WorldWideScience

Sample records for program deep gulf

  1. Deep Eddies in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furey, H. H.; Bower, A. S.; Perez-Brunius, P.; Hamilton, P.

    2014-12-01

    A major Lagrangian program is currently underway to map the deep (1500-2500 m) circulation of the entire Gulf of Mexico. Beginning in 2011, more than 120 acoustically tracked RAFOS floats have been released in the eastern, central and western Gulf, many in pairs and triplets. Most floats are programmed to drift for two years, obtaining position fixes and temperature/pressure measurements three times daily. More than 80 floats have completed their missions, and results from the trajectories will be described with a focus on mesoscale eddying behavior. In particular, the first-ever observations of deep energetic anticyclonic eddies (possibly lenses) forming at and separating from a northeastward-flowing boundary current west of Campeche Bank will be discussed. The existence of these eddies has major implications for exchange between the continental slope and interior Gulf. The project is being supported by the U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM).

  2. Deepwater Program: Lophelia II, continuing ecological research on deep-sea corals and deep-reef habitats in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demopoulos, Amanda W.J.; Ross, Steve W.; Kellogg, Christina A.; Morrison, Cheryl L.; Nizinski, Martha S.; Prouty, Nancy G.; Bourque, Jill R.; Galkiewicz, Julie P.; Gray, Michael A.; Springmann, Marcus J.; Coykendall, D. Katharine; Miller, Andrew; Rhode, Mike; Quattrini, Andrea; Ames, Cheryl L.; Brooke, Sandra D.; McClain Counts, Jennifer; Roark, E. Brendan; Buster, Noreen A.; Phillips, Ryan M.; Frometa, Janessy

    2017-12-11

    The deep sea is a rich environment composed of diverse habitat types. While deep-sea coral habitats have been discovered within each ocean basin, knowledge about the ecology of these habitats and associated inhabitants continues to grow. This report presents information and results from the Lophelia II project that examined deep-sea coral habitats in the Gulf of Mexico. The Lophelia II project focused on Lophelia pertusa habitats along the continental slope, at depths ranging from 300 to 1,000 meters. The chapters are authored by several scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, University of North Carolina Wilmington, and Florida State University who examined the community ecology (from microbes to fishes), deep-sea coral age, growth, and reproduction, and population connectivity of deep-sea corals and inhabitants. Data from these studies are presented in the chapters and appendixes of the report as well as in journal publications. This study was conducted by the Ecosystems Mission Area of the U.S. Geological Survey to meet information needs identified by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management.

  3. Deep Crustal Structure Northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christeson, G. L.; Van Avendonk, H. J.; Eddy, D. R.; Norton, I. O.; Karner, G. D.; Johnson, C. A.; Kneller, E. A.; Snedden, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Gulf of Mexico is a small ocean basin between the US and Mexico that opened up soon after the breakup of Pangea. Although the area has been heavily surveyed with seismic reflection profiles, the deep structure of the region is poorly understood because of lack of penetration beneath the thick sediments and salt. We present the results of the GUMBO (GUlf of Mexico Basin Opening) project that constrains seismic velocities and thicknesses of the sediments and crust from the continental shelf to deep ocean basin in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Data were acquired in 2010 along four profiles 300-500 km in length, using the industry vessel R/V Iron Cat and ocean bottom seismometers at 10-12 km spacing. Plate tectonic models for the Gulf of Mexico region have rifting initiating in the Late Triassic or Early Jurassic, with seafloor spreading beginning ~166-154 Ma in the western Gulf, propagating to the eastern Gulf, and ending ~154-135 Ma. Many models include transform motion along the Florida margin during initiation of continental rifting. We observe a strong change in rifting style from west to east across the ocean basin. Our western profile, offshore Texas, images highly heterogeneous crust with sediment velocities directly overlying Moho in some locations. These observations are consistent with either sedimentary basins within rifted continental crust or ultra-slow-spreading oceanic crust. The profile offshore Lousiana images thicker, faster, and more homogeneous crust. This could suggest an eastward increase in magmatic output during rifting. The eastern profiles offshore Alabama and Florida image the ocean-continent boundary and extensive regions of oceanic crust. The thickness of crystalline crust from the continental shelf to the deep basin decreases from ~25 km to 6-7 km over a horizontal distance of 150 km in the eastern Gulf of Mexico. The profile offshore Alabama, near a region where syn-rift volcanism has been interpreted on seismic reflection data, has

  4. Deep Crustal Structure Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christeson, Gail; Eddy, Drew; van Avendonk, Harm; Norton, Ian; Karner, Garry; Johnson, Chris; Kneller, Erik; Snedden, John

    2013-04-01

    The Gulf of Mexico is a small ocean basin between the US and Mexico that opened up soon after the breakup of Pangea. Although the area has been heavily surveyed with seismic reflection profiles, the deep structure of the region is poorly understood because of lack of penetration beneath the thick sediments and salt. We present the results of two wide-angle seismic refraction profiles in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico that constrain seismic velocities and thicknesses of the sediments and crust from the continental shelf to deep ocean basin. Profile GUMBO 3 extends 523 km from offshore Alabama south-southwest via the De Soto Canyon to the central Gulf of Mexico, while GUMBO 4 extends 507 km from the northwestern Florida peninsula across the Florida Escarpment to the central Gulf of Mexico. On both profiles, ocean bottom seismometers were positioned at 12-km spacing, and recorded air gun shots at offsets >100 km. We use a tomographic inversion of first-arrival and secondary travel time picks from these data to build a layered velocity model (water, sediments, crystalline crust, mantle) along each profile. On GUMBO 3 and GUMBO 4 the thickness of crystalline crust from the continental shelf to the deep basin decreases from ~25 km to ~7 km (GUMBO 4) or ~8 km (GUMBO 3) over a horizontal distance of ~150 km. Velocities of 7-7.5 km/s are observed at the base of the crust along most of GUMBO 3, while velocities of 6.5-7 km/s are observed at similar depths along GUMBO 4. We suggest that higher lower crustal velocities, and thicker oceanic crust, on GUMBO 3 compared to GUMBO 4 may be explained by elevated syn-rift mantle temperatures in the vicinity of the De Soto Canyon and South Georgia Rift during rifting and continental breakup. We have integrated seismic refraction, seismic reflection, and well data to interpret sequence stratigraphic units along GUMBO 3 and GUMBO 4. We have constructed a geologic history of the late-Jurassic/early-Cretaceous, beginning first with Louann

  5. What Lagrangian Trajectories Reveal about Deep Circulation in the Western Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furey, H. H.; Bower, A. S.; Perez-Brunius, P.; Hamilton, P.; Leben, R. R.

    2016-02-01

    A major Lagrangian program is underway to map the deep (1500-2500) circulation of the entire Gulf of Mexico. From 2011 through 2015, 180 two-year acoustically-tracked RAFOS floats were released across the Gulf, many in pairs and triplets. In the western Gulf, the float trajectories reveal a slow persistent deep boundary current along the Gulf boundary, from the Mississippi Fan to the eastern Campeche Bank. Trajectories show that this boundary current is interrupted, or split, mid-traverse of the Campeche Bank slope, as an accelerating jet separates and turns northward, into the interior Gulf. The trajectories show the first-ever observations of deep energetic anticyclonic eddies (possibly lenses) forming at and separating from this northeastward-flowing current. This eddy formation region appears to be a major exchange site between the deep boundary current along the Mexican continental slope and the interior Gulf. The pathways of the deep trajectories also challenge the idea of deep closed-streamline cyclonic circulation under the Campeche Gyre.

  6. Deep Eddies and Cross-Slope Exchange in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furey, Heather; Bower, Amy; Perez-Brunius, Paula; Hamilton, Peter

    2015-04-01

    A major Lagrangian program is currently underway to map the deep (1500-2500) circulation of the entire Gulf of Mexico. Beginning in 2011, more than 120 acoustically tracked RAFOS floats have been released in the eastern, central and western Gulf, many in pairs and triplets. The floats are programmed to drift for two years, obtaining position fixes and temperature/pressure measurements three times daily. The trajectories will be described with a focus on mesoscale eddying behavior as it relates to cross-slope exchange. In particular, the first-ever observations of deep energetic anticyclonic eddies (possibly lenses) forming at and separating from a northeastward-flowing boundary current west of Campeche Bank will be discussed. The existence of this eddy formation region has major implications for exchange between the newly-observed deep boundary current along the Mexican continental slope and the interior Gulf. The Campeche Bank exchange region appears to be the dominant deep pathway from the boundary into the western Gulf for heat, salt, and nutrients, and also for oil spill pollutants. Cross-slope exchange via eddies is also seen in other regions of the Gulf, and will be presented. The project is being supported by the U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM).

  7. Central Gulf of Alaska Rockfish Permit Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The North Pacific Fishery Management Council adopted the Central Gulf of Alaska Rockfish Program (Rockfish Program) on June 14, 2010, to replace the expiring Pilot...

  8. Deep Gulf project opens new ROV era

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baugh, B.F. (Baugh Consulting Engineers Inc., Houston, TX (US)); Tillinghast, W.S. (Conoco Inc., Houston, TX (US))

    1990-05-07

    This paper reports on multipurpose interface profiles installed on 12 ball valves in 1,080 ft of seawater. These profiles allow an ROV (remotely operated vehicle) to swim up to and operate valves with 5,000 ft-lb torque, and also to inject repair sealant. Repair sealant can be injected into the upstream seat, downstream seat, and the stem packing through standardized porting. The ball valves are in a subsea pipeline system in the Gulf of Mexico that connects the Jolliet TLWP (tension leg wellhead platform) in 1,760 ft of water to more conventional platform facilities in 616 ft of water. The unified connection skid housing most of the valves and attached profiles discussed is in 1,080 ft of water.

  9. Gulf of Mexico Deep-Sea Coral Ecosystem Studies, 2008-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, Christina A.

    2009-01-01

    Most people are familiar with tropical coral reefs, located in warm, well-illuminated, shallow waters. However, corals also exist hundreds and even thousands of meters below the ocean surface, where it is cold and completely dark. These deep-sea corals, also known as cold-water corals, have become a topic of interest due to conservation concerns over the impacts of trawling, exploration for oil and gas, and climate change. Although the existence of these corals has been known since the 1800s, our understanding of their distribution, ecology, and biology is limited due to the technical difficulties of conducting deep-sea research. DISCOVRE (DIversity, Systematics, and COnnectivity of Vulnerable Reef Ecosystems) is a new U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) program focused on deep-water coral ecosystems in the Gulf of Mexico. This integrated, multidisciplinary, international effort investigates a variety of topics related to unique and fragile deep-sea coral ecosystems from the microscopic level to the ecosystem level, including components of microbiology, population genetics, paleoecology, food webs, taxonomy, community ecology, physical oceanography, and mapping.

  10. An American Honors Program in the Arab Gulf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yyelland, Byrad

    2012-01-01

    The first Western honors program to be established in the Arab Gulf is offered in Doha, Qatar, on a small satellite campus of an American university. Doha is the capital city of Qatar, a sovereign Arab state physically located on a small peninsula bordering Saudi Arabia in the south and jutting into the Persian Gulf. With a population of only 1.7…

  11. Long-term observations of epibenthic fish zonation in the deep northern Gulf of Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Lin Wei

    Full Text Available A total of 172 bottom trawl/skimmer samples (183 to 3655-m depth from three deep-sea studies, R/V Alaminos cruises (1964-1973, Northern Gulf of Mexico Continental Slope (NGoMCS study (1983-1985 and Deep Gulf of Mexico Benthos (DGoMB program (2000 to 2002, were compiled to examine temporal and large-scale changes in epibenthic fish species composition. Based on percent species shared among samples, faunal groups (≥10% species shared consistently reoccurred over time on the shelf-break (ca. 200 m, upper-slope (ca. 300 to 500 m and upper-to-mid slope (ca. 500 to 1500 m depths. These similar depth groups also merged when the three studies were pooled together, suggesting that there has been no large-scale temporal change in depth zonation on the upper section of the continental margin. Permutational multivariate analysis of variance (PERMANOVA also detected no significant species changes on the limited sites and areas that have been revisited across the studies (P>0.05. Based on the ordination of the species shared among samples, species replacement was a continuum along a depth or macrobenthos biomass gradient. Despite the well-known, close, negative relationship between water depth and macrofaunal biomass, the fish species changed more rapidly at depth shallower than 1,000 m, but the rate of change was surprisingly slow at the highest macrofaunal biomass (>100 mg C m(-2, suggesting that the composition of epibenthic fishes was not altered in response to the extremely high macrofaunal biomass in the upper Mississippi and De Soto Submarine Canyons. An alternative is that the pattern of fish species turnover is related to the decline in macrofaunal biomass, the presumptive prey of the fish, along the depth gradient.

  12. New deep-sea Paratanaoidea (Crustacea: Peracarida: Tanaidacea) from the northeastern Gulf of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drumm, David T; Bird, Graham J

    2016-08-23

    One new genus is erected and four new species of paratanaoidean tanaidaceans are described from deep waters in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico: one in each of the genera Collettea, Tanaella, and Pseudomacrinella, and one as a new genus in the family Anarthruridae. Keys to species in the genera Collettea, Tanaella, and the genera of the Anarthruridae are provided.

  13. The western gulf forest tree improvement program, history and organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.P. Van Buijtenen

    1973-01-01

    The following remarks are primarily an account of the experience of the Texas Forest Service in organizing the Western Gulf Forest Tree Improvement Program (WGFTIP) and the philosophy that went into its devetopment. The program of the Texas Forest Service has had two very distinct phases, although in both phases it was a cooperative effort. The initial phase lasted...

  14. Deep Sea Sediment Gravity Flow Deposits in Gulf of Tomini, Sulawesi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dida Kusnida

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.17014/ijog.vol3no4.20084Micro plate collision against the Eastern Arm of Sulawesi since Pliocene has resulted in a major supply of terigenous sediments into Late Miocene rift-basins in Gulf of Tomini. Studies on offshore multi-channel seismic reflection data complemented by published on-land geological data indicate a series of tectonic events that influenced the depositional system in the Gulf of Tomini. During the Late Neogene, alternating pulses of terigenous sediments were deposited in the basins in the form of deep-sea slump-turbidite-pelagic sediments. A sediment gravity flow deposit system at the slope and the base of the basins changed gradually into a deep-sea pelagic fill system toward the center of the basins. Three tectono-stratigraphy sequences (A, B, and C separated by unconformities indicating the Late Neogene history and the development of the basins were identified. These tectonic processes imply that the earlier sediments in the Gulf of Tomini are accomplished by a differential subsidence, which allows a thickening of basin infill. The Pliocene-Quaternary basin fill marks the onset of a predominant gravity flow depositional system  

  15. Deep-sea coral research and technology program: Alaska deep-sea coral and sponge initiative final report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooper, Chris; Stone, Robert P.; Etnoyer, Peter; Conrath, Christina; Reynolds, Jennifer; Greene, H. Gary; Williams, Branwen; Salgado, Enrique; Morrison, Cheryl L.; Waller, Rhian G.; Demopoulos, Amanda W.J.

    2017-01-01

    Deep-sea coral and sponge ecosystems are widespread throughout most of Alaska’s marine waters. In some places, such as the central and western Aleutian Islands, deep-sea coral and sponge resources can be extremely diverse and may rank among the most abundant deep-sea coral and sponge communities in the world. Many different species of fishes and invertebrates are associated with deep-sea coral and sponge communities in Alaska. Because of their biology, these benthic invertebrates are potentially impacted by climate change and ocean acidification. Deepsea coral and sponge ecosystems are also vulnerable to the effects of commercial fishing activities. Because of the size and scope of Alaska’s continental shelf and slope, the vast majority of the area has not been visually surveyed for deep-sea corals and sponges. NOAA’s Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology Program (DSCRTP) sponsored a field research program in the Alaska region between 2012–2015, referred to hereafter as the Alaska Initiative. The priorities for Alaska were derived from ongoing data needs and objectives identified by the DSCRTP, the North Pacific Fishery Management Council (NPFMC), and Essential Fish Habitat-Environmental Impact Statement (EFH-EIS) process.This report presents the results of 15 projects conducted using DSCRTP funds from 2012-2015. Three of the projects conducted as part of the Alaska deep-sea coral and sponge initiative included dedicated at-sea cruises and fieldwork spread across multiple years. These projects were the eastern Gulf of Alaska Primnoa pacifica study, the Aleutian Islands mapping study, and the Gulf of Alaska fish productivity study. In all, there were nine separate research cruises carried out with a total of 109 at-sea days conducting research. The remaining projects either used data and samples collected by the three major fieldwork projects or were piggy-backed onto existing research programs at the Alaska Fisheries Science Center (AFSC).

  16. Short-chain alkane cycling in deep Gulf of Mexico cold-seep sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibert, R.; Joye, S. B.; Hunter, K.

    2015-12-01

    Mixtures of light hydrocarbon gases are common in deep Gulf of Mexico cold-seep sediments, and are typically dissolved in pore fluids, adsorbed to sediment particles, trapped in methane ice, or as free gas. The dominant component in these natural gas mixtures is usually methane (>80% C1), but ethane (C2) and propane (C3) are nearly always present in trace amounts (cracking of fossil organic matter, or 2) as a direct product of microbial metabolism, i.e. methanogenesis. In surface sediments, it appears that both microbial consumption and chemical deposition of methane (i.e. as methane clathrate) ensures that >95% of the methane produced at depth never reaches the water column. Production of C1 and C2 in deep-sea sediments has been historically attributed only to thermocatalytic processes, though limited data suggests production of C2/C3 compounds through the activity of archaea at depth. Furthermore, carbon isotopic data on ethane and propane from deep cores of Gulf of Mexico sediments suggest alkanogenesis at >3 m depth in the sediment column and alkane oxidation in uppermost oxidant-rich sediments. Additional studies have also isolated microorganisms capable of oxidizing ethane and propane in the laboratory, but field studies of microbial-driven dynamics of C2/C3 gases in cold-seep sediments are rare. Here, we present the results of a series of incubation experiments using sediment slurries culled from surface sediments from one of the most prolific natural oil and gas seeps in the Gulf of Mexico. Rates of alkane oxidation were measured under a variety of conditions to assess the surface-driven microbial controls on C2/C3 cycling in cold-seep environments. Such microbial processes are important in terms of the possible 'oxidative overprinting' of alkane isotopic signatures produced at depth, possibly obscuring typical microbial isotopic signals.

  17. Policy Subsystem Portfolio Management: A Neural Network Model of the Gulf of Mexico Program

    OpenAIRE

    Larkin, George Richard

    1999-01-01

    This study provides insights into the behavior of an environmental policy subsystem. The study uses neural network theory to model the Gulf of Mexico Program's allocation of implementation funds. The Gulf of Mexico Program is a prototype effort to institutionalize a policy subsystem. A project implementation fund is at the core of the Gulf of Mexico Program. The United States Environmental Protection Agency provides the implementation fund and the Mexico Program Office (GMPO) administers it. ...

  18. Deepwater Program: Studies of Gulf of Mexico lower continental slope communities related to chemosynthetic and hard substrate habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Steve W.; Demopoulos, Amanda W.J.; Kellogg, Christina A.; Morrison, Cheryl L.; Nizinski, Martha S.; Ames, Cheryl L.; Casazza, Tara L.; Gualtieri, Daniel; Kovacs, Kaitlin; McClain, Jennifer P.; Quattrini, Andrea M.; Roa-Varon, Adela Y.; Thaler, Andrew D.

    2012-01-01

    This report summarizes research funded by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in collaboration with the University of North Carolina at Wilmington (UNCW) on the ecology of deep chemosynthetic communities in the Gulf of Mexico. The research was conducted at the request of the U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (BOEMRE; formerly Minerals Management Service) to complement a BOEMRE-funded project titled "Deepwater Program: Investigations of Chemosynthetic Communities on the Lower Continental Slope of the Gulf of Mexico." The overall research partnership, known as "Chemo III," was initiated to increase understanding of the distribution, structure, function, and vulnerabilities of these poorly known associations of animals and microbes for water depths greater than 1,000 meters (m) in the Gulf of Mexico. Chemosynthetic communities rely on carbon sources that are largely independent of sunlight and photosynthetic food webs. Despite recent research directed toward chemosynthetic and deep coral (for example, Lophelia pertusa) based ecosystems, these habitats are still poorly studied, especially at depths greater than 1,000 m. With the progression into deeper waters by fishing and energy industries, developing sufficient knowledge to manage these deep ecosystems is essential. Increased understanding of deep-sea communities will enable sound evaluations of potential impacts and appropriate mitigations.

  19. Distinct protistan assemblages characterize the euphotic zone and deep sea (2500 m) of the western North Atlantic (Sargasso Sea and Gulf Stream).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Countway, Peter D; Gast, Rebecca J; Dennett, Mark R; Savai, Pratik; Rose, Julie M; Caron, David A

    2007-05-01

    Protistan diversity was characterized at three locations in the western North Atlantic (Sargasso Sea and Gulf Stream) by sequencing 18S rRNA genes in samples from euphotic (< or = 125 m) and bathypelagic depths (2500 m). A total of 923 partial-length protistan sequences were analysed, revealing 324 distinct operational taxonomic units (OTUs) determined by an automated OTU-calling program set to 95% sequence similarity. Most OTUs were comprised of only one or two sequences suggesting a large but rare pool of protistan diversity. Many OTUs from both depth strata were associated with recently described novel alveolate and stramenopile lineages while many OTUs from the bathypelagic were affiliated with Acantharea, Polycystinea and Euglenozoa and were not observed in euphotic zone libraries. Protistan assemblages from the euphotic zone and the deep sea were largely composed of distinct OTUs; only 28 of the 324 protistan OTUs were detected in both shallow and deep sea clone libraries. The diversity of protistan assemblages in the deep sea was distinctly lower than the diversity of euphotic zone assemblages. Protistan assemblages from the Gulf Stream were the most diverse for either depth strata. Overall, protistan assemblages from different stations but comparable depths were more similar than the assemblages from different depths at the same station. These data suggest that particular groups of protistan OTUs formed distinct 'shallow' and 'deep-sea' assemblages across widely spaced oceanic locales.

  20. Deep currents in the Gulf of Guinea: along slope propagation of intraseasonal waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Guiavarc'h

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available In the Gulf of Guinea, intraseasonal variability is large at the equator and along the coast. Current data on the continental slope near 7.5° S show very energetic biweekly oscillations at 1300 m depth. A high resolution primitive equation numerical model demonstrates that this deep variability is forced by equatorial winds, through the generation of equatorial Yanai waves that propagate eastward and at depth, and then poleward as coastally-trapped waves upon reaching the coast of Africa. Intraseasonal variability is intensified along the coast of the Gulf of Guinea, especially in the 10–20 day period range and at depths between 500 and 1500 m. The kinetic energy distribution is well explained at first order by linear theory. Along the equator, eastward intensification of energy and bottom intensification are in qualitative agreement with vertically propagating Yanai waves, although the signal is influenced by the details of the bathymetry. Along the coast, baroclinic modes 3 to 5 are important close to the equator, and the signal is dominated by lower vertical modes farther south. Additional current meter data on the continental slope near 3° N display an energy profile in the 10–20 day period band that is strikingly different from the one at 7.5° S, with surface intensification rather than bottom intensification and a secondary maximum near 800 m. The model reproduces these features and explains them: the surface intensification in the north is due to the regional wind forcing, and the north-south asymmetry of the deep signal is due to the presence of the zonal African coast near 5° N. A 4 years time series of current measurements at 7.5° S shows that the biweekly oscillations are intermittent and vary from year to year. This intermittency is not well correlated with fluctuations of the equatorial winds and does not seem to be a simple linear response to the wind forcing.

  1. Characterizing Natural Gas Hydrates in the Deep Water Gulf of Mexico: Applications for Safe Exploration and Production Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bent, Jimmy

    2014-05-31

    In 2000 Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deep water portion of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). Chevron is an active explorer and operator in the Gulf of Mexico and is aware that natural gas hydrates need to be understood to operate safely in deep water. In August 2000 Chevron worked closely with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and held a workshop in Houston, Texas to define issues concerning the characterization of natural gas hydrate deposits. Specifically, the workshop was meant to clearly show where research, the development of new technologies, and new information sources would be of benefit to the DOE and to the oil and gas industry in defining issues and solving gas hydrate problems in deep water.

  2. Acoustic doppler current meter data collected in support of the Minerals Management Service-supported Deep Water Program in the the Gulf of Mexico, 1999 - 2003 (NODC Accession 0002196)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A research program has been initiated by the Minerals Management Service (Contract No. 1435-01-99-CT-30991) to gain better knowledge of the benthic communities of...

  3. Deep-sea coral and hardbottom habitats on the west Florida slope, eastern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Steve W.; Rhode, Mike; Brooke, Sandra

    2017-02-01

    Until recently, benthic habitats dominated by deep-sea corals (DSC) appeared to be less extensive on the slope of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) than in the northeast Atlantic Ocean or off the southeastern US. There are relatively few bioherms (i.e., coral-built mounds) in the northern GOM, and most DSCs are attached to existing hard substrata (e.g., authigenically formed carbonate). The primary structure-forming, DSC in the GOM is Lophelia pertusa, but structure is also provided by other living and dead scleractinians, antipatharians (black corals), octocorals (gorgonians, soft corals), hydrocorals and sponges, as well as abundant rocky substrata. The best development of DSCs in the GOM was previously documented within Viosca Knoll oil and gas lease blocks 826 and 862/906 (north-central GOM) and on the Campeche Bank (southern GOM in Mexican waters). This paper documents extensive deep reef ecosystems composed of DSC and rocky hard-bottom recently surveyed on the West Florida Slope (WFS, eastern GOM) during six research cruises (2008-2012). Using multibeam sonar, CTD casts, and video from underwater vehicles, we describe the physical and oceanographic characteristics of these deep reefs and provide size or area estimates of deep coral and hardground habitats. The multibeam sonar analyses revealed hundreds of mounds and ridges, some of which were subsequently surveyed using underwater vehicles. Mounds and ridges in <525 m depths were usually capped with living coral colonies, dominated by L. pertusa. An extensive rocky scarp, running roughly north-south for at least 229 km, supported lower abundances of scleractinian corals than the mounds and ridges, despite an abundance of settlement substrata. Areal comparisons suggested that the WFS may exceed other parts of the GOM slope in extent of living deep coral coverage and other deep-reef habitat (dead coral and rock). The complex WFS region warrants additional studies to better understand the influences of oceanography and

  4. Beginning the Program. Project DEEP (Diversified Educational Experiences Program).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connett, Jane; And Others

    Project DEEP (Diversified Educational Experience Program) was developed to improve the behavior and attitudes of secondary students in schools where dropouts, absenteeism, and poor attitudes are existing problems. The open classroom with student involvement and participation in goal setting, presentation, and evaluation is the basic concept of…

  5. 75 FR 53007 - Gulf Opportunity Pilot Loan Program (GO Loan Pilot)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-30

    ... Loans has continued during FY2010 in response to the ongoing need to rebuild the Gulf Coast areas... ADMINISTRATION Gulf Opportunity Pilot Loan Program (GO Loan Pilot) AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration... the extension of the ``Notice of waiver of regulatory provisions'' for SBA's GO Loan Pilot until...

  6. Gulf War Illness-Evaluation of an Innovative Detoxification Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Approximately 25% of military personnel who served in the 1990-1991 Gulf War developed a syndrome ...personnel who served in the 1990-1991 Gulf War developed a syndrome of symptoms, now known as Gulf War Illness, characterized by chronic pain, fatigue...times a blood sample was drawn for analysis of clinical chemistry parameters (comprehensive metabolic panel, lipid panel, complete blood count and

  7. Deep-water oilfield development cost analysis and forecasting —— Take gulf of mexico for example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Mingyu; Wang, Jianjun; Yi, Chenggao; Bai, Jianhui; Wang, Jing

    2017-11-01

    Gulf of Mexico (GoM) is the earliest offshore oilfield which has ever been developed. It tends to breed increasingly value of efficient, secure and cheap key technology of deep-water development. Thus, the analyze of development expenditure in this area is significantly important the evaluation concept of deep-water oilfield all over the world. This article emphasizes on deep-water development concept and EPC contract value in GoM in recent 10 years in case of comparison and selection to the economic efficiency. Besides, the QUETOR has been put into use in this research processes the largest upstream cost database to simulate and calculate the calculating examples’ expenditure. By analyzing and forecasting the deep-water oilfield development expenditure, this article explores the relevance between expenditure index and oil price.

  8. Macrobenthic community structure in the deep Gulf of Mexico one year after the Deepwater Horizon blowout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Travis W.; Reuscher, Michael G.; Montagna, Paul A.; Cooksey, Cynthia; Hyland, Jeffrey L.

    2017-09-01

    The impacts of the 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) disaster on deep-sea Gulf of Mexico benthic communities were analyzed one year after the blowout. Richness, diversity, and evenness were severely impaired within a radius of approximately 1 km around the DWH wellhead. However, lower diversity than background was observed in several stations up to 29 km to the southwest of the wellhead. Compared to samples from 2010, abundance near the DWH wellhead increased in 2011 with some of the highest values found at stations within the 1 km radius. The increase was mostly caused by the high abundance of opportunistic polychaetes of the family Dorvilleidae, genus Ophryotrocha. At contaminated stations near the DWH wellhead, diversity did not change with increased sampling area, whereas a steep increase of diversity with increasing sampling area was observed at stations farther from the wellhead. The spatial extent of DWH impacts appeared to decrease from 2010 to 2011. Impacts on diversity near the wellhead were still observed; however, the large increase in abundance may indicate the initial stages of recovery, year-to-year variability, or an early stage of succession following a disturbance; and this can be resolved only with additional temporal sampling.

  9. [Taxonomic composition and zoogeographical aspects of deep sea fishes (90-540m) from the Gulf of California, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Martínez, Juana; Acevedo-Cervantes, Alejandro; Herrera-Valdivia, Eloisa; Rodríguez-Romero, Jesús; Palacios-Salgado, Deivis S

    2012-03-01

    The Gulf of California has a high variety of ecosystems that allow different services and the fishery resources play a prominent role in its ecology, evolution and economics. Fish coastal species have been previously reported for most coastal areas, especially those species that are subject to fishing, however, little is known on the species from deep sea zones, due to sampling difficulties. We studied the deep sea fishes collected with trawl nets during three research surveys in the Gulf of California, Mexico in 2004-2005. We provide a systematic checklist and some notes on biogeographical aspects. For this, 74 fishing hauls were done, and a total of 9 898 fishes were captured, belonging to two classes, 15 orders, 35 families, 53 genera and 70 species. The best represented families in number of species were: Paralichthyidae (eight), Serranidae (six), and Scorpaenidae and Triglidae with five species each one. The typical families from deep waters were: Ophidiidae, Moridae, Lophiidae, Scorpaenidae, Triglidae, Paralichthydae, Pleuronectidae and Cynoglossidae. Size range varied from 13cm for the Splinose searobin (Bellator xenisma) to 234cm in the Pacific Cutlassfish (Trichiurus nitens). The biogeographical affinity showed that species with affinity to the East Tropical Pacific (ETP) dominated, followed by species from San Diego-Panamic, San Diego-Panamic-Peruvian-Chilean and Oregonian-Cortes provinces, respectively. A biogeographic overlap was found in the fauna, which reflects the Gulf of California's geographical position, with distribution limits of species from temperate, tropical and warm-temperature transition affinities, divisions that characterize the Gulf of California. Taxonomic status of fish with a focus on composition, location, characterization and zoogeography are fundamental to any subject of biodiversity and fisheries management actions.

  10. Assessment of Longitudinal Gradients in Nematode Communities in the Deep Northern Gulf of Mexico and Concordance with Benthic Taxa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyotsna Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Meiobenthic nematode assemblages were examined at 16 stations along two transects on the eastern and western boundaries of the deep northern Gulf of Mexico (dNGOM at depths of 212–3000 m. The highest abundance (297 individuals 10 cm−2 and number of genera (71 occurred at stations near the Mississippi River delta. Number of genera decreased with increasing depth, and showed differences in community composition between the east and west regions. The dominant family, Comesomatidae, was represented by Sabatieria that was present at most shallow stations but absent at greater water depths. A significant difference in nematode feeding morphology was observed between depth groups but not between the two transects at different longitudes. Patterns of nematode community structure are congruent with harpacticoid copepods. Overall, the higher abundance and diversity of nematodes in the north-central Gulf of Mexico is consistent with findings of other benthic taxa and reflects organic material loading from the Mississippi River driving deep sea communities in the Gulf. The east-west gradient in composition of nematode communities suggests that nematode assemblages have well-defined distribution patterns similar to other meiobenthic taxa in the GOM but they are not aligned in the bathymetric zones observed in macrofauna, megafauna and demersal fishes.

  11. Benthic foraminifera from the deep-water Niger delta (Gulf of Guinea): Assessing present-day and past activity of hydrate pockmarks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fontanier, C.; Koho, K.A.; Goñi-Urriza, M.S.; Deflandre, B.; Galaup, S.; Ivanovsky, A.; Gayet, N.; Dennielou, B.; Gremare, A.; Bichon, S.; Gassie, C.; Anschutz, P.; Durán, R.; Reichart, G.J.

    2014-01-01

    We present ecological and isotopic (d18O and d13C) data on benthic foraminifera sampled from 4 deep-sea stations in a pockmark field from the deep-water Niger delta (Gulf of Guinea, Equatorial Atlantic Ocean). In addition, a series of sedimentological and (bio)geochemical data are shown to back up

  12. Benthic foraminifera from the deep-water Niger delta (Gulf of Guinea) : Assessing present-day and past activity of hydrate pockmarks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fontanier, C.; Koho, K. A.; Goñi-Urriza, M. S.; Deflandre, B.; Galaup, S.; Ivanovsky, A.; Gayet, N.; Dennielou, B.; Grémare, A.; Bichon, S.; Gassie, C.; Anschutz, P.; Duran, R.; Reichart, G. J.

    2014-01-01

    We present ecological and isotopic (δ18O and δ13C) data on benthic foraminifera sampled from 4 deep-sea stations in a pockmark field from the deep-water Niger delta (Gulf of Guinea, Equatorial Atlantic Ocean). In addition, a series of sedimentological and (bio)geochemical data are shown to back up

  13. New records of the deep-sea anemone Phelliactis callicyclus Riemann-Zurneck, 1973 (Cnidaria, Actiniaria, Hormathiidae) from the Gulf of California, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickx, M E; Hinojosa-Corona, A; Ayón-Parente, M

    2016-10-20

    Specimens of a deep-sea anemone were observed in photographs and video footage taken with the Remotely Operated Vehicle JASON (WHOI Deep Submergence Laboratory) in the Gulf of California, Mexico, in May 2008. Comparison of our material with photographs and description of this species available in literature indicate that the sea anemones filmed during the JASON survey are most likely to represent Phelliactis callicyclus Riemann-Zurneck, 1973. This species has previously been reported from a locality in the Gulf of California near the present record. During the JASON survey, 28 specimens of P. callicyclus were spotted in 27 locations during six dives. The specimens occurred on angular rock outcrops along the escarpments of the transform faults of the Gulf of California, between depths of 993-2543 m and at temperatures ranging from 2.3 to 4.5°C. Based on these new records, Phelliactis callicyclus appears to be widely spread in the Gulf of California.

  14. Scalloped hammerhead shark Sphyrna lewini, utilizes deep-water, hypoxic zone in the Gulf of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, S J; Klimley, A P; Muhlia-Melo, A F

    2009-05-01

    A hammerhead shark Sphyrna lewini tracked for 74 days revealed an expansion of the range of vertical distribution for the species to include the extreme hypoxic environment of the oxygen minimum layer in the Gulf of California.

  15. Long Term Geoelectrical Monitoring of Deep-water Horizon Oil Spill in the Gulf Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heenan, J. W.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Slater, L. D.; Atekwana, E. A.; Ross, C.; Nolan, J. T.; Atekwana, E. A.

    2011-12-01

    In the aftermath of the catastrophic Deep-water Horizon (DWH) spill in the Gulf Coast, opportunities exist to study the evolution of fresh crude oil contamination in beach sediments and marshes. Grand Terre 1 Island, off the coast of Grand Isle in southern Louisiana, is an uninhabited barrier island, heavily impacted by the DWH spill, and ideal for undisturbed long term monitoring of crude oil degradation processes. A 10 channel Syscal-Pro resistivity / IP instrument (IRIS Instruments, France) is the heart of the fully autonomous geoelectrical monitoring system; the system, which is housed in a weatherproof container, relies solely on solar power, is controlled by an energy efficient PC and can be accessed remotely via web tools. The monitoring scheme involves collecting bi-daily resistivity measurements from surface and shallow boreholes, ranging from January 2011 to the present; environmental parameters, such as T, are continuously recorded at several depths. During regular field trips we perform larger scale geophysical surveys, and geochemical measurements (pH, DO, T, fluid C) to support the continuous geophysical monitoring. The contaminated layer on site is a visually distinctive layer of crude oil, isolated by cleaner sands above and below which is identified by a clear and obvious resistive anomaly in preliminary surveys. Early results show a decrease in average of the resistance values of each dataset over time. Further processing of the data yields a linearly shaped resistive anomaly, which coincides with the location of the oil layer. The changes in subsurface resistivity appear to be focused within this anomaly. Time filtering of the data by the time that they were collected, morning or evening, reveals a diurnal variation. While both time frames follow the same overall trend, the measurements in the morning are slightly more resistive than those in the evening. This indicates that there are environmental factors, such as temperature, that need to be

  16. First autonomous bio-optical profiling float in the Gulf of Mexico reveals dynamic biogeochemistry in deep waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Rebecca E; Bower, Amy S; Lugo-Fernández, Alexis

    2014-01-01

    Profiling floats equipped with bio-optical sensors well complement ship-based and satellite ocean color measurements by providing highly-resolved time-series data on the vertical structure of biogeochemical processes in oceanic waters. This is the first study to employ an autonomous profiling (APEX) float in the Gulf of Mexico for measuring spatiotemporal variability in bio-optics and hydrography. During the 17-month deployment (July 2011 to December 2012), the float mission collected profiles of temperature, salinity, chlorophyll fluorescence, particulate backscattering (bbp), and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) fluorescence from the ocean surface to a depth of 1,500 m. Biogeochemical variability was characterized by distinct depth trends and local "hot spots", including impacts from mesoscale processes associated with each of the water masses sampled, from ambient deep waters over the Florida Plain, into the Loop Current, up the Florida Canyon, and eventually into the Florida Straits. A deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM) occurred between 30 and 120 m, with the DCM depth significantly related to the unique density layer ρ = 1023.6 (R2 = 0.62). Particulate backscattering, bbp, demonstrated multiple peaks throughout the water column, including from phytoplankton, deep scattering layers, and resuspension. The bio-optical relationship developed between bbp and chlorophyll (R2 = 0.49) was compared to a global relationship and could significantly improve regional ocean-color algorithms. Photooxidation and autochthonous production contributed to CDOM distributions in the upper water column, whereas in deep water, CDOM behaved as a semi-conservative tracer of water masses, demonstrating a tight relationship with density (R2 = 0.87). In the wake of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, this research lends support to the use of autonomous drifting profilers as a powerful tool for consideration in the design of an expanded and integrated observing network for

  17. First autonomous bio-optical profiling float in the Gulf of Mexico reveals dynamic biogeochemistry in deep waters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca E Green

    Full Text Available Profiling floats equipped with bio-optical sensors well complement ship-based and satellite ocean color measurements by providing highly-resolved time-series data on the vertical structure of biogeochemical processes in oceanic waters. This is the first study to employ an autonomous profiling (APEX float in the Gulf of Mexico for measuring spatiotemporal variability in bio-optics and hydrography. During the 17-month deployment (July 2011 to December 2012, the float mission collected profiles of temperature, salinity, chlorophyll fluorescence, particulate backscattering (bbp, and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM fluorescence from the ocean surface to a depth of 1,500 m. Biogeochemical variability was characterized by distinct depth trends and local "hot spots", including impacts from mesoscale processes associated with each of the water masses sampled, from ambient deep waters over the Florida Plain, into the Loop Current, up the Florida Canyon, and eventually into the Florida Straits. A deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM occurred between 30 and 120 m, with the DCM depth significantly related to the unique density layer ρ = 1023.6 (R2 = 0.62. Particulate backscattering, bbp, demonstrated multiple peaks throughout the water column, including from phytoplankton, deep scattering layers, and resuspension. The bio-optical relationship developed between bbp and chlorophyll (R2 = 0.49 was compared to a global relationship and could significantly improve regional ocean-color algorithms. Photooxidation and autochthonous production contributed to CDOM distributions in the upper water column, whereas in deep water, CDOM behaved as a semi-conservative tracer of water masses, demonstrating a tight relationship with density (R2 = 0.87. In the wake of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, this research lends support to the use of autonomous drifting profilers as a powerful tool for consideration in the design of an expanded and integrated observing

  18. The Deep Space Network Advanced Systems Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davarian, Faramaz

    2010-01-01

    The deep space network (DSN)--with its three complexes in Goldstone, California, Madrid, Spain, and Canberra, Australia--provides the resources to track and communicate with planetary and deep space missions. Each complex consists of an array of capabilities for tracking probes almost anywhere in the solar system. A number of innovative hardware, software and procedural tools are used for day-to-day operations at DSN complexes as well as at the network control at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Systems and technologies employed by the network include large-aperture antennas (34-m and 70-m), cryogenically cooled receivers, high-power transmitters, stable frequency and timing distribution assemblies, modulation and coding schemes, spacecraft transponders, radiometric tracking techniques, etc. The DSN operates at multiple frequencies, including the 2-GHz band, the 7/8-GHz band, and the 32/34-GHz band.

  19. Acute survivorship of the deep-sea coral Lophelia pertusa from the Gulf of Mexico under acidification, warming, and deoxygenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunden, Jay J.; McNicholl, Conall G.; Sears, Christopher R.; Morrison, Cheryl L.; Cordes, Erik E.

    2014-01-01

    Changing global climate due to anthropogenic emissions of CO2 are driving rapid changes in the physical and chemical environment of the oceans via warming, deoxygenation, and acidification. These changes may threaten the persistence of species and populations across a range of latitudes and depths, including species that support diverse biological communities that in turn provide ecological stability and support commercial interests. Worldwide, but particularly in the North Atlantic and deep Gulf of Mexico, Lophelia pertusa forms expansive reefs that support biological communities whose diversity rivals that of tropical coral reefs. In this study, L. pertusa colonies were collected from the Viosca Knoll region in the Gulf of Mexico (390 to 450 m depth), genotyped using microsatellite markers, and exposed to a series of treatments testing survivorship responses to acidification, warming, and deoxygenation. All coral nubbins survived the acidification scenarios tested, between pH of 7.67 and 7.90 and aragonite saturation states of 0.92 and 1.47. However, net calcification generally declined with respect to pH, though a disparate response was evident where select individuals net calcified and others exhibited net dissolution near a saturation state of 1. Warming and deoxygenation both had negative effects on survivorship, with up to 100% mortality observed at temperatures above 14°C and oxygen concentrations of approximately 1.5 ml· l−1. These results suggest that, over the short-term, climate change and OA may negatively impact L. pertusa in the Gulf of Mexico, though the potential for acclimation and the effects of genetic background should be considered in future research.

  20. Acute survivorship of the deep-sea coral Lophelia pertusa from the Gulf of Mexico under acidification, warming, and deoxygenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay J Lunden

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Changing global climate due to anthropogenic emissions of CO2 are driving rapid changes in the physical and chemical environment of the oceans via warming, deoxygenation, and acidification. These changes may threaten the persistence of species and populations across a range of latitudes and depths, including species that support diverse biological communities that in turn provide ecological stability and support commercial interests. Worldwide, but particularly in the North Atlantic and deep Gulf of Mexico, Lophelia pertusa forms expansive reefs that support biological communities whose diversity rivals that of tropical coral reefs. In this study, L. pertusa colonies were collected from the Viosca Knoll region in the Gulf of Mexico (390 to 450 m depth, genotyped using microsatellite markers, and exposed to a series of treatments testing survivorship responses to acidification, warming, and deoxygenation. All coral nubbins survived the acidification scenarios tested, between pH of 7.67 and 7.90 and aragonite saturation states of 0.92 and 1.47. However, calcification generally declined with respect to pH, though a disparate response was evident where select individuals net calcified and others exhibited net dissolution near a saturation state of 1. Warming and deoxygenation both had negative effects on survivorship, with up to 100% mortality observed at temperatures above 14ºC and oxygen concentrations of approximately 1.5 ml·l-1. These results suggest that, over the short-term, climate change and OA may negatively impact L. pertusa in the Gulf of Mexico, though the potential for acclimation and the effects of genetic background should be considered in future research.

  1. Deep Sediment-Sourced Methane Contribution to Shallow Sediment Organic Carbon: Atwater Valley, Texas-Louisiana Shelf, Gulf of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard B. Coffin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Coastal methane hydrate deposits are globally abundant. There is a need to understand the deep sediment sourced methane energy contribution to shallow sediment carbon relative to terrestrial sources and phytoplankton. Shallow sediment and porewater samples were collected from Atwater Valley, Texas-Louisiana Shelf, Gulf of Mexico near a seafloor mound feature identified in geophysical surveys as an elevated bottom seismic reflection. Geochemical data revealed off-mound methane diffusion and active fluid advection on-mound. Gas composition (average methane/ethane ratio ~11,000 and isotope ratios of methane on the mound (average δ13CCH4(g = −71.2‰; D14CCH4(g = −961‰ indicate a deep sediment, microbial source. Depleted sediment organic carbon values on mound (δ13CSOC = −25.8‰; D14CSOC = −930‰ relative to off-mound (δ13CSOC = −22.5‰; D14CSOC = −629‰ suggest deep sourced ancient carbon is incorporated into shallow sediment organic matter. Porewater and sediment data indicate inorganic carbon fixed during anaerobic oxidation of methane is a dominant contributor to on-mound shallow sediment organic carbon cycling. A simple stable carbon isotope mass balance suggests carbon fixation of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC associated with anaerobic oxidation of hydrate-sourced CH4 contributes up to 85% of shallow sediment organic carbon.

  2. Bioinformatics in Middle East Program Curricula--A Focus on the Arabian Gulf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucif, Samia

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the inclusion of bioinformatics in program curricula in the Middle East, focusing on educational institutions in the Arabian Gulf. Bioinformatics is a multidisciplinary field which has emerged in response to the need for efficient data storage and retrieval, and accurate and fast computational and…

  3. Grain Size Data from the Brine Disposal Program, Gulf of Mexico

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are part of the Brine Disposal Program funded by NOAA in the US Gulf of Mexico, compiled by NOAA/CEAS and partially conducted by R. W. Hann of Texas A and...

  4. Volume and accessibility of entrained (solution) methane in deep geopressured reservoirs - tertiary formations of the Texas Gulf Coast. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory, A.R.; Dodge, M.M.; Posey, J.S.; Morton, R.A.

    1980-10-01

    The objective of this project was to appraise the total volume of in-place methane dissolved in formation waters of deep sandstone reservoirs of the onshore Texas Gulf Coast within the stratigraphic section extending from the base of significant hydrocarbon production (8000 ft)* to the deepest significant sandstone occurrence. The area of investigation is about 50,000 mi/sup 2/. Factors that determine the total methane resource are reservoir bulk volume, porosity, and methane solubility; the latter is controlled by the temperature, pressure, and salinity of formation waters. Regional assessment of the volume and the distribution of potential sandstone reservoirs was made from a data base of 880 electrical well logs, from which a grid of 24 dip cross sections and 4 strike cross sections was constructed. Solution methane content in each of nine formations or divisions of formations was determined for each subdivision. The distribution of solution methane in the Gulf Coast was described on the basis of five reservoir models. Each model was characterized by depositional environment, reservoir continuity, porosity, permeability, and methane solubility.

  5. Deep-water seamount wakes on SEASAT SAR image in the Gulf Stream region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Quanan; Holt, Benjamin; Li, Xiaofeng; Liu, Xinan; Zhao, Qing; Yuan, Yeli; Yang, Xiaofeng

    2012-08-01

    A SEASAT synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image taken over the Gulf Stream region shows streak-like patterns. The physics of their generation and interaction with the Gulf Stream are disputed. This study seeks a convincing interpretation for the SAR imagery patterns. Bathymetric maps show that the sea floor area beneath the streaks is the northeast Hoyt Hills, where isolated seamounts with the heights of 20 to 140 m above the background sea floor are distributed. All the SAR imagery streaks originate from these seamounts and extend downstream. Thus the SAR imagery streaks are interpreted as surface roughness imprints of the seamount wakes. Hydrostatic flow dynamics of the generation of wakes on the lee side of a solid obstacle is used to explain the generation mechanism and internal structure of the seamount wakes. The analysis indicates that boundary conditions and hydrodynamic conditions are favorable for the generation and vertical propagation of the seamount wakes to the upper layer.

  6. Paraffin dispersant application for cleaning subsea flow lines in the deep water Gulf of Mexico cottonwood development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennings, David; White, Jake; Pogoson, Oje [Baker Hughes Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Barros, Dalmo; Ramachandran, Kartik; Bonin, George; Waltrich, Paulo; Shecaira, Farid [PETROBRAS America, Houston, TX (United States); Ziglio, Claudio [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (CENPES/PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento

    2012-07-01

    This paper discusses a paraffin dispersant (in seawater) application to clean paraffin deposition from a severely restricted 17.4-mile dual subsea flow line system in the Gulf of Mexico Cottonwood development. In principle, dispersant treatments are simple processes requiring effective dispersant packages and agitation to break-up and disperse deposition. Dispersants have been used onshore for treating wax deposition for decades. Implementation of a treatment in a long deep water production system, however, poses numerous challenges. The Cottonwood application was one of the first ever deep water dispersant applications. The application was designed in four separate phases: pre-treatment displacement for hydrate protection, dispersant treatment for paraffin deposition removal, pigging sequence for final flow line cleaning, and post-treatment displacement for hydrate protection. In addition, considerable job planning was performed to ensure the application was executed in a safe and environmentally responsible manner. Two dynamically positioned marine vessels were used for pumping fluids and capturing returns. The application was extremely successful in restoring the deep water flow lines back to near pre-production state. Final pigging operations confirmed the flow lines were cleaned of all restrictions. Significant paraffin deposition was removed in the application. Approximately 900 bbls of paraffin sludge was recovered from the 4000 bbl internal volume flow line loop. Furthermore, the application was completed with zero discharge of fluids. The application provided significant value for the Cottonwood development. It allowed production from wells to be brought on-line at a higher capacity, thereby generating increased revenue. It also allowed resumption of routine pigging operations. As such, the Cottonwood dispersant application illustrates that with proper planning and execution, paraffin dispersant treatments can be highly effective solutions for cleaning

  7. Reprint of - Deep-sea coral and hardbottom habitats on the west Florida slope, eastern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Steve W.; Rhode, Mike; Brooke, Sandra

    2017-09-01

    Until recently, benthic habitats dominated by deep-sea corals (DSC) appeared to be less extensive on the slope of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) than in the northeast Atlantic Ocean or off the southeastern US. There are relatively few bioherms (i.e., coral-built mounds) in the northern GOM, and most DSCs are attached to existing hard substrata (e.g., authigenically formed carbonate). The primary structure-forming, DSC in the GOM is Lophelia pertusa, but structure is also provided by other living and dead scleractinians, antipatharians (black corals), octocorals (gorgonians, soft corals), hydrocorals and sponges, as well as abundant rocky substrata. The best development of DSCs in the GOM was previously documented within Viosca Knoll oil and gas lease blocks 826 and 862/906 (north-central GOM) and on the Campeche Bank (southern GOM in Mexican waters). This paper documents extensive deep reef ecosystems composed of DSC and rocky hard-bottom recently surveyed on the West Florida Slope (WFS, eastern GOM) during six research cruises (2008-2012). Using multibeam sonar, CTD casts, and video from underwater vehicles, we describe the physical and oceanographic characteristics of these deep reefs and provide size or area estimates of deep coral and hardground habitats. The multibeam sonar analyses revealed hundreds of mounds and ridges, some of which were subsequently surveyed using underwater vehicles. Mounds and ridges in region warrants additional studies to better understand the influences of oceanography and geology on the occurrence of DSC and associated organisms. Protection measures are being considered to ensure the long-term integrity of this diverse ecosystem.

  8. Validating Annual Growth Bands of Deep Sea Corals from the Gulf of Mexico and Southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohon, L. M.; Roark, E.; Guillemette, R. N.; Prouty, N.; Ross, S.

    2012-12-01

    The deep-water black corals, Leiopathes sp., have the potential to be used as an archive of historical oceanographic and biochemical changes. Deep-sea corals can extend our observations of ocean dynamics and climate well beyond the onset of instrumental records. In this study we investigate different methods of determining the growth rates and age distributions of deep-water black corals (Leiopathes sp.) in the Gulf of Mexico and the southeastern Unites States. Leiopathes sp. grow in a tree-like fashion by depositing growth rings resulting in decadally resolved and perhaps annually resolved paleoceanographic records. We use radiocarbon measurements to validate annual growth bands and annual variations in iodine concentrations. Radiocarbon results from five specimens show that these animals have been growing continuously for at least the last two millennia, with growth rates ranging from 8 to 22 μm yr-1. Results from scanning electron microscope (SEM) work to image growth rings (90x and 900x) in back-scattered electrons (BSE) mode and measure iodine by wavelength dispersive spectrometer (WDS). Ages were determined by the counting of growth bands by independent observes and counting of peaks of iodine and BSE measured with 1 μm spots shoulder to shoulder across the radius of the specimen. Peaks in iodine concentration associated with the glueing regions of the growth bands are also in excellent agreement with the radiocarbon results suggesting annual ring formation. For example in one specimen from the Gulf of Mexico (GOM-JSL04-4734-BC1), the 14C derived age (670 ± 40 yrs.) was in excellent agreement with the iodine derived age of (666 ± 65 yrs.), while the BSE counts (626 ± 60 yrs.) and the visual ring counts (783 ±78 yrs.) were only in good agreement. These results indicate that at a minimum, the iodine derived ages can be used as an independent chronology. Iodine derived ages were used to determine the atmospheric 14C age which was subtracted from the

  9. Large-scale deposition of weathered oil in the Gulf of Mexico following a deep-water oil spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Isabel C; Toro-Farmer, Gerardo; Diercks, Arne-R; Schwing, Patrick; Muller-Karger, Frank; Murawski, Steven; Hollander, David J

    2017-09-01

    The blowout of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) drilling rig in 2010 released an unprecedented amount of oil at depth (1,500 m) into the Gulf of Mexico (GoM). Sedimentary geochemical data from an extensive area (∼194,000 km2) was used to characterize the amount, chemical signature, distribution, and extent of the DWH oil deposited on the seafloor in 2010-2011 from coastal to deep-sea areas in the GoM. The analysis of numerous hydrocarbon compounds (N = 158) and sediment cores (N = 2,613) suggests that, 1.9 ± 0.9 × 104 metric tons of hydrocarbons (>C9 saturated and aromatic fractions) were deposited in 56% of the studied area, containing 21± 10% (up to 47%) of the total amount of oil discharged and not recovered from the DWH spill. Examination of the spatial trends and chemical diagnostic ratios indicate large deposition of weathered DWH oil in coastal and deep-sea areas and negligible deposition on the continental shelf (behaving as a transition zone in the northern GoM). The large-scale analysis of deposited hydrocarbons following the DWH spill helps understanding the possible long-term fate of the released oil in 2010, including sedimentary transformation processes, redistribution of deposited hydrocarbons, and persistence in the environment as recycled petrocarbon. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Biodiversity and community composition of sediment macrofauna associated with deep-sea Lophelia pertusa habitats in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demopoulos, Amanda W.J.; Bourque, Jill R.; Frometa, Janessy

    2014-01-01

    Scleractinian corals create three-dimensional reefs that provide sheltered refuges, facilitate sediment accumulation, and enhance colonization of encrusting fauna. While heterogeneous coral habitats can harbor high levels of biodiversity, their effect on the community composition within nearby sediments remains unclear, particularly in the deep sea. Sediment macrofauna from deep-sea coral habitats (Lophelia pertusa) and non-coral, background sediments were examined at three sites in the northern Gulf of Mexico (VK826, VK906, MC751, 350–500 m depth) to determine whether macrofaunal abundance, diversity, and community composition near corals differed from background soft-sediments. Macrofaunal densities ranged from 26 to 125 individuals 32 cm−2 and were significantly greater near coral versus background sediments only at VK826. Of the 86 benthic invertebrate taxa identified, 16 were exclusive to near-coral habitats, while 14 were found only in background sediments. Diversity (Fisher’s α) and evenness were significantly higher within near-coral sediments only at MC751 while taxon richness was similar among all habitats. Community composition was significantly different both between near-coral and background sediments and among the three primary sites. Polychaetes numerically dominated all samples, accounting for up to 70% of the total individuals near coral, whereas peracarid crustaceans were proportionally more abundant in background sediments (18%) than in those near coral (10%). The reef effect differed among sites, with community patterns potentially influenced by the size of reef habitat. Taxon turnover occurred with distance from the reef, suggesting that reef extent may represent an important factor in structuring sediment communities near L. pertusa. Polychaete communities in both habitats differed from other Gulf of Mexico (GOM) soft sediments based on data from previous studies, and we hypothesize that local environmental conditions found near L

  11. Comparative genomic analysis of oil spill impacts on deep water shipwreck microbiomes in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, L. J.; Damour, M.; McGown, C.; Figan, C.; Kassahun, Z.; Blackwell, K.; Horrell, C.; Gillevet, P.

    2014-12-01

    Shipwrecks serve as artificial reefs in the deep ocean. Because of their inherent diversity compared to their surrounding environment and their random distribution, shipwrecks are ideal ecosystems to study pollution impacts and microbial distribution patterns in the deep biosphere. This study provides a comparative assessment of Deepwater Horizon spill impacts on shipwreck and local sedimentary microbiomes and the synergistic effects of contaminants on these communities and the physical structures that support them. For this study, microbiomes associated with wooden 19th century shipwrecks and World War II era steel shipwrecks in the northern Gulf of Mexico were investigated using next generation sequencing. Samples derived from in situ biofilm monitoring platforms deployed adjacent to 5 shipwrecks for 4 months, and sediment collected from distances ranging from 2-200m from each shipwreck were evaluated for shifts in microbiome structure and gene function relative to proximity to the spill, and oil spill related contaminants in the local environment. The goals of the investigation are to determine impacts to recruitment and community structure at sites located within and outside of areas impacted by the spill. Taxonomic classification of dominant and rare members of shipwreck microbiomes and metabolic information extracted from sequence data yield new understanding of microbial processes associated with site formation. The study provides information on the identity of microbial inhabitants of shipwrecks, their role in site preservation, and impacts of the Deepwater Horizon spill on the primary colonizers of artificial reefs in the deep ocean. This approach could inform about the role of microorganisms in establishment and maintenance of the artificial reef environment, while providing information about ecosystem feedbacks resulting from spills.

  12. Community composition and temporal change at deep Gulf of Mexico cold seeps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessard-Pilon, Stephanie; Porter, Matthew D.; Cordes, Erik E.; MacDonald, Ian; Fisher, Charles R.

    2010-11-01

    Specialized cold-seep communities have been known to exist in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) since the mid-1980s, but only recently has extensive research been carried out on sites at depths >1000 m. This study uses a combination of imagery and analyses within a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) framework to examine the composition of mussel and tubeworm communities at depths between 2200 and 2800 m in the Gulf of Mexico, spatial relations among the fauna, and changes in these communities over time. Photomosaics at three discrete seep communities were obtained in 2006 and a video mosaic of another community was obtained in 1992. Each of these communities was re-imaged in 2007. In addition, quantitative physical collections were made within two of the photomosaic sites and used to confirm the identification of megafauna, quantify the occurrence of smaller and cryptic macrofauna, and allow first-order calculations of biomass within the sites. Substrate type had a significant effect on community composition. Significant associations were identified between live mussels with anemones, shrimp, and sea cucumbers, and between tubeworm aggregations and Munidopsis sp. crabs and encrusting fauna, indicating differences in the composition of megafauna associated with adjacent mussel and tubeworm aggregations. Little change was seen in the total area colonized by foundation fauna (tubeworms and mussels) between years at any site. However, significant changes occurred in the positions of mussels, even over periods of a single year, at all sites, and evidence for the establishment of new tubeworm aggregations between 1992 and 2007 was noted at one site. These photomosaics provide data suggesting that environmental conditions can change over small spatial and temporal scales and mussels move in response to these changes. The successional trends are examined and compared to the patterns that have been documented in shallow (Mexico seep communities.

  13. Student Deep Learning in Bachelor English Programs within Pakistani Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Khazima

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to contrast undergraduate students' descriptions about transformational teaching practices, and student deep learning in bachelor English programs in selected universities within Pakistan. This study utilized a survey to gather responses from five hundred and twenty three students. A paired sample t test was utilized…

  14. Submesoscale currents in the northern Gulf of Mexico: Deep phenomena and dispersion over the continental slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracco, Annalisa; Choi, Jun; Joshi, Keshav; Luo, Hao; McWilliams, James C.

    2016-05-01

    This study examines the mesoscale and submesoscale circulations along the continental slope in the northern Gulf of Mexico at depths greater than 1000 m. The investigation is performed using a regional model run at two horizontal grid resolutions, 5 km and 1.6 km, over a 3 year period, from January 2010 to December 2012. Ageostrophic submesoscale eddies and vorticity filaments populate the continental slope, and they are stronger and more abundant in the simulation at higher resolution, as to be expected. They are formed from horizontal shear layers at the edges of highly intermittent, bottom-intensified, along-slope boundary currents and in the cores of those currents where they are confined to steep slopes. Two different flow regimes are identified. The first applies to the De Soto Canyon that is characterized by weak mean currents and, in the high-resolution run, by intense but few submesoscale eddies that form near preferentially along the Florida continental slope. The second is found in the remainder of the domain, where the mean currents are stronger and the circulation is highly variable in both space and time, and the vorticity field is populated, in the high-resolution case, by numerous vorticity filaments and short-lived eddies. Lagrangian tracers are deployed at different times along the continental shelf below 1000 m depth to quantify the impact of the submesoscale currents on transport and mixing. The modeled absolute dispersion is, on average, independent of horizontal resolution, while mixing, quantified by finite-size Lyapunov exponents and vertical relative dispersion, increases when submesoscale processes are present. Dispersion in the De Soto Canyon is smaller than in the rest of the model domain and less affected by resolution. This is further confirmed comparing the evolution of passive dye fields deployed in De Soto Canyon near the Macondo Prospect, where the Deepwater Horizon rig exploded in 2010, and at the largest known natural hydrocarbon

  15. Submesoscale circulation in the Northern Gulf of Mexico: Deep phenomena and dispersion over the continental slope

    CERN Document Server

    Bracco, Annalisa; Luo, Hao; McWilliams, Jim C

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the mesoscale and submesoscale circulations along the continental slope in the northern Gulf of Mexico at depths greater than 1000 m. The investigation is performed using a regional model run at two horizontal grid resolutions, 5 km and 1.6 km, over a three year period from January 2010 to December 2012. Ageostrophic submesoscale eddies, and vorticity filaments populate the continental slope, and they are stronger and more abundant in the simulation at higher resolution, as to be expected. They are formed from horizontal shear layers at the edges of highly intermittent, bottom-intensified, along-slope boundary currents and in the cores of those currents when they are confined on steep slopes. The horizontal resolution influences the representation of the lateral and vertical transport of neutrally buoyant tracers. This is exemplified by a passive dye deployed near the Macondo Prospect, where the Deepwater Horizon rig exploded in 2010, and at the largest known natural hydrocarbon seep in th...

  16. Predictors of species richness in the deep-benthic fauna of the northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haedrich, Richard L.; Devine, Jennifer A.; Kendall, Valerie J.

    2008-12-01

    Species richness in macrofauna and megafauna collected with box cores and trawls from 35 standard stations over a depth range of 175-3720 m in the northern Gulf of Mexico was examined in terms of two primary questions: (1) are observed patterns random? and (2) if not, what environmental factors might account for the patterns? A null model tested whether richness vs. depth distributions were random. Groups with species that had broad vertical depth ranges fit the null model better than groups with small ranges, but for almost all phyla a non-random pattern was indicated. With randomness as a proximal explanation ruled out, further examination of the relationship between richness and environmental factors was justified. A generalized linear model (GLM) showed that a suite of 18 factors categorized as food-related, habitat-related, pollution-related and location-related were significantly related to richness patterns, but that different mixes of factors applied to different phyla. No one factor accounted for any observed patterns. Thus, each taxonomic group needs to be examined individually, and no generally applicable explanation for the causes of richness patterns may exist. Nonetheless, mapping richness itself indicates valuable areas in the Mississippi Trough that must receive special consideration and possible protection.

  17. Enumeration of viruses and prokaryotes in deep-sea sediments and cold seeps of the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, Christina A.

    2010-11-01

    Little is known about the distribution and abundance of viruses in deep-sea cold-seep environments. Like hydrothermal vents, seeps support communities of macrofauna that are sustained by chemosynthetic bacteria. Sediments close to these communities are hypothesized to be more microbiologically active and therefore to host higher numbers of viruses than non-seep areas. Push cores were taken at five types of Gulf of Mexico habitats at water depths below 1000 m using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). The habitats included non-seep reference sediment, brine seeps, a microbial mat, an urchin field, and a pogonophoran worm community. Samples were processed immediately for enumeration of viruses and prokaryotes without the addition of a preservative. Prokaryote counts were an order of magnitude lower in sediments directly in contact with macrofauna (urchins, pogonophorans) compared to all other samples (107 vs. 108 cells g-1 dry weight) and were highest in areas of elevated salinity (brine seeps). Viral-Like Particle (VLP) counts were lowest in the reference sediments and pogonophoran cores (108 VLP g-1 dry wt), higher in brine seeps (109 VLP g-1 dry wt), and highest in the microbial mats (1010 VLP g-1 dry wt). Virus-prokaryote ratios (VPR) ranged from 30 in the microbial mats and >60 in the urchin field. VLP counts and VPR were all significantly greater than those reported from sediments in the deep Mediterranean Sea and in most cases were higher than recent data from a cold-seep site near Japan. The high VPR suggest that greater microbial activity in or near cold-seep environments results in greater viral production and therefore higher numbers of viruses.

  18. Enumeration of viruses and prokaryotes in deep-sea sediments and cold seeps of the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, Christina A.

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about the distribution and abundance of viruses in deep-sea cold-seep environments. Like hydrothermal vents, seeps support communities of macrofauna that are sustained by chemosynthetic bacteria. Sediments close to these communities are hypothesized to be more microbiologically active and therefore to host higher numbers of viruses than non-seep areas. Push cores were taken at five types of Gulf of Mexico habitats at water depths below 1000 m using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). The habitats included non-seep reference sediment, brine seeps, a microbial mat, an urchin field, and a pogonophoran worm community. Samples were processed immediately for enumeration of viruses and prokaryotes without the addition of a preservative. Prokaryote counts were an order of magnitude lower in sediments directly in contact with macrofauna (urchins, pogonophorans) compared to all other samples (107 vs. 108 cells g-1 dry weight) and were highest in areas of elevated salinity (brine seeps). Viral-Like Particle (VLP) counts were lowest in the reference sediments and pogonophoran cores (108 VLP g-1 dry wt), higher in brine seeps (109 VLP g-1 dry wt), and highest in the microbial mats (1010 VLP g-1 dry wt). Virus-prokaryote ratios (VPR) ranged from 30 in the microbial mats and >60 in the urchin field. VLP counts and VPR were all significantly greater than those reported from sediments in the deep Mediterranean Sea and in most cases were higher than recent data from a cold-seep site near Japan. The high VPR suggest that greater microbial activity in or near cold-seep environments results in greater viral production and therefore higher numbers of viruses.

  19. Hydrocarbons in Deep-Sea Sediments following the 2010 Deepwater Horizon Blowout in the Northeast Gulf of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Isabel C; Schwing, Patrick T; Brooks, Gregg R; Larson, Rebekka A; Hastings, David W; Ellis, Greg; Goddard, Ethan A; Hollander, David J

    2015-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon (DWH) spill released 4.9 million barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) over 87 days. Sediment and water sampling efforts were concentrated SW of the DWH and in coastal areas. Here we present geochemistry data from sediment cores collected in the aftermath of the DWH event from 1000-1500 m water depth in the DeSoto Canyon, NE of the DWH wellhead. Cores were analyzed at high-resolution (at 2 mm and 5 mm intervals) in order to evaluate the concentration, composition and input of hydrocarbons to the seafloor. Specifically, we analyzed total organic carbon (TOC), aliphatic, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs), and biomarker (hopanes, steranes, diasteranes) compounds to elucidate possible sources and transport pathways for deposition of hydrocarbons. Results showed higher hydrocarbon concentrations during 2010-2011 compared to years prior to 2010. Hydrocarbon inputs in 2010-2011 were composed of a mixture of sources including terrestrial, planktonic, and weathered oil. Our results suggest that after the DWH event, both soluble and highly insoluble hydrocarbons were deposited at enhanced rates in the deep-sea. We proposed two distinct transport pathways of hydrocarbon deposition: 1) sinking of oil-particle aggregates (hydrocarbon-contaminated marine snow and/or suspended particulate material), and 2) advective transport and direct contact of the deep plume with the continental slope surface sediments between 1000-1200 m. Our findings underline the complexity of the depositional event observed in the aftermath of the DWH event in terms of multiple sources, variable concentrations, and spatial (depth-related) variability in the DeSoto Canyon, NE of the DWH wellhead.

  20. Hydrocarbons in Deep-Sea Sediments following the 2010 Deepwater Horizon Blowout in the Northeast Gulf of Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel C Romero

    Full Text Available The Deepwater Horizon (DWH spill released 4.9 million barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico (GoM over 87 days. Sediment and water sampling efforts were concentrated SW of the DWH and in coastal areas. Here we present geochemistry data from sediment cores collected in the aftermath of the DWH event from 1000-1500 m water depth in the DeSoto Canyon, NE of the DWH wellhead. Cores were analyzed at high-resolution (at 2 mm and 5 mm intervals in order to evaluate the concentration, composition and input of hydrocarbons to the seafloor. Specifically, we analyzed total organic carbon (TOC, aliphatic, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs, and biomarker (hopanes, steranes, diasteranes compounds to elucidate possible sources and transport pathways for deposition of hydrocarbons. Results showed higher hydrocarbon concentrations during 2010-2011 compared to years prior to 2010. Hydrocarbon inputs in 2010-2011 were composed of a mixture of sources including terrestrial, planktonic, and weathered oil. Our results suggest that after the DWH event, both soluble and highly insoluble hydrocarbons were deposited at enhanced rates in the deep-sea. We proposed two distinct transport pathways of hydrocarbon deposition: 1 sinking of oil-particle aggregates (hydrocarbon-contaminated marine snow and/or suspended particulate material, and 2 advective transport and direct contact of the deep plume with the continental slope surface sediments between 1000-1200 m. Our findings underline the complexity of the depositional event observed in the aftermath of the DWH event in terms of multiple sources, variable concentrations, and spatial (depth-related variability in the DeSoto Canyon, NE of the DWH wellhead.

  1. Trophic interactions of common elasmobranchs in deep-sea communities of the Gulf of Mexico revealed through stable isotope and stomach content analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, Diana A.; Heithaus, Michael R.; Vaudo, Jeremy J.; Grubbs, R. Dean; Gastrich, Kirk; Castro, José I.

    2015-05-01

    Deep-water sharks are abundant and widely distributed in the northern and eastern Gulf of Mexico. As mid- and upper-level consumers that can range widely, sharks likely are important components of deep-sea communities and their trophic interactions may serve as system-wide baselines that could be used to monitor the overall health of these communities. We investigated the trophic interactions of deep-sea sharks using a combination of stable isotope (δ13C and δ15N) and stomach content analyses. Two hundred thirty-two muscle samples were collected from elasmobranchs captured off the bottom at depths between 200 and 1100 m along the northern slope (NGS) and the west Florida slope (WFS) of the Gulf of Mexico during 2011 and 2012. Although we detected some spatial, temporal, and interspecific variation in apparent trophic positions based on stable isotopes, there was considerable isotopic overlap among species, between locations, and through time. Overall δ15N values in the NGS region were higher than in the WFS. The δ15N values also increased between April 2011 and 2012 in the NGS, but not the WFS, within Squalus cf. mitsukurii. We found that stable isotope values of S. cf. mitsukurii, the most commonly captured elasmobranch, varied between sample regions, through time, and also with sex and size. Stomach content analysis (n=105) suggested relatively similar diets at the level of broad taxonomic categories of prey among the taxa with sufficient sample sizes. We did not detect a relationship between body size and relative trophic levels inferred from δ15N, but patterns within several species suggest increasing trophic levels with increasing size. Both δ13C and δ15N values suggest a substantial degree of overlap among most deep-water shark species. This study provides the first characterization of the trophic interactions of deep-sea sharks in the Gulf of Mexico and establishes system baselines for future investigations.

  2. Mesozoic (Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous) deep gas reservoir play, central and eastern Gulf coastal plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, E.A.; Li, P.; Goddard, D.A.; Ramirez, V.O.; Talukdar, S.C.

    2008-01-01

    The Mesozoic (Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous) deeply buried gas reservoir play in the central and eastern Gulf coastal plain of the United States has high potential for significant gas resources. Sequence-stratigraphic study, petroleum system analysis, and resource assessment were used to characterize this developing play and to identify areas in the North Louisiana and Mississippi Interior salt basins with potential for deeply buried gas reservoirs. These reservoir facies accumulated in Upper Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous Norphlet, Haynesville, Cotton Valley, and Hosston continental, coastal, and marine siliciclastic environments and Smackover and Sligo nearshore marine shelf, ramp, and reef carbonate environments. These Mesozoic strata are associated with transgressive and regressive systems tracts. In the North Louisiana salt basin, the estimate of secondary, nonassociated thermogenic gas generated from thermal cracking of oil to gas in the Upper Jurassic Smackover source rocks from depths below 3658 m (12,000 ft) is 4800 tcf of gas as determined using software applications. Assuming a gas expulsion, migration, and trapping efficiency of 2-3%, 96-144 tcf of gas is potentially available in this basin. With some 29 tcf of gas being produced from the North Louisiana salt basin, 67-115 tcf of in-place gas remains. Assuming a gas recovery factor of 65%, 44-75 tcf of gas is potentially recoverable. The expelled thermogenic gas migrated laterally and vertically from the southern part of this basin to the updip northern part into shallower reservoirs to depths of up to 610 m (2000 ft). Copyright ?? 2008. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists. All rights reserved.

  3. Data collected by the R/V Gyre in the Gulf of Mexico to support the Stability and Change in the Gulf of Mexico Chemosynthetic Communities Program, 1996 - 2002 (NODC Accession 0000788)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A multidisciplinary team of marine scientists has completed a program entitled Stability and Change in Gulf of Mexico Chemosynthetic Communities. The program was...

  4. The Dynamics of Vertical Migration in the Oceanic Gulf of Mexico after Deepwater Horizon: Active Linkage of Large Vertebrates and Deep-Pelagic Nekton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, T.; Cook, A.; Frank, T. M.; Boswell, K. M.; Vecchione, M.; Judkins, H.; Romero, I.

    2016-02-01

    Toothed whales, smaller cetaceans, seabirds, and epipelagic gamefishes rely on deep-pelagic (meso- and bathypelagic) nekton as primary or secondary prey. This trophic interaction is mediated by downward and upward vertical movements (e.g., sperm whale diving and lanternfishes migration, respectively). This interaction also links particle-feeding lower trophic levels with top predators in a manner that spans the gamut of depth domains. This is particularly important with respect to a whole-water column disturbance such as the Deepwater Horizon oil spill (DWHOS). Here we present highly resolved vertical distribution and migration data collected during a large-scale, NOAA-supported, deep-pelagic (0-1500 m) survey in 2011, along with data collected during ongoing GoMRI-supported DEEPEND consortium surveys. The deep-pelagic nekton community of the Gulf of Mexico is a complex mixture of migrating, non-migrating, and partially migrating assemblages that connect surface waters with depths in excess of 1000 m. Major patterns of vertical distribution for 400+ species of fishes, cephalopods, and macrocrustaceans, the primary prey of many important species of oceanic vertebrates living near-surface, will be summarized and quantified with the goal of highlighting potential vectors of anthropogenic contamination transfer in the deep-pelagial, the Gulf's largest ecosystem.

  5. First record of Tanaidacea (Crustacea) from a deep-sea coral reef in the Gulf of Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakiel, Aleksandra; Stępień, Anna; Jóźwiak, Piotr; Serigstad, Bjørn; Błażewicz-Paszkowycz, Magdalena

    2015-08-05

    Four undescribed species of Tanaidacea were discovered during a baseline monitoring program conducted off the coast of Ghana. The specimens came from a deep-water reef largely composed of the ahermatypic coral, Lophelia pertusa. The tanaidacean material was collected during November 2012 onboard the RV Dr Fridtjof Nansen using a van Veen grab in depths of between 375 and 386 m. Three of the new species described herein are tanaidomorphans belonging to the genera Bathyleptochelia (Leptocheliidae), Pseudotanais (Pseudotanaidae) and Cryptocopoides (Cryptocopidae). The fourth species, an apseudomorphan, belongs to Calozodion (Metapseudidae), a genus hitherto known only from shallow waters (<200 m). This report constitutes the first records of tanaidaceans from a deep-sea Lophelia reef.

  6. Metagenomic analysis and metabolite profiling of deep-sea sediments from the Gulf of Mexico following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikole Elizabeth Kimes

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Marine subsurface environments, such as deep-sea sediments, house abundant and diverse microbial communities that are believed to influence large-scale geochemical processes. These processes include the biotransformation and mineralization of numerous petroleum constituents. Thus, microbial communities in the Gulf of Mexico are thought to be responsible for the intrinsic bioremediation of crude oil released by the Deepwater Horizon (DWH oil spill. While hydrocarbon contamination is known to enrich for aerobic, oil-degrading bacteria in deep-seawater habitats, relatively little is known about the response of communities in deep-sea sediments, where low oxygen levels may hinder such a response. Here, we examined the hypothesis that increased hydrocarbon exposure results in an altered sediment microbial community structure that reflects the prospects for oil biodegradation under the prevailing conditions. We explore this hypothesis using metagenomic analysis and metabolite profiling of deep-sea sediment samples following the DWH oil spill. The presence of aerobic microbial communities and associated functional genes was consistent among all samples, whereas, a greater number of Deltaproteobacteria and anaerobic functional genes were found in sediments closest to the DWH blowout site. Metabolite profiling also revealed a greater number of putative metabolites in sediments surrounding the blowout zone relative to a background site located 127 km away. The mass spectral analysis of the putative metabolites revealed that alkylsuccinates remained below detection levels, but a homologous series of benzylsuccinates (with carbon chain lengths from 5 to 10 could be detected. Our findings suggest that increased exposure to hydrocarbons enriches for Deltaproteobacteria, which are known to be capable of anaerobic hydrocarbon metabolism. We also provide evidence for an active microbial community metabolizing aromatic hydrocarbons in deep-sea sediments of the

  7. Characterization of 13 microsatellite loci for the deep-sea coral, Lophelia pertusa (Linnaeus 1758), from the western North Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, C.L.; Eackles, M.S.; Johnson, R.L.; King, T.L.

    2008-01-01

    A suite of 13 polymorphic tri- and tetranucleotide microsatellite loci were isolated from the ahermatypic deep-sea coral, Lophelia pertusa. Among 51 individuals collected from three disjunct oceanic regions, allelic diversity ranged from six to 38 alleles and averaged 9.1 alleles per locus. Observed heterozygosity ranged from 9.1 to 96.8% and averaged 62.3% in the Gulf of Mexico population. For some loci, amplification success varied among collections, suggesting regional variation in priming site sequences. Four loci showed departures from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in certain collections which may reflect nonrandom mating. ?? 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Biodiversity of the deep-sea continental margin bordering the Gulf of Maine (NW Atlantic: relationships among sub-regions and to shelf systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noreen E Kelly

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In contrast to the well-studied continental shelf region of the Gulf of Maine, fundamental questions regarding the diversity, distribution, and abundance of species living in deep-sea habitats along the adjacent continental margin remain unanswered. Lack of such knowledge precludes a greater understanding of the Gulf of Maine ecosystem and limits development of alternatives for conservation and management. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We use data from the published literature, unpublished studies, museum records and online sources, to: (1 assess the current state of knowledge of species diversity in the deep-sea habitats adjacent to the Gulf of Maine (39-43°N, 63-71°W, 150-3000 m depth; (2 compare patterns of taxonomic diversity and distribution of megafaunal and macrofaunal species among six distinct sub-regions and to the continental shelf; and (3 estimate the amount of unknown diversity in the region. Known diversity for the deep-sea region is 1,671 species; most are narrowly distributed and known to occur within only one sub-region. The number of species varies by sub-region and is directly related to sampling effort occurring within each. Fishes, corals, decapod crustaceans, molluscs, and echinoderms are relatively well known, while most other taxonomic groups are poorly known. Taxonomic diversity decreases with increasing distance from the continental shelf and with changes in benthic topography. Low similarity in faunal composition suggests the deep-sea region harbours faunal communities distinct from those of the continental shelf. Non-parametric estimators of species richness suggest a minimum of 50% of the deep-sea species inventory remains to be discovered. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The current state of knowledge of biodiversity in this deep-sea region is rudimentary. Our ability to answer questions is hampered by a lack of sufficient data for many taxonomic groups, which is constrained by sampling biases, life

  9. Teacher perceptions of the Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence: Central Gulf of Mexico program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sempier, Tracie Tingle

    The 12 Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence (COSEE) are funded by the National Science Foundation and are designed to promote creative ways of disseminating marine science research and its importance to the public. The focus of this study is the COSEE Central Gulf of Mexico program which encourages active partnerships between research scientists and teachers. In these collaborative partnerships, teachers and scientists work together to create educational products and disseminate best practices in ocean sciences education. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the lesson plans and curricula created through the Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence: Central Gulf of Mexico program (COSEE:CGOM), which are the products of this collaboration, were being used effectively in the classroom. The study addressed issues such as teacher perceptions of collaboration with scientists, effectiveness of COSEE:CGOM curriculum implementation in producing more ocean literate students, and teachers' varying views concerning how to successfully implement new COSEE:CGOM knowledge and concepts into their classrooms in order to improve student scientific understanding. In addition, the study examined frequency of use of COSEE:CGOM lesson plans and identified predictor variables that can produce a model for understanding factors hindering or enhancing lesson plan use. Further, participant perceptions of using peer-teaching as a method for disseminating COSEE:CGOM information in their districts were addressed.

  10. AFSC/ABL: Deep-Water Longline Survey for Giant Grenadier and Sablefish in the Western Gulf of Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — An experimental bottom longline survey was conducted at depths >1,000 m in the western Gulf of Alaska in August 2008. The objective was to investigate the...

  11. STIMULATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR DEEP WELL COMPLETIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen Wolhart

    2003-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring a Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies is conducting a project to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project is to assess U.S. deep well drilling & stimulation activity, review rock mechanics & fracture growth in deep, high pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. Phase 1 was recently completed and consisted of assessing deep gas well drilling activity (1995-2007) and an industry survey on deep gas well stimulation practices by region. Of the 29,000 oil, gas and dry holes drilled in 2002, about 300 were drilled in the deep well; 25% were dry, 50% were high temperature/high pressure completions and 25% were simply deep completions. South Texas has about 30% of these wells, Oklahoma 20%, Gulf of Mexico Shelf 15% and the Gulf Coast about 15%. The Rockies represent only 2% of deep drilling. Of the 60 operators who drill deep and HTHP wells, the top 20 drill almost 80% of the wells. Six operators drill half the U.S. deep wells. Deep drilling peaked at 425 wells in 1998 and fell to 250 in 1999. Drilling is expected to rise through 2004 after which drilling should cycle down as overall drilling declines.

  12. 78 FR 22949 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-17

    ... queen conch, Gulf red drum, Gulf reef fish, Gulf shrimp, Gulf coral, Gulf and South Atlantic coastal... emergency rule implementing management measures for Gulf of Mexico red snapper (78 FR 17882, March 25, 2013...) program for Gulf red snapper. 622.22 Individual fishing quota (IFQ) program for Gulf groupers and...

  13. Alternative response technology program for the Deepwater Horizon in the Gulf of Mexico - an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortez, Michael J.; Rowe, Hunter G. [BP - Gulf Coast Restoration (United States)], email: michael.cortez@bp.com

    2011-07-01

    The innovative approach utilized by the Alternative Response Technology (ART) Program for the MC252 Deepwater Horizon response in the Gulf of Mexico during 2010 was presented in this paper. The ART program is authorized by the Unified Area Command. This paper focuses on the spill response technologies that were implemented offshore, near shore and on-shore, and covers technologies related to booming, skimming, separation, sand cleaning, surveillance and detection. A process was designed and implemented for capturing ideas real time, which leveraged the public's ingenuity and entrepreneurial spirit. About 120,000 individual ideas were submitted by the public globally from more than 100 countries. About 40,000 of these ideas were related to addressing the spill response. There are about 100 new technologies related to spill response that were formally evaluated and/or field tested, and approximately 25 of those tested were successfully implemented across the spill response area.

  14. Validating Annual Growth Bands of Deep-Sea Black Corals and Calculating Ocean Reservoir Ages in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roark, E. B.; Mohon, M. L.; Prouty, N.; Guillemette, R. N.; Fallon, S.; Ross, S. W.

    2015-12-01

    Deep-sea black corals (Leiopathes sp.) are long-lived (up to 4,000 yrs old), and grow in a tree-like fashion depositing growth rings in their skeleton. Scanning electron microscopy at 900x magnification was used to image thin sections and identify peaks in iodine intensity using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy in three specimens from the Gulf of Mexico. Age determination by counting visual growth bands and iodine peaks were compared to both radiocarbon and U/Th-derived ages. The first specimen (GOM-JSL04-4734-BC1) has an iodine peak count age of 695 ±70, and growth band age of 785 ± 80 which compare quite well to the radiocarbon age of 670 ±40 years and a U/Th age of 780 ±16 years. There was similar agreement between the radiocarbon ages (1399 ±30 and 670 ±35 years) and the iodine peak count ages (1240 ±125 and 715±70 years) for the remaining two specimens with growth rates ranging from 11 ±3 to 16 ±2 µm yr-1 for all 3 specimens. Using the independent (iodine derived) age models in conjunction with the radiocarbon data, a high resolution ocean reservoir age record was developed for the last 600 years. Reservoir ages varied from 120 to 550 14C years on decadal to centennial time scales. The modern reservoir age in the GOM is 235 ±11 14C years. The preferred explanation for the variability found in these reservoir ages is related to changes in the strength of the Yucatan Current. This novel approach combines the identification of growth bands captured in high-resolution SEM in combination with synchronous peaks in skeleton iodine composition and is the first to validate that both can be used as annual chronometers. Using the independent iodine age models in conjunction with the radiocarbon records, ocean reservoir age records can be developed for the last ~500 to 1000 years.

  15. 78 FR 57534 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-19

    ..., Caribbean reef fish, Caribbean spiny lobster, Caribbean queen conch, Gulf red drum, Gulf reef fish, Gulf... related to the IFQ program for Gulf red snapper as specified in Sec. 622.21, or the IFQ program for Gulf... regarding the IFQ program for Gulf red snapper as specified in Sec. 622.21, or the IFQ program for Gulf...

  16. Computer-Guided Deep Brain Stimulation Programming for Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldman, Dustin A; Pulliam, Christopher L; Urrea Mendoza, Enrique; Gartner, Maureen; Giuffrida, Joseph P; Montgomery, Erwin B; Espay, Alberto J; Revilla, Fredy J

    2016-02-01

    Pilot study to evaluate computer-guided deep brain stimulation (DBS) programming designed to optimize stimulation settings using objective motion sensor-based motor assessments. Seven subjects (five males; 54-71 years) with Parkinson's disease (PD) and recently implanted DBS systems participated in this pilot study. Within two months of lead implantation, the subject returned to the clinic to undergo computer-guided programming and parameter selection. A motion sensor was placed on the index finger of the more affected hand. Software guided a monopolar survey during which monopolar stimulation on each contact was iteratively increased followed by an automated assessment of tremor and bradykinesia. After completing assessments at each setting, a software algorithm determined stimulation settings designed to minimize symptom severities, side effects, and battery usage. Optimal DBS settings were chosen based on average severity of motor symptoms measured by the motion sensor. Settings chosen by the software algorithm identified a therapeutic window and improved tremor and bradykinesia by an average of 35.7% compared with baseline in the "off" state (p computer-guided DBS programming identified stimulation parameters that significantly improved tremor and bradykinesia with minimal clinician involvement. Automated motion sensor-based mapping is worthy of further investigation and may one day serve to extend programming to populations without access to specialized DBS centers. © 2015 International Neuromodulation Society.

  17. Coccolithophore and benthic foraminifera distribution patterns in the Gulf of Cadiz and Western Iberian Margin during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 339

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestra, B.; Grunert, P.; Ausin, B.; Hodell, D.; Flores, J.-A.; Alvarez-Zarikian, C. A.; Hernandez-Molina, F. J.; Stow, D.; Piller, W. E.; Paytan, A.

    2017-06-01

    For the first time during an Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition (Exp. 339, Mediterranean Outflow) water samples for living coccolithophore distributions and mudline samples for coccoliths, benthic foraminifera, and geochemical analyses in the underlying surface sediments were collected. In total, 14 water samples (from 5 to 20 m water depth) and 7 mudline samples were gathered at the drill sites. Coccolithophore distributions show spatial variations in species diversity. In particular, assemblages that characterize the Western Iberian Margin differ from those in the Gulf of Cadiz, indicative of oceanographic and environmental controls on the community in the upper ocean (0-20 m depth). Comparison of the living assemblages to those in surface sediments shows differences in the presence of some species, suggesting the influence of post deposition sedimentary processes. Other factors such as the season of sampling and the limited sampling depth may also have a role in the differences recorded. Benthic foraminiferal assemblages seem to be primarily determined by source, quantity and quality of available food. Sites in the Gulf of Cadiz are bathed by Mediterranean Outflow Water (MOW) and characterized by a considerable amount of advected food particles. Elevated epibenthic foraminifera exploit this niche, while arborescent epifaunal and infaunal taxa thrive on food particles falling out of MOW. The combined data suggest different flow speeds and settling of MOW suspension load in the Gulf of Cadiz. In contrast, assemblages from the Western Iberian Margin located farthest from or outside of MOW are determined by local export productivity and mirror trophic conditions in the surface waters. Both assemblages reveal variation in the composition at intermediate and deep water depths along the southern and western Iberian Margins with distance from the Strait of Gibraltar.

  18. Introduction to the programming of deep brain stimulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkmann, Jens; Herzog, Jan; Kopper, Florian; Deuschl, Güntner

    2002-01-01

    The clinical success of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for treating Parkinson's disease, tremor, or dystonia critically depends on the quality of postoperative neurologic management. Movement disorder specialists becoming involved with this therapy need to acquire new skills to optimally adapt stimulation parameters and medication after implantation of a DBS system. In clinical practice, the infinite number of possible parameter settings in DBS can be reduced to few relevant combinations. In this article, the authors describe a general scheme of selecting stimulation parameters in DBS and provide clinical and neurophysiological arguments for such a standardized algorithm. They also describe noninvasive technical trouble shooting by using programming features of the commercially available neurostimulation devices. Copyright 2002 Movement Disorder Society

  19. Potential Environmental Factors Affecting Oil-Degrading Bacterial Populations in Deep and Surface Waters of the Northern Gulf of Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jiqing; Bacosa, Hernando P.; Liu, Zhanfei

    2017-01-01

    Understanding bacterial community dynamics as a result of an oil spill is important for predicting the fate of oil released to the environment and developing bioremediation strategies in the Gulf of Mexico. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the roles of temperature, water chemistry (nutrients), and initial bacterial community in selecting oil degraders through a series of incubation experiments. Surface (2 m) and bottom (1537 m) waters, collected near the Deepwater Horizon site, were amend...

  20. Relationship Between Zooplankton Distribution and Hydrography in Deep Waters of the Southern Gulf of México. A Seasonal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farber Lorda, J. F.; Athie, G.

    2016-02-01

    Samples obtained during three different seasons (XIXIMI 1, November 2010; XIXIMI 2, July 2011; and XIXIMI 3 February-March, 2013) were utilized to study zooplankton distribution and hydrography. We observe the same distributional pattern for the three seasons. In the south, in the Gulf of Campeche, where a quasi-permanent gyre was present, we found the most productive area, with high zooplankton bio volumes. During autumn and winter, coastal currents in the same area induced by wind forcing is apparently producing an upwelling, which, by Ekman pumping, is transporting, nutrients to the open ocean, increasing primary productivity. The depth of the isopycnes, showed, during the three cruises, a domed structure in the Gulf of Campeche (South of the area in front of Campeche and Veracruz states), around cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies; this in coincidence with high CDT fluorescence values and high bio volumes of zooplankton. The main zooplankton groups showed small seasonal variability, in their proportions, but a great seasonal variability in their abundances and bio volumes. For the three seasons sampled, a significant difference was found for the bio volumes. During summer 2011, after a strong rain event, great concentrations of salps were found in the Gulf of Campeche, and within the before mentioned eddies. Bio volumes during summer were 9 times higher than during autumn. Even excluding the salps volumes, during summer we did find significant differences among the bio volumes of the three cruises, with mean values (six for autumn, and two times higher for winter), than the other two seasons sampled. These results demonstrate that the Gulf of Campeche is a permanently higher productivity area, but with considerable seasonal differences.

  1. Biodegradation of crude oil and dispersants in deep seawater from the Gulf of Mexico: Insights from ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Michael; Kleindienst, Sara; Dittmar, Thorsten; Joye, Samantha B.; Medeiros, Patricia M.

    2016-07-01

    During the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, three million liters of chemical dispersants (Corexit 9500 and 9527) were directly applied at the discharging wellhead at 1500 m water depth. Such a deep-water large-scale application was unprecedented and the effect of dispersants on oil biodegradation is not yet completely understood. The present study explores the biodegradation of oil, dispersant, dispersed oil or dispersed oil and nutrients at the molecular level using ultra-high resolution Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) following a laboratory experiment with Gulf deep water. Oil-derived molecular formulae exhibited a specific molecular fingerprint and were mainly observed in the mass range changes over time in the molecular composition were less pronounced in the dispersed oil treatments compared to the oil-only treatments, suggesting that dispersants affected the metabolic pathways of organic matter biodegradation. In particular, dispersant addition led to an increase of S-containing organic molecular formulae, likely derived from the surfactant di-octyl sulfosuccinate (DOSS). DOSS and several dispersant-derived metabolites (with and without S) were still detectable after six weeks of incubation, underscoring that they were not rapidly biodegraded under the experimental conditions. FT-ICR-MS fragmentation studies allowed tentatively assigning structures to several of these molecules, and we propose that they are degradation products of DOSS and other dispersant components. The present study suggests preferential degradation, transformation and enrichment of distinct dispersant molecules, highlighting the need to include these compounds when tracking Corexit-derived compounds in the environment.

  2. Particle swarm optimization for programming deep brain stimulation arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Edgar; Zhang, Simeng; Deyo, Steve; Xiao, YiZi; Johnson, Matthew D

    2017-02-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy relies on both precise neurosurgical targeting and systematic optimization of stimulation settings to achieve beneficial clinical outcomes. One recent advance to improve targeting is the development of DBS arrays (DBSAs) with electrodes segmented both along and around the DBS lead. However, increasing the number of independent electrodes creates the logistical challenge of optimizing stimulation parameters efficiently. Solving such complex problems with multiple solutions and objectives is well known to occur in biology, in which complex collective behaviors emerge out of swarms of individual organisms engaged in learning through social interactions. Here, we developed a particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm to program DBSAs using a swarm of individual particles representing electrode configurations and stimulation amplitudes. Using a finite element model of motor thalamic DBS, we demonstrate how the PSO algorithm can efficiently optimize a multi-objective function that maximizes predictions of axonal activation in regions of interest (ROI, cerebellar-receiving area of motor thalamus), minimizes predictions of axonal activation in regions of avoidance (ROA, somatosensory thalamus), and minimizes power consumption. The algorithm solved the multi-objective problem by producing a Pareto front. ROI and ROA activation predictions were consistent across swarms (<1% median discrepancy in axon activation). The algorithm was able to accommodate for (1) lead displacement (1 mm) with relatively small ROI (⩽9.2%) and ROA (⩽1%) activation changes, irrespective of shift direction; (2) reduction in maximum per-electrode current (by 50% and 80%) with ROI activation decreasing by 5.6% and 16%, respectively; and (3) disabling electrodes (n  =  3 and 12) with ROI activation reduction by 1.8% and 14%, respectively. Additionally, comparison between PSO predictions and multi-compartment axon model simulations showed discrepancies

  3. Particle swarm optimization for programming deep brain stimulation arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Edgar; Zhang, Simeng; Deyo, Steve; Xiao, YiZi; Johnson, Matthew D.

    2017-02-01

    Objective. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy relies on both precise neurosurgical targeting and systematic optimization of stimulation settings to achieve beneficial clinical outcomes. One recent advance to improve targeting is the development of DBS arrays (DBSAs) with electrodes segmented both along and around the DBS lead. However, increasing the number of independent electrodes creates the logistical challenge of optimizing stimulation parameters efficiently. Approach. Solving such complex problems with multiple solutions and objectives is well known to occur in biology, in which complex collective behaviors emerge out of swarms of individual organisms engaged in learning through social interactions. Here, we developed a particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm to program DBSAs using a swarm of individual particles representing electrode configurations and stimulation amplitudes. Using a finite element model of motor thalamic DBS, we demonstrate how the PSO algorithm can efficiently optimize a multi-objective function that maximizes predictions of axonal activation in regions of interest (ROI, cerebellar-receiving area of motor thalamus), minimizes predictions of axonal activation in regions of avoidance (ROA, somatosensory thalamus), and minimizes power consumption. Main results. The algorithm solved the multi-objective problem by producing a Pareto front. ROI and ROA activation predictions were consistent across swarms (<1% median discrepancy in axon activation). The algorithm was able to accommodate for (1) lead displacement (1 mm) with relatively small ROI (⩽9.2%) and ROA (⩽1%) activation changes, irrespective of shift direction; (2) reduction in maximum per-electrode current (by 50% and 80%) with ROI activation decreasing by 5.6% and 16%, respectively; and (3) disabling electrodes (n  =  3 and 12) with ROI activation reduction by 1.8% and 14%, respectively. Additionally, comparison between PSO predictions and multi-compartment axon

  4. U.S. Geological Survey program of offshore resource and geoenvironmental studies, Atlantic-Gulf of Mexico region, from September 1, 1976, to December 31, 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folger, David W.; Needell, Sally W.

    1983-01-01

    acromagnetic data, and 39,000 km of gravity data, plus 10,000 samples and logs obtained from U.S. Geological Survey and industry drilling (for example, coreholes of the Atlantic Slope Program, Joint Oceanographic Institutions Deep Earth Sampling, Continental Offshore Stratigraphic Tests, and the Atlantic Margin Coring Program). A sedimentary section of Jurassic and Cretaceous age grades from terrigenous clastic rocks nearshore to carbonate rocks offshore; this section is part of an extensive buried bank-platform complex that could contain large reserves of natural gas and oil. The volume of sediment deposited offshore far exceeds the volume deposited onshore where extensive accumulations of oil, gas, and minerals have been found. Commercial exploratory drilling offshore thus far has been limited to the Baltimore Canyon Trough area off New Jersey, where at least two holes have found gas; leasing has taken place in the Southeast Georgia Embayment, where drilling was scheduled to begin in 1979, and is imminent in the Georges Bank area off New England. In addition, hydrogeologic and hydrochemical data obtained from the drilling studies have delineated freshwater-bearing submarine extensions of land aquifers that are important coastal ground-water resources. Hazards in the Georges Bank area include sand mobility associated with strong currents and storm-driven waves; high concentrations of suspended sediment in the water column that, when mixed with spilled oil, may sink to the bottom; and slumping along the upper slope. In the Baltimore Canyon, high sediment mobility accompanies major winter storms, and slumped material may cover as much as 20 percent of the upper slope. Potentially unstable slope areas are being studied in great detail to provide data on timing, triggering mechanisms, and rates of sediment movement. In the Southeast Georgia Embayment and Blake Plateau Basin, strong Gulf Stream flow poses a major problem to all offshore operations. In the Gulf o

  5. Polychaete annelid (segmented worms) abundance and species composition in the proximity (6-9 km) of the Deep Water Horizon (DWH) Oil Spill in the Deep Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Fangyuan; Nunnally, Clifton C.; Lemanski, Joseph R.; Wade, Terry L.; Amon, Rainer M. W.; Rowe, Gilbert T.

    2016-07-01

    Polychaete annelids (segmented worms) dominated the macrobenthos in sediments located 6-9 km from the Deep Water Horizon (DWH) Oil Spill site five months after the event, based on nine 0.2 m2 box core samples. Numbers of species, abundance, and biodiversity indices in the polychaete taxa were significantly lower than pre-spill values from similar depths in the eastern Gulf of Mexico (GoM). Both non-selective and selective deposit feeders were the most frequent feeding guilds, as expected, but their abundances were significantly lower. An increase in the number of carnivorous Sigalionidae may be a response to an accumulation of petroleum hydrocarbons on the sediment. The concentration of oil in the sediments was low and the source of the oil remains equivocal. Multivariate analyses illustrated the differences between communities near the DWH and those from prior studies in similar deep GoM habitats. In summary, Deep Water Horizon Oil Spill appears to have had a measurable impact on the polychaetes.

  6. Application of the Coastal and Marine Ecological Classification Standard to ROV Video Data for Enhanced Analysis of Deep-Sea Habitats in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruby, C.; Skarke, A. D.; Mesick, S.

    2016-02-01

    The Coastal and Marine Ecological Classification Standard (CMECS) is a network of common nomenclature that provides a comprehensive framework for organizing physical, biological, and chemical information about marine ecosystems. It was developed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Coastal Services Center, in collaboration with other feral agencies and academic institutions, as a means for scientists to more easily access, compare, and integrate marine environmental data from a wide range of sources and time frames. CMECS has been endorsed by the Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) as a national metadata standard. The research presented here is focused on the application of CMECS to deep-sea video and environmental data collected by the NOAA ROV Deep Discoverer and the NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer in the Gulf of Mexico in 2011-2014. Specifically, a spatiotemporal index of the physical, chemical, biological, and geological features observed in ROV video records was developed in order to allow scientist, otherwise unfamiliar with the specific content of existing video data, to rapidly determine the abundance and distribution of features of interest, and thus evaluate the applicability of those video data to their research. CMECS units (setting, component, or modifier) for seafloor images extracted from high-definition ROV video data were established based upon visual assessment as well as analysis of coincident environmental sensor (temperature, conductivity), navigation (ROV position, depth, attitude), and log (narrative dive summary) data. The resulting classification units were integrated into easily searchable textual and geo-databases as well as an interactive web map. The spatial distribution and associations of deep-sea habitats as indicated by CMECS classifications are described and optimized methodological approaches for application of CMECS to deep-sea video and environmental data are presented.

  7. Hydrocarbons in Deep-Sea Sediments following the 2010 Deepwater Horizon Blowout in the Northeast Gulf of Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Romero, Isabel C.; Schwing, Patrick T.; Brooks, Gregg R.; Rebekka A Larson; Hastings, David W.; Greg Ellis; Ethan A Goddard; Hollander, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon (DWH) spill released 4.9 million barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) over 87 days. Sediment and water sampling efforts were concentrated SW of the DWH and in coastal areas. Here we present geochemistry data from sediment cores collected in the aftermath of the DWH event from 1000 ? 1500 m water depth in the DeSoto Canyon, NE of the DWH wellhead. Cores were analyzed at high-resolution (at 2 mm and 5 mm intervals) in order to evaluate the concentration, compositio...

  8. Strategic assessment of fisheries independent monitoring programs in the gulf of Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Mark Suprenand

    Full Text Available This study evaluates information produced from 14 fisheries independent monitoring programs (FIM in the Gulf of Mexico. We consider the uniqueness of information from each program and its usefulness in estimating fisheries management indices. Biomass values of 35 functional groups are extracted from an operating model (Ecospace with a method that replicates the patterns of historic FIM samplings. Observation error is added to these data in order to create a set of pseudo data that replicate the type and quality of information obtained from FIM programs. The pseudo data were put into a separate fishery assessment model (Pella-Tomlinson to determine management indices of each functional group (maximum sustainable yield (MSY, biomass at MSY, and fishing mortality at MSY. These indices are compared against values in Ecospace, and against previously published single-species stock assessments. We also evaluate the full suite of information derived from FIM within an ecosystem context, considering whether functional roles are over- or under-sampled, and whether sampling effort is proportional to the value of fish stocks. Results reveal that model derived fishery indices closely matched published indices for the majority of the functional groups, economic and ecological evaluation suggests that several piscivorous functional groups are under-sampled include forage base species that are likely to indirectly support fisheries for piscivores, and sampling efforts are not proportional to the value of some fish stocks. Following ecological modelling we performed statistical analyses on historic FIM catch data to identify optimal species-specific sampling months and gear-types that can be used to refine future FIM sampling efforts.

  9. A DEEP CUT ELLIPSOID ALGORITHM FOR CONVEX-PROGRAMMING - THEORY AND APPLICATIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    FRENK, JBG; GROMICHO, J; ZHANG, S

    1994-01-01

    This paper proposes a deep cut version of the ellipsoid algorithm for solving a general class of continuous convex programming problems. In each step the algorithm does not require more computational effort to construct these deep cuts than its corresponding central cut version. Rules that prevent

  10. Standing stocks and body size of deep-sea macrofauna: Predicting the baseline of 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chih-Lin; Rowe, Gilbert T.; Escobar-Briones, Elva; Nunnally, Clifton; Soliman, Yousria; Ellis, Nick

    2012-11-01

    A composite database encompassing 6 benthic surveys from years 1983 to 2003 was constructed to evaluate the distribution of macrofaunal biomass in the deep Gulf of Mexico (GoM) prior to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Predictive models based on optimal scaling of ocean color data and high resolution bathymetry were employed to map the benthic biomass in the vicinity of spill site because no previous sampling had been conducted at that exact location. The predicted biomass declines with water and mixed layer depth and is an increasing function of surface primary production and temporal variation of sea surface temperature. The decline of animal size with depth, however, was a function of a shift of dominant abundance from large to small taxa. At a local scale, high benthic biomass in the N GoM was associated with the enhanced productivity by the nutrient-laden Mississippi River outflows, offshore transport of the river plumes, and upwelling along the northern edge of the Loop Current. The apparent biomass enhancement at the Mississippi and De Soto Canyon and deep sediment fan was presumably related to lateral down-slope advection of organic carbon from the surrounding continental margin. Except for the Campeche Bank, the meager biomass of the Mexican margin may reflect the characteristic low-productivity Caribbean water that enters the GoM through Yucatan Strait. Benthic biomass in the N GoM was not statistically different between comprehensive surveys in the years 1983-1985 and 2000-2002. The stock assessment and biomass predictions from 669 cores at 170 locations throughout the deep GoM provide an important baseline of the sediment-dwelling fauna that may be subjected to immediate or long-term impacts from the oil spill or from climate change.

  11. Exploration Of Deep Learning Algorithms Using Openacc Parallel Programming Model

    KAUST Repository

    Hamam, Alwaleed A.

    2017-03-13

    Deep learning is based on a set of algorithms that attempt to model high level abstractions in data. Specifically, RBM is a deep learning algorithm that used in the project to increase it\\'s time performance using some efficient parallel implementation by OpenACC tool with best possible optimizations on RBM to harness the massively parallel power of NVIDIA GPUs. GPUs development in the last few years has contributed to growing the concept of deep learning. OpenACC is a directive based ap-proach for computing where directives provide compiler hints to accelerate code. The traditional Restricted Boltzmann Ma-chine is a stochastic neural network that essentially perform a binary version of factor analysis. RBM is a useful neural net-work basis for larger modern deep learning model, such as Deep Belief Network. RBM parameters are estimated using an efficient training method that called Contrastive Divergence. Parallel implementation of RBM is available using different models such as OpenMP, and CUDA. But this project has been the first attempt to apply OpenACC model on RBM.

  12. Fluorescence and DOC contents of pore waters from coastal and deep-sea sediments in the Gulf of Biscay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sierra, M.M.D. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis-SC (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Donard, O.F.X. [Pau Univ. (France). Lab. de Chimie Bio-Inorganique et Environnement; Etcheber, H. [Universite de Bordeaux I, Talence (France). Dept. de Geologie et Oceanographie; Soriano-Sierra, E.J. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis-SC (Brazil). Nucleo de Estudos do Mar; Ewald, M. [Universite de Bordeaux I, Talence (France). Lab. de Physico Toxico-Chimie des Systemes Naturels

    2001-07-01

    Fluorescence of waters from the Gulf of Biscay was investigated. Pore waters fluoresced more intensely and exhibited red-shifted spectra relative to overlying seawaters. Also, a blue-shift was observed going from coastal to open sea sites. Results indicate that continental inputs of fluorescent material reach the sea bed at all sites studied. Organic matter (OM) modifications within sediments were also observed. In the uppermost layer (6 cm), fluorescence intensity and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations decrease, followed by a red-shift in emission spectra with increasing depth. This may reflect the increase in OM molar mass due to humification. The reverse of these trends in the deepest sub-oxic sediments might be related to the degradation of OM released from the solid phase, resulting in dissolved fluorescent material with a relative paucity of oxygen-containing functional groups. A very good correlation of DOC with fluorescence was observed in all cores. (author)

  13. Impact of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on a deep-water coral community in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Helen K.; Hsing, Pen-Yuan; Cho, Walter; Shank, Timothy M.; Cordes, Erik E.; Quattrini, Andrea M.; Nelson, Robert K.; Camilli, Richard; Demopoulos, Amanda W.J.; German, Christopher R.; Brooks, James M.; Roberts, Harry H.; Shedd, William; Reddy, Christopher M.; Fisher, Charles R.

    2012-01-01

    To assess the potential impact of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on offshore ecosystems, 11 sites hosting deep-water coral communities were examined 3 to 4 mo after the well was capped. Healthy coral communities were observed at all sites >20 km from the Macondo well, including seven sites previously visited in September 2009, where the corals and communities appeared unchanged. However, at one site 11 km southwest of the Macondo well, coral colonies presented widespread signs of stress, including varying degrees of tissue loss, sclerite enlargement, excess mucous production, bleached commensal ophiuroids, and covering by brown flocculent material (floc). On the basis of these criteria the level of impact to individual colonies was ranked from 0 (least impact) to 4 (greatest impact). Of the 43 corals imaged at that site, 46% exhibited evidence of impact on more than half of the colony, whereas nearly a quarter of all of the corals showed impact to >90% of the colony. Additionally, 53% of these corals’ ophiuroid associates displayed abnormal color and/or attachment posture. Analysis of hopanoid petroleum biomarkers isolated from the floc provides strong evidence that this material contained oil from the Macondo well. The presence of recently damaged and deceased corals beneath the path of a previously documented plume emanating from the Macondo well provides compelling evidence that the oil impacted deep-water ecosystems. Our findings underscore the unprecedented nature of the spill in terms of its magnitude, release at depth, and impact to deep-water ecosystems.

  14. Gynecologic evaluation of the first female soldiers enrolled in the Gulf War Comprehensive Clinical Evaluation Program at Tripler Army Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittich, A C

    1996-11-01

    Tripler Army Medical Center initiated the Department of Defense's Persian Gulf Illness Comprehensive Clinical Evaluation Program (CCEP) on June 15, 1994. In the first 5 months, 100 patients enrolled in this program. Sixteen (16%) were women who served in the Persian Gulf during Desert Shield/ Desert Storm, and 1 (1%) was the dependent wife of a Gulf War veteran who is experiencing illness that may be related to the Persian Gulf War. All 17 women enrolled in the CCEP were evaluated in the Tripler Army Medical Center Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinic between June 17 and November 10, 1994. Each patient underwent gynecologic history, pelvic exam, Pap smear, and screen for fecal occult blood. Ten patients underwent baseline mammograms and 13 patients underwent urogenital and cervical cultures for aerobic bacteria, chlamydia and herpes simplex. The 1 patient with an abnormal Pap smear underwent cervical and endocervical biopsies and colposcopy (histology demonstrated no dysplasia or neoplasia). Half of the 16 Gulf War veterans experienced gynecologic problems while serving in the Gulf and 43% admitted gynecologic problems since returning in 1991. Of 6 patients who became pregnant after returning, 5 had normal pregnancies and 1 suffered four miscarriages.

  15. Oceanic ensemble forecasting in the Gulf of Mexico: An application to the case of the Deep Water Horizon oil spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khade, Vikram; Kurian, Jaison; Chang, Ping; Szunyogh, Istvan; Thyng, Kristen; Montuoro, Raffaele

    2017-05-01

    This paper demonstrates the potential of ocean ensemble forecasting in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM). The Bred Vector (BV) technique with one week rescaling frequency is implemented on a 9 km resolution version of the Regional Ocean Modelling System (ROMS). Numerical experiments are carried out by using the HYCOM analysis products to define the initial conditions and the lateral boundary conditions. The growth rates of the forecast uncertainty are estimated to be about 10% of initial amplitude per week. By carrying out ensemble forecast experiments with and without perturbed surface forcing, it is demonstrated that in the coastal regions accounting for uncertainties in the atmospheric forcing is more important than accounting for uncertainties in the ocean initial conditions. In the Loop Current region, the initial condition uncertainties, are the dominant source of the forecast uncertainty. The root-mean-square error of the Lagrangian track forecasts at the 15-day forecast lead time can be reduced by about 10 - 50 km using the ensemble mean Eulerian forecast of the oceanic flow for the computation of the tracks, instead of the single-initial-condition Eulerian forecast.

  16. Multicomponent seismic methods for characterizing gas hydrate occurrences and systems in deep-water Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Seth S.; Lee, Myung W.; Collett, Timothy S.; Hardage, Bob A.

    2011-01-01

    In-situ characterization and quantification of natural gas hydrate occurrences remain critical research directions, whether for energy resource, drilling hazard, or climate-related studies. Marine multicomponent seismic data provide the full seismic wavefield including partial redundancy, and provide a promising set of approaches for gas hydrate characterization. Numerous authors have demonstrated the possibilities of multicomponent data at study sites around the world. We expand on this work by investigating the utility of very densely spaced (10’s of meters) multicomponent receivers (ocean-bottom cables, OBC, or ocean-bottom seismometers, OBS) for gas hydrate studies in the Gulf of Mexico and elsewhere. Advanced processing techniques provide high-resolution compressional-wave (PP) and converted shearwave (PS) reflection images of shallow stratigraphy, as well as P-wave and S-wave velocity estimates at each receiver position. Reflection impedance estimates can help constrain velocity and density, and thus gas hydrate saturation. Further constraint on velocity can be determined through identification of the critical angle and associated phase reversal in both PP and PS wideangle data. We demonstrate these concepts with examples from OBC data from the northeast Green Canyon area and numerically simulated OBS data that are based on properties of known gas hydrate occurrences in the southeast (deeper water) Green Canyon area. These multicomponent data capabilities can provide a wealth of characterization and quantification information that is difficult to obtain with other geophysical methods.

  17. A photographic and acoustic transect across two deep-water seafloor mounds, Mississippi Canyon, northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, P.E.; Hutchinson, D.R.; Gardner, J.; Carney, R.S.; Fornari, D.

    2008-01-01

    In the northern Gulf of Mexico, a series of seafloor mounds lie along the floor of the Mississippi Canyon in Atwater Valley lease blocks 13 and 14. The mounds, one of which was drilled by the Chevron Joint Industry Project on Methane Hydrates in 2005, are interpreted to be vent-related features that may contain significant accumulations of gas hydrate adjacent to gas and fluid migration pathways. The mounds are located ???150 km south of Louisiana at ???1300 m water depth. New side-scan sonar data, multibeam bathymetry, and near-bottom photography along a 4 km northwest-southeast transect crossing two of the mounds (labeled D and F) reveal the mounds' detailed morphology and surficial characteristics. Mound D, ???250 m in diameter and 7-10 m in height, has exposures of authigenic carbonates and appears to result from a seafloor vent of slow-to-moderate flux. Mound F, which is ???400 m in diameter and 10-15 m high, is covered on its southwest flank by extruded mud flows, a characteristic associated with moderate-to-rapid flux. Chemosynthetic communities visible on the bottom photographs are restricted to bacterial mats on both mounds and mussels at Mound D. No indications of surficial gas hydrates are evident on the bottom photographs.

  18. 50 CFR 622.16 - Gulf red snapper individual fishing quota (IFQ) program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... identification number--the personal identification number (PIN) will be provided in a subsequent letter. (ii) The... board, except as provided in paragraph (c)(1)(ii) of this section. Such red snapper can only be received by a dealer with a Gulf IFQ dealer endorsement. (ii) A person on board a vessel with an IFQ vessel...

  19. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic signatures of fauna associated with the deep-sea hydrothermal vent system of Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Luis A.

    2009-09-01

    Potential food sources and the trophic position of some of the most conspicuous faunal components (vent and non-vent) were examined in the deep-hydrothermal vent system of Guaymas Basin, in the Gulf of California using carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analyses. The isotopic signatures of 13 species collected by the DSRV Alvin and Nautile mostly from sulfide-influenced habitats were analyzed. The δ 13C of nine vent species had a wide range (-36.0‰ to -12.7‰), whereas the δ 15N values varied from -5.0‰ to+9.4‰. The dual isotopic approach allowed the recognition of two main groups containing vent-endemic fauna. One was represented by an assemblage of eight species associated with sulfide deposits, visually dominated by the siboglinid worm Riftia pachyptila and characterized by enriched δ 13C values (means -13.7‰ to -21.0‰). The second group included a single species, the bivalve Vesicomya gigas, an inhabitant of soft sediments, which had depleted δ 13C and δ 15N signatures (means -35.7‰ and -1.5‰). The galatheid Munidopsis alvisca is an exception among the species in the R. pachyptila aggregation, due to its depleted δ 13C (-26.4‰) and an intermediate δ 15N value (+5.5‰). Isotopic δ 13C and δ 15N signatures of four non-vent species exhibited mostly enriched δ 15N values (means δ 13C -27.8‰ to -13.6‰; δ 15N +14.5‰ to +17.9‰), expected for higher consumers and detritivores in a deep-sea food web. They may benefit from the vent production via microbial matter or decaying vent organisms. Vent and non-vent fauna were assigned to five feeding guilds: symbiont-containing fauna, bacterivores, detritivores, predator-scavengers, and suspension-feeders. Based on isotopic values of vent and non-vent fauna, as well as that of surficial sediments, it is inferred that the hydrothermal ecosystem in the Guaymas Basin is self-supported with high-energy efficiency and with low exporting capacity to the background deep-sea food web.

  20. The cost and performance of utility commercial lighting programs. A report from the Database on Energy Efficiency Programs (DEEP) project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eto, J.; Vine, E.; Shown, L.; Sonnenblick, R.; Payne, C. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.

    1994-05-01

    The objective of the Database on Energy Efficiency Programs (DEEP) is to document the measured cost and performance of utility-sponsored, energy-efficiency, demand-side management (DSM) programs. Consistent documentation of DSM programs is a challenging goal because of problems with data consistency, evaluation methodologies, and data reporting formats that continue to limit the usefulness and comparability of individual program results. This first DEEP report investigates the results of 20 recent commercial lighting DSM programs. The report, unlike previous reports of its kind, compares the DSM definitions and methodologies that each utility uses to compute costs and energy savings and then makes adjustments to standardize reported program results. All 20 programs were judged cost-effective when compared to avoided costs in their local areas. At an average cost of 3.9{cents}/kWh, however, utility-sponsored energy efficiency programs are not ``too cheap to meter.`` While it is generally agreed upon that utilities must take active measures to minimize the costs and rate impacts of DSM programs, the authors believe that these activities will be facilitated by industry adoption of standard definitions and reporting formats, so that the best program designs can be readily identified and adopted.

  1. A Guide for Implementing Project DEEP (Diversified Educational Experiences Program). Administrator's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connett, Jane; Swanson, Monty

    The guide is designed to provide the building level administrator a step by step model for implementing Project DEEP's (Diversified Educational Experiences Program) alternative classroom management system for secondary academic classrooms with disaffected (attendance problems, discipline problems, potential dropouts), average, and gifted and…

  2. New geographic and depth records for deep-water mollusks in the Gulf of California, Mexico Nuevos registros geográficos y batimétricos para moluscos de mar profundo en el golfo de California, México

    OpenAIRE

    Pablo Zamorano; Hendrickx, Michel E; Arturo Toledano-Granados

    2007-01-01

    Six oceanographic cruises (Talud IV-IX) were made in the southern Gulf of California aboard the R/V El Puma of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. A total of 56 species of deep-sea mollusks were identified, of which 16 (13 Bivalvia, 2 Gastropoda, 1 Scaphopoda) represent either a new geographic or bathymetric record, or both.A partir de 6 campañas oceanográficas (Talud IV-IX) realizadas en el sur del golfo de California a bordo del B/O "El Puma" de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de ...

  3. Deep ancestry of programmed genome rearrangement in lampreys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timoshevskiy, Vladimir A; Lampman, Ralph T; Hess, Jon E; Porter, Laurie L; Smith, Jeramiah J

    2017-09-01

    In most multicellular organisms, the structure and content of the genome is rigorously maintained over the course of development. However some species have evolved genome biologies that permit, or require, developmentally regulated changes in the physical structure and content of the genome (programmed genome rearrangement: PGR). Relatively few vertebrates are known to undergo PGR, although all agnathans surveyed to date (several hagfish and one lamprey: Petromyzon marinus) show evidence of large scale PGR. To further resolve the ancestry of PGR within vertebrates, we developed probes that allow simultaneous tracking of nearly all sequences eliminated by PGR in P. marinus and a second lamprey species (Entosphenus tridentatus). These comparative analyses reveal conserved subcellular structures (lagging chromatin and micronuclei) associated with PGR and provide the first comparative embryological evidence in support of the idea that PGR represents an ancient and evolutionarily stable strategy for regulating inherent developmental/genetic conflicts between germline and soma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. RB-10-07 Lophelia II 2010: Oil Seeps and Deep Reefs on NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown in the Gulf of Mexico between 20101014 and 20101104

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Lophelia II project involves exploration and research of the northern Gulf of Mexico deepwater natural and artificial hard bottom habitats with emphasis on coral...

  5. Deep Drilling with the ANDRILL Program in Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Pyne

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available ANDRILL (ANtarctic geological DRILLing is a new international, multi-disciplinary drilling program that targets geological records that lie hidden beneath the icy blanket of Antarctica. The primary objective is to investigate Antarctica’s role in global environmental change over the past sixty-fi ve million years, at various scales of age resolution, and thereby enhance our understanding of Antarctica’s potential response to future global changes. Efforts to understand the infl uence of Antarctica on global climate change require a fundamental knowledge of how the Antarctic cryosphere (ice sheets, ice shelves, and sea ice has evolved, not only in recent times but also during earlier geological periods when global temperature and atmospheric CO2 levels were similar to what might be reached by the end of this century. ANDRILL’s integrated science approach willuse stratigraphic drilling, coring, and multi-proxy core analysis combined with geophysical surveys and numerical modeling to study the Cenozoic history of Antarctic climate and ice sheets, the evolution of polar biota, Antarctic tectonism, and Antarctica’s role in the evolution of Earth’s ocean–climate system.

  6. Nursing time to program and assess deep brain stimulators in movement disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunka, Karen; Suchowersky, Oksana; Wood, Susan; Derwent, Lorelei; Kiss, Zelma H T

    2005-08-01

    The use of deep brain stimulation (DBS) to treat movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, and dystonia is increasing. Although some published literature describes the methods for DBS programming, the time and nursing requirements to run a DBS surgical program have not been examined previously. For this study, we prospectively recorded the time required for both assessments and programming of the DBS from the preoperative period to 1 year after surgery in a variety of patients. Results showed that the mean total time spent programming the stimulator and assessing these patients ranged from 18.0-36.2 hours per patient. It took twice as long to program the stimulator in patients with Parkinson's disease as it did in patients with essential tremor or dystonia. When setting up a program for movement disorders surgery, nursing time spent on patient assessment and programming should be considered in the workload.

  7. Comparison of modeling methods to predict the spatial distribution of deep-sea coral and sponge in the Gulf of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooper, Christopher N.; Zimmermann, Mark; Prescott, Megan M.

    2017-08-01

    Deep-sea coral and sponge ecosystems are widespread throughout most of Alaska's marine waters, and are associated with many different species of fishes and invertebrates. These ecosystems are vulnerable to the effects of commercial fishing activities and climate change. We compared four commonly used species distribution models (general linear models, generalized additive models, boosted regression trees and random forest models) and an ensemble model to predict the presence or absence and abundance of six groups of benthic invertebrate taxa in the Gulf of Alaska. All four model types performed adequately on training data for predicting presence and absence, with regression forest models having the best overall performance measured by the area under the receiver-operating-curve (AUC). The models also performed well on the test data for presence and absence with average AUCs ranging from 0.66 to 0.82. For the test data, ensemble models performed the best. For abundance data, there was an obvious demarcation in performance between the two regression-based methods (general linear models and generalized additive models), and the tree-based models. The boosted regression tree and random forest models out-performed the other models by a wide margin on both the training and testing data. However, there was a significant drop-off in performance for all models of invertebrate abundance ( 50%) when moving from the training data to the testing data. Ensemble model performance was between the tree-based and regression-based methods. The maps of predictions from the models for both presence and abundance agreed very well across model types, with an increase in variability in predictions for the abundance data. We conclude that where data conforms well to the modeled distribution (such as the presence-absence data and binomial distribution in this study), the four types of models will provide similar results, although the regression-type models may be more consistent with

  8. Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 2-A: Resource description, program history, wells tested, university and company based research, site restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

    1998-06-01

    The US Department of Energy established a geopressured-geothermal energy program in the mid 1970`s as one response to America`s need to develop alternate energy resources in view of the increasing dependence on imported fossil fuel energy. This program continued for 17 years and approximately two hundred million dollars were expended for various types of research and well testing to thoroughly investigate this alternative energy source. This volume describes the following studies: Geopressured-geothermal resource description; Resource origin and sediment type; Gulf Coast resource extent; Resource estimates; Project history; Authorizing legislation; Program objectives; Perceived constraints; Program activities and structure; Well testing; Program management; Program cost summary; Funding history; Resource characterization; Wells of opportunity; Edna Delcambre No. 1 well; Edna Delcambre well recompletion; Fairfax Foster Sutter No. 2 well; Beulah Simon No. 2 well; P.E. Girouard No. 1 well; Prairie Canal No. 1 well; Crown Zellerbach No. 2 well; Alice C. Plantation No. 2 well; Tenneco Fee N No. 1 well; Pauline Kraft No. 1 well; Saldana well No. 2; G.M. Koelemay well No. 1; Willis Hulin No. 1 well; Investigations of other wells of opportunity; Clovis A. Kennedy No. 1 well; Watkins-Miller No. 1 well; Lucien J. Richard et al No. 1 well; and the C and K-Frank A. Godchaux, III, well No. 1.

  9. Programming Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease: The Toronto Western Hospital Algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picillo, Marina; Lozano, Andres M; Kou, Nancy; Puppi Munhoz, Renato; Fasano, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established and effective treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD). After surgery, a number of extensive programming sessions are performed to define the most optimal stimulation parameters. Programming sessions mainly rely only on neurologist's experience. As a result, patients often undergo inconsistent and inefficient stimulation changes, as well as unnecessary visits. We reviewed the literature on initial and follow-up DBS programming procedures and integrated our current practice at Toronto Western Hospital (TWH) to develop standardized DBS programming protocols. We propose four algorithms including the initial programming and specific algorithms tailored to symptoms experienced by patients following DBS: speech disturbances, stimulation-induced dyskinesia and gait impairment. We conducted a literature search of PubMed from inception to July 2014 with the keywords "deep brain stimulation", "festination", "freezing", "initial programming", "Parkinson's disease", "postural instability", "speech disturbances", and "stimulation induced dyskinesia". Seventy papers were considered for this review. Based on the literature review and our experience at TWH, we refined four algorithms for: (1) the initial programming stage, and management of symptoms following DBS, particularly addressing (2) speech disturbances, (3) stimulation-induced dyskinesia, and (4) gait impairment. We propose four algorithms tailored to an individualized approach to managing symptoms associated with DBS and disease progression in patients with PD. We encourage established as well as new DBS centers to test the clinical usefulness of these algorithms in supplementing the current standards of care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Intertidal organism and habitat data from the Gulf of Alaska from the HUMDINGER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 20 April 1976 to 24 August 1976 (NODC Accession 7800272)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Intertidal organism and habitat data were collected in the Gulf of Alaska from the HUMDINGER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program...

  11. Drifting buoy and other data from the Gulf of Alaska as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 26 October 1980 to 27 March 1981 (NODC Accession 8200115)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Drifting buoy data was collected from the Gulf of Alaska by the Science Application INC (SAI) as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program...

  12. Plutonium in the Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, M. R.; Salter, P. F.

    1980-01-01

    The geochemistry of fallout plutonium in the sediments of the Gulf of Mexico was studied. A series of sediment cores was collected in a traverse from the deep Gulf of Mexico to the Mississippi Delta. The cores were sliced into 1 cm intervals and analyzed for plutonium. Explanations for the variations in concentration are presented. (ACR)

  13. Hydrologic-hydrochemical characterization of Texas Gulf Coast saline formations used for deep-well injection of chemical wastes. Final report, January 1987-July 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreitler, C.W.; Akhter, M.S.; Donnelly, A.C.A.

    1988-08-01

    About 70% of the Class I injection wells in the United States are located in the Gulf Coast. This report presents the results of investigations into fluid-migration potential, direction, and velocities in the regional hydrologic environment of the Texas Gulf Coast Tertiary formations, and geochemical interactions that may be occurring. The study focused on the Frio Formation as it is the target of a very large waste-injection volume as well as a large data base of formation pressures and water chemistry.

  14. Planetary science and exploration in the deep subsurface: results from the MINAR Program, Boulby Mine, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payler, Samuel J.; Biddle, Jennifer F.; Coates, Andrew J.; Cousins, Claire R.; Cross, Rachel E.; Cullen, David C.; Downs, Michael T.; Direito, Susana O. L.; Edwards, Thomas; Gray, Amber L.; Genis, Jac; Gunn, Matthew; Hansford, Graeme M.; Harkness, Patrick; Holt, John; Josset, Jean-Luc; Li, Xuan; Lees, David S.; Lim, Darlene S. S.; McHugh, Melissa; McLuckie, David; Meehan, Emma; Paling, Sean M.; Souchon, Audrey; Yeoman, Louise; Cockell, Charles S.

    2017-04-01

    The subsurface exploration of other planetary bodies can be used to unravel their geological history and assess their habitability. On Mars in particular, present-day habitable conditions may be restricted to the subsurface. Using a deep subsurface mine, we carried out a program of extraterrestrial analog research - MINe Analog Research (MINAR). MINAR aims to carry out the scientific study of the deep subsurface and test instrumentation designed for planetary surface exploration by investigating deep subsurface geology, whilst establishing the potential this technology has to be transferred into the mining industry. An integrated multi-instrument suite was used to investigate samples of representative evaporite minerals from a subsurface Permian evaporite sequence, in particular to assess mineral and elemental variations which provide small-scale regions of enhanced habitability. The instruments used were the Panoramic Camera emulator, Close-Up Imager, Raman spectrometer, Small Planetary Linear Impulse Tool, Ultrasonic drill and handheld X-ray diffraction (XRD). We present science results from the analog research and show that these instruments can be used to investigate in situ the geological context and mineralogical variations of a deep subsurface environment, and thus habitability, from millimetre to metre scales. We also show that these instruments are complementary. For example, the identification of primary evaporite minerals such as NaCl and KCl, which are difficult to detect by portable Raman spectrometers, can be accomplished with XRD. By contrast, Raman is highly effective at locating and detecting mineral inclusions in primary evaporite minerals. MINAR demonstrates the effective use of a deep subsurface environment for planetary instrument development, understanding the habitability of extreme deep subsurface environments on Earth and other planetary bodies, and advancing the use of space technology in economic mining.

  15. Adjustment of the basin-scale circulation at 26° N to variations in Gulf Stream, deep western boundary current and Ekman transports as observed by the Rapid array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Cunningham

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The Rapid instrument array across the Atlantic Ocean along 26° N provides unprecedented monitoring of the basin-scale circulation. A unique feature of the Rapid array is the combination of full-depth moorings with instruments measuring temperature, salinity, pressure time series at many depths with co-located bottom pressure measurements so that dynamic pressure can be measured from surface to bottom. Bottom pressure measurements show a zonally uniform rise (and fall of bottom pressure of 0.015 dbar on a 5 to 10 day time scale, suggesting that the Atlantic basin is filling and draining on a short time scale. After removing the zonally uniform bottom pressure fluctuations, bottom pressure variations at 4000 m depth against the western boundary compensate instantaneously for baroclinic fluctuations in the strength and structure of the deep western boundary current so there is no basin-scale mass imbalance resulting from variations in the deep western boundary current. After removing the mass compensating bottom pressure, residual bottom pressure fluctuations at the western boundary just east of the Bahamas balance variations in Gulf Stream transport. Again the compensation appears to be especially confined close to the western boundary. Thus, fluctuations in either Gulf Stream or deep western boundary current transports are compensated in a depth independent (barotropic manner very close to the continental slope off the Bahamas. In contrast, compensation for variations in wind-driven surface Ekman transport appears to involve fluctuations in both western basin and eastern basin bottom pressures, though the bottom pressure difference fluctuations appear to be a factor of 3 too large, perhaps due to an inability to resolve small bottom pressure fluctuations after removal of larger zonal average, baroclinic, and Gulf Stream pressure components. For 4 tall moorings where time series dynamic height (geostrophic pressure profiles can be estimated from

  16. Programming Deep Brain Stimulation for Tremor and Dystonia: The Toronto Western Hospital Algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picillo, Marina; Lozano, Andres M; Kou, Nancy; Munhoz, Renato Puppi; Fasano, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective treatment for essential tremor (ET) and dystonia. After surgery, a number of extensive programming sessions are performed, mainly relying on neurologist's personal experience as no programming guidelines have been provided so far, with the exception of recommendations provided by groups of experts. Finally, fewer information is available for the management of DBS in ET and dystonia compared with Parkinson's disease. Our aim is to review the literature on initial and follow-up DBS programming procedures for ET and dystonia and integrate the results with our current practice at Toronto Western Hospital (TWH) to develop standardized DBS programming protocols. We conducted a literature search of PubMed from inception to July 2014 with the keywords "balance", "bradykinesia", "deep brain stimulation", "dysarthria", "dystonia", "gait disturbances", "initial programming", "loss of benefit", "micrographia", "speech", "speech difficulties" and "tremor". Seventy-six papers were considered for this review. Based on the literature review and our experience at TWH, we refined three algorithms for management of ET, including: (1) initial programming, (2) management of balance and speech issues and (3) loss of stimulation benefit. We also depicted algorithms for the management of dystonia, including: (1) initial programming and (2) management of stimulation-induced hypokinesia (shuffling gait, micrographia and speech impairment). We propose five algorithms tailored to an individualized approach to managing ET and dystonia patients with DBS. We encourage the application of these algorithms to supplement current standards of care in established as well as new DBS centers to test the clinical usefulness of these algorithms in supplementing the current standards of care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Preliminary results of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission collaborative research program to assess tsunami hazard for nuclear power plants on the Atlantic and gulf coasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammerer, A.M.; ten Brink, Uri S.; Twitchell, David C.; Geist, Eric L.; Chaytor, Jason D.; Locat, J.; Lee, H.J.; Buczkowski, Brian J.; Sansoucy, M.

    2008-01-01

    In response to the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami, the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) initiated a long-term research program to improve understanding of tsunami hazard levels for nuclear facilities in the United States. For this effort, the US NRC organized a collaborative research program with the United States Geological Survey (USGS) and other key researchers for the purpose of assessing tsunami hazard on the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts of the United States. The initial phase of this work consisted principally of collection, interpretation, and analysis of available offshore data and information. Necessarily, the US NRC research program includes both seismic- and landslide-based tsunamigenic sources in both the near and the far fields. The inclusion of tsunamigenic landslides, an important category of sources that impact tsunami hazard levels for the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts over the long time periods of interest to the US NRC is a key difference between this program and most other tsunami hazard assessment programs. Although only a few years old, this program is already producing results that both support current US NRC activities and look toward the long-term goal of probabilistic tsunami hazard assessment. This paper provides a summary of results from several areas of current research. An overview of the broader US NRC research program is provided in a companion paper in this conference.

  18. 2016 USACE National Coastal Mapping Program (NCMP) Gulf Coast Lidar and Imagery Acquisition - Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) plans to perform a coastal survey along the Gulf Coast in 2016 with funding provided by...

  19. 2012-2017 OCS Oil and Gas Leasing Final Program - Gulf of Mexico Region

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This file represents the program areas of the Outer Continental Shelf that have been included in the 2012-2017 Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Leasing Proposed...

  20. United States-Gulf Cooperation Council Security Cooperation in a Multipolar World

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Gulf. x 1 UNITED STATES-GULF COOPERATION COUNCIL SECURITY COOPERATION IN A MULTIPOLAR WORLD INTRODUCTION For the United States, the Arabian Gulf...Kuwait Program on Development, Governance and Globalisation in the Gulf States, 2010; Thierry Kellner, “The GCC States of the Persian Gulf and Asia

  1. New geographic and depth records for deep-water mollusks in the Gulf of California, Mexico Nuevos registros geográficos y batimétricos para moluscos de mar profundo en el golfo de California, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Zamorano

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Six oceanographic cruises (Talud IV-IX were made in the southern Gulf of California aboard the R/V El Puma of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. A total of 56 species of deep-sea mollusks were identified, of which 16 (13 Bivalvia, 2 Gastropoda, 1 Scaphopoda represent either a new geographic or bathymetric record, or both.A partir de 6 campañas oceanográficas (Talud IV-IX realizadas en el sur del golfo de California a bordo del B/O "El Puma" de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, se identificaron 56 especies de moluscos de aguas profundas. De ellas 16 (13 Bivalvia, 2 Gastropoda, 1 Scaphopoda corresponden a un nuevo registro geográfico, batimétrico o ambos.

  2. NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research'sOkeanos Explorer Program 2014 Discoveries - U.S. Atlantic Continental Margin and Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobecker, E.; McKenna, L.; Sowers, D.; Elliott, K.; Kennedy, B.

    2014-12-01

    NOAA ShipOkeanos Explorer, the only U.S. federal vessel dedicated to global ocean exploration, made several important discoveries in U.S. waters of the North Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico during the 2014 field season. Based on input received from a broad group ofmarine scientists and resource managers, over 100,000 square kilometers of seafloor and associated water column were systematically explored using advanced mapping sonars. 39 ROV diveswere conducted, leading to new discoveries that will further ourunderstanding of biologic, geologic, and underwater-cultural heritage secrets hidden withinthe oceans. In the Atlantic, season highlights include completion of a multi-year submarine canyons mapping effort of the continental shelf break from North Carolina to the U.S.-Canada maritime border;new information on the ephemerality of recently discovered and geographically extensive cold water seeps; and continued exploration of the New England Seamount chain; and mapping of two potential historically significant World War II wreck sites. In the Gulf of Mexico, season highlights includecompletion of a multi-year mapping effort of the West Florida Escarpment providing new insight into submarine landslides and detachment zones;the discovery of at least two asphalt volcanoes, or 'tar lilies'; range extensions of deep-sea corals; discovery of two potential new species of crinoids; identification of at least 300 potential cold water seeps; and ROV exploration of three historically significant19th century shipwrecks. In both regions, high-resolution mapping led to new insight into the geological context in which deep sea corals develop,while ROV dives provided valuable observations of deep sea coral habitats and their associated organisms, and chemosynthetic habitats. All mapping and ROV data is freely available to the public in usable data formats and maintained in national geophysical and oceanographic data archives.

  3. Overview of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission collaborative research program to assess tsunami hazard for nuclear power plants on the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammerer, A.M.; ten Brink, Uri S.; Titov, V.V.

    2017-01-01

    In response to the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami, the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) initiated a long-term research program to improve understanding of tsunami hazard levels for nuclear facilities in the United States. For this effort, the US NRC organized a collaborative research program with the United States Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) with a goal of assessing tsunami hazard on the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts of the United States. Necessarily, the US NRC research program includes both seismic- and landslide-based tsunamigenic sources in both the near and the far fields. The inclusion of tsunamigenic landslides, an important category of sources that impact tsunami hazard levels for the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts is a key difference between this program and most other tsunami hazard assessment programs. The initial phase of this work consisted of collection, interpretation, and analysis of available offshore data, with significant effort focused on characterizing offshore near-field landslides and analyzing their tsunamigenic potential and properties. In the next phase of research, additional field investigations will be conducted in key locations of interest and additional analysis will be undertaken. Simultaneously, the MOST tsunami generation and propagation model used by NOAA will first be enhanced to include landslide-based initiation mechanisms and then will be used to investigate the impact of the tsunamigenic sources identified and characterized by the USGS. The potential for probabilistic tsunami hazard assessment will also be explore in the final phases of the program.

  4. The Evolution of Technology in the Deep Space Network: A History of the Advanced Systems Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layland, J. W.; Rauch, L. L.

    1997-04-01

    This article presents a survey of the principal efforts of the DSN Advanced Systems Program and its impact upon the operational Deep Space Network from about 1960 to 1995. The article is structured along two main themes. First is a tour of the fundamental services provided by the Network and the physical elements and technologies that support these services. The second theme is presented as a series of focused case histories of changes inspired by specific missions, such as Galileo, Voyager, or Mariner{Venus{Mercury, or by specific technologies, such as the application of fiber optics. A bibliographic entree to a substantial body of other reading material also is provided.

  5. Integration of Deep Biosphere Research into the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Kallmeyer

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available An international workshop on the Integration of Deep Biosphere Research into the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP was held on 27–29 September 2009 in Potsdam. It was organized by the Helmholtz Centre Potsdam GFZ German Research Centrefor Geosciences and the University of Potsdam (Germany. Financial support was provided by ICDP. This workshop brought together the expertise of thirty-three microbiologists, biogeochemists, and geologists from seven countries (Finland, Germany, Japan, New Zealand, Sweden, U.K., U.S.A.. Over the last two decades, microbiological and biogeochemical investigations have demonstrated the occurrence of microbial life widely disseminated within the deep subsurface of the Earth (Fredrickson and Onstott, 1996; Parkes et al., 2000; Pedersen, 2000; Sherwood Lollar et al., 2006. Considering the large subsurface pore space available as a life habitat, it has been estimated that the biomass of the so-called deep biosphere might be equal to or even larger than that of the surface biosphere (Whitman et al., 1998.

  6. Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2006-09-30

    The objectives of the study were: (1) to perform resource assessment of the thermogenic gas resources in deeply buried (>15,000 ft) natural gas reservoirs of the onshore interior salt basins of the north central and northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas through petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling; and (2) to use the petroleum system based resource assessment to estimate the volume of the deep thermogenic gas resource that is available for potential recovery and to identify those areas in the interior salt basins with high potential for this thermogenic gas resource. Petroleum source rock analysis and petroleum system characterization and modeling, including thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling, have shown that the Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation served as the regional petroleum source rock in the North Louisiana Salt Basin, Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin. Thus, the estimates of the total hydrocarbons, oil, and gas generated and expelled are based on the assumption that the Smackover Formation is the main petroleum source rock in these basins and subbasins. The estimate of the total hydrocarbons generated for the North Louisiana Salt Basin in this study using a petroleum system approach compares favorably with the total volume of hydrocarbons generated published by Zimmermann (1999). In this study, the estimate is 2,870 billion barrels of total hydrocarbons generated using the method of Schmoker (1994), and the estimate is 2,640 billion barrels of total hydrocarbons generated using the Platte River software application. The estimate of Zimmermann (1999) is 2,000 to 2,500 billion barrels of total hydrocarbons generated. The estimate of gas generated for this basin is 6,400 TCF using the Platte River software application, and 12,800 TCF using the method of Schmoker (1994). Barnaby (2006) estimated that the total gas volume generated for this basin ranges from 4,000 to 8,000 TCF. Seventy

  7. The Iraqi Ballistic Missile Program: The Gulf War and the Future of the Missile Threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-01

    London, 1985. In Antwerp an even worse event occurred on December 16, 1944 when a V-2 struck the Rex Cinema killing 271. See David Irving, The Mare’s...had a nuclear weapons program which was shut down by Brazilian President Fernando Collor de Mello as part of his efforts to bring the Brazilian ...a result, if the Brazilian government should change its mind, it will be easy for them to produce nuclear weapons. Although North Korea has signed

  8. Final Technical Report. DeepCwind Consortium Research Program. January 15, 2010 - March 31, 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagher, Habib [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Viselli, Anthony [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Goupee, Andrew [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Thaler, Jeffrey [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Brady, Damian [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Browne, Peter [HDR, Inc., Omaha, NE (United States); Browning, James [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Chung, Jade [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Coulling, Alexander [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Deese, Heather [Island Institute, Rockland, ME (United States); Fowler, Matthew [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Holberton, Rebecca [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Anant, Jain [Intertek, Duluth, GA (United States); Jalbert, Dustin [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Johnson, Theresa [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Jonkman, Jason [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States); Karlson, Benjamin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kimball, Richard [Maine Maritime Academy, Castine, ME (United States); Koo, Bonjun [Technip, Paris (France); Lackner, Matthew [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Lambrakos, Kostas [Technip, Paris (France); Lankowski, Matthew [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Leopold, Adrienne [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Lim, Ho-Joon [Technip, Paris (France); Mangum, Linda [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Martin, Heather [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Masciola, Marco [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States); Maynard, Melissa [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); McCleave, James [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Mizrahi, Robert [New Jersey Audubon Society, Bernardsville, NJ (United States); Molta, Paul [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States); Pershing, Andrew [Gulf of Maine Research Institute, Portland, ME (United States); Pettigrew, Neal [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Prowell, Ian [MMI Engineering, Oakland, CA (United States); Qua, Andrew [Kleinschmidt Associates, Pittsfield, ME (United States); Sherwood, Graham [Gulf of Maine Research Institute, Portland, ME (United States); Snape, Thomas [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Steneck, Robert [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Stewart, Gordon [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Stockwell, Jason [Gulf of Maine Research Institute, Portland, ME (United States); Swift, Andrew H. P. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States); Thomas, Dale [Maine Maritime Academy, Castine, ME (United States); Viselli, Elizabeth [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Zydlewski, Gayle [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States)

    2013-06-11

    This is the final technical report for the U.S. Department of Energy-funded program, DE-0002981: DeepCwind Consortium Research Program. The project objective was the partial validation of coupled models and optimization of materials for offshore wind structures. The United States has a great opportunity to harness an indigenous abundant renewable energy resource: offshore wind. In 2010, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) estimated there to be over 4,000 GW of potential offshore wind energy found within 50 nautical miles of the US coastlines (Musial and Ram, 2010). The US Energy Information Administration reported the total annual US electric energy generation in 2010 was 4,120 billion kilowatt-hours (equivalent to 470 GW) (US EIA, 2011), slightly more than 10% of the potential offshore wind resource. In addition, deep water offshore wind is the dominant US ocean energy resource available comprising 75% of the total assessed ocean energy resource as compared to wave and tidal resources (Musial, 2008). Through these assessments it is clear offshore wind can be a major contributor to US energy supplies. The caveat to capturing offshore wind along many parts of the US coast is deep water. Nearly 60%, or 2,450 GW, of the estimated US offshore wind resource is located in water depths of 60 m or more (Musial and Ram, 2010). At water depths over 60 m building fixed offshore wind turbine foundations, such as those found in Europe, is likely economically infeasible (Musial et al., 2006). Therefore floating wind turbine technology is seen as the best option for extracting a majority of the US offshore wind energy resource. Volume 1 - Test Site; Volume 2 - Coupled Models; and Volume 3 - Composite Materials

  9. Development of dynamic analysis program for tethered type deep-sea ROV (remotely operated vehicle) system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takasugi, Noriyuki; Taniuchi, Takuya; Fukuda, Yutaka; Ito, Reiji; Kawakami, Hajime; Yoshikawa, Takao

    1987-08-20

    Nowadays, the development of the tethered type deep-sea ROV system using optical communication techniques, automated control techniques and robotics has been conducted and it is becoming possible to do safe and comparatively inexpensive investigations. However, since it constitutes problems that the power and light cables which hang an unmanned submarine (vehicle) receive the fluid dynamic actions and that due to the above effect, and the free movements of a mother ship and the vehicle are restricted, the technique of analyzing these behaviors is indispensable for the design of the vehicle system. Kawasaki Heavy Industries developed a program which can analyze in the time domain by the finite element method the three dimensional behaviors of the system in which mothership, tethering cable, launcher and vehicle are deemed to be an entirety and the tension of the tethering cables, etc. This article introduces this program. Thanks for this, the simulation of dynamic behavior of the above system and the simulation of total deep-sea operation supporting system have become feasible. (11 figs, 1 tab, 2 refs)

  10. Surgical neuroanatomy and programming in deep brain stimulation for obsessive compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Takashi; Fayad, Sarah M; Goodman, Wayne K; Foote, Kelly D; Chen, Dennis; Peace, David A; Rhoton, Albert L; Okun, Michael S

    2014-06-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been established as a safe, effective therapy for movement disorders (Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, etc.), and its application is expanding to the treatment of other intractable neuropsychiatric disorders including depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Several published studies have supported the efficacy of DBS for severely debilitating OCD. However, questions remain regarding the optimal anatomic target and the lack of a bedside programming paradigm for OCD DBS. Management of OCD DBS can be highly variable and is typically guided by each center's individual expertise. In this paper, we review the various approaches to targeting and programming for OCD DBS. We also review the clinical experience for each proposed target and discuss the relevant neuroanatomy. A PubMed review was performed searching for literature on OCD DBS and included all articles published before March 2012. We included all available studies with a clear description of the anatomic targets, programming details, and the outcomes. Six different DBS approaches were identified. High-frequency stimulation with high voltage was applied in most cases, and predictive factors for favorable outcomes were discussed in the literature. DBS remains an experimental treatment for medication refractory OCD. Target selection and programming paradigms are not yet standardized, though an improved understanding of the relationship between the DBS lead and the surrounding neuroanatomic structures will aid in the selection of targets and the approach to programming. We propose to form a registry to track OCD DBS cases for future clinical study design. © 2013 International Neuromodulation Society.

  11. The Deep River Science Academy: a unique and innovative program for engaging students in science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, C.W., E-mail: carlrhonda.turner@sympatico.ca [Deep River Science Academy, Deep River, Ontario (Canada); Didsbury, R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Ingram, M. [Deep River Science Academy, Deep River, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    For 28 years, the Deep River Science Academy (DRSA) has been offering high school students the opportunity to engage in the excitement and challenge of professional scientific research to help nurture their passion for science and to provide them with the experience and the knowledge to make informed decisions regarding possible future careers in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). The venue for the DRSA program has been a six-week summer science camp where students, working in pairs under the guidance of a university undergraduate tutor, contribute directly to an on-going research program under the supervision of a professional scientist or engineer. This concept has been expanded in recent years to reach students in classrooms year round by engaging students via the internet over a 12-week term in a series of interactive teaching sessions based on an on-going research project. Although the research projects for the summer program are offered primarily from the laboratories of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited at its Chalk River Laboratories site, projects for the year-round program can be based, in principle, in laboratories at universities and other research institutes located anywhere in Canada. This paper will describe the program in more detail using examples illustrating how the students become engaged in the research and the sorts of contributions they have been able to make over the years. The impact of the program on the students and the degree to which the DRSA has been able to meet its objective of encouraging students to choose careers in the fields of STEM and equipping them with the skills and experience to be successful will be assessed based on feedback from the students themselves. Finally, we will examine the program in the context of how well it helps to address the challenges faced by educators today in meeting the demands of students in a world where the internet provides instant access to information. (author)

  12. The Evolution of Technology in the Deep Space Network: A History of the Advanced Systems Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layland, J. W.; Rauch, L. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Deep Space Network (DSN) of 1995 might be described as the evolutionary result of 45 years of deep space communication and navigation, together with the synergistic activities of radio science and radar and radio astronomy. But the evolution of the DSN did not just happen - it was carefully planned and created. The evolution of the DSN has been an ongoing engineering activity, and engineering is a process of problem solving under constraints, one of which is technology. In turn, technology is the knowledge base providing the capability and experience for practical application of various areas of science, when needed. The best engineering solutions result from optimization under the fewest constraints, and if technology needs are well anticipated (ready when needed), then the most effective engineering solution is possible. Throughout the history of the DSN it has been the goal and function of DSN advanced technology development (designated the DSN Advanced Systems Program from 1963 through 1994) to supply the technology needs of the DSN when needed, and thus to minimize this constraint on DSN engineering. Technology often takes considerable time to develop, and when that happens, it is important to have anticipated engineering needs; at times, this anticipation has been by as much as 15 years. Also, on a number of occasions, mission malfunctions or emergencies have resulted in unplanned needs for technology that has, in fact, been available from the reservoir of advanced technology provided by the DSN Advanced Systems Program. Sometimes, even DSN engineering personnel fail to realize that the organization of JPL permits an overlap of DSN advanced technology activities with subsequent engineering activities. This can result in the flow of advanced technology into DSN engineering in a natural and sometimes almost unnoticed way. In the following pages, we will explore some of the many contributions of the DSN Advanced Systems Program that were provided to DSN

  13. Optimized programming algorithm for cylindrical and directional deep brain stimulation electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Daria Nesterovich; Osting, Braxton; Vorwerk, Johannes; Dorval, Alan D; Butson, Christopher R

    2018-04-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a growing treatment option for movement and psychiatric disorders. As DBS technology moves toward directional leads with increased numbers of smaller electrode contacts, trial-and-error methods of manual DBS programming are becoming too time-consuming for clinical feasibility. We propose an algorithm to automate DBS programming in near real-time for a wide range of DBS lead designs. Magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging are used to build finite element models that include anisotropic conductivity. The algorithm maximizes activation of target tissue and utilizes the Hessian matrix of the electric potential to approximate activation of neurons in all directions. We demonstrate our algorithm's ability in an example programming case that targets the subthalamic nucleus (STN) for the treatment of Parkinson's disease for three lead designs: the Medtronic 3389 (four cylindrical contacts), the direct STNAcute (two cylindrical contacts, six directional contacts), and the Medtronic-Sapiens lead (40 directional contacts). The optimization algorithm returns patient-specific contact configurations in near real-time-less than 10 s for even the most complex leads. When the lead was placed centrally in the target STN, the directional leads were able to activate over 50% of the region, whereas the Medtronic 3389 could activate only 40%. When the lead was placed 2 mm lateral to the target, the directional leads performed as well as they did in the central position, but the Medtronic 3389 activated only 2.9% of the STN. This DBS programming algorithm can be applied to cylindrical electrodes as well as novel directional leads that are too complex with modern technology to be manually programmed. This algorithm may reduce clinical programming time and encourage the use of directional leads, since they activate a larger volume of the target area than cylindrical electrodes in central and off-target lead placements.

  14. Temperature and salinity collected for MMS 'Deepwater Program: Northern Gulf of Mexico Continental Slope Habitat and Benthic Ecology' from the Gulf of Mexico, 1999 - 2002 (NODC Accession 0002185)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data collection includes profile data containing temperature and salinity collected in support of this research program to gain better knowledge of the benthic...

  15. 'Grands Fonds Marins', the French program of deep offshore petroleum research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naudin, Y.

    1978-01-01

    ''Grands Fonds Marins'', the French program of deep offshore petroleum research, which has been conducted jointly by Compagnie Francaise des Petroles (CRFP), Societe Nationale Elf Aquitaine, and the Institut Francais du Petrole since 1973, include research, development, and testing of techniques for drilling, production, and pipeline transport of oil at depths over 300 m. The pipelaying studies discussed include the testing of the RAT method and the ''J-curve'' method of pipelaying, the new welding techniques now under study, i.e., welding under atmospheric pressure (the WELDAP method) applicable at up to about 1000 m depths, and hyperbaric welding. According to CFP, the minimum rate of economical production at 1000 m depths will be 5000 bbl/day, and the investment and operating costs required will be $200 million to $600 million, and $25 million to $50 million, respectively, depending on the depth.

  16. OK - Establishing a mussel monitoring program to evaluate point-source discharges into Deep Fork NWR

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A study incorporating several investigative methods was conducted at the Deep Fork River, Okmulgee, Oklahoma in and near the Deep Fork National Wildlife Refuge. The...

  17. Regional tertiary cross sections: Texas Gulf Coast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debout, D.G.; Luttrell, P.E.; Seo, J.H.

    1976-01-01

    Regional studies of the Frio Formation along the Texas Gulf Coast were conducted to evaluate potential geothermal energy from deep, geopressured sandstone reservoirs. Published regional cross sections, unpublished cross sections provided by several major oil companies, and extensive micropaleontological and electrical-log files at the Bureau of Economic Geology served as basic data. These sections are meant to show gross regional distribution of sand and shale facies both laterally and vertically throughout the entire Tertiary section along the Texas Gulf Coast.

  18. The Gulf of Mexico research initiative: It takes a village

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, Rita R.

    2016-07-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI) was established at the time of one of the most significant ecological events in recent memory, the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Defined by the discharge of over 150 million gallons of crude oil and the introduction of over 1.8 million gallons of chemical dispersants into the Gulf system, the impacts of the Deepwater Horizon disaster reached the Gulf Coast's wetlands and beaches and impacted the surface and deep ocean. The ecological story of the event reveals a strong linkage between the deep sea research community and research priorities in the Gulf of Mexico (coastal processes, human health, etc.). Deep Sea research efforts have revealed critical parts of the story, providing information on transport, fate, and effects of the Deepwater Horizon oil release and subsequent recovery of the Gulf of Mexico ecosystems.

  19. Characterization of deep coral and sponge communities in the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary: Rittenburg Bank, Cochrane Bank and the Farallon Escarpment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etnoyer, P.; Cochrane, Guy R.; Salgado, E.; Graiff, K.; Roletto, J.; Williams, G.J.; Reyna, K.; Hyland, J.

    2014-01-01

    Benthic surveys were conducted in the Gulf of Farallones National Marine Sanctuary (GFNMS) aboard R/V Fulmar, October 3-11, 2012 using the large observation-class remotely operated vehicle (ROV) Beagle. The purpose of the surveys was to groundtruth mapping data collected in 2011, and to characterize the seafloor biota, particularly corals and sponges, in order to support Essential Fish Habitat designations under Magnuson-Stevens Act (MSA) and other conservation and management goals under the National Marine Sanctuaries Act (NMSA). A total area of 25,416 sq. meters of sea floor was surveyed during 34 ROV transects. The overall research priorities were: (1) to locate and characterize DSC and sponge habitats in priority areas; (2) to collect information to help understand the value of DSCs and sponges as reservoirs of biodiversity, or habitat for associated species, including commercially important fishes and invertebrates; (3) to assess the condition of DSC/sponge assemblages in relation to potential anthropogenic or environmental disturbances; and (4) to make this information available to support fisheries and sanctuary management needs under MSA and NMSA requirements.

  20. δ(13)C and δ(15)N in deep-living fishes and shrimps after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, Gulf of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana-Rizzo, Ester; Torres, Joseph J; Ross, Steve W; Romero, Isabel; Watson, Kathleen; Goddard, Ethan; Hollander, David

    2015-05-15

    The blowout of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) drill-rig produced a surface oil layer, dispersed micro-droplets throughout the water column, and sub-surface plumes. We measured stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes in mesopelagic fishes and shrimps in the vicinity of DWH collected prior to, six weeks after, and one year after the oil spill (2007, 2010 and 2011). In 2010, the year of the oil spill, a small but significant depletion of δ(13)C was found in two mesopelagic fishes (Gonostoma elongatum and Chauliodus sloani) and one shrimp (Systellaspis debilis); a significant δ(15)N enrichment was identified in the same shrimp and in three fish species (G. elongatum, Ceratoscopelus warmingii, and Lepidophanes guentheri). The δ(15)N change did not suggest a change of trophic level, but did indicate a change in diet. The data suggest that carbon from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill was incorporated into the mesopelagic food web of the Gulf of Mexico. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard

    2005-04-15

    The principal research effort for the first six months of Year 2 of the project has been petroleum system characterization. Understanding the burial and thermal maturation histories of the strata in the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas is important in petroleum system characterization. The underburden and overburden rocks in these basins and subbasins are a product of their rift-related geohistory. Petroleum source rock analysis and thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling indicate that an effective regional petroleum source rock in the onshore interior salt basins, the North Louisiana Salt Basin, Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin, was the Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone. The Upper Cretaceous Tuscaloosa shale was an effective local petroleum source rock in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and a possible local source bed in the North Louisiana Salt Basin. Hydrocarbon generation and expulsion was initiated in the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin. Hydrocarbon generation and expulsion was initiated in the Late Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin. Reservoir rocks include Jurassic, Cretaceous and Tertiary siliciclastic and carbonate strata. Seal rocks include Jurassic, Cretaceous and Tertiary anhydrite and shale beds. Petroleum traps include structural and combination traps.

  2. Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

    2005-10-28

    The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project has been petroleum system characterization and modeling. Understanding the burial, thermal maturation, and hydrocarbon expulsion histories of the strata in the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas is important in hydrocarbon resource assessment. The underburden and overburden rocks in these basins and subbasins are a product of their rift-related geohistory. Petroleum source rock analysis and initial thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling indicated that an effective regional petroleum source rock in the onshore interior salt basins and subbasins, the North Louisiana Salt Basin, Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin, was Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone. The initial modeling also indicated that hydrocarbon generation and expulsion were initiated in the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and that hydrocarbon generation and expulsion were initiated in the Late Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin. Refined thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling and additional petroleum source rock analysis have confirmed that the major source rock in the onshore interior salt basins and subbasins is Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone. Hydrocarbon generation and expulsion were initiated in the Early to Late Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary.

  3. Topographic Rossby waves in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Peter

    2009-07-01

    Observations of topographic Rossby waves (TRW), using moored current meters, bottom pressure gauges, and Lagrangian RAFOS floats, are investigated for the deep basin of the Gulf of Mexico. Recent extensive measurement programs in many parts of the deep gulf, which were inspired by oil and gas industry explorations into ever deeper water, allow more comprehensive analyses of the propagation and dissipation of these deep planetary waves. The Gulf of Mexico circulation can be divided into two layers with the ∼800-1200 m upper layer being dominated by the Loop Current (LC) pulsations and shedding of large (diameters ∼300-400 km) anticyclonic eddies in the east, and the translation of these LC eddies across the basin to the west. These processes spawn smaller eddies of both signs through instabilities, and interactions with topography and other eddies to produce energetic surface layer flows that have a rich spectrum of orbit periods and diameters. In contrast, current variability below 1000 m often has the characteristics of TRWs, with periods ranging from ∼10-100 days and wavelengths of ∼50-200 km, showing almost depth-independent or slightly bottom intensified currents through the weakly stratified lower water column. These fluctuations are largely uncorrelated with simultaneous upper-layer eddy flows. TRWs must be generated through energy transfer from the upper-layer eddies to the lower layer by potential vorticity adjustments to changing depths of the bottom and the interface between the layers. Therefore, the LC and LC eddies are prime candidates as has been suggested by some model studies. Model simulations have also indicated that deep lower-layer eddies may be generated by the LC and LC eddy shedding processes. In the eastern gulf, the highest observed lower-layer kinetic energy was north of the Campeche Bank under the LC in a region that models have identified as having strong baroclinic instabilities. Part of the 60-day TRW signal propagates towards

  4. Population structure of two deep sea tubeworms, Lamellibrachia luymesi and Seepiophila jonesi, from the hydrocarbon seeps of the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullin, Erin R.; Nelson, Kimberlyn; Fisher, Charles R.; Schaeffer, Stephen W.

    2010-11-01

    Vestimentiferan tubeworms are a group of large sessile marine polychaete annelids (family Siboglinidae) found in the regions of hydrothermal venting or seepage of the reduced chemical hydrogen sulfide. Hydrocarbon seeps on the Louisiana Slope of the Gulf of Mexico support large communities of the co-occurring vestimentiferan species Lamellibrachia luymesi and Seepiophila jonesi. These sessile species have the opportunity to disperse between the patchy sites of active seepage on the seafloor during a planktonic larval stage. However, it is unclear whether dispersal occurs at a local or global scale. Four ( L. luymesi) and seven ( S. jonesi) microsatellite loci were used to test for population substructure among ten hydrocarbon seep sites on the Louisiana Slope. Both species showed high levels of allelic diversity, averaging 18.5 ( L. luymesi) and 22 ( S. jonesi) alleles/locus, respectively, and high observed heterozygosity at all microsatellite loci (0.71-0.9 in L. luymesi, 0.27-0.84 in S. jonesi). The two species showed a significant deficiency in heterozygotes compared to that predicted under the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. L. luymesi showed a small but significant amount of population structure, with a positive correlation between genetic and geographic distance among the sample sites spanning 540 km. S. jonesi, in contrast, showed no evidence for isolation by distance, but did show a significant genetic difference between aggregations of different ages. These results suggest that these two species differ in how larvae are able to colonize new seep sites through space ( L. luymesi) and though time ( S. jonesi).

  5. Energy Savings from GSA's National Deep Retrofit Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shonder, John A [ORNL

    2014-09-01

    Under its National Deep Energy Retrofit (NDER) program, the U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) awarded 10 ESPC projects with the objectives of using innovative technologies and renewable energy technologies, and moving buildings toward net zero energy consumption. This report analyzes data on energy savings from the 10 NDER projects, and compares them with the savings of a sample of other recently awarded Federal ESPC projects. It is shown that by emphasizing the need for deeper energy savings, and by the establishment of a central Project Management Office (PMO) to provide authoritative contracting, technical and pricing assistance, the NDER projects achieved an average level of savings more than twice that of the other Federal ESPC projects. The level of savings achieved in each project seems to be dependent more on the availability of ECMs at the site than on energy price, energy cost per square foot, pre-retrofit EUI or the length of the contract term. This suggests that GSA can achieve similar results in a wide variety of building

  6. Rescuing Paleomagnetic Data from Deep-Sea Cores Through the IEDA-CCNY Data Internship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, A.; Randel, C.; Palumbo, R. V.; Carter, M.; Cai, Y.; Kent, D. V.; Lehnert, K.; Block, K. A.

    2016-12-01

    Paleomagnetic data provides essential information for evaluating the chronostratigraphy of sedimentary cores. Lamont research vessels Vema and Robert Conrad collected over 10,000 deep-sea sediment cores around the world from 1953 to 1989. 10% of these cores have been sampled for paleomagnetic analyses at Lamont. Over the years, only 10% of these paleomagnetic records have been published. Moreover, data listings were only rarely made available in older publications because electronic appendices were not available and cyberinfrastructure was not in place for publishing and preserving these data. As a result, the majority of these datasets exist only as fading computer printouts in binders on the investigator's bookshelf. This summer, undergraduate students from the NSF-funded IEDA-CCNY Data Internship Program started digitizing this enormous dataset under the supervision of Dennis Kent, the current custodian of the data and one of the investigators who oversaw some of the data collection process, and an active leader in the field. Undergraduate students worked on digitizing paper records, proof-reading and organizing the data sheets for future integration into an appropriate repository. Through observing and plotting the data, the students learned about how sediment cores and paleomagnetic data are collected and used in research, and the best practices in data publishing and preservation from IEDA (Interdisciplinary Earth Data Alliance) team members. The students also compared different optical character recognition (OCR) softwares and established an efficient workflow to digitize these datasets. These datasets will eventually be incorporated in the Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC), so that they can be easily compared with similar datasets and have the potential to generate new findings. Through this data rescue project, the students had the opportunity to learn about an important field of scientific research and interact with world-class scientists.

  7. Deep Water Horizon (HB1006, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Monitor and measure the biological, chemical, and physical environment in the area of the oil spill from the deep water horizon oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico. A wide...

  8. Combining Multicomponent Seismic Attributes, New Rock Physics Models, and In Situ Data to Estimate Gas-Hydrate Concentrations in Deep-Water, Near-Seafloor Strata of the Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bureau of Economic Geology

    2009-04-30

    The Bureau of Economic Geology was contracted to develop technologies that demonstrate the value of multicomponent seismic technology for evaluating deep-water hydrates across the Green Canyon area of the Gulf of Mexico. This report describes the methodologies that were developed to create compressional (P-P) and converted-shear (P-SV) images of near-seafloor geology from four-component ocean-bottom-cable (4C OBC) seismic data and the procedures used to integrate P-P and P-SV seismic attributes with borehole calibration data to estimate hydrate concentration across two study areas spanning 16 and 25 lease blocks (or 144 and 225 square miles), respectively. Approximately 200 km of two-dimensional 4C OBC profiles were processed and analyzed over the course of the 3-year project. The strategies we developed to image near-seafloor geology with 4C OBC data are unique, and the paper describing our methodology was peer-recognized with a Best Paper Award by the Society of Exploration Geophysicists in the first year of the project (2006). Among the valuable research findings demonstrated in this report, the demonstrated ability to image deep-water near-seafloor geology with sub-meter resolution using a standard-frequency (10-200 Hz) air gun array on the sea surface and 4C sensors on the seafloor has been the accomplishment that has received the most accolades from professional peers. Our study found that hydrate is pervasive across the two study areas that were analyzed but exists at low concentrations. Although our joint inversion technique showed that in some limited areas, and in some geologic units across those small areas, hydrates occupied up to 40-percent of the sediment pore space, we found that when hydrate was present, hydrate concentration tended to occupy only 10-percent to 20-percent of the pore volume. We also found that hydrate concentration tended to be greater near the base of the hydrate stability zone than it was within the central part of the stability

  9. Evaluation of Rehabilitation Strategies and Management Schemes for the Improvement of Mangrove Management Programs in Lingayen Gulf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Severino Salmo III

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the mangrove rehabilitation strategies and management schemes in five municipalities in Lingayen Gulf (Bolinao, Anda, Bani, Alaminos and San Fernando. Mangrove planting appears to be the first and only option used in the area, ignoring other recommended management strategies, e.g. conservation, landscaping, and sustainable production. All planting sites were located in coastal fringes and are mostly monospeficic stands of the species Rhizophora mucronata. The planted mangroves were constrained by low seedling survival and stunted growth as probably caused by poor species-substrate matching, mono-species planting and pest infestations. Three management schemes were noted: community-managed (Bolinao and Anda, local government unit (LGU-managed (Alaminos and San Fernando, and co-managed between the LGU and the community (Bani. The community-managed mangrove areas have the benefits of voluntary efforts from community-based organizations in conducting daily management activities but were constrained with budgetary and logistical concerns. In contrast, both LGU-managed and co-managed areas received institutional and logistical supports from their respective municipal governments, but lacking community participation made mangrove management difficult. Almost two decades of mangrove management indeed helped improved the mangrove forest condition, at least in terms of forest structure. These projects demonstrated some level of success but also encountered several setbacks. Several lessons can be derived from these areas that can help improve the mangrove rehabilitation and management approaches in Lingayen Gulf. Among the recommendations are: (1 provide ordinance enacting the remaining natural secondary growth mangroves as marine protected areas, (2 promote planting in former mangrove areas by reverting abandoned, idled and unproductive aquaculture ponds to mangroves; (3 improve management schemes by formulating resource management plan

  10. The Gulfwatch contaminants monitoring program in the Gulf of Maine: Are its data being used for ocean protection, with special reference to Nova Scotia, Canada?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Sarah D; Wells, Peter G; MacDonald, Bertrum H

    2017-10-03

    The Gulfwatch Contaminants Monitoring Program is part of the Canada-US, Gulf of Maine Council on the Marine Environment (GOMC). Programs monitoring legacy toxic substances, i.e., chemical contaminants, such as Gulfwatch, collect and analyse environmental samples (e.g., blue mussels), interpret the data, and report on chemical levels and trends (spatial and temporal) in coastal waters. This study explored the extent to which its extensive information (data, reports, papers) has been used broadly and by Nova Scotia, a GOMC member. A mixed-methods study was conducted, using quantitative and qualitative metrics. Citations to some Gulfwatch papers and analysis of use of the Gulfwatch website showed that its data and information were accessed, mostly by government departments. However, interviews revealed that the departments were not using the data to inform Nova Scotia provincial coastal policy or practices. Recommendations are presented to improve the visibility and use of information provided by long-term, environmental monitoring programs. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Gulf Offshore Satellite Application Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biegert, E.K.; Berry, J.L.; Oakley, S.D. [Shell E and P Technology Co., Houston, TX (United States); Baker, R.N. [Amoco (United States); Mott, S. [Imagelinks (United States); Gelpi, C. [Xontech (United States); Mitchell, R. [Earth Satellite Corp., Washington, DC (United States)

    1998-12-31

    The Gulf Offshore Satellite Applications Project (GOSAP) was designed to evaluate remote sensing systems such as RADARSAT and SAR and their use in petroleum, marine and environmental industries. The project`s goal is to detect oil seeps and spills in the marine environment and to determine the influence of sea temperature, geological, geochemical and biological factors on natural seep rates. GOSAP and the RADARSAT Application Development and Research Opportunity (ADRO) program acquired the first RADARSAT images over a Gulf of Mexico test site and observed spills as well as natural oil slicks. Operational criteria for RADARSAT commercial products for these applications were also determined, and special processing problems were resolved.

  12. Effects of a deep-water running program on muscle function and functionality in elderly women community dwelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisy Alberti

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract AIMS The aim of the study was to determine the effects of deep-water running on muscle function and functionality in community dwelling old women. METHODS Older women (n=19 were randomly assigned to one of the two groups: deep-water running (DWR: n=09, 64.33±4.24 years, 75.15±12.53 kg, 160.45±7.52 cm; or control group CG: n=10, 64.40±4.22 years, 74.46±12.39 kg, 158.88±5.48 cm. The DWR group carried out 18 weeks of deep-water running, twice/week 50 min sessions. Dynamic isokinetic strength for the lower limb and functionality was assessed before and after intervention. RESULTS DWR group increased peak torque, total work and average power of the knee and hip flexors and extensors. Additionally showed better performance on gait speed, timed up and go test, five-times-sit-to-stand-test repetitions from a chair as well as the six-minute walk test. CONCLUSION The deep-water running program was effective to improve muscle function and functionality.

  13. 77 FR 65408 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Western Planning Area (WPA) Gulf of Mexico (GOM) Oil and Gas Lease...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-26

    ... Boulevard, New Orleans, Louisiana 70123-2394, (504) 736- 2519 or (800) 200-GULF. BOEM Internet Web site at... the BOEM Gulf of Mexico Internet Web site at http://www.boem.gov/About-BOEM/BOEM-Regions/Gulf-of... under existing BSEE regulations at 30 CFR part 203 and BOEM regulations at 30 CFR part 560. Deep and...

  14. Probiotic (VSL# 3) for Gulf War Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    pain, insomnia, general stiffness and headache) associated with IBS. All of these symptoms are part of the Gulf War illness. We screened our first ...Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0593 TITLE: Probiotic (VSL#3) for Gulf War Illness PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ashok Tuteja, M.D. M.P.H. CONTRACTING...Gulf War Illness 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0593 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6 . AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Ashok Tuteja, M.D. 5e. TASK NUMBER

  15. Use of efficacy probability maps for the post-operative programming of deep brain stimulation in essential tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phibbs, Fenna T; Pallavaram, Srivatsan; Tolleson, Christopher; D'Haese, Pierre-François; Dawant, Benoit M

    2014-12-01

    Post-operative programming of deep brain stimulation for movement disorders can be both time consuming and difficult, which can delay the optimal symptom control for the patient. Probabilistic maps of stimulation response could improve programming efficiency and optimization. The clinically selected contacts of patients who had undergone ventral intermediate nucleus deep brain stimulation for the treatment of essential tremor at our institution were compared against contacts selected based on a probability map of symptom reduction built by populating data from a number of patients using non-rigid image registration. A subgroup of patients whose clinical contacts did not match the map-based selections prospectively underwent a tremor rating scale evaluation to compare the symptom relief achieved by the two options. Both the patient and video reviewer were blinded to the selection. 54% of the map-based and clinical contacts were an exact match retrospectively and were within one contact 83% of the time. In 5 of the 8 mismatched leads that were evaluated prospectively in a double blind fashion, the map-based contact showed equivalent or better tremor improvement than the clinically active contact. This study suggests that probability maps of stimulation responses can assist in selecting the clinically optimal contact and increase the efficiency of programming. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The distribution of life cycle stages of two deep-water pleuronectids, Dover sole ( Microstomus pacificus) and rex sole ( Glyptocephalus zachirus), at the northern extent of their range in the Gulf of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abookire, Alisa A.; Bailey, Kevin M.

    2007-02-01

    Dover sole ( Microstomus pacificus) and rex sole ( Glyptocephalus zachirus) are both commercially valuable, long-lived pleuronectids that are distributed widely throughout the North Pacific. While their ecology and life cycle have been described for southern stocks, few investigations have focused on these species at higher latitudes. We synthesized historical research survey data among critical developmental stages to determine the distribution of life cycle stages for both species in the northern Gulf of Alaska (GOA). Bottom trawl survey data from 1953 to 2004 (25 519 trawls) were used to characterize adult distribution during the non-spawning and spawning seasons, ichthyoplankton data from 1972 to 2003 (10 776 tows) were used to determine the spatial and vertical distribution of eggs and larvae, and small-meshed shrimp trawl survey data from 1972 to 2004 (6536 trawls) were used to characterize areas utilized by immature stages. During the non-spawning season, adult Dover sole and rex sole were widely distributed from the inner shelf to outer slope. While both species concentrated on the continental slope to spawn, Dover sole spawning areas were more geographically specific than rex sole. Although spawned in deep water, eggs of both species were found in surface waters near spawning areas. Dover sole larvae did not appear to have an organized migration from offshore spawning grounds toward coastal nursery areas, and our data indicated facultative settling to their juvenile habitat in winter. Rex sole larvae progressively moved cross-shelf toward shore as they grew from April to September, and larvae presumably settled in coastal nursery areas in the autumn. In contrast with studies in the southern end of their range, we found no evidence in the GOA that Dover or rex sole have pelagic larval stages longer than nine months; however, more sampling for large larvae is needed in winter offshore of the continental shelf as well as sampling for newly settled larvae over

  17. The Gulf of Mexico ecosystem - Before, during and after the Deepwater Horizon oil well blowout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joye, Samantha B.

    2016-07-01

    The Gulf of Mexico ocean basin represents a highly unique, diverse, and dynamic ecosystem. The Gulf system developed in the Triassic and is underpinned by a large salt body (the widespread Louann salt halite body as well as some locally important sulfur containing evaporates). The Gulf is a prolific hydrocarbon basin, noted by widespread natural seepage of oil and gas through deep sediments to the water column. The Gulf system supports a range of economically critical industries, including recreational tourism, a range of fisheries, and oil and gas industry exploration that, together, form a backbone of the Gulf economy.

  18. Utility residential new construction programs: Going beyond the code. A report from the Database on Energy Efficiency Programs (DEEP) Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vine, E.

    1995-08-01

    Based on an evaluation of 10 residential new construction programs, primarily sponsored by investor-owned utilities in the United States, we find that many of these programs are in dire straits and are in danger of being discontinued because current inclusion of only direct program effects leads to the conclusion that they are not cost-effective. We believe that the cost-effectiveness of residential new construction programs can be improved by: (1) promoting technologies and advanced building design practices that significantly exceed state and federal standards; (2) reducing program marketing costs and developing more effective marketing strategies; (3) recognizing the role of these programs in increasing compliance with existing state building codes; and (4) allowing utilities to obtain an ``energy-savings credit`` from utility regulators for program spillover (market transformation) impacts. Utilities can also leverage their resources in seizing these opportunities by forming strong and trusting partnerships with the building community and with local and state government.

  19. Gulf War Illness Inflammation Reduction Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0477 TITLE: Gulf War Illness Inflammation Reduction Trial PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ronald R. Bach, Ph.D...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Gulf War Illness Inflammation Reduction Trial 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0477 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...GWI). Elevated biomarkers of inflammation were observed in our pilot observational study of GWI. Thus, chronic inflammation appears to be part of

  20. Coral Research Data from NOAA's Undersea Research Center, Southeast U.S. and Gulf of Mexico, NOAA's Undersea Research Program (NURP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's Undersea Research Center for the Southeastern U.S. and Gulf of Mexico region (SEGM) explores and studies the waters off the Southeast coast as well as those...

  1. Sperm whales (Physeter catodon) in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collum, L.A.; Fritts, T.H.

    1985-01-01

    The distribution of the sperm whale, Physeter catodon, was documented in the Gulf of Mexico during 1979 to 1981 using regular aerial surveys and opportunistic sightings from ships. Most sightings were in the western Gulf of Mexico in deep waters near the edge of the continental shelf. A total of 47 adults and 12 young animals was sighted in groups containing from one to 14 animals.

  2. SAR observations in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheres, David

    1992-01-01

    The Gulf of Mexico (GOM) exhibits a wealth of energetic ocean features; they include the Loop Current with velocities of about 2 m/s and strong shear fronts, mesoscale eddies, double vortices, internal waves, and the outflow of the 'Mighty Mississippi' river. These energetic features can have a strong impact on the economies of the states surrounding the Gulf. Large fisheries, oil and gas production as well as pollution transport are relevant issues. These circulation features in the Gulf are invisible to conventional IR and visible satellite imagery during the Summer months due to cloud cover and uniform surface temperatures. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery of the Gulf does penetrate the cloud cover and shows a rich assembly of features there year-round. Below are preliminary results from GOM SAR imagery taken by SEASAT in 1978 and by the AIRSAR program in 1991.

  3. Programming for Stimulation-Induced Transient Nonmotor Psychiatric Symptoms after Bilateral Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xi; Qiu, Yiqing; Simfukwe, Keith; Wang, Jiali; Chen, Jianchun

    2017-01-01

    Background Stimulation-induced transient nonmotor psychiatric symptoms (STPSs) are side effects following bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. We designed algorithms which (1) determine the electrode contacts that induce STPSs and (2) provide a programming protocol to eliminate STPS and maintain the optimal motor functions. Our objective is to test the effectiveness of these algorithms. Materials and Methods 454 PD patients who underwent programming sessions after STN-DBS implantations were retrospectively analyzed. Only STPS patients were enrolled. In these patients, the contacts inducing STPS were found and the programming protocol algorithms used. Results Eleven patients were diagnosed with STPS. Of these patients, two had four episodes of crying, and two had four episodes of mirthful laughter. In one patient, two episodes of abnormal sense of spatial orientation were observed. Hallucination episodes were observed twice in one patient, while five patients recorded eight episodes of hypomania. There were no statistical differences between the UPDRS-III under the final stimulation parameter (without STPS) and previous optimum UPDRS-III under the STPSs (p = 1.000). Conclusion The flow diagram used for determining electrode contacts that induce STPS and the programming protocol employed in the treatment of these symptoms are effective. PMID:28894620

  4. Deep-water Asteroidea (Echinodermata collected during the TALUD cruises in the Gulf of California, Mexico Asteroidea (Echinodermata de aguas profundas recolectados durante cruceros TALUD en el Golfo de California, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel E. Hendrickx

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available During a series of cruises aboard the R/V "El Puma" aimed at collecting the deep-water benthic and pelagic fauna off the Pacific coast of Mexico, in the eastern Pacific, samples of Asteroidea were collected below 500 m depth (587-1 526 m. A total of 335 specimens were collected, belonging to 18 species, 14 identified to species, 3 to genus, and 1 previously undescribed species. New records are provided for Dipsacaster laetmophilus Fisher, 1910, Myxoderma sacculatum (Fisher, 1905, Peribolaster biserialis Fisher, 1905, Ampheraster chiroplus Fisher, 1928, Ampheraster hyperoncus (H. L. Clark, 1913, Anteliaster coscinactis Fisher, 1923, Nearchaster aciculosus (Fisher, 1910, Ceramaster leptoceramus (Fisher, 1905, Mediaster transfuga Ludwig, 1905, and Lophaster furcilliger Fisher, 1905. All species were collected below the oxygen minimum zone that extends throughout the central and southern Gulf of California, or within the threshold zone where severe to mild hypoxic conditions prevail. Epibenthic dissolved oxygen concentrations associated with the capture of the specimens show support for strong tolerance to severe hypoxia (Durante una serie de campañas oceanográficas realizadas a bordo del B/O "El Puma", enfocadas a la recolección de la fauna bentónica y pelágica de aguas profundas en la costa del Pacífico de México, en el Pacífico oriental, se recolectaron ejemplares de Asteroidea por debajo de 500 m de profundidad (587-1 526 m. Un total de 335 ejemplares fueron recolectados, pertenecientes a 18 especies; 14 fueron determinadas hasta especie, 3 hasta género y 1 especie no descrita. Se proporcionan nuevos registros para Dipsacaster laetmophilus Fisher, 1910, Myxoderma sacculatum (Fisher, 1905, Peribolaster biserialis Fisher, 1905, Ampheraster chiroplus Fisher, 1928, Ampheraster hyperoncus (H. L. Clark, 1913, Anteliaster coscinactis Fisher, 1923, Nearchaster aciculosus (Fisher, 1910, Ceramaster leptoceramus (Fisher, 1905, Mediaster transfuga

  5. Successes and Lessons Learned From Implementing Community Health Worker Programs in Community-Based and Clinical Settings: Insights From the Gulf Coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Mya; Covert, Hannah; Fox, Laila; Lichtveld, Maureen

    Community health workers (CHWs) are an increasingly viable component of the American health system. While organizations may be interested in incorporating CHWs into the health care workforce, there are challenges to doing so. This study characterizes the successes and lessons learned from implementing new CHW programs in clinical and community-based settings in 4 US Gulf states. Semistructured interviews were conducted with CHWs and their supervisors. Interviews were conducted with participants in 16 community-based organizations and federally qualified health centers located in coastal counties and parishes of Louisiana, Florida, Alabama, and Mississippi. Study participants consisted of 22 CHWs and 17 CHW supervisors. Although most challenges and strategies were reported by participants working in both clinical and community-based settings, some were workplace-specific. Participants from predominantly clinical settings described the importance of strengthening organizational cohesion and coordination, whereas participants from community-based participants discussed the need for specialized training for CHWs. In both work environments, participants indicated that CHW functioning was constrained by limited organizational resources, difficulty accessing the client population, and limited knowledge regarding the CHW's scope of practice. Strategies to improve CHW functioning in both settings included investing in local partnerships, streamlining resources, prioritizing strong communication and outreach, and establishing explicit operating procedures. The majority of participants noted that challenges lessened over time. Evaluating successes and lessons learned in CHW work is critical to maximize CHWs' abilities to address clients' health needs and promote health in underserved communities. This study provides important insights into how to successfully integrate CHWs into the public health workforce.

  6. An Analysis of Artificial Reef Fish Community Structure along the Northwestern Gulf of Mexico Shelf: Potential Impacts of "Rigs-to-Reefs" Programs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Ajemian

    Full Text Available Artificial structures are the dominant complex marine habitat type along the northwestern Gulf of Mexico (GOM shelf. These habitats can consist of a variety of materials, but in this region are primarily comprised of active and reefed oil and gas platforms. Despite being established for several decades, the fish communities inhabiting these structures remain poorly investigated. Between 2012 and 2013 we assessed fish communities at 15 sites using remotely operated vehicles (ROVs. Fish assemblages were quantified from standing platforms and an array of artificial reef types (Liberty Ships and partially removed or toppled platforms distributed over the Texas continental shelf. The depth gradient covered by the surveys (30-84 m and variability in structure density and relief also permitted analyses of the effects of these characteristics on fish richness, diversity, and assemblage composition. ROVs captured a variety of species inhabiting these reefs from large transient piscivores to small herbivorous reef fishes. While structure type and relief were shown to influence species richness and community structure, major trends in species composition were largely explained by the bottom depth where these structures occurred. We observed a shift in fish communities and relatively high diversity at approximately 60 m bottom depth, confirming trends observed in previous studies of standing platforms. This depth was also correlated with some of the largest Red Snapper captured on supplementary vertical longline surveys. Our work indicates that managers of artificial reefing programs (e.g., Rigs-to-Reefs in the GOM should carefully consider the ambient environmental conditions when designing reef sites. For the Texas continental shelf, reefing materials at a 50-60 m bottom depth can serve a dual purpose of enhancing diving experiences and providing the best potential habitat for relatively large Red Snapper.

  7. Evaluation of Early Performance Results for Massachusetts Homes in the National Grid Pilot Deep Energy Retrofit Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuhauser, K. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Gates, C. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2013-11-01

    This research project evaluates post-retrofit performance measurements, energy use data and construction costs for 13 projects that participated in the National Grid Deep Energy Retrofit Pilot program. The projects implemented a package of measures defined by performance targets for building enclosure components and building enclosure air tightness. Nearly all of the homes reached a post-retrofit air tightness result of 1.5 ACH 50. Homes that used the chainsaw retrofit technique along with roof insulation, and wall insulation applied to the exterior had the best air tightness results and the lowest heating and cooling source energy use. Analysis of measure costs and project objectives yielded a categorization of costs relative to energy performance objectives. On average about ½ of the energy-related measure costs correspond primarily to energy-related objectives, and 20% of energy-related measure costs relate primarily to non-energy objectives.

  8. Evaluation of Early Performance Results for Massachusetts Homes in the National Grid Pilot Deep Energy Retrofit Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gates, C. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Neuhauser, K. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2013-11-01

    This research project evaluates post-retrofit performance measurements, energy use data and construction costs for 13 projects that participated in the National Grid Deep Energy Retrofit Pilot program. The projects implemented a package of measures defined by performance targets for building enclosure components and building enclosure air tightness. Nearly all of the homes reached a post-retrofit air tightness result of 1.5 ACH 50. Homes that used the chainsaw retrofit technique along with roof insulation, and wall insulation applied to the exterior had the best air tightness results and the lowest heating and cooling source energy use. Analysis of measure costs and project objectives yielded a categorization of costs relative to energy performance objectives. On average about 1/2 of the energy-related measure costs correspond primarily to energy-related objectives, and 20% of energy-related measure costs relate primarily to non-energy objectives.

  9. Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 3: Applied and direct uses, resource feasibility, economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

    1998-06-01

    The US Department of Energy established a geopressured-geothermal energy program in the mid 1970`s as one response to America`s need to develop alternate energy resources in view of the increasing dependence on imported fossil fuel energy. This program continued for 17 years and approximately two hundred million dollars were expended for various types of research and well testing to thoroughly investigate this alternative energy source. This volume describes the following studies: Geopressured-geothermal hybrid cycle power plant: design, testing, and operation summary; Feasibility of hydraulic energy recovery from geopressured-geothermal resources: economic analysis of the Pelton turbine; Brine production as an exploration tool for water drive gas reservoirs; Study of supercritical Rankine cycles; Application of the geopressured-geothermal resource to pyrolytic conversion or decomposition/detoxification processes; Conclusions on wet air oxidation, pyrolytic conversion, decomposition/detoxification process; Co-location of medium to heavy oil reservoirs with geopressured-geothermal resources and the feasibility of oil recovery using geopressured-geothermal fluids; Economic analysis; Application of geopressured-geothermal resources to direct uses; Industrial consortium for the utilization of the geopressured-geothermal resource; Power generation; Industrial desalination, gas use and sales, pollutant removal, thermal EOR, sulfur frasching, oil and natural gas pipelining, coal desulfurization and preparation, lumber and concrete products kilning; Agriculture and aquaculture applications; Paper and cane sugar industries; Chemical processing; Environmental considerations for geopressured-geothermal development. 27 figs., 25 tabs.

  10. Sea-level and environmental changes since the last interglacial in the Gulf of Carpentaria, Australia: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivas, Allan R.; Garcı́a, Adriana; van der Kaars, Sander; Couapel, Martine; Holt, Sabine; Reeves, Jessica M.; Wheeler, David J.; Switzer, Adam D.; Murray-Wallace, Colin V.; Banerjee, Debabrata; Price, David M.; Wang, Sue X.; Pearson, Grant; Edgar, N. Terry; Beaufort, Luc; de Deckker, Patrick; Lawson, Ewan; Cecil, C. Blaine

    2001-01-01

    The Gulf of Carpentaria is an epicontinental sea (maximum depth 70 m) between Australia and New Guinea, bordered to the east by Torres Strait (currently 12 m deep) and to the west by the Arafura Sill (53 m below present sea level). Throughout the Quaternary, during times of low sea-level, the Gulf was separated from the open waters of the Indian and Pacific Oceans, forming Lake Carpentaria, an isolation basin, perched above contemporaneous sea-level with outlet channels to the Arafura Sea. A preliminary interpretation is presented of the palaeoenvironments recorded in six sediment cores collected by the IMAGES program in the Gulf of Carpentaria. The longest core (approx. 15 m) spans the past 130 ka and includes a record of sea-level/lake-level changes, with particular complexity between 80 and 40 ka when sea-level repeatedly breached and withdrew from Gulf/Lake Carpentaria. Evidence from biotic remains (foraminifers, ostracods, pollen), sedimentology and geochemistry clearly identifies a final marine transgression at about 9.7 ka (radiocarbon years). Before this transgression, Lake Carpentaria was surrounded by grassland, was near full, and may have had a surface area approaching 600 km×300 km and a depth of about 15 m. The earlier rise in sea-level which accompanied the Marine Isotopic Stage 6/5 transgression at about 130 ka is constrained by sedimentological and biotic evidence and dated by optical- and thermoluminescence and amino acid racemisation methods.

  11. Neurologist consistency in interpreting information provided by an interactive visualization software for deep brain stimulation postoperative programming assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallavaram, Srivatsan; Phibbs, Fenna T; Tolleson, Christopher; Davis, Thomas L; Fang, John; Hedera, Peter; Li, Rui; Koyama, Tatsuki; Dawant, Benoit M; D'Haese, Pierre-François

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative programming in deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy for movement disorders can be challenging and time consuming. Providing the neurologist with tools to visualize the electrode location relative to the patient's anatomy along with models of tissue activation and statistical data can therefore be very helpful. In this study, we evaluate the consistency between neurologists in interpreting and using such information provided by our DBS programming assistance software. Five neurologists experienced in DBS programming were each given a dataset of 29 leads implanted in 17 patients. For each patient, probabilistic maps of stimulation response, anatomical images, models of tissue activation volumes, and electrode positions were presented inside a software framework called CRAnialVault Explorer (CRAVE) developed in house. Consistency between neurologists in optimal contact selection using the software was measured. With only the efficacy map, the average consistency among the five neurologists with respect to the mode and mean of their selections was 97% and 95%, respectively, while these numbers were 93% and 89%, respectively, when both efficacy and an adverse effect map were used simultaneously. Fleiss' kappa statistic also showed very strong agreement among the neurologists (0.87 when using one map and 0.72 when using two maps). Our five neurologists demonstrated high consistency in interpreting information provided by the CRAVE interactive visualization software for DBS postoperative programming assistance. Three of our five neurologists had no prior experience with the software, which suggests that the software has a short learning curve and contact selection is not dependent on familiarity with the program tools. © 2013 Vanderbilt University.

  12. Considerations of human inturison in U.S. programs for deep geologic disposal of radioactive waste.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swift, Peter N.

    2013-01-01

    Regulations in the United States that govern the permanent disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in deep geologic repositories require the explicit consideration of hypothetical future human intrusions that disrupt the waste. Specific regulatory requirements regarding the consideration of human intrusion differ in the two sets of regulations currently in effect in the United States; one defined by the Environmental Protection Agencys 40 Code of Federal Regulations part 197, applied only to the formerly proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and the other defined by the Environmental Protection Agencys 40 Code of Federal Regulations part 191, applied to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico and potentially applicable to any repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in the United States other than the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. This report reviews the regulatory requirements relevant to human intrusion and the approaches taken by the Department of Energy to demonstrating compliance with those requirements.

  13. Computerized Bone Age Estimation Using Deep Learning Based Program: Evaluation of the Accuracy and Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Rye; Shim, Woo Hyun; Yoon, Hee Mang; Hong, Sang Hyup; Lee, Jin Seong; Cho, Young Ah; Kim, Sangki

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the accuracy and efficiency of a new automatic software system for bone age assessment and to validate its feasibility in clinical practice. A Greulich-Pyle method-based deep-learning technique was used to develop the automatic software system for bone age determination. Using this software, bone age was estimated from left-hand radiographs of 200 patients (3-17 years old) using first-rank bone age (software only), computer-assisted bone age (two radiologists with software assistance), and Greulich-Pyle atlas-assisted bone age (two radiologists with Greulich-Pyle atlas assistance only). The reference bone age was determined by the consensus of two experienced radiologists. First-rank bone ages determined by the automatic software system showed a 69.5% concordance rate and significant correlations with the reference bone age (r = 0.992; p software system for both reviewer 1 (63.0% for Greulich-Pyle atlas-assisted bone age vs 72.5% for computer-assisted bone age) and reviewer 2 (49.5% for Greulich-Pyle atlas-assisted bone age vs 57.5% for computer-assisted bone age). Reading times were reduced by 18.0% and 40.0% for reviewers 1 and 2, respectively. Automatic software system showed reliably accurate bone age estimations and appeared to enhance efficiency by reducing reading times without compromising the diagnostic accuracy.

  14. Deep sea study takes a new approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robigou, Véronique; Ballard, Robert D.

    The rapidly evolving technology of remotely operated vehicles (ROV) is revolutionizing the exploration and study of deepwater environments. In 1991, the JASON/MEDEA ROV system exhibited its high-resolution imaging capabilities in the rugged hydrothermal environment of the Endeavour Segment, northern Juan de Fuca Ridge [Delaney et al., 1991; Sempéré et al., 1991]. In 1992, the Canadian Remotely Operated Platform for Ocean Science (ROPOS) successfully sampled hydrothermal vents along the Juan de Fuca Ridge and recovered data from an Ocean Drilling Program borehole in Middle Valley, northern Juan de Fuca Ridge [Embley and Franklin, 1993]. In 1993, a 21-day expedition to the Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California, Mexico, went a step further, combining ROV and manned-submersible assets to maximize the effectiveness of both vehicles for scientific use and ultimately demonstrating a completely new approach to deep-sea research.

  15. 75 FR 74650 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Reef Fish Fishery of the Gulf of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    ... measures to reduce overfishing of gag in the Gulf of Mexico (Gulf). This final rule reduces the commercial... Management Council (Council). The intended effect of this final temporary rule is to reduce overfishing of... tilefish IFQ program. The purpose of this final temporary rule is to reduce overfishing of the gag resource...

  16. Temperature, salinity, nutrients, freons, oxygen, currents (ADCP), underway and other measurements collected in the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic as part of the Gulf of Mexico and East Coast Carbon Cruise (GOMECC) 2007 (NCEI Accession 0066603)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — GOMECC Gulf of Mexico and East Coast Carbon Cruise(RB 07-05). North American Carbon Program (NACP) Gulf of Mexico and East Coast Carbon (GOMECC) Cruise on board NOAA...

  17. Using self-paced, `flipped' teaching to promote deep learning in an Earth Sciences programming course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalnins, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    Over the last year we implemented a complete restructuring of a second year Matlab-based course on numerical modelling of Earth processes, with changes aimed at 1) strengthening students' independence as programmers, 2) addressing student concerns about support in developing coding skills, and 3) improving key modelling skills such as choosing boundary conditions. To address this, we designed a mastery-based approach where students progress through a series of small programming projects at their own pace. As part of this, all lectures are `flipped' into short videos, allowing all contact hours to be spent on programming. The projects themselves are structured based on a `bottlenecks to learning' approach, explicitly separating out the steps of learning new commands and code structures, creating a conceptual and mathematical model of the problem, and development of more generic programmings skills such as debugging before asking the students to combine all of the above to build a numerical model of an Earth Sciences problem. Compared with the previous, traditionally taught cohort, student questionnaires show a strong improvement in overall satisfaction. Free text responses show a focus on learning for understanding, and that students particularly valued the encouragement to slow down and work towards understanding when they encountered a difficult topic, rather than being pressured by a set timetable to move on. Quantitatively, exam performance improved on key conceptual questions, such as boundary conditions and discretisation, and overall achievement also rose, with 25% of students achieving an `A+' standard of work. Many of the final projects also demonstrated programming and modelling skills that had not been directly taught, ranging from use of new commands to extension of techniques taught in 1D to the 2D case: strong confirmation of the independent skills we aimed to foster with this new approach.

  18. Beyond the Gulf Metropolises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wippel, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    The extended studies on urbanisation in the Gulf region that came up in the early 2000s concentrated on the main centres with their worldwide-admired mega-projects and branding strategies. Only rather recently did a more general interest arise in the second-tier range of Gulf cities, which also s...

  19. Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 2-B: Resource description, program history, wells tested, university and company based research, site restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

    1998-06-01

    The US Department of Energy established a geopressured-geothermal energy program in the mid 1970`s as one response to America`s need to develop alternate energy resources in view of the increasing dependence on imported fossil fuel energy. This program continued for 17 years and approximately two hundred million dollars were expended for various types of research and well testing to thoroughly investigate this alternative energy source. This volume describes the following studies: Design well program; LaFourche Crossing; MG-T/DOE Amoco Fee No. 1 (Sweet Lake); Environmental monitoring at Sweet Lake; Air quality; Water quality; Microseismic monitoring; Subsidence; Dow/DOE L.R. Sweezy No. 1 well; Reservoir testing; Environmental monitoring at Parcperdue; Air monitoring; Water runoff; Groundwater; Microseismic events; Subsidence; Environmental consideration at site; Gladys McCall No. 1 well; Test results of Gladys McCall; Hydrocarbons in production gas and brine; Environmental monitoring at the Gladys McCall site; Pleasant Bayou No. 2 well; Pleasant Bayou hybrid power system; Environmental monitoring at Pleasant Bayou; and Plug abandonment and well site restoration of three geopressured-geothermal test sites. 197 figs., 64 tabs.

  20. The risk component in Land Use Planning Programs: the case of the Regional and Marine Use Planning Program for the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Antonio Rosete Vergés

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The concern to include in the land use planning programs aspects related to risk management has about 15 years. In a few cases the presence of a specific danger has been the trigger to start a land use planning process. This is true for processes like The Regional Land Use Planning of the Popocatepetl Volcano and his Core Area, The Land Use Planning of the Monarch Butterfly Region or The Regional Land Use Planning of the Necaxa and Laxaxalpan Watersheds. On the other hand, even though the use of spatial models focused on the selection of vulnerable areas to climate change risks has been as strong research issue for the last 14 years, the last six years were determinant as in this time models have grown stronger on the methodological level. The identification of those climate change danger vulnerable areas has been only recently incorporated into the methodology. With the increase of natural danger associated to global climate change, the inclusion of guidelines focused on mitigation and adaptation in the Land Use Planning Programs is a must, especially in those areas that proof to be more vulnerable to those effects.

  1. Temperature, salinity, and optical characteristics data from NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration Operation Deep Scope cruise in the Gulf of Mexico, August 7-17, 2004 (NODC Accession 0001965)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession includes physical, chemical, optical and ocean color measurements, video and still photography data collected during the Operation Deep Scope cruise,...

  2. Ocean Observing Public-Private Collaboration to Improve Tropical Storm and Hurricane Predictions in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, R.; Leung, P.; McCall, W.; Martin, K. M.; Howden, S. D.; Vandermeulen, R. A.; Kim, H. S. S.; Kirkpatrick, B. A.; Watson, S.; Smith, W.

    2016-02-01

    In 2008, Shell partnered with NOAA to explore opportunities for improving storm predictions in the Gulf of Mexico. Since, the collaboration has grown to include partners from Shell, NOAA National Data Buoy Center and National Center for Environmental Information, National Center for Environmental Prediction, University of Southern Mississippi, and the Gulf of Mexico Coastal Ocean Observing System. The partnership leverages complementary strengths of each collaborator to build a comprehensive and sustainable monitoring and data program to expand observing capacity and protect offshore assets and Gulf communities from storms and hurricanes. The program combines in situ and autonomous platforms with remote sensing and numerical modeling. Here we focus on profiling gliders and the benefits of a public-private partnership model for expanding regional ocean observing capacity. Shallow and deep gliders measure ocean temperature to derive ocean heat content (OHC), along with salinity, dissolved oxygen, fluorescence, and CDOM, in the central and eastern Gulf shelf and offshore. Since 2012, gliders have collected 4500+ vertical profiles and surveyed 5000+ nautical miles. Adaptive sampling and mission coordination with NCEP modelers provides specific datasets to assimilate into EMC's coupled HYCOM-HWRF model and 'connect-the-dots' between well-established Eulerian metocean measurements by obtaining (and validating) data between fixed stations (e.g. platform and buoy ADCPs) . Adaptive sampling combined with remote sensing provides satellite-derived OHC validation and the ability to sample productive coastal waters advected offshore by the Loop Current. Tracking coastal waters with remote sensing provides another verification of estimate Loop Current and eddy boundaries, as well as quantifying productivity and analyzing water quality on the Gulf coast, shelf break and offshore. Incorporating gliders demonstrates their value as tools to better protect offshore oil and gas assets

  3. Investigating Clinical Benefits of a Novel Sleep-Focused, Mind-Body Program on Gulf War Illness Symptoms: An Exploratory Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    breathing with any restrictive or obstructive pulmonary disease , but these illnesses were used as part of a stratified randomization procedure (see...movement disorder, and/or sleep-disordered breathing with any restrictive or obstructive pulmonary disease . They only found out their treatment...Persian Gulf War (GW). Many of these GW Veterans continue to experience a complex of troubling chronic symptoms, at a significantly higher rate than

  4. Toxiological Considerations in the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Deep Water Horizon oil rig exploded on April 20, 2010, resulting in an ongoing release of light sweet petroleum crude oil and methane into Gulf of Mexico waters. The release from the deepwater wellhead 41 miles from Louisiana is at approximately 1 mile depth, and flow rates e...

  5. Probiotic (VSL#3) for Gulf War Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0593 TITLE: Probiotic (VSL#3) for Gulf War Illness. PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ashok Tuteja, M.D...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Probiotic (VSL#3) for Gulf War Illness 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0593 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6 . AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...ABSTRACT The overall objective of the study is to determine whether probiotic VSL#3® will improve 1) intestinal symptoms of Irritable Bowel Syndrome and 2

  6. Gulf Coast Clean Energy Application Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillingham, Gavin [Houston Advanced Research Center, TX (United States)

    2013-09-30

    The Gulf Coast Clean Energy Application Center was initiated to significantly improve market and regulatory conditions for the implementation of combined heat and power technologies. The GC CEAC was responsible for the development of CHP in Texas, Louisiana and Oklahoma. Through this program we employed a variety of outreach and education techniques, developed and deployed assessment tools and conducted market assessments. These efforts resulted in the growth of the combined heat and power market in the Gulf Coast region with a realization of more efficient energy generation, reduced emissions and a more resilient infrastructure. Specific t research, we did not formally investigate any techniques with any formal research design or methodology.

  7. NASA Earth Observations Track the Gulf Oil Spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jason B.; Childs, Lauren

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Applied Sciences Program created the Gulf of Mexico Initiative (GOMI) in 2007 "to enhance the region s ability to recover from the devastating hurricanes of 2005 and to address its coastal management issues going into the future." The GOMI utilizes NASA Earth science assets to address regional priorities defined by the Gulf of Mexico Alliance, a partnership formed by the states of Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas, along with 13 federal agencies and 4 regional organizations to promote regional collaboration and enhance the ecological and economic health of the Gulf of Mexico. NASA's GOMI is managed by the Applied Science and Technology Project Office at Stennis Space Center and has awarded over $18 million in Gulf of Mexico research since 2008. After the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, GOMI personnel assisted members of the Gulf of Mexico Alliance with obtaining NASA remote sensing data for use in their oil spill response efforts.

  8. Gulf Petro Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fathi Boukadi

    2011-02-05

    In this report, technologies for petroleum production and exploration enhancement in deepwater and mature fields are developed through basic and applied research by: (1) Designing new fluids to efficiently drill deepwater wells that can not be cost-effectively drilled with current technologies. The new fluids will be heavy liquid foams that have low-density at shallow dept to avoid formation breakdown and high density at drilling depth to control formation pressure. The goal of this project is to provide industry with formulations of new fluids for reducing casing programs and thus well construction cost in deepwater development. (2) Studying the effects of flue gas/CO{sub 2} huff n puff on incremental oil recovery in Louisiana oilfields bearing light oil. An artificial neural network (ANN) model will be developed and used to map recovery efficiencies for candidate reservoirs in Louisiana. (3) Arriving at a quantitative understanding for the three-dimensional controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) geophysical response of typical Gulf of Mexico hydrocarbon reservoirs. We will seek to make available tools for the qualitative, rapid interpretation of marine CSEM signatures, and tools for efficient, three-dimensional subsurface conductivity modeling.

  9. Gulf Shrimp System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gulf of Mexico Shrimp Landings - This data set contains catch (landed catch) and effort for fishing trips made by the larger vessels that fish near and offshore for...

  10. Gulf stream separation dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoonover, Joseph

    Climate models currently struggle with the more traditional, coarse ( O(100 km) ) representation of the ocean. In these coarse ocean simulations, western boundary currents are notoriously difficult to model accurately. The modeled Gulf Stream is typically seen exhibiting a mean pathway that is north of observations, and is linked to a warm sea-surface temperature bias in the Mid-Atlantic Bight. Although increased resolution ( O(10 km) ) improves the modeled Gulf Stream position, there is no clean recipe for obtaining the proper pathway. The 70 year history of literature on the Gulf Stream separation suggests that we have not reached a resolution on the dynamics that control the current's pathway just south of the Mid-Atlantic Bight. Without a concrete knowledge on the separation dynamics, we cannot provide a clean recipe for accurately modeling the Gulf Stream at increased resolutions. Further, any reliable parameterization that yields a realistic Gulf Stream path must express the proper physics of separation. The goal of this dissertation is to determine what controls the Gulf Stream separation. To do so, we examine the results of a model intercomparison study and a set of numerical regional terraforming experiments. It is argued that the separation is governed by local dynamics that are most sensitive to the steepening of the continental shelf, consistent with the topographic wave arrest hypothesis of Stern (1998). A linear extension of Stern's theory is provided, which illustrates that wave arrest is possible for a continuously stratified fluid.

  11. Oceanographic data collected during the Gulf of Alaska 2004 Expedition (alaska2004) on RV Atlantis in Gulf of Alaska from July 30, 2004 - August 23, 2004 (NODC Accession 0072310)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 2004 Gulf of Alaska Seamount Expedition will use the deep submergence vehicle (DSV) Alvin to explore five large seamounts. Giacomini, Pratt, Welker, Denson, and...

  12. Water-quality, bed-sediment, and discharge data for the Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet and adjacent waterways, southeastern Louisiana, August 2008 through December 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarzenski, Christopher M.; Mize, Scott V.; Lovelace, John K.

    2012-01-01

    The Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet navigation channel (MRGO) was constructed in the early 1960s to provide a safer and shorter route between the Gulf of Mexico and the Port of New Orleans for deep-draft, ocean-going vessels and to promote the economic development of the Port of New Orleans. In 2006, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers developed a plan to de-authorize the MRGO. The plan called for a rock barrier to be constructed across the MRGO near Bayou La Loutre. In 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Louisiana Coastal Area Science and Technology Program began a study to document the impacts of the rock barrier on water-quality and flow before, during, and after its construction. Water-quality, bed-sediment, and discharge data were collected in the MRGO and adjacent water bodies from August 2008 through December 2009.

  13. Composición taxonómica y aspectos zoogeográficos de peces de profundidad (90-540m del Golfo de California, México Taxonomic composition and zoogeographical aspects of deep sea fishes (90-540m from the Gulf of California, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juana López-Martínez

    2012-03-01

    ía son fundamentales para desarrollar cualquier tema de biodiversidad y manejo pesqueroTaxonomic composition and zoogeographical aspects of deep sea fishes (90-540m from the Gulf of California, Mexico. The Gulf of California has a high variety of ecosystems that allow different services and the fishery resources play a prominent role in its ecology, evolution and economics. Fish coastal species have been previously reported for most coastal areas, especially those species that are subject to fishing, however, little is known on the species from deep sea zones, due to sampling cifficulties. We studied the deep sea fishes collected with trawl nets during three research surveys in the Gulf of California, Mexico in 2004-2005. We provide a systematic checklist and some notes on biogeographical aspects. For this, 74 fishing hauls were done, and a total of 9 898 fishes were captured, belonging to two classes, 15 orders, 35 families, 53 genera and 70 species. The best represented families in number of species were: Paralichthyidae (eight, Serranidae (six, and Scorpaenidae and Triglidae with five species each one. The typical families from deep waters were: Ophidiidae, Moridae, Lophiidae, Scorpaenidae, Triglidae, Paralichthydae, Pleuronectidae and Cynoglossidae. Size range varied from 13cm for the Splinose searobin (Bellator xenisma to 234cm in the Pacific Cutlassfish (Trichiurus nitens. The biogeographical affinity showed that species with affinity to the East Tropical Pacific (ETP dominated, followed by species from San Diego-Panamic, San Diego-Panamic-Peruvian-Chilean and Oregonian-Cortes provinces, respectively. A biogeographic overlap was found in the fauna, which reflects the Gulf of California’s geographical position, with distribution limits of species from temperate, tropical and warm-temperature transition affinities, divisions that characterize the Gulf of California. Taxonomic status of fish with a focus on composition, location, characterization and zoogeography

  14. Deep Water Coral (HB1402, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The cruise will survey and collect samples of deep-sea corals and related marine life in the canyons in the northern Gulf of Maine in U.S. and Canadian waters. The...

  15. Ocean currents across the entrance to the Gulf of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Curtis A.; Garfield, Newell; Mascarenhas, Affonso S.; Spearman, Monty G.; Rago, Thomas A.

    1997-09-01

    Observations of transport and currents in April, May, and December 1992 and January 1993 were made across the entrance to the Gulf of California with an acoustically tracked dropsonde. Flow was into the gulf along Sinaloa and out of the gulf along Baja California. The transports were 5-10 Sv and the currents were deep, with 10 cm s-1 flow extending to depths greater than 1000 m. The currents were intensified in the upper 300 m. Geostrophic flows compared well with observed currents when smoothed to 2-3 times the Rossby radius. Salinity in the upper 300 m was higher on the Baja California side of the gulf, indicating modification of Subtropical Subsurface waters within the Gulf as well as the presence of surface and near-surface gulf waters. The salinity minimum associated with California Current waters at 50 m had narrow cores that can be resolved only with closely spaced conductivity-temperature-depth casts. Mass and heat fluxes for the upper 300 m were estimated as 280 t s-1 and -0.1×1012 W in May and 170 t s-1 and 2.0×1012 W in December.

  16. Measurements of bottom cores collected in the Gulf of Mexico in support of MMS 'Deepwater Program: Northern Gulf of Mexico Continental Slope Habitat and Benthic Ecology', 2000 - 2001 (NCEI Accession 0002382)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data collection includes characteristics of bottom cores collected in support of this research program to gain better knowledge of the benthic communities of...

  17. Temperature, salinity and associated variables collected for MMS Deepwater Program: Northern Gulf of Mexico Continental Slope Habitat and Benthic Ecology from the Gulf of Mexico, 1999 - 2002 (NODC Accession 0002099)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data collection includes profile data containing temperature, salinity and associated variables collected in support of this research program to gain better...

  18. Deep pockets for deep seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    Peter Auster, a fisheries ecologist with the National Undersea Research Center in Connecticut, plans to assess degradation of the deep-shelf seafloor from bottom trawling. Magnus Ngoile, an official with Tanzania's National Environmental Management Council, will work on building capacity of poor villagers to protect their coastline. And Alison Rieser, a lawyer with the University of Maine School of Law, will produce a textbook to educate scientists on how to apply the law for marine conservation.These individuals are among 11 recipients of the Pew Charitable Trust's 10th annual marine conservation fellowships, announced on July 12. With each recipient receiving an award of $150,000, the program is the world's largest award for marine conservationists. Other 1999 recipients will be involved with areas including investigating marine pollution in the Arctic region, examining economic incentives for conservation in Baja, Mexico, and establishing a marine conservation biology training program for minority students.

  19. 76 FR 68339 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Reef Fish Fishery of the Gulf of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-04

    ...). Amendment 29 established a multi-species IFQ program for the grouper and tilefish component of the... U.S. citizens or permanent resident aliens to meet current Gulf IFQ program and Magnuson-Stevens... participant in an IFQ program to be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident alien. Currently, information...

  20. Sea Level Changes Due to Water Mass Variations in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpytchev, M.

    2016-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that interannual sea level variations on the shelfof the Gulf of Mexico are weakly correlated with the sea level over the Gulf deep waters.This has been shown to be due to a complex interplay between the Loop Currentdriving sea level changes in the deeper part of the Gulf with the shelf waves propagatingfrom the North Atlantic. In this study, we, first, examine the relationship between the low-frequency sea levelfluctuations deduced from satellite altimetry observations and from tide gauge recordsand, then, focus on evaluating water mass changes in the Gulf of Mexico.We compare the estimates obtained from satellite altimetry corrected forthermosteric effects with the changes in water mass observed by GRACEand discuss the importance of water mass changes for the low-frequency sea level fluctuationsin the Gulf.

  1. Ship Track for Deep Sea Medicines 2003 - Office of Ocean Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Ship track of the Ronald H. Brown during the "Deep Sea Medicines 2003: Exploring the Gulf of Mexico" expedition sponsored by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric...

  2. Ship Sensor Observations for Deep Sea Medicines 2003 - Office of Ocean Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hourly measurements made by selected ship sensors on the NOAA ship Ronald H. Brown during the "Deep Sea Medicines 2003: Exploration of the Gulf of Mexico" expedition...

  3. Investigating Clinical Benefits of a Novel Sleep-Focused Mind-Body Program on Gulf War Illness Symptoms: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yoshio; Lipschitz, David L; Donaldson, Gary W; Kida, Yuri; Williams, Samuel L; Landward, Richard; Glover, Don W; West, Gavin; Tuteja, Ashok K

    Mind-Body Bridging (MBB) has been shown to be effective for improving disturbed sleep. In this prospective randomized controlled trial, we evaluated the efficacy of sleep-focused MBB compared with sleep education control (SED) for improving sleep in previously deployed Gulf War veterans. US military service members with sleep and physical health complaints who were deployed in 1990-1991 were randomized to receive three weekly sessions of either MBB (n = 33) or SED (n = 27) between 2012 and 2015. The primary outcome of Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale was completed at baseline, weekly during treatment, postintervention, and 3-month follow-up. Secondary outcome measures for posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, fatigue, quality of life, symptom severity, and mindfulness were completed at baseline, postintervention and 3-month follow-up. Salivary samples were collected at five time points per day at each visit for cortisol and α-amylase assessment. Clinician-administered assessments of sleep and co-occurring conditions were conducted at baseline and postintervention. MBB was significantly more efficacious than SED in reducing disturbed sleep at follow-up (F(1,180.54) = 4.04, p = .046). In addition, self-reported posttraumatic stress disorder (F(1,56.42) = 4.50, p = .038) for the treatment effect, depression (F(1,93.70) = 4.44, p = .038), and fatigue symptoms (F(1,68.58) = 3.90, p = .050) at follow-up improved in MBB compared with those in SED. Consistently higher percentages of veterans in MBB reported improvements of sleep, pain, and composite sleep/general co-occurring symptoms at the postclinical evaluation, as compared with veterans in SED. Finally, the mean waking level of salivary α-amylase in the MBB declined to a greater extent than that in the SED, at follow-up (F(1,88.99) = 3.78, p = .055), whereas no effects were found on cortisol. Sleep-focused MBB can improve sleep and possibly also co-occurring symptoms in Gulf War veterans. Clinicaltrials

  4. Deep water invasions in oil fields of the gulf of Mexico: a challenge for the application of environmental isotopes; Invasiones de aguas profundas en yacimientos petroleros del golfo de Mexico: un reto para la aplicacion de isotopos ambientales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkle, Peter [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2001-07-01

    It was verified the use of environmental isotopes as a useful method to improve the efficiency of the present exploitation in oil fields of the Gulf of Mexico. In general, the stable isotopes like deuterium, 18 O, 13 C, 37 Cl, 87 Sr and 34 S, support in questions on the origin of waters, its quality, the geochemistry evolution, recharge processes, interaction water-rock, origin of the salinity and contamination processes, whereas the radioactive isotopes (Tritium, 14 C, 36 I and 129 I) provide information on the time of circulation, the origin and the age of underground waters. Since year 1998, the Gerencia de Geotermia of the Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas is making investigation projects in the oil fields of the Actives of Production Luna, Pol-Chuc, Chilpilla-Colomo (all of them in the state of Tabasco) and Cactus-Sitio Grande (Chiapas) in the South Region of PEMEX Exploration and Production (PEP). As primary target of these studies hidrogeological models were developed on the migration and circulation of the fluids in the oil fields with the purpose of limiting the water invasion in producing wells and to increase the crude oil production. [Spanish] Se comprobo el uso de los isotopos ambientales como un metodo util para mejorar la eficiencia de la explotacion actual en yacimientos petroleros del golfo de Mexico. En general, los isotopos estables como deuterio, 18 O, 13 C, 37 Cl, 87 Sr y 34 S, apoyan en cuestiones sobre el origen de las aguas, su calidad, la evolucion geoquimica, procesos de recarga, interaccion agua-roca, origen de la salinidad y procesos de contaminacion, mientras que los isotopos radiactivos (Tritio, 14 C, 36 l Y 129 I) proporcionan informacion sobre el tiempo de circulacion, el origen y la edad de las aguas subterraneas. Desde el ano 1998, la Gerencia de Geotermia del Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas esta realizando proyectos de investigacion en los campos petroleros de los activos de Produccion Luna, Pol-Chuc, Chilpilla

  5. Galveston Bay Foundation Receives Second Place Gulf Guardian Award in the Civic/Non Profit Category

    Science.gov (United States)

    DALLAS - (July 30, 2015) The Gulf of Mexico Program recently announced Galveston Bay Foundation (GBF) will receive a Second Place 2015 Gulf Guardian Award in the Civic/Non Profit Category. The awards ceremony will be held on July 30, 2015, at the Te

  6. 77 FR 8810 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... Individual Fishing Quota Programs and discuss the National Center for Disaster Fraud/Gulf Coast. They will...

  7. 77 FR 39998 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE...), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Gulf Council's Individual Fishing Quota Programs and discuss the National Center for Disaster Fraud...

  8. Dr. Richard D. Gragg III to Receive Third Place Gulf Guardian Award in the Individual Category

    Science.gov (United States)

    ATLANTA - Today, the Gulf of Mexico Program announced that Dr. Richard D. Schulterbrandt Gragg III will receive a Third Place 2015 Gulf Guardian Award in the Individual Category. The award will be given tonight at an awards ceremony at the Texas State Aqua

  9. American Persian Gulf policy after the Gulf War

    OpenAIRE

    Redmond, Daniel F.

    1992-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited American policy in the Persian Gulf since the end of the Gulf war has dangerously overemphasized military instruments to protect United States interests in the region. This military focus suggests that threats to American interests are external and visible. At the same time it neglects the challenges posed to U.S. interests by internal political upheaval in the pro-American regimes of the Gulf Cooperation Council and ignores the societ...

  10. The effectiveness of a deep water aquatic exercise program in cancer-related fatigue in breast cancer survivors: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantarero-Villanueva, Irene; Fernández-Lao, Carolina; Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio I; Del Moral-Avila, Rosario; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Arroyo-Morales, Manuel

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of an 8-week aquatic program on cancer-related fatigue, as well as physical and psychological outcomes in breast cancer survivors. A randomized controlled trial. Outpatient clinic, urban, academic medical center, and a sport university swimming pool. Breast cancer survivors (N=68) were randomly assigned to either an experimental (aquatic exercise group in deep water pool) group or a control (usual care) group. The intervention group attended aquatic exercise sessions 3 times per week for 8 weeks in a heated deep swimming pool. Sessions lasted 60 minutes in duration: 10 minutes of warm-up, 40 minutes of aerobic and endurance exercises, and 10 minutes of cool-down exercises. Patients allocated to the usual care group followed the oncologist's recommendations in relation to a healthy lifestyle. Values for fatigue (Piper Fatigue Scale), mood state (Profile of Mood States), and abdominal (trunk curl static endurance test) and leg (multiple sit-to-stand test) strength were collected at baseline, after the last treatment session, and at a 6-month follow-up. Immediately after discharge, the aquatic exercise group showed a large effect size in total fatigue score (d=.87; 95% confidence interval, .48-1.26), trunk curl endurance (d=.92; 95% confidence interval, 1.97-3.83), and leg strength (d=1.10; .55-2.76), but negligible effects in vigor, confusion, and disturbance of mood (daquatic exercise group maintained large to small effect sizes in fatigue scores, multiple sit-to-stand test, and trunk curl static endurance (.25>d>.90) and negligible effects for the fatigue-severity dimension and different scales of the Profile of Mood States (daquatic exercise program conducted in deep water was effective for improving cancer-related fatigue and strength in breast cancer survivors. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. 76 FR 50979 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Reef Fish Fishery of the Gulf of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ...). Amendment 29 established a multi-species IFQ program for the grouper and tilefish component of the... certify their status as U.S. citizens or permanent resident aliens to meet current Gulf IFQ program and... 1, 2012, all U.S. citizens and permanent resident aliens will be eligible to acquire red snapper IFQ...

  12. Remotely Programmed Deep Brain Stimulation of the Bilateral Subthalamic Nucleus for the Treatment of Primary Parkinson Disease: A Randomized Controlled Trial Investigating the Safety and Efficacy of a Novel Deep Brain Stimulation System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dianyou; Zhang, Chencheng; Gault, Judith; Wang, Wei; Liu, Jianmin; Shao, Ming; Zhao, Yanyan; Zeljic, Kristina; Gao, Guodong; Sun, Bomin

    2017-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is the most commonly performed surgery for the debilitating symptoms of Parkinson disease (PD). However, DBS systems remain largely unaffordable to patients in developing countries, warranting the development of a safe, economically viable, and functionally comparable alternative. To investigate the efficacy and safety of wirelessly programmed DBS of bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) in patients with primary PD. Sixty-four patients with primary PD were randomly divided into test and control groups (1:1), where DBS was initiated at either 1 month or 3 months, respectively, after surgery. Safety and efficacy of the treatment were compared between on- and off-medication states 3 months after surgery. Outcome measures included analysis of Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) scores, duration of "on" periods, and daily equivalent doses of levodopa. All patients were followed up both 6 and 12 months after surgery. Three months after surgery, significant decrease in the UPDRS motor scores were observed for the test group in the off-medication state (25.08 ± 1.00) versus the control group (4.20 ± 1.99). Bilateral wireless programming STN-DBS is safe and effective for patients with primary PD in whom medical management has failed to restore motor function. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Physical data from CTD and bottle casts from the R/V ALPHA HELIX in the Gulf of Alaska by the University of Alaska; Institute of Marine Science (UAK/IMS) in support of the Exxon Oil Spill Monitoring Program and the Gulf of Alaska Recirculation Project from 05 May 1989 to 28 May 1989 (NODC Accession 8900171)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity, and sigma-t profiles from CTD and bottle casts from the R/V ALPHA HELIX. Data were collected in the Gulf of Alaska by the University of...

  14. Physical and nutrient profile data from bottle casts in the Bering Sean and the Gulf of Alaska from the R/V Alpha Helix as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) and Gulf of Alaska-1 (GAK-1) projects from 25 April 1988 to 15 May 1988 (NODC Accession 0000222)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and nutrient profile data were collected from bottle casts in the Bering Sea and the Gulf of Alaska from the R/V Alpha Helix. Data were collected from from...

  15. Atmospheric forcing controlling inter-annual nutrient dynamics in the open Gulf of Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtoranta, Jouni; Savchuk, Oleg P.; Elken, Jüri; Dahlbo, Kim; Kuosa, Harri; Raateoja, Mika; Kauppila, Pirkko; Räike, Antti; Pitkänen, Heikki

    2017-07-01

    The loading of P into the Gulf of Finland has decreased markedly, but no overall trend in the concentration of P has been observed in the open Gulf, where the concentrations of both inorganic N and P still have a pronounced inter-annual variability. Our main aim was to study whether the internal processes driven by atmospheric forcing can explain the variation in the nutrient conditions in the Gulf during the period 1992-2014. We observed that the long-term salinity variation of the bottom water in the northern Baltic Proper controls that in the Gulf, and that the deep-water concentrations of oxygen and nutrients are significantly correlated between the basins. This imposes preconditions regarding how atmospheric forcing may influence deep water flows and stratification in the Gulf on a long-term scale. We found that over short timescales, winter winds in particular can control the in- and outflows of water and the vertical stratification and mixing, which to a large extent explained the inter-annual variation in the DIN and TP pools in the Gulf. We conclude that the inter-annual variation in the amounts, ratios, and spatial distribution of nutrients sets variable preconditions for the spring and potential blue-green algae blooms, and that internal processes were able to mask the effects of the P load reductions implemented across the whole Gulf. The transportation of P along the bottom from the northern Baltic Proper and its evident uplift in the Gulf highlights the fact that the nutrient reductions are also needed in the entire catchment of the Baltic Sea to improve the trophic status of the open Gulf.

  16. 5-second shot points along chirp seismic lines collected during the 2002 MARION DUFRESNE cruise (02018) in the Gulf of Mexico (MD02CHIRPPNTS.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Since 1982, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has collected a large amount of surficial and shallow subsurface geologic information in the deep parts of the Gulf of...

  17. Interpretation of depositional units on the SeaMARC 1A image of the Mississippi Fan, USGS Gulf of Mexico Cruise 90001 (INTERP.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Since 1982 the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has collected a large amount of surficial and shallow subsurface geologic information in the deep parts of the Gulf of...

  18. Tracklines for Chirp profiles collected during the 2002 MARION DUFRESNE cruise (02018) in the Gulf of Mexico (MD02CHIRPLN.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Since 1982, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has collected a large amount of surficial and shallow subsurface geologic information in the deep parts of the Gulf of...

  19. Islands in the Stream 2001 on NOAA Ship Gordon Gunter in the North Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico between 20010510 and 20011004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Islands in the Stream expedition explored protected and unprotected deep water coral reefs and hard-bottom communities throughout the Gulf of Mexico and South...

  20. Gulf-Wide Information System, Environmental Sensitivity Index National Heritage Program Database, Geographic NAD83, LDWF (2001) [esi_nhp_LDWF_2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data developed from the Louisiana National Heritage Program (NHP) database for coastal Louisiana. Vector...

  1. Programming for Stimulation-Induced Transient Nonmotor Psychiatric Symptoms after Bilateral Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Wu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Stimulation-induced transient nonmotor psychiatric symptoms (STPSs are side effects following bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS in Parkinson’s disease (PD patients. We designed algorithms which (1 determine the electrode contacts that induce STPSs and (2 provide a programming protocol to eliminate STPS and maintain the optimal motor functions. Our objective is to test the effectiveness of these algorithms. Materials and Methods. 454 PD patients who underwent programming sessions after STN-DBS implantations were retrospectively analyzed. Only STPS patients were enrolled. In these patients, the contacts inducing STPS were found and the programming protocol algorithms used. Results. Eleven patients were diagnosed with STPS. Of these patients, two had four episodes of crying, and two had four episodes of mirthful laughter. In one patient, two episodes of abnormal sense of spatial orientation were observed. Hallucination episodes were observed twice in one patient, while five patients recorded eight episodes of hypomania. There were no statistical differences between the UPDRS-III under the final stimulation parameter (without STPS and previous optimum UPDRS-III under the STPSs (p=1.000. Conclusion. The flow diagram used for determining electrode contacts that induce STPS and the programming protocol employed in the treatment of these symptoms are effective.

  2. Planning and Execution of a Marine Methane Hydrate Pressure Coring Program for the Walker Ridge and Green Canyon Areas of the Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humphrey, Gary [Fugro Geoconsulting Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-09-14

    The objective of this project (and report) is to produce a guide to developing scientific, operational, and logistical plans for a future methane hydrate-focused offshore pressure coring program. This report focuses primarily on a potential coring program in the Walker Ridge 313 and Green Canyon 955 blocks where previous investigations were undertaken as part of the 2009 Department of Energy JIP Leg II expedition, however, the approach to designing a pressure coring program that was utilized for this project may also serve as a useful model for planning pressure coring programs for hydrates in other areas. The initial portion of the report provides a brief overview of prior investigations related to gas hydrates in general and at the Walker Ridge 313 and Green Canyon 955 blocks in particular. The main content of the report provides guidance for various criteria that will come into play when designing a pressure coring program.

  3. Current and other data from meters attached to fixed platforms in the Gulf of Alaska as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 24 April 1978 to 21 September 1978 (NODC Accession 7900207)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current and other data were collected from meters attached to fixed platforms in the Gulf of Alaska by the University of Alaska - Fairbanks; Institute of Marine...

  4. Current and other data from meters attached to fixed platforms in the Gulf of Alaska as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 13 May 1979 to 29 July 1979 (NODC Accession 8000542)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current and other data were collected from meters attached to fixed platforms in the Gulf of Alaska by the University of Alaska - Fairbanks; Institute of Marine...

  5. Drifting buoy and other data from the Gulf of Alaska as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 21 October 1976 to 11 November 1976 (NODC Accession 7700740)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Drifting buoy data was collected from the Gulf of Alaska by the Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) as part of the Outer Continental Shelf...

  6. Fish survey, fishing duration and other data in the Gulf of Alaska from the HUMDINGER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 23 July 1975 to 22 June 1976 (NODC Accession 8200114)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish survey, fishing duration, and other data were collected in the Gulf of Alaska from the HUMDINGER from 23 July 1975 to 22 June 1976. Data were collected by Dames...

  7. Fish survey, fishing duration, and other data from net trawls in the Gulf of Alaska from the NORTH PACIFIC as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 03 May 1975 to 07 August 1975 (NODC Accession 7601886)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish survey, fishing duration, and other data were collected from net trawls in the Gulf of Alaska from the NORTH PACIFIC from 03 May 1975 to 07 August 1975. Data...

  8. Fish survey, fishing duration, and other data from net trawls in the Gulf of Alaska from the NORTH PACIFIC as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 03 May 1975 to 07 August 1975 (NODC Accession 7601885)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish survey, fishing duration, and other data were collected from net trawls in the Gulf of Alaska from the NORTH PACIFIC from 03 May 1975 to 07 August 1975. Data...

  9. Zooplankton and other data from net casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the SURVEYOR as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 30 September 1975 to 24 October 1975 (NODC Accession 7601809)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton and other data were collected from net casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the SURVEYOR from 30 September 1975 to 24 October 1975. Data were collected by...

  10. Toxic substance and other data from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program from 1975-10-08 to 1975-11-09 (NODC Accession 7600630)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Toxic substances and pollutants data were collected from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER. Data were collected by Pacific Marine...

  11. Marine toxic substance and other data from the Gulf of Alaska from the MOANA WAVE as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program from 1976-06-25 to 078 July 1976 (NCEI Accession 7601849)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance and other data were collected in the Gulf of Alaska from the MOANA WAVE. Data were collected by Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL)...

  12. Physical and other data from CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 20 March 1981 to 03 April 1981 (NODC Accession 8300087)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and other data were collected from CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from 20 March 1981 to 03 April 1981. Data were collected by Science Applications, INC....

  13. Benthic organism and other data from otter trawls from the Gulf of Alaska from the BIG VALLEY as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 17 June 1976 to 18 March 1977 (NODC Accession 7700849)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organism and other data were collected from otter trawls in the Gulf of Alaska from the BIG VALLEY by University of Alaska; Institute of Marine Science...

  14. Benthic organism and other data from the MOANA WAVE in the Gulf of Alaska as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 01 April 1976 (NODC Accession 7601558)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organism and other data were collected in the Gulf of Alaska from the MOANA WAVE by the University of Alaska - Fairbanks; Institute of Marine Science...

  15. Benthic organism and other data from the Gulf of Alaska from the USNS SILAS BENT as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 31 August 1975 to 14 September 1975 (NODC Accession 7700434)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organism and other data were collected in the Gulf of Alaska from the USNS SILAS BENT by University of Alaska; Institute of Marine Science (UAK/IMS). Data...

  16. Benthic organism and other data from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER from the Gulf of Alaska as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1975-11-23 to 1975-12-02 (NODC Accession 7700435)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organism and other data were collected in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER by University of Alaska; Institute of Marine Science (UAK/IMS). Data...

  17. Benthic organism and other data from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN from the Gulf of Alaska as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1979-02-15 to 1979-02-24 (NODC Accession 8100499)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organism and other data were collected in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN by University of Alaska; Institute of Marine Science (UAK/IMS)....

  18. Pressure gauge and other data from MOANA WAVE in the Gulf of Alaska as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 04 March 1976 to 22 August 1976 (NODC Accession 7601926)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Pressure gauge and other data were collected from the MOANA WAVE in the Gulf of Alaska from 04 March 1976 to 22 August 1976. Data were collected by the Pacific...

  19. Pressure gauge and other data in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1976-05-13 to 1976-08-26 (NODC Accession 7700097)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Pressure gauge and other data were collected in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER from 13 May 1976 to 26 August 1976. Data were collected by the Pacific...

  20. Physical and other data from bottle and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the ACONA as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 03 June 1975 to 13 June 1975 (NODC Accession 7601552)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and other data were collected from bottle and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the ACONA. Data were collected by the University of Alaska - Fairbanks;...

  1. Marine toxic substance and other data from the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1977-05-05 to 1979-05-18 (NODC Accession 8100493)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance and other data were collected in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER from 05 May 1977 to 18 May 1979. Data were collected by the...

  2. Marine Toxic Substance and other data from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the ACONA as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 28 June 1977 to 16 July 1977 (NODC Accession 7700756)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine Toxic Substance and other data were collected from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the ACONA. Data were collected by Pacific Marine Environmental...

  3. Current and other data from meters attached to fixed platforms in the Gulf of Alaska and other locations as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 17 August 1974 to 01 September 1975 (NODC Accession 7601625)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current and other data were collected from meters attached to fixed platforms in the Gulf of Alaska and other locations by the Pacific Marine Environmental...

  4. Physical and other data from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the SURVEYOR as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 05 June 1975 to 12 June 1975 (NODC Accession 7601225)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and other data were collected from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the SURVEYOR. Data were collected by the Pacific Marine...

  5. Temperature and salinity profiles from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the SURVEYOR as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 21 September 1975 to 22 September 1975 (NODC Accession 7601224)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and salinity profiles were collected from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the SURVEYOR. Data were collected by the Pacific...

  6. Diets and food web relationships of seabirds in the Gulf of Alaska and adjacent marine regions: Final report to the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the findings of a research program focused on the effects of petroleum development. Field studies were conducted from 1975 to 1978 on the...

  7. Deep frying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koerten, van K.N.

    2016-01-01

    Deep frying is one of the most used methods in the food processing industry. Though practically any food can be fried, French fries are probably the most well-known deep fried products. The popularity of French fries stems from their unique taste and texture, a crispy outside with a mealy soft

  8. Danish Gulf War Veterans Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Lars Ravnborg; Stoltenberg, Christian; Nielsen, Anni B Sternhagen

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the assumption that postdeployment incidence of sickness and other absence from work are higher among Gulf War Veterans compared with nonveterans. METHODS: A prospective registry study including a cohort of 721 Danish Gulf War Veterans and a control cohort of 3,629 nonvetera...

  9. Deep learning

    CERN Document Server

    Goodfellow, Ian; Courville, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Deep learning is a form of machine learning that enables computers to learn from experience and understand the world in terms of a hierarchy of concepts. Because the computer gathers knowledge from experience, there is no need for a human computer operator to formally specify all the knowledge that the computer needs. The hierarchy of concepts allows the computer to learn complicated concepts by building them out of simpler ones; a graph of these hierarchies would be many layers deep. This book introduces a broad range of topics in deep learning. The text offers mathematical and conceptual background, covering relevant concepts in linear algebra, probability theory and information theory, numerical computation, and machine learning. It describes deep learning techniques used by practitioners in industry, including deep feedforward networks, regularization, optimization algorithms, convolutional networks, sequence modeling, and practical methodology; and it surveys such applications as natural language proces...

  10. Gulf of Mexico Regional Collaborative Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judd, Kathleen S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Judd, Chaeli [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Engel-Cox, Jill A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gulbransen, Thomas [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Anderson, Michael G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Woodruff, Dana L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Thom, Ronald M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Guzy, Michael [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hardin, Danny [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Estes, Maury [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2007-12-01

    This report presents the results of the Gulf of Mexico Regional Collaborative (GoMRC), a year-long project funded by NASA. The GoMRC project was organized around end user outreach activities, a science applications team, and a team for information technology (IT) development. Key outcomes are summarized below for each of these areas. End User Outreach; Successfully engaged federal and state end users in project planning and feedback; With end user input, defined needs and system functional requirements; Conducted demonstration to End User Advisory Committee on July 9, 2007 and presented at Gulf of Mexico Alliance (GOMA) meeting of Habitat Identification committee; Conducted significant engagement of other end user groups, such as the National Estuary Programs (NEP), in the Fall of 2007; Established partnership with SERVIR and Harmful Algal Blooms Observing System (HABSOS) programs and initiated plan to extend HABs monitoring and prediction capabilities to the southern Gulf; Established a science and technology working group with Mexican institutions centered in the State of Veracruz. Key team members include the Federal Commission for the Protection Against Sanitary Risks (COFEPRIS), the Ecological Institute (INECOL) a unit of the National Council for science and technology (CONACYT), the Veracruz Aquarium (NOAA’s first international Coastal Ecology Learning Center) and the State of Veracruz. The Mexican Navy (critical to coastal studies in the Southern Gulf) and other national and regional entities have also been engaged; and Training on use of SERVIR portal planned for Fall 2007 in Veracruz, Mexico Science Applications; Worked with regional scientists to produce conceptual models of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) ecosystems; Built a logical framework and tool for ontological modeling of SAV and HABs; Created online guidance for SAV restoration planning; Created model runs which link potential future land use trends, runoff and SAV viability; Analyzed SAV

  11. Incorporating Cutting Edge Scientific Results from the Margins-Geoprisms Program into the Undergraduate Curriculum, Rupturing Continental Lithosphere Part II: Introducing Euler Poles Using Baja-North America Relative Plate Motion Across the Gulf of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveless, J. P.; Bennett, S. E. K.; Cashman, S. M.; Dorsey, R. J.; Goodliffe, A. M.; Lamb, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    The NSF-MARGINS Program funded a decade of research on continental margin processes. The NSF-GeoPRISMS Mini-lesson Project, funded by NSF-TUES, is designed to integrate the significant findings from the MARGINS program into open-source college-level curriculum. The Gulf of California (GOC) served as the focus site for the Rupturing Continental Lithosphere (RCL) initiative, which addressed several scientific questions: What forces drive rift initiation, localization, propagation and evolution? How does deformation vary in time and space, and why? How does crust evolve, physically and chemically, as rifting proceeds to sea-floor spreading? What is the role of sedimentation and magmatism in continental extension? We developed two weeks of curriculum, including lectures, labs, and in-class activities that can be used as a whole or individually. This component of the curriculum introduces students to the Euler pole description of relative plate motion (RPM) by examining the tectonic interactions of the Baja California microplate and North American plate. The plate boundary varies in rift obliquity along strike, from highly oblique and strike-slip dominated in the south to slightly less oblique and with a larger extensional component in the north. This Google Earth-based exercise provides students with a visualization of RPM using small circle contours of the local direction and magnitude of Baja-North America movement on a spherical Earth. Students use RPM to calculate the fault slip rates on transform, normal, and oblique-slip faults and examine how the varying faulting styles combine to accommodate RPM. MARGINS results are integrated via comparison of rift obliquity with the structural style of rift-related faults around the GOC. We find this exercise to fit naturally into courses about plate tectonics, geophysics, and especially structural geology, given the similarity between Euler pole rotations and stereonet-based rotations of structural data.

  12. Incorporating Cutting Edge Scientific Results from the Margins-Geoprisms Program into the Undergraduate Curriculum, Rupturing Continental Lithosphere Part I: Introducing Seismic Interpretation and Isostasy Principles Using Gulf of California Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, M. A.; Cashman, S. M.; Dorsey, R. J.; Bennett, S. E. K.; Loveless, J. P.; Goodliffe, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    The NSF-MARGINS Program funded a decade of research on continental margin processes. The NSF-GeoPRISMS Mini-lesson Project, funded by NSF-TUES, is designed to integrate the significant findings from the MARGINS program into open-source college-level curriculum. The Gulf of California (GOC) served as the focus site for the Rupturing Continental Lithosphere initiative, which addressed several scientific questions: What forces drive rift initiation, localization, propagation and evolution? How does deformation vary in time and space, and why? How does crust evolve, physically and chemically, as rifting proceeds to sea-floor spreading? What is the role of sedimentation and magmatism in continental extension? We developed two weeks of curriculum designed for an upper-division structural geology, tectonics or geophysics course. The curriculum includes lectures, labs, and in-class activities that can be used as a whole or individually. The first set of materials introduces the RCL initiative to students and has them analyze the bathymetry and oblique-rifting geometry of the GOC in an exercise using GeoMapApp. The second set of materials has two goals: (1) introduce students to fundamental concepts of interpreting seismic reflection data via lectures and in-class interpretation of strata, basement, and faults from recent GOC seismic data, and (2) encourage students to discover the structural geometry and rift evolution, including the east-to-west progression of faulting and transition from detachment to high-angle faulting in the northern GOC, and changes in deformation style from north to south. In the third set of materials, students investigate isostatic affects of sediment fill in GOC oblique rift basins. This activity consists of a problem set, introduced in a lecture, where students integrate their findings from the previous bathymetry- and seismic-interpretation exercises.

  13. Thermocline Regulated Seasonal Evolution of Surface Chlorophyll in the Gulf of Aden

    KAUST Repository

    Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2015-04-01

    The Gulf of Aden, although subject to seasonally reversing monsoonal winds, has been previously reported as an oligotrophic basin during summer, with elevated chlorophyll concentrations only occurring during winter due to convective mixing. However, the Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) ocean color data reveal that the Gulf of Aden also exhibits a prominent summer chlorophyll bloom and sustains elevated chlorophyll concentrations throughout the fall, and is a biophysical province distinct from the adjacent Arabian Sea. Climatological hydrographic data suggest that the thermocline, hence the nutricline, in the entire gulf is markedly shoaled by the southwest monsoon during summer and fall. Under this condition, cyclonic eddies in the gulf can effectively pump deep nutrients to the surface layer and lead to the chlorophyll bloom in late summer, and, after the transition to the northeast monsoon in fall, coastal upwelling driven by the northeasterly winds produces a pronounced increase in surface chlorophyll concentrations along the Somali coast.

  14. Stimulation Technologies for Deep Well Completions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen Wolhart

    2005-06-30

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring the Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies conducted a study to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project was to review U.S. deep well drilling and stimulation activity, review rock mechanics and fracture growth in deep, high-pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. This report documents results from this project.

  15. 78 FR 50030 - Implementation of New Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Science, Observation, Monitoring, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT: Russ Beard, Acting Program Director, Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Science... Space Center, MS 39529. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Introduction The Resources and Ecosystem... science investments will evolve over time, adapting to changing information and knowledge. As noted...

  16. Gulf Watch Alaska Forage Fish Component: Hydroacoustic Surveys in Prince William Sound, Alaska 2014-2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data are part of the Gulf Watch Alaska (GWA) long term monitoring program, forage fish component. These datasets consist of echointegration data from forage...

  17. 77 FR 2353 - Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-17

    ... Southwest Asia theater of operations during the Gulf War. The Committee will review VA program activities... each day. A sign-up sheet for five-minute comments will be available at the meeting. Individuals who...

  18. CTD and other physical oceanographic data collected from R/V Pelican in Gulf of Mexico near the DeepWater Horizon oil spill region for the GO4 field survey from 2013-07-09 to 2013-07-14 (NCEI Accession 0131099)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twenty-six conductivity, temperature and depth profiles from GISR (Gulf Integrated Spill Research Consortium) Mooring Recovery Cruise G04.

  19. Natural Sunlight Shapes Crude Oil-Degrading Bacterial Communities in Northern Gulf of Mexico Surface Waters

    OpenAIRE

    Bacosa, Hernando P.; Zhanfei eLiu; Erdner, Deana L.

    2015-01-01

    Following the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) spill in 2010, an enormous amount of oil was observed in the deep and surface waters of the northern Gulf of Mexico. Surface waters are characterized by intense sunlight and high temperature during summer. While the oil-degrading bacterial communities in the deep-sea plume have been widely investigated, the effect of natural sunlight on those in oil polluted surface waters remains unexplored to date. In this study, we incubated surface water from the DWH ...

  20. Deep web

    OpenAIRE

    Bago, Neven

    2016-01-01

    Završnom radu „Deep Web“ je cilj da se u osnovi nauči što je on te koliko je rasprostranjen. Korištenjem programa TOR pristupa se „sakrivenom“ dijelu interneta poznatom kao Deep Web. U radu je opisan proces pristupanja Deep Webu pomoću spomenutog programa. Navodi sve njegove mogućnosti i prednosti nad ostalim web pretraživačima. Istražena je valuta BitCoin koja se koristi u online transakcijama zbog mogućnosti kojom pruža anonimnost. Cilj ovog rada je pokazati do koje mjere ...

  1. Geologic and Geophysicsal Studies of Natural Hazards and Risks in the Gulf of Peter the Great, Japan Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anokhin, Vladimir; Shcherbakov, Viktor; Motychko, Viktor; Slinchenkov, Vladimir; Sokolov, Georgy; Kotov, Sergey; Kartashov, Sergey

    2013-04-01

    The area of the Gulf of Peter the Great is socially, economically and culturally one of the most important regions for the Russian Far East. At the same time, there have been reported palpable natural hazards, which pose a real threat to local infrastructure. Complex field team of the Gramaberg VNIIOkeangeologia institute carried out geological and geophysical studies of natural hazards in the water area and coastal zone of the gulf in the summer and autumn of 2012. The research program included - geodetic deformation monitoring of the coastal zone by the HDS 3000 Leica tachometer; - echo sounding of the underwater part of the coastal slope by the LCX-37C depth sounder equipped with active external 12-channel GPS Lowrance antenna LGC-3000; - high-frequency acoustic profiling by GeoPulse Subbotom Profilier with oscillator frequency of 12.2 kHz for the study of bottom sediments to a depth of 40 m; - hydromagnetic measurements by SeaSPY Marine Magnetics magnetometer for investigation of deep geological structure; - sonar measurements by GEO SM C-MAX, 325 kHz frequency emitters for studying seafloor features; - studies of the water column (sensing and sampling); - bottom sediment sampling. Analytic work was performed by mass spectrometry, atomic absorption spectrophotometry, chromatography, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, gamma spectrometry and included the following. For water - the content of Fe, Mn, Cd, As, Pb, Cu, Co, Ni, Cr, Zn, Hg in solution and in suspension, polycyclic aromatic compounds, organochlorine pesticides, oil, methane. For sediments - grade analysis, mineralogical analysis of sand, determination of Fe, Mn, Cd, As, Pb, Cu, Co, Ni, Cr, Zn, Hg content; identification of petroleum products, polychlorinated biphenyls, organochlorine pesticides, the specific activity of Cs-137. As a result, a set of geological maps was composed: maps of pre-Quaternary and Quaternary rocks and deposits, lithological map, geomorphological map, map of engineering

  2. Design, Fabrication, and Testing of a Composite Rack Prototype in Support of the Deep Space Habitat Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Russ; Hagen, Richard

    2015-01-01

    In support of the Deep Space Habitat project a number of composite rack prototypes were developed, designed, fabricated and tested to various extents ( with the International Standard Payload Rack configuration, or crew quarters, as a baseline). This paper focuses specifically on a composite rack prototype with a direct tie in to Space Station hardware. The outlined prototype is an all composite construction, excluding metallic fasteners, washers, and their associated inserts. The rack utilizes braided carbon composite tubing for the frame with the sidewalls, backwall and flooring sections utilizing aircraft grade composite honeycomb sandwich panels. Novel additively manufactured thermoplastic joints and tube inserts were also developed in support of this effort. Joint and tube insert screening tests were conducted at a preliminary level. The screening tests allowed for modification, and enhancement, of the fabrication and design approaches, which will be outlined. The initial joint tests did not include mechanical fasteners. Adhesives were utilized at the joint to composite tube interfaces, along with mechanical fasteners during final fabrication (thus creating a stronger joint than the adhesive only variant). In general the prototype was focused on a potential in-space assembly approach, or kit-of-parts construction concept, which would not necessarily require the inclusion of an adhesive in the joint regions. However, given the tie in to legacy Station hardware (and potential flight loads with imbedded hardware mass loadings), the rack was built as stiff and strong as possible. Preliminary torque down tests were also conducted to determine the feasibility of mounting the composite honeycomb panels to the composite tubing sections via the additively manufactured tube inserts. Additional fastener torque down tests were also conducted with inserts (helicoils) imbedded within the joints. Lessons learned are also included and discussed.

  3. Stimulation Technologies for Deep Well Completions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2003-09-30

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring the Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies is conducting a study to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project is to assess U.S. deep well drilling & stimulation activity, review rock mechanics & fracture growth in deep, high pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. An assessment of historical deep gas well drilling activity and forecast of future trends was completed during the first six months of the project; this segment of the project was covered in Technical Project Report No. 1. The second progress report covers the next six months of the project during which efforts were primarily split between summarizing rock mechanics and fracture growth in deep reservoirs and contacting operators about case studies of deep gas well stimulation.

  4. Case Study: Using Microbe Molecular Biology for Gulf Oil Spill Clean Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    This case has the student actively investigate the regulation of expression of a novel bacterial gene in the context of attempts to solve a real world problem, clean up of the April 2010 Deep Water Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Although the case is fictitious, it is based on factual gene regulatory characteristics of oil-degrading…

  5. United States Gulf Coast Geopressured Geothermal Program: special projects research and coordination assistance. Final report, October 1, 1977-November 30, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorfman, M.H.; Bebout, D.G.

    1979-04-01

    The activities involved in the coordination assistance function are reviewed including: technical assistance and liaison; technical assistance for review and evaluation of proposals and contract results; technical assistance and coordination for geopressure geothermal test well; technical assistance, coordination, and planning of surface component test facility; legal research in geopressure geothermal resource development; and operation of geopressure geothermal information service. This function takes the form of providing liaison with various industrial components that participate in the program and with state and local agencies. (MHR)

  6. 78 FR 62579 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Shrimp Fishery of the Gulf of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-22

    ... and for the data transmission from the ELB units to a NOAA server. The purpose of the proposed changes... holders in the Gulf shrimp fishery through the NMFS vessel monitoring system (VMS) program, an estimated... and maintenance of the new ELB units and the data transmission from the ELB units to a NOAA server...

  7. Electrodril system field test program. Phase II: Task C-1-deep drilling system demonstration. Final report for Phase II: Task C-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, P D

    1981-04-01

    The Electrodril Deep Drilling System field test demonstrations were aborted in July 1979, due to connector problems. Subsequent post test analyses concluded that the field replacable connectors were the probable cause of the problems encountered. The designs for both the male and female connectors, together with their manufacturing processes, were subsequently modified, as was the acceptance test procedures. A total of nine male and nine female connectors were manufactured and delivered during the 2nd Quarter 1980. Exhaustive testing was then conducted on each connector as a precursor to formal qualification testing conducted during the month of October 1980, at the Brown Oil Tool test facility located in Houston, Texas. With this report, requirements under Phase II, Task C-1 are satisfied. The report documents the results of the connector qualification test program which was successfully completed October 28, 1980. In general, it was concluded that connector qualification had been achieved and plans are now in progress to resume the field test demonstration program so that Electrodril System performance predictions and economic viability can be evaluated.

  8. The program at JPL to investigate the nuclear interaction of RTG's with scientific instruments on deep space probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truscello, V.

    1972-01-01

    A major concern in the integration of a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) with a spacecraft designed to explore the outer planets is the effect of the emitted radiation on the normal operation of scientific instruments. The necessary techniques and tools developed to allow accurate calculation of the neutron and gamma spectrum emanating from the RTG. The specific sources of radiation were identified and quantified. Monte Carlo techniques are then employed to perform the nuclear transport calculations. The results of these studies are presented. An extensive experimental program was initiated to measure the response of a number of scientific components to the nuclear radiation.

  9. Mapping the Intricacies of the Gulf of Mexico's Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo-Fernández, Alexis; Green, Rebecca E.

    2011-01-01

    From hosting key shipping lines, drilling platforms, and commercial fisheries, to sustaining mangrove swamps that shelter the coastline from the hurricanes that churn its waters, the Gulf of Mexico is important to the nations surrounding it for socio-economic, ecological, military, political, and scientific reasons. Critical to all of these sectors is the Gulf's circulation—it controls hurricane tracks and intensity, biological productivity, and larvae dispersal. Since 1982, the Environmental Studies Program (ESP) of the U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (BOEMRE) has invested more than $67 million in field and numerical modeling studies to improve our understanding of the Gulf's circulation (see Figure 1). ESP-funded research has covered a broad array of topics, some applied and some basic. Studies carried out on behalf of the bureau reflect the bureau's information needs, stakeholder input, and offshore energy exploration and development trends. All ESP studies culminate in a technical report—127 technical reports on physical oceanography are publicly available (see http://www.gomr.boemre.gov/homepg/regulate/environ/techsumm/rec_pubs.html). Additionally, more than 100 peer-reviewed publications have been issued on the Gulf's physical oceanography and circulation. The AGU Geophysical Monograph Circulation in the Gulf of Mexico: Observations and Models, the very first circulation overview since 1972, was funded by ESP. Additionally, data collected during fieldwork are deposited in national archives for public dissemination.

  10. Gulf War Illness and the Health of Gulf War Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    sign. higher; retinol binding protein ns higher 2005: Serum uric acid ns lower Neurocognitive function 1997: Poorer accuracy on automated performance...with muscle metabolism and physical endurance in 49 Gulf War veterans and 61 nonveterans with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS).1725 In Gulf War veterans...118. 120. Behan PO, Behan WM, Horrobin D. Effect of high doses of essential fatty acids on the postviral fatigue syndrome . Acta Neurol Scand. 1990;82

  11. Macro-Ecology of Gulf of Mexico Cold Seeps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, Erik E.; Bergquist, Derk C.; Fisher, Charles R.

    2009-01-01

    Shortly after the discovery of chemosynthetic ecosystems at deep-sea hydrothermal vents, similar ecosystems were found at cold seeps in the Gulf of Mexico. Over the past two decades, these sites have become model systems for understanding the physiology of the symbiont-containing megafauna and the ecology of seep communities worldwide. Symbiont-containing bivalves and siboglinid polychaetes dominate the communities, including five bathymodiolin mussel species and six vestimentiferan (siboglinid polychaete) species in the Gulf of Mexico. The mussels include the first described examples of methanotrophic symbiosis and dual methanotrophic/thiotrophic symbiosis. Studies with the vestimentiferans have demonstrated their potential for extreme longevity and their ability to use posterior structures for subsurface exchange of dissolved metabolites. Ecological investigations have demonstrated that the vestimentiferans function as ecosystem engineers and identified a community succession sequence from a specialized high-biomass endemic community to a low-biomass community of background fauna over the life of a hydrocarbon seep site.

  12. 78 FR 17340 - Control Date for Qualifying Landings History in the Western Gulf of Alaska Trawl Groundfish...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-21

    ... history for an allocation-based management or catch share program in the Western Gulf of Alaska (GOA... future management measures in determining how to credit landings and permit history acquired before or... Landings History in the Western Gulf of Alaska Trawl Groundfish Fisheries AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries...

  13. 77 FR 75966 - Control Date for Qualifying Landings History in the Central Gulf of Alaska Trawl Groundfish...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-26

    ... permit history for an allocation-based management or catch share program in the Central Gulf of Alaska..., so that the full catch history for 2012 may be considered in any such future management actions. We... Landings History in the Central Gulf of Alaska Trawl Groundfish Fisheries AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries...

  14. Gulf Coast Geology (GCG) Online

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A large percentage of the present and future energy resources of the United States reside in the Gulf of Mexico Basin, one of the major hydrocarbon producing areas...

  15. Deep learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecun, Yann; Bengio, Yoshua; Hinton, Geoffrey

    2015-05-01

    Deep learning allows computational models that are composed of multiple processing layers to learn representations of data with multiple levels of abstraction. These methods have dramatically improved the state-of-the-art in speech recognition, visual object recognition, object detection and many other domains such as drug discovery and genomics. Deep learning discovers intricate structure in large data sets by using the backpropagation algorithm to indicate how a machine should change its internal parameters that are used to compute the representation in each layer from the representation in the previous layer. Deep convolutional nets have brought about breakthroughs in processing images, video, speech and audio, whereas recurrent nets have shone light on sequential data such as text and speech.

  16. Gulf Coast Deep Water Port Facilities Study. Environmental Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-04-01

    terrains, and * Extreme vulnerability of aquifers in Karst terrains to pollution . Corpus Christi. Groundwater aquifers in the Corpus area are for the most...water table and. as such. are potential point sources of groundwater pollution . Finally, groundwater moves rapidly in carbonate Karst aquifers and...original benthic communities, and associated time scales: * Estuarine vulnerability to salinity regime alteration; and 0 Vulnerability of aquifers to

  17. Oceanographic Data collected during the Islands in the Stream Expedition on NOAA Ship Gordon Gunter in the North Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico between 2001-05-10 to 2001-10-04 (NCEI Accession 0104416)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Islands in the Stream expedition explored protected and unprotected deep water coral reefs and hard-bottom communities throughout the Gulf of Mexico and South...

  18. Prospects and Techniques for Eddy-Resolving Acoustic Tomography in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruthers, J. W.; Nechaev, D.; Roman, D. A.; Sidorovskaia, N. A.; Ioup, G. E.; Ioup, J.; Yaremchuk, M.

    2007-05-01

    For several decades monitoring and modeling the dynamics and physical structure of the Gulf of Mexico have been major efforts undertaken by oceanographers of the United States and other American countries. There are very interesting physical oceanographic features in the Gulf, not the least of which are the Gulf Loop Current and the eddies it spawns. Satellite sensing of IR and altimeter imagery has been a major input to modeling those features. Such efforts are very important to the economy and well being of much of the United States and Mexico, including fisheries, mineral economies, hurricane strengths and paths in the summer, and severe snow storms in the eastern US in the winter. A major shortcoming of the present monitoring of the Gulf is the lack of subsurface input to the dynamic models of the Gulf. Acoustic tomography is a viable means of providing that missing input. Several universities have come together to investigate the prospects for establishing a Gulf Eddy Monitoring System (GEMS) for the deep eastern half of the Gulf using acoustic tomography. The group has conducted several acoustics experiments and propagation studies to determine the feasibility of long-range propagation in the eastern Gulf and the mitigation of adverse effects on marine mammal populations in that region under the Office of Naval Research project entitled the Littoral Acoustic Demonstration Center (LADC). The group has also convened an invited session for the 9th World Multiconference on Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics (WMSCI 2005) Orlando, FL, July 2005. This paper discusses prospects for establishing the GEMS tomographic system, its technical characteristics, and its contributions to advancing the knowledge of the dynamics of the Gulf. This presentation will concentrate on the characteristics of a single-slice tomographic system, called GEMS Phase I, across the approaches to the DeSoto Canyon in the northeastern Gulf and its prospect for monitoring the movements of

  19. Binational collaboration to study Gulf of Mexico's harmful algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Inia; Hu, Chuanmin; Steidinger, Karen; Muller-Karger, Frank; Cannizzaro, Jennifer; Wolny, Jennifer; Cerdeira-Estrada, Sergio; Santamaria-del-Angel, Eduardo; Tafoya-del-Angel, Fausto; Alvarez-Torres, Porfirio; Herrera Silveira, Jorge; Allen, Jeanne

    2012-01-01

    Blooms of the toxic marine dinoflagellate Karenia brevis cause massive fish kills and other public health and economic problems in coastal waters throughout the Gulf of Mexico [Steidinger, 2009]. These harmful algal blooms (HABs) are a gulf-wide problem that require a synoptic observing system for better serving decision-making needs. The major nutrient sources that initiate and maintain these HABs and the possible connectivity of blooms in different locations are important questions being addressed through new collaborations between Mexican and U.S. researchers and government institutions. These efforts were originally organized under the U.S./Mexico binational partnership for the HABs Observing System (HABSOS), led by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Gulf of Mexico Program (EPAGMP) and several agencies in Veracruz, Mexico, since 2006. In 2010 these efforts were expanded to include other Mexican states and institutions with the integrated assessment and management of the Gulf of Mexico Large Marine Ecosystem (GoMLME) program sponsored by the Global Environment Facility (GEF), the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), the Secretaría de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales (SEMARNAT), and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

  20. Deep Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishaq, Omer; Sadanandan, Sajith Kecheril; Wählby, Carolina

    2017-01-01

    Zebrafish ( Danio rerio) is an important vertebrate model organism in biomedical research, especially suitable for morphological screening due to its transparent body during early development. Deep learning has emerged as a dominant paradigm for data analysis and found a number of applications in computer vision and image analysis. Here we demonstrate the potential of a deep learning approach for accurate high-throughput classification of whole-body zebrafish deformations in multifish microwell plates. Deep learning uses the raw image data as an input, without the need of expert knowledge for feature design or optimization of the segmentation parameters. We trained the deep learning classifier on as few as 84 images (before data augmentation) and achieved a classification accuracy of 92.8% on an unseen test data set that is comparable to the previous state of the art (95%) based on user-specified segmentation and deformation metrics. Ablation studies by digitally removing whole fish or parts of the fish from the images revealed that the classifier learned discriminative features from the image foreground, and we observed that the deformations of the head region, rather than the visually apparent bent tail, were more important for good classification performance.

  1. Structure and early evolution of the northern Gulf of Mexico: constraints from marine seismic refraction data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Avendonk, H. J.; Christeson, G. L.; Norton, I. O.; Eddy, D. R.

    2016-12-01

    Plate tectonic reconstructions of the Atlantic Ocean and surrounding continental masses indicate that the Gulf of Mexico opened in the Jurassic between Texas and the Yucatan block. Since the crystalline basement of the Gulf of Mexico lies deep beneath carbonate platforms, salt structures, and other sedimentary strata, we have few direct geological clues to the rifting history of this ocean basin. However, the gravity and magnetic data suggest that rifted continental crust along the northern and southern margins is flanked by ocean crust in the central Gulf. The 2010 GUMBO study was carried out by the University of Texas Institute for Geophysics to investigate the nature of the northern continent-ocean boundary of the Gulf of Mexico. We used ocean-bottom seismic refraction data to construct an image of the seismic velocity structure along four profiles from the coast to the deep Gulf basin. The seismic transects in the west offshore Texas and Louisiana lie across the large and deep Louann salt basin. Seismic reflection data along two profiles in the eastern Gulf of Mexico offshore Alabama and Florida show much thinner salt layers, which is consistent with the idea that rifting was progressing from west to east as the evaporates were deposited. The seismic velocity structure across the northwestern Gulf of Mexico margin offshore Texas shows strong lateral crustal heterogeneity beneath the shelf and slope. The thinned crust is consistent with large-scale extensional faulting and moderate amounts of syn-rift magmatism before continental breakup. In contrast, high compressional seismic velocities (> 7.2 km/s) are imaged in the thick lower crust of the northeastern Gulf of Mexico, which can be interpreted as extensive syn-rift magmatism and underplating, common features of volcanic rift margins. The Proterozoic, Laurentian continental lithosphere of central Texas may have been too thick at the onset of rifting (>100 km) to let magmatic diking control the extension in the

  2. Promoting International Energy Security: Volume 4, The Gulf of Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Also in accordance with the gas master plan, the governments of Nigeria, Niger, and Algeria agreed in 2009 to develop a 2,500-mile gas pipeline across...secu- rity in Nigeria, Niger, and Algeria (Watkins, 2009; Fabiani, 2009). Other Nations in the Gulf of Guinea This section briefly reviews the...Question of Distributive Equity,” Journal of Human Ecology , May 2010. Arab Press Service, “Nigeria—IOC Partners’ Role in Deep-Water Oil & Gas,” APS Review

  3. The Gulf of Mexico ecosystem, six years after the Macondo oil well blowout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joye, Samantha B.; Bracco, Annalisa; Özgökmen, Tamay M.; Chanton, Jeffrey P.; Grosell, Martin; MacDonald, Ian R.; Cordes, Erik E.; Montoya, Joseph P.; Passow, Uta

    2016-07-01

    The Gulf of Mexico ecosystem is a hotspot for biological diversity and supports a number of industries, from tourism to fishery production to oil and gas exploration, that serve as the economic backbone of Gulf coast states. The Gulf is a natural hydrocarbon basin, rich with stores of oil and gas that lie in reservoirs deep beneath the seafloor. The natural seepage of hydrocarbons across the Gulf system is extensive and, thus, the system's biological components experience ephemeral, if not, frequent, hydrocarbon exposure. In contrast to natural seepage, which is diffuse and variable over space and time, the 2010 Macondo oil well blowout, represented an intense, focused hydrocarbon infusion to the Gulf's deepwaters. The Macondo blowout drove rapid shifts in microbial populations and activity, revealed unexpected phenomena, such as deepwater hydrocarbon plumes and marine "oil snow" sedimentation, and impacted the Gulf's pelagic and benthic ecosystems. Understanding the distribution and fate of Macondo oil was limited to some degree by an insufficient ability to predict the physical movement of water in the Gulf. In other words, the available physical oceanographic models lacked critical components. In the past six years, much has been learned about the physical oceanography of the Gulf, providing transformative knowledge that will improve the ability to predict the movement of water and the hydrocarbons they carry in future blowout scenarios. Similarly, much has been learned about the processing and fate of Macondo hydrocarbons. Here, we provide an overview of the distribution, fate and impacts of Macondo hydrocarbons and offer suggestions for future research to push the field of oil spill response research forward.

  4. Titan : A new facility for ultraclean sampling of trace elements and isotopes in the deep oceans in the international Geotraces program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Baar, H.J.W.; Timmermans, K.R; Laan, P.; De Porto, H.H.; Ober, S.; Blom, J.J.; Bakker, M.C.; Schilling, J; Sarthou, G.; Smit, M. G.; Klunder, M

    2008-01-01

    Towards more rapid ultraclean sampling of deep ocean waters for trace elements, a novel rectangular frame was constructed of titanium, holding two rows of 12 samplers, as well as various sensors. The frame is deployed to deep ocean waters by an 8000 m length Kevlar wire with internal power and

  5. Gulf Coast Deep Water Port Facilities Study. Appendix C. Eastern Gulf Hydrobiological Zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-04-01

    in both St. Andrew and Tampa Bays levels of microzooplankton arc in large measure regulated by ctenophores and jellyfish which graze especially...modeled ad verified by Ross for hydraulic behavior , current velocities and tide heights. flushing... biochemical oxygen demand, dissolved oxygen...mammals here should be capable of swimming out of man-influenced environmental disturbances. J. ZONE XXIV Climatic data from Summary Area C (Figure C-2

  6. Gulf Coast Deep Water Port Facilities study. Appendix B. North Central Gulf Hydrobiological Zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-04-01

    Cladium jamaicense) Fresh Maiden cane (Panicum hemitomon) 1,193,325 Pennywort (Hydrocotyl sp.) Pickerelweed ( Pontederia cordata ) Alligator weed...typical of trawl samples are Penaeus a:recus. Squilla empusa. Pitar cordata , and the fish, Prionotus rubio. The presumably burrowing "lobster," Calocaris

  7. [A biogeochemical model for the Gulf of Nicoya, Costa Rica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabash Blanco, Farid A

    2007-03-01

    In agreement with the Broecker and Penn two-boxes model, I generated a biogeochemical balance model for the Gulf of Nicoya (Guanacaste, Costa Rica) using two nutrient reservoirs: surface water and deep water. The mixing zone was located at a depth of 20 m. There is a balance between surface waters descending to the bottom and upwelling waters that carry nutrients and other chemical elements to the surface. The main source of nitrogen (nitrate), was the outlet of the Tempisque and Tárcoles rivers. The Gulf of Nicoya is a net source of Dissolved Inorganic Nitrogen (DIN) with an availability rate of 87 x 10(3) mol day(-1) in the dry season and 3044 x 10(3) mol day(-1)in the rainy season. Dissolved Inorganic Phosphate (DIP) was estimated in 27 mol day(-1) in the dry season and 207 mol day(-1) in the rainy season. The dynamics of these biolimited nutrients, in relation to runoff seasonal variations, fits the biological processes reported for the gulf, for example, for variations in primary productivity levels, and maturity and reproduction seasons for species with short and long life cycles.

  8. Gulf of Mexico soundscapes as indicators of ecological stressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorovskaia, N.; Li, K.; Tiemann, C.; Ackleh, A. S.; Tang, T.; Risbourg, J. H.

    2016-12-01

    Soundscapes in the Northern Gulf of Mexico are complex and represent a combination of anthropogenic noise (oil exploration and production, shipping, rig construction, etc.), bio-soundscapes (sound of marine mammals and fish), and geo-soundscapes (weather events, submarine landslides, distant earthquakes, natural gas seeps). We will discuss how Passive Acoustic Monitoring in the deep Gulf has been utilized during the past decade to study the soundscape variability on daily, monthly, and yearly timescales and what environmental information can be extracted from this variability. Isolation of bio-soundscapes, identification of their sources, and abundance estimates based on acoustic cues are used to track the recovery of marine mammal species after major ecological disasters, such as the recent 2010 oil spill. Association of acoustic activity of marine species with anthropogenic noise levels and other environmental variables can provide base data that can be used to build ecological models of habitat preferences for different marine species. Understanding how the variability of anthropogenic soundscapes correlates with marine species distributions is critically important for regional conservation and mitigation strategies. Such studies can also assist in forecasting the long-term ecosystem health status and ecosystem response to disturbances of different spatial and temporal extent, including slow variations associated with climate change. [This research was made possible in part by a grant from The Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative, and in part by funding provided by ONR and The Joint Industry Programme.

  9. Gulf of California biogeographic regions based on coastal zone color scanner imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    SantamaríA-Del-Angel, Eduardo; Alvarez-Borrego, Saúl; Müller-Karger, Frank E.

    1994-04-01

    Topographically, the Gulf of California is divided into a series of basins and trenches that deepen to the south. Maximum depth at the mouth is greater than 3000 m. Most of the northern gulf is less than 200 m deep. The gulf has hydrographic features conducive to high primary productivity. Upwelling events have been described on the basis of temperature distributions at the eastern coast during winter and spring and at the western coast during summer. Tidal amplitude may be as high as 9 m in the upper gulf. On the basis of discrete phytoplankton sampling, the gulf was previously divided into four geographic regions. This division took into consideration only the space distribution, taxonomic composition, and abundance of microphytoplankton. With the availability of the coastal zone color scanner (CZCS) imagery, we were able to include the time variability of pigments to make a more detailed biogeographic division of the gulf. With weekly composites of the imagery, we generated time series of pigment concentrations for 33 locations throughout the gulf and for the whole life span of the CZCS. The time series show a clear seasonal variation, with maxima in winter and spring and minima in summer. The effect of upwelling at the eastern coast is clearly evident, with high pigment concentrations. The effect of the summer upwelling off the Baja California coast is not evident in these time series. Time series from locations on the western side of the gulf also show maxima in winter and spring that are due to the eddy circulation that brings upwelled water from the eastern side. Principal-component analysis was applied to define 14 regions. Ballenas Channel, between Angel de la Guarda and Baja California, and the upper gulf always appeared as very distinct regions. Some of these 14 regions relate to the geographic distributions of important faunal groups, including the benthos, or their life cycles. For example, the upper gulf is a place for reproduction and the nursery of

  10. Gulf Watch Alaska Nearshore Component: Sea Otter Aerial Survey Data Kenai Fjords National Park, 2002-2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data are part of the Gulf Watch Alaska (GWA) long term monitoring program, nearshore monitoring component. Specifically, these data describe sea otter (Enhydra...

  11. 78 FR 27126 - East Bay, St. Andrews Bay and the Gulf of Mexico at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida; Restricted...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-09

    ... Gulf of Mexico and Apalachicola Bay south of Apalachicola, Fla., Drone Recovery Area, Tyndall Air Force... approximations obtained using a commercial mapping program which utilizes Simple Cylindrical projection with a...

  12. Sequence of hydrographic changes in NW Mediterranean deep water due to the exceptional winter of 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Font

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Time series measurements at a mooring site on the deep slope of the NW Mediterranean from October 2003 to July 2005 revealed the sequence of effects of the anomalously dry, markedly cold, and very windy winter of 2005 in deep water thermohaline properties. At the end of January, a dense water mass that was warmer and saltier than usual reached the deep slope mooring site. Almost simultaneously, the start of deep dense shelf water cascading episodes was observed in the Gulf of Lions’ submarine canyons. 30 days later, colder, fresher and even denser waters reached the mooring, with a 5-day delay from an intensification of the Gulf of Lions’ cascading. The signature of these waters was detected for 35 days, and by late spring 2005 a new stable water mass situation was reached, with higher thermohaline values than those that characterised the deep layer from October 2003 to January 2005.

  13. Gulf and Dilmun Type seals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    From around 2100 BC a glyptic tradition emerges in the Arabian Gulf, which is dependant on the well-established schools of the Indus Valley seal cutters. These circular hybrids of classic Harappan seals rapidly became popular amongst the merchants of Dilmun, centered on Bahrain Island. At first...... these Gulf Type‘ seals drew heavily on Indus Valley iconography and Indus script was occasionally employed in a pidgin-like manner. While the earliest circular seals incorporate features from Mesopotamian glyptic only to a lesser extent, this becomes a more important source of inspiration for later Dilmun...... Type seals....

  14. NASA DEVELOP Students Rev Up Response to Gulf Oil Spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jason B.; Childs, Lauren M.

    2010-01-01

    After the April 20th explosion aboard the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig in the Gulf of Mexico, the world witnessed one of the worst oil spill catastrophes in global history. In an effort to mitigate the disaster, the U.S. government moved quickly to establish a unified command for responding to the spill. Some of the command's most immediate needs were to track the movement of the surface oil slick, establish a baseline measurement of pre-oil coastal ecosystem conditions, and assess potential air quality and water hazards related to the spill. To help address these needs and assist the Federal response to the disaster, NASA deployed several of its airborne and satellite research sensors to collect an unprecedented amount of remotely-sensed data over the Gulf of Mexico region. Although some of these data were shared with the public via the media, much of the NASA data on the disaster was not well known to the Gulf Coast community. The need existed to inform the general public about these datasets and help improve understanding about how NASA's science research was contributing to oil spill response and recovery. With its extensive experience conducting community-oriented remote sensing projects and close ties to organizations around Gulf of Mexico, the NASA DEVELOP National Program stood in a unique position to meet this need.

  15. Multibeam mapping of the Pinnacles region, Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, James V.; Dartnell, Peter; Sulak, Kenneth J.

    2002-01-01

    Recent USGS mapping shows an extensive deep (~100 m) reef tract occurs on the Mississippi-Alabama outer continental shelf (Figure 1). The tract, known as "The Pinnacles", is apparently part of a sequence of drowned reef complexes along the "40-fathom" shelf edge of the northern Gulf of Mexico (Ludwick and Walton, 1957). It is critical to determine the accurate geomorphology of these deep-reefs because of their importance as benthic habitats for fisheries. The Pinnacles have previously been mapped using a single-beam echo sounder (Ludwick and Walton,1957), sidescan sonar (Laswell et al., 1990), and the TAMU2 towed single-beam sidescan-sonar system (Anonymous, 1999). These existing studies do not provide the quality of geomorphic data necessary for reasonable habitat studies.

  16. Spreading of the Western Mediterranean Deep Water after winter 2005: Time scales and deep cyclone transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuvier, J.; BéRanger, K.; Lebeaupin Brossier, C.; Somot, S.; Sevault, F.; Drillet, Y.; Bourdallé-Badie, R.; Ferry, N.; Lyard, F.

    2012-07-01

    This work is dedicated to the study of the propagation of the Western Mediterranean Deep Water (WMDW) formed in the Gulf of Lions during the exceptional winter 2005. A simulation of the 1998-2008 period has been carried out with an eddy-resolving Ocean General Circulation Model of the Mediterranean Sea, driven by interannual high-resolution air-sea fluxes. This study first presents a validation of the recently improved model configuration against satellite observations. Then, we assess the ability of the model to reproduce the particularly intense deep convection event of winter 2005 in the Gulf of Lions. A huge volume of very dense water is formed in the simulation at that time (annual formation rate higher than 3 Sv). The thermohaline characteristics of the new WMDW allow a monitoring of its deep propagation. We identify several deep cyclones as mainly responsible of the fast spreading of the WMDW southwards in the Western Mediterranean. By comparing Eulerian and Lagrangian approaches, we estimate different transport times of the WMDW by these cyclonic eddies and compare them to those deduced from several observations. Finally, we argue that these cyclones favor the propagation of the WMDW thermohaline characteristics toward the Channel of Sardinia and decrease the volume of WMDW which can reach the Strait of Gibraltar.

  17. Radiocarbon-Based Ages and Growth Rates of Bamboo Corals from the Gulf of Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roark, E B; Guilderson, T P; Flood-Page, S; Dunbar, R B; Ingram, B L; Fallon, S J; McCulloch, M

    2004-12-12

    Deep-sea coral communities have long been recognized by fisherman as areas that support large populations of commercial fish. As a consequence, many deep-sea coral communities are threatened by bottom trawling. Successful management and conservation of this widespread deep-sea habitat requires knowledge of the age and growth rates of deep-sea corals. These organisms also contain important archives of intermediate and deep-water variability, and are thus of interest in the context of decadal to century-scale climate dynamics. Here, we present {Delta}{sup 14}C data that suggest that bamboo corals from the Gulf of Alaska are long-lived (75-126 years) and that they acquire skeletal carbon from two distinct sources. Independent verification of our growth rate estimates and coral ages is obtained by counting seasonal Sr/Ca cycles and probable lunar cycle growth bands.

  18. DeepProf: Performance Analysis for Deep Learning Applications via Mining GPU Execution Patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Jiazhen; Liu, Huan; Zhou, Yangfan; Wang, Xin

    2017-01-01

    Deep learning applications are computation-intensive and often employ GPU as the underlying computing devices. Deep learning frameworks provide powerful programming interfaces, but the gap between source codes and practical GPU operations make it difficult to analyze the performance of deep learning applications. In this paper, through examing the features of GPU traces and deep learning applications, we use the suffix tree structure to extract the repeated patten in GPU traces. Performance a...

  19. Deep Energy Retrofit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhivov, Alexander; Lohse, Rüdiger; Rose, Jørgen

    Deep Energy Retrofit – A Guide to Achieving Significant Energy User Reduction with Major Renovation Projects contains recommendations for characteristics of some of core technologies and measures that are based on studies conducted by national teams associated with the International Energy Agency...... Energy Conservation in Buildings and Communities Program (IEA-EBC) Annex 61 (Lohse et al. 2016, Case, et al. 2016, Rose et al. 2016, Yao, et al. 2016, Dake 2014, Stankevica et al. 2016, Kiatreungwattana 2014). Results of these studies provided a base for setting minimum requirements to the building...... envelope-related technologies to make Deep Energy Retrofit feasible and, in many situations, cost effective. Use of energy efficiency measures (EEMs) in addition to core technologies bundle and high-efficiency appliances will foster further energy use reduction. This Guide also provides best practice...

  20. Atlantic Cooperation for Gulf Security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-04-01

    social , political and economic one. They believe that direct Soviet intervention is not likely and that emphasis on the possibility may exacerbate local... logement in the mountains of central Iran, we could seriously hope to prevent crippling blows against the fragile oil loading facilities in the Gulf

  1. Towards the creation of a multi-institutional HF Radar Network in the Gulf of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-vidal, X.; Flament, P. J.; Durazo, R.; Navarro, L. F.; Salles, P.; Alvarez, P.; Carrillo, L.; Kurczyn, J. A.; Ulloa, M. J.; Rodriguez, I.; Toro Valencia, V. G.; Marin, M.; Perales, H.; Sanay, R.

    2016-12-01

    The Gulf of Mexico is source of important resources for both Mexico and USA, its beaches and coasts bring economical resources for these countries through the generation of jobs on the fisheries, touristic and industrial sectors. However, systematic monitoring is still necessary to evaluate its health and dynamics. This work is part of a multi-institutional project named "Implementation of oceanographic observational networks (physical, geochemical and ecological) to generate scenarios for possible contingencies related to the exploration and production of hydrocarbons in the deep waters of the Gulf of Mexico" (funded by SENER-CONACyT) which is an unprecedented Mexican joint effort to better understand the dynamics in the Gulf of Mexico. We will present the first actions towards the creation of the Mexican multi-Institutional HF Radar Network, which will allow us to synoptically map in real time the sea surface currents up to 200 km offshore. We expect to attract collaborations with the active or ongoing USA HF radar stations and institutions along the Gulf of Mexico, as well as to share methodologies and to evaluate standard data formats. The Radar Network in the Gulf of Mexico is planned to be active during 2017-2018, and it is expected to be permanent.

  2. Biological and Archaeological Analysis of Deepwater Shipwrecks in the Gulf of Mexico: Studying the Artificial Reef Effect of Six World War II Shipwrecks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, R. A.; Irion, J. B.; Schroeder, W. W.; Warren, D. J.

    2006-12-01

    In the summer of 2004 researchers from across the United States and Canada partnered together to investigate biological and archaeological questions relating to six World War II era shipwrecks discovered in the Gulf of Mexico. The science team included microbiologists, marine vertebrate and invertebrate zoologists, a molecular biologist, an oceanographer, marine archaeologists, remotely operated vehicle (ROV) technicians, and a professional marine survey crew. The United States Department of the Interior, Minerals Management Service, and the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration sponsored this multidisciplinary project under the auspices of the National Oceanographic Partnership Program. The organizational involvement included six universities, two non-profit organizations, three commercial companies, and three U. S. federal agencies. The depth of the shipwrecks ranged from 87 to 1,964 meters. All six shipwrecks were war casualties, found during the past two decades on oil and gas surveys. These wrecks serve as artificial reefs sunk on well- documented dates, thereby offering biologists a unique opportunity to study the "artificial reef effect" of man- made structures in deep water. Taken together, these sites are an underwater battlefield, and a vital historical resource documenting a little-studied area in a crucial period of world history. They preserve information vital to scholarly and popular understanding of the war's impact in the Gulf of Mexico, on the American home front, and the global conflict. This paper will discuss the field methodology and touch on many of the scientific and technical aspects, and findings of the project.

  3. Surface temperatures and temperature gradient features of the US Gulf Coast waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, O. K.; Rouse, L. J., Jr.; Smith, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    Satellite thermal infrared data on the Gulf of Mexico show that a seasonal cycle exists in the horizontal surface temperature structure. In the fall, the surface temperatures of both coastal and deep waters are nearly uniform. With the onset of winter, atmospheric cold fronts, which are accompanied by dry, low temperature air and strong winds, draw heat from the sea. A band of cooler water forming on the inner shelf expands, until a thermal front develops seaward along the shelf break between the cold shelf waters and the warmer deep waters of the Gulf. Digital analysis of the satellite data was carried out in an interactive mode using a minicomputer and software. A time series of temperature profiles illustrates the temporal and spatial changes in the sea-surface temperature field.

  4. Deep Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez, Pau; Cucurull, Guillem; Gonzàlez, Jordi

    2017-01-01

    appearance versus taking into account the whole image: As a result, we outperform current state- of-the-art AUC performance in the UNBC-McMaster Shoulder Pain Expression Archive Database. In addition, to evaluate the generalization properties of our proposed methodology on facial motion recognition, we also......Pain is an unpleasant feeling that has been shown to be an important factor for the recovery of patients. Since this is costly in human resources and difficult to do objectively, there is the need for automatic systems to measure it. In this paper, con- trary to current state-of-the-art techniques...... in pain assessment, which are based on facial features only, we suggest that the performance can be enhanced by feeding the raw frames to deep learning models, outperforming the latest state-of-the-art results while also directly facing the problem of imbalanced data. As a baseline, our approach first...

  5. Passive acoustic monitoring of beaked whale densities in the Gulf of Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Hildebrand, JA; Baumann-Pickering, S; Frasier, KE; Trickey, JS; Merkens, KP; Wiggins, SM; McDonald, MA; Garrison, LP; Harris, D; Marques, TA; Thomas, L

    2015-01-01

    Funding to support the tag data was also received from the MASTS pooling initiative (The Marine Alliance for Science and Technology for Scotland) funded by the Scottish Funding Council (grant reference HR09011) and contributing institutions. Beaked whales are deep diving elusive animals, difficult to census with conventional visual surveys. Methods are presented for the density estimation of beaked whales, using passive acoustic monitoring data collected at sites in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM...

  6. 76 FR 54375 - Safety Zone; Thunder on the Gulf, Gulf of Mexico, Orange Beach, AL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Thunder on the Gulf, Gulf of Mexico, Orange... establishing a temporary safety zone for a portion of the Gulf of Mexico for the waters off Orange Beach... Mexico, south of Orange Beach, Alabama to occur from October 6, 2011 through October 9, 2011. This event...

  7. La géochimie organique des sédiments marins profonds. Mission Orgon 4, 1978 (golfe d'Aden, mer d'Oman. Généralités et résultats obtenus à la mer Organic Geochemistry of Deep Marine Sediments. Organ 4 Mission, 1978 (Gulf of Aden, Sea of Oman. General and Results Obtained At Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelet R.

    2006-11-01

    populations microbiennes a été tenté, par mises en culture sous pression correspondant à la pression de fond, pour essayer de déceler une éventuelle présence de formes barophiles. Four separate articles deal with: 1 general comments on the ORGON 4 mission, 2 the geographic setting and the general geology as well as a description of the tore samples taken, 3 the biochemistry of the waters, and 4 microbiology. Several environments were encountered and investigated, ranging from a lagoon (Ghubbet el Kharab to a deep fault trough (Alula-Fartak trough. Two radials, one in the Arabian Sea and the other in the Gulf of Oman, were used to follow the evolution of their characteristics from coastal zones down to the abyssal plain. The location of core-sampling sites was studied so as to avoid zones with extensive detrital influx (Indus cone. The results given indicate that this goal has certainly been attained and, in particular, that the organic matter in the sediments is massively of autochthonous marine origin (planktonic. An analysis of the waters came up with the same result that had previously been found, i. e. the existence in medium depths (800 to 1800 m of a very pronounced minimum-oxygen-content zone (= 1 ml /I corresponding to sedimentation environments with a clearcut reducing nature and a relatively high organic matter content. More generally, the organic carbon contents of the sediment samples taken during ORGON 4 are the highest of all those measured in the ORGON missions, for both mean and maximum values. This is certainly linked to the exceptional primary productivity of the underlying waters. Microbiological analyses did not find the spectacular phenomena found in ORGON 3, i. e. layers with exceptionally abundant microflora interbedded with sterile layers in the depth of the cores. Nonetheless, there were tendencies to acquire such a nature in some levels. Mention should be made of an attempt to make a more exhaustive investigation of microbial populations by

  8. Lophelia II 2009: Deepwater Program: Exploration and Research of Northern Gulf of Mexico Deepwater Natural and Artificial Hard Bottom Habitats with Emphasis on Coral Communities: Reefs, Rigs and Wrecks on NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown between 20090819 and 20090912

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This cruise used the remotely operated vehicle (ROV) Jason II to: explore 4-6 new sites for the occurrence of deep water coral reefs; made collections of Lophelia...

  9. Fishery potential of the Gulf of Kachchh

    OpenAIRE

    Nair, V.R.; Govindan, K.; Ramaiah, N.; Gajbhiye, S.N.

    1993-01-01

    Fishery potential of the interior Gulf of Kachchh and adjacent creek regions was reported for the first time as baseline data for future ecological assessment. The experimental trawling and gill netting indicated that the inner Gulf (av. 7.8 kg/h) was three times more productive than the creek (av. 2.3 kg/h). The number of species found in the Gulf and creek were respectively 34 and 20 suggesting good biodiversity of the living resources of the area.

  10. Transport of Ocean Waters between the Pacific Ocean and the Gulf of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Curtis; Castro-Valdez, Ruben; Mascarenhas, Affonso; Margolina, Tetyana

    2014-05-01

    Ocean transports between the Pacific Ocean and the Gulf of California contribute to the seasonal heating and cooling of the Gulf and add high salinity waters to the surface and upper thermocline waters of the Pacific. These transports have been measured by 1) moored arrays of temperature, salinity and pressure instruments on either side of the entrance to the Gulf in water 130 m deep and 2) shipboard hydrographic measurements across the Gulf along a section between Sinaloa and Baja California. The moored measurements extended from November 2003 to May 2006 and the hydrographic section was occupied eighteen times between 1992 and 2013. Results of these measurements are described in this presentation. The moored measurements resolved baroclinic transport at 40 and 80 dbar referenced to 120 dbar. Geostrophic flow was into (out) the Gulf from May to October (November to April). Mean transport into (out) of the Gulf at 40 dbar was 5.6 x 103 m3/s (4.2 x 103 m3/s) and at 80 dbar was 1.3 x 103 m3/s (1.8 x 103 m3/s). Maximum and minimum geostrophic velocities were observed about July 1 and December 1, respectively, and were about three times as large as the mean values. Steric heights at the mooring locations were compared to satellite sea level height anomalies. Agreement was good and provided a more robust measure of the annual cycle of the mean surface geostrophic flow and transport because 9 years of continuous observations were available. The hydrographic measurements indicated predominately cyclonic flow patterns with inflow along Sinaloa and outflow along Baja California. During periods of strong exchange, narrow deep jets were observed to develop over the continental slopes of Sinaloa and Baja California. Overturning circulation within the Gulf is clearly indicated by the patterns of salinity along the hydrographic sections in which inflows of fresher Pacific waters (S34.8 for densities between 25 and 26 kg/m3) along Baja California. Geostrophic velocities for these

  11. Productivity --- 8 for 8. [Labor Relations at Gulf Oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breaux, M.P.

    1983-03-01

    According to the author, a spokesman for Gulf Oil Corporation, the petroleum industry in the United States has reason to be proud of its record in labor relations, in labor negotiations, and in the success of its bargaining. For many years, this industry found itself alone in advocating noncompliance with COLAs and not participating in fully paid medical plans and other labor programs other industries felt it necessary to adopt and underwrite. This staunch resistance lent the petroleum industry, over the years, the reputation of an industrial dinosaur, but this has lately changed as industry at large, especially during an economic recession, has seen the wisdom behind the motives of the petroleum industry. The author goes on to state that Gulf's employees are well paid and that the last contract, stipulating a 9 percent and 7 percent increase over the next two years, was a bilaterally fair settlement.

  12. Early results from the Northern Gulf of Mexico Ecosystem Change and Hazard Susceptibility Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, John C.; Lavoie, Dawn L.; Poore, Richard Z.

    2011-01-01

    The northern Gulf of Mexico coastal region and its diverse ecosystems are threatened by population and development pressure and by the impacts of rising sea level and severe storms such as the series of hurricanes that has impacted the northern Gulf in recent years. In response to the complex management issues facing the region, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) organized a multidisciplinary research program to coordinate the activities of USGS and other scientists working in the northern Gulf of Mexico region (fig. 1). The Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM) Ecosystem Change and Hazard Susceptibility Project aims to develop a thorough understanding of the dynamic coastal ecosystems on the northern Gulf coast, the impact of human activities on these ecosystems, and the vulnerability of ecosystems and human communities to more frequent and more intense hurricanes in the future. A special issue of Geo-Marine Letters published in December 2009 is devoted to early results of studies completed as part of this project. These studies, which have been conducted at sites throughout the northern Gulf region, from the Chandeleur Islands to Apalachicola Bay, have focused on three themes: (1) The underlying geologic framework that exerts controls over coastal processes (2) The impact of human activities on nearshore water quality (3) Hurricanes and associated effects

  13. Deep-sea benthic ecosystem collapse and recovery after an intense Dense Shelf Water Cascading event

    OpenAIRE

    Pusceddu, A.; Mea, M.; M. Canals; Heussner, S; Durrieu de Madron, X.; Sanchez-Vidal, A.; Bianchelli, S.; Corinaldesi, C.; Dell'Anno, A.; Thomsen, L.; Danovaro, R.

    2012-01-01

    Submarine canyons of several regions of the world are preferential conduits for Dense Shelf Water Cascading (DSWC), which quickly modify physical and chemical conditions while transporting large amounts of material towards the adjacent deep margin. Observations conducted during the last 15 yr in the Cap de Creus Canyon (Gulf of Lion, NW Mediterranean Sea) reported several intense events of DSWC. Their effects on the deep-sea biodiversity and ecosystem functioning are almost unknown. To in...

  14. Biodiversity and ecosystem function in the Gulf of Maine: pattern and role of zooplankton and pelagic nekton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Catherine L; Runge, Jeffrey A; Curtis, K Alexandra; Durbin, Edward G; Hare, Jonathan A; Incze, Lewis S; Link, Jason S; Melvin, Gary D; O'Brien, Todd D; Van Guelpen, Lou

    2011-01-31

    This paper forms part of a broader overview of biodiversity of marine life in the Gulf of Maine area (GoMA), facilitated by the GoMA Census of Marine Life program. It synthesizes current data on species diversity of zooplankton and pelagic nekton, including compilation of observed species and descriptions of seasonal, regional and cross-shelf diversity patterns. Zooplankton diversity in the GoMA is characterized by spatial differences in community composition among the neritic environment, the coastal shelf, and deep offshore waters. Copepod diversity increased with depth on the Scotian Shelf. On the coastal shelf of the western Gulf of Maine, the number of higher-level taxonomic groups declined with distance from shore, reflecting more nearshore meroplankton. Copepod diversity increased in late summer, and interdecadal diversity shifts were observed, including a period of higher diversity in the 1990s. Changes in species diversity were greatest on interannual scales, intermediate on seasonal scales, and smallest across regions, in contrast to abundance patterns, suggesting that zooplankton diversity may be a more sensitive indicator of ecosystem response to inter annual climate variation than zoo plankton abundance. Local factors such as bathymetry, proximity of the coast, and advection probably drive zooplankton and pelagic nekton diversity patterns in the GoMA, while ocean-basin scale diversity patterns probably contribute to the increase in diversity at the Scotian Shelf break, a zone of mixing between the cold-temperate community of the shelf and the warm-water community offshore. Pressing research needs include establishment of a comprehensive system for observing change in zooplankton and pelagic nekton diversity, enhanced observations of "underknown" but important functional components of the ecosystem, population and metapopulation studies, and development of analytical modeling tools to enhance understanding of diversity patterns and drivers. Ultimately

  15. Biodiversity and ecosystem function in the Gulf of Maine: pattern and role of zooplankton and pelagic nekton.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine L Johnson

    Full Text Available This paper forms part of a broader overview of biodiversity of marine life in the Gulf of Maine area (GoMA, facilitated by the GoMA Census of Marine Life program. It synthesizes current data on species diversity of zooplankton and pelagic nekton, including compilation of observed species and descriptions of seasonal, regional and cross-shelf diversity patterns. Zooplankton diversity in the GoMA is characterized by spatial differences in community composition among the neritic environment, the coastal shelf, and deep offshore waters. Copepod diversity increased with depth on the Scotian Shelf. On the coastal shelf of the western Gulf of Maine, the number of higher-level taxonomic groups declined with distance from shore, reflecting more nearshore meroplankton. Copepod diversity increased in late summer, and interdecadal diversity shifts were observed, including a period of higher diversity in the 1990s. Changes in species diversity were greatest on interannual scales, intermediate on seasonal scales, and smallest across regions, in contrast to abundance patterns, suggesting that zooplankton diversity may be a more sensitive indicator of ecosystem response to inter annual climate variation than zoo plankton abundance. Local factors such as bathymetry, proximity of the coast, and advection probably drive zooplankton and pelagic nekton diversity patterns in the GoMA, while ocean-basin scale diversity patterns probably contribute to the increase in diversity at the Scotian Shelf break, a zone of mixing between the cold-temperate community of the shelf and the warm-water community offshore. Pressing research needs include establishment of a comprehensive system for observing change in zooplankton and pelagic nekton diversity, enhanced observations of "underknown" but important functional components of the ecosystem, population and metapopulation studies, and development of analytical modeling tools to enhance understanding of diversity patterns and

  16. The Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative: Managing a Multidisciplinary Data Explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, M. K.; Gibeaut, J. C.; Reed, D.

    2011-12-01

    On April 20, 2010 the Deepwater Horizon drilling unit located in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico, experienced a catastrophic wellhead blowout. Roughly 5 billion barrels of oil and 1 million U.S. gallons of dispersant were released near the wellhead over the next three months. Within weeks of the blowout, BP announced the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GRI) and pledged 50M/yr over 10 years for independent scientific research on the spill's impact on the ecosystem. Two months after the blowout three institutions were awarded a total of 25M in fast-track grants (Louisiana State University, Northern Gulf Institute, and Florida Institute of Oceanography). Soon after the Alabama Marine Environmental Sciences Consortium and the National Institutes of Health were awarded 5M and 10M, respectively. These five institutions began to generate data almost immediately. First year grants funded 100's of researchers from nearly 100 research units. Their activities included numerical modeling, field data collection, and laboratory experiments. Measured parameters included those associated with chemical analyses of oil, gas, and dispersants, studies of bacteria, plants and animals -from phytoplankton to marsh grasses, from zooplankton to cetaceans. Studies were conducted from estuaries to the deep Gulf, from atmosphere to sediments. Parameters from physical oceanography, marine meteorology, and biogeochemistry were measured in abundance. Additionally, impact studies on human mental, physical health and businesses were made. Proposals for years 2-4 of the program were to be awarded in August 2011 supporting 4-8 research consortia. Consortia may have up to 20 named researchers. In aggregate, these studies yielded a multidisciplinary data explosion. Following the fast-track awards the GRI Administrative Unit (AU) was established and a data management activity initiated. That activity became the GRI Information and Data Cooperative (GRIIDC). "Cooperative" emphasizes the

  17. Dolphins in a Scaled-Down Mediterranean: The Gulf of Corinth's Odontocetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearzi, G; Bonizzoni, S; Santostasi, N L; Furey, N B; Eddy, L; Valavanis, V D; Gimenez, O

    The Gulf of Corinth is a 2400-km 2 semi-enclosed inland system (a mediterraneus) in central Greece. Its continental shelf areas, steep bottom relief, and waters up to 500-900m deep offer suitable habitat to neritic and pelagic species. We used photographic capture-recapture, distribution modelling, and direct observations to investigate the abundance, status, habitat preferences, movements, and group size of four odontocete species regularly observed in the Gulf, based on five years (2011-2015) of survey effort from small boats. Striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) are more abundant (1324 individuals, 95%CI 1158-1515) than was determined from previous estimates. Striped dolphins appear to be confined to the Gulf, where they favour deep and oligotrophic waters, and were encountered in single-species and mixed-species groups. Short-beaked common dolphins (Delphinus delphis) (22 individuals, 95%CI 16-31), individuals with intermediate pigmentation (possibly striped/common dolphin hybrids) (55, 95%CI 36-83), and a single Risso's dolphin (Grampus griseus) were only encountered in mixed-species groups with striped dolphins. Short-beaked common dolphins constitute a discrete conservation unit (subpopulation), and based on the current estimate, would qualify as Critically Endangered according to International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List criteria. Common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) (39 animals, 95%CI 33-47) occur in single-species groups; they prefer continental shelf waters and areas near fish farms in the northern sector, and several animals appear to move into and out of the Gulf. Additionally, we contribute records of marine fauna and an assessment of the fishing fleet operating in the Gulf. Our study shows that the importance of this vulnerable marine environment has been underestimated, and management action must be taken to mitigate human impact and ensure long-term protection. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved.

  18. DeepPy: Pythonic deep learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders Boesen Lindbo

    This technical report introduces DeepPy – a deep learning framework built on top of NumPy with GPU acceleration. DeepPy bridges the gap between highperformance neural networks and the ease of development from Python/NumPy. Users with a background in scientific computing in Python will quickly...... be able to understand and change the DeepPy codebase as it is mainly implemented using high-level NumPy primitives. Moreover, DeepPy supports complex network architectures by letting the user compose mathematical expressions as directed graphs. The latest version is available at http...

  19. Bacterial Sulfate Reduction Above 100-Degrees-C in Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent Sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    JØRGENSEN, BB; ISAKSEN, MF; JANNASCH, HW

    1992-01-01

    -reducing bacteria was done in hot deep-sea sediments at the hydrothermal vents of the Guaymas Basin tectonic spreading center in the Gulf of California. Radiotracer studies revealed that sulfate reduction can occur at temperatures up to 110-degrees-C, with an optimum rate at 103-degrees to 106-degrees...

  20. Department of Veterans Affairs, Gulf War Veterans’ Illnesses Task Force to the Secretary of Veterans Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-29

    overall exposure of troops to Leishmania tropica? 3. What were the exposure concentrations to various petroleum products, and their combustion products...have been identified in Veterans of the 1990 – 1991 Gulf War. 3. What were the exposure concentrations to various petroleum products, and their...Research Program within CDMRP (DoD). A clinical study to examine the effects of aspirin and Clopidogrel on biomarkers of Gulf War Veterans

  1. Physical oceanographic conditions in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico in summer 2000-2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochens, Ann E.; DiMarco, Steven F.

    2008-12-01

    The circulation and distribution of water properties in the water column of the Gulf of Mexico influence the flux of carbon to the benthic environment. The eddy field of the upper 1000 m creates environmental conditions that are favorable for biological productivity in an otherwise oligotrophic subtropical ocean. This eddy field results in the transport of nutrients and organic matter into the photic zone through cross-margin flow of shelf waters, upwelling in cyclones, and uplift from the interaction of anticyclones with bathymetry. These conditions then allow the productivity that becomes a possible source of carbon to the benthos. Data from four cruises during summers of 2000-2002 are used to describe the currents and water property distributions in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico, which consists of water depths greater than 400 m. Comparisons are made to historical data sets to provide an understanding of the persistence of the characteristics of the Gulf and the processes that occur there. The currents in the Gulf are surface intensified, have minimum in 800-1000 m depths, and also exhibit bottom intensification, especially near sloping topography. Historical time series records show current speeds near-bottom reach 50-100 cm s -1. At basin scales, these currents tend to flow cyclonically (counter-clockwise) along the bathymetry. These near-bottom, episodic, high-speed currents provide a mechanism for the transport of organic material, in both large and small particle sizes, from one benthic area to another. The distributions of temperature, salinity, nutrients, and dissolved oxygen during the study appear to be unchanged from historical findings. The source waters for the deep Gulf are the water masses brought into the Gulf by the Loop Current system. The properties in the upper 100-200 m are the most variable of the water column, consistent with their proximity to wind mixing, river discharge mixing, and atmospheric influences. Below 1500 m, there are no major

  2. A Short Reference Grammar of Gulf Arabic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qafisheh, Hamdi A.

    This work seeks to fill important gaps existing in the study of Peninsular Arabic, especially that of the United Arab Emirates. It presents an explicit outline of the structure of Gulf Arabic, based on the dialect of Abu Dhabi. It is intended for students and teachers of Gulf Arabic, for linguists and dialectologists, and for other individuals who…

  3. Sandwaves of the Gulf of Khambhat

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vora, K.H.; Gujar, A.R.; Karisiddaiah, S.M.

    of the sandwaves in the Gulf is related to the abundant coarse sediment from the rivers Narmada and Tapti. High energy hydrodynamic conditions primarily, due to large tidal range in the funnel shaped Gulf appear to be responsible for the formation...

  4. Water masses in the Gulf of Aden

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Al Saafani, M.A.; Shenoi, S.S.C.

    Hydrographic data collected from Gulf of Aden since 1920 have been compiled to identify and refine the definitions of water masses in the Gulf of Aden (GA) and to describe their spatio-temporal variability. Four water masses have been identified...

  5. Keeping Safe Online: Perceptions of Gulf Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqahtani, Abdulmagni Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    With an increasing number of young people across the Gulf States now having access to the internet, the online safety of these adolescents is of concern. In a survey of 115 adolescents from the Gulf States, it was found that, although there are many benefits to young people, the risks of online usage are not fully understood by teenagers or their…

  6. D region depletions above the Persian Gulf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givishvili, G. V.; Leshchenko, L. N.

    1993-01-01

    The extraordinary delay of the daily variation of absorption and electron density observed in the ionospheric D region above the Persian Gulf in 1976 observed from the research vessel 'Akademik Kurchatov' may be a consequence of air pollution by oil production by-products. It is suggested that the Gulf war might also have caused a lower ozone abundance in that region.

  7. Fishery potential of the Gulf of Kachchh

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, V.R.; Govindan, K.; Ramaiah, Neelam; Gajbhiye, S.N.

    Fishery potential of the interior Gulf of Kachchh and adjacent creek regions was reported for the first time as baseline data for future ecological assessment. The experimental trawling and gill netting indicated that the inner Gulf (av. 7.8 kg...

  8. The Gulf Stream Separation and Topographic Wave Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoonover, J. A.; Dewar, W. K.; Wienders, N.

    2016-02-01

    The separation of western boundary currents, such as the Gulf Stream, have been notoriously difficult to model accurately in coarse resolution ( O(100 km) ) models and requires some finesse in eddy resolving (O(10 km)) models. Numerous separation hypotheses have been spurred from the use of numerical ocean models, yet a clear recipe for separation is unknown. Establishing a clear recipe for separation will help guide future modelling practices. Competing theories can be divided into those which rely on global vorticity constraints and those which rely on local processes. Evidence will be given from a model comparison study which indicates that the separation of the Gulf Stream is insensitive to gyre-scale barotropic vorticity balances, which suggests that the separation is controlled by local processes. Currently, literature on this topic indicates a common agreement amongst all ``local-process'' theories, namely that separation relies on the production of a counterflow between the current and the boundary. For the Gulf Stream, this corresponds to the production of cyclonic vorticity. A series of artificial terraforming experiments investigate the sensitivity of the separation to the presence of the Deep Western Boundary Current and the local topographic structure. It is found that the separation is linked to the location where the continental shelf steepens, as it does between Charleston, SC and Cape Hatteras, NC. These results are consistent with an idealized model which illustrates that cyclonic vorticity is generated when a jet encounters steepening topography. The generation and subsequent evolution of the vorticity is found to depend on the criticality of the upstream flow with respect to local topographic waves.

  9. Geothermal resources of the northern gulf of Mexico basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, P.H.

    1970-01-01

    Published geothermal gradient maps for the northern Gulf of Mexico basin indicate little or no potential for the development of geothermal resources. Results of deep drilling, from 4000 to 7000 meters or more, during the past decade however, define very sharp increases in geothermal gradient which are associated with the occurrence of abnormally high interstitial fluid pressure (geopressure). Bounded by regional growth faults along the landward margin of the Gulf Basin, the geopressured zone extends some 1300 km from the Rio Grande (at the boundary between the United States and Mexico) to the mouth of the Mississippi river. Gulfward, it extends to an unknown distance across the Continental Shelf. Within geopressured deposits, geothermal gradients range upwards to 100 ??C/km, being greatest within and immediately below the depth interval in which the maximum pressure gradient change occurs. The 120 ??C isogeotherm ranges from about 2500 to 5000 m below sea level, and conforms in a general way with depth of occurrence of the top of the geopressured zone. Measured geostatic ratios range upward to 0.97; the maximum observed temperature is 273 ??C, at a depth of 5859 m. Dehydration of montmorillonite, which comprises 60 to 80 percent of clay deposited in the northern Gulf Basin during the Neogene, occurs at depths where temperature exceeds about 80 ??C, and is generally complete at depths where temperature exceeds 120 ??C. This process converts intracrystalline and bound water to free pore water, the volume produced being roughly equivalent to half the volume of montmorillonite so altered. Produced water is fresh, and has low viscosity and density. Sand-bed aquifers of deltaic, longshore, or marine origin form excellent avenues for drainage of geopressured deposits by wells, each of which may yield 10,000 m3 or more of superheated water per day from reservoirs having pressures up to 1000 bars at depths greater than 5000 m. ?? 1971.

  10. Archive of digitized analog boomer seismic reflection data collected during U.S. Geological Survey cruise Acadiana 87-2 in the northern Gulf of Mexico, June 1987

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Program has actively collected geophysical and sedimentological data in the northern Gulf of Mexico for...

  11. Gulf Watch Alaska, Nearshore Monitoring Component: Sea Otter Foraging Observations from Prince William Sound, Katmai National Park and Preserve, and Kenai Fjords National Park, 2012-2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data is part of the Gulf Watch Alaska (GWA) long term monitoring program, benthic monitoring component and a seasonal diet study in Kenai Fjords National Park....

  12. Gulf Watch Alaska Nearshore Component: Intertidal Mussel Site Data from Prince William Sound, Katmai National Park and Preserve, and Kenai Fjords National Park, 2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data is part of the Gulf Watch Alaska (GWA) long term monitoring program, nearshore monitoring component. Specifically, these data describe mussel sampling and...

  13. Gulf Watch Alaska Nearshore Component: Intertidal Mussel Site Data from Prince William Sound, Katmai National Park and Preserve, and Kenai Fjords National Park, 2008-2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data is part of the Gulf Watch Alaska (GWA) long term monitoring program, nearshore monitoring component. Specifically, these data describe mussel sampling and...

  14. Greedy Deep Dictionary Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Tariyal, Snigdha; Majumdar, Angshul; Singh, Richa; Vatsa, Mayank

    2016-01-01

    In this work we propose a new deep learning tool called deep dictionary learning. Multi-level dictionaries are learnt in a greedy fashion, one layer at a time. This requires solving a simple (shallow) dictionary learning problem, the solution to this is well known. We apply the proposed technique on some benchmark deep learning datasets. We compare our results with other deep learning tools like stacked autoencoder and deep belief network; and state of the art supervised dictionary learning t...

  15. Design and construction of an export harbour in Persian Gulf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karimzadegan, K. [Horizon Engineering Inc., North Vancover, BC (Canada); Raissi, H. [Tehran Berkeley Engineers, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    Design and construction of the Pars Sulphur Export Harbour near the city of Beshar, in southern Iran on the Persian Gulf, to accommodate 15,000 DWT (deadweight) general cargo vessels is described. Although the steep drop of the ground near the shore was ideal for ship-berthing facilities, the construction of the associated breakwater in very deep waters required a significant amount of land reclamation (102,000 sq m, with a depth of backfilling up to eight metres and volume of about 550,000 cu m). The paper provides design details for filling the reclamation area in an economical way. It also describes the construction management and control issues that had to be dealt with to allow for the successful completion of the project within the approved budget. 5 tabs., 5 figs.

  16. Reconnaissance Strategy for Seep Chemosynthetic Communities in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, I. R.; Roberts, H. H.; Fisher, C. R.; Bernard, B. B.; Joye, S.; Carney, R.; Hunt, J.; Shedd, W.

    2007-05-01

    The Continental Slope of the Gulf of Mexico hosts diverse chemosynthetic communities at oil and gas seeps. Exploration is needed to extend knowledge of the Gulf of Mexico chemosynthetic ecosystem in the zones anticipated to receive energy exploration and production activities over the coming decades. A nested survey approach can be used to identify representative sampling sites within this vast offshore area. Potential sites where chemosynthetic community could occur are selected on the basis geophysical, geochemical, and satellite remote-sensing indicators. Photo-reconnaissance using cost-effective camera systems is then used to confirm the presences or absence of chemosynthetic communities at high-probability sites. Follow-up sampling can then proceed with submersibles or ROVs to acquire tissue and or geochemical samples. However, because access is limited, submersible dives may not be possible at all sites. Two examples of this approach have recently been applied in the northern and southern Gulf of Mexico, respectively. We compared community characterizations obtained from the initial reconnaissance with more detailed characterizations forthcoming from submersible sampling. Our results show that major differences in community type and geochemical substrata are evident from preliminary reconnaissance, while details of animal densities and species compositions require targeted sampling with submersibles. However, given the limited access to submersibles, cost-effective surveys with deep-sea camera systems would greatly expand understanding of the zoogeography of chemosynthetic fauna in the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea.

  17. Thermocline Regulated Seasonal Evolution of Surface Chlorophyll in the Gulf of Aden

    KAUST Repository

    Yao, Fengchao

    2015-03-19

    The Gulf of Aden, although subject to seasonally reversing monsoonal winds, has been previously reported as an oligotrophic basin during summer, with elevated chlorophyll concentrations only occurring during winter due to convective mixing. However, the Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) ocean color data reveal that the Gulf of Aden also exhibits a prominent summer chlorophyll bloom and sustains elevated chlorophyll concentrations throughout the fall, and is a biophysical province distinct from the adjacent Arabian Sea. Climatological hydrographic data suggest that the thermocline, hence the nutricline, in the entire gulf is markedly shoaled by the southwest monsoon during summer and fall. Under this condition, cyclonic eddies in the gulf can effectively pump deep nutrients to the surface layer and lead to the chlorophyll bloom in late summer, and, after the transition to the northeast monsoon in fall, coastal upwelling driven by the northeasterly winds produces a pronounced increase in surface chlorophyll concentrations along the Somali coast. © 2015 Yao, Hoteit.

  18. 77 FR 30507 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Reef Fish Fishery of the Gulf of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    ... conducted in the exclusive economic zone (EEZ) of the Gulf of Mexico (Gulf), is intended to better document... age structure and life history of red snapper in the Gulf of Mexico. If approved, the EFP would... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA847 Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico...

  19. 76 FR 74038 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Reef Fish Resources of the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-30

    ..., Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Reef Fish Resources of the Gulf of Mexico; Commercial Reef Fish..., WordPerfect, or Adobe PDF file formats only. Comments received through means not specified in this rule... allocation. A Gulf of Mexico (Gulf) commercial reef fish permit will still be required to harvest, land, and...

  20. 78 FR 27084 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Reef Fish Fishery of the Gulf of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-09

    ..._fisheries/gulf_fisheries/reef_fish/2013/am37/documents/pdfs/gray_triggerfish_outreach.pdf . The document..., Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Reef Fish Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico; Amendment 37 AGENCY... triggerfish described in Amendment 37 to the Fishery Management Plan for the Reef Fish Resources of the Gulf...

  1. AISI/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: Removal of Residual Elements in The Steel Ladle by a Combination of Top Slag and Deep Injection Practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Street; K.S. Coley; G.A. Iron

    2001-08-31

    The objective of this work was to determine if tin could be removed from liquid steel by a combination of deep injection of calcium and a reducing top-slag practice. The work was carried out in three stages: injection of Ca wire into 35 Kg heats in an induction furnace under laboratory condition; a fundamental study of the solubility of Sn in the slag as a function of oxygen potential, temperature and slag composition; and, two full-scale plant trials. During the first stage, it was found that 7 to 50% of the Sn was removed from initial Sn contents of 0.1%, using 8 to 16 Kg of calcium per tonne of steel. The Sn solubility study suggested that low oxygen potential, high basicity of the slag and lower temperature would aid Sn removal by deep injection of Ca in the bath. However, two full-scale trials at the LMF station in Dofasco's plant showed virtually no Sn removal, mainly because of very low Ca consumption rates used (0.5 to 1.1 Kg/tonne vs. 8 to 16 Kg/tonne used during the induction furnace study in the laboratory). Based on the current price of Ca, addition of 8 to 16 Kg/tonne of steel to remove Sn is too cost prohibitive, and therefore, it is not worthwhile to pursue this process further, even though it may be technically feasible.

  2. Scientific Diving Training Course. Red Sea & Gulf of Aden Programme (PERSGA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arab Organization for Education and Science, Cairo (Egypt).

    This document presents the scientific diving training course organized by the Arab League Educational, Cultural and Scientific Organization (ALECSO) for the Program for Environmental Studies, Red Sea and Gulf of Aden (PERSGA). This course of six weeks duration aims to produce a person who is capable of carrying out scientific diving tasks in the…

  3. 77 FR 22760 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Southeast Region Gulf of Mexico Electronic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE... Region Gulf of Mexico Electronic Logbook Program AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Commerce, as part of its continuing effort...

  4. 76 FR 55107 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement for General Management Plan, Gulf Islands National Seashore...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-06

    ... management under alternative 3 is to enhance visitor education, research, and resource protection opportunities. The seashore would be managed as an outdoor classroom for exploring the natural and human history of the Gulf of Mexico's barrier islands and coastal environments. Interpretive programs would focus...

  5. National Program for Inspection of Non-Federal Dams. Rogers Pond Dam (CT 00428), Connecticut River Basin, Deep River, Connecticut. Phase I Inspection Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-01

    8217 " : ’• . .. "’ .: ," . 3. Establish a monitoring program for use during and immediately after heavy rainfall and also a downstream .0t warning program...edge of spillway. 12.iwo owsra altolf fsilwycanl PHLPW GNVS ASCAE ,IC OER OD DM C048 ENGINEER HADE C.-CIC C-0 13 iwo ontemwalt eto plwy meow. 14 iwo anfo

  6. Economic impact evaluation of the Procap 1000: Deep Water Qualification Program from PETROBRAS; Avaliacao de impactos economicos do Procap 1000: Programa de Capacitacao em Aguas Profundas da PETROBRAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furtado, Andre T.; Pereira, Newton M. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias. Dept. de Politica Cientifica e Tecnologica; Suslick, Saul [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias. Dept. de Administracao e Politica de Recursos Minerais; Freitas, Adriana G. de [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica. Planejamento de Sistemas Energeticos; Bach, Laurent [Universite Louis Pasteur, 67 -Strasbourg (France). Bureau d' Economie Theorique et Appliquee

    1999-07-01

    PETROBRAS, a Brazilian petroleum company, managed between 1986 and 1992 a program with purpose to dominate the necessary technology for the petroleum production up to 1000 meters depth. This program was going called Procap 1000. The aim of the work was to evaluate the impacts of Procap 1000. The proposed evaluation method by Beta was going used. The results are presented.

  7. Hydrocarbon Potential of the Southern Gulf of Mexico. Evidences from Tectonic Features and Oil Seeps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla Y Sanch, R.

    2008-05-01

    The Gulf of Mexico has an enormous oil potential, about 104 billion barrels of oil equivalent (BBOE). From these, about 54 BBOE are in Mexican waters. Tectonic features in the sea-floor of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) are closely related to oil seepage that have been mapped since the early 20 century, and are direct evidences of working petroleum systems, as well as that deep reservoirs are leaking oil to the surface. This could be considered an inconvenience by some, but it is known that the giant field Cantarell was named after a fisherman that reported frequently giant oil seeps offshore northward Ciudad del Carmen. Deep water exploration has become more and more important these days because of the continuously increasing oil prices. The northern half of the Gulf of Mexico today displays an unusual drilling activity, whereas in the southern part drilling activity is too low. In this research work the interest is focused on the satellite detected oil seeps, and ther coincident location with the tectonic structures shown in the new digital tectonic map of mexico.

  8. The Iranian century: the tension between Iran and the Gulf States

    OpenAIRE

    Al Kaabi, Yousef H.; Al Kaabi, Khaled M.

    2011-01-01

    The Arabian Gulf represents a significant part in the world because of its oil wealth. During the last thirty years, three wars have taken place in the region resulting in regional and global instability: the Iran-Iraq war; the Persian Gulf War of 1990-1991, and the U.S. led invasion of Iraq in 2003. The fall of Iraq made Iran more powerful in the region, and as a domination strategy, Iran launched its nuclear program. Iran represents a major power in the region; it can destabilize the region...

  9. Alaska, Gulf spills share similarities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usher, D. (Marine Pollution Control Co., Detroit, MI (United States))

    The accidental Exxon Valdez oil spill in Alaska and the deliberate dumping of crude oil into the Persian Gulf as a tactic of war contain both glaring differences and surprising similarities. Public reaction and public response was much greater to the Exxon Valdez spill in pristine Prince William Sound than to the war-related tragedy in the Persian Gulf. More than 12,000 workers helped in the Alaskan cleanup; only 350 have been involved in Kuwait. But in both instances, environmental damages appear to be less than anticipated. Natures highly effective self-cleansing action is primarily responsible for minimizing the damages. One positive action growing out of the two incidents is increased international cooperation and participation in oil-spill clean-up efforts. In 1990, in the aftermath of the Exxon Valdez spill, 94 nations signed an international accord on cooperation in future spills. The spills can be historic environmental landmarks leading to creation of more sophisticated response systems worldwide.

  10. Amoco hikes production, reserves in Texas Gulf Coast fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bleakley, W.B.

    1980-12-01

    Amoco Production Co., making use of sound engineering planning triggered by favorable oil prices, has increase production rates from several Texas Gulf Coast fields and added substantially to recoverable reserves. Two fields in particular, Live Oak Lake and High Is., responded to engineering analysis and infill drilling and are typical examples of what price decontrol has done to relieve the energy shortage. Countering this benefit is the government-imposed crude oil excise tax which prevents expansion of these programs into many other promising areas. Amoco's experience typifies what operations can do with older fields to accelerate producing rates and improve ultimate recovery.

  11. Hunting for Exoplanets at Florida Gulf Coast University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzasi, Derek L.; Lezcano, Andy; Fine, Stephanie; Humes, Cassandra; King, Alex; Patel, Keval; Rivers, Dakota; Sinclair, Kelsey; Stacey, Enzo; Vural, Leyla; Zimmer, Jenna

    2016-06-01

    Honors Program participants at Florida Gulf Coast University must complete two of four required "Honors Experiences". One student option is a research experience, and we have developed a "Planet Hunters" course to provide an astronomical research track. In the course, students spend the first semester learning astronomical background and exoplanet detection techniques, while the second semester is devoted to planet searches in Kepler and K2 data, using student-oriented software tools developed specifically for the task. In this poster, we present the tools, data sets, and results obtained by students participating in the first year of the course, along with lessons learned for future implementation.

  12. Challenging oil bioremediation at deep-sea hydrostatic pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Scoma

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Deepwater Horizon (DWH accident has brought oil contamination of deep-sea environments to worldwide attention. The risk for new deep-sea spills is not expected to decrease in the future, as political pressure mounts to access deep-water fossil reserves, and poorly tested technologies are used to access oil. This also applies to the response to oil-contamination events, with bioremediation the only (biotechnology presently available to combat deep-sea spills. Many questions about the fate of petroleum-hydrocarbons at deep-sea remain unanswered, as much as the main constraints limiting bioremediation under increased hydrostatic pressures and low temperatures. The microbial pathways fueling oil take up are unclear, and the mild upregulation observed for beta-oxidation-related genes in both water and sediments contrasts with the high amount of alkanes present in the spilled-oil. The fate of solid alkanes (tar and that of hydrocarbons degradation rates was largely overlooked, as the reason why the most predominant hydrocarbonoclastic genera were not enriched at deep-sea, despite being present at hydrocarbon seeps at the Gulf of Mexico. This mini-review aims at highlighting the missing information in the field, proposing a holistic approach where in situ and ex situ studies are integrated to reveal the principal mechanisms accounting for deep-sea oil bioremediation.

  13. De novo peptide sequencing by deep learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Ngoc Hieu; Zhang, Xianglilan; Xin, Lei; Shan, Baozhen; Li, Ming

    2017-07-18

    De novo peptide sequencing from tandem MS data is the key technology in proteomics for the characterization of proteins, especially for new sequences, such as mAbs. In this study, we propose a deep neural network model, DeepNovo, for de novo peptide sequencing. DeepNovo architecture combines recent advances in convolutional neural networks and recurrent neural networks to learn features of tandem mass spectra, fragment ions, and sequence patterns of peptides. The networks are further integrated with local dynamic programming to solve the complex optimization task of de novo sequencing. We evaluated the method on a wide variety of species and found that DeepNovo considerably outperformed state of the art methods, achieving 7.7-22.9% higher accuracy at the amino acid level and 38.1-64.0% higher accuracy at the peptide level. We further used DeepNovo to automatically reconstruct the complete sequences of antibody light and heavy chains of mouse, achieving 97.5-100% coverage and 97.2-99.5% accuracy, without assisting databases. Moreover, DeepNovo is retrainable to adapt to any sources of data and provides a complete end-to-end training and prediction solution to the de novo sequencing problem. Not only does our study extend the deep learning revolution to a new field, but it also shows an innovative approach in solving optimization problems by using deep learning and dynamic programming.

  14. Tides in the Gulf of Kutch, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shetye, S.R.

    the dynamics behind the observed behaviour of amplitudes and phases of M 2 , S 2 , K 1 , and O 1 ,the four most prominent tidal constituents in the gulf. Though there have been numerical models constructed to simulate tides in the gulf (Vaidyaraman et al., 1987...; Unnikrishnan et al., 1999) and though these have been largely successful in simulating both the surface elevation and currents in the gulf, the dynamics underlying the observed behaviour of tides have not been elucidated. It has been pointed out that a possible...

  15. Habitat, Fauna, and Conservation of Florida's Deep-Water Coral Reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, J. K.; Pomponi, S. A.; Messing, C. G.; Brooke, S.

    2008-05-01

    Various types of deep-water coral habitats are common off the southeastern United States from the Blake Plateau through the Straits of Florida to the eastern Gulf of Mexico. Expeditions in the past decade with the Johnson-Sea- Link manned submersibles, ROVs, and AUVs have discovered, mapped and compiled data on the status, distribution, habitat, and biodiversity for many of these relatively unknown deep-sea coral ecosystems. We have discovered over three hundred, high relief (15-152-m tall) coral mounds (depth 700-800 m) along the length of eastern Florida (700 km). The north Florida sites are rocky lithoherms, whereas the southern sites are primarily classic coral bioherms, capped with dense 1-2 m tall thickets of Lophelia pertusa and Enallopsammia profunda. Off southeastern Florida, the Miami Terrace escarpment (depth 300-600 m) extends nearly 150 km as a steep, rocky slope of Miocene-age phosphoritic limestone, which provides habitat for a rich biodiversity of fish and benthic invertebrates. Off the Florida Keys, the Pourtalès Terrace (depth 200- 460 m) has extensive high-relief bioherms and numerous deep-water sinkholes to depths of 250-610 m and diameters up to 800 m. The dominant, deep-water, colonial scleractinian corals in this region include Oculina varicosa, L. pertusa, E. profunda, Madrepora oculata, and Solenosmilia variabilis. Other coral species include hydrozoans (Stylasteridae), bamboo octocorals (Isididae), numerous other gorgonians, and black corals (Antipatharia). These structure-forming taxa provide habitat and living space for a relatively unknown but biologically rich and diverse community of crustaceans, mollusks, echinoderms, polychaete and sipunculan worms, and associated fishes. We have identified 142 taxa of benthic macro-invertebrates, including 66 Porifera and 57 Cnidaria. Nearly 100 species of fish have been identified to date in association with these deep-water coral habitats. Paull et al. (2000) estimated that over 40

  16. Temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen measurements collected using CTD, bottle from multiple platforms in the Gulf of Mexico from 1992 through 2008 as part of the Southeast Area Monitoring and Assessment Program (SEAMAP) (NODC Accession 0069702)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Southeast Area Monitoring and Assessment Program (SEAMAP) is a State/Federal/university program for collection, management and dissemination of...

  17. Zooplankton community response to the winter 2013 deep convection process in the NW Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoso, Katty; Carlotti, François; Pagano, Marc; Hunt, Brian P. V.; Escribano, Rubén.; Berline, Léo.

    2017-03-01

    The Gulf of Lion is an important area of deep convection, where intense winter vertical mixing brings nutrients up from deeper layers, promoting the largest bloom in the Mediterranean at the end of winter/early spring. The DEWEX program conducted cruises in February and April 2013 to investigate the ecosystem level impacts of deep water convection. Zooplankton data were collected through net sampling and imaging with an Underwater Vision Profiler. In winter, low zooplankton abundance and biomass were observed in the Deep Convection Zone (DCZ) and higher values on its periphery. In spring, this pattern reversed with high biomass in the DCZ and lower values on the periphery. On average for the whole area, the potential grazing impact was estimated to increase by one order of magnitude from winter to spring. In April, all areas except the DCZ incurred top-down control by zooplankton on the phytoplankton stock. In the DCZ, the chlorophyll-a values remained high despite the high zooplankton biomass and carbon demand, indicating a sustained bottom-up control. The zooplankton community composition was comparable for both periods, typified by high copepod dominance, but with some differences between the DCZ and peripheral regions. In spring the DCZ was characterized by a strong increase in herbivorous species such as Centropages typicus and Calanus helgolandicus, and an increase in the number of large zooplankton individuals. Our study indicates that the DCZ is likely an area of both enhanced energy transfer to higher trophic levels and organic matter export in the North Western Mediterranean Sea.

  18. The Red Sea and Gulf of Aden Basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosworth, William; Huchon, Philippe; McClay, Ken

    2005-10-01

    normal (N60°E) to highly oblique and parallel to the Aqaba-Levant transform (N15°E). North of Suez in Egypt the rift system became emergent, perhaps due to minor compression of the Sinai sub-plate, and the marine connection to the Mediterranean Sea became restricted but not terminated. Red Sea sedimentation changed from predominantly open marine to evaporitic, although deep water persisted in many regions. A third phase of magmatism commenced, locally in Ethiopia but predominantly in western Saudi Arabia and extending north to Harrat Ash Shama and Jebel Druse in Jordan, Lebanon, and Syria. At ˜10 Ma, the Sheba Ridge rapidly propagated west over 400 km from the central Gulf of Aden to the Shukra al Sheik discontinuity. Oceanic spreading followed in the south-central Red Sea at ˜5 Ma. This corresponded in time to an important unconformity throughout the Red Sea basin and along the margins of the Gulf of Aden, coeval with the Messinian unconformity of the Mediterranean basin. A major phase of pull-apart basin development also occurred along the Aqaba-Levant transform. In the early Pliocene the influx of marine waters through Bab al Mandeb increased and Red Sea sedimentation thereafter returned to predominantly open marine conditions. By ˜3-2 Ma, oceanic spreading moved west of the Shukra al Sheik discontinuity, and the entire Gulf of Aden was an oceanic rift. During the last ˜1 My, the southern Red Sea plate boundary linked to the Aden spreading center through the Gulf of Zula, Danakil Depression, and Gulf of Tadjoura. Presently, the Red Sea spreading center appears to be propagating toward the northern Red Sea to link with the Aqaba-Levant transform. Alkali basaltic volcanism continues within the Younger Harrats of western Saudi Arabia and Yemen and offshore southern Red Sea islands. Most of the Arabian plate is now experiencing N-S upper crustal compression, whereas the maximum horizontal stress is oriented E-W in NE Africa. Arabia and Africa, now on separate plates

  19. Stratigraphic nomenclature and geologic sections of the Gulf Coastal Plain of Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, E.T.

    1995-01-01

    Geologic sections showing the subsurface delineation of approximately 100 Stratigraphic units composing the Mesozoic and Cenozoic Eras illustrate the interrelation of these units across most of the Gulf Coastal Plain of Texas. The geologic names that constitute the nomenclature have been published, and the vast majority are approved for use by the U.S. Geological Survey. Four dip sections and four strike sections, extending from the land surface to a maximum of about 18,000 feet below sea level, provide continuity of correlation from the outcrop to the deep subsurface. Stratigraphic units containing water with less than 3,000 milligrams per liter concentration of dissolved solids are shown on the geologic sections and serve as an indicator of water quality in the Gulf Coastal Plain of Texas.

  20. Aftershocks of the 8 July, 1975 Canal De Las Ballenas, Gulf of California, earthquake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munguia, L.; Reichle, M.; Reyes, A.; Simons, R.; Brune, J.

    1977-11-01

    A M/sub s/-6.5 earthquake occurred on 8 July, 1975 in the northern part of the Gulf of California. The calculated seismic moment is 2 x 10/sup 25/ dyne-cm. This event occurred in a region of particular interest since the position of the transform fault in this region was not well known and had been locked for at least 20 years. Over 180 aftershocks were located along a zone 54 Km long, 10 Km wide and 10--15 Km deep running between Baja California and Isla Angel de la Guarda. The depth of the aftershock zone is somewhat greater than that found in previous studies in the Gulf. The aftershock trend and that of the fault plane solution is consistent with an event occurring along a vertical strike-slip fault with motion in the direction of known regional plate movement.

  1. Fisheries-Independent Biological and Environmental Trawl Data from the Mississippi Department of Marine Resources and the University of Southern Mississippi's Gulf Coast Research Laboratory (1973-2005) as Part of the Comparative Assessment of Gulf Estuarine Systems (CAGES) Database (NODC Accession 0115183)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The CAGES program (Comparative Assessment of Gulf Estuarine Systems) is designed to examine the differences between estuarine ecosystems and investigate why some are...

  2. Taoism and Deep Ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvan, Richard; Bennett, David

    1988-01-01

    Contrasted are the philosophies of Deep Ecology and ancient Chinese. Discusses the cosmology, morality, lifestyle, views of power, politics, and environmental philosophies of each. Concludes that Deep Ecology could gain much from Taoism. (CW)

  3. Deep Incremental Boosting

    OpenAIRE

    Mosca, Alan; Magoulas, George D

    2017-01-01

    This paper introduces Deep Incremental Boosting, a new technique derived from AdaBoost, specifically adapted to work with Deep Learning methods, that reduces the required training time and improves generalisation. We draw inspiration from Transfer of Learning approaches to reduce the start-up time to training each incremental Ensemble member. We show a set of experiments that outlines some preliminary results on some common Deep Learning datasets and discuss the potential improvements Deep In...

  4. Gulf of Mexico Nutrient, carbon, CTD data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Gulf of Mexico cruise, nearshore and CTD data collected by the USEPA during 2002 - 2008. This dataset is associated with the following publications: Pauer , J., T....

  5. 2013 Gulf of Mexico SPCE angler survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This survey provides economic data related to marine recreational fishing in the Gulf of Mexico. The data collected include preference and opinion information...

  6. ROE Gulf of Mexico Hypoxia Sample Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset describes dissolved oxygen levels in the Gulf of Mexico. Individual sampling sites are represented by point data. The background polygon shows areas...

  7. Anticlines in the US Gulf Coast [anticlineg

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset of anticlines is intended primarily for reference; it includes major structures such as those shown on Plate 2, Principal structural features, Gulf of...

  8. Gulf Coast climate change adaptation pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Climate change-related issues place substantial operating and financial burdens on public transit agencies, particularly in coastal settings. Gulf of Mexico coastal transit agencies and their constituents are especially vulnerable to natural hazards ...

  9. Monthly Composite Chlorophyll Concentrations - Gulf of Maine

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This personal geodatabase contains raster images of chlorophyll concentrations in the Gulf of Maine. These raster images are monthly composites, and were calculated...

  10. Seasonal Composite Chlorophyll Concentrations - Gulf of Maine

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This personal geodatabase contains raster images of chlorophyll concentrations in the Gulf of Maine. These raster images are seasonal composites, and were calculated...

  11. Gulf of Mexico Deepwater Bathymetry Contours

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — Gulf of Mexico Depth Contours derived from NOAA's NGDC bathymetric grids and from BOEM's seismic grid compilation. Both NOAA and BOEM contours are shown in meters or...

  12. Southeast Gulf of Mexico Sperm Whale Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Large vessel surveys were conducted during the summers of 2012 and 2014 in the southeastern Gulf of Mexico north of the Dry Tortugas. Data were collected on the...

  13. Gulf of Mexico Ecosystem Status Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Gulf of Mexico is one of the most ecologically and economically valuable marine ecosystems in the world and is affected by a variety of natural and anthropogenic...

  14. Ground water discharge and nitrate flux to the Gulf of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Carolyn B; Poreda, Robert J; Hunt, Andrew G; Carey, Anne E

    2004-01-01

    Ground water samples (37 to 186 m depth) from Baldwin County, Alabama, are used to define the hydrogeology of Gulf coastal aquifers and calculate the subsurface discharge of nutrients to the Gulf of Mexico. The ground water flow and nitrate flux have been determined by linking ground water concentrations to 3H/3He and 4He age dates. The middle aquifer (A2) is an active flow system characterized by postnuclear tritium levels, moderate vertical velocities, and high nitrate concentrations. Ground water discharge could be an unaccounted source for nutrients in the coastal oceans. The aquifers annually discharge 1.1 +/- 0.01 x 10(8) moles of nitrate to the Gulf of Mexico, or 50% and 0.8% of the annual contributions from the Mobile-Alabama River System and the Mississippi River System, respectively. In southern Baldwin County, south of Loxley, increasing reliance on ground water in the deeper A3 aquifer requires accurate estimates of safe ground water withdrawal. This aquifer, partially confined by Pliocene clay above and Pensacola Clay below, is tritium dead and contains elevated 4He concentrations with no nitrate and estimated ground water ages from 100 to 7000 years. The isotopic composition and concentration of natural gas diffusing from the Pensacola Clay into the A3 aquifer aids in defining the deep ground water discharge. The highest 4He and CH4 concentrations are found only in the deepest sample (Gulf State Park), indicating that ground water flow into the Gulf of Mexico suppresses the natural gas plume. Using the shape of the CH4-He plume and the accumulation of 4He rate (2.2 +/- 0.8 microcc/kg/1000 years), we estimate the natural submarine discharge and the replenishment rate for the A3 aquifer.

  15. Deep Space Telecommunications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiper, T. B. H.; Resch, G. M.

    2000-01-01

    The increasing load on NASA's deep Space Network, the new capabilities for deep space missions inherent in a next-generation radio telescope, and the potential of new telescope technology for reducing construction and operation costs suggest a natural marriage between radio astronomy and deep space telecommunications in developing advanced radio telescope concepts.

  16. Deep Learning Online Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    TECHNICAL REPORT 3053 November 2016 Deep Learning Online Couse Katie Rainey Approved for public release...Science and Engineering (NISE) project entitled Deep Learning Online Course, executed in fiscal year 2016 at Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center...Pacific (SSC Pacific). RESULTS The project was successful in training a large group of scientists and engineers in the topic of deep learning , a

  17. How does mesoscale impact deep convection? Answers from ensemble Northwestern Mediterranean Sea simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, Robin; Herrmann, Marine; Somot, Samuel; Arsouze, Thomas; Benshila, Rachid; Bosse, Anthony; Chanut, Jérôme; Giordani, Hervé; Pennel, Romain; Sevault, Florence; Testor, Pierre

    2017-04-01

    Ocean deep convection is a major process of interaction between surface and deep ocean. The Gulf of Lions is a well-documented deep convection area in the Mediterranean Sea, and mesoscale dynamics is a known factor impacting this phenomenon. However, previous modelling studies don't allow to address the robustness of its impact with respect to the physical configuration and ocean intrinsic variability. In this study, the impact of mesoscale on ocean deep convection in the Gulf of Lions is investigated using a multi-resolution ensemble simulation of the northwestern Mediterranean sea. The eddy-permitting Mediterranean model NEMOMED12 (6km resolution) is compared to its eddy-resolving counterpart with the 2-way grid refinement AGRIF in the northwestern Mediterranean (2km resolution). We focus on the well-documented 2012-2013 period and on the multidecadal timescale (1979-2013). The impact of mesoscale on deep convection is addressed in terms of its mean and variability, its impact on deep water transformations and on associated dynamical structures. Results are interpreted by diagnosing regional mean and eddy circulation and using buoyancy budgets. We find a mean inhibition of deep convection by mesoscale with large interannual variability. It is associated with a large impact on mean and transient circulation and a large air-sea flux feedback.

  18. [The use of ultra deep sequencing technique in the screening program on HIV-1 drug resistance mutation among ART-naїve patients in Hunan province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jianmei; Zou, Xiaobai; Chen, Xi; Zheng, Jun

    2014-10-01

    To determine the prevalence rates of nucleotide reverse-transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)TDRs among HIV-1 ART-naїve patients in Hunan province using the ultra deep sequencing (UDS) technique. ART-naїve subjects diagnosed in Hunan between 2010 and 2011 were evaluated by both UDS technique and Sanger sequencing techniques, to the 1% variant level. Mutations were scored using the Stanford HIVdb algorithm to infer the status on drug resistance. UDS method was performed on 90 ART-naїve subjects that seeking service of care, in Hunan. In total, 42.2% (38/90) of the subjects showed major NRTI or nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor NNRTI TDRs by UDS technique, at a HIV variant frequency level of ≥1%, 15.6% (14/90) showed NRTI TDR, 16.7% (15/90) showed a major NNRTI TDR and 10% (9/90) were both resistant to NRTI and NNRTI when variants were analyzed by Stanford HIVdb. ART-naїve subjects from Hunan province, which had been predominately infected by subtype AE, would frequently possess HIV variants with NRTI/NNRTI TDRs that would affect the use of first line ART in the region, identified by the UDS technique. Further studies were needed to describe the prevalence of TDRs and to gather related information.

  19. Major reproductive health characteristics in male Gulf War Veterans. The Danish Gulf War Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ishøy, T; Andersson, A M; Suadicani, Poul Vilhelm

    2001-01-01

    The male reproductive system could have been affected by various hazardous agents and exposures during and in the aftermath of the Persian Gulf War scenario. We tested the hypothesis that, compared to controls, male Danish Gulf War Veterans would have adverse sex hormone levels, decreased fertility...

  20. Optimal site matching of wind turbine generator: Case study of the Gulf of Suez region in Egypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EL-Shimy, M. [Electric Power and Machines Department, Ain Shams University, Faculty of Engineering, 1 EL-Sarayat St., Abassia, 11517 Cairo (Egypt)

    2010-08-15

    During the last few years, Egypt has emerged as the leader of wind power in the Middle East and Africa. In the Gulf of Suez region, a continuously expanding large-scale grid-connected wind farm is available at Zafarana site. The Gulf of EL-Zayt site in the Gulf of Suez region is now under extensive studies related to wind power projects such as feasibility and bird migration studies. Therefore, the Gulf of Suez region is considered in this paper for optimal site matching of wind turbine generator (WTG). This paper treats the problem of site matching of WTG through improved formulation of the capacity factor. Such factor is estimated based on Weibull PDF and an accurate model for the WTG output-power-curve. Ornithological, martial, and other limitations placed on WTG hub heights in the Gulf of Suez region in Egypt are taken into account. In addition, a MATLAB based program is created to implement the presented technique of optimal site matching of WTG. Based on turbine-performance-index (TPI) maximization, optimal output-power-curve and optimal commercial WTG are determined for each candidate site in the Gulf of Suez region. Long-term performance measurements at Zafarana wind farms in comparison with the results are used to validate the presented technique and the optimality of the results. (author)

  1. Estuarine circulation reversals and related rapid changes in winter near-bottom oxygen conditions in the Gulf of Finland, Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Liblik

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The reversal of estuarine circulation caused by southwesterly wind forcing may lead to vanishing of stratification and subsequently to oxygenation of deep layers during the winter in the Gulf of Finland. Six conductivity, temperature, depth (CTD+oxygen transects (130 km long, 10 stations were conducted along the thalweg from the western boundary to the central gulf (21 December 2011–8 May 2012. Two bottom-mounted ADCP were installed, one near the western border and the second in the central gulf. A CTD with a dissolved oxygen sensor was deployed close to the western ADCP. Periods of typical estuarine circulation were characterized by strong stratification, high salinity, hypoxic conditions and inflow to the gulf in the near-bottom layer. Two circulation reversals were observed: one in December–January and one in February. The first reversal event was well developed; it caused the disappearance of the stratification and an increase in the oxygen concentration from hypoxic values to 270 μmol L−1 (to 6 mL L−1 throughout the water column along the thalweg and lasted approximately 1.5 months. Shifts from estuarine circulation to reversed circulation and vice versa were both associated with strong longitudinal (east–west gulf currents (up to 40 cm s−1 in the deep layer. The change from oxygenated to hypoxic conditions in the western near-entrance area of the gulf occurred very rapidly, within less than a day, due to the intrusion of the hypoxic salt wedge from the NE Baltic Proper. In the eastern part of the gulf, good oxygen conditions caused by reversals remained for a few months.

  2. Microbial life in the deep terrestrial subsurface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fliermans, C.B. [E.I. DuPont de Nemours and Co., Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Lab.; Balkwill, D.L. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Beeman, R.E. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)] [and others

    1988-12-31

    The distribution and function of microorganisms is a vital issue in microbial ecology. The US Department of Energy`s Program, ``Microbiology of the Deep Subsurface,`` concentrates on establishing fundamental scientific information about organisms at depth, and the use of these organisms for remediation of contaminants in deep vadose zone and groundwater environments. This investigation effectively extends the Biosphere hundreds of meters into the Geosphere and has implications to a variety of subsurface activities.

  3. Deep learning with Python

    CERN Document Server

    Chollet, Francois

    2018-01-01

    DESCRIPTION Deep learning is applicable to a widening range of artificial intelligence problems, such as image classification, speech recognition, text classification, question answering, text-to-speech, and optical character recognition. Deep Learning with Python is structured around a series of practical code examples that illustrate each new concept introduced and demonstrate best practices. By the time you reach the end of this book, you will have become a Keras expert and will be able to apply deep learning in your own projects. KEY FEATURES • Practical code examples • In-depth introduction to Keras • Teaches the difference between Deep Learning and AI ABOUT THE TECHNOLOGY Deep learning is the technology behind photo tagging systems at Facebook and Google, self-driving cars, speech recognition systems on your smartphone, and much more. AUTHOR BIO Francois Chollet is the author of Keras, one of the most widely used libraries for deep learning in Python. He has been working with deep neural ...

  4. Deep Water Compositions From the Los Angeles Basin and the Origin of Formation Water Salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boles, J.; Giles, G.; Lockman, D.

    2005-12-01

    Deep basin formation waters represent original depositional waters that have been modified by diagenetic processes at elevated temperatures and pressures. In addition, they may be diluted by meteoric incursion from elevated structural blocks along basin flanks. It has long been thought that deep basin formation waters have salinities greater than sea water due to various processes like clay membrane filtration or other types of water-rock interaction. However, our work and similar studies in the San Joaquin basin show that formation waters in deep basins are more likely to become diluted rather than concentrated in the absence of soluble evaporite deposits that might underlie the basin. The idea of increased salinity with depth arose from studies in which the underpinning of the basin consisted of soluble evaporate deposits such as the Texas Gulf Coast, Illinois, Michigan, and some North Sea areas. There are very few deep formation water analyses from the Los Angeles Basin. Furthermore, very few of the current produced waters from any depth can be considered pristine because of the widespread formation water injection programs and commingling of fluids from different levels. Here, we describe the first analyses from a deep, previously untouched part of the basin that is currently being developed in the Inglewood Oil Field. We have analyzed a suite of formation waters from the mid-Miocene marine Sentous sandstone from sub-sea level depths of 2250 m to 2625 m at temperatures of about 110 to 126°C and pressures of about 27 MPa. The original depositional waters in the Sentous Formation were sea water whereas the sampled waters are diluted by about 20% from sea water and some show as much as 50% dilution. Based on comparison of oxygen and deuterium isotopes between the meteoric water trend and these waters, we conclude that the smectite to illite dehydration reaction is the major cause of dilution to the original formation water. Other notable differences include

  5. Factors governing the deep ventilation of the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Papadopoulos, Vassilis P.

    2015-11-19

    A variety of data based on hydrographic measurements, satellite observations, reanalysis databases, and meteorological observations are used to explore the interannual variability and factors governing the deep water formation in the northern Red Sea. Historical and recent hydrographic data consistently indicate that the ventilation of the near-bottom layer in the Red Sea is a robust feature of the thermohaline circulation. Dense water capable to reach the bottom layers of the Red Sea can be regularly produced mostly inside the Gulfs of Aqaba and Suez. Occasionally, during colder than usual winters, deep water formation may also take place over coastal areas in the northernmost end of the open Red Sea just outside the Gulfs of Aqaba and Suez. However, the origin as well as the amount of deep waters exhibit considerable interannual variability depending not only on atmospheric forcing but also on the water circulation over the northern Red Sea. Analysis of several recent winters shows that the strength of the cyclonic gyre prevailing in the northernmost part of the basin can effectively influence the sea surface temperature (SST) and intensify or moderate the winter surface cooling. Upwelling associated with periods of persistent gyre circulation lowers the SST over the northernmost part of the Red Sea and can produce colder than normal winter SST even without extreme heat loss by the sea surface. In addition, the occasional persistence of the cyclonic gyre feeds the surface layers of the northern Red Sea with nutrients, considerably increasing the phytoplankton biomass.

  6. Mobility and Fate of Pollutants in the Aquifer System of the Northwestern Suez Gulf, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snousy, Moustafa Gamal; Zawrah, M F; Abdel-Moghny, Th; Ebiad, M A; Rashad, A M; Khalil, Mahmoud M; Abu El Ella, E M; El-Sayed, E; Tantawy, M A

    The northwestern part of Suez Gulf region is a strategic area in Egypt. It includes important sources of national income. To achieve the development goals, the government has established huge projects in this area (e.g. establishment and expanding of a large commercial port at Ain Sokhna, many industrial zones as well as tourism projects). The utilization of the Suez Gulf resources and their continuing development mainly depend on the creation of actual pollution control programs. The environmental quality control and pollution reduction activities are important ingredients of any economic development program. These different activities in this area depend mainly on the groundwater that is pumped intensively from different water bearing formations or aquifers. The main objective of the present work is compiling the previous studies from the 1980s up to 2015. These studies are concerned with estimating the concentrations of different pollutants in various ecosystems in the northwestern Suez Gulf region. Also, to provide an explanation for the movement of different pollutants such as organic and heavy metals from contaminated land to ground and surface (Gulf) waters. This issue has not been extensively surveyed before, and this review, gives specific directions for future monitoring and remediation strategies in this region.

  7. Slope tectonics-comparisons and contrasts of structural styles of salt and shale tectonics of the northern Gulf of Mexico with shale tectonics of Offshore Nigeria in Gulf of Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shengyu; Bally, Albert W.

    Regional structural styles on the continental slope are revealed by well-imaged deep multi-channel seismic profiles from northern Gulf of Mexico and Offshore Nigeria in Gulf of Guinea. Both provinces are situated on passive continental margins developed during the breakup of Gondwana. The northern Gulf of Mexico as well as Offshore Nigeria are underlain by complex systems of thin skinned upslope extensional fault systems, downslope contractional fold and thrust systems along with large scale salt or shale structures. The interactions between the deformation of mid-Jurassic salt and various stages and patterns of sedimentation on the continental slope are responsible for both extensional growth faults and Tertiary contractional fold and thrust systems in the northern Gulf of Mexico. The slope tectonics style of the northern Gulf of Mexico passive margin is characterized by perennial upslope extension since mid-Jurassic, associated with multistage autochthonous and allochthonous salt deformations along with brief periods of late Tertiary shortening in the down-dip fold belts. Offshore Nigeria is a salt-free progradational margin characterized by upslope extension, various shale structures and downslope toe-thrust systems. Gravity spreading and gliding in response to rapidly prograding Tertiary sedimentation over under-compacted shales resulted in the structural styles of the slope of Offshore Nigeria. Large upslope extensional tectonics are linked to coeval and balanced downslope contractional deformations in the form of shale ridges, massifs and diapirs, and deep basin toe thrusts. Late Miocene-Early Pliocene contractional deformation is widespread across the entire foldbelt, and with later shortening, folding migrated in a landward direction.

  8. The Apseudomorpha (Crustacea: Tanaidacea) of the Gulf of Cadiz and Horseshoe Continental Rise (NE Atlantic): A taxonomic review with new records, species, and ecological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquete, P; Cunha, M R

    2017-06-09

    The apseudomorphan tanaidaceans of the deep sea have been under-studied, especially in chemosynthetic habitats. A total of ten species present in the Gulf of Cadiz and the Horseshoe Continental Rise (SW off the Iberian Peninsula) are listed here, and new distribution data, ecological remarks and description of one new species of Atlantapseudes (Atlantapseudes curvatus sp. nov.) from recent research cruises are added. Pseudosphyrapus azorensis and Francapseudes uniarticulatus are recorded for the first time since the original descriptions. Notes on morphological development of Leviapseudes segonzaci and intraspecific variation of F. uniarticulatus are included, together with illustrations and descriptions of the material from the Gulf of Cadiz to complement previous descriptions.

  9. Gulf of Mexico Hydrocarbon Seeps (SEEPS.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This GIS overlay is a component of the U.S. Geological Survey, Woods Hole Science Center's, Gulf of Mexico GIS database. The Gulf of Mexico GIS database is intended...

  10. Gulf of Mexico dead zone - the last 150 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterman, Lisa; Swarzenski, P.W.; Poore, R.Z.

    2006-01-01

    'Gulf of Mexico Dead Zone-The Last 150 Years' discusses the dead zone that forms seasonally in the northern Gulf of Mexico when subsurface waters become depleted in dissolved oxygen and cannot support most life.

  11. Marine Toxic Substance and other data from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1977-04-05 to 1977-04-16 (NODC Accession 7800383)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine Toxic Substance and other data were collected from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER. Data were collected by Pacific Marine...

  12. Marine Toxic Substance and other data from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1977-10-05 to 1977-10-09 (NODC Accession 7800450)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine Toxic Substance and other data were collected from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER. Data were collected by Pacific Marine...

  13. Marine Toxic Substance and other data from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1976-04-14 to 1976-06-26 (NODC Accession 7700241)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine Toxic Substance and other data were collected from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms. Data were collected by...

  14. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska and other locations from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1976-09-27 to 1976-10-23 (NODC Accession 7700134)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska and other locations from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER. Data...

  15. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska and other locations from the ACONA and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 30 March 1977 to 17 May 1979 (NODC Accession 7900265)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska and other locations from the ACONA...

  16. Fish pathology and other data from fish trawls in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1977-01-27 to 1977-02-10 (NODC Accession 7700662)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish pathology and other data were collected from fish trawls in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN from 27 January 1977 to 10 February 1977. Data were...

  17. Marine toxic substance and other data from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1976-07-19 to 1976-07-31 (NODC Accession 7601930)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance and other data were collected from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER. Data were collected by Pacific Marine...

  18. Temperature profile data from surface sensors and CTD casts from the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1990-04-17 to 1990-10-11 (NODC Accession 9100188)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN from 17 April 1990 to 11 October 1990....

  19. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the ACONA as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 09 April 1977 to 10 April 1977 (NODC Accession 7700680)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the ACONA. Data were collected...

  20. Benthic organism and other data from the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1978-07-30 to 1979-11-26 (NODC Accession 8200057)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organism and other data were collected in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN and other platforms by University of Alaska; Institute of Marine...

  1. Phytoplankton and other data from net and bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the ACONA and other platforms as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 25 May 1976 to 31 August 1976 (NODC Accession 7700120)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Phytoplankton and other data were collected from net and bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the ACONA and other platforms from 25 May 1976 to 31 August 1976....

  2. Benthic organism and other data from grab casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER in the Gulf of Alaska as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1975-10-08 to 1975-10-16 (NODC Accession 7601793)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organism and other data were collected from grab casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER by the University of Alaska - Fairbanks; Institute of...

  3. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1977-03-29 to 1977-04-02 (NODC Accession 7700681)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN. Data...

  4. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the ACONA as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 16 February 1978 to 25 February 1978 (NODC Accession 7800444)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the ACONA. Data were collected...

  5. Marine mammal specimen and other data from the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship SURVEYOR and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1978-04-06 to 1978-09-12 (NODC Accession 8000004)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine mammal specimen and other data were collected in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship SURVEYOR and other platforms from 06 April 1978 to 12 September 1978. Data...

  6. Marine mammal specimen, CTD, and other data from the Gulf of Alaska and other locations from the ACONA and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 22 March 1978 to 28 July 1979 (NODC Accession 8000009)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine mammal specimen, CTD, and other data were collected in the Gulf of Alaska and other locations from the ACONA and other platforms from 22 March 1978 to 28 July...

  7. Marine Toxic Substance and other data from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1978-05-06 to 1978-05-16 (NODC Accession 7800684)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine Toxic Substance and other data were collected from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER. Data were collected by Pacific Marine...

  8. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship SURVEYOR as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1975-10-28 to 1975-11-17 (NODC Accession 7601830)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship SURVEYOR. Data were...

  9. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1977-03-02 to 1977-03-10 (NODC Accession 7700659)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER. Data were collected by...

  10. Marine toxic substance and other data from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program from 1976-04-13 to 1976-04-30 (NODC Accession 7601548)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance and other data were collected in the Gulf of Alaska from bottle casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER. Data were collected by Pacific Marine...

  11. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the SURVEYOR and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 22 July 1976 to 02 October 1976 (NODC Accession 7800045)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the SURVEYOR and other...

  12. Marine bird sighting and other data from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms from the Gulf of Alaska and other locations as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1976-04-26 to 1976-11-20 (NODC Accession 7900049)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sighting and other data were collected from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms in the Gulf of Alaska and other locations. Data were collected by...

  13. Physical and other data from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship RAINIER as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1975-04-28 to 1975-05-07 (NODC Accession 7601226)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and other data were collected from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship RAINIER. Data were collected by the Pacific Marine...

  14. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska and other locations from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1976-09-08 to 1976-11-19 (NODC Accession 7700461)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska and other locations from NOAA Ship...

  15. Phytoplankton and other data from net and bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN and other platforms as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1978-03-24 to 1978-08-16 (NODC Accession 7900142)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Phytoplankton and other data were collected from net and bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN and other platforms from 24 March 1978 to...

  16. Marine Toxic Substance and other data from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1976-07-19 to 1976-07-31 (NCEI Accession 7700784)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine Toxic Substance and other data were collected from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER. Data were collected by Pacific Marine...

  17. Benthic organism and other data from otter trawls and bottom grabs in the Gulf of Alaska from the NORTH PACIFIC as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 03 May 1975 to 07 August 1975 (NODC Accession 7601352)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organism and other data were collected from otter trawls and bottom grabs in the Gulf of Alaska from the NORTH PACIFIC by the University of Alaska -...

  18. Benthic organism and other data from bottom grabs from the ACONA and other platforms in the Gulf of Alaska as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 02 July 1974 to 16 May 1975 (NODC Accession 7601353)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organism and other data were collected in the Gulf of Alaska from the ACONA and other platforms by the University of Alaska - Fairbanks; Institute of Marine...

  19. Benthic organism and other data from net trawls in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1977-11-05 to 1978-11-16 (NODC Accession 8000164)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organism and other data were collected from net trawls in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN and other platforms by University of Alaska;...

  20. Benthic organism and other data from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms from the Gulf of Alaska as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1976-06-14 to 1976-09-15 (NODC Accession 7800759)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organism and other data were collected in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms by the University of Alaska; Institute of Marine...

  1. Benthic organism and other data from pipe dredge from the Gulf of Alaska and other locations NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1976-04-01 to 1976-10-29 (NODC Accession 7800538)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organism and other data were collected from a pipe drege in the Gulf of Alaska and other locations from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN and other platforms by...

  2. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the MOANA WAVE as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 19 August 1976 to 23 August 1976 (NODC Accession 7700164)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the MOANA WAVE. Data were collected by the...

  3. Marine bird sighting and other data from aircraft and other platforms from the Gulf of Alaska and other locations as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 01 March 1976 to 08 June 1976 (NODC Accession 7900046)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sighting and other data were collected from aircraft and other platforms in the Gulf of Alaska and other locations. Data were collected by the Fish and...

  4. Marine Toxic Substance and other data from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1977-04-05 to 1977-04-22 (NODC Accession 7700755)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine Toxic Substance and other data were collected from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER. Data were collected by Pacific Marine...

  5. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the MOANA WAVE as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 20 April 1976 to 20 May 1976 (NODC Accession 7601825)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the MOANA WAVE. Data...

  6. Marine toxic substance, phytoplankton, and other data from bottle casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1975-10-24 to 1976-04-13 (NODC Accession 7601545)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance, phytoplankton, and other data were collected in the Gulf of Alaska from bottle casts and other instruments from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER. Data...

  7. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the ALPHA HELIX and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 04 May 1980 to 15 May 1983 (NODC Accession 8300155)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the ALPHA HELIX and other...

  8. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1977-04-05 to 1977-06-10 (NODC Accession 7700741)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms. Data...

  9. Archive of Sidescan Sonar and Swath Bathymetry Data Collected During USGS Cruise 13CCT04 Offshore of Petit Bois Island, Gulf Islands National Seashore, Mississippi, August 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, Nancy T.; Flocks, James G.; Kindinger, Jack G.; Bernier, Julie C.; Kelso, Kyle W.; Wiese, Dana S.; Finlayson, David P.; Pfeiffer, William R.

    2015-01-01

    In August of 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a geophysical survey offshore of Petit Bois Island, Mississippi. This effort was part of the U.S. Geological Survey Gulf of Mexico Science Coordination partnership with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to assist the Mississippi Coastal Improvements Program and the Northern Gulf of Mexico Ecosystem Change and Hazards Susceptibility Project, by mapping the shallow geologic stratigraphic framework of the Mississippi Barrier Island Complex.

  10. Fundamentals of the NEA Thermochemical Database and its influence over national nuclear programs on the performance assessment of deep geological repositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragoussi, Maria-Eleni; Costa, Davide

    2017-03-14

    For the last 30 years, the NEA Thermochemical Database (TDB) Project (www.oecd-nea.org/dbtdb/) has been developing a chemical thermodynamic database for elements relevant to the safety of radioactive waste repositories, providing data that are vital to support the geochemical modeling of such systems. The recommended data are selected on the basis of strict review procedures and are characterized by their consistency. The results of these efforts are freely available, and have become an international point of reference in the field. As a result, a number of important national initiatives with regard to waste management programs have used the NEA TDB as their basis, both in terms of recommended data and guidelines. In this article we describe the fundamentals and achievements of the project together with the characteristics of some databases developed in national nuclear waste disposal programs that have been influenced by the NEA TDB. We also give some insights on how this work could be seen as an approach to be used in broader areas of environmental interest. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Variations of marine pore water salinity and chlorinity in Gulf of Alaska sediments (IODP Expedition 341)

    Science.gov (United States)

    März, Christian; Mix, Alan C.; McClymont, Erin; Nakamura, Atsunori; Berbel, Glaucia; Gulick, Sean; Jaeger, John; Schneider (LeVay), Leah

    2014-05-01

    Pore waters of marine sediments usually have salinities and chlorinities similar to the overlying sea water, ranging around 34-35 psu (Practical Salinity Units) and around 550 mM Cl-, respectively. This is because these parameters are conservative in the sense that they do not significantly participate in biogeochemical cycles. However, pore water studies carried out in the frame of the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) and its predecessors have shown that salinities and chlorinities of marine pore waters can substantially deviate from the modern bottom water composition in a number of environmental settings, and various processes have been suggested to explain these phenomena. Also during the recent IODP Expedition 341 that drilled five sites in the Gulf of Alaska (Northeast Pacific Ocean) from the deep Surveyor Fan across the continental slope to the glaciomarine shelf deposits, several occurrences of pore waters with salinities and chlorinities significantly different from respective bottom waters were encountered during shipboard analyses. At the pelagic Sites U1417 and U1418 (~4,200 and ~3,700 m water depth, respectively), salinity and chlorinity maxima occur around 20-50 m sediment depth, but values gradually decrease with increasing drilling depths (down to 30 psu in ~600 m sediment depth). While the pore water freshening at depth is most likely an effect of clay mineral dehydration due to increasing burial depth, the shallow salinity and chlorinity maxima are interpreted as relicts of more saline bottom waters that existed in the North Pacific during the Last Glacial Maximum (Adkins et al., 2002). In contrast, the glaciomarine slope and shelf deposits at Site U1419 to U1421 (~200 to 1,000 m water depth) are characterised by unexpectedly low salinitiy and chlorinity values (as low as 16 psu and 295 mM Cl-, respectively) already in very shallow sediment depths (~10 m), and their records do not show systematic trends with sediment depth. Freshening

  12. Rigless completion of deep wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelley, C.W. Jr.

    1973-03-01

    The turnkey contract arrangement appears to be the answer to many of the high cost problems associated with drilling and completion of deep gas wells. This arrangement was utilized recently on at least 2 deep Texas Panhandle area gas wells, resulting in substantial dollar savings (and quicker payout) and indirectly enabling completions to be carried out without a rig. Casing and tubing were run before the rig was released. Each of these wells was drilled and completed, and production equipment installed, for some $800,000. Some recent gas contracts in the Panhandle area have been signed in the range of 40 cents/Mcf to 50 cents/Mcf. If the wells live up to promised production rates, they will pay out in less than a year. Described in detail are the following: (1) drilling, protection casing programs; (2) production casing strings; (3) casing testing and inspection; (4) running casing; (5) completion (including perforating); and (6) well stimulation.

  13. 77 FR 42251 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Reef Fish Fishery of the Gulf of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-18

    ... crew size. In addition, due to the costs involved with carrying extra crew, there ] would be little... IFQ vessel account required to fish for, possess, or land Gulf red snapper or Gulf groupers and...

  14. Deep Wilcox structure and stratigraphy in Fandango field area, Zapata County, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, D.M.

    1984-04-01

    The Fandango field in Zapata County, Texas, is a new deep Wilcox trend extension. The deep Wilcox sands are commonly found at depths of 15,000-20,000 ft (4500-6100 m). Enough well log and seismic control exists to make an accurate integrated interpretation of regional deep Wilcox structure and stratigraphy. Deep Wilcox structure and stratigraphy are controlled by regionally extensive shale anticlines. These shale uplifts control deep Wilcox sand distribution, create large anticlines, and cause regional growth faults which frequently influence local structure. Each regional uplift presents a new exploration frontier holding the promise of vast reserves in the deep Wilcox. The history of Frio-Vicksburg exploration is analogous to the deep Wilcox trend of today. It took 40 years to expand Frio exploration from shallow stratigraphic traps down into enormous reserves in the Gulf of Mexico, because each new fault block extension was considered to mark the downdip limit of Frio production. This assumption was not true, and is not true in the deep Wilcox today. The deep Wilcox trend remains virtually unexplored, and it is my belief that continued work will prove the existence of much more deep Wilcox potential than is currently thought to exist.

  15. Deep Wilcox structure and stratigraphy in Fandango field area, Zapata County, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, D.M.

    1983-09-01

    The Fandango field in Zapata County, Texas, is a new deep Wilcox trend extension. The deep Wilcox sands are commonly found at depths of 15,000 to 20,000 ft (4,500 to 6,100 m). Enough well log and seismic control now exists to make an accurate integrated interpretation of regional deep Wilcox structure and stratigraphy. Deep Wilcox structure and stratigraphy are controlled by regionally extensive shale anticlines. These shale uplifts control deep Wilcox sand distribution, create large anticlines, and cause regional growth faults which commonly influence local structure. Each regional uplift presents a new exploration frontier holding the promise of vast reserves in the deep Wilcox. The history of Frio-Vicksburg exploration is an analogy to the deep Wilcox trend today. It took 40 years to expand Frio exploration from shallow stratigraphic tramps down into the enormous reserves in the Gulf of Mexico, because each new fault-block extension was considered to mark the downdip limit of Frio production. This was, of course, not true and is not true in the deep Wilcox today. The deep Wilcox trend remains virtually unexplored and it is the author's belief that continued work will prove the existence of much more deep Wilcox potential than is currently thought to exist.

  16. 77 FR 1405 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, LA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-10

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, LA AGENCY... the SR 384 (Grand Lake) pontoon bridge across the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, mile 231.4 West of... Lake Pontoon Bridge across the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, mile 231.5 west of Harvey Lock (WHL), at...

  17. 77 FR 18307 - Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-27

    ... addressing 1990-1991 Gulf War Veterans' illnesses. The GWVI-TF published its first annual report in September... AFFAIRS Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force Report AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Secretary Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) established the Gulf War Veterans...

  18. Deep-sea coral record of human impact on watershed quality in the Mississippi River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prouty, Nancy G.; Roark, E. Brendan; Koenig, Alan E.; Demopoulos, Amanda W. J.; Batista, Fabian C.; Kocar, Benjamin D.; Selby, David; McCarthy, Matthew D.; Mienis, Furu

    2014-01-01

    One of the greatest drivers of historical nutrient and sediment transport into the Gulf of Mexico is the unprecedented scale and intensity of land use change in the Mississippi River Basin. These landscape changes are linked to enhanced fluxes of carbon and nitrogen pollution from the Mississippi River, and persistent eutrophication and hypoxia in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Increased terrestrial runoff is one hypothesis for recent enrichment in bulk nitrogen isotope (δ15N) values, a tracer for nutrient source, observed in a Gulf of Mexico deep-sea coral record. However, unambiguously linking anthropogenic land use change to whole scale shifts in downstream Gulf of Mexico biogeochemical cycles is difficult. Here we present a novel approach, coupling a new tracer of agro-industrialization to a multiproxy record of nutrient loading in long-lived deep-sea corals collected in the Gulf of Mexico. We found that coral bulk δ15N values are enriched over the last 150–200 years relative to the last millennia, and compound-specific amino acid δ15N data indicate a strong increase in baseline δ15N of nitrate as the primary cause. Coral rhenium (Re) values are also strongly elevated during this period, suggesting that 34% of Re is of anthropogenic origin, consistent with Re enrichment in major world rivers. However, there are no pre-anthropogenic measurements of Re to confirm this observation. For the first time, an unprecedented record of natural and anthropogenic Re variability is documented through coral Re records. Taken together, these novel proxies link upstream changes in water quality to impacts on the deep-sea coral ecosystem.

  19. Deep learning relevance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lioma, Christina; Larsen, Birger; Petersen, Casper

    2016-01-01

    train a Recurrent Neural Network (RNN) on existing relevant information to that query. We then use the RNN to "deep learn" a single, synthetic, and we assume, relevant document for that query. We design a crowdsourcing experiment to assess how relevant the "deep learned" document is, compared...... to existing relevant documents. Users are shown a query and four wordclouds (of three existing relevant documents and our deep learned synthetic document). The synthetic document is ranked on average most relevant of all....

  20. Zooplankton variation in relation to hydrology in an enclosed hypoxic bay (Amvrakikos Gulf, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. KEHAYIAS

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the temporal and spatial variation of the zooplankton community of a hypoxic coastal embayment (Amvrakikos Gulf, western Greece in relation to hydrological characteristics during an annual cycle. The main hydrological feature was the prolonged water stratification, which determined hypoxic conditions in the deeper layers that became anoxic close to the bottom in September, while vertical mixing occurred for a very short period (October-November. The total zooplankton abundance fluctuated between 44.6 and 159.7 ind l-1. Fourteen groups were recorded, among which copepods dominated accounting on average for 86.4 %. Most of the groups presented higher abundance values in winter and spring when increased chlorophyll-α concentrations were found. Oxygen depletion affects the vertical distribution of most zooplankton groups and the vertical habitat partitioning between copepod orders and their ontogenetic stages. Several taxa were recorded even in the deep, anoxic layers, but only the polychaete larvae increased in abundance with depth. Calanoids, appendicularians and bivalve larvae presented eastward decrease of abundance in the deepest layers following the same pattern of oxygen decrease. Notwithstanding hypoxic conditions in its deepest layers, Amvrakikos Gulf was accounted for a mesotrophic ecosystem, with the nutrient concentration being lower than in the past. Several biotic elements indicate that the gulf is in a transitional phase towards a better quality state and these results reinforce the need for consistent monitoring of this ecosystem.

  1. Interaction of anticyclonic eddies with the topography in the western Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenreiro, M. C.; Candela, J.

    2016-02-01

    The western Gulf of Mexico (GoM) is strongly dominated by the presence of Loop Current eddies (LCEs) ( 100-200 km diameter), in particular the region north of 22oN they impinge on the slope and continental shelf, interact with the topography, and dissipate. These anticyclonic coherent structures are important because they trap and transport westward heat, salt, and tracers across the Gulf. The propagation of coastal trapped waves (or Topographic Rossby Waves, TRWs) in the western Gulf of Mexico which propagate anticlockwise along the topography has been strongly discussed during the last several years, however, the generation mechanism of these subinertial waves is still unknown. It has been proposed that the TRWs could be forced by meridional Loop Current vacillations, LCE shedding, or directly by LCEs. Total velocity measurements have been made in the western and southwestern part of the GoM using 30 moorings highly instrumented with acoustic Doppler current profilers that sampled continuously the water column from the near-surface to the bottom at one hour resolution during more than 5 years (July 2008 - October 2013). Spatial decorrelation scales were estimated from the space-time dataset and then used to interpolate objectively in order to get maps of the regional circulation at constant depth levels. Several features are discussed; in particular it is shown deep coherent structures (dipoles) coupled with upper ocean LCEs and the dissipation of these LCEs by generation of topographic wave energy.

  2. 76 FR 64248 - Gulf of Mexico Reef Fish Fishery; Closure of the 2011 Gulf of Mexico Commercial Sector for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-18

    ... Fishery; Closure of the 2011 Gulf of Mexico Commercial Sector for Greater Amberjack AGENCY: National...: Temporary rule; closure. SUMMARY: NMFS closes the commercial sector for greater amberjack in the exclusive... Gulf greater amberjack resource. DATES: The closure of the commercial sector for Gulf greater amberjack...

  3. 78 FR 28146 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Shrimp Fishery of the Gulf of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    ... prevent the waste of brown shrimp that would be discarded in fishing operations because of their small... INFORMATION: The Gulf shrimp fishery is managed under the Fishery Management Plan for the Shrimp Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico (FMP). The FMP was prepared by the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council and is...

  4. 76 FR 75488 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Spiny Lobster Fishery of the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-02

    ... Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Spiny Lobster Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico and South... 10 to the Fishery Management Plan for the Spiny Lobster Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico and South... Councils (Councils). This rule revises the lobster species contained within the fishery management unit...

  5. 77 FR 25116 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Spiny Lobster Fishery of the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-27

    ..., Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Spiny Lobster Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic... Amendment 11 to the Fishery Management Plan for the Spiny Lobster Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico and South... lobster fishing using trap gear in certain areas in the exclusive economic zone off the Florida Keys to...

  6. 75 FR 64171 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Reef Fish Fishery of the Gulf of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-19

    ... reached by October 28, 2010. This closure is necessary to prevent overfishing of Gulf greater amberjack... legal requirements to prevent and end overfishing and rebuild greater amberjack in the Gulf. On August 4... prevent overfishing of Gulf greater amberjack and increase the likelihood that the 2010 quota will not be...

  7. 76 FR 13122 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Reef Fish Fishery of the Gulf of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-10

    ..., Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Reef Fish Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico; Greater Amberjack... may submit attachments to electronic comments in Microsoft Word, Excel, WordPerfect, or Adobe PDF file...-5305; fax: 727-824-5308. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The reef fish fishery of the Gulf of Mexico is...

  8. Estimating hydrologic budgets for six Persian Gulf watersheds, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Majid; Ghafouri, Mohammad; Tabatabaei, MahmoudReza; Goodarzi, Masoud; Mokarian, Zeinab

    2017-10-01

    Estimation of the major components of the hydrologic budget is important for determining the impacts on the water supply and quality of either planned or proposed land management projects, vegetative changes, groundwater withdrawals, and reservoir management practices and plans. As acquisition of field data is costly and time consuming, models have been created to test various land use practices and their concomitant effects on the hydrologic budget of watersheds. To simulate such management scenarios realistically, a model should be able to simulate the individual components of the hydrologic budget. The main objective of this study is to perform the SWAT2012 model for estimation of hydrological budget in six subbasin of Persian Gulf watershed; Golgol, Baghan, Marghab Shekastian, Tangebirim and Daragah, which are located in south and south west of Iran during 1991-2009. In order to evaluate the performance of the model, hydrological data, soil map, land use map and digital elevation model (DEM) are obtained and prepared for each catchment to run the model. SWAT-CUP with SUFI2 program was used for simulation, uncertainty and validation with 95 Percent Prediction Uncertainty. Coefficient of determination ( R 2) and Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient (NS) were used for evaluation of the model simulation results. Comparison of measured and predicted values demonstrated that each component of the model gave reasonable output and that the interaction among components was realistic. The study has produced a technique with reliable capability for annual and monthly water budget components in Persian Gulf watershed.

  9. Fisheries-Independent Biological and Environmental Trawl Data from the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (1986-2007) as Part of the Comparative Assessment of Gulf Estuarine Systems (CAGES) Database (NODC Accession 0115183)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The CAGES program (Comparative Assessment of Gulf Estuarine Systems) is designed to examine the differences between estuarine ecosystems and investigate why some are...

  10. Gulf Watch Alaska Nearshore Component: Black Oystercatcher Nest Density and Chick Diets Data from Prince William Sound, Katmai National Park and Preserve, and Kenai Fjords National Park, 2006-2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data is part of the Gulf Watch Alaska (GWA) long term monitoring program, nearshore monitoring component. Specifically, these data describe black oystercatcher...

  11. Fisheries-Independent Biological and Environmental Trawl Data from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (1989-2005) as Part of the Comparative Assessment of Gulf Estuarine Systems (CAGES) Database (NODC Accession 0115183)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The CAGES program (Comparative Assessment of Gulf Estuarine Systems) is designed to examine the differences between estuarine ecosystems and investigate why some are...

  12. Fisheries-Independent Biological and Environmental Trawl Data from the Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (1981-2007) as Part of the Comparative Assessment of Gulf Estuarine Systems (CAGES) Database (NODC Accession 0115183)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The CAGES program (Comparative Assessment of Gulf Estuarine Systems) is designed to examine the differences between estuarine ecosystems and investigate why some are...

  13. Physical, chemical, and deepwater current profiles collected from CTD, XBT, and ADCP moorings in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico from January 19, 2005 to January 28, 2006 (NODC Accession 0070922)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Minerals Management Service (MMS) program entitled Survey of Deepwater Currents in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico, awarded to Evans-Hamilton, Inc. This data set...

  14. Fisheries-Independent Biological and Environmental Trawl Data from the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (1982-2005) as Part of the Comparative Assessment of Gulf Estuarine Systems (CAGES) Database (NODC Accession 0115183)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The CAGES program (Comparative Assessment of Gulf Estuarine Systems) is designed to examine the differences between estuarine ecosystems and investigate why some are...

  15. Gulf International Conference on Applied Mathematics 2013

    CERN Document Server

    Advances in Applied Mathematics

    2014-01-01

    This volume contains contributions from the Gulf International Conference in Applied Mathematics, held at the Gulf University for Science & Technology. The proceedings reflects the three major themes of the conference. The first of these was mathematical biology, including a keynote address by Professor Philip Maini. The second theme was computational science/numerical analysis, including a keynote address by Professor Grigorii Shishkin. The conference also addressed more general applications topics, with papers in business applications, fluid mechanics, optimization, scheduling problems, and engineering applications, as well as a keynote by Professor Ali Nayfeh.

  16. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OWNER

    CONCLUSION: Deep Venous Thrombosis is a common disease with fatal and serious long term burdensome complications. ... WAJM 2009; 28(2): 77–82. Keywords: Deep Vein Thrombosis, Venous Thrombosis,. Phlebothrombosis. ... phlebitic syndrome, ulcers and varicose veins. In surgical patients with malignant disease ...

  17. Holocene tsunamigenic sediments and tsunami modelling in the Thermaikos Gulf area (northern Greece)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reicherter, Klaus; Papanikolaou, Ioannis D.; Roger, Jean; Grützner, Christoph; Stamatis, Georgios; Papanikolaou, Dimitrios

    2010-05-01

    Shallow drill cores in flat and southerly exposed coastal areas around the Thermaikos Gulf (Thessalonica, northern Greece) provided evidence for past high energy sedimentary events, which are interpreted as tsunamites. A tsunamigenic source is located along the western tip of the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ) in the North Aegean Basin, where water depths ranging between 1.200 and 1.650 m are sufficiently deep to generate tsunamis. However, the event layers up to now cannot be assigned to individual seismic or landslide sources, but the potential of a tsunami threat in the Thermaikos Gulf area can now be tested, following both sedimentological and modelling processes. Such potential threat regarding the Thermaikos Gulf has only recently been notified but never tested and studied in depth. As a result, several Holocene coarse clastic layers have been found intercalated in clayey or gypsiferous lagoonal deposits. These layers have erosive bases, show fining-up and thinning-up sequences, and include shell debris, foraminifera and rip-up clasts of lagoonal sediments. A widely observed significant feature of these layers involves mud-coated beach clasts, clasts that rework the high-plasticity clays of lagoons. Such features that indicate highly disturbed sedimentological condition (hyperpyncal flows) are rarely described elsewhere. Multiple intercalations of these layers with all the mentioned indicative features downhole are interpreted paleotsunami deposits from tsunamis generated by earthquakes or earthquake-triggered submarine landslides triggered by seismic shaking in the Thermaikos Gulf. Modelling of the tsunami potential of the basin-bounding fault southwards of the Thermaikos Gulf provides an example for possible tsunami generation at only one segment of NAFZ along an approx. 55 km normal fault at the southern fault-bound margin of the North Aegean Basin. The Herodotus Histories report on inundations and sea withdrawals occurring during the Greek-Persian war

  18. Protocols for long-term monitoring of seabird ecology in the Gulf of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatt, John F.; Byrd, G. Vernon; Harding, Ann M.A.; Kettle, Arthur B.; Kitaysky, Sasha; Litzow, Michael A.; Roseneau, David G.; Shultz, Michael T.; van Pelt, Thomas I.

    2003-01-01

    Seabird populations will need to be monitored for many years to assess both recovery and ecological conditions affecting recovery. Detailed studies of individual seabird colonies and marine ecosystems in the Gulf of Alaska have been conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service under the auspices of damage assessment and restoration programs of the Trustee Council. Much has been learned about factors influencing seabird populations and their capacity to recover from the spill in the Gulf of Alaska. As the restoration program moves toward long-term monitoring of populations, however, protocols and long-term monitoring strategies that focus on key parameters of interest and that are inexpensive, practical, and applicable over a large geographic area need to be developed.

  19. Atlas of Northern Gulf of Mexico Gas and Oil Reservoirs: Procedures and examples of resource distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seni, S.J.; Finley, R.J.

    1995-06-01

    The objective of the program is to produce a reservoir atlas series of the Gulf of Mexico that (1) classifies and groups offshore oil and gas reservoirs into a series of geologically defined reservoir plays, (2) compiles comprehensive reservoir play information that includes descriptive and quantitative summaries of play characteristics, cumulative production, reserves, original oil and gas in place, and various other engineering and geologic data, (3) provides detailed summaries of representative type reservoirs for each play, and (4) organizes computerized tables of reservoir engineering data into a geographic information system (GIS). The primary product of the program will be an oil and gas atlas series of the offshore Northern Gulf of Mexico and a computerized geographical information system of geologic and engineering data linked to reservoir location.

  20. [Deep neck infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Katarzyna; Szyfter, Witold

    2006-01-01

    Deep neck infection is relatively rare but potentially life threatening complication of common oropharyngeal infections. This retrospective study was aimed at analyzing the occurrence of complications, diagnostic methods and proper management of deep neck infection. A review was conducted in 32 cases who were diagnosed as having deep neck infection from 1995 to 2005. The causes of deep neck infections were tonsillitis (16 cases), tooth diseases (6 cases), paratonsillar abscess (4 cases), parotitis (1 case), pussy lymphonodes after tonsillectomy (2 cases), pussy congenital neck cyst (1 case), chronic otitis media (1 case), parotitis (1 case), foreign body of the esophagus (1 case). All the puss bacterial cultivation were positive. All the patients were treated by different ways of chirurgical drainage and use of large dosage of antibiotics. Deep neck infection should be suspected in patients with long lasting fever and painful swelling of the neck and treatment should begin quick as possible.

  1. Autonomous robotics and deep learning

    CERN Document Server

    Nath, Vishnu

    2014-01-01

    This Springer Brief examines the combination of computer vision techniques and machine learning algorithms necessary for humanoid robots to develop "true consciousness." It illustrates the critical first step towards reaching "deep learning," long considered the holy grail for machine learning scientists worldwide. Using the example of the iCub, a humanoid robot which learns to solve 3D mazes, the book explores the challenges to create a robot that can perceive its own surroundings. Rather than relying solely on human programming, the robot uses physical touch to develop a neural map of its en

  2. 78 FR 46923 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Snapper-Grouper Fishery off the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-02

    ... economic and social impacts on fishery participants. Additionally, exceeding recreational ACLs could have... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-BA53 Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico... considering development of a recreational data collection program that would be linked to the use of harvest...

  3. 76 FR 14040 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Central and Western Gulf of Mexico, Oil and Gas Lease Sales for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... possible conflicts between future OCS oil and gas activities that may result from the proposed sales and... Western Gulf of Mexico, Oil and Gas Lease Sales for Years 2012-2017 AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy... (GOM) Planning Areas to be included in the OCS Oil and Gas Leasing Program for 2012-2017. Ten lease...

  4. 78 FR 45557 - Gulf of Mexico, Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Western Planning Area (WPA) Oil and Gas Lease Sale...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-29

    ... (WPA) Oil and Gas Lease Sale 233 AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), Interior. ACTION... WPA Lease Sale 233 on the Gulf of Mexico OCS Oil and Gas Lease Sales: 2013-2014; Western Planning Area... second WPA lease sale scheduled in the Proposed Final Outer Continental Shelf Oil & Gas Leasing Program...

  5. Submesoscale structures related to upwelling events in the Gulf of Finland, Baltic Sea (numerical experiments)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Väli, Germo; Zhurbas, Victor; Lips, Urmas; Laanemets, Jaan

    2017-07-01

    The appearance of submesoscale structures in the Gulf of Finland was investigated using model simulations for series of coastal upwelling events in July-September 2006. We applied the Princeton Ocean Model. The horizontal step of the model grid was refined to 0.5, 0.25 and 0.125 nautical miles in the gulf and reached 4 times the resolution in the rest of the Baltic Sea; there were 60 σ-levels in the vertical direction for all simulations. The contribution of salinity to the strength of baroclinic front of upwelling along the northern and southern coasts and thereby to the submesoscale dynamics of the gulf's surface layer was analyzed. Model results with refinement of the grid size to 0.125 nautical miles revealed different forms of submesoscale structures in the gulf's surface layer such as the high Rossby number (Ro) threads (elongated spots of Ro > 1 with typical width and length of 2-3 km and 10-50 km, respectively), cyclonic vortices with Ro > 1 core of 4-6 km diameter, and spiral cyclonic eddies (spirally wrapped high Rossby number threads) of 10-15 km diameter. The high potential vorticity threads presumably formed during the development phase, while the cyclonic vortices and spiral cyclonic eddies during the relaxation phase of upwelling. One of the simulated submesoscale cyclonic eddies, at the beginning with the Ro > 1 core extension as deep as 31-66 m was traced for the period of 33 days. The power spectral density of temperature and velocity fluctuations in the surface layer pointed at some increase of spectral levels and shallowing of spectral slopes towards - 2 on the shorter (submesoscale) wavelengths with the refinement of model grid.

  6. Tectono-sedimentary evolution of Gulf of Gabes (Southern Tunisia) during Mezozoic-Cenozoic periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayech, Malek; Soumaya, Abdelkader; Ben Ayed, Noureddine; Hedi Inoubli, Mohamed; Delvaux, Damien; Belkhiria, Wajdi

    2017-04-01

    In order to reconstruct the tectono-sedimentary evolution of Gulf of Gabes (Southern Tunisia), a seismo-stratigraphic analysis of single and multichannel seismic reflection profiles has been carried out. High-resolution 2D seismic profiles allow us to identify, between 20 and 40 km offshore the Gulf of Gabes, a wide deformation zone, characterized by a set of NW-SE and E-W striking fault segments related to a polyphasic activity. Within this region, we observe: 1) NW-SE Cretaceous normal faults; 2) local transpression structures attested by well-defined compressive features like push-up, fault-bend anticlines and folds; 3) angular unconformities below the Cenomanian deposits; 4) NW-SE striking Neogene normal faults. The major unconformity is at the base of the Cenomanian Zebbag formation. Based on the available sections, this unconformity is determined to have been formed by uplift, erosion or rotated fault blocks essentially during the Mesozoic period. In conjunction with the currently tectonic background, the following conclusions are suggested: the unconformities at the bases of the Cenomanian formations are most likely related to large scale uplift during Aptian-Albian time or may be related to reactivation of the Northern Chott dextral slip fault in the upper Aptian. In Neogene rocks, we observed a normal oblique and strike slip reactivation of inherited NW-SE and E-W faults as a consequence of the NW- Africa/Europe convergence. With regard to active tectonics, recent GPS data and local seismicity events in the Gulf of Gabes suggest that this deformation pattern could be still active and accomplished through deep-buried structures. The Gulf of Gabes was active since the Mesozoic to present day and several periods of tectonic deformation.

  7. A retrospective view of the development of the Gulf of Bothnia ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuosa, Harri; Fleming-Lehtinen, Vivi; Lehtinen, Sirpa; Lehtiniemi, Maiju; Nygård, Henrik; Raateoja, Mika; Raitaniemi, Jari; Tuimala, Jarno; Uusitalo, Laura; Suikkanen, Sanna

    2017-03-01

    We analysed long-term monitoring data from 1979 to 2012 in the Gulf of Bothnia, the northernmost extension of the Baltic Sea, to examine changes in the summer food web structure, and to reveal the factors causing the observed changes. Of the two sub-basins in the Gulf of Bothnia, the Bothnian Sea is more dynamic in its hydrography and food web structure than the Bothnian Bay, due to the variable influence of the more eutrophic and more saline Baltic Proper. Variation in deep-water intrusion from the main Baltic Proper, and its effect on salinity and stratification, had a clear effect on the phyto- and zooplankton communities in the Bothnian Sea. Probably due to this intrusion, the nutrient status in this basin has also changed in terms of nitrogen limitation, with subsequent class- and genus-level changes in phytoplankton community composition. The migration of cod to the Bothnian Sea during the 1980s had profound effects on the herring population, but cascading effects affecting the basis of the food web were not obvious. In contrast to a more pronounced interplay of both top-down control and bottom-up nutrient limitation of the Bothnian Sea, the Bothnian Bay food web was mostly driven by hydrography and climate, and major changes were observed in the basis of the food web. Community changes were observed in both basins in the Gulf of Bothnia throughout the entire time period. Human influence considerably affects both the basis of the food web and its very top, where man has replaced the natural top predators. Though the eutrophication status of the Gulf has been rather stable, the results indicate that the potential symptoms should be surveyed specifically in the Bothnian Sea, and that management of Baltic herring stocks requires an understanding, and thus monitoring, of the entire food web.

  8. The Gemini Deep Deep Survey and Integrated Spectra of Galaxies in the Redshift Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savaglio, S.; Glazebrook, K.; Abraham, R. G.; Crampton, D.; Chen, H.-W.; McCarthy, P. J. P.; Jorgensen, I.; Roth, K. C.; Hook, I. M.; Marzke, R. O.; Murowinski, R. G.; Carlberg, R. G.

    2003-12-01

    The Gemini Deep Deep Survey (GDDS) is an infrared-selected ultra-deep spectroscopic program aiming to investigate galaxies in the redshift interval 1 1 galaxies are at the most 5 Gyr old, it is easier to understand their underlying stellar populations. Using the multi-object spectrograph at the Gemini North telescope, combined with the nod and shuffle technique, we have detected a number of interesting galaxies showing very different spectral features, from blue star-forming, to red quiescent, to ``k+a" post starburst. To identify the nature of these objects, we use the newly proposed spectral synthesis models able to deal with young/metal poor stellar systems.

  9. Trends in marine debris in the U.S. Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico, 1996-2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribic, Christine; Seba B. Sheavly,; Rugg, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Marine debris is a widespread and globally recognized problem. Sound information is necessary to understand the extent of the problem and to inform resource managers and policy makers about potential mitigation strategies. Although there are many short-term studies on marine debris, a longer-term perspective and the ability to compare among regions has heretofore been missing in the U.S. Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico. We used data from a national beach monitoring program to evaluate and compare amounts, composition, and trends of indicator marine debris in the U.S. Caribbean (Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands) and the Gulf of Mexico from 1996 to 2003. Indicator items provided a standardized set that all surveys collected; each was assigned a probable source: ocean-based, land-based, or general-source. Probable ocean-based debris was related to activities such as recreational boating/fishing, commercial fishing and activities on oil/gas platforms. Probable land-based debris was related to land-based recreation and sewer systems. General-source debris represented plastic items that can come from either ocean- or land-based sources; these items were plastic bags, strapping bands, and plastic bottles (excluding motor oil containers). Debris loads were similar between the U.S. Caribbean and the western Gulf of Mexico; however, debris composition on U.S. Caribbean beaches was dominated by land-based indicators while the western Gulf of Mexico was dominated by ocean-based indicators. Beaches along the eastern Gulf of Mexico had the lowest counts of debris; composition was dominated by land-based indicators, similar to that found for the U.S. Caribbean. Debris loads on beaches in the Gulf of Mexico are likely affected by Gulf circulation patterns, reducing loads in the eastern Gulf and increasing loads in the western Gulf. Over the seven years of monitoring, we found a large linear decrease in total indicator debris, as well as all source categories, for the U

  10. Benthic faunal assemblages from the Holocene middle shelf of the South Evoikos Gulf, central Greece, and their palaeoenvironmental implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asimina Louvari, Markella; Tsourou, Theodora; Drinia, Hara; Anastasakis, George

    2013-04-01

    South Evoikos Gulf is an elongate, WNW - ESE trending basin, 60 km long and 15 km wide. Its floor slopes towards the south-east where the basin connects with the Aegean Sea across a 55 m deep sill. The hydrographic network of the area is characterized by Asopos river the small Lilas River and some other ephemeral streams. A sedimentary record spanning the last 13000 calyr BP was recovered at N 38°12'23.1228" E 24°8'14.2404", water depth 70 m, in this gulf. A total of 52 samples from the lower half of the core were quantitatively analyzed for micropalaeontological (benthic foraminifera and ostracods) study in order to reconstruct palaeoenvironmental conditions. This work contributes to the evaluation of the modern environmental problems in South Evoikos Gulf (hypoxia, ecosystem changes, subaquatic vegetation die-off, metal pollution) within the context of the palaeoenvironmental record. In the investigated core, the benthic microfaunal assemblages indicate a marine coastal environment with a gradual transition from a circalittoral to an infralittoral restricted environment. The basal part of the record is characterized by Haynesina depressula Assemblage, which is composed of Haynesina depressula, Textularia agglutinans and Bulimina aculeata.The abundance of Haynesina depressula could be associated with normal marine conditions, but always with periodic brackish water influence. The species composed this assemblage, which are almost all typically infaunal, characterize sediments with a high or medium-high muddy fraction, rich in organic matter available for the organisms that live within the sediment, and low salinity bottom water. Samples from the upper unit of the core indicate a nearshore, inner-shelf facies less than 50 m deep. Common inner-shelf species in these samples include Ammonia beccarii together with Bulimina marginata (Sgarrella & Moncharmont Zei, 1993). The highest abundance of A. beccarii is found between 15 and 20 m water-depth in samples with

  11. Deep Echo State Network (DeepESN): A Brief Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Gallicchio, Claudio; Micheli, Alessio

    2017-01-01

    The study of deep recurrent neural networks (RNNs) and, in particular, of deep Reservoir Computing (RC) is gaining an increasing research attention in the neural networks community. The recently introduced deep Echo State Network (deepESN) model opened the way to an extremely efficient approach for designing deep neural networks for temporal data. At the same time, the study of deepESNs allowed to shed light on the intrinsic properties of state dynamics developed by hierarchical compositions ...

  12. Coastal sensitivity mapping of Gulf of Kachchh and Gulf of Cambay, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    ManiMurali, R.; Boora, P.; Vethamony, P.

    as it provides fast way of data collection and cheap with respect to field data collection. In the present study, satellite data of medium resolution alongwith topographic map was successfully applied in ESI mapping. Satellite images of IRSP6 sensor with 23... regions to oil spills. This research focuses on improving information about coastal environment mapping from remote sensing and GIS technology to generate maps of environmental sensitivity index for oil spill in Gulf of Kachchh and Gulf of Cambay...

  13. Gulf of Mexico low-frequency ocean soundscape impacted by airguns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Sean M; Hall, Jesse M; Thayre, Bruce J; Hildebrand, John A

    2016-07-01

    The ocean soundscape of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) has not been well-studied, although it is an important habitat for marine mammals, including sperm and beaked whales, many dolphin species, and a potentially endangered baleen whale species. The GOM is also home to high levels of hydrocarbon exploration and extraction, heavily used commercial shipping ports, and significant fishery industry activity, all of which are known contributors to oceanic noise. From 2010-2013, the soundscape of three deep and two shallow water sites in the GOM were monitored over 10 - 1000 Hz. Average sound pressure spectrum levels were high, >90 dB re 1 μPa(2)/Hz at seismic exploration airguns. More moderate sound pressure levels, 700 Hz, were present at a shallow water site in the northeastern Gulf, removed from the zone of industrial development and bathymetrically shielded from deep water anthropogenic sound sources. During passage of a high wind event (Hurricane Isaac, 2012), sound pressure levels above 200 Hz increased with wind speed, but at low frequencies (<100 Hz) sound pressure levels decreased owing to absence of noise from airguns.

  14. Trophic structure of macrobenthos in the Gulf of St. Lawrence and on the Scotian Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desrosiers, G.; Savenkoff, C.; Olivier, M.; Stora, G.; Juniper, K.; Caron, A.; Gagné, J.-P.; Legendre, L.; Mulsow, S.; Grant, J.; Roy, S.; Grehan, A.; Scaps, P.; Silverberg, N.; Klein, B.; Tremblay, J.-E.; Therriault, J.-C.

    2000-04-01

    The Gulf of St. Lawrence and Scotian Shelf provide a diversity of oceanographic conditions in a continental margin setting. Climate is markedly seasonal, and bathymetry and hydrodynamic conditions cover a broad range, significantly influencing the patterns of organic matter sedimentation and, potentially, benthic community dynamics. Samples for analysis of benthic macrofauna and sediment microorganisms were collected at six stations in the Gulf of St. Lawrence (GSL) and the Scotian Shelf during winter and summer cruises, as part of the Canadian Joint Global Ocean Flux Study. Multivariate analyses indicate significant site-related trends in trophic guilds, benthic assemblages, and microbial activity, some of which are related to geomorphological characteristics (bathymetry, topography, and substratum). Macrofaunal trophic guild data show that the stations with relatively deep settling basins (Cabot Strait and Emerald Basin), dominated by surface deposit feeders, were distinct from stations with sloping bottoms (Anticosti Gyre and Anticosti Channel), where subsurface deposit feeders dominated or surface and subsurface deposit feeders were equally abundant. Deposit feeders (surface and subsurface trophic groups) made up >60% of the benthic communities, except at the Scotian slope station where they represented 44% of the total benthic abundances. Based on the data collected in both the water column and the sediment at three deep stations in the GSL, we hypothesize that the proportion of surface and subsurface deposit feeders, and thus the nature of bioturbation activity, is related to the magnitude and pattern of organic matter supply from the euphotic zone.

  15. Time-domain incomplete Gauss-Newton full-waveform inversion of Gulf of Mexico data

    KAUST Repository

    AlTheyab, Abdullah

    2013-09-22

    We apply the incomplete Gauss-Newton full-waveform inversion (TDIGN-FWI) to Gulf of Mexico (GOM) data in the space-time domain. In our application, iterative least-squares reverse-time migration (LSRTM) is used to estimate the model update at each non-linear iteration, and the number of LSRTM iterations is progressively increased after each non-linear iteration. With this method, model updating along deep reflection wavepaths are automatically enhanced, which in turn improves imaging below the reach of diving-waves. The forward and adjoint operators are implemented in the space-time domain to simultaneously invert the data over a range of frequencies. A multiscale approach is used where higher frequencies are down-weighted significantly at early iterations, and gradually included in the inversion. Synthetic data results demonstrate the effectiveness of reconstructing both the high- and low-wavenumber features in the model without relying on diving waves in the inversion. Results with Gulf of Mexico field data show a significantly improved migration image in both the shallow and deep sections.

  16. Tectonoestratigraphic and Thermal Models of the Tiburon and Wagner Basins, northern Gulf of California Rift System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, J.; Ramirez Zerpa, N. A.; Negrete-Aranda, R.

    2014-12-01

    The northern Gulf of California Rift System consist sofa series faults that accommodate both normal and strike-slip motion. The faults formed a series of half-greens filled with more than 7 km of siliciclastic suc­cessions. Here, we present tectonostratigraphic and heat flow models for the Tiburón basin, in the southern part of the system, and the Wag­ner basin in the north. The models are constrained by two-dimensional seis­mic lines and by two deep boreholes drilled by PEMEX­-PEP. Analysis of the seismic lines and models' results show that: (i) subsidence of the basins is controlled by high-angle normal faults and by flow of the lower crust, (ii) basins share a common history, and (iii) there are significant differences in the way brittle strain was partitioned in the basins, a feature frequently observed in rift basins. On one hand, the bounding faults of the Tiburón basin have a nested geometry and became active following a west-to-east sequence of activation. The Tiburon half-graben was formed by two pulses of fault activity. One took place during the protogulf extensional phase in the Miocene and the other during the opening of Gulf of California in the Pleistocene. On the other hand, the Wagner basin is the result of two fault generations. During the late-to middle Miocene, the west-dipping Cerro Prieto and San Felipe faults formed a domino array. Then, during the Pleistocene the Consag and Wagner faults dissected the hanging-wall of the Cerro Prieto fault forming the modern Wagner basin. Thermal modeling of the deep borehole temperatures suggests that the heat flow in these basins in the order of 110 mW/m2 which is in agreement with superficial heat flow measurements in the northern Gulf of California Rift System.

  17. 78 FR 42021 - Atlantic Highly Migratory Species; Commercial Gulf of Mexico Aggregated Large Coastal Shark and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-15

    ... Species; Commercial Gulf of Mexico Aggregated Large Coastal Shark and Gulf of Mexico Hammerhead Shark... management groups for aggregated large coastal sharks (LCS) and hammerhead sharks in the Gulf of Mexico...: The commercial Gulf of Mexico aggregated LCS and Gulf of Mexico hammerhead shark management groups are...

  18. Deep learning in bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Seonwoo; Lee, Byunghan; Yoon, Sungroh

    2017-09-01

    In the era of big data, transformation of biomedical big data into valuable knowledge has been one of the most important challenges in bioinformatics. Deep learning has advanced rapidly since the early 2000s and now demonstrates state-of-the-art performance in various fields. Accordingly, application of deep learning in bioinformatics to gain insight from data has been emphasized in both academia and industry. Here, we review deep learning in bioinformatics, presenting examples of current research. To provide a useful and comprehensive perspective, we categorize research both by the bioinformatics domain (i.e. omics, biomedical imaging, biomedical signal processing) and deep learning architecture (i.e. deep neural networks, convolutional neural networks, recurrent neural networks, emergent architectures) and present brief descriptions of each study. Additionally, we discuss theoretical and practical issues of deep learning in bioinformatics and suggest future research directions. We believe that this review will provide valuable insights and serve as a starting point for researchers to apply deep learning approaches in their bioinformatics studies. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Fish larvae from the Gulf of California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Aceves-Medina

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Taxonomic composition of fish larvae was analysed from 464 plankton samples obtained during 10 oceanographic surveys in the Gulf of California between 1984 and 1988. We identified 283 taxa: 173 species, 57 genera, and 53 families. Tropical and subtropical species predominated except during the winter, when temperate-subarctic species were dominant. The most abundant species were the mesopelagic Benthosema panamense, Triphoturus mexicanus and Vinciguerria lucetia, but the coastal pelagic species Engraulis mordax, Opisthonema spp., Sardinops caeruleus and Scomber japonicus were also prominent. The taxonomic composition of the ichthyoplankton shows the seasonality of the Gulf as well as environmental changes that occurred between the 1984-1987 warm period and the 1956-1957 cool period previously reported. The presence of E. mordax larvae as one of the most abundant species in the Gulf provides evidence of the reproduction of this species two years before the development of the northern anchovy fishery and the decline of the sardine fishery in the Gulf of California.

  20. Fishery potential of the Gulf of Kachchh

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, V.R.; Govindan, K.; Ramaiah, Neelam; Gajbhiye, S.N.

    /h) was three times more productive than the creek (av. 2.3 kg/h). The number of species found in the Gulf and creek were respectively 34 and 20 suggesting good biodiversity of the living resources of the area....

  1. A vorticity budget for the Gulf Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bras, Isabela; Toole, John

    2017-04-01

    We develop a depth-averaged vorticity budget framework to diagnose the dynamical balance of the Gulf Stream, and apply this framework to observations and the ECCO state estimate (Wunsch and Heimbach 2013) above the thermocline in the subtropical North Atlantic. Using the hydrographic and ADCP data along the WOCE/CLIVAR section A22 and a variety of wind stress data products, we find that the advective vorticity flux out of the western region is on the same order as the wind stress forcing over the eastern portion of the gyre. This is consistent with a large-scale balance between a negative source of vorticity from wind stress forcing and a positive source of vorticity in the western region. Additionally, the form of the vorticity flux indicates that the Gulf Stream has a significant inertial component. In the ECCO state estimate, we diagnose a seasonal cycle in advective vorticity flux across a meridional section associated with seasonal fluctuations in Gulf Stream transport. This vorticity flux is forced by wind stress over the eastern subtropical North Atlantic and balanced by lateral friction with the western boundary. The lateral friction in ECCO is a necessary parameterization of smaller scale processes that occur in the real ocean, and quantifying these remains an open and interesting question. This simplified framework provides a means to interpret large scale ocean dynamics. In our application, it points to wind stress forcing over the subtropical North Altantic as an important regulator of the Gulf Stream and hence the climate system.

  2. CLARIIDAE) FROM THE MWANZA GULF, LAKE VICTORIA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. Seventeen species of parasites were recovered from 107 I Clarias gariepinus examined flom the. Mwanza Gulf of Lake Victoria. The parasite fauna comprised of four ectoparasites, a. Monogenea, Hirudinea, crustacean and a Digenea,' and fourteen endoparasites, five nematodes,. five trematodes and three ...

  3. 77 FR 56749 - Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-13

    ... of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (FWPCA) (33 U.S.C. 1321), section 1006 of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (33 U.S.C. 2706), and section 301 of title 3, United States Code, it is hereby ordered... restoration planning efforts have advanced significantly. The Task Force's Gulf of Mexico Regional Ecosystem...

  4. Faults in the Gulf Coast [gcfaultsg

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These mapped faults are modified from Plate 2, Principal structural features, Gulf of Mexico Basin (compiled by T.E. Ewing and R.F. Lopez) in Volume J, The Geology...

  5. Salt Diapirs in the Gulf Coast [gcdiapirg

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Locations and shapes of salt diapirs were modified after the New Orleans Geological Society map, Salt tectonism of the U.S. Gulf Coast Basin (compiled by J.A. Lopez,...

  6. New offshore platform in the Mexican Gulf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beisel, T.

    1982-04-01

    After a construction period of only 10 months, the second steel Offshore platform was recently completed in the Mexican Gulf. The pattern for this structure was the Cognac platform. The erection of the new platform, called the 'Cerveza' platform, is described in the article.

  7. Fault Zones in the Gulf Coast [gcfltzoneg

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data represent major fault zones as indicated on Plate 2, Principal structural features, Gulf of Mexico Basin (compiled by T.E. Ewing and R.F. Lopez) in volume...

  8. The distribution of nutrients, dissolved oxygen and chlorophyll a in the upper Gulf of Nicoya, Costa Rica, a tropical estuary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Palter

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available in the Gulf of Nicoya on the Pacific Coast of Costa Rica, nutrient rich equatorial subsurface water (ESW is upwelled in much of the lower gulf. These offshore waters are often regarded as the major source of nutrients to the gulf. However, for most of the year, the ESW has little influence on the nutrient content of the upper gulf, which has a distinct character from the lower gulf. The upper gulf, extending 40 km north of the restriction between Puntarenas Peninsula and San Lucas island, is bordered primarily by mangrove swamps, is less than 20 m deep, and is less saline than the lower gulf. We surveyed the upper gulf for dissolved inorganic nitrogen, phosphate, silicate, dissolved oxygen, and chlorophyll in November 2000, January and July 2001. All nutrients are more concentrated in the upper gulf during the rainy and transitional seasons than the dry season, significantly so for phosphate and silicate. Throughout the year, nutrients tend to be much more concentrated in the less saline water of the upper gulf. This trend indicates that discharge from the Tempisque River predominantly controls spatial and temporal nutrient variability in the upper gulf. However, nutrient rich ESW, upwelled offshore and mixed to form a mid-temperature intermediate water, may enter the inner gulf to provide an important secondary source of nutrients during the dry season. Rev. Biol. Trop. 55 (2: 427-436. Epub 2007 June, 29.Las aguas subsuperficiales ecuatoriales (ESW que entran por la parte externa del Golfo de Nicoya de Costa Rica, se consideran una fuente importante de nutrientes para el estuario. Sin embargo, durante la mayoría del año las ESW tiene una influencia pequeña en la parte interna del golfo, que es oceanográfica y biológicamente diferente de la parte externa. La parte interna está ubicada desde la península de Puntarenas hasta la boca del Río Tempisque, 40 km al norte; es un área que se caracteriza por un importante aporte de agua dulce

  9. Two Years of Hunting Exoplanets at Florida Gulf Coast University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzasi, Derek L.; Carboneau, Lindsey; Childs, Stephen; Colon, Tristan; Dumouchel, Emily; Glenn, William; Humphrey, Morgan; Hunter, Alana; Klunk, Derek; Myers, Riley; Nadreau, Jacob; Nance, Rebecca; Reynolds, Zachary; Romas, Olivia; Smith, Alexandra; Stansfield, Alexis; Sumler, Kendyll; Vignet-Williams, Gabrielle

    2017-06-01

    Honors Program participants at Florida Gulf Coast University must complete two of four required "Honors Experiences". One student option is a research experience, and we have developed a "Planet Hunters" course to provide an astronomical research track. In the course, students spend the first semester learning astronomical background and exoplanet detection techniques, while the second semester is devoted to planet searches in Kepler and K2 data, using student-oriented software tools developed specifically for the task. During the first year, students detected both a brown dwarf candidate and a hot Jupiter candidate. In this poster, we review the tools, data sets, and results obtained by students participating in the second year of the course, along with lessons learned for future implementation, including possible extension to TESS data.

  10. Treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants. Program for encapsulation, deep geologic deposition and research, development and demonstration; Kaernkraftavfallets behandling och slutfoervaring. Program foer inkapsling, geologisk djupfoervaring samt forskning, utveckling och demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    Programs for RD and D concerning disposal of radioactive waste are presented. Main topics include: Design, testing and manufacture of canisters for the spent fuels; Design of equipment for deposition of waste canisters; Material and process for backfilling rock caverns; Evaluation of accuracy and validation of methods for safety analyses; Development of methods for defining scenarios for the safety analyses. 471 refs, 67 figs, 21 tabs.

  11. Deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Dowsey-Limousin, P.; Fraix, V.; Benabid, A. L.; Pollak, P.

    2001-01-01

    During the last 15 years deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been established as a highly-effective therapy for advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). Patient selection, stereotactic implantation, postoperative stimulator programming and patient care requires a multi-disciplinary team including movement disorders specialists in neurology and functional neurosurgery. To treat medically r...

  12. Lack of serological evidence for Mycoplasma fermentans infection in army Gulf War veterans: a large scale case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, S C; Levin, L; Ribas, J; Chung, R; Wang, R Y; Wear, D; Shih, J W

    2000-12-01

    Mycoplasma firmentans is suspected in the development of 'Gulf War illness' in veterans of Operation Desert Storm. We conducted a matched case-control study for the prevalence of M. firmentans-specific antibodies before and after the operation, as well as seroconversion rates in veterans with and without complaints of 'Gulf War illness'. Cases consisted of Gulf War veterans, who complained of various illnesses and were enrolled in the second phase of the health evaluation by the Army Comprehensive Clinical Examination Program (CCEP). Controls were selected from Gulf War veterans who did not participate in the registry and did not request a health evaluation by the CCEP. Before operation deployment, 34 out of 718 of the cases (48%) and 116 out of 2233 of the controls (5.2%) tested positive for M. fermentans-specific antibodies. There was no difference in rates of seroconversion between cases and controls (1.1 vs. 1.2%) to M. fermentans during Operation Desert Storm. Thus, there is no serological evidence that suggests infectionby M. fermentans is associated with development of 'Gulf War illness'.

  13. Bathymetric patterns of polychaete (Annelida) species richness in the continental shelf of the Gulf of California, Eastern Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Alcántara, Pablo; Salas-de León, David Alberto; Solís-Weiss, Vivianne; Monreal-Gómez, María Adela

    2014-08-01

    The mid-domain effect was tested to evaluate the bathymetric patterns of the polychaete species richness in the Upper and Lower Gulf of California as a possible hypothesis to explain the species richness gradient, exploring the overlapping of species depth ranges towards the middle continental shelf. The bathymetric gradient of the number of species was estimated with the depth ranges of 554 polychaete species, and the mid-domain effect was tested using a Monte Carlo simulation program at bands of 10 m depth. The Upper (251 species) and Lower (491 species) Gulf regions showed clear differences in their faunal composition (Jaccard similarity index = 0.34); the species richness pattern was characterized by a highly significant presence of polychaetes with short depth ranges (< 10 m). The richness distribution could be described as a cubic polynomial curve, but the maximum values in both Gulf regions (141 and 317 species, respectively for Upper and Lower Gulf regions) are strongly biased to shallow waters (40 m). This is not consistent with the peak of diversity at 60-70 m predicted by the model. The observed patterns cannot be reproduced by the mid-domain effect, suggesting the existence of non-random factors affecting the species richness gradients in the Gulf.

  14. Deep Sea Pockmark Environments in the eastern Mediterranean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dimitrov, L.; Woodside, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    A great number of circular to isometric depressions have been observed on the deep water seafloor in the eastern Mediterranean by MAK-1 and ORETech deep-tow side-scan sonar during several TTR cruises of the UNESCO Floating University Program since 1993, and also by visual observations made during

  15. Effectiveness of a deep-water coral conservation area: Evaluation of its boundaries and changes in octocoral communities over 13 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennecke, Swaantje; Metaxas, Anna

    2017-03-01

    Over the past 15 years, multiple areas in the North Atlantic have been closed to destructive fishing practices to protect vulnerable deep-water coral ecosystems, known to provide habitat for diverse associated fauna. Despite the growing number of conservation measures, long-term studies on the recovery of deep-water coral communities from fisheries impacts remain scarce. In the Gulf of Maine, the Northeast Channel Coral Conservation Area (NECCCA)1

  16. Petroleum geology of the Gulf of California, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman, A.E. (Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX), San Luis Potosi, Mexico)

    1990-05-01

    The Gulf of California basin proper is a very young (late Miocene) feature in northwestern Mexico, produced by the tectonic interaction of the Pacific and American plates. Sediments are mostly siliciclastic with thicknesses that may exceed 8,000 m (26,248 ft). Exploratory drilling started in 1979 and since then, ten offshore and seven onshore wells have been spudded. Foremost among the former the Extremeno 1 well tested from a thin deltaic sand 4,115 m deep (13,501 ft) a daily flow of 6.2 million ft{sup 3} of gas and 130 bbl of gas condensate through a 0.25 in. choke with a pressure of 280 kg/cm{sup 2} (3,981 psi). In the southern part of the basin, the offshore Huichol 1 well was also a gas and condensate producer, albeit noncommercial. Geologically, the basin's favorable generation and trapping conditions make up a very attractive scenario for a future petroleum producing province, once exploration priorities are considered timely.

  17. Environmental Assessment: Geothermal Energy Geopressure Subprogram. Gulf Coast Well Drilling and Testing Activity (Frio, Wilcox, and Tuscaloosa Formations, Texas and Louisiana)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated a program to evaluate the feasibility of developing the geothermal-geopressured energy resources of the Louisiana-Texas Gulf Coast. As part of this effort, DOE is contracting for the drilling of design wells to define the nature and extent of the geopressure resource. At each of several sites, one deep well (4000-6400 m) will be drilled and flow tested. One or more shallow wells will also be drilled to dispose of geopressured brines. Each site will require about 2 ha (5 acres) of land. Construction and initial flow testing will take approximately one year. If initial flow testing is successful, a continuous one-year duration flow test will take place at a rate of up to 6400 m{sup 3} (40,000 bbl) per day. Extensive tests will be conducted on the physical and chemical composition of the fluids, on their temperature and flow rate, on fluid disposal techniques, and on the reliability and performance of equipment. Each project will require a maximum of three years to complete drilling, testing, and site restoration.

  18. Molecular and carbon isotopic variability of hydrocarbon gases from mud volcanoes in the Gulf of Cadiz, NE Atlantic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadnitskaia, Alina; Weering, Tjeerd C.E. van [Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research (NIOZ), P.O. Box 59, 1790 AB Den Burg, Texel (Netherlands); Ivanov, Michail K.; Blinova, Valentina [Geological Faculty, UNESCO-MSU Centre for Marine Geosciences, Moscow State University, Vorobjevy Gory, Moscow 119899 (Russian Federation); Kreulen, Rob [ISOLAB, 1e Tieflaarsestraat 23, 4182 PC Neerijnen (Netherlands)

    2006-04-15

    Investigations of molecular and carbon isotopic variability of hydrocarbon gases from methane through butanes (pentanes) have been performed on six mud volcanoes from two fluid venting provinces located in the Gulf of Cadiz, NE Atlantic. The main aims were to define the basic gas types, to describe their geochemical characteristics in relationship to their sources, and to determine the secondary effects due to migration/mixing and microbial alteration. Hydrocarbon gas data reveal two groups of gases. Despite the different maturation characteristics, both gas groups are allochthonous to the erupted mud breccia and represent a complex of redeposited, secondary migrated, mixed, and microbially altered hydrocarbons. It may possibly imply the presence of hydrocarbon accumulations in the deep subsurface of the Gulf of Cadiz. (author)

  19. Deep Water Survey Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The deep water biodiversity surveys explore and describe the biodiversity of the bathy- and bentho-pelagic nekton using Midwater and bottom trawls centered in the...

  20. Deep Time Contagion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy Weir

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available An artist from London researching the effects of deprioritised subjectivity and contemporary art, Weir presents acoustic recordings made in deep geological repository sites. Repurposing these sites from their typical use as storage space for nuclear waste, Weir addresses the extra-human scale of Deep Time through sonic-fiction. Inhumanly enduring and impinging upon humanity largely imperceptibly, what agency—at what scale—is present?