) nationwide place residents on remediation and probation. However, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and the EM PDs have not defined these terms, and individual institutions must set guidelines defining a change in resident status from good standing to remediation or probation. The primary objective of this study was to determine if EM PDs follow a common process to guide actions when residents are placed on remediation and probation. An anonymous electronic survey was distributed to EM PDs via e-mail using SurveyMonkey to determine the current practice followed after residents are placed on remediation or probation. The survey queried four designations: informal remediation, formal remediation, informal probation, and formal probation. These designations were compared for deficits in the domains of medical knowledge (MK) and non-MK remediation. The survey asked what process for designation exists and what actions are triggered, specifically if documentation is placed in a resident's file, if the graduate medical education (GME) office is notified, if faculty are informed, or if resident privileges are limited. Descriptive data are reported. Eighty-one of 160 PDs responded. An official policy on remediation and/or probation was reported by 41 (50.6%) programs. The status of informal remediation is used by 73 (90.1%), 80 (98.8%) have formal remediation, 40 (49.4%) have informal probation, and 79 (97.5%) have formal probation. There was great variation among PDs in the management and definition of remediation and probation. Between 81 and 86% of programs place an official letter into the resident's file regarding formal remediation and probation. However, only about 50% notify the GME office when a resident is placed on formal remediation. There were no statistical differences between MK and non-MK remediation practices. There is significant variation among EM programs regarding the

  1. Program Director Perceptions of Proficiency in the Core Entrustable Professional Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearlman, R Ellen; Pawelczak, Melissa; Yacht, Andrew C; Akbar, Salaahuddin; Farina, Gino A

    2017-10-01

    The Association of American Medical Colleges describes 13 core entrustable professional activities (EPAs) that every graduating medical student should be expected to perform proficiently on day 1 of residency, regardless of chosen specialty. Studies have shown wide variability in program director (PD) confidence in interns' abilities to perform these core EPAs. Little is known regarding comparison of United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) scores with proficiency in EPAs. We determined if PDs from a large health system felt confident in their postgraduate year 1 residents' abilities to perform the 13 core EPAs, and compared perceived EPA proficiency with USMLE Step 1 and Step 2 scores. The PDs were asked to rate their residents' proficiency in each EPA and to provide residents' USMLE scores. Timing coincided with the reporting period for resident milestones. Surveys were completed on 204 of 328 residents (62%). PDs reported that 69% of residents (140 of 204) were prepared for EPA 4 (orders/prescriptions), 61% (117 of 192) for EPA 7 (form clinical questions), 68% (135 of 198) for EPA 8 (handovers), 63% (116 of 185) for EPA 11 (consent), and 38% (49 of 129) for EPA 13 (patient safety). EPA ratings and USMLE 1 and 2 were negatively correlated ( r (101) = -0.23, P  = .031). PDs felt that a significant percentage of residents were not adequately prepared in order writing, forming clinical questions, handoffs, informed consent, and promoting a culture of patient safety. We found no positive association between USMLE scores and EPA ratings.

  2. Readiness for practice: a survey of neurosurgery graduates and program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji, Faizal A; Steven, David A

    2014-11-01

    Postgraduate neurosurgical education is undergoing significant reform, including transition to a competency-based training model. To support these efforts, the purpose of this study was to determine neurosurgical graduates' and program directors' (PDs) opinions about graduates' level of competence in reference to the 2010 Royal College Objectives of Training in Neurosurgery. An electronic survey was distributed to Canadian neurosurgery PDs and graduates from 2011. The questionnaire addressed graduates' abilities in nonprocedural knowledge and skills, CanMEDS roles, proficiency with core neurosurgical procedures and knowledge of complex neurosurgical techniques. Thirteen of 22 (59%) graduate and 17/25 (65%) PD surveys were completed. There were no significant differences between PD and graduate responses. Most respondents agreed that these graduates possess the knowledge and skills expected of an independently practicing neurosurgeon across current objectives of training. A small proportion felt some graduates did not achieve this level of proficiency on specific vascular, functional, peripheral nerve and endoscopic procedures. This was partially attributed to limited exposure to these procedures during training and perceptions that some techniques required fellowship-level training. Graduating neurosurgical residents are perceived to possess a high level of proficiency in the majority of neurosurgical practice domains. Inadequate exposure during training or a perception that subspecialists should perform some procedures may contribute to cases where proficiency is not as high. The trends identified in this study could be monitored on an ongoing basis to provide supplemental data to guide curricular decisions in Canadian neurosurgical training.

  3. Navigation and flight director guidance for the NASA/FAA helicopter MLS curved approach flight test program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phatak, A. V.; Lee, M. G.

    1985-01-01

    The navigation and flight director guidance systems implemented in the NASA/FAA helicopter microwave landing system (MLS) curved approach flight test program is described. Flight test were conducted at the U.S. Navy's Crows Landing facility, using the NASA Ames UH-lH helicopter equipped with the V/STOLAND avionics system. The purpose of these tests was to investigate the feasibility of flying complex, curved and descending approaches to a landing using MLS flight director guidance. A description of the navigation aids used, the avionics system, cockpit instrumentation and on-board navigation equipment used for the flight test is provided. Three generic reference flight paths were developed and flown during the test. They were as follows: U-Turn, S-turn and Straight-In flight profiles. These profiles and their geometries are described in detail. A 3-cue flight director was implemented on the helicopter. A description of the formulation and implementation of the flight director laws is also presented. Performance data and analysis is presented for one pilot conducting the flight director approaches.

  4. Teaching atraumatic restorative treatment in U.S. dental schools: a survey of predoctoral pediatric dentistry program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kateeb, Elham T; Warren, John J; Damiano, Peter; Momany, Elizabeth; Kanellis, Michael; Weber-Gasparoni, Karin; Ansley, Tim

    2013-10-01

    The International Dental Federation and World Health Organization have promoted the use of Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) in modern clinical settings worldwide. In the United States, the practice of ART is not believed to be widely used, which may be a result of little attention given to ART training in predoctoral pediatric dentistry curricula in U.S. dental schools. This study investigated the extent of clinical and didactic instruction on ART provided in U.S. dental schools by surveying the predoctoral pediatric dentistry programs in 2010. Of the fifty-seven directors asked to complete the survey, forty-four responded for a response rate of 77 percent. Of these forty-four programs, 66 percent reported providing clinical training on ART, though only 14 percent provide this training often or very often. The types of ART training provided often or very often included interim treatment (18 percent) and single-surface cavities (14 percent) in primary teeth. However, ART was said to be rarely taught as a definitive treatment in permanent teeth (2 percent). Attitude was a major predictor, for clinical training provided and using professional guidelines in treatment decisions were associated with a positive attitude towards ART. These predoctoral pediatric dentistry programs used ART mainly in primary, anterior, and single-surface cavities and as interim treatment. As ART increases access of children to dental care, the incorporation of the ART approach into the curricula of U.S. dental schools should be facilitated by professional organizations.

  5. Pathways to Academic Leadership in Plastic Surgery: A Nationwide Survey of Program Directors, Division Chiefs, and Department Chairs of Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Jordan E; Pang, John Henry Y; Losee, Joseph E; Rubin, J Peter; Nguyen, Vu T

    2018-06-01

    Many aspire to leadership in academic plastic surgery yet there is no well-documented pathway. Information regarding plastic surgery residencies and program directors was obtained from the American Medical Association's FREIDA database. The division chief or department chair (academic head) of every academic plastic surgery program was identified. One Internet-based survey was distributed to academic heads; another, to program directors. Ninety academic heads were identified, 35 of whom also serve as program director. Sixty-seven unique program directors were identified. There was a 51 percent academic head response rate and a 65 percent program director response rate. Academic plastic surgery is overwhelmingly administered by midcareer men. The average program director was appointed at age 45 and has served for 7 years. She or he was trained through the independent track, completed additional training in hand surgery, and is a full professor. She or he publishes two or three peer-reviewed manuscripts per year and spends 9 hours per week in administration. The average academic head was appointed at age 45 and has held the position for 12 years. She or he was trained in the independent model, completed fellowship training, and is a full professor. She or he publishes five peer-reviewed manuscripts per year and spends 12 hours per week involved in administration. Program directors and academic heads serve nonoverlapping roles. Few program directors will advance to the role of academic head. Successful applicants to the program director position often serve as an associate program director and are seen as motivated resident educators. In contrast, those faculty members selected for the academic head role are academically accomplished administrators with business acumen.

  6. Toward an objective assessment of technical skills: a national survey of surgical program directors in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhayal, Abdullah; Aldhukair, Shahla; Alselaim, Nahar; Aldekhayel, Salah; Alhabdan, Sultan; Altaweel, Waleed; Magzoub, Mohi Elden; Zamakhshary, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    After almost a decade of implementing competency-based programs in postgraduate training programs, the assessment of technical skills remains more subjective than objective. National data on the assessment of technical skills during surgical training are lacking. We conducted this study to document the assessment tools for technical skills currently used in different surgical specialties, their relationship with remediation, the recommended tools from the program directors' perspective, and program directors' attitudes toward the available objective tools to assess technical skills. This study was a cross-sectional survey of surgical program directors (PDs). The survey was initially developed using a focus group and was then sent to 116 PDs. The survey contains demographic information about the program, the objective assessment tools used, and the reason for not using assessment tools. The last section discusses the recommended tools to be used from the PDs' perspective and the PDs' attitude and motivation to apply these tools in each program. The associations between the responses to the assessment questions and remediation were statistically evaluated. Seventy-one (61%) participants responded. Of the respondents, 59% mentioned using only nonstandardized, subjective, direct observation for technical skills assessment. Sixty percent use only summative evaluation, whereas 15% perform only formative evaluations of their residents, and the remaining 22% conduct both summative and formative evaluations of their residents' technical skills. Operative portfolios are kept by 53% of programs. The percentage of programs with mechanisms for remediation is 29% (19 of 65). The survey showed that surgical training programs use different tools to assess surgical skills competency. Having a clear remediation mechanism was highly associated with reporting remediation, which reflects the capability to detect struggling residents. Surgical training leadership should invest more in

  7. A national survey of program director opinions of core competencies and structure of hand surgery fellowship training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Erika Davis; Larson, Bradley P; Chung, Kevin C

    2012-10-01

    We assessed hand surgery program directors' opinions of essential components of hand surgery training and potential changes in the structure of hand surgery programs. We recruited all 74 program directors of Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education-accredited hand surgery fellowship programs to participate. We designed a web-based survey to assess program directors' support for changes in the structure of training programs and to assess opinions of components that are essential for graduates to be proficient. Respondents were asked to rate 9 general areas of practice, 97 knowledge topics, and 172 procedures. Each component was considered essential if 50% or more of respondents thought that graduates must be fully knowledgeable of the topic and be able to perform the procedure at the end of training. The response rate was 84% (n = 62). A minority of program directors (n = 15; 24%) supported creation of additional pathways for hand surgery training, and nearly three-quarters (n = 46; 74%) preferred a fellowship model to an integrated residency model. Most program directors (n = 40; 65%) thought that a 1-year fellowship was sufficient to train a competent hand surgeon. Wrist, distal radius/ulna, forearm, and peripheral nerve conditions were rated as essential areas of practice. Of the detailed components, 76 of 97 knowledge topics and 98 of 172 procedures were rated as essential. Only 48% respondents (n = 30) rated microsurgery as it relates to free tissue transfer as essential. However, small and large vessel laceration repairs were rated as essential by 92% (n = 57) and 77% (n = 48) of respondents, respectively. This study found resistance to prolonging the length of fellowship training and introduction of an integrated residency pathway. To train all hand surgeons in essential components of hand surgery, programs must individually evaluate exposure provided and find innovative ways to augment training when necessary. Studies of curriculum content in hand

  8. Procedural Headache Medicine in Neurology Residency Training: A Survey of US Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Matthew S; Robertson, Carrie E; Ailani, Jessica; Levin, Morris; Friedman, Deborah I; Dodick, David W

    2016-01-01

    To survey neurology residency program directors (PDs) on trainee exposure, supervision, and credentialing in procedures widely utilized in headache medicine. Clinic-based procedures have assumed a prominent role in headache therapy. Headache fellows obtain procedural competence, but reliance on fellowship-trained neurologists cannot match the population eligible for treatments. The inclusion of educational modules and mechanisms for credentialing trainees pursuing procedural competence in residency curricula at individual programs is not known. A web-based survey of US neurology residency PDs was designed by the American Headache Society (AHS) procedural special interest section in collaboration with AHS and American Academy of Neurology's Headache and Facial Pain section leadership. The survey addressed exposure, training, and credentialing in: (1) onabotulinumtoxinA (onabotA) injections, (2) extracranial peripheral nerve blocks (PNBs), and (3) trigger point injections (TPIs). Fifty-five PDs (42.6%) completed the survey. Compared to noncompleters, survey completers were more likely to feature headache fellowships at their institutions (38.2% vs 10.8%, P=0.0002). High exposure (onabotA=90.9%, PNBs=80.0%, TPIs=70.9%) usually featured hands-on patient instruction (66.2%) and lectures (55.7%). Supervised performance rates were high (onabotA=65.5%, PNBs=60.0%, TPIs=52.7%), usually in continuity clinic (60.0%) or headache elective (50.9%). Headache specialists (69.1%) or general neurology (32.7%) faculty most commonly trained residents. Formal credentialing was uncommon (16.4-18.2%), mostly by documenting supervised procedures (25.5%). Only 27.3% of programs permitted trainees to perform procedures independently. Most PDs felt procedural exposure (80.0-90.9%) and competence (50.9-56.4%) by all trainees was important. Resident exposure to procedures for headache is high, but credentialing mechanisms, while desired by most PDs, are not generally in place. Implementation

  9. Preparation in the business and practice of medicine: perspectives from recent gynecologic oncology graduates and program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlumbrecht, Matthew; Siemon, John; Morales, Guillermo; Huang, Marilyn; Slomovitz, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Preparation in the business of medicine is reported to be poor across a number of specialties. No data exist about such preparation in gynecologic oncology training programs. Our objectives were to evaluate current time dedicated to these initiatives, report recent graduate perceptions about personal preparedness, and assess areas where improvements in training can occur. Two separate surveys were created and distributed, one to 183 Society of Gynecologic Oncology candidate members and the other to 48 gynecologic oncology fellowship program directors. Candidate member surveys included questions about perceived preparedness for independent research, teaching, job-hunting, insurance, and billing. Program director surveys assessed current and desired time dedicated to the topics asked concurrently on the candidate survey. Statistical analysis was performed using Chi-squared (or Fisher's exact test if appropriate) and logistic regression. Survey response rates of candidate members and program directors were 28% and 40%, respectively. Candidate members wanted increased training in all measures except retrospective protocol writing. Female candidates wanted more training on writing letters of intent (LOI) ( p  = 0.01) and billing ( p  communication between the two may serve to achieve the educational goals of each.

  10. Opinions regarding neonatal resuscitation training for the obstetric physician: a survey of neonatal and obstetric training program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, C J; Johnston, L; Lee, C; Bernstein, P S; Goffman, D

    2018-04-01

    Our goal was to garner opinions regarding neonatal resuscitation training for obstetric physicians. We sought to evaluate obstacles to neonatal resuscitation training for obstetric physicians and possible solutions for implementation challenges. We distributed a national survey via email to all neonatal-perinatal medicine fellowship directors and obstetrics & gynecology residency program directors in the United States. This survey was designed by a consensus method. Ninety-eight (53%) obstetric and fifty-seven (51%) neonatal program directors responded to our surveys. Eighty-eight percent of neonatologists surveyed believe that obstetricians should be neonatal resuscitation program (NRP) certified. The majority of surveyed obstetricians (>89%) believe that obstetricians should have some neonatal resuscitation training. Eighty-six percent of obstetric residents have completed training in NRP, but only 19% of obstetric attendings are NRP certified. Major barriers to NRP training that were identified include time, lack of national requirement, lack of belief it is helpful, and cost. Most obstetric attendings are not NRP certified, but the majority of respondents believe that obstetric providers should have some neonatal resuscitation training. Our study demonstrates that most respondents support a modified neonatal resuscitation course for obstetric physicians.

  11. Child abuse training and knowledge: a national survey of emergency medicine, family medicine, and pediatric residents and program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starling, Suzanne P; Heisler, Kurt W; Paulson, James F; Youmans, Eren

    2009-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the level of knowledge, comfort, and training related to the medical management of child abuse among pediatrics, emergency medicine, and family medicine residents. Surveys were administered to program directors and third-year residents at 67 residency programs. The resident survey included a 24-item quiz to assess knowledge regarding the medical management of physical and sexual child abuse. Sites were solicited from members of a network of child abuse physicians practicing at institutions with residency programs. Analyzable surveys were received from 53 program directors and 462 residents. Compared with emergency medicine and family medicine programs, pediatric programs were significantly larger and more likely to have a medical provider specializing in child abuse pediatrics, have faculty primarily responsible for child abuse training, use a written curriculum for child abuse training, and offer an elective rotation in child abuse. Exposure to child abuse training and abused patients was highest for pediatric residents and lowest for family medicine residents. Comfort with managing child abuse cases was lowest among family medicine residents. On the knowledge quiz, pediatric residents significantly outperformed emergency medicine and family medicine residents. Residents with high knowledge scores were significantly more likely to come from larger programs and programs that had a center, provider, or interdisciplinary team that specialized in child abuse pediatrics; had a physician on faculty responsible for child abuse training; used a written curriculum for child abuse training; and had a required rotation in child abuse pediatrics. By analyzing the relationship between program characteristics and residents' child abuse knowledge, we found that pediatric programs provide far more training and resources for child abuse education than emergency medicine and family medicine programs. As leaders, pediatricians must

  12. Funding and Strategic Alignment Guidance for Infusing Small Business Innovation Research Technology into NASA Programs Associated with the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2015-01-01

    This report is intended to help NASA program and project managers incorporate Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) technologies that have gone through Phase II of the SBIR program into NASA Aeronautics and Mission Directorate (ARMD) programs. Other Government and commercial program managers can also find this information useful.

  13. Balancing Privacy and Professionalism: A Survey of General Surgery Program Directors on Social Media and Surgical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenfeld, Sean J; Vargo, Daniel J; Schenarts, Paul J

    Unprofessional behavior is common among surgical residents and faculty surgeons on Facebook. Usage of social media outlets such as Facebook and Twitter is growing at exponential rates, so it is imperative that surgery program directors (PDs) focus on professionalism within social media, and develop guidelines for their trainees and surgical colleagues. Our study focuses on the surgery PDs current approach to online professionalism within surgical education. An online survey of general surgery PDs was conducted in October 2015 through the Association for Program Directors in Surgery listserv. Baseline PD demographics, usage and approach to popular social media outlets, existing institutional policies, and formal curricula were assessed. A total of 110 PDs responded to the survey (110/259, 42.5% response rate). Social media usage was high among PDs (Facebook 68% and Twitter 40%). PDs frequently viewed the social media profiles of students, residents, and faculty. Overall, 11% of PDs reported lowering the rank or completely removing a residency applicant from the rank order list because of online behavior, and 10% reported formal disciplinary action against a surgical resident because of online behavior. Overall, 68% of respondents agreed that online professionalism is important, and that residents should receive instruction on the safe use of social media. However, most programs did not have formal didactics or known institutional policies in place. Use of social media is high among PDs, and they often view the online behavior of residency applicants, surgical residents, and faculty surgeons. Within surgical education, there needs to be an increased focus on institutional policies and standardized curricula to help educate physicians on social media and online professionalism. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Director's report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, K B

    1993-07-01

    The director's report for the International Institute for Population Sciences in Bombay, India, provides descriptions of the Institute's teaching programs, research, publications, seminars, library collection, visitors, faculty and staff, and special events. The teaching programs include regular instruction in one-year diploma courses in population studies and a masters and a masters in philosophy in population studies; a diploma is also available in health education. Student represent a variety of countries for the diploma programs, while the other certificate programs draw on the national population. A listing is provided of those receiving certificates. Research programs are listed by whether the program was completed during 1992-93 or earlier or is a new project. The Institute conducts a National Family Welfare Survey among 23 states. This household survey is directed to women and supplies village level data. The Institute publishes a quarterly newsletter about ongoing activities and a biennial compendium of research findings. The Institute observes World Population Day and organized the 10th Annual Convention on Medical Statistics and other conferences. The Institute held the first meeting of the National Council of Population Research on September 21, 1992, and the designated subcommittee members met on November 14, 1992. The library recently added 1117 volumes, which contributed to the total library collection of 55,539 volumes, including 8000 bound periodicals and 12,615 reprints. Several high government officials visited the Institute in 1992. Other visitors came from the US, Bangladesh, and the UN. The Institute is comprised of six academic departments with computer and library resources. Staff were involved a few overseas tours of study. Founders day is celebrated as a cultural event.

  15. Programs director's report for the Office of Health and Environmental Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    Since its establishment, the Department of Energy's Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) has had responsibility for conducting biological research to develop the knowledge needed to identify, understand, and anticipate the long-term health consequences of energy use and development, including the potential health impacts of radiation. The Health Effects Research Program has established the basis for understanding the health consequences of radiation for humans, developed radiation dosimetry methodology, characterized and evaluated the health impacts of fossil fuels, and developed and conducted research to determine the health impacts of inhaled toxicants. The results of this research have provided input for setting genetic standards for radiation and chemical exposure

  16. Funding and Strategic Alignment Guidance for Infusing Small Business Innovation Research Technology into NASA Programs Associated with the Science Mission Directorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2015-01-01

    This report is intended to help NASA program and project managers incorporate Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) technologies that have gone through Phase II of the SBIR program into NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) programs. Other Government and commercial project managers can also find this information useful.

  17. Funding and Strategic Alignment Guidance for Infusing Small Business Innovation Research Technology Into NASA Programs Associated With the Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2015-01-01

    This report is intended to help NASA program and project managers incorporate Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) technologies that have gone through Phase II of the SBIR program into NASA Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD) programs. Other Government and commercial project managers can also find this information useful.

  18. Training in childhood obesity management in the United States: a survey of pediatric, internal medicine-pediatrics and family medicine residency program directors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhodes Erinn T

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information about the availability and effectiveness of childhood obesity training during residency is limited. Methods We surveyed residency program directors from pediatric, internal medicine-pediatrics (IM-Peds, and family medicine residency programs between September 2007 and January 2008 about childhood obesity training offered in their programs. Results The response rate was 42.2% (299/709 and ranged by specialty from 40.1% to 45.4%. Overall, 52.5% of respondents felt that childhood obesity training in residency was extremely important, and the majority of programs offered training in aspects of childhood obesity management including prevention (N = 240, 80.3%, diagnosis (N = 282, 94.3%, diagnosis of complications (N = 249, 83.3%, and treatment (N = 242, 80.9%. However, only 18.1% (N = 54 of programs had a formal childhood obesity curriculum with variability across specialties. Specifically, 35.5% of IM-Peds programs had a formal curriculum compared to only 22.6% of pediatric and 13.9% of family medicine programs (p Conclusions While most residents receive training in aspects of childhood obesity management, deficits may exist in training quality with a minority of programs offering a formal childhood obesity curriculum. Given the high prevalence of childhood obesity, a greater emphasis should be placed on development and use of effective training strategies suitable for all specialties training physicians to care for children.

  19. Committee Opinion No. 715: Social Etiquette for Program Directors and Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Educators in obstetrics and gynecology work within a changing clinical learning environment. Ethnic, cultural, and social diversity among colleagues and learners have increased, and methods of communication have expanded in ever more novel ways. Clerkship, residency, and fellowship directors, in partnership with chairs and senior faculty, are urged to take the lead in setting the tone for workplace etiquette, communication, and social behavior of faculty and trainees to promote a high standard of civility and citizenship. The Council on Resident Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology (CREOG) Education Committee has promulgated recommendations that can be used to help address professional relationships, professional appearance, and social media usage. These recommendations also address communications pertinent to educational processes such as interviewing, teaching, evaluation, and mentoring.

  20. Committee Opinion No. 715 Summary: Social Etiquette for Program Directors and Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Educators in obstetrics and gynecology work within a changing clinical learning environment. Ethnic, cultural, and social diversity among colleagues and learners have increased, and μethods of communication have expanded in ever more novel ways. Clerkship, residency, and fellowship directors, in partnership with chairs and senior faculty, are urged to take the lead in setting the tone for workplace etiquette, communication, and social behavior of faculty and trainees to promote a high standard of civility and citizenship. The Council on Resident Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology (CREOG) Education Committee has promulgated recommendations that can be used to help address professional relationships, professional appearance, and social media usage. These recommendations also address communications pertinent to educational processes such as interviewing, teaching, evaluation, and mentoring.

  1. Views from the field: program directors' perceptions of teacher education and the education of students who are deaf or hard of hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teller, Henry; Harney, Jillian

    Arandom sample of directors of programs for the deaf in North America were surveyed to get their views about the skills that teacher education programs need to be teaching future teachers of students who are deaf or hard of hearing. The directors were queried about literacy practices, classroom management strategies, and communication strategies used in their programs, and were encouraged to comment freely on the questionnaire items presented to them. Program directors predicted a need for more itinerant and resource teachers. The survey also revealed that programs for the deaf are highly behaviorist (i.e., You do this and you'll get that) in the way they induce students to learn and in how they manage student behavior.

  2. The American College of Surgeons/Association of Program Directors in Surgery National Skills Curriculum: adoption rate, challenges and strategies for effective implementation into surgical residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korndorffer, James R; Arora, Sonal; Sevdalis, Nick; Paige, John; McClusky, David A; Stefanidis, Dimitris

    2013-07-01

    The American College of Surgeons/Association of Program Directors in Surgery (ACS/APDS) National Skills Curriculum is a 3-phase program targeting technical and nontechnical skills development. Few data exist regarding the adoption of this curriculum by surgical residencies. This study attempted to determine the rate of uptake and identify implementation enablers/barriers. A web-based survey was developed by an international expert panel of surgical educators (5 surgeons and 1 psychologist). After piloting, the survey was sent to all general surgery program directors via email link. Descriptive statistics were used to determine the residency program characteristics and perceptions of the curriculum. Implementation rates for each phase and module were calculated. Adoption barriers were identified quantitatively and qualitatively using free text responses. Standardized qualitative methodology of emergent theme analysis was used to identify strategies for success and details of support required for implementation. Of the 238 program directors approached, 117 (49%) responded to the survey. Twenty-one percent (25/117) were unaware of the ACS/APDS curriculum. Implementation rates for were 36% for phase I, 19% for phase II, and 16% for phase III. The most common modules adopted were the suturing, knot-tying, and chest tube modules of phase I. Over 50% of respondents identified lack of faculty protected time, limited personnel, significant costs, and resident work-hour restrictions as major obstacles to implementation. Strategies for effective uptake included faculty incentives, adequate funding, administrative support, and dedicated time and resources. Despite the availability of a comprehensive curriculum, its diffusion into general surgery residency programs remains low. Obstacles related to successful implementation include personnel, learner, and administrative issues. Addressing these issues may improve the adoption rate of the curriculum. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc

  3. Ambulatory-based education in internal medicine: current organization and implications for transformation. Results of a national survey of resident continuity clinic directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadkarni, Mohan; Reddy, Siddharta; Bates, Carol K; Fosburgh, Blair; Babbott, Stewart; Holmboe, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Many have called for ambulatory training redesign in internal medicine (IM) residencies to increase primary care career outcomes. Many believe dysfunctional, clinic environments are a key barrier to meaningful ambulatory education, but little is actually known about the educational milieu of continuity clinics nationwide. We wished to describe the infrastructure and educational milieu at resident continuity clinics and assess clinic readiness to meet new IM-RRC requirements. National survey of ACGME accredited IM training programs. Directors of academic and community-based continuity clinics. Two hundred and twenty-one out of 365 (62%) of clinic directors representing 49% of training programs responded. Wide variation amongst continuity clinics in size, structure and educational organization exist. Clinics below the 25th percentile of total clinic sessions would not meet RRC-IM requirements for total number of clinic sessions. Only two thirds of clinics provided a longitudinal mentor. Forty-three percent of directors reported their trainees felt stressed in the clinic environment and 25% of clinic directors felt overwhelmed. The survey used self reported data and was not anonymous. A slight predominance of larger clinics and university based clinics responded. Data may not reflect changes to programs made since 2008. This national survey demonstrates that the continuity clinic experience varies widely across IM programs, with many sites not yet meeting new ACGME requirements. The combination of disadvantaged and ill patients with inadequately resourced clinics, stressed residents, and clinic directors suggests that many sites need substantial reorganization and institutional commitment.New paradigms, encouraged by ACGME requirement changes such as increased separation of inpatient and outpatient duties are needed to improve the continuity clinic experience.

  4. Assessing experiential education factors contributing to a PGY1 residency match: Pharmacy residency program director and comparative student survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisco, Jennifer L; Hritcko, Philip M; Feret, Brett; Yorra, Mark L; Todd, Noreen E; Kim Tanzer; Basile, Cathy; Bonaceto, Kara; Morelli, Rita; Carace, Nicole; Szumita, Andrew

    2018-02-01

    To compare and contrast experiential education perceptions of pharmacy residency program directors (RPDs) and doctor of pharmacy students in their last year of the curriculum for residency application considerations. The New England Regional Departments of Experiential Education (NERDEE) consortium developed a 17-question survey to assess residency factors, including those related to experiential education. The survey was dispersed to advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) students from six colleges/schools of pharmacy and RPDs nationwide. Students have different values on experiential preferences compared to RPDs. Sample findings include internal medicine and specialty clinical elective experiences prior to American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) Midyear were extremely important to important for students, while RPDs viewed these experiences as somewhat important at best (p hinder a successful postgraduate year 1 (PGY1) residency match. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Teaching Residents to Teach: Do Program Directors and Trainees Agree on Format and Content?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Lacasse

    2010-03-01

    Methods: This needs assessment was an observational study with a cross-sectional design. Online or printed questionnaires were used to assess the preferred format and content for this curriculum among MS, residents from most postgraduate medical training programs, and PD from Faculté de médecine de l’Université Laval. Results: The questionnaires were completed by 26 PD (response rate 72.2%, 146 residents (response rate 21.9% and 154 MS (response rate 15.7%. Among the list of potential subjects that could be included in the curriculum, Learning styles, Working with students in difficulty and Self-directed learning were scored high by both residents and PD. MS favored Learning styles, Teaching in the ambulatory care setting, Teaching health promotion and prevention, Teaching with time constraints and Direct supervision strategies. PD also favored Teaching conflict management and Teaching professionalism, however these were both among the residents’ lower scores. The preferred formats were One half-day, One day and Online learning for PD and One day, Two consecutive days and A few one-day sessions over several months for residents. Conclusion: The PD and MS perception of the optimal format and content for residents’ teaching-skills training showed some discrepancies when compared with residents’ preferences. Since PD are largely involved in curriculum development for their respective specialties and since MS are also well positioned to assess residents’ teaching performance, we suggest that PD, residents and MS should all be consulted locally before organizing any intervention for teaching curricula.

  6. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Marshall Space Flight Center Space Transportation Directorate Risk Management Implementation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Luis Alberto; Kross, Denny (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The US civil aerospace program has been a great contributor to the creation and implementation of techniques and methods to identify, analyze, and confront risk. NASA has accomplished mission success in many instances, but also has had many failures. Anomalies have kept the Agency from achieving success on other occasions, as well. While NASA has mastered ways to prevent risks, and to quickly and effectively react and recover from anomalies or failures, it was not until few years ago that a comprehensive Risk Management process started being implemented in some of its programs and projects. A Continuous Risk Management (CRM) cycle process was developed and has been promoted and used successfully in programs and projects across the Agency.

  7. 76 FR 55125 - Finance, Budget & Program Committee Meeting of the Board of Directors; Sunshine Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-06

    ... NEIGHBORHOOD REINVESTMENT CORPORATION Finance, Budget & Program Committee Meeting of the Board of..., Assistant Corporate Secretary, (202) 220-2376; [email protected] . AGENDA: I. CALL TO ORDER II. Financial Report III. Budget Report IV. Lease Update V. Corporate Scorecard VI. National Foreclosure Mitigation...

  8. 78 FR 8193 - Sunshine Act Meeting; Finance, Budget & Program Committee Meeting of the Board of Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    ... NEIGHBORHOOD REINVESTMENT CORPORATION Sunshine Act Meeting; Finance, Budget & Program Committee...: Erica Hall, Assistant Corporate Secretary, (202) 220-2376; [email protected] . AGENDA: I. Call To Order II.../Treasury Initiative VI. Lease and Move VII. FY 13 Corporate Milestone Report and Dashboard VIII. NFMC and...

  9. 77 FR 56238 - Finance, Budget & Program. Committee Meeting of the Board of Directors; Sunshine Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-12

    ... NEIGHBORHOOD REINVESTMENT CORPORATION Finance, Budget & Program. Committee Meeting of the Board of..., Assistant Corporate Secretary, (202) 220-2376; [email protected] . AGENDA: I. Call to Order II. Executive Session... Associated Budget VI. FY 12 Corporate Milestone Report and Dashboard VII. National Foreclosure Mitigation...

  10. Relationships between high-stakes clinical skills exam scores and program director global competency ratings of first-year pediatric residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik E. Langenau

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Responding to mandates from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME and American Osteopathic Association (AOA, residency programs have developed competency-based assessment tools. One such tool is the American College of Osteopathic Pediatricians (ACOP program directors’ annual report. High-stakes clinical skills licensing examinations, such as the Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing Examination Level 2-Performance Evaluation (COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE, also assess competency in several clinical domains.The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationships between program director competency ratings of first-year osteopathic residents in pediatrics and COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE scores from 2005 to 2009.The sample included all 94 pediatric first-year residents who took COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE and whose training was reviewed by the ACOP for approval of training between 2005 and 2009. Program director competency ratings and COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE scores (domain and component were merged and analyzed for relationships.Biomedical/biomechanical domain scores were positively correlated with overall program director competency ratings. Humanistic domain scores were not significantly correlated with overall program director competency ratings, but did show moderate correlation with ratings for interpersonal and communication skills. The six ACGME or seven AOA competencies assessed empirically by the ACOP program directors’ annual report could not be recovered by principal component analysis; instead, three factors were identified, accounting for 86% of the variance between competency ratings.A few significant correlations were noted between COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE scores and program director competency ratings. Exploring relationships between different clinical skills assessments is inherently difficult because of the heterogeneity of tools used and overlap of constructs within the AOA and ACGME core competencies.

  11. Case Management Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankston White, Cheri; Birmingham, Jackie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose and Objectives: Case management directors are in a dynamic position to affect the transition of care of patients across the continuum, work with all levels of providers, and support the financial well-being of a hospital. Most importantly, they can drive good patient outcomes. Although the position is critical on many different levels, there is little to help guide a new director in attending to all the “moving parts” of such a complex role. This is Part 2 of a two-part article written for case management directors, particularly new ones. Part 1 covered the first 4 of 7 tracks: (1) Staffing and Human Resources, (2) Compliance and Accreditation, (3) Discharge Planning and (4) Utilization Review and Revenue Cycle. Part 2 addresses (5) Internal Departmental Relationships (Organizational), (6) External Relationships (Community Agency), and (7) Quality and Program Outcomes. This article attempts to answer the following questions: Are case management directors prepared for an expanded role that affects departments and organizations outside of their own?How does a case management director manage the transition of care of patients while managing required relationships outside the department?How does the director manage program outcomes in such a complex department? Primary Practice Setting: The information is most meaningful to those case management directors who work in either stand-alone hospitals or integrated health systems and have frontline case managers (CMs) reporting to them. Findings/Conclusions: Part 1 found that case management directors would benefit from further research and documentation of “best practices” related to their role, particularly in the areas of leadership and management. The same conclusion applies to Part 2, which addresses the director's responsibilities outside her immediate department. Leadership and management skills apply as well to building strong, productive relationships across a broad spectrum of external organizations

  12. The internal medicine clerkship and ambulatory learning experiences: results of the 2010 clerkship directors in internal medicine survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, Amy; Papp, Klara K; Torre, Dario

    2013-01-01

    Education in the ambulatory setting should be an integral part of undergraduate medical education. However, previous studies have shown education in this setting has been lacking in medical school. Ambulatory education occurs on some internal medicine clerkships. The extent of this education is unclear. The purpose of this survey was to assess the structure, curriculum, assessment methods, and barriers to implementation of ambulatory education on the internal medicine clerkship. An annual survey of institutional members of the Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine (CDIM) was done in April 2010. The data were anonymous and descriptive statistics were used to summarize responses. Free text results were analyzed using qualitative techniques. The response rate was 75%. The majority of respondents had a required ambulatory component to the clerkship. Ambulatory experiences distinct from the inpatient internal medicine experience were common (46%). Integration with either the inpatient experiences or other departmental clerkships also occurred. The majority of ambulatory educational experiences were with generalists (74%) and/or subspecialists (45%). The most common assessment tool was the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) ambulatory shelf exam. Thematic analysis of the question about how practice based learning was taught elicited four major themes: Not taught; taught in the context of learning evidence based medicine; taught while learning chronic disease management with quality improvement; taught while learning about health care finance. Barriers to implementation included lack of faculty and financial resources. There have been significant increases in the amount of time dedicated to ambulatory internal medicine. The numbers of medical schools with ambulatory internal medicine education has increased. Integration of the ambulatory experiences with other clerkships such as family medicine occurs. Curriculum was varied but difficulties with dissemination

  13. Current Status of Nutrition Training in Graduate Medical Education From a Survey of Residency Program Directors: A Formal Nutrition Education Course Is Necessary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Brian J; Cherry-Bukowiec, Jill; Van Way, Charles W; Collier, Bryan; Gramlich, Leah; McMahon, M Molly; McClave, Stephen A

    2016-01-01

    Nutrition leaders surmised graduate medical nutrition education was not well addressed because most medical and surgical specialties have insufficient resources to teach current nutrition practice. A needs assessment survey was constructed to determine resources and commitment for nutrition education from U.S. graduate medical educators to address this problem. An online survey of 36 questions was sent to 495 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Program Directors in anesthesia, family medicine, internal medicine, pediatrics, obstetrics/gynecology, and general surgery. Demographics, resources, and open-ended questions were included. There was a 14% response rate (72 programs), consistent with similar studies on the topic. Most (80%) of the program directors responding were from primary care programs, the rest surgical (17%) or anesthesia (3%). Program directors themselves lacked knowledge of nutrition. While some form of nutrition education was provided at 78% of programs, only 26% had a formal curriculum and physicians served as faculty at only 53%. Sixteen programs had no identifiable expert in nutrition and 10 programs stated that no nutrition training was provided. Training was variable, ranging from an hour of lecture to a month-long rotation. Seventy-seven percent of program directors stated that the required educational goals in nutrition were not met. The majority felt an advanced course in clinical nutrition should be required of residents now or in the future. Nutrition education in current graduate medical education is poor. Most programs lack the expertise or time commitment to teach a formal course but recognize the need to meet educational requirements. A broad-based, diverse universal program is needed for training in nutrition during residency. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  14. Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors, Inc. (CRCPD). A model for networking, cooperation, resource sharing, information exchange and regulation harmonization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The focus of the talk will be to introduce the participants to the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors, Inc. (CRCPD) and their proven methods for networking, information exchange, regulation development and standardization, and radiation protection guidance on emerging technologies. The presentation will describe how radiation control programs and staff from all 50 states in the US work collaboratively to ensure adequate radiation protection standards are uniformly applied throughout the country by pooling of resources and networking between all the states and the federal government, as well as with international members and partners. The products of CRCPD, such as the Suggested State Regulations along with other relevant informational documents, will be discussed along with how participants can access these products for use in their respective countries. CRCPD and its members represent a comprehensive radiation regulatory structure, covering all radiation sources and activities, (radioactive materials, licensing, registration, radioactive waste, x-ray, accelerators, emergency response, environmental monitoring, radon, and security). Networks are in place for all radiation issues. At the completion of this presentation, the participants will better understand a proven method to develop and implement a cooperative partnership with other countries. They will also gain knowledge on how to access CRCPD products that can be tailored for their own use and how to request technical assistance from membership. (author)

  15. The Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors (CRCPD): a model for networking, cooperation, information exchange and regulation harmonization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilley, Debbie Bray

    2008-01-01

    This presentation will be to introduce to the participants the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors, Inc. (CRCPD) and the proven methods used by this organization for networking, information exchange, regulation development and standardization, and radiation protection guidance on emerging technologies. The presentation will describe how radiation control programs and staff from all 50 states in the US work collaboratively to ensure adequate radiation protection standards are uniformly applied throughout the country through the pooling of resources and networking between all the states and the federal government, as well as with international members and partners. The products of CRCPD, such as the Suggested State Regulations along with other relevant informational documents, will be discussed along with how participants can access these products for use in their respective countries. CRCPD and its members represent a comprehensive radiation regulatory structure, covering radioactive materials, radioactive waste, X-ray, accelerators, emergency response, environmental monitoring, radon, and security. Networks are in place for all radiation issues. After the presentation, participants will better understand how to develop and implement a cooperative partnership with other countries. They will also know how to access our products that can be tailored for their own use. They will also be informed of how to contact CRCPD and request technical assistance from one of our 1000 members through our international outreach initiative. (author)

  16. Overnight Hospital Experiences for Medical Students: Results of the 2014 Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goren, Eric N; Leizman, Debra S; La Rochelle, Jeffrey; Kogan, Jennifer R

    2015-09-01

    Since the 2011 Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) work hour rules for residents were implemented, 24-30 h call for interns has been replaced by shift work, including night-float. The impact of these changes on undergraduate medical education experiences in internal medicine has not been described. We aimed to determine the current status of medical students' overnight experiences in Internal Medicine clerkships and sub-internships, and to assess internal medicine educators' perceptions of the importance of overnight work during internal medicine rotations. In May 2014, the Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine (CDIM) conducted its annual survey. Twenty-eight questions about student participation in overnight work and perceptions of the importance of overnight work (rated on 1-5 Likert scale, 1 = very unimportant and 5 =  ery important) were included. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize responses. Free text results were analyzed qualitatively. The response rate was 78 %. A minority of respondents reported students having any overnight experience during the clerkship (38.7 %) or the sub-internship (40.7 %). Only 5 % of respondents reported having students assigned to night-float rotations outside of clerkships or sub-internships. Respondents agreed that overnight experiences were more important during the sub-internship than the clerkship, 4.0 ± 1.1 vs. 3.2 ± 1.2, p intern in particular was an important chance to practice providing emergency cross coverage and other intern roles. In the era of ACGME duty hours, there is a need to further examine whether there is a role for increased overnight hospital experiences for medical students.

  17. Funding and Strategic Alignment Guidance for Infusing Small Business Innovation Research Technology Into Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate Programs and Projects for 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2016-01-01

    This report is intended to help NASA program and project managers incorporate Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR)/(STTR) technologies into NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) projects. Other Government and commercial projects managers can also find this useful.

  18. Independent Directors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringe, Wolf-Georg

    2013-01-01

    This paper re-evaluates the corporate governance concept of ‘board independence’ against the disappointing experiences during the 2007-08 financial crisis. Independent or outside directors had long been seen as an essential tool to improve the monitoring role of the board. Yet the crisis revealed...... that they did not prevent firms' excessive risk taking; further, these directors sometimes showed serious deficits in understanding the business they were supposed to control, and remained passive in addressing structural problems. A closer look reveals that under the surface of seemingly unanimous consensus...

  19. 75 FR 17940 - Draft Programmatic Environmental Assessment for the Evaluation of the Grant Programs Directorate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-08

    ... Environmental Assessment (PEA) to address the potential impacts to the human environment resulting from typical... projects. FEMA is also making available for public comment a draft Memorandum of Understanding (MOU..., minimize and avoid avian mortalities from communication tower construction activities funded by FEMA. The...

  20. Starting a new residency program: a step-by-step guide for institutions, hospitals, and program directors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Barajaz

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Although our country faces a looming shortage of doctors, constraints of space, funding, and patient volume in many existing residency programs limit training opportunities for medical graduates. New residency programs need to be created for the expansion of graduate medical education training positions. Partnerships between existing academic institutions and community hospitals with a need for physicians can be a very successful means toward this end. Baylor College of Medicine and The Children's Hospital of San Antonio were affiliated in 2012, and subsequently, we developed and received accreditation for a new categorical pediatric residency program at that site in 2014. We share below a step-by-step guide through the process that includes building of the infrastructure, educational development, accreditation, marketing, and recruitment. It is our hope that the description of this process will help others to spur growth in graduate medical training positions.

  1. Science Education and Public Outreach Forums (SEPOF): Providing Coordination and Support for NASA's Science Mission Directorate Education and Outreach Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, B. J.; Smith, D.; Shipp, S. S.; Schwerin, T. G.; Stockman, S. A.; Cooper, L. P.; Peticolas, L. M.

    2009-12-01

    NASA is working with four newly-formed Science Education and Public Outreach Forums (SEPOFs) to increase the overall coherence of the Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) program. SEPOFs support the astrophysics, heliophysics, planetary and Earth science divisions of NASA SMD in three core areas: * E/PO Community Engagement and Development * E/PO Product and Project Activity Analysis * Science Education and Public Outreach Forum Coordination Committee Service. SEPOFs are collaborating with NASA and external science and education and outreach communities in E/PO on multiple levels ranging from the mission and non-mission E/PO project activity managers, project activity partners, and scientists and researchers, to front line agents such as naturalists/interpreters, teachers, and higher education faculty, to high level agents such as leadership at state education offices, local schools, higher education institutions, and professional societies. The overall goal for the SEPOFs is increased awareness, knowledge, and understanding of scientists, researchers, engineers, technologists, educators, product developers, and dissemination agents of best practices, existing NASA resources, and community expertise applicable to E/PO. By coordinating and supporting the NASA E/PO Community, the NASA/SEPOF partnerships will lead to more effective, sustainable, and efficient utilization of NASA science discoveries and learning experiences.

  2. Substance abuse: a national survey of Canadian residency program directors and site chiefs at university-affiliated anesthesia departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulis, Sherif; Khanduja, P Kristina; Downey, Kristi; Friedman, Zeev

    2015-09-01

    The abuse of substances available to anesthesiologists in their workspace is a potentially lethal occupational hazard. Our primary objective was to define the prevalence of substance abuse cases among Canadian anesthesiologists at university-affiliated hospitals. Our secondary aim was to describe the current management of confirmed cases, rehabilitation procedures being offered, and preventative strategies being employed. We conducted a cross-sectional electronic survey of all Canadian anesthesia residency program directors and site chiefs at university-affiliated hospitals. Data analysis was performed using descriptive statistics. The survey response rate was 54% (53/98). Substance abuse was reported as 1.6% for residents and 0.3% for clinical fellows over a ten-year period ending in June 2014. Fentanyl was abused in nine of 24 reported cases. At present, one of 22 respondents (4.5%) reported a formal education program on substance abuse for faculty members, and 72% described mandatory education for residents. The majority of participants did not perceive substance abuse as a growing problem. Seventy-one percent of respondents indicated that methods for controlled-drug handling had changed in the previous ten years; however, 66% did not think that the incidence of controlled substance abuse could be decreased further by more stringent measures. Only 21% of respondents supported the introduction of random urine drug testing. The prevalence of substance abuse among Canadian anesthesiologists and the substances abused appear comparable with data from the United States, with residents being the group most often affected. Early recognition and treatment of chemically dependent anesthesiologists remain imperfect.

  3. The State of Neurocritical Care Fellowship Training and Attitudes toward Accreditation and Certification: A Survey of Neurocritical Care Fellowship Program Directors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajat Dhar

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Neurocritical care as a recognized and distinct subspecialty of critical care has grown remarkably since its inception in the 1980s. As of 2016, there were 61 fellowship training programs accredited by the United Council for Neurologic Subspecialties (UCNS in the United States and more than 1,000 UCNS-certified neurointensivists from diverse medical backgrounds. In late 2015, the Program Accreditation, Physician Certification, and Fellowship Training (PACT Committee of the Neurocritical Care Society (NCS was convened to promote and support excellence in the training and certification of neurointensivists. One of the first tasks of the committee was to survey neurocritical care fellowship training program directors to ascertain the current state of fellowship training and attitudes regarding transition to Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME accreditation of training programs and American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS certification of physicians. First, the survey revealed significant heterogeneities in the manner of neurocritical care training and a lack of consistency in requirements for fellow procedural competency. Second, although a majority of the 33 respondents indicated that a move toward ACGME accreditation/ABMS certification would facilitate further growth and mainstreaming of training in neurocritical care, many programs do not currently meet administrative requirements and do not receive the level of institutional support that would be needed for such a transition. In summary, the results revealed that there is an opportunity for future harmonization of training standards and that a transition to ACGME accreditation/ABMS certification is preferred. While the results reflect the opinions of more than half of the survey respondents, they represent only a small sample of neurointensivists.

  4. Educational Gaps in Molecular Diagnostics, Genomics, and Personalized Medicine in Dermatopathology Training: A Survey of U.S. Dermatopathology Fellowship Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre, Kristin; Russomanno, Kristen; Ferringer, Tammie; Elston, Dirk; Murphy, Michael J

    2018-01-01

    Molecular technologies offer clinicians the tools to provide high-quality, cost-effective patient care. We evaluated education focused on molecular diagnostics, genomics, and personalized medicine in dermatopathology fellowship training. A 20-question online survey was emailed to all (n = 53) Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited dermatopathology training programs in the United States. Thirty-one of 53 program directors responded (response rate = 58%). Molecular training is undertaken in 74% of responding dermatopathology fellowships, with levels of instruction varying among dermatology-based and pathology-based programs. Education differed for dermatology- and pathology-trained fellows in approximately one-fifth (19%) of programs. Almost half (48%) of responding program directors believe that fellows are not currently receiving adequate molecular education, although the majority (97%) expect to incorporate additional instruction in the next 2-5 years. Factors influencing the incorporation of relevant education include perceived clinical utility and Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education/residency review committee (RRC) requirements. Potential benefits of molecular education include increased medical knowledge, improved patient care, and promotion of effective communication with other healthcare professionals. More than two-thirds (68%) of responding program directors believe that instruction in molecular technologies should be required in dermatopathology fellowship training. Although all responding dermatopathology fellowship program directors agreed that molecular education is important, only a little over half of survey participants believe that their fellows receive adequate instruction. This represents an important educational gap. Discussion among those who oversee fellow education is necessary to best integrate and evaluate teaching of molecular dermatopathology.

  5. National Science Foundation Assistant Director for Mathematics and Physical Sciences Tony Chan (USA) visiting CMS experiment on 23rd May 2007 with Spokesperson T. Virdee, Deputy Spokesperson R. Cousins, Advisor to CERN Director-General J. Ellis, US CMS Research Program Deputy Manager D. Marlow and FNAL D. Green

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2007-01-01

    National Science Foundation Assistant Director for Mathematics and Physical Sciences Tony Chan (USA) visiting CMS experiment on 23rd May 2007 with Spokesperson T. Virdee, Deputy Spokesperson R. Cousins, Advisor to CERN Director-General J. Ellis, US CMS Research Program Deputy Manager D. Marlow and FNAL D. Green

  6. Gender Diversity in Anesthesiology Programs: The Role of Current Residents and Department Leadership in the 2014 Match Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranner, Paul W; Mussehl, Denise A; Hess, Aaron S

    2016-01-01

    Nearly half of graduates of American medical colleges are women, yet the percentage of women entering accredited anesthesiology programs remains less than 40%. There are obviously many factors that influence the choice of a residency training program, from geography to reputation to the atmosphere, composition and camaraderie of the department. We examined whether a greater number of current female residents, a female Chair, or a female Program Director were associated with a program matching a greater number of female candidates in the 2014 NRMP Match. An electronic questionnaire was sent to all 132 ACGME-accredited anesthesiology programs immediately following the 2014 Match seeking information on the gender mix of their current residents, the gender of the Chair and Program Director, and the gender composition of their newly-matched candidates. The percentage of current female residents was significantly associated with the percentage of incoming female residents (p = 0.013). There was no association between the percentage of new female residents obtained in the Match and the presence of a female Chair or Program Director. The results of the 2013 NRMP anesthesiology match indicate that programs with a higher proportion of female residents were able to sustain that diversity and successfully match a higher percentage of female candidates. No correlation was seen with Chair and Program Director gender, suggesting further work is needed to define the influence of female role models on female applicants' choice of anesthesiology residency programs.

  7. Clinical Reasoning Education at US Medical Schools: Results from a National Survey of Internal Medicine Clerkship Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rencic, Joseph; Trowbridge, Robert L; Fagan, Mark; Szauter, Karen; Durning, Steven

    2017-11-01

    Recent reports, including the Institute of Medicine's Improving Diagnosis in Health Care, highlight the pervasiveness and underappreciated harm of diagnostic error, and recommend enhancing health care professional education in diagnostic reasoning. However, little is known about clinical reasoning curricula at US medical schools. To describe clinical reasoning curricula at US medical schools and to determine the attitudes of internal medicine clerkship directors toward teaching of clinical reasoning. Cross-sectional multicenter study. US institutional members of the Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine (CDIM). Examined responses to a survey that was emailed in May 2015 to CDIM institutional representatives, who reported on their medical school's clinical reasoning curriculum. The response rate was 74% (91/123). Most respondents reported that a structured curriculum in clinical reasoning should be taught in all phases of medical education, including the preclinical years (64/85; 75%), clinical clerkships (76/87; 87%), and the fourth year (75/88; 85%), and that more curricular time should be devoted to the topic. Respondents indicated that most students enter the clerkship with only poor (25/85; 29%) to fair (47/85; 55%) knowledge of key clinical reasoning concepts. Most institutions (52/91; 57%) surveyed lacked sessions dedicated to these topics. Lack of curricular time (59/67, 88%) and faculty expertise in teaching these concepts (53/76, 69%) were identified as barriers. Internal medicine clerkship directors believe that clinical reasoning should be taught throughout the 4 years of medical school, with the greatest emphasis in the clinical years. However, only a minority reported having teaching sessions devoted to clinical reasoning, citing a lack of curricular time and faculty expertise as the largest barriers. Our findings suggest that additional institutional and national resources should be dedicated to developing clinical reasoning curricula to improve

  8. Mission Operations Directorate - Success Legacy of the Space Shuttle Program (Overview of the Evolution and Success Stories from MOD During the Space Shuttle program)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azbell, Jim A.

    2011-01-01

    In support of the Space Shuttle Program, as well as NASA's other human space flight programs, the Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) at the Johnson Space Center has become the world leader in human spaceflight operations. From the earliest programs - Mercury, Gemini, Apollo - through Skylab, Shuttle, ISS, and our Exploration initiatives, MOD and its predecessors have pioneered ops concepts and emphasized a history of mission leadership which has added value, maximized mission success, and built on continual improvement of the capabilities to become more efficient and effective. This paper provides specific examples that illustrate how MOD's focus on building and contributing value with diverse teams has been key to their successes both with the US space industry and the broader international community. This paper will discuss specific examples for the Plan, Train, Fly, and Facilities aspects within MOD. This paper also provides a discussion of the joint civil servant/contractor environment and the relative badge-less society within MOD. Several Shuttle mission related examples have also been included that encompass all of the aforementioned MOD elements and attributes, and are used to show significant MOD successes within the Shuttle Program. These examples include the STS-49 Intelsat recovery and repair, the (post-Columbia accident) TPS inspection process and the associated R-Bar Pitch Maneuver for ISS missions, and the STS-400 rescue mission preparation efforts for the Hubble Space Telescope repair mission. Since their beginning, MOD has consistently demonstrated their ability to evolve and respond to an ever changing environment, effectively prepare for the expected and successfully respond to the unexpected, and develop leaders, expertise, and a culture that has led to mission and Program success.

  9. First results from the Hubble OPAL Program: Jupiter in 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Amy A.; Wong, Michael H.; Orton, Glenn S.

    2015-11-01

    The Hubble 2020: Outer Planet Atmospheres Legacy (OPAL) program is a Director's Discretionary program designed to generate two yearly global maps for each of the outer planets to enable long term studies of atmospheric color, structure and two-dimensional wind fields. This presentation focuses on Jupiter results from the first year of the campaign. Data were acqured January 19, 2015 with the WFC3/UVIS camera and the F275W, F343N, F395N, F467M, F502N, F547M, F631N, F658N, and F889N filters. Global maps were generated and are publicly available through the High Level Science Products archive: https://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/opal/Using cross-correlation on the global maps, the zonal wind profile was measured between +/- 50 degrees latitude and is in family with Voyager and Cassini era profiles. There are some variations in mid to high latitude wind jet magnitudes, particularly at +40°and -35° planetographic latitude. The Great Red Spot continues to maintain an intense orange coloration, as it did in 2014. However, the interior shows changed structure, including a reduced core and new filamentary features. Finally, a wave not previously seen in Hubble images was also observed and is interpreted as a baroclinic instability with associated cyclone formation near 16° N latitude. A similar feature was observed faintly in Voyager 2 images, and is consistent with the Hubble feature in location and scale.

  10. Communication Skills Training in Ophthalmology: Results of a Needs Assessment and Pilot Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Anuradha; Browning, David; Haviland, Miriam J; Jackson, Mary Lou; Luff, Donna; Meyer, Elaine C; Talcott, Katherine; Kloek, Carolyn E

    To conduct a needs assessment to identify gaps in communication skills training in ophthalmology residency programs and to use these results to pilot a communication workshop that prepares residents for difficult conversations. A mixed-methods design was used to perform the needs assessment. A pre-and postsurvey was administered to workshop participants. Mass Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School (HMS), Department of Ophthalmology. HMS ophthalmology residents from postgraduate years 2-4 participated in the needs assessment and the workshop. Ophthalmology residency program directors in the United States participated in national needs assessment. Ophthalmology program directors across the United States were queried on their perception of resident communication skills training through an online survey. A targeted needs assessment in the form of a narrative exercise captured resident perspectives on communication in ophthalmology from HMS residents. A group of HMS residents participated in the pilot workshop and a pre- and postsurvey was administered to participants to assess its effectiveness. The survey of program directors yielded a response rate of 40%. Ninety percent of respondents agreed that the communication skills training in their programs could be improved. Fifteen of 24 residents (62%) completed the needs assessment. Qualitative analysis of the narrative material revealed four themes; (1) differing expectations, (2) work role and environment, (3) challenges specific to ophthalmology, and (4) successful strategies adopted. Nine residents participated in the workshop. There was a significant improvement post-workshop in resident reported scores on their ability to manage their emotions during difficult conversations (p = 0.03). There is an opportunity to improve communication skills training in ophthalmology residency through formalized curriculum. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  11. [Integration of district psychiatric hospitals into the development of regional community psychiatry networks--the actual state. Results of a survey among medical directors of Bavarian district hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welschehold, Michael; Kraus, Eva

    2004-11-01

    In this study, the medical directors of all Bavarian district psychiatric hospitals evaluated certain aspects of the integration of their hospitals into the development of regional community psychiatry networks ("Gemeindepsychiatrische Verbunde" - GPVs). They were asked to rate the actual quantity of cooperation between their hospitals and diverse community based services and to express their requests concerning the quality of cooperation. An estimation of possible advantages of the hospitals' integration in GPVs and expectations to future perspectives of GPV development were also investigated. The data were collected by a written questionnaire. The results of the survey indicate that a high relevance is attached to GPV: inspite of current heterogenous developments and inspite of existing skepticism concerning the feasibility of a complete GPV structure, medical directors strongly approve of seeing their hospitals actively engaged in the further development of community psychiatry networks.

  12. Annual report on major results and progress of Fusion Research and Development Directorate of JAEA from April 1, 2006 to March 31, 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Satoshi; Ishii, Yasutomo; Sukegawa, Atsuhiko; Iwai, Yasunori; Nakamura, Hiroo; Sugie, Tatsuo

    2008-08-01

    This annual report provides an overview of major results and progress on research and development (R and D) activities at Fusion Research and Development Directorate of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) from April 1, 2006 to March 31, 2007, including those performed in collaboration with other research establishments of JAEA, research institutes, and universities. In JT-60, as a result of ferritic steel tiles (FSTs) installation to reduce the toroidal field ripple and the application of the real time current profile control, high boot strap current fraction (∼0.7) has successfully been sustained about 8 s. In addition, the conceptual design of JT-60SA, which was placed as a combined project of JA-EU Satellite Tokamak Programme under the Broader Approach Programme and JAEA's programme for national use, was progressed. In theoretical and analytical researches, studies on ITB events and their triggers, plasma shape effect on edge stability and driven magnetic island evolution in rotating plasmas were progressed. In the NEXT project, computer simulations of the plasma turbulence were progressed. In fusion reactor technologies, R and Ds for ITER and fusion DEMO plants have been carried out. For ITER, a steady state operation of the 170GHz gyrotron up to 10min with 0.82MW was demonstrated. Also current density of the neutral beam injector has been extended to 146A/m 2 at 0.84MeV. In the ITER Test Blanket Module (TBM), designs and R and Ds of Water and Helium Cooled Solid Breeder TBMs including tritium breeder/multiplier materials were progressed. Tritium processing technology for breeding blankets and neutronics integral experiments with a blanket mockup were also progressed. For ITER and DEMO blankets, studies on neutron irradiation effects and ion irradiation effects on F82H steel characteristics were continued using HFIR, TIARA and so on. In the IFMIF program, transitional activities to EVEDA were continued. In the ITER Program, under the framework of the ITER

  13. Internal Medicine Residency Program Directors' Views of the Core Entrustable Professional Activities for Entering Residency: An Opportunity to Enhance Communication of Competency Along the Continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, Steven V; Vu, T Robert; Willett, Lisa L; Call, Stephanie; Halvorsen, Andrew J; Chaudhry, Saima

    2017-06-01

    To examine internal medicine (IM) residency program directors' (PDs') perspectives on the Core Entrustable Professional Activities for Entering Residency (Core EPAs)-introduced into undergraduate medical education to further competency-based assessment-and on communicating competency-based information during transitions. A spring 2015 Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine survey asked PDs of U.S. IM residency programs for their perspectives on which Core EPAs new interns must or should possess on day 1, which are most essential, and which have the largest gap between expected and observed performance. Their views and preferences were also requested regarding communicating competency-based information at transitions from medical school to residency and residency to fellowship/employment. The response rate was 57% (204/361 programs). The majority of PDs felt new interns must/should possess 12 of the 13 Core EPAs. PDs' rankings of Core EPAs by relative importance were more varied than their rankings by the largest gaps in performance. Although preferred timing varied, most PDs (82%) considered it important for medical schools to communicate Core EPA-based information to PDs; nearly three-quarters (71%) would prefer a checklist format. Many (60%) would be willing to provide competency-based evaluations to fellowship directors/employers. Most (> 80%) agreed that there should be a bidirectional communication mechanism for programs/employers to provide feedback on competency assessments. The gaps identified in Core EPA performance may help guide medical schools' curricular and assessment tool design. Sharing competency-based information at transitions along the medical education continuum could help ensure production of competent, practice-ready physicians.

  14. Association of Program Directors in Vascular Surgery (APDVS) survey of program selection, knowledge acquisition, and education provided as viewed by vascular trainees from two different training paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalsing, Michael C; Makaroun, Michel S; Harris, Linda M; Mills, Joseph L; Eidt, John; Eckert, George J

    2012-02-01

    Methods of learning may differ between generations and even the level of training or the training paradigm, or both. To optimize education, it is important to optimize training designs, and the perspective of those being trained can aid in this quest. The Association of Program Directors in Vascular Surgery leadership sent a survey to all vascular surgical trainees (integrated [0/5], independent current and new graduates [5 + 2]) addressing various aspects of the educational experience. Of 412 surveys sent, 163 (∼40%) responded: 46 integrated, 96 fellows, and 21 graduates. The survey was completed by 52% of the integrated residents, 59% of the independent residents, and 20% of the graduates. When choosing a program for training, the integrated residents are most concerned with program atmosphere and the independent residents with total clinical volume. Concerns after training were thoracic and thoracoabdominal aneurysm procedures and business aspects: 40% to 50% integrated, and 60% fellows/graduates. Integrated trainees found periprocedural discussion the best feedback (79%), with 9% favoring written test review. Surgical training and vascular laboratory and venous training were judged "just right" by 87% and ∼71%, whereas business aspects needed more emphasis (65%-70%). Regarding the 80-hour workweek, 82% felt it prevented fatigue, and 24% thought it was detrimental to patient care. Independent program trainees also found periprocedural discussion the best feedback (71%), with 12% favoring written test review. Surgical training and vascular laboratory/venous training were "just right" by 87% and 60% to 70%, respectively, whereas business aspects needed more emphasis (∼65%-70%). Regarding the 80-hour workweek, 62% felt it was detrimental to patient care, and 42% felt it prevented fatigue. A supportive environment and adequate clinical volume will attract trainees to a program. For "an urgent need to know," the integrated trainees are especially turning to

  15. Lands directorate publications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    The directorate has a lead role in providing advice to the federal government on land use policy in Canada. The Canada Land Inventory (CLI) Program has produced significant amounts of data pertaining to the capability of Canadian lands to support agriculture, forestry, recreation, wildlife and sport fish. A list of CLI reports is presented in this publication. In addition, and capability maps have been compiled for agricultural, forestry, recreation and wildlife and are listed and described in this publication. (KRM)

  16. Designing faculty development to support the evaluation of resident competency in the intrinsic CanMEDS roles: practical outcomes of an assessment of program director needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puddester, Derek; MacDonald, Colla J; Clements, Debbie; Gaffney, Jane; Wiesenfeld, Lorne

    2015-06-05

    The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and the College of Family Physicians of Canada mandate that faculty members demonstrate they are evaluating residents on all CanMEDS (Canadian Medical Education Directions for Specialists) roles as part of the accreditation process. Postgraduate Medical Education at the University of Ottawa initiated a 5-year project to develop and implement a comprehensive system to assess the full spectrum of CanMEDS roles. This paper presents the findings from a needs assessment with Program Directors, in order to determine how postgraduate medical faculty can be motivated and supported to evaluate residents on the intrinsic CanMEDS roles. Semi-structured individual interviews were conducted with 60 Postgraduate Program Directors in the Faculty of Medicine. Transcribed interviews were analyzed using qualitative analysis. Once the researchers were satisfied the identified themes reflected the views of the participants, the data was assigned to categories to provide rich, detailed, and comprehensive information that would indicate what faculty need in order to effectively evaluate their residents on the intrinsic roles. Findings indicated faculty members need faculty development and shared point of care resources to support them with how to not only evaluate, but also teach, the intrinsic roles. Program Directors expressed the need to collaborate and share resources across departments and national specialty programs. Based on our findings, we designed and delivered workshops with companion eBooks to teach and evaluate residents at the point of care (Developing the Professional, Health Advocate and Scholar). Identifying stakeholder needs is essential for designing effective faculty development. By sharing resources, faculties can prevent 'reinventing the wheel' and collaborate to meet the Colleges' accreditation requirements more efficiently.

  17. Surgical training, duty-hour restrictions, and implications for meeting the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies: views of surgical interns compared with program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiel, Ryan M; Van Arendonk, Kyle J; Reed, Darcy A; Terhune, Kyla P; Tarpley, John L; Porterfield, John R; Hall, Daniel E; Joyce, David L; Wightman, Sean C; Horvath, Karen D; Heller, Stephanie F; Farley, David R

    2012-06-01

    To describe the perspectives of surgical interns regarding the implications of the new Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) duty-hour regulations for their training. We compared responses of interns and surgery program directors on a survey about the proposed ACGME mandates. Eleven general surgery residency programs. Two hundred fifteen interns who were administered the survey during the summer of 2011 and a previously surveyed national sample of 134 surgery program directors. Perceptions of the implications of the new duty-hour restrictions on various aspects of surgical training, including the 6 ACGME core competencies of graduate medical education, measured using 3-point scales (increase, no change, or decrease). Of 215 eligible surgical interns, 179 (83.3%) completed the survey. Most interns believed that the new duty-hour regulations will decrease continuity with patients (80.3%), time spent operating (67.4%), and coordination of patient care (57.6%), while approximately half believed that the changes will decrease their acquisition of medical knowledge (48.0%), development of surgical skills (52.8%), and overall educational experience (51.1%). Most believed that the changes will improve or will not alter other aspects of training, and 61.5% believed that the new standards will decrease resident fatigue. Surgical interns were significantly less pessimistic than surgery program directors regarding the implications of the new duty-hour restrictions on all aspects of surgical training (P training under the new paradigm of duty-hour restrictions have significant concerns about the effect of these regulations on the quality of their training.

  18. Training in childhood obesity management in the United States: a survey of pediatric, internal medicine-pediatrics and family medicine residency program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Margaret S; Rhodes, Erinn T; Ludwig, David S

    2010-02-17

    Information about the availability and effectiveness of childhood obesity training during residency is limited. We surveyed residency program directors from pediatric, internal medicine-pediatrics (IM-Peds), and family medicine residency programs between September 2007 and January 2008 about childhood obesity training offered in their programs. The response rate was 42.2% (299/709) and ranged by specialty from 40.1% to 45.4%. Overall, 52.5% of respondents felt that childhood obesity training in residency was extremely important, and the majority of programs offered training in aspects of childhood obesity management including prevention (N = 240, 80.3%), diagnosis (N = 282, 94.3%), diagnosis of complications (N = 249, 83.3%), and treatment (N = 242, 80.9%). However, only 18.1% (N = 54) of programs had a formal childhood obesity curriculum with variability across specialties. Specifically, 35.5% of IM-Peds programs had a formal curriculum compared to only 22.6% of pediatric and 13.9% of family medicine programs (p obesity training was competing curricular demands (58.5%). While most residents receive training in aspects of childhood obesity management, deficits may exist in training quality with a minority of programs offering a formal childhood obesity curriculum. Given the high prevalence of childhood obesity, a greater emphasis should be placed on development and use of effective training strategies suitable for all specialties training physicians to care for children.

  19. Regional Director | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... its effective utilization in the design and execution of the IDRC strategic plan. ... Provides assistance to Program Managers/Leaders, Directors of Program Areas, ... the Partnership and Business Development Division and Programs Branch.

  20. Director ownership, outside directors and commitment to corporate social responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Ying

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the effects of director ownership and the proportion of outside directors on firms’ commitment to corporate social responsibility (CSR. Using a sample of 453 Hong Kong listed companies for 2005, we find that there is a non-linear relationship between the level of director ownership and firms’ engagement in CSR behavior. Commitment to CSR first increases as the proportion of director ownership increases up to 50% and then decreases as that proportion of ownership grows higher. Further, the proportion of outside directors on the board exhibits a positive relationship with the level of CSR commitment. These results provide explanations for firms’ commitment to CSR from the corporate governance perspective.

  1. Fermilab Education Office - Director's Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Search The Director's Award Exceptional Service To Fermilab's K-12 Education Programs The many successes of Fermilab's K-12 education programs depend on the talents of the over 200 employees, users, and $1,000, made possible by an anonymous donor to Fermilab Friends for Science Education, recognizes one

  2. Results of prevention programs with adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, C L

    1987-09-01

    Programs for preventing smoking and alcohol and drug abuse have radically changed in the past decade. Instead of being regarded as a health or discipline problem that involves only a few deviant adolescents, drug use has begun to be viewed as social behavior that is functional for adolescents, not capricious, and is normative for that population. The most successful prevention programs have sought to delay the onset of tobacco use. Based on theoretical and etiological research, these programs target factors that have repeatedly been predictive of adolescent smoking, alcohol and drug use. The programs teach adolescents (1) why people their age smoke tobacco or use alcohol and drugs; (2) how these meanings get established by peers, older role models and advertising; (3) how to resist these influences to smoke or to use alcohol and drugs; and (4) life skills and competencies to counterbalance the functions that drug use serves. Because of the association with the onset of smoking and the onset of using other drugs, these strategies are being studied for alcohol use and other drugs. In addition, elected peer leaders are trained to conduct these activities with their classmates and act as new role models for non-use. Evaluations of these approaches are optimistic. Studies in northern California and Minnesota reveal 50-70% reductions in the onset of smoking. Botvin's 'Life Skills Training' program demonstrates success in delaying heavy alcohol and marijuana use.

  3. Improved self-exclusion program: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Nicole; Boutin, Claude; Ladouceur, Robert

    2008-12-01

    The gambling industry has offered self-exclusion programs for quite a long time. Such measures are designed to limit access to gaming opportunities and provide problem gamblers with the help they need to cease or limit their gambling behaviour. However, few studies have empirically evaluated these programs. This study has three objectives: (1) to observe the participation in an improved self-exclusion program that includes an initial voluntary evaluation, phone support, and a mandatory meeting, (2) to evaluate satisfaction and usefulness of this service as perceived by self-excluders, (3) to measure the preliminary impact of this improved program. One hundred sixteen self-excluders completed a questionnaire about their satisfaction and their perception of the usefulness during the mandatory meeting. Among those participants, 39 attended an initial meeting. Comparisons between data collected at the initial meeting and data taken at the final meeting were made for those 39 participants. Data showed that gamblers chose the improved self-exclusion program 75% of the time; 25% preferred to sign a regular self-exclusion contract. Among those who chose the improved service, 40% wanted an initial voluntary evaluation and 37% of these individuals actually attended that meeting. Seventy percent of gamblers came to the mandatory meeting, which was a required condition to end their self-exclusion. The majority of participants were satisfied with the improved self-exclusion service and perceived it as useful. Major improvements were observed between the final and the initial evaluation on time and money spent, consequences of gambling, DSM-IV score, and psychological distress. The applicability of an improved self-exclusion program is discussed and, as shown in our study, the inclusion of a final mandatory meeting might not be so repulsive for self-excluders. Future research directives are also proposed.

  4. 78 FR 53790 - Sunshine Act Meeting; Finance, Budget and Program Committee Meeting of the Board of Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-30

    ... NEIGHBORHOOD REINVESTMENT CORPORATION Sunshine Act Meeting; Finance, Budget and Program Committee... PERSON FOR MORE INFORMATION: Erica Hall, Assistant Corporate Secretary (202) 220-2376; [email protected] Education & Counseling VII. Quarterly Program Reports VIII. Financial Report IX. FY13 Corporate Scorecard...

  5. 77 FR 24538 - Sunshine Act Meeting Notice; Finance, Budget & Program; Committee Meeting of the Board of Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-24

    ... NEIGHBORHOOD REINVESTMENT CORPORATION Sunshine Act Meeting Notice; Finance, Budget & Program...: Erica Hall, Assistant Corporate Secretary, (202) 220-2376; [email protected] . AGENDA: I. Call to Order II.../Dashboard VII. NFMC & EHLP VIII. Program Updates IX. Adjournment Erica Hall, Assistant Corporate Secretary...

  6. Message from Fermilab Director

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    With this issue’s message, Fermilab Director Pier Oddone opens a new series of occasional exchanges between CERN and other laboratories world-wide. As part of this exchange, CERN Director-General Rolf Heuer, wrote a message in Tuesday’s edition of Fermilab TodayPerspectivesNothing is more important for our worldwide particle physics community than successfully turning on the LHC later this year. The promise for great discoveries is huge, and many of the plans for our future depend on LHC results. Those of us planning national programmes in anticipation of data from the LHC face formidable challenges to develop future facilities that are complementary to the LHC, whatever the physics discoveries may be. At Fermilab, this has led us to move forcefully with a programme at the intensity frontier, where experiments with neutrinos and rare decays open a complementary window into nature. Our ultimate goal for a unified picture of nat...

  7. Medical results of the Skylab program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, R. S.; Dietlein, L. F.

    1974-01-01

    The Skylab food system, waste management system, operational bioinstrumentation, personal hygiene provisions, in-flight medical support system, and the cardiovascular counterpressure garment worn during reentry are described. The medical experiments program provided scientific data and also served as the basis for real-time decisions on flight duration. Premission support, in-flight operational support, and postflight medical activities are surveyed. Measures devised to deal with possible food spoilage, medical instrument damage, and toxic atmosphere caused by the initial failures on the Orbital Workshop (OWS) are discussed. The major medical experiments performed in flight allowed the study of physiological changes as a function of exposure to weightless flight. The experiments included studies of the cardiovascular system, musculoskeletal and fluid/electrolyte balance, sleep, blood, vestibular system, and time and motion studies.

  8. Results of the national audits radiotherapy program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso Samper, Jose Luis; Alert Silva, Jose; Alfonso Laguardia, Rodolfo

    2009-01-01

    The National Audit Programme in Radiotherapy in Cuba works regularly 8 years visiting each country's radiotherapy service at least once every two years, during the visit involving two physicists and an oncologist radiation therapist. This paper presents the main features of the program and its main . Early detection deficiencies in the work of the Radiation Therapy Services to may cause radiological risk situations for both patients and workers and the general public. Help with their comments to the continuous improvement of quality treatments. During audit visits is reviewed throughout the process of radiation from that the patient comes to the monitoring service. This is done by dividing the audits into three groups or aspects Clinical Aspects, Aspects of Safety and Quality Control Aspects of the equipment. Methodological guidelines have been established for conducting audits and they serve as standards of quality in radiation therapy, these guidelines also allow quantification of the . It has identified the main gaps in services that affect quality treatments. After each visit, leave recommendations may be directed to service itself, to the direction of the provincial hospital or health. We believe that the National Audit Programme in Radiotherapy is a efficient tool in controlling the quality of treatments given and at the same time with its recommendations to help improve services of continuous quality. (author)

  9. 77 FR 68155 - Finance, Budget & Program Committee Meeting of the Board of Directors; Sunshine Act Meeting Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-15

    ... NEIGHBORHOOD REINVESTMENT CORPORATION Finance, Budget & Program Committee Meeting of the Board of...: Erica Hall, Assistant Corporate Secretary, (202) 220-2376; [email protected] . AGENDA: I. Call To Order II. Executive Session III. Budget Update IV. Committee Charter Review V. Financial Report VI. Corporate...

  10. Neurology Didactic Curricula for Psychiatry Residents: A Review of the Literature and a Survey of Program Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Claudia L.; Walaszek, Art

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Minimal literature exists on neurology didactic instruction offered to psychiatry residents, and there is no model neurology didactic curriculum offered for psychiatry residency programs. The authors sought to describe the current state of neurology didactic training in psychiatry residencies. Methods: The authors electronically…

  11. Partnering for Preschool: A Study of Center Directors in New Jersey's Mixed-Delivery Abbott Program. Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitebook, Marcy; Ryan, Sharon; Kipnis, Fran; Sakai, Laura

    2008-01-01

    In a series of New Jersey Supreme Court decisions known as Abbott v. Burke, the 28 (now 31) urban school districts serving the state's poorest students were ordered to create systems of high-quality preschool for all three- and four-year-old children, beginning in the 1999-2000 school year. The Abbott Preschool Program now serves approximately…

  12. Recent Results from the ATLAS UPC Program

    CERN Document Server

    Cole, Brian; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Recent results from ATLAS measurements of ultra-peripheral Pb+Pb collisions are presented. Measurements include gamma+gamma -> dimuon, photo-nuclear production of di/multi-jets, and light-by-light scattering.

  13. TOTEM Physics program, analysis and results

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    The published results will be quickly reviewed. The current analyses of the data taken in the joint TOTEM-CMS runs will be discussed, including forward multiplicities, jets physics, soft diffractive processes, and related cross-sections. Progress in the study of low-t elastic scattering will be presented.

  14. Attitudes toward the use of gender-inclusive language among residency trainees. The McMaster Residency Training Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyatt, G H; Cook, D J; Griffith, L; Walter, S D; Risdon, C; Liutkus, J

    1997-05-01

    To explore postgraduate medical trainees' attitudes toward the use of gender-inclusive language. Self-administered questionnaire. Seven residency training programs at McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont., from July 1993 to June 1994. Of 225 residents in the programs, 186 responded to the survey, for a response rate of 82.7%. Men and women were equally represented among the respondents. Categorization of attitudes about the use of language as gender-inclusive or gender-exclusive; characteristics predicting a gender-inclusive attitude. Factor analysis and Cronbach's alpha (0.90) supported the existence of a construct related to attitudes about language use, the poles of which were categorized as gender-inclusive and gender-exclusive. The authors classified residents with respect to their attitudes to language use from their responses to the questionnaire. In univariate analyses, sex, residency program and country of graduation significantly predicted a gender-inclusive attitude (p inclusive attitudes, whereas residents in surgery and anesthesia had the most gender-exclusive attitudes. Residents' values are reflected in the language they choose to use. Language use may provide an index of underlying attitudes that may create hostile environments for female trainees.

  15. Results of Amultidisciplinary Antimicrobial Stewardship Program

    OpenAIRE

    Letícia Gomes Lobo; Fabiano Ramos; Miriane Melo Moretti; Paola Hoff Alves

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of the PCA developed by the Infection Control Service of a university hospital in southern Brazil from January / 2013 to July / 2014. Methods: The PCA is developed by two doctors and a pharmacist infectious disease. They are evaluated all prescriptions carbapenems, vancomycin, polymyxin B, daptomycin, tigecycline, linezolid, voriconazole, micafungin and amphotericin b lipid complex. In need of intervention the same i...

  16. Results of Amultidisciplinary Antimicrobial Stewardship Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Gomes Lobo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of the PCA developed by the Infection Control Service of a university hospital in southern Brazil from January / 2013 to July / 2014. Methods: The PCA is developed by two doctors and a pharmacist infectious disease. They are evaluated all prescriptions carbapenems, vancomycin, polymyxin B, daptomycin, tigecycline, linezolid, voriconazole, micafungin and amphotericin b lipid complex. In need of intervention the same is conducted by telephone with guidance to prescribers or alert in the electronic medical record. Moreover, they are made rounds with teams of cardiac intensive care unit (ICU-CV for case discussion. Results and Conclusion: 5118 requirements were evaluated with an average of 297 prescriptions month. The percentage of crops request in half 1 (January to June / 13, 2 (July to December / 13 and 3 (January to July / 14 was respectively 25%, 35% and 83%. on average they were performed 70 operations / month, where the percentage of accepted interventions in the semester 1,2 and 3 was respectively 61%, 70% and 84%. The defined daily dose (DDD of meropenem in UTI-CV for the period was 231.4 DDD / 1000 patient-days in semestre1, 108.13 DDD / 1000 patient-days in semester 2 and 83.79 DDD / 1000-patient -day in half 3.Nossos data allow to conclude that actions such as encouraging the targeted treatment (culture collection, education and feedback to prescribers (guiding the rational use and active participation in rounds together the care teams can be strategies in the fight against the resistance. KEY WORDS: Infection control. Anti-Infective Agents. Interdisciplinary research.

  17. Facilitating the implementation of the American College of Surgeons/Association of Program Directors in Surgery phase III skills curriculum: training faculty in the assessment of team skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Louise; Arora, Sonal; Stefanidis, Dimitrios; Sevdalis, Nick

    2015-11-01

    Effective teamwork is critical to safety in the operating room; however, implementation of phase III of the American College of Surgeons (ACS) and Association of Program Directors in Surgery (APDS) Curriculum that focuses on team-based skills remains worryingly low. Training and assessing the complexities of teamwork is challenging. The objective of this study was to establish guidelines and recommendations for training faculty in assessing/debriefing team skills. A multistage survey-based consensus study was completed by 108 experts responsible for training and assessing surgical residents from the ACS Accredited Educational Institutes. Experts agreed that a program to teach faculty to assess team-based skills should include training in the recognition of teamwork skills, practice rating these skills, and training in the provision of feedback/debriefing. Agreement was reached that faculty responsible for conducting team-based skills assessment should be revalidated every 2 years and stringent proficiency criteria should be met. Faculty development is critical to ensure high-quality, standardized training and assessment. Training faculty to assess team-based skills has the potential to facilitate the effective implementation of phase III of the ACS and APDS Curriculum. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Director`s series on proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, K.C.; Price, M.E. [eds.

    1994-12-27

    The Director`s Series on Proliferation is an occasional publication of essays on the topics of nuclear, chemical, biological, and missile proliferation. The seven papers presented in this issue cover the following topics: Should the Treaty on the Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) be amended?; NPT extension - Legal and procedural issues; An Indonesian view of NPT review conference issues; The treaty of Tlatelolco and the NPT - Tools for peace and development; Perspectives on cut-off, weapons dismantlement, and security assurances; Belarus and NPT challenges; A perspective on the chemical weapons convention - Lessons learned from the preparatory commission.

  19. Institutional directors and board compensation: Spanish evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix López-Iturriaga

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We address the influence of directors who represent institutional investors in three aspects of board compensation policies: level of compensation, composition, and performance sensitivity. We differentiate pressure-sensitive directors (i.e., with business links and pressure-resistant directors (i.e., without business links. Our results show that pressure-resistant directors decrease total board compensation and its fixed proportion, whereas they increase the variable proportion of total remuneration and the pay-for-performance sensitivity. By contrast, pressure-sensitive directors offer the opposite results. These findings are consistent with the view that institutional investors are not a homogeneous group and that pressure-resistant directors fulfill a more thorough monitoring role.

  20. 30 CFR 732.11 - Review by the Director.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... proposed State program, the Director shall publish in the Federal Register and in a newspaper of general... determined by the Director and published in the Federal Register notice required by paragraph (a). (2) When... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Review by the Director. 732.11 Section 732.11...

  1. DOE Radiological Calibrations Intercomparison Program: Results of fiscal year 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, F.M.; McDonald, J.C.

    1988-06-01

    This report presents the FY 1987 results of the radiological calibrations intercomparison program. The intercomparison operation is discussed, and the equipment is described, particularly the instrument set, the beta source set, and relevant calculations. Solutions to problems and improvements in the program are suggested, and conclusions are then introduced. 9 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs

  2. ICU Director Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbu, Ogbonna C.; Coopersmith, Craig M.

    2015-01-01

    Improving value within critical care remains a priority because it represents a significant portion of health-care spending, faces high rates of adverse events, and inconsistently delivers evidence-based practices. ICU directors are increasingly required to understand all aspects of the value provided by their units to inform local improvement efforts and relate effectively to external parties. A clear understanding of the overall process of measuring quality and value as well as the strengths, limitations, and potential application of individual metrics is critical to supporting this charge. In this review, we provide a conceptual framework for understanding value metrics, describe an approach to developing a value measurement program, and summarize common metrics to characterize ICU value. We first summarize how ICU value can be represented as a function of outcomes and costs. We expand this equation and relate it to both the classic structure-process-outcome framework for quality assessment and the Institute of Medicine’s six aims of health care. We then describe how ICU leaders can develop their own value measurement process by identifying target areas, selecting appropriate measures, acquiring the necessary data, analyzing the data, and disseminating the findings. Within this measurement process, we summarize common metrics that can be used to characterize ICU value. As health care, in general, and critical care, in particular, changes and data become more available, it is increasingly important for ICU leaders to understand how to effectively acquire, evaluate, and apply data to improve the value of care provided to patients. PMID:25846533

  3. PBF severe fuel damage program: results and comparison to analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, P.E.; Buescher, B.J.; Gruen, G.E.; Hobbins, R.R.; McCardell, R.K.

    1983-01-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission has initiated a severe fuel damage research program in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) to investigate fuel rod and core response, and fission product and hydrogen release and transport under degraded core cooling accident conditions. This paper presents a description of Phase I of the PBF Severe Fuel Damage Program, discusses the results of the first experiment, and compares those results with analysis performed using the TRAC-BD1 computer code

  4. Health insurers promoting employee wellness: strategies, program components and results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Brigid M; Schoenman, Julie A; Pirani, Hafiza

    2010-01-01

    To examine health insurance companies' role in employee wellness. Case studies of eight insurers. Wellness activities in work, clinical, online, and telephonic settings. Senior executives and wellness program leaders from Blue Cross Blue Shield health insurers and from one wellness organization. Telephone interviews with 20 informants. Health insurers were engaged in wellness as part of their mission to promote health and reduce health care costs. Program components included the following: education, health risk assessments, incentives, coaching, environmental consultation, targeted programming, onsite biometric screening, professional support, and full-time wellness staff. Programs relied almost exclusively on positive incentives to encourage participation. Results included participation rates as high as 90%, return on investment ranging from $1.09 to $1.65, and improved health outcomes. Health insurers have expertise in developing, implementing, and marketing health programs and have wide access to employers and their employees' health data. These capabilities make health insurers particularly well equipped to expand the reach of wellness programming to improve the health of many Americans. By coupling members' medical data with wellness-program data, health insurers can better understand an individual's health status to develop and deliver targeted interventions. Through program evaluation, health insurers can also contribute to the limited but growing evidence base on employee wellness programs.

  5. Gender Quotas on Board of Directors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Nina

    2013-01-01

    Beside arguments of fairness and equal opportunities, it is often argued that gender diversity on boards of directors may improve firm performance, but the empirical results are mixed and often negative. Based on the available research, gender quotas on boards of directors cannot be justified...

  6. VMware vCloud director cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Langenhan, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    VMware vCloud Director Cookbook will adopt a Cookbook-based approach. Packed with illustrations and programming examples, this book explains the simple as well as the complex recipes in an easy-to-understand language.""VMware vCloud Director Cookbook"" is aimed at system administrators and technical architects moving from a virtualized environment to cloud environments. Familiarity with cloud computing platforms and some knowledge of virtualization and managing cloud environments is expected.

  7. Research results of the Optimiturve research program in 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alakangas, E.

    1992-01-01

    Optimiturve research program is one of the energy research programs funded by the Ministry of Trade and Industry of Finland. The main target of the program is double the annual hectare yield of peat dried by solar radiation to decrease the peat production costs, to speed up the circulation of capital invested to peat production with the aid of a new production method developed in this research, and hence improve the price competitivity of peat. The targets of the research program are expected to be completed by improving the drying of peat, the efficiency of the peat production machinery, and by developing peat production techniques. The program was started in 1988, and the targets are to be fulfilled up to year 1993. The research program is carried out in cooperation with universities, research organizations and peat producers. This publication consists of the results of the ongoing projects in the Optimiturve research program in 1991. The aim, the contents and the main results of the 18 projects are presented. At the end of this publication there is a list of the reports published in Reports series

  8. Exact penalty results for mathematical programs with vanishing constraints

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hoheisel, T.; Kanzow, Ch.; Outrata, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 72, č. 5 (2010), s. 2514-2526 ISSN 0362-546X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100750802 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : Mathematical programs with vanishing constraints * Mathematical programs with equilibrium constraints * Exact penalization * Calmness * Subdifferential calculus * Limiting normal cone Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.279, year: 2010 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2010/MTR/outrata-exact penalty results for mathematical programs with vanishing constraints.pdf

  9. Load monitoring program: Status and results report. Volume 1: Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    British Columbia Hydro conducts a monitoring program to provide information on customer needs and values for planning; to measure customer response, energy savings impacts, and load shape impacts due to changes in rate level, rate restructuring, and Power Smart programs; to estimate end-use consumption and load shapes by customer class; and to provide load information for distribution and system load studies. To achieve these objectives, the monitoring program tracks the characteristics and energy use patterns of a sample of BC Hydro residential, commercial, and industrial customers over a period of several years. The entire sample will be surveyed periodically to obtain information on changes in building characteristics, equipment stocks, and energy-use behavior and attitudes. A report is provided on the status of monitoring program activities and some results obtained in 1993/94. For the residential sector, the results include typical load profiles, end-user demographics, and extent of electric space heating and water heating. In the commercial sector, customers were divided into two main groups. The large-building group was relatively well organized in terms of energy needs and participated in Power Smart programs. The small-building group was relatively energy-inefficient and relatively unaware of Power Smart programs. 43 figs., 15 tabs

  10. LWR aerosol containment experiments (LACE) program and initial test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhlestein, L.D.; Hilliard, R.K.; Bloom, G.R.; McCormack, J.D.; Rahn, F.J.

    1985-01-01

    The LWR aerosol containment experiments (LACE) program is described. The LACE program is being performed at the Hanford Engineer Development Laboratory (operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company) and the initial tests are sponsored by EPRI. The objectives of the LACE program are: to demonstrate, at large-scale, inherent radioactive aerosol retention behavior for postulated high consequence LWR accident situations; and to provide a data base to be used for aerosol behavior . Test results from the first phase of the LACE program are presented and discussed. Three large-scale scoping tests, simulating a containment bypass accident sequence, demonstrated the extent of agglomeration and deposition of aerosols occurring in the pipe pathway and vented auxiliary building under realistic accident conditions. Parameters varied during the scoping tests were aerosol type and steam condensation

  11. Reporting Newborn Audiologic Results to State EHDI Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Winnie; Beauchaine, Kathryn L; Grimes, Alison; O'Hollearn, Tammy; Mason, Craig; Ringwalt, Sharon

    All US states and territories have an Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI) program to facilitate early hearing evaluation and intervention for infants who are deaf or hard of hearing. To ensure efficient coordination of care, the state EHDI programs rely heavily on audiologists' prompt reporting of a newborn's hearing status. Several states have regulations requiring mandatory reporting of a newborn's hearing status. This is an important public health responsibility of pediatric audiologists. Reasons for failing to report vary. The Early Hearing Detection and Intervention-Pediatric Audiology Links to Services (EHDI) facility survey was used to inform reporting compliance of audiology facilities throughout the United States. The survey was disseminated via articles, newsletters, and call-to-action notices to audiologists. Among 1024 facilities surveyed, 88 (8.6%) reported that they did not report newborn's hearing findings to their state EHDI program. Not knowing how to report to the state EHDI program was the most frequently chosen reason (60%). However, among the 936 facilities that were compliant with the reporting requirements, 51 estimated that they reported less than two-third of all hearing evaluation results (5.4%). Some facilities did not report a normal-hearing result and some failed to report because they assumed another facility would report the hearing results. Survey results indicated that audiologists were compliant reporting hearing results to the state EHDI programs. However, there is room for improvement. Regular provider outreach and training by the state EHDI program is necessary to ensure those who are not reporting will comply and to clarify reporting requirements for those who are already compliant.

  12. Methods used by accredited dental specialty programs to advertise faculty positions: results of a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Richard W; Hagan, Joseph L; Armbruster, Paul C; Gallo, John R

    2011-01-01

    The various reasons for the current and projected shortages of dental faculty members in the United States have received much attention. Dental school deans have reported that the top three factors impacting their ability to fill faculty positions are meeting the requirements of the position, lack of response to position announcement, and salary/budget limitations. An electronic survey sent to program directors of specialty programs at all accredited U.S. dental schools inquired about the number of vacant positions, advertised vacant positions, reasons for not advertising, selection of advertising medium, results of advertising, and assistance from professional dental organizations. A total of seventy-three permanently funded full-time faculty positions were reported vacant, with 89.0 percent of these positions having been advertised in nationally recognized professional journals and newsletters. Networking or word-of-mouth was reported as the most successful method for advertising. The majority of those responding reported that professional dental organizations did not help with filling vacant faculty positions, but that they would utilize the American Dental Association's website or their specialty organization's website to post faculty positions if they were easy to use and update.

  13. Family and Provider/Teacher Relationship Quality: Director Measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Administration for Children & Families, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The director measure is intended for use with program directors in center-based, family child care, and Head Start/Early Head Start settings for children from birth through five years old. This measure asks respondents general questions about the early childhood education environment, the children enrolled in the program, and how the program…

  14. Instruction in teaching and teaching opportunities for residents in US dermatology programs: Results of a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgin, Susan; Homayounfar, Gelareh; Newman, Lori R; Sullivan, Amy

    2017-04-01

    Dermatology residents routinely teach junior co-residents and medical students. Despite the importance of teaching skills for a successful academic career, no formal teaching instruction programs for dermatology residents have been described to our knowledge, and the extent of teaching opportunities for dermatology residents is unknown. We sought to describe the range of teaching opportunities and instruction available to dermatology residents and to assess the need for additional teaching training from the perspective of dermatology residency program directors nationwide. A questionnaire was administered to 113 US dermatology residency program directors or their designees. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze questionnaire item responses. The response rate was 55% (62/113). All program directors reported that their residents teach; 59% (33/56) reported offering trainees teaching instruction; 11% (7/62) of programs offered a short-term series of formal sessions on teaching; and 7% (4/62) offered ongoing, longitudinal training. Most program directors (74%, 40/54) believed that their residents would benefit from more teaching instruction. Response rate and responder bias are potential limitations. Dermatology residents teach in a broad range of settings, over half receive some teaching instruction, and most dermatology residency program directors perceive a need for additional training for residents as teachers. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Risk-based technical specifications program: Site interview results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andre, G.R.; Baker, A.J.; Johnson, R.L.

    1991-08-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute and Pacific Gas and Electric Company are sponsoring a program directed at improving Technical Specifications using risk-based methods. The major objectives of the program are to develop risk-based approaches to improve Technical Specifications and to develop an Interactive Risk Advisor (IRA) prototype. The IRA is envisioned as an interactive system that is available to plant personnel to assist in controlling plant operation. Use of an IRA is viewed as a method to improve plant availability while maintaining or improving plant safety. In support of the program, interviews were conducted at several PWR and BWR plant sites, to elicit opinions and information concerning risk-based approaches to Technical Specifications and IRA requirements. This report presents the results of these interviews, including the functional requirements of an IRA. 2 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Evaluation of analytical results on DOE Quality Assessment Program Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaquish, R.E.; Kinnison, R.R.; Mathur, S.P.; Sastry, R.

    1985-01-01

    Criteria were developed for evaluating the participants analytical results in the DOE Quality Assessment Program (QAP). Historical data from previous QAP studies were analyzed using descriptive statistical methods to determine the interlaboratory precision that had been attained. Performance criteria used in other similar programs were also reviewed. Using these data, precision values and control limits were recommended for each type of analysis performed in the QA program. Results of the analysis performed by the QAP participants on the November 1983 samples were statistically analyzed and evaluated. The Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) values were used as the known values and 3-sigma precision values were used as control limits. Results were submitted by 26 participating laboratories for 49 different radionuclide media combinations. The participants reported 419 results and of these, 350 or 84% were within control limits. Special attention was given to the data from gamma spectral analysis of air filters and water samples. both normal probability and box plots were prepared for each nuclide to help evaluate the distribution of the data. Results that were outside the expected range were identified and suggestions made that laboratories check calculations, and procedures on these results

  17. Smoking cessation results in a clinical lung cancer screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borondy Kitts, Andrea K; McKee, Andrea B; Regis, Shawn M; Wald, Christoph; Flacke, Sebastian; McKee, Brady J

    2016-07-01

    Lung cancer screening may provide a "teachable moment" for promoting smoking cessation. This study assessed smoking cessation and relapse rates among individuals undergoing follow-up low-dose chest computed tomography (CT) in a clinical CT lung screening program and assessed the influence of initial screening results on smoking behavior. Self-reported smoking status for individuals enrolled in a clinical CT lung screening program undergoing a follow-up CT lung screening exam between 1st February, 2014 and 31st March, 2015 was retrospectively reviewed and compared to self-reported smoking status using a standardized questionnaire at program entry. Point prevalence smoking cessation and relapse rates were calculated across the entire population and compared with exam results. All individuals undergoing screening fulfilled the National Comprehensive Cancer Network Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology: Lung Cancer Screening v1.2012(®) high-risk criteria and had an order for CT lung screening. A total of 1,483 individuals underwent a follow-up CT lung screening exam during the study interval. Smoking status at time of follow-up exam was available for 1,461/1,483 (98.5%). A total of 46% (678/1,461) were active smokers at program entry. The overall point prevalence smoking cessation and relapse rates were 20.8% and 9.3%, respectively. Prior positive screening exam results were not predictive of smoking cessation (OR 1.092; 95% CI, 0.715-1.693) but were predictive of reduced relapse among former smokers who had stopped smoking for 2 years or less (OR 0.330; 95% CI, 0.143-0.710). Duration of program enrollment was predictive of smoking cessation (OR 0.647; 95% CI, 0.477-0.877). Smoking cessation and relapse rates in a clinical CT lung screening program rates are more favorable than those observed in the general population. Duration of participation in the screening program correlated with increased smoking cessation rates. A positive exam result correlated with reduced

  18. Culham names new director

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "The United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) announced the appointment of Professor Sir Chris Llewellyn Smith FRS (Fellow of the Royal Society) as Director of Culham, responsible for developing and implementing the strategy for the UK's fusion research programme" (1 page).

  19. Ideas for Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child Care Information Exchange, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Presents child care center directors with a variety of relevant management ideas from business and the child care field. They include translating employee body language; leadership myths; on-the-job teacher training; undesirable bosses; wasting employee talent; voicing disagreement; employee anger; encouraging creativity; and coping with late…

  20. Director Networks and Takeovers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renneboog, L.D.R.; Zhao, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: We study the impact of corporate networks on the takeover process. We find that better connected companies are more active bidders. When a bidder and a target have one or more directors in common, the probability that the takeover transaction will be successfully completed augments, and

  1. Director networks and takeovers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renneboog, L.D.R.; Zhao, Y.

    2014-01-01

    We study the impact of corporate networks on the takeover process. We find that better connected companies are more active bidders. When a bidder and a target have one or more directors in common, the probability that the takeover transaction will be successfully completed augments, and the duration

  2. REGIONAL CUSTOMS DIRECTORATES MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CABA STEFAN

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The management of a regional customs directorate is analyzed. A new approach of the managerial system, in the European integration context, is presented. The customs system is one of the first “doors” to a new economic, social and cultural community. For

  3. Director, Platform and Audience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Richard D.

    The open stage is discussed both as architecture and as part of a new theatrical style. In reference to use of the open stage, emphasis is given to specifics with which the director must deal, to special problems of the actor, to the approach to blocking a play, and to the open stage as "theatrical experience". The architectural advantage of the…

  4. DOE radiological calibrations intercomparison program: Results of fiscal year 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, F.M.; Roberson, P.L.; McDonald, J.C.

    1987-05-01

    The Department of Energy Radiological Calibration Intercomparison Program was initiated in January 1986, under the research portion of the DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program. The program operates via the exchange of transfer standards, consisting of instrument sets and standard secondary beta sources. There are two instrument sets and the scheduled use has been staggered such that one set is available for use during each month. One set of secondary standard beta sources is available for use bimonthly. During the 1986 fiscal year, five laboratories used the instrument sets and three laboratories used the beta source set. Results were reported for all the measurements. The average and one standard deviation of the ratios of participant results to Pacific Northwest Laboratory calibration values were 1.12 +- 0.17 for gamma measurements. Those ratios for the gamma measurements varied from 0.98 to 3.06. The larger differences of results from measurements performed at two facilities were directly attributable to unfamiliarity with the intercomparison instruments. The average and one standard deviation of the ratios of participant results to PNL calibration values obtained using the secondary 90 Sr beta source was 1.02 +- 0.05, which is well within measurement uncertainties. The one participant who performed measurements using 147 Pm and 204 Tl sources obtained ratios of 0.68 and 1.11, respectively. No measurements were performed using neutron or x-ray sources

  5. Westinghouse accident tolerant fuel program. Current results and future plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, Sumit; Xu, Peng; Lahoda, Edward; Hallstadius, Lars; Boylan, Frank [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Hopkins, SC (United States)

    2016-07-15

    This paper discusses the current status, results from initial tests, as well as the future direction of the Westinghouse's Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) program. The current preliminary testing is addressed that is being performed on these samples at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) test reactor, initial results from these tests, as well as the technical learning from these test results. In the Westinghouse ATF approach, higher density pellets play a significant role in the development of an integrated fuel system.

  6. Assessment of Changes in School Nutrition Programs and the School Environment as a Result of Following the HealthierUS School Challenge Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jennifer S.; Bednar, Carolyn; DiMarco, Nancy M.; Connors, Priscilla L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine changes in school nutrition programs and the school environment as reported by school nutrition directors who are following the U.S. Department of Agriculture's HealthierUS School Challenge (HUSSC) program. The objective was to determine before and after changes in the average lunch…

  7. Emergency operating procedure upgrade program and audit results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, P.D.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the method and results of upgrading the River Bend station boiling water reactor 6 emergency operating procedures (EOPs). The upgrade program replaced difficult-to-implement narrative procedures with well-developed flowcharts. The flowcharts eliminate a number of human factors problems, are user friendly, provide for easy implementation, and provide technical information in a clear, concise format. Positive results were seen immediately. The operating crews found the flowcharts to be clear, understandable, and usable. Simulator training and EOP implementation became something that the operators no longer dreaded, and their confidence in their ability to control emergency situations was greatly improved. The paper provides a summary of the EOP upgrade program

  8. Cabo Verde telemedicine program: initial results of nationwide implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latifi, Rifat; Dasho, Erion; Merrell, Ronald C; Lopes, Miguel; Azevedo, Vanda; Bekteshi, Flamur; Osmani, Kalterina L; Qesteri, Orland; Kucani, Julian; Lecaj, Ismet

    2014-11-01

    Telemedicine and e-health have been suggested as one solution for closing the health disparity gap between the developed world and the developing world. Yet evidence is lacking from current successful programs in the developing world and, in particular, from sub-Saharan Africa. The primary objective of our study was to present the preliminary results of our efforts in building the Integrated Telemedicine and e-Health Program for Cabo Verde (ITeHP-CV), with an emphasis on initial utilization and results. This is a prospective study of data collected while we worked to establish a fully functional, integrated national telemedicine network and virtual education network in Cabo Verde. We used the International Virtual e-Hospital Foundation strategic approach known as "initiate-build-operate-transfer" over a 26-month period (November 2011-December 2013). We describe herein the five main pillars of this process that have been implemented: (1) capacity building; (2) network development and deployment of equipment; (3) implementation of clinical telemedicine; (4) implementation of activities related to continuing medical education, delivered from within the country and from abroad; and (5) establishment and use of the electronic virtual library. Based on comprehensive technical and medical assessment of the country's needs, 10 fully functional telemedicine centers in all nine inhabited islands of the Republic of Cabo Verde have been established. RESULTS are presented under the five main pillars of capacity building, network deployment, implementation of clinical telemedicine, implementation of continuing medical education activities, and establishment of the electronic virtual library. The ITeHP-CV has been successfully launched, and the initial results are encouraging. The continuity of the program and sustainability are primary goals once the program is transferred fully to the Ministry of Health of Cabo Verde. A long-term follow-up study is required in order to ensure

  9. Laser long-range remote-sensing program experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highland, Ronald G.; Shilko, Michael L.; Fox, Marsha J.; Gonglewski, John D.; Czyzak, Stanley R.; Dowling, James A.; Kelly, Brian; Pierrottet, Diego F.; Ruffatto, Donald; Loando, Sharon; Matsuura, Chris; Senft, Daniel C.; Finkner, Lyle; Rae, Joe; Gallegos, Joe

    1995-12-01

    A laser long range remote sensing (LRS) program is being conducted by the United States Air Force Phillips Laboratory (AF/PL). As part of this program, AF/PL is testing the feasibility of developing a long path CO(subscript 2) laser-based DIAL system for remote sensing. In support of this program, the AF/PL has recently completed an experimental series using a 21 km slant- range path (3.05 km ASL transceiver height to 0.067 km ASL target height) at its Phillips Laboratory Air Force Maui Optical Station (AMOS) facility located on Maui, Hawaii. The dial system uses a 3-joule, (superscript 13)C isotope laser coupled into a 0.6 m diameter telescope. The atmospheric optical characterization incorporates information from an infrared scintillometer co-aligned to the laser path, atmospheric profiles from weather balloons launched from the target site, and meteorological data from ground stations at AMOS and the target site. In this paper, we report a description of the experiment configuration, a summary of the results, a summary of the atmospheric conditions and their implications to the LRS program. The capability of such a system for long-range, low-angle, slant-path remote sensing is discussed. System performance issues relating to both coherent and incoherent detection methods, atmospheric limitations, as well as, the development of advanced models to predict performance of long range scenarios are presented.

  10. Recent results from the ATLAS heavy ion program

    CERN Document Server

    Havener, Laura Brittany; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The heavy-ion program in the ATLAS experiment at the LHC originated as an extensive program to probe and characterize the hot, dense matter created in relativistic lead-lead collisions. In recent years, the program has also broadened to a detailed study of collective behavior in smaller systems. In particular, the techniques used to study larger systems are also applied to proton-proton and proton-lead collisions over a wide range of particle multiplicities, to try and understand the early-time dynamics which lead to similar flow-like features in all of the systems. Another recent development is a program studying ultra-peripheral collisions, which provide gamma-gamma and photonuclear processes over a wide range of CM energy, to probe the nuclear wavefunction. This talk presents a subset of the the most recent results from the ATLAS experiment based on Run 1 and Run 2 data, including measurements of collectivity over a wide range of collision systems, potential nPDF modifications — using electroweak bosons,...

  11. Demystifying Data: Data Use in State and Local Public Health Nutrition Programs--Measuring Achievement of the 1990 Health Promotion/Disease Prevention Objectives for the Nation. Proceedings of the Continuing Education Conference for the Association of State and Territorial Public Health Nutrition Directors and Association of Faculties of Graduate Programs in Public Health Nutrition (Chapel Hill, North Carolina, May 21-24, 1985).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Mildred, Comp.

    This document contains the proceedings from the Conference of State and Territorial Public Health Nutrition Directors and Faculties of Graduate Programs in Public Health Nutrition designed to improve participants' proficiency in data management. It includes an introduction by Mildred Kaufman, a conference agenda, and the following presentations:…

  12. PROSID - a program to evaluate SIMMER-II results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flad, M.; Kuefner, K.; Maschek, W.

    1990-02-01

    The PROSID program supports the evaluation of SIMMER-II results. PROSID enables the user to get a printout of variables, to get a linear combination of variables or quadrats of variables, to sum up variables or quadrats of variables, to compare variables or whole datasets, to interpolate to a new meshgrid and to get weighted mean values. As special options are available the calculation of the volume of connected gas regions, the evaluation of the fuel enrichment, an estimation of reactivity changes and the retransformation of interpolated velocity values. The results can be stored for further evaluations. (orig.) [de

  13. [Preoperative psychoprophylaxis in childhood. Results of a hospital program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Admetlla i Admetlla, I A; Jover i Fulgueira, S

    1988-05-01

    Results of a surgical psychoprophylaxis program, theoretically and technically framed within psychoanalytic theory is presented. It also comprises a description of the method used, as well as criteria by which authors have determined whether or not a child is ready for surgery. Results obtained with 134 children and a description of those who showed post-surgical disturbances are presented. Analysis is carried out of the percentage of disorders according to age group, showing that highest risk is among children up to five years of age, coinciding with the finding put forth by other authors. Finally some conclusions in relation to prevention of psychologic iatrogenic disorders in pediatric surgery are drawn.

  14. Active aging promotion: results from the vital aging program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprara, Mariagiovanna; Molina, María Ángeles; Schettini, Rocío; Santacreu, Marta; Orosa, Teresa; Mendoza-Núñez, Víctor Manuel; Rojas, Macarena; Fernández-Ballesteros, Rocío

    2013-01-01

    Active aging is one of the terms in the semantic network of aging well, together with others such as successful, productive, competent aging. All allude to the new paradigm in gerontology, whereby aging is considered from a positive perspective. Most authors in the field agree active aging is a multidimensional concept, embracing health, physical and cognitive fitness, positive affect and control, social relationships and engagement. This paper describes Vital Aging, an individual active aging promotion program implemented through three modalities: Life, Multimedia, and e-Learning. The program was developed on the basis of extensive evidence about individual determinants of active aging. The different versions of Vital Aging are described, and four evaluation studies (both formative and summative) are reported. Formative evaluation reflected participants' satisfaction and expected changes; summative evaluations yielded some quite encouraging results using quasi-experimental designs: those who took part in the programs increased their physical exercise, significantly improved their diet, reported better memory, had better emotional balance, and enjoyed more cultural, intellectual, affective, and social activities than they did before the course, thus increasing their social relationships. These results are discussed in the context of the common literature within the field and, also, taking into account the limitations of the evaluations accomplished.

  15. Active Aging Promotion: Results from the Vital Aging Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariagiovanna Caprara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Active aging is one of the terms in the semantic network of aging well, together with others such as successful, productive, competent aging. All allude to the new paradigm in gerontology, whereby aging is considered from a positive perspective. Most authors in the field agree active aging is a multidimensional concept, embracing health, physical and cognitive fitness, positive affect and control, social relationships and engagement. This paper describes Vital Aging, an individual active aging promotion program implemented through three modalities: Life, Multimedia, and e-Learning. The program was developed on the basis of extensive evidence about individual determinants of active aging. The different versions of Vital Aging are described, and four evaluation studies (both formative and summative are reported. Formative evaluation reflected participants’ satisfaction and expected changes; summative evaluations yielded some quite encouraging results using quasi-experimental designs: those who took part in the programs increased their physical exercise, significantly improved their diet, reported better memory, had better emotional balance, and enjoyed more cultural, intellectual, affective, and social activities than they did before the course, thus increasing their social relationships. These results are discussed in the context of the common literature within the field and, also, taking into account the limitations of the evaluations accomplished.

  16. US country studies program: Results from mitigation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the U.S. Country Studies Program which was implemented to support the principles and objectives of the Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC). There were three principle objectives in this program: to enhance capabilities to conduct climate change assessments, prepare action plans, and implement technology projects; to help establish a process for developing and implementing national policies and measures; to support principles and objective of the FCCC. As a result, 55 countries are completing studies, more than 2000 analysts engaged in the studies have been trained, and there is a much broader understanding and support for climate change concerns. The article describes experiences of some countries, and general observations and conclusions which are broadly seperated into developed countries and those with economies in transition.

  17. Preliminary Results of the Louisiana Sex Offender Treatment Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee A. Underwood

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to offer preliminary support for the Louisiana Sex Offender Treatment Program (LSOTP in addressing the needs of juvenile sex offenders. Research objectives were (1 to offer statistical evidence for reductions in anxiety, depression, cognitive distortion and negative attitudes towards women comparing a group of 21 adolescents, 12 of whom received services as usual and nine of whom participated in the LSOTP. A controlled experimental evaluation design was utilized. The juvenile sex offenders were randomly assigned to the experimental group for 12 weeks receiving treatment services and a control group receiving care “as usual” in a residential group care program. Participants in the experimental group experienced statistically significant decreases in cognitive distortions related specifically to rape and molestation.The results of this study offer preliminary support of the LSOTP as a best practices alternative to other treatment modalities.

  18. The Seismic Category I Structures Program results for FY 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrar, C.R.; Bennett, J.G.; Dunwoody, W.E.; Baker, W.E.

    1990-10-01

    The accomplishments of the Seismic Category I Structures Program for FY 1987 are summarized. These accomplishments include the quasi-static load cycle testing of large shear wall elements, an extensive analysis of previous data to determine if equivalent linear analytical models can predict the response of damaged shear wall structures, and code committee activities. In addition, previous testing and results that led to the FY 1987 program plan are discussed and all previous data relating to shear wall stiffness are summarized. Because separate reports have already summarized the experimental and analytical work in FY 1987, this report will briefly highlight this work and the appropriate reports will be references for a more detailed discussion. 12 refs., 23 figs., 18 tabs

  19. Annual report on major results and progress of Naka Fusion Research Establishment of JAERI from April 1 to September 30, 2005 and Fusion Research and Development Directorate of JAEA from October 1, 2005 to March 31, 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hidetoshi; Oasa, Kazumi; Hayashi, Takao; Nakamura, Hiroo; Ogawa, Hiroaki

    2006-09-01

    This annual report provides an overview of major results and progress on research and development (R and D) activities at Naka Fusion Research Establishment of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) during the period from April 1 to September 30, 2005 and at Fusion Research and Development Directorate of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) from October 1, 2005 to March 31, 2006, including those performed in collaboration with other research establishments of JAERI, research institutes, and universities. In JT-60, ferritic steel tiles (FSTs) were installed inside the vacuum vessel of JT-60U to reduce the toroidal field ripple. After the installation of FSTs, a high normalized beta plasma at β N ∼2.3 was sustained for 28.6s with ELMy H-mode confinement as required for an ITER hybrid operation scenario. National Centralized Tokamak was placed as the ITER satellite tokamak in collaboration with the EU fusion community, and the facility design was modified strongly in support of ITER. In theoretical and analytical researches, studies on H-mode confinement, ITB in reversed shear plasmas, aspect ratio effects on external MHD modes and magnetic island evolution in a rotating plasma were progressed. Progress was also made in the NEXT project in which the behaviors of collisionless MHD modes and the dynamics of zonal flows were simulated. In fusion reactor technologies, R and Ds for ITER and fusion DEMO plants have been carried out. For ITER, a steady state operation of the 170GHz gyrotron up to 1000 s with 0.2 MW was demonstrated. Also current density of the neutral beam injector has been extended to 134A/m 2 at 0.75MeV. In the ITER Test Blanket Module (TBM), designs of Water and Helium Cooled Solid Breeder TBMs and R and Ds of tritium breeder/multiplier materials were progressed. Tritium processing technology for breeding blankets was also progressed. For the DEMO reactors, high temperature superconductor such as Bi2212 has been examined. In plasma facing

  20. Beam director design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younger, F.C.

    1986-08-01

    A design and fabrication effort for a beam director is documented. The conceptual design provides for the beam to pass first through a bending and focusing system (or ''achromat''), through a second achromat, through an air-to-vacuum interface (the ''beam window''), and finally through the vernier steering system. Following an initial concept study for a beam director, a prototype permanent magnet 30 0 beam-bending achromat and prototype vernier steering magnet were designed and built. In volume II, copies are included of the funding instruments, requests for quotations, purchase orders, a complete set of as-built drawings, magnetic measurement reports, the concept design report, and the final report on the design and fabrication project

  1. Discussion with CERN Directorate

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Please note that the Discussion with CERN Directorate will be transmitted also in the following rooms: Council Chamber - 503-1-001 IT Amphitheatre - 31-3-004 Prevessin 774-R-013 Simultaneous interpreting into French and English will be available in the Main Auditorium. Une interprétation simultanée en français et en anglais sera disponible dans l'amphithéâtre principal.

  2. Applying national survey results for strategic planning and program improvement: the National Diabetes Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffey, Susan; Piccinino, Linda; Gallivan, Joanne; Lotenberg, Lynne Doner; Tuncer, Diane

    2015-02-01

    Since the 1970s, the federal government has spearheaded major national education programs to reduce the burden of chronic diseases in the United States. These prevention and disease management programs communicate critical information to the public, those affected by the disease, and health care providers. The National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), the leading federal program on diabetes sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), uses primary and secondary quantitative data and qualitative audience research to guide program planning and evaluation. Since 2006, the NDEP has filled the gaps in existing quantitative data sources by conducting its own population-based survey, the NDEP National Diabetes Survey (NNDS). The NNDS is conducted every 2–3 years and tracks changes in knowledge, attitudes and practice indicators in key target audiences. This article describes how the NDEP has used the NNDS as a key component of its evaluation framework and how it applies the survey results for strategic planning and program improvement. The NDEP's use of the NNDS illustrates how a program evaluation framework that includes periodic population-based surveys can serve as an evaluation model for similar national health education programs.

  3. CIEE 1993 annual conference: Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    The California Institute for Energy efficiency`s third annual conference highlights the results of CIEE-sponsored multiyear research in three programs: Building Energy Efficiency, Air Quality Impacts of Energy Efficiency, and End-Use Resource Planning. Results from scoping studies, Director`s discretionary research, and exploratory research are also featured.

  4. El Consejero Dominical y el Gobierno Corporativo / Institutional Directors and Corporate Governance

    OpenAIRE

    Chiva Ortells, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this research is to study the role of institutional directors in corporate governance. For this purpose, we have analysed the impact that these directors have on CEO compensation and on corporate social responsibility disclosure. Moreover, institutional directors have been classified into two groups: pressure-resistant institutional directors and pressure-sensitive institutional directors. The results show that institutional directors, as a whole, and pressure-resistant institution...

  5. Plutonium immobilization program - Cold pour Phase 1 test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, L.

    2000-01-01

    The Plutonium Immobilization Project will disposition excess weapons grade plutonium. It uses the can-in-canister approach that involves placing plutonium-ceramic pucks in sealed cans that are then placed into Defense Waste Processing Facility canisters. These canisters are subsequently filled with high-level radioactive waste glass. This process puts the plutonium in a stable form and makes it unattractive for reuse. A cold (non-radioactive) glass pour program was performed to develop and verify the baseline design for the canister and internal hardware. This paper describes the Phase 1 scoping test results

  6. Latest results from the Seismic Category I Structures Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, J.G.; Dove, R.C.; Dunwoody, W.E.; Farrar, C.

    1985-01-01

    With the use of scale models, the Seismic Category I Structures Program has demonstrated consistent results for measured values of stiffness at working loads. Furthermore, the values are well below the theoretical stiffnesses calculated from an uncracked strength-of-materials approach. The scale model structures, which are also models of each other, have demonstrated scalability between models. The current effort is to demonstrate that the use of microconcrete and other modeling effects do not introduce significant distortions that could drastically change conclusions regarding prototype behavior for these very stiff, shear dominated structures. 3 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  7. Plutonium Immobilization Program - Cold pour Phase 1 test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, L.

    2000-01-01

    The Plutonium Immobilization Project will disposition excess weapons grade plutonium. It uses the can-in-canister approach that involves placing plutonium-ceramic pucks in sealed cans that are then placed into Defense Waste Processing Facility canisters. These canisters are subsequently filled with high-level radioactive waste glass. This process puts the plutonium in a stable form and makes it unattractive for reuse. A cold (non-radioactive) glass pour program was performed to develop and verify the baseline design for the canister and internal hardware. This paper describes the Phase 1 scoping test results

  8. Seismic II over I Drop Test Program results and interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, B.

    1993-03-01

    The consequences of non-seismically qualified (Category 2) objects falling and striking essential seismically qualified (Category 1) objects has always been a significant, yet analytically difficult problem, particularly in evaluating the potential damage to equipment that may result from earthquakes. Analytical solutions for impact problems are conservative and available for mostly simple configurations. In a nuclear facility, the {open_quotes}sources{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}targets{close_quotes} requiring evaluation are frequently irregular in shape and configuration, making calculations and computer modeling difficult. Few industry or regulatory rules are available on this topic even though it is a source of considerable construction upgrade costs. A drop test program was recently conducted to develop a more accurate understanding of the consequences of seismic interactions. The resulting data can be used as a means to improve the judgment of seismic qualification engineers performing interaction evaluations and to develop realistic design criteria for seismic interactions. Impact tests on various combinations of sources and targets commonly found in one Savannah River Site (SRS) nuclear facility were performed by dropping the sources from various heights onto the targets. This report summarizes results of the Drop Test Program. Force and acceleration time history data are presented as well as general observations on the overall ruggedness of various targets when subjected to impacts from different types of sources.

  9. Seismic II over I Drop Test Program results and interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, B.

    1993-03-01

    The consequences of non-seismically qualified (Category 2) objects falling and striking essential seismically qualified (Category 1) objects has always been a significant, yet analytically difficult problem, particularly in evaluating the potential damage to equipment that may result from earthquakes. Analytical solutions for impact problems are conservative and available for mostly simple configurations. In a nuclear facility, the [open quotes]sources[close quotes] and [open quotes]targets[close quotes] requiring evaluation are frequently irregular in shape and configuration, making calculations and computer modeling difficult. Few industry or regulatory rules are available on this topic even though it is a source of considerable construction upgrade costs. A drop test program was recently conducted to develop a more accurate understanding of the consequences of seismic interactions. The resulting data can be used as a means to improve the judgment of seismic qualification engineers performing interaction evaluations and to develop realistic design criteria for seismic interactions. Impact tests on various combinations of sources and targets commonly found in one Savannah River Site (SRS) nuclear facility were performed by dropping the sources from various heights onto the targets. This report summarizes results of the Drop Test Program. Force and acceleration time history data are presented as well as general observations on the overall ruggedness of various targets when subjected to impacts from different types of sources.

  10. Seismic II over I Drop Test Program results and interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, B.

    1993-03-01

    The consequences of non-seismically qualified (Category 2) objects falling and striking essential seismically qualified (Category 1) objects has always been a significant, yet analytically difficult problem, particularly in evaluating the potential damage to equipment that may result from earthquakes. Analytical solutions for impact problems are conservative and available for mostly simple configurations. In a nuclear facility, the open-quotes sourcesclose quotes and open-quotes targetsclose quotes requiring evaluation are frequently irregular in shape and configuration, making calculations and computer modeling difficult. Few industry or regulatory rules are available on this topic even though it is a source of considerable construction upgrade costs. A drop test program was recently conducted to develop a more accurate understanding of the consequences of seismic interactions. The resulting data can be used as a means to improve the judgment of seismic qualification engineers performing interaction evaluations and to develop realistic design criteria for seismic interactions. Impact tests on various combinations of sources and targets commonly found in one Savannah River Site (SRS) nuclear facility were performed by dropping the sources from various heights onto the targets. This report summarizes results of the Drop Test Program. Force and acceleration time history data are presented as well as general observations on the overall ruggedness of various targets when subjected to impacts from different types of sources

  11. Improving the Teaching Skills of Residents in a Surgical Training Program: Results of the Pilot Year of a Curricular Initiative in an Ophthalmology Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Yewlin E; Newman, Lori R; Loewenstein, John I; Kloek, Carolyn E

    2015-01-01

    To design and implement a teaching skills curriculum that addressed the needs of an ophthalmology residency training program, to assess the effect of the curriculum, and to present important lessons learned. A teaching skills curriculum was designed for the Harvard Medical School (HMS) Residency Training Program in Ophthalmology. Results of a needs assessment survey were used to guide curriculum objectives. Overall, 3 teaching workshops were conducted between October 2012 and March 2013 that addressed areas of need, including procedural teaching. A postcurriculum survey was used to assess the effect of the curriculum. Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, a tertiary care institution in Boston, MA. Overall, 24 residents in the HMS Residency Training Program in Ophthalmology were included. The needs assessment survey demonstrated that although most residents anticipated that teaching would be important in their future career, only one-third had prior formal training in teaching. All residents reported they found the teaching workshops to be either very or extremely useful. All residents reported they would like further training in teaching, with most residents requesting additional training in best procedural teaching practices for future sessions. The pilot year of the resident-as-teacher curriculum for the HMS Residency Training Program in Ophthalmology demonstrated a need for this curriculum and was perceived as beneficial by the residents, who reported increased comfort in their teaching skills after attending the workshops. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Worker Safety and Health Issues Associated with the DOE Environmental Cleanup Program: Insights From the DOE Laboratory Directors' Environmental and Occupational/Public health Standards Steering Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M.C. Edelson; Samuel C. Morris; Joan M. Daisey

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Laboratory Directors' Environmental and Occupational/Public Health Standards Steering Group (or ''SSG'') was formed in 1990. It was felt then that ''risk'' could be an organizing principle for environmental cleanup and that risk-based cleanup standards could rationalize clean up work. The environmental remediation process puts workers engaged in cleanup activities at risk from hazardous materials and from the more usual hazards associated with construction activities. In a real sense, the site remediation process involves the transfer of a hypothetical risk to the environment and the public from isolated contamination into real risks to the workers engaged in the remediation activities. Late in its existence the SSG, primarily motivated by its LANL representative, Dr. Harry Ettinger, actively investigated issues associated with worker health and safety during environmental remediation activities. This paper summarizes the insights noted by the SSG. Most continue to be pertinent today

  13. Variability of ethics education in laboratory medicine training programs: results of an international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, David E; Burtis, Carl A; Gronowski, Ann M; McQueen, Matthew J; Newman, Anthony; Jonsson, Jon J

    2015-03-10

    Ethical considerations are increasingly important in medicine. We aimed to determine the mode and extent of teaching of ethics in training programs in clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine. We developed an on-line survey of teaching in areas of ethics relevant to laboratory medicine. Reponses were invited from directors of training programs who were recruited via email to leaders of national organizations. The survey was completed by 80 directors from 24 countries who directed 113 programs. The largest numbers of respondents directed postdoctoral training of scientists (42%) or physicians (33%), post-masters degree programs (33%), and PhD programs (29%). Most programs (82%) were 2years or longer in duration. Formal training was offered in research ethics by 39%, medical ethics by 31%, professional ethics by 24% and business ethics by 9%. The number of reported hours of formal training varied widely, e.g., from 0 to >15h/year for research ethics and from 0 to >15h for medical ethics. Ethics training was required and/or tested in 75% of programs that offered training. A majority (54%) of respondents reported plans to add or enhance training in ethics; many indicated a desire for online resources related to ethics, especially resources with self-assessment tools. Formal teaching of ethics is absent from many training programs in clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine, with heterogeneity in the extent and methods of ethics training among the programs that provide the training. A perceived need exists for online training tools, especially tools with self-assessment components. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Utilization of aging program results in plant inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunther, W.; Fullwood, R.

    1989-01-01

    Research conducted under the auspices of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program has resulted in a large data base of component and system operating experience. This data base has been used to determine equipment aging susceptibility and the potential for equipment aging to impact plant safety and reliability. Methods of detecting and mitigating component and system aging have also been identified. This paper discusses how the NPAR results could be used to focus inspection activities on age-sensitive components and systems and on the specific modes and mechanisms of age degradation. These activities range from the regular inspections conducted by resident inspectors to extensive special inspections such as the Safety System Functional Inspection typically conducted by a team of inspectors. 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  15. Utilization of aging program results in plant inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunther, W.; Fullwood, R.

    1988-01-01

    Research conducted under the auspices of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program has resulted in a large data base of component and system operating experience. This data base has been used to determine equipment aging susceptibility and the potential for equipment aging to impact plant safety and reliability. Methods of detecting and mitigating component and system aging have also been identified. This paper discusses how the NPAR results could be used to focus inspection activities on age-sensitive components and systems and on the specific modes and mechanisms of age degradation. These activities range from the regular inspections conducted by resident inspectors to extensive special inspections such as the Safety System Functional Inspection typically conducted by a team of inspectors. 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  16. 76 FR 58303 - Regular Board of Directors Meeting; Sunshine Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    ..., Washington, DC 20005. STATUS: Open. CONTACT PERSON FOR MORE INFORMATION: Erica Hall, Assistant Corporate... Directors Minutes III. Approval of the Special Board of Directors Minutes IV. Approval of the Corporate Administration Committee Minutes V. Approval of the Finance, Budget and Program Committee Minutes VI. Approval of...

  17. New project director for Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Miguel Machuca has been installed as project director for the Honduras Contraceptive Social Marketing Program (HCSMP). he was selected from a field of candidates with public and private sector experience in marketing, business management and program development. Machuca will direct the development of the social marketing program and work to establish a marketing function within ASHONPLAFA, the sponsoring organization for HCSMP. A major goal is to correct misinformation or lack of information about family planning methods among consumers and reatilers; for example, consumers worry about the side-effects of oral contraceptives (OCs) and many perceive subsidized products to be either experimental or discards. Easily understandable graphic package naterials are being prepared for OCs distributed through the program. Another goal is sales training. The project is scheduled to be launched in March 1984 with distribution of Perla, a standard dose OC. Radio spots and newspaper ads are being prepared to inform consumers that Perla can be purchased through pharmacies and small rural shops at the cost of US$.75/cycle. A low-dose OC, a condom and a vaginal tablet are scheduled to be added to the product line by December 1984. Market research on brand names, packaging and pricing of these products is currently being conducted. According the Machuca, his biggest challenge will be to maintain a balance between the need to comply with the policies and regulations of the various organizations involved with the HCSMP and the simultaneous need to promote and implement the entrepreneurial activities necessary to project goals.

  18. European Fusion Materials Research Program - Recent Results and Future Strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diegele, E.; Andreani, R.; Laesser, R.; Schaaf, B. van der

    2005-01-01

    The paper reviews the objectives and the status of the current EU long-term materials program. It highlights recent results, discusses some of the key issues and major existing problems to be resolved and presents an outlook on the R and D planned for the next few years. The main objectives of the Materials Development program are the development and qualification of reduced activation structural materials for the Test Blanket Modules (TBMs) in ITER and of low activation structural materials resistant to high fluence neutron irradiation for in-vessel components such as breeding blanket, divertor and first wall in DEMO. The EU strategy assumes: (i) ITER operation starting in 2015 with DEMO relevant Test Blanket Modules to be installed from day one of operation, (ii) IFMIF operation in 2017 and (iii) DEMO final design activities in 2022 to 2025. The EU candidate structural material EUROFER for TBMs has to be fully code qualified for licensing well before 2015. In parallel, research on materials for operation at higher temperatures is conducted following a logical sequence, by supplementing EUROFER with the oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels and, thereafter, with fibre-reinforced Silicon Carbide (SiC f /SiC). Complementary, tungsten alloys are developed as structural material for high temperature applications such as gas-cooled divertors

  19. Directors General appointed

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    At a special session on 21 March, presided over by P. Levaux, the Council of the European Organization for Nuclear Research appointed J . B. Adams and L . Van Hove as Directors General of the Organization for a period of five years beginning 1 January 1976. Dr. Adams will be responsible for the administration of CERN, for the operation of the equipment and services and for the construction of buildings and major equipment. Professor Van Hove will be responsible for the research activities of the Organization.

  20. Educational Data Processing Directors' Perceptions of Technological Training Priorities for School Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, W. C.; Spuck, D. W.

    Results of a survey of school district data processing directors' attitudes toward the content of technology curriculum in educational administrator training programs are presented in this paper. Questionnaires sent to 152 large school districts yielded 78 usable returns, a 51 percent response rate. Respondents rated the following topics as most…

  1. 25 CFR 224.137 - What must the Director do if a tribe's noncompliance has resulted in harm or the potential for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... potential for harm to a physical trust asset? If, because of the tribe's noncompliance with Federal law or... resulted in harm or the potential for harm to a physical trust asset? 224.137 Section 224.137 Indians... physical trust asset that does not rise to the level of imminent jeopardy to a physical trust asset, the...

  2. First Results from the AKARI FU-HYU Mission Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, C.; Serjeant, S.; Takagi, T.; Jeong, W.-S.; Negrello, M.; Matsuhara, H.; Wada, T.; Oyabu, S.; Lee, H. M.; Im, M.

    2009-12-01

    The AKARI FU-HYU mission program has carried out mid-infrared imaging of several well studied Spitzer fields. This imaging fills in the wavelength coverage lacking from the Spitzer surveys and gives an extremely high scientific return for minimal input for AKARI. We select fields already rich in multi-wavelength data from radio to X-ray wavelengths and present the results from our initial analysis in the GOODS-N field. We utilize the comprehansive multiwavelength coverage in the GOODS-N field to produce a multiwavelength catalogue from infrared to ultraviolet wavelengths including photometric redshifts. Using the FU-HYU catalogue we present colour-colour diagrams that map the passage of PAH features through our observation bands. These colour-colours diagrams are used as tools to extract anomalous colour populations, in particular a population of Silicate Break galaxies from the GOODS-N field.

  3. IMPACTS. Industrial Technologies Program: Summary of Program Results for CY 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2010-08-02

    The Impacts report summarizes benefits resulting from ITP-sponsored technologies, including energy savings, waste reduction, increased productivity, and lowered emissions. It also provides an overview of the activities of the Industrial Assessment Centers, BestPractices Program, and Combined Heat and Power efforts.

  4. National Resident Matching Program, Results and Data: 2016 Main Residency Match®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Gisondi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available ALiEM EM Match Advice is a web series hosted on the Academic Life in Emergency Medicine website. The intended audience includes senior medical students seeking a residency in emergency medicine (EM and the faculty members who advise them. Each episode features a panel of three EM program directors who discuss a critical step in the residency application process. This article serves as a user’s guide to the series, including a timeline for viewing each episode, brief summaries of the panel discussions, and reflection questions for discussion between students and their faculty advisors.

  5. An Overview of Recent PISCES Program PMI Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tynan, George; Doerner, Russell; Abe, Shota; Baldwin, Matthew; Barton, Joseph; Chen, Renkun; Gosselin, Jordan; Hollmann, Eric; Nishijima, Daisuke; Simmonds, Michael; Wang, Yong; Yu, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    The PISCES Program is focused on fundamental PMI studies of Be and W-based solid plasma facing components under steady-state and transient conditions. We will show results from studies in W, Be and mixed W-Be material systems. Topics of investigation include formation of near-surface nanobubbles from He plasma ion implantation, growth of W-fuzz from these bubbles in steady-state and transient conditions, D retention in Be and W and development of a D-retention model for both H/D isotope exchange and displacement damage experiments. Initial studies of PMI in displacement damaged W are also presented, showing the effect of damage and exposure temperature on D retention, D diffusion, W thermal conductivity. Be-based results include morphology evolution under high plasma flux exposure, Be erosion mechanisms, and retention in Be-based materials. Future plans and connections to fusion energy system requirements will be discussed. This work supported by grant DE-FG02-07ER54912.

  6. Navy Professional Reading Program: Results of the 2007 Survey

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Uriell, Zannette A; Johnson, J. S

    2008-01-01

    In 2007, the Navy instituted the Navy Professional Reading Program (NPRP), designed to empower Sailors to grow professionally by improving critical thinking and stimulating discussion through professional reading...

  7. Dedicated training program for shoulder sonography: the results of a quality program reverberate with everyone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delzell, Patricia B; Boyle, Alex; Schneider, Erika

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to define and report on the effect of a comprehensive musculoskeletal sonography training program to improve accuracy (sensitivity and specificity) for the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears in relatively inexperienced operators. Before the training program was implemented, radiologists (n = 12) had a mean of 2 years (range, training shoulder sonographic results were compared to surgical reports or, in their absence, to shoulder magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomographic arthrographic results if within 2 months of the sonographic examination. A total of 82 patients were included in the pre-training group (January 2010-December 2011), and 50 patients were included in the post-training group (January 2012-June 2013). The accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were determined for the presence or absence of supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendon tears. After implementation of the training program, the sensitivity of sonography for detecting full-thickness rotator cuff tears increased by 14%, and the sensitivity for detecting partial-thickness rotator cuff tears increased by 3%. Quality improvement programs and acquisition standardization along with ongoing, focused case conferences for the entire care team increased the sensitivity of shoulder sonography for diagnosing both full- and partial-thickness rotator cuff tears, independent of the years of operator experience. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  8. STS-61 mission director's post-mission report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Ronald L.

    1995-01-01

    To ensure the success of the complex Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission, STS-61, NASA established a number of independent review groups to assess management, design, planning, and preparation for the mission. One of the resulting recommendations for mission success was that an overall Mission Director be appointed to coordinate management activities of the Space Shuttle and Hubble programs and to consolidate results of the team reviews and expedite responses to recommendations. This report presents pre-mission events important to the experience base of mission management, with related Mission Director's recommendations following the event(s) to which they apply. All Mission Director's recommendations are presented collectively in an appendix. Other appendixes contain recommendations from the various review groups, including Payload Officers, the JSC Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Section, JSC EVA Management Office, JSC Crew and Thermal Systems Division, and the STS-61 crew itself. This report also lists mission events in chronological order and includes as an appendix a post-mission summary by the lead Payload Deployment and Retrieval System Officer. Recommendations range from those pertaining to specific component use or operating techniques to those for improved management, review, planning, and safety procedures.

  9. State Energy Program Results: More Projects That Work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1998-12-01

    A Summary of Success stories of the State Energy Programs. The goal of the State Energy Program is to strengthen the capabilities of States to promote energy efficiency and to adopt renewable energy technologies, thereby helping the nation save energy and realize a stronger economy, cleaner environment, and a more secure future.

  10. Expanding Gerontology Enrollments: Successful Results of an Innovative Outreach Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Sandra L.; Haley, William E.; Hyer, Kathryn

    2007-01-01

    As state budget allocations for higher education decrease, "specialty" programs such as gerontology must continually demonstrate their productivity. State and private universities increasingly rely on student credit hours (SCH) or tuition generated, which is making it difficult for many gerontology programs to expand. The School of Aging Studies…

  11. [The German program for disease management guidelines. Results and perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollenschläger, Günter; Kopp, Ina

    2007-05-15

    The Program for National Disease Management Guidelines (German DM-CPG Program) is a joint initiative of the German Medical Association (umbrella organization of the German Chambers of Physicians), the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies (AWMF), and of the National Association of Statutory Health Insurance Physicians (NASHIP). The program aims at developing, implementing and continuously updating best-practice recommendations for countrywide and regional disease management programs in Germany. Since 2003 twelve national guidelines (topics: asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, HI (Chronic heart failure), CVD (Chronic coronary heart disease) back pain, depression, several aspects of diabetes) have been produced by use of a standardized procedure in accordance with internationally consented methodologies. For countrywide dissemination and implementation the program uses a wide range of specialist journals, continuous medical education and quality management programs. So far, 36 out of 150 national scientific medical associations, four allied health profession organizations, and twelve national consumer organizations have been participating in the DM-CPG Program. Studies to evaluate the program's effects on health-care providers' behavior and patients' outcomes are under way.

  12. Two SPSS programs for interpreting multiple regression results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo-Seva, Urbano; Ferrando, Pere J; Chico, Eliseo

    2010-02-01

    When multiple regression is used in explanation-oriented designs, it is very important to determine both the usefulness of the predictor variables and their relative importance. Standardized regression coefficients are routinely provided by commercial programs. However, they generally function rather poorly as indicators of relative importance, especially in the presence of substantially correlated predictors. We provide two user-friendly SPSS programs that implement currently recommended techniques and recent developments for assessing the relevance of the predictors. The programs also allow the user to take into account the effects of measurement error. The first program, MIMR-Corr.sps, uses a correlation matrix as input, whereas the second program, MIMR-Raw.sps, uses the raw data and computes bootstrap confidence intervals of different statistics. The SPSS syntax, a short manual, and data files related to this article are available as supplemental materials from http://brm.psychonomic-journals.org/content/supplemental.

  13. Magnetic heat pump flow director

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Frank S. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A fluid flow director is disclosed. The director comprises a handle body and combed-teeth extending from one side of the body. The body can be formed of a clear plastic such as acrylic. The director can be used with heat exchangers such as a magnetic heat pump and can minimize the undesired mixing of fluid flows. The types of heat exchangers can encompass both heat pumps and refrigerators. The director can adjust the fluid flow of liquid or gas along desired flow directions. A method of applying the flow director within a magnetic heat pump application is also disclosed where the comb-teeth portions of the director are inserted into the fluid flow paths of the heat pump.

  14. Defining and Selecting Independent Directors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Pichet

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Drawing from the Enlightened Shareholder Theory that the author first developed in 2011, this theoretical paper with practical and normative ambitions achieves a better definition of independent director, while improving the understanding of the roles he fulfils on boards of directors. The first part defines constructs like firms, Governance system and Corporate governance, offering a clear distinction between the latter two concepts before explaining the four main missions of a board. The second part defines the ideal independent director by outlining the objective qualities that are necessary and adding those subjective aspects that have turned this into a veritable profession. The third part defines the ideal process for selecting independent directors, based on nominating committees that should themselves be independent. It also includes ways of assessing directors who are currently in function, as well as modalities for renewing their mandates. The paper’s conclusion presents the Paradox of the Independent Director.

  15. 75 FR 67380 - Office of the Director; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-02

    ... of Outside Awards for ACD Approval; Biomedical Workforce Issues; ACD Stem Cell Working Group Report...: 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Agenda: NIH Director's Report, Lasker Clinical Research Program; ACD TRND Working...

  16. Office of Industrial Technologies: Summary of program results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-01-01

    Working in partnership with industry, the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) is helping reduce industrial energy use, emissions, and waste while boosting productivity. Operating within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE), OIT conducts research, development, demonstration, and technology transfer efforts that are producing substantial, measurable benefits to industry. This document summarizes some of the impacts of OIT`s programs through 1997. OIT tracks energy savings as well as other benefits associated with the successfully commercialized technologies resulting from OIT-supported research partnerships. Specifically, a chart shows current and cumulative energy savings as well as cumulative reductions of various air pollutants including particulates, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}), and the greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). The bulk of the document consists of four appendices. Appendix 1 describes the technologies currently available commercially, along with their applications and benefits; Appendix 2 describes the OIT-supported emerging technologies that are likely to be commercialized within the next year or two; Appendix 3 describes OIT-sponsored technologies used in commercial applications in the past that are no longer tracked; and Appendix 4 describes the methodology used to assess and track OIT-supported technologies.

  17. Expanding gerontology enrollments: successful results of an innovative outreach program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Sandra L; Haley, William E; Hyer, Kathryn

    2007-01-01

    As state budget allocations for higher education decrease, "specialty" programs such as gerontology must continually demonstrate their productivity. State and private universities increasingly rely on student credit hours (SCH) or tuition generated, which is making it difficult for many gerontology programs to expand. The School of Aging Studies at the University of South Florida has achieved a 236% increase in annual SCH productivity over the past 5 years by methods including qualifying courses for university liberal arts requirements, and designing and cross-listing interdisciplinary courses. This increased productivity has supported program expansion and led to beneficial outreach to students from diverse majors.

  18. [Basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation program for high school students (PROCES). Results from the pilot program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miró, Oscar; Jiménez-Fábrega, Xavier; Díaz, Núria; Coll-Vinent, Blanca; Bragulat, Ernest; Jiménez, Sònia; Espinosa, Gerard; Hernández-Rodríguez, José; García-Alfranca, Fernando; Alvarez, M Teresa; Salvador, Jordi; Millá, José; Sánchez, Miquel

    2005-01-15

    The PROCES (Programa de Reanimació Cardiopulmonar Orientat a Centres d'Ensenyament Secundari) program is aimed at teaching basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation (b-CPR) to teenagers within high school. Our aim was to analyze the results obtained from the pilot program. PROCES was splitted in 7 sessions: 5 of them (5 hours) were taught by teachers at high school and 2 of them (4 hours, including how to perform b-CPR) were taught by emergency physicians. To assess the degree of students' learning, they were administered a 20-question test before and after the program. Epidemiological characteristics and students' opinions (all them were requested to rate the program from 0 to 10) were also collected. Students were 14 years-old in 38%, 15 in 38% and 16 or more in 24%. Before PROCES, the mean mark (over 20 points) was 8.5 (2.4). After PROCES, marks improved up to 13.5 (3.2) (p knowledge and skills in b-CPR, with no exceptions associated with teenagers' characteristics.

  19. LGBT Coverage in U.S. Dental Schools and Dental Hygiene Programs: Results of a National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillenburg, Kenneth L; Murdoch-Kinch, Carol A; Kinney, Janet S; Temple, Henry; Inglehart, Marita R

    2016-12-01

    The aims of this study were to assess curricular coverage of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) content in U.S. and Canadian dental schools and U.S. dental hygiene programs, including hours of LGBT content, pedagogy used, and assessment methods, and to determine whether respondents perceived their institution's coverage as adequate. Data were collected from academic deans at 32 U.S. and two Canadian dental schools and from program directors at 71 U.S. dental hygiene programs (response rates 49%, 20%, 23%, respectively). The results showed that 29% of responding dental schools and 48% of responding dental hygiene programs did not cover LGBT content. Among the respondents, dental schools dedicated on average 3.68 hours and dental hygiene programs 1.25 hours in required settings to LGBT content. Lectures (dental schools 68%, dental hygiene programs 45%) and small group instruction (43%, 25%) were reported as the most common methodology used in teaching this content. Most of the responding dental schools and dental hygiene programs covered HIV (85%, 53%), oral disease risk (63%, 54%), and barriers to accessing health care for LGBT people (58%, 38%). Up to a third reported no need for coverage of topics such as sexual orientation (21%, 32%), coming out (29%, 37%), transitioning (29%, 38%), and sex reassignment surgery (32%, 35%). Assessment was through written examinations (41%, 30%) and faculty-observed patient interactions (21%, 23%); some respondents (20%, 33%) reported no assessment of learning outcomes. The most frequently endorsed strategies for increasing LGBT content were receiving curricular material focusing on LGBT-related health issues and health disparities and having trained faculty to teach LGBT content.

  20. Empowering primary care workers to improve health services: results from Mozambique's leadership and management development program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Cary

    2008-07-23

    This article is the third article in the Human Resources for Health journal's feature on the theme of leadership and management in public health. The series of six articles has been contributed by Management Sciences for Health (MSH) and will be published article-by-article over the next few weeks. The third article presents a successful application in Mozambique of a leadership development program created by Management Sciences for Health (MSH). Through this program, managers from 40 countries have learned to work in teams to identify their priority challenges and act to implement effective responses. From 2003 to 2004, 11 health units in Nampula Province, participated in a leadership and management development program called the Challenges Program. This was following an assessment which found that the quality of health services was poor, and senior officials determined that the underlying cause was the lack of human resource capacity in leadership and management in a rapidly decentralizing health care system. The program was funded by the US Agency for International Development (USAID) and implemented in partnership between the Mozambican Ministry of Health (MOH) Provincial Directorate in Nampula and Management Sciences for Health (MSH). The Challenges Program used simple management and leadership tools to assist the health units and their communities to address health service challenges. An evaluation of the program in 2005 showed that 10 of 11 health centers improved health services over the year of the program. The Challenges Program used several strategies that contributed to successful outcomes. It integrated leadership strengthening into the day-to-day challenges that staff were facing in the health units. The second success factor in the Challenges Program was the creation of participatory teams. After the program, people no longer waited passively to be trained but instead proactively requested training in needed areas. MOH workers in Nampula reported

  1. Research and Development Conference CIEE Program 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-11-01

    CIEE`s second annual Research and Development Conference will introduce you to some of the results achieved to date through CIEE-sponsored multiyear research performed in three programs: Building Energy Efficiency, Air Quality Impacts of Energy Efficiency, and End-Use Resource Planning. Results from scoping studies, Director`s discretionary research, and exploratory research will also be featured in this report.

  2. Results of 200 KW fuel cell evaluation programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrey, J.M.; Merten, G.P. [SAIC, San Diego, CA (United States); Binder, M.J. [Army Construction Engineering Research Labs., Champaign, IL (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) has installed six monitoring systems on ONSI Corporation 200 kW phosphoric acid fuel cells. Three of the systems were installed for the U.S. Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratories (USACERL) which is coordinating the Department of Defense (DoD) fuel cell Demonstration Program and three were installed under a contract with the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). Monitoring of the three NYSERDA sites has been completed. Monitoring systems for the DoD fuel cells were installed in August, 1996 and thus no operating data was available at the time of this writing, but will be presented at the Fuel Cell Seminar. This paper will present the monitoring configuration and research approach for each program. Additionally, summary performance data is presented for the completed NYSERDA program.

  3. The Director's Work on Himself

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhlmann, Annelis

    2008-01-01

    A reading of Stanislavsky's major works about the actor's work on himself from the viewpoint of the director's work on himself.......A reading of Stanislavsky's major works about the actor's work on himself from the viewpoint of the director's work on himself....

  4. IT governance guidelines for directors

    CERN Document Server

    Calder, Alan

    2005-01-01

    This important new book – 'IT Governance: Guidelines for Directors' provides directors, executives, managers and professional advisers with clear, pragmatic guidelines for ensuring that IT and the business work together for the same strategic objectives. 

  5. Three directors for one strategy

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Following the interview with the Director General, Rolf-Dieter Heuer, the Bulletin continues its series of interviews with the members of CERN’s new Management team. This week, the Bulletin interviewed the three Directors, who presented their strategies for their respective sectors as a new era begins for CERN.

  6. Demand in Pediatric Dentistry for Sedation and General Anesthesia by Dentist Anesthesiologists: A Survey of Directors of Dentist Anesthesiologist and Pediatric Dentistry Residencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, C. Gray; Jones, James E.; Saxen, Mark A.; Maupome, Gerardo; Sanders, Brian J.; Walker, LaQuia A.; Weddell, James A.; Tomlin, Angela

    2012-01-01

    This study describes what training programs in pediatric dentistry and dental anesthesiology are doing to meet future needs for deep sedation/general anesthesia services required for pediatric dentistry. Residency directors from 10 dental anesthesiology training programs in North America and 79 directors from pediatric dentistry training programs in North America were asked to answer an 18-item and 22-item online survey, respectively, through an online survey tool. The response rate for the 10 anesthesiology training program directors was 9 of 10 or 90%. The response rate for the 79 pediatric dentistry training program directors was 46 of 79 or 58%. Thirty-seven percent of pediatric dentistry programs use clinic-based deep sedation/general anesthesia for dental treatment in addition to hospital-based deep sedation/general anesthesia. Eighty-eight percent of those programs use dentist anesthesiologists for administration of deep sedation/general anesthesia in a clinic-based setting. Pediatric dentistry residency directors perceive a future change in the need for deep sedation/general anesthesia services provided by dentist anesthesiologists to pediatric dentists: 64% anticipate an increase in need for dentist anesthesiologist services, while 36% anticipate no change. Dental anesthesiology directors compared to 2, 5, and 10 years ago have seen an increase in the requests for dentist anesthesiologist services by pediatric dentists reported by 56% of respondents (past 2 years), 63% of respondents (past 5 years), and 88% of respondents (past 10 years), respectively. Predicting the future need of dentist anesthesiologists is an uncertain task, but these results show pediatric dentistry directors and dental anesthesiology directors are considering the need, and they recognize a trend of increased need for dentist anesthesiologist services over the past decade. PMID:22428968

  7. Demand in pediatric dentistry for sedation and general anesthesia by dentist anesthesiologists: a survey of directors of dentist anesthesiologist and pediatric dentistry residencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, C Gray; Jones, James E; Saxen, Mark A; Maupome, Gerardo; Sanders, Brian J; Walker, Laquia A; Weddell, James A; Tomlin, Angela

    2012-01-01

    This study describes what training programs in pediatric dentistry and dental anesthesiology are doing to meet future needs for deep sedation/general anesthesia services required for pediatric dentistry. Residency directors from 10 dental anesthesiology training programs in North America and 79 directors from pediatric dentistry training programs in North America were asked to answer an 18-item and 22-item online survey, respectively, through an online survey tool. The response rate for the 10 anesthesiology training program directors was 9 of 10 or 90%. The response rate for the 79 pediatric dentistry training program directors was 46 of 79 or 58%. Thirty-seven percent of pediatric dentistry programs use clinic-based deep sedation/general anesthesia for dental treatment in addition to hospital-based deep sedation/general anesthesia. Eighty-eight percent of those programs use dentist anesthesiologists for administration of deep sedation/general anesthesia in a clinic-based setting. Pediatric dentistry residency directors perceive a future change in the need for deep sedation/general anesthesia services provided by dentist anesthesiologists to pediatric dentists: 64% anticipate an increase in need for dentist anesthesiologist services, while 36% anticipate no change. Dental anesthesiology directors compared to 2, 5, and 10 years ago have seen an increase in the requests for dentist anesthesiologist services by pediatric dentists reported by 56% of respondents (past 2 years), 63% of respondents (past 5 years), and 88% of respondents (past 10 years), respectively. Predicting the future need of dentist anesthesiologists is an uncertain task, but these results show pediatric dentistry directors and dental anesthesiology directors are considering the need, and they recognize a trend of increased need for dentist anesthesiologist services over the past decade.

  8. Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: Program Descriptionand Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Xu, Peng

    2006-04-06

    California utilities have been exploring the use of critical peak prices (CPP) to help reduce needle peaks in customer end-use loads. CPP is a form of price-responsive demand response (DR). Recent experience has shown that customers have limited knowledge of how to operate their facilities in order to reduce their electricity costs under CPP (Quantum 2004). While the lack of knowledge about how to develop and implement DR control strategies is a barrier to participation in DR programs like CPP, another barrier is the lack of automation of DR systems. During 2003 and 2004, the PIER Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) conducted a series of tests of fully automated electric demand response (Auto-DR) at 18 facilities. Overall, the average of the site-specific average coincident demand reductions was 8% from a variety of building types and facilities. Many electricity customers have suggested that automation will help them institutionalize their electric demand savings and improve their overall response and DR repeatability. This report focuses on and discusses the specific results of the Automated Critical Peak Pricing (Auto-CPP, a specific type of Auto-DR) tests that took place during 2005, which build on the automated demand response (Auto-DR) research conducted through PIER and the DRRC in 2003 and 2004. The long-term goal of this project is to understand the technical opportunities of automating demand response and to remove technical and market impediments to large-scale implementation of automated demand response (Auto-DR) in buildings and industry. A second goal of this research is to understand and identify best practices for DR strategies and opportunities. The specific objectives of the Automated Critical Peak Pricing test were as follows: (1) Demonstrate how an automated notification system for critical peak pricing can be used in large commercial facilities for demand response (DR). (2) Evaluate effectiveness of such a system. (3) Determine how customers

  9. 25 CFR 39.409 - How does the OIEP Director ensure accountability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How does the OIEP Director ensure accountability? 39.409... EQUALIZATION PROGRAM Accountability § 39.409 How does the OIEP Director ensure accountability? (a) The Director of OIEP must ensure accountability in student counts and student transportation by doing all of the...

  10. 45 CFR 660.11 - What are the Director's obligations in interstate situations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What are the Director's obligations in interstate... SCIENCE FOUNDATION INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVIEW OF THE NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES § 660.11 What are the Director's obligations in interstate situations? (a) The Director is responsible...

  11. 49 CFR 1.63 - Delegations to Assistant to the Secretary and Director of Public Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Director of Public Affairs. 1.63 Section 1.63 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation... and Director of Public Affairs. The Assistant to the Secretary and Director of Public Affairs is delegated authority to: (a) [Reserved] (b) Monitor the overall public information program and review and...

  12. Navy Professional Reading Program: Results of the 2007 Survey

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Uriell, Zannette A; Johnson, J. S

    2008-01-01

    .... The program includes 60 books across 6 subject areas and 5 career states. Toward the end of the first year of implementation, a survey was conducted to look at reading habits of Navy personnel as well as opinions of the NPRP...

  13. Results from a Faculty Development Program in Teaching Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walstad, William B.; Salemi, Michael K.

    2011-01-01

    The Teaching Innovations Program (TIP) was a six-year project funded by the National Science Foundation that gave economics instructors the opportunity to learn interactive teaching strategies for use in undergraduate economics courses. TIP participants first attended a teaching workshop that presented various teaching strategies. They then could…

  14. Nursing directors' leadership styles and faculty members' job satisfaction in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsiu-Chin; Baron, Mark

    2006-10-01

    Nursing leaders in Taiwan seldom receive the leadership training necessary to lead an academic organization. As a result, leaders may experience burn out, and dissatisfaction among faculty may increase. This study examined nursing faculty members' perceptions of nursing directors' leadership and their job satisfaction levels to understand how perceptions of leadership styles related to job satisfaction in Taiwan. This descriptive, correlational, cross-sectional study used self-administered questionnaires. Transformational leadership theory supported the research framework. Nine schools with nursing programs awarding diplomas to students participated in this study. A total of 175 questionnaires were returned (72% response rate). The findings indicated that Taiwan's nursing directors tend to display transformational leadership more frequently in their workplaces and that Taiwan's nursing faculty members are moderately satisfied in their jobs. In addition, nursing faculty in Taiwan are more satisfied with directors who practice the leadership style of attributed idealized influence.

  15. Summary of Program Evaluation Results: 1985-1986 School Year Pre-Kindergarten Educational Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Robert W.; And Others

    Reported are findings of the 1985-86 program evaluation of the prenatal-to-preschool and preschool programs operating under the auspices of the Kamehameha Schools/Bishop Estate. Evaluation of the prenatal-to-preschool program (the Kupulani Program) included item analysis of the Questions about Pregnancy Test, development of a revised data…

  16. Mentoring Faculty: Results from National Science Foundation's ADVANCE Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Faculty mentoring programs are common components of National Science Foundation ADVANCE awards. The ADVANCE program aims to increase the number of women on the faculty in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) departments through grants to individuals and to entire institutions. These grants target a change in institutional culture so that faculty from non-majority groups will succeed and thrive. Mentoring programs are generally designed to fit the particular institution(s) or target population (e.g., meteorologists at the beginning of their careers). A successful mentoring program makes the implicit knowledge necessary for faculty success explicit: policies and practices are made transparent; routes for finding answers are clarified or generated with faculty input; faculty overcome a sense of isolation and develop a community. Mentoring programs may be formal, with assigned mentors and mentees, or informal, with opportunities for beginning, middle and advanced career STEM faculty to mingle, generally over food and sometimes with a formal speaker. The programs are formally evaluated; in general, attention to mentoring generates better outcomes for all faculty. Research indicates that most successful scientists have a network of mentors rather than relying on one person to help navigate department, institution, and profession. The University of Nebraska-Lincoln's (UNL) award, ADVANCE-Nebraska, offered opportunities for faculty to informally network over luncheons with women speakers, advanced in their careers. We also offered after-hours networking receptions. In response to faculty feedback, we shifted to a series of panel discussions entitled "Conversations". Most panels were conducted by successful UNL faculty; about one-third had an outside expert on a given topic. Topics were chosen based on faculty feedback and targeted specifically to beginning faculty (How to Start Up a Lab; How to Balance Teaching and Writing), mid-career faculty (Putting

  17. Structural aging program -- a summary of activities, results, and conclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.; Ellingwood, B.R.

    1997-01-01

    Research has been conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to address aging management of nuclear power plant concrete structures. The purpose was to identify potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in continued service assessments. Primary program accomplishments have included formulation of a Structural Materials Information Center that contains data and information on the time variation of material properties under the influence of pertinent environmental stressors and aging factors for 144 materials, an aging assessment methodology to identify critical structures and degradation factors that can potentially impact their performance, guidelines and evaluation criteria for use in condition assessments of reinforced concrete structures, and a reliability-based methodology for current condition assessments and estimations of future performance of reinforced concrete nuclear power plant structures. In addition, the Structural Aging Program conducted in-depth evaluations of several nondestructive evaluation and repair-related technologies to develop guidance on their applicability

  18. The Accident Sequence Precursor program: Methods improvements and current results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minarick, J.W.; Manning, F.M.; Harris, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    Changes in the US NRC Accident Sequence Precursor program methods since the initial program evaluations of 1969-81 operational events are described, along with insights from the review of 1984-85 events. For 1984-85, the number of significant precursors was consistent with the number observed in 1980-81, dominant sequences associated with significant events were reasonably consistent with PRA estimates for BWRs, but lacked the contribution due to small-break LOCAs previously observed and predicted in PWRs, and the frequency of initiating events and non-recoverable system failures exhibited some reduction compared to 1980-81. Operational events which provide information concerning additional PRA modeling needs are also described

  19. Results of the pollution reduction technology program for turboprop engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mularz, E. J.

    1976-01-01

    A program was performed to evolve and demonstrate advanced combustor technology aimed at achieving the 1979 EPA standards for turboprop engines (Class P2). The engine selected for this program was the 501-D22A turboprop manufactured by Detroit Diesel Allison Division of General Motors Corporation. Three combustor concepts were designed and tested in a combustor rig at the exact combustor operating conditions of the 501-D22A engine over the EPA landing-takeoff cycle. Each combustor concept exhibited pollutant emissions well below the EPA standards, achieving substantial reductions in unburned hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and smoke emissions compared with emissions from the production combustor of this engine. Oxides of nitrogen emissions remained well below the EPA standards, also.

  20. The CoRoT Exoplanet program: status & results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moutou C.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The CoRoT satellite is the first instrument hunting for planets from space. We will review the status of the CoRoT/Exoplanet program. We will then present the CoRoT exoplanetary systems and how they widen the range of properties of the close-in population and contribute to our understanding of the properties of planets.

  1. Preliminary Results of the Louisiana Sex Offender Treatment Program

    OpenAIRE

    Lee A. Underwood; Frances L.L. Dailey; Carrie Merino; Yolanda Crump

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to offer preliminary support for the Louisiana Sex Offender Treatment Program (LSOTP) in addressing the needs of juvenile sex offenders. Research objectives were (1) to offer statistical evidence for reductions in anxiety, depression, cognitive distortion and negative attitudes towards women comparing a group of 21 adolescents, 12 of whom received services as usual and nine of whom participated in the LSOTP. A controlled experimental evaluation design was utilize...

  2. Final results of the Maryland WIC Food for Life Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havas, Stephen; Anliker, Jean; Greenberg, Deborah; Block, Gladys; Block, Torin; Blik, Cheryl; Langenberg, Patricia; DiClemente, Carlo

    2003-11-01

    The few randomized community trials in middle-income populations that tried to modify multiple dietary risk factors for cancer only demonstrated small changes. This trial sought to decrease the percent of calories derived from fat and to increase fruit, vegetable, and fiber intake among low-income women served by the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) in Maryland. We conducted six-month intervention programs for 1055 women at ten WIC sites; 1011 women served as controls. Intervention participants were invited to five interactive nutrition sessions and were sent written materials. Controls received usual care. Women were surveyed at baseline, two months post intervention, and one year later. All analyses conducted used an intention-to-treat paradigm. Mean differences (intervention-control) in change from baseline were for percent calories from fat -1.62 +/- 0.33% (P fruits and vegetables 0.40 +/- 0.11 servings (P = 0.0003), and for fiber intake 1.01 +/- 0.31 grams (P = 0.001). These differences in change were related in a dose-response relationship to the number of sessions women attended and remained significant one year post-intervention for the first two outcomes. Multiple dietary improvements can be achieved in a low-income population with an effective, multi-faceted intervention program. The changes in this trial exceeded those in previous community trials conducted in higher SES populations.

  3. Implementation and Results of a Learning Assistant Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogue, Thomas B.; Seeley, L.; Vokos, S.

    2006-12-01

    The Physics Department at Seattle Pacific University has recently completed a three-year CCLI grant to integrate Tutorials in Introductory Physics , Activity Based Physics , and Real Time Physics into our one-year introductory curriculum. One of the difficulties encountered in doing this at a small undergraduate university was the need for additional instructors. This need is met through the use of undergraduate learning assistants. The development of recruitment and implementation methods will be discussed, along with the advantages to physics education, and the challenges encountered. We will also discuss several strategies we have identified as critical to a successful learning assistant program.

  4. The Managerial Roles of Academic Library Directors: The Mintzberg Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, Michael Ann

    1986-01-01

    A study based on a model developed by Henry Mintzberg examined the internal and external managerial roles of 126 New England college and university library directors. Survey results indicate that the 97 responding directors were primarily involved with internal managerial roles and work contacts. (CDD)

  5. Comments from the Science Education Directorate, National Science Foundation: CAUSE, ISEP, and LOCI: Three-Program Approach to College-Level Science Improvement. II. Patterns and Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Judith B.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Discusses patterns resulting from the monitor of science education proposals which may reflect problems or differing perceptions of NSF. Discusses these areas: proposal submissions from two-year institutions and social and behavioral scientists, trends in project content at the academic-industrial interface and in computer technology, and…

  6. Boards: Independent and Committed Directors?

    OpenAIRE

    Christophe Volonté

    2011-01-01

    Regulators, proxy advisors and shareholders are regularly calling for independent directors. However, at the same time, independent directors commonly engage in numerous outside activities potentially reducing their time and commitment with the particular firm. Using Tobin's Q as an approximation of market valuation and controlling for endogeneity, our empirical analysis reveals that neither is independence positively related to firm performance nor are outside activities negatively related t...

  7. Empowering primary care workers to improve health services: results from Mozambique's leadership and management development program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perry Cary

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This article is the third article in the Human Resources for Health journal's feature on the theme of leadership and management in public health. The series of six articles has been contributed by Management Sciences for Health (MSH and will be published article-by-article over the next few weeks. The third article presents a successful application in Mozambique of a leadership development program created by Management Sciences for Health (MSH. Through this program, managers from 40 countries have learned to work in teams to identify their priority challenges and act to implement effective responses. From 2003 to 2004, 11 health units in Nampula Province, participated in a leadership and management development program called the Challenges Program. This was following an assessment which found that the quality of health services was poor, and senior officials determined that the underlying cause was the lack of human resource capacity in leadership and management in a rapidly decentralizing health care system. The program was funded by the US Agency for International Development (USAID and implemented in partnership between the Mozambican Ministry of Health (MOH Provincial Directorate in Nampula and Management Sciences for Health (MSH. The Challenges Program used simple management and leadership tools to assist the health units and their communities to address health service challenges. An evaluation of the program in 2005 showed that 10 of 11 health centers improved health services over the year of the program. The Challenges Program used several strategies that contributed to successful outcomes. It integrated leadership strengthening into the day-to-day challenges that staff were facing in the health units. The second success factor in the Challenges Program was the creation of participatory teams. After the program, people no longer waited passively to be trained but instead proactively requested training in needed areas. MOH workers

  8. Alternative filtration testing program: Pre-evaluation of test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgeton, G.K.; Poirier, M.R.

    1990-01-01

    Based on results of testing eight solids removal technologies and one pretreatment option, it is recommended that a centrifugal ultrafilter and polymeric ultrafilter undergo further testing as possible alternatives to the Norton Ceramic filters. Deep bed filtration should be considered as a third alternative, if a backwashable cartridge filter is shown to be inefficient in separate testing

  9. Alternative filtration testing program: Pre-evaluation of test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgeton, G.K.; Poirier, M.R.

    1990-09-28

    Based on results of testing eight solids removal technologies and one pretreatment option, it is recommended that a centrifugal ultrafilter and polymeric ultrafilter undergo further testing as possible alternatives to the Norton Ceramic filters. Deep bed filtration should be considered as a third alternative, if a backwashable cartridge filter is shown to be inefficient in separate testing.

  10. State Legislation to Address Childhood Obesity. Program Results Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiester, Leila

    2012-01-01

    An estimated 12.5 million American children and teens are obese. Over time, the diseases and disabilities associated with obesity may undermine this population's health and result in substantial social and economic costs. Policies that address children's nutrition and physical activity are an important tool in reversing the obesity epidemic. More…

  11. PND fuel handling decontamination program: specialized techniques and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, R.; Hobbs, K.; Minnis, M.; Graham, K.

    1995-01-01

    The use of various decontamination techniques and equipment has become a critical part of Fuel Handling maintenance work at the Pickering Nuclear Station, an eight unit CANDU station located about 30 km east of Toronto. This paper presents an overview of the set up and techniques used for cleaning in the PND Fuel Handling Maintenance Facility, and the results achieved. (author)

  12. Endocrine surgery fellowship graduates past, present, and future: 8 years of early job market experiences and what program directors and trainees can expect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Vikram D; Gutnick, Jesse; Slotcavage, Rachel; Jin, Judy; Berber, Eren; Siperstein, Allan; Shin, Joyce J

    2017-01-01

    Given the increasing number of endocrine surgery fellowship graduates, we investigated if expectations and job opportunities changed over time. American Association of Endocrine Surgeons (AAES) fellowship graduates, surgery department chairs, and physician recruiters were surveyed. Univariate analysis was performed with JMP Pro 12 software. We identified 141 graduates from 2008-2015; survey response rate was 72% (n = 101). Compared to earlier graduates, fewer academic opportunities were available for the recent graduates who intended to join them (P = .001). Unlike earlier graduates, recent graduates expected to also perform elective general surgery, which ultimately represented a greater percentage of their practices (both P job offers decreased. Overall, 84% of graduates matched their intended practice type and 98% reported being satisfied. Reponses from graduates, department chairs, and physician recruiters highlighted opportunities to improve mentor involvement, job search strategies, and online job board utilization. The endocrine surgery job market has diversified resulting in more graduates entering nonacademic practices and performing general surgery. This rapid evolution supports future analyses of the job market and opportunities for job creation. Almost every graduate reported job satisfaction, which encourages graduates to consider joining both academic and nonacademic practices equally. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. NASA Astrophysics E/PO Impact: NASA SOFIA AAA Program Evaluation Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harman, Pamela; Backman, Dana E.; Clark, Coral; Inverness Research Sofia Aaa Evaluation Team, Wested Sofia Aaa Evaluation Team

    2015-01-01

    SOFIA is an airborne observatory, studying the universe at infrared wavelengths, capable of making observations that are impossible for even the largest and highest ground-based telescopes. SOFIA also inspires the development of new scientific instrumentation and fosters the education of young scientists and engineers.SOFIA is an 80% - 20% partnership of NASA and the German Aerospace Center (DLR), consisting of an extensively modified Boeing 747SP aircraft carrying a reflecting telescope with an effective diameter of 2.5 meters (100 inches). The SOFIA aircraft is based at NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center, Building 703, in Palmdale, California. The Science Program and Outreach Offices are located at NASA Ames Research center. SOFIA is a program in NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Astrophysics Division.Data will be collected to study many different kinds of astronomical objects and phenomena, including star cycles, solar system formation, identification of complex molecules in space, our solar system, galactic dust, nebulae and ecosystems.Airborne Astronomy Ambassador (AAA) Program:The SOFIA Education and Communications program exploits the unique attributes of airborne astronomy to contribute to national goals for the reform of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education, and to elevate public scientific and technical literacy.The AAA effort is a professional development program aspiring to improve teaching, inspire students, and inform the community. To date, 55 educators from 21 states; Cycles 0, 1 and 2; have completed their astronomy professional development and their SOFIA science flight experience. Evaluation has confirmed the program's positive impact on the teacher participants, on their students, and in their communities. The inspirational experience has positively impacted their practice and career trajectory. AAAs have incorporated content knowledge and specific components of their experience into their curricula, and have given

  14. People's Republic of Bangladesh - Revenue Mobilization Program for Results : VAT Improvement Program

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2014-01-01

    In accordance with the Bank s OP/BP 9.0 an Integrated Fiduciary Systems Assessment (IFSA) was carried out to determine whether the fiduciary systems pertaining to the Program provide reasonable assurances that the Program funds will be used for their intended purpose. The IFSA comprised an assessment of the fiduciary risks relating to: (a) procurement; (b) financial management; and (c) gov...

  15. Hans Blix appointed Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    On 1 December 1981, Dr Hans Blix took office as Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency in succession to Dr Sigvard Eklund who has headed the IAEA since 1961. The Agency's Board of Governors nominated Dr Blix by acclamation on 26 September. His appointment was unanimously approved by the final session of the 25th regular session of the General Conference of the IAEA the same day. The President of the Conference, Ambassador Manaspas Xuto, administered the oath of office to Dr Blix at the final plenary meeting that day. Hans Blix was born in 1928 in Uppsala He studied at the University of Uppsala, at Columbia University, where he was also a research graduate and at Cambridge, where he received his Ph D In 1959 he became Doctor of Laws at the Stockholm University and in 1960 was appointed associate professor in international law. From 1963 to 1976 Dr Blix was Head of Department at the Ministry for Foreign Affairs and served as Legal Adviser on International Law. In 1976 he became Undersecretary of State at the Ministry for Foreign Affairs in charge of international development co-operation He was appointed Minister for Foreign Affairs in October 1978 In September 1979 he was again appointed Undersecretary of State at the Ministry for Foreign Affairs in charge of international development co-operation. Since 1961 he has been a member of Sweden's delegation to the United Nations General Assembly, and from 1962 to 1978 a member of the Swedish delegation to the Conference on Disarmament in Geneva. He has written several books on subjects associated with international and constitutional law and was leader of the Liberal Campaign Committee in favour of retention of the Swedish nuclear energy program in the referendum in 1980

  16. Results of initial nuclear tests on LWBR (LWBR Development Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarber, W.K.

    1979-06-01

    This report presents and discusses the results of physics tests performed at beginning of life on the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR). These tests have confirmed that movable seed assembly critical positions and reactivity worths, temperature coefficients, xenon transient characteristics, core symmetry, and core shutdown are within the range of values used in the design of the LWBR and its reactor protection analysis. Measured core physics parameters were found to be in good agreement with the calculated values

  17. LWR surveillance dosimetry improvement program: PSF metallurgical blind test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kam, F.B.K.; Stallmann, F.W.; Guthrie, G.; McElroy, W.N.

    1985-01-01

    The ORR-PSF benchmark experiment was designed to simulate the surveillance capsule-pressure vessel configuration in power reactors and to test the validity of procedures which determine the radiation damage in the vessel from test results in the surveillance capsule. The PSF metallurgical blind test was initiated to give participants an opportunity to test their current embrittlement prediction methodologies. Experimental results were withheld from the participants except for the type of information which is normally contained in surveillance reports. Preliminary analysis of the PSF metallurgical blind test results shows that: (1) current prediction methodologies, as used by the PSF Blind Test participants, are adequate, falling within +- 20 0 C of the measured values for Δ NDT. None of the different methods is clearly superior; (2) the proposed revision of Reg. Guide 1.99 (Rev. 2) gives a better representation of the fluence and chemistry dependency of Δ NDT than the current version (Rev. 1); and (3) fluence rate effects can be seen but not quantified. Fluence spectral effects are too small to be detectable in this experiment. (orig.)

  18. Energy and Environment Directorate Status Report March 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, J S

    2006-01-01

    The Energy and Environment Directorate (E and ED) is one of 13 directorates at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), which is operated by the University of California (UC) for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). We operate in the context of a national security laboratory and focus on meeting major national needs, especially from a long-term perspective. In the LLNL context, E and ED is a hybrid ''program'' and ''discipline'' directorate, combining the program development responsibilities in the national energy and environment arenas to the benefit of the entire Laboratory and also serving as the Laboratory's science base of atmospheric, earth, environmental, and energy science. This Status Report is part of the annual evaluation process required by the Department of Energy (DOE) as part of its contract with UC. The annual review typically will focus on about one third of the activities and programs of a directorate, so that the entire organization is evaluated over a three-year window. This year's review is focused on the basic science foundations for the directorate and two major program areas in the directorate, with an update from a third program. The programs for review are: (1) Earth System Science and Engineering; (2) Nuclear Systems Science and Engineering; and (3) NARAC/IMAAC update. Major questions to be addressed during this review include: (1) Are the programmatic directions appropriate? How can they be improved? (2) What actions can E and ED take to ensure success? How well poised for success are the current staff and facilities? What additions are needed? (3) What recommendations can be made to the Director and the University? This Status Report provides background information on the entire directorate including the parts of the directorate that are the focus of this year's review by the Energy and Environment Directorate Review Committee, to be held March 6-9, 2006. The following sections describe

  19. Results of a QC program on dental radiography in Greece

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pappous, George; Kolitsi, Zoi; Pallikarakis, Nikolas [Medical Physics Department, Patras University, 26 500 Patras (Greece); Arvanitakis, Gerasimos [Achaia branch of Hellenic Dental Association, Pantanasis 70-72, 262 21 (Greece)

    1999-12-31

    Quality Control (QC) performed on 99 intraoral dental X-Ray units, installed in equal in number dental offices, at the Achaia prefecture, a region of south west Greece. The QC procedure includes collection of general information, radiation safety checks, beam qualitative and quantitative characteristic checks, and film processing checks, according to international established protocols. The collected data are characterised by a non-uniformity and in some cases indicate a poor performance level. The results of the study on a representative sample of dental X-Ray units helps to map the existing situation and may be useful in the reviewing and optimisation of the applied process. (authors) 10 refs., 11 figs.

  20. Results of a QC program on dental radiography in Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pappous, George; Kolitsi, Zoi; Pallikarakis, Nikolas; Arvanitakis, Gerasimos

    1998-01-01

    Quality Control (QC) performed on 99 intraoral dental X-Ray units, installed in equal in number dental offices, at the Achaia prefecture, a region of south west Greece. The QC procedure includes collection of general information, radiation safety checks, beam qualitative and quantitative characteristic checks, and film processing checks, according to international established protocols. The collected data are characterised by a non-uniformity and in some cases indicate a poor performance level. The results of the study on a representative sample of dental X-Ray units helps to map the existing situation and may be useful in the reviewing and optimisation of the applied process. (authors)

  1. Recent results from the MISTRAL mass measurement program at ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Lunney, M D; Audi, G; Bollen, G; Borcea, C; Doubre, H; Gaulard, C; Henry, S; De Saint-Simon, M; Thibault, C; Toader, C F; Vieira, N

    2001-01-01

    The MISTRAL experiment (Mass measurements at ISOLDE with a Transmission and Radiofrequency spectrometer on-Line), conceived for very short-lived nuclides, has reached the end of its commissioning phase. Installed in 1997, results have been obtained consistent with all aspects of the projected spectrometer performance: nuclides with half-lives as short as 30 ms have been measured and accuracies of $\\pm$0.4 have been achieved, despite the presence of a systematic shift and difficulties with isobaric contamination. Masses of several nuclides, including $^{25-26}\\!$Ne and $^{32}$Mg that forms the famous island of inversion around N=20, have been significantly improved.

  2. Targets and results of the German Reactor Safety Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walte, F.; Schmitz, V.; Kroening, M.

    1999-01-01

    The results obtained so far by the first two austenitic weld research projects show that the approach taken was the right one, as the modelling work in connection with the pulse-echo testing techniques did in fact achieve enhancements in the ultrasonic inspection of austenitic welds. The tools developed are: Ray tracing, point source synthesis, and EFIT, and can be successfully applied for NDE of transverse-isotropic weld microstructures, as was shown by all verification experiments. The project tasks for EFIT simulation and verification of the ultrasonic test method applied to anisotropic, dissimilar welds are expected to be concluded towards the end of the project period. If these activities prove to be successful, too, there will be several examples available giving evidence of the feasibility and suitability of the tools for an optimisation of the test parameters. The results available to date have been obtained with tests at several welds, assuming flaw types such as root defects perpendicular to the surface, which were introduced into the specimens by notches. (orig./CB) [de

  3. An Afterschool Director's Educational Leadership Strategies: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Tammy

    2014-01-01

    Afterschool programs linked to schools provide opportunities to keep children safe and engage them in enrichment activities that can support their growth and development. Often, these programs are led by afterschool directors with a background in youth development and no experience or education in leading in educational environments. These…

  4. Results of the quality assurance testing program for radiopharmaceuticals 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldas, J.; Binnyman, J.; Ivanov, Z.; Lauder, R.

    1996-07-01

    The results of the quality assurance testing conducted by the Australian Radiation Laboratory is summarised. Overall 111 batches of 27 different types of radiopharmaceuticals were tested on samples obtained through normal commercial channels. Failure to meet full specifications was observed in 10 of the 111 batches. All technetium-99m cold kits were reconstituted according to the directions in the package insert using sodium pertechnetate ( 99m Tc) injection. Radionuclidic purity has been determined at the calibration time, except for Thallous [ 201 Tl] Chloride injection where the highest impurity level up to product expiry is quoted. Non-compliance of the vial label was observed in one of the ten batches failing specification and was the sole cause of product failure for this batch. Vial label non-compliance consisted of, absence of volume in the vial. Six batches failed the biodistribution test but in no case did this involve failure of the distribution for the target organs. tabs

  5. Results of the quality assurance testing program for radiopharmaceuticals 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldas, J.; Binnyman, J.; Ivanov, Z.; Lauder, R.

    1996-07-01

    The results of the quality assurance testing conducted by the Australian Radiation Laboratory is summarised. Overall 111 batches of 27 different types of radiopharmaceuticals were tested on samples obtained through normal commercial channels. Failure to meet full specifications was observed in 10 of the 111 batches. All technetium-99m cold kits were reconstituted according to the directions in the package insert using sodium pertechnetate ( {sup 99m}Tc) injection. Radionuclidic purity has been determined at the calibration time, except for Thallous [{sup 201}Tl] Chloride injection where the highest impurity level up to product expiry is quoted. Non-compliance of the vial label was observed in one of the ten batches failing specification and was the sole cause of product failure for this batch. Vial label non-compliance consisted of, absence of volume in the vial. Six batches failed the biodistribution test but in no case did this involve failure of the distribution for the target organs. tabs.

  6. The long-term benefits of director stock ownership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Bolton

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In October 2009, the United States Treasury Department and Congress considered new regulations requiring executives and directors to receive much of their compensation in the form of long-term stock. One concern with this is that it may have negative consequences by entrenching managers and directors over the long term. This study compares the potential benefits of long-term director ownership with the potential costs of entrenchment. Using the dollar amount of stock owned by independent directors, the results suggest that the incentive effect dominates any costs related to entrenchment: firms with greater stock ownership outperform other firms, regardless of the degree of managerial entrenchment that may be present. The implication for policy-makers is that providing directors with incentives through stock ownership can be a very effective corporate governance mechanism.

  7. Auditor’s Risk Assessment of Independent Directors in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salau Abdulmalik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to investigate the external auditor’s risk assessment of independent directors in Nigeria. The study utilized data from 94 non-financial listed companies on the Nigerian Stock Exchange for the periods 2008-2013. The study used cross-sectional time-series feasible generalized least square regression, which account for heteroscedasticity and autocorrelation to test the influence independent non-executive director on auditor pricing decision in Nigeria. Our result indicates that the proportion of independent non-executive director has a positive relationship with audit fees, suggesting that this class of directors is priced high by the Nigerian auditors. These findings have both policy and practical implication on corporate governance. For instance, future regulatory reforms could consider collaborative board model instead of the insistence on more independent director presence in the boardroom.

  8. Professional Socialisation of Valuers: Program Directors Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Geoff

    2007-01-01

    An examination of the professional socialisation process is critical in changing the way graduates are trained and how they are supported post graduation. This article summarises key mechanisms to facilitate socialisation from recent socialisation studies undertaken in the fields of medicine, physical therapy nursing, occupational therapy, and…

  9. Results of the General Atomic deposition loop program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, D.L.

    1976-01-01

    The transport behavior of fission products in flowing helium streams has been studied to determine their deposition and re-entrainment characteristics. Such information is required for the design and safety analysis of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). A small high-pressure, high-temperature loop was constructed for deposition studies at near-HTGR conditions. Five loop experiments were performed to determine the plateout distribution of iodine, strontium, and cesium. In general, the plateout activity showed an exponential decrease with distance from the source with enhanced plateout at flow disturber locations (contractions, bends, etc.) and especially in a chill section where the surface was cooled. Blowdown tests were performed on selected loop specimens to determine the amount of re-entrainment caused by abnormally high wall shear stresses. The liftoff fraction (fractional amount removed) was shown to vary approximately linearly with the shear ratio (defined as the ratio of the steady state wall shear stress under blowdown conditions to that under normal operating conditions). Blowdown results are also reported for pipe sections taken from the GAIL-IV in-pile loop. Attempts were made to correlate these plateout data with the PAD code (Plateout Activity Distribution) which was developed for prediction of plateout distribution in an HTGR primary circuit. Because of inadequate modeling of the effects of the chill section, the agreement was generally poor. Consequently, to test further the PAD code, a review of the available plateout literature was made. Plateout distributions in the Peach Bottom and Dragon HTGRs and the Battelle Memorial Institute out-of-pile loop were successfully modeled

  10. LWR surveillance dosimetry improvement program: PSF metallurgical blind test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kam, F.B.K.; Maerker, R.E.; Stallmann, F.W.

    1984-01-01

    The metallurgical irradiation experiment at the Oak Ridge Research Reactor Poolside Facility (ORR-PSF) was designed as a benchmark to test the accuracy of radiation embrittlement predictions in the pressure vessel wall of light water reactors on the basis of results from surveillance capsules. The PSF metallurgical Blind Test is concerned with the simulated surveillance capsule (SSC) and the simulated pressure vessel capsule (SPVC). The data from the ORR-PSF benchmark experiment are the basis for comparison with the predictions made by participants of the metallurgical ''Blind Test''. The Blind Test required the participants to predict the embrittlement of the irradiated specimen based only on dosimetry and metallurgical data from the SSC1 capsule. This exercise included both the prediction of damage fluence and the prediction of embrittlement based on the predicted fluence. A variety of prediction methodologies was used by the participants. No glaring biases or other deficiencies were found, but neither were any of the methods clearly superior to the others. Closer analysis shows a rather complex and poorly understood relation between fluence and material damage. Many prediction formulas can give an adequate approximation, but further improvement of the prediction methodology is unlikely at this time given the many unknown factors. Instead, attention should be focused on determining realistic uncertainties for the predicted material changes. The Blind Test comparisons provide some clues for the size of these uncertainties. In particular, higher uncertainties must be assigned to materials whose chemical composition lies outside the data set for which the prediction formula was obtained. 16 references, 14 figures, 5 tables

  11. Restricted working hours in Austrian residency programs : Survey results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmeister, Konstantin D; Aman, Martin; Podesser, Bruno K

    2018-04-27

    New regulations for working hours of medical doctors have been implemented in Austria based on the European directive 2003/88/EG, limiting on-duty working hours to 48 h per week. Clinical work is, therefore, substantially reduced compared to previous decades, and little is known on physician and students' opinions on this matter. We illustrate survey results concerning on-job training, its difficulties, and implications for restricted working hours. We conducted an internal survey among M.D. and Ph.D. students and medical staff members at the Medical University of Vienna using the MedCampus system (CAMPUSOnline, Graz, Austria) and SPSS (V.21, IBM Corp, Armonk, NY, USA). Participants were 36.5% staff members and 63.5% students. Students rated continuous education of physicians high at 9.19 ± 1.76 and staff members at 8.90 ± 2.48 on a 1-10 (1 unimportant, 10 most important) scale. Students rated limited time resources, while staff considered financial resources as the greatest challenge for in-hospital education. Overall, 28.85% thought that restricted working hours can positively influence education, while 19.04% thought the opposite and 52.11% were undecided. Considering the limited available time and financial resources, education of tomorrow's medical doctors remains an important but difficult task. While participants of our survey rated education as very important despite its many challenges, the opinions towards limited working hours were not as clear. Given that over 50% are still undecided whether reduced work hours may also positively influence medical education, it clearly presents an opportunity to include the next generations of physicians in this undertaking.

  12. Who's the Boss at the Top? A Micro-Level Analysis of Director Expertise, Status and Conformity Within Boards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltrop, Dennis B.; Molleman, Eric; Hooghiemstra, Reggy B. H.; van Ees, Hans

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we address how director expertise impacts a director's social status and conformity within the board. Our results, derived from two unique multi-source datasets of peer ratings on director status and conformity of non-executive directors from Dutch organizations, indicate that

  13. Results from a Multi-Modal Program Evaluation of a Four Year Statewide Juvenile Sex Offender Treatment and Reentry Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Lee A.; Dailey, Frances L. L.; Merino, Carrie; Crump, Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    The results of the Program Evaluation show the OJJ Statewide Sex Offender Treatment program is exceptionally productive in meeting over 90% of its established performance markers. These markers included successful screening and assessment of risk and psychosocial needs, completion of initial and master treatment plans, establishment of sex…

  14. The role of the psychiatrist: job satisfaction of medical directors and staff psychiatrists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranz, J; Stueve, A; McQuistion, H L

    2001-12-01

    In a previous survey of Columbia University Public Psychiatry Fellowship alumni, medical directors reported experiencing higher job satisfaction compared to staff psychiatrists. To further this inquiry, the authors conducted an expanded survey among the membership of the American Association of Community Psychiatrists (AACP). We mailed a questionnaire to all AACP members. Respondents categorized their positions as staff psychiatrist, program medical director or agency medical director, and rated their overall job satisfaction. The form also included a number of demographic and job characteristic items. Of 479 questionnaires mailed, a total of 286 individuals returned questionnaires (61%-12 forms were undeliverable). As in our previous survey, medical directors experience significantly higher job satisfaction compared to staff psychiatrists. Program and agency medical directors do not differ significantly. In addition, job satisfaction is strongly and negatively correlated with age for staff psychiatrists but not for medical directors. This survey strengthens the previously reported advantage medical directors have over staff psychiatrists regarding job satisfaction. The finding that job satisfaction decreases with increasing age of staff psychiatrists but not medical directors is particularly interesting, suggesting that staff psychiatrist positions may come to be regarded as "dead-end" over time. Psychiatrists are advised to seek promotions to program medical director positions early in their careers, since these positions are far more available, and provide equal job satisfaction, compared to agency medical director positions.

  15. Bridge Programs in Illinois: Results of the 2010 Illinois Bridge Status Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J. L.; Harmon, T.

    2010-01-01

    This report provides a summary of major results of the Illinois Bridge Status Survey, administered online between April and June 2010. The purpose of the survey was to understand the extent to which bridge programs are being implemented in Illinois, as well as to build an online directory of bridge programs. Bridge programs are an emerging…

  16. The governance of director networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renneboog, L.D.R.; Zhou, Y.; Wright, M.; Siegel, D.; Keasey, K.; Filatotchev, I.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter studies director networks, which have gained increasing attention from sociology, finance, and management. It considers the argument that these networks have an interesting role in corporate governance and then reviews their rules in major developed countries. The chapter goes on to

  17. ISO New England: Results of Ancillary Service Pilot Programs, Alternative Technology Regulation Pilot Program and Demand Response Reserves Pilot Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowell, Jon [ISO New England, Holyoke, MA (United States); Yoshimura, Henry [ISO New England, Holyoke, MA (United States)

    2011-10-26

    This PowerPoint presentation compares performance of pilot program assets and generation resources in alternative technology regulation and demand response reserves for flywheels and residential electric thermal storage.

  18. What's Ethical and What's Not in Electronic Journalism: Perceptions of News Directors. Radio-Television Journalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulfemeyer, K. Tim

    A study examined the perceptions about what is and is not ethical behavior in electronic journalism. Subjects, 220 television news directors and 66 radio news directors, responded to a 117-item survey of ethics in electronic journalism. Results indicated that the news directors identified: (1) 10 "acceptable" behaviors, including working…

  19. 75 FR 44018 - Sunshine Act Meetings of the Board of Directors; Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-27

    ... of Human Resources. Mark Freedman, Office of Legal Affairs. 14. Report on TIG grants management. Janet LaBella, Director, Office of Program Performance. Glenn Rawdon, TIG program counsel. David...

  20. Surgeons' attitude toward a competency-based training and assessment program: results of a multicenter survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopmans, Cornelis J; den Hoed, Pieter T; Wallenburg, Iris; van der Laan, Lijkckle; van der Harst, Erwin; van der Elst, Maarten; Mannaerts, Guido H H; Dawson, Imro; van Lanschot, Jan J B; Ijzermans, Jan N M

    2013-01-01

    training region in the Netherlands do not acknowledge the importance of all CanMEDS competencies and consider the assessment tools generally unsuitable for competence evaluation. Copyright © 2013 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. 2015 Science Mission Directorate Technology Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seablom, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    The role of the Science Mission Directorate (SMD) is to enable NASA to achieve its science goals in the context of the Nation's science agenda. SMD's strategic decisions regarding future missions and scientific pursuits are guided by Agency goals, input from the science community including the recommendations set forth in the National Research Council (NRC) decadal surveys and a commitment to preserve a balanced program across the major science disciplines. Toward this end, each of the four SMD science divisions -- Heliophysics, Earth Science, Planetary Science, and Astrophysics -- develops fundamental science questions upon which to base future research and mission programs. Often the breakthrough science required to answer these questions requires significant technological innovation, e.g., instruments or platforms with capabilities beyond the current state of the art. SMD's targeted technology investments fill technology gaps, enabling NASA to build the challenging and complex missions that accomplish groundbreaking science.

  2. Computation Directorate 2007 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henson, V E; Guse, J A

    2008-03-06

    If there is a single word that both characterized 2007 and dominated the thoughts and actions of many Laboratory employees throughout the year, it is transition. Transition refers to the major shift that took place on October 1, when the University of California relinquished management responsibility for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (LLNS), became the new Laboratory management contractor for the Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). In the 55 years under the University of California, LLNL amassed an extraordinary record of significant accomplishments, clever inventions, and momentous contributions in the service of protecting the nation. This legacy provides the new organization with a built-in history, a tradition of excellence, and a solid set of core competencies from which to build the future. I am proud to note that in the nearly seven years I have had the privilege of leading the Computation Directorate, our talented and dedicated staff has made far-reaching contributions to the legacy and tradition we passed on to LLNS. Our place among the world's leaders in high-performance computing, algorithmic research and development, applications, and information technology (IT) services and support is solid. I am especially gratified to report that through all the transition turmoil, and it has been considerable, the Computation Directorate continues to produce remarkable achievements. Our most important asset--the talented, skilled, and creative people who work in Computation--has continued a long-standing Laboratory tradition of delivering cutting-edge science even in the face of adversity. The scope of those achievements is breathtaking, and in 2007, our accomplishments span an amazing range of topics. From making an important contribution to a Nobel Prize-winning effort to creating tools that can detect malicious codes embedded in commercial

  3. Search Results | Page 22 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Results 211 - 220 of 8494 ... Peter Taylor is Acting Director of IDRC's Inclusive Economies program. ... Research Program is a seven-year, CA$35 million partnership between IDRC, the Azrieli Foundation, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and the Israel Science Foundation that draws on the scientific strengths of Ca.

  4. Independent Directors and Stakeholders Protection: A Case of Sime Darby

    OpenAIRE

    Prashanth Beleya; Gopalan Raman; Charles Ramendren; Suresh Nodeson

    2012-01-01

    In today’s ever challenging corporate environment, the unfortunate events of decision making by top management has led major companies to suffer huge losses. This results and mistakes made have given a significant impact to the stake holder’s perception and raise a serious questions on the role of board of directors especially the role of independent directors. In today’s fast evolving business pace with stiff economic conditions, unethical and misjudgment in business decisions are driving th...

  5. Female Directors and Firm Performance: Evidence from UK Listed Firms

    OpenAIRE

    Pasaribu, Pananda

    2017-01-01

    The impact of female directors on firm performance has lacked consistency in the previously conducted empirical studies, which may be due to the endogeneity problem, or certain characteristics (i.e. governance, industry, competition). This study examines the relationship between female directors and firm performance by addressing those problems. This study analyses all non-financial UK listed firms during the period 2004-2012 and employs several econometric models. The regression results indi...

  6. Final results of the Cuban program for children from areas affected by the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina, Julio; García, Omar

    2016-01-01

    From 1990 till 2011, a free health care program for children from areas affected by the Chernobyl accident was organized and implemented by the Cuban Government. A significant number of qualified personal in medicine and science collaborated with this program. The information gathered for more than 21 years and the conclusive results obtained in the program are presented here. During this time, 26 114 patients, 84 % children, mostly from Ukraine, Russia and Belarus were treated in the mentioned program. Other aspects of the Cuban medical assistance in Ukraine and the main results obtained in the radiological impact evaluation of the accident on the children treated in Cuba are also included. (author)

  7. Fermilab Friends for Science Education | Board of Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermilab Friends for Science Education FFSE Home About Us Join Us Support Us Contact Us Board of Directors Board Tools Calendar Join Us Donate Now Get FermiGear! Education Office Search Programs Calendar , Chicago, IL Join Us/Renew Membership Forms: Online - Print Support Us Donation Forms: Online - Print Tree

  8. 77 FR 58416 - Regular Board of Directors Meeting; Sunshine Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-20

    ..., DC 20005. STATUS: Open. CONTACT PERSON FOR MORE INFORMATION: Erica Hall, Assistant Corporate... Annual Board of Directors Meeting Minutes IV. Approval of the Corporate Administration Committee Meeting Minutes V. Approval of the Finance, Budget & Program Committee Meeting Minutes VI. Approval of the Audit...

  9. 76 FR 74831 - Regular Board of Directors Meeting; Sunshine Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    ..., DC 20005. STATUS: Open. CONTACT PERSON FOR MORE INFORMATION: Erica Hall, Assistant Corporate... the Regular Board of Directors Meeting Minutes IV. Approval of the Finance, Budget and Program Committee Meeting Minutes V. Approval of the Corporate Administrative Committee Meeting Minutes VI. Approval...

  10. Important characteristics of a director of medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, V D; George, R J

    1993-11-01

    In osteopathic graduate medical education programs, the Director of Medical Education (DME) plays the key leadership role. This article outlines critical characteristics and skills that the DME should possess to successfully perform in this role. Central to this success is a passionate commitment to osteopathic medical education and a commitment to justice and fairness.

  11. 77 FR 15142 - Regular Board of Directors Meeting; Sunshine Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-14

    ... 20005. STATUS: Open. CONTACT PERSON: Erica Hall, Assistant Corporate Secretary, (202) 220- 2376; ehall... Directors Meeting Minutes IV. Approval of the Audit Committee Meeting Minutes V. Approval of the Finance, Budget and Program Committee Meeting Minutes VI. Approval of the Corporate Administration Committee...

  12. 77 FR 76078 - Regular Board of Directors Sunshine Act Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-26

    ..., DC 20005. STATUS: Open. CONTACT PERSON FOR MORE INFORMATION: Erica Hall, Assistant Corporate... Regular Board of Directors Meeting Minutes IV. Approval of the Finance, Budget & Program Committee Meeting... Corporate Secretary. [FR Doc. 2012-31163 Filed 12-21-12; 4:15 pm] BILLING CODE 7570-02-P ...

  13. Journal Clubs in Sports Medicine Fellowship Programs: Results From a National Survey and Recommendations for Quality Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asif, Irfan M; Wiederman, Michael; Kapur, Rahul

    2017-11-01

    Journal club is a pervasive component of graduate medical education, yet there is no gold standard as to format and logistics. Survey of primary care sports medicine fellowship directors in the United States. Sixty-nine program directors completed the online questionnaire (40% response rate). There were some common aspects to journal club exhibited by a majority of programs, including the general format, required attendance by fellows and expected or required attendance by faculty, the expectation that participants had at least read the article before the meeting, and that meetings occurred during the workday in the work setting without provision of food. There was considerable variation on other aspects, including the objectives of journal club, who had primary responsibility for organizing the session, the criteria for selection of articles, who was invited to attend, and the perceived problems with journal club. This is the first survey investigating the current state of journal club in primary care sports medicine fellowship programs. Several opportunities for educational enhancements exist within journal clubs in primary care sports medicine, including the use of structured tools to guide discussion, providing mechanisms to evaluate the journal club experience as a whole, inviting multidisciplinary team members (eg, statisticians) to discussions, and ensuring that objectives are explicitly stated to participants.

  14. Female Directors and Firm Performance: Evidence from UK Listed Firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pananda Pasaribu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The impact of female directors on firm performance has lacked consistency in the previously conducted empirical studies, which may be due to the endogeneity problem, or certain characteristics (i.e. governance, industry, competition. This study examines the relationship between female directors and firm performance by addressing those problems. This study analyses all non-financial UK listed firms during the period 2004-2012 and employs several econometric models. The regression results indicate that there is little evidence that female directors have a positive and strong relationship with firm performance. But, further analysis reports that the UK’s small listed firms experience a positive significant effect, because small firms do not suffer from the problem of over-monitoring and they have more flexibility in composing their boards of directors.

  15. Integration of Leadership Styles of School Director

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovic, Nebojsa; Oljaca, Milka; Kostovic, Svetlana

    2012-01-01

    Management style can be defined as a special behavior of directors in the work process that affects the performance in an organization, in this case-school. Management style has two related meanings: first is behavior of directors to employees, second is directors' approach in school regarding management, participation of employees in decision…

  16. 30 CFR 282.11 - Director's authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... CONTINENTAL SHELF FOR MINERALS OTHER THAN OIL, GAS, AND SULPHUR Jurisdiction and Responsibilities of Director § 282.11 Director's authority. (a) In the exercise of jurisdiction under § 282.10, the Director is... of two or more OCS mineral leases or portions of two or more OCS mineral leases into a single mining...

  17. 30 CFR 736.14 - Director's decision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Director shall publish the decision in the Federal Register, including a statement of the basis and purpose... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Director's decision. 736.14 Section 736.14... Director's decision. (a) After considering all relevant information received under § 736.12 of this part...

  18. 12 CFR 7.2010 - Directors' responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... refer to OCC published guidance for additional information regarding responsibilities of directors. ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Directors' responsibilities. 7.2010 Section 7... OPERATIONS Corporate Practices § 7.2010 Directors' responsibilities. The business and affairs of the bank...

  19. A classification of components of workplace disability management programs: results from a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gensby, U; Labriola, M; Irvin, E; Amick, B C; Lund, T

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents results from a Campbell systematic review on the nature and effectiveness of workplace disability management programs (WPDM) promoting return to work (RTW), as implemented and practiced by employers. A classification of WPDM program components, based on the review results, is proposed. Twelve databases were searched between 1948 to July 2010 for peer-reviewed studies of WPDM programs provided by employers to re-entering workers with occupational or non-occupational illnesses or injuries. Screening of articles, risk of bias assessment and data extraction were conducted in pairs of reviewers. Studies were clustered around various dimensions of the design and context of programs. 16,932 records were identified by the initial search. 599 papers were assessed for relevance. Thirteen studies met inclusion criteria. Twelve peer reviewed articles (two non-randomized studies, and ten single group experimental before and after studies), including ten different WPDM programs informed the synthesis of results. Narrative descriptions of the included program characteristics provided insight on program scope, components, procedures and human resources involved. However, there were insufficient data on the characteristics of the sample and the effect sizes were uncertain. A taxonomy classifying policies and practices around WPDM programs is proposed. There is insufficient evidence to draw conclusions on the effectiveness of employer provided WPDM programs promoting RTW. It was not possible to determine if specific program components or specific sets of components are driving effectiveness. The proposed taxonomy may guide future WPDM program evaluation and clarify the setup of programs offered to identify gaps in existing company strategies.

  20. National Alliance of Business Sales Techniques and Results (STAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golightly, Steven J.

    This paper presents an overview of the Sales Techniques and Results (STAR) training program developed by the National Alliance of Business in conjunction with IBM. The STAR training program can be used to help vocational directors, teachers, and counselors to be better salespersons for cooperative education or job placement programs. The paper…

  1. KEEP Reading Research and Instruction: Results of the 1973-74 Program. Technical Report No. 26.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Kathryn H.; Speidel, Gisela E.

    This report summarizes research related to the use of a conventional basal reading program with students in the Kamehameha Early Education Program (KEEP). Results of instruction were measured by the number of objectives gained each quarter, the total number of objectives gained, the number of lessons taken for each objective, and scores on the…

  2. Cooperative Work-Study Programs in Vocational Rehabilitation: Results of a National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullis, Michael; Foss, Gilbert

    1983-01-01

    Conducted a national survey of vocational rehabilitation agencies (N=42) to determine the present status of cooperative work study programs serving mentally retarded secondary students. Results documented a decrease both in formal programs and number of students served. (Author/JAC)

  3. State survey of silviculture nonpoint source programs: a comparison of the 2000 northeastern and national results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamela J. Edwards; Gordon W. Stuart

    2002-01-01

    The National Association of State Foresters conducts surveys of silviculture nonpoint source (NPS) pollution control programs to measure progress and identify needs. The 2000 survey results are summarized here for the nation and for the 20-state northeastern region. Current emphasis of NPS pollution programs is on education, training, and monitoring. Educational...

  4. The Results of a Randomized Control Trial Evaluation of the SPARK Literacy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Curtis J.; Christian, Michael; Rice, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the results of a two-year randomized control trial evaluation of the SPARK literacy program. SPARK is an early grade literacy program developed by Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Milwaukee. In 2010, SPARK was awarded an Investing in Innovation (i3) Department of Education grant to further develop the…

  5. [Analysis of the results of the SEIMC External Quality Control Program, 2007].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guna Serrano, María del Remedio; Orta Mira, Nieves; Ovies, María; Gimeno Cardona, Concepción; Pérez, José L

    2008-11-01

    The External Quality Control Program of the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC) includes controls for bacteriology, serology, mycology, parasitology, mycobacteria, virology and molecular microbiology. This article presents the most important conclusions and lessons drawn from the 2007 controls. As a whole, the results obtained in 2007 confirm the excellent skill and good technical standards found in previous years. However, erroneous results can be obtained in any laboratory and in clinically relevant determinations. A few deviations were observed in some controls, calling for critical reflection. Once again, the results of this program highlighted the need to complement internal with external controls, such as those offered by the SEIMC program.

  6. Comparison of the results of radiation transport calculation obtained by means of different programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorbatkov, D.V.; Kruchkov, V.P.

    1995-01-01

    Verification of calculational results of radiation transport, obtained by the known, programs and constant libraries (MCNP+ENDF/B, ANISN+HILO, FLUKA92) by means of their comparison with the precision results calculations through ROZ-6N+Sadko program constant complex and with experimental data, is carried out. Satisfactory agreement is shown with the MCNP+ENDF/B package data for the energy range of E<14 MeV. Analysis of the results derivations, obtained trough the ANISN-HILO package for E<400 MeV and the FLUKA92 programs of E<200 GeV is carried out. 25 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Secondary Choral Directors' Multicultural Teaching Practices, Attitudes and Experiences in International Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett Walling, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether secondary choral directors employed at international schools implemented a multicultural education in their programs. Participants (N = 126) were secondary choral directors working at international schools in 59 different countries. A researcher-designed questionnaire was used to collect…

  8. 32 CFR 2400.19 - Declassification by the Director of the Information Security Oversight Office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Information Security Oversight Office. 2400.19 Section 2400.19 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to... SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY INFORMATION SECURITY PROGRAM Declassification and Downgrading § 2400.19 Declassification by the Director of the Information Security Oversight Office. If the Director of the Information...

  9. 25 CFR 1000.67 - How will the Director award planning and negotiation grants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Other Financial Assistance for Planning and Negotiation Grants for Non-BIA Programs Eligibility and Application Process § 1000.67 How will the Director award planning... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How will the Director award planning and negotiation...

  10. Professional Development Needs of Directors Leading in a Mixed Service Delivery Preschool System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Sharon; Whitebook, Marcy; Kipnis, Fran; Sakai, Laura

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on an interview study with directors of Head Start and child care programs who are collaborating with local education authorities to provide publicly funded preschool in New Jersey, USA. A standardized interview protocol was utilized with 98 directors chosen to represent a range of center types from across the three main regions…

  11. 75 FR 44271 - Office of the Director; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-28

    ... 20892. Contact Person: Lawrence A. Tabak, PhD, DDS, Acting Director, Division of Program Coordination..., Building 31, Room 2C39, Bethesda, MD 20892, 301- 496-3571, lawrence[email protected] . This notice is being.... Dated: July 22, 2010. Jennifer Spaeth, Director, Office of Federal Advisory Committee Policy. [FR Doc...

  12. 45 CFR 660.5 - What is the Director's obligation with respect to Federal interagency coordination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What is the Director's obligation with respect to... Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVIEW OF THE NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES § 660.5 What is the Director's obligation with respect to Federal...

  13. Noted astrophysicist Michael S. Turner to Head NSF'S mathematical and physical sciences directorate

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "The National Science Foundation has named celebrated astrophysicist Michael S. Turner of the University of Chicago as Assistant Director for Mathematical and Physical Sciences. He will head a $1 billion directorate that supports research in mathematics, physics, chemistry, materials and astronomy, as well as multidisciplinary programs and education" (1/2 page).

  14. Nanotechnology Concepts at MSFC: Engineering Directorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Biliyar; Kaul, Raj; Shah, Sandeep; Smithers, Gweneth; Watson, Michael D.

    2000-01-01

    Nanotechnology is the art and science of building materials and devices at the ultimate level of finesse: atom by atom. Our nation's space program has needs for miniaturization of components, minimization of weight and maximization of performance, and nanotechnology will help us get there. MSFC - Engineering Directorate (ED) is committed to developing nanotechnology that will enable MSFC missions in space transportation, space science and space optics manufacturing. MSFC-ED has a dedicated group of technologists who are currently developing high pay-off nanotechnology concepts. This poster presentation will outline some of the concepts being developed at this time including, nanophase structural materials, carbon nanotube reinforced metal and polymer matrix composites, nanotube temperature sensors and aerogels. The poster will outline these concepts and discuss associated technical challenges in turning these concepts into real components and systems.

  15. IAEA Director General to Visit Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Full text: The Director General of the IAEA, Yukiya Amano, will travel to Tehran this Sunday, 20 May 2012, to discuss issues of mutual interest with high Iranian officials. In the course of his one-day working visit, on Monday 21 May 2012 the Director General will meet the Secretary of Iran's Supreme National Security Council, His Excellency Saeed Jalili, and other senior representatives of the Iranian government. Herman Nackaerts, Deputy Director General for Safeguards, and Rafael Mariano Grossi, Assistant Director General for Policy, will accompany the Director General. (IAEA)

  16. Papike appointed Director of IOM

    Science.gov (United States)

    James Papike was appointed director of the Institute of Meteoritics in the Department of Geology and Presidential Professor at the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, on July 1, 1990. Papike succeeded Klaus Keil, who moved to the University of Hawaii to direct the Planetary Geoscience Division at the Hawaii Institute of Geosciences.The newly constituted IOM will emphasize planetary volcanic processes through the study of achondritic meteorites, the Moon, and Earth, and the origin of primitive solar system materials and planetary formation through the study of chondritic meteorites.

  17. 2011 Computation Directorate Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, D L

    2012-04-11

    From its founding in 1952 until today, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has made significant strategic investments to develop high performance computing (HPC) and its application to national security and basic science. Now, 60 years later, the Computation Directorate and its myriad resources and capabilities have become a key enabler for LLNL programs and an integral part of the effort to support our nation's nuclear deterrent and, more broadly, national security. In addition, the technological innovation HPC makes possible is seen as vital to the nation's economic vitality. LLNL, along with other national laboratories, is working to make supercomputing capabilities and expertise available to industry to boost the nation's global competitiveness. LLNL is on the brink of an exciting milestone with the 2012 deployment of Sequoia, the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA's) 20-petaFLOP/s resource that will apply uncertainty quantification to weapons science. Sequoia will bring LLNL's total computing power to more than 23 petaFLOP/s-all brought to bear on basic science and national security needs. The computing systems at LLNL provide game-changing capabilities. Sequoia and other next-generation platforms will enable predictive simulation in the coming decade and leverage industry trends, such as massively parallel and multicore processors, to run petascale applications. Efficient petascale computing necessitates refining accuracy in materials property data, improving models for known physical processes, identifying and then modeling for missing physics, quantifying uncertainty, and enhancing the performance of complex models and algorithms in macroscale simulation codes. Nearly 15 years ago, NNSA's Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI), now called the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Program, was the critical element needed to shift from test-based confidence to science-based confidence

  18. CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL DEFENSE: Program Planning and Evaluation Should Follow Results Act Framework

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1999-01-01

    As you requested, we examined the extent to which DOD has applied the Results Act's outcome-oriented principles to the CB Defense Program, focusing in particular on research, development, testing, and evaluation (RDT&E...

  19. The FAA Health Awareness Program: Results of the 1998 Customer Service Assessment Survey

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hilton, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    This report presents the results of an agency-wide survey of employee health and wellness to determine workforce involvement in and satisfaction with the Federal Aviation Administration's Health Awareness Program (HAP...

  20. PBF Severe Fuel-Damage Program: results and comparison to analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, P.E.; Buescher, B.J.; Hobbins, R.R.; McCardell, R.K.; Gruen, G.E.

    1983-01-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission has initiated a severe fuel-damage research program in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) to investigate fuel-rod and core response, and fission-product and hydrogen release and transport under degraded-core-cooling accident conditions. This paper presents a description of Phase I of the PBF Severe Fuel Damage Program, discusses the results of the first experiment, and compares those results with analysis performed using the TRAC-BD1 computer code

  1. Summary results of an assessment of research projects in the National Photovoltaics Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The Office of Energy Research (OER) undertook an assessment of 115 research projects (listed in Appendix A) sponsored by the National Photovoltaics Program. The Program is located within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE). This report summarizes the results of that review. The Office of Solar Energy Conversion is responsible for the management of the National Photovoltaics Program. This program focuses on assisting US industry in development of fundamental technology to bring advanced photovoltaic energy systems to commercial use. The purpose of the assessment was to determine the following: (1) the quality of research of individual projects; (2) the impact of these individual projects on the mission of the program; and (3) the priority of future research opportunities.

  2. Results from the Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program: Their use in inspection activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunther, W.; Taylor, J.

    1990-09-01

    The US NCR's Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program has determined the susceptibility to aging of components and systems, and the potential for aging to impact plant safety and availability. The NPAR Program also identified methods for detecting and mitigating aging in components. This report describes the NPAR results which can enhance NRC inspection activities. Recommendations are provided for communicating pertinent information to NRC inspectors. These recommendations are based on a detailed assessment of the NRC's Inspection Program, and feedback from resident and regional inspectors as described within. Examples of NPAR report summaries and aging inspection guides for components and systems are included. 13 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  3. Genetic programming over context-free languages with linear constraints for the knapsack problem: first results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruhn, Peter; Geyer-Schulz, Andreas

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce genetic programming over context-free languages with linear constraints for combinatorial optimization, apply this method to several variants of the multidimensional knapsack problem, and discuss its performance relative to Michalewicz's genetic algorithm with penalty functions. With respect to Michalewicz's approach, we demonstrate that genetic programming over context-free languages with linear constraints improves convergence. A final result is that genetic programming over context-free languages with linear constraints is ideally suited to modeling complementarities between items in a knapsack problem: The more complementarities in the problem, the stronger the performance in comparison to its competitors.

  4. Exploration for fossil and nuclear fuels from orbital altitudes. [results of ERTS program for oil exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, N. M.

    1974-01-01

    Results from the ERTS program pertinent to exploration for oil, gas, and uranium are discussed. A review of achievements in relevant geological studies from ERTS, and a survey of accomplishments oriented towards exploration for energy sources are presented along with an evaluation of the prospects and limitations of the space platform approach to fuel exploration, and an examination of continuing programs designed to prove out the use of ERTS and other space system in exploring for fuel resources.

  5. The dismantling of nuclear installations: The dismantling of nuclear installations at the CEA's Directorate for nuclear energy; The CEA's sanitation and dismantling works: example of one of the Marcoule UP1 program lots; Research and innovation in sanitation-dismantling; Global optimisation of the management of dismantling radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauet, Jean-Pierre; Piketty, Laurence; Moitrier, Cyril; Blanchard, Samuel; Soulabaille, Yves; Georges, Christine; Dutzer, Michel; Legee, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    This publication proposes a set of four articles which addresses issues related to the dismantling of nuclear installations in France, notably for the different involved actors such as the CEA and the ANDRA. The authors more particularly address the issue and the general strategy of dismantling within the Directorate for nuclear energy of the CEA; comment the example of one of the Marcoule UP1 program lots to highlight sanitation and dismantling works performed by the CEA; discuss current research and innovation activities within the CEA regarding sanitation and dismantling; and comment how to globally optimise the management of radioactive wastes produced by dismantling activities

  6. Director general presentation to personnel

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Dear Colleagues, Many important discussions are scheduled for the upcoming Council Week (13-17 June) on topics including the Medium-Term Plan, the Pension Fund and other matters of great relevance to us.   I would therefore like to share the main outcome of the week with you and I invite you to join me and the Directors in the Main Auditorium at 10 a.m. on Thursday 23 June. The meeting will last about one hour and a webcast will also be available. Best regards, Fabiola Gianotti DG presentation to personnel Thursday 23 June at 10 am Main Auditorium Retransmission in Council Chamber, IT Auditorium, Kjell Jonhsen Auditorium, Prevessin 864-1-C02 Webcast on cern.ch/webcast More information on the event page.

  7. Broadening measures of success: results of a behavioral health translational research training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Julie A; Williamson, Heather J; Eaves, Emery R; Levin, Bruce L; Burton, Donna L; Massey, Oliver T

    2017-07-24

    While some research training programs have considered the importance of mentoring in inspiring professionals to engage in translational research, most evaluations emphasize outcomes specific to academic productivity as primary measures of training program success. The impact of such training or mentoring programs on stakeholders and local community organizations engaged in translational research efforts has received little attention. The purpose of this evaluation is to explore outcomes other than traditional academic productivity in a translational research graduate certificate program designed to pair graduate students and behavioral health professionals in collaborative service-learning projects. Semi-structured qualitative interviews with scholars, community mentors, and academic mentors were conducted regarding a translational research program to identify programmatic impacts. Interviews were transcribed and coded by the research team to identify salient themes related to programmatic outcomes. Results are framed using the Translational Research Impact Scale which is organized into three overarching domains of potential impact: (1) research-related impacts, (2) translational impacts, and (3) societal impacts. This evaluation demonstrates the program's impact in all three domains of the TRIS evaluation framework. Graduate certificate participants (scholars) reported that gaining experience in applied behavioral health settings added useful skills and expertise to their present careers and increased their interest in pursuing translational research. Scholars also described benefits resulting from networks gained through participation in the program, including valuable ties between the university and community behavioral health organizations. This evaluation of the outcomes of a graduate certificate program providing training in translational research highlights the need for more community-oriented and practice-based measures of success. Encouraging practitioner

  8. Creating a comprehensive customer service program to help convey critical and acute results of radiology studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towbin, Alexander J; Hall, Seth; Moskovitz, Jay; Johnson, Neil D; Donnelly, Lane F

    2011-01-01

    Communication of acute or critical results between the radiology department and referring clinicians has been a deficiency of many radiology departments. The failure to perform or document these communications can lead to poor patient care, patient safety issues, medical-legal issues, and complaints from referring clinicians. To mitigate these factors, a communication and documentation tool was created and incorporated into our departmental customer service program. This article will describe the implementation of a comprehensive customer service program in a hospital-based radiology department. A comprehensive customer service program was created in the radiology department. Customer service representatives were hired to answer the telephone calls to the radiology reading rooms and to help convey radiology results. The radiologists, referring clinicians, and customer service representatives were then linked via a novel workflow management system. This workflow management system provided tools to help facilitate the communication needs of each group. The number of studies with results conveyed was recorded from the implementation of the workflow management system. Between the implementation of the workflow management system on August 1, 2005, and June 1, 2009, 116,844 radiology results were conveyed to the referring clinicians and documented in the system. This accounts for more than 14% of the 828,516 radiology cases performed in this time frame. We have been successful in creating a comprehensive customer service program to convey and document communication of radiology results. This program has been widely used by the ordering clinicians as well as radiologists since its inception.

  9. Recent Trends in Publications of US and European Directors in Vascular Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurshina, Afsha; Hingorani, Anil; Hingorani, Amrit; Marks, Natalie; Ascher, Enrico

    2018-02-24

    We hypothesized that there may be significant differences between academic productivity of the vascular training programs in the United States (US) and Europe. In an effort to explore this theory, we reviewed the number of vascular publications listed in PubMed from 2010 to 2015 for US and European directors in vascular surgery. The list of program directors from the Association of Program Directors in Vascular Surgery (APDVS) and the European Union of Medical Specialists (EUMS) were queried for the names of the directors of vascular surgical training programs at the end of 2015. PubMed listed 5,474 citations published from 2010 to 2015. Three thousand five hundred sixty-one were from Europe while 1,912 were from the US. UK and German programs did not list their directors' names in the EUMS website and were thus not included in the European data. The average number of citations in PubMed per program director was 2.36 per year. In Europe, each of the 273 program directors averaged 2.17 publications per year, whereas each of the 114 US program directors averaged 2.80 publications per year (P = 0.37). Journal of Vascular Surgery (JVS) publications made up 24.0% (12.7% in Europe and 45.0% in the US). In the US, the top third produced 69% of the publications and 77% of the JVS publications, whereas in Europe, the top third produced 87% of the publications and 98% of the JVS publications. In the US, 5 program directors (4.4%) had no publications and 21 (18.4%) had no JVS publications. In Europe, 82 program directors (30.0%) had no publications, whereas 180 (65.9%) had no JVS publications. Abstracts were categorized by topic for comparison. In both Europe and the US, the top third produced more than two-thirds of the publications, with the disparity being even more pronounced in Europe where the top third produced almost 90% of the total publications. Comparing the topics of the publications from Europe and the US, it was found that the US program directors published a

  10. [A therapeutic education program for parents of children with ASD: Preliminary results about the effectiveness of the ETAP program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derguy, C; Poumeyreau, M; Pingault, S; M'bailara, K

    2017-11-24

    in the ETAP program ("ETAP Group"), compared to ten controls who did not participate, but who are on a waiting list ("Control Group"). Each participant completed a Quality of Life Questionnaire (WhoQol-Brief) and an Anxiety-Depressive Symptomatology Questionnaire (HADS) prior to the start of the program (T1) and after the session 7 (T2). Preliminary analyses show a good intergroup matching on socio-demographic and medical data. Moreover, the two groups are not significantly different at T1 over the set of dependent variables measured. Our results show an improvement in the quality of life of the depressive symptomatology in the participants. On the other hand, we did not notice any significant decrease in anxiety symptoms. However, when we consider the proportion of parents with a significant anxiety state (in terms of the clinical threshold of HADS, score ≥10), we see that it tends to decrease after the program only for the group ETAP. These data should be interpreted with caution because of their preliminary nature and the small size of our sample. However, the first steps are encouraging and confirm the value of the therapeutic education model for parents of children with ASD. The different information given during the sessions takes into account the previous representations, knowledge and skills of the parent. Thus the program promotes the upholding and the development of individual resources in parents. In addition, the psychosocial skills targeted also to make access easier to available environmental resources. Finally, in a more indirect way, the ETAP program also aims to maintain or restore a positive parenthood and individual identity and the progressive development of new ways of to interact with the environment. An adaptation of the Hobfoll resource conservation model is proposed by the authors to formulate hypotheses on the mechanisms of action of the ETAP program. Copyright © 2017 L'Encéphale, Paris. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights

  11. Training in Tobacco Treatments in Psychiatry: A National Survey of Psychiatry Residency Training Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochaska, Judith J.; Fromont, Sebastien C.; Louie, Alan K.; Jacobs, Marc H.; Hall, Sharon M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Nicotine dependence is the most prevalent substance abuse disorder among adult psychiatric patients and is a leading cause of death and disability. This study examines training in tobacco treatment in psychiatry residency programs across the United States. Method The authors recruited training directors to complete a survey of their program’s curriculum related to tobacco treatment, attitudes related to treating tobacco in psychiatry, and perceptions of residents’ skills for addressing nicotine dependence in psychiatric patients. Results Respondents were representative of the national pool. Half of the programs provided training in tobacco treatments for a median duration of 1 hour. Content areas covered varied greatly. Programs with tobacco-related training expressed more favorable attitudes toward addressing tobacco in psychiatry and were more likely to report confidence in their residents’ skills for treating nicotine dependence. Programs without tobacco training reported a lack of faculty expertise on tobacco treatments. Most training directors reported moderate to high interest in evaluating a model tobacco curriculum for psychiatry and stated they would dedicate an average of 4 hours of curriculum time. Conclusions The findings demonstrate the need for and interest in a model tobacco treatment curriculum for psychiatry residency training. Training psychiatrists offers the potential of delivering treatment to one of the largest remaining groups of smokers: patients with mental disorders. PMID:17021144

  12. Area Monitoring Dosimeter Program for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Results for CY 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bivins, Steven R; Stoetzel, Gregory A

    2001-01-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) established an area monitoring dosimeter program in accordance with Article 514 of the Department of Energy (DOE) Radiological Control Manual (RCM) in January 1993. This program is to minimize the number of areas requiring issuance of personnel dosimeters and to demonstrate that doses outside Radiological Buffer Areas are negligible. In accordance with 10 CFR Part 835.402 (a) (1)-(4) and Article 511.1 of the DOE Standard Radiological Control, personnel dosimetry shall be provided to (1) radiological workers who are likely to receive at least 100 mrem annually, and (2) declared pregnant workers, minors, and members of the public who are likely to receive at least 50 mrem annually. Program results for calendar years 1993-2000 confirm that personnel dosimetry is not needed for individuals located in areas monitored by the program

  13. [Analysis of the results of the SEIMC External Quality Control Program. Year 2011].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz de Gopegui Bordes, Enrique; Guna Serrano, M del Remedio; Orta Mira, Nieves; Ovies, María Rosario; Poveda, Marta; Gimeno Cardona, Concepción

    2013-02-01

    The External Quality Control Program of the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica [SEIMC]) includes controls for bacteriology, serology, mycology, parasitology, mycobacteria, virology, and molecular microbiology. This article presents the most relevant conclusions and lessons from the 2011 controls. Overall, the results obtained in 2011 confirm the excellent skill and good technical standards found in previous years. Nevertheless, erroneous results can be obtained in any laboratory and in clinically relevant determinations. The results of this program highlight the need to implement both internal and external controls, such as those offered by the SEIMC program, in order to ensure maximal quality of microbiological tests. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  14. 78 FR 68466 - BLM Director's Response to the Idaho Governor's Appeal of the BLM Idaho State Director's Governor...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-14

    ... Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is publishing this notice to explain why the BLM Director is denying the...] BLM Director's Response to the Idaho Governor's Appeal of the BLM Idaho State Director's Governor's... (Finding) to the BLM Idaho State Director (State Director). The State Director determined the Governor's...

  15. Battelle integrity of nuclear piping program. Summary of results and implications for codes/standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Naoki

    2005-01-01

    The BINP(Battelle Integrity of Nuclear Piping) program was proposed by Battelle to elaborate pipe fracture evaluation methods and to improve LBB and in-service flaw evaluation criteria. The program has been conducted from October 1998 to September 2003. In Japan, CRIEPI participated in the program on behalf of electric utilities and fabricators to catch up the technical backgrounds for possible future revision of LBB and in-service flaw evaluation standards and to investigate the issues needed to be reflected to current domestic standards. A series of the results obtained from the program has been well utilized for the new LBB Regulatory Guide Program by USNRC and for proposal of revised in-service flaw evaluation criteria to the ASME Code Committee. The results were assessed whether they had implications for the existing or future domestic standards. As a result, the impact of many of these issues, which were concerned to be adversely affected to LBB approval or allowable flaw sizes in flaw evaluation criteria, was found to be relatively minor under actual plant conditions. At the same time, some issues that needed to be resolved to address advanced and rational standards in the future were specified. (author)

  16. Sun-Earth National Program. 2006-2009 results and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontaine, Dominique; Vilmer, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    PNST (Programme National Soleil-Terre/Sun-Earth National Program) is dedicated to analysis of the Sun-Earth system, from generation of the solar magnetic field, flares and coronal mass ejections, until impact on the terrestrial magnetosphere, ionosphere and thermosphere. Research activities carried out in the frame of Programme National Soleil-Terre (PNST) rely on both ground-based and space-borne instruments. One of the main objectives of PNST is to stimulate coordinated studies and to optimize scientific return of these instruments. This document is the 2006-2009 scientific report of the program. It presents in the introduction some highlights, the main questions, the thematic reviews and the forces and weaknesses of the program. Then, part 2 is a review of the main scientific questions: mechanisms at the origin of the eruptive activity in plasmas; mechanisms involved in particles heating and acceleration; energy transfers at different scales in the plasma and dynamics of turbulence in this anisotropic medium; coupling mechanisms between the different plasma envelopes; Sun-Earth relations and space meteorology; interfaces with other programs (planetary plasmas, magnetism and sun-type stars activity). Part 3 presents the results and prospects of the ground and space instrumentation, of databases and numerical tools. Finally, the administrative and financial status of the program is summarized (Program structure and operation, budget, manpower, publications)

  17. Results of Occupational Monitoring Program in Technologic Navy Center in Sao Paulo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, Clarice F.A.; Bitelli, Ricardo D.; Oliveira, Rodemir

    2013-01-01

    The CTMSP, Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo, is a nuclear research Center located in the State of Sao Paulo. CTMSP headquarters is placed at the Campus of the University of Sao Paulo. Most of CTMSP nuclear facilities are at the Centro Experimental Aramar (CEA), located 120 km northwest from the Capital city of Sao Paulo. CTMSP has two major nuclear programs. One is the development of a PWR reactor for naval propulsion, and the other is associated with the front end fuel cycle technology comprising enrichment, conversion and reconversion. These activities require an extensive area monitoring program. This paper presents the results of this program covering the years of 2003 to 2011. The results include surface monitoring, dose rates and uranium concentrations in the air. (author)

  18. Gender differences in salary of internal medicine residency directors: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Lisa L; Halvorsen, Andrew J; McDonald, Furman S; Chaudhry, Saima I; Arora, Vineet M

    2015-06-01

    Whether salary disparities exist between men and women in medical education leadership roles is not known. The study objective was to determine whether salary disparities exist between male and female Internal Medicine residency program directors, and if so, to identify factors associated with the disparities and explore historical trends. The annual Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine (APDIM) survey in August 2012 included items to assess the salary and demographic characteristics of program directors, which were merged with publically available program data. To assess historical trends, we used similarly obtained survey data from 2008 to 2011. The study included program directors of 370 APDIM member programs, representing 95.6% of the 387 accredited Internal Medicine training programs in the United States and Puerto Rico. Of the 370 APDIM member programs, 241 (65.1%) completed the survey, of whom 169 (70.1%) were men and 72 (29.9%) were women. Program directors' total annual salary, measured in $25,000 increments, ranged from $75,000 or less to more than $400,000. Historical trends of mode salary by gender from 2008 to 2012 were assessed. The mode salary was $200,000 to 225,000 for men and $175,000 to $200,000 for women (P = .0005). After controlling for academic rank, career in general internal medicine, and program director age, the distribution of salary remained different by gender (P = .004). Historical trends show that the difference in mode salary has persisted since 2008. Leaders in academic medical centers, residency and fellowship directors, and all faculty in medical education need to be aware that salary disparities cited decades ago persist in this sample of medical educators. Closing the gender gap will require continued advocacy for measuring and reporting salary gaps, and changing the culture of academic medical centers. Copyright © 2015 Alliance for Academic Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Enrolling Underserved Women in mHealth Programs: Results From Text4baby Outreach Campaigns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushar, Jessica A; Fishman, Jodie; Garfinkel, Danielle; Pirretti, Amy

    2018-03-01

    Public health practitioners have increasingly leveraged technology-based communication to get health information into the hands of hard-to-reach populations; however, best practices for outreach and enrollment into mobile health (mHealth) programs are lacking. This article describes enrollment results from campaigns focused on enrolling underserved pregnant women and mothers in Text4baby-a free, mHealth service-to inform outreach strategies for mHealth programs. Text4baby participants receive health and safety information, interactive surveys, alerts, and appointment reminders through at least three weekly texts and a free app-timed to users' due date or babies' birth date. Text4baby worked with partners to implement national, state, and community-based enrollment campaigns. Descriptive statistics were used to compare baseline enrollment prior to a campaign with enrollment during a campaign to generate enrollment estimates. Enrollment rates were calculated for campaigns for which the number targeted/reached was available. National television campaigns resulted in more than 10,000 estimated enrollments. Campaigns that were integrated with an existing program and text-based recruitment had the highest enrollment rates, ranging from 7% to 24%. Facebook advertisements and traditional media targeting providers and consumers were least effective. mHealth programs should consider text-based recruitment and outreach via existing programs; additional research is needed on return on investment for different outreach strategies and on the effectiveness of different outreach strategies at reaching and enrolling specific target populations.

  20. Teaching Basic Programming Concepts to Young Primary School Students Using Tablets: Results of a Pilot Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokides, Emmanuel

    2018-01-01

    The study presents the results of a project in which tablets and a ready-made application were used for teaching basic programming concepts to young primary school students (ages 7-9). A total of 135 students participated in the study, attending primary schools in Athens, Greece, divided into three groups. The first was taught conventionally. The…

  1. Tuberculosis Infection in Urban Adolescents: Results of a School-Based Testing Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, M. Anita; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Discusses a tuberculosis skin testing program introduced for seventh and tenth grade students in Boston (Massachusetts) public schools. Positivity rate was significantly higher in tenth grade students. Among those testing positive, the majority were born outside the United States. Results suggest that testing may identify a significant number of…

  2. Experimental validation of the twins prediction program for rolling noise. Pt.2: results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, D.J.; Fodiman, P.; Mahé, H.

    1996-01-01

    Two extensive measurement campaigns have been carried out to validate the TWINS prediction program for rolling noise, as described in part 1 of this paper. This second part presents the experimental results of vibration and noise during train pass-bys and compares them with predictions from the

  3. Online Student Evaluation Improves Course Experience Questionnaire Results in a Physiotherapy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Beatrice; Jones, Sue; Straker, Leon

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports the use of an online student evaluation system, Course Experience on the Web (CEW), in a physiotherapy program to improve their Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ) results. CEW comprises a course survey instrument modeled on the CEQ and a tailored unit survey instrument. Closure of the feedback loop is integral in the CEW…

  4. Programs in Fortran language for reporting the results of the analyses by ICP emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roca, M.

    1985-01-01

    Three programs, written in FORTRAN IV language, for reporting the results of the analyses by ICP emission spectroscopy from data stored in files on floppy disks have been developed. They are intended, respectively, for the analyses of: 1) waters, 2) granites and slates, and 3) different kinds of geological materials. (Author) 8 refs

  5. Effectiveness of an Intervention Program for Improving School Atmosphere: Some Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, A. M.; Rivas, M. T.; Trianes, M. V.

    2006-01-01

    This work describes the results of the "Programa de Desarrollo Social y Afectivo" [Social and Affective Development Program] (Trianes & Munoz, 1994; Trianes, 1996), under way during four years at a public school in a disadvantaged area Malaga, earmarked for special educational resources. The intervention is meant to improve classroom…

  6. Results of Four Studies on Logo Programming, Problem Solving, and Knowledge-Based Instructional Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Karen; Black, John B.

    The results of four research studies conducted with subjects ranging in age and ability from elementary to graduate school students demonstrate that Logo programming environments can be instrumental in the development of five particular problem solving strategies: (1) subgoals formation; (2) forward chaining; (3) systematic trial and error; (4)…

  7. Occupational radioprotection program at Nuclear Engineering Institute -IEN: results obtained in 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajardo, P.W.; Pastura, V.F.S.; Soares, M.L.; LeRoy, C.L.; Teixeira, M.V.; Santos, I.H.T.; Pujol Filho, S.V.

    1992-01-01

    The results of occupational radioprotection program at Nuclear Engineering Institute-IEN- in 1991 are presented. The personnel monitoring, the routine monitoring of limited areas, the operational monitoring during the operation and the cyclotron CV-28 maintenance, the radioisotope processing and Argonauta Reactor operation, the control of radioprotection equipment and the control of radiation sources are included. (C.G.C.)

  8. PLAY DIRECTING AND DIRECTORS: AN EVOLUTIONARY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While the theatre director can be seen as the `god of the theatre', he/she can also be seen as a priest and a carrier who must coordinate human and material resources a master and a messenger. Drawing from the above, this paper traces the evolution of play directing and the theatre director in different theatres of the world ...

  9. CERN loses two former Directors-General

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Victor Weisskopf, a giant of modern physics and Director General of CERN from 1961-65, died on 21 April. The previous month, Willibald Jentschke, Director General from 1971-75 and founder of the DESY Laboratory in Hamburg, passed away.

  10. Robert Aymar, Director-General of CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Patrice Loïez

    2003-01-01

    Robert Aymar, photographed in 2003 before taking his position as Director-General at CERN, succeeding Luciano Maiani in 2004. At this time, Aymar was director of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) although he had already been involved with developments at CERN, chairing the External Review Committee, set up in 2001 in response to the increased cost of the LHC.

  11. Dr. Francis Collins Is New NIH Director

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ph.D., a physician and geneticist, is the new Director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. President Barack Obama nominated Dr. Collins, who served as Director of ...

  12. J. B. Adams Acting Director-General

    CERN Multimedia

    1960-01-01

    After the tragic death of Prof. C. J. Bakker, the Council of CERN held an emergency meeting on May 3, 1960. Following this session, Mr. F. de Rose, President of the Council of the European Organization for Nuclear Research, announced the appointment of Mr. J. B. Adams, Director of the PS division to the post of acting Director-General.

  13. Director Turnover: An Australian Academic Development Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Kym; Ryan, Yoni

    2012-01-01

    Although it can be argued that directors of central academic development units (ADUs) are critical to the implementation of university teaching and learning strategies, it would appear there is a high director turnover rate. While research in the USA, the UK, and Australia illustrates that ADUs are frequently closed or restructured, that research…

  14. Predictors of Choral Directors' Voice Handicap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Vocal demands of teaching are considerable and these challenges are greater for choral directors who depend on the voice as a musical and instructive instrument. The purpose of this study was to (1) examine choral directors' vocal condition using a modified Voice Handicap Index (VHI), and (2) determine the extent to which the major variables…

  15. Female directors and real activities manipulation: Evidence from China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-hui Luo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Unlike previous studies that focus on accrual-based earnings management, this study analyzes real activities manipulation and investigates whether female directors on boards of directors (BoDs affect managers’ real activities manipulation. Using a large sample of 11,831 firm-year observations from Chinese listed companies from the 2000 to 2011 period, we find that higher female participation on BoDs is associated with lower levels of real activities manipulation, and that this negative relationship is stronger when female directors have higher ownership. These results hold for a battery of robustness checks. Overall, our findings indicate that board gender diversity may serve as a substitute mechanism for corporate governance to curb real activities manipulation and thus provide interested stakeholders with higher quality earnings reports.

  16. [Analysis of the results of the SEIMC External Quality Control Program. Year 2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gopegui Bordes, Enrique Ruiz; Orta Mira, Nieves; Del Remedio Guna Serrano, M; Medina González, Rafael; Rosario Ovies, María; Poveda, Marta; Gimeno Cardona, Concepción

    2015-07-01

    The External Quality Control Program of the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC) include controls for bacteriology, serology, mycology, parasitology, mycobacteria, virology, molecular microbiology and HIV-1, HCV and HBV viral loads. This manuscript presents the analysis of results obtained of the participants from the 2013 SEIMC External Quality Control Programme, except viral loads controls, that they are summarized in a manuscript abroad. As a whole, the results obtained in 2013 confirm the excellent skill and good technical standards found in previous editions. However, erroneous results can be obtained in any laboratory and in clinically relevant determinations. Once again, the results of this program highlighted the need to implement both internal and external controls in order to assure the maximal quality of the microbiological tests. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. From the Director's Desk News

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Gloria Lihemo

    2015-12-01

    Dec 1, 2015 ... Our work with local communities is making urban areas safer and .... At the midpoint of a five-year program of research, experts working through the Safe ... Environment and Health program in Africa over the next five years.

  18. Results evaluation of the environmental monitoring program of the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear - CDTN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peixoto, Claudia M.; Pego, Valdivio D.

    1997-01-01

    Due to the research works preformed at CDTN, solid, liquid and gaseous wastes are produced and released to the environment. Consequently, CDTN has been performing since 1985 an Environmental Monitoring Program . In this Program, matrix samples, sampling frequencies and the analysis to be realized for measuring the radiation and radioactive contamination levels are specified. The paper also presents the analytical results of the radionuclides monitored within the period 1991-1995, concerning the sampling points located at Corrego Engenho Nogueira, which receives liquid contaminants that are eventually released by CDTN. Moreover, an estimation of radiation dose due to water consumption is presented. (author). 4 refs., 5 figs., 9 tabs

  19. Implementation of the G8GP program on physical protection - experiences and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagemann, A.

    2006-01-01

    At the Kananaskis Summit in June 2002, G8 Leaders launched the Global Partnership against the Spread of Weapons and Materials of Mass Destruction committing to support projects to issues of non-proliferation, disarmament, counter terrorism and nuclear safety in Russia. Since then progress has been made in implementing projects. The German Federal Foreign Office contracted GRS to implement a program for improving the physical protection of nuclear or highly radioactive materials of relevance at facilities in the Russian Federation. This paper reports about this G8GP Program on physical protection, its implementation, gained experiences, current achievements and results. (author)

  20. Results of the groundwater quality assessment program at the 216-A-29 ditch RCRA facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Votava, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the findings of the groundwater quality assessment program for the 216-A-29 Ditch. The information presented in this report Ditch have affected the quality of the groundwater in the unconfined aquifer beneath the facility. The results indicate that the 216-A-29 Ditch is the source of elevated specific conductance in well 299-E25-35 and that the source is nonhazardous. This report describes the current monitoring status of the 216-A-29 Ditch, groundwater chemical data interpretation, and recommends the reinstatement of an indicator-evaluation monitoring program in accordance with 40 CFR 265.93(d)(6)

  1. ARE COMMUNITY –BASED INTERVENTION PROGRAMS EFFECTIVE IN THE YOUTH POPULATION? RESULTS FROM ISFAHAN HEALTHY HEART PROGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Roohafza

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract    BACKGROUND: Although the relationship between unhealthy lifestyle and development of non-communicable diseases in the youth has been understood but intervention studies to improve lifestyle behaviors in this age group are low. Consequently, this study was performed to highlight important intervention activity of a NCD prevention and health promotion program for young people and to present its main results in Iran.    METHODS: The Youth Intervention Project (YIP as a part of Isfahan Healthy Heart Program (IHHP was carried out on all the youth aged 19-25 years in Isfahan and Najafabad counties as intervention areas and Arak as control area. The target groups could be reached in Red Crescent Society, universities, and garrisons. Multifactorial interventions included healthy nutrition, physical activity, coping with stress, and tobacco cessation by more emphasis on hookah smoking. Also, enforcing no-smoking regulations in teahouses and coffee shops was considered.    RESULTS: After performing multifactorial interventions, the change of fast food consumption frequency was statistically significant in comparison between intervention and control areas (P for trend<0.05. Percentage of individuals with high stress level were more significant in intervention area compared with control area (P for trend<0.05. Smoking was increased among men and women in both areas whereas the increase was higher in control area (P for trend<0.05. Although daily physical activity frequency was increased in intervention areas but it wasn’t significant compared with control area. Also, decreased trend of carbonated drink consumption were not significant in intervention area compared with control area.     CONCLUSION: The lifestyle modification program in the youth was successfully implemented and was shown to have improved some of the youth’s lifestyle behaviors related to healthy lifestyle.      Keywords: Intervention,The youth, Non

  2. Mergers and acquisitions: director and consultant liability exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waxman, J M

    1995-02-01

    Corporate directors and their consultants must make decisions in an uncertain and changing health care environment. The losses each may face as a result of an incomplete analysis of the true value of the entities involved in mergers or acquisitions may extend beyond the failure of the transaction to the creation of personal liability as well. Accordingly, objective, careful, detailed, and fair decision-making based upon adequate information is more critical than ever for directors if they are to be able to take advantage of the business judgment rule, and also for consultants to avoid their own liability when transactions fail to deliver the values they have estimated.

  3. Experimental results concerning global observables from the CERN SPS heavy ion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, G.R.

    1990-06-01

    A brief overview is given of experimental results obtained during the initial operation of the heavy-ion program at the CERN SPS during the period 1986--1988. This paper confines itself to a presentation of results on so-called global observables, such as energy flow and multiplicity distributions, and on information extracted from them. Of particular interest among the latter are an estimate of the magnitude and spatial distribution of the energy density attained. 3 refs., 27 figs

  4. Results of a Master's degree program for high-school teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocke, W. J.

    1993-05-01

    Starting in the summer of 1990, the Astronomy Department at the University of Arizona began a 3-year summer program for upgrading the skills of high-school and middle-school science teachers. The program granted Master's degrees in Astronomy to the 33 teachers that completed the program this past summer. The teachers received tuition waivers and stipends to cover living expenses. The funding came mostly from the National Science Foundation, but the University of Arizona cost-shared at the 15% level. About half of the teachers were from Arizona, and the rest came from out-of-state. Although minorities were encouraged to apply, we had few minority applicants, and there were no Afro-Americans and only one Hispanic in the program. The content of the courses was heavily slanted towards mathematics and the physical sciences. The math level went up to vector calculus and linear partial differential equations, and there was a heavy emphasis on physics and astrophysics. Astronomy turned out to be a good umbrella under which to strengthen the teachers' knowledge of the physical sciences. One of the weak points in the program was the pace at which we introduced new material to the teachers. The summer sessions were short and very intense, and the teachers often found themselves with insufficient time to digest the information. This was offset to some degree by the high rate of cooperative learning that the teachers exhibited. The program seems to have been a great success, and the teachers report that their higher level of understanding is very useful to them in the classroom, and the astronomy content provided an excellent source of new demonstrations and projects. We present the results of a final survey, in which we ask the teachers to summarize their thoughts about the program and its effectiveness.

  5. Area monitoring dosimeter program for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Results for CY 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bivins, S.R.; Stoetzel, G.A.

    1998-07-01

    In January 1993, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) established an area monitoring dosimeter program in accordance with Article 514 of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Radiological Control Manual (RCM). The purpose of the program was to minimize the number of areas requiring issuance of personnel dosimeters and to demonstrate that doses outside Radiological Buffer Areas are negligible. In accordance with 10 CFR Part 835.402 (a) (1)--(3) and Article 511.1 of the RCM, personnel dosimetry shall be provided to (1) radiological workers who are likely to receive at least 100 mrem annually, and (2) declared pregnant workers, minors, and members of the public who are likely to receive at least 50 mrem annually. Program results for calendar years (CY) 1993--1996 confirmed that personnel dosimetry was not needed for individuals located in areas monitored by the program. A total of 93 area thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were placed in PNNL facilities during CY 1997. The TLDs were exchanged and analyzed quarterly. All routine area monitoring TLD results were less than 50 mrem annually after correcting for worker occupancy. The results support the conclusions that personnel dosimeters are not necessary for staff, declared pregnant workers, minors, or members of the public in these monitored areas

  6. Area Monitoring Dosimeter Program for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Results for CY 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GA Stoetzel; SR Bivins

    1999-01-01

    In January 1993, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) established an area monitoring dosimeter program in accordance with Article 514 of the Department of Energy (DOE) Radiological Control Manual (RCM). The purpose of the program was to minimize the number of areas requiring issuance of personnel dosimeters and to demonstrate that doses outside Radiological Buffer Areas are negligible. In accordance with 10 CFR Part 835.402 (a)(1)-(4) and Article 511.1 of the RCM, personnel dosimetry shall be provided to (1) radiological workers who are likely to receive at least 100 mrem annually and (2) declared pregnant workers, minors, and members of the public who are likely to receive at least 50 mrem annually. Program results for calendar years 1993-1997 confirmed that personnel dosimetry was not needed for individuals located in areas monitored by the program. A total of 97 area thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were placed in PNNL facilities during calendar year 1998. The TLDs were exchanged and analyzed quarterly. All routine area monitoring TLD results were less than 50 mrem annually after correcting for worker occupancy. The results support the conclusion that personnel dosimeters are not necessary for staff, declared pregnant workers, minors, or members of the public in these monitored areas

  7. Test results of the new NSSS thermal-hydraulics program of the KNPEC-2 simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, J. Z.; Kim, K. D.; Lee, M. S.; Hong, J. H.; Lee, Y. K.; Seo, J. S.; Kweon, K. J.; Lee, S. W.

    2001-01-01

    As a part of the KNPEC-2 Simulator Upgrade Project, KEPRI and KAERI have developed a new NSSS thermal-hydraulics program, which is based on the best-estimate system code, RETRAN. The RETRAN code was originally developed for realistic simulation of thermal-hydraulic transient in power plant systems. The capability of 'real-time simulation' and robustness' should be first developed before being implemented in full-scope simulators. For this purpose, we have modified the RETRAN code by (i) eliminating the correlations' discontinuities between flow regime maps, (ii) simplifying physical correlations, (iii) correcting errors in the original program, and (iv) others. This paper briefly presents the test results fo the new NSSS thermal-hydraulics program

  8. Results from the Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program: Their use in inspection activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunther, W.; Taylor, J. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA))

    1990-09-01

    The US NCR's Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program has determined the susceptibility to aging of components and systems, and the potential for aging to impact plant safety and availability. The NPAR Program also identified methods for detecting and mitigating aging in components. This report describes the NPAR results which can enhance NRC inspection activities. Recommendations are provided for communicating pertinent information to NRC inspectors. These recommendations are based on a detailed assessment of the NRC's Inspection Program, and feedback from resident and regional inspectors as described within. Examples of NPAR report summaries and aging inspection guides for components and systems are included. 13 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Targeted breast cancer screening in women younger than 40: results from a statewide program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarff, MaryClare; Schmidt, Katherine; Vetto, John T

    2008-05-01

    Our state Breast and Cervical Cancer Program (BCCP) has previously reported a paucity of data supporting breast screening for asymptomatic women younger than 40 (cancer detection rate of .25% per screening-year). In partnership with the local Affiliate of the Susan G. Komen for the Cure Foundation, we began a targeted "screening" program to evaluate women younger than 40 referred for symptoms or other concerns. Retrospective data review of program results, including demographics, symptoms, evaluations performed, and outcomes. A total of 176 women, ages 16 to 39 years, were referred to the BCCP/Komen program. Of the women with documented presenting symptoms, the most common was breast lump (81%). Evaluation triggered 75 surgical referrals and 69 biopsies, yielding 16 cancers (a biopsy positive rate of 23% and overall cancer detection rate from the program of 9%). For women younger than age 40, targeted breast cancer screening is a more efficient utilization of screening resources, with a higher cancer detection rate than asymptomatic screening.

  10. Sun-Earth National Program (PNST). 2010-2013 results and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    PNST (Programme National Soleil-Terre/Sun-Earth National Program) is dedicated to analysis of the Sun-Earth system, from generation of the solar magnetic field, flares and coronal mass ejections, until impact on the terrestrial magnetosphere, ionosphere and thermosphere. Research activities carried out in the frame of Programme National Soleil-Terre (PNST) rely on both ground-based and space-borne instruments. One of the main objectives of PNST is to stimulate coordinated studies and to optimize scientific return of these instruments. This document is the 2010-2013 scientific report of the program. It presents in the introduction the main questions and the 2010-2013 highlights. The 2010-2013 results and prospects are detailed in part 2: coupling mechanisms between the different plasma envelopes; multi-scale energy transport and turbulence; plasma acceleration and heating mechanisms; eruptive or impulsive activity in plasmas; space meteorology; perspectives. Part 3 deals with the interfaces with other programs (planetary plasmas, magnetism and sun-type stars activity). Part 4 presents the means, services and tools (ground and space instrumentation, databases and numerical tools). Finally, the administrative and financial status of the program is summarized (Program structure and operation, budget, manpower, publications)

  11. The risk-adjusted performance of companies with female directors: A South African case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mkhethwa Mkhize

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to examine the effects of female directors on the risk-adjusted performance of firms listed on the JSE Securities Exchange of South Africa (the JSE. The theoretical underpinning for the relationship between representation of female directors and the risk-adjusted performance of companies was based on institutional theory. The hypothesis that there is no difference between the risk-adjusted performance of companies with female directors and that of companies without female directors was rejected. Implications of the results are discussed and suggestions for future research presented.

  12. [Analysis of the results of the SEIMC External Quality Control Program. Year 2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gopegui Bordes, Enrique Ruiz; Guna Serrano, M del Remedio; Orta Mira, Nieves; Ovies, María Rosario; Poveda, Marta; Gimeno Cardona, Concepción

    2014-02-01

    The External Quality Control Program of the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC) include controls for bacteriology, serology, mycology, parasitology, mycobacteria, virology and molecular microbiology. This article presents the most relevant conclusions and lessons from the 2012 controls. As a whole, the results obtained in 2012 confirm the excellent skill and good technical standards found in previous editions. However, erroneous results can be obtained in any laboratory and in clinically relevant determinations. Once again, the results of this program highlighted the need to implement both internal and external controls in order to assure the maximal quality of the microbiological tests. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  13. [Analysis of the results of the SEIMC External Quality Control Program. Year 2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopegui Bordes, Enrique Ruiz de; Guna Serrano, M Del Remedio; Orta Mira, Nieves; Medina González, Rafael; Rosario Ovies, María; Poveda, Marta; Gimeno Cardona, Concepción

    2016-07-01

    The External Quality Control Program of the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC) include controls for bacteriology, serology, mycology, parasitology, mycobacteria, virology and molecular microbiology. This article presents the most relevant conclusions and lessons from the 2014 controls. As a whole, the results obtained in 2014 confirm the excellent skill and good technical standards found in previous editions. However, erroneous results can be obtained in any laboratory and in clinically relevant determinations. Once again, the results of the SEIMC program highlighted the need to implement both internal and external controls in order to assure the maximal quality of the microbiological tests. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. [Analysis of the results of the SEIMC External Quality Control Program. Year 2009].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gopegui Bordes, Enrique Ruiz; del Remedio Guna Serrano, M; Orta Mira, Nieves; Ovies, María; Poveda, Marta; Gimeno Cardona, Concepción; Pérez, José L

    2011-03-01

    The External Quality Control Program of the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC) includes controls for bacteriology, serology, mycology, parasitology, mycobacteria, virology and molecular microbiology. In this article, the most important conclusions and lessons from the 2009 controls are presented. As a whole, the results obtained in 2009 confirm the excellent skill and good technical standards found in previous editions. However, erroneous results can be obtained in any laboratory and in clinically relevant determinations. The results of this program highlight the need to implement both internal and external controls in order to ensure maximal quality of microbiological tests. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España S.L. All rights reserved.

  15. Current results for the NRC's short cracks in piping and piping welds research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkowski, G.; Krishnaswamy, P. Brust, F.; Francini, R.; Ghadiali, N.; Kilinski, T.; Marschall, C.; Rahman, S.; Rosenfield, A.; Scott, P.

    1994-01-01

    The overall objective of the Short Cracks in Piping and Piping Welds Program is to verify and improve engineering analyses to predict the fracture behavior of circumferentially cracked pipe under quasi-static loading with particular attention to crack lengths typically used in LBB or flaw evaluation criteria. The program consists of 8 technical tasks as listed below. Task 1 Short through-wall-cracked (TWC) pipe evaluations. Task 2 Short surface-cracked pipe evaluations. Task 3 Bi-metallic weld crack evaluations. Task 4 Dynamic strain aging and crack instabilities. Task 5 Fracture evaluations of anisotropic pipe. Task 6 Crack-opening-area evaluations. Task 7 NRCPIPE Code improvements. Task 8 Additional efforts. Since the last WRSM meeting several additional tasks have been initiated in this program. These are discussed in Task 8. Based on results to date, the first seven tasks have also been modified as deemed necessary. The most significant accomplishments in each of these tasks since the last WRSIM meeting are discussed below. The details of all the results presented here are published in the semiannual reports from this program

  16. CEA nuclear energy Directorate - Activity report 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    After an overview of the activities of the Directorate at the international level, of its scientific activities, and of the consideration given to quality, and a presentation of the transverse program on advanced materials, this report proposes presentations of activities in different domains: future nuclear industrial systems (reactors of 4. generation, back-end of the future cycle, sustainable management of nuclear materials, fundamental scientific and technological research), optimization of the present industrial nuclear activity (reactors of 2. and 3. generation, front-end and back-end of the fuel cycle), the main tools for nuclear development (numerical simulation, the Jules Horowitz reactor), valorisation, economic support of Haute-Marne and Meuse territories (the Syndiese project), nuclear dismantling and decontamination (dismantling projects, projects and works in Fontenay-aux-Roses, Grenoble and Saclay, waste and material flow management, nuclear service facilities, transports). It also presents the activities of some specific CEA centres like Marcoule (R and D in fuel cycle), Cadarache (future energies) and Saclay (nuclear sciences and simulation of reactors and fuel cycle)

  17. 20 CFR 702.272 - Informal recommendation by district director.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... LONGSHOREMEN'S AND HARBOR WORKERS' COMPENSATION ACT AND RELATED STATUTES ADMINISTRATION AND PROCEDURE Claims... any wage loss suffered as the result of the discharge or discrimination. The district director may... of the Chief Administrative Law Judge for hearing pursuant to § 702.317. [42 FR 45302, Sept. 9, 1977] ...

  18. Director and Officer Liability in the Zone of Insolvency; A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In principle, the company, alone, is responsible for the debts incurred in the running of the company and the creditors are, in principle, precluded from looking to the directors or shareholders for payment of any shortfall arising as a result of the company\\'s insolvency. This principle has, in a number of jurisdictions undergone ...

  19. Development and Implementation of a Mental Health Work Rehabilitation Program: Results of a Developmental Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvain, Chantal; Durand, Marie-José; Velasquez Sanchez, Astrid; Lessard, Nathalie; Maillette, Pascale

    2018-05-23

    Purpose Long-term work disability due to common mental disorders (CMDs) is a growing problem. Yet optimal interventions remain unclear and little is known about implementation challenges in everyday practice. This study aimed to support and evaluate, in real time, the development and implementation of a work rehabilitation program (WRP) designed to promote post-CMD return-to-work (RTW). Methods A 2-year developmental evaluation was performed using a participatory approach. At program outset, the researchers held five work meetings to revise the program's logic model and discuss its underlying change theory with clinicians. Data collection tools used throughout the study period were structured charts of activities conducted with workers (n = 41); in-depth interviews with program clinicians and managers (n = 9); and participant observation during work meetings. Quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Qualitative data underwent thematic analysis using a processual approach. Results Three types of activity were developed and implemented: individual and group interventions targeting workers, and joint activities targeting partners (physicians, employers, others). While worker-targeted activities were generally implemented as planned, joint activities were sporadic. Analysis of the implementation process revealed five challenges faced by clinicians. Determinants included clinicians, host organization, sociopolitical context and resources provided by the evaluation. Conclusion The program studied is original in that it is based on the best available scientific knowledge, yet adapted to contextual particularities. The identified implementation challenges highlight the need for greater importance to be placed on the external, non-program context to ensure sustainable implementation in everyday practice.

  20. New Community Education Program on Oceans and Global Climate Change: Results from Our Pilot Year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, B. C.; Wiener, C.

    2010-12-01

    evaluation results from the first year and discuss how our program has been informed by this feedback.

  1. ANALYSIS AND QUANTITATIVE ASSESSMENT FOR RESULTS OF EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS APPLICATION BY MEANS OF DIAGNOSTIC TESTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Kon

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research.The problem actuality for creation, control and estimation of results for competence-oriented educational programs is formulated and proved. Competences elements and components, assembled in modules, course units and parts of educational program, are defined as objects of control. Specific tasks of proficiency examination for competences and their components are stated; subject matter of the paper is formulated. Methods of Research. Some adapted statements and methods of technical science are offered to be applied for control tasks solution, decoding and estimation of education results. The approach to quantitative estimation of testing results with the use of additive integrated differential criterion of estimation is offered. Main Results. Statements, defining conditions of certain and uncertain (indeterminacy decision-making about proficiency examination for elements of discipline components controlled by test according to test realization results, are formulated and proved. Probabilistic characteristicsof both decision-making variants are estimated. Variants of determinate and fuzzy logic mathematic methods application for decreasing decision-making indeterminancy are offered; further research direction is selected for development of methods and algorithms for results decoding of diagnostic tests set realization. Practical Relevance. It is shown, that proposed approach to quantitative estimation of testing results will give the possibility to automate the procedure of formation and analysis for education results, specified in the competence format.

  2. Early Childhood Program Participation, Results from the National Household Education Surveys Program of 2016. First Look. NCES 2017-101

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Lisa; Steinley, Katrina

    2017-01-01

    This report presents findings from the Early Childhood Program Participation Survey of the National Household Education Surveys Program of 2016 (NHES:2016). The Early Childhood Program Participation Survey collected data on children's participation in relative care, nonrelative care, and center-based care arrangements. It also collected…

  3. [Analysis of the results of the SEIMC External Quality Control Program. Year 2008].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, María del Remedio Guna; Mira, Nieves Orta; de Gopegui, Enrique Ruiz; Ovies, María Rosario; Cardona, Concepción Gimeno; Pérez, José L

    2010-01-01

    The External Quality Control Program of the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC) include controls for bacteriology, serology, mycology, parasitology, mycobacteria and virology. This article present the most relevant conclusions and lessons from the 2008 controls. As a whole, the results obtained in 2008 confirm the excellent skill and good technical standards of the microbiology laboratories in Spain found in previous editions. However, a few deviations can be obtained in any laboratory, even in clinically relevant determinations. Once again, the results of this program highlighted the need to implement both internal an external controls in order to assure the maximal quality of the microbiological tests. 2010 Elsevier España S.L. All rights reserved.

  4. The German carbide program: Performance, experimental findings, and evaluation of irradiation results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, H.; Freund, D.; Geithoff, D.

    1982-09-01

    In this report a synopsis of the German carbide program is presented. The program comprises the irradiation of about 100 carbide pins equipped with pelletted fuel. Most of these fuel pins were He-bonded, the sodium bonding concept taken as a back-up solution. The main design parameters such as smear and pellet density, gap size, pin diameter and wall thickness as well as the irradiation conditions were varied mostly within wide ranges. Based on a compilation of relevant pin parameters, irradiation conditions, and the results of various irradiation experiments conclusions on the optimum ranges of the main design parameters are drawn. Furthermore, some important aspects of fuel pin behaviour are discussed based on quantitative results from post irradiation examinations. (orig.) [de

  5. Low pollution combustor designs for CTOL engines - Results of the Experimental Clean Combustor Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, R.; Peduzzi, A.; Niedzwiecki, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    The NASA/Pratt & Whitney Aircraft Experimental Clean Combustor Program is a multi-year, major contract effort. Primary program objectives are the generation of combustor technology for development of advanced commercial CTOL engines with lower exhaust emissions than current aircraft and demonstration of this technology in a full-scale JT9D engine in 1976. This paper describes the pollution and performance goals, Phase I and II test results, and the Phase III combustor hardware, pollution sampling techniques, and test plans. Best results were obtained with the Vorbix concept which employs multiple burning zones and improved fuel preparation and distribution. Substantial reductions were achieved in all pollutant categories, meeting the 1979 EPA standards for NOx, THC, and smoke when extrapolated to JT9D cycle conditions. The Vorbix concept additionally demonstrated the capability for acceptable altitude relight and did not appear to have unsolvable durability or exit temperature distribution problems.

  6. Multicenter Collaborative Quality Assurance Program for the Province of Ontario, Canada: First-Year Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Létourneau, Daniel; McNiven, Andrea; Jaffray, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this work was to develop a collaborative quality assurance (CQA) program to assess the performance of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning and delivery across the province of Ontario, Canada. Methods and Materials: The CQA program was designed to be a comprehensive end-to-end test that can be completed on multiple planning and delivery platforms. The first year of the program included a head-and-neck (H and N) planning exercise and on-site visit to acquire dosimetric measurements to assess planning and delivery performance. A single dosimeter was used at each institution, and the planned to measured dose agreement was evaluated for both the H and N plan and a standard plan (linear-accelerator specific) that was created to enable a direct comparison between centers with similar infrastructure. Results: CQA program feasibility was demonstrated through participation of all 13 radiation therapy centers in the province. Planning and delivery was completed on a variety of infrastructure (treatment planning systems and linear accelerators). The planning exercise was completed using both static gantry and rotational IMRT, and planned-to-delivered dose agreement (pass rates) for 3%/3-mm gamma evaluation were greater than 90% (92.6%-99.6%). Conclusions: All centers had acceptable results, but variation in planned to delivered dose agreement for the same planning and delivery platform was noted. The upper end of the range will provide an achievable target for other centers through continued quality improvement, aided by feedback provided by the program through the use of standard plans and simple test fields

  7. Cooperative Severe Accident Research Program of the USNRC and its foreign partners: Program content and principal results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, R.W.; Eltawila, F.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and its associated foreign partners have been engaged in an extensive Cooperative Severe Accident Research Program. In addition to the NRC, the partners currently include Belgium, the Czech Republic, Canada, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Korea, the Netherlands, Russia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, the United Kingdom, and the Community of European Countries. The purpose of this research is to provide a technical basis for decisions involved in potential severe accidents in light water reactor (LWR) power plants. The research includes relatively large-scale integral tests and smaller scale separate-effects experiments on the dominant phenomena regarding severe accident behavior in LWR power plants, the development of phenomenological models of the key phenomena involved, and the development and validation of large computer codes for use in the analysis of core behavior and of a LWR systems behavior under severe accident conditions. The research results are also used in probabilistic risk assessment for LWRS

  8. Financial performance and remuneration of executive directors of brazilian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Degenhart

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to examine whether there is a relationship between financial performance and the remuneration of executive directors of Brazilian companies. Thus, there was a descriptive, documentary and quantitative research. The review period was the years 2011 to 2015. The study population consisted of Brazilian companies listed on the BM&FBovespa and the sample consisted of companies that presented all the variables used in each year surveyed, totaling 219 companies. For the data analysis was conducted to Spearman correlation analysis and linear regression, and was performed using the SPSS statistical software. From the study results it was found that the variables: Total Asset Profitability (ROA and company size had a significant and positive relationship with the fixed remuneration, variable and total executive directors. These results showed for the analyzed scenario, the compensation of executive officers is higher when the ROA is high and also in relation to the company size, large companies pay their executives more than smaller companies. Finally, it can be concluded that there is a relationship between financial performance and Fixed Compensation, and Variable Total executive directors of Brazilian companies listed on the BM&FBovespa. In addition, this research contributes to the understanding of the amounts paid to executive officers, demonstrating that the performance of companies reflected in the remuneration of the executive directors, so that they act in the company in order to raise the economic and financial results.

  9. Empirical Tests and Preliminary Results with the Krakatoa Tool for Full Static Program Verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramírez-de León Edgar Darío

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available XJML (Ramírez et al., 2012 is a modular external platform for Verification and Validation of Java classes using the Java Modeling Language (JML through contracts written in XML. One problem faced in the XJML development was how to integrate Full Static Program Verification (FSPV. This paper presents the experiments and results that allowed us to define what tool to embed in XJML to execute FSPV.

  10. PHEBUS program: first results on PWR fuel behaviour in LOCA conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Negro, R.; Reocreux, M.; Pelce, J.; Legrand, B.; Berna, P.

    1982-09-01

    In the first PHEBUS test with pressurized rods some rods burst and clad temperature reached 1100 0 C in the 25 rods bundle. There is now a lot of valuable experimental results and their analysis is in progress. The phase II on fuel behaviour in case of a large LOCA will start at the beginning of 83. The onset of the SFD program is foreseen to take place on the first months of 85

  11. The passive seismic aftershock Monitoring system: testing program and preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokhtari, M.

    2005-01-01

    The paper is dedicated to testing program (phase of the passive seismic aftershock monitoring system with RefTek equipment (Refraction Technology, Inc., USA) for On-Site Inspection purposes that was carried out near Vienna International Centre in 2000. Equipment and applied software are described. Testing results were analyzed; in particular, least needs in maintenance personnel during operation. Development perspectives of passive seismic aftershock monitoring system for On-Site Inspection have been discussed. (author)

  12. Sort of agricultural species introducing in production resulting of mutation breeding programs in cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Talavera, Susana

    1999-01-01

    Radiomutant varieties of important species used in the Cuban agricultural productions are shown. They were obtained by INIFAT specialists as authors or co-author with the aid of radiomutation techniques in plant breeding programs. Several dates concerning the procedure and some of the features rendering varieties more useful are given. The introduction and acceptability by farmers are also commented. The information was collected from members of the scientific staff involving in the results and from the available literature

  13. What every library director should know

    CERN Document Server

    Curzon, Susan Carol

    2014-01-01

    What Every Library Director Should Know is the insider's view of vital actions, behaviors and strategies to succeed in every type of library. The content is based both on the author's direct experience after a long career in several types of libraries but also on the direct observation of other managers. Inset into the book are pearls of wisdom from other directors, managers and observers who are answering the question, "what is the one piece of management wisdom that you would give to anyone who wishes to become a library director?" This book will help to get you there by explaining and illus

  14. [Cognitive rehabilitation in multiple sclerosis: preliminary results and presentation of a new program, PROCOG-SEP].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissart, H; Leroy, M; Debouverie, M

    2010-04-01

    Although cognitive disorders are well-known in multiple sclerosis (MS), even in earlier stages of the disease, their management may be overlooked. Our objective was to elaborate and evaluate the efficiency of a remedial program (PROCOG-SEP) designed for MS patients. The evidence-based program proposes exercises to both stimulate preserved functions and develop new abilities compensating for cognitive disabilities. Twenty-four patients with MS participated in 10/2-hour PROCOG-SEP sessions over a 6-month period. A neuropsychologist recorded BCcog-SEP performances before and after the PROCOG-SEP program. In addition, the same neuropsychologist conducted psychoclinical interviews to complete the before and after cognitive evaluations. The statistical analysis used the t-test performed with Excel. Compared with the initial levels, subtests of BCcog-SEP showing improvement after PROCOG-SEP were: verbal memory (SRT), visuospatial memory (10/36), verbal fluency (animal categories) and response to conflicting orders. Also, individual psychological interviews tended to be in favor of a general improvement in quality of life (more social interactions for instance). To our knowledge, the management program we have elaborated is the first designed to improve cognitive deficits in MS. These encouraging results suggest possibilities for improving cognition and thus quality-of-life in MS patients. 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluating Behaviorally Oriented Aviation Maintenance Resource Management (MRM) Training and Programs: Methods, Results, and Conclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, James C.; Thomas, Robert L., III

    2003-01-01

    Assessment of the impact of Aviation Resource Management Programs on aviation culture and performance has compelled a considerable body of research (Taylor & Robertson, 1995; Taylor, 1998; Taylor & Patankar, 2001). In recent years new methods have been applied to the problem of maintenance error precipitated by factors such as the need for self-assessment of communication and trust. The present study - 2002 -- is an extension of that past work. This research project was designed as the conclusion of a larger effort to help understand, evaluate and validate the impact of Maintenance Resource Management (MRM) training programs, and other MRM interventions on participant attitudes, opinions, behaviors, and ultimately on enhanced safety performance. It includes research and development of evaluation methodology as well as examination of psychological constructs and correlates of maintainer performance. In particular, during 2002, three issues were addressed. First, the evaluation of two (independent & different) MRM programs for changing behaviors was undertaken. In one case we were able to further apply the approach to measuring written communication developed during 2001 (Taylor, 2002; Taylor & Thomas, 2003). Second, the MRM/TOQ surveys were made available for completion on the internet. The responses from these on-line surveys were automatically linked to a results calculator (like the one developed and described in Taylor, 2002) to aid industry users in analyzing and evaluating their local survey data on the internet. Third, the main trends and themes from our research about MRM programs over the past dozen years were reviewed.

  16. Significant ELCAP analysis results: Summary report. [End-use Load and Consumer Assessment Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, R.G.; Conner, C.C.; Drost, M.K.; Miller, N.E.; Cooke, B.A.; Halverson, M.A.; Lebaron, B.A.; Lucas, R.G.; Jo, J.; Richman, E.E.; Sandusky, W.F. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Ritland, K.G. (Ritland Associates, Seattle, WA (USA)); Taylor, M.E. (USDOE Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR (USA)); Hauser, S.G. (Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (USA))

    1991-02-01

    The evolution of the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP) since 1983 at Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) has been eventful and somewhat tortuous. The birth pangs of a data set so large and encompassing as this have been overwhelming at times. The early adolescent stage of data set development and use has now been reached and preliminary results of early analyses of the data are becoming well known. However, the full maturity of the data set and the corresponding wealth of analytic insights are not fully realized. This document is in some sense a milestone in the brief history of the program. It is a summary of the results of the first five years of the program, principally containing excerpts from a number of previous reports. It is meant to highlight significant accomplishments and analytical results, with a focus on the principal results. Many of the results have a broad application in the utility load research community in general, although the real breadth of the data set remains largely unexplored. The first section of the document introduces the data set: how the buildings were selected, how the metering equipment was installed, and how the data set has been prepared for analysis. Each of the sections that follow the introduction summarize a particular analytic result. A large majority of the analyses to date involve the residential samples, as these were installed first and had highest priority on the analytic agenda. Two exploratory analyses using commercial data are included as an introduction to the commercial analyses that are currently underway. Most of the sections reference more complete technical reports which the reader should refer to for details of the methodology and for more complete discussion of the results. Sections have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  17. Worker Safety and Health Issues Associated with the DOE Environmental Cleanup Program: Insights From the DOE Laboratory Directors' Environmental and Occupational/Public health Standards Steering Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.C. Edelson; Samuel C. Morris; Joan M. Daisey

    2001-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Laboratory Directors' Environmental and Occupational/Public Health Standards Steering Group (or ''SSG'') was formed in 1990. It was felt then that ''risk'' could be an organizing principle for environmental cleanup and that risk-based cleanup standards could rationalize clean up work. The environmental remediation process puts workers engaged in cleanup activities at risk from hazardous materials and from the more usual hazards associated with construction activities. In a real sense, the site remediation process involves the transfer of a hypothetical risk to the environment and the public from isolated contamination into real risks to the workers engaged in the remediation activities. Late in its existence the SSG, primarily motivated by its LANL representative, Dr. Harry Ettinger, actively investigated issues associated with worker health and safety during environmental remediation activities. This paper summarizes the insights noted by the SSG. Most continue to be pertinent today.

  18. 78 FR 4435 - BLM Director's Response to the Alaska Governor's Appeal of the BLM Alaska State Director's...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    ... Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is publishing this notice to explain why the BLM Director is rejecting... Director's Response to the Alaska Governor's Appeal of the BLM Alaska State Director's Governor's... the BLM Alaska State Director. The State Director determined the Governor's Finding was outside the...

  19. SAMPLE RESULTS FROM THE INTEGRATED SALT DISPOSITION PROGRAM MACROBATCH 4 TANK 21H QUALIFICATION SAMPLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, T.; Fink, S.

    2011-06-22

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H to qualify them for use in the Integrated Salt Disposition Program (ISDP) Batch 4 processing. All sample results agree with expectations based on prior analyses where available. No issues with the projected Salt Batch 4 strategy are identified. This revision includes additional data points that were not available in the original issue of the document, such as additional plutonium results, the results of the monosodium titanate (MST) sorption test and the extraction, scrub strip (ESS) test. This report covers the revision to the Tank 21H qualification sample results for Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 4 of the Integrated Salt Disposition Program (ISDP). A previous document covers initial characterization which includes results for a number of non-radiological analytes. These results were used to perform aluminum solubility modeling to determine the hydroxide needs for Salt Batch 4 to prevent the precipitation of solids. Sodium hydroxide was then added to Tank 21 and additional samples were pulled for the analyses discussed in this report. This work was specified by Task Technical Request and by Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP).

  20. Scientific Growth and Identity Development during a Postbaccalaureate Program: Results from a Multisite Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remich, Robin; Naffziger-Hirsch, Michelle E; Gazley, J Lynn; McGee, Richard

    2016-01-01

    This report builds upon our previous study, which described five patterns of why college graduates join National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded diversity-focused Postbaccalaureate Research Education Programs (PREP). A 2015 report from the NIH showed that a high fraction of PREP participants matriculate into PhD and MD/PhD programs. This current study reveals how participants change during PREP, the program elements that facilitate change, and how identity as a graduate student and future scientist develops. Data come from in-depth interviews done at the beginning and end of PREP with 48 individuals from seven PREP programs. Results reveal three domains of development: academics, research, and presentation of oneself; each domain contains a developmental continuum. Key attributes of PREP enabling development include opportunities to attend graduate-level classes and seminars; time to practice reading literature; extended lab time with one's own project; high and explicit expectations from mentors; and multiple opportunities to talk about science and improve communication skills. PREP enabled participants to develop their identities as graduate students and to anticipate being seen by others as highly prepared for PhD training. After PREP, 85% (n = 41) started the PhD or MD/PhD, making PREP an intervention approach with great potential to broaden participation in biomedical PhD programs. © 2016 R. Remich et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2016 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  1. Developing a national role description for medical directors in long-term care: survey-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim-Jamal, Sherin; Quail, Patrick; Bhaloo, Tajudaullah

    2010-01-01

    To develop a national role description for medical directors in long-term care (LTC) based on role functions drawn from the literature and the LTC industry. A questionnaire about the role functions identified from the literature was mailed or e-mailed to randomly selected medical directors, directors of care or nursing (DOCs), and administrators in LTC facilities. Long-term care facilities in Canada randomly selected from regional clusters. Medical directors, DOCs, and administrators in LTC facilities; a national advisory group of medical directors from the Long Term Care Medical Directors Association of Canada; and a volunteer group of medical directors. Respondents were asked to indicate, from the list of identified functions, 1) whether medical directors spent any time on each activity; 2) whether medical directors should spend time on each activity; and 3) if medical directors should spend time on an activity, whether the activity was "essential" or "desirable." An overall response rate of 37% was obtained. At least 80% of the respondents from all 3 groups (medical directors, DOCs, and administrators) highlighted 24 functions they deemed to be "essential" or "desirable," which were then included in the role description. In addition, the advisory group expanded the role description to include 5 additional responsibilities from the remaining 18 functions originally identified. A volunteer group of medical directors confirmed the resulting role description. The role description developed as a result of this study brings clarity to the medical director's role in Canadian LTC facilities; the functions outlined are considered important for medical directors to undertake. The role description could be a useful tool in negotiations pertaining to time commitment and expectations of a medical director and fair compensation for services rendered.

  2. Analysis and presentation of experimental results with examples, problems and programs

    CERN Document Server

    Christodoulides, Costas

    2017-01-01

    This book is intended as a guide to the analysis and presentation of experimental results. It develops various techniques for the numerical processing of experimental data, using basic statistical methods and the theory of errors. After presenting basic theoretical concepts, the book describes the methods by which the results can be presented, both numerically and graphically. The book is divided into three parts, of roughly equal length, addressing the theory, the analysis of data, and the presentation of results. Examples are given and problems are solved using the Excel, Origin, Python and R software packages. In addition, programs in all four languages are made available to readers, allowing them to use them in analyzing and presenting the results of their own experiments. Subjects are treated at a level appropriate for undergraduate students in the natural sciences, but this book should also appeal to anyone whose work involves dealing with experimental results.

  3. The limnology of L Lake: Results of the L-Lake monitoring program, 1986--1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowers, J.A.

    1991-12-15

    L Lake was constructed in 1985 on the upper regions of Steel Creek, SRS to mitigate the heated effluents from L Reactor. In addition to the NPDES permit specifications (Outfall L-007) for the L-Reactor outfall, DOE-SR executed an agreement with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), that thermal effluents from L-Reactor will not substantially alter ecosystem components in the approximate lower half of L Lake. This region should be inhabited by Balanced (Indigenous) Biological Communities (BBCs) in accordance with Section 316(a) of the Pollution Control (Clean Water) Act (Public Law 92-500). In response to this requirement the Environmental Sciences Section/Ecology Group initiated a comprehensive biomonitoring program which documented the development of BBCs in L Lake from January 1986 through December 1989. This report summarizes the principal results of the program with regards to BBC compliance issues and community succession in L Lake. The results are divided into six sections: water quality, macronutrients, and phytoplankton, aquatic macrophytes, zooplankton, benthic macroinvertebrates, fish, and community succession. One of the prime goals of the program was to detect potential reactor impacts on L Lake.

  4. Directors' report and accounts 1991-1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report for Scottish Hydro-Electric PLC contains details of key financial statistics, the financial calendar, the Directors' Report, the Auditors' Report, accounting policies, a Group Profit and Loss Account, balance sheets and a Group Cash Flow Statement. (UK)

  5. Leader in Digital Transformation: Director, Information Management ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    As the Deputy Chief Information Officer, the Director is also accountable for developing ... operations and maintenance of key business systems (financial applications, ... Plays a key role in the control of access to personal information in e-mail ...

  6. Selected Publications by the NCI Director

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dr. Norman Sharpless's written work on cancer research appears in many leading scientific journals, as well as a variety of other publications. This page lists some of the articles published by Dr. Sharpless since becoming NCI director.

  7. Wanted: Fermilab director who can build consensus

    CERN Multimedia

    Pierce, G M

    2004-01-01

    "With current Fermilab Director Michael Witherell stepping down in July 2005, an appointed committee has vowed to find a new leader who will keep the Batavia lab at the forefront of the high-energy physics field" (1 page).

  8. A couples’ based self-management program for heart failure: Results of a feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranak Trivedi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Heart failure (HF is associated with frequent exacerbations and shortened lifespan. Informal caregivers such as significant others often support self-management in patients with HF. However, existing programs that aim to enhance self-management seldom engage informal caregivers or provide tools that can help alleviate caregiver burden or improve collaboration between patients and their informal caregivers. Objective: To develop and pilot test a program targeting the needs of self-management support among HF patients as well as their significant others. Methods: We developed the Dyadic Health Behavior Change model and conducted semi-structured interviews to determine barriers to self-management from various perspectives. Participants’ feedback was used to develop a family-centered self-management program called SUCCEED: Self-management Using Couples’ Coping EnhancEment in Diseases. The goals of this program are to improve HF self-management, quality of life, communication within couples, relationship quality, and stress and caregiver burden. We conducted a pilot study with 17 Veterans with HF and their significant others to determine acceptability of the program. We piloted psychosocial surveys at baseline and after participants’ program completion to evaluate change in depressive symptoms, caregiver burden, self-management of HF, communication, quality of relationship, relationship mutuality, and quality of life. Results: Of the 17 couples, 14 completed at least 1 SUCCEED session. Results showed high acceptability for each of SUCCEED’s sessions. At baseline, patients reported poor quality of life, clinically significant depressive symptoms, and inadequate self-management of HF. After participating in SUCCEED, patients showed improvements in self-management of HF, communication, and relationship quality, while caregivers reported improvements in depressive symptoms and caregiver burden. Quality of life of both patients and

  9. Phebus program main results and status for severe fuel damage studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duco, J.; Reocreux, M.; Tattegrain, A.

    1986-06-01

    A large experimental in-pile program has been set up at the PHEBUS facility to investigate the actual behavior of .8 m active height, 25-rod PWR-type pressurized fresh fuel bundles under typical accident conditions. The program consists of four stages. Stage 1 was devoted to the adjustment of the operational procedure for stage 2. Stage 2 refers to the simulation of conservatively calculated L.B. LOCA 2 - peak transients. Stages 3/4 refer to four PWR severe accident scenarios retained for in-pile simulation at PHEBUS: a) a large break LOCA with injection failure; b) a small break LOCA associated with an injection failure; c) a prolonged total loss of the steam generator feedwater; and, d) a prolonged core uncovery a few days after reactor shutdown. The main PHEBUS stage 2 results are presented and finally interpreted

  10. Results of calendar year 1995 Well Inspection and Maintenance Program Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMaster, B.W.

    1996-07-01

    This document is a compendium of results of the 1995 Monitor Well Inspection and Maintenance Program at the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. This report documents the work relating to well inspections and maintenance requests. Inspections are implemented in order to better assess the condition and maintenance needs of wells that are actively being monitored. Currently this approach calls for inspecting all wells on a routine (annual or triennial) basis which are: (1) in an active sampling program; (2) included in a hydrologic study; or (3) not in service, but not scheduled for plugging and abandonment. Routine inspections help to ensure that representative groundwater samples and hydrologic data are being collected, and contribute to the effective longevity of each well. This report formally presents well inspection and maintenance activities that were conducted at the Y-12 Plant from August through December 1995

  11. Out of pile French research program on the UMo/Al system: First results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubois, S.; Mazaudier, F.; Piron, J.P.; Martin, P.; Dumas, J.C.; Huet, F.; Noel, H.; Tougait, O.; Jarousse, C.; Lemoine, P.

    2005-01-01

    This paper focuses on a French scientific program built to gain further knowledge on the UMo/Al interaction and to discuss promising solutions to prevent this interaction under neutron flux. Three themes are thus developed. Thermodynamic investigations, through UMo-Al ternary system studies, may lead to determining the phase equilibria at different temperatures. Metallurgical out-of-pile diffusion couple studies are intended to improve the understanding of diffusion mechanisms and should underline the role of different parameters, which could prevent or decrease the UMo/Al reaction. Finally, the irradiation effect has been taken into account, either through a simulation program or an in-pile one. The results already achieved are described and discussed. (author)

  12. THE INTERIM RESULTS AND THE WAYS TO IMPLEMENT THE PROGRAMS TEACHER TRAINING IN NETWORK FORM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Tolsteneva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of approbation of new modules primary educational undergraduate specialties Group expanded education and pedagogy (training areas-economics, involving academic mobility of students of universities in terms of networking of Novosibirsk and Nizhny Novgorod pedagogical universities. The article describes the structure of established affiliate networks, conducted pedagogical and methodical analysis modules have passed testing, recommendations for improvement and suggested ways for the development of a modular approach to building educational programs in teacher education system. The implementation of educational modules require their integration into the curricula of the Nizhny Novgorod State Pedagogical University, with no loss of content, giving the existing curriculum structure saturation. Thus, it was achieved 100% consistency of curriculum, opening further opportunities for the implementation of educational programs in terms of networking.

  13. The pollution reduction technology program for can-annular combustor engines - Description and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, R.; Fiorentino, A. J.; Diehl, L.

    1976-01-01

    Pollutant reduction and performance characteristics were determined for three successively more advanced combustor concepts. Program Element I consisted of minor modifications to the current production JT8D combustor and fuel system to evaluate means of improved fuel preparation and changes to the basic airflow distribution. Element II addressed versions of the two-staged Vorbix (vortex burning and mixing) combustor and represented a moderate increase in hardware complexity and difficulty of development. The concept selected for Element III employed vaporized fuel as a means of achieving minimum emission levels and represented the greatest difficulty of development and adaptation to the JT8D engine. Test results indicate that the Element I single-stage combustors were capable of dramatic improvement in idle pollutants. The multistage combustors evaluated in Program Elements II and III simultaneously reduced CO, THC and NOx emissions, but were unable to satisfy the current 1979 EPA standards.

  14. Analysis results from the Los Alamos 2D/3D program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyack, B.E.; Cappiello, M.W.; Harmony, S.C.; Shire, P.R.; Siebe, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is a participant in the 2D/3D program. Activities conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory in support of 2D/3D program goals include analysis support of facility design, construction, and operation; provision of boundary and initial conditions for test-facility operations based on analysis of pressurized water reactors; performance of pretest and posttest predictions and analyses; and use of experimental results to validate and assess the single- and multi-dimensional, nonequilibrium features in the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC). During fiscal year 1987, Los Alamos conducted analytical assessment activities using data from the Slab Core Test Facility, The Cylindrical Core Test Facility, and the Upper Plenum Test Facility. Finally, Los Alamos continued work to provide TRAC improvements. In this paper, Los Alamos activities during fiscal year 1987 will be summarized; several significant accomplishments will be described in more detail to illustrate the work activities at Los Alamos

  15. Preliminary irradiation test results from the Yankee Atomic Electric Company reactor vessel test irradiation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biemiller, E.C.; Fyfitch, S.; Campbell, C.A.

    1993-01-01

    The Yankee Atomic Electric Company test irradiation program was implemented to characterize the irradiation response of representative Yankee Rowe reactor vessel beltline plate materials and to remove uncertainties in the analysis of existing irradiation data on the Yankee Rowe reactor vessel steel. Plate materials each containing 0.24 w/o copper, but different nickel contents at 0.63 w/o and 0.19 w/o, were heat treated to simulate the Yankee vessel heat treatment (austenitized at 1800 deg F) and to simulate Regulatory Guide 1.99 database materials (austenitized at 1600 deg. F). These heat treatments produced different microstructures so the effect of microstructure on irradiation damage sensitivity could be tested. Because the nickel content of the test plates varied and the copper level was constant, the effect of nickel on irradiation embrittlement was also tested. Correlation monitor material, HSST-02, was included in the program to benchmark the Ford Nuclear Reactor (U. of Michigan Test Reactor) which had never been used for this type of irradiation program. Materials taken from plate surface locations (vs. 1/4T) were included to test whether or not the improved toughness properties of the plate surface layer, resulting from the rapid quench, is maintained after irradiation. If the improved properties are maintained, pressurized thermal shock calculations could utilize this margin. Finally, for one experiment, irradiations were conducted at two irradiation temperatures (500 deg. F and 550 deg. F) to determine the effect of irradiation temperature on embrittlement. The preliminary results of the irradiation program show an increase in T 30 shift of 69 deg. F for a decrease in irradiation temperature of 50 deg. F. The results suggest that for nickel bearing steels, the superior toughness of plate surface material is maintained after irradiation and for the copper content tested, nickel had no apparent effect on irradiation response. No apparent microstructure

  16. Technology transfer from havana hospitals to primary care: yamila de armas, MD. Deputy director, provincial health department, havana city province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo, Gloria

    2009-01-01

    Dr Yamila de Armas has occupied an array of posts since finishing her residency in family medicine in her home province of Cienfuegos in 1992. She has served as a family doctor; polyclinic, municipal and provincial health director; medical school dean; and twice vice minister of public health. But few would doubt her toughest job is the one she has now: deputy director of the Havana City Provincial Health Department, in charge of medical services for the 2.2 million people living in Cuba's complex, sprawling capital. It was here in 2002-2003 that the program was launched to repair, refurbish and expand the country's nearly 500 community polyclinics. Key to the effort was equipping these facilities with a broader range of new and upgraded medical technology. Dr de Armas offers MEDICC Review her reflections on the results five years later.

  17. Alternative Perspectives on Independence of Directors

    OpenAIRE

    Brennan, Niamh; McDermott, Michael

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines the issue of independence of boards of directors and non-executive directors of companies listed on the Irish Stock Exchange. Based on information published in annual reports, the study found that most Irish listed companies were complying with the Combined Code’s recommendations for a balanced board structure, albeit with only 60 per cent having majority-independent boards. The study found a lack of consistency in interpreting the definition of “independence”, a lack of d...

  18. Board Directors and Corporate Social Responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Nedelcu (Bunea

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The boards of directors and corporate social responsibility (CSR have been the subject of much study and debate in the corporate governance circles over the two last decades. With issues ranging from poor corporate reporting to excessive executive compensation often splashed in the headlines, the role of boards comes into the media limelight as never before. Boards of directors are also becoming increasingly aware of corporate social responsibility issues.

  19. Board Directors and Corporate Social Responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Mariana Nedelcu (Bunea)

    2014-01-01

    The boards of directors and corporate social responsibility (CSR) have been the subject of much study and debate in the corporate governance circles over the two last decades. With issues ranging from poor corporate reporting to excessive executive compensation often splashed in the headlines, the role of boards comes into the media limelight as never before. Boards of directors are also becoming increasingly aware of corporate social responsibility issues.

  20. Initial Results from the STEM Student Experiences Aboard Ships (STEMSEAS) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, J. C.; Cooper, S. K.; Thomson, K.; Rabin, B.; Alberts, J.

    2016-12-01

    The Science Technology Engineering and Math Student Experiences Aboard Ships (STEMSEAS) program was created as a response to NSF's call (through GEOPATHS) for improving undergraduate STEM education and enhancing diversity in the geosciences. It takes advantage of unused berths on UNOLS ships during transits between expeditions. During its 2016 pilot year - which consisted of three transits on three different research vessels in different parts of the country, each with a slightly different focus - the program has gained significant insights into how best to create and structure these opportunities and create impact on individual students. A call for applications resulted in nearly 900 applicants for 30 available spots. Of these applicants, 32% are from minority groups underrepresented in the geosciences (Black, Hispanic, or American Indian) and 20% attend community colleges. The program was able to sail socioeconomically diverse cohorts and include women, veterans, and students with disabilities and from two- and four-year colleges. Twenty-three are underrepresented minorities, 6 attend community colleges, 5 attend an HBCU or tribal college, and many are at HSIs or other MSIs. While longer term impact assessment will have to wait, initial results and 6-month tracking for the first cohort indicate that these kinds of relatively short but intense experiences can indeed achieve significant impacts on students' perception of the geosciences, in their understanding of STEM career opportunities, their desire to work in a geoscience lab setting, and to incorporate geosciences into non-STEM careers. Insights were also gained into the successful makeup of mentor/leader groups, factors to consider in student selection, necessary pre- and post-cruise logistics management, follow-up activities, structure of activities during daily life at sea, increasing student networks and access to mentorships, and leveraging of pre-existing resources and ship-based opportunities

  1. Neuromuscular Changes in Female Collegiate Athletes Resulting From a Plyometric Jump-Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, Gary B.; Colston, Marisa A.; Short, Nancy I.; Neal, Kristina L.; Hoewischer, Paul E.; Pixley, Jennifer J.

    2004-03-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess performance changes induced by a 6- week plyometric jump-training program. DESIGN AND SETTING: We used a quasiexperimental design to compare groups formed on the basis of team membership. Testing was conducted in an athletic training research laboratory, both before and after a 6-week period of preseason basketball conditioning. SUBJECTS: Nineteen female collegiate basketball players from a National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I program (8 subjects) and a National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics Division II program (11 subjects) who had no history of anterior cruciate ligament injury and who had no history of any lower extremity injury during the preceding 6 months. MEASUREMENTS: The variables of primary interest were hamstrings and quadriceps isokinetic peak torque. Of secondary interest were 5 variables derived from step-down and lunging maneuvers performed on a computerized forceplate system and 4 variables derived from tracking the position of the body core during performance of a T-pattern agility drill with a computerized infrared tracking system. RESULTS: A significant group x trial interaction was found for hamstrings peak torque at 60 degrees.s(-1) (F(1,17) = 9.16, P =.008.), and the proportion of total variance attributable to the treatment effect produced by the jump-training program was relatively large (eta(2) =.35, omega(2) =.30). None of the other variables demonstrated statistically significant changes. CONCLUSIONS: Our primary results support plyometric jump training as a strategy for improving neuromuscular attributes that are believed to reduce the risk of anterior cruciate ligament injury in female college basketball players. They also provide the basis for reasonable isokinetic strength goals.

  2. Promoting Self-regulated Learning of Brazilian Preservice Student Teachers: Results of an Intervention Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Ribeiro Ganda

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Self-regulation is the process by which individuals monitor, control, and reflect on their learning. Self-regulated students have motivational, metacognitive, affective, and behavioral characteristics that enhance their learning. As the importance of self-regulated learning is well acknowledged by research nowadays, the aim of this study is to examine the effectiveness of an innovative course designed to promote self-regulated learning among Brazilian preservice student teachers. The innovative approach was developed in the format of a program of intervention based heavily on self-reflection. The content involved student exposure to self-reflexive activities, lectures on the self-regulated learning framework, and theoretical tasks aimed at fostering self-regulation of students in a double perspective: as a student and as a future teacher. The efficacy of the approach was tested by comparison with both the results of students who had taken a course with theoretical content only and those who had not taken any course at all. The sample consisted of 109 students in 4 different freshman classes in a Teacher Education Program in a Brazilian public university in an inner city in the state of São Paulo. The research was conducted using a quasi-experimental design with three stages: pretest, intervention, and posttest. The classes were randomly assigned to experimental and control conditions as follows: an experimental group involving intervention, an experimental group exposed to theory, and two control groups not taking the course. Before and after the intervention program, all the participants responded to the Learning and Study Strategies Inventory and the Self-efficacy for Self-regulated Learning scales. Overall, the results showed that the intervention program format had a positive impact in enhancing student self-regulation. Moreover, students in both the experimental groups reported both higher gains in self-efficacy for self-regulated learning

  3. Maternal obesity and malnourishment exacerbate perinatal oxidative stress resulting in diabetogenic programming in F1 offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, M I; Abdelkhalek, T M; Haiba, M M; Saleh, M M; Hanafi, M Y; Tawfik, S H; Kamel, M A

    2016-06-01

    The effect of in-utero environment on fetal health and survival is long-lasting, and this is known as the fetal origin hypothesis. The oxidative stress state during gestation could play a pivotal role in fetal programming and development of diseases such as diabetes. In this study, we investigated the effect of intra-uterine obesity and malnutrition on oxidative stress markers in pancreatic and peripheral tissues of F1 offspring both prenatally and postnatally. Furthermore, the effect of postnatal diet on oxidative stress profile was evaluated. The results indicated that intra-uterine obesity and malnourishment significantly increased oxidative stress in F1 offspring. Moreover, the programming effect of obesity was more pronounced and protracted than malnutrition. The obesity-induced programming of offspring tissues was independent of high-caloric environment that the offspring endured; however, high-caloric diet potentiated its effect. In addition, pancreas and liver were the most affected tissues by fetal reprogramming both prenatally and postnatally. In conclusion, maternal obesity and malnutrition-induced oxidative stress could predispose offspring to insulin resistance and diabetes.

  4. Results from two workshops: Developing and amending regulations and funding state radiation control programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, G.

    1993-09-01

    The first section of this document presents the results of a technical workshop on the process of regulations development and amendment sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This workshop focused on methods for reducing the time it takes to promulgate regulations to help those States that are having difficulty meeting the three-year deadline for adopting new NRC regulations. Workshop participants responded to six questions, reviewed the procedures used by various States for revising and adopting changes to their regulations, and reviewed the time-flow charts used by various States. This workshop was designed to provide guidance to States that are promulgating and revising regulations. The second section of this document summarizes the proceedings of a technical workshop, also sponsored by the NRC, on funding radiation control programs that emphasized fee schedules and effective strategies for the 1990s. This workshop focused on determining the true costs of running a program, on setting realistic fees for the various categories of licenses, and on the most efficient methods for sending invoices, recording receipts, depositing money received, and issuing licenses. Workshop participants responded to seven questions; reviewed the methods various States use to determine true costs; reviewed the procedure that the various States use to produce invoices and licenses; reviewed the procedures that the States are required to abide by when they receive money; and reviewed the method used by the NRC to determine the cost of its various programs

  5. Results of the remote sensing feasibility study for the uranium hexafluoride storage cylinder yard program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balick, L.K.; Bowman, D.R.

    1997-02-01

    The US DOE manages the safe storage of approximately 650,000 tons of depleted uranium hexafluoride remaining from the Cold War. This slightly radioactive, but chemically active, material is contained in more than 46,000 steel storage cylinders that are located at Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Paducah, Kentucky; and Portsmouth, Ohio. Some of the cylinders are more than 40 years old, and approximately 17,500 are considered problem cylinders because their physical integrity is questionable. These cylinders require an annual visual inspection. The remainder of the 46,000-plus cylinders must be visually inspected every four years. Currently, the cylinder inspection program is extremely labor intensive. Because these inspections are accomplished visually, they may not be effective in the early detection of leaking cylinders. The inspection program requires approximately 12--14 full-time-equivalent (FTE) employees. At the cost of approximately $125K per FTE, this translates to $1,500K per annum just for cylinder inspection. As part of the technology-development portion of the DOE Cylinder Management Program, the DOE Office of Facility Management requested the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) to evaluate remote sensing techniques that have potential to increase the effectiveness of the inspection program and, at the same time, reduce inspection costs and personnel radiation exposure. During two site visits (March and May 1996) to the K-25 Site at Oak Ridge, TN, RSL personnel tested and characterized seven different operating systems believed to detect leakage, surface contamination, thickness and corrosion of cylinder walls, and general area contamination resulting from breached cylinders. The following techniques were used and their performances are discussed: Laser-induced fluorescent imaging; Long-range alpha detection; Neutron activation analysis; Differential gamma-ray attenuation; Compton scatterometry; Active infrared inspection; and Passive thermal infrared imaging

  6. Initial results of strand produced in Phase 2 of the SSCL Vendor Qualification Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdmann, M.; Capone, D. II; Coleman, S.; Jones, B.; Seuntjens, J.

    1993-05-01

    In 1991, the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) instituted a program to qualify specific superconductor manufacturers for production of cable acceptable for use in both Collider Dipole (CDM) and Quadrupole (CQM) magnets. The SSCL Vendor Qualification Program (VQP) was designed with two Phases. Phase 1 was divided into two additional phases, 1A and 1B, which ran concurrently. In Phase 1B, each vendor was directed to manufacture roughly 3000 kg of cable using a ''baseline'' process. The baseline process was agreed to by both the SSCL and the vendor at the beginning of the VQP. In this phase, process control was closely monitored with the use of statistical methods and each vendor was graded based on these results. Phase 1A, known as the R ampersand D phase, was developed to allow each vendor an opportunity to optimize and improve on their baseline process in terms of both cost and manufacturability. In this phase, multifilament billets were designed to explore several key variables such as alternate alloy sources, process modifications and improved billet designs. At the end of Phase 1, the results from both 1A and 1B were evaluated at a review between the SSCL and each vendor, and a final Phase 2 process was generated and fixed using the best results. In Phase 2, each vendor is required to manufacture roughly 6000 kg of superconducting cable under a firm fixed price contract which can then be used to create an accurate price estimate for competitive bidding on the full rate production CDM and CQM contracts. At the end of Phase 2, each vendor must meet the minimum requirements outlined in the contract to become a qualified superconducting cable supplier. For one requirement, critical process variables identified by the SSCL Conductor Department at the beginning of the VQP will be evaluated to determine the quality and uniformity of the material produced during Phase 2 of the program

  7. NASA Space Geodesy Program: GSFC data analysis, 1993. VLBI geodetic results 1979 - 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chopo; Ryan, James W.; Caprette, Douglas S.

    1994-01-01

    The Goddard VLBI group reports the results of analyzing Mark 3 data sets acquired from 110 fixed and mobile observing sites through the end of 1992 and available to the Space Geodesy Program. Two large solutions were used to obtain site positions, site velocities, baseline evolution for 474 baselines, earth rotation parameters, nutation offsets, and radio source positions. Site velocities are presented in both geocentric Cartesian and topocentric coordinates. Baseline evolution is plotted for the 89 baselines that were observed in 1992 and positions at 1988.0 are presented for all fixed stations and mobile sites. Positions are also presented for quasar radio sources used in the solutions.

  8. arXiv Recent results from the strong interactions program of NA61/SHINE

    CERN Document Server

    Pulawski, Szymon

    2017-01-01

    The NA61/SHINE experiment studies hadron production in hadron+hadron, hadron+nucleus and nucleus+nucleus collisions. The strong interactions program has two main purposes: study the properties of the onset of deconfinement and search for the signatures of the critical point of strongly interacting matter. This aim is pursued by performing a two-dimensional scan of the phase diagram by varying the energy/momentum (13A-158A GeV/c) and the system size (p+p, Be+Be, Ar+Sc, Xe+La) of the collisions. This publication reviews recent results from p+p, Be+Be and Ar+Sc interactions. Measured particle spectra are discussed and compared to NA49 results from Pb+Pb collisions. The results illustrate the progress towards scanning the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter.

  9. Distributed Pair Programming Using Collaboration Scripts: An Educational System and Initial Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsompanoudi, Despina; Satratzemi, Maya; Xinogalos, Stelios

    2015-01-01

    Since pair programming appeared in the literature as an effective method of teaching computer programming, many systems were developed to cover the application of pair programming over distance. Today's systems serve personal, professional and educational purposes allowing distributed teams to work together on the same programming project. The…

  10. The function of a medical director in healthcare institutions: a master or a servant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossaify, Antoine; Rasputin, Boris; Lahoud, Jean Claude

    2013-01-01

    The function of a medical director is presented along with features of efficiency and deficiencies from the perspective of healthcare system improvement. A MEDLINE/Pubmed research was performed using the terms "medical director" and "director", and 50 relevant articles were selected. Institutional healthcare quality is closely related to the medical director efficiency and deficiency, and a critical discussion of his or her function is presented along with a focus on the institutional policies, protocols, and procedures. The relationship between the medical director and the executive director is essential in order to implement a successful healthcare program, particularly in private facilities. Issues related to professionalism, fairness, medical records, quality of care, patient satisfaction, medical teaching, and malpractice are discussed from the perspective of institutional development and improvement strategies. In summary, the medical director must be a servant to the institutional constitution and to his or her job description; when his or her function is fully implemented, he or she may represent a local health governor or master, ensuring supervision and improvement of the institutional healthcare system.

  11. Summary of ROSA-4 LSTF first phase test program and station blackout (TMLB) test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasaka, K.; Kukita, Y.; Anoda, Y.

    1990-01-01

    This paper summarizes major test results obtained at the ROSA-4 Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) during the first phase of the test program. The results from a station blackout (TMLB) test conducted at the end of the first-phase program are described in some detail. The LSTF is an integral test facility being operated by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute for simulation of pressurized water reactor (PWR) thermal-hydraulic responses during small-break loss-of-coolant accidents (SBLOCAs) and operational/abnormal transients. It is a 1/48 volumetrically scaled, full-height, full-pressure simulator of a Westinghouse-type 4-loop PWR. The facility includes two symmetric primary loops each one containing an active inverted-U tube steam generator and an active reactor coolant pump. The loop horizontal legs are sized to conserve the scaled (1/24) volumes as well as the length to the square root of the diameter ratio in order to simulate the two-phase flow regime transitions. The primary objective of the LSTF first-phase program was to define the fundamental PWR thermal-hydraulic responses during SBLOCAs and transients. Most of the tests were conducted with simulated component/operator failures, including unavailability of the high pressure injection system and auxiliary feedwater system, as well as operator failure to take corrective actions. The forty-two first phase tests included twenty-nine SBLOCA tests conducted mainly for cold leg breaks, three abnormal transient tests and ten natural circulation tests. Attempts were made in several of the SBLOCA tests to simulate the plant recovery procedures as well as candidate accident management measures for prevention of high-pressure core melt situation. The natural circulation tests simulated the single-phase and two-phase natural circulation as well as reflux condensation behavior in the primary loops in steady or quasi-steady states

  12. Brain donation in psychiatry: results of a Dutch prospective donor program among psychiatric cohort participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lange, Geertje M; Rademaker, Marleen; Boks, Marco P; Palmen, Saskia J M C

    2017-10-20

    Human brain tissue is crucial to study the molecular and cellular basis of psychiatric disorders. However, the current availability of human brain tissue is inadequate. Therefore, the Netherlands Brain Bank initiated a program in which almost 4.000 participants of 15 large Dutch psychiatric research cohorts were asked to register as prospective brain donors. We approached patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, families with a child with autism or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, healthy relatives and healthy unrelated controls, either face-to-face or by post. We investigated whether diagnosis, method of approach, age, and gender were related to the likelihood of brain-donor registration. We found a striking difference in registration efficiency between the diagnosis groups. Patients with bipolar disorder and healthy relatives registered most often (25% respectively 17%), followed by unrelated controls (8%) and patients with major depressive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder (9%, 6% resp. 5%). A face-to-face approach was 1.3 times more effective than a postal approach and the likelihood of registering as brain donor significantly increased with age. Gender did not make a difference. Between 2013 and 2016, our prospective brain-donor program for psychiatry resulted in an almost eightfold increase (from 149 to 1149) in the number of registered psychiatric patients at the Netherlands Brain Bank. Based on our results we recommend, when starting a prospective brain donor program in psychiatric patients, to focus on face to face recruitment of people in their sixties or older.

  13. Targets and results of the Brazilian Biodiesel Incentive Program – Has it reached the Promised Land?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathmann, Régis; Szklo, Alexandre; Schaeffer, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We test the assumptions that justified the Brazilian Biodiesel Production Program. ► The “Promised Land” has not been reached, particularly from a socioeconomic standpoint. ► The generation of jobs in the agricultural sector has been much lower than expected. -- Abstract: This study tests the assumptions that justified the establishment of the Brazilian Biodiesel Production Program (PNPB), to see whether this program has achieved its promised results. Given the connection between socioeconomic, political, technological and environmental issues, the study performs an analysis covering these different dimensions. From the socioeconomic standpoint, findings of the study show that the generation of jobs in the agricultural sector has been much lower than the expected 1.3-million-job creation figure. From the standpoint of reducing the outflow of foreign exchange because of potentially lower demand for imported diesel, the option for the methanol instead of ethanol production route has led to an increased net outflow, as the greater need to import methanol to produce biodiesel more than offsets the lesser need to import mineral diesel. Nevertheless, even though the “Promised Land” has not been reached, particularly from a socioeconomic standpoint, the premises of energy efficiency and the potential to mitigate GHG emissions appear to be on solid ground. In this respect, the input/output energy ratio of producing soy-based biodiesel and the GHG mitigation potential of pure biodiesel justify the continuing effort to improve the PNPB to achieve more promising results in relation to the other indicators.

  14. Presentation of the results of a Bayesian automatic event detection and localization program to human analysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushida, N.; Kebede, F.; Feitio, P.; Le Bras, R.

    2016-12-01

    The Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) has been developing and testing NET-VISA (Arora et al., 2013), a Bayesian automatic event detection and localization program, and evaluating its performance in a realistic operational mode. In our preliminary testing at the CTBTO, NET-VISA shows better performance than its currently operating automatic localization program. However, given CTBTO's role and its international context, a new technology should be introduced cautiously when it replaces a key piece of the automatic processing. We integrated the results of NET-VISA into the Analyst Review Station, extensively used by the analysts so that they can check the accuracy and robustness of the Bayesian approach. We expect the workload of the analysts to be reduced because of the better performance of NET-VISA in finding missed events and getting a more complete set of stations than the current system which has been operating for nearly twenty years. The results of a series of tests indicate that the expectations born from the automatic tests, which show an overall overlap improvement of 11%, meaning that the missed events rate is cut by 42%, hold for the integrated interactive module as well. New events are found by analysts, which qualify for the CTBTO Reviewed Event Bulletin, beyond the ones analyzed through the standard procedures. Arora, N., Russell, S., and Sudderth, E., NET-VISA: Network Processing Vertically Integrated Seismic Analysis, 2013, Bull. Seismol. Soc. Am., 103, 709-729.

  15. 75 FR 28262 - Office of the Director, National Institutes of Health; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-20

    ... discussion are: (1) NIH Director's Report; (2) Work Group for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Review; (3) Work... available. (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.14, Intramural Research Training Award; 93.22, Clinical Research Loan Repayment Program for Individuals from Disadvantaged Backgrounds; 93...

  16. arXiv Recent results and future of the NA61/SHINE strong interactions program

    CERN Document Server

    Lysakowski, Bartosz

    2018-01-01

    NA61/SHINE is a fixed target experiment at the CERN Super-Proton- Synchrotron. The main goals of the experiment are to discover the critical point of strongly interacting matter and study the properties of the onset of deconfnement. In order to reach these goals the collaboration studies hadron production properties in nucleus-nucleus, proton-proton and proton-nucleus interactions. In this talk, recent results on particle production in p+p interactions, as well as Be+Be and Ar+Sc collisions in the SPS energy range are reviewed. The results are compared with available world data. The future of the NA61/SHINE scientifc program is also presented.

  17. Results from utility wind resource assessment programs in Nebraska, Colorado, and Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drapeau, C.L. [Global Energy Concepts, Inc., Bothell, WA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Global Energy Concepts (GEC) has been retained by utilities in Colorado, Nebraska, and Arizona to site, install, and operate 21 wind monitoring stations as part of the Utility Wind Resource Assessment Program (U*WRAP). Preliminary results indicate wind speed averages at 40 meters (132 ft) of 6.5 - 7.4 m/s (14.5-16.5 mph) in Nebraska and 7.6 - 8.9 m/s (17.0-19.9 mph) in Colorado. The Arizona stations are not yet operational. This paper presents the history and current status of the 21 monitoring stations as well as preliminary data results. Information on wind speeds, wind direction, turbulence intensity, wind shear, frequency distribution, and data recovery rates are provided.

  18. Results of the initial test program for the Sandia Pulsed Reactor III (SPR III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estes, B.F.; Reuscher, J.A.

    1976-08-01

    This document presents a detailed discussion of the reactor including the mechanical and nuclear design characteristics. Also presented are the complete results of the Initial Approach to Critical and the Zero-and-Low Power testing programs. Reactivity worth measurements are given for such parameters as control element integral worth, Safety Block integral worth, and various materials (polyethylene, copper, lead, etc) as a function of position relative to the core. Subcritical reactivity measurements made during the approach to critical generally proved to be in reasonably good agreement with design values due to the good source-fuel-detector geometry possible with a reactor of this type. Subsequent dynamic measurements for reactivity worths are shown to be in good agreement with calculated results

  19. Follow-up of abnormal or inadequate test results in the Danish Cervical Cancer Screening Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Bettina Kjær

    2014-01-01

    Denmark has a higher incidence of cervical cancer than other Nordic countries, although all Danish women (aged 23–65) are screened regularly to identify possible cervical dysplasia or asymptomatic invasive cancer. Annually 40 000 women receives an abnormal or inadequate test result and a follow......-up recommendation. However problems with delayed follow-up may threaten the effectiveness of the Danish Cervical Cancer Screening Program, as 20% of women are delayed and dysplasia potentially can progress into cancer. Delayed follow-up is found in situations where women either consciously or unconsciously postpone...... up will be sent to the women (RCT). The intention is to ensure that all women will be notified about the test result, quickly, homogenously and in layman’s written language, still with the opportunity to contact or be contacted by the GP, if there is special needs. Furthermore, it is assumed that GP...

  20. results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salabura Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available HADES experiment at GSI is the only high precision experiment probing nuclear matter in the beam energy range of a few AGeV. Pion, proton and ion beams are used to study rare dielectron and strangeness probes to diagnose properties of strongly interacting matter in this energy regime. Selected results from p + A and A + A collisions are presented and discussed.